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Sample records for impaired heart function

  1. Impaired cholesterol efflux capacity and vasculoprotective function of high-density lipoprotein in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neha; Jacobs, Frank; Rader, Daniel J; Vanhaecke, Johan; Van Cleemput, Johan; De Geest, Bart

    2014-05-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism is significantly altered in heart transplant recipients. We hypothesized that HDL function may be impaired in these patients. Fifty-two patients undergoing coronary angiography between 5 and 15 years after heart transplantation were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Cholesterol efflux capacity of apolipoprotein B-depleted plasma was analyzed using a validated assay. The vasculoprotective function of HDL was studied by means of an endothelial progenitor cell migration assay. HDL cholesterol levels were similar in heart transplant patients compared with healthy controls. However, normalized cholesterol efflux and vasculoprotective function were reduced by 24.1% (p < 0.001) and 27.0% (p < 0.01), respectively, in heart transplant recipients compared with healthy controls. HDL function was similar in patients with and without cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) and was not related to C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. An interaction effect (p = 0.0584) was observed between etiology of heart failure before transplantation and steroid use as factors of HDL cholesterol levels. Lower HDL cholesterol levels occurred in patients with prior ischemic cardiomyopathy who were not taking steroids. However, HDL function was independent of the etiology of heart failure before transplantation and steroid use. The percentage of patients with a CRP level ≥6 mg/liter was 3.92-fold (p < 0.01) higher in patients with CAV than in patients without CAV. HDL function is impaired in heart transplant recipients, but it is unrelated to CAV status. The proportion of patients with a CRP level ≥6 mg/liter is prominently higher in CAV-positive patients. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impaired dynamics and function of mitochondria caused by mtDNA toxicity leads to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Knut H; Kleppa, Liv; Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Eide, Lars; Carlsen, Harald; Haugen, Øyvind P; Sjaastad, Ivar; Klungland, Arne; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Attramadal, Håvard; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda H

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in heart failure of diverse etiologies. Generalized mitochondrial disease also leads to cardiomyopathy with various clinical manifestations. Impaired mitochondrial homeostasis may over time, such as in the aging heart, lead to cardiac dysfunction. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), close to the electron transport chain and unprotected by histones, may be a primary pathogenetic site, but this is not known. Here, we test the hypothesis that cumulative damage of cardiomyocyte mtDNA leads to cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Transgenic mice with Tet-on inducible, cardiomyocyte-specific expression of a mutant uracil-DNA glycosylase 1 (mutUNG1) were generated. The mutUNG1 is known to remove thymine in addition to uracil from the mitochondrial genome, generating apyrimidinic sites, which obstruct mtDNA function. Following induction of mutUNG1 in cardiac myocytes by administering doxycycline, the mice developed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, leading to congestive heart failure and premature death after ∼2 mo. The heart showed reduced mtDNA replication, severely diminished mtDNA transcription, and suppressed mitochondrial respiration with increased Pgc-1α, mitochondrial mass, and antioxidative defense enzymes, and finally failing mitochondrial fission/fusion dynamics and deteriorating myocardial contractility as the mechanism of heart failure. The approach provides a model with induced cardiac-restricted mtDNA damage for investigation of mtDNA-based heart disease.

  3. Functional impairment of hematopoietic progenitor cells in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Liguori, Antonio; Fiorito, Carmela; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa; Crimi, Ettore; Bruzzese, Giuseppe; Williams-Ignarro, Sharon; D'Amora, Maurizio; Sommese, Linda; Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Minucci, Pellegrino Biagio; Giovane, Alfonso; Farzati, Bartolomeo; Ignarro, Louis J; Napoli, Claudio

    2008-03-01

    The circulating form of endothelial progenitors cells (EPCs) are derived from bone marrow (BM)-derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Enhanced mobilization of EPCs was shown to be linked to cardiac diseases. This study investigated whether reduced EPC levels in advanced coronary heart disease (CHD) are secondary to a functional exhaustion of HSCs in the BM or to reduced mobilization. Number and functional properties of EPCs were assessed in 15 healthy controls, and 40 patients with CHD. The colony-forming unit (CFU) capacity of BM-derived mononuclear cells and the CD34+ HSC number were examined in four healthy volunteers, and 15 CHD patients. EPC number was reduced in CHD patients (P < 0.01 vs. controls). Moreover, the migratory capacity was significantly impaired in EPCs of CHD patients (P < 0.05 vs. controls). On multivariate analysis, CHD was an independent predictor of functional EPC impairment. CFUs were reduced in CHD patients (59.6 +/- 21.2 vs. 75.4 +/- 25.8 in controls, P < 0.05). CHD was also predictor of impaired CFU capacity. In this small clinical study, CHD is associated with selective impairment of HSC function in the BM and in the peripheral blood, which may contribute to impairment of cardiac function.

  4. Oncometabolite d-2-hydroxyglutarate impairs α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and contractile function in rodent heart

    PubMed Central

    Karlstaedt, Anja; Zhang, Xiaotian; Vitrac, Heidi; Harmancey, Romain; Vasquez, Hernan; Wang, Jing Han; Goodell, Margaret A.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies are frequently associated with cardiac pathologies. Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in a subset of acute myeloid leukemia patients, causing metabolic and epigenetic derangements. We have now discovered that altered metabolism in leukemic cells has a profound effect on cardiac metabolism. Combining mathematical modeling and in vivo as well as ex vivo studies, we found that increased amounts of the oncometabolite d-2-hydroxyglutarate (D2-HG), produced by IDH2 mutant leukemic cells, cause contractile dysfunction in the heart. This contractile dysfunction is associated with impaired oxidative decarboxylation of α-ketoglutarate, a redirection of Krebs cycle intermediates, and increased ATP citrate lyase (ACL) activity. Increased availability of D2-HG also leads to altered histone methylation and acetylation in the heart. We propose that D2-HG promotes cardiac dysfunction by impairing α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and induces histone modifications in an ACL-dependent manner. Collectively, our results highlight the impact of cancer cell metabolism on function and metabolism of the heart. PMID:27582470

  5. Heart Rate Variability Correlates to Functional Aerobic Impairment in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Maria Angela Magalhães de Queiroz; Nogueira, André Barros; Pena, Felipe Montes; Kiuchi, Marcio Galindo; Rodrigues, Ronaldo Campos; Rodrigues, Rodrigo da Rocha; de Matos, Jorge Paulo Strogoff; Lugon, Jocemir Ronaldo

    2015-01-01

    Background Autonomic dysfunction (AD) is highly prevalent in hemodialysis (HD) patients and has been implicated in their increased risk of cardiovascular mortality. Objective To correlate heart rate variability (HRV) during exercise treadmill test (ETT) with the values obtained when measuring functional aerobic impairment (FAI) in HD patients and controls. Methods Cross-sectional study involving HD patients and a control group. Clinical examination, blood sampling, transthoracic echocardiogram, 24-hour Holter, and ETT were performed. A symptom-limited ramp treadmill protocol with active recovery was employed. Heart rate variability was evaluated in time domain at exercise and recovery periods. Results Forty-one HD patients and 41 controls concluded the study. HD patients had higher FAI and lower HRV than controls (p<0.001 for both). A correlation was found between exercise HRV (SDNN) and FAI in both groups. This association was independent of age, sex, smoking, body mass index, diabetes, and clonidine or beta-blocker use, but not of hemoglobin levels. Conclusion No association was found between FAI and HRV on 24-hour Holter or at the recovery period of ETT. Of note, exercise HRV was inversely correlated with FAI in HD patients and controls. PMID:26131705

  6. B lymphocytes trigger monocyte mobilization and impair heart function after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zouggari, Yasmine; Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Bonnin, Philippe; Simon, Tabassome; Sage, Andrew P; Guérin, Coralie; Vilar, José; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Laurans, Ludivine; Dumeau, Edouard; Kotti, Salma; Bruneval, Patrick; Charo, Israel F; Binder, Christoph J; Danchin, Nicolas; Tedgui, Alain; Tedder, Thomas F; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Mallat, Ziad

    2014-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Here, we show that after acute myocardial infarction in mice, mature B lymphocytes selectively produce Ccl7 and induce Ly6Chi monocyte mobilization and recruitment to the heart, leading to enhanced tissue injury and deterioration of myocardial function. Genetic (Baff receptor deficiency) or antibody-mediated (CD20- or Baff-specific antibody) depletion of mature B lymphocytes impeded Ccl7 production and monocyte mobilization, limited myocardial injury and improved heart function. These effects were recapitulated in mice with B cell–selective Ccl7 deficiency. We also show that high circulating concentrations of CCL7 and BAFF in patients with acute myocardial infarction predict increased risk of death or recurrent myocardial infarction. This work identifies a crucial interaction between mature B lymphocytes and monocytes after acute myocardial ischemia and identifies new therapeutic targets for acute myocardial infarction. PMID:24037091

  7. Relationship between linear and nonlinear dynamics of heart rate and impairment of lung function in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Mazzuco, Adriana; Medeiros, Wladimir Musetti; Sperling, Milena Pelosi Rizk; de Souza, Aline Soares; Alencar, Maria Clara Noman; Arbex, Flávio Ferlin; Neder, José Alberto; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), functional and structural impairment of lung function can negatively impact heart rate variability (HRV); however, it is unknown if static lung volumes and lung diffusion capacity negatively impacts HRV responses. We investigated whether impairment of static lung volumes and lung diffusion capacity could be related to HRV indices in patients with moderate to severe COPD. Sixteen sedentary males with COPD were enrolled in this study. Resting blood gases, static lung volumes, and lung diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were measured. The RR interval (RRi) was registered in the supine, standing, and seated positions (10 minutes each) and during 4 minutes of a respiratory sinus arrhythmia maneuver (M-RSA). Delta changes (Δsupine-standing and Δsupine-M-RSA) of the standard deviation of normal RRi, low frequency (LF, normalized units [nu]) and high frequency (HF [nu]), SD1, SD2, alpha1, alpha2, and approximate entropy (ApEn) indices were calculated. HF, LF, SD1, SD2, and alpha1 deltas significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second, DLCO, airway resistance, residual volume, inspiratory capacity/total lung capacity ratio, and residual volume/total lung capacity ratio. Significant and moderate associations were also observed between LF/HF ratio versus total gas volume (%), r=0.53; LF/HF ratio versus residual volume, %, r=0.52; and HF versus total gas volume (%), r=-0.53 (P<0.05). Linear regression analysis revealed that ΔRRi supine-M-RSA was independently related to DLCO (r=-0.77, r (2)=0.43, P<0.05). Responses of HRV indices were more prominent during M-RSA in moderate to severe COPD. Moreover, greater lung function impairment was related to poorer heart rate dynamics. Finally, impaired lung diffusion capacity was related to an altered parasympathetic response in these patients.

  8. The Prognostic Importance of Impaired Systolic Function in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction and the Impact of Spironolactone

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amil M.; Claggett, Brian; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Anand, Inder S.; Liu, Li; Pitt, Bertram; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Solomon, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Impairment in left ventricular (LV) systolic function has been described in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), but its prognostic relevance is not known. We determined whether LV longitudinal strain (LS) is predictive of cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in HFpEF beyond clinical and conventional echocardiographic measures. Methods and Results LS was assessed by 2D speckle-tracking echocardiography at baseline in 447 HFpEF patients enrolled in the Treatment Of Preserved Cardiac Function Heart Failure with an Aldosterone Antagonist (TOPCAT) trial. At a median follow-up of 2.6 (IQR 1.5–3.9) years, 115 patients experienced the primary composite outcome of CV death, HF hospitalization, or aborted cardiac arrest. Impaired LS, defined as an absolute LS<15.8%, was present in 52% of patients and was predictive of the composite outcome (adjusted HR 2.14, 95% CI 1.26–3.66; p=0.005), CV death alone (adjusted HR 3.20, 95% CI 1.44–7.12; p=0.004), and HF hospitalization alone (adjusted HR 2.23, 95% CI 1.16–4.28; p=0.016) after adjusting for clinical and conventional echocardiographic variables. LS was the strongest echocardiographic predictor of the composite outcome. Exploratory analysis in a subset of 131 patients with follow-up LS assessed after 12–18 months demonstrated a trend towards improvement in LS associated with spironolactone in patients enrolled in the Americas but not in Russia or Georgia. Conclusions Impaired LV systolic function is a powerful predictor of HF hospitalization, CV death, or aborted cardiac arrest in HFpEF, independent of clinical predictors. Impaired LS represents a novel imaging biomarker to identify HFpEF patients at particularly high risk for CV morbidity and mortality. Clinical Trial Registration Information Clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier NCT00094302. PMID:26130119

  9. Eosinophil cationic granule proteins impair thrombomodulin function. A potential mechanism for thromboembolism in hypereosinophilic heart disease.

    PubMed Central

    Slungaard, A; Vercellotti, G M; Tran, T; Gleich, G J; Key, N S

    1993-01-01

    Thromboembolism is a prominent but poorly understood feature of eosinophilic, or Loeffler's endocarditis. Eosinophil (EO) specific granule proteins, in particular major basic protein (MBP), accumulate on endocardial surfaces in the course of this disease. We hypothesized that these unusually cationic proteins promote thrombosis by binding to the anionic endothelial protein thrombomodulin (TM) and impairing its anticoagulant activities. We find that MBP potently (IC50 of 1-2 microM) inhibits the capacity of endothelial cell surface TM to generate the natural anticoagulant activated protein C (APC). MBP also inhibits APC generation by purified soluble rabbit TM with an IC50 of 100 nM without altering its apparent Kd for thrombin or Km for protein C. This inhibition is reversed by polyanions such as chondroitin sulfate E and heparin. A TM polypeptide fragment comprising the extracellular domain that includes its naturally occurring anionic glycosaminoglycan (GAG) moiety (TMD-105) is strongly inhibited by MBP, whereas its counterpart lacking the GAG moiety (TMD-75) is not. MBP also curtails the capacity of TMD-105 but not TMD-75 to prolong the thrombin clotting time. Thus, EO cationic proteins potently inhibit anticoagulant activities of the glycosylated form of TM, thereby suggesting a potential mechanism for thromboembolism in hypereosinophilic heart disease. Images PMID:8386194

  10. Eosinophil cationic granule proteins impair thrombomodulin function. A potential mechanism for thromboembolism in hypereosinophilic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, A; Vercellotti, G M; Tran, T; Gleich, G J; Key, N S

    1993-04-01

    Thromboembolism is a prominent but poorly understood feature of eosinophilic, or Loeffler's endocarditis. Eosinophil (EO) specific granule proteins, in particular major basic protein (MBP), accumulate on endocardial surfaces in the course of this disease. We hypothesized that these unusually cationic proteins promote thrombosis by binding to the anionic endothelial protein thrombomodulin (TM) and impairing its anticoagulant activities. We find that MBP potently (IC50 of 1-2 microM) inhibits the capacity of endothelial cell surface TM to generate the natural anticoagulant activated protein C (APC). MBP also inhibits APC generation by purified soluble rabbit TM with an IC50 of 100 nM without altering its apparent Kd for thrombin or Km for protein C. This inhibition is reversed by polyanions such as chondroitin sulfate E and heparin. A TM polypeptide fragment comprising the extracellular domain that includes its naturally occurring anionic glycosaminoglycan (GAG) moiety (TMD-105) is strongly inhibited by MBP, whereas its counterpart lacking the GAG moiety (TMD-75) is not. MBP also curtails the capacity of TMD-105 but not TMD-75 to prolong the thrombin clotting time. Thus, EO cationic proteins potently inhibit anticoagulant activities of the glycosylated form of TM, thereby suggesting a potential mechanism for thromboembolism in hypereosinophilic heart disease.

  11. Renal impairment and worsening of renal function in acute heart failure: can new therapies help? The potential role of serelaxin.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Mitrovic, Veselin; Hengstenberg, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Renal dysfunction is a frequent finding in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) and an important prognostic factor for adverse outcomes. Worsening of renal function occurs in 30-50% of patients hospitalised for AHF, and is associated with increased mortality, prolonged hospital stay and increased risk of readmission. Likely mechanisms involved in the decrease in renal function include impaired haemodynamics and activation of neurohormonal factors, such as the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, the sympathetic nervous system and the arginine-vasopressin system. Additionally, many drugs currently used to treat AHF have a detrimental effect on renal function. Therefore, pharmacotherapy for AHF should carefully take into account any potential complications related to renal function. Serelaxin, currently in clinical development for the treatment of AHF is a recombinant form of human relaxin-2, identical in structure to the naturally occurring human relaxin-2 peptide hormone that mediates cardiac and renal adaptations during pregnancy. Data from both pre-clinical and clinical studies indicate a potentially beneficial effect of serelaxin on kidney function. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms and impact of impairment of renal function in AHF, and the potential benefits of new therapies, such as serelaxin, in this context.

  12. Short-Term Exposure to Ozone Does Not Impair Vascular Function or Affect Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Young Men

    PubMed Central

    Barath, Stefan; Langrish, Jeremy P.; Blomberg, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Air pollution exposure is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, yet the role of individual pollutants remains unclear. In particular, there is uncertainty regarding the acute effect of ozone exposure on cardiovascular disease. In these studies, we aimed to determine the effect of ozone exposure on vascular function, fibrinolysis, and the autonomic regulation of the heart. Thirty-six healthy men were exposed to ozone (300 ppb) and filtered air for 75min on two occasions in randomized double-blind crossover studies. Bilateral forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured using forearm venous occlusion plethysmography before and during intra-arterial infusions of vasodilators 2–4 and 6–8h after each exposure. Heart rhythm and heart rate variability (HRV) were monitored during and 24h after exposure. Compared with filtered air, ozone exposure did not alter heart rate, blood pressure, or resting FBF at either 2 or 6h. There was a dose-dependent increase in FBF with all vasodilators that was similar after both exposures at 2–4h. Ozone exposure did not impair vasomotor or fibrinolytic function at 6–8h but rather increased vasodilatation to acetylcholine (p = .015) and sodium nitroprusside (p = .005). Ozone did not affect measures of HRV during or after the exposure. Our findings do not support a direct rapid effect of ozone on vascular function or cardiac autonomic control although we cannot exclude an effect of chronic exposure or an interaction between ozone and alternative air pollutants that may be responsible for the adverse cardiovascular health effects attributed to ozone. PMID:23872581

  13. Short-term exposure to ozone does not impair vascular function or affect heart rate variability in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Barath, Stefan; Langrish, Jeremy P; Lundbäck, Magnus; Bosson, Jenny A; Goudie, Colin; Newby, David E; Sandström, Thomas; Mills, Nicholas L; Blomberg, Anders

    2013-10-01

    Air pollution exposure is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, yet the role of individual pollutants remains unclear. In particular, there is uncertainty regarding the acute effect of ozone exposure on cardiovascular disease. In these studies, we aimed to determine the effect of ozone exposure on vascular function, fibrinolysis, and the autonomic regulation of the heart. Thirty-six healthy men were exposed to ozone (300 ppb) and filtered air for 75min on two occasions in randomized double-blind crossover studies. Bilateral forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured using forearm venous occlusion plethysmography before and during intra-arterial infusions of vasodilators 2-4 and 6-8h after each exposure. Heart rhythm and heart rate variability (HRV) were monitored during and 24h after exposure. Compared with filtered air, ozone exposure did not alter heart rate, blood pressure, or resting FBF at either 2 or 6h. There was a dose-dependent increase in FBF with all vasodilators that was similar after both exposures at 2-4h. Ozone exposure did not impair vasomotor or fibrinolytic function at 6-8h but rather increased vasodilatation to acetylcholine (p = .015) and sodium nitroprusside (p = .005). Ozone did not affect measures of HRV during or after the exposure. Our findings do not support a direct rapid effect of ozone on vascular function or cardiac autonomic control although we cannot exclude an effect of chronic exposure or an interaction between ozone and alternative air pollutants that may be responsible for the adverse cardiovascular health effects attributed to ozone.

  14. Influence of renal impairment on myocardial function in outpatients with systolic heart failure: an echocardiographic and cardiac biomarker study.

    PubMed

    Bosselmann, Helle; Tonder, Niels; Sölétormos, György; Rossing, Kasper; Iversen, Kasper; Goetze, Jens P; Gustafsson, Finn; Schou, Morten

    2014-12-20

    Renal dysfunction (RD) is associated with poor outcome in systolic heart failure (HF). Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is not depressed to a greater extent in patients with RD compared to patients with normal renal function, but it is relatively unknown whether other measures of myocardial function are impaired by RD. The objective of the present study is to evaluate whether RD in systolic HF is associated with excessive impairment of myocardial function, evaluated by strain analysis and cardiac biomarkers. Patients with LVEF <0.45% were enrolled from an outpatient HF clinic. The patients underwent advanced echocardiography. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated by the CKD-EPI equation (eGFR) and patients grouped by eGFR: eGFR group-I, ≥ 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2); eGFR group-II, 60-89 ml/min/1.73 m(2); and eGFR group-III, ≤ 59 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Multivariate regression models were developed to evaluate the associations between eGFR groups, echocardiographic measures and cardiac biomarkers. A total of 149 patients participated in the study. Median age was 69 years, 26% were female; LVEF was 33%. Patients with a low eGFR were older (P < 0.001), but there were no differences in frequency of atrial fibrillation, hypertension, diabetes and ischemic heart disease between eGFR groups (P > 0.05 for all). RD was associated with impaired global longitudinal strain (P = 0.018), increased E/e' (P = 0.032), larger left atria (P = 0.038) and increased levels of proANP (P < 0.001), NT-proBNP (P < 0.001) and troponin I (P = 0.019) after adjustment for traditional confounders. Echocardiographic measures and biomarkers reflecting different aspects of myocardial function are impaired in systolic HF patients with RD and the increased mortality risk in these patients may partly be explained by a depressed cardiac function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fentanyl-droperidol-nitrous oxide anaesthesia in patients with ischaemic heart disease and various degrees of left ventricular functional impairment.

    PubMed

    Milocco, I; Schlossman, D; William-Olsson, G; Appelgren, L K

    1985-10-01

    Haemodynamic stability and left ventricular function (LVF) during induction of anaesthesia and sternotomy were compared in three groups of patients with ischaemic heart disease, angiographically classified as having good, poor and depressed LVF. Anaesthesia was given with fentanyl-droperidol and nitrous oxide. The group with good LVF showed large variations in arterial pressure and heart rate between stimulated and unstimulated states with a reasonable preservation of LVF, expressed as stroke volume, through the whole observation period. The group with poor LVF showed monotonously falling arterial pressure, and no heart rate response to tracheal intubation. These patients maintained remarkably stable stroke volumes in connection with low afterloads. After nitrous oxide, additional volume loading was required because of profound hypotension. The majority of the patients in the intermediate group, labelled "depressed LVF", reacted to intubation and sternotomy with signs of left ventricular failure in connection with tachycardia and increased afterloads. The individual variations between patients with different degrees of left ventricular impairment were considerable, and these haemodynamic patterns need to be confirmed with a larger material.

  16. A re-appraisal of volume status and renal function impairment in chronic heart failure: combined effects of pre-renal failure and venous congestion on renal function.

    PubMed

    Sinkeler, Steef J; Damman, Kevin; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Hillege, Hans; Navis, Gerjan

    2012-03-01

    The association between cardiac failure and renal function impairment has gained wide recognition over the last decade. Both structural damage in the form of systemic atherosclerosis and (patho) physiological hemodynamic changes may explain this association. As regards hemodynamic factors, renal impairment in chronic heart failure is traditionally assumed to be mainly due to a decrease in cardiac output and a subsequent decrease in renal perfusion. This will lead to a decrease in glomerular filtration rate and a compensatory increase in tubular sodium retention. The latter is a physiological renal response aimed at retaining fluids in order to increase cardiac filling pressure and thus renal perfusion. In heart failure, however, larger increases in cardiac filling pressure are needed to restore renal perfusion and thus more volume retention. In this concept, in chronic heart failure, an equilibrium exists where a certain degree of congestion is the price to be paid to maintain adequate renal perfusion and function. Recently, this hypothesis was challenged by new studies, wherein it was found that the association between right-sided cardiac filling pressures and renal function is bimodal, with worse renal function at the highest filling pressures, reflecting a severely congested state. Renal hemodynamic studies suggest that congestion negatively affects renal function in particular in patients in whom renal perfusion is also compromised. Thus, an interplay between cardiac forward failure and backward failure is involved in the renal function impairment in the congestive state, presumably along with other factors. Only few data are available on the impact of intervention in volume status on the cardio-renal interaction. Sparse data in cardiac patients as well as evidence from cohorts with primary renal disease suggest that specific targeting of volume overload may be beneficial for long-term outcome, in spite of a certain further decrease in renal function, at least

  17. Maintenance of respiratory chain function in mouse hearts with severely impaired mtDNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    Freyer, Christoph; Park, Chan Bae; Ekstrand, Mats I.; Shi, Yonghong; Khvorostova, Julia; Wibom, Rolf; Falkenberg, Maria; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2010-01-01

    The basal mitochondrial transcription machinery is essential for biogenesis of the respiratory chain and consists of mitochondrial RNA polymerase, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mitochondrial transcription factor B2. This triad of proteins is sufficient and necessary for mtDNA transcription initiation. Abolished mtDNA transcription caused by tissue-specific knockout of TFAM in the mouse heart leads to early onset of a severe mitochondrial cardiomyopathy with lethality within the first post-natal weeks. Here, we describe a mouse model expressing human TFAM instead of the endogenous mouse TFAM in heart. These rescue mice have severe reduction in mtDNA transcription initiation, but, surprisingly, are healthy at the age of 52 weeks with near-normal steady-state levels of transcripts. In addition, we demonstrate that heavy-strand mtDNA transcription normally terminates at the termination-associated sequence in the control region. This termination is abolished in rescue animals resulting in heavy (H)-strand transcription of the entire control region. In conclusion, we demonstrate here the existence of an unexpected mtDNA transcript stabilization mechanism that almost completely compensates for the severely reduced transcription initiation in rescue hearts. Future elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanism may provide a novel pathway to treat mitochondrial dysfunction in human pathology. PMID:20566479

  18. S-glutathiolation impairs phosphoregulation and function of cardiac myosin-binding protein C in human heart failure.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulou, Konstantina; Wittig, Ilka; Heidler, Juliana; Piasecki, Angelika; Richter, Florian; Diering, Simon; van der Velden, Jolanda; Buck, Friedrich; Donzelli, Sonia; Schröder, Ewald; Wijnker, Paul J M; Voigt, Niels; Dobrev, Dobromir; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Carrier, Lucie; Eaton, Philip; Cuello, Friederike

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) regulates actin-myosin interaction and thereby cardiac myocyte contraction and relaxation. This physiologic function is regulated by cMyBP-C phosphorylation. In our study, reduced site-specific cMyBP-C phosphorylation coincided with increased S-glutathiolation in ventricular tissue from patients with dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy compared to nonfailing donors. We used redox proteomics, to identify constitutive and disease-specific S-glutathiolation sites in cMyBP-C in donor and patient samples, respectively. Among those, a cysteine cluster in the vicinity of the regulatory phosphorylation sites within the myosin S2 interaction domain C1-M-C2 was identified and showed enhanced S-glutathiolation in patients. In vitro S-glutathiolation of recombinant cMyBP-C C1-M-C2 occurred predominantly at Cys(249), which attenuated phosphorylation by protein kinases. Exposure to glutathione disulfide induced cMyBP-C S-glutathiolation, which functionally decelerated the kinetics of Ca(2+)-activated force development in ventricular myocytes from wild-type, but not those from Mybpc3-targeted knockout mice. These oxidation events abrogate protein kinase-mediated phosphorylation of cMyBP-C and therefore potentially contribute to the reduction of its phosphorylation and the contractile dysfunction observed in human heart failure.-Stathopoulou, K., Wittig, I., Heidler, J., Piasecki, A., Richter, F., Diering, S., van der Velden, J., Buck, F., Donzelli, S., Schröder, E., Wijnker, P. J. M., Voigt, N., Dobrev, D., Sadayappan, S., Eschenhagen, T., Carrier, L., Eaton, P., Cuello, F. S-glutathiolation impairs phosphoregulation and function of cardiac myosin-binding protein C in human heart failure. © FASEB.

  19. S-glutathiolation impairs phosphoregulation and function of cardiac myosin-binding protein C in human heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Stathopoulou, Konstantina; Wittig, Ilka; Heidler, Juliana; Piasecki, Angelika; Richter, Florian; Diering, Simon; van der Velden, Jolanda; Buck, Friedrich; Donzelli, Sonia; Schröder, Ewald; Wijnker, Paul J. M.; Voigt, Niels; Dobrev, Dobromir; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Carrier, Lucie; Eaton, Philip; Cuello, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) regulates actin–myosin interaction and thereby cardiac myocyte contraction and relaxation. This physiologic function is regulated by cMyBP-C phosphorylation. In our study, reduced site-specific cMyBP-C phosphorylation coincided with increased S-glutathiolation in ventricular tissue from patients with dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy compared to nonfailing donors. We used redox proteomics, to identify constitutive and disease-specific S-glutathiolation sites in cMyBP-C in donor and patient samples, respectively. Among those, a cysteine cluster in the vicinity of the regulatory phosphorylation sites within the myosin S2 interaction domain C1-M-C2 was identified and showed enhanced S-glutathiolation in patients. In vitro S-glutathiolation of recombinant cMyBP-C C1-M-C2 occurred predominantly at Cys249, which attenuated phosphorylation by protein kinases. Exposure to glutathione disulfide induced cMyBP-C S-glutathiolation, which functionally decelerated the kinetics of Ca2+-activated force development in ventricular myocytes from wild-type, but not those from Mybpc3-targeted knockout mice. These oxidation events abrogate protein kinase–mediated phosphorylation of cMyBP-C and therefore potentially contribute to the reduction of its phosphorylation and the contractile dysfunction observed in human heart failure.—Stathopoulou, K., Wittig, I., Heidler, J., Piasecki, A., Richter, F., Diering, S., van der Velden, J., Buck, F., Donzelli, S., Schröder, E., Wijnker, P. J. M., Voigt, N., Dobrev, D., Sadayappan, S., Eschenhagen, T., Carrier, L., Eaton, P., Cuello, F. S-glutathiolation impairs phosphoregulation and function of cardiac myosin-binding protein C in human heart failure. PMID:26839380

  20. Impaired hepato-renal function defined by the MELD XI score as prognosticator in acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Biegus, Jan; Zymliński, Robert; Sokolski, Mateusz; Siwołowski, Paweł; Gajewski, Piotr; Nawrocka-Millward, Sylwia; Poniewierka, Elżbieta; Jankowska, Ewa A; Banasiak, Waldemar; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2016-12-01

    Multi-organ dysfunction often complicates the natural course of acute heart failure (AHF) and identifies patients with poor prognosis. The MELD score (Model of End-Stage Liver Dysfunction) combines data reflecting liver and kidney function, which makes it a potentially useful tool for the assessment of patients with AHF. The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic utility of the MELD score in patients with AHF. The MELD score was calculated on admission and during hospital stay (days 2-3) using a formula that does not take into account the international normalized ratio (MELD XI). The study population consisted of 203 AHF patients (mean age 65 ± 12 years, 76% male). The mean MELD XI score was -14.8 ± 4.5 points on admission and 13.9 ± 4.3 points during hospitalization. Contributors of elevated MELD XI score at baseline and during hospital stay were isolated increase in creatinine in 22-25%, isolated increase in bilirubin in 17-19%, and abnormal values of both in 40-46% of patients. During 1-year follow-up, 67 (33%) patients died. After adjustment for well-established prognosticators, MELD XI score at baseline and during hospital stay were significant predictors of poor outcome [hazard ratio (95% confidence interval): 1.11 (1.05-1.2) and 1.14 (1.09-1.2), respectively, P < 0.001]. An increase in the MELD XI score during hospital stay occurred in 31% of patients and was related to increased risk of death at 1 year [1.97 (1.2-3.2), P < 0.005]. Impairment of hepato-renal function defined by the MELD XI score is common and carries unfavourable prognosis in AHF patients. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2016 European Society of Cardiology.

  1. Remote ischemic preconditioning impairs ventricular function and increases infarct size after prolonged ischemia in the isolated neonatal rabbit heart.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Michael R; Støttrup, Nicolaj B; Michelsen, Marie M; Contractor, Hussain; Sørensen, Keld E; Kharbanda, Rajesh K; Redington, Andrew N; Bøtker, Hans E

    2014-03-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (rIPC) reduces myocardial injury in adults and children undergoing cardiac surgery. We compared the effect of rIPC in adult and neonatal rabbits to investigate whether protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury can be achieved in the newborn heart by (1) in vivo rIPC and (2) dialysate from adult rabbits undergoing rIPC. Isolated hearts from newborn and adult rabbits were randomized into 3 subgroups (control, in vivo rIPC, and dialysate obtained from adult, remotely preconditioned rabbits). Remote preconditioning was induced by four 5-minute cycles of lower limb ischemia. Left ventricular (LV) function was assessed using a balloon-tipped catheter, glycolytic flux by tracer kinetics, and infarct size by tetrazolium staining. Isolated hearts underwent stabilization while perfused with standard Krebs-Henseleit buffer (control and in vivo rIPC) or Krebs-Henseleit buffer with added dialysate, followed by global no-flow ischemia and reperfusion. Within the age groups, the baseline LV function was similar in all subgroups. In the adult rabbit hearts, rIPC and rIPC dialysate attenuated glycolytic flux and protected against ischemia-reperfusion injury, with better-preserved LV function compared with that of the controls. In contrast, in the neonatal hearts, the glycolytic flux was lower and LV function was better preserved in the controls than in the rIPC and dialysate groups. In the adult hearts, the infarct size was reduced in the rIPC and dialysate groups compared with that in the controls. In the neonatal hearts, the infarct size was smaller in the controls than in the rIPC and dialysate groups. Remote ischemic preconditioning does not protect against ischemia-reperfusion injury in isolated newborn rabbit hearts and might even cause deleterious effects. Similar adverse effects were induced by dialysate from remotely preconditioned adult rabbits. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  2. Cardiac-Restricted Expression of VCP/TER94 RNAi or Disease Alleles Perturbs Drosophila Heart Structure and Impairs Function.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Meera C; Blice-Baum, Anna C; Sang, Tzu-Kang; Cammarato, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a highly conserved mechanoenzyme that helps maintain protein homeostasis in all cells and serves specialized functions in distinct cell types. In skeletal muscle, it is critical for myofibrillogenesis and atrophy. However, little is known about VCP's role(s) in the heart. Its functional diversity is determined by differential binding of distinct cofactors/adapters, which is likely disrupted during disease. VCP mutations cause multisystem proteinopathy (MSP), a pleiotropic degenerative disorder that involves inclusion body myopathy. MSP patients display progressive muscle weakness. They also exhibit cardiomyopathy and die from cardiac and respiratory failure, which are consistent with critical myocardial roles for the enzyme. Nonetheless, efficient models to interrogate VCP in cardiac muscle remain underdeveloped and poorly studied. Here, we investigated the significance of VCP and mutant VCP in the Drosophila heart. Cardiac-restricted RNAi-mediated knockdown of TER94, the Drosophila VCP homolog, severely perturbed myofibrillar organization and heart function in adult flies. Furthermore, expression of MSP disease-causing alleles engendered cardiomyopathy in adults and structural defects in embryonic hearts. Drosophila may therefore serve as a valuable model for examining role(s) of VCP in cardiogenesis and for identifying novel heart-specific VCP interactions, which when disrupted via mutation, contribute to or elicit cardiac pathology.

  3. Cardiac-Restricted Expression of VCP/TER94 RNAi or Disease Alleles Perturbs Drosophila Heart Structure and Impairs Function

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Meera C.; Blice-Baum, Anna C.; Sang, Tzu-Kang; Cammarato, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a highly conserved mechanoenzyme that helps maintain protein homeostasis in all cells and serves specialized functions in distinct cell types. In skeletal muscle, it is critical for myofibrillogenesis and atrophy. However, little is known about VCP's role(s) in the heart. Its functional diversity is determined by differential binding of distinct cofactors/adapters, which is likely disrupted during disease. VCP mutations cause multisystem proteinopathy (MSP), a pleiotropic degenerative disorder that involves inclusion body myopathy. MSP patients display progressive muscle weakness. They also exhibit cardiomyopathy and die from cardiac and respiratory failure, which are consistent with critical myocardial roles for the enzyme. Nonetheless, efficient models to interrogate VCP in cardiac muscle remain underdeveloped and poorly studied. Here, we investigated the significance of VCP and mutant VCP in the Drosophila heart. Cardiac-restricted RNAi-mediated knockdown of TER94, the Drosophila VCP homolog, severely perturbed myofibrillar organization and heart function in adult flies. Furthermore, expression of MSP disease-causing alleles engendered cardiomyopathy in adults and structural defects in embryonic hearts. Drosophila may therefore serve as a valuable model for examining role(s) of VCP in cardiogenesis and for identifying novel heart-specific VCP interactions, which when disrupted via mutation, contribute to or elicit cardiac pathology. PMID:27500162

  4. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (/sup 131/I) scintigraphy detects impaired myocardial sympathetic neuronal transport function of canine mechanical-overload heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovitch, M.A.; Rose, C.P.; Rouleau, J.L.; Chartrand, C.; Wieland, D.M.; Lepanto, L.; Legault, F.; Suissa, S.; Rosenthall, L.; Burgess, J.H.

    1987-12-01

    In heart failure secondary to chronic mechanical overload, cardiac sympathetic neurons demonstrate depressed catecholamine synthetic and transport function. To assess the potential of sympathetic neuronal imaging for detection of depressed transport function, serial scintigrams were acquired after the intravenous administration of metaiodobenzylguanidine (/sup 131/I) to 13 normal dogs, 3 autotransplanted (denervated) dogs, 5 dogs with left ventricular failure, and 5 dogs with compensated left ventricular hypertrophy due to a surgical arteriovenous shunt. Nine dogs were killed at 14 hours postinjection for determination of metaiodobenzylguanidine (/sup 131/I) and endogenous norepinephrine content in left atrium, left ventricle, liver, and spleen. By 4 hours postinjection, autotransplanted dogs had a 39% reduction in mean left ventricular tracer accumulation, reflecting an absent intraneuronal tracer pool. Failure dogs demonstrated an accelerated early mean left ventricular tracer efflux rate (26.0%/hour versus 13.7%/hour in normals), reflecting a disproportionately increased extraneuronal tracer pool. They also showed reduced late left ventricular and left atrial concentrations of tracer, consistent with a reduced intraneuronal tracer pool. By contrast, compensated hypertrophy dogs demonstrated a normal early mean left ventricular tracer efflux rate (16.4%/hour) and essentially normal late left ventricular and left atrial concentrations of tracer. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (/sup 131/I) scintigraphic findings reflect the integrity of the cardiac sympathetic neuronal transport system in canine mechanical-overload heart failure. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (/sup 123/I) scintigraphy should be explored as a means of early detection of mechanical-overload heart failure in patients.

  5. Endocardial Remodeling in Heart Failure Patients with Impaired and Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function--A Magnetic Resonance Image Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lian-Yu; Su, Mao-Yuan M; Pham, Van-Truong; Tran, Thi-Thao; Wang, Yung-Hung; Tseng, Wen-Yih I; Lo, Men-Tzung; Lin, Jiunn-Lee

    2016-02-15

    Left ventricular (LV) trabeculation has been studied in certain forms of cardiomyopathy. However, the changes of LV endocardial trabeculation during the remodeling process leading to heart failure (HF) are unclear. Seventy-four patients with systolic heart failure (SHF), 65 with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and 61 without HF were prospectively enrolled. All subjects received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study including cine, T1 and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images. Trabecular-papillary muscle (TPM) mass, fractal dimension (FD) and extracellular volume (ECV) were derived. The results showed that TPM mass index was higher in patients with SHF than that in patients with HFpEF and non-HF. The TPM mass-LV mass ratio (TPMm/LVM) was higher in SHF group than that in HFpEF and non-HF. FD was not different among groups. The presence of LGE was inversely associated with TPM mass index and TPMm/LVM while the ECV were positively associated with TPMm/LVM. The FD was positively associated with LV chamber size. In conclusion, TPM increases in patients with SHF and are probably related to myocardial cell hypertrophy and fibrotic repair during remodeling. The FD increases with the dilatation of LV chamber but remain unchanged with the deterioration of LV function.

  6. Profiling posttraumatic functional impairment.

    PubMed

    Norman, Sonya B; Stein, Murray B; Davidson, Jonathan R T

    2007-01-01

    Many individuals who have been exposed to psychological trauma suffer from impaired functioning, regardless of whether they have PTSD. Our purpose was to identify a subset of PTSD symptoms linked to functional impairment to a) improve the likelihood that individuals with posttraumatic impairment receive treatment, and b) offer a method to assess cost-burden of trauma history in epidemiological studies. We examined patterns of trauma-related symptoms in two independent community surveys (N=1002 and 630). Rank ordering of symptoms and their associations with impairment guided construction of an impairment-related profile in the first data set. The profile was then tested in the second data set. The derived symptom profile, consisting of intense recollections and/or emotional symptoms upon exposure to reminders, plus one or more of numbing/detachment, avoidance, sleep problems, concentration problems, or hypervigilance, detected the majority (88% and 74%) of persons with posttraumatic functional impairment. The symptom profile can help identify traumatized individuals who may benefit from treatment but do not necessarily meet criteria for PTSD.

  7. The CopenHeartSF trial—comprehensive sexual rehabilitation programme for male patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillator or ischaemic heart disease and impaired sexual function: protocol of a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Pernille Palm; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Hastrup-Svendsen, Jesper; Frederiksen, Marianne; Lindschou, Jane; Winkel, Per; Gluud, Christian; Giraldi, Annamaria; Steinke, Elaine; Jaarsma, Tiny; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Sexuality is an important part of people’s physical and mental health. Patients with heart disease often suffer from sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunction has a negative impact on quality of life and well-being in persons with heart disease, and sexual dysfunction is associated with anxiety and depression. Treatment and care possibilities seem to be lacking. Studies indicate that non-pharmacological interventions such as exercise training and psychoeducation possess the potential of reducing sexual dysfunction in patients with heart disease. The CopenHeartSF trial will investigate the effect of a comprehensive sexual rehabilitation programme versus usual care. Methods and analysis CopenHeartSF is an investigator-initiated randomised clinical superiority trial with blinded outcome assessment, with 1:1 central randomisation to sexual rehabilitation plus usual care versus usual care alone. Based on sample size calculations, 154 male patients with impaired sexual function due to implantable cardioverter defibrillator or ischaemic heart disease will be included from two university hospitals in Denmark. All patients receive usual care and patients allocated to the experimental intervention group follow a 12-week sexual rehabilitation programme consisting of an individualised exercise programme and psychoeducative consultation with a specially trained nurse. The primary outcome is sexual function measured by the International Index of Erectile Function. The secondary outcome measure is psychosocial adjustment to illness by the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale, sexual domain. A number of explorative analyses will also be conducted. Ethics and dissemination CopenHeartSF is approved by the regional ethics committee (no H-4-2012-168) and the Danish Data Protection Agency (no 2007-58-0015) and is performed in accordance with good clinical practice and the Declaration of Helsinki in its latest form. Registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01796353

  8. Diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and metabolic biomarkers in individuals with normal glucose tolerance are inversely associated with lung function: the Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Hickson, DeMarc A; Burchfiel, Cecil M; Liu, Jiankang; Petrini, Marcy F; Harrison, Kimystian; White, Wendy B; Sarpong, Daniel F

    2011-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the hypothesis that diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), diabetes control and diabetes duration, and metabolic biomarkers in adults with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) are inversely associated with spirometry-measured lung function. We conducted a cross-sectional observational cohort study that included nonsmoking African American adults (n = 2,945; mean age = 52.5 ± 12.6 years; 69.2% female), who were free of cardiovascular disease, from the Jackson Heart Study. The interventions were diabetes, metabolic biomarkers and lung function. We measured the associations of glycemia with forced expiratory volume (FEV) in 1 s, FEV in 6 s, and vital capacity. Multivariable adjusted mean lung function values were lower among adults with diabetes and IGT (in women only, but not after adjustment for waist circumference) than adults with NGT. Among adults with diabetes, no associations were observed between lung function and diabetes control or duration. In women with NGT, lower lung function was consistently associated with higher glucose levels and less consistently with higher insulin levels and insulin resistance. Lower lung function was consistently associated with higher insulin levels and insulin resistance and less consistently associated with insulin and hemoglobin A1c in men with NGT. Overall, our findings generally support the hypothesis that diabetes, IGT, and increased levels of metabolic biomarkers in individuals with NGT are inversely associated with lung function in African Americans, independent of adiposity.

  9. Ace inhibitor therapy for heart failure in patients with impaired renal function: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Valika, Ali A; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2013-03-01

    Heart failure syndromes are often associated with multi-organ dysfunction, and concomitant liver, renal, and neurologic involvement is very common. Neuro-hormonal antagonism plays a key role in the management of this syndrome, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are one of the cornerstones of therapy. Cardiorenal physiology is becoming more recognized in these patients with advanced heart failure, and the role of neuro-hormonal blockade in this setting is vaguely defined in the literature. Often, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are decreased or even withheld in these circumstances. The purpose of this article is to review the role and pathophysiology of ace inhibition and angiotensin receptor blockade in patients with acute and chronic heart failure syndromes and concomitant cardiorenal physiology.

  10. Impaired energy metabolism of the taurine‑deficient heart.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Stephen W; Shimada-Takaura, Kayoko; Jong, Chian Ju; Ito, Takashi; Takahashi, Kyoko

    2016-02-01

    Taurine is a β-amino acid found in high concentrations in excitable tissues, including the heart. A significant reduction in myocardial taurine content leads to the development of a unique dilated, atrophic cardiomyopathy. One of the major functions of taurine in the heart is the regulation of the respiratory chain. Hence, we tested the hypothesis that taurine deficiency-mediated defects in respiratory chain function lead to impaired energy metabolism and reduced ATP generation. We found that while the rate of glycolysis was significantly enhanced in the taurine-deficient heart, glucose oxidation was diminished. The major site of reduced glucose oxidation was pyruvate dehydrogenase, an enzyme whose activity is reduced by the increase in the NADH/NAD+ ratio and by decreased availability of pyruvate for oxidation to acetyl CoA and changes in [Mg2+]i. Also diminished in the taurine-deficient heart was the oxidation of two other precursors of acetyl CoA, endogenous fatty acids and exogenous acetate. In the taurine-deficient heart, impaired citric acid cycle activity decreased both acetate oxidation and endogenous fatty acid oxidation, but reductions in the activity of the mitochondrial transporter, carnitine palmitoyl transferase, appeared to also contribute to the reduction in fatty acid oxidation. These changes diminished the rate of ATP production, causing a decline in the phosphocreatine/ATP ratio, a sign of reduced energy status. The findings support the hypothesis that the taurine-deficient heart is energy starved primarily because of impaired respiratory chain function, an increase in the NADH/NAD+ ratio and diminished long chain fatty acid uptake by the mitochondria. The results suggest that improved energy metabolism contributes to the beneficial effect of taurine therapy in patients suffering from heart failure.

  11. Impaired β-cell function attenuates training effects by reducing the increase in heart rate reserve in patients with myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Omiya, Kazuto; Minami, Keisuke; Sato, Yukio; Takai, Manabu; Takahashi, Eiji; Hayashi, Akio; Yamauchi, Masahiro; Suzuki, Kengo; Akashi, Yoshihiro J; Osada, Naohiko; Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Watanabe, Satoshi

    2015-02-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is characterized as a metabolic disorder syndrome that is upstream of hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus (DM). This study investigated exercise training effects on the exercise tolerance and heart rate dynamics in patients with IR or pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. Seventy patients (mean age, 60.1 years) with myocardial infarction (MI) participating in a phase II cardiac rehabilitation program were studied. Patients diagnosed with DM were excluded. Homeostasis model-assessment indices were used to divide patients into three groups - A: IR; B: normal; and C: β-cell dysfunction. A cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPX) was performed and peak oxygen uptake (V˙O2) was measured. After baseline testing, subjects participated in a supervised, combined aerobic and resistance exercise program. Peak V˙O2 at baseline was comparable among the three groups, and it improved after training in all groups (p<0.05). However, both the increase and percentage increase in peak V˙O2 were smaller in Group C than in Group A (p<0.05). Heart rate (HR) reserve (peak HR-rest HR), and HR recovery immediately 1min after exercise during CPX were calculated in 45 patients who were not taking negative chronotropic agents. Group C alone did not show any significant increase in HR reserve. HR reserve at both baseline and after training had significant positive correlations with peak V˙O2. HR recovery was 1.9 beats/min lower in group C than group A, but this was not significant. HR recovery in group C did not increase after cardiac rehabilitation. Impaired HR reserve increase after training in patients with pancreatic β-cell dysfunction attenuates exercise training effects on functional capacity. Comprehensive treatment including vigorous exercise training will be needed in such prediabetic patients. Copyright © 2014 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Exercise-induced torsional dyssynchrony relates to impaired functional capacity in patients with heart failure and normal ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yu Ting; Wenzelburger, Frauke Wg; Sanderson, John E; Leyva, Francisco

    2013-02-01

    Left ventricular (LV) systole and diastole are intimately dependent on myocardial torsion, which involves coupling between myocardial rotation (twisting in systole and untwisting in diastole) and longitudinal motion. Heart failure with normal ejection fraction (HFNEF) is known to involve exercise-induced wall motion abnormalities, but torsion on exercise has not been explored. We hypothesised that torsional dyssynchrony may also be involved and be exaggerated by exercise. 67 patients (age 73±7 years, 45 female) with HFNEF and 38 controls underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing and echocardiography at rest and on supine exercise. Analysis of three plane motions was performed using speckle tracking and tissue Doppler imaging. Torsional dyssynchrony was quantified as the SD of the time to peak systolic motion (SDSM) (basal and apical rotation, longitudinal and radial displacement); the time difference between peak twist and peak longitudinal displacement (twist-longitudinal motion delay, TLMD) and the ratio of untwist to longitudinal extension (UT:LE). At rest, HFNEF patients had similar SDSM, TLMD and UT:LE compared with controls. Exercise was associated with significantly more dyssynchrony in the HFNEF patients (SDSM 38.8±27.6 ms vs 25.9±15.5 ms, p=0.02; TLMD 28.4±46.2 ms vs 2.9±31.2 ms, p=0.005 and UT:LE 10.4±15.3 vs 3.3±3.8, p=0.022). The SDSM correlated positively with LV wall thickness (r=0.31, p=0.015) and negatively with peak oxygen consumption (r=-0.299, p=0.01) and changes in stroke volume on exercise (r=-0.371, p=0.001). HFNEF involves exercise-induced torsional dyssynchrony in systole and diastole, which relates to LV hypertrophy as well as exercise capacity.

  13. Abnormal splicing in the N-terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T impairs systolic function of the heart with preserved Frank-Starling compensation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Chen, Guozhen; Nan, Changlong; Huang, Xupei; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Abnormal splice-out of the exon 7-encoded segment in the N-terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T (cTnT-ΔE7) was found in turkeys and, together with the inclusion of embryonic exon (eTnT), in adult dogs with a correlation with dilated cardiomyopathy. Overexpression of these cTnT variants in transgenic mouse hearts significantly decreased cardiac function. To further investigate the functional effect of cTnT-ΔE7 or ΔE7+eTnT in vivo under systemic regulation, echocardiography was carried out in single and double-transgenic mice. No atrial enlargement, ventricular hypertrophy or dilation was detected in the hearts of 2-month-old cTnT-ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT mice in comparison to wild-type controls, indicating a compensated state. However, left ventricular fractional shortening and ejection fraction were decreased in ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT mice, and the response to isoproterenol was lower in ΔE7+eTnT mice. Left ventricular outflow tract velocity and gradient were decreased in the transgenic mouse hearts, indicating decreased systolic function. Ex vivo working heart function showed that high afterload or low preload resulted in more severe decreases in the systolic function and energetic efficiency of cTnT-ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT hearts. On the other hand, increases in preload demonstrated preserved Frank-Starling responses and minimized the loss of cardiac function and efficiency. The data demonstrate that the N-terminal variable region of cardiac TnT regulates systolic function of the heart. © 2014 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  14. Abnormal splicing in the N‐terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T impairs systolic function of the heart with preserved Frank‐Starling compensation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Han‐Zhong; Chen, Guozhen; Nan, Changlong; Huang, Xupei; Jin, Jian‐Ping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Abnormal splice‐out of the exon 7‐encoded segment in the N‐terminal variable region of cardiac troponin T (cTnT‐ΔE7) was found in turkeys and, together with the inclusion of embryonic exon (eTnT), in adult dogs with a correlation with dilated cardiomyopathy. Overexpression of these cTnT variants in transgenic mouse hearts significantly decreased cardiac function. To further investigate the functional effect of cTnT‐ΔE7 or ΔE7+eTnT in vivo under systemic regulation, echocardiography was carried out in single and double‐transgenic mice. No atrial enlargement, ventricular hypertrophy or dilation was detected in the hearts of 2‐month‐old cTnT‐ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT mice in comparison to wild‐type controls, indicating a compensated state. However, left ventricular fractional shortening and ejection fraction were decreased in ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT mice, and the response to isoproterenol was lower in ΔE7+eTnT mice. Left ventricular outflow tract velocity and gradient were decreased in the transgenic mouse hearts, indicating decreased systolic function. Ex vivo working heart function showed that high afterload or low preload resulted in more severe decreases in the systolic function and energetic efficiency of cTnT‐ΔE7 and ΔE7+eTnT hearts. On the other hand, increases in preload demonstrated preserved Frank‐Starling responses and minimized the loss of cardiac function and efficiency. The data demonstrate that the N‐terminal variable region of cardiac TnT regulates systolic function of the heart. PMID:25194024

  15. Receptor-interacting protein 140 overexpression impairs cardiac mitochondrial function and accelerates the transition to heart failure in chronically infarcted rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, YanFang; Chen, ShaoRui; Yue, ZhongBao; Zhang, YiQiang; Zhou, ChangHua; Cao, WeiWei; Chen, Xi; Zhang, LuanKun; Liu, PeiQing

    2017-02-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with myocardial energy metabolic abnormality. Receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) is an important transcriptional cofactor for maintaining energy balance in high-oxygen consumption tissues. However, the role of RIP140 in the pathologic processes of HF remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of RIP140 in mitochondrial and cardiac functions in rodent hearts under myocardial infarction (MI) stress. MI was created by a permanent ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery and exogenous expression of RIP140 by adenovirus (Ad) vector delivery. Four weeks after MI or Ad-RIP140 treatment, cardiac function was assessed by echocardiographic and hemodynamics analyses, and the mitochondrial function was determined by mitochondrial genes expression, biogenesis, and respiration rates. In Ad-RIP140 or MI group, a subset of metabolic genes changed, accompanied with slight reductions in mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration rates but no change in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content. Cardiac malfunction was compensated. However, under MI stress, rats overexpressing RIP140 exhibited greater repressions in mitochondrial genes, state 3 respiration rates, respiration control ratio, and ATP content and had further deteriorated cardiac malfunction. In conclusion, RIP140 overexpression leads to comparable cardiac function as resulted from MI, but RIP140 aggravates metabolic repression, mitochondrial malfunction, and further accelerates the transition to HF in response to MI stress.

  16. Impaired post exercise heart rate recovery in anabolic steroid users.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, M R; Dias, R G; Laterza, M C; Rondon, M U P B; Braga, A M F W; de Moraes Moreau, R L; Negrão, C E; Alves, M-J N N

    2013-10-01

    Previous study showed that muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was augmented in anabolic steroids users (AASU). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the heart rate (HR) responses after maximal exercise testing would be reduced in AASU. 10 male AASU and 10 AAS nonusers (AASNU) were studied. Cardiopulmonary exercise was performed to assess the functional capacity and heart rate recovery. MSNA was recorded directly from the peroneal nerve by microneurography technique. Peak oxygen consumption (VO₂) was lower in AASU compared to AASNU (43.66±2.24 vs. 52.70±1.68 ml/kg/min, P=0.005). HR recovery (HRR) at first and second minute was lower in AASU than AASNU (21±2 vs. 27±2 bpm, P=0.02 and 37±4 vs. 45±2 bpm, P=0.05, respectively). MSNA was higher in AASU than AASNU (29±3 vs. 20±1 bursts/min, P=0.01). Further analysis showed a correlation between HRR and MSNA (r=- 0.64, P=0.02), HRR at first minute and peak VO₂ (r=0.70, P=0.01) and HRR at second minute and peak VO₂ (r=0.62, P=0.02). The exacerbated sympathetic outflow associated with a lower parasympathetic activation after maximal exercise, which impairs heart rate recovery, strengthens the idea of autonomic imbalance in AASU. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Diastolic function in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Sándor J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure has reached epidemic proportions, and diastolic heart failure or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) constitutes about 50% of all heart failure admissions. Long-term prognosis of both reduced ejection fraction heart failure and HFpEF are similarly dismal. No pharmacologic agent has been developed that actually treats or repairs the physiologic deficit(s) responsible for HFpEF. Because the physiology of diastole is both subtle and counterintuitive, its role in heart failure has received insufficient attention. In this review, the focus is on the physiology of diastole in heart failure, the dominant physiologic laws that govern the process in all hearts, how all hearts work as a suction pump, and, therefore, the elucidation and characterization of what actually is meant by "diastolic function". The intent is for the reader to understand what diastolic function actually is, what it is not, and how to measure it. Proper measurement of diastolic function requires one to go beyond the usual E/A, E/E', etc. phenomenological metrics and employ more rigorous causality (mathematical modeling) based parameters of diastolic function. The method simultaneously provides new physiologic insight into the meaning of in vivo "equilibrium volume" of the left ventricle (LV), longitudinal versus transverse volume accommodation of the chamber, diastatic "ringing" of the mitral annulus, and the mechanism of L-wave generation, as well as availability of a load-independent index of diastolic function (LIIDF). One important consequence of understanding what diastolic function is, is the recognition that all that current therapies can do is basically alter the load, rather than actually "repair" the functional components (chamber stiffness, chamber relaxation). If beneficial (biological/structural/metabolic) remodeling due to therapy does manifest ultimately as improved diastolic function, it is due to resumption of normal physiology (as in alleviation of

  18. Diastolic Function in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Sándor J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure has reached epidemic proportions, and diastolic heart failure or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) constitutes about 50% of all heart failure admissions. Long-term prognosis of both reduced ejection fraction heart failure and HFpEF are similarly dismal. No pharmacologic agent has been developed that actually treats or repairs the physiologic deficit(s) responsible for HFpEF. Because the physiology of diastole is both subtle and counterintuitive, its role in heart failure has received insufficient attention. In this review, the focus is on the physiology of diastole in heart failure, the dominant physiologic laws that govern the process in all hearts, how all hearts work as a suction pump, and, therefore, the elucidation and characterization of what actually is meant by “diastolic function”. The intent is for the reader to understand what diastolic function actually is, what it is not, and how to measure it. Proper measurement of diastolic function requires one to go beyond the usual E/A, E/E′, etc. phenomenological metrics and employ more rigorous causality (mathematical modeling) based parameters of diastolic function. The method simultaneously provides new physiologic insight into the meaning of in vivo “equilibrium volume” of the left ventricle (LV), longitudinal versus transverse volume accommodation of the chamber, diastatic “ringing” of the mitral annulus, and the mechanism of L-wave generation, as well as availability of a load-independent index of diastolic function (LIIDF). One important consequence of understanding what diastolic function is, is the recognition that all that current therapies can do is basically alter the load, rather than actually “repair” the functional components (chamber stiffness, chamber relaxation). If beneficial (biological/structural/metabolic) remodeling due to therapy does manifest ultimately as improved diastolic function, it is due to resumption of normal physiology (as in

  19. Heart rhythm complexity impairment in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Hung; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Heng; Wu, Vin-Cent; Lo, Men-Tzung; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Liu, Li-Yu Daisy; Lin, Lian-Yu; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in patients with advanced renal disease. The objective of this study was to investigate impairments in heart rhythm complexity in patients with end-stage renal disease. We prospectively analyzed 65 patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) without prior cardiovascular disease and 72 individuals with normal renal function as the control group. Heart rhythm analysis including complexity analysis by including detrended fractal analysis (DFA) and multiscale entropy (MSE) were performed. In linear analysis, the PD patients had a significantly lower standard deviation of normal RR intervals (SDRR) and percentage of absolute differences in normal RR intervals greater than 20 ms (pNN20). Of the nonlinear analysis indicators, scale 5, area under the MSE curve for scale 1 to 5 (area 1–5) and 6 to 20 (area 6–20) were significantly lower than those in the control group. In DFA anaylsis, both DFA α1 and DFA α2 were comparable in both groups. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, scale 5 had the greatest discriminatory power for two groups. In both net reclassification improvement model and integrated discrimination improvement models, MSE parameters significantly improved the discriminatory power of SDRR, pNN20, and pNN50. In conclusion, PD patients had worse cardiac complexity parameters. MSE parameters are useful to discriminate PD patients from patients with normal renal function.

  20. Heart failure and cognitive impairment: Challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Heckman, George A; Patterson, Christopher J; Demers, Catherine; St.Onge, Joye; Turpie, Irene D; McKelvie, Robert S

    2007-01-01

    As populations age, heart failure (HF) is becoming increasingly common, and in addition to a high burden of morbidity and mortality, HF has an enormous financial impact. Though disproportionately affected by HF, the elderly are less likely to receive recommended therapies, in part because clinical trials of HF therapy have ignored outcomes of importance to this population, including impaired cognitive function (ICF). HF is associated with ICF, manifested primarily as delirium in hospitalized patients, or as mild cognitive impairment or dementia in otherwise stable outpatients. This association is likely the result of shared risk factors, as well as perfusion and rheological abnormalities that occur in patients with HF. Evidence suggests that these abnormalities may be partially reversible with standard HF therapy. The clinical consequences of ICF in HF patients are significant. Clinicians should consider becoming familiar with screening instruments for ICF, including delirium and dementia, in order to identify patients at risk of nonadherence to HF therapy and related adverse consequences. Preliminary evidence suggests that optimal HF therapy in elderly patients may preserve or even improve cognitive function, though the impact on related outcomes remains to be determined. PMID:18044137

  1. Reduced Mastication Impairs Memory Function.

    PubMed

    Fukushima-Nakayama, Y; Ono, Takehito; Hayashi, M; Inoue, M; Wake, H; Ono, Takashi; Nakashima, T

    2017-08-01

    Mastication is an indispensable oral function related to physical, mental, and social health throughout life. The elderly tend to have a masticatory dysfunction due to tooth loss and fragility in the masticatory muscles with aging, potentially resulting in impaired cognitive function. Masticatory stimulation has influence on the development of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as the growth of maxillofacial tissue in children. Although the relationship between mastication and cognitive function is potentially important in the growth period, the cellular and molecular mechanisms have not been sufficiently elucidated. Here, we show that the reduced mastication resulted in impaired spatial memory and learning function owing to the morphological change and decreased activity in the hippocampus. We used an in vivo model for reduced masticatory stimuli, in which juvenile mice were fed with powder diet and found that masticatory stimulation during the growth period positively regulated long-term spatial memory to promote cognitive function. The functional linkage between mastication and brain was validated by the decrease in neurons, neurogenesis, neuronal activity, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the hippocampus. These findings taken together provide in vivo evidence for a functional linkage between mastication and cognitive function in the growth period, suggesting a need for novel therapeutic strategies in masticatory function-related cognitive dysfunction.

  2. Left atrial volume index in patients with heart failure and severely impaired left ventricular systolic function: the role of established echocardiographic parameters, circulating cystatin C and galectin-3.

    PubMed

    Zivlas, Christos; Triposkiadis, Filippos; Psarras, Stelios; Giamouzis, Gregory; Skoularigis, Ioannis; Chryssanthopoulos, Stavros; Kapelouzou, Alkistis; Ramcharitar, Steve; Barnes, Edward; Papasteriadis, Evangelos; Cokkinos, Dennis

    2017-08-01

    Backround: Left atrial (LA) enlargement plays an important role in the development of heart failure (HF) and is a robust prognostic factor. Fibrotic processes have also been advocated to evoke HF through finite signalling proteins. We examined the association of two such proteins, cystatin C (CysC) and galectin-3 (Gal-3), and other clinical, echocardiographic and biochemical parameters with LA volume index (LAVi) in patients with HF with severely impaired left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Severe renal, liver, autoimmune disease and cancer were exclusion criteria. A total of 40 patients with HF (31 men, age 66.6 ± 1.7) with LVEF = 25.4 ± 0.9% were divided into two groups according to the mean LAVi (51.03 ± 2.9 ml/m(2)) calculated by two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography. Greater LAVi was positively associated with LV end-diastolic volume ( p = 0.017), LV end-systolic volume ( p = 0.025), mitral regurgitant volume (MRV) ( p = 0.001), right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) ( p < 0.001), restrictive diastolic filling pattern ( p = 0.003) and atrial fibrillation ( p = 0.005). Plasma CysC was positively correlated with LAVi ( R(2) = 0.135, p = 0.019) and log-transformed plasma Gal-3 ( R(2) = 0.109, p = 0.042) by simple linear regression analysis. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis showed that only MRV ( t = 2.236, p = 0.032), CysC ( t = 2.467, p = 0.019) and RVSP ( t = 2.155, p = 0.038) were significant predictors of LAVi. Apart from known determinants of LAVi, circulating CysC and Gal-3 were associated with greater LA dilatation in patients with HF with reduced LVEF. Interestingly, the correlation between these two fibrotic proteins was positive.

  3. Reduced heart rate variability in chronic severe traumatic brain injury: Association with impaired emotional and social functioning, and potential for treatment using biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Francis, Heather M; Fisher, Alana; Rushby, Jacqueline A; McDonald, Skye

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) may provide an index of capacity for social functioning and may be remediated by HRV biofeedback. Given reductions in HRV are found following traumatic brain injury (TBI), the present study aimed to determine whether lower HRV in TBI is associated with social function, and whether HRV biofeedback might be a useful remediation technique in this population. Resting state HRV and measures of social and emotional processing were collected in 30 individuals with severe TBI (3-34 years post-injury) and 30 controls. This was followed by a single session of HRV biofeedback. HRV was positively associated with social cognition and empathy, and negatively associated with alexithymia for the TBI group. Both TBI and control groups showed significantly increased HRV on both time-domain (i.e., SDNN, rMSSD) and frequency-domain measures (LF, HF, LF:HF ratio) during biofeedback compared to baseline. These results suggest that decreased HRV is linked to social and emotional function following severe TBI, and may be a novel target for therapy using HRV biofeedback techniques.

  4. Cognitive Reserve Moderates the Association between Heart Failure and Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; van Dulmen, Manfred; Colbert, Lisa H.; Josephson, Richard; Waechter, Donna; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment in persons with heart failure is common. Theories of cognitive reserve suggest that premorbid factors, such as intellectual ability, may provide a buffer against cognitive impairment due to neuropathological insult. No study has examined the influence of cognitive reserve on cognitive functioning in older adults with heart failure. Aim This study examined whether cognitive reserve moderates the relationship between heart failure severity and cognitive function. Methods A total of 157 persons with heart failure (69.26 ± 9.26 years; 39% female) completed neuropsychological testing and a brief fitness assessment. Cognitive reserve was operationalized using estimated premorbid intellect on American National Adult Reading Test (AMNART). Results A moderation analysis was performed using a hierarchical regression models for each cognitive domain. An interaction term between the AMNART and 2-minute step test was created and entered into the final block of the model, with demographic, psychosocial, and heart failure severity entered in the previous blocks. The interaction term was significant for attention (t(155) = −2.54, p = .012), executive function (t(155) = −3.30, p = .001), and language (t(155) = −2.83, p = .005) domains. Conclusion The current findings suggest that cognitive reserve moderates the association between heart failure severity and cognitive function in multiple cognitive domains. Further work is needed to clarify the mechanisms by which cognitive reserve attenuates cognitive impairment in this population. PMID:22034987

  5. Decreased frequencies and impaired functions of the CD31(+) subpopulation in Treg cells associated with decreased FoxP3 expression and enhanced Treg cell defects in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Zheng, Y; Yuan, X; Ma, Y; Xie, G; Wang, W; Chen, H; Shen, L

    2017-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is one of the most common types of organ lesions caused by atherosclerosis, in which CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+) ) regulatory T cells (Treg ) play an atheroprotective role. However, Treg cell numbers are decreased and their functions are impaired in atherosclerosis; the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. CD31 plays an important part in T cell response and contributes to maintaining T cell tolerance. The immunomodulatory effects of CD31 are also implicated in atherosclerosis. In this study, we found that decreased frequencies of the CD31(+) subpopulation in Treg cells (CD31(+) Tr cells) correlated positively with decreased FoxP3 expression in CHD patients. Cell culture in vitro demonstrated CD31(+) Tr cells maintaining stable FoxP3 expression after activation and exhibited enhanced proliferation and immunosuppression compared with the CD31(-) subpopulation in Treg cells (CD31(-) Tr cells). We also confirmed impaired secretion of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and interleukin (IL)-10 in CD31(+) Tr cells of CHD patients. Further analysis revealed reduced phospho-SHP2 (associated with CD31 activation) and phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 (STAT-5) (associated with FoxP3 transcription) levels in CD31(+) Tr cells of CHD patients, suggesting that decreased FoxP3 expression in CD31(+) Tr cells might be because of attenuated SHP2 and STAT-5 activation. These data indicate that decreased frequencies and impaired functions of the CD31(+) Tr subpopulation associated with decreased FoxP3 expression give rise, at least in part, to Treg cell defects in CHD patients. Our findings emphasize the important role of the CD31(+) Tr subpopulation in maintaining Treg cell normal function and may provide a novel explanation for impaired immunoregulation of Treg cells in CHD.

  6. Patients with a congenital heart defect and type D personality feel functionally more impaired, report a poorer health status and quality of life, but use less healthcare.

    PubMed

    Schoormans, Dounya; Mulder, Barbara Jm; van Melle, Joost P; Pieper, Els G; van Dijk, Arie Pj; Sieswerda, Gert-Jan Tj; Hulsbergen-Zwarts, Mariët S; Plokker, Thijs Hwm; Brunninkhuis, Leo Gh; Vliegen, Hubert W; Sprangers, Mirjam Ag

    2012-09-01

    Type D personality, characterized by high levels of negative affectivity and social inhibition, is related to mortality, morbidity, poor health status, quality of life (QoL) and less healthcare utilization in various cardiovascular patient groups. To date, studies in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) are lacking. (1) To examine the prevalence of type D personality in CHD patients; (2) to compare type D to non-type D patients with regard to disease severity, functional status, health status and QoL; and (3) to examine the extent to which type D personality is independently related to healthcare utilization. A total of 1109 adult CHD patients were included in a questionnaire survey. Due to missing data, 302 patients were excluded. The prevalence of Type D personality was 20.4%. Type D patients reported a poorer functional status, health status and QoL than non-type D patients (p<0.05). Type D patients reported less healthcare use than non-type D patients (primary and cardiac outpatient healthcare: adjusted OR=0.56, 95% CI=0.35-0.90; inpatient healthcare: adjusted OR=0.38, 95% CI=0.17-0.83). Results of a post-hoc analysis showed a high prevalence of type D personality in patients with a poor functional status who did not consult their cardiologist. type D patients report a poorer functional status, health status and QoL, but less healthcare utilization. In clinical practice, patients should be screened for type D personality, since social inhibition may prevent them from contacting a healthcare provider in the event of symptom aggravation.

  7. Attitudes about impairment and depression in elders suffering from chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Turvey, Carolyn L; Klein, Dawn M; Pies, Carla J; Arndt, Stephan

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between functional impairment and depression in patients with heart failure using a new measure of Attitudes about Impairment. Sixty-nine patients with chronic heart failure completed diagnostic interviews and questionnaires about mood, comorbid illness, functional impairment, and social support. Study design was case-control with cases selected because they met criteria for DSM-IV major or minor depression (n = 23). Controls reported no or very few depressive symptoms (n = 46). A preliminary study of the psychometric properties of a new 15-item measure of Attitudes about Impairment was conducted. The Attitudes about Impairment measure had a Cronbach's alpha = 0.81. A factor analysis revealed content domains of negative attitudes about dependency, lack of recreational activities, and concerns about being a burden both currently and in the future. This measure correlated highly with the Geriatric Depression Scale (r = 0.61) and remained high even after controlling for medical burden and social support. Patients were diagnosed with either major, minor or no depression using a DSM-IV based structured interview. Depressed patients had significantly more negative attitudes about impairment and the association between depression and physical impairment was no longer significant after controlling for scores on the Attitudes about Impairment measure. Negative attitudes about loss of autonomy, concerns about being a burden and having few recreational activities are strongly associated with depression in patients with heart failure. These attitudes account, in part, for the association between impairment and depression in these patients. The Attitudes about Impairment measure has adequate internal consistency and both convergent and discriminant validity with related measures of social support, functional disability and depression.

  8. Mitochondrial function as a therapeutic target in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David A.; Perry, Justin B.; Allen, Mitchell E.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Stauffer, Brian L.; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Cleland, John G. F.; Colucci, Wilson S.; Butler, Javed; Voors, Adriaan A.; Anker, Stefan D.; Pitt, Bertram; Pieske, Burkert; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Greene, Stephen J.; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure is a pressing worldwide public-health problem with millions of patients having worsening heart failure. Despite all the available therapies, the condition carries a very poor prognosis. Existing therapies provide symptomatic and clinical benefit, but do not fully address molecular abnormalities that occur in cardiomyocytes. This shortcoming is particularly important given that most patients with heart failure have viable dysfunctional myocardium, in which an improvement or normalization of function might be possible. Although the pathophysiology of heart failure is complex, mitochondrial dysfunction seems to be an important target for therapy to improve cardiac function directly. Mitochondrial abnormalities include impaired mitochondrial electron transport chain activity, increased formation of reactive oxygen species, shifted metabolic substrate utilization, aberrant mitochondrial dynamics, and altered ion homeostasis. In this Consensus Statement, insights into the mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure are presented, along with an overview of emerging treatments with the potential to improve the function of the failing heart by targeting mitochondria. PMID:28004807

  9. Cardiac ablation of Rheb1 induces impaired heart growth, endoplasmic reticulum-associated apoptosis and heart failure in infant mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yunshan; Tao, Lichan; Shen, Shutong; Xiao, Junjie; Wu, Hang; Li, Beibei; Wu, Xiangqi; Luo, Wen; Xiao, Qi; Hu, Xiaoshan; Liu, Hailang; Nie, Junwei; Lu, Shuangshuang; Yuan, Baiyin; Han, Zhonglin; Xiao, Bo; Yang, Zhongzhou; Li, Xinli

    2013-12-13

    Ras homologue enriched in brain 1 (Rheb1) plays an important role in a variety of cellular processes. In this study, we investigate the role of Rheb1 in the post-natal heart. We found that deletion of the gene responsible for production of Rheb1 from cardiomyocytes of post-natal mice resulted in malignant arrhythmias, heart failure, and premature death of these mice. In addition, heart growth impairment, aberrant metabolism relative gene expression, and increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis were observed in Rheb1-knockout mice prior to the development of heart failure and arrhythmias. Also, protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) signaling was enhanced in Rheb1-knockout mice, and removal of phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) significantly prolonged the survival of Rheb1-knockouts. Furthermore, signaling via the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) was abolished and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and phosphorylation levels of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) were increased in Rheb1 mutant mice. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Rheb1 is important for maintaining cardiac function in post-natal mice via regulation of mTORC1 activity and stress on the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, activation of Akt signaling helps to improve the survival of mice with advanced heart failure. Thus, this study provides direct evidence that Rheb1 performs multiple important functions in the heart of the post-natal mouse. Enhancing Akt activity improves the survival of infant mice with advanced heart failure.

  10. Reversible heart rhythm complexity impairment in patients with primary aldosteronism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Hung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Lo, Men-Tzung; Wu, Xue-Ming; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Stowasser, Michael; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-08-01

    Excess aldosterone secretion in patients with primary aldosteronism (PA) impairs their cardiovascular system. Heart rhythm complexity analysis, derived from heart rate variability (HRV), is a powerful tool to quantify the complex regulatory dynamics of human physiology. We prospectively analyzed 20 patients with aldosterone producing adenoma (APA) that underwent adrenalectomy and 25 patients with essential hypertension (EH). The heart rate data were analyzed by conventional HRV and heart rhythm complexity analysis including detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and multiscale entropy (MSE). We found APA patients had significantly decreased DFAα2 on DFA analysis and decreased area 1-5, area 6-15, and area 6-20 on MSE analysis (all p < 0.05). Area 1-5, area 6-15, area 6-20 in the MSE study correlated significantly with log-transformed renin activity and log-transformed aldosterone-renin ratio (all p < = 0.01). The conventional HRV parameters were comparable between PA and EH patients. After adrenalectomy, all the altered DFA and MSE parameters improved significantly (all p < 0.05). The conventional HRV parameters did not change. Our result suggested that heart rhythm complexity is impaired in APA patients and this is at least partially reversed by adrenalectomy.

  11. Deletion of neurturin impairs development of cholinergic nerves and heart rate control in postnatal mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Downs, Anthony M; Jalloh, Hawa B; Prater, Kayla J; Fregoso, Santiago P; Bond, Cherie E; Hampton, Thomas G; Hoover, Donald B

    2016-05-01

    The neurotrophic factor neurturin is required for normal cholinergic innervation of adult mouse heart and bradycardic responses to vagal stimulation. Our goals were to determine effects of neurturin deletion on development of cardiac chronotropic and dromotropic functions, vagal baroreflex response, and cholinergic nerve density in nodal regions of postnatal mice. Experiments were performed on postnatal C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and neurturin knockout (KO) mice. Serial electrocardiograms were recorded noninvasively from conscious pups using an ECGenie apparatus. Mice were treated with atenolol to evaluate and block sympathetic effects on heart rate (HR) and phenylephrine (PE) to stimulate the baroreflex. Immunohistochemistry was used to label cholinergic nerves in paraffin sections. WT and KO mice showed similar age-dependent increases in HR and decreases in PR interval between postnatal days (P) 2.5 and 21. Treatment with atenolol reduced HR significantly in WT and KO pups at P7.5. PE caused a reflex bradycardia that was significantly smaller in KO pups. Cholinergic nerve density was significantly less in nodal regions of P7.5 KO mice. We conclude that cholinergic nerves have minimal influence on developmental changes in HR and PR, QRS, and QTc intervals in mouse pups. However, cholinergic nerves mediate reflex bradycardia by 1 week postnatally. Deletion of neurturin impairs cholinergic innervation of the heart and the vagal efferent component of the baroreflex early during postnatal development. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  12. Aspirate from human stented saphenous vein grafts induces epicardial coronary vasoconstriction and impairs perfusion and left ventricular function in rat bioassay hearts with pharmacologically induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lieder, Helmut R; Baars, Theodor; Kahlert, Philipp; Kleinbongard, Petra

    2016-08-01

    Stent implantation into aortocoronary saphenous vein grafts (SVG) releases particulate debris and soluble vasoactive mediators, for example, serotonin. We now analyzed effects of the soluble mediators released into the coronary arterial blood during stent implantation on vasomotion of isolated rat epicardial coronary artery segments and on coronary flow and left ventricular developed pressure in isolated perfused rat hearts. Coronary blood was retrieved during percutaneous SVG intervention using a distal occlusion/aspiration protection device in nine symptomatic patients with stable angina pectoris and a flow-limiting SVG stenosis. The blood was separated into particulate debris and plasma. Responses to coronary plasma were determined in isolated rat epicardial coronary arteries and in isolated, constant pressure-perfused rat hearts (±nitric oxide synthase [NOS] inhibition and ±serotonin receptor blockade, respectively). Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation induced a stronger vasoconstriction of rat epicardial coronary arteries (52 ± 8% of maximal potassium chloride induced vasoconstriction [% KClmax = 100%]) than plasma taken before stent implantation (12 ± 8% of KClmax); NOS inhibition augmented this vasoconstrictor response (to 110 ± 15% and 24 ± 9% of KClmax). Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation reduced in isolated perfused rat hearts only under NOS inhibition coronary flow by 17 ± 3% and left ventricular developed pressure by 25 ± 4%. Blockade of serotonin receptors abrogated these effects. Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation induces vasoconstriction in isolated rat epicardial coronary arteries and reduces coronary flow and left ventricular developed pressure in isolated perfused rat hearts with pharmacologically induced endothelial dysfunction. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The

  13. Experimental Evolution and Heart Function in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Shahrestani, Parvin; Burke, Molly K; Birse, Ryan; Kezos, James N; Ocorr, Karen; Mueller, Laurence D; Rose, Michael R; Bodmer, Rolf

    Drosophila melanogaster is a good model species for the study of heart function. However, most previous work on D. melanogaster heart function has focused on the effects of large-effect genetic variants. We compare heart function among 18 D. melanogaster populations that have been selected for altered development time, aging, or stress resistance. We find that populations with faster development and faster aging have increased heart dysfunction, measured as percentage heart failure after electrical pacing. Experimental evolution of different triglyceride levels, by contrast, has little effect on heart function. Evolved differences in heart function correlate with allele frequency changes at many loci of small effect. Genomic analysis of these populations produces a list of candidate loci that might affect cardiac function at the intersection of development, aging, and metabolic control mechanisms.

  14. Marital Conflict, Depressive Symptoms, and Functional Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Heejeong; Marks, Nadine F

    2008-01-01

    Guided by a stress process perspective, we investigated (a) whether marital conflict might directly lead to changes in depression and functional impairment, (b) whether marital conflict might indirectly lead to changes in functional impairment via depression, and (c) whether marital conflict might indirectly lead to changes in depression via…

  15. Impairment of cardiac function and energetics in experimental renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Raine, A E; Seymour, A M; Roberts, A F; Radda, G K; Ledingham, J G

    1993-01-01

    Cardiac function and energetics in experimental renal failure in the rat (5/6 nephrectomy) have been investigated by means of an isolated perfused working heart preparation and an isometric Langendorff preparation using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR). 4 wk after nephrectomy cardiac output of isolated hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer was significantly lower (P < 0.0001) at all levels of preload and afterload in the renal failure groups than in the pair-fed sham operated control group. In control hearts, cardiac output increased with increases in perfusate calcium from 0.73 to 5.61 mmol/liter whereas uremic hearts failed in high calcium perfusate. Collection of 31P NMR spectra from hearts of renal failure and control animals during 30 min normoxic Langendorff perfusion showed that basal phosphocreatine was reduced by 32% to 4.7 mumol/g wet wt (P < 0.01) and the phosphocreatine to ATP ratio was reduced by 32% (P < 0.01) in uremic hearts. During low flow ischemia, there was a substantial decrease in phosphocreatine in the uremic hearts and an accompanying marked increase in release of inosine into the coronary effluent (14.9 vs 6.1 microM, P < 0.01). We conclude that cardiac function is impaired in experimental renal failure, in association with abnormal cardiac energetics and increased susceptibility to ischemic damage. Disordered myocardial calcium utilization may contribute to these derangements. PMID:8254048

  16. Association of prediabetes by fasting glucose and/or haemoglobin A1c levels with subclinical atherosclerosis and impaired renal function: observations from the Dallas Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Xing, Frank Y F; Neeland, Ian J; Gore, M Odette; Ayers, Colby R; Paixao, Andre R M; Turer, Aslan T; Berry, Jarett D; Khera, Amit; de Lemos, James A; McGuire, Darren K

    2014-01-01

    Prediabetes defined by fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) predicts incident diabetes, but their individual and joint associations with micro- and macro-vascular risk remain poorly defined. FPG, HbA1c, coronary artery calcium (CAC), carotid wall thickness, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) were measured in adults free from prior diabetes or cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the Dallas Heart Study 2 (DHS-2), a population-based cohort study. Prediabetes was defined by FPG 100-125 mg/dL and/or HbA1c 5.7%-6.4%. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyse associations of HbA1c and/or FPG in the prediabetes range with subclinical atherosclerosis and renal measures. The study comprised 2340 participants, median age = 49 years; 60% women and 50% black. Those with prediabetes were older (52 vs 48 years), more often men (63% vs 53%), black (53% vs 47%) and obese (58% vs 40%; p < 0.001 for each). Prediabetes was captured by FPG alone (43%), HbA1c alone (30%) or both (27%). Those with prediabetes by HbA1c or FPG versus normal HbA1c/FPG had more CAC [odds ratio (OR) = 1.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.5-2.2], higher carotid wall thickness (1.32 vs 1.29 mm, p < 0.001), eGFR < 60 mL/min [OR = 1.6 (95% CI = 1.1-2.4)], UACR > 30 mg/dL [OR = 1.8 (95% CI = 1.2-2.7)] and a higher odds for the composite eGFR + UACR [chronic kidney disease (CKD) ≥ 2] [OR = 1.9 (95% CI = 1.5-2.6)]. After multivariable adjustment, none of these associations remained significant. Prediabetes defined by HbA1c and/or FPG criteria is crudely associated with markers of diabetic macro- and micro-vascular disease, but not after statistical adjustment, suggesting the relationships are attributable to other characteristics of the prediabetes population.

  17. [Functional impairment associated with cognitive impairment in hospitalised elderly].

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Chaparro, José Mauricio; Mosquera-Jiménez, José Ignacio; Davis, Annabelle S; Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A

    2017-06-24

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of cognitive impairment on functional decline in hospitalised patients aged ≥60 years. Measurements at admission included demographic data, Charlson's comorbidity index, and cognitive impairment (according to education level). Data were also collected on hospital length of stay, depression, and delirium developed during hospitalisation. The outcome, Barthel Index (BI), was measured at admission, discharge, and 1-month post-discharge. Patients with BI≤75 at admission (n=54) or with a missing BI value were excluded (n=1). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to explore predictive factors with functional decline (BI≤75) from admission to discharge, and 1-month later. Of the 133 patients included, 24.8% and 19.6% had a BI≤75 at discharge and at 1-month, respectively. Compared with men, women had more than double risk for functional decline at discharge and 1-month (P<.05). Compared with those without delirium and without cognitive impairment, those with delirium and cognitive impairment had an increased risk for functional decline (BI≤75) at discharge (OR 5.15, 95% CI; 1.94-13.67), and at 1-month (OR 6.26, 95% CI; 2.30-17.03). Similarly, those with comorbidity (≥2) had increased functional decline at discharge (OR 2.36, 95% CI; 1.14-4.87), and at 1-month after discharge (OR 2.71, 95% CI; 1.25-5.89). Delirium during hospitalisation, together with cognitive impairment on admission, was a strong predictor of functional decline. Copyright © 2017 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Inferential functioning in visually impaired children.

    PubMed

    Puche-Navarro, Rebeca; Millán, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The current study explores the inferential abilities of visually impaired children in a task presented in two formats, manipulative and verbal. The results showed that in the group of visually impaired children, just as with children with normal sight, there was a wide range of inference types. It was found that the visually impaired children perform slightly better in the use of inductive and relational inferences in the verbal format, while in the manipulative format children with normal sight perform better. These results suggest that in inferential functioning of young children, and especially visually impaired children, the format of the task influences performance more than the child's visual ability.

  19. Impairment of heart rate recovery after peak exercise predicts poor outcome after pediatric heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Giardini, Alessandro; Fenton, Matthew; Derrick, Graham; Burch, Michael

    2013-09-10

    A blunted heart rate recovery (HRR) from peak exercise is associated with adverse outcome in adults with ischemic heart disease. We assessed HRR after pediatric heart transplantation (HTx) and its prognostic use. Between 2004 and 2010 we performed 360 maximal exercise tests (median, 2 tests/patient; range, 1-7) in 128 children (66 men; age at test, 14 ± 3 years) who received HTx (age, 8.5 ± 5.1 years) because of cardiomyopathy (66%) or congenital heart defects (34%). The change in heart rate from peak exercise to 1 minute of recovery was measured as HRR and was expressed as Z score calculated from reference data obtained in 160 healthy children. HRR was impaired soon after HTx (average in first 2 years Z=-1.9 ± 3.5) but improved afterward (Z=+0.52/y), such that HRR Z score normalized in most patients by 6 years after HTx (average, 0.6 ± 1.8). A subsequent decline in HRR Z score was noted from 6 years after HTx (rate of Z=-0.11/y). After 27 ± 15 months from the most recent exercise test, 19 patients died or were re-heart transplantation. For the follow-up after 6 years, HRR Z score was the only predictor of death/re-heart transplantation (P=0.003). Patients in the lowest quartile of HRR Z score had a much higher 5-year event rate (event-free rate, 29% versus 84%; hazard ratio, 7.0; P=0.0013). HRR is blunted soon after HTx but normalizes at ≈ 6 years, potentially as a result of parasympathetic reinnervation of the graft, but then declines. This late decline in HRR Z score is associated with worse outcome.

  20. PPAR ligands improve impaired metabolic pathways in fetal hearts of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Melisa; Capobianco, Evangelina; Martinez, Nora; Roberti, Sabrina Lorena; Arany, Edith; Jawerbaum, Alicia

    2014-10-01

    In maternal diabetes, the fetal heart can be structurally and functionally affected. Maternal diets enriched in certain unsaturated fatty acids can activate the nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and regulate metabolic and anti-inflammatory pathways during development. Our aim was to investigate whether PPARα expression, lipid metabolism, lipoperoxidation, and nitric oxide (NO) production are altered in the fetal hearts of diabetic rats, and to analyze the putative effects of in vivo PPAR activation on these parameters. We found decreased PPARα expression in the hearts of male but not female fetuses of diabetic rats when compared with controls. Fetal treatments with the PPARα ligand leukotriene B4 upregulated the expression of PPARα and target genes involved in fatty acid oxidation in the fetal hearts. Increased concentrations of triglycerides, cholesterol, and phospholipids were found in the hearts of fetuses of diabetic rats. Maternal treatments with diets supplemented with 6% olive oil or 6% safflower oil, enriched in unsaturated fatty acids that can activate PPARs, led to few changes in lipid concentrations, but up-regulated PPARα expression in fetal hearts. NO production, which was increased in the hearts of male and female fetuses in the diabetic group, and lipoperoxidation, which was increased in the hearts of male fetuses in the diabetic group, was reduced by the maternal treatments supplemented with safflower oil. In conclusion, impaired PPARα expression, altered lipid metabolism, and increased oxidative and nitridergic pathways were evidenced in hearts of fetuses of diabetic rats and were regulated in a gender-dependent manner by treatments enriched with PPAR ligands.

  1. Loss of MCL-1 leads to impaired autophagy and rapid development of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Robert L.; Roberts, David J.; Kubli, Dieter A.; Lee, Youngil; Quinsay, Melissa N.; Owens, Jarvis B.; Fischer, Kimberlee M.; Sussman, Mark A.; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Gustafsson, Åsa B.

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1) is an anti-apoptotic BCL-2 protein that is up-regulated in several human cancers. MCL-1 is also highly expressed in myocardium, but its function in myocytes has not been investigated. We generated inducible, cardiomyocyte-specific Mcl-1 knockout mice and found that ablation of Mcl-1 in the adult heart led to rapid cardiomyopathy and death. Although MCL-1 is known to inhibit apoptosis, this process was not activated in MCL-1-deficient hearts. Ultrastructural analysis revealed disorganized sarcomeres and swollen mitochondria in myocytes. Mitochondria isolated from MCL-1-deficient hearts exhibited reduced respiration and limited Ca2+-mediated swelling, consistent with opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Double-knockout mice lacking MCL-1 and cyclophilin D, an essential regulator of the mPTP, exhibited delayed progression to heart failure and extended survival. Autophagy is normally induced by myocardial stress, but induction of autophagy was impaired in MCL-1-deficient hearts. These data demonstrate that MCL-1 is essential for mitochondrial homeostasis and induction of autophagy in the heart. This study also raises concerns about potential cardiotoxicity for chemotherapeutics that target MCL-1. PMID:23788623

  2. Functional impairment and hospital readmission in Medicare seniors.

    PubMed

    Greysen, S Ryan; Stijacic Cenzer, Irena; Auerbach, Andrew D; Covinsky, Kenneth E

    2015-04-01

    ADL (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.96-1.21), 16.5% with dependency in 1 to 2 ADLs (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.11-1.44), and 18.2% with dependency in 3 or more ADLs (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.20-1.69). Subanalysis restricted to patients admitted with conditions targeted by Medicare (ie, heart failure, myocardial infarction, and pneumonia) revealed a parallel trend with larger effects for the most impaired (16.9% readmission rate for no impairment vs 25.7% for dependency in 3 or more ADLs [OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.04-2.78]). Functional impairment is associated with increased risk of 30-day all-cause hospital readmission in Medicare seniors, especially those admitted for heart failure, myocardial infarction, or pneumonia. Functional impairment may be an important but underaddressed factor in preventing readmissions for Medicare seniors.

  3. Heart failure: when form fails to follow function.

    PubMed

    Katz, Arnold M; Rolett, Ellis L

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac performance is normally determined by architectural, cellular, and molecular structures that determine the heart's form, and by physiological and biochemical mechanisms that regulate the function of these structures. Impaired adaptation of form to function in failing hearts contributes to two syndromes initially called systolic heart failure (SHF) and diastolic heart failure (DHF). In SHF, characterized by high end-diastolic volume (EDV), the left ventricle (LV) cannot eject a normal stroke volume (SV); in DHF, with normal or low EDV, the LV cannot accept a normal venous return. These syndromes are now generally defined in terms of ejection fraction (EF): SHF became 'heart failure with reduced ejection fraction' (HFrEF) while DHF became 'heart failure with normal or preserved ejection fraction' (HFnEF or HFpEF). However, EF is a chimeric index because it is the ratio between SV--which measures function, and EDV--which measures form. In SHF the LV dilates when sarcomere addition in series increases cardiac myocyte length, whereas sarcomere addition in parallel can cause concentric hypertrophy in DHF by increasing myocyte thickness. Although dilatation in SHF allows the LV to accept a greater venous return, it increases the energy cost of ejection and initiates a vicious cycle that contributes to progressive dilatation. In contrast, concentric hypertrophy in DHF facilitates ejection but impairs filling and can cause heart muscle to deteriorate. Differences in the molecular signals that initiate dilatation and concentric hypertrophy can explain why many drugs that improve prognosis in SHF have little if any benefit in DHF.

  4. Soft robotic sleeve supports heart function.

    PubMed

    Roche, Ellen T; Horvath, Markus A; Wamala, Isaac; Alazmani, Ali; Song, Sang-Eun; Whyte, William; Machaidze, Zurab; Payne, Christopher J; Weaver, James C; Fishbein, Gregory; Kuebler, Joseph; Vasilyev, Nikolay V; Mooney, David J; Pigula, Frank A; Walsh, Conor J

    2017-01-18

    There is much interest in form-fitting, low-modulus, implantable devices or soft robots that can mimic or assist in complex biological functions such as the contraction of heart muscle. We present a soft robotic sleeve that is implanted around the heart and actively compresses and twists to act as a cardiac ventricular assist device. The sleeve does not contact blood, obviating the need for anticoagulation therapy or blood thinners, and reduces complications with current ventricular assist devices, such as clotting and infection. Our approach used a biologically inspired design to orient individual contracting elements or actuators in a layered helical and circumferential fashion, mimicking the orientation of the outer two muscle layers of the mammalian heart. The resulting implantable soft robot mimicked the form and function of the native heart, with a stiffness value of the same order of magnitude as that of the heart tissue. We demonstrated feasibility of this soft sleeve device for supporting heart function in a porcine model of acute heart failure. The soft robotic sleeve can be customized to patient-specific needs and may have the potential to act as a bridge to transplant for patients with heart failure. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Regenerating functional heart tissue for myocardial repair

    PubMed Central

    Alcon, Andre; Bozkulak, Esra Cagavi; Qyang, Yibing

    2012-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and the number of patients with the disease is likely to grow with the continual decline in health for most of the developed world. Heart transplantation is one of the only treatment options for heart failure due to an acute myocardial infarction, but limited donor supply and organ rejection limit its widespread use. Cellular cardiomyoplasty, or cellular implantation, combined with various tissue-engineering methods aims to regenerate functional heart tissue. This review highlights the numerous cell sources that have been used to regenerate the heart as well as cover the wide range of tissue-engineering strategies that have been devised to optimize the delivery of these cells. It will probably be a long time before an effective regenerative therapy can make a serious impact at the bedside. PMID:22388688

  6. The Clinical Functional Impairment Scale Development.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Adrian; Wright, Mary Ellen; Denslow, Sheri

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the project was to review content validity and assess the span of responses for the newly developed Clinical Functional Impairment Scale (CFIS). A cross-sectional, content validity process using focus groups of developmental, behavioral pediatric clinicians was conducted. After qualitative analysis of the focus group data, adjustments were made in the CFIS based on the recommendations of the content experts. A survey was conducted of clinicians participating in the online Society of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics Discussion Board. Clinicians reviewed 2 case studies and used the CFIS to score severity and interval change of predetermined functional impairments. The amount of spread in the answers was assessed by calculating the index of dispersion. Qualitative analysis of the focus groups resulted in adjustment to the CFIS to 20 functional impairments, with a 5-point Likert scale of severity and a 7-point Likert scale of interval change. Ninety-four clinicians participated in the survey. The index of dispersion ranged from 0.49 to 0.88. The interval ratings of severity and interval change had lower dispersion ranges. The CFIS uses a mutual prioritization by the family and clinician of the child's functional impairments. The study demonstrated that the clinicians' ratings of the case studies were more variable in the initial symptom severity score than their ratings of symptom severity and interval change in symptoms. Further testing of the CFIS is planned using face-to-face clinical encounters and including parent/caregiver ratings of severity and interval change.

  7. Cardiac energetic impairment in heart disease and the potential role of metabolic modulators: a review for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satnam; Schwarz, Konstantin; Horowitz, John; Frenneaux, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac energetic impairment is a frequent finding in patients with both inherited and acquired diseases of heart muscle. In this review the mechanisms of energy generation in the healthy heart and their disturbances in heart muscle diseases are described. Therapeutic agents targeted at correcting cardiac energetic impairment are discussed. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Functional impairment and mental health functioning among Vietnamese children

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Hoang-Minh; Weiss, Bahr; Trung, Lam T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Functional impairment is a key indicator of need for mental health services among children and adolescents, often a stronger predictor of service usage than mental health symptoms themselves. Functional impairment may be of particular importance in low and middle income countries (LMIC) because of its potential to focus policy on treatment of child mental health problems which is generally given low priority in LMIC. However, few studies have assessed functional impairment in LMIC. The present study assessed rates of functional impairment among children in Vietnam, as a case example of an LMIC, as well as effects of other risk/protective factors of particular relevance to LMIC (e.g., whether the family lived in an urban or rural area; family structure variables such as grandparents living with the family). Methods 1,314 parents of children 6–16 years old from 10 Vietnamese provinces were interviewed. Results The overall rate of functional impairment among Vietnamese children was 20%, similar to rates in high income countries such as Germany and the United States, suggesting that LMIC status may not be associated with dramatic increases in functional impairment in children. Functional impairment was significantly greater among mental health cases than non-cases, with increases of over 550% associated with mental health caseness. A number of other risk factors (e.g., marital status) had smaller but significant effects. Conclusions Mental health problems are a major but not the sole contributor to functional impairment among Vietnamese children. The pragmatic significance of this research lies in its potential to affect public awareness and policy related to child mental health in LMIC. PMID:26315942

  9. Chronic renal dysfunction and anaemia are associated with cognitive impairment in older patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Pulignano, Giovanni; Del Sindaco, Donatella; Di Lenarda, Andrea; Tinti, Maria Denitza; Tarantini, Luigi; Cioffi, Giovanni; Tolone, Stefano; Pero, Gaetano; Minardi, Giovanni

    2014-06-01

    Cognitive impairment, anaemia and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are associated with mortality and disability in chronic heart failure patients. We hypothesized that anaemia and CKD are independent predictors of cognitive impairment in older patients with heart failure. One hundred and ninety community-living elderly patients aged at least 70 years, treated with optimized therapy for heart failure in stable clinical conditions, were prospectively studied. They underwent clinical and multidimensional assessment. Cognitive status was assessed by the Mini Mental State Examination. Cognitive impairment was defined as the Mini Mental State Examination score adjusted by age and educational level below 24. CKD was defined as the Cockcroft-Gault glomerular filtration rate below 60  ml/min and anaemia as haemoglobin below 12  g/dl. Cognitive impairment was diagnosed in 38.9% of patients, CKD in 85.7% and anaemia in 42.6%. Age, female sex, BMI, education less than 5 years, depressive symptoms, anaemia, CKD, disability and worse quality of life were significantly associated with cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment involved primarily global cognitive deficit, memory, mental speed, attention, calculation and language. A significant relationship between haemoglobin levels and cognitive impairment was found, with the range of 15-16.5  g/dl having the lower prevalence of cognitive impairment (19.4%). At multivariate analysis, advanced age, low education level, anaemia and CKD were independently associated with cognitive impairment. Cox analysis showed that cognitive impairment was an independent predictor of hospitalization for worsening heart failure alone and combined with all-cause death. Cognitive impairment is common in elderly heart failure patients and is independently associated with anaemia and renal dysfunction. Further studies are needed to assess whether optimal treatment of anaemia and CKD may prevent the development of cognitive impairment in heart failure

  10. Impaired myocardial development resulting in neonatal cardiac hypoplasia alters postnatal growth and stress response in the heart.

    PubMed

    Drenckhahn, Jörg-Detlef; Strasen, Jette; Heinecke, Kirsten; Langner, Patrick; Yin, Kom Voy; Skole, Friederike; Hennig, Maria; Spallek, Bastian; Fischer, Robert; Blaschke, Florian; Heuser, Arnd; Cox, Timothy C; Black, Mary Jane; Thierfelder, Ludwig

    2015-04-01

    Foetal growth has been proposed to influence cardiovascular health in adulthood, a process referred to as foetal programming. Indeed, intrauterine growth restriction in animal models alters heart size and cardiomyocyte number in the perinatal period, yet the consequences for the adult or challenged heart are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate postnatal myocardial growth pattern, left ventricular function, and stress response in the adult heart after neonatal cardiac hypoplasia in mice. Utilizing a new mouse model of impaired cardiac development leading to fully functional but hypoplastic hearts at birth, we show that myocardial mass is normalized until early adulthood by accelerated physiological cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Compensatory hypertrophy, however, cannot be maintained upon ageing, resulting in reduced organ size without maladaptive myocardial remodelling. Angiotensin II stress revealed aberrant cardiomyocyte growth kinetics in adult hearts after neonatal hypoplasia compared with normally developed controls, characterized by reversible overshooting hypertrophy. This exaggerated growth mainly depends on STAT3, whose inhibition during angiotensin II treatment reduces left ventricular mass in both groups but causes contractile dysfunction in developmentally impaired hearts only. Whereas JAK/STAT3 inhibition reduces cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area in the latter, it prevents fibrosis in control hearts, indicating fundamentally different mechanisms of action. Impaired prenatal development leading to neonatal cardiac hypoplasia alters postnatal cardiac growth and stress response in vivo, thereby linking foetal programming to organ size control in the heart. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Renal function assessment in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Pérez Calvo, J I; Josa Laorden, C; Giménez López, I

    Renal function is one of the most consistent prognostic determinants in heart failure. The prognostic information it provides is independent of the ejection fraction and functional status. This article reviews the various renal function assessment measures, with special emphasis on the fact that the patient's clinical situation and response to the heart failure treatment should be considered for the correct interpretation of the results. Finally, we review the literature on the performance of tubular damage biomarkers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  12. The influence of chronic heart failure on pulmonary function tests in patients undergoing orthotopic heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lizak, M K; Zakliczyński, M; Jarosz, A; Zembala, M

    2009-10-01

    Chronic heart failure and airway obstruction produce overlapping syndromes. Existent criteria for the diagnosis and grading of airway obstruction based on spirometry results may be inadequate in the presence of coexistent cardiac failure. The cardiac component of pulmonary function tests (PFT) can be measured in patients undergoing orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). Before and 1 year after OHT between 2006 and 2008 PFT were performed in 29 patients according to existent guideline. Willcoxon matched pair tests were used for analysis in Statistica 7.1. The general group characteristic included age, gender, New York Heart Association class, CCS class, body mass index, present medications, blood and chemistry tests, as well as exercise tolerance tests, right heart catheterization, and echocardiography results. One year after OHT we observed significant improvements in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) and its percent of normal value (FEV1%) as well as forced vital capacity (FVC), FVC%, vital capacity (VC) and VC%: namely, 2.56 L versus 2.96 L; 82% versus 93%; 3.30 L versus 3.81 L; 85% versus 97%; 3.38 L versus 4.04 L and 85% versus 100% (all P < .01). FEV1 and FVC increments of: 0.39 and 0.471 respectively, exceeded the cutoff point of 12% of predicted value established as the spirometry criterion for reversibility of obstruction. Elimination of heart failure by OHT did not significantly change the FEV1 to FVC ratio (FEV1%FVC). Chronic heart failure contributed to significant FEV1 reduction, which limits the usefulness of PFT for diagnosis and grading of airway obstruction. FEV1%FVC, the main diagnostic criterion of chronic obstructive lung disease, seems to be an index independent of concomittant heart function impairment.

  13. Quercetin Affects Erythropoiesis and Heart Mitochondrial Function in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Paula A.; Barreto, Marlen; Elorza, Alvaro A.

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin, a dietary flavonoid used as a food supplement, showed powerful antioxidant effects in different cellular models. However, recent in vitro and in vivo studies in mammals have suggested a prooxidant effect of quercetin and described an interaction with mitochondria causing an increase in O2 ∙− production, a decrease in ATP levels, and impairment of respiratory chain in liver tissue. Therefore, because of its dual actions, we studied the effect of quercetin in vivo to analyze heart mitochondrial function and erythropoiesis. Mice were injected with 50 mg/kg of quercetin for 15 days. Treatment with quercetin decreased body weight, serum insulin, and ceruloplasmin levels as compared with untreated mice. Along with an impaired antioxidant capacity in plasma, quercetin-treated mice showed a significant delay on erythropoiesis progression. Heart mitochondrial function was also impaired displaying more protein oxidation and less activity for IV, respectively, than no-treated mice. In addition, a significant reduction in the protein expression levels of Mitofusin 2 and Voltage-Dependent Anion Carrier was observed. All these results suggest that quercetin affects erythropoiesis and mitochondrial function and then its potential use as a dietary supplement should be reexamined. PMID:26106459

  14. Impaired alpha1-adrenergic responses in aged rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Olivier; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Guenoun, Thierry; Laplace, Monique; Crozatier, Bertrand

    2005-06-01

    To determine age-related changes in the cardiac effect of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation, both cardiomyocyte Ca2+-transient and cardiac protein kinase C (PKC) activity were measured in 3-month- (3MO) and 24-month- (24MO) old Wistar rats. Ca2+ transients obtained under 1 Hz pacing by microfluorimetry of cardiomyocyte loaded with indo-1 (405/480 nm fluorescence ratio) were compared in control conditions (Kreb's solution alone) and after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation (phenylephrine or cirazoline, an alpha1-specific agonist). PKC activity and PKC translocation index (particulate/total activity) were also assayed before and after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation. In 3MO, cirazoline induced a significant increase in Ca2+ transient for a 10(-9) M concentration which returned to control values for larger concentrations. In contrast, in 24MO, we observed a constant negative effect of cirazoline on the Ca2+ transient with a significant decrease at 10(-6) M compared with both baseline and Kreb's solution. Preliminary experiments showed that, in a dose-response curve to phenylephrine, the response of Ca2+ transient was maximal at 10(-7) M. This concentration induced a significant increase in Ca2+ transient in 3MO and a significant decrease in 24MO. The same concentration was chosen to perform PKC activity measurements under alpha1-adrenergic stimulation. In the basal state, PKC particulate activity was higher in 24MO than that in 3MO but was not different in cytosolic fractions; so that the translocation index was higher in 24MO (P < 0.01). After phenylephrine, a translocation of PKC toward the particulate fraction was observed in 3MO but not in 24MO. In conclusion, cardiac alpha1-adrenoceptor response was found to be impaired in aged hearts. The negative effect of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation on Ca2+ transient in cardiomyocytes obtained from old rats can be related to an absence of alpha1-adrenergic-induced PKC translocation.

  15. ON THE BIOMECHANICS OF HEART VALVE FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Michael S.; Merryman, W. David; Schmidt, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Heart valves (HVs) are fluidic control components of the heart that ensure unidirectional blood flow during the cardiac cycle. However, this description does not adequately describe the biomechanical ramifications of their function in that their mechanics are multi-modal. Moreover, they must replicate their cyclic function over an entire lifetime, with an estimated total functional demand of least 3×109 cycles. The focus of the present review is on the functional biomechanics of heart valves. Thus, the focus of the present review is on functional biomechanics, referring primarily to biosolid as well as several key biofluid mechanical aspects underlying heart valve physiological function. Specifically, we refer to the mechanical behaviors of the extra-cellular matrix structural proteins, underlying cellular function, and their integrated relation to the major aspects of valvular hemodynamic function. While we focus on the work from the author’s laboratories, relevant works of other investigators have been included whenever appropriate. We conclude with a summary of important future trends. PMID:19540499

  16. Quantification of the impaired cardiac output response to exercise in heart failure: application of a non-invasive device.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jonathan; Gujja, Pradeep; Neelagaru, Suresh; Hsu, Leon; Burkhoff, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    An impaired cardiac output (CO) response to exercise is a hallmark of chronic heart failure (CHF), and the degree to which CO is impaired is related to the severity of CHF and prognosis. However, practical methods for obtaining cardiac output during exercise are lacking, and what constitutes and impaired response is unclear. Forty six CHF patients and 13 normal subjects underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) while CO and other hemodynamic measurements at rest and during exercise were obtained using a novel, non-invasive, bioreactance device based on assessment of relative phase shifts of electric currents injected across the thorax, heart rate and ventricular ejection time. An abnormal cardiac output response to exercise was defined as achieving ≤ 95% of the confidence limits of the slope of the relationship between CO and oxygen uptake (VO2). An impaired CO slope identified patients with more severe CHF as evidenced by a lower peak VO2, lower peak CO, heightened VE/VCO2 slope, and lower oxygen uptake efficiency slope. CO can be estimated during exercise using a novel bioreactance technique; patients with an impaired response to exercise exhibit reduced exercise capacity and inefficient ventilation typical of more severe CHF. Non- invasive measurement of cardiac performance in response to exercise provides a simple method of identifying patients with more severe CHF and may complement the CPX in identifying CHF patients at high risk. Key pointsNon-invasive measurement of cardiac output during exercise is feasible in patients with heart failure.Impairment in the CO response to exercise identifies heart failure patients with more severe disease, lower exercise capacity and inefficient ventilation.Non-invasive measurement of cardiac performance during exercise has potentially important applications for the functional and prognostic assessment of patients with heart failure.

  17. [Heart function and phonomechanocardiography (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Guijarro Morales, A

    1979-03-10

    The phonomechanocardiographic parameters most closely associated with heart failure are reviewed and a critical judgement is made of the method. The conclusion is drawn that phonomechanocardiographic measurements help to establish approximate limits of functional normality in cases of moderate abnormality. When acute phonomechanocardiographic alterations appear following infection or toxic heart disease or the use of potentially cardiotoxic drugs, the diagnosis of miocarditis can be made on an objective basis. To control the clinical course of heart failure the following parameters are useful: variations in the period of expulsion, "a" and "telediastolic" indices of the apexcardiogram, and the expulsion period/pre-expulsion period and expulsion period/systolic isovolumetric phase coefficients. Although phonomechancardiography lacks exact biological precision, it represents a rational and no invasive method for estimating heart function. It provides a means for recognizing diverse functional anomalies at their onset and for controlling their development. It thus helps in choosing adequate preventive and therapeutic measures to keep an early functional miocardial disease from becoming a serious case of heart failure.

  18. [Preliminary assessment of heart function in chronically dialysed children].

    PubMed

    Drozdz, Dorota; Rudziński, Andrzej; Kordon, Zbigniew; Drozdz, Maciej; Zachwieja, Katarzyna; Pietrzyk, Jacek A; Miklaszewska, Monika; Dziedzic, Aleksandra

    2006-01-01

    Renal replacement therapy has become a recognized treatment modality of children with chronic renal failure (CRF). Despite of unquestionable progress in heamodialysis treatment quite high morbidity and mortality still remain a serious problem among pediatric patients. The most common cause of death in haemodialyzed and transplanted patients are cardiovascular complications. The main aim of the study was an echocardiographic (ECHO) assessment of selected cardiac parameters in heamodialyzed children. 16 chronically dialyzed (6 HD, 10 PD) children participated in the study (10 M, 6 F), aged 5-18,5 yrs (x=12.2 +/- 3.8 yrs). Echocardiography examinations were carried out with HP 5500 device and S4 ultrasound probe of variable frequency. Diastolic and systolic LV dimension, ejection fraction (EF) and LV mass index (LVMI) were evaluated. By means of pulsating Doppler method mitral flow peak E and A velocity and isovolumetric relaxation time (IRT) were assessed. On the basis of ECHO examinations 3 groups were singled out: A (n=3) of normal heart function, B (n=3) of impaired systolic and diastolic heart function and C (n=10) of normal systolic and impaired diastolic heart function. In group of children with severe cardiac lesion (B group) a higher LV mass (A vs B vs C: 74.7 vs 119.9 vs 73.5 g/m2) and statistically significant lower ejection fraction (68.1 vs. 33.7 vs. 65.9%) were ascertained. These children were anuric (996 vs. 0 vs. 1112 mild), their systolic (102.1 vs. 118.4 vs. 117,9) and diastolic (64,4 vs. 84.8 vs. 77.9) blood pressure were significantly higher, so was the number or hipotensive medications (0.33 vs. 1.72 vs. 1,44). The great majority of chronically dialyzed children demonstrates an impairment of cardiac function mainly of diastolic parameters. Anuria and hypertension stand for a significant risk factor of cardiac lesion.

  19. Endothelial NOS (NOS3) impairs myocardial function in developing sepsis.

    PubMed

    van de Sandt, Annette M; Windler, Rainer; Gödecke, Axel; Ohlig, Jan; Zander, Simone; Reinartz, Michael; Graf, Jürgen; van Faassen, Ernst E; Rassaf, Tienush; Schrader, Jürgen; Kelm, Malte; Merx, Marc W

    2013-03-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS)3-derived nitric oxide (NO) modulates inotropic response and diastolic interval for optimal cardiac performance under non-inflammatory conditions. In sepsis, excessive NO production plays a key role in severe hypotension and myocardial dysfunction. We aimed to determine the role of NOS3 on myocardial performance, NO production, and time course of sepsis development. NOS3(-/-) and C57BL/6 wildtype mice were rendered septic by cecum ligation and puncture (CLP). Cardiac function was analyzed by serial echocardiography, in vivo pressure and isolated heart measurements. Cardiac output (CO) increased to 160 % of baseline at 10 h after sepsis induction followed by a decline to 63 % of baseline after 18 h in wildtype mice. CO was unaltered in septic NOS3(-/-) mice. Despite the hyperdynamic state, cardiac function and mean arterial pressure were impaired in septic wildtype as early as 6 h post CLP. At 12 h, cardiac function in septic wildtype was refractory to catecholamines in vivo and respective isolated hearts showed impaired pressure development and limited coronary flow reserve. Hemodynamics remained stable in NOS3(-/-) mice leading to significant survival benefit. Unselective NOS inhibition in septic NOS3(-/-) mice diminished this survival benefit. Plasma NO( x )- and local myocardial NO( x )- and NO levels (via NO spin trapping) demonstrated enhanced NO( x )- and bioactive NO levels in septic wildtype as compared to NOS3(-/-) mice. Significant contribution by inducible NOS (NOS2) during this early phase of sepsis was excluded. Our data suggest that NOS3 relevantly contributes to bioactive NO pool in developing sepsis resulting in impaired cardiac contractility.

  20. Lung Function Abnormalities in Smokers with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Franssen, Frits M E; Soriano, Joan B; Roche, Nicolas; Bloomfield, Paul H; Brusselle, Guy; Fabbri, Leonardo M; García-Rio, Francisco; Kearney, Mark T; Kwon, Namhee; Lundbäck, Bo; Rabe, Klaus F; Raillard, Alice; Muellerova, Hana; Cockcroft, John R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the ALICE (Airflow Limitation in Cardiac Diseases in Europe) study was to investigate the prevalence of airflow limitation in patients with ischemic heart disease and the effects on quality of life, healthcare use, and future health risk. To examine prebronchodilator and post-bronchodilator spirometry in outpatients aged greater than or equal to 40 years with clinically documented ischemic heart disease who were current or former smokers. This multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 cardiovascular outpatient clinics in nine European countries. Airflow limitation was defined as post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC less than 0.70. Among the 3,103 patients with ischemic heart disease who were recruited, lung function was defined for 2,730 patients. Airflow limitation was observed in 30.5% of patients with ischemic heart disease: 11.3% had mild airflow limitation, 15.8% moderate airflow limitation, 3.3% severe airflow limitation, and 0.1% very severe airflow limitation. Most patients with airflow limitation (70.6%) had no previous spirometry testing or diagnosed pulmonary disease. Airflow limitation was associated with greater respiratory symptomatology, impaired health status, and more frequent emergency room visits (P < 0.05). Airflow limitation compatible with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease affects almost one-third of patients with ischemic heart disease. Although airflow limitation is associated with additional morbidity and societal burden, it is largely undiagnosed and untreated. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01485159).

  1. Impaired Myocardial Oxygen Availability Contributes to Abnormal Exercise Hemodynamics in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    van Empel, Vanessa P. M.; Mariani, Justin; Borlaug, Barry A.; Kaye, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a frequent risk factor for the development of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). Progressive extracellular matrix accumulation has been presumed to be the fundamental pathophysiologic mechanism that leads to the transition to impaired diastolic reserve. However, the contribution of other mechanisms affecting active and passive components of diastolic function has not been comprehensively assessed. In this study, we investigated the potential role of impaired myocardial oxygen delivery in the pathophysiology of HFPEF. Methods and Results Patients with HFPEF, those with controlled hypertension, and healthy controls underwent simultaneous right‐heart catheterization, echocardiography, and paired arterial and coronary sinus blood gas sampling at rest and during supine‐cycle ergometry. Despite a lower workload (HFPEF vs control, hypertension: 43±8 versus 114±12, 87±14 W; P<0.001 and P<0.05, respectively), peak exercise pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was markedly higher in HFPEF patients compared with healthy and hypertensive controls (32±2 versus 16±1 and 17±1 mm Hg, both P<0.001). During exercise, the transcardiac oxygen gradient increased significantly in all groups; however, the peak transcardiac oxygen gradient was significantly lower in HFPEF patients (P<0.05). In addition, the left ventricular–work corrected transcardiac oxygen gradient remained significantly lower in HFPEF patients compared with controls (P<0.001). Conclusion The current study provides unique data suggesting that the abnormal diastolic reserve observed during exertion in HFPEF patients may, in part, be explained by impaired myocardial oxygen delivery due possibly to microvascular dysfunction. Further studies are required to confirm the structural and functional basis of these findings and to investigate the influence of potential therapies on this abnormality. PMID:25468660

  2. Rehabilitation of impaired speech function (dysarthria, dysglossia)

    PubMed Central

    Schröter-Morasch, Heidrun; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2005-01-01

    Speech disorders can result (1) from sensorimotor impairments of articulatory movements = dysarthria, or (2) from structural changes of the speech organs, in adults particularly after surgical and radiochemical treatment of tumors = dysglossia. The decrease of intelligibility, a reduced vocal stamina, the stigmatization of a conspicuous voice and manner of speech, the reduction of emotional expressivity all mean greatly diminished quality of life, restricted career opportunities and diminished social contacts. Intensive therapy based on the pathophysiological facts is absolutely essential: Functional exercise therapy plays a central role; according to symptoms and their progression it can be complemented with prosthetic and surgical approaches. In severe cases communicational aids have to be used. All rehabilitation measures have to take account of frequently associated disorders of body motor control and/or impairment of cognition and behaviour. PMID:22073063

  3. The impact of anaemia and kidney function in congestive heart failure and preserved systolic function.

    PubMed

    Philipp, Sebastian; Ollmann, Henrike; Schink, Tania; Dietz, Rainer; Luft, Friedrich C; Willenbrock, Roland

    2005-05-01

    The importance of anaemia in chronic heart failure was highlighted recently by different cohort studies. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of anaemia and its relationship to renal function, left ventricular function and symptoms of heart failure. We surveyed cases of patients admitted to the Department of Cardiology during 22 consecutive months. Laboratory measurements, blood pressure and echocardiographic parameters were obtained with standardized methods. Out of a total number of 2941 patients, 238 patients (8.1%) had haemoglobin values <11 g/dl. There was a positive association of anaemia with the symptoms of heart failure with a lowering of the median haemoglobin from 14.2 g/dl [New York Heart Association (NYHA) I] to 12.9 g/dl (NYHA IV, P<0.001). Interestingly, anaemia was not associated with left ventricular function or any left ventricular parameters. Symptoms of heart failure, however, were associated with kidney function. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was 82 ml/min at NYHA I and 59 ml/min at NYHA IV, P<0.05. There was an association between impaired renal function and haemoglobin values. Haemoglobin was 14.2 g/dl in the group with normal renal function and 11.1 g/dl in the group with a GFR <25 ml/min (P<0.001). Even in patients with normal renal function (878 patients, GFR >85 ml/min), we still found an association of anaemia with the symptoms of heart failure. Haemoglobin was 14.5 g/dl at NYHA I and 13.4 g/dl at NYHA IV, P<0.0001. Anaemia is found in 8.1% of patients admitted to cardiology service. Anaemia was clearly associated with symptoms of congestive heart failure even in patients with normal renal function. Anaemia was not associated with left ventricular function.

  4. Functional Hubs in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, Adrián; Papo, David; Boccaletti, Stefano; Del-Pozo, F.; Bajo, Ricardo; Maestú, Fernando; Martínez, J. H.; Gil, Pablo; Sendiña-Nadal, Irene; Buldú, Javier M.

    We investigate how hubs of functional brain networks are modified as a result of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a condition causing a slight but noticeable decline in cognitive abilities, which sometimes precedes the onset of Alzheimer's disease. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate the functional brain networks of a group of patients suffering from MCI and a control group of healthy subjects, during the execution of a short-term memory task. Couplings between brain sites were evaluated using synchronization likelihood, from which a network of functional interdependencies was constructed and the centrality, i.e. importance, of their nodes was quantified. The results showed that, with respect to healthy controls, MCI patients were associated with decreases and increases in hub centrality respectively in occipital and central scalp regions, supporting the hypothesis that MCI modifies functional brain network topology, leading to more random structures.

  5. Ischemic aetiology, self-reported frailty, and gender with respect to cognitive impairment in chronic heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    González-Moneo, María J; Sánchez-Benavides, Gonzalo; Verdu-Rotellar, José M; Cladellas, Mercé; Bruguera, Jordi; Quiñones-Ubeda, Sonia; Enjuanes, Cristina; Peña-Casanova, Jordi; Comín-Colet, Josep

    2016-08-30

    Decisive information on the parameters involved in cognitive impairment in patients with chronic heart failure is as yet lacking. Our aim was to determine the functional and psychosocial variables related with cognitive impairment using the mini-mental-state examination (MMSE) with age-and education-corrected scores. A cohort study of chronic heart failure patients included in an integrated multidisciplinary hospital/primary care program. The MMSE (corrected for age and education in the Spanish population) was administered at enrolment in the program. Analyses were performed in 525 patients. Demographic and clinical variables were collected. Comprehensive assessment included depression (Yesavage), family function (family APGAR), social network (Duke), dependence (Barthel Index), frailty (Barber), and comorbidities. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were performed to determine the predictors of cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment affected 145 patients (27.6 %). Explanatory factors were gender (OR: 2.77 (1.75-4.39) p < 0.001), ischemic etiology (OR: 1.99 (1.25-3.17) p = 0.004), frailty (OR: 1.58 (0.99 to 2.50, p =0.050), albumin > 3.5 (OR: 0.59 (0.35-0.99) p = 0.048), and beta-blocker treatment (OR: 0.36 (0.17 to 0.76, p = 0.007)). No association was found between cognitive impairment and social support or family function. The observed prevalence of cognitive impairment using MMSE corrected scores was 27.6 %. A global approach in the management of these patients is needed, especially focusing on women and patients with frailty, low albumin levels, and ischemic aetiology heart failure.

  6. Cognitive Impairment and Heart Failure: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Jane A; Moffitt, Peter; Perez-Moreno, Ana Cristina; Walters, Matthew R; Broomfield, Niall M; McMurray, John J V; Quinn, Terence J

    2017-06-01

    Cognitive impairment and dementia are associated with a range of cardiovascular conditions, including hypertension, coronary artery disease, and atrial fibrillation. We aimed to describe the association with heart failure, summarizing published data to give estimates of prevalence, incidence, and relative risk of cognitive impairment/dementia in heart failure. We searched multidisciplinary databases including MEDLINE (OVID), EMBASE (OVID), CINAHL (EBSCO), PsychINFO (EBSCO), Web of Science (Thomson Reuters), and CENTRAL (Cochrane Library) from inception until May 31, 2015. All relevant studies looking at cognitive impairment/dementia in heart failure were included. Studies were selected by 2 independent reviewers using prespecified inclusion/exclusion criteria. Where data allowed, we performed meta-analysis and pooled results using random effects models. From 18,000 titles, 37 studies were eligible (n = 8411 participants). Data from 4 prospective cohorts (n = 2513 participants) suggest greater cognitive decline in heart failure compared with non-heart failure over the longer term. These data were not suitable for meta-analysis. In case control studies describing those with and without heart failure (n = 4 papers, 1414 participants) the odds ratio for cognitive impairment in the heart failure population was 1.67 (95% confidence interval 1.15-2.42). Prevalence of cognitive impairment in heart failure cohorts (n = 26 studies, 4176 participants) was 43% (95% confidence interval 30-55). This review suggests a substantial proportion of patients with heart failure have concomitant cognitive problems. This has implications for planning treatment and services. These data do not allow us to comment on causation, and further work is needed to describe the underlying pathophysiology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Heart energy metabolism impairment in Western-diet induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Neves, Fabiana A; Cortez, Erika; Bernardo, Amélia F; Mattos, Ana B M; Vieira, Anatalia K; Malafaia, Tayanne de O; Thole, Alessandra A; Rodrigues-Cunha, Alessandra C de S; Garcia-Souza, Erica P; Sichieri, Rosely; Moura, Anibal S

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional transition has contributed to growing obesity, mainly by changing eating habits of the population. The mechanisms by which diet-induced obesity leads to cardiac injury are not completely understood, but it is known that obesity is associated to impaired cardiac function and energy metabolism, increasing morbidity and mortality. Therefore, our study aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying cardiac metabolism impairment related to Western diet-induced obesity. After weaning, male Swiss mice were fed a Western diet for 16 weeks in order to induce obesity. After this period, the content of proteins involved in heart energy metabolism GLUT1, cytosolic lysate and plasma membrane GLUT4, AMPK, pAMPK, IRβ, IRS-1, PGC-1α, CPT1 and UCP2 was evaluated. Also, the oxidative phosphorylation of myocardial fibers was measured by high-resolution respirometry. Mice in the Western diet group (WG) presented altered biometric parameters compared to those in control group, including higher body weight, increased myocardial lipid deposition and glucose intolerance, which demonstrate the obesogenic role of Western diet. WG presented increased CPT1 and UCP2 contents and decreased IRS-1, plasma membrane GLUT4 and PGC-1α contents. In addition, WG presented cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced biogenesis, demonstrating a lower capacity of carbohydrates and fatty acid oxidation and also decreased coupling between oxidative phosphorylation and adenosine triphosphate synthesis. Cardiac metabolism impairment related to Western diet-induced obesity is probably due to damaged myocardial oxidative capacity, reduced mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondria uncoupling, which compromise the bioenergetic metabolism of heart. © 2014.

  8. Caffeine impairs gastrointestinal function in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Christopher; Pan, Jingyi; Belik, Jaques

    2015-07-01

    Feeding intolerance is commonly documented in premature infants. Caffeine is routinely utilized for apnea of prematurity treatment and known to reduce the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) muscle tone, but the caffeine effect on the newborn gastrointestinal function is unknown. We hypothesized that caffeine impairs esophageal and gastrointestinal motor function. As such, we investigated the drug effect on the tissue's mechanical properties and the newborn rat's in vivo gastric emptying rate. The effects of caffeine on LES, gastric fundal and antrum, as well as ileal and colonic muscle force potential and relaxation response, were measured in newborn and adult rats. The caffeine-induced (10 mg/kg i.p.) newborn gastric emptying rate changes were evaluated following 3 h of fasting. Caffeine relaxed the precontracted LES and fundal muscle (P < 0.01), reduced the gastric and intestinal muscle contraction (P < 0.01), and delayed the pups' gastric emptying time (P < 0.01). The caffeine-induced muscle relaxant effect was independent of age and mediated via ryanodine receptors. Caffeine administration to newborn rats at a dose comparable to the one therapeutically used for preterm neonates impairs LES and gastrointestinal motor function. Further clinical investigation on the possible contribution of caffeine to neonatal feeding intolerance is warranted.

  9. Impaired ATP Kinetics in Failing in vivo Mouse Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashish; Chacko, Vadappuram P.; Schär, Michael; Akki, Ashwin; Weiss, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Background The hypothesis that the failing heart may be energy starved is supported, in part, by observations of reduced rates of ATP synthesis through the creatine kinase (CK) reaction, the primary myocardial energy reservoir, in heart failure (HF) patients. Although murine models have been used to probe HF pathophysiology, it has not been possible to non-invasively measure the rate of ATP synthesis through CK in the in vivo mouse heart. The purpose of this work was to exploit non-invasive spatially-localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) techniques to measure ATP flux through CK in in vivo mouse hearts and determine the extent of any reductions in murine HF. Methods and Results The Triple Repetition Time Saturation Transfer (TRiST) MRS method of measuring ATP kinetics was first validated in skeletal muscle, rendering similar results to conventional saturation transfer MRS. In normal mouse hearts the in vivo CK pseudo-first-order-rate constant, kf, was 0.32±0.03 s−1 (mean±SD) and the rate of ATP synthesis through CK was 3.16±0.47 µmol/g/s. Thoracic aortic constriction (TAC) reduced kf by 31% (0.23±0.03 s−1, p<0.0001) and ATP synthesis through CK by 51% (1.54±0.25 µmol/g/s, p<0.0001), analogous values to those in failing human hearts. Conclusions Despite the small size and high murine heart rate, the ATP synthesis rate through CK is similar in vivo in murine and human hearts and comparably reduced in HF. Because murine TAC shares fundamental energetic similarities with human HF, this model and new MRS approach promise a powerful means to non-invasively probe altered energetics in HF. PMID:20926788

  10. Tbx2 misexpression impairs deployment of second heart field derived progenitor cells to the arterial pole of the embryonic heart.

    PubMed

    Dupays, Laurent; Kotecha, Surendra; Angst, Brigitt; Mohun, Timothy J

    2009-09-01

    Tbx2 is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors that play important roles during heart development. In the embryonic heart tube, Tbx2 is expressed in non-chamber myocardium (outflow tract and interventricular canal) and has been shown to block chamber formation. We have developed a genetic system to conditionally misexpress Tbx2 in the embryonic mouse heart at early stages of development. We show that Tbx2 expression throughout the myocardium of the heart tube both represses proliferation and impairs secondary heart field (SHF) progenitor cell deployment into the outflow tract (OFT). Repression of proliferation is accompanied by the upregulation of Ndrg2 and downregulation of Ndrg4 expression, both genes believed to be involved in cell growth and proliferation. Impaired deployment of SHF cells from the pharyngeal mesoderm is accompanied by downregulation of the cell adhesion molecules Alcam and N-cadherin in the anterior part of the embryonic heart. Tbx2 misexpression also results in downregulation of Tbx20 within the OFT, indicating complex and region-specific transcriptional cross-regulation between the two T-box genes.

  11. Tributyltin impairs the coronary vasodilation induced by 17β-estradiol in isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Roger Lyrio; Podratz, Priscila Lang; Sena, Gabriela Cavati; Filho, Vicente Sathler Delgado; Lopes, Pedro Francisco Iguatemy; Gonçalves, Washington Luiz Silva; Alves, Leandro Miranda; Samoto, Vivian Yochiko; Takiya, Christina Maeda; de Castro Miguel, Emilio; Moysés, Margareth Ribeiro; Graceli, Jones Bernardes

    2012-01-01

    Triorganotins, such as tributyltin (TBT), are environmental contaminants that are commonly used as antifouling agents for boats. However, TBT is also known to alter mammalian reproductive functions. Although the female sex hormones are primarily involved in the regulation of reproductive functions, 17β-estradiol also protects against cardiovascular diseases, in that this hormone reduces the incidence of coronary artery disease via coronary vasodilation. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of 100 ng/kg TBT administered daily by oral gavage for 15 d on coronary functions in female Wistar rats. Findings were correlated with changes in sex steroids concentrations. Tributyltin significantly increased the baseline coronary perfusion pressure and impaired vasodilation induced by 17β-estradiol. In addition, TBT markedly decreased serum 17β-estradiol levels accompanied by a significant rise in serum progesterone levels. Tributyltin elevated collagen deposition in the heart interstitium and number of mast cells proximate to the cardiac vessels. There was a positive correlation between the increase in coronary perfusion pressure and incidence of cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, TBT induced endothelium denudation (scanning electron microscopy) and accumulation of platelets. Moreover, TBT impaired coronary vascular reactivity to estradiol (at least in part), resulting in endothelial denudation, enhanced collagen deposition and elevated number of mast cells. Taken together, the present results demonstrate that TBT exposure may be a potential risk factor for cardiovascular disorders in rats.

  12. Impaired Serotonergic Brainstem Function during and after Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Qiong; Buchanan, Gordon F.; Motelow, Joshua E.; Andrews, John; Vitkovskiy, Petr; Chen, William C.; Serout, Florian; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Kundishora, Adam; Furman, Moran; Li, Wei; Bo, Xiao; Richerson, George B.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired breathing, cardiac function, and arousal during and after seizures are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Previous work suggests that these changes are associated with depressed brainstem function in the ictal and post-ictal periods. Lower brainstem serotonergic systems are postulated to play an important role in cardiorespiratory changes during and after seizures, whereas upper brainstem serotonergic and other systems regulate arousal. However, direct demonstration of seizure-associated neuronal activity changes in brainstem serotonergic regions has been lacking. Here, we performed multiunit and single-unit recordings from medullary raphe and midbrain dorsal raphe nuclei in an established rat seizure model while measuring changes in breathing rate and depth as well as heart rate. Serotonergic neurons were identified by immunohistochemistry. Respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute ventilation were all significantly decreased during and after seizures in this model. We found that population firing of neurons in the medullary and midbrain raphe on multiunit recordings was significantly decreased during the ictal and post-ictal periods. Single-unit recordings from identified serotonergic neurons in the medullary raphe revealed highly consistently decreased firing during and after seizures. In contrast, firing of midbrain raphe serotonergic neurons was more variable, with a mixture of increases and decreases. The markedly suppressed firing of medullary serotonergic neurons supports their possible role in simultaneously impaired cardiorespiratory function in seizures. Decreased arousal likely arises from depressed population activity of several neuronal pools in the upper brainstem and forebrain. These findings have important implications for preventing morbidity and mortality in people living with epilepsy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Seizures often cause impaired breathing, cardiac dysfunction, and loss of consciousness. The brainstem and

  13. Relation of impaired interorgan communication and parasympathetic activity in chronic heart failure and multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H; Lotze, U; Ghanem, A; Anker, S D; Said, S M; Braun-Dullaeus, R; Oltmanns, G; Rose, S; Buerke, M; Müller-Werdan, U; Werdan, K; Rauchhaus, M

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the relationship of impaired autonomic function and severity of illness in chronic heart failure (CHF) and multiple-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) as an end stage of CHF. Furthermore, we assessed the link of parasympathetic modulation of the heart rate and inflammatory activation in CHF and MODS. Sixty-five patients admitted for worsening of CHF were retrospectively enrolled in this study. In addition, 65 age- and sex-matched patients with pronounced MODS were assigned for comparison of autonomic function and C-reactive protein in patients with CHF or MODS, respectively. Heart rate variability (HRV) parameters of the time and frequency domain as markers of autonomic function were analyzed from 24-hour Holter electrocardiograms. The more pronounced the severity of illness as expressed by the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation score, the more the HRV was impaired. This effect was particularly seen for overall variability (SD of RR intervals) and HRV parameters characterizing the parasympathetic modulations of the heart rate (high, very low frequency power). C-reactive protein levels as markers of inflammation were inversely related to high and very low frequencies. Our results allow for speculation that autonomic dysfunction in CHF indicates a beginning of uncoupled interorgan communication potentially leading to MODS as characterized by disruption of communication between the organs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. How Do Cognitive Function and Knowledge Affect Heart Failure Self-Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Lee, Christopher S.; Riegel, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive patient education, few heart failure (HF) patients master self-care. Impaired cognitive function may explain why patient education is ineffective. A concurrent triangulation mixed methods design was used to explore how knowledge and cognitive function influence HF self-care. A total of 41 adults with HF participated in interviews…

  15. How Do Cognitive Function and Knowledge Affect Heart Failure Self-Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Lee, Christopher S.; Riegel, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive patient education, few heart failure (HF) patients master self-care. Impaired cognitive function may explain why patient education is ineffective. A concurrent triangulation mixed methods design was used to explore how knowledge and cognitive function influence HF self-care. A total of 41 adults with HF participated in interviews…

  16. Genome-wide compendium and functional assessment of in vivo heart enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Dickel, Diane E.; Barozzi, Iros; Zhu, Yiwen; Fukuda-Yuzawa, Yoko; Osterwalder, Marco; Mannion, Brandon J.; May, Dalit; Spurrell, Cailyn H.; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Pickle, Catherine S.; Lee, Elizabeth; Garvin, Tyler H.; Kato, Momoe; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Afzal, Veena; Lee, Ah Young; Gorkin, David U.; Ren, Bing; Rubin, Edward M.; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2016-10-05

    Whole-genome sequencing is identifying growing numbers of non-coding variants in human disease studies, but the lack of accurate functional annotations prevents their interpretation. We describe the genome-wide landscape of distant-acting enhancers active in the developing and adult human heart, an organ whose impairment is a predominant cause of mortality and morbidity. Using integrative analysis of > 35 epigenomic data sets from mouse and human pre-and postnatal hearts we created a comprehensive reference of > 80,000 putative human heart enhancers. To illustrate the importance of enhancers in the regulation of genes involved in heart disease, we deleted the mouse orthologs of two human enhancers near cardiac myosin genes. In both cases, we observe in vivo expression changes and cardiac phenotypes consistent with human heart disease. Our study provides a comprehensive catalogue of human heart enhancers for use in clinical whole-genome sequencing studies and highlights the importance of enhancers for cardiac function.

  17. Genome-wide compendium and functional assessment of in vivo heart enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Dickel, Diane E.; Barozzi, Iros; Zhu, Yiwen; Fukuda-Yuzawa, Yoko; Osterwalder, Marco; Mannion, Brandon J.; May, Dalit; Spurrell, Cailyn H.; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Pickle, Catherine S.; Lee, Elizabeth; Garvin, Tyler H.; Kato, Momoe; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Afzal, Veena; Lee, Ah Young; Gorkin, David U.; Ren, Bing; Rubin, Edward M.; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing is identifying growing numbers of non-coding variants in human disease studies, but the lack of accurate functional annotations prevents their interpretation. We describe the genome-wide landscape of distant-acting enhancers active in the developing and adult human heart, an organ whose impairment is a predominant cause of mortality and morbidity. Using integrative analysis of >35 epigenomic data sets from mouse and human pre- and postnatal hearts we created a comprehensive reference of >80,000 putative human heart enhancers. To illustrate the importance of enhancers in the regulation of genes involved in heart disease, we deleted the mouse orthologs of two human enhancers near cardiac myosin genes. In both cases, we observe in vivo expression changes and cardiac phenotypes consistent with human heart disease. Our study provides a comprehensive catalogue of human heart enhancers for use in clinical whole-genome sequencing studies and highlights the importance of enhancers for cardiac function. PMID:27703156

  18. Impairment of pulmonary diffusion correlates with hypoxemic burden in central sleep apnea heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Fox, Henrik; Koerber, Britta; Bitter, Thomas; Horstkotte, Dieter; Oldenburg, Olaf

    2017-09-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) and Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) are highly prevalent in heart failure (HF) and are linked to increased mortality. Impaired pulmonary diffusion capacity [DLCO] and [KCO]) have been suggested to play a key role in CSA-CSR pathophysiology. This study investigated the relationship between HF, CSR, DLCO and KCO in well-characterized HF patients. This prospective study included HF patients with CSR, all patients underwent full overnight polysomnography (PSG) and lung function testing. A total of 100 patients were included (age 70.7±9.7years, 95% male, body mass index 28.9±5.3kg/m(2), left ventricular ejection fraction 33.5±7.7%, New York Heart Association class III 65%. DLCO and oxygenation were significantly correlated with hypoxemic burden (p<0.05). Mean oxygen saturation, oxygen desaturation, C-reactive protein level and pH were significantly associated with CSA-CSR severity (p<0.05). The finding that lung diffusion capacity is significantly associated with hypoxemic burden in HF patients with CSA-CSR highlights the important of lung function in HF patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Hippocampal damage and memory impairment in congenital cyanotic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, Mónica; Hoskote, Aparna; Chadwick, Martin J; Dzieciol, Anna M; Gadian, David G; Chong, Kling; Banks, Tina; de Haan, Michelle; Baldeweg, Torsten; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2017-04-01

    Neonatal hypoxia can lead to hippocampal atrophy, which can lead, in turn, to memory impairment. To test the generalizability of this causal sequence, we examined a cohort of 41 children aged 8-16, who, having received the arterial switch operation to correct for transposition of the great arteries, had sustained significant neonatal cyanosis but were otherwise neurodevelopmentally normal. As predicted, the cohort had significant bilateral reduction of hippocampal volumes relative to the volumes of 64 normal controls. They also had significant, yet selective, impairment of episodic memory as measured by standard tests of memory, despite relatively normal levels of intelligence, academic attainment, and verbal fluency. Across the cohort, degree of memory impairment was correlated with degree of hippocampal atrophy suggesting that even as early as neonatal life no other structure can fully compensate for hippocampal injury and its special role in serving episodic long term memory. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Hippocampal damage and memory impairment in congenital cyanotic heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoskote, Aparna; Chadwick, Martin J.; Dzieciol, Anna M.; Gadian, David G.; Chong, Kling; Banks, Tina; de Haan, Michelle; Baldeweg, Torsten; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha‐Khadem, Faraneh

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neonatal hypoxia can lead to hippocampal atrophy, which can lead, in turn, to memory impairment. To test the generalizability of this causal sequence, we examined a cohort of 41 children aged 8‐16, who, having received the arterial switch operation to correct for transposition of the great arteries, had sustained significant neonatal cyanosis but were otherwise neurodevelopmentally normal. As predicted, the cohort had significant bilateral reduction of hippocampal volumes relative to the volumes of 64 normal controls. They also had significant, yet selective, impairment of episodic memory as measured by standard tests of memory, despite relatively normal levels of intelligence, academic attainment, and verbal fluency. Across the cohort, degree of memory impairment was correlated with degree of hippocampal atrophy suggesting that even as early as neonatal life no other structure can fully compensate for hippocampal injury and its special role in serving episodic long term memory. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:28032672

  1. Resistance of Dynamin-related Protein 1 Oligomers to Disassembly Impairs Mitophagy, Resulting in Myocardial Inflammation and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Thomas J; Leo, Vincenzo; Kelly, Matthew; Stockenhuber, Alexander; Kennedy, Nolan W; Bao, Leyuan; Cereghetti, Grazia; Harper, Andrew R; Czibik, Gabor; Lao, Chunyan; Bellahcene, Mohamed; Steeples, Violetta; Ghaffari, Safar; Yavari, Arash; Mayer, Alice; Poulton, Joanna; Ferguson, David J P; Scorrano, Luca; Hettiarachchi, Nishani T; Peers, Chris; Boyle, John; Hill, R Blake; Simmons, Alison; Watkins, Hugh; Dear, T Neil; Ashrafian, Houman

    2015-10-23

    We have reported previously that a missense mutation in the mitochondrial fission gene Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) underlies the Python mouse model of monogenic dilated cardiomyopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of the C452F mutation on Drp1 protein function and to define the cellular sequelae leading to heart failure in the Python monogenic dilated cardiomyopathy model. We found that the C452F mutation increased Drp1 GTPase activity. The mutation also conferred resistance to oligomer disassembly by guanine nucleotides and high ionic strength solutions. In a mouse embryonic fibroblast model, Drp1 C452F cells exhibited abnormal mitochondrial morphology and defective mitophagy. Mitochondria in C452F mouse embryonic fibroblasts were depolarized and had reduced calcium uptake with impaired ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation. In the Python heart, we found a corresponding progressive decline in oxidative phosphorylation with age and activation of sterile inflammation. As a corollary, enhancing autophagy by exposure to a prolonged low-protein diet improved cardiac function in Python mice. In conclusion, failure of Drp1 disassembly impairs mitophagy, leading to a downstream cascade of mitochondrial depolarization, aberrant calcium handling, impaired ATP synthesis, and activation of sterile myocardial inflammation, resulting in heart failure.

  2. Heart Rate Variability and Drawing Impairment in Hypoxemic COPD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Corsonello, Andrea; Trojano, Luigi; Pedone, Claudio; Acanfora, Domenico; Spada, Aldo; D'Addio, Gianni; Maestri, Roberto; Rengo, Franco; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We studied 54 patients with hypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The Mini Mental State Examination and the Mental Deterioration Battery were used for neuropsychological assessment. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed based on 24-h Holter ECG recording. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare HRV parameters of patients…

  3. Heart Rate Variability and Drawing Impairment in Hypoxemic COPD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Corsonello, Andrea; Trojano, Luigi; Pedone, Claudio; Acanfora, Domenico; Spada, Aldo; D'Addio, Gianni; Maestri, Roberto; Rengo, Franco; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We studied 54 patients with hypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The Mini Mental State Examination and the Mental Deterioration Battery were used for neuropsychological assessment. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed based on 24-h Holter ECG recording. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare HRV parameters of patients…

  4. Drug-induced impairment of renal function

    PubMed Central

    Pazhayattil, George Sunny; Shirali, Anushree C

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical agents provide diagnostic and therapeutic utility that are central to patient care. However, all agents also carry adverse drug effect profiles. While most of these are clinically insignificant, some drugs may cause unacceptable toxicity that impacts negatively on patient morbidity and mortality. Recognizing adverse effects is important for administering appropriate drug doses, instituting preventive strategies, and withdrawing the offending agent due to toxicity. In the present article, we will review those drugs that are associated with impaired renal function. By focusing on pharmaceutical agents that are currently in clinical practice, we will provide an overview of nephrotoxic drugs that a treating physician is most likely to encounter. In doing so, we will summarize risk factors for nephrotoxicity, describe clinical manifestations, and address preventive and treatment strategies. PMID:25540591

  5. Sleep-disordered breathing, impaired cardiac adrenergic innervation and prognosis in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Scala, Oriana; Paolillo, Stefania; Formisano, Roberto; Pellegrino, Teresa; Rengo, Giuseppe; Gargiulo, Paola; De Michele, Fausto; Starace, Antonio; Rapacciuolo, Antonio; Parisi, Valentina; Prastaro, Maria; Piscopo, Valentina; Dellegrottaglie, Santo; Bruzzese, Dario; De Martino, Fabiana; Parente, Antonio; Leosco, Dario; Trimarco, Bruno; Cuocolo, Alberto; Perrone-Filardi, Pasquale

    2016-06-23

    Unfavourable effects of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in heart failure (HF) are mainly mediated by impaired sympathetic activity. Few data are available on SDB and cardiac adrenergic impairment evaluated at myocardial level. The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between SDB, cardiac sympathetic innervation assessed by (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) imaging and prognosis in HF. Observational, prospective study enrolling patients with HF and reduced systolic function. Patients underwent nocturnal cardiorespiratory monitoring to assess SDB presence by apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI), and (123)I-MIBG imaging to calculate heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratios and washout rate. Patients were prospectively followed for 29±18 months for the combined endpoint of cardiovascular death and HF hospitalisation. Ninety-four patients (66.1±9.8 years; left ventricular ejection fraction 32±7%) were enrolled; 72 (77%) showed SDB and, compared with non-SDB, significantly reduced early (1.67±0.22 vs 1.77±0.13; p=0.019) and late H/M ratios (1.50±0.22 vs 1.61±0.23; p=0.038). Dividing patients into two groups according to SDB severity, patients with a moderate-severe disturbance (AHI >15; n=43) showed significantly worse survival for the composite study outcome (log-rank test, p=0.001) with respect to patients with mild or no disorder (AHI ≤15; n=51). Adding SDB variables to the already known prognostic role of (123)I-MIBG imaging, we observed a worse survival in patients with both SDB and H/M impairment. Patients with systolic HF and SDB show more impaired cardiac adrenergic innervation assessed by (123)I-MIBG imaging, and more adverse prognosis compared with HF patients without SDB. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Impairment of energy metabolism in intact residual myocardium of rat hearts with chronic myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, S; Horn, M; Naumann, A; Tian, R; Hu, K; Laser, M; Friedrich, J; Gaudron, P; Schnackerz, K; Ingwall, J S

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that energy metabolism is impaired in residual intact myocardium of chronically infarcted rat heart, contributing to contractile dysfunction. Myocardial infarction (MI) was induced in rats by coronary artery ligation. Hearts were isolated 8 wk later and buffer-perfused isovolumically. MI hearts showed reduced left ventricular developed pressure, but oxygen consumption was unchanged. High-energy phosphate contents were measured chemically and by 31P-NMR spectroscopy. In residual intact left ventricular tissue, ATP was unchanged after MI, while creatine phosphate was reduced by 31%. Total creatine kinase (CK) activity was reduced by 17%, the fetal CK isoenzymes BB and MB increased, while the "adult" mitochondrial CK isoenzyme activity decreased by 44%. Total creatine content decreased by 35%. Phosphoryl exchange between ATP and creatine phosphate, measured by 31P-NMR magnetization transfer, fell by 50% in MI hearts. Thus, energy reserve is substantially impaired in residual intact myocardium of chronically infarcted rats. Because phosphoryl exchange was still five times higher than ATP synthesis rates calculated from oxygen consumption, phosphoryl transfer via CK may not limit baseline contractile performance 2 mo after MI. In contrast, when MI hearts were subjected to acute stress (hypoxia), mechanical recovery during reoxygenation was impaired, suggesting that reduced energy reserve contributes to increased susceptibility of MI hearts to acute metabolic stress. PMID:7883957

  7. Heart failure and diabetes: left ventricular systolic function.

    PubMed

    Palmiero, P; Macello, M; De Pascalis, S

    2006-04-01

    Heart failure is the main cause of mortality and morbidity in general population, annual mortality rate is 20%, in spite of pharmacological treatments or other therapies. Cardio-vascular events and diabetes tight correlation is well known, while it is less evaluated diabetes and heart failure correlation is less studied, heart failure as left ventricular systolic function impairment. Cardiovascular disease rate is decreasing, systolic heart failure rate is raising. Our study goal is to evaluate which role diabetes plays in determining systolic heart failure, diagnosed by echocardiographical examination. Four hundred and fifty consecutive patients, systolic heart failure prone, diagnosed by left ventricular ejection fraction less than 40%, were included. Exclusion criteria were rheumatic or congenital valve diseases. Mean age was 78.3 years (53-93 years), 286 were women and 164 men. Statistical analysis were performed by parametric t-Student test and not parametric chi2 test. High significant difference was assessed for P<0.05. Seventy six (16.9%) patients were diabetes prone (D), 374 (83.1%) were diabetes free, so not diabetic (ND). Forty three men were D (56.5%), 131 ND (35%). Diabetic mean age was 74.7 years (52-88), not diabetic was 79.3 (53-93). Six D (7.8%) and 21 ND patients (5.6%) were hypercholesterolemia prone. Eight D (10.5%) and 18 ND (10.1%) patients were smokers. Twenty eight D (36.8%) and 107 ND patients (28.6%) were hypertensive. Thirty three D (43.4%) and 88 ND (26.4%) patients were coronary artery disease prone, 3 of 33 (3.9%) D and 28 of 88 (7.4%) ND ischemic patients were myocardial infarction prone. Twenty one D (27.6%) and 106 ND (28.3%) patients were atrial fibrillation prone. There were not statistical significant difference among D and ND patients for following variables: sex, smoke, total cholesterolemia, hypertension and atrial fibrillation. We found an high significant difference for mean age (P<0.005) and coronary artery disease prone

  8. Insulin resistance impairs nigrostriatal dopamine function.

    PubMed

    Morris, J K; Bomhoff, G L; Gorres, B K; Davis, V A; Kim, J; Lee, P-P; Brooks, W M; Gerhardt, G A; Geiger, P C; Stanford, J A

    2011-09-01

    Clinical studies have indicated a link between Parkinson's disease (PD) and Type 2 Diabetes. Although preclinical studies have examined the effect of high-fat feeding on dopamine function in brain reward pathways, the effect of diet on neurotransmission in the nigrostriatal pathway, which is affected in PD and parkinsonism, is less clear. We hypothesized that a high-fat diet, which models early-stage Type 2 Diabetes, would disrupt nigrostriatal dopamine function in young adult Fischer 344 rats. Rats were fed a high fat diet (60% calories from fat) or a normal chow diet for 12 weeks. High fat-fed animals were insulin resistant compared to chow-fed controls. Potassium-evoked dopamine release and dopamine clearance were measured in the striatum using in vivo electrochemistry. Dopamine release was attenuated and dopamine clearance was diminished in the high-fat diet group compared to chow-fed rats. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated increased iron deposition in the substantia nigra of the high fat group. This finding was supported by alterations in the expression of several proteins involved in iron metabolism in the substantia nigra in this group compared to chow-fed animals. The diet-induced systemic and basal ganglia-specific changes may play a role in the observed impairment of nigrostriatal dopamine function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Methods to assess Drosophila heart development, function and aging

    PubMed Central

    Ocorr, Karen; Vogler, Georg; Bodmer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the Drosophila heart has become an established model of many different aspects of human cardiac disease. This model has allowed identification of disease-causing mechanisms underlying congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathies and has permitted the study underlying genetic, metabolic and age-related contributions to heart function. In this review we discuss methods currently employed in the analysis of the Drosophila heart structure and function, such as optical methods to infer heart function and performance, electrophysiological and mechanical approaches to characterize cardiac tissue properties, and conclude with histological techniques used in the study of heart development and adult structure. PMID:24727147

  10. The Missing Link in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Design of the Heart-Brain Study.

    PubMed

    Hooghiemstra, Astrid M; Bertens, Anne Suzanne; Leeuwis, Anna E; Bron, Esther E; Bots, Michiel L; Brunner-La Rocca, Hans-Peter; de Craen, Anton J M; van der Geest, Rob J; Greving, Jacoba P; Kappelle, L Jaap; Niessen, Wiro J; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; van Osch, Matthias J P; de Roos, Albert; van Rossum, Albert C; Biessels, Geert Jan; van Buchem, Mark A; Daemen, Mat J A P; van der Flier, Wiesje M

    2017-10-10

    Hemodynamic balance in the heart-brain axis is increasingly recognized as a crucial factor in maintaining functional and structural integrity of the brain and thereby cognitive functioning. Patients with heart failure (HF), carotid occlusive disease (COD), and vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) present themselves with complaints attributed to specific parts of the heart-brain axis, but hemodynamic changes often go beyond the part of the axis for which they primarily seek medical advice. The Heart-Brain Study hypothesizes that the hemodynamic status of the heart and the brain is an important but underestimated cause of VCI. We investigate this by studying to what extent hemodynamic changes contribute to VCI and what the mechanisms involved are. Here, we provide an overview of the design and protocol. The Heart-Brain Study is a multicenter cohort study with a follow-up measurement after 2 years among 645 participants (175 VCI, 175 COD, 175 HF, and 120 controls). Enrollment criteria are the following: 1 of the 3 diseases diagnosed according to current guidelines, age ≥50 years, no magnetic resonance contraindications, ability to undergo cognitive testing, and independence in daily life. A core clinical dataset is collected including sociodemographic factors, cardiovascular risk factors, detailed neurologic, cardiac, and medical history, medication, and a physical examination. In addition, we perform standardized neuropsychological testing, cardiac, vascular and brain MRI, and blood sampling. In subsets of participants we assess Alz-heimer biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid, and assess echocardiography and 24-hour blood pressure monitoring. Follow-up measurements after 2 years include neuropsychological testing, brain MRI, and blood samples for all participants. We use centralized state-of-the-art storage platforms for clinical and imaging data. Imaging data are processed centrally with automated standardized pipelines. The Heart-Brain Study investigates

  11. Executive function impairments in depression and bipolar disorder: association with functional impairment and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Cotrena, Charles; Branco, Laura Damiani; Shansis, Flávio Milman; Fonseca, Rochele Paz

    2016-01-15

    The neuropsychological correlates of major depressive (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD), and their association with quality of life (QOL) and functioning, have not been sufficiently studied in the literature. The present study aimed to compare executive functions, attention, processing speed, QOL and disability between patients with BD type I, BD type II, MDD and healthy controls. 205 participants (n=37 BDI, 81% female; n=35 BDII, 80% female; n=45 MDD, 69% female; n=89C, 46% female) aged between 18 and 67 years were administered an extensive neurocognitive battery consisting of widely used standardized measures such as the Trail Making Test, the Stroop Color-Word Test and a modified version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task. Z-scores were compared between groups by ANCOVA. The prevalence of impairments on each measure (Z-score<1.5) was compared between groups using chi-square tests. The associations between cognition, quality of life and functioning were evaluated through correlational analysis. Patients with MDD showed poor selective and sustained attention, and exhibited impairments in timed tasks, suggesting low efficiency of executive processing. Patients with BDI displayed more widespread cognitive impairment than the remaining groups, and performed worse than subjects with MDD on measures of sustained attention and inhibitory control. Decision-making ability and attentional control were able to distinguish between patients with BDI and BDII. QOL and disability were most impaired in patients with BDI, and more closely associated with cognitive impairment than in the remaining groups. No control of pharmacological variables, clinical or demographic characteristics. Our results provide important information regarding the nature and severity of the cognitive alterations associated with different mood disorders, and may contribute to the diagnosis, rehabilitation and treatment of these conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional MT + lesion impairs contralateral motion processing.

    PubMed

    Moo, Lauren R; Emerton, Britt C; Slotnick, Scott D

    2008-07-01

    Human motion processing region MT + is retinotopically organized with perception of and attention to motion in the right visual field preferentially associated with left MT + activity and vice versa. However, the degree to which MT + is crucial for motion processing is uncertain. We report an epilepsy patient with visual symptoms early in his seizure evolution and a left temporal-occipital seizure onset electrographically in whom we hypothesized a functional left MT + lesion. The patient was impaired in his right but not left visual field on a hemifield motion attention task and demonstrated worse performance on a hemifield picture identification task when pictures implying motion were presented in the right as opposed to the left visual field. Functional MRI (fMRI) during a full-field motion detection task activated right MT + but failed to activate left MT + despite activating both left and right MT + in each of 10 controls. Furthermore, fMRI during a hemifield motion attention task also showed a lack of left MT + attention effects in the patient. Together these results suggest that MT + is necessary for normal motion processing.

  13. Cognitive impairment in heart failure: A protective role for angiotensin-(1-7).

    PubMed

    Hay, Meredith; Vanderah, Todd W; Samareh-Jahani, Farmin; Constantopoulos, Eleni; Uprety, Ajay R; Barnes, Carol A; Konhilas, John

    2017-02-01

    Patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) have increased hospital readmission rates and mortality if they are concomitantly diagnosed with cognitive decline and memory loss. Accordingly, we developed a preclinical model of CHF-induced cognitive impairment with the goal of developing novel protective therapies against CHF related cognitive decline. CHF was induced by ligation of the left coronary artery to instigate a myocardial infarction (MI). By 4- and 8-weeks post-MI, CHF mice had approximately a 50% and 70% decline in ejection fraction as measured by echocardiography. At both 4- and 8-weeks post-MI, spatial memory performance in CHF mice as tested using the Morris water task was significantly impaired as compared with sham. In addition, CHF mice had significantly worse performance on object recognition when compared with shams as measured by discrimination ratios during the novel object recognition NOR task. At 8-weeks post-MI, a subgroup of CHF mice were given Angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7) (50mcg/kg/hr) subcutaneously for 4 weeks. Following 3 weeks treatment with systemic Ang-(1-7), the CHF mice NOR discrimination ratios were similar to shams and significantly better than the performance of CHF mice treated with saline. Ang-(1-7) also improved spatial memory in CHF mice as compared with shams. Ang-(1-7) had no effect on cardiac function. Inflammatory biomarker studies from plasma revealed a pattern of neuroprotection that may underlie the observed improvements in cognition. These results demonstrate a preclinical mouse model of CHF that exhibits both spatial memory and object recognition dysfunction. Furthermore, this CHF-induced cognitive impairment is attenuated by treatment with systemic Ang-(1-7). (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Annual Research Review: Conceptualising Functional Impairment in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapee, Ronald M.; Bogels, Susan M.; van der Sluis, Cathy M.; Craske, Michelle G.; Ollendick, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Functional impairment is a key factor in the clinical importance of mental health problems in children. Yet, the nature of impairment and criteria for defining and assessing impairment in childhood disorders has been surprisingly overlooked in much of the literature. The current article examines the extant literature on the conceptualisation,…

  15. Annual Research Review: Conceptualising Functional Impairment in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapee, Ronald M.; Bogels, Susan M.; van der Sluis, Cathy M.; Craske, Michelle G.; Ollendick, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Functional impairment is a key factor in the clinical importance of mental health problems in children. Yet, the nature of impairment and criteria for defining and assessing impairment in childhood disorders has been surprisingly overlooked in much of the literature. The current article examines the extant literature on the conceptualisation,…

  16. JWH-018 impairs sensorimotor functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Ossato, A; Vigolo, A; Trapella, C; Seri, C; Rimondo, C; Serpelloni, G; Marti, M

    2015-08-06

    Naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) is a synthetic cannabinoid agonist illegally marketed in "Spice" and "herbal blend" for its psychoactive effect greater than those produced by cannabis. In rodents JWH-018 reproduces typical effects of (-)-Δ(9)-THC or Dronabinol® (Δ(9)-THC) such as hypothermia, analgesia, hypolocomotion and akinesia, while its effects on sensorimotor functions are still unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of acute administration of JWH-018 (0.01-6mg/kg i.p.) on sensorimotor functions in male CD-1 mice and to compare its effects with those caused by the administration of Δ(9)-THC (0.01-6mg/kg i.p.). A specific battery of behavioral tests were adopted to investigate effects of cannabinoid agonists on sensorimotor functions (visual, auditory, tactile) and neurological changes (convulsion, myoclonia, hyperreflexia) while video-tracking analysis was used to study spontaneous locomotion. JWH-018 administration inhibited sensorimotor responses at lower doses (0.01-0.1mg/kg), reduced spontaneous locomotion at intermediate/high doses (1-6mg/kg) and induced convulsions, myoclonia and hyperreflexia at high doses (6mg/kg). Similarly, administration of Δ(9)-THC reduced sensorimotor responses in mice but it did not inhibit spontaneous locomotion and it did not induce neurological alterations. All behavioral effects and neurological alterations were prevented by the administration of the selective CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM 251). For the first time these data demonstrate that JWH-018 impairs sensorimotor responses in mice. This aspect should be carefully evaluated to better understand the potential danger that JWH-018 may pose to public health, with particular reference to decreased performance in driving and hazardous works.

  17. Effects of exercise on renal function in patients with moderate impairment of renal function compared to normal men.

    PubMed

    Taverner, D; Craig, K; Mackay, I; Watson, M L

    1991-01-01

    The renal excretory and haemodynamic responses to sustained moderate exertion were investigated in normotensive humans with impaired renal function and normal volunteers. The heart rate increase with exercise was similar in each group. Subjects with impaired renal function showed a significant fall in glomerular filtration rate on exertion, while normals did not. In the presence of renal disease, urine osmolality did not rise with exertion, although it rose markedly in the normal group. Free water clearance became negative after exercise in the normal group only. The diseased kidney is unable to maintain glomerular filtration rate or conserve water under the stress of exertion as well as the normal kidney.

  18. Decreased long-chain fatty acid oxidation impairs postischemic recovery of the insulin-resistant rat heart.

    PubMed

    Harmancey, Romain; Vasquez, Hernan G; Guthrie, Patrick H; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2013-10-01

    Diabetic patients with acute myocardial infarction are more likely to die than nondiabetic patients. In the present study we examined the effect of insulin resistance on myocardial ischemia tolerance. Hearts of rats, rendered insulin resistant by high-sucrose feeding, were subjected to ischemia/reperfusion ex vivo. Cardiac power of control hearts from chow-fed rats recovered to 93%, while insulin-resistant hearts recovered only to 80% (P<0.001 vs. control). Unexpectedly, impaired contractile recovery did not result from an impairment of glucose oxidation (576±36 vs. 593±42 nmol/min/g dry weight; not significant), but from a failure to increase and to sustain oxidation of the long-chain fatty acid oleate on reperfusion (1878±56 vs. 2070±67 nmol/min/g dry weight; P<0.05). This phenomenon was due to a reduced ability to transport oleate into mitochondria and associated with a 38-58% decrease in the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) levels. Contractile function was rescued by replacing oleate with a medium-chain fatty acid or by restoring UCP3 levels with 24 h of food withdrawal. Lastly, the knockdown of UCP3 in rat L6 myocytes also decreased oleate oxidation by 13-18% following ischemia. Together the results expose UCP3 as a critical regulator of long-chain fatty acid oxidation in the stressed heart postischemia and identify octanoate as an intervention by which myocardial metabolism can be manipulated to improve function of the insulin-resistant heart.

  19. Chamber identity programs drive early functional partitioning of the heart.

    PubMed

    Mosimann, Christian; Panáková, Daniela; Werdich, Andreas A; Musso, Gabriel; Burger, Alexa; Lawson, Katy L; Carr, Logan A; Nevis, Kathleen R; Sabeh, M Khaled; Zhou, Yi; Davidson, Alan J; DiBiase, Anthony; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey; MacRae, Calum A; Zon, Leonard I

    2015-08-26

    The vertebrate heart muscle (myocardium) develops from the first heart field (FHF) and expands by adding second heart field (SHF) cells. While both lineages exist already in teleosts, the primordial contributions of FHF and SHF to heart structure and function remain incompletely understood. Here we delineate the functional contribution of the FHF and SHF to the zebrafish heart using the cis-regulatory elements of the draculin (drl) gene. The drl reporters initially delineate the lateral plate mesoderm, including heart progenitors. Subsequent myocardial drl reporter expression restricts to FHF descendants. We harnessed this unique feature to uncover that loss of tbx5a and pitx2 affect relative FHF versus SHF contributions to the heart. High-resolution physiology reveals distinctive electrical properties of each heart field territory that define a functional boundary within the single zebrafish ventricle. Our data establish that the transcriptional program driving cardiac septation regulates physiologic ventricle partitioning, which successively provides mechanical advantages of sequential contraction.

  20. The Study of Cognitive Function and Related Factors in Patients With Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Atefeh; Moaddab, Fatemeh; Salari, Arsalan; Kazemnezhad Leyli, Ehsan; Sedghi Sabet, Mitra; Paryad, Ezzat

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cognitive impairment is increasingly recognized as a common adverse consequence of heart failure. Both Heart failure and cognitive impairment are associated with frequent hospitalization and increased mortality, particularly when they occur simultaneously. Objectives: To determine cognitive function and related factors in patients with heart failure. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, we assessed 239 patients with heart failure. Data were collected by Mini Mental status Examination, Charlson comorbidity index and NYHA classification system. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, chi-square test, t-test and logistic regression analysis. Results: The mean score of cognitive function was 21.68 ± 4.51. In total, 155 patients (64.9%) had cognitive impairment. Significant associations were found between the status of cognitive impairment and gender (P < 0.002), education level (P < 0.000), living location (P < 0.000), marital status (P < 0.03), living arrangement (P < 0.001 ), employment status (P < 0.000), income (P < 0.02), being the head of family (P < 0.03), the family size (P < 0.02), having a supplemental insurance (P < 0.003) and the patient’s comorbidities (P < 0.02). However, in logistic regression analysis, only education and supplementary insurance could predict cognitive status which indicates that patients with supplementary insurance and higher education levels were more likely to maintain optimal cognitive function. Conclusions: More than a half of the subjects had cognitive impairment. As the level of patients cognitive functioning affects their behaviors and daily living activities, it is recommended that patients with heart failure should be assessed for their cognitive functioning. PMID:25414874

  1. Association of Central Sleep Apnea with Impaired Heart Structure and Cardiovascular Hemodynamics in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kazimierczak, Anna; Krzesiński, Paweł; Gielerak, Grzegorz; Uziębło-Życzkowska, Beata; Smurzyński, Paweł; Ryczek, Robert; Cwetsch, Andrzej; Skrobowski, Andrzej

    2016-08-25

    BACKGROUND Advanced heart failure (HF) is commonly accompanied by central sleep apnea (CSA) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between CSA/CSR and other clinical features of HF, with particular emphasis on cardiovascular hemodynamics. MATERIAL AND METHODS In 161 stable HF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% (NYHA class I-III; mean LVEF 32.8%) the clinical evaluation included: LVEF; left and right ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDd, RVDd); ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic septal mitral annulus velocity (E/e') assessed by echocardiography; stroke index (SI); heart rate (HR); cardiac index (CI); and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) assessed by impedance cardiography (ICG). The comparison was performed between 2 subgroups: one with moderate/severe CSA/CSR - CSR_ [+] (n=51), and one with mild or no CSA/CSR - CSR_ [-] (n=110). RESULTS CSR_ [+] patients presented more advanced NYHA class (p<0.001) and more frequently had permanent atrial fibrillation (p=0.018). Moreover, they had: lower LVEF (p<0.0001); higher LVDd (p<0.0001), RVDd (p<0.001), and E/e' (p<0.001); lower SI (p<0.001) and CI (p=0.009); and higher HR (p=0.044) and SVRI (p=0.016). The following predictors of CSR_ [+] were identified: NYHA class (OR=3.34 per class, p<0.001, which was the only independent predictor); atrial fibrillation (OR=2.29, p=0.019); RV enlargement (OR=2.75, p=0.005); LVEF<35% (OR=3.38, p=0.001); E/e' (OR=3.15; p=0.003); and SI<35 ml/m2 (OR=2.96, p=0.003). CONCLUSIONS Presence of CSA/CSR in HF is associated with NYHA class, atrial fibrillation and more advanced impairment of cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics. Patient functional state remains the main determinant of CSR.

  2. Association of Central Sleep Apnea with Impaired Heart Structure and Cardiovascular Hemodynamics in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kazimierczak, Anna; Krzesiński, Paweł; Gielerak, Grzegorz; Uziebło-Życzkowska, Beata; Smurzyński, Paweł; Ryczek, Robert; Cwetsch, Andrzej; Skrobowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced heart failure (HF) is commonly accompanied by central sleep apnea (CSA) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between CSA/CSR and other clinical features of HF, with particular emphasis on cardiovascular hemodynamics. Material/Methods In 161 stable HF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% (NYHA class I–III; mean LVEF 32.8%) the clinical evaluation included: LVEF; left and right ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDd, RVDd); ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic septal mitral annulus velocity (E/e’) assessed by echocardiography; stroke index (SI); heart rate (HR); cardiac index (CI); and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) assessed by impedance cardiography (ICG). The comparison was performed between 2 subgroups: one with moderate/severe CSA/CSR - CSR_ [+] (n=51), and one with mild or no CSA/CSR – CSR_ [−] (n=110). Results CSR_ [+] patients presented more advanced NYHA class (p<0.001) and more frequently had permanent atrial fibrillation (p=0.018). Moreover, they had: lower LVEF (p<0.0001); higher LVDd (p<0.0001), RVDd (p<0.001), and E/e’ (p<0.001); lower SI (p<0.001) and CI (p=0.009); and higher HR (p=0.044) and SVRI (p=0.016). The following predictors of CSR_ [+] were identified: NYHA class (OR=3.34 per class, p<0.001, which was the only independent predictor); atrial fibrillation (OR=2.29, p=0.019); RV enlargement (OR=2.75, p=0.005); LVEF<35% (OR=3.38, p=0.001); E/e’ (OR=3.15; p=0.003); and SI<35 ml/m2 (OR=2.96, p=0.003). Conclusions Presence of CSA/CSR in HF is associated with NYHA class, atrial fibrillation and more advanced impairment of cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics. Patient functional state remains the main determinant of CSR. PMID:27558771

  3. Impaired cardiovascular function in primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David E. J.; Hollingsworth, Kieren; Fattakhova, Gulnar; MacGowan, Guy; Taylor, Roy; Blamire, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular system dysregulation in the form of autonomic dysfunction is common at all stages of the disease process in the autoimmune liver disease primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and associates with the symptom of fatigue. The mechanisms underpinning autonomic dysfunction in PBC are, however, at present unclear. In this study we set out to explore, for the first time, cardiac structure and function in PBC using impedance cardiography (ICG) and magnetic resonance methodologies. ICG was assessed beat to beat in response to orthostasis (by head-up tilt) in age and sex case-matched high-fatigue and low-fatigue PBC groups (assessed by Fatigue Impact Scale), normal control subjects (n = 15 each group) and a liver disease control cohort (primary sclerosing cholangitis). Cardiac structure and bioenergetics were examined in 15 of the PBC subjects and 8 of the normal control subjects by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cine imaging. Capacity of the left ventricle to respond to orthostasis [left ventricular ejection time (LVET)] was impaired in PBC compared with matched normal control subjects (P = 0.05). This was a PBC-specific phenomenon unrelated to fatigue status. PBC patients exhibited significantly lower cardiac muscle phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratio (PCr/ATP ratio; measure of cardiac bioenergetic integrity) compared with control subjects (P < 0.01). PCr/ATP <1.6 (indicative of increased risk of death in cardiomyopathy) was present in 6/15 (40%) PBC patients (0/8 control subjects; P < 0.05). Cardiac structure and function were similar in all measures of left ventricular morphology between control subjects and PBC. The close relationship between PCr/ATP and LVET seen in normal subjects (r2 = 0.6; P < 0.05) was lost in PBC patients, a finding compatible with myocardial dysfunction. Significant correlation was seen between fatigue severity in PBC and fall in cardiac output on orthostasis (r2 = 0.25; P = 0.005). Our findings suggest the presence of altered myocardial

  4. Impaired NHEJ function in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Clara; Toor, Amir A.; Singh, Sheetal; Betti, Christopher; Vaughan, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is characterized by multiple chromosomal aberrations. To assess the contribution of DNA repair to this phenotype, ionizing radiation was used to induce DNA double strand breaks in three MM cell lines. Clonogenic survival assays showed U266 (SF4= 15.3+6.4%) and RPMI 8226 (SF4=12.6.0+1.7%) were radiation sensitive while OPM2 was resistant (SF4=78.9+4.1%). Addition of the DNA-PK inhibitor NU7026 showed the expected suppression in radiation survival in OPM2 but increased survival in both radiation sensitive cell lines. To examine NHEJ repair in these lines, the ability of protein extracts to support in vitro DNA repair was measured. Among the three MM cell lines analyzed, RPMI 8226 demonstrated impaired blunt ended DNA ligation using a ligation mediated PCR technique. In a bacterial based functional assay to rejoin a DNA break within the β-galactosidase gene, RPMI 8226 demonstrated a four fold reduction in rejoining fidelity compared to U266, with OPM2 showing an intermediate capacity. Ionizing radiation induced a robust γ-H2AX response in OPM2 but only a modest increase in each radiation sensitive cell line perhaps related to the high level of γ-H2AX in freshly plated cells. Examination of γ-H2AX foci in RPMI 8226 cells confirmed data from Western blots where a significant number of foci were present in freshly plated untreated cells which diminished over 24 h of culture. Based on the clonogenic survival and functional repair assays, all three cell lines exhibited corrupt NHEJ repair. We conclude that suppression of aberrant NHEJ function using the DNA-PK inhibitor NU7026 may facilitate access of DNA ends to an intact homologous recombination repair pathway, paradoxically increasing survival after irradiation. These data provide insight into the deregulation of DNA repair at the site of DNA breaks in MM that may underpin the characteristic genomic instability of this disease. PMID:19028508

  5. Heart-Rate Recovery Index Is Impaired in Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Ergun Baris; Yorgun, Hikmet; Akdogan, Ali; Ates, Ahmet Hakan; Canpolat, Ugur; Sunman, Hamza; Aytemir, Kudret; Tokgozoglu, Lale; Kabakci, Giray; Calguneri, Meral; Ozkutlu, Hilmi; Oto, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Behçet's disease, a multisystemic inflammatory disorder, has been associated with a number of cardiovascular dysfunctions, including ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Heart-rate recovery after exercise can provide both an estimate of impaired parasympathetic tone and a prognosis in regard to all-cause and cardiovascular death. The aim of our study was to evaluate heart-rate recovery in Behçet's disease From January through July 2008, we examined at our outpatient clinic and prospectively enrolled 30 consecutive patients with Behçet's disease and 50 healthy control participants who were matched for age and sex. Basal electrocardiography, echocardiography, and treadmill exercise testing were performed in all patients and control participants. The heart-rate recovery index was calculated in the usual manner, by subtracting the 1st-minute (Rec1), 2nd-minute (Rec2), and 3rd-minute (Rec3) recovery heart rates from the maximal heart rate after exercise stress testing. Patients with Behçet's disease exhibited significantly lower heart-rate recovery numbers, compared with healthy control participants: Rec1, 24.28 ± 8.2 vs 34.4 ± 7.6, P = 0.002; Rec2, 49.28 ± 11.2 vs 57.5 ± 7.0, P < 0.05; and Rec3, 56.2 ± 12.11 vs 67.4 ± 8.7, P = 0.014. To our knowledge, this is the 1st study that shows an impaired heart-rate recovery index (indicative of reduced parasympathetic activity) among patients with Behçet's disease. Given the independent prognostic value of the heart-rate recovery index, our results may explain the increased occurrence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in Behçet's patients. Therefore, this index may be clinically useful in the identification of high-risk patients. PMID:19693299

  6. Mild cognitive impairment predicts death and readmission within 30days of discharge for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Quan L; Negishi, Kazuaki; Blizzard, Leigh; Saito, Makoto; De Pasquale, Carmine G; Hare, James L; Leung, Dominic; Stanton, Tony; Sanderson, Kristy; Venn, Alison J; Marwick, Thomas H

    2016-10-15

    Cognitive impairment is highly prevalent in heart failure (HF), and may be associated with short-term readmission. This study investigated the role of cognition, incremental to other clinical and non-clinical factors, independent of depression and anxiety, in predicting 30-day readmission or death in HF. This study followed 565 patients from an Australia-wide HF longitudinal study. Cognitive function (MoCA score) together with standard clinical and non-clinical factors, mental health and 2D echocardiograms were collected before hospital discharge. The study outcomes were death and readmission within 30days of discharge. Logistic regression, Harrell's C-statistic, integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) and net reclassification index were used for analysis. Among 565 patients, 255 (45%) had at least mild cognitive impairment (MoCA≤22). Death (n=43, 8%) and readmission (n=122, 21%) within 30days of discharge were more likely to occur among patients with mild cognitive impairment (OR=2.00, p=0.001). MoCA score was also negatively associated with 30-day readmission or death (OR=0.91, p<0.001) independent of other risk factors. Adding MoCA score to an existing prediction model of 30-day readmission significantly improved discrimination (C-statistic=0.715 vs. 0.617, IDI estimate 0.077, p<0.001). From prediction models developed from our study, adding MoCA score (C-statistic=0.83) provided incremental value to that of standard clinical and non-clinical factors (C-statistic=0.76) and echocardiogram parameters (C-statistic=0.81) in predicting 30-day readmission or death. Reclassification analysis suggests that addition of MoCA score improved classification for a net of 12% of patients with 30-day readmission or death and of 6% of patients without (p=0.002). Mild cognitive impairment predicts short-term outcomes in HF, independent of clinical and non-clinical factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment of Functional Impairment in Patients with Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Moreno, Jose; Martinez-Aran, Anabel; Vieta, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, functional impairment has received little attention in bipolar disorder, despite the fact that many patients experience significant impairments in daily life. In the last decade, research has changed its focus from clinical remission to functional recovery in bipolar patients as a priority. A literature review of this topic will allow us provide an overview of the relevance of functional impairment as well as the potential factors that can predict or contribute to low functioning in bipolar disorder (BD). Treatment approaches should consider not only euthymia as a goal but also cognitive and functional improvement of patients with such a complex disorder. Functional remediation and psychoeducation among psychological interventions may help to enhance functioning. The combination of cognitive enhancers and cognitive/functional remediation programs may help in improving cognitive and functional impairments. Early interventions are essential to prevent cognitive deficits and disability.

  8. Blunted frequency-dependent upregulation of cardiac output is related to impaired relaxation in diastolic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, Rolf; Schmidt-Schweda, Stephan; Westermann, Dirk; Post, Heiner; Edelmann, Frank; Kasner, Mario; Lüers, Claus; Steendijk, Paul; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Tschöpe, Carsten; Pieske, Burkert

    2009-01-01

    Aims We tested the hypothesis that, in heart failure with normal ejection fraction (HFNEF), diastolic dysfunction is accentuated at increasing heart rates, and this contributes to impaired frequency-dependent augmentation of cardiac output. Methods and results In 17 patients with HFNEF (median age 69 years, 13 female) and seven age-matched control patients, systolic and diastolic function was analysed by pressure–volume loops at baseline heart rate and during atrial pacing to 100 and 120 min−1. At baseline, relaxation was prolonged and end-diastolic left ventricular stiffness was higher in HFNEF, whereas all parameters of systolic function were not different from control patients. This resulted in smaller end-diastolic volumes, higher end-diastolic pressure, and a lower stroke volume and cardiac index in HFNEF vs. control patients. During pacing, frequency-dependent upregulation of contractility indices (+dP/dtmax and Ees) occurred similarly in HFNEF and control patients, but frequency-dependent acceleration of relaxation (dP/dtmin) was blunted in HFNEF. In HFNEF, end-diastolic volume and stroke volume decreased with higher heart rates while both remained unchanged in control patients. Conclusion In HFNEF, frequency-dependent upregulation of cardiac output is blunted. This results from progressive volume unloading of the left ventricle due to limited relaxation reserve in combination with increased LV passive stiffness, despite preserved force–frequency relation. PMID:19720638

  9. Blunted frequency-dependent upregulation of cardiac output is related to impaired relaxation in diastolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wachter, Rolf; Schmidt-Schweda, Stephan; Westermann, Dirk; Post, Heiner; Edelmann, Frank; Kasner, Mario; Lüers, Claus; Steendijk, Paul; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Tschöpe, Carsten; Pieske, Burkert

    2009-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that, in heart failure with normal ejection fraction (HFNEF), diastolic dysfunction is accentuated at increasing heart rates, and this contributes to impaired frequency-dependent augmentation of cardiac output. In 17 patients with HFNEF (median age 69 years, 13 female) and seven age-matched control patients, systolic and diastolic function was analysed by pressure-volume loops at baseline heart rate and during atrial pacing to 100 and 120 min(-1). At baseline, relaxation was prolonged and end-diastolic left ventricular stiffness was higher in HFNEF, whereas all parameters of systolic function were not different from control patients. This resulted in smaller end-diastolic volumes, higher end-diastolic pressure, and a lower stroke volume and cardiac index in HFNEF vs. control patients. During pacing, frequency-dependent upregulation of contractility indices (+dP/dt(max) and Ees) occurred similarly in HFNEF and control patients, but frequency-dependent acceleration of relaxation (dP/dt(min)) was blunted in HFNEF. In HFNEF, end-diastolic volume and stroke volume decreased with higher heart rates while both remained unchanged in control patients. In HFNEF, frequency-dependent upregulation of cardiac output is blunted. This results from progressive volume unloading of the left ventricle due to limited relaxation reserve in combination with increased LV passive stiffness, despite preserved force-frequency relation.

  10. Executive function moderates the relationship between depressive symptoms and resting heart rate variability in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gathright, Emily C; Walter, Fawn A; Hawkins, Misty A W; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Hughes, Joel W; Gunstad, John

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with high rates of depression. In turn, depression is associated with reduced heart rate variability (HRV), a marker of parasympathetic dysfunction and poorer cardiac outcomes. Cognitive impairment--especially executive dysfunction--is also highly prevalent in HF, but it is unknown whether executive function (EF) impacts the depression-HRV relationship. The primary objective of this paper is to examine whether EF moderates the relationship between depression and HRV in HF. Participants were 109 HF patients. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory-II. EF was assessed using a composite of age-adjusted T scores on the Frontal Assessment Battery, Trail Making Test B, and Stroop Color Word subtest. Parasympathetic function was assessed using resting high frequency HRV (HF-HRV). Multiple hierarchical regression was used to conduct BDI × EF moderation analyses. BDI scores were associated with reduced resting HF-HRV (p < .05). No main effects were detected between EF and resting HF-HRV (p > .05). However, EF moderated the relationship between BDI scores and resting HF-HRV (β = 0.59, p < .01). Simple slope analyses revealed that among participants with poorer EF, higher BDI scores were associated with lower resting HF-HRV (p < .001). Structural brain changes common in HF may contribute to lower EF, increased depression, and poorer autonomic functioning. Alternatively, the results may indicate that individuals with intact EF engage in self-care strategies that negate the detrimental impact of depression on autonomic function. Additional work is needed to clarify these possibilities and the potential benefits of treating depression in HF patients with different cognitive abilities.

  11. Functional Impairment in Youth Three Years after Detention

    PubMed Central

    Abram, Karen M.; Choe, Jeanne Y.; Washburn, Jason J.; Romero, Erin G.; Teplin, Linda A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose This article examines functional impairment across global and specific dimensions among youth 3 years after their detention. Methods Functional impairment was assessed using the Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS) in a large, stratified, random sample of formerly detained youth (N = 1653). Results More than one-fifth of the sample were scored as having marked impairment that required, at minimum, “multiple sources of care” (CAFAS Total Score of 100 or higher); 7.0% required “intensive intervention” (CAFAS Total Score ≥140). Most of the sample had impairment; only 7.5% of the sample had “no noteworthy impairment” (CAFAS Total Score ≤10). Significantly more males were impaired than females. Among males living in the community at follow-up, African Americans and Hispanics were more likely to be impaired than non-Hispanic whites. In comparison to males living in the community, males who were incarcerated at follow-up were significantly more likely to have impaired thinking and impaired functioning at their place of residence but less likely to have substance use problems. Conclusions Three years after detention, most youth struggle in one or more life domains; more than one in five have marked impairment in functioning. These findings underscore the ongoing costs, to both youth and society, of our failure to provide effective rehabilitation to youth after detention. PMID:19465316

  12. Coronary heart disease and risk for cognitive impairment or dementia: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Deckers, Kay; Schievink, Syenna H J; Rodriquez, Maria M F; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; van Boxtel, Martin P J; Verhey, Frans R J; Köhler, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests an association between coronary heart disease and risk for cognitive impairment or dementia, but no study has systematically reviewed this association. Therefore, we summarized the available evidence on the association between coronary heart disease and risk for cognitive impairment or dementia. Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, and CINAHL were searched for all publications until 8th January 2016. Articles were included if they fulfilled the inclusion criteria: (1) myocardial infarction, angina pectoris or coronary heart disease (combination of both) as predictor variable; (2) cognition, cognitive impairment or dementia as outcome; (3) population-based study; (4) prospective (≥1 year follow-up), cross-sectional or case-control study design; (5) ≥100 participants; and (6) aged ≥45 years. Reference lists of publications and secondary literature were hand-searched for possible missing articles. Two reviewers independently screened all abstracts and extracted information from potential relevant full-text articles using a standardized data collection form. Study quality was assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. We pooled estimates from the most fully adjusted model using random-effects meta-analysis. We identified 6,132 abstracts, of which 24 studies were included. A meta-analysis of 10 prospective cohort studies showed that coronary heart disease was associated with increased risk of cognitive impairment or dementia (OR = 1.45, 95%CI = 1.21-1.74, p<0.001). Between-study heterogeneity was low (I2 = 25.7%, 95%CI = 0-64, p = 0.207). Similar significant associations were found in separate meta-analyses of prospective cohort studies for the individual predictors (myocardial infarction, angina pectoris). In contrast, meta-analyses of cross-sectional and case-control studies were inconclusive. This meta-analysis suggests that coronary heart disease is prospectively associated with increased odds of developing cognitive impairment or dementia

  13. Impaired lymphatic function accelerates cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Steinskog, Eli Sihn Samdal; Sagstad, Solfrid Johanne; Wagner, Marek; Karlsen, Tine Veronica; Yang, Ning; Markhus, Carl Erik; Yndestad, Synnøve; Wiig, Helge; Eikesdal, Hans Petter

    2016-01-01

    Increased lymphangiogenesis is a common feature of cancer development and progression, yet the influence of impaired lymphangiogenesis on tumor growth is elusive. C3HBA breast cancer and KHT-1 sarcoma cell lines were implanted orthotopically in Chy mice, harboring a heterozygous inactivating mutation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3, resulting in impaired dermal lymphangiogenesis. Accelerated tumor growth was observed in both cancer models in Chy mice, coinciding with reduced peritumoral lymphangiogenesis. An impaired lymphatic washout was observed from the peritumoral area in Chy mice with C3HBA tumors, and the number of macrophages was significantly reduced. While fewer macrophages were detected, the fraction of CD163+ M2 macrophages remained constant, causing a shift towards a higher M2/M1 ratio in Chy mice. No difference in adaptive immune cells was observed between wt and Chy mice. Interestingly, levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophage-associated cytokines were reduced in C3HBA tumors, pointing to an impaired innate immune response. However, IL-6 was profoundly elevated in the C3HBA tumor interstitial fluid, and treatment with the anti-IL-6 receptor antibody tocilizumab inhibited breast cancer growth. Collectively, our data indicate that impaired lymphangiogenesis weakens anti-tumor immunity and favors tumor growth at an early stage of cancer development. PMID:27329584

  14. Angina pectoris severity among coronary heart disease patients is associated with subsequent cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Galit; Goldbourt, Uri; Tanne, David

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between coronary heart disease (CHD) and cognitive function is not completely elucidated. We examined the association between severity of angina pectoris (AP) in mid-life and subsequent cognitive impairment among CHD patients. Severity of AP according to the Canadian Cardiovascular Society angina classification was assessed in a subgroup of people with chronic CHD, who previously participated in a secondary prevention trial. Cognitive performance was evaluated 15±3 years later, using a validated set of computerized cognitive tests (Neurotrax Computerized Cognitive Battery; computing index scores summarizing performance in each cognitive domain and a global cognitive score). We compared the risk of cognitive deficits in participants with AP class >2 to those with AP≤2, adjusting for vascular risk factors, common carotid-intima media thickness (CC-IMT), and presence of carotid plaques. Among 535 participants (mean age at baseline 57.9±6.6 y; 95% males), AP class >2 was associated with subsequent poorer performance on tests of memory and attention compared to those with AP class ≤2 (β=-4.3±1.8; P=0.016 and β=-3.6±1.7; P=0.029, respectively) and with a higher risk of having impairment in these domains [odds ratio (95% confidence interval)=1.83 (1.11-3.02); P=0.019 and 2.36 (1.34-4.16); P=0.003, for memory and attention, respectively]. These results were similar after controlling for vascular risk factors; however, the association of AP with memory domain attenuated after adjustment for CC-IMT or presence of carotid plaques. In people with preexisting CHD, severity of AP is associated with late-life poorer cognitive performance, independent of other vascular risk factors.

  15. Illness severity, trait anxiety, cognitive impairment and heart rate variability in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Levy, Boaz

    2014-12-30

    Numerous studies have documented a significant association between symptom severity and cognitive functioning in bipolar disorder (BD). These findings advanced speculations about a potential link between the physiological stress associated with illness severity and cognitive dysfunction. To explore this hypothesis, the current study employed heart rate variability (HRV) as a physiological measure that is sensitive to the effects of chronic stress, and a scale of trait anxiety for assessing a psychological condition that is correlated with hyper sympathetic arousal. Analyses indicated that BD patients with High Illness Severity reported more symptoms of trait-anxiety (i.e., State Trait Anxiety Inventory), performed more poorly on a computerized neuropsychological battery (i.e., CNS Vital Signs), and exhibited a more constricted HRV profile (i.e., lower SDNN with elevated LF/HF ratio) than patients with Low Illness Severity. Illness severity was determined by a history of psychosis, illness duration, and number of mood episodes. A third group of healthy controls (n=22) performed better on the neuropsychological battery and exhibited a healthier HRV profile than the BD groups. This study provides preliminary evidence that illness severity and cognitive impairment in BD may be associated with state anxiety and neuro-cardiac alterations that are sensitive to physiological stress.

  16. Acyl-CoA synthetase 1 deficiency alters cardiolipin species and impairs mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Martin, Sarah A.; Katunga, Lalage; Cooper, Daniel E.; Anderson, Ethan J.; Murphy, Robert C.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) contributes more than 90% of total cardiac ACSL activity, but its role in phospholipid synthesis has not been determined. Mice with an inducible knockout of ACSL1 (Acsl1T−/−) have impaired cardiac fatty acid oxidation and rely on glucose for ATP production. Because ACSL1 exhibited a strong substrate preference for linoleate, we investigated the composition of heart phospholipids. Acsl1T−/− hearts contained 83% less tetralinoleoyl-cardiolipin (CL), the major form present in control hearts. A stable knockdown of ACSL1 in H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes resulted in low incorporation of linoleate into CL and in diminished incorporation of palmitate and oleate into other phospholipids. Overexpression of ACSL1 in H9c2 and HEK-293 cells increased incorporation of linoleate into CL and other phospholipids. To determine whether increasing the content of linoleate in CL would improve mitochondrial respiratory function in Acsl1T−/− hearts, control and Acsl1T−/− mice were fed a high-linoleate diet; this diet normalized the amount of tetralinoleoyl-CL but did not improve respiratory function. Thus, ACSL1 is required for the normal composition of several phospholipid species in heart. Although ACSL1 determines the acyl-chain composition of heart CL, a high tetralinoleoyl-CL content may not be required for normal function. PMID:26136511

  17. Impaired baroreflex control of vascular resistance and heart rate in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, T; Takeshita, A; Makino, N; Ashihara, T; Yamamoto, K; Nakamura, M

    1984-01-01

    The baroreflex control of vascular resistance and heart rate was studied in 11 patients to determine whether it is impaired in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Reflex forearm vasoconstriction in response to lower body negative pressure at 40 mm Hg was less in the early convalescent phase (mean seven days) than in the late convalescent phase (mean 41 days). Pressor as well as vasoconstricting responses to the cold pressor test did not differ between the early and late convalescent phases. The slope of the regression line relating systolic blood pressure and the RR interval during a transient rise in blood pressure produced by intravenous phenylephrine was appreciably reduced in the early convalescent phase of myocardial infarction. These results suggest that baroreflex control of vascular resistance and heart rate is impaired in patients with acute myocardial infarction. PMID:6477780

  18. Assessment of Diastolic Function in Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Panesar, Dilveer Kaur; Burch, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Diastolic function is an important component of left ventricular (LV) function which is often overlooked. It can cause symptoms of heart failure in patients even in the presence of normal systolic function. The parameters used to assess diastolic function often measure flow and are affected by the loading conditions of the heart. The interpretation of diastolic function in the context of congenital heart disease requires some understanding of the effects of the lesions themselves on these parameters. Individual congenital lesions will be discussed in this paper. Recently, load-independent techniques have led to more accurate measurements of ventricular compliance and remodeling in heart disease. The combination of inflow velocities and tissue Doppler measurements can be used to estimate diastolic function and LV filling pressures. This review focuses on diastolic function and assessment in congenital heart disease. PMID:28261582

  19. Renal function in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Burlet, A; Drukker, A; Guignard, J P

    1999-01-01

    We performed renal function tests in 18 young patients, 1.8-14.6 years of age, with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). Glomerular filtration rate was normal (116 +/- 4.5 ml/min/1.73 m2), and renal plasma flow was decreased (410 +/- 25 ml/min/1.73 m2) with a rise in the filtration fraction (29 +/- 1.1%). The suggested pathophysiologic explanation of these findings is that the blood hyperviscosity seen in patients with CCHD causes an overall increase in renal vascular resistance with a rise in intraglomerular blood pressure. Despite a sluggish flow of blood in the glomerular capillary bed, the effective filtration pressure was adjusted to conserve the glomerular filtration rate. In addition to these renal hemodynamic parameters, we also studied renal acidification and tubular sodium and water handling during a forced water diuresis. Our data indicate that children with CCHD have a mild to moderate normal ion gap metabolic acidosis due to a low proximal tubular threshold for bicarbonate. Proximal tubular sodium and water reabsorption under these conditions were somewhat increased, though not significantly, probably due to intrarenal hydrostatic forces, in particular the rise in the oncotic pressure in the postglomerular capillaries in patients with high hematocrit values. The distal tubular functions such as sodium handling and acidification were not affected.

  20. Functional status and quality of life among breast cancer survivors with heart failure: results of the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jordan M; Davis, Matthew A; Barton, Debra L; Janz, Nancy K; Pressler, Susan J; Friese, Christopher R

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this population-based study was to examine health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and functional status among breast cancer survivors with heart failure. We examined Medicare Health Outcomes Survey data from women aged 65 and older diagnosed with breast cancer in the past 5 years. Surveys were linked to Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results cancer registries. Each woman identified with self-reported heart failure (n = 239) was matched to controls without heart failure (n = 685) using propensity scores. The Short Form-36/Veterans Rand-12 measured eight domains of HRQOL. Functional status impairment was measured by limitations in six activities of daily living (ADLs). Linear models estimated associations between heart failure status and HRQOL. Logistic regression models estimated odds ratios for associations between heart failure and ADL impairment. We examined associations for the total study population and subgroups stratified by cancer stage. Among all study participants, heart failure was associated with significant deficits in every HRQOL domain and impairment in all ADLs (p < 0.01, ORs ranged from 1.74 to 2.47). After stratification by cancer stage, heart failure was associated with physical HRQOL deficits across all cancer stages (physical function, vitality, general health) and mental HRQOL deficits only in women with stage I/II cancer (role-emotional, social function). Women with early stage cancer experienced the greatest HRQOL deficits associated with heart failure. Heart failure in breast cancer survivors is associated with substantial HRQOL deficits and functional status impairment, particularly in early stage cancer. Tailored interventions are needed to improve physical function and mental wellbeing in this high-risk population.

  1. Structure and function relationship of human heart from DENSE MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Gharib, Morteza

    2007-03-01

    The study here, suggests a macroscopic structure for the Left Ventricle (LV), based on the heart kinematics which is obtained through imaging. The measurement of the heart muscle deformation using the Displacement ENcoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI, which describes the heart kinematics in the Lagrangian frame work, is used to determine the high resolution patterns of true myocardial strain. Subsequently, the tangential Shortening Index (SI) and the thickening of the LV wall are calculated for each data point. Considering the heart as a positive-displacement pump, the contribution of each segment of LV in the heart function, can be determined by the SI and thickening of the wall in the same portion. Hence the SI isosurfaces show the extent and spatial distribution of the heart activity and reveals its macro structure. The structure and function of the heart are, therefore, related which in turn results in a macroscopic model for the LV. In particular, it was observed that the heart functionality is not uniformly distributed in the LV, and the regions with greater effect on the pumping process, form a band which wraps around the heart. These results, which are supported by the established histological evidence, may be considered as a landmark in connecting the structure and function of the heart through imaging. Furthermore, the compatibility of this model with microscopic observations about the fiber direction is investigated. This method may be used for planning as well as post evaluation of the ventriculoplasty.

  2. Abnormal lung function in adults with congenital heart disease: prevalence, relation to cardiac anatomy, and association with survival.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Gonzalez, Rafael; Borgia, Francesco; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Inuzuka, Ryo; Kempny, Aleksander; Martinez-Naharro, Ana; Tutarel, Oktay; Marino, Philip; Wustmann, Kerstin; Charalambides, Menelaos; Silva, Margarida; Swan, Lorna; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2013-02-26

    Restrictive lung defects are associated with higher mortality in patients with acquired chronic heart failure. We investigated the prevalence of abnormal lung function, its relation to severity of underlying cardiac defect, its surgical history, and its impact on outcome across the spectrum of adult congenital heart disease. A total of 1188 patients with adult congenital heart disease (age, 33.1±13.1 years) undergoing lung function testing between 2000 and 2009 were included. Patients were classified according to the severity of lung dysfunction based on predicted values of forced vital capacity. Lung function was normal in 53% of patients with adult congenital heart disease, mildly impaired in 17%, and moderately to severely impaired in the remainder (30%). Moderate to severe impairment of lung function related to complexity of underlying cardiac defect, enlarged cardiothoracic ratio, previous thoracotomy/ies, body mass index, scoliosis, and diaphragm palsy. Over a median follow-up period of 6.7 years, 106 patients died. Moderate to severe impairment of lung function was an independent predictor of survival in this cohort. Patients with reduced force vital capacity of at least moderate severity had a 1.6-fold increased risk of death compared with patients with normal lung function (P=0.04). A reduced forced vital capacity is prevalent in patients with adult congenital heart disease; its severity relates to the complexity of the underlying heart defect, surgical history, and scoliosis. Moderate to severe impairment of lung function is an independent predictor of mortality in contemporary patients with adult congenital heart disease.

  3. Radiation–Induced Signaling Results in Mitochondrial Impairment in Mouse Heart at 4 Weeks after Exposure to X-Rays

    PubMed Central

    Barjaktarovic, Zarko; Schmaltz, Dominik; Shyla, Alena; Azimzadeh, Omid; Schulz, Sabine; Haagen, Julia; Dörr, Wolfgang; Sarioglu, Hakan; Schäfer, Alexander; Atkinson, Michael J.; Zischka, Hans; Tapio, Soile

    2011-01-01

    Backround Radiation therapy treatment of breast cancer, Hodgkin's disease or childhood cancers expose the heart to high local radiation doses, causing an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in the survivors decades after the treatment. The mechanisms that underlie the radiation damage remain poorly understood so far. Previous data show that impairment of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism is directly linked to the development of cardiovascular disease. Methodology/Principal findings In this study, the radiation-induced in vivo effects on cardiac mitochondrial proteome and function were investigated. C57BL/6N mice were exposed to local irradiation of the heart with doses of 0.2 Gy or 2 Gy (X-ray, 200 kV) at the age of eight weeks, the control mice were sham-irradiated. After four weeks the cardiac mitochondria were isolated and tested for proteomic and functional alterations. Two complementary proteomics approaches using both peptide and protein quantification strategies showed radiation-induced deregulation of 25 proteins in total. Three main biological categories were affected: the oxidative phophorylation, the pyruvate metabolism, and the cytoskeletal structure. The mitochondria exposed to high-dose irradiation showed functional impairment reflected as partial deactivation of Complex I (32%) and Complex III (11%), decreased succinate-driven respiratory capacity (13%), increased level of reactive oxygen species and enhanced oxidation of mitochondrial proteins. The changes in the pyruvate metabolism and structural proteins were seen with both low and high radiation doses. Conclusion/Significance This is the first study showing the biological alterations in the murine heart mitochondria several weeks after the exposure to low- and high-dose of ionizing radiation. Our results show that doses, equivalent to a single dose in radiotherapy, cause long-lasting changes in mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and mitochondria-associated cytoskeleton. This prompts us to

  4. Radiation-induced signaling results in mitochondrial impairment in mouse heart at 4 weeks after exposure to X-rays.

    PubMed

    Barjaktarovic, Zarko; Schmaltz, Dominik; Shyla, Alena; Azimzadeh, Omid; Schulz, Sabine; Haagen, Julia; Dörr, Wolfgang; Sarioglu, Hakan; Schäfer, Alexander; Atkinson, Michael J; Zischka, Hans; Tapio, Soile

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy treatment of breast cancer, Hodgkin's disease or childhood cancers expose the heart to high local radiation doses, causing an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in the survivors decades after the treatment. The mechanisms that underlie the radiation damage remain poorly understood so far. Previous data show that impairment of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism is directly linked to the development of cardiovascular disease. In this study, the radiation-induced in vivo effects on cardiac mitochondrial proteome and function were investigated. C57BL/6N mice were exposed to local irradiation of the heart with doses of 0.2 Gy or 2 Gy (X-ray, 200 kV) at the age of eight weeks, the control mice were sham-irradiated. After four weeks the cardiac mitochondria were isolated and tested for proteomic and functional alterations. Two complementary proteomics approaches using both peptide and protein quantification strategies showed radiation-induced deregulation of 25 proteins in total. Three main biological categories were affected: the oxidative phophorylation, the pyruvate metabolism, and the cytoskeletal structure. The mitochondria exposed to high-dose irradiation showed functional impairment reflected as partial deactivation of Complex I (32%) and Complex III (11%), decreased succinate-driven respiratory capacity (13%), increased level of reactive oxygen species and enhanced oxidation of mitochondrial proteins. The changes in the pyruvate metabolism and structural proteins were seen with both low and high radiation doses. This is the first study showing the biological alterations in the murine heart mitochondria several weeks after the exposure to low- and high-dose of ionizing radiation. Our results show that doses, equivalent to a single dose in radiotherapy, cause long-lasting changes in mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and mitochondria-associated cytoskeleton. This prompts us to propose that these first pathological changes lead to an increased

  5. Impaired Heart Rate Response to Exercise in Diabetes and Its Long-term Significance.

    PubMed

    Sydó, Nóra; Sydó, Tibor; Merkely, Béla; Carta, Karina Gonzales; Murphy, Joseph G; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco; Allison, Thomas G

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the effect of diabetes mellitus on exercise heart rate and the role of impaired heart rate in excess mortality in diabetes. Patients without cardiovascular disease who underwent exercise testing from September 1, 1993, through December 31, 2010, were included. Mortality was determined from Mayo Clinic records and the Minnesota Death Index. Multivariate linear regression was used to compare heart rate responses in patients with vs without diabetes. Cox regression was used to determine the effect of abnormal heart rate recovery and abnormal chronotropic index on survival. A total of 21,396 patients (65.4% men) with a mean ± SD age of 51±11 years, including 1200 patients with diabetes (5.4%), were included. Patients with diabetes had a higher resting heart rate (81±14 vs 77±13 beats/min), lower peak heart rate (154±20 vs 165±19 beats/min), heart rate reserve (73±19 vs 88±19 beats/min), chronotropic index (0.86±0.22 vs 0.99±0.20), and heart rate recovery (15±8 vs 19±9 beats/min) vs patients without diabetes. There were 1362 deaths (6.4%) during a mean ± SD follow-up of 11.9±4.9 years. Adjusting for age, sex, and heart rate-lowering drug use, a chronotropic index less than 0.8 contributed significantly to risk in patients with diabetes (hazard ratio [HR], 2.21; 95% CI, 1.62-3.00; P<.001) and patients without diabetes (HR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.71-2.20; P<.001), as did abnormal heart rate recovery (patients with diabetes: HR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.60-5.05; P<.001; patients without diabetes: HR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.55-1.97). Patients with diabetes exhibit abnormal heart rate responses to exercise, which are independently predictive of reduced long-term survival in patients with diabetes as in patients without diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impaired heart rate recovery is associated with new-onset atrial fibrillation: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Thomas M; Ross, Colleen; Ho, P Michael; Magid, David; Rumsfeld, John S

    2009-03-12

    Autonomic dysfunction appears to play a significant role in the development of atrial fibrillation (AF), and impaired heart rate recovery (HRR) during exercise treadmill testing (ETT) is a known marker for autonomic dysfunction. However, whether impaired HRR is associated with incident AF is unknown. We studied the association of impaired HRR with the development of incident AF, after controlling for demographic and clinical confounders. We studied 8236 patients referred for ETT between 2001 and 2004, and without a prior history of AF. Patients were categorized by normal or impaired HRR on ETT. The primary outcome was the development of AF. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to control for demographic and clinical characteristics. Secondary analyses exploring a continuous relationship between impaired HRR and AF, and exploring interactions between cardiac medication use, HRR, and AF were also conducted. After adjustment, patients with impaired HRR were more likely to develop AF than patients with normal HRR (HR 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06, 1.93). In addition, there was a linear trend between impaired HRR and AF (HR 1.05 for each decreasing BPM in HRR, 95% CI 0.99, 1.11). No interactions between cardiac medications, HRR, and AF were noted. Patients with impaired HRR on ETT were more likely to develop new-onset AF, as compared to patients with normal HRR. These findings support the hypothesis that autonomic dysfunction mediates the development of AF, and suggest that interventions known to improve HRR, such as exercise training, may delay or prevent AF.

  7. Elevated heart rate predicts β cell function in non-diabetic individuals: the RISC cohort.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Fabrice; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Natali, Andrea; Monti, Lucilla; Golay, Alain; Lalic, Katarina; Dekker, Jacqueline; Mari, Andrea; Balkau, Beverley

    2015-09-01

    Elevated heart rate has been associated with insulin resistance and incident type 2 diabetes but its relationship with β-cell function is not known. Our aim was to investigate whether baseline heart rate is associated with β-cell function and hyperglycaemia. We used the prospective RISC cohort with 1005 non-diabetic individuals who had an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at baseline and after 3 years. Impaired glucose regulation was defined as a fasting plasma glucose ≥ 6.1 mmol/l or a 2-h plasma glucose ≥ 7.8 mmol/l. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the OGIS index and insulin secretion and β-cell glucose sensitivity at both baseline and 3 years. Baseline heart rate was positively related to both fasting (P < 0.0001) and 2 h glucose levels (P = 0.02) at year 3 and predicted the presence of impaired glucose regulation at year 3 in a logistic regression model adjusting for insulin sensitivity at inclusion (OR/10 beats per min: 1.31; 95% CI (1.07-1.61); P = 0.01). Baseline heart rate was associated with lower insulin sensitivity (β = -0.11; P < .0001), a decrease in both β-cell glucose sensitivity (β = -0.11; P = 0.003) and basal insulin secretion rate (β = -0.11; P = 0.002) at 3 years in an adjusted multivariable regression model. Baseline heart rate predicted the 3-year decrease in β-cell glucose sensitivity (β = -0.10; P = 0.007) and basal insulin secretion (β = -0.12; P = 0.007). Heart rate predicts β-cell function and impaired glucose regulation at 3 years in non-diabetic individuals, independently of the level of insulin sensitivity. These findings suggest a possible effect of the sympathetic nervous system on β-cell dysfunction, which deserves further investigation. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  8. Adrenergic deficiency leads to impaired electrical conduction and increased arrhythmic potential in the embryonic mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Baker, Candice; Taylor, David G; Osuala, Kingsley; Natarajan, Anupama; Molnar, Peter J; Hickman, James; Alam, Sabikha; Moscato, Brittany; Weinshenker, David; Ebert, Steven N

    2012-07-06

    To determine if adrenergic hormones play a critical role in the functional development of the cardiac pacemaking and conduction system, we employed a mouse model where adrenergic hormone production was blocked due to targeted disruption of the dopamine β-hydroxylase (Dbh) gene. Immunofluorescent histochemical evaluation of the major gap junction protein, connexin 43, revealed that its expression was substantially decreased in adrenergic-deficient (Dbh-/-) relative to adrenergic-competent (Dbh+/+ and Dbh+/-) mouse hearts at embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5), whereas pacemaker and structural protein staining appeared similar. To evaluate cardiac electrical conduction in these hearts, we cultured them on microelectrode arrays (8×8, 200 μm apart). Our results show a significant slowing of atrioventricular conduction in adrenergic-deficient hearts compared to controls (31.4±6.4 vs. 15.4±1.7 ms, respectively, p<0.05). To determine if the absence of adrenergic hormones affected heart rate and rhythm, mouse hearts from adrenergic-competent and deficient embryos were cultured ex vivo at E10.5, and heart rates were measured before and after challenge with the β-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol (0.5 μM). On average, all hearts showed increased heart rate responses following isoproterenol challenge, but a significant (p<0.05) 225% increase in the arrhythmic index (AI) was observed only in adrenergic-deficient hearts. These results show that adrenergic hormones may influence heart development by stimulating connexin 43 expression, facilitating atrioventricular conduction, and helping to maintain cardiac rhythm during a critical phase of embryonic development.

  9. One Minute of Marijuana Secondhand Smoke Exposure Substantially Impairs Vascular Endothelial Function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyin; Derakhshandeh, Ronak; Liu, Jiangtao; Narayan, Shilpa; Nabavizadeh, Pooneh; Le, Stephenie; Danforth, Olivia M; Pinnamaneni, Kranthi; Rodriguez, Hilda J; Luu, Emmy; Sievers, Richard E; Schick, Suzaynn F; Glantz, Stanton A; Springer, Matthew L

    2016-07-27

    Despite public awareness that tobacco secondhand smoke (SHS) is harmful, many people still assume that marijuana SHS is benign. Debates about whether smoke-free laws should include marijuana are becoming increasingly widespread as marijuana is legalized and the cannabis industry grows. Lack of evidence for marijuana SHS causing acute cardiovascular harm is frequently mistaken for evidence that it is harmless, despite chemical and physical similarity between marijuana and tobacco smoke. We investigated whether brief exposure to marijuana SHS causes acute vascular endothelial dysfunction. We measured endothelial function as femoral artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in rats before and after exposure to marijuana SHS at levels similar to real-world tobacco SHS conditions. One minute of exposure to marijuana SHS impaired FMD to a comparable extent as impairment from equal concentrations of tobacco SHS, but recovery was considerably slower for marijuana. Exposure to marijuana SHS directly caused cannabinoid-independent vasodilation that subsided within 25 minutes, whereas FMD remained impaired for at least 90 minutes. Impairment occurred even when marijuana lacked cannabinoids and rolling paper was omitted. Endothelium-independent vasodilation by nitroglycerin administration was not impaired. FMD was not impaired by exposure to chamber air. One minute of exposure to marijuana SHS substantially impairs endothelial function in rats for at least 90 minutes, considerably longer than comparable impairment by tobacco SHS. Impairment of FMD does not require cannabinoids, nicotine, or rolling paper smoke. Our findings in rats suggest that SHS can exert similar adverse cardiovascular effects regardless of whether it is from tobacco or marijuana. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  10. Functional Assessment in Young Children with Neurological Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Stephen M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the role and practice of functional-status assessment in young children with neurological impairments, examines issues in selection of functional assessment measures, and describes functional assessment approaches developed in the fields of special education and pediatric rehabilitation, including adaptive scales,…

  11. Cognitive Impairment Precedes and Predicts Functional Impairment in Mild Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu-Seifert, Hong; Siemers, Eric; Price, Karen; Han, Baoguang; Selzler, Katherine J.; Henley, David; Sundell, Karen; Aisen, Paul; Cummings, Jeffrey; Raskin, Joel; Mohs, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The temporal relationship of cognitive deficit and functional impairment in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is not well characterized. Recent analyses suggest cognitive decline predicts subsequent functional decline throughout AD progression. Objective: To better understand the relationship between cognitive and functional decline in mild AD using autoregressive cross-lagged (ARCL) panel analyses in several clinical trials. Methods: Data included placebo patients with mild AD pooled from two multicenter, double-blind, Phase 3 solanezumab (EXPEDITION/2) or semagacestat (IDENTITY/2) studies, and from AD patients participating in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Cognitive and functional outcomes were assessed using AD Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog), AD Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living instrumental subscale (ADCS-iADL), or Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ), respectively. ARCL panel analyses evaluated relationships between cognitive and functional impairment over time. Results: In EXPEDITION, ARCL panel analyses demonstrated cognitive scores significantly predicted future functional impairment at 5 of 6 time points, while functional scores predicted subsequent cognitive scores in only 1 of 6 time points. Data from IDENTITY and ADNI programs yielded consistent results whereby cognition predicted subsequent function, but not vice-versa. Conclusions: Analyses from three databases indicated cognitive decline precedes and predicts subsequent functional decline in mild AD dementia, consistent with previously proposed hypotheses, and corroborate recent publications using similar methodologies. Cognitive impairment may be used as a predictor of future functional impairment in mild AD dementia and can be considered a critical target for prevention strategies to limit future functional decline in the dementia process. PMID:26402769

  12. Effect of yoga therapy on heart rate, blood pressure and cardiac autonomic function in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Bandi Hari; Pal, Pravati; G K, Pal; J, Balachander; E, Jayasettiaseelon; Y, Sreekanth; M G, Sridhar; G S, Gaur

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that a hall mark of heart failure is adverse changes in autonomic function. Elevated blood pressure is a powerful predictor of congestive heart failure and other Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) outcomes. In this study, we planned to examine the effects of a 12 week yoga therapy on blood pressure, heart rate, heart rate variability, and rate pressure product (RPP). Out of 130 heart failure patients recruited for the study, 65 patients were randomly selected to receive 12 week yoga therapy along with standard medical therapy (yoga group). Other patients (n=65) received only standard medical therapy (control group). Heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac autonomic function (by short-term heart-rate variability analysis) and myocardial oxygen consumption (by RPP) were assessed before and after 12 weeks. In the yoga group, 44 patients and in the control group, 48 patients completed the study. There was a significant decrease in heart rate, blood pressure and RPP in yoga group compared to control group. Also, LFnu and LF-HF ratio decreased significantly and HFnu increased significantly in yoga group compared to control group. Twelve-week yoga therapy significantly improved the parasympathetic activity and decreased the sympathetic activity in heart failure patients (NYHA I&II).

  13. Cardiac telomere length in heart development, function, and disease.

    PubMed

    Booth, S A; Charchar, F J

    2017-07-01

    Telomeres are repetitive nucleoprotein structures at chromosome ends, and a decrease in the number of these repeats, known as a reduction in telomere length (TL), triggers cellular senescence and apoptosis. Heart disease, the worldwide leading cause of death, often results from the loss of cardiac cells, which could be explained by decreases in TL. Due to the cell-specific regulation of TL, this review focuses on studies that have measured telomeres in heart cells and critically assesses the relationship between cardiac TL and heart function. There are several lines of evidence that have identified rapid changes in cardiac TL during the onset and progression of heart disease as well as at critical stages of development. There are also many factors, such as the loss of telomeric proteins, oxidative stress, and hypoxia, that decrease cardiac TL and heart function. In contrast, antioxidants, calorie restriction, and exercise can prevent both cardiac telomere attrition and the progression of heart disease. TL in the heart is also indicative of proliferative potential and could facilitate the identification of cells suitable for cardiac rejuvenation. Although these findings highlight the involvement of TL in heart function, there are important questions regarding the validity of animal models, as well as several confounding factors, that need to be considered when interpreting results and planning future research. With these in mind, elucidating the telomeric mechanisms involved in heart development and the transition to disease holds promise to prevent cardiac dysfunction and potentiate regeneration after injury. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. The Brief Impairment Scale (Bis): A Multidimensional Scale of Functional Impairment for Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Hector R.; Canino, Glorisa J.; Davies, Mark; Ramirez, Rafael; Chavez, Ligia; Duarte, Cristiane; Shen, Sa

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This article provides the results of the psychometric testing of the Brief Impairment Scale (BIS). The BIS is a 23-item instrument that evaluates three domains of functioning: interpersonal relations, school/work functioning, and self-care/self-fulfilment. It capitalizes on the strengths of existing global measures while addressing some…

  15. The Brief Impairment Scale (Bis): A Multidimensional Scale of Functional Impairment for Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Hector R.; Canino, Glorisa J.; Davies, Mark; Ramirez, Rafael; Chavez, Ligia; Duarte, Cristiane; Shen, Sa

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This article provides the results of the psychometric testing of the Brief Impairment Scale (BIS). The BIS is a 23-item instrument that evaluates three domains of functioning: interpersonal relations, school/work functioning, and self-care/self-fulfilment. It capitalizes on the strengths of existing global measures while addressing some…

  16. Relationship between pulse transit time and blood pressure is impaired in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Daniel R; Roesch, Norbert; Harpes, Patrick; Körtke, Heinrich; Plumer, Pierre; Saberin, Amir; Chakoutio, Viviane; Oundjede, Denis; Delagardelle, Charles; Beissel, Jean; Gilson, Georges; Kindermann, Ingrid; Böhm, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT), the interval between ventricular electrical activity and arrival of the peripheral pulse wave, has been used to detect changes in autonomic tone during sleep and anesthesia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate PTT in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). Pulse transit time was measured with R-wave gated photoplethysmography in 24 healthy volunteers and in 112 patients with chronic HF and ejection fraction (EF) <40%. PTT was mildly elevated in patients with HF (468 ± 12 vs. 430 ± 23 ms, p = 0.001). In healthy volunteers, PTT was directly proportional to blood pressure (BP): when BP increased, PTT shortened, and vice versa. This relationship between PTT and BP (PTTi) was altered in patients with HF and particularly in the 26 patients with decompensated HF (3.6 ± 0.4 vs. 4.2 ± 0.9, p = 0.04). PTTi did not correlate with functional NYHA class and levels of pro-BNP, epinephrine or norepinephrine. There was a modest correlation between PTTi and EF (p = 0.01, r = -0.48) and PTTi tended to correlate with microvascular flow measured with Laser Doppler (p = 0.08). However, there was an excellent correlation between PTTi and systolic time intervals, left ventricular ejection time (LVET) (p = 0.0014, r = -0.75) and pre-ejection time/LVET (p = 0.006, r = 0.80). The latter ratio reflects ventricular-arterial coupling. The relationship between PTT and BP is altered in severe HF and may indicate impaired ventricular-arterial coupling. It merits further investigation as both parameters can be easily determined and used for serial monitoring in HF.

  17. Effect of low thyroid function on cardiac structure and function in spontaneously hypertensive heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Kisso, Bassel; Patel, Ankit; Redetzke, Rebecca; Gerdes, A Martin

    2008-03-01

    Although low thyroid function is known to have detrimental effects on the cardiovascular system, including microvascular impairment, little is known about the pathophysiologic consequences of hypothyroidism in the background of hypertension. Hypothyroidism was induced in female spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rats by treatment with propylthiouracil (PTU) for 6 months. Untreated SHHF and normotensive Wistar Furth (WF) rats served as controls. In terminal experiments, heart weight, echocardiographic measurements, hemodynamics, and arteriolar morphometry were performed. Left ventricular internal diameter in systole and diastole were increased and wall thickness, ejection fraction, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and +/-dP/dt were significantly decreased in the treatment group. Surprisingly, there were no observed differences in arteriolar density among the 3 groups. As expected, PTU treatment of SHHF rats led to systolic dysfunction and chamber dilation. However, PTU treatment did not lead to arteriolar loss as previously observed in normotensive rats treated with PTU. These finding suggest that induced hypothyroidism leads to detrimental changes in SHHF rats, but the overall effects were no worse than those previously observed in normotensive rats treated with PTU.

  18. Impairment of Caloric Function after Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuang, Heide; Haversat, Heather H.; Michaelides, Elias M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article seeks to review current literature on caloric function following cochlear implantation while analyzing any correlations of caloric function changes with vestibular symptoms. Method: This article is a systematic review of evidence-based literature. English language articles published between 1980 and 2014 that presented some…

  19. Impairment of Caloric Function after Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuang, Heide; Haversat, Heather H.; Michaelides, Elias M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article seeks to review current literature on caloric function following cochlear implantation while analyzing any correlations of caloric function changes with vestibular symptoms. Method: This article is a systematic review of evidence-based literature. English language articles published between 1980 and 2014 that presented some…

  20. Right heart function and haemodynamics in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hemnes, A R; Champion, H C

    2008-07-01

    The primary challenge in the care of the patient with advanced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is right ventricular dysfunction with concomitant right heart failure. Right heart function is closely tied to survival in this disease, and there is a growing interest in the study of this unique structure. While echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) have augmented our ability to image the right ventricle (RV), the primary means of assessing right heart function remains right heart catheterisation. Several of the currently available treatments for PAH have been shown to have effects on the RV, not just the pulmonary vasculature, and, in future, therapies aimed at optimizing right ventricular function may allow better outcomes in this challenging disease. New directions in right ventricular assessment including measurement of pulmonary vascular impedance and more widespread availability of CMR may allow greater knowledge about this little studied, yet highly important, right side of the heart.

  1. PTSD subclusters and functional impairment in Kosovo peacekeepers.

    PubMed

    Maguen, Shira; Stalnaker, Mark; McCaslin, Shannon; Litz, Brett T

    2009-08-01

    Peacekeepers deployed to Kosovo (N = 203) were evaluated prospectively, before the mission (August 2000) and at postdeployment, on a number of mental health and functional impairment variables. We examined the association between PTSD symptom subclusters and three indicators of functional impairment using hierarchical regression analyses, controlling for PTSD symptoms before the mission, and history of prior trauma. In the first model, avoidance and hyperarousal symptoms uniquely predicted a conglomerate of functional impact outcomes (e.g., employment, family relationships, social functioning). In the second model, emotional numbing was the only significant predictor of violent behaviors. In the third model, re-experiencing symptoms were the only significant predictor of alcohol abuse problems. Overall, the four PTSD subclusters are differentially associated with varying functional impairment outcomes, which is important to note for evaluation and treatment purposes for veterans returning from overseas deployments.

  2. Impaired physical function following pediatric LT.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Amy G; Neighbors, Katie; Mukherjee, Shubhra; Rak, Melanie; Varni, James W; Alonso, Estella M

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the spectrum of physical function of pediatric liver transplantation (LT) recipients 12-24 months after LT. Review data were collected through the functional outcomes group, an ancillary study of the Studies of Pediatric Liver Transplantation registry. Patients were eligible if they had survived LT by 12-24 months. Children ≥ 8 years and parents completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ 4.0 generic core scales, which includes 8 questions assessing physical function. Scores were compared to a matched healthy child population (n = 1658) and between survivors with optimal versus nonoptimal health. A total of 263 patients were included. Median age at transplant and survey was 4.8 years (interquartile range [IQR], 1.3-11.4 years) and 5.9 years (IQR, 2.6-13.1 years), respectively. The mean physical functioning score on child and parent reports were 81.2 ± 17.3 and 77.1 ± 23.7, respectively. Compared to a matched healthy population, transplant survivors and their parents reported lower physical function scores (P < 0.001); 32.9% of patients and 35.0% of parents reported a physical function score <75, which is > 1 standard deviation below the mean of a healthy population. Physical functioning scores were significantly higher in survivors with optimal health than those with nonoptimal health (P < 0.01). There was a significant relationship between emotional functioning and physical functioning scores for LT recipients (r = 0.69; P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, primary disease, height z score < -1.64 at longterm follow-up (LTF) visit,  > 4 days of hospitalization since LTF visit, and not being listed as status 1 were predictors of poor physical function. In conclusion, pediatric LT recipients 1-2 years after LT and their parents report lower physical function than a healthy population. Findings suggest practitioners need to routinely assess physical function, and

  3. Impaired Physical Function Following Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Amy G.; Neighbors, Katie; Mukherjee, Shubra; Rak, Melanie; Varni, James W.; Alonso, Estella M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Investigate the spectrum of physical function of pediatric liver transplant (LT) recipients 12–24 months post-LT. Study design Review data collected through the Functional Outcomes Group, an ancillary study of Studies of Pediatric Liver Transplantation registry. Patients were eligible if they had survived LT by 12–24 months. Children ≥ 8 years and parents completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales, which includes 8 questions assessing physical function. Scores were compared to a matched healthy child population (n=1658), and between survivors with optimal versus non-optimal health. Results A total of 263 patients were included. Median age at transplant and survey was 4.8 years (IQR 1.3–11.4) and 5.9 years (IQR 2.6–13.1), respectively. The mean Physical Functioning Score on child and parent reports were 81.2± 17.3 and 77.1± 23.7, respectively. Compared to a matched healthy population, transplant survivors and their parents reported lower physical function scores (p<0.01). 32.9% of patients and 35.0% of parents reported a physical function score <75, which is >1 SD below the mean of a healthy population. Physical Function Scores were significantly higher in survivors with optimal health than those with non-optimal health (p<0.01). There was a significant relationship between Emotional Functioning and Physical Functioning Scores for LT recipients (r=0.69, p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, primary disease, height Z score<−1.64 at long term follow-up (LTF) visit, ≥4 days of hospitalization since LTF visit, and not listed as Status 1 were predictors of poor physical function. Conclusions Pediatric LT recipients 1–2 years post-LT and their parents report lower physical function than a healthy population. Findings suggest practitioners need to routinely assess physical function, and development of rehabilitation programs may be important. PMID:26850789

  4. Peak oxygen uptake and left ventricular ejection fraction, but not depressive symptoms, are associated with cognitive impairment in patients with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Gerrit; Lossnitzer, Nicole; Schellberg, Dieter; Mueller-Tasch, Thomas; Krueger, Carsten; Haass, Markus; Ladwig, Karl Heinz; Herzog, Wolfgang; Juenger, Jana

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to assess cognitive impairment in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and its associations with depressive symptoms and somatic indicators of illness severity, which is a matter of controversy. Methods and results Fifty-five patients with CHF (mean age 55.3 ± 7.8 years; 80% male; New York Heart Association functional class I–III) underwent assessment with an expanded neuropsychological test battery (eg, memory, complex attention, mental flexibility, psychomotor speed) to evaluate objective and subjective cognitive impairment. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (SCID) and a self-report inventory (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]). A comprehensive clinical dataset, including left ventricular ejection fraction, peak oxygen uptake, and a 6-minute walk test, was obtained for all patients. Neuropsychological functioning revealed impairment in 56% of patients in at least one measure of our neuropsychological test battery. However, the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) could only detect cognitive impairment in 1.8% of all patients, 24% had HADS scores indicating depressive symptoms, and 11.1% met SCID criteria for a depressive disorder. No significant association was found between depressive symptoms and cognitive impairment. Left ventricular ejection fraction was related to subjective cognitive impairment, and peak oxygen uptake was related to objective cognitive impairment. Conclusion Cognitive functioning was substantially reduced in patients with CHF and should therefore be diagnosed and treated in routine clinical practice. Caution is advised when the MMSE is used to identify cognitive impairment in patients with CHF. PMID:22267941

  5. [Impaired hemostasis as a cause of intensified bleeding after heart surgery with extracorporeal blood circulation].

    PubMed

    Morozov, Iu A; Charnaia, M A; Gladysheva, V G

    2004-01-01

    The paper contains the results of a retrospective analysis of causes for an intensified bleeding in patients operated on the heart with artificial blood circulation. An affected hemostasis plasma chain, i.e. insufficiency of blood coagulation factors due to hemodelution, hypofibrinogenemia etc., provoked the above disorder in 39% of patients with a higher postoperative bleeding. Additional reasons for the impaired hemostasis chain included: the "heparin-rebound" phenomenon (3.4%), activation of the secondary fibrinolysis (3.4%) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) (0.14%). Finally, an undiagnosed inadequate surgical hemostasis provoked an intense bleeding in 19.5% of cases.

  6. Phonatory Function of Neurologically Impaired Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwirner, Petra; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This investigation compared five parameters of phonatory function in an examination of the use of acoustic measures in differential diagnosis in 39 subjects in 3 neuropathological groups (Parkinson, Huntington, cerebellar ataxia) and a normal control group. Results indicated higher variability in perturbation in all the neuropathological groups.…

  7. Phonatory Function of Neurologically Impaired Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwirner, Petra; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This investigation compared five parameters of phonatory function in an examination of the use of acoustic measures in differential diagnosis in 39 subjects in 3 neuropathological groups (Parkinson, Huntington, cerebellar ataxia) and a normal control group. Results indicated higher variability in perturbation in all the neuropathological groups.…

  8. Functional Impairment and Occupational Outcome in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjervan, Bjorn; Torgersen, Terje; Nordahl, Hans M.; Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Objective: ADHD is associated with poor functional outcomes. The objectives were to investigate the prevalence of functional impairment and occupational status in a clinically referred sample of adults with ADHD and explore factors predicting occupational outcome. Method: A sample of 149 adults with a confirmed diagnosis of ADHD participated in…

  9. Functional Impairment and Occupational Outcome in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjervan, Bjorn; Torgersen, Terje; Nordahl, Hans M.; Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Objective: ADHD is associated with poor functional outcomes. The objectives were to investigate the prevalence of functional impairment and occupational status in a clinically referred sample of adults with ADHD and explore factors predicting occupational outcome. Method: A sample of 149 adults with a confirmed diagnosis of ADHD participated in…

  10. Executive Function Impairment in Adolescence: TBI and ADHD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ylvisaker, Mark; Debonis, David

    2000-01-01

    This article presents a functional understanding of the executive system, its development in childhood, its relation to communication effectiveness, and an everyday approach to intervention for adolescents with executive function impairments associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The role of…

  11. Genome-wide compendium and functional assessment of in vivo heart enhancers

    DOE PAGES

    Dickel, Diane E.; Barozzi, Iros; Zhu, Yiwen; ...

    2016-10-05

    Whole-genome sequencing is identifying growing numbers of non-coding variants in human disease studies, but the lack of accurate functional annotations prevents their interpretation. We describe the genome-wide landscape of distant-acting enhancers active in the developing and adult human heart, an organ whose impairment is a predominant cause of mortality and morbidity. Using integrative analysis of > 35 epigenomic data sets from mouse and human pre-and postnatal hearts we created a comprehensive reference of > 80,000 putative human heart enhancers. To illustrate the importance of enhancers in the regulation of genes involved in heart disease, we deleted the mouse orthologs ofmore » two human enhancers near cardiac myosin genes. In both cases, we observe in vivo expression changes and cardiac phenotypes consistent with human heart disease. Our study provides a comprehensive catalogue of human heart enhancers for use in clinical whole-genome sequencing studies and highlights the importance of enhancers for cardiac function.« less

  12. Particulate air pollution and impaired lung function

    PubMed Central

    Paulin, Laura; Hansel, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world, particularly in individuals with existing lung disease. Of the most common air pollutants, particulate matter (PM) is associated with an increased risk of exacerbations and respiratory symptoms in individuals with existing lung disease, and to a lesser extent, in those without known respiratory issues. The majority of published research has focused on the effects of PM exposures on symptoms and health care utilization. Fewer studies focus on the impact of PM on objective measurements of pulmonary function. This review will focus on the effects of PM exposure on objective measurements of lung function in both healthy individuals and those with existing lung disease. PMID:26962445

  13. Treatment Concerns and Functional Impairment in Pediatric Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Wu, Monica S; Salloum, Alison; Lewin, Adam B; Selles, Robert R; McBride, Nicole M; Crawford, Erika A; Storch, Eric A

    2016-08-01

    Although there are efficacious, evidence-based treatments for anxiety disorders, youth often experience delays in seeking therapy. Myriad reasons may contribute to this lag in treatment initiation, with some youth possessing concerns about therapy. Treatment concerns are broadly characterized by worries/ambivalence about seeking treatment, including concerns about the negative reactions, consequences, and inconvenience of treatment. As no studies exist for youth with anxiety disorders, this study examined the phenomenology of treatment concerns in 119 treatment-seeking, anxious youth and utilized a structural equation model to examine the relationship between child anxiety, depressive symptoms, treatment concerns, and anxiety-related functional impairment. Over 90 % of the children positively endorsed some type of treatment-related fear, with the most frequently expressed concern being that therapy would take too much time (50.4 %). Based on the model, both child anxiety and depressive symptoms predicted functional impairment, and treatment concerns mediated the relationship between child anxiety and functional impairment.

  14. [Cannabis use and impairment of respiratory function].

    PubMed

    Underner, M; Urban, T; Perriot, J; Peiffer, G; Meurice, J-C

    2013-04-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly smoked illicit substance in many countries including France. It can be smoked alone in plant form (marijuana) but in our country it is mainly smoked in the form of cannabis resin mixed with tobacco. The technique of inhaling cannabis differs from that of tobacco, increasing the time that the smoke spends in contact with the bronchial mucosal and its impact on respiratory function. One cigarette composed of cannabis and tobacco is much more harmful than a cigarette containing only tobacco. In cannabis smokers there is an increased incidence of respiratory symptoms and episodes of acute bronchitis. Cannabis produces a rapid bronchodilator effect; chronic use provokes a reduction in specific conductance and increase in airways resistance. Studies on the decline of Forced Expiratory Volume are discordant. Cannabis smoke and tetrahydrocannabinol irritate the bronchial tree. They bring about histological signs of airways inflammation and alter the fungicidal and antibacterial activity of alveolar macrophages. Inhalation of cannabis smoke is a risk factor for lung cancer. Stopping smoking cannabis will bring about important benefits for lung function. This should encourage clinicians to offer patients support in quitting smoking. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Perceived Cognitive Impairment among African American elders: health and functional impairments in daily life

    PubMed Central

    Ficker, Lisa J.; Lysack, Cathy L.; Hanna, Mena; Lichtenberg, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The Center for Disease Control began to assess Perceived Cognitive Impairment in 2009, yet there has been no in-depth study of how perceived decline in thinking or memory skills may be associated to the health and lifestyle of an independent community-dwelling older person. Among urban-dwelling older African Americans who are at elevated risk for cognitive impairment and dementia, we know even less regarding the interaction of these risk factors. Method Five hundred and one African American elders (n = 501) between the ages of 55 and 95 with an average age of 70.73 years (SD = 8.6 years) participated in telephone interviews. Results Approximately one-third of the elders reported that their memory, thinking skills, or ability to reason was worse than a year ago (n = 150; 29.9%) and 25% of this group (n = 38) reported that this Perceived Cognitive Impairment impacted their daily activities and/or warranted a consultation with their doctor. Bivariate analyses indicated that Perceived Cognitive Impairment was associated with increased health problems, mobility limitations, depressed mood, and lower social functioning. Conclusion Elders who reported that cognitive problems impacted their daily functioning reported the greatest health and mental health problems. Perceived Cognitive Impairment is an important health variable with implications for an older adult’s overall health, mobility, and mental health. PMID:24328435

  16. Creatine kinase–mediated improvement of function in failing mouse hearts provides causal evidence the failing heart is energy starved

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashish; Akki, Ashwin; Wang, Yibin; Leppo, Michelle K.; Chacko, V.P.; Foster, D. Brian; Caceres, Viviane; Shi, Sa; Kirk, Jonathan A.; Su, Jason; Lai, Shenghan; Paolocci, Nazareno; Steenbergen, Charles; Gerstenblith, Gary; Weiss, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    ATP is required for normal cardiac contractile function, and it has long been hypothesized that reduced energy delivery contributes to the contractile dysfunction of heart failure (HF). Despite experimental and clinical HF data showing reduced metabolism through cardiac creatine kinase (CK), the major myocardial energy reserve and temporal ATP buffer, a causal relationship between reduced ATP-CK metabolism and contractile dysfunction in HF has never been demonstrated. Here, we generated mice conditionally overexpressing the myofibrillar isoform of CK (CK-M) to test the hypothesis that augmenting impaired CK-related energy metabolism improves contractile function in HF. CK-M overexpression significantly increased ATP flux through CK ex vivo and in vivo but did not alter contractile function in normal mice. It also led to significantly increased contractile function at baseline and during adrenergic stimulation and increased survival after thoracic aortic constriction (TAC) surgery–induced HF. Withdrawal of CK-M overexpression after TAC resulted in a significant decline in contractile function as compared with animals in which CK-M overexpression was maintained. These observations provide direct evidence that the failing heart is “energy starved” as it relates to CK. In addition, these data identify CK as a promising therapeutic target for preventing and treating HF and possibly diseases involving energy-dependent dysfunction in other organs with temporally varying energy demands. PMID:22201686

  17. Reduced Physical Fitness in Patients With Heart Failure as a Possible Risk Factor for Impaired Driving Performance

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Penn, Marc S.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Cleveland, Mary Jo; Ott, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Reduced physical fitness secondary to heart failure (HF) may contribute to poor driving; reduced physical fitness is a known correlate of cognitive impairment and has been associated with decreased independence in driving. No study has examined the associations among physical fitness, cognition, and driving performance in people with HF. METHOD. Eighteen people with HF completed a physical fitness assessment, a cognitive test battery, and a validated driving simulator scenario. RESULTS. Partial correlations showed that poorer physical fitness was correlated with more collisions and stop signs missed and lower scores on a composite score of attention, executive function, and psychomotor speed. Cognitive dysfunction predicted reduced driving simulation performance. CONCLUSION. Reduced physical fitness in participants with HF was associated with worse simulated driving, possibly because of cognitive dysfunction. Larger studies using on-road testing are needed to confirm our findings and identify clinical interventions to maximize safe driving. PMID:26122681

  18. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Carneiro, Vitor C; Mata-Santos, Hilton; Vicentino, Amanda R R; Ramos, Isalira P; Giarola, Naira L L; Feijó, Daniel F; Meyer-Fernandes, José R; Paula-Neto, Heitor A; Medei, Emiliano; Bozza, Marcelo T; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Paiva, Claudia N

    2016-10-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol's actions using metformin (AMPK-activator) or tempol (SOD-mimetic). Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC.

  19. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Santos, Hilton; Vicentino, Amanda R. R.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Meyer-Fernandes, José R.; Paula-Neto, Heitor A.; Medei, Emiliano; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Paiva, Claudia N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol’s actions using metformin (AMPK-activator) or tempol (SOD-mimetic). Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC. PMID:27788262

  20. Hypercholesterolemia Impaired Sperm Functionality in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Monclus, Maria A.; Cabrillana, Maria E.; Clementi, Marisa A.; Espínola, Leandro S.; Cid Barría, Jose L.; Vincenti, Amanda E.; Santi, Analia G.; Fornés, Miguel W.

    2010-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia represents a high risk factor for frequent diseases and it has also been associated with poor semen quality that may lead to male infertility. The aim of this study was to analyze semen and sperm function in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Twelve adult White New Zealand male rabbits were fed ad libitum a control diet or a diet supplemented with 0.05% cholesterol. Rabbits under cholesterol-enriched diet significantly increased total cholesterol level in the serum. Semen examination revealed a significant reduction in semen volume and sperm motility in hypercholesterolemic rabbits (HCR). Sperm cell morphology was seriously affected, displaying primarily a “folded head”-head fold along the major axe-, and the presence of cytoplasmic droplet on sperm flagellum. Cholesterol was particularly increased in acrosomal region when detected by filipin probe. The rise in cholesterol concentration in sperm cells was determined quantitatively by Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses. We also found a reduction of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in sperm incubated under capacitating conditions from HCR. Interestingly, the addition of Protein Kinase A pathway activators -dibutyryl-cyclic AMP and iso-butylmethylxanthine- to the medium restored sperm capacitation. Finally, it was also reported a significant decrease in the percentage of reacted sperm in the presence of progesterone. In conclusion, our data showed that diet-induced hypercholesterolemia adversely affects semen quality and sperm motility, capacitation and acrosomal reaction in rabbits; probably due to an increase in cellular cholesterol content that alters membrane related events. PMID:20976152

  1. Dietary phosphorus acutely impairs endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Shuto, Emi; Taketani, Yutaka; Tanaka, Rieko; Harada, Nagakatsu; Isshiki, Masashi; Sato, Minako; Nashiki, Kunitaka; Amo, Kikuko; Yamamoto, Hironori; Higashi, Yukihito; Nakaya, Yutaka; Takeda, Eiji

    2009-07-01

    Excessive dietary phosphorus may increase cardiovascular risk in healthy individuals as well as in patients with chronic kidney disease, but the mechanisms underlying this risk are not completely understood. To determine whether postprandial hyperphosphatemia may promote endothelial dysfunction, we investigated the acute effect of phosphorus loading on endothelial function in vitro and in vivo. Exposing bovine aortic endothelial cells to a phosphorus load increased production of reactive oxygen species, which depended on phosphorus influx via sodium-dependent phosphate transporters, and decreased nitric oxide production via inhibitory phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Phosphorus loading inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation of rat aortic rings. In 11 healthy men, we alternately served meals containing 400 mg or 1200 mg of phosphorus in a double-blind crossover study and measured flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery before and 2 h after the meals. The high dietary phosphorus load increased serum phosphorus at 2 h and significantly decreased flow-mediated dilation. Flow-mediated dilation correlated inversely with serum phosphorus. Taken together, these findings suggest that endothelial dysfunction mediated by acute postprandial hyperphosphatemia may contribute to the relationship between serum phosphorus level and the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  2. Dietary Phosphorus Acutely Impairs Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Shuto, Emi; Taketani, Yutaka; Tanaka, Rieko; Harada, Nagakatsu; Isshiki, Masashi; Sato, Minako; Nashiki, Kunitaka; Amo, Kikuko; Yamamoto, Hironori; Higashi, Yukihito; Nakaya, Yutaka; Takeda, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    Excessive dietary phosphorus may increase cardiovascular risk in healthy individuals as well as in patients with chronic kidney disease, but the mechanisms underlying this risk are not completely understood. To determine whether postprandial hyperphosphatemia may promote endothelial dysfunction, we investigated the acute effect of phosphorus loading on endothelial function in vitro and in vivo. Exposing bovine aortic endothelial cells to a phosphorus load increased production of reactive oxygen species, which depended on phosphorus influx via sodium-dependent phosphate transporters, and decreased nitric oxide production via inhibitory phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Phosphorus loading inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation of rat aortic rings. In 11 healthy men, we alternately served meals containing 400 mg or 1200 mg of phosphorus in a double-blind crossover study and measured flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery before and 2 h after the meals. The high dietary phosphorus load increased serum phosphorus at 2 h and significantly decreased flow-mediated dilation. Flow-mediated dilation correlated inversely with serum phosphorus. Taken together, these findings suggest that endothelial dysfunction mediated by acute postprandial hyperphosphatemia may contribute to the relationship between serum phosphorus level and the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:19406976

  3. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Physical Function after Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Shanholtz, Carl; Husain, Nadia; Dennison, Cheryl R.; Herridge, Margaret S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and physical impairment, but the longitudinal epidemiology of these conditions remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate the 2-year incidence and duration of depressive symptoms and physical impairment after ALI, as well as risk factors for these conditions. Methods: This prospective, longitudinal cohort study recruited patients from 13 intensive care units (ICUs) in four hospitals, with follow-up 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI. The outcomes were Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score greater than or equal to 8 (“depressive symptoms”) in patients without a history of depression before ALI, and two or more dependencies in instrumental activities of daily living (“impaired physical function”) in patients without baseline impairment. Measurements and Main Results: During 2-year follow-up of 186 ALI survivors, the cumulative incidences of depressive symptoms and impaired physical function were 40 and 66%, respectively, with greatest incidence by 3-month follow-up; modal durations were greater than 21 months for each outcome. Risk factors for incident depressive symptoms were education 12 years or less, baseline disability or unemployment, higher baseline medical comorbidity, and lower blood glucose in the ICU. Risk factors for incident impaired physical function were longer ICU stay and prior depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Incident depressive symptoms and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting during the first 2 years after ALI. Interventions targeting potentially modifiable risk factors (e.g., substantial depressive symptoms in early recovery) should be evaluated to improve ALI survivors’ long-term outcomes. PMID:22161158

  4. Liguzinediol improved the heart function and inhibited myocardial cell apoptosis in rats with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu; Song, Ping; Zhu, Qing; Yin, Qiu-yi; Ji, Jia-wen; Li, Wei; Bian, Hui-min

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Liguzinediol is a novel derivative of ligustrazine isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine Chuanxiong (Ligusticum wallichii Franch), and produces significant positive inotropic effect in isolated rat hearts. In this study we investigated the effects of liguzinediol on a rat model of heart failure. Methods: To induce heart failure, male SD rats were injected with doxorubicin (DOX, 2 mg/kg, ip) once a week for 4 weeks. Then the rats were administered with liguzinediol (5, 10, 20 mg·kg−1·d−1, po) for 2 weeks. Hemodynamic examination was conducted to evaluate heart function. Myocardial cell apoptosis was examined morphologically. The expression of related genes and proteins were analyzed using immunohistochemical staining and Western blot assays, respectively. Results: Oral administration of liguzinediol dose-dependently improved the heart function in DOX-treated rats. Electron microscopy revealed that liguzinediol (10 mg·kg−1·d−1) markedly attenuated DOX-induced injury of cardiomyocytes, and decreased the number of apoptotic bodies in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, liguzinediol significantly decreased Bax protein level, and increased Bcl-2 protein level in cardiomyocytes of DOX-treated rats, led to an increase in the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax. Moreover, liguzinediol significantly decreased the expression of both cleaved caspase-3 and NF-κB in cardiomyocytes of DOX-treated rats. Administration of digitalis (0.0225 mg·kg−1·d−1) also markedly improved the heart function and the morphology of cardiomyocytes in DOX-treated rats. Conclusion: Liguzinediol improves the heart function and inhibits myocardial cell apoptosis in the rat model of heart failure, which is associated with regulating Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3 and NF-κB expression. PMID:25220638

  5. Functional iron deficiency and diastolic function in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Kasner, Mario; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar S; Westermann, Dirk; Lassner, Dirk; Gross, Michael; von Haehling, Stephan; Anker, Stefan D; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Tschöpe, Carsten

    2013-10-12

    Functional iron deficiency (FID) is an independent risk factor for poor outcome in advanced heart failure with reduced EF, but its role in heart failure with preserved EF (HFPEF) remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the impact of FID on cardiac performance determined by pressure-volume loop analysis in HFPEF. 26 HFPEF patients who showed an increase in LV stiffness by pressure-volume (PV) loop analysis obtained by conductance-catheterization, performed exercise testing, echocardiographic examination including tissue Doppler and determination of iron metabolism: serum iron, ferritin and transferrin saturation. HFPEF patients who provided ferritin <100 μg/l or ferritin of 100-299 μg/l in combination with transferrin saturation <20% were defined as having FID. In 14 patients the expression of transferrin receptor was determined from available endomyocardial biopsies. Fifteen out of 26 HFPEF patients showed FID without anemia. Compared to control subjects and HFPEF patients without FID, HFPEF patients with FID showed an up-regulation of the myocardial transferrin receptor expression (p<0.05). No differences between HFPEF patients with and without iron deficiency were found in heart dimensions, systolic and diastolic function obtained by PV-loop and echocardiography analysis. According to the linear regression analysis, LV stiffness was correlated with peak oxygen uptake (r=-0.636, p<0.001) but not with the ferritin level or transferrin saturation. No relation was found between FID and exercise capacity. The association of LV stiffness with exercise performance was independent from the level of iron deficiency. In non-anemic HFPEF patients, cardiac dysfunction and impaired exercise capacity occur independently of FID. © 2013.

  6. Mediterranean Dietary Patterns and Impaired Physical Function in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Struijk, Ellen A; Guallar-Castillón, Pilar; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; López-García, Esther

    2016-10-19

    Information about nutritional risk factors of functional limitation is scarce. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the Mediterranean diet and risk of physical function impairment in older adults. We used data from 1,630 participants in the Seniors-ENRICA cohort aged ≥60 years. In 2008-2010, adherence to the Mediterranean diet pattern was measured with the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) and the Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS). Study participants were followed up through 2012 to assess incident impairment in agility and mobility as well as impairment in overall physical functioning, defined as a ≥5-point decrease from baseline to follow-up in the physical component summary of the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Over a median follow-up of 3.5 years, we identified 343 individuals with agility limitation, 212 with mobility limitation, and 457 with decreased overall physical functioning. No association was found between the MDS score and the likelihood of impaired agility or mobility, although a 2-point increment in the MDS score was marginally associated with lower likelihood for decreased overall physical function. Compared to individuals in the lowest tertile of the MEDAS score, those in the highest tertile showed a lower odds of agility limitation (odds ratio: 0.67, 95% confidence interval: 0.48; 0.94, p trend = .02), mobility limitation (odds ratio: 0.69, 95% confidence interval: 0.40; 0.88, p trend = .01), and decreased overall physical functioning (odds ratio: 0.60, 95% confidence interval: 0.45; 0.79, p trend < .001). In this prospective cohort study, a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern, especially when measured with the MEDAS, was associated with a lower likelihood of physical function impairment in older adults.

  7. [Heart functions in monkeys during a 2-week antiorthostatic hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotov, V. P.; Convertino, V.; Korol'kov, V. I.; Latham, R.; Trambovetskii, E. V.; Fanton, J.; Crisman, R.; Truzhennikov, A. N.; Evert, D.; Nosovskii, A. M.; hide

    1996-01-01

    Dynamics of the left heart ventricular muscle contractility and compliance was studied in 4 monkeys in the head down position (antiorthostatic hypokinesia) with the body angle 10 during 2 weeks. Functional tests on a tilt table and under two conditions of centrifuge rotation were performed prior to and after the antiorthostatic hypokinesia. No changes in the left heart ventricular muscle contractility was found. However, the sensitivity level of the baroreflex control decreased. Compliance of the left heart myocardial fibre increased in the first hours and days of the antiorthostatic hypokinesia.

  8. Assessing Functional Impairment in Siblings Living With Children With Disability

    PubMed Central

    Havercamp, Susan; Jamieson, Barry; Sahr, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to empirically test if siblings of children with disability had higher levels of parent-reported behavioral and emotional functional impairment compared with a peer group of siblings residing with only typically developing children. METHODS: This was a retrospective secondary analysis of data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. We included only households with at least 2 children to ensure sibling relationships. Two groups of siblings were formed: 245 siblings resided in households with a child with disability and 6564 siblings resided in households with typically developing children. Parents responded to questions from the Columbia Impairment Scale to identify functional impairment in their children. RESULTS: On the basis of parent reports and after adjusting for sibling demographic characteristics and household background, siblings of children with disability were more likely than siblings residing with typically developing children to have problems with interpersonal relationships, psychopathological functioning, functioning at school, and use of leisure time (P < .05). The percentage of siblings of children with disability classified with significant functional impairment was 16.0% at the first measurement period and 24.2% at the second (P < .001). For siblings of typically developing children there was a smaller percentage increase from 9.5% to 10.3% (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Functional impairment is a key indicator for the need of mental health services and, as such, early assessment and interventions to limit increasing severity and short- to long-term consequences need to be addressed. Health care professionals need to consider a family-based health care approach for families raising children with disability. PMID:23897909

  9. Assessing functional impairment in siblings living with children with disability.

    PubMed

    Goudie, Anthony; Havercamp, Susan; Jamieson, Barry; Sahr, Timothy

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically test if siblings of children with disability had higher levels of parent-reported behavioral and emotional functional impairment compared with a peer group of siblings residing with only typically developing children. This was a retrospective secondary analysis of data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. We included only households with at least 2 children to ensure sibling relationships. Two groups of siblings were formed: 245 siblings resided in households with a child with disability and 6564 siblings resided in households with typically developing children. Parents responded to questions from the Columbia Impairment Scale to identify functional impairment in their children. On the basis of parent reports and after adjusting for sibling demographic characteristics and household background, siblings of children with disability were more likely than siblings residing with typically developing children to have problems with interpersonal relationships, psychopathological functioning, functioning at school, and use of leisure time (P < .05). The percentage of siblings of children with disability classified with significant functional impairment was 16.0% at the first measurement period and 24.2% at the second (P < .001). For siblings of typically developing children there was a smaller percentage increase from 9.5% to 10.3% (P < .001). Functional impairment is a key indicator for the need of mental health services and, as such, early assessment and interventions to limit increasing severity and short- to long-term consequences need to be addressed. Health care professionals need to consider a family-based health care approach for families raising children with disability.

  10. Assessment of cardiac autonomic functions by heart rate recovery, heart rate variability and QT dynamicity parameters in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Dural, Muhammet; Kabakcı, Giray; Cınar, Neşe; Erbaş, Tomris; Canpolat, Uğur; Gürses, Kadri Murat; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Oto, Ali; Kaya, Ergün Barış; Yorgun, Hikmet; Sahiner, Levent; Dağdelen, Selçuk; Aytemir, Kudret

    2014-04-01

    Cardiovascular complications are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in acromegaly. However, there is little data regarding cardiac autonomic functions in these patients. Herein, we aimed to investigate several parameters of cardiac autonomic functions in patients with acromegaly compared to healthy subjects. We enrolled 20 newly diagnosed acromegalic patients (55% female, age:45.7 ± 12.6 years) and 32 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent 24 h Holter recording. Heart rate recovery (HRR) indices were calculated by subtracting 1st, 2nd and 3rd minute heart rates from maximal heart rate. All patients underwent heart rate variability (HRV) and QT dynamicity analysis. Baseline characteristics were similar except diabetes mellitus and hypertension among groups. Mean HRR1 (29.2 ± 12.3 vs 42.6 ± 6.5, p = 0.001), HRR2 (43.5 ± 15.6 vs 61.1 ± 10.8, p = 0.001) and HRR3 (46.4 ± 16.2 vs 65.8 ± 9.8, p = 0.001) values were significantly higher in control group. HRV parameters as, SDNN [standard deviation of all NN intervals] (p = 0.001), SDANN [SD of the 5 min mean RR intervals] (p = 0.001), RMSSD [root square of successive differences in RR interval] (p = 0.001), PNN50 [proportion of differences in successive NN intervals >50 ms] (p = 0.001) and high-frequency [HF] (p = 0.001) were significantly decreased in patients with acromegaly; but low frequency [LF] (p = 0.046) and LF/HF (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in acromegaly patients. QTec (p = 0.009), QTac/RR slope (p = 0.017) and QTec/RR slope (p = 0.01) were significantly higher in patients with acromegaly. Additionally, there were significant negative correlation of disease duration with HRR2, HRR3, SDNN, PNN50, RMSSD, variability index. Our study results suggest that cardiac autonomic functions are impaired in patients with acromegaly. Further large scale studies are needed to exhibit the prognostic significance of impaired autonomic functions in patients with

  11. Pericardial Fat Is Associated With Impaired Lung Function and a Restrictive Lung Pattern in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiankang; Bidulescu, Aurelian; Burchfiel, Cecil M.; Taylor, Herman A.; Petrini, Marcy F.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Impaired lung function has been linked to obesity and systemic inflammation. Pericardial fat has been shown to be associated with anomalies in cardiac structure, function, and atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that pericardial fat may have a similar role in the impairment of lung function. Methods: Cross-sectional associations of pericardial fat volumes, quantified by multidetector CT scan, with FEV1 and FVC assessed by spirometry, were investigated in 1,293 participants (54.5 ± 10.8 years; 66.4% women) in the Jackson Heart Study. We also examined whether these associations were independent of visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Results: Pericardial fat was associated with impaired lung function after multivariable adjustment, but these associations generally did not remain after adjustment for VAT. An exception was the FEV1/FVC ratio. Higher pericardial fat volumes were associated with higher odds of a restrictive lung pattern and lower odds of airway obstruction. Participants in the highest quartile had the highest odds of a restrictive lung pattern (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.22-2.79, compared with quartile 1), even after adjustment for VAT. The odds of obstruction decreased across increasing quartiles of pericardial fat. These relationships were generally graded, suggesting dose-response trends. Conclusions: Pericardial fat is generally associated with lower lung function and independently associated with a restrictive lung pattern in middle-aged and elderly adults. Further research is needed to fully understand the mechanisms through which pericardial fat contributes to pulmonary anomalies. PMID:21737489

  12. Executive Function Impairments in High IQ Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Thomas E.; Reichel, Philipp C.; Quinlan, Donald M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To demonstrate that high IQ adults diagnosed with ADHD suffer from executive function (EF) impairments that: a) can be identified with a combination of standardized measures and self-report data; and b) occur more commonly in this group than in the general population. Method: 157 ADHD adults with IQ greater than or equal to 120 were…

  13. Executive Function in Preschoolers with Primary Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Hui-Chun; Gray, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether preschoolers with primary language impairment (PLI) show deficits in executive function (EF) compared with their peers with typical development (TD) when inhibition, updating, and mental-set shifting are examined using both linguistically based and visually based tasks. Method: Twenty-two…

  14. Executive Functioning in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Lucy A.; Messer, David J.; Nash, Gilly

    2012-01-01

    Background: A limited range of evidence suggests that children with specific language impairment (SLI) have difficulties with higher order thinking and reasoning skills (executive functioning, EF). This study involved a comprehensive investigation of EF in this population taking into account the contributions of age, nonverbal IQ and verbal…

  15. Androgenic anabolic steroids also impair right ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Kasikcioglu, Erdem; Oflaz, Huseyin; Umman, Berrin; Bugra, Zehra

    2009-05-01

    Chronic anabolic steroid use suppresses left ventricular functions. However, there is no information regarding the chronic effects of anabolic steroids on right ventricular function which also plays a key role in global cardiac function. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of androgenic anabolic steroids usage among athletes on remodeling the right part of the heart. Androgenic-anabolic steroids-using bodybuilders had smaller diastolic velocities of both ventricles than drug-free bodybuilders and sedentary counterparts. This study shows that androgenic anabolic steroids-using bodybuilders exhibited depressed diastolic functions of both ventricles.

  16. Analysis of right ventricular function during bypass of the left side of the heart by afterload alterations in both normal and failing hearts.

    PubMed

    Park, C H; Nishimura, K; Kitano, M; Matsuda, K; Okamoto, Y; Ban, T

    1996-05-01

    the left side of the heart compared with that without left heart bypass (-0.131 +/- 0.042 versus -0.051 +/- 0.038, p < 0.005). Therefore ++these two slopes of the relationship intersected at a point that was considered the critical point of afterload during bypass of the left side of the heart. In other words, right ventricular stroke volume was decreased by 100% left heart bypass above the critical point of afterload. In conclusion, this study demonstrates not only that bypass of the left side of the heart results in an increase in right ventricular stroke volume in both normal and failing hearts at the physiologic range of afterload, but also that right ventricular function against higher afterload is impaired by 100% assist of bypass of the left side of the heart in failing hearts.

  17. Exercise intolerance in rats with hypertensive heart disease is associated with impaired diastolic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Guazzi, M; Brenner, D A; Apstein, C S; Saupe, K W

    2001-02-01

    A decrease in functional capacity is one of the most important clinical manifestations of hypertensive heart disease, but its cause is poorly understood. Our purpose was to evaluate potential causes of hypertension-induced exercise intolerance, focusing on identifying the type(s) of cardiac dysfunction associated with the first signs of exercise intolerance during the course of hypertensive heart disease. Exercise capacity was measured weekly in Dahl salt-sensitive rats as they developed hypertension as well as in Dahl salt-resistant control rats. Exercise capacity was unchanged from baseline during the first 8 weeks of hypertension, suggesting that hypertension itself did not cause exercise intolerance. After 9 to 12 weeks of hypertension, exercise capacity decreased in salt-sensitive rats but not in control rats. After 10 weeks of hypertension, indices of diastolic function (early truncation of the E wave), as assessed by echocardiography at rest, were decreased in the salt-sensitive rats. When exercise capacity had decreased by approximately 25% in a rat, the heart was isolated, and left ventricular (LV) compliance and systolic function were measured. At that time point, LV hypertrophy was modest (an approximately 20% increase in LV mass), and systolic function was normal or supernormal, indicating that exercise intolerance began during "compensated" LV hypertrophy. Passive LV compliance remained normal in salt-sensitive rats. Thus, in this model of hypertensive heart disease, exercise intolerance develops during the compensated stage of LV hypertrophy and appears to be due to changes in diastolic rather than systolic function. However, studies in which LV function is assessed during exercise are needed to conclusively define the roles of systolic and diastolic dysfunction in causing exercise intolerance.

  18. [The assessment of heart function in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD)].

    PubMed

    Drozdz, Dorota; Kordon, Zbigniew; Pietrzyk, Jacek A; Drozdz, Maciej; Rudziński, Andrzej; Zachwieja, Katarzyna

    2008-01-01

    The echocardiography evaluation of cardiac function in children with CKD. 30 children (17 males, 13 females), aged 2-20 yrs with CKD 2-5. Left ventricular (LV) dimensions, LV ejection fraction (EF) and LV mass index (LVMI), as well mitral inflow velocity (E/A waves) and isovolumetric relaxation time (IRT) were evaluated. Impaired diastolic heart function were ascertained in 12 patients (in 2 from 5 with CKD 3, in 3 from 10 with 4 and 7 from 14 with 5). Left ventricular hypertrophy was observed in 13 children with CDD 3-5 (4, 4, 5), and decreased ejection fraction in 2. The vast majority of children with chronic kidney disease demonstrate an impairment of diastolic cardiac function.

  19. Impairment and Functional Interventions for Aphasia: Having it All

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Aphasia, a cognitive-linguistic disorder secondary to stroke, is a frequent and often chronic consequence of stroke with detrimental effects on autonomy and health-related quality of life. Treatment of aphasia can be approached in a number of ways. Impairment-based approaches that focus on training a specific linguistic form can be implemented. Additionally, functionally oriented intervention such as supported conversation and aphasia groups are also frequently utilized when providing a treatment program for an individual with aphasia. Creating a treatment approach that includes both impairment and functional methodologies and considers how these relate to the three domains proposed by the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF)—body functions and structure, activity, and participation—can provide an individual with aphasia an optimal treatment program that is person-centered and multi-faceted. PMID:25133085

  20. Diabetes mellitus induced impairment of male reproductive functions: a review.

    PubMed

    Jangir, Ram Niwas; Jain, Gyan Chand

    2014-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) represents one of the greatest threats to human health all over the world. The incidence of DM is rising rapidly also including children and young persons of reproductive age. Diabetes has been associated with reproductive impairment in both men and women. Diabetes may affect male reproductive functions at multiple levels as a result of its effects on the endocrine control of spermatogenesis, steroidogenesis, sperm maturation, impairment of penile erection and ejaculation. A large number of studies both on diabetic men and experimental diabetic animals have been published on the impact of DM on male reproductive functions during the past few years but many of them have conflicting results. The present review summarizes the research finding of a large number of research papers on the reproductive functions especially on hypothalmo-pituitary-gonadal axis, spermatogenesis, histopathology of testis, synthesis and secretion of testosterone, sperm quality, ejaculatory function and fertility both in diabetic men and experimental diabetic animals.

  1. Structure and function of the hearts of lizards and snakes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bjarke; Moorman, Antoon F M; Wang, Tobias

    2014-05-01

    With approximately 7000 species, snakes and lizards, collectively known as squamates, are by far the most species-rich group of reptiles. It was from reptile-like ancestors that mammals and birds evolved and squamates can be viewed as phylogenetically positioned between them and fishes. Hence, their hearts have been studied for more than a century yielding insights into the group itself and into the independent evolution of the fully divided four-chambered hearts of mammals and birds. Structurally the heart is complex and debates persist on rudimentary issues such as identifying structures critical to understanding ventricle function. In seeking to resolve these controversies we have generated three-dimensional (3D) models in portable digital format (pdf) of the anaconda and anole lizard hearts ('typical' squamate hearts) and the uniquely specialized python heart with comprehensive annotations of structures and cavities. We review the anatomy and physiology of squamate hearts in general and emphasize the unique features of pythonid and varanid lizard hearts that endow them with mammal-like blood pressures. Excluding pythons and varanid lizards it is concluded that the squamate heart has a highly consistent design including a disproportionately large right side (systemic venous) probably due to prevailing pulmonary bypass (intraventricular shunting). Unfortunately, investigations on rudimentary features are sparse. We therefore point out gaps in our knowledge, such as the size and functional importance of the coronary vasculature and of the first cardiac chamber, the sinus venosus, and highlight areas with implications for vertebrate cardiac evolution. © 2013 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2013 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  2. Heart autonomic function in overweight adolescents.

    PubMed

    Guízar, Juan-Manuel; Ahuatzin, Rosalía; Amador, Norma; Sánchez, Guillermo; Romer, Gustavo

    2005-05-01

    We compared factors associated with sympathetic cardiac activity in 70 male adolescents (34 obese and 36 with appropriate weight). In fasting we measured insulin, leptin, glucose, blood pressure, and heart rate variability by power spectral analysis. Obese adolescents had higher values for systolic blood pressure, insulin, leptin, low frequency/high frequency index (LF/HF); and lower for standard deviation of all the normal RR intervals, and total power. In the multiple regression analysis, factors associated with LF/HF index were leptin and systolic blood pressure (R2 = 0.18; P = 0.004 for the model). We concluded that higher sympathetic activity in obese adolescents is related to higher leptin and systolic blood pressure levels..

  3. Chronic cyanosis and vascular function: implications for patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cordina, Rachael L; Celermajer, David S

    2010-06-01

    In patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease, chronic hypoxaemia leads to important changes in blood vessel function and structure. Some of these alterations are maladaptive and probably contribute to impaired cardiopulmonary performance and an increased incidence of thrombotic and embolic events. Recent evidence suggests that deranged endothelial function, a sequel of chronic cyanosis, could be an important factor in the pathogenesis of cyanosis-associated cardiovascular risk. In this article, we discuss the physiological and mechanical consequences of compensatory erythrocytosis and possible pathophysiological mechanisms of vascular dysfunction in chronic cyanosis.

  4. American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7: Avoiding Heart Failure and Preserving Cardiac Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Folsom, Aaron R; Shah, Amil M; Lutsey, Pamela L; Roetker, Nicholas S; Alonso, Alvaro; Avery, Christy L; Miedema, Michael D; Konety, Suma; Chang, Patricia P; Solomon, Scott D

    2015-09-01

    Many people may underappreciate the role of lifestyle in avoiding heart failure. We estimated whether greater adherence in middle age to American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7 guidelines—on smoking, body mass, physical activity, diet, cholesterol, blood pressure, and glucose—is associated with lower lifetime risk of heart failure and greater preservation of cardiac structure and function in old age. We studied the population-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study cohort of 13,462 adults ages 45-64 years in 1987-1989. From the 1987-1989 risk factor measurements, we created a Life's Simple 7 score (range 0-14, giving 2 points for ideal, 1 point for intermediate, and 0 points for poor components). We identified 2218 incident heart failure events using surveillance of hospital discharge and death codes through 2011. In addition, in 4855 participants free of clinical cardiovascular disease in 2011-2013, we performed echocardiography from which we quantified left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. One in four participants (25.5%) developed heart failure through age 85 years. Yet, this lifetime heart failure risk was 14.4% for those with a middle-age Life's Simple 7 score of 10-14 (optimal), 26.8% for a score of 5-9 (average), and 48.6% for a score of 0-4 (inadequate). Among those with no clinical cardiovascular event, the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy in late life was approximately 40% as common, and diastolic dysfunction was approximately 60% as common, among those with an optimal middle-age Life's Simple 7 score, compared with an inadequate score. Greater achievement of American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7 in middle age is associated with a lower lifetime occurrence of heart failure and greater preservation of cardiac structure and function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Epidemiological evidence of altered cardiac autonomic function in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance but not isolated impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Shang; Yang, Yi-Ching; Lin, Thy-Sheng; Huang, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Jin; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2007-10-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is present in diabetes mellitus (DM), but no study is available on alteration in cardiac autonomic function (CAF) across different glycemic statuses including normal glucose tolerance (NGT), isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and DM. Our objective was to examine whether CAF is altered in subjects with IGT and isolated IFG. The study was a stratified systematic cluster sampling design within the general community. A total of 1440 subjects were classified as NGT (n = 983), isolated IFG (n = 163), IGT (n = 188), and DM (n = 106). CAF was determined by 1) standard deviation of normal-to-normal (SDNN) or RR interval, power spectrum in low and high frequency (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz; HF, 0.15-0.40 Hz), and LF/HF ratio in supine position for 5 min; 2) ratio between 30th and 15th RR interval after standing from supine position (30/15 ratio); and 3) average heart rate change during breathing of six deep breaths for 1 min (HR(DB)). Univariate analysis showed significant differences in SDNN, 30/15 ratio, HR(DB), HF power, and LF/HF ratio among subjects with NGT, isolated IFG, IGT, and DM. In multivariate analysis, none of the indices of CAF was related to isolated IFG in the reference group of NGT. IGT and DM were negatively associated with 30/15 ratio and HF power but positively associated with LF/HF ratio. In addition, DM was also related to a lower SDNN. DM and IGT subjects had an impaired CAF independent of other cardiovascular risk factors. The risk of altered CAF is not apparent in subjects with isolated IFG.

  6. Iron Status in Chronic Heart Failure: Impact on Symptoms, Functional Class and Submaximal Exercise Capacity.

    PubMed

    Enjuanes, Cristina; Bruguera, Jordi; Grau, María; Cladellas, Mercé; Gonzalez, Gina; Meroño, Oona; Moliner-Borja, Pedro; Verdú, José M; Farré, Nuria; Comín-Colet, Josep

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of iron deficiency and anemia on submaximal exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure. We undertook a single-center cross-sectional study in a group of stable patients with chronic heart failure. At recruitment, patients provided baseline information and completed a 6-minute walk test to evaluate submaximal exercise capacity and exercise-induced symptoms. At the same time, blood samples were taken for serological evaluation. Iron deficiency was defined as ferritin < 100 ng/mL or transferrin saturation < 20% when ferritin is < 800 ng/mL. Additional markers of iron status were also measured. A total of 538 heart failure patients were eligible for inclusion, with an average age of 71 years and 33% were in New York Heart Association class III/IV. The mean distance walked in the test was 285 ± 101 meters among those with impaired iron status, vs 322 ± 113 meters (P=.002). Symptoms during the test were more frequent in iron deficiency patients (35% vs 27%; P=.028) and the most common symptom reported was fatigue. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that increased levels of soluble transferrin receptor indicating abnormal iron status were independently associated with advanced New York Heart Association class (P < .05). Multivariable analysis using generalized additive models, soluble transferrin receptor and ferritin index, both biomarkers measuring iron status, showed a significant, independent and linear association with submaximal exercise capacity (P=.03 for both). In contrast, hemoglobin levels were not significantly associated with 6-minute walk test distance in the multivariable analysis. In patients with chronic heart failure, iron deficiency but not anemia was associated with impaired submaximal exercise capacity and symptomatic functional limitation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Aging Impairs Myocardial Fatty Acid and Ketone Oxidation and Modifies Cardiac Functional and Metabolic Responses to Insulin in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hyyti, Outi M.; Ledee, Dolena; Ning, Xue-Han; Ge, Ming; Portman, Michael A.

    2010-07-02

    Aging presumably initiates shifts in substrate oxidation mediated in part by changes in insulin sensitivity. Similar shifts occur with cardiac hypertrophy and may contribute to contractile dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that aging modifies substrate utilization and alters insulin sensitivity in mouse heart when provided multiple substrates. In vivo cardiac function was measured with microtipped pressure transducers in the left ventricle from control (4–6 mo) and aged (22–24 mo) mice. Cardiac function was also measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate and anaplerotic fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle (CAC) by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids (FFA), acetoacetate, lactate, and unlabeled glucose. Stroke volume and cardiac output were diminished in aged mice in vivo, but pressure development was preserved. Systolic and diastolic functions were maintained in aged isolated hearts. Insulin prompted an increase in systolic function in aged hearts, resulting in an increase in cardiac efficiency. FFA and ketone flux were present but were markedly impaired in aged hearts. These changes in myocardial substrate utilization corresponded to alterations in circulating lipids, thyroid hormone, and reductions in protein expression for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)4. Insulin further suppressed FFA oxidation in the aged. Insulin stimulation of anaplerosis in control hearts was absent in the aged. The aged heart shows metabolic plasticity by accessing multiple substrates to maintain function. However, fatty acid oxidation capacity is limited. Impaired insulin-stimulated anaplerosis may contribute to elevated cardiac efficiency, but may also limit response to acute stress through depletion of CAC intermediates.

  8. A novel bisindolylmaleimide derivative enhances functional recovery of heart after long-term hypothermic heart preservation.

    PubMed

    Katare, Rajesh Gopalrao; Zhitian, Zou; Sodeoka, Mikiko; Sasaguri, Shiro

    2007-06-27

    Functional recovery following heart transplantation mainly depends on the ability of preservative solution in providing the physical and biochemical environment so as to maintain the viability of the tissue during preservation and in reperfusion. Here we demonstrate the protective effects of a novel bisindolylmaleimide derivative, MS1, on enhancing the functional recovery of the heart following long-term hypothermic preservation when added to the preservative solution. After anesthesia and artificial ventilation, the hearts were rapidly isolated and perfused with Kreb's Henseleit buffer at 37 degrees C in working mode. After 30 minutes of perfusion, the hearts were arrested with cardioplegic solution and preserved in University of Wisconsin solution with (UW-MS1 group) or without MS1 (UW-Vehicle group) for 12 h at 4 degrees C. After 12 hours, the hearts were reperfused for 60 minutes. MS1 treated hearts showed: a) significant recovery of cardiac functions (P<0.001), b) well-preserved myocardial ATP levels (P<0.001), c) less myocardial water content (P<0.01), d) reduced oxidative stress (P<0.001), e) less intracellular swelling and well-preserved mitochondria, and g) activation of cell survival cascades compared to the control hearts preserved in UW solution without MS1. In contrast, these protective effects of MS1 were abolished on opening the permeability transition pore before MS1 treatment. These results altogether indicate the efficacy of this compound in protecting the myocardium against reperfusion injury and thus making this drug a clinically useful tool in patients undergoing reperfusion after cardiac surgeries.

  9. Impaired skeletal muscle vasodilation during exercise in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joshua F; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Nelson, Ashley D; Garten, Ryan S; Ryan, John J; Nativi-Nicolau, Jose N; Richardson, Russell S; Wray, D Walter

    2016-05-15

    Exercise intolerance is a hallmark symptom of heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), which may be related to an impaired ability to appropriately increase blood flow to the exercising muscle. We evaluated leg blood flow (LBF, ultrasound Doppler), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, photoplethysmography) during dynamic, single leg knee-extensor (KE) exercise in HFpEF patients (n=21; 68 ± 2 yrs) and healthy controls (n=20; 71 ± 2 yrs). HFpEF patients exhibited a marked attrition during KE exercise, with only 60% able to complete the exercise protocol. In participants who completed all exercise intensities (0-5-10-15 W; HFpEF, n=13; Controls, n=16), LBF was not different at 0 W and 5 W, but was 15-25% lower in HFpEF compared to controls at 10 W and 15 W (P<0.001). Likewise, leg vascular conductance (LVC), an index of vasodilation, was not different at 0 W and 5 W, but was 15-20% lower in HFpEF compared to controls at 10 W and 15 W (P<0.05). In contrast to these peripheral deficits, exercise-induced changes in central variables (HR, SV, CO), as well as MAP, were similar between groups. These data reveal a marked reduction in LBF and LVC in HFpEF patients during exercise that cannot be attributed to a disease-related alteration in central hemodynamics, suggesting that impaired vasodilation in the exercising skeletal muscle vasculature may play a key role in the exercise intolerance associated with this patient population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impaired Skeletal Muscle Vasodilation during Exercise in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joshua F.; Barrett-O’Keefe, Zachary; Nelson, Ashley D.; Garten, Ryan S.; Ryan, John J.; Nativi-Nicolau, Jose N.; Richardson, Russell S.; Wray, D. Walter

    2016-01-01

    Background Exercise intolerance is a hallmark symptom of heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), which may be related to an impaired ability to appropriately increase blood flow to the exercising muscle. Methods We evaluated leg blood flow (LBF, ultrasound Doppler), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, photoplethysmography) during dynamic, single leg knee-extensor (KE) exercise in HFpEF patients (n = 21; 68 ± 2 yrs) and healthy controls (n = 20; 71 ± 2 yrs). Results HFpEF patients exhibited a marked attrition during KE exercise, with only 60% able to complete the exercise protocol. In participants who completed all exercise intensities (0-5-10-15W; HFpEF, n = 13; Controls, n = 16), LBF was not different at 0W and 5W, but was 15-25% lower in HFpEF compared to controls at 10W and 15W (P < 0.001). Likewise, leg vascular conductance (LVC), an index of vasodilation, was not different at 0W and 5W, but was 15-20% lower in HFpEF compared to controls at 10W and 15W (P < 0.05). In contrast to these peripheral deficits, exercise-induced changes in central variables (HR, SV, CO), as well as MAP, were similar between groups. Conclusions These data reveal a marked reduction in LBF and LVC in HFpEF patients during exercise that cannot be attributed to a disease-related alteration in central hemodynamics, suggesting that impaired vasodilation in the exercising skeletal muscle vasculature may play a key role in the exercise intolerance associated with this patient population. PMID:26970959

  11. Altered distribution of ICa impairs Ca release at the t-tubules of ventricular myocytes from failing hearts.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Simon M; Kong, Cherrie H T; Watson, Judy; Cannell, Mark B; James, Andrew F; Orchard, Clive H

    2015-09-01

    In mammalian cardiac ventricular myocytes, Ca influx and release occur predominantly at t-tubules, ensuring synchronous Ca release throughout the cell. Heart failure is associated with disrupted t-tubule structure, but its effect on t-tubule function is less clear. We therefore investigated Ca influx and release at the t-tubules of ventricular myocytes isolated from rat hearts ~18weeks after coronary artery ligation (CAL) or corresponding Sham operation. L-type Ca current (ICa) was recorded using the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique in intact and detubulated myocytes; Ca release at t-tubules was monitored using confocal microscopy with voltage- and Ca-sensitive fluorophores. CAL was associated with cardiac and cellular hypertrophy, decreased ejection fraction, disruption of t-tubule structure and a smaller, slower Ca transient, but no change in ryanodine receptor distribution, L-type Ca channel expression, or ICa density. In Sham myocytes, ICa was located predominantly at the t-tubules, while in CAL myocytes, it was uniformly distributed between the t-tubule and surface membranes. Inhibition of protein kinase A with H-89 caused a greater decrease of t-tubular ICa in CAL than in Sham myocytes; in the presence of H-89, t-tubular ICa density was smaller in CAL than in Sham myocytes. The smaller t-tubular ICa in CAL myocytes was accompanied by increased latency and heterogeneity of SR Ca release at t-tubules, which could be mimicked by decreasing ICa using nifedipine. These data show that CAL decreases t-tubular ICa via a PKA-independent mechanism, thereby impairing Ca release at t-tubules and contributing to the altered excitation-contraction coupling observed in heart failure. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Altered distribution of ICa impairs Ca release at the t-tubules of ventricular myocytes from failing hearts

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Simon M.; Kong, Cherrie H.T.; Watson, Judy; Cannell, Mark B.; James, Andrew F.; Orchard, Clive H.

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cardiac ventricular myocytes, Ca influx and release occur predominantly at t-tubules, ensuring synchronous Ca release throughout the cell. Heart failure is associated with disrupted t-tubule structure, but its effect on t-tubule function is less clear. We therefore investigated Ca influx and release at the t-tubules of ventricular myocytes isolated from rat hearts ~ 18 weeks after coronary artery ligation (CAL) or corresponding Sham operation. L-type Ca current (ICa) was recorded using the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique in intact and detubulated myocytes; Ca release at t-tubules was monitored using confocal microscopy with voltage- and Ca-sensitive fluorophores. CAL was associated with cardiac and cellular hypertrophy, decreased ejection fraction, disruption of t-tubule structure and a smaller, slower Ca transient, but no change in ryanodine receptor distribution, L-type Ca channel expression, or ICa density. In Sham myocytes, ICa was located predominantly at the t-tubules, while in CAL myocytes, it was uniformly distributed between the t-tubule and surface membranes. Inhibition of protein kinase A with H-89 caused a greater decrease of t-tubular ICa in CAL than in Sham myocytes; in the presence of H-89, t-tubular ICa density was smaller in CAL than in Sham myocytes. The smaller t-tubular ICa in CAL myocytes was accompanied by increased latency and heterogeneity of SR Ca release at t-tubules, which could be mimicked by decreasing ICa using nifedipine. These data show that CAL decreases t-tubular ICa via a PKA-independent mechanism, thereby impairing Ca release at t-tubules and contributing to the altered excitation–contraction coupling observed in heart failure. PMID:26103619

  13. A Methodology for Quantifying Heart Function in the Embryonic Zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Brennan; Garrity, Deborah; Dasi, Lakshmi

    2012-11-01

    Several studies have linked epigenetic factors such as blood flow dynamics and cardiac function to proper heart development. To better understand this process, it is essential to develop robust quantitative methods to investigate the blood dynamics and wall kinematics in vivo. Here, we develop a methodology that can be used throughout the early stages of development which requires no specialized equipment other than a bright field microscope and high-speed camera. We use the embryonic zebrafish as our model due to its superb optical access and widespread acceptance as a powerful model for human heart development. Using these methods, we quantify blood flow rates, stroke volume, cardiac output, ejection fraction, and other important parameters related to heart function. We also investigate the pumping mechanics from heart tube to looped configuration. We show that although the mechanism changes fundamentally, it does so in a continuous fashion that can incorporate combined pumping mechanisms at intermediate stages. This work provides a basis for quantitatively comparing normal and abnormal heart development, and may help us gain a better understanding of congenital heart defects. Funded by NSF.

  14. Restoring heart function and electrical integrity: closing the circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Luís Miguel; Vasques-Nóvoa, Francisco; Ferreira, Lino; Pinto-do-Ó, Perpétua; Nascimento, Diana Santos

    2017-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the main cause of death in the world and are often associated with the occurrence of arrhythmias due to disruption of myocardial electrical integrity. Pathologies involving dysfunction of the specialized cardiac excitatory/conductive tissue are also common and constitute an added source of morbidity and mortality since current standard therapies withstand a great number of limitations. As electrical integrity is essential for a well-functioning heart, innovative strategies have been bioengineered to improve heart conduction and/or promote myocardial repair, based on: (1) gene and/or cell delivery; or (2) conductive biomaterials as tools for cardiac tissue engineering. Herein we aim to review the state-of-art in the area, while briefly describing the biological principles underlying the heart electrical/conduction system and how this system can be disrupted in heart disease. Suggestions regarding targets for future studies are also presented.

  15. Executive function deficits in congenital heart disease: why is intervention important?

    PubMed

    Calderon, Johanna; Bellinger, David C

    2015-10-01

    It is widely recognised that children with congenital heart disease (CHD) are at high risk for neurodevelopmental impairments including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder symptoms. Executive function impairments are one of the most prominent neurodevelopmental features associated with CHD. These deficits can have widespread debilitating repercussions in children's neurocognitive, behavioural, and psycho-social development. There is a crucial gap in research regarding the efficacy of preventive or treatment strategies for these important cognitive morbidities. Executive functions are complex neurocognitive skills highly amenable to improvement. Evidence-based interventions have shown promising results in other paediatric populations, strongly suggesting that they might also benefit the growing population of children with CHD. In this review, we summarise the available data on executive function impairments in children and adolescents with CHD. We underline the important co-morbidity of executive dysfunction with other cognitive and psychiatric issues in CHD, which raises awareness of the crucial need to prevent or at least mitigate these deficits. Finally, we summarise future avenues for research in terms of interventions that may help reduce executive function impairments in youth with CHD.

  16. Quality of life, social support and cognitive impairment in heart failure patients without diagnosed dementia.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Robyn; Sullivan, Anne; Burke, Rhonda; Hales, Susan; Sharpe, Precilla; Tofler, Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    Improving health-related quality of life (HRQL) is an important goal for heart failure (HF) patients, and understanding the factors that influence HRQL is essential to this process. We investigated the influence of social support and cognitive impairment on HRQL in community dwelling HF patients (n = 104) without diagnosed dementia. Patients were aged mean 80.93 years (SD 11.01) and were classified as New York Heart Association Class 1/II (45%) or III/IV (53%). Age, social support and cognition had important independent effects. Younger people had the most negative effects of HF in all areas of HRQL: emotional (B = -0.32), physical (B = -0.44) and overall (B = -1). Well-supported patients (general social support) had the least negative effect from HF on HRQL: emotional domain (B = -4.62) and overall (B = -11.72). Patients with normal cognition had more negative impact of HF on HRQL: physical domain (B = 5.51) and overall HRQL (B = 10.42). A clearer understanding of the relationships between age, social support and cognition and the effect on the impact of HF on HRQL is needed before interventions can be appropriately developed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Thermal hydrotherapy improves quality of life and hemodynamic function in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Michalsen, Andreas; Lüdtke, Rainer; Bühring, Malte; Spahn, Günther; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav J

    2003-10-01

    Chronic heart failure is characterized by increased peripheral vascular resistance and reduced peripheral perfusion due to adrenergic and renin angiotensin activation and impaired endothelial function. Recent studies have shown that nonpharmacological peripheral vasodilation with thermal therapy by means of warm-water baths and sauna has beneficial effects in chronic heart failure. European hydrotherapy (according to Kneipp) additionally uses short cold water stimuli, which lead to prolonged vasodilation and adaptive responses. Studies on the efficacy of hydrotherapy in chronic heart failure are lacking. We studied 15 patients (5 men, 10 women, mean (+/- SD) age 64.3 +/- 1.8 years) with mild chronic heart failure (NYHA functional class II to III, ejection fraction 30%-40%). Patients were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of intensive home-based hydrotherapy or 6 weeks restriction in a crossover intervention trial. Quality of life and heart-failure--related symptoms were assessed by means of a validated questionnaire (PLC). Graded bicycle exercise test with incremental workloads (0, 50, 75, 100 watts) was performed at the end of each treatment period. The hydrotherapeutic program consisted of a structured combination of daily home-based external warm- and cold-water applications. Baseline characteristics were balanced between the groups. With hydrotherapy, a significant (P < or =.05) improvement in 3 of 6 dimensions of quality of life (mood, physical capacity, enjoyment) and a significant reduction in heart-failure-related symptoms was found. Heart rates at rest and at 50-Watt workload were significantly reduced by hydrotherapy; blood pressure decreased nonsignificantly at rest and during exercise. The hydrotherapeutic treatment was well accepted and no relevant adverse effects were observed. A home-based hydrotherapeutic thermal treatment program improves quality of life, heart-failure-related symptoms and heart rate response to exercise in patients with mild chronic

  18. Functional assessment taxonomy relevant to low-back impairments.

    PubMed

    Halpern, M

    2001-09-01

    A taxonomy of functional assessment constructs was developed to help the Social Security Administration refine the measurements of work disability. This report addresses content validity of the new taxonomy by examining the relevance of its constructs to a specific disability, and by examining the relationship between these constructs and constructs in other taxonomies. Seven experts linked the new taxonomy to consequences of low-back impairments. The selected constructs were compared to those reported independently by patients (Harper AC, Harper DA, Lambert L, Andrews HB, Lo SK, Ross FM, Straker LM. Pain 1992; 50(2): 189-195). The International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps served to bridge the two exercises. The findings reveal that it is feasible to use the taxonomy to define the impact of a specific disability and consequently link it to a set of standard measurements. Low-back impairments may be best assessed through measures of physical functional limitations, vocational impact, and interpersonal and emotional behavior. The study did not yield cognitive and intellectual measures that were relevant to this impairment.

  19. Limb distribution, motor impairment, and functional classification of cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Gorter, Jan Willem; Rosenbaum, Peter L; Hanna, Steven E; Palisano, Robert J; Bartlett, Doreen J; Russell, Dianne J; Walter, Stephen D; Raina, Parminder; Galuppi, Barbara E; Wood, Ellen

    2004-07-01

    This study explored the relationships between the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), limb distribution, and type of motor impairment. Data used were collected in the Ontario Motor Growth study, a longitudinal cohort study with a population-based sample of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in Canada (n=657; age 1 to 13 years at study onset). The majority (87.8%) of children with hemiplegia were classified as level I. Children with a bilateral syndrome were represented in all GMFCS levels, with most in levels III, IV, and V. Classifications by GMFCS and 'limb distribution' or by GMFCS and 'type of motor impairment' were statistically significantly associated (Pearson's chi2 p<0.001), though the correlation for limb distribution (two categories) by GMFCS was low (tau-b=0.43). An analysis of function (GMFCS) by impairment (limb distribution) indicates that the latter clinical characteristic does not add prognostic value over GMFCS. Although classification of CP by impairment level is useful for clinical and epidemiological purposes, the value of these subgroups as an indicator of mobility is limited in comparison with the classification of severity with the GMFCS.

  20. Brief Exposure to Secondhand Smoke Reversibly Impairs Endothelial Vasodilatory Function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to determine the effects of brief exposures to low concentrations of tobacco secondhand smoke (SHS) on arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD, a nitric oxide-dependent measure of vascular endothelial function), in a controlled animal model never before exposed to smoke. In humans, SHS exposure for 30min impairs FMD. It is important to gain a better understanding of the acute effects of exposure to SHS at low concentrations and for brief periods of time. Methods: We measured changes in FMD in rats exposed to a range of real-world levels of SHS for durations of 30min, 10min, 1min, and 4 breaths (roughly 15 s). Results: We observed a dose-response relationship between SHS particle concentration over 30min and post-exposure impairment of FMD, which was linear through the range typically encountered in smoky restaurants and then saturated at higher concentrations. One min of exposure to SHS at moderate concentrations was sufficient to impair FMD. Conclusions: Brief SHS exposure at real-world levels reversibly impairs FMD. Even 1min of SHS exposure can cause reduction of endothelial function. PMID:24302638

  1. Impairment of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Bree, L.; van Iwaarden, J.F.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J. )

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibited phagocytosis and superoxide anion production by rat alveolar macrophages. The inhibition was irreversible and concentration and exposure time dependent. The potential relationship between H2O2-induced biochemical perturbations and impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytic functions was investigated. Alveolar macrophage viability and Fc receptor binding capacity were not affected by H2O2. There was probably no correlation between a H2O2-induced rise in cytosolic (Ca2+) ((Ca2+)i) and the impairment of phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages, as was suggested by the following findings. First, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i could be inhibited by chelation of extracellular Ca2+, whereas the H2O2-induced impairment of phagocytosis could not. Second, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was reversible, whereas the impairment of phagocytosis was not. And finally, a rise in (Ca2+)i by incubation of alveolar macrophages with the calcium ionophore A23187 did not affect phagocytosis. Various experiments suggested that ATP depletion may play an important role in the H2O2 toxicity for alveolar macrophages. Comparable concentrations of H2O2 caused an irreversible decrease both in cellular ATP and in phagocytosis and superoxide production by alveolar macrophages. In addition, time course of ATP depletion and induction of impaired alveolar macrophage function were similar. In view of the fact that the strong oxidant H2O2 may react with a large variety of biological substances, possible other toxic lesions may not be excluded as underlying mechanism for H2O2-induced inhibition of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages.

  2. [Echocardiographic evaluation of the athlete's heart: from morphological adaptations to myocardial function].

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Antonello; Galderisi, Maurizio; Sciomer, Susanna; Nistri, Stefano; Agricola, Eustachio; Ballo, Piercarlo; Buralli, Simona; D'Errico, Arcangelo; Losi, Maria Angela; Mele, Donato; Mondillo, Sergio

    2009-08-01

    The definition of the athlete's heart includes the mechanisms of cardiac adaptation to training, characterized by the increase of internal chamber dimensions, ventricular wall thickness, and atrial chambers. The morphology of the athlete's heart is intermediate between concentric and eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), in relation to the large prevalence of mixed sports activities and training protocols (including both aerobic and anaerobic exercise). Echocardiography is the tool of choice for the assessment of the athlete's heart and also for the differentiation of physiologic and pathologic LVH (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and LVH due to arterial hypertension). The initial echocardiographic approach includes the quantitative analysis of the left ventricle, in order to calculate left ventricular mass, left ventricular mass index and relative wall thickness for diagnosing concentric or eccentric LVH. Tissue Doppler (pulsed or color modality) and strain rate imaging (Doppler or two-dimensional modality) may give additional information to the standard indices of systolic function. Diastolic function can be evaluated not only by standard Doppler transmitral inflow measurements but also using pulsed tissue Doppler, which may allow to distinguish the athlete's LVH from diastolic impairment of hypertensive patients or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by the simple determination of myocardial early diastolic velocity. Also the morphological and functional features of the left atrium and of the right ventricle can be assessed in the athlete's heart by combining standard echocardiography with new echocardiographic technologies.

  3. Action Potential-Evoked Calcium Release Is Impaired in Single Skeletal Muscle Fibers from Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Quiñonez, Marbella; Shieh, Perry; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Cruz, Daniel; Deng, Mario C.; Vergara, Julio L.; Middlekauff, Holly R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure (HF) has been attributed to abnormalities of the skeletal muscles. Muscle function depends on intact excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), but ECC studies in HF models have been inconclusive, due to deficiencies in the animal models and tools used to measure calcium (Ca2+) release, mandating investigations in skeletal muscle from HF patients. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Ca2+ release is significantly impaired in the skeletal muscle of HF patients in whom exercise capacity is severely diminished compared to age-matched healthy volunteers. Methods and Findings Using state-of-the-art electrophysiological and optical techniques in single muscle fibers from biopsies of the locomotive vastus lateralis muscle, we measured the action potential (AP)-evoked Ca2+ release in 4 HF patients and 4 age-matched healthy controls. The mean peak Ca2+ release flux in fibers obtained from HF patients (10±1.2 µM/ms) was markedly (2.6-fold) and significantly (p<0.05) smaller than in fibers from healthy volunteers (28±3.3 µM/ms). This impairment in AP-evoked Ca2+ release was ubiquitous and was not explained by differences in the excitability mechanisms since single APs were indistinguishable between HF patients and healthy volunteers. Conclusions These findings prove the feasibility of performing electrophysiological experiments in single fibers from human skeletal muscle, and offer a new approach for investigations of myopathies due to HF and other diseases. Importantly, we have demonstrated that one step in the ECC process, AP-evoked Ca2+ release, is impaired in single muscle fibers in HF patients. PMID:25310188

  4. Neuropsychological Criteria for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia Risk in the Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Jak, Amy J; Preis, Sarah R; Beiser, Alexa S; Seshadri, Sudha; Wolf, Philip A; Bondi, Mark W; Au, Rhoda

    2016-10-01

    To refine mild cognitive impairment (MCI) diagnostic criteria, we examined progression to dementia using two approaches to identifying MCI. A total of 1203 Framingham Heart Study participants were classified at baseline as cognitively normal or MCI (overall and four MCI subtypes) via conventional Petersen/Winblad criteria (single cognitive test impaired per domain, >1.5 SD below expectations) or Jak/Bondi criteria (two tests impaired per domain, >1 SD below norms). Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to examine the association between each MCI definition and incident dementia. The Petersen/Winblad criteria classified 34% of participants as having MCI while the Jak/Bondi criteria classified 24% as MCI. Over a mean follow-up of 9.7 years, 58 participants (5%) developed incident dementia. Both MCI criteria were associated with incident dementia [Petersen/Winblad: hazards ratio (HR) = 2.64; p-value=.0002; Jak/Bondi: HR=3.30; p-value <.0001]. When both MCI definitions were included in the same model, only the Jak/Bondi definition remained statistically significantly associated with incident dementia (HR=2.47; p-value=.008). Multi-domain amnestic and single domain non-amnestic MCI subtypes were significantly associated with incident dementia for both diagnostic approaches (all p-values <.01). The Jak/Bondi MCI criteria had a similar association with dementia as the conventional Petersen/Winblad MCI criteria, despite classifying ~30% fewer participants as having MCI. Further exploration of alternative methods to conventional MCI diagnostic criteria is warranted. (JINS, 2016, 22, 937-943).

  5. Neuropsychological Criteria for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia Risk in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Jak, Amy J.; Preis, Sarah R.; Beiser, Alexa S.; Seshadri, Sudha; Wolf, Philip A.; Bondi, Mark W.; Au, Rhoda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To refine mild cognitive impairment (MCI) diagnostic criteria, we examined progression to dementia using two approaches to identifying MCI. Methods A total of 1203 Framingham Heart Study participants were classified at baseline as cognitively normal or MCI (overall and four MCI subtypes) via conventional Petersen/Winblad criteria (single cognitive test impaired per domain, >1.5 SD below expectations) or Jak/Bondi criteria (two tests impaired per domain, >1 SD below norms). Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to examine the association between each MCI definition and incident dementia. Results The Petersen/Winblad criteria classified 34% of participants as having MCI while the Jak/Bondi criteria classified 24% as MCI. Over a mean follow-up of 9.7 years, 58 participants (5%) developed incident dementia. Both MCI criteria were associated with incident dementia [Petersen/Winblad: hazards ratio (HR) = 2.64; p-value = .0002; Jak/Bondi: HR = 3.30; p-value <.0001]. When both MCI definitions were included in the same model, only the Jak/Bondi definition remained statistically significantly associated with incident dementia (HR = 2.47; p-value = .008). Multi-domain amnestic and single domain non-amnestic MCI subtypes were significantly associated with incident dementia for both diagnostic approaches (all p-values <.01). Conclusions The Jak/Bondi MCI criteria had a similar association with dementia as the conventional Petersen/Winblad MCI criteria, despite classifying ~30% fewer participants as having MCI. Further exploration of alternative methods to conventional MCI diagnostic criteria is warranted. PMID:27029348

  6. Effect of Right Heart Systolic Function on Outcomes in Patients with Constrictive Pericarditis Undergoing Pericardiectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xue; Xu, Rui-Yi; Liu, Jian-Zhou; Chen, Wei; Chen, Lian-Feng; Yang, Peng-Hua; Fang, Li-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Background: To determine the influence of right ventricular function in patients with constrictive pericarditis (CP) undergoing surgery and to compare the outcomes of patients who received surgery with those managed medically. Methods: Patients with the diagnosis of CP and healthy volunteers were recruited from January 2006 to November 2011. Patients with CP chose to either receive pericardiectomy or medical management. Echocardiographic measurements were performed to evaluate heart function, and survival was recorded. Results: A total of 58 patients with CP (36 received pericardiectomy, 22 managed medically), and 43 healthy volunteers were included. CP patients who received surgery had a higher survival rate than those managed medically (P = 0.003), and higher survival was also seen in the subgroup of CP patients with severely impaired right systolic function. Albumin level, left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, and tricuspid regurgitation velocity were associated with survival in CP patients who received surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative right heart function does not affect surgical outcomes. Patients with severely impaired preoperative right systolic function obtain a greater survival advantage with surgery than with medical treatment. PMID:26830985

  7. Ciprofloxacin pharmacokinetics in patients with normal and impaired renal function.

    PubMed Central

    Gasser, T C; Ebert, S C; Graversen, P H; Madsen, P O

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin following single oral doses of 500 and 750 mg in 32 patients with various degrees of renal function impairment were investigated in an open, randomized crossover fashion. Ciprofloxacin was administered after overnight fasting; the washout time between the two doses was 1 week. Serum and urine samples were collected serially between 0 and 24 h and subjected to bioassay and high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic parameters were analyzed, assuming an open two-compartment model with first-order input and elimination. A distinct difference was observed in pharmacokinetic parameters between patients with impaired renal function (creatinine clearance, less than 50 ml/min per 1.73 m2) and those with normal renal function (creatinine clearance, greater than or equal to 50 ml/min per 1.73 m2). For the former group, the area under the curve of serum concentration versus time was doubled, the renal clearance of ciprofloxacin was cut to one-fourth, the total and nonrenal ciprofloxacin clearance was reduced by 50%, and the elimination half-life was prolonged by a factor of approximately 1.7. The correlation between renal drug clearance and creatinine clearance was highly significant (r = 0.890; P less than 0.001). On the basis of these findings, it appears that a 50% dose reduction of ciprofloxacin in patients with impaired renal function (creatinine clearance, less than 50 ml/min per 1.73 m2) may be indicated to achieve concentrations in serum similar to those observed in normal individuals. As the concentration of ciprofloxacin in urine after 24 h remained above the MIC for most urinary pathogens, this drug appears to be of potential benefit for the treatment of urinary tract infections in patients with impaired renal function. PMID:3300537

  8. The Living Heart Project: A robust and integrative simulator for human heart function

    PubMed Central

    Baillargeon, Brian; Rebelo, Nuno; Fox, David D.; Taylor, Robert L.; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The heart is not only our most vital, but also our most complex organ: Precisely controlled by the interplay of electrical and mechanical fields, it consists of four chambers and four valves, which act in concert to regulate its filling, ejection, and overall pump function. While numerous computational models exist to study either the electrical or the mechanical response of its individual chambers, the integrative electro-mechanical response of the whole heart remains poorly understood. Here we present a proof-of-concept simulator for a four-chamber human heart model created from computer topography and magnetic resonance images. We illustrate the governing equations of excitation-contraction coupling and discretize them using a single, unified finite element environment. To illustrate the basic features of our model, we visualize the electrical potential and the mechanical deformation across the human heart throughout its cardiac cycle. To compare our simulation against common metrics of cardiac function, we extract the pressure-volume relationship and show that it agrees well with clinical observations. Our prototype model allows us to explore and understand the key features, physics, and technologies to create an integrative, predictive model of the living human heart. Ultimately, our simulator will open opportunities to probe landscapes of clinical parameters, and guide device design and treatment planning in cardiac diseases such as stenosis, regurgitation, or prolapse of the aortic, pulmonary, tricuspid, or mitral valve. PMID:25267880

  9. The Living Heart Project: A robust and integrative simulator for human heart function.

    PubMed

    Baillargeon, Brian; Rebelo, Nuno; Fox, David D; Taylor, Robert L; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-11-01

    The heart is not only our most vital, but also our most complex organ: Precisely controlled by the interplay of electrical and mechanical fields, it consists of four chambers and four valves, which act in concert to regulate its filling, ejection, and overall pump function. While numerous computational models exist to study either the electrical or the mechanical response of its individual chambers, the integrative electro-mechanical response of the whole heart remains poorly understood. Here we present a proof-of-concept simulator for a four-chamber human heart model created from computer topography and magnetic resonance images. We illustrate the governing equations of excitation-contraction coupling and discretize them using a single, unified finite element environment. To illustrate the basic features of our model, we visualize the electrical potential and the mechanical deformation across the human heart throughout its cardiac cycle. To compare our simulation against common metrics of cardiac function, we extract the pressure-volume relationship and show that it agrees well with clinical observations. Our prototype model allows us to explore and understand the key features, physics, and technologies to create an integrative, predictive model of the living human heart. Ultimately, our simulator will open opportunities to probe landscapes of clinical parameters, and guide device design and treatment planning in cardiac diseases such as stenosis, regurgitation, or prolapse of the aortic, pulmonary, tricuspid, or mitral valve.

  10. Hyponatremia, Cognitive Function, and Mobility in an Outpatient Heart Failure Population

    PubMed Central

    Albabtain, Monirah; Brenner, Michael J.; Nicklas, John M.; Hummel, Scott L.; McCormick, Michael P.; Pawlowski, Jeffrey L.; Remington, Tami L.; Gure, Tanya R.; Dorsch, Michael P.; Bleske, Barry E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The association of hyponatremia with cognitive impairment and mobility in heart failure (HF) patients is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if hyponatremia is associated with cognitive and mobility impairment as measured by simple, validated, and time-sensitive tests. Material/Methods This was a prospective study in patients with reduced and preserved ejection fraction (HFrEF, HFpEF) seen in outpatient HF clinics. Hyponatremia was defined as sodium level ≤136 mEq/L. Cognitive function was measured using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) tool, and mobility was measured with the Timed Up and Go test (TUG-t). Results A total of 121 patients were evaluated; 30% were hyponatremic (134±1.9 mEq/l, range 128–136 mEq/l). Overall, 92% of hyponatremic patients had cognitive impairment (MoCA <26) compared to 76% of the non-hyponatremic patients [relative risk 1.2 (confidence interval: 1.02–1.4, p=0.02)]. In regard to mobility, 72% of hyponatremic patients and 62% of non-hyponatremic patients (p=0.4) had TUG-t times that were considered to be worse than average. A total of 84% (N=76) of HFrEF and 71% (N=22) of HFpEF patients had cognitive impairment (p=0.86). HFrEF patients had significantly lower overall MoCA scores (21.2±3.7 vs. 23.3±3.6, p=0.006) and similar TUG-t times compared to HFpEF patients. Conclusions Most heart failure patients (HFrEF and HFpEF) seen in an ambulatory setting had impairment of cognitive function and mobility, with a higher prevalence among those with hyponatremia. Screening can be done using tests that can be administered in a clinical setting. PMID:27988787

  11. Impaired left ventricular global longitudinal strain in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: insights from the RELAX trial.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Adam D; McNulty, Steven; Alenezi, Fawaz; Ersboll, Mads; Vader, Justin M; Oh, Jae K; Lin, Grace; Redfield, Margaret M; Lewis, Gregory; Semigran, Marc J; Anstrom, Kevin J; Hernandez, Adrian F; Velazquez, Eric J

    2017-07-01

    While abnormal left ventricular (LV) global longitudinal strain (GLS) has been described in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), its prevalence and clinical significance are poorly understood. Patients enrolled in the RELAX trial of sildenafil in HFpEF (LV ejection fraction ≥50%) in whom two-dimensional, speckle-tracking LV GLS was possible (n = 187) were analysed. The distribution of LV GLS and its associations with clinical characteristics, LV structure and function, biomarkers, exercise capacity and quality of life were assessed. Baseline median LV GLS was -14.6% (25th and 75th percentile, -17.0% and -11.9%, respectively) and abnormal (≥ - 16%) in 122/187 (65%) patients. Patients in the tertile with the best LV GLS had lower N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) [median 505 pg/mL (161, 1065) vs. 875 pg/mL (488, 1802), P = 0.008) and lower collagen III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP) levels [median 6.7 µg/L (5.1, 8.1) vs. 8.1 µg/L (6.5, 10.5), P = 0.001] compared with the tertile with the worst LV GLS. There was also a modest linear relationship with LV GLS and log-transformed NT-proBNP and PIIINP (r = 0.29, P < 0.001 and r = 0.19, P = 0.009, respectively). We observed no linear association of LV GLS with Minnesota Living with Heart Failure scores, 6-min walk distance, peak oxygen consumption, or expiratory minute ventilation/carbon dioxide excretion slope. Impaired LV GLS is common among HFpEF patients, indicating the presence of covert systolic dysfunction despite normal LV ejection fraction. Impaired LV GLS was associated with biomarkers of wall stress and collagen synthesis and diastolic dysfunction but not with quality of life or exercise capacity, suggesting other processes may be more responsible for these aspects of the HFpEF syndrome. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  12. The Independent Association of Hypertension with Cognitive Function Among Older Adults with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Brickman, Adam M.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; van Dulmen, Manfred; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Colbert, Lisa H.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective Hypertension is the most common comorbidity among heart failure (HF) patients and has been independently linked with cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment is prevalent among HF patients, though the extent to which hypertension contributes to cognitive function in this population is unclear. Methods 116 HF patients (31.0% women, 67.68 ± 11.16 years) completed neuropsychological testing and impedance cardiography. History of physician diagnosed hypertension, along with other medical characteristics, was ascertained through a review of participants’ medical charts. Results 69.8% of the HF patients had a diagnostic history of hypertension. After adjustment for demographic and medical characteristics (i.e., cardiac index, medication status, and resting blood pressure), hypertension was independently associated with attention/executive function/psychomotor speed (ΔF(1,103) = 10.85, ΔR2 = .07, p < .01) and motor functioning (ΔF(1,103) = 4.46, ΔR2 = .04, p < .05). HF patients with a diagnosed history of hypertension performed worse in these domains than those without such history. Conclusion The current findings indicate that diagnostic history of hypertension is an important contributor to cognitive impairment in HF. Hypertension frequently precedes HF and future studies should examine whether sustained hypertension compromises cerebral autoregulatory mechanisms to produce brain damage and exacerbate cognitive impairment in this population. PMID:23026535

  13. Leptin impairs cardiovagal baroreflex function at the level of the solitary tract nucleus.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Amy C; Shaltout, Hossam A; Gallagher, Patricia E; Diz, Debra I

    2009-11-01

    Circulating leptin is elevated in some forms of obesity-related hypertension, associated with impaired baroreflex function. Leptin receptors are present on vagal afferent fibers and neurons within the solitary tract nucleus, providing an anatomic distribution consistent with baroreflex modulation. Although solitary tract nucleus microinjection of 144 fmol/60 nL of leptin had no significant effect on baroreflex sensitivity for control of the heart rate in urethane/chloralose-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, 500 fmol of leptin impaired baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia in response to increases in pressure (1.15+/-0.04 versus 0.52+/-0.12 ms/mm Hg; P<0.01). Transgenic ASrAOGEN rats with low brain angiotensinogen have an upregulation of the leptin receptor and p85 alpha mRNA in the dorsal medulla relative to Sprague-Dawley rats. Consistent with these observations, the response to leptin was enhanced in ASrAOGEN rats, because both the 144-fmol (1.46+/-0.08 versus 0.75+/-0.10 ms/mm Hg; P<0.001) and 500-fmol (1.36+/-0.32 versus 0.44+/-0.06 ms/mm Hg; P<0.05) leptin microinjections impaired baroreflex sensitivity. At these doses, leptin microinjection had no effect on resting pressure, heart rate, or the tachycardic response to decreases in pressure in Sprague-Dawley or ASrAOGEN rats. Thus, exogenous leptin at sites within the solitary tract nucleus impairs the baroreflex sensitivity for bradycardia induced by increases in arterial pressure, consistent with a permissive role in mediating increases in arterial pressure. Baroreflex inhibition was enhanced in animals with evidence of increased leptin receptor and relevant signaling pathway mRNA.

  14. Impaired function of Fanconi anemia type C-deficient macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Ballman, Kimberly; Li, Deqiang; Khan, Shehnaz; Derr-Yellin, Ethel; Shou, Weinian; Haneline, Laura S

    2012-02-01

    FA is a genetic disorder characterized by BM failure, developmental defects, and cancer predisposition. Previous studies suggest that FA patients exhibit alterations in immunologic function. However, it is unclear whether the defects are immune cell-autonomous or secondary to leukopenia from evolving BM failure. Given the central role that macrophages have in the innate immune response, inflammation resolution, and antigen presentation for acquired immunity, we examined whether macrophages from Fancc-/- mice exhibit impaired function. Peritoneal inflammation induced by LPS or sodium periodate resulted in reduced monocyte/macrophage recruitment in Fancc-/- mice compared with WT controls. Fancc-/- mice also had decreased inflammatory monocytes mobilized into the peripheral blood after LPS treatment compared with controls. Furthermore, Fancc-/- peritoneal macrophages displayed cell-autonomous defects in function, including impaired adhesion to FN or endothelial cells, reduced chemoattractant-mediated migration, and decreased phagocytosis. Moreover, dysregulated F-actin rearrangement was detected in Fancc-/- macrophages after adhesion to FN, which was consistent with an observed reduction in RhoA-GTP levels. Importantly, these data suggest that impaired cytoskeletal rearrangements in Fancc-/- macrophages may be the common mechanism responsible for cell-autonomous defects detected in vitro, as well as altered monocyte/macrophage trafficking in vivo.

  15. Functional Literacy for Students with Visual Impairments and Significant Cognitive Disabilities: The Perspective of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebehazy, Kim T.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports opinions and practices of teachers of students with visual impairments (TSVIs) in 34 states regarding functional literacy for students with visual impairments (VIs) and significant cognitive disabilities (SCDs). The survey asked TSVIs to select a definition of functional literacy, indicate agreement with a series of literacy…

  16. Functional Literacy for Students with Visual Impairments and Significant Cognitive Disabilities: The Perspective of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebehazy, Kim T.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports opinions and practices of teachers of students with visual impairments (TSVIs) in 34 states regarding functional literacy for students with visual impairments (VIs) and significant cognitive disabilities (SCDs). The survey asked TSVIs to select a definition of functional literacy, indicate agreement with a series of literacy…

  17. Wound Healing in Patients With Impaired Kidney Function.

    PubMed

    Maroz, Natallia; Simman, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Renal impairment has long been known to affect wound healing. However, information on differences in the spectrum of wound healing depending on the type of renal insufficiency is limited. Acute kidney injury (AKI) may be observed with different wound types. On one hand, it follows acute traumatic conditions such as crush injury, burns, and post-surgical wounds, and on the other hand, it arises as simultaneous targeting of skin and kidneys by autoimmune-mediated vasculitis. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) often occur in older people, who have limited physical mobility and predisposition for developing pressure-related wounds. The common risk factors for poor wound healing, generally observed in patients with CKD and ESRD, include poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, chronic venous insufficiency, and aging. ESRD patients have a unique spectrum of wounds related to impaired calcium-phosphorus metabolism, including calciphylaxis, in addition to having the risk factors presented by CKD patients. Overall, there is a wide range of uremic toxins: they may affect local mechanisms of wound healing and also adversely affect the functioning of multiple systems. In the present literature review, we discuss the association between different types of renal impairments and their effects on wound healing and examine this association from different aspects related to the management of wounds in renal impairment patients.

  18. Impairments of Motor Function While Multitasking in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kronemer, Sharif I.; Mandel, Jordan A.; Sacktor, Ned C.; Marvel, Cherie L.

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) became a treatable illness with the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (CART). As a result, patients with regular access to CART are expected to live decades with HIV. Long-term HIV infection presents unique challenges, including neurocognitive impairments defined by three major stages of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The current investigation aimed to study cognitive and motor impairments in HIV using a novel multitasking paradigm. Unlike current standard measures of cognitive and motor performance in HIV, multitasking increases real-world validity by mimicking the dual motor and cognitive demands that are part of daily professional and personal settings (e.g., driving, typing and writing). Moreover, multitask assessments can unmask compensatory mechanisms, normally used under single task conditions, to maintain performance. This investigation revealed that HIV+ participants were impaired on the motor component of the multitask, while cognitive performance was spared. A patient-specific positive interaction between motor performance and working memory recall was driven by poor HIV+ multitaskers. Surprisingly, HAND stage did not correspond with multitask performance and a variety of commonly used assessments indicated normal motor function among HIV+ participants with poor motor performance during the experimental task. These results support the use of multitasks to reveal otherwise hidden impairment in chronic HIV by expanding the sensitivity of clinical assessments used to determine HAND stage. Future studies should examine the capability of multitasks to predict performance in personal, professional and health-related behaviors and prognosis of patients living with chronic HIV. PMID:28503143

  19. Impairment of Endothelial Function by Little Cigar Secondhand Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangtao; Wang, Xiaoyin; Narayan, Shilpa; Glantz, Stanton A.; Schick, Suzaynn F.; Springer, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Little cigars and cigarillos are gaining in popularity as cigarette use wanes, mainly due to relaxed regulatory standards that make them cheaper, easier to buy individually, and available in a variety of flavors not allowed in cigarettes. To address whether they should be regulated as strictly as cigarettes, we investigated whether little cigar secondhand smoke (SHS) decreases vascular endothelial function like that of cigarettes. Methods We exposed rats to SHS from little cigars, cigarettes, or chamber air, for 10 minutes and measured the resulting acute impairment of arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Results SHS from both little cigars and cigarettes impaired FMD. Impairment was greater after exposure to little cigar SHS than by cigarette SHS relative to pre-exposure values, although the post-exposure FMD values were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions Exposure to little cigar SHS leads to impairment of FMD that is at least equal to that resulting from similar levels of cigarette SHS. Our findings support the need to prevent even brief exposure to little cigar SHS, and support tobacco control policies that regulate little cigars as strictly as cigarettes. PMID:26753171

  20. Impairments of Motor Function While Multitasking in HIV.

    PubMed

    Kronemer, Sharif I; Mandel, Jordan A; Sacktor, Ned C; Marvel, Cherie L

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) became a treatable illness with the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (CART). As a result, patients with regular access to CART are expected to live decades with HIV. Long-term HIV infection presents unique challenges, including neurocognitive impairments defined by three major stages of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The current investigation aimed to study cognitive and motor impairments in HIV using a novel multitasking paradigm. Unlike current standard measures of cognitive and motor performance in HIV, multitasking increases real-world validity by mimicking the dual motor and cognitive demands that are part of daily professional and personal settings (e.g., driving, typing and writing). Moreover, multitask assessments can unmask compensatory mechanisms, normally used under single task conditions, to maintain performance. This investigation revealed that HIV+ participants were impaired on the motor component of the multitask, while cognitive performance was spared. A patient-specific positive interaction between motor performance and working memory recall was driven by poor HIV+ multitaskers. Surprisingly, HAND stage did not correspond with multitask performance and a variety of commonly used assessments indicated normal motor function among HIV+ participants with poor motor performance during the experimental task. These results support the use of multitasks to reveal otherwise hidden impairment in chronic HIV by expanding the sensitivity of clinical assessments used to determine HAND stage. Future studies should examine the capability of multitasks to predict performance in personal, professional and health-related behaviors and prognosis of patients living with chronic HIV.

  1. The evaluation of functional heart condition with machine learning algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overchuk, K. V.; Lezhnina, I. A.; Uvarov, A. A.; Perchatkin, V. A.; Lvova, A. B.

    2017-08-01

    This paper is considering the most suitable algorithms to build a classifier for evaluating of the functional heart condition with the ability to estimate the direction and progress of the patient’s treatment. The cons and pros of algorithms was analyzed with respect to the problem posed. The most optimal solution has been given and justified.

  2. Pulmonary Function and Arterial Stiffness in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bangchuan; Gong, Shijin; Yu, Yihua; Dai, Haiwen

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffness contributes to heart failure and is decreased by angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). This cross-sectional study aimed to assess associations of lung function and ARB with arterial stiffness in patients with chronic heart failure. 354 outpatients (168 males; 186 females; 68.2 ± 7.2 years old) with chronic heart failure were evaluated. Lung function parameters, including forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), and FEV1 to FVC ratio (FEV1/FVC), were assessed. The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) was used to estimate arterial stiffness. Unadjusted correlation analyses revealed a positive association of CAVI with ARB but not ACEI, and a negative correlation with FEV1 (r = −0.2987, p < 0.0001). Multiple stepwise regression analyses showed that ARB and FEV1 (p < 0.0001) were independent predicting factors for CAVI. These findings suggest that reduced pulmonary function is associated with increased CAVI. Pulmonary function protection could be used to improve the prognosis in heart failure, but additional studies are necessary. PMID:28097138

  3. Morphological and functional state of the heart during magnetic storm.

    PubMed

    Chibisov, S M; Breus, T K; Illarionova, T S

    2001-12-01

    Magnetic storm modulates morphological and functional state of the heart and the related systems. Changes in cardiomyocyte ultrastructure induced by changes in geomagnetic activity were studied in experiments on rabbits. We describe a possible mechanism underlying changes in cardiac activity in intact animals induced by geomagnetic perturbations. The most pronounced alterations of cardiomyocyte ultrastructure were observed during the major phase of magnetic storm.

  4. Targeting Functional Impairments in the Treatment of Children and Adolescents with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Sasser, Tyler; Schoenfelder, Erin N; Stein, Mark A

    2017-02-01

    The diagnostic criteria for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) require both symptoms and impairment to be present. Impairment in functioning is commonly the primary reason for referral, and is also a better predictor of long-term outcomes than ADHD symptoms. And yet, only recently has research begun to examine the impact of ADHD treatments on functional impairment using efficient and psychometrically sound outcome measures. In this article, we identify several noteworthy multidimensional measures of functional impairment (ADHD FX, Barkley Functional Impairment Scale [BFIS], Impairment Rating Scale [IRS], Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale [WFIRS]) utilized in recent clinical trials for ADHD, and describe their psychometric properties and clinical utility. We also review existing evidence on the impact of pharmacological and behavioral treatments on different domains of functional impairment in ADHD youth as measured by these specific measures. Further research is needed to evaluate longitudinal effects of ADHD treatments on functional impairment, and the use of these measures in adaptive treatment designs.

  5. Renal Function Recovery with Total Artificial Heart Support.

    PubMed

    Quader, Mohammed A; Goodreau, Adam M; Shah, Keyur B; Katlaps, Gundars; Cooke, Richard; Smallfield, Melissa C; Tchoukina, Inna F; Wolfe, Luke G; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure patients requiring total artificial heart (TAH) support often have concomitant renal insufficiency (RI). We sought to quantify renal function recovery in patients supported with TAH at our institution. Renal function data at 30, 90, and 180 days after TAH implantation were analyzed for patients with RI, defined as hemodialysis supported or an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m. Between January 2008 and December 2013, 20 of the 46 (43.5%) TAH recipients (age 51 ± 9 years, 85% men) had RI, mean preoperative eGFR of 48 ± 7 ml/min/1.73 m. Renal function recovery was noted at each follow-up interval: increment in eGFR (ml/min/1.73 m) at 30, 90, and 180 days was 21 ± 35 (p = 0.1), 16.5 ± 18 (p = 0.05), and 10 ± 9 (p = 0.1), respectively. Six patients (30%) required preoperative dialysis. Of these, four recovered renal function, one remained on dialysis, and one died. Six patients (30%) required new-onset dialysis. Of these, three recovered renal function and three died. Overall, 75% (15 of 20) of patients' renal function improved with TAH support. Total artificial heart support improved renal function in 75% of patients with pre-existing significant RI, including those who required preoperative dialysis.

  6. The importance of lung function, non-malignant diseases associated with asbestos, and symptoms as predictors of ischaemic heart disease in shipyard workers exposed to asbestos.

    PubMed Central

    Sandén, A; Järvholm, B; Larsson, S

    1993-01-01

    The mortality from ischaemic heart disease was studied in a prospective cohort of 1725 shipyard workers exposed to asbestos. The analyses were stratified for age and smoking habits and restricted to men. In agreement with other findings, men with impaired lung function had a significantly higher risk (relative risk (RR) = 3.5) of dying from ischaemic heart disease than men with normal lung function. Men with asbestosis or suspected asbestosis had a significantly higher risk (RR = 3.1) of dying from ischaemic heart disease than men without asbestosis. Thus asbestosis or suspected asbestosis also seemed to be a risk factor for ischaemic heart disease. This finding was independent of respiratory function. There was no increased risk for ischaemic heart disease in men with compared with men without pleural plaques. Men with production of phlegm or sputum and wheezing or whistling had no increased risk for ischaemic heart disease compared with men without these symptoms. In the group with normal lung function men with dyspnoea had a significantly higher risk of dying from ischaemic heart disease than men without dyspnoea. The findings for men with asbestosis or suspected asbestosis indicated a further risk factor besides impaired lung function, in persons exposed to asbestos. Perhaps this risk factor is due to lesions of the pericardium with consequences for heart function. PMID:8398871

  7. Biomarkers of renal injury and function: diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic implications in heart failure.

    PubMed

    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Ruilope, Luis M; Maisel, Alan S; Damman, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Heart failure guidelines suggest evaluating renal function as a routine work-up in every patient with heart failure. Specifically, it is advised to calculate glomerular filtration rate and determine blood urea nitrogen. The reason for this is that renal impairment and worsening renal function (WRF) are common in heart failure, and strongly associate with poor outcome. Renal function, however, consists of more than glomerular filtration alone, and includes tubulointerstitial damage and albuminuria. For each of these renal entities, different biomarkers exist that have been investigated in heart failure. Hypothetically, and in parallel to data in nephrology, these markers may aid in the diagnosis of renal dysfunction, or for risk stratification, or could help in therapeutic decision-making. However, as reviewed in the present manuscript, while these markers may carry prognostic information (although not always additive to established markers of renal function), their role in predicting WRF is limited at best. More importantly, none of these markers have been evaluated as a therapeutic target nor have their serial values been used to guide therapy. The evidence is most compelling for the oldest-serum creatinine (in combination with glomerular filtration rate)-but even for this biomarker, evidence to guide therapy to improve outcome is circumstantial at best. Although many new renal biomarkers have emerged at the horizon, they have only limited usefulness in clinical practice until thoroughly and prospectively studied. For now, routine measurement of (novel) renal biomarkers can help to determine cardiovascular risk, but there is no role for these biomarkers to change therapy to improve clinical outcome in heart failure.

  8. Executive Function Is Selectively Impaired in Old Age Bipolar Depression.

    PubMed

    Caixeta, Leonardo; Soares, Vânia L D; Vieira, Renata T; Soares, Cândida D; Caixeta, Victor; Ferreira, Sandra B; Aversi-Ferreira, Tales A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the cognitive signature of bipolar disorder (BD) in elderly brains. The neuropsychological features of depressive elderly with early-onset BD are largely unknown. This issue is relevant because cognitive impairment can produce an additional impact on the already compromised functionality of elderly with BD. The aim of this study is to assess executive functions (EFs) in the depressive phase of elderly outpatients with early-onset BD. Methods: Forty-nine elderly outpatients with early-onset BD were assessed with several neuropsychological tests for EF in the depressive phase of the disorder. Results: Executive dysfunction is very common in old age bipolar depression. Thirteen patients (26.5%) had a pseudodementia presentation. The worst performances were observed in the following tests: Trail Making B, Stroop Test 3, Backward Digit Span and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Conclusion: Executive dysfunction profile in elderly BD is complex and heterogeneous, but most cases display difficulties in working memory, inhibitory control, mental flexibility, and information processing speed. The performance of elderly with bipolar depression in executive assessment can be divided into two main categories: (1) Single EF domain impairment; and (2) Multiple EF domain impairment with or without a pseudodementia syndrome. Executive dysfunction in old age bipolar depression may be explained by lack of sufficient mental energy to run those cognitive processes that require larger amounts of effort to be performed.

  9. Impairment of B-cell functions during HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Amu, Sylvie; Ruffin, Nicolas; Rethi, Bence; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-09-24

    A variety of B-cell dysfunctions are manifested during HIV-1 infection, as reported early during the HIV-1 epidemic. It is not unusual that the pathogenic mechanisms presented to elucidate impairment of B-cell responses during HIV-1 infection focus on the impact of reduced T-cell numbers and functions, and lack of germinal center formation in lymphoid tissues. To our understanding, however, perturbation of B-cell phenotype and function during HIV-1 infection may begin at several different B-cell developmental stages. These impairments can be mediated by intrinsic B-cell defects as well as by the lack of proper T-cell help. In this review, we will highlight some of the pathways and molecular interactions leading to B-cell impairment prior to germinal center formation and B-cell activation mediated through the B-cell receptor in response to HIV-1 antigens. Recent studies indicate a regulatory role for B cells on T-cell biology and immune responses. We will discuss some of these novel findings and how these regulatory mechanisms could potentially be affected by the intrinsic defects of B cells taking place during HIV-1 infection.

  10. Executive Function Is Selectively Impaired in Old Age Bipolar Depression

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Leonardo; Soares, Vânia L. D.; Vieira, Renata T.; Soares, Cândida D.; Caixeta, Victor; Ferreira, Sandra B.; Aversi-Ferreira, Tales A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the cognitive signature of bipolar disorder (BD) in elderly brains. The neuropsychological features of depressive elderly with early-onset BD are largely unknown. This issue is relevant because cognitive impairment can produce an additional impact on the already compromised functionality of elderly with BD. The aim of this study is to assess executive functions (EFs) in the depressive phase of elderly outpatients with early-onset BD. Methods: Forty-nine elderly outpatients with early-onset BD were assessed with several neuropsychological tests for EF in the depressive phase of the disorder. Results: Executive dysfunction is very common in old age bipolar depression. Thirteen patients (26.5%) had a pseudodementia presentation. The worst performances were observed in the following tests: Trail Making B, Stroop Test 3, Backward Digit Span and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Conclusion: Executive dysfunction profile in elderly BD is complex and heterogeneous, but most cases display difficulties in working memory, inhibitory control, mental flexibility, and information processing speed. The performance of elderly with bipolar depression in executive assessment can be divided into two main categories: (1) Single EF domain impairment; and (2) Multiple EF domain impairment with or without a pseudodementia syndrome. Executive dysfunction in old age bipolar depression may be explained by lack of sufficient mental energy to run those cognitive processes that require larger amounts of effort to be performed. PMID:28243220

  11. Serum vitamin D and functional impairment in octogenarian women.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Martínez, Rut; Fernández-Garrido, Julio; Buigues, Cristina; Martinez-Martinez, Mary; Cantero-Díaz, Liliana; Santamaría-Carrillo, Yolanda; Serra-Catalá, Nuria; Peris, Carlos; Cauli, Omar

    2016-05-01

    Serum vitamin D deficiency has been associated with frailty in people aged 65 and over, however its relationship with functional impairment has not been investigated in octogenerian (aged 80-90 years) institutionalized women. We assessed functional impairment in this latter group by measuring frailty syndrome and other geriatric and psychological assessment scales: the Tinetti gait and balance index to determine the risk for falls, the Barthel index to measure the basic activities of daily living, the Lawton index for instrumental activities, the mini-mental score examination test for cognitive impairment, the Yesavage scale for geriatric depression, and the Norton scale for the risk of ulceration. Frail individuals had significantly reduced serum vitamin D concentrations (measured as total 25-hydroxyvitamin D; 25(OH)D) compared to robust individuals, but reduced 25(OH)D concentration did not significantly correlate with frailty syndrome severity, and mean 25(OH)D concentrations were within the recommended levels in all groups. The 25(OH)D concentration did not correlate with any of the blood analytical parameters measured and with the geriatric assessment scales used, suggesting a selective relationship with frailty. These results highlight the need to individualize treatment such as vitamin D supplementation in order to treat frailty syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Impaired functional integration in multiple sclerosis: a graph theory study.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Maria A; Valsasina, Paola; Meani, Alessandro; Falini, Andrea; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to explore the topological organization of functional brain network connectivity in a large cohort of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and to assess whether its disruption contributes to disease clinical manifestations. Graph theoretical analysis was applied to resting state fMRI data from 246 MS patients and 55 matched healthy controls (HC). Functional connectivity between 116 cortical and subcortical brain regions was estimated using a bivariate correlation analysis. Global network properties (network degree, global efficiency, hierarchy, path length and assortativity) were abnormal in MS patients vs HC, and contributed to distinguish cognitively impaired MS patients (34%) from HC, but not the main MS clinical phenotypes. Compared to HC, MS patients also showed: (1) a loss of hubs in the superior frontal gyrus, precuneus and anterior cingulum in the left hemisphere; (2) a different lateralization of basal ganglia hubs (mostly located in the left hemisphere in HC, and in the right hemisphere in MS patients); and (3) a formation of hubs, not seen in HC, in the left temporal pole and cerebellum. MS patients also experienced a decreased nodal degree in the bilateral caudate nucleus and right cerebellum. Such a modification of regional network properties contributed to cognitive impairment and phenotypic variability of MS. An impairment of global integration (likely to reflect a reduced competence in information exchange between distant brain areas) occurs in MS and is associated with cognitive deficits. A regional redistribution of network properties contributes to cognitive status and phenotypic variability of these patients.

  13. Parieto-motor functional connectivity is impaired in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Palomar, Francisco J; Conde, Virginia; Carrillo, Fátima; Fernández-del-Olmo, Miguel; Koch, Giacomo; Mir, Pablo

    2013-03-01

    Bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease is associated with a difficulty in selecting and executing motor actions, likely due to alterations in the functional connectivity of cortico-cortical circuits. Our aims were to analyse the functional interplay between the posterior parietal cortex and the ipsilateral primary motor area in Parkinson's disease using bifocal transcranial magnetic stimulation, to evaluate its modulation by dopaminergic treatment and its relationship to a simple choice reaction task. We studied 12 Parkinson's disease patients with and without dopaminergic treatment and 12 healthy controls. A paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol was applied over the right posterior parietal cortex and the right primary motor area using different conditioning stimulus intensities and interstimulus intervals. Reaction and movement times were studied by a simple choice reaction task. In controls, we observed a significant facilitation of motor evoked potential amplitudes at 4 ms interstimulus interval when conditioning stimulus intensity was set to 90% of resting motor threshold. This functional interaction was not observed in Parkinson's disease patients without dopaminergic treatment and was not restored with treatment. Moreover, correlation analyses revealed that Parkinson's disease patients with less impaired parieto-motor interaction were faster in executing reaching movements in a choice reaction time task, suggesting that the functional parieto-motor impairment described here could be related to bradykinesia observed in Parkinson's disease patients. Parieto-motor functional connectivity is impaired in Parkinson's disease. The reduced efficacy of this connection could be related to presence of bradykinesia previously observed in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Chronic mercury exposure impairs the sympathovagal control of the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Simões, M R; Azevedo, B F; Fiorim, J; Jr Freire, D D; Covre, E P; Vassallo, D V; Dos Santos, L

    2016-11-01

    Mercury is known to cause harmful neural effects affecting the cardiovascular system. Here, we evaluated the chronic effects of low-dose mercury exposure on the autonomic control of the cardiovascular system. Wistar rats were treated for 30 days with HgCl2 (1st dose 4.6 μg/kg followed by 0.07 μg/kg per day, intramuscular) or saline. The femoral artery and vein were then cannulated for evaluation of autonomic control of the hemodynamic function, which was evaluated in awake rats. The following tests were performed: baroreflex sensitivity, Von Bezold-Jarisch reflex, heart rate variability (HRV) and pharmacological blockade with methylatropine and atenolol to test the autonomic tone of the heart. Exposure to HgCl2 for 30 days slightly increased the mean arterial pressure and heart rate (HR). There was a significant reduction in the baroreflex gain of animals exposed to HgCl2 . Moreover, haemodynamic responses to the activation of the Von Bezold-Jarisch reflex were also reduced. The changes in the spectral analysis of HRV suggested a shift in the sympathovagal balance toward a sympathetic predominance after mercury exposure, which was confirmed by autonomic pharmacological blockade in the HgCl2 group. This group also exhibited reduced intrinsic HR after the double block suggesting that the pacemaker activity of the sinus node was also affected. These findings suggested that the autonomic modulation of the heart was significantly altered by chronic mercury exposure, thus reinforcing that even at low concentrations such exposure might be associated with increased cardiovascular risk. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Assessment of right ventricular systolic function by echocardiography after surgical repair of congenital heart defects.

    PubMed

    Khraiche, Diala; Ben Moussa, Nidhal

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative impairment of right ventricular (RV) systolic function can appear after surgical repair of complex congenital heart defects, such as tetralogy of Fallot; it is caused by chronic volume and/or pressure overload due to pulmonary regurgitation and/or stenosis. RV dysfunction is strongly associated with prognosis in these patients. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is the gold standard for quantification of RV volumes and ejection fraction in patients with congenital heart diseases; however, it is costly and is not widely available. Echocardiography is the imaging modality that is most available and most frequently used to assess RV systolic function. However, RV ejection fraction cannot be measured accurately by standard two-dimensional echocardiography because of its pyramidal shape. Surrogate parameters of RV systolic function are mostly used in routine practice. New techniques of two-dimensional strain and three-dimensional quantification of RV volumes and ejection fraction have been developed in recent years. The aim of this article is to show the pertinence of each variable of RV systolic function measured by echocardiography in patients with repaired congenital heart disease and residual chronic RV overload.

  16. Impaired regulation of cardiac function in sepsis, SIRS, and MODS.

    PubMed

    Werdan, Karl; Schmidt, Hendrik; Ebelt, Henning; Zorn-Pauly, Klaus; Koidl, Bernd; Hoke, Robert Sebastian; Heinroth, Konstantin; Müller-Werdan, Ursula

    2009-04-01

    In sepsis, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS), a severe prognostically relevant cardiac autonomic dysfunction exists, as manifested by a strong attenuation of sympathetically and vagally mediated heart rate variability (HRV). The mechanisms underlying this attenuation are not limited to the nervous system. They also include alterations of the cardiac pacemaker cells on a cellular level. As shown in human atrial cardiomyocytes, endotoxin interacts with cardiac hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels, which mediate the pacemaker current If and play an important role in transmitting sympathetic and vagal signals on heart rate and HRV. Moreover, endotoxin sensitizes cardiac HCN channels to sympathetic signals. These findings identify endotoxin as a pertinent modulator of the autonomic nervous regulation of heart function. In MODS, the vagal pathway of the autonomic nervous system is particularly compromised, leading to an attenuation of the cholinergic antiinflammatory reflex. An amelioration of the blunted vagal activity appears to be a promising novel therapeutic target to achieve a suppression of the inflammatory state and thereby an improvement of prognosis in MODS patients. Preliminary data revealed therapeutic benefits (increased survival rates and improvements of the depressed vagal activity) of the administration of statins, beta-blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in patients with MODS.

  17. Stress task specific impairments of cardiovascular functioning in obese participants.

    PubMed

    Burch, Ashley E; Allen, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    The role that excess adipose tissue plays in chronic inflammation gives rise to its importance as an independent risk factor in cardiovascular dysfunction. Operationalizing chronic stress as obesity, we sought to explore the relationship between obesity, perceived stress and cardiovascular reactivity and recovery from laboratory stressors. Cardiovascular function was assessed using blood pressure and heart rate. Two stress tasks (mental arithmetic and cold pressor) were employed to examine potential differences between type of stress and cardiovascular response. Body mass index (BMI) was able to predict dysfunction in both cardiovascular reactivity and recovery. Participants with a higher BMI exhibited blunted systolic blood pressure and heart rate reactivity to the mental arithmetic task. In contrast, BMI has an incongruent effect on blood pressure reactivity to the cold pressor task that is dependent on the level of perceived stress. This suggests that in some instances the effect of BMI on cardiovascular response to acute stress may be moderated by perceived stress. Further, we found greater adiposity was related to delayed heart rate recovery following both stress tasks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effects of Heart Failure on Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Udani, Suneel M; Koyner, Jay L

    2010-01-01

    Summary Heart-kidney interactions have been increasingly recognized by clinicians and researchers involved in the study and treatment of heart failure and kidney disease. A classification system has been developed to categorize the different manifestations of cardiac and renal dysfunction. Recent work has highlighted the significant negative prognostic effect of worsening renal function on outcomes for individuals with heart failure. The etiology of the concomitant cardiac and renal dysfunction remains unclear; however, increasing evidence supports alternatives to the established theory of underfilling, including effects of venous congestion and changes in intra-abdominal pressure. Conventional therapy focuses on blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with expanding use of direct renin and aldosterone antagonists. Novel therapeutic interventions using extracorporeal therapy and antagonists of the adenosine pathway show promise and require further investigation. PMID:20621250

  19. Lung function and heart disease in American Indian adults with high frequency of metabolic abnormalities (from the Strong Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Yeh, Fawn; Dixon, Anne E; Best, Lyle G; Marion, Susan M; Lee, Elisa T; Ali, Tauqeer; Yeh, Jeunliang; Rhoades, Everett R; Howard, Barbara V; Devereux, Richard B

    2014-07-15

    The associations of pulmonary function with cardiovascular disease (CVD) independent of diabetes mellitus (DM) and metabolic syndrome have not been examined in a population-based setting. We examined prevalence and incidence CVD in relation to lower pulmonary function in the Strong Heart Study second examination (1993 to 1995) in 352 CVD and 2,873 non-CVD adults free of overt lung disease (mean age 60 years). Lung function was assessed by standard spirometry. Participants with metabolic syndrome or DM with or without CVD had lower pulmonary function than participants without these conditions after adjustment for hypertension, age, gender, abdominal obesity, smoking, physical activity index, and study field center. CVD participants with DM had significantly lower forced vital capacity than participants with CVD alone. Significant associations were observed between reduced pulmonary function, preclinical CVD, and prevalent CVD after adjustment for multiple CVD risk factors. During follow-up (median 13.3 years), pulmonary function did not predict CVD incidence, it predicted CVD mortality. Among 3,225 participants, 412 (298 without baseline CVD) died from CVD by the end of 2008. In models adjusted for multiple CVD risk factors, DM, metabolic syndrome, and baseline CVD, compared with highest quartile of lung function, lower lung function predicted CVD mortality (relative risk up to 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.0, p<0.05). In conclusion, a population with a high prevalence of DM and metabolic syndrome and lower lung function was independently associated with prevalent clinical and preclinical CVD, and its impairment predicted CVD mortality. Additional research is needed to identify mechanisms linking metabolic abnormalities, low lung function, and CVD.

  20. Medication self-management skills and cognitive impairment in older adults hospitalized for heart failure: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Erik H; Senapati, Alpana; Hsich, Eileen; Gorodeski, Eiran Z

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cognitive impairment is highly prevalent among older adults (aged ≥65 years) hospitalized for heart failure and has been associated with poor outcomes. Poor medication self-management skills have been associated with poor outcomes in this population as well. The presence and extent of an association between cognitive impairment and poor medication self-management skills in this population has not been clearly defined. Objective: We assessed the cognition of consecutive older adults hospitalized for heart failure, in relation to their medication self-management skills. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of older adults (aged ≥65 years) who were hospitalized for heart failure and were being discharged home. Prior to discharge, we assessed cognition using the Mini-Cog. We also tested patients’ ability to read a pill bottle label, open a pill bottle safety cap, and allocate mock pills to a pill box. Pill allocation performance was assessed quantitatively (counts of errors of omission and commission) and qualitatively (patterns suggestive of knowledge-based mistakes, rule-based mistakes, or skill-based slips). Results: Of 55 participants, 22% were found to have cognitive impairment. Patients with cognitive impairment tended to be older as compared to those without cognitive impairment (mean age = 81 vs 76 years, p = NS). Patients with cognitive impairment had a higher prevalence of inability to read pill bottle label (prevalence ratio = 5.8, 95% confidence interval = 3.2–10.5, p = 0.001) and inability to open pill bottle safety cap (prevalence ratio = 3.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.3–8.4, p = 0.03). While most patients (65%) had pill-allocation errors regardless of cognition, those patients with cognitive impairment tended to have more errors of omission (mean number of errors = 48 vs 23, p = 0.006), as well as more knowledge-based mistakes (75% vs 40%, p = 0.03). Conclusion: There is

  1. Medication self-management skills and cognitive impairment in older adults hospitalized for heart failure: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Howell, Erik H; Senapati, Alpana; Hsich, Eileen; Gorodeski, Eiran Z

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is highly prevalent among older adults (aged ≥65 years) hospitalized for heart failure and has been associated with poor outcomes. Poor medication self-management skills have been associated with poor outcomes in this population as well. The presence and extent of an association between cognitive impairment and poor medication self-management skills in this population has not been clearly defined. We assessed the cognition of consecutive older adults hospitalized for heart failure, in relation to their medication self-management skills. We conducted a cross-sectional study of older adults (aged ≥65 years) who were hospitalized for heart failure and were being discharged home. Prior to discharge, we assessed cognition using the Mini-Cog. We also tested patients' ability to read a pill bottle label, open a pill bottle safety cap, and allocate mock pills to a pill box. Pill allocation performance was assessed quantitatively (counts of errors of omission and commission) and qualitatively (patterns suggestive of knowledge-based mistakes, rule-based mistakes, or skill-based slips). Of 55 participants, 22% were found to have cognitive impairment. Patients with cognitive impairment tended to be older as compared to those without cognitive impairment (mean age = 81 vs 76 years, p = NS). Patients with cognitive impairment had a higher prevalence of inability to read pill bottle label (prevalence ratio = 5.8, 95% confidence interval = 3.2-10.5, p = 0.001) and inability to open pill bottle safety cap (prevalence ratio = 3.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.3-8.4, p = 0.03). While most patients (65%) had pill-allocation errors regardless of cognition, those patients with cognitive impairment tended to have more errors of omission (mean number of errors = 48 vs 23, p = 0.006), as well as more knowledge-based mistakes (75% vs 40%, p = 0.03). There is an association between cognitive impairment and poor

  2. Exploring Heart and Lung Function in Space: ARMS Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuipers, Andre; Cork, Michael; LeGouic, Marine

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Respiratory Monitoring System (ARMS) is a suite of monitoring instruments and supplies used to study the heart, lungs, and metabolism. Many experiments sponsored by the European Space Agency (ESA) will be conducted using ARMS during STS-107. The near-weightless environment of space causes the body to undergo many physiological adaptations, and the regulation of blood pressure is no exception. Astronauts also experience a decrease in blood volume as an adaptation to microgravity. Reduced blood volume may not provide enough blood pressure to the head during entry or landing. As a result, astronauts often experience light-headedness, and sometimes even fainting, when they stand shortly after returning to Earth. To help regulate blood pressure and heart rate, baroreceptors, sensors located in artery walls in the neck and near the heart, control blood pressure by sending information to the brain and ensuring blood flow to organs. These mechanisms work properly in Earth's gravity but must adapt in the microgravity environment of space. However, upon return to Earth during entry and landing, the cardiovascular system must readjust itself to gravity, which can cause fluctuation in the control of blood pressure and heart rate. Although the system recovers in hours or days, these occurrences are not easily predicted or understood - a puzzle investigators will study with the ARMS equipment. In space, researchers can focus on aspects of the cardiovascular system normally masked by gravity. The STS-107 experiments using ARMS will provide data on how the heart and lungs function in space, as well as how the nervous system controls them. Exercise will also be combined with breath holding and straining (the Valsalva maneuver) to test how heart rate and blood pressure react to different stresses. This understanding will improve astronauts' cardiopulmonary function after return to Earth, and may well help Earthbound patients who experience similar effects after long

  3. Haemodynamic effects of intravenous amrinone in patients with impaired left ventricular function.

    PubMed Central

    Wilmshurst, P T; Thompson, D S; Jenkins, B S; Coltart, D J; Webb-Peploe, M M

    1983-01-01

    The effects of intravenous amrinone on resting haemodynamic function were investigated in 15 patients with impaired left ventricular function. All patients received 1 X 5 mg/kg and 10 received a further 2 mg/kg. We observed dose related increases in heart rate and cardiac index, and reductions in mean arterial pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and systemic vascular resistance. A small reduction in left ventricular end-diastolic volume and a 36% increase in ejection fraction occurred. No significant change in max dp/dt, min dp/dt, (Max dp/dt/P), max (dp/dt/P), KVmax or the ratio of left ventricular end-systolic pressure to left ventricular end-systolic volume was detected. It is concluded that the beneficial effects of intravenous amrinone on the resting haemodynamics in our patients were attributable to vasodilatation, with the drug having no demonstrable positive inotropic effect. PMID:6821613

  4. Impairments that Influence Physical Function among Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Carmen L.; Gawade, Prasad L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2015-01-01

    Children treated for cancer are at increased risk of developing chronic health conditions, some of which may manifest during or soon after treatment while others emerge many years after therapy. These health problems may limit physical performance and functional capacity, interfering with participation in work, social, and recreational activities. In this review, we discuss treatment-induced impairments in the endocrine, musculoskeletal, neurological, and cardiopulmonary systems and their influence on mobility and physical function. We found that cranial radiation at a young age was associated with a broad range of chronic conditions including obesity, short stature, low bone mineral density and neuromotor impairments. Anthracyclines and chest radiation are associated with both short and long-term cardiotoxicity. Although numerous chronic conditions are documented among individuals treated for childhood cancer, the impact of these conditions on mobility and function are not well characterized, with most studies limited to survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and brain tumors. Moving forward, further research assessing the impact of chronic conditions on participation in work and social activities is required. Moreover, interventions to prevent or ameliorate the loss of physical function among children treated for cancer are likely to become an important area of survivorship research. PMID:25692094

  5. The Early Indicators of Functional Decrease in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kubicki, Alexandre; Fautrelle, Lilian; Bourrelier, Julien; Rouaud, Olivier; Mourey, France

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Motor deficiency is associated with cognitive frailty in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairments (MCI). In this study we aimed to test the integrity in muscle synergies involved in an arm-pointing movement in functionally unimpaired MCI patients. We hypothesized that early motor indicators exist in this population at a preclinical level. Methods: Electromyographic signals were collected for 11 muscles in 3 groups: Young Adults (YA), Older Adults (OA), and MCI patients. The OA and MCI groups presented the same functional status. Each subject performed 20 arm-pointing movements from a standing position. Results: The main differences were (1) an earlier activation of the left Obliquus internus in MCI compared with OA group, (2) an earlier activation for the MCI compared with both OA and YA. The temporal differences in muscle synergies between MCI and OA groups were linked with executive functions of MCI patients, assessed by the trail making test. Moreover, the results show a delayed activation of the right Biceps Femoris and the right Erector Spinae at l3 in MCI and OA compared with YA. Interpretation: The motor program changes highlighted in our patient MCI group suggest that discrete modifications of the motor command seem to exist even in the absence of functional impairment. Instead of showing an indication of delayed muscle activation in the MCI patients, our results highlight some early activation of several trunk muscles. PMID:27570509

  6. The eel heart: multilevel insights into functional organ plasticity.

    PubMed

    Imbrogno, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    The remarkable functional homogeneity of the heart as an organ requires a well-coordinated myocardial heterogeneity. An example is represented by the selective sensitivity of the different cardiac cells to physical (i.e. shear stress and/or stretch) or chemical stimuli (e.g. catecholamines, angiotensin II, natriuretic peptides, etc.), and the cell-specific synthesis and release of these substances. The biological significance of the cardiac heterogeneity has recently received great attention in attempts to dissect the complexity of the mechanisms that control the cardiac form and function. A useful approach in this regard is to identify natural models of cardiac plasticity. Among fishes, eels (genus Anguilla), for their adaptive and acclimatory abilities, represent a group of animals so far largely used to explore the structural and ultrastructural myoarchitecture organization, as well as the complex molecular networks involved in the modulation of the heart function, such as those converting environmental signals into physiological responses. However, an overview on the existing current knowledge of eel cardiac form and function is not yet available. In this context, this review will illustrate major features of eel cardiac organization and pumping performance. Aspects of autocrine-paracrine modulation and the influence of factors such as body growth, exercise, hypoxia and temperature will highlight the power of the eel heart as an experimental model useful to decipher how the cardiac morpho-functional heterogeneities may support the uniformity of the whole-organ mechanics.

  7. Influence of cognitive impairment, functional impairment and care setting on dementia care mapping results.

    PubMed

    Edelman, P; Kuhn, D; Fulton, B R

    2004-11-01

    Quality of life (QOL) for people with dementia has become a major focus over the past decade. Dementia care mapping (DCM) is an observational measure of quality of care given by staff in formal care settings, as well as a measure of QOL that has been used in many studies of people with dementia in residential care settings. However, the method itself has not been rigorously studied in a scientific manner. For this report, mapping data were collected for 166 persons with dementia in three types of care settings: special care facilities that are licensed nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and adult day centers. The relationships between DCM and several independent variables including cognitive status, functional status, care setting, depression, length of stay, and co-morbid illnesses were assessed. Both cognitive status and functional status were found to be associated with DCM scores. Moreover, DCM was sensitive in differentiating among persons with four levels of cognitive impairment. Implications for practice are discussed.

  8. Chromium Supplementation Reduces Resting Heart Rate in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Nussbaumerova, Barbora; Rosolova, Hana; Krizek, Miroslav; Sefrna, Frantisek; Racek, Jaroslav; Müller, Ludek; Sindberg, Christian

    2017-08-30

    Chromium (Cr) is considered as an important mineral, involved in biochemical reactions in human metabolic pathways. Organically bound Cr supplementation has been suggested to improve glycemia especially in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, but there are conflicting reports on efficacy. Effect of Cr is not clear in prediabetes status. Seventy patients with metabolic syndrome and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), who are observed and treated in the Center of Preventive Cardiology of the University Hospital in Pilsen, were included in the prospective, randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled clinical study. Effect of Cr-enriched yeast (200 μg of elementary Cr in the morning and 100 μg in the evening) on glucose, lipid metabolism, fat tissue hormones, oxidative stress, and DNA damage markers was analyzed. There were no significant changes in glucose and lipid parameters, oxidative stress, or other laboratory markers. Only resting heart rate was significantly reduced in patients treated by Cr yeast, reflecting reduced sympathetic activity. This could represent an important cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with high cardiometabolic risk.

  9. Structural remodeling and mechanical function in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Bridget Louise; Smaill, Bruce Henry; LeGrice, Ian John

    2012-02-01

    The cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM) is the three-dimensional scaffold that defines the geometry and muscular architecture of the cardiac chambers and transmits forces produced during the cardiac cycle throughout the heart wall. The cardiac ECM is an active system that responds to the stresses to which it is exposed and in the normal heart is adapted to facilitate efficient mechanical function. There are marked differences in the short- and medium-term changes in ventricular geometry and cardiac ECM that occur as a result of volume overload, hypertension, and ischemic cardiomyopathy. Despite this, there is a widespread view that a common remodeling "phenotype" governs the final progression to end-stage heart failure in different forms of heart disease. In this review article, we make the case that this interpretation is not consistent with the clinical and experimental data on the topic. We argue that there is a need for new theoretical and experimental models that will enable stresses acting on the ECM and resultant deformations to be estimated more accurately and provide better spatial resolution of local signaling mechanisms that are activated as a result. These developments are necessary to link the effects of structural remodeling with altered cardiac mechanical function.

  10. The heart's ‘little brain’ controlling cardiac function in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Brack, Kieran E

    2015-01-01

    was investigated using a bolus application of nicotine or electrical stimulation at each of the above sites whilst measuring heart rate and atrioventricular conduction. Nicotine applied to different ganglionic plexuses caused a bradycardia, a tachycardia or a mixture of the two, with the right atrial plexus producing the largest chronotropic responses. Electrical stimulation at these sites induced only a bradycardia. Atrioventricular conduction was modestly changed by nicotine, the main response being a prolongation. Electrical stimulation produced significant prolongation of atrioventricular conduction, particularly when the right neuronal complex was stimulated. These studies show that the intrinsic plexuses of the heart are important and could be crucial for understanding impairments of cardiac function. Additionally, they provide a strong basis from which to progress using the isolated, innervated rabbit heart preparation. PMID:25833107

  11. Effects of acarbose on cardiovascular and diabetes outcomes in patients with coronary heart disease and impaired glucose tolerance (ACE): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Holman, Rury R; Coleman, Ruth L; Chan, Juliana C N; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Feng, Huimei; Ge, Junbo; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Gray, Richard; Huo, Yong; Lang, Zhihui; McMurray, John J; Rydén, Lars; Schröder, Stefan; Sun, Yihong; Theodorakis, Michael J; Tendera, Michal; Tucker, Lynne; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Wei, Yidong; Yang, Wenying; Wang, Duolao; Hu, Dayi; Pan, Changyu

    2017-09-12

    The effect of the α-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with coronary heart disease and impaired glucose tolerance is unknown. We aimed to assess whether acarbose could reduce the frequency of cardiovascular events in Chinese patients with established coronary heart disease and impaired glucose tolerance, and whether the incidence of type 2 diabetes could be reduced. The Acarbose Cardiovascular Evaluation (ACE) trial was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 4 trial, with patients recruited from 176 hospital outpatient clinics in China. Chinese patients with coronary heart disease and impaired glucose tolerance were randomly assigned (1:1), in blocks by site, by a centralised computer system to receive oral acarbose (50 mg three times a day) or matched placebo, which was added to standardised cardiovascular secondary prevention therapy. All study staff and patients were masked to treatment group allocation. The primary outcome was a five-point composite of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, hospital admission for unstable angina, and hospital admission for heart failure, analysed in the intention-to-treat population (all participants randomly assigned to treatment who provided written informed consent). The secondary outcomes were a three-point composite outcome (cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and non-fatal stroke), death from any cause, cardiovascular death, fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction, fatal or non-fatal stroke, hospital admission for unstable angina, hospital admission for heart failure, development of diabetes, and development of impaired renal function. The safety population comprised all patients who received at least one dose of study medication. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00829660, and the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number registry, number ISRCTN91899513. Between March 20, 2009

  12. Balance Functional Assessment in People with Visual Impairment.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska, Izabela; Bednarczuk, Grzegorz; Molik, Bartosz; Morgulec-Adamowicz, Natalia; Marszałek, Jolanta; Kaźmierska-Kowalewska, Kalina; Koc, Krzysztof

    2015-11-22

    The aims of this study were twofold: to assess the level of balance of people with visual impairment against the BOT-2 standard scores for the able-bodied, and to identify in which trials subjects had the greatest difficulties in maintaining balance with respect to the degree of vision loss and age categories. One hundred twenty-seven subjects with visual impairment aged 6-16 years, participated in the study (68 girls and 59 boys). The division for partially sighted people (61) and the blind (66) was made according to the WHO classification. Functional balance assessment was made using a balance subtest from the Bruininks-Oseretsky test. Significant relationships were noticed between age and the level of balance (χ2 = 8.35 p <0,05), as well as between the degree of vision loss and the level of balance (χ2 = 24.53 p <0,001). The level of balance of almost all blind subjects was below (20%) or well-below (60%) the average for the able-bodied. The subjects' ability to maintain balance was not dependent on gender and was associated primarily with the degree of visual impairment and age. Partially sighted people had better balance than the blind and the decrease in visual acuity resulted in reduction of balance skills. The lowest level of balance was observed in blind students aged 7-11 years. Elaborating physical fitness improvement programs for children and adolescents with visual impairment, diversity of age, the degree of vision loss and limitations of ablility to maintain balance should be taken into account.

  13. Balance Functional Assessment in People with Visual Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowska, Izabela; Bednarczuk, Grzegorz; Molik, Bartosz; Morgulec-Adamowicz, Natalia; Marszałek, Jolanta; Kaźmierska-Kowalewska, Kalina; Koc, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were twofold: to assess the level of balance of people with visual impairment against the BOT-2 standard scores for the able-bodied, and to identify in which trials subjects had the greatest difficulties in maintaining balance with respect to the degree of vision loss and age categories. One hundred twenty-seven subjects with visual impairment aged 6–16 years, participated in the study (68 girls and 59 boys). The division for partially sighted people (61) and the blind (66) was made according to the WHO classification. Functional balance assessment was made using a balance subtest from the Bruininks-Oseretsky test. Significant relationships were noticed between age and the level of balance (χ2 = 8.35 p <0,05), as well as between the degree of vision loss and the level of balance (χ2 = 24.53 p <0,001). The level of balance of almost all blind subjects was below (20%) or well-below (60%) the average for the able-bodied. The subjects’ ability to maintain balance was not dependent on gender and was associated primarily with the degree of visual impairment and age. Partially sighted people had better balance than the blind and the decrease in visual acuity resulted in reduction of balance skills. The lowest level of balance was observed in blind students aged 7–11 years. Elaborating physical fitness improvement programs for children and adolescents with visual impairment, diversity of age, the degree of vision loss and limitations of ablility to maintain balance should be taken into account. PMID:26834878

  14. Brain but not lung functions impaired after a chlorine incident.

    PubMed

    Kilburn, Kaye H

    2003-10-01

    A workplace bleach exposure incident was studied in 13 women to determine whether chlorine caused neurobehavioral and pulmonary functional effects. We compared neurophysiological and neuropsychological measurements in 13 chlorine-exposed women, 4.5 years after exposure, and 41 unexposed women. Reaction times, balance, blink reflex latency, color discrimination and several psychological tests were measured. Pulmonary function was assessed by spirometry. A profile of mood states and frequencies of 35 symptoms were obtained. Chlorine exposed women performed statistically significantly below unexposed women for simple and choice reaction times, balance with eyes open and eyes closed, color discrimination, grip strength, Culture Fair, digit symbol substitution, vocabulary, trail making B and pegboard. Profile of mood states scores and frequency symptoms were elevated. Respiratory symptoms were elevated but pulmonary volumes and flows were not reduced. Chlorine bleach exposure was associated with impaired neurobehavioral functions and elevated POMS scores and symptom frequencies. Alternatives to chlorine should be used.

  15. Anaesthesia for the patient with impaired renal function.

    PubMed

    Maddern, P J

    1983-11-01

    Patients with renal disease are at risk of further deterioration of renal function and acute tubular necrosis when subjected to anaesthesia and surgery. Optimal fluid loading and careful selection of anaesthetic techniques and agents, appropriate monitoring and the use of mannitol and dopamine assist in the maintenance of renal blood flow and help preserve renal function in these patients. In association with renal failure, physiological changes in other systems result in reduced oxygen supply to the tissues, metabolic disturbances, impairment of the coagulation and immune defence mechanisms and an increased risk of cardiac and cerebrovascular catastrophe. Although many anaesthetic techniques including regional analgesia may be used successfully in these patients caution with most drugs, especially pethidine, phenoperidine, suxamethonium and all non-depolarising neuromuscular relaxants is recommended. Of the volatile anaesthetics currently available, halothane is the agent of choice. Oxygen therapy and close monitoring of cardiorespiratory function are necessary postoperatively.

  16. Cryopreservation of human skeletal muscle impairs mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Larsen, S; Wright-Paradis, C; Gnaiger, E; Helge, J W; Boushel, R

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated if cryopreservation is a viable approach for functional mitochondrial analysis. Different tissues have been studied, and conflicting results have been published. The aim of the present study was to investigate if mitochondria in human skeletal muscle maintain functionality after long term cryopreservation (1 year). Skeletal muscle samples were preserved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for later analysis. Human skeletal muscle fibres were thawed and permeabilised with saponin, and mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry. The capacity of oxidative phosphorylation was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in cryopreserved human skeletal muscle samples. Cryopreservation impaired respiration with substrates linked to Complex I more than for Complex II (P < 0.05). Addition of cytochrome c revealed an increase in respiration indicating cytochrome c loss from the mitochondria. The results from this study demonstrate that normal mitochondrial functionality is not maintained in cryopreserved human skeletal muscle samples.

  17. Impaired Pancreatic Beta Cell Function by Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Khan, Shakil A.; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Nanduri, Jayasri

    2013-01-01

    Breathing disorders with recurrent apnea produce periodic decreases in arterial blood O2 or chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). Recurrent apnea patients and CIH-exposed rodents exhibit several co-morbidities including diabetes. However, the effects of CIH on pancreatic beta cell function are not known. In the present study, we investigated pancreatic beta cell function in C57BL6 mice exposed to 30 days of CIH. CIH-exposed mice exhibited elevated levels of fasting plasma insulin, but comparable glucose levels, and higher homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), indicating insulin resistance. Pancreatic beta cell morphology was unaltered in CIH- exposed mice. Insulin content was decreased in CIH-exposed beta cells, and this effect was associated with increased proinsulin levels. mRNA and protein levels of the enzyme pro-hormone convertase 1 (PC1) which converts proinsulin to insulin were down regulated in CIH-treated islets. More importantly, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was impaired in CIH-exposed mice and in isolated islets. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were elevated in CIH-exposed pancreatic islets. Treatment of mice with mito-tempol, a scavenger of mitochondrial ROS during CIH exposure, prevented the augmented insulin secretion and restored the proinsulin as well as HOMA values to control levels. These results demonstrate that CIH leads to pancreatic beta cell dysfunction manifested by augmented basal insulin secretion, insulin resistance, defective proinsulin processing, impaired GSIS and mitochondrial ROS mediates the effects of CIH on pancreatic beta cell function. PMID:23709585

  18. Effects of brain death on myocardial function and ischemic tolerance of potential donor hearts.

    PubMed

    Szabó, G; Sebening, C; Hackert, T; Hagl, C; Tochtermann, U; Vahl, C F; Hagl, S

    1998-09-01

    An increasing number of experimental and clinical studies reports hemodynamic instability in the donor organism after brain death. However, the relative importance of brain death-related cardiac dysfunction on posttransplantation cardiac function and the reversibility of the observed changes remain controversial. In this study a load-independent analysis of cardiac function after brain death was performed. Special interest was focused on a possible interactive influence of brain death and cardiac preservation on postischemic cardiac function. In 12 anesthetized dogs, brain death was induced by inflation of a subdural balloon; 12 sham-operated animals served as control subjects. After a 2-hour observation in situ, the hearts were explanted and perfused parabiotically either immediately or after hypothermic ischemic preservation (4 hours, 4 degrees C). Heart rate, cardiac output, left ventricular pressure, the maximum of left ventricular pressure development and aortic pressure were measured in situ. In addition, the slope of the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship, coronary blood flow, and myocardial oxygen consumption were estimated in the cross-circulated hearts. In spite of a brain death-associated hemodynamic deterioration in situ (expressed as low mean aortic pressure and significant decrease of maximal dP/dt), myocardial function was similar to control after explantation, if assessed ex vivo. Furthermore, after hypothermic ischemic preservation and reperfusion, complete functional recovery of control and brain-dead hearts could be observed. These data indicate that hemodynamic instability after brain death may rather reflect altered loading conditions than irreversible myocardial damage or primary cardiac dysfunction. Furthermore, there is no evidence for a brain death-related impairment of ischemic tolerance.

  19. l-carnitine preserves cardiac function by activating p38 MAPK/Nrf2 signalling in hearts exposed to irradiation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhigang; Han, Yang; Ye, Yuanpeng; Liu, Chao; Cai, Hui

    2017-06-05

    Radiation-induced heart damage (RIHD) is now considered to be one of the causes of mortality in cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Cardiac function impairments are clinical manifestations of RIHD. L-carnitine shows protective effects against irradiation and heart disease. This study was aimed to investigate the cardioprotective effects and potential molecular mechanisms of L-carnitine against RIHD. Mouse hearts were exposed to γ-radiation to induce RIHD. L-carnitine at doses of 100mg/Kg and 200mg/Kg was used to treat animals intraperitoneally. Additionally, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK was used to treat animals by intraperitoneal injections. Cardiac systolic/diastolic functions were determined using invasive hemodynamic methods; myocyte apoptosis was assessed using the TUNEL assay; intracellular reactive oxygen species production was measured using DHE staining; and western blotting was used to evaluate the phosphorylation of p38MAPK, phosphorylation of Nrf2, and expression levels of HO1, NQO1, caspase3 and bax. L-carnitine treatments inhibited irradiation induced cardiac function impairments. Radiation exposure induced myocyte apoptosis and reactive oxygen species production, which were attenuated by L-carnitine treatments. However, administration of a p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580) dramatically impaired L-carnitine's effect on attenuating apoptosis, reactive oxygen species accumulation and cardiac functions in irradiated hearts. Our study showed that L-carnitine administration activated p38MAPK/Nrf2 signalling, initiating the expression of HO1 and NQO1, which have anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative effects, respectively. In conclusion, L-carnitine attenuates cardiac function loss by inhibiting reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis in hearts exposed to radiation. The cardioprotective effects of L-carnitine were mediated by p38MAPK/Nrf2 signalling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Impaired Right Ventricular Function in Long-Term Lymphoma Survivors.

    PubMed

    Murbraech, Klaus; Holte, Espen; Broch, Kaspar; Smeland, Knut B; Holte, Harald; Rösner, Assami; Lund, May Brit; Dalen, Håvard; Kiserud, Cecilie; Aakhus, Svend

    2016-06-01

    Cardiotoxicity from anthracyclines or cardiac radiation therapy is detrimental to left ventricular (LV) function. However, the long-term effects on right ventricular (RV) performance are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term impact of cardiotoxic treatment on RV function among adult cancer survivors. Adult lymphoma survivors (LSs) who underwent autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Norway from 1987 to 2008 were invited to undergo cardiovascular evaluation by echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. In total, 274 LSs participated. The mean age was 56 ± 12 years, and the mean follow-up time since lymphoma diagnosis was 13 ± 6 years. Echocardiographic parameters were compared with those of age- and gender-matched control subjects from an existing large Norwegian database. RV systolic dysfunction was indicated by two or more abnormal RV systolic parameters according to current recommendations. LV systolic dysfunction was indicated by LV global longitudinal strain > -17%. All parameters of RV systolic function were impaired in LSs compared with control subjects (P < .01 for all). The most pronounced difference was observed for tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion: 22.9 ± 4.1 versus 27.1 ± 4.2 mm. Greater cardiotoxic treatment burden was associated with larger RV functional impairment. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion correlated with peak oxygen consumption (r = 0.23, P = .001). RV systolic performance was associated with LV systolic function (r = 0.49, P < .001 for tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion vs LV global longitudinal strain), but a greater proportion of patients had LV dysfunction (30.8%) compared with RV dysfunction (6.2%) (P < .001). RV systolic function was impaired in LSs. The association between RV and LV function indicates a global, long-term cardiotoxic effect. However, RV dysfunction was less prevalent than LV dysfunction. Copyright

  1. Absolute and Functional Iron Deficiency Is a Common Finding in Patients With Heart Failure and After Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Przybylowski, P; Wasilewski, G; Golabek, K; Bachorzewska-Gajewska, H; Dobrzycki, S; Koc-Zorawska, E; Malyszko, J

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is relatively common in patients with heart failure and heart transplant recipients. Both absolute and functional iron deficiency may contribute to the anemia in these populations. Functional iron deficiency (defined as ferritin greater than 200 ng/mL with TSAT (Transferrin saturation) less than 20%) is characterized by the presence of adequate iron stores as defined by conventional criteria, but with insufficient iron mobilization to adequately support. The aim of this study was to determine prevalence of absolute and functional iron deficiency in patients with heart failure (n = 269) and after heart transplantation (n = 130) and their relation to parameters of iron status and inflammation. Iron status, complete blood count, and creatinine levels were assessed using standard laboratory methods. C-reactive protein, hepcidin and hemojuvelin were measured using commercially available kits. Absolute iron deficiency was present in 15% of patients with heart failure and 30% in heart transplant recipients, whereas functional iron deficiency was present in 18% of patients with heart failure and 17% in heart transplant recipients. Functional iron deficiency was associated with significantly higher C-reactive protein and hepcidin levels in heart failure patients, and higher hepcidin and lower estimate glomerular filtration rates in heart transplant recipients. Prevalence of anemia (according to the World Health Organization) was significantly higher in heart transplant recipients (40% vs 22%, P < .001), they were also younger, but with worse kidney function than patients with heart failure. Both absolute and functional iron deficiency were present in a considerable group of patients. This population should be carefully screened for possible reversible causes of inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of the organophosphorus pesticide Folisuper 600 (methyl parathion) on the heart function of bullfrog tadpoles, Lithobates catesbeianus (Shaw, 1802).

    PubMed

    Costa, M J; Ribeiro, L R; Salla, R F; Gamero, F U; Alves, L M L M; Silva-Zacarin, E C M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate whether the heart function of bullfrog tadpoles (25 Gosner stage) is affected by their acute exposure (48 h) to a sub-lethal concentration (10 µg.L-1) of the active principle of the organophosphorus pesticide Folisuper 600R (methyl parathion - MP). Our results demonstrated that MP causes not only a reduction in tadpoles' cardiac ventricular mass, resulting in a marked reduction in their cardiac twitch force, but also impairs their swimming performance, irrespective of increasing their heart rate. Together, these findings indicate that low and realistic concentration of MP have a negative impact on tadpoles' performance, jeopardizing their survival.

  3. High-fat diet induces protein kinase A and G-protein receptor kinase phosphorylation of β2 -adrenergic receptor and impairs cardiac adrenergic reserve in animal hearts.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qin; Hu, Yuting; Wang, Qingtong; Liu, Yongming; Li, Ning; Xu, Bing; Kim, Sungjin; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Xiang, Yang K

    2017-03-15

    Patients with diabetes show a blunted cardiac inotropic response to β-adrenergic stimulation despite normal cardiac contractile reserve. Acute insulin stimulation impairs β-adrenergically induced contractile function in isolated cardiomyocytes and Langendorff-perfused hearts. In this study, we aimed to examine the potential effects of hyperinsulinaemia associated with high-fat diet (HFD) feeding on the cardiac β2 -adrenergic receptor signalling and the impacts on cardiac contractile function. We showed that 8 weeks of HFD feeding leads to reductions in cardiac functional reserve in response to β-adrenergic stimulation without significant alteration of cardiac structure and function, which is associated with significant changes in β2 -adrenergic receptor phosphorylation at protein kinase A and G-protein receptor kinase sites in the myocardium. The results suggest that clinical intervention might be applied to subjects in early diabetes without cardiac symptoms to prevent further cardiac complications. Patients with diabetes display reduced exercise capability and impaired cardiac contractile reserve in response to adrenergic stimulation. We have recently uncovered an insulin receptor and adrenergic receptor signal network in the heart. The aim of this study was to understand the impacts of high-fat diet (HFD) on the insulin-adrenergic receptor signal network in hearts. After 8 weeks of HFD feeding, mice exhibited diabetes, with elevated insulin and glucose concentrations associated with body weight gain. Mice fed an HFD had normal cardiac structure and function. However, the HFD-fed mice displayed a significant elevation of phosphorylation of the β2 -adrenergic receptor (β2 AR) at both the protein kinase A site serine 261/262 and the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase site serine 355/356 and impaired adrenergic reserve when compared with mice fed on normal chow. Isolated myocytes from HFD-fed mice also displayed a reduced contractile response to adrenergic

  4. Heart on a Plate: Histological and Functional Assessment of Isolated Adult Zebrafish Hearts Maintained in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Pieperhoff, Sebastian; Wilson, Kathryn S.; Baily, James; de Mora, Kim; Maqsood, Sana; Vass, Sharron; Taylor, Jonathan; Del-Pozo, Jorge; MacRae, Calum A.; Mullins, John J.; Denvir, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish is increasingly used for cardiovascular genetic and functional studies. We present a novel protocol to maintain and monitor whole isolated beating adult zebrafish hearts in culture for long-term experiments. Excised whole adult zebrafish hearts were transferred directly into culture dishes containing optimized L-15 Leibovitz growth medium and maintained for 5 days. Hearts were assessed daily using video-edge analysis of ventricle function using low power microscopy images. High-throughput histology techniques were used to assess changes in myocardial architecture and cell viability. Mean spontaneous Heart rate (HR, min−1) declined significantly between day 0 and day 1 in culture (96.7±19.5 to 45.2±8.2 min−1, mean±SD, p = 0.001), and thereafter declined more slowly to 27.6±7.2 min−1 on day 5. Ventricle wall motion amplitude (WMA) did not change until day 4 in culture (day 0, 46.7±13.0 µm vs day 4, 16.9±1.9 µm, p = 0.08). Contraction velocity (CV) declined between day 0 and day 3 (35.6±14.8 vs 15.2±5.3 µms−1, respectively, p = 0.012) while relaxation velocity (RV) declined quite rapidly (day 0, 72.5±11.9 vs day 1, 29.5±5.8 µms−1, p = 0.03). HR and WMA responded consistently to isoproterenol from day 0 to day 5 in culture while CV and RV showed less consistent responses to beta-agonist. Cellular architecture and cross-striation pattern of cardiomyocytes remained unchanged up to day 3 in culture and thereafter showed significant deterioration with loss of striation pattern, pyknotic nuclei and cell swelling. Apoptotic markers within the myocardium became increasingly frequent by day 3 in culture. Whole adult zebrafish hearts can be maintained in culture-medium for up to 3 days. However, after day-3 there is significant deterioration in ventricle function and heart rate accompanied by significant histological changes consistent with cell death and loss of cardiomyocyte cell integrity. Further studies are needed to

  5. Hypothyroidism and renal function in patients with systolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Merla, Ramanna; Martinez, Juan D; Martinez, Milagros A; Khalife, Wissam; Bionat, Susan; Bionat, Joanne; Barbagelata, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which hypothyroidism affects renal function in patients with heart failure remains incompletely explored, despite the known adverse prognostic implications of renal dysfunction in these patients.In a pilot retrospective study, we evaluated 75 patients (age, >or=18 yr) with left ventricular ejection fractions <0.40. Forty-five patients had normal thyroid function (thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], 0.35-5.5 micro IU/mL) and 30 had hypothyroidism. The group with hypothyroidism was subdivided into 17 patients who had controlled hypothyroidism (TSH, 0.35-5.5 micro IU/mL) and 13 who had uncontrolled hypothyroidism (TSH, >5.5 micro IU/mL). Renal function, measured in terms of glomerular filtration rate, was analyzed once in each patient, and the populations were statistically compared, with P <0.05 conferring statistical significance.Baseline characteristics in all groups were similar. Mean glomerular filtration rate was better in patients with normal thyroid function than those with hypothyroidism (75.45 +/- 31.48 vs 63.95 +/- 21.43 mL/min/1.73 m2; P=0.032). There was no significant difference between patients with controlled hypothyroidism (66.89 +/- 24.18 mL/min/1.73 m2) and those with normal thyroid function (P=0.131). In patients with uncontrolled hypothyroidism, mean glomerular filtration rate (60.2 +/- 17.4 mL/min/1.73 m2) was significantly worse than in patients with normal thyroid function (P=0.015).We found that heart-failure patients with insufficiently treated hypothyroidism have worse renal function than do patients whose thyroid function is normal or whose hypothyroidism is effectively treated. Larger studies will be needed in order to evaluate this conclusion further. We recommend that hypothyroidism in heart-failure patients be strictly controlled, lest it affect prognosis adversely.

  6. Cyclohexanone contamination from extracorporeal circuits impairs cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Torgerson, Caitlin S; Champion, Hunter C; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Harris, Z Leah; Shoukas, Artin A

    2009-06-01

    Extracorporeal circulation provides critical life support in the face of cardiopulmonary or renal failure, but it also introduces a host of unique morbidities characterized by edema formation, cardiac insufficiency, autonomic dysfunction, and altered vasomotor function. We tested the hypothesis that cyclohexanone (CHX), a solvent used in production of extracorporeal circuits and intravenous (IV) bags, leaches into the contained fluids and can replicate these clinical morbidities. Crystalloid fluid samples from circuits and IV bags were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to provide a range of clinical CHX exposure levels, revealing CHX contamination of sampled fluids (9.63-3,694 microg/l). In vivo rat studies were conducted (n = 49) to investigate the effects of a bolus IV infusion of CHX vs. saline alone on cardiovascular function, baroreflex responsiveness, and edema formation. Cardiovascular function was evaluated by cardiac output, heart rate, stroke volume, vascular resistance, arterial pressure, and ventricular contractility. Baroreflex function was assessed by mean femoral arterial pressure responses to bilateral carotid occlusion. Edema formation was assessed by the ratio of wet to dry organ weights for lungs, liver, kidneys, and skin. CHX infusion led to systemic hypotension; pulmonary hypertension; depressed contractility, heart rate, stroke volume, and cardiac output; and elevated vascular resistance (P < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure responsiveness to carotid occlusion was dampened after CHX infusion (from +17.25 +/- 1.8 to +5.61 +/- 3.2 mmHg; P < 0.05). CHX infusion led to significantly higher wet-to-dry weight ratios vs. saline only (3.8 +/- 0.06 vs. 3.5 +/- 0.05; P < 0.05). CHX can reproduce clinical cardiovascular, neurological, and edema morbidities associated with extracorporeal circulatory treatment.

  7. Cyclohexanone contamination from extracorporeal circuits impairs cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    Thompson-Torgerson, Caitlin S.; Champion, Hunter C.; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Harris, Z. Leah; Shoukas, Artin A.

    2009-01-01

    Extracorporeal circulation provides critical life support in the face of cardiopulmonary or renal failure, but it also introduces a host of unique morbidities characterized by edema formation, cardiac insufficiency, autonomic dysfunction, and altered vasomotor function. We tested the hypothesis that cyclohexanone (CHX), a solvent used in production of extracorporeal circuits and intravenous (IV) bags, leaches into the contained fluids and can replicate these clinical morbidities. Crystalloid fluid samples from circuits and IV bags were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to provide a range of clinical CHX exposure levels, revealing CHX contamination of sampled fluids (9.63–3,694 μg/l). In vivo rat studies were conducted (n = 49) to investigate the effects of a bolus IV infusion of CHX vs. saline alone on cardiovascular function, baroreflex responsiveness, and edema formation. Cardiovascular function was evaluated by cardiac output, heart rate, stroke volume, vascular resistance, arterial pressure, and ventricular contractility. Baroreflex function was assessed by mean femoral arterial pressure responses to bilateral carotid occlusion. Edema formation was assessed by the ratio of wet to dry organ weights for lungs, liver, kidneys, and skin. CHX infusion led to systemic hypotension; pulmonary hypertension; depressed contractility, heart rate, stroke volume, and cardiac output; and elevated vascular resistance (P < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure responsiveness to carotid occlusion was dampened after CHX infusion (from +17.25 ± 1.8 to +5.61 ± 3.2 mmHg; P < 0.05). CHX infusion led to significantly higher wet-to-dry weight ratios vs. saline only (3.8 ± 0.06 vs. 3.5 ± 0.05; P < 0.05). CHX can reproduce clinical cardiovascular, neurological, and edema morbidities associated with extracorporeal circulatory treatment. PMID:19411286

  8. Temafloxacin pharmacokinetics in subjects with normal and impaired renal function.

    PubMed Central

    Granneman, G R; Braeckman, R; Kraut, J; Shupien, S; Craft, J C

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of temafloxacin were investigated following oral administration of single 400-mg doses to 6 normal subjects and 18 subjects with various degrees of impaired renal function. Renal impairment did not significantly affect the peak concentration, time to peak concentration, or the nonrenal clearance of temafloxacin. Both renal clearance (CLR) and total apparent clearance (CLT/F, where F represents the fraction of dose absorbed) of temafloxacin were highly correlated with creatinine clearance (CLCR). The regression equations were as follows: CLR = 0.85.CLCR, with R2 = 0.907, and CLT/F = 56.0 + 0.92.CLCR, with R2 = 0.656. The half-life (mean +/- standard deviation) increased from 10.6 +/- 2.4 h in the normal volunteers to 24.6 +/- 7.3 h in the subjects with a CLCR of less than 10 ml/min; the respective CLT/F decreased from 169 +/- 58 to 70 +/- 27 ml/min. Compared with the CLT/F in the subjects with normal renal function, CLT/F was reduced 60% in subjects with a CLCR of less than 40 ml/min, indicating that the dosage should be reduced by at least one-half for patients with comparable impairment. For the subjects on chronic hemodialysis, most of the variability in the nonrenal clearance and the terminal-phase rate constant of temafloxacin was associated with the quantity of calcium carbonate and related medication taken for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia. Supplemental dosage is not required for patients undergoing hemodialysis, since the distribution of temafloxacin in tissue is extensive and the recoveries from 4-h dialysis sessions accounted for less than 10% of the drug present at the start of the dialysis. PMID:1666497

  9. Strongmen sport is associated with larger absolute heart size and impaired cardiac relaxation.

    PubMed

    Venckunas, Tomas; Vasiliauskas, Donatas; Marcinkeviciene, Jolanta E; Grizas, Vytautas; Stasiulis, Arvydas; Malkova, Dalia

    2011-10-01

    This study was carried out to compare cardiac structure and function and blood lipids among Strongmen, sedentary controls, and marathoners. Echocardiography was performed, and endothelial function, blood lipids and maximal oxygen uptake were measured in 27 Caucasian adult men (8 Strongmen, 10 marathoners, 9 controls). Absolute cardiac size parameters such as left ventricular (LV) diameter and wall thickness of Strongmen were higher (p < 0.05), but relative (body surface area indexed) parameters were not different between controls and Strongmen. In Strongmen, the relative LV diameter (p < 0.05), wall thickness (p < 0.001), and LV mass index (p < 0.01) were lower than in marathoners. The absolute but not relative right ventricular diameter was larger in Strongmen as compared with controls, whereas all of the measured relative cardiac size parameters were higher in marathoners as opposed to in controls. The endothelial function and the ratio of wall thickness to chamber diameter were similar among the groups (p > 0.05). Maximal oxygen uptake of Strongmen was lower than in controls (p < 0.05) and marathoners (p < 0.001). Global diastolic LV function of Strongmen was impaired in comparison to controls (p < 0.05) and marathoners (p < 0.05). Plasma lipids were not different between Strongmen and sedentary controls, but in comparison to runners, Strongmen had higher low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (p < 0.05) and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p < 0.01). Participation in Strongmen sport is associated with higher absolute but not relative cardiac size parameters, impaired myocardial relaxation, and low cardiorespiratory fitness. Therefore, Strongmen may demand greater attention as an extreme group of athletes with regard to cardiovascular risk.

  10. Impaired endothelial function and blood flow in repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Brunnekreef, J; Brunnekreef, J J; Benda, N; Benda, N M M; Schreuder, T; Schreuder, T H A; Hopman, M; Hopman, M T E; Thijssen, D; Thijssen, D H J

    2012-10-01

    Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) is a disabling upper extremity overuse injury that may be associated with pathophysiological changes in the vasculature. In this study we investigated whether RSI is associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired exercise-induced blood flow in the affected forearm. 10 patients with RSI (age, 40.2 ± 10.3; BMI, 23.8 ± 3.3) and 10 gender- and age-matched control subjects (age, 38.0 ± 12.4; BMI, 22.7 ± 3.4) participated in this study. Brachial artery blood flow was measured at rest and during 3-min periods of isometric handgrip exercise at 15%, 30% and 45% of the individual maximal voluntary contraction. Brachial artery endothelial function was assessed as the flow mediated dilation (FMD), by measuring brachial artery diameter and velocity before and after 5-min ischemic occlusion. We found a lower exercise-induced brachial artery blood flow in patients with RSI than in controls (p=0.04). Brachial artery FMD was significantly lower in patients with RSI than in controls (p<0.01), whilst a lower FMD was also found in patient with unilateral RSI when comparing the affected arm with the non-affected arm (p=0.04). Our results suggest that patients with RSI have an attenuated exercise-induced blood flow and an impaired endothelial function in the affected arm. These findings importantly improve our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanism of RSI.

  11. Gallium arsenide exposure impairs splenic B cell accessory function.

    PubMed

    Gondre-Lewis, Timothy A; Hartmann, Constance B; Caffrey, Rebecca E; McCoy, Kathleen L

    2003-03-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is utilized in industries for its semiconductor and optical properties. Chemical exposure of animals systemically suppresses several immune functions. The ability of splenic B cells to activate antigen-specific helper CD4(+) T cell hybridomas was assessed, and various aspects of antigen-presenting cell function were examined. GaAs-exposed murine B cells were impaired in processing intact soluble protein antigens, and the defect was antigen dependent. In contrast, B cells after exposure competently presented peptides to the T cells, which do not require processing. Cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and several costimulatory molecules on splenic B cells, which are critical for helper T cell activation, was not affected by chemical exposure. GaAs exposure also did not influence the stability of MHC class II heterodimers, suggesting that the defect may precede peptide exchange. GaAs-exposed B cells contained a normal level of aspartyl cathepsin activity; however, proteolytic activities of thiol cathepsins B and L were approximately half the control levels. Furthermore, two cleavage fragments of invariant chain, a molecular chaperone of MHC class II molecules, were increased in GaAs-exposed B cells, indicative of defective degradation. Thus, diminished thiol proteolytic activity in B cells may be responsible for their impaired antigen processing and invariant chain degradation, which may contribute to systemic immunosuppression caused by GaAs exposure.

  12. Does acute exposure to aldehydes impair pulmonary function and structure?

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mariana de; Neto, Alcendino Cândido; Carvalho, Giovanna; Casquillo, Natalia Vasconcelos; Carvalho, Niedja; Okuro, Renata; Ribeiro, Gabriel C Motta; Machado, Mariana; Cardozo, Aléxia; Silva, Aline Santos E; Barboza, Thiago; Vasconcellos, Luiz Ricardo; Rodrigues, Danielle Araujo; Camilo, Luciana; Carneiro, Leticia de A M; Jandre, Frederico; Pino, Alexandre V; Giannella-Neto, Antonio; Zin, Walter A; Corrêa, Leonardo Holanda Travassos; Souza, Marcio Nogueira de; Carvalho, Alysson R

    2016-07-15

    Mixtures of anhydrous ethyl alcohol and gasoline substituted for pure gasoline as a fuel in many Brazilian vehicles. Consequently, the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as ketones, other organic compounds, and particularly aldehydes increased in many Brazilian cities. The current study aims to investigate whether formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, or mixtures of both impair lung function, morphology, inflammatory and redox responses at environmentally relevant concentrations. For such purpose, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either medical compressed air or to 4 different mixtures of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Eight hours later animals were anesthetized, paralyzed and lung mechanics and morphology, inflammatory cells and IL-1β, KC, TNF-α, IL-6, CCL2, MCP-1 contents, superoxide dismutase and catalalase activities were determined. The extra pulmonary respiratory tract was also analyzed. No differences could be detected between any exposed and control groups. In conclusion, no morpho-functional alterations were detected in exposed mice in relation to the control group.

  13. Redox proteomics identification of oxidatively modified myocardial proteins in human heart failure: implications for protein function.

    PubMed

    Brioschi, Maura; Polvani, Gianluca; Fratto, Pasquale; Parolari, Alessandro; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Tremoli, Elena; Banfi, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress in a failing heart may contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to identify the oxidised proteins in the myocardium of HF patients and analyse the consequences of oxidation on protein function. The carbonylated proteins in left ventricular tissue from failing (n = 14) and non-failing human hearts (n = 13) were measured by immunoassay and identified by proteomics. HL-1 cardiomyocytes were incubated in the presence of stimuli relevant for HF in order to assess the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the induction of protein carbonylation, and its consequences on protein function. The levels of carbonylated proteins were significantly higher in the HF patients than in the controls (p<0.01). We identified two proteins that mainly underwent carbonylation: M-type creatine kinase (M-CK), whose activity is impaired, and, to a lesser extent, α-cardiac actin. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to angiotensin II and norepinephrine led to ROS generation and M-CK carbonylation with loss of its enzymatic activity. Our findings indicate that protein carbonylation is increased in the myocardium during HF and that these oxidative changes may help to explain the decreased CK activity and consequent defects in energy metabolism observed in HF.

  14. Redox Proteomics Identification of Oxidatively Modified Myocardial Proteins in Human Heart Failure: Implications for Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Brioschi, Maura; Polvani, Gianluca; Fratto, Pasquale; Parolari, Alessandro; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Tremoli, Elena; Banfi, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress in a failing heart may contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to identify the oxidised proteins in the myocardium of HF patients and analyse the consequences of oxidation on protein function. The carbonylated proteins in left ventricular tissue from failing (n = 14) and non-failing human hearts (n = 13) were measured by immunoassay and identified by proteomics. HL-1 cardiomyocytes were incubated in the presence of stimuli relevant for HF in order to assess the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the induction of protein carbonylation, and its consequences on protein function. The levels of carbonylated proteins were significantly higher in the HF patients than in the controls (p<0.01). We identified two proteins that mainly underwent carbonylation: M-type creatine kinase (M-CK), whose activity is impaired, and, to a lesser extent, α-cardiac actin. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to angiotensin II and norepinephrine led to ROS generation and M-CK carbonylation with loss of its enzymatic activity. Our findings indicate that protein carbonylation is increased in the myocardium during HF and that these oxidative changes may help to explain the decreased CK activity and consequent defects in energy metabolism observed in HF. PMID:22606238

  15. Honokiol protects against doxorubicin cardiotoxicity via improving mitochondrial function in mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lizhen; Zhang, Kailiang; Guo, Yingying; Huang, Fengyuan; Yang, Kevin; Chen, Long; Huang, Kai; Zhang, Fengxue; Long, Qinqiang; Yang, Qinglin

    2017-09-20

    Honokiol is a key component of a medicinal herb, Magnolia bark. Honokiol possesses potential pharmacological benefits for many disease conditions, especially cancer. Recent studies demonstrate that Honokiol exerts beneficial effects on cardiac hypertrophy and doxorubicin (Dox)-cardiotoxicity via deacetylation of mitochondrial proteins. However, the effects and mechanisms of Honokiol on cardiac mitochondrial respiration remain unclear. In the present study, we investigate the effect of Honokiol on cardiac mitochondrial respiration in mice subjected to Dox treatment. Oxygen consumption in freshly isolated mitochondria from mice treated with Honokiol showed enhanced mitochondrial respiration. The Dox-induced impairment of mitochondrial respiration was less pronounced in honokiol-treated than control mice. Furthermore, Luciferase reporter assay reveals that Honokiol modestly increased PPARγ transcriptional activities in cultured embryonic rat cardiomyocytes (H9c2). Honokiol upregulated the expression of PPARγ in the mouse heart. Honokiol repressed cardiac inflammatory responses and oxidative stress in mice subjected to Dox treatment. As a result, Honokiol alleviated Dox-cardiotoxicity with improved cardiac function and reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. We conclude that Honokiol protects the heart from Dox-cardiotoxicity via improving mitochondrial function by not only repressing mitochondrial protein acetylation but also enhancing PPARγ activity in the heart. This study further supports Honokiol as a promising therapy for cancer patients receiving Dox treatment.

  16. Canola oil rich in oleic acid improves diastolic heart function in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Thandapilly, Sijo Joseph; Raj, Pema; Louis, Xavier Lieben; Perera, Danielle; Yamanagedara, Prasanga; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G; Netticadan, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. It directly affects heart structure and function and contributes to heart failure. Diet is a major factor involved in the development of obesity along with genetic factors. We examined the effects of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich oils on cardiac structure and function in the diet-induced rodent model of obesity (DIO). Obese prone (OP) rats were fed a high-fat diet (HF; 55% of kcal) for 12 weeks; Sprague-Dawley rats fed commercial chow served as control. Echocardiography was performed to assess the cardiac structure and function in all rats at 12 weeks. OP rats fed the HF diet showed significant impairment in diastolic function compared to control rats. The HF diet containing high oleic canola oil significantly improved diastolic function of OP rats compared to the HF diet with lard. In conclusion, canola oil rich in oleic acid, when incorporated into an HF diet, prevents the development of diastolic dysfunction in DIO rats.

  17. Superoxide Dismutase 1 in vivo Ameliorates Maternal Diabetes-Induced Apoptosis and Heart Defects through Restoration of Impaired Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Fisher, Steven A.; Zhong, Jianxiang; Wu, Yanqing; Yang, Peixin

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress is manifested in embryos exposed to maternal diabetes, yet specific mechanisms for diabetes-induced heart defects are not defined. Gene deletion of intermediates of Wingless-related integration (Wnt) signaling causes heart defects similar to those observed in embryos from diabetic pregnancies. We tested the hypothesis that diabetes-induced oxidative stress impairs Wnt signaling thereby causing heart defects, and that these defects can be rescued by transgenic overexpression of the reactive oxygen species scavenger SOD1. Methods and Results Wild-type (WT) and superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) overexpressing embryos from nondiabetic WT control dams and nondiabetic/diabetic WT female mice mated with SOD1 transgenic male mice were analyzed. No heart defects were observed in WT and SOD1 embryos under nondiabetic conditions. WT embryos of diabetic dams had a 26% incidence of cardiac outlet defects that were suppressed by SOD1 overexpression. Insulin treatment reduced blood glucose levels and heart defects. Diabetes increased superoxide production, canonical Wnt antagonist expression, caspase activation, and apoptosis, and suppressed cell proliferation. Diabetes suppressed Wnt signaling intermediates and Wnt target gene expression in the embryonic heart, each of which were reversed by SOD1 overexpression. Hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite mimicked the inhibitory effect of high glucose on Wnt signaling, which was abolished by the SOD1 mimetic, tempol. Conclusions The oxidative stress of diabetes impairs Wnt signaling and causes cardiac outlet defects that are rescued by SOD1 overexpression. This suggests that targeting of components of the Wnt5a signaling pathway may be a viable strategy for suppression of CHDs in fetuses of diabetic pregnancies. PMID:26232087

  18. Resting heart rate and the risk of developing impaired fasting glucose and diabetes: the Kailuan prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Cui, Liufu; Wang, Yanxue; Vaidya, Anand; Chen, Shuohua; Zhang, Caifeng; Zhu, Ying; Li, Dongqing; Hu, Frank B; Wu, Shouling; Gao, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate the association between resting heart rate and the risk of developing impaired fasting glucose (IFG), diabetes and conversion from IFG to diabetes. Methods: The prospective analysis included 73 357 participants of the Kailuan cohort (57 719 men and 15 638 women). Resting heart rate was measured via electrocardiogram in 2006. Incident diabetes was defined as either the fasting blood glucose (FBG) ≥ 7.0 mmol/l or new active use of diabetes medications during the 4-year follow-up period. IFG was defined as a FBG between 5.6 and 6.9 mmol/l. A meta-analysis including seven published prospective studies focused on heart rate and diabetes risk, and our current study was then conducted using random-effects models. Results: During 4 years of follow-up, 17 463 incident IFG cases and 4 649 incident diabetes cases were identified. The corresponding adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for each 10 beats/min increase in heart rate were 1.23 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.19, 1.27] for incident diabetes, 1.11 (95% CI: 1.09, 1.13) for incident IFG and 1.13 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.17) for IFG to diabetes conversion. The risks of incident IFG and diabetes were significantly higher among participants aged < 50 years than those aged ≥ 50 years (P-interaction < 0.02 for both). A meta-analysis confirmed the positive association between resting heart rate and diabetes risk (pooled HR for the highest vs lowest heart rate quintile = 1.59, 95% CI:1.27, 2.00; n = 8). Conclusion: Faster resting heart rate is associated with higher risk of developing IFG and diabetes, suggesting that heart rate could be used to identify individuals with a higher future risk of diabetes. PMID:26002923

  19. Impaired Left Ventricular Filling in COPD and Emphysema: Is It the Heart or the Lungs?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Benjamin M.; Prince, Martin R.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Bluemke, David A.; Liu, Chia-Ying; Rabinowitz, Dan; Hueper, Katja; Parikh, Megha A.; Gomes, Antoinette S.; Michos, Erin D.; Lima, João A. C.; Barr, R. Graham

    2013-01-01

    Background: COPD and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction overlap clinically, and impaired left ventricular (LV) filling is commonly reported in COPD. The mechanism underlying these observations is uncertain, but may include upstream pulmonary dysfunction causing low LV preload or intrinsic LV dysfunction causing high LV preload. The objective of this study is to determine if COPD and emphysema are associated with reduced pulmonary vein dimensions suggestive of low LV preload. Methods: The population-based Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) COPD Study recruited smokers aged 50 to 79 years who were free of clinical cardiovascular disease. COPD was defined by spirometry. Percent emphysema was defined as regions < −910 Hounsfield units on full-lung CT scan. Ostial pulmonary vein cross-sectional area was measured by contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance and expressed as the sum of all pulmonary vein areas. Linear regression was used to adjust for age, sex, race/ethnicity, body size, and smoking. Results: Among 165 participants, the mean (± SD) total pulmonary vein area was 558 ± 159 mm2 in patients with COPD and 623 ± 145 mm2 in control subjects. Total pulmonary vein area was smaller in patients with COPD (−57 mm2; 95% CI, −106 to −7 mm2; P = .03) and inversely associated with percent emphysema (P < .001) in fully adjusted models. Significant decrements in total pulmonary vein area were observed among participants with COPD alone, COPD with emphysema on CT scan, and emphysema without spirometrically defined COPD. Conclusions: Pulmonary vein dimensions were reduced in COPD and emphysema. These findings support a mechanism of upstream pulmonary causes of underfilling of the LV in COPD and in patients with emphysema on CT scan. PMID:23764937

  20. Impaired isotonic contractility and structural abnormalities in the diaphragm of congestive heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    van Hees, Hieronymus W H; van der Heijden, Henricus F M; Hafmans, Theo; Ennen, Leo; Heunks, Leo M A; Verheugt, Freek W A; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard

    2008-08-29

    Metabolic alterations and decreased isometric force generation have been demonstrated in different animal models for congestive heart failure (CHF). However, as few morphological examinations have been performed on the CHF diaphragm, it is unknown if structural abnormalities comprise a substrate for diaphragm dysfunction in CHF. Therefore, we investigated CHF diaphragm isometric and isotonic contractility together with the presence of structural abnormalities. Isometric twitch (P(t)) and maximal (P(o)) force, shortening velocity and power generation were determined in diaphragm bundles from rats with CHF, induced by myocardial infarction, and sham-operated rats. Immunofluorescence staining of myosin and sarcolemmal components fibronectin, laminin and dystrophin was performed on diaphragm cryosections. Electron microscopy was used to study the ultrastructure of diaphragm fibres. P(t) and P(o) were respectively approximately 30% and approximately 20% lower in CHF diaphragm bundles than sham. Maximal shortening velocity was reduced by approximately 20% and maximal power generation by approximately 35%. Structural abnormalities were frequently observed in CHF diaphragm fibres and were mainly marked by focal degradation of sarcomeric constituents and expansion of intermyofibrillar spaces with swollen and degenerated mitochondria. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed reduced staining intensities of myosin in CHF diaphragm fibres compared to sham. No differences were found regarding the distribution of fibronectin, laminin and dystrophin, indicating an intact sarcolemma in both groups. This study demonstrates impaired isometric and isotonic contractility together with structural abnormalities in the CHF diaphragm. The sarcolemma of CHF diaphragm fibres appeared to be intact, excluding a role for sarcolemmal injuries in the development of CHF diaphragm dysfunction.

  1. Functional connectivity correlates of response inhibition impairment in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Collantoni, Enrico; Michelon, Silvia; Tenconi, Elena; Degortes, Daniela; Titton, Francesca; Manara, Renzo; Clementi, Maurizio; Pinato, Claudia; Forzan, Monica; Cassina, Matteo; Santonastaso, Paolo; Favaro, Angela

    2016-01-30

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a disorder characterized by high levels of cognitive control and behavioral perseveration. The present study aims at exploring inhibitory control abilities and their functional connectivity correlates in patients with AN. Inhibitory control - an executive function that allows the realization of adaptive behavior according to environmental contingencies - has been assessed by means of the Stop-Signal paradigm. The study involved 155 patients with lifetime AN and 102 healthy women. A subsample underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and was genotyped for COMT and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms. AN patients showed an impaired response inhibition and a disruption of the functional connectivity of the ventral attention circuit, a neural network implicated in behavioral response when a stimulus occurs unexpected. The 5-HTTLPR genotype appears to significantly interact with the functional connectivity of ventral attention network in explaining task performance in both patients and controls, suggesting a role of the serotoninergic system in mechanisms of response selection. The disruption of the ventral attention network in patients with AN suggests lower efficiency of bottom-up signal filtering, which might be involved in difficulties to adapt behavioral responses to environmental needs. Our findings deserve further research to confirm their scientific and therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural Equation Modeling of Motor Impairment, Gross Motor Function, and the Functional Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study…

  3. Structural Equation Modeling of Motor Impairment, Gross Motor Function, and the Functional Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study…

  4. Health literacy and global cognitive function predict e-mail but not internet use in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Schprechman, Jared P; Gathright, Emily C; Goldstein, Carly M; Guerini, Kate A; Dolansky, Mary A; Redle, Joseph; Hughes, Joel W

    2013-01-01

    Background. The internet offers a potential for improving patient knowledge, and e-mail may be used in patient communication with providers. However, barriers to internet and e-mail use, such as low health literacy and cognitive impairment, may prevent patients from using technological resources. Purpose. We investigated whether health literacy, heart failure knowledge, and cognitive function were related to internet and e-mail use in older adults with heart failure (HF). Methods. Older adults (N = 119) with heart failure (69.84 ± 9.09 years) completed measures of health literacy, heart failure knowledge, cognitive functioning, and internet use in a cross-sectional study. Results. Internet and e-mail use were reported in 78.2% and 71.4% of this sample of patients with HF, respectively. Controlling for age and education, logistic regression analyses indicated that higher health literacy predicted e-mail (P < .05) but not internet use. Global cognitive function predicted e-mail (P < .05) but not internet use. Only 45% used the Internet to obtain information on HF and internet use was not associated with greater HF knowledge. Conclusions. The majority of HF patients use the internet and e-mail, but poor health literacy and cognitive impairment may prevent some patients from accessing these resources. Future studies that examine specific internet and email interventions to increase HF knowledge are needed.

  5. Ethanol exposure alters early cardiac function in the looping heart: a mechanism for congenital heart defects?

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, Ganga; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Peterson, Lindsy M; Mai, Katherine; McHale, Quinn; Jenkins, Michael W; Linask, Kersti K; Rollins, Andrew M; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-02-01

    Alcohol-induced congenital heart defects are frequently among the most life threatening and require surgical correction in newborns. The etiology of these defects, collectively known as fetal alcohol syndrome, has been the focus of much study, particularly involving cellular and molecular mechanisms. Few studies have addressed the influential role of altered cardiac function in early embryogenesis because of a lack of tools with the capability to assay tiny beating hearts. To overcome this gap in our understanding, we used optical coherence tomography (OCT), a nondestructive imaging modality capable of micrometer-scale resolution imaging, to rapidly and accurately map cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics in real time under physiological conditions. In this study, we exposed avian embryos to a single dose of alcohol/ethanol at gastrulation when the embryo is sensitive to the induction of birth defects. Late-stage hearts were analyzed using standard histological analysis with a focus on the atrio-ventricular valves. Early cardiac function was assayed using Doppler OCT, and structural analysis of the cardiac cushions was performed using OCT imaging. Our results indicated that ethanol-exposed embryos developed late-stage valvuloseptal defects. At early stages, they exhibited increased regurgitant flow and developed smaller atrio-ventricular cardiac cushions, compared with controls (uninjected and saline-injected embryos). The embryos also exhibited abnormal flexion/torsion of the body. Our evidence suggests that ethanol-induced alterations in early cardiac function have the potential to contribute to late-stage valve and septal defects, thus demonstrating that functional parameters may serve as early and sensitive gauges of cardiac normalcy and abnormalities.

  6. Medroxyprogesterone acetate impairs human dendritic cell activation and function.

    PubMed

    Quispe Calla, N E; Ghonime, M G; Cherpes, T L; Vicetti Miguel, R D

    2015-05-01

    Does medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) impair human dendritic cell (DC) activation and function? In vitro MPA treatment suppressed expression of CD40 and CD80 by human primary DCs responding to Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) agonist stimulation (i.e. DC activation). Moreover, this MPA-mediated decrease in CD40 expression impaired DC capacity to stimulate T cell proliferation (i.e. DC function). MPA is the active molecule in Depo-Provera(®) (DMPA), a commonly used injectable hormonal contraceptive (HC). Although DMPA treatment of mice prior to viral mucosal tissue infection impaired the capacity of DCs to up-regulate CD40 and CD80 and prime virus-specific T cell proliferation, neither DC activation marker expression nor the ability of DCs to promote T cell proliferation were affected by in vitro progesterone treatment of human DCs generated from peripheral blood monocytes. This cross-sectional study examined MPA-mediated effects on the activation and function of human primary untouched peripheral blood DCs. Human DCs isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells by negative immunomagnetic selection were incubated for 24 h with various concentrations of MPA. After an additional 24 h incubation with the TLR3 agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), flow cytometry was used to evaluate DC phenotype (i.e. expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DR). In separate experiments, primary untouched human DCs were sequentially MPA-treated, poly I:C-activated, and incubated for 7 days with fluorescently labeled naïve allogeneic T cells. Flow cytometry was then used to quantify allogeneic T cell proliferation. Several pharmacologically relevant concentrations of MPA dramatically reduced CD40 and CD80 expression in human primary DCs responding to the immunostimulant poly I:C. In addition, MPA-treated DCs displayed a reduced capacity to promote allogeneic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation. In other DC: T cell co-cultures, the addition of antibody blocking the CD40

  7. The Reliability of the CVI Range: A Functional Vision Assessment for Children with Cortical Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Children who are identified as visually impaired frequently have a functional vision assessment as one way to determine how their visual impairment affects their educational performance. The CVI Range is a functional vision assessment for children with cortical visual impairment. The purpose of the study presented here was to examine the…

  8. 75 FR 13562 - Revised Draft Guidance for Industry on Pharmacokinetics in Patients With Impaired Renal Function...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Patients With Impaired Renal Function--Study Design, Data Analysis, and Impact on Dosing and Labeling... ``Pharmacokinetics in Patients With Impaired Renal Function--Study Design, Data Analysis, and Impact on Dosing and... influence of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of an investigational drug. It...

  9. The Reliability of the CVI Range: A Functional Vision Assessment for Children with Cortical Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Children who are identified as visually impaired frequently have a functional vision assessment as one way to determine how their visual impairment affects their educational performance. The CVI Range is a functional vision assessment for children with cortical visual impairment. The purpose of the study presented here was to examine the…

  10. Impaired cortical mitochondrial function following TBI precedes behavioral changes

    PubMed Central

    Watson, William D.; Buonora, John E.; Yarnell, Angela M.; Lucky, Jessica J.; D’Acchille, Michaela I.; McMullen, David C.; Boston, Andrew G.; Kuczmarski, Andrew V.; Kean, William S.; Verma, Ajay; Grunberg, Neil E.; Cole, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) pathophysiology can be attributed to either the immediate, primary physical injury, or the delayed, secondary injury which begins minutes to hours after the initial injury and can persist for several months or longer. Because these secondary cascades are delayed and last for a significant time period post-TBI, they are primary research targets for new therapeutics. To investigate changes in mitochondrial function after a brain injury, both the cortical impact site and ipsilateral hippocampus of adult male rats 7 and 17 days after a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury were examined. State 3, state 4, and uncoupler-stimulated rates of oxygen consumption, respiratory control ratios (RCRs) were measured and membrane potential quantified, and all were significantly decreased in 7 day post-TBI cortical mitochondria. By contrast, hippocampal mitochondria at 7 days showed only non-significant decreases in rates of oxygen consumption and membrane potential. NADH oxidase activities measured in disrupted mitochondria were normal in both injured cortex and hippocampus at 7 days post-CCI. Respiratory and phosphorylation capacities at 17 days post-CCI were comparable to naïve animals for both cortical and hippocampus mitochondria. However, unlike oxidative phosphorylation, membrane potential of mitochondria in the cortical lining of the impact site did not recover at 17 days, suggesting that while diminished cortical membrane potential at 17 days does not adversely affect mitochondrial capacity to synthesize ATP, it may negatively impact other membrane potential-sensitive mitochondrial functions. Memory status, as assessed by a passive avoidance paradigm, was not significantly impaired until 17 days after injury. These results indicate pronounced disturbances in cortical mitochondrial function 7 days after CCI which precede the behavioral impairment observed at 17 days. PMID:24550822

  11. The beneficial effects of melatonin against heart mitochondrial impairment during sepsis: inhibition of iNOS and preservation of nNOS.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Francisco; García, José A; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Doerrier, Carolina; López, Ana; Venegas, Carmen; Volt, Huayqui; Luna-Sánchez, Marta; López, Luis C; Escames, Germaine

    2014-01-01

    While it is accepted that the high production of nitric oxide (NO˙) by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) impairs cardiac mitochondrial function during sepsis, the role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) may be protective. During sepsis, there is a significantly increase in the expression and activity of mitochondrial iNOS (i-mtNOS), which parallels the changes in cytosolic iNOS. The existence of a constitutive NOS form (c-mtNOS) in heart mitochondria has been also described, but its role in the heart failure during sepsis remains unclear. Herein, we analyzed the changes in mitochondrial oxidative stress and bioenergetics in wild-type and nNOS-deficient mice during sepsis, and the role of melatonin, a known antioxidant, in these changes. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture, and heart mitochondria were analyzed for NOS expression and activity, nitrites, lipid peroxidation, glutathione and glutathione redox enzymes, oxidized proteins, and respiratory chain activity in vehicle- and melatonin-treated mice. Our data show that sepsis produced a similar induction of iNOS/i-mtNOS and comparable inhibition of the respiratory chain activity in wild-type and in nNOS-deficient mice. Sepsis also increased mitochondrial oxidative/nitrosative stress to a similar extent in both mice strains. Melatonin administration inhibited iNOS/i-mtNOS induction, restored mitochondrial homeostasis in septic mice, and preserved the activity of nNOS/c-mtNOS. The effects of melatonin were unrelated to the presence or the absence of nNOS. Our observations show a lack of effect of nNOS on heart bioenergetic impairment during sepsis and further support the beneficial actions of melatonin in sepsis.

  12. Overnutrition during lactation leads to impairment in insulin signaling, up-regulation of GLUT1 and increased mitochondrial carbohydrate oxidation in heart of weaned mice.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Amélia F; Cortez, Erika; Neves, Fabiana A; Vieira, Anatalia K G; Soares, Vivian de M; Rodrigues-Cunha, Alessandra C de S; Andrade, Daniela C; Thole, Alessandra A; Gabriel-Costa, Daniele; Brum, Patricia C; Moura, Aníbal S; Garcia-Souza, Érica P

    2016-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that overnutrition during early postnatal period can increase the long-term risk of developing obesity and cardiac disorders, yet the short-term effects of postnatal overfeeding in cardiac metabolism remains unknown. The aim of our study was to investigate the cardiac metabolism of weaned mice submitted to overnutrition during lactation, particularly as to mitochondrial function, substrate preference and insulin signaling. Postnatal overfeeding was induced by litter size reduction in mice at postnatal day 3. At 21 days of age (weaning), mice in the overfed group (OG) presented biometric and biochemical parameters of obesity, including increased body weight, visceral fat, liver weight and increased left ventricle weight/tibia length ratio; indicating cardiac hypertrophy, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and increased liver glycogen content compared to control group. In the heart, we detected impaired insulin signaling, mainly due to decreased IRβ, pTyr-IRS1, PI3K, GLUT4 and pAkt/Akt and increased PTP1B, GLUT1 and pAMPKα/AMPKα content. Activities of lactate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase were increased, accompanied by enhanced carbohydrate oxidation, as observed by high-resolution respirometry. Moreover, OG hearts had lower CPT1, PPARα and increased UCP2 mRNA expression, associated with increased oxidative stress (4-HNE content), BAX/BCL2 ratio and cardiac fibrosis. Ultrastructural analysis of OG hearts demonstrated mild mitochondrial damage without alterations in OXPHOS complexes. In conclusion, overnutrition during early life induces short-term metabolic disturbances, impairment in heart insulin signaling, up-regulates GLUT-1 and switch cardiac fuel preference in juvenile mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Executive functioning in preschoolers with specific language impairment

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Constance; Koolen, Sophieke; Hermans, Daan; Scheper, Annette; Knoors, Harry

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Specific Language Impairment (SLI) is still largely beyond our understanding. In this review, a neuropsychological perspective on language impairments in SLI is taken, focusing specifically on executive functioning (EF) in preschoolers (age range: 2.6–6.1 years) with SLI. Based on the studies described in this review, it can be concluded that similar to school-aged children with SLI, preschoolers with SLI show difficulties in working memory, inhibition and shifting, as revealed by both performance based measures and behavioral ratings. It seems plausible that a complex, reciprocal relationship exists between language and EF throughout development. Future research is needed to examine if, and if yes how, language and EF interact in SLI. Broad neuropsychological assessment in which both language and EF are taken into account may contribute to early detection of SLI. This in turn can lead to early and tailored treatment of children with (suspected) SLI aimed not only at stimulating language development but also at strengthening EF. PMID:26539136

  14. Impaired quality and efficiency of sleep impairs cognitive functioning in Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Henry, Michelle; Ross, Ian Louis; Wolf, Pedro Sofio Abril; Thomas, Kevin Garth Flusk

    2017-04-01

    Standard replacement therapy for Addison's disease (AD) does not restore a normal circadian rhythm. Periods of sub- and supra- physiological cortisol levels experienced by patients with AD likely induce disrupted sleep. Given that healthy sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation, the novelty of the current study was to characterise, using objective measures, the relationship between sleep and memory in patients with AD, and to examine the hypothesis that poor sleep is a biological mechanism underlying memory impairment in those patients. We used a within-subjects design. Ten patients with AD and 10 matched healthy controls completed standardised neuropsychological tests assessing declarative memory (Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test) and procedural memory (Finger Tapping Task) before and after a period of actigraphy-measured sleep, and before and after a period of waking. Relative to healthy controls, patients with AD experienced disrupted sleep characterised by poorer sleep efficiency and more time spent awake. Patients also showed impaired verbal learning and memory relative to healthy controls (p=0.007). Furthermore, whereas healthy controls' declarative memory performance benefited from a period of sleep compared to waking (p=0.032), patients with AD derived no such benefit from sleep (p=0.448). Regarding the procedural memory task, analyses detected no significant between-group differences (all p's<0.065), and neither group showed significant sleep-enhanced performance. We demonstrated, using actigraphy and standardized measures of memory performance, an association between sleep disturbances and cognitive deficits in patients with AD. These results suggest that, in patients with AD, the source of memory deficits is, at least to some extent, disrupted sleep patterns that interfere with optimal consolidation of previously-learned declarative information. Hence, treating the sleep disturbances that are frequently experienced by patients with AD may

  15. Decreased function of survival motor neuron protein impairs endocytic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriadi, Maria; Derdowski, Aaron; Kalloo, Geetika; Maginnis, Melissa S.; O’Hern, Patrick; Bliska, Bryn; Sorkaç, Altar; Nguyen, Ken C. Q.; Cook, Steven J.; Poulogiannis, George; Atwood, Walter J.; Hall, David H.; Hart, Anne C.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by depletion of the ubiquitously expressed survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, with 1 in 40 Caucasians being heterozygous for a disease allele. SMN is critical for the assembly of numerous ribonucleoprotein complexes, yet it is still unclear how reduced SMN levels affect motor neuron function. Here, we examined the impact of SMN depletion in Caenorhabditis elegans and found that decreased function of the SMN ortholog SMN-1 perturbed endocytic pathways at motor neuron synapses and in other tissues. Diminished SMN-1 levels caused defects in C. elegans neuromuscular function, and smn-1 genetic interactions were consistent with an endocytic defect. Changes were observed in synaptic endocytic proteins when SMN-1 levels decreased. At the ultrastructural level, defects were observed in endosomal compartments, including significantly fewer docked synaptic vesicles. Finally, endocytosis-dependent infection by JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) was reduced in human cells with decreased SMN levels. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that SMN depletion causes defects in endosomal trafficking that impair synaptic function, even in the absence of motor neuron cell death. PMID:27402754

  16. Impaired orofacial motor functions on chronic temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Cláudia Lúcia Pimenta; Machado, Bárbara Cristina Zanandréa; Borges, Carina Giovana Pissinatti; Rodrigues Da Silva, Marco Antonio M; Sforza, Chiarella; De Felício, Cláudia Maria

    2014-08-01

    Because temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) rehabilitation continues to be a challenge, a more comprehensive picture of the orofacial functions in patients with chronic pain is required. This study assessed the orofacial functions, including surface electromyography (EMG) of dynamic rhythmic activities, in patients with moderate-severe signs and symptoms of chronic TMD. It was hypothesized that orofacial motor control differs between patients with moderate-severe chronic TMD and healthy subjects. Seventy-six subjects (46 with TMD and 30 control) answered questionnaires of severity of TMD and chewing difficulties. Orofacial functions and EMG during chewing were assessed. Standardized EMG indices were obtained by quantitative analysis of the differential EMG signals of the paired masseter and temporal muscles, and used to describe muscular action during chewing. TMD patients showed significant greater difficulty in chewing; worse orofacial scores; longer time for free mastication; a less accurate recruitment of the muscles on the working and balancing sides, reduced symmetrical mastication index (SMI) and increased standardized activity during EMG test than healthy subjects. SMI, TMD severity and orofacial myofunctional scores were correlated (P<0.01). Impaired orofacial functions and increased activity of the muscles of balancing sides during unilateral chewing characterized the altered orofacial motor control in patients with moderate-severe chronic TMD. Implications for rehabilitation are discussed.

  17. Functional impairment of precerebral arteries in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Kobal, Jan; Cankar, Ksenija; Pretnar, Janja; Zaletel, Marjan; Kobal, Lucijan; Teran, Natasa; Melik, Ziva

    2017-01-15

    Cardiovascular pathology of Huntington disease (HD) appears to be complex; while microvascular dysfunction seems to appear early, deaths from cardiomyopathy and stroke might occur in the late phase of HD. Our study evaluated global risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD), structure and function of precerebral arteries in 41 HD subjects and 41 matched controls. HD subjects were divided into groups by the United Huntington disease rating scale (presymptomatic-PHD, early-EHD, midstage-MHD and late-LHD). CHD risk factors assessment and Doppler examination of precerebral arteries were performed, including measurements of the carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), and parameters indicating local carotid artery distensibility (stiffness index β, pulse wave velocity, pressure strain elasticity module and carotid artery compliance). In the HD and controls we identified a comparable number of non-obstructive plaques (<50% lumen narrowing). No obstructive plaques (>50% lumen narrowing) were found. There was significantly increased IMT in MHD. In PHD and EHD the parameters of arterial stiffness were significantly higher and the carotid artery compliance was significantly lower. Our results reveal functional vascular pathology in PHD, EHD, and MHD. Precerebral arteries dysfunction in HD therefore appears to be mostly functional and in agreement with recently described autonomic nervous system changes in HD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    SciTech Connect

    Asdonk, Tobias; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 {mu}g of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5 Prime end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  19. Impaired endothelial progenitor cell recruitment may contribute to heart transplant microvasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Osto, Elena; Castellani, Chiara; Fadini, Gian Paolo; Baesso, Ilenia; Gambino, Antonio; Agostini, Carlo; Avogaro, Angelo; Gerosa, Gino; Thiene, Gaetano; Iliceto, Sabino; Angelini, Annalisa; Tona, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Circulating progenitor cells (PCs) may play a role in the pathogenesis of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in heart transplantation (HTx). We assessed the relationship between circulating PCs and their incorporation into allografts and coronary microvascular function in HTx. PCs were quantified by flow cytometry on the basis of the surface expression of CD34, CD133, and kinase domain receptor (KDR) antigens. Biopsy specimens at 2 different times were examined. Immunohistochemistry for the stem cell marker c-Kit, endothelial PC (EPC) marker KDR, and CD34 was performed in serial sections in all specimens. Cells positive for each marker were counted in all specimen area sections, and the number obtained was corrected by area section. Coronary flow in the left anterior descending coronary artery was detected at rest and during intravenous adenosine by transthoracic echocardiography. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) was the ratio of hyperemic diastolic mean velocity (DMV)/resting DMV. CFR was measured in 29 patients and was abnormal (CFR < 2) in 6 (Group A) and normal in 23 (Group B). CFR was lower in Group A (1.5 ± 0.1 vs 3.3 ± 0.8, p < 0.0001). CD34(+)KDR(+), CD133(+)KDR(+), and CD34(+)CD133(+)KDR(+) cell counts were lower in Group A (p < 0.05). EPCs in biopsy sections tended to be lower in Group A (p = 0.06) and correlated to circulating CD133(+)KDR(+) and CD34(+)CD133(+)KDR(+) (p = 0.003 and p = 0.052, respectively). EPCs are decreased in the circulation and in the allograft in patients with microvasculopathy. Defective mobilization and engraftment of EPCs may be involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac allograft vasculopathy. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  1. Functional outcome in chronic heart failure after exercise training: Possible predictive value of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Ricca-Mallada, Roberto; Migliaro, Edurado R; Silvera, Gabriela; Chiappella, Lilian; Frattini, Rossana; Ferrando-Castagnetto, Federico

    2017-04-01

    Controlled exercise training (ET) is a valuable therapeutic addition to pharmacological treatment in most patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), reducing long-term mortality, preventing cardiac remodelling and improving functional capacity. Despite the fact that the mechanism underlying its benefits might be multifactorial, a sustained improvement in autonomic balance is usually attributed as a major effect. Nevertheless, not all eligible subjects show the same response to ET, probably due to several differences in the subpopulations enrolled. We hypothesize that some heart rate variability (HRV) indexes could be valid tools to optimize the selection and follow-up of CHF patients receiving ET intervention. Forty patients with CHF and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)≤40% under complete evidence-based pharmacological treatment were included; 20 were assigned to a program of controlled ET on a 3-times/week basis during 24 weeks, training group (TG) and 20 received a standard follow-up program, control group (CG). In each patient, full clinical assessments, echocardiography, HRV analysis and 6-minute-walk test were performed at the beginning and the end of the study. After 24 weeks, patients in the TG showed a significant improvement in LVEF, 6-minute walk test, functional class of symptoms and HRV parasympathetic related indices (HF and rMSSD). Patients in the CG did not exhibit any improvement in the aforementioned indices and experienced more adverse events. Moreover, an initial value of HF<150 ms(2)/Hz or rMSSD<20ms predicted better outcomes of the ET program, including improvements in systolic function, the distance walked in 6minutes, and the functional class of symptoms, along with a reduction in clinical events. In CHF patients, HRV indexes related to parasympathetic function are valid and clinically useful tools to select and follow-up those candidates that could experience superior functional improvement after ET. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  2. Sleep Apnea and Left Atrial Phasic Function in Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Nobuhiko; Tsang, Wendy; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Woo, Anna; Tomlinson, George; Logan, Alexander G; Bradley, T Douglas; Floras, John S

    2016-12-01

    The study aim was to determine whether phasic left atrial (LA) function of patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction differs between those with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and central sleep apnea (CSA). Participation in the Adaptive Servo Ventilation for Therapy of Sleep Apnea in Heart Failure (ADVENT-HF) trial requires 2-dimensional echocardiographic documentation of left ventricular ejection fraction ≤ 45% and a polysomnographic apnea hypopnea index (AHI) ≥ 15 events per hour. Of initial enrollees, we identified 132 patients in sinus rhythm (82 with predominantly OSA and 50 with CSA). To determine LA reservoir (expansion index; EI), conduit (passive emptying index; PEI), and booster function (active emptying index), we blindly quantified maximum and minimum LA volume and LA volume before atrial contraction. Each of EI (P = 0.004), PEI (P < 0.001), and active emptying index (P = 0.045) was less in participants with CSA compared with those with OSA, whereas average left ventricular ejection fraction and LA and left ventricular volumes were similar. Multivariable analysis identified an independent relationship between central AHI and LA EI (P = 0.040) and PEI (P = 0.005). In contrast, the obstructive AHI was unrelated to any LA phasic index, and slopes relating central AHI to EI and PEI differed significantly from corresponding relationships with obstructive AHI (P = 0.018; P = 0.006). In these ADVENT-HF patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, all 3 components of LA phasic function (reservoir, conduit, and contractile) were significantly reduced in those with CSA compared with participants with OSA. The severity of CSA, but not OSA associated inversely and independently with LA reservoir and conduit function. Impaired LA phasic function might be consequent to or could exacerbate CSA. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of electroporation pulses on functioning of the heart.

    PubMed

    Mali, Barbara; Jarm, Tomaz; Corovic, Selma; Paulin-Kosir, Marija Snezna; Cemazar, Maja; Sersa, Gregor; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2008-08-01

    Electrochemotherapy is an effective antitumor treatment currently applied to cutaneous and subcutaneous tumors. Electrochemotherapy of tumors located close to the heart could lead to adverse effects, especially if electroporation pulses were delivered within the vulnerable period of the heart or if they coincided with arrhythmias of some types. We examined the influence of electroporation pulses on functioning of the heart of human patients by analyzing the electrocardiogram. We found no pathological morphological changes in the electrocardiogram; however, we demonstrated a transient RR interval decrease after application of electroporation pulses. Although no adverse effects due to electroporation have been reported so far, the probability for complications could increase in treatment of internal tumors, in tumor ablation by irreversible electroporation, and when using pulses of longer durations. We evaluated the performance of our algorithm for synchronization of electroporation pulse delivery with electrocardiogram. The application of this algorithm in clinical electroporation would increase the level of safety for the patient and suitability of electroporation for use in anatomical locations presently not accessible to existing electroporation devices and electrodes.

  4. Neutrophil depletion impairs natural killer cell maturation, function, and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Baptiste N.; Donadieu, Jean; Cognet, Céline; Bernat, Claire; Ordoñez-Rueda, Diana; Barlogis, Vincent; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Fenis, Aurore; Narni-Mancinelli, Emilie; Beaupain, Blandine; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Bajénoff, Marc; Malissen, Bernard; Malissen, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are bone marrow (BM)–derived granular lymphocytes involved in immune defense against microbial infections and tumors. In an N-ethyl N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis strategy, we identified a mouse mutant with impaired NK cell reactivity both in vitro and in vivo. Dissection of this phenotype showed that mature neutrophils were required both in the BM and in the periphery for proper NK cell development. In mice lacking neutrophils, NK cells displayed hyperproliferation and poor survival and were blocked at an immature stage associated with hyporesponsiveness. The role of neutrophils as key regulators of NK cell functions was confirmed in patients with severe congenital neutropenia and autoimmune neutropenia. In addition to their direct antimicrobial activity, mature neutrophils are thus endowed with immunoregulatory functions that are conserved across species. These findings reveal novel types of cooperation between cells of the innate immune system and prompt examination of NK cell functional deficiency in patients suffering from neutropenia-associated diseases. PMID:22393124

  5. Melamine Impairs Renal and Vascular Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiao Yu; Wong, Wing Tak; Lau, Chi Wai; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Cheang, Wai San; Liu, Jian; Lu, Ye; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Chen, Zhen Yu; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Lau, Chau-Ming; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Melamine incident, linked to nephrotoxicity and kidney stone in infants previously exposed to melamine-contaminated milk products, was unprecedentedly grave in China in 2008 as little was known about the mechanistic process leading to renal dysfunction in affected children. This study investigates whether neonatal ingestion of melamine leads to renal and vascular dysfunction in adulthood; and whether ingestion of melamine in pregnant rats leads to renal dysfunction in their offspring. A combination of approaches employed includes functional studies in rat renal arteries, renal blood flow measurement by functional magnetic resonance imaging, assay for pro-inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry, and detection of plasma and renal melamine. We provide mechanistic evidence showing for the first time that melamine reduces renal blood flow and impairs renal and vascular function associated with overexpression of inflammatory markers, transforming growth factor-β1, bone morphogenic protein 4 and cyclooxygenase-2 in kidney and renal vasculature. Melamine also induces renal inflammation and fibrosis. More importantly, melamine causes nephropathies in offsprings from pregnant rat exposed to melamine during pregnancy, as well as in neonatal rat exposed to melamine afterbirth, thus supporting the clinical observations of kidney stone and acute renal failure in infants consuming melamine-contaminated milk products. PMID:27324576

  6. Melamine Impairs Renal and Vascular Function in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiao Yu; Wong, Wing Tak; Lau, Chi Wai; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Cheang, Wai San; Liu, Jian; Lu, Ye; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Chen, Zhen Yu; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Lau, Chau-Ming; Huang, Yu

    2016-06-21

    Melamine incident, linked to nephrotoxicity and kidney stone in infants previously exposed to melamine-contaminated milk products, was unprecedentedly grave in China in 2008 as little was known about the mechanistic process leading to renal dysfunction in affected children. This study investigates whether neonatal ingestion of melamine leads to renal and vascular dysfunction in adulthood; and whether ingestion of melamine in pregnant rats leads to renal dysfunction in their offspring. A combination of approaches employed includes functional studies in rat renal arteries, renal blood flow measurement by functional magnetic resonance imaging, assay for pro-inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry, and detection of plasma and renal melamine. We provide mechanistic evidence showing for the first time that melamine reduces renal blood flow and impairs renal and vascular function associated with overexpression of inflammatory markers, transforming growth factor-β1, bone morphogenic protein 4 and cyclooxygenase-2 in kidney and renal vasculature. Melamine also induces renal inflammation and fibrosis. More importantly, melamine causes nephropathies in offsprings from pregnant rat exposed to melamine during pregnancy, as well as in neonatal rat exposed to melamine afterbirth, thus supporting the clinical observations of kidney stone and acute renal failure in infants consuming melamine-contaminated milk products.

  7. Impairment of T Cell Function in Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Vasco; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela; Laforge, Mireille; Ouaissi, Ali; Akharid, Khadija; Silvestre, Ricardo; Estaquier, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    In mammals subverted as hosts by protozoan parasites, the latter and/or the agonists they release are detected and processed by sensors displayed by many distinct immune cell lineages, in a tissue(s)-dependent context. Focusing on the T lymphocyte lineage, we review our present understanding on its transient or durable functional impairment over the course of the developmental program of the intracellular parasites Leishmania spp., Plasmodium spp., Toxoplasma gondii, and Trypanosoma cruzi in their mammalian hosts. Strategies employed by protozoa to down-regulate T lymphocyte function may act at the initial moment of naïve T cell priming, rendering T cells anergic or unresponsive throughout infection, or later, exhausting T cells due to antigen persistence. Furthermore, by exploiting host feedback mechanisms aimed at maintaining immune homeostasis, parasites can enhance T cell apoptosis. We will discuss how infections with prominent intracellular protozoan parasites lead to a general down-regulation of T cell function through T cell anergy and exhaustion, accompanied by apoptosis, and ultimately allowing pathogen persistence. PMID:24551250

  8. A Study of Adverse Occurrences and Major Functional Impairment Following Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    275 A Study of Adverse Occurrences and Major Functional Impairment Following Surgery Mary Rojas, Alan Silver, Christine Llewellyn, Lenora Rances...database. Non- NYPORTS controls were matched for surgery type, hospital, and procedure date. Functional status was assessed before surgery and at...334 as having high functional impairment before surgery . After adjusting for presurgery functional status, age, gender, and perioperative risk, there

  9. Assistive Devices for Children with Functional Impairments: Impact on Child and Caregiver Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Stacey; Skelton, Heather; Rosenbaum, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Functional impairments can limit a child's ability to participate in the experiences of childhood. This "deprivation" can, in turn, have a negative effect on such children's development, academic performance, and quality of life, as well as on the lives of their caregivers and families. Many adults use assistive devices to overcome functional…

  10. Assistive Devices for Children with Functional Impairments: Impact on Child and Caregiver Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Stacey; Skelton, Heather; Rosenbaum, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Functional impairments can limit a child's ability to participate in the experiences of childhood. This "deprivation" can, in turn, have a negative effect on such children's development, academic performance, and quality of life, as well as on the lives of their caregivers and families. Many adults use assistive devices to overcome functional…

  11. Compensating for Executive Function Impairments after TBI: A Single Case Study of Functional Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkstra, Lyn S.; Flora, Tracy L.

    2002-01-01

    Compensatory strategies were designed to enable a client with traumatic brain injury to obtain professional employment. In a series of speech-language therapy sessions, compensatory strategies targeting impairments in executive function were developed, refined, and trained in mock-interview situations. Significant improvements were noted in…

  12. Multiple sclerosis impairs regional functional connectivity in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Kasper Winther; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Paulson, Olaf Bjarne; Blinkenberg, Morten; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2014-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) has been used to study changes in long-range functional brain connectivity in multiple sclerosis (MS). Yet little is known about how MS affects functional brain connectivity at the local level. Here we studied 42 patients with MS and 30 matched healthy controls with whole-brain rs-fMRI at 3 T to examine local functional connectivity. Using the Kendall's Coefficient of Concordance, regional homogeneity of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD)-signal fluctuations was calculated for each voxel and used as a measure of local connectivity. Patients with MS showed a decrease in regional homogeneity in the upper left cerebellar hemisphere in lobules V and VI relative to healthy controls. Similar trend changes in regional homogeneity were present in the right cerebellar hemisphere. The results indicate a disintegration of regional processing in the cerebellum in MS. This might be caused by a functional disruption of cortico-ponto-cerebellar and spino-cerebellar inputs, since patients with higher lesion load in the left cerebellar peduncles showed a stronger reduction in cerebellar homogeneity. In patients, two clusters in the left posterior cerebellum expressed a reduction in regional homogeneity with increasing global disability as reflected by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score or higher ataxia scores. The two clusters were mainly located in Crus I and extended into Crus II and the dentate nucleus but with little spatial overlap. These findings suggest a link between impaired regional integration in the cerebellum and general disability and ataxia.

  13. Multiple sclerosis impairs regional functional connectivity in the cerebellum☆

    PubMed Central

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Kasper Winther; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Paulson, Olaf Bjarne; Blinkenberg, Morten; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2013-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) has been used to study changes in long-range functional brain connectivity in multiple sclerosis (MS). Yet little is known about how MS affects functional brain connectivity at the local level. Here we studied 42 patients with MS and 30 matched healthy controls with whole-brain rs-fMRI at 3 T to examine local functional connectivity. Using the Kendall's Coefficient of Concordance, regional homogeneity of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD)-signal fluctuations was calculated for each voxel and used as a measure of local connectivity. Patients with MS showed a decrease in regional homogeneity in the upper left cerebellar hemisphere in lobules V and VI relative to healthy controls. Similar trend changes in regional homogeneity were present in the right cerebellar hemisphere. The results indicate a disintegration of regional processing in the cerebellum in MS. This might be caused by a functional disruption of cortico-ponto-cerebellar and spino-cerebellar inputs, since patients with higher lesion load in the left cerebellar peduncles showed a stronger reduction in cerebellar homogeneity. In patients, two clusters in the left posterior cerebellum expressed a reduction in regional homogeneity with increasing global disability as reflected by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score or higher ataxia scores. The two clusters were mainly located in Crus I and extended into Crus II and the dentate nucleus but with little spatial overlap. These findings suggest a link between impaired regional integration in the cerebellum and general disability and ataxia. PMID:24371795

  14. Assessing Psychosocial Impairment in Children and Adolescents: A Review of the Barkley Functional Impairment Scale (BFIS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill, Ryan J.

    2014-01-01

    Appraising psychosocial impairment is an essential enterprise of diagnostic decision-making in the field of school psychology. Despite its importance, few practitioners utilize systematic procedures when engaging in this process, despite the fact that a number of impairment measures and scales have been developed specifically for this purpose. The…

  15. Drug effects on functional structures in isolated perfused pig heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinks, Tobias; Rauh, Robert; Hiller, Michael; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2002-06-01

    Until today monitoring of immediate drug tissue interaction in living organs is an unsolved problem. However, for the development of new drugs and the improvement of medical therapy outcome it would be helpful to get new tools to visualize drug effects on tissue directly. With the EMPHO II SSK and a 3D-scanning device we detected changes of functional structures in an isolated perfused pig heart model after adding commonly used drugs like verapamil, nitroglycerin and salviae miltiorrhizae (Chinese herbal drug). In the paper the results are presented.

  16. Facets of psychopathy, heart rate variability and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anita Lill; Johnsen, Bjørn Helge; Thornton, David; Waage, Leif; Thayer, Julian F

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the four facets of Hare's Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R; Hare, 1991; Bolt, Hare, Vitale, & Newman, 2004) were related to physiological and cognitive mechanisms. Fifty-three male prisoners participated in this study. Physiological responses were measured as heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate (HR). Cognitive functions were measured using a continuous performance test (CPT; California Computerized Assessment Package, Abbreviated version) and a working memory test (WMT); based on Baddeley & Hitch (1974). The regression analysis of the HRV revealed that the interpersonal facet explained most of the variance during baseline (28%), CPT (16%), and WMT (12%). This was also true for the HR data during baseline (28%), CPT (20%), WMT (10%), and recovery (13%). The antisocial facet explained 10% of the variance only during baseline. Subjects scoring high compared to low on the interpersonal facet also showed better cognitive functioning. The study suggests that the different facets were differently associated with both physiological and cognitive functions.

  17. Myocardial contractile dysfunction is associated with impaired mitochondrial function and dynamics in type 2 diabetic but not in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Montaigne, David; Marechal, Xavier; Coisne, Augustin; Debry, Nicolas; Modine, Thomas; Fayad, Georges; Potelle, Charlotte; El Arid, Jean-Marc; Mouton, Stéphanie; Sebti, Yasmine; Duez, Hélène; Preau, Sébastien; Remy-Jouet, Isabelle; Zerimech, Farid; Koussa, Mohamed; Richard, Vincent; Neviere, Remi; Edme, Jean-Louis; Lefebvre, Philippe; Staels, Bart

    2014-08-12

    Obesity and diabetes mellitus are independently associated with the development of heart failure. In this study, we determined the respective effects of obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes mellitus on the intrinsic contraction and mitochondrial function of the human myocardium before the onset of cardiomyopathy. Right atrial myocardium was obtained from 141 consecutive patients presenting no sign of cardiomyopathy. We investigated ex vivo isometric contraction, mitochondrial respiration and calcium retention capacity, and respiratory chain complex activities and oxidative stress status. Diabetes mellitus was associated with a pronounced impairment of intrinsic contraction, mitochondrial dysfunction, and increased myocardial oxidative stress, regardless of weight status. In contrast, obesity was associated with less pronounced contractile dysfunction without any significant perturbation of mitochondrial function or oxidative stress status. Tested as continuous variables, glycated hemoglobin A1C, but neither body mass index nor the insulin resistance index (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance), was independently associated with cardiac mitochondrial function. Furthermore, diabetes mellitus was associated with cardiac mitochondrial network fragmentation and significantly decreased expression of the mitochondrial fusion related protein MFN1. Myocardial MFN1 content was inversely proportional to hemoglobin A1C. Worsening of intrinsic myocardial contraction in the transition from obesity to diabetes mellitus is likely related to worsening of cardiac mitochondrial function because impaired mitochondrial function and dynamics and contractile dysfunction are observed in diabetic patients but not in "metabolically healthy" obese patients at early stage in insulin resistance. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Structural equation modeling of motor impairment, gross motor function, and the functional outcome in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-05-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study confirmed the construct of motor impairment and performed structural equation modeling (SEM) between motor impairment, gross motor function, and functional outcomes of regarding activities of daily living in children with CP. 98 children (59 boys, 39 girls) with CP participated in this cross-sectional study. Mean age was 11 y 5 mo (SD 1 y 9 mo). The Manual Muscle Test (MMT), the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), range of motion (ROM) measurement, and the selective motor control (SMC) scale were used to assess motor impairments. Gross motor function and functional outcomes were measured using the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and the Functional Skills domain of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) respectively. Measurement of motor impairment was consisted of strength, spasticity, ROM, and SMC. The construct of motor impairment was confirmed though an examination of a measurement model. The proposed SEM model showed good fit indices. Motor impairment effected gross motor function (β=-.0869). Gross motor function and motor impairment affected functional outcomes directly (β=0.890) and indirectly (β=-0.773) respectively. We confirmed that the construct of motor impairment consist of strength, spasticity, ROM, and SMC and it was identified through measurement model analysis. Functional outcomes are best predicted by gross motor function and motor impairments have indirect effects on functional outcomes.

  19. Treatment with enhanced external counterpulsation improves cognitive functions in chronic heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Kozdağ, Güliz; Işeri, Pervin; Gökçe, Gökçen; Ertaş, Gökhan; Aygün, Fatih; Kutlu, Ayşe; Hebert, Kathy; Ural, Dilek

    2013-07-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) has been associated with an increased risk of poorer cognitive performance in older adults. Reversibility of cognitive impairment after medical treatment has been reported, although the restorative effects of enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP) on cognitive performance have not been studied. We investigated the effect of EECP on cognitive functions in CHF patients. Thirty-six individuals (mean age: 66±8 years) who were diagnosed with CHF and were New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class II-III and Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Class II-III participated in this study. Neuropsychological assessment was performed in these patients. Patients in the EECP treatment group showed a statistically significant improvement in spontaneous naming (p=0.011) and forward row score of the attention subset among domains of cognition (p=0.020) and interference time of executive function (p=0.012). Enhanced external counter pulsation resulted in improvement in all domains of cognitive functions except verbal and visual memory tests.

  20. Functional impairment in mild cognitive impairment evidenced using performance-based measurement.

    PubMed

    Puente, Antonio Nicolas; Terry, Douglas P; Faraco, Carlos C; Brown, Courtney L; Miller, L Stephen

    2014-12-01

    Older adults (OAs) with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are traditionally thought to have preservation of activities of daily living (ADLs). However, recent evidence suggests OAs with MCI may have difficulty completing ADLs and specifically instrumental ADLs (IADLs). The ADLs are frequently evaluated through self- or collateral report questionnaires, while performance-based measures are infrequently utilized, despite the decreased bias and increased accuracy and sensitivity associated with these instruments. This investigation compared ADLs between community-dwelling OAs with (n = 20) and without MCI (n = 30) using a self-report questionnaire (Older American Resources and Services Activities of Daily Living Scale; OARS), a collateral report questionnaire (OARS), and a performance-based measure (the Direct Assessment of Functional Status-Revised). Consistent with our hypothesis, OAs with MCI had decreased ADLs and IADLs on the performance-based measure compared to cognitively intact OAs, while there were no differences in ADLs or IADLs on self-report questionnaires or collateral report questionnaires. Our results suggest OAs with MCI have decreased ability to complete IADLs. However, this investigation suggests these deficits may not be detected by questionnaires and are more likely to be found with performance-based testing.

  1. Overexpression of glutathione peroxidase attenuates myocardial remodeling and preserves diastolic function in diabetic heart.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Shouji; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Ide, Tomomi; Matsusaka, Hidenori; Inoue, Naoki; Ohta, Yukihiro; Yokota, Takashi; Sunagawa, Kenji; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2006-11-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the structural and functional abnormalities of diabetic heart. Glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) is a critical antioxidant enzyme that removes H(2)O(2) in both the cytosol and mitochondia. We hypothesized that the overexpression of GSHPx gene could attenuate left ventricular (LV) remodeling in diabetes mellitus (DM). We induced DM by injection of streptozotocin (160 mg/kg ip) in male GSHPx transgenic mice (TG+DM) and nontransgenic wildtype littermates (WT+DM). GSHPx activity was higher in the hearts of TG mice compared with WT mice, with no significant changes in other antioxidant enzymes. LV thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances measured in TG+DM at 8 wk were significantly lower than those in WT+DM (58 +/- 3 vs. 71 +/- 5 nmol/g, P < 0.05). Heart rate and aortic blood pressure were comparable between groups. Systolic function was preserved normal in WT+DM and TG+DM mice. In contrast, diastolic function was impaired in WT+DM and was improved in TG+DM as assessed by the deceleration time of peak velocity of transmitral diastolic flow and the time needed for relaxation of 50% maximal LV pressure to baseline value (tau; 13.5 +/- 1.2 vs. 8.9 +/- 0.7 ms, P < 0.01). The TG+DM values were comparable with those of WT+Control (tau; 7.8 +/- 0.2 ms). Improvement of LV diastolic function was accompanied by the attenuation of myocyte hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and apoptosis. Overexpression of GSHPx gene ameliorated LV remodeling and diastolic dysfunction in DM. Therapies designed to interfere with oxidative stress might be beneficial to prevent cardiac abnormalities in DM.

  2. The Influence of Motor Impairment on Autonomic Heart Rate Modulation among Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamuner, Antonio Roberto; Cunha, Andrea Baraldi; da Silva, Ester; Negri, Ana Paola; Tudella, Eloisa; Moreno, Marlene Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    The study of heart rate variability is an important tool for a noninvasive evaluation of the neurocardiac integrity. The present study aims to evaluate the autonomic heart rate modulation in supine and standing positions in 12 children diagnosed with cerebral palsy and 16 children with typical motor development (control group), as well as to…

  3. The Influence of Motor Impairment on Autonomic Heart Rate Modulation among Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamuner, Antonio Roberto; Cunha, Andrea Baraldi; da Silva, Ester; Negri, Ana Paola; Tudella, Eloisa; Moreno, Marlene Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    The study of heart rate variability is an important tool for a noninvasive evaluation of the neurocardiac integrity. The present study aims to evaluate the autonomic heart rate modulation in supine and standing positions in 12 children diagnosed with cerebral palsy and 16 children with typical motor development (control group), as well as to…

  4. Hyponatremia Associated with Heart Failure: Pathological Role of Vasopressin-Dependent Impaired Water Excretion.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, San-E

    2015-05-08

    An exaggerated increase in circulatory blood volume is linked to congestive heart failure. Despite this increase, reduction of the "effective circulatory blood volume" in congestive heart failure is associated with decreased cardiac output, and can weaken the sensitivity of baroreceptors. Thereafter, tonic inhibition of the baroreceptor-mediated afferent pathway of vagal nerves is removed, providing an increase in non-osmotic release of arginine vasopressin (AVP). In the renal collecting duct, the aquaporin-2 (AQP2) water channel is regulated by sustained elevation of AVP release, and this leads to augmented hydroosmotic action of AVP, that results in exaggerated water retention and dilutional hyponatremia. Hyponatremia is also a predictor for worsening heart failure in patients with known/new onset heart failure. Therefore, such a dilutional hyponatremia associated with organ damage is predictive of the short- and long-term outcome of heart failure.

  5. Intermittent Hypoxia Impairs Endothelial Function in Early Preatherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tuleta, I; França, C N; Wenzel, D; Fleischmann, B; Nickenig, G; Werner, N; Skowasch, D

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia seems to be a major pathomechanism of obstructive sleep apnea-associated progression of atherosclerosis. The goal of the present study was to assess the influence of hypoxia on endothelial function depending on the initial stage of vasculopathy. We used 16 ApoE-/- mice were exposed to a 6-week-intermittent hypoxia either immediately (early preatherosclerosis) or after 5 weeks of high-cholesterol diet (advanced preatherosclerosis). Another 16 ApoE-/- mice under normoxia served as corresponding controls. Endothelial function was measured by an organ bath technique. Blood plasma CD31+/annexin V+ endothelial microparticles as well as sca1/flk1+ endothelial progenitor cells in blood and bone marrow were analyzed by flow cytometry. The findings were that intermittent hypoxia impaired endothelial function (56.6±6.2% of maximal phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction vs. 35.2±4.1% in control) and integrity (increased percentage of endothelial microparticles: 0.28±0.05% vs. 0.15±0.02% in control) in early preatherosclerosis. Peripheral repair capacity expressed as the number of endothelial progenitor cells in blood was attenuated under hypoxia (2.0±0.5% vs. 5.3±1.9% in control), despite the elevated number of these cells in the bone marrow (2.0±0.4% vs. 1.1±0.2% in control). In contrast, endothelial function, as well as microparticle and endothelial progenitor cell levels were similar under hypoxia vs. control in advanced preatherosclerosis. We conclude that hypoxia aggravates endothelial dysfunction and destruction in early preatherosclerosis.

  6. Acrolein impairs the cholesterol transport functions of high density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Holme, Rebecca L; Chen, Yiliang; Thomas, Michael J; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Silverstein, Roy L; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Sahoo, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are considered athero-protective, primarily due to their role in reverse cholesterol transport, where they transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. The current study was designed to determine the impact of HDL modification by acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde found in high abundance in cigarette smoke, on the cholesterol transport functions of HDL. HDL was chemically-modified with acrolein and immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed apolipoprotein crosslinking, as well as acrolein adducts on apolipoproteins A-I and A-II. The ability of acrolein-modified HDL (acro-HDL) to serve as an acceptor of free cholesterol (FC) from COS-7 cells transiently expressing SR-BI was significantly decreased. Further, in contrast to native HDL, acro-HDL promotes higher neutral lipid accumulation in murine macrophages as judged by Oil Red O staining. The ability of acro-HDL to mediate efficient selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters (CE) into SR-BI-expressing cells was reduced compared to native HDL. Together, the findings from our studies suggest that acrolein modification of HDL produces a dysfunctional particle that may ultimately promote atherogenesis by impairing functions that are critical in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway.

  7. Impaired fetal adrenal function in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunfang; Chen, Xiaojun; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Li, Xiaotian

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a pregnancy-associated liver disease of unknown etiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the change in maternal and fetal adrenal function in clinical and experimental ICP. Material/Methods The maternal and fetal serum levels of cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) were determined in 14 women with ICP and in pregnant rats with estrogen-induced intrahepatic cholestasis. Results In women with ICP, the fetal serum cortisol and DHEAS levels were significantly higher than those in women with normal pregnancy, after correcting the impact of gestational age at delivery. The relationship between fetal cortisol and maternal cholic acid levels was bidirectional; the fetal cortisol tended to increase in mild ICP, while it decreased in severe ICP. In pregnant rats with estrogen-induced cholestasis, the fetal cortisol level was significantly lower in the group with oxytocin injection, compared with the group without oxytocin injection (191.92±18.86 vs. 272.71±31.83 ng/ml, P<0.05). In contrast, the fetal cortisol concentration was increased after oxytocin injection in normal control rats. Conclusions The data indicate that fetal stress-responsive system is stimulated in mild ICP, but it is suppressed in severe ICP, which might contribute to the occurrence of unpredictable sudden fetal death. Further studies are warranted to explore the role of impaired fetal adrenal function in the pathogenesis of ICP and the clinical implications. PMID:21525808

  8. Impaired PGC-1alpha function in muscle in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Rajnish K; Adhihetty, Peter; Shukla, Shubha; Hennessy, Thomas; Calingasan, Noel; Yang, Lichuan; Starkov, Anatoly; Kiaei, Mahmoud; Cannella, Milena; Sassone, Jenny; Ciammola, Andrea; Squitieri, Fernando; Beal, M Flint

    2009-08-15

    We investigated the role of PPAR gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) in muscle dysfunction in Huntington's disease (HD). We observed reduced PGC-1alpha and target genes expression in muscle of HD transgenic mice. We produced chronic energy deprivation in HD mice by administering the catabolic stressor beta-guanidinopropionic acid (GPA), a creatine analogue that reduces ATP levels, activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which in turn activates PGC-1alpha. Treatment with GPA resulted in increased expression of AMPK, PGC-1alpha target genes, genes for oxidative phosphorylation, electron transport chain and mitochondrial biogenesis, increased oxidative muscle fibers, numbers of mitochondria and motor performance in wild-type, but not in HD mice. In muscle biopsies from HD patients, there was decreased PGC-1alpha, PGC-1beta and oxidative fibers. Oxygen consumption, PGC-1alpha, NRF1 and response to GPA were significantly reduced in myoblasts from HD patients. Knockdown of mutant huntingtin resulted in increased PGC-1alpha expression in HD myoblast. Lastly, adenoviral-mediated delivery of PGC-1alpha resulted increased expression of PGC-1alpha and markers for oxidative muscle fibers and reversal of blunted response for GPA in HD mice. These findings show that impaired function of PGC-1alpha plays a critical role in muscle dysfunction in HD, and that treatment with agents to enhance PGC-1alpha function could exert therapeutic benefits. Furthermore, muscle may provide a readily accessible tissue in which to monitor therapeutic interventions.

  9. Sleep Restriction Impairs Blood–Brain Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    He, Junyun; Hsuchou, Hung; He, Yi; Kastin, Abba J.; Wang, Yuping

    2014-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a large regulatory and exchange interface between the brain and peripheral circulation. We propose that changes of the BBB contribute to many pathophysiological processes in the brain of subjects with chronic sleep restriction (CSR). To achieve CSR that mimics a common pattern of human sleep loss, we quantified a new procedure of sleep disruption in mice by a week of consecutive sleep recording. We then tested the hypothesis that CSR compromises microvascular function. CSR not only diminished endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase, endothelin1, and glucose transporter expression in cerebral microvessels of the BBB, but it also decreased 2-deoxy-glucose uptake by the brain. The expression of several tight junction proteins also was decreased, whereas the level of cyclooxygenase-2 increased. This coincided with an increase of paracellular permeability of the BBB to the small tracers sodium fluorescein and biotin. CSR for 6 d was sufficient to impair BBB structure and function, although the increase of paracellular permeability returned to baseline after 24 h of recovery sleep. This merits attention not only in neuroscience research but also in public health policy and clinical practice. PMID:25355222

  10. Conduction block and impaired axonal function in tick paralysis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Arun V; Lin, Cindy S; Reddel, Stephen W; McGrath, Robert; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2009-09-01

    Tick paralysis (TP) is an uncommon disorder caused by a neurotoxin secreted by engorged female ticks. The cause of TP remains unclear, although alterations in axonal ion channel function and neuromuscular transmission have been proposed. In the present case, nerve excitability techniques, which provide information regarding axonal ion channel function, were used to elucidate the mechanism underlying weakness in a 45-year-old man who presented with weakness following a tick bite in the lateral aspect of the left axilla. Standard clinical nerve conduction studies were undertaken during the acute phase of symptoms and following clinical recovery. Nerve excitability studies were performed to investigate possible changes in ion channel properties distal to the site of conduction failure. Nerve conduction studies and electromyography suggested the possibility of a lesion involving the lower trunk of the left brachial plexus. Nerve excitability studies distal to the site of the tick bite demonstrated an abrupt increase in refractoriness, a marker of recovery from inactivation of Na(+) channels. There was normalization of both nerve conduction and nerve excitability parameters associated with clinical recovery. The alteration in refractoriness is similar to that noted in disorders involving the terminal portion of the motor nerve. The changes raise the possibility that TP may cause weakness through impairment of distal neural transmission.

  11. Impaired mitochondrial functions in organophosphate induced delayed neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Anwar; Kiran, Ravi; Sandhir, Rajat

    2009-12-01

    Acute exposure to organophosphates induces a delayed neurodegenerative condition known as organophosphate-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN). The mechanism of OPIDN has not been fully understood as it does not involve cholinergic crisis. The present study has been designed to evaluate the role of mitochondrial dysfunctions in the development of OPIDN. OPIDN was induced in rats by administering acute dose of monocrotophos (MCP, 20 mg/kg body weight, orally) or dichlorvos (DDVP, 200 mg/kg body weight, subcutaneously), 15-20 min after treatment with antidotes [atropine (20 mg/kg body weight) and 2-PAM (100 mg/kg body weight) intraperitoneally]. MDA levels were observed to be higher and thiol content was lower in mitochondria from brain regions of OP exposed animals. This was accompanied by decreased activities of the mitochondrial enzymes; NADH dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and cytochrome oxidase. In addition, mitochondrial functions assessed by MTT reduction also confirmed mitochondrial dysfunctions following development of OPIDN. The spatial long-term memory evaluated using elevated plus-maze test was observed to be deficit in OPIDN. The results suggest impaired mitochondrial functions as a mechanism involved in the development of organophosphate induced delayed neuropathy.

  12. Sleep restriction impairs blood-brain barrier function.

    PubMed

    He, Junyun; Hsuchou, Hung; He, Yi; Kastin, Abba J; Wang, Yuping; Pan, Weihong

    2014-10-29

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a large regulatory and exchange interface between the brain and peripheral circulation. We propose that changes of the BBB contribute to many pathophysiological processes in the brain of subjects with chronic sleep restriction (CSR). To achieve CSR that mimics a common pattern of human sleep loss, we quantified a new procedure of sleep disruption in mice by a week of consecutive sleep recording. We then tested the hypothesis that CSR compromises microvascular function. CSR not only diminished endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase, endothelin1, and glucose transporter expression in cerebral microvessels of the BBB, but it also decreased 2-deoxy-glucose uptake by the brain. The expression of several tight junction proteins also was decreased, whereas the level of cyclooxygenase-2 increased. This coincided with an increase of paracellular permeability of the BBB to the small tracers sodium fluorescein and biotin. CSR for 6 d was sufficient to impair BBB structure and function, although the increase of paracellular permeability returned to baseline after 24 h of recovery sleep. This merits attention not only in neuroscience research but also in public health policy and clinical practice.

  13. Evaluation of Heart Function in Patients With Hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Amoozgar, Hamid; Fath, Maedeh; Jooya, Parisa; Karimi, Mehran

    2015-11-04

    There are conflicting reports about the protective effect of hemophilia on the occurrence of ischemic heart disease. This study focuses on evaluation of heart function in patients with hemophilia. Cross-sectional, case-control study was done on all patients with hemophilia A or B who came to hemophilia center, and data were compared to controls. The data were collected from their charts, and heart function was evaluated by 2-dimensional, Doppler and pulse tissue Doppler. The serum troponin I level was measured in all patients as a marker of myocardial damage. Fifty patients with hemophilia took part in this study. All of them were male with mean age 29.1 years. Systolic blood pressure (mean = 121.52 ± 11 vs 115.61 ± 9.81, P = .038) and diastolic (mean = 81.94 ± 4.51 vs 75.21 ± 3.95, P = .042) blood pressure were higher in the patients. Five (10%) patients had systolic hypertension and 7 (14%) patients had diastolic hypertension. The M-mode echocardiography results showed that interventricular septum in diastole in patients with hemophilia (mean 1.143 ± 0.29) was significantly thicker than the control group (mean 0.828 ± 0.22, P < .001). Tissue Doppler echocardiography showed that late diastolic velocity of septum (Aa; P = .030), systolic velocity (S) of lateral mitral valve (P = .006), late diastolic velocity of lateral mitral (Aa) annulus (P = .038), and late velocity of (Aa) tricuspid (P = .004) had significant difference compared with the control group (P < .05). Troponin enzyme level was < 0.1 in all patients. Patients with hemophilia had higher blood pressure and more hypertension. Echocardiographic study of patients with hemophilia showed some increase in septal thickness and changes in diastolic dysfunction.

  14. While systolic cardiomyocyte function is preserved, diastolic myocyte function and recovery from acidosis are impaired in CaMKIIδ-KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Neef, Stefan; Sag, Can M.; Daut, Maria; Bäumer, Henrik; Grefe, Clemens; El-Armouche, Ali; DeSantiago, Jaime; Pereira, Laetitia; Bers, Donald M.; Backs, Johannes; Maier, Lars S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective CaMKII contributes to impaired contractility in heart failure by inducing SR Ca2+-leak. CaMKII-inhibition in the heart was suggested to be a novel therapeutic principle. Different CaMKII isoforms exist. Specifically targeting CaMKIIδ, the dominant isoform in the heart, could be of therapeutic potential without impairing other CaMKII isoforms. Rationale We investigated whether cardiomyocyte function is affected by isoform-specific knockout (KO) of CaMKIIδ under basal conditions and upon stress, i.e. upon ß-adrenergic stimulation and during acidosis. Results Systolic cardiac function was largely preserved in the KO in vivo (echocardiography) corresponding to unchanged Ca2+-transient amplitudes and isolated myocyte contractility in vitro. CaMKII activity was dramatically reduced while phosphatase-1 inhibitor-1 was significantly increased. Surprisingly, while diastolic Ca2+-elimination was slower in KO most likely due to decreased phospholamban Thr-17 phosphorylation, frequency-dependent acceleration of relaxation was still present. Despite decreased SR Ca2+-reuptake at lower frequencies, SR Ca2+-content was not diminished, which might be due to reduced diastolic SR Ca2+-loss in the KO as a consequence of lower RyR Ser-2815 phosphorylation. Challenging KO myocytes with isoproterenol showed intact inotropic and lusitropic responses. During acidosis, SR Ca2+-reuptake and SR Ca2+-loading were significantly impaired in KO, resulting in an inability to maintain systolic Ca2+-transients during acidosis and impaired recovery. Conclusions Inhibition of CaMKIIδ appears to be safe under basal physiologic conditions. Specific conditions exist (e.g. during acidosis) under which CaMKII-inhibition might not be helpful or even detrimental. These conditions will have to be more clearly defined before CaMKII inhibition is used therapeutically. PMID:23473775

  15. Impaired heart rate variability as a marker of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tombul, Temel; Anlar, Omer; Tuncer, Mustafa; Huseyinoglu, Nergis; Eryonucu, Beyhan

    2011-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) can cause alterations in autonomic cardiovascular functions. We aimed to investigate the correlation of disease activity and disability with heart rate variability (HRV) of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction (CAD) demonstrated by 24-h Holter monitorization. Thirty-four patients with clinically active relapsing-remitting MS, age 33.8 +/- 7.6 years, were studied. Twenty healthy volunteers served as controls. The time domain long-term HRV parameters were recorded by a digicorder recorder calculated by ambulatory electrocardiograms. Variabilities in time domain were lower in the MS patients: SDNN (standard deviation of all R-R intervals, p = 0,019), SDANN (standard deviation of the averages of R-R intervals in all 5-minute segments of the entire recordings, p = 0,040), RMSSD (the square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent R-R intervals, p = 0,026), HRVM (mean of the SDNN in all the 5-minute intervals, p = 0,029), HRVSD (standard deviation of the SDNN in all the 5-minute, p = 0,043). These results suggest that MS causes CAD manifesting as long-term HRV abnormalities. This illness seems to cause a dysfunction in parasympathetic cardiovascular tone. Depressed HRV parameters are independent from the clinicalfindings, but the illness progression partially seems to provoke a decrease in such parameters.

  16. Impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in heart failure: underrecognized and undertreated?

    PubMed

    Mamas, Mamas A; Deaton, Christi; Rutter, Martin K; Yuille, Martin; Williams, Simon G; Ray, Simon G; New, John; Gibson, J Martin; Neyses, Ludwig

    2010-09-01

    A link between diabetes mellitus (DM) and heart failure (HF) has been well-recognized for more than a century. HF is also closely linked to abnormal glucose regulation (AGR) and insulin resistance (IR) in patients without DM and, similarly, these conditions commonly coexist. In epidemiological studies, each condition appears to predict the other. The prevalence of AGR/IR in HF patients without DM is significantly underrecognized and, as yet, the optimal method for screening for these abnormalities in the outpatient setting is unclear. The purpose of this review is to overview the prevalence and prognostic impact of AGR and IR in HF patients without DM and discuss potential pathophysiological pathways that link these conditions with HF. The severity of glucose intolerance in patients with HF correlates with functional and clinical severity of HF and is an independent predictor of an adverse outcome. It is thought that changes in cardiac metabolism, including a switch from glucose metabolism toward fatty acid metabolism, may in part contribute to the pathophysiological processes associated with HF patients with AGR/IR. We discuss how pharmacological targeting of metabolic pathways in the myocardium of these patients with HF may represent novel therapeutic strategies in these at-risk patients. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Studies on evaluation of the oxygen transport system function with multistage treadmill stress testing: comparison between normal control subjects and patients with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Doba, N; Kushiro, T; Tomiyama, H; Hayashida, N; Yamashina, A; Abe, H; Hinohara, S

    1989-07-01

    The oxygen transport system (OTS) function was evaluated with multistage treadmill stress testing on 171 normal control subjects and 80 patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). After Bruce's definition, OTS function was expressed with functional aerobic impairment (FAI), left ventricular impairment (LVI) or myocardial aerobic impairment (MAI), heart rate impairment (HRI) or chronotropic reserve impairment (CRI) and peripheral circulatory impairment (PCI). All subjects were monitored on heart rate, blood pressure, electrocardiogram and endtidal O2 and CO2 before and every one minute during the symptom limited maximal stress testing. Seventy three of 80 coronary patients were subjected to the coronary arteriography and were classified into four groups; 31 with single vessel disease (SVD), 20 with double vessel disease (DVD), 15 with triple vessel disease (TVD) and 7 with A-C bypass surgery. Comparison between normal control subjects and the CHD patients with regard to the relation of age and VO2max derived from the linear regression analysis disclosed the identical age-related decrease in VO2max in both groups. The age corrected VO2max in the CHD patients, however, was 2.2 METS less than that of normal control subjects. Therefore, the level of VO2max in CHD patients was determined not only by disease, but also by ageing process itself. Comparisons among three CHD groups with regard to FAI, LVI, HRI and PCI clearly demonstrated different functional impairments paralleling to the severity of the disease process. On the other hand, the patients with A-C bypass surgery revealed almost identical functional impairment to the patients with SVD. In conclusion, these simple and noninvasive evaluations of the oxygen transport system could give us valuable informations reasonably differentiating the clinical status of the patients with CHD.

  18. Functional Tricuspid Regurgitation Model in a Beating Heart Platform.

    PubMed

    Jaworek, Michal; Piola, Marco; Lucherini, Federico; Gelpi, Guido; Castagna, Marco; Lentini, Giuliana; Antona, Carlo; Fiore, Gianfranco B; Vismara, Riccardo

    2017-01-03

    Currently, clinicians are seeking new, minimally invasive treatment options for functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR). Challenging tricuspid complexity requires the evaluation of the treatment techniques in adequate and realistic preclinical scenario. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design and functional assessment of a novel passive beating heart model of the pulmonary circulation with the possibility to tightly control FTR.The model housed porcine hearts actuated by a volumetric pump that cyclically pressurized the right ventricle. The in-vitro FTR model exploited the tendency of the ventricle to dilate under pressure. The dilation entailed papillary muscles displacement and valve annulus enlargement, thus inducing tricuspid valve insufficiency. Employment of constraint bands allowed to restore valve competency.The system provided consistent replication of the main determinants of the pulmonary hemodynamics in a wide range of working conditions. The experimental model of FTR was reliable, easily controllable and showed good stability over time. Echocardiography and fiberscope imaging provided a unique opportunity to investigate valve dynamics. These features make the platform suitable for realistic training purposes and testing of the upcoming FTR therapies.

  19. Impaired norepinephrine regulation of monocyte inflammatory cytokine balance in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Tien MH; Toews, Myron L

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effect of norepinephrine on inflammatory cytokine expression in ex vivo human monocytes and monocytic THP-1 cells. METHODS For human monocyte studies, cells were isolated from 12 chronic heart failure (HF) (66 ± 12 years, New York Heart Association functional class III-IV, left ventricular ejection fraction 22% ± 9%) and 14 healthy subjects (66 ± 12 years). Monocytes (1 × 106/mL) were incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 100 ng/mL, LPS + norepinephrine (NE) 10-6 mol/L or neither (control) for 4 h. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) production were determined by ELISA. Relative contribution of α- and β-adrenergic receptor subtypes on immunomodulatory activity of NE was assessed in LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells incubated with NE, the α-selective agonist phenylephrine (PE), and the β-selective agonist isoproterenol (IPN). NE-pretreated THP-1 cells were also co-incubated with the β-selective antagonist propranolol (PROP), α2-selective antagonist yohimbine (YOH) or the α1-selective antagonist prazosin (PRAZ). RESULTS Basal TNFα concentrations were higher in HF vs healthy subjects (6.3 ± 3.3 pg/mL vs 2.5 ± 2.6 pg/mL, P = 0.004). Norepinephrine’s effect on TNFα production was reduced in HF (-41% ± 17% HF vs -57% ± 9% healthy, P = 0.01), and proportionately with NYHA FC. Increases in IL-10 production by NE was also attenuated in HF (16% ± 18% HF vs 38% ± 23% healthy, P = 0.012). In THP-1 cells, NE and IPN, but not PE, induced a dose-dependent suppression of TNFα. Co-incubation with NE and antagonists revealed a dose-dependent inhibition of the NE suppression of TNFα by PROP, but not by YOH or PRAZ. Dose-dependent increases in IL-10 production were seen with NE and IPN, but not with PE. This effect was also antagonized by PROP but not by YOH or PRAZ. Pretreatment of cells with IPN attenuated the effects of NE and IPN, but did not induce a response to PE. CONCLUSION NE regulation of monocyte inflammatory

  20. The bitter fate of the sweet heart: impairment of iron homeostasis in diabetic heart leads to failure in myocardial protection by preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Vinokur, Vladimir; Berenshtein, Eduard; Bulvik, Baruch; Grinberg, Leonid; Eliashar, Ron; Chevion, Mordechai

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular dysfunction is a major complication of diabetes. Examining mechanistic aspects underlying the incapacity of the diabetic heart to respond to ischemic preconditioning (IPC), we could show that the alterations in iron homeostasis can explain this phenomenon. Correlating the hemodynamic parameters with levels of ferritin, the main iron storage and detoxifying protein, without and with inhibitors of protein degradation, substantiated this explanation. Diabetic hearts were less sensitive to ischemia-reperfusion stress, as indicated by functional parameters and histology. Mechanistically, since ferritin has been shown to provide cellular protection against insults, including ischemia-reperfusion stress and as the basal ferritin level in diabetic heart was 2-fold higher than in controls, these are in accord with the greater resistance of the diabetic heart to ischemia-reperfusion. Additionally, during ischemia-reperfusion, preceded by IPC, a rapid and extensive loss in ferritin levels, during the prolonged ischemia, in diabetic heart but not in non-diabetic controls, provide additional substantiation to the explanation for loss of respond to IPC. Current research is shedding light on the mechanism behind ferritin degradation as well, suggesting a novel explanation for diabetes-induced loss of cardioprotection.

  1. Microbubbles shunting via a patent foramen ovale impair endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Fok, Henry; Jiang, Benyu; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Exposure to intravascular microbubbles after diving and during medical procedures alters endothelial function. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a patent foramen ovale altered forearm endothelial function by facilitating microbubbles transfer. Design Patients attended on two separate visits, at least seven days apart receiving agitated saline or no active intervention in random order. On both days, flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery was measured using vascular ultrasound. On the intervention visit, agitated saline was injected and the passage of microbubbles into the arterial circulation was confirmed by echocardiography. Serial flow-mediated dilatation measurements were made after agitated saline and at the same time points after no intervention. Setting St Thomas’ Hospital in London. Participants Patients with a patent foramen ovale (PFO+n = 14, 9 male, mean ± SD age 42.2 ± 10.5 years) and patients without a patent foramen ovale (PFO− n = 10, 7 male, mean ± SD age 49.4 ± 18.4 years) were recruited. Main outcome measures Change in brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation. Results In patent foramen ovale + patients, flow-mediated dilatation did not change significantly on the control day but after agitated saline reduced by 2.3 ± 0.3%, 20 minutes after bubble injection (P < 0.005 vs. corresponding change in flow-mediated dilatation during control study). There was no significant change in flow-mediated dilatation for patent foramen ovale− patients at either visit. Conclusion These results suggest that the presence of a patent foramen ovale facilitated impairment of endothelial function acutely by the transfer of microbubbles into the arterial circulation. As a patent foramen ovale is a common condition, this may be relevant to microbubbles exposure in medical procedures and in decompression illness. PMID:26668739

  2. Microbubbles shunting via a patent foramen ovale impair endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Fok, Henry; Jiang, Benyu; Chowienczyk, Phil; Clapp, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to intravascular microbubbles after diving and during medical procedures alters endothelial function. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a patent foramen ovale altered forearm endothelial function by facilitating microbubbles transfer. Patients attended on two separate visits, at least seven days apart receiving agitated saline or no active intervention in random order. On both days, flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery was measured using vascular ultrasound. On the intervention visit, agitated saline was injected and the passage of microbubbles into the arterial circulation was confirmed by echocardiography. Serial flow-mediated dilatation measurements were made after agitated saline and at the same time points after no intervention. St Thomas' Hospital in London. Patients with a patent foramen ovale (PFO+n = 14, 9 male, mean ± SD age 42.2 ± 10.5 years) and patients without a patent foramen ovale (PFO- n = 10, 7 male, mean ± SD age 49.4 ± 18.4 years) were recruited. Change in brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation. In patent foramen ovale + patients, flow-mediated dilatation did not change significantly on the control day but after agitated saline reduced by 2.3 ± 0.3%, 20 minutes after bubble injection (P < 0.005 vs. corresponding change in flow-mediated dilatation during control study). There was no significant change in flow-mediated dilatation for patent foramen ovale- patients at either visit. These results suggest that the presence of a patent foramen ovale facilitated impairment of endothelial function acutely by the transfer of microbubbles into the arterial circulation. As a patent foramen ovale is a common condition, this may be relevant to microbubbles exposure in medical procedures and in decompression illness.

  3. Reconstructive procedures for impaired upper airway function: laryngeal respiration

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    The larynx is the "bottleneck" of the human airway. For this reason, the effects of stenosing laryngeal pathologies on the vital factor respiratory gas exchange are particularly critical. Internal stabilization is a prerequisite for recovery of the laryngeal respiratory function in severe forms of inspiratory collapse (laryngomalacia). Effective laser surgery techniques have been developed to this end in recent years. Glottis-dilating surgery in cases of bilateral vocal cord motion impairment is now moving in the direction of endoscopic laser cordotomy or cordectomy, whereas arytenoidectomy and open surgical procedures are now used only rarely due to higher secondary morbidity rates. In individual cases, in particular if functional recovery is expected, temporary laterofixation of a vocal cord using an endoscopic suturing technique can be a helpful approach. Extensive laryngeal defects can be covered by means of composite grafts with mucosal lining, a supporting skeleton and their own vascularization. Autologous transplantation of the larynx, with its complex surgical and immunological problems, has become a manageable procedure. The problems of post-transplantation reinnervation and risk assessment of immunosuppression-induced recurrence of the tumor are still under consideration. Reanimation of the bilaterally paralyzed larynx by means of neurorrhaphy (neurosuture), neural grafting and, more recently, functional electrostimulation (pacemaker) represents a challenge for the coming years. In most cases of paralysis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, a part of the muscles is maintained by synkinetic reinnervation when therapy is carried out, which however also prevents effective vocal cord movement due to simultaneous activity of agonists and antagonists. Modulation of reinnervation by means of electrostimulation and modern genetic therapy approaches justify hopes of better outcomes in the future. PMID:22073057

  4. Heart Valve Structure and Function in Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Robert B.; Yutzey, Katherine E.

    2014-01-01

    The mature heart valves are made up of highly organized extracellular matrix (ECM) and valve interstitial cells (VIC) surrounded by an endothelial cell layer. The ECM of the valves is stratified into elastin-, proteoglycan- and collagen-rich layers that confer distinct biomechanical properties to the leaflets and supporting structures. Signaling pathways have critical functions in primary valvulogenesis as well as maintenance of valve structure and function over time. Animal models provide powerful tools to study valve development and disease processes. Valve disease is a significant public health problem and increasing evidence implicates aberrant developmental mechanisms underlying pathogenesis. Further studies are necessary to determine regulatory pathway interactions underlying pathogenesis in order to generate new avenues for novel therapeutics. PMID:20809794

  5. Functional role of voltage gated Ca2+ channels in heart automaticity

    PubMed Central

    Mesirca, Pietro; Torrente, Angelo G.; Mangoni, Matteo E.

    2015-01-01

    Pacemaker activity of automatic cardiac myocytes controls the heartbeat in everyday life. Cardiac automaticity is under the control of several neurotransmitters and hormones and is constantly regulated by the autonomic nervous system to match the physiological needs of the organism. Several classes of ion channels and proteins involved in intracellular Ca2+ dynamics contribute to pacemaker activity. The functional role of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in heart automaticity and impulse conduction has been matter of debate for 30 years. However, growing evidence shows that VGCCs are important regulators of the pacemaker mechanisms and play also a major role in atrio-ventricular impulse conduction. Incidentally, studies performed in genetically modified mice lacking L-type Cav1.3 (Cav1.3−/−) or T-type Cav3.1 (Cav3.1−/−) channels show that genetic inactivation of these channels strongly impacts pacemaking. In cardiac pacemaker cells, VGCCs activate at negative voltages at the beginning of the diastolic depolarization and importantly contribute to this phase by supplying inward current. Loss-of-function of these channels also impairs atrio-ventricular conduction. Furthermore, inactivation of Cav1.3 channels promotes also atrial fibrillation and flutter in knockout mice suggesting that these channels can play a role in stabilizing atrial rhythm. Genomic analysis demonstrated that Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels are widely expressed in pacemaker tissue of mice, rabbits and humans. Importantly, human diseases of pacemaker activity such as congenital bradycardia and heart block have been attributed to loss-of-function of Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels. In this article, we will review the current knowledge on the role of VGCCs in the generation and regulation of heart rate and rhythm. We will discuss also how loss of Ca2+ entry through VGCCs could influence intracellular Ca2+ handling and promote atrial arrhythmias. PMID:25698974

  6. Ten-Year Review of Rating Scales, VII: Scales Assessing Functional Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Nancy C.; Collett, Brent R.; Myers, Kathleen M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This is the seventh in a series of 10-year reviews of rating scales. Here the authors present scales measuring functional impairment, a sequela of mental illness. The measurement of functional impairment has assumed importance with the recognition that symptom resolution does not necessarily correlate with functional improvement.…

  7. hnRNP U protein is required for normal pre-mRNA splicing and postnatal heart development and function

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Junqiang; Beetz, Nadine; O’Keeffe, Sean; Tapia, Juan Carlos; Macpherson, Lindsey; Chen, Weisheng V.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.; Maniatis, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We report that mice lacking the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP U) in the heart develop lethal dilated cardiomyopathy and display numerous defects in cardiac pre-mRNA splicing. Mutant hearts have disorganized cardiomyocytes, impaired contractility, and abnormal excitation–contraction coupling activities. RNA-seq analyses of Hnrnpu mutant hearts revealed extensive defects in alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding proteins known to be critical for normal heart development and function, including Titin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (Camk2d). Loss of hnRNP U expression in cardiomyocytes also leads to aberrant splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding the excitation–contraction coupling component Junctin. We found that the protein product of an alternatively spliced Junctin isoform is N-glycosylated at a specific asparagine site that is required for interactions with specific protein partners. Our findings provide conclusive evidence for the essential role of hnRNP U in heart development and function and in the regulation of alternative splicing. PMID:26039991

  8. hnRNP U protein is required for normal pre-mRNA splicing and postnatal heart development and function.

    PubMed

    Ye, Junqiang; Beetz, Nadine; O'Keeffe, Sean; Tapia, Juan Carlos; Macpherson, Lindsey; Chen, Weisheng V; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N; Maniatis, Tom

    2015-06-09

    We report that mice lacking the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP U) in the heart develop lethal dilated cardiomyopathy and display numerous defects in cardiac pre-mRNA splicing. Mutant hearts have disorganized cardiomyocytes, impaired contractility, and abnormal excitation-contraction coupling activities. RNA-seq analyses of Hnrnpu mutant hearts revealed extensive defects in alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding proteins known to be critical for normal heart development and function, including Titin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (Camk2d). Loss of hnRNP U expression in cardiomyocytes also leads to aberrant splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding the excitation-contraction coupling component Junctin. We found that the protein product of an alternatively spliced Junctin isoform is N-glycosylated at a specific asparagine site that is required for interactions with specific protein partners. Our findings provide conclusive evidence for the essential role of hnRNP U in heart development and function and in the regulation of alternative splicing.

  9. suPAR level is associated with myocardial impairment assessed with advanced echocardiography in patients with type 1 diabetes with normal ejection fraction and without known heart disease or end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Theilade, Simone; Rossing, Peter; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Jensen, Jan S; Jensen, Magnus T

    2016-06-01

    Heart disease is a common fatal diabetes-related complication. Early detection of patients at particular risk of heart disease is of prime importance. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a novel biomarker for development of cardiovascular disease. We investigate if suPAR is associated with early myocardial impairment assessed with advanced echocardiographic methods. In an observational study on 318 patients with type 1 diabetes without known heart disease and with normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (biplane LVEF >45%), we performed conventional, tissue Doppler and speckle tracking echocardiography, and measured plasma suPAR levels. Associations between myocardial function and suPAR levels were studied in adjusted models including significant covariates. Patients were 55±12 years (mean±s.d.) and 160 (50%) males. Median (interquartile range) suPAR was 3.4 (1.7) ng/mL and LVEF was 58±5%. suPAR levels were not associated with LVEF (P=0.11). In adjusted models, higher suPAR levels were independently associated with both impaired systolic function assessed with global longitudinal strain (GLS) and tissue velocity s', and with impaired diastolic measures a' and e'/a' (all P=0.034). In multivariable analysis including cardiovascular risk factors and both systolic and diastolic measures (GLS and e'/a'), both remained independently associated with suPAR levels (P=0.012). In patients with type 1 diabetes with normal LVEF and without known heart disease, suPAR is associated with early systolic and diastolic myocardial impairment. Our study implies that both suPAR and advanced echocardiography are useful diagnostic tools for identifying patients with diabetes at risk of future clinical heart disease, suited for intensified medical therapy. © 2016 European Society of Endocrinology.

  10. Functional Characterization of a Novel Mutation in NKX2-5 Associated with Congenital Heart Disease and Adult-Onset Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Mauro W.; Guo, Guanglan; Wolstein, Orit; Vale, Molly; Castro, M. Leticia; Wang, Libin; Otway, Robyn; Riek, Peter; Cochrane, Natalie; Furtado, Milena; Semsarian, Christopher; Weintraub, Robert G.; Yeoh, Thomas; Hayward, Christopher; Keogh, Anne; Macdonald, Peter; Feneley, Michael; Graham, Robert M.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Rosenthal, Nadia; Fatkin, Diane; Harvey, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The transcription factor NKX2-5 is crucial for heart development and mutations in this gene have been implicated in diverse congenital heart diseases (CHD) and conduction defects (CD) in mouse models and humans. Whether NKX2-5 mutations have a role in adult-onset heart disease is unknown. Methods and Results Mutation screening was performed in 220 probands with adult-onset dilated cardiomypathy (DCM). Six NKX2-5 coding sequence variants were identified, including 3 non-synonymous variants. A novel heterozygous mutation, I184M, located within the NKX2-5 homeodomain (HD), was identified in one family. A subset of family members had CHD, but there was an unexpectedly high prevalence of DCM. Functional analysis of I184M in vitro demonstrated a striking increase in protein expression when transfected into COS-7 cells or HL-1 cardiomyocytes, due to reduced degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). In functional assays, DNA binding activity of I184M was reduced, resulting in impaired activation of target genes, despite increased expression levels of mutant protein. Conclusions Certain NKX2-5 HD mutations show abnormal protein degradation via the UPS and partially impaired transcriptional activity. We propose that this class of mutation can impair heart development and mature heart function, and contribute to NKX2-5-related cardiomyopathies with graded severity. PMID:23661673

  11. Aerobic interval training partly reverse contractile dysfunction and impaired Ca2+ handling in atrial myocytes from rats with post infarction heart failure.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Anne Berit; Høydal, Morten; Røsbjørgen, Ragnhild; Stølen, Tomas; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    There is limited knowledge about atrial myocyte Ca(2+) handling in the failing hearts. The aim of this study was to examine atrial myocyte contractile function and Ca(2+) handling in rats with post-infarction heart failure (HF) and to examine whether aerobic interval training could reverse a potential dysfunction. Post-infarction HF was induced in Sprague Dawley rats by ligation of the left descending coronary artery. Atrial myocyte shortening was depressed (p<0.01) and time to relaxation was prolonged (p<0.01) in sedentary HF-rats compared to healthy controls. This was associated with decreased Ca(2+) amplitude, decreased SR Ca(2+) content, and slower Ca(2+) transient decay. Atrial myocytes from HF-rats had reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase activity, increased Na(+)/Ca(2+)-exchanger activity and increased diastolic Ca(2+) leak through ryanodine receptors. High intensity aerobic interval training in HF-rats restored atrial myocyte contractile function and reversed changes in atrial Ca(2+) handling in HF. Post infarction HF in rats causes profound impairment in atrial myocyte contractile function and Ca(2+) handling. The observed dysfunction in atrial myocytes was partly reversed after aerobic interval training.

  12. Aerobic Interval Training Partly Reverse Contractile Dysfunction and Impaired Ca2+ Handling in Atrial Myocytes from Rats with Post Infarction Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Anne Berit; Høydal, Morten; Røsbjørgen, Ragnhild; Stølen, Tomas; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Background There is limited knowledge about atrial myocyte Ca2+ handling in the failing hearts. The aim of this study was to examine atrial myocyte contractile function and Ca2+ handling in rats with post-infarction heart failure (HF) and to examine whether aerobic interval training could reverse a potential dysfunction. Methods and results Post-infarction HF was induced in Sprague Dawley rats by ligation of the left descending coronary artery. Atrial myocyte shortening was depressed (p<0.01) and time to relaxation was prolonged (p<0.01) in sedentary HF-rats compared to healthy controls. This was associated with decreased Ca2+ amplitude, decreased SR Ca2+ content, and slower Ca2+ transient decay. Atrial myocytes from HF-rats had reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase activity, increased Na+/Ca2+-exchanger activity and increased diastolic Ca2+ leak through ryanodine receptors. High intensity aerobic interval training in HF-rats restored atrial myocyte contractile function and reversed changes in atrial Ca2+ handling in HF. Conclusion Post infarction HF in rats causes profound impairment in atrial myocyte contractile function and Ca2+ handling. The observed dysfunction in atrial myocytes was partly reversed after aerobic interval training. PMID:23799089

  13. Protective Mechanisms of Mitochondria and Heart Function in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tocchetti, Carlo G.; Bhatt, Niraj; Paolocci, Nazareno; Cortassa, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The heart depends on continuous mitochondrial ATP supply and maintained redox balance to properly develop force, particularly under increased workload. During diabetes, however, myocardial energetic-redox balance is perturbed, contributing to the systolic and diastolic dysfunction known as diabetic cardiomyopathy (DC). Critical Issues: How these energetic and redox alterations intertwine to influence the DC progression is still poorly understood. Excessive bioavailability of both glucose and fatty acids (FAs) play a central role, leading, among other effects, to mitochondrial dysfunction. However, where and how this nutrient excess affects mitochondrial and cytoplasmic energetic/redox crossroads remains to be defined in greater detail. Recent Advances: We review how high glucose alters cellular redox balance and affects mitochondrial DNA. Next, we address how lipid excess, either stored in lipid droplets or utilized by mitochondria, affects performance in diabetic hearts by influencing cardiac energetic and redox assets. Finally, we examine how the reciprocal energetic/redox influence between mitochondrial and cytoplasmic compartments shapes myocardial mechanical activity during the course of DC, focusing especially on the glutathione and thioredoxin systems. Future Directions: Protecting mitochondria from losing their ability to generate energy, and to control their own reactive oxygen species emission is essential to prevent the onset and/or to slow down DC progression. We highlight mechanisms enforced by the diabetic heart to counteract glucose/FAs surplus-induced damage, such as lipid storage, enhanced mitochondria-lipid droplet interaction, and upregulation of key antioxidant enzymes. Learning more on the nature and location of mechanisms sheltering mitochondrial functions would certainly help in further optimizing therapies for human DC. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1563–1586. PMID:25674814

  14. Dexamethasone impairs hypoxia-inducible factor-1 function

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, A.E.; Huck, G.; Stiehl, D.P.; Jelkmann, W.; Hellwig-Buergel, T.

    2008-07-25

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimeric transcription-factor composed of {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits. HIF-1 is not only necessary for the cellular adaptation to hypoxia, but it is also involved in inflammatory processes and wound healing. Glucocorticoids (GC) are therapeutically used to suppress inflammatory responses. Herein, we investigated whether GC modulate HIF-1 function using GC receptor (GR) possessing (HepG2) and GR deficient (Hep3B) human hepatoma cell cultures as model systems. Dexamethasone (DEX) treatment increased HIF-1{alpha} levels in the cytosol of HepG2 cells, while nuclear HIF-1{alpha} levels and HIF-1 DNA-binding was reduced. In addition, DEX dose-dependently lowered the hypoxia-induced luciferase activity in a reporter gene system. DEX suppressed the hypoxic stimulation of the expression of the HIF-1 target gene VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) in HepG2 cultures. DEX did not reduce hypoxically induced luciferase activity in HRB5 cells, a Hep3B derivative lacking GR. Transient expression of the GR in HRB5 cells restored the susceptibility to DEX. Our study discloses the inhibitory action of GC on HIF-1 dependent gene expression, which may be important with respect to the impaired wound healing in DEX-treated patients.

  15. Normal form from biological motion despite impaired ventral stream function.

    PubMed

    Gilaie-Dotan, S; Bentin, S; Harel, M; Rees, G; Saygin, A P

    2011-04-01

    We explored the extent to which biological motion perception depends on ventral stream integration by studying LG, an unusual case of developmental visual agnosia. LG has significant ventral stream processing deficits but no discernable structural cortical abnormality. LG's intermediate visual areas and object-sensitive regions exhibit abnormal activation during visual object perception, in contrast to area V5/MT+ which responds normally to visual motion (Gilaie-Dotan, Perry, Bonneh, Malach, & Bentin, 2009). Here, in three studies we used point light displays, which require visual integration, in adaptive threshold experiments to examine LG's ability to detect form from biological and non-biological motion cues. LG's ability to detect and discriminate form from biological motion was similar to healthy controls. In contrast, he was significantly deficient in processing form from non-biological motion. Thus, LG can rely on biological motion cues to perceive human forms, but is considerably impaired in extracting form from non-biological motion. Finally, we found that while LG viewed biological motion, activity in a network of brain regions associated with processing biological motion was functionally correlated with his V5/MT+ activity, indicating that normal inputs from V5/MT+ might suffice to activate his action perception system. These results indicate that processing of biologically moving form can dissociate from other form processing in the ventral pathway. Furthermore, the present results indicate that integrative ventral stream processing is necessary for uncompromised processing of non-biological form from motion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Aspects of studies on the functional impairment electrohypersensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Olle

    2010-04-01

    Persons, claiming to suffer from exposure to electromagnetic fields, have been described in the literature. In Sweden, electrohypersensitivity (EHS) is an officially fully recognized functional impairment (i.e., it is not regarded as a disease). Survey studies show that somewhere between 230,000 - 290,000 Swedish men and women - out of a population of 9,000,000 - report a variety of symptoms when being in contact with electromagnetic field (EMF) sources. Swedish electrohypersensitive people have their own handicap organization, The Swedish Association for the Electrohypersensitive, which has its own website in both Swedish and English. This organization is included in the Swedish Disability Federation (Handikappförbundens SamarbetsOrgan; HSO). One aim of our studies has been to investigate possible alterations, in the cellular and neuronal systems of these persons' skin. In summary, it is evident from our preliminary data that various alterations are present in the electrohypersensitive persons' skin that are not indicated in the skin of normal healthy volunteers.

  17. Monocyte function is severely impaired by the fluorochrome calcein acetomethylester

    SciTech Connect

    Czepluch, Frauke S.; Olieslagers, Serve J.F.; Waltenberger, Johannes . E-mail: j.waltenberger@cardio.azm.nl

    2007-09-21

    For rapid chemotaxis quantification, cell prelabelling is often performed with the fluorochrome calcein acetomethylester (calcein AM). We investigated whether calcein AM-prelabelling is reliable for monocyte migration analysis. Human monocytes were either preexposed to calcein AM or unlabelled. Monocyte migration towards the potent chemoattractants transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and N-formyl-Methionin-Leucin-Phenylalanin (fMLP) was assessed using a 48-well micro-chemotaxis chamber. For quantification, cells were visualized by light microscopy and counted. Surprisingly, random migration of calcein AM-prelabelled cells was significantly impaired compared to the unlabelled control. Accordingly, monocyte chemotaxis towards either TGF-{beta}1 or fMLP dramatically declined. Adherence of calcein AM-labelled monocytes on plastic was also significantly decreased compared to control cells. As adhesion is regarded as an essential component of monocyte migration, the reduced migration observed in calcein AM-labelled monocytes might be explained by a fluorochrome-induced adhesion defect. Therefore, use of the fluorochrome calcein AM cannot be recommended for functional testing of monocytes.

  18. Elevated copper impairs hepatic nuclear receptor function in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wooton-Kee, Clavia Ruth; Jain, Ajay K; Wagner, Martin; Grusak, Michael A; Finegold, Milton J; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Moore, David D

    2015-09-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in accumulation of copper in the liver as a consequence of mutations in the gene encoding the copper-transporting P-type ATPase (ATP7B). WD is a chronic liver disorder, and individuals with the disease present with a variety of complications, including steatosis, cholestasis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. Similar to patients with WD, Atp7b⁻/⁻ mice have markedly elevated levels of hepatic copper and liver pathology. Previous studies have demonstrated that replacement of zinc in the DNA-binding domain of the estrogen receptor (ER) with copper disrupts specific binding to DNA response elements. Here, we found decreased binding of the nuclear receptors FXR, RXR, HNF4α, and LRH-1 to promoter response elements and decreased mRNA expression of nuclear receptor target genes in Atp7b⁻/⁻ mice, as well as in adult and pediatric WD patients. Excessive hepatic copper has been described in progressive familial cholestasis (PFIC), and we found that similar to individuals with WD, patients with PFIC2 or PFIC3 who have clinically elevated hepatic copper levels exhibit impaired nuclear receptor activity. Together, these data demonstrate that copper-mediated nuclear receptor dysfunction disrupts liver function in WD and potentially in other disorders associated with increased hepatic copper levels.

  19. Reductive stress impairs myoblasts mitochondrial function and triggers mitochondrial hormesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, François; Charles, Anne-Laure; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Bouitbir, Jamal; Bonifacio, Annalisa; Piquard, François; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Geny, Bernard; Zoll, Joffrey

    2015-07-01

    Even though oxidative stress damage from excessive production of ROS is a well known phenomenon, the impact of reductive stress remains poorly understood. This study tested the hypothesis that cellular reductive stress could lead to mitochondrial malfunction, triggering a mitochondrial hormesis (mitohormesis) phenomenon able to protect mitochondria from the deleterious effects of statins. We performed several in vitro experiments on L6 myoblasts and studied the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) at different exposure times. Direct NAC exposure (1mM) led to reductive stress, impairing mitochondrial function by decreasing maximal mitochondrial respiration and increasing H₂O₂production. After 24h of incubation, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was increased. The resulting mitochondrial oxidation activated mitochondrial biogenesis pathways at the mRNA level. After one week of exposure, mitochondria were well-adapted as shown by the decrease of cellular ROS, the increase of mitochondrial content, as well as of the antioxidant capacities. Atorvastatin (ATO) exposure (100μM) for 24h increased ROS levels, reduced the percentage of live cells, and increased the total percentage of apoptotic cells. NAC exposure during 3days failed to protect cells from the deleterious effects of statins. On the other hand, NAC pretreatment during one week triggered mitochondrial hormesis and reduced the deleterious effect of statins. These results contribute to a better understanding of the redox-dependant pathways linked to mitochondria, showing that reductive stress could trigger mitochondrial hormesis phenomenon.

  20. Diabetes impairs hematopoietic stem cell mobilization by altering niche function.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Francesca; Lymperi, Stefania; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón; Saez, Borja; Spencer, Joel A; Yeap, Beow Y; Masselli, Elena; Graiani, Gallia; Prezioso, Lucia; Rizzini, Elisa Lodi; Mangoni, Marcellina; Rizzoli, Vittorio; Sykes, Stephen M; Lin, Charles P; Frenette, Paul S; Quaini, Federico; Scadden, David T

    2011-10-12

    Success with transplantation of autologous hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in patients depends on adequate collection of these cells after mobilization from the bone marrow niche by the cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). However, some patients fail to achieve sufficient HSPC mobilization. Retrospective analysis of bone marrow transplant patient records revealed that diabetes correlated with poor mobilization of CD34+ HSPCs. In mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes (streptozotocin-induced and db/db mice, respectively), we found impaired egress of murine HSPCs from the bone marrow after G-CSF treatment. Furthermore, HSPCs were aberrantly localized in the marrow niche of the diabetic mice, and abnormalities in the number and function of sympathetic nerve termini were associated with this mislocalization. Aberrant responses to β-adrenergic stimulation of the bone marrow included an inability of marrow mesenchymal stem cells expressing the marker nestin to down-modulate the chemokine CXCL12 in response to G-CSF treatment (mesenchymal stem cells are reported to be critical for HSPC mobilization). The HSPC mobilization defect was rescued by direct pharmacological inhibition of the interaction of CXCL12 with its receptor CXCR4 using the drug AMD3100. These data suggest that there are diabetes-induced changes in bone marrow physiology and microanatomy and point to a potential intervention to overcome poor HSPC mobilization in diabetic patients.

  1. What is your patient’s cognitive profile? Three distinct subgroups of cognitive function in persons with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Misty A.W.; Schaefer, Julie T.; Gunstad, John; Dolansky, Mary A.; Redle, Joseph D.; Josephson, Richard; Moore, Shirley M.; Hughes, Joel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether patients with heart failure (HF) have distinct profiles of cognitive impairment. Background Cognitive impairment is common in HF. Recent work found three cognitive profiles in HF patients— (1) intact, (2) impaired, and (3) memory-impaired. We examined the reproducibility of these profiles and clarified mechanisms. Methods HF patients (68.6±9.7years; N=329) completed neuropsychological testing. Composite scores were created for cognitive domains and used to identify clusters via agglomerative-hierarchical cluster analysis. Results A 3-cluster solution emerged. Cluster 1 (n=109) had intact cognition. Cluster 2 (n=123) was impaired across all domains. Cluster 3 (n=97) had impaired memory only. Clusters differed in age, race, education, SES, IQ, BMI, and diabetes (ps ≤.026) but not in mood, anxiety, cardiovascular, or pulmonary disease (ps≥.118). Conclusions We replicated three distinct patterns of cognitive function in persons with HF. These profiles may help providers offer tailored care to patients with different cognitive and clinical needs. PMID:25510559

  2. Chlorpheniramine impairs functional recovery in Carassius auratus after telencephalic ablation.

    PubMed

    Garção, D C; Canto-de-Souza, L; Romaguera, F; Mattioli, R

    2009-04-01

    We determined the effect of an H1 receptor antagonist on the functional recovery of Carassius auratus submitted to telencephalic ablation. Five days after surgery the fish underwent a spatial-choice learning paradigm test. The fish, weighing 6-12 g, were divided into four groups: telencephalic ablation (A) or sham lesion (S) and saline (SAL) or chlorpheniramine (CPA, ip, 16 mg/kg). For eight consecutive days each animal was trained individually in sessions separated by 24 h (alternate days). Training trials (T1-T8) consisted of finding the food in one of the feeders, which were randomly blocked for each subject. Animals received an intraperitoneal injection of SAL or CPA 10 min after the training trials. The time spent by the animals in each group to find the food (latency) was analyzed separately at T1 and T8 by the Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by the Student Newman-Keuls test. At T1 the latencies (mean +/- SEM) of the A-SAL (586.3 +/- 13.6) and A-CPA (600 +/- 0) groups were significantly longer than those of the S-SAL (226.14 +/- 61.15) and S-CPA (356.33 +/- 68.8) groups. At T8, the latencies of the A-CPA group (510.11 +/- 62.2) remained higher than those of the other groups, all of which showed significantly shorter latencies (A-SAL = 301.91 +/- 78.32; S-CPA = 191.58 +/- 73.03; S-SAL = 90.28 +/- 41) compared with T1. These results support evidence that training can lead to functional recovery of spatial-choice learning in telencephalonless fish and also that the antagonist of the H1 receptor impairs it.

  3. Rotenone impairs autophagic flux and lysosomal functions in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, F; Xu, H-D; Guan, J-J; Hou, Y-S; Gu, J-H; Zhen, X-C; Qin, Z-H

    2015-01-22

    Rotenone is an environmental neurotoxin that induces accumulation of α-synuclein and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), but the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. We investigated whether rotenone induced impairment of autophagic flux and lysosomal functions. Autophagy flux, accumulation of α-synuclein, lysosomal membrane integrity and neurodegeneration were assessed in the rotenone-treated rat model and PC12 cells, and the effects of the autophagy inducer trehalose on rotenone's cytotoxicity were also studied. Rotenone administration significantly reduced motor activity and caused a loss of tyrosine hydroxylase in SNpc of Lewis rats. The degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons was accompanied by the deposition of α-synuclein aggregates, autophagosomes and redistribution of cathepsin D from lysosomes to the cytosol. In cultured PC12 cells, rotenone also induced increases in protein levels of α-synuclein, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II, Beclin 1, and p62. Rotenone increased lysosomal membrane permeability as evidenced by leakage of N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase and cathepsin D, the effects were blocked by reactive oxygen species scavenger tiron. Autophagy inducer trehalose enhanced the nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB, accelerated the clearance of autophagosomes and α-synuclein and attenuated rotenone-induced cell death of PC12 cells. Meanwhile, administration of trehalose to rats in drinking water (2%) decreased rotenone-induced dopaminergic neurons loss in SNpc. These studies indicate that the lysosomal dysfunction contributes to rotenone's neurotoxicity and restoration of lysosomal function could be a new therapeutic strategy for Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Impaired default network functional connectivity in autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Chhatwal, Jasmeer P.; Schultz, Aaron P.; Johnson, Keith; Benzinger, Tammie L.S.; Jack, Clifford; Ances, Beau M.; Sullivan, Caroline A.; Salloway, Stephen P.; Ringman, John M.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Marcus, Daniel S.; Thompson, Paul; Saykin, Andrew J.; Correia, Stephen; Schofield, Peter R.; Rowe, Christopher C.; Fox, Nick C.; Brickman, Adam M.; Mayeux, Richard; McDade, Eric; Bateman, Randall; Fagan, Anne M.; Goate, Allison M.; Xiong, Chengjie; Buckles, Virginia D.; Morris, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate default mode network (DMN) functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) in a large cross-sectional cohort of subjects from families harboring pathogenic presenilin-1 (PSEN1), presenilin-2 (PSEN2), and amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutations participating in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network. Methods: Eighty-three mutation carriers and 37 asymptomatic noncarriers from the same families underwent fMRI during resting state at 8 centers in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Using group-independent component analysis, fcMRI was compared using mutation status and Clinical Dementia Rating to stratify groups, and related to each participant's estimated years from expected symptom onset (eYO). Results: We observed significantly decreased DMN fcMRI in mutation carriers with increasing Clinical Dementia Rating, most evident in the precuneus/posterior cingulate and parietal cortices (p < 0.001). Comparison of asymptomatic mutation carriers with noncarriers demonstrated decreased fcMRI in the precuneus/posterior cingulate (p = 0.014) and right parietal cortex (p = 0.0016). We observed a significant interaction between mutation carrier status and eYO, with decreases in DMN fcMRI observed as mutation carriers approached and surpassed their eYO. Conclusion: Functional disruption of the DMN occurs early in the course of autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease, beginning before clinically evident symptoms, and worsening with increased impairment. These findings suggest that DMN fcMRI may prove useful as a biomarker across a wide spectrum of disease, and support the feasibility of DMN fcMRI as a secondary endpoint in upcoming multicenter clinical trials in Alzheimer disease. PMID:23884042

  5. Impairment of striatal mitochondrial function by acute paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed

    Czerniczyniec, Analía; Lanza, E M; Karadayian, A G; Bustamante, J; Lores-Arnaiz, S

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondria are essential for survival. Their primary function is to support aerobic respiration and to provide energy for intracellular metabolic pathways. Paraquat is a redox cycling agent capable of generating reactive oxygen species. The aim of the present study was to evaluate changes in cortical and striatal mitochondrial function in an experimental model of acute paraquat toxicity and to compare if the brain areas and the molecular mechanisms involved were similar to those observed after chronic exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats received paraquat (25 mg/Kg i.p.) or saline and were sacrificed after 24 h. Paraquat treatment decreased complex I and IV activity by 37 and 21 % respectively in striatal mitochondria. Paraquat inhibited striatal state 4 and state 3 KCN-sensitive respiration by 80 % and 62 % respectively, indicating a direct effect on respiratory chain. An increase of 2.2 fold in state 4 and 2.3 fold in state 3 in KCN-insensitive respiration was observed in striatal mitochondria from paraquat animals, suggesting that paraquat redox cycling also consumed oxygen. Paraquat treatment increased hydrogen peroxide production (150 %), TBARS production (42 %) and cardiolipin oxidation/depletion (12 %) in striatal mitochondria. Also, changes in mitochondrial polarization was induced after paraquat treatment. However, no changes were observed in any of these parameters in cortical mitochondria from paraquat treated-animals. These results suggest that paraquat treatment induced a clear striatal mitochondrial dysfunction due to both paraquat redox cycling reactions and impairment of the mitochondrial electron transport, causing oxidative damage. As a consequence, mitochondrial dysfunction could probably lead to alterations in cellular bioenergetics.

  6. Binge Drinking Impairs Vascular Function in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Goslawski, Melissa; Piano, Mariann R.; Bian, Jing-Tan; Church, Emily; Szczurek, Mary; Phillips, Shane A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The study aimed to assess whether young binge drinkers have impaired macrovascular and microvascular function and cardiovascular (CV) disease risk factors compared to age-matched alcohol abstainers. Background Binge drinking rates are highest on college campuses and among 18- to 25-year-olds; however, macrovascular and microvascular endothelial function in young adults with a history of repeated binge drinking (≥5 standard drinks in 2 hrs. in men; ≥4 standard drinks in 2 hrs. in women) has not been investigated Methods We evaluated the cardiovascular profile, brachial artery endothelial-dependent flow mediated vasodilation (FMD), and flow independent nitroglycerin (NTG)-mediated dilation and vasoreactivity of resistance arteries (isolated from gluteal fat biopsies) in abstainers and binge drinkers. Results Men and women (18–25 years of age, abstainers [A] n = 17, binge drinkers [BD] n = 19) were enrolled. Among the BD group, past-month average number of binge episodes was 6 ± 1, and average duration of binge drinking behavior was 4 ± 0.6 years. FMD and NTG-mediated dilations were significantly lower in the BD (FMD: 8.4% ± 0.7, P = 0.022; NTG: 19.6% ± 2, P = 0.009) than the A group (FMD: 11 ± 0.7%; NTG: 28.6 ± 2%). ACh- and SNP-induced dilation in resistance arteries was not significantly different between the A and BD groups. However, ET-1-induced constriction was significantly enhanced in the BD group compared to the A group (P = 0.032). No differences between groups were found in blood pressure, lipoproteins, and C-reactive protein. Conclusions Alterations in the macrocirculation and microcirculation may represent early clinical manifestations of CV risk in otherwise healthy young binge drinkers. This study has important clinical implications for screening young adults for a repeated history of binge drinking. PMID:23623907

  7. Capture-related stressors impair immune system function in sablefish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lupes, S.C.; Davis, M.W.; Olla, B.L.; Schreck, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    The sablefish Anoplopoma fimbria is a valuable North Pacific Ocean species that, when not targeted in various commercial fisheries, is often a part of discarded bycatch. Predictions of the survival of discarded fish are dependent on understanding how a fish responds to stressful conditions. Our objective was to describe the immunological health of sablefish exposed to capture stressors. In laboratory experiments designed to simulate the capture process, we subjected sablefish to various stressors that might influence survival: towing in a net, hooking, elevated seawater and air temperatures, and air exposure time. After stress was imposed, the in vitro mitogen-stimulated proliferation of sablefish leukocytes was used to evaluate the function of the immune system in an assay we validated for this species. The results demonstrated that regardless of fishing gear type, exposure to elevated seawater temperature, or time in air, the leukocytes from stressed sablefish exhibited significantly diminished proliferative responses to the T-cell mitogen, concanavalin A, or the B-cell mitogen, lipopolysaccharide. There was no difference in the immunological responses associated with seawater or air temperature. The duration and severity of the capture stressors applied in our study were harsh enough to induce significantly elevated levels of plasma cortisol and glucose, but there was no difference in the magnitude of levels among stressor treatments. These data suggest that immunological suppression occurs in sablefish subjected to capture-related stressors. The functional impairment of the immune system after capture presents a potential reason why delayed mortality is possible in discarded sablefish. Further studies are needed to determine whether delayed mortality in discarded sablefish can be caused by increased susceptibility to infectious agents resulting from stressor-mediated immunosuppression.

  8. Functional Impairment in Adult Sleepwalkers: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Regis; Jaussent, Isabelle; Scholz, Sabine; Bayard, Sophie; Montplaisir, Jacques; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the restorative quality of sleep and daytime functioning in sleepwalking adult patients in comparison with controls. Design: Prospective case-control study. Setting: Data were collected at the Sleep Disorders Center, Hôpital-Gui-de Chauliac, Montpellier, France between June 2007 and January 2011. Participants: There were 140 adult sleepwalkers (100 (median age 30 y, 55% male) in whom primary SW was diagnosed) who underwent 1 night of video polysomnography. All patients participated in a standardized clinical interview and completed a battery of questionnaires to assess clinical characteristics of parasomnia, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, insomnia, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and health-related quality of life. Results were compared with those of 100 sex- and age-matched normal controls. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Of the sleepwalkers, 22.3% presented with daily episodes and 43.5% presented with weekly episodes. Median age at sleepwalking onset was 9 y. Familial history of sleepwalking was reported in 56.6% of sleepwalkers and violent sleep related behaviors in 57.9%, including injuries requiring medical care for at least one episode in 17%. Significant associations were found between sleepwalking and daytime sleepiness, fatigue, insomnia, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and altered quality of life. Early-onset sleepwalkers had higher frequency of violent behaviors and injuries. Sleepwalkers with violent behaviors had higher frequency of sleep terrors and triggering factors, with greater alteration in health-related quality of life. Conclusion: Adult sleepwalking is a potentially serious condition that may induce violent behaviors, self-injury or injury to bed partners, sleep disruption, excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and psychological distress, all of which affect health-related quality of life. Citation: Lopez R; Jaussent I; Scholz S; Bayard S; Montplaisir J; Dauvilliers Y. Functional impairment in

  9. Dynamic heart-in-thorax phantom for functional SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Celler, A.; Lyster, D.; Farncombe, T.

    1996-12-31

    We have designed and built a dynamic heart-in-thorax phantom to be used as a primary tool during the experimental verification of the performance of the quantitative dynamic functional imaging method we are developing for standard rotating single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cameras. The phantom consists of two independent parts (i) a dynamic heart model with the possibility of mounting {open_quotes}defects{close_quotes} inside it and (ii) a non-uniform thorax model with lungs and spinal cord, and uses the fact that the washout of a tracer by dilution is governed by a linear first order equation, the same type of equation as is used to model time-activity distribution in myocardial viability studies. Tests of the dynamic performance of the phantom in planar scanning mode have confirmed the validity of these assumptions. Also the preliminary results obtained in SPECT mode show that the values of characteristic times could be experimentally determined and that these values agreed well with the values preset on the phantom. We consider that the phantom is ready for extensive use in studies into development of the dynamic SPECT method.

  10. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (ogg1) maintains the function of cardiac progenitor cells during heart formation in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lifeng; Zhou, Yong; Yu, Shanhe; Ji, Guixiang; Liu, Wei; Gu, Aihua

    2013-11-15

    Genomic damage may devastate the potential of progenitor cells and consequently impair early organogenesis. We found that ogg1, a key enzyme initiating the base-excision repair, was enriched in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. So far, little is known about DNA repair in cardiogenesis. Here, we addressed the critical role of ogg1 in cardiogenesis for the first time. ogg1 mainly expressed in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), the primary heart tube, and subsequently the embryonic myocardium by in situ hybridisation. Loss of ogg1 resulted in severe cardiac morphogenesis and functional abnormalities, including the short heart length, arrhythmia, decreased cardiomyocytes and nkx2.5{sup +} cardiac progenitor cells. Moreover, the increased apoptosis and repressed proliferation of progenitor cells caused by ogg1 deficiency might contribute to the heart phenotype. The microarray analysis showed that the expression of genes involved in embryonic heart tube morphogenesis and heart structure were significantly changed due to the lack of ogg1. Among those, foxh1 is an important partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage. Our work demonstrates the requirement of ogg1 in cardiac progenitors and heart development in zebrafish. These findings may be helpful for understanding the aetiology of congenital cardiac deficits. - Highlights: • A key DNA repair enzyme ogg1 is expressed in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. • We found that ogg1 is essential for normal cardiac morphogenesis in zebrafish. • The production of embryonic cardiomyocytes requires appropriate ogg1 expression. • Ogg1 critically regulated proliferation of cardiac progenitor cells in zebrafish. • foxh1 is a partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage.

  11. Muscle function in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kröönström, Linda Ashman; Johansson, Linda; Zetterström, Anna-Klara; Dellborg, Mikael; Eriksson, Peter; Cider, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to assess muscle function in a sample of Swedish adult men and women with congenital heart disease (ACHD) and to compare the results with published reference values in healthy adults. From April 2009 to December 2010, 762 adult outpatients were assessed for their suitability and individual need for tests of physical fitness. The patients performed five muscle function tests, two isotonic tests and three isometric tests. Of the 762 patients, 315 (41.3%) patients performed the tests. Patients with ACHD had lower isotonic muscle function compared to healthy reference values. In the heel lift test, men with ACHD performed at 63% and women at 58% of the healthy reference values and in the shoulder flexion test the corresponding performance level was 60% for men with ACHD and 85% for the women. Multiple regression analyses showed that NYHA class II-IV was a significant predictor for a lower isotonic muscle function i.e. heel lift in women (p<0.001) and men (p=0.05) and in shoulder flexion (p<0.001) in women, as well as in isometric knee extension (p=0.04) and isometric shoulder abduction (p<0.001) in women. This is the first report of muscle function in a broad and unselected group of patients with ACHD. Our data shows that patients with ACHD have lower isotonic muscle function. The impacts of low muscle function in activities of daily living and the question of whether muscle function could be improved with exercise training need further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Impairment and disability in persons with MS: do functional performance or functional limitations matter?

    PubMed

    Klaren, Rachel E; Pilutti, Lara A; Sandroff, Brian M; Motl, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    Persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) often demonstrate impairment in cardiorespiratory and musculoskeletal systems that may be associated with functional performance, functional limitations, and disability limitations. This study examined such relationships in persons with MS using Nagi's disablement model and its subsequent conceptual modifications. The sample included 63 persons with MS (75% relapsing-remitting MS, median EDSS = 4.0, and mean MS duration = 13.1 years) who underwent measurements of aerobic fitness and muscular strength (i.e. impairment), functional performance, functional limitations, and disability limitations. The data were primarily examined using path analysis in Mplus 7.0. Our final model provided an excellent fit for the data (χ² = 0.67, df = 3, p = 0.88, SRMR = 0.01, and CFI = 1.00). The final model indicated that aerobic fitness and muscular strength were indirectly associated with disability limitations in persons with MS through a pathway that included functional limitations (indirect path coefficients of 0.29 and 0.20, respectively), but not functional performance. Aerobic fitness and muscular strength may be the important targets of exercise training interventions for improving perceived functional limitations and disability limitations in persons with MS.

  13. Interleukin-6 impairs chronotropic responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation and decreases heart rate variability in mice.

    PubMed

    Hajiasgharzadeh, Khalil; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad; Mani, Ali R

    2011-12-30

    Heart rate variability is reduced in several clinical settings associated with systemic inflammation. The underlying mechanism of decreased heart rate variability during systemic inflammation is unknown. It appears that the inflammatory cytokines might play a role, since epidemiologic studies has shown that circulating levels of interleukine-6 (IL-6) correlate significantly with indexes of depressed heart rate variability in various clinical conditions. The present investigation was carried out to study the peripheral and central effects of IL-6 on heart rate dynamic in mice. Adult male BALB/c mice were used in the study. RT-PCR was performed to study the expression of IL-6 receptor in mouse atrial and the results showed that gp130 mRNA was detectable in the atrium. The effect of IL-6 was also studies on chronotropic responsiveness of isolated atria to adrenergic and cholinergic stimulations. Incubation of isolated atria with 10 ng/ml of IL-6 was associated with a significant hypo-responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation (log IC₅₀ of carbacholine changed from -6.26±0.10 in controls to -5.59±0.19 following incubation with IL-6, P<0.05). The chronotropic responsiveness to adrenergic stimulation was identical with or without incubation with IL-6. Intraperitoneal injection of IL-6 (200 ng/mouse) was associated with a significant decrease in heart rate variability parameters (SDNN, SD1, and SD2). While intracerebroventricular injection of IL-6 (50 ng/mouse) had no significant effect on heart rate variability parameters. These data are in line with a peripheral role for IL-6 in the genesis of decreased heart rate variability during systemic inflammation.

  14. Social drinkers underestimate the additive impairing effects of alcohol and visual degradation on behavioral functioning.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Emily L R; Fillmore, Mark T

    2005-02-01

    Studies have shown that social drinkers are poor estimators of alcohol-induced impairment. Underestimates of blood alcohol concentration and other indices of intoxication are associated with decisions to perform risky behaviors, such as operating a motor vehicle. It is possible that self-evaluations of impaired functioning under alcohol might be particularly compromised in the presence of other sources of impairment. A common source of impairment that co-occurs with alcohol is visual degradation. The present study compared actual and self-evaluated impairment in response to four conditions (0.65 g/kg alcohol, degradation of task-relevant stimuli, alcohol plus visual degradation, and no-treatment control) to determine whether social drinkers would perceive an increase in impairment from the combined treatments. Actual psychomotor impairment was measured in 16 social drinkers (eight men) by a pursuit rotor task and their self-evaluations of this impairment were obtained on a rating scale. Alcohol and visual degradation impaired participants' actual performance to a similar degree and, in combination, the impairing effects were additive. Participants' self-evaluation ratings showed that they underestimated the additive impairment produced by the combination of alcohol and visual degradation. The findings suggest that social drinkers might be unable to appreciate an increase in behavioral impairment when alcohol is consumed in the context of another impairing influence.

  15. Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate Targeting Myocardial Reactive Oxygen Species Production Improves Left Ventricular Remodeling and Function in Rats With Ischemic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fraccarollo, Daniela; Galuppo, Paolo; Neuser, Jonas; Bauersachs, Johann; Widder, Julian D

    2015-11-01

    Reduced nitric oxide bioavailability contributes to progression of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in ischemic heart failure. Clinical use of organic nitrates as nitric oxide donors is limited by development of nitrate tolerance and reactive oxygen species formation. We investigated the effects of long-term therapy with pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), an organic nitrate devoid of tolerance, in rats with congestive heart failure after extensive myocardial infarction. Seven days after coronary artery ligation, rats were randomly allocated to treatment with PETN (80 mg/kg BID) or placebo for 9 weeks. Long-term PETN therapy prevented the progressive left ventricular dilatation and improved left ventricular contractile function and relaxation in rats with congestive heart failure. Mitochondrial superoxide anion production was markedly increased in the failing left ventricular myocardium and nearly normalized by PETN treatment. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that PETN beneficially modulated the dysregulation of mitochondrial genes involved in energy metabolism, paralleled by prevention of uncoupling protein-3, thioredoxin-2, and superoxide dismutase-2 downregulation. Moreover, PETN provided a remarkable protective effect against reactive fibrosis in chronically failing hearts. Mechanistically, induction of heme oxygenase-1 by PETN prevented mitochondrial superoxide generation, NOX4 upregulation, and ensuing formation of extracellular matrix proteins in fibroblasts from failing hearts. In summary, PETN targeting reactive oxygen species generation prevented the changes of mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes and progressive fibrotic remodeling, leading to amelioration of cardiac functional performance. Therefore, PETN might be a promising therapeutic option in the treatment of ischemic heart diseases involving oxidative stress and impairment in nitric oxide bioactivity. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Tinman/Nkx2-5 acts via miR-1 and upstream of Cdc42 to regulate heart function across species

    PubMed Central

    Wythe, Joshua D.; Liu, Jiandong; Cartry, Jerome; Vogler, Georg; Mohapatra, Bhagyalaxmi; Otway, Robyn T.; Huang, Yu; King, Isabelle N.; Maillet, Marjorie; Zheng, Yi; Crawley, Timothy; Taghli-Lamallem, Ouarda; Semsarian, Christopher; Dunwoodie, Sally; Winlaw, David; Harvey, Richard P.; Fatkin, Diane; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Srivastava, Deepak; Ocorr, Karen; Bruneau, Benoit G.

    2011-01-01

    Unraveling the gene regulatory networks that govern development and function of the mammalian heart is critical for the rational design of therapeutic interventions in human heart disease. Using the Drosophila heart as a platform for identifying novel gene interactions leading to heart disease, we found that the Rho-GTPase Cdc42 cooperates with the cardiac transcription factor Tinman/Nkx2-5. Compound Cdc42, tinman heterozygous mutant flies exhibited impaired cardiac output and altered myofibrillar architecture, and adult heart–specific interference with Cdc42 function is sufficient to cause these same defects. We also identified K+ channels, encoded by dSUR and slowpoke, as potential effectors of the Cdc42–Tinman interaction. To determine whether a Cdc42–Nkx2-5 interaction is conserved in the mammalian heart, we examined compound heterozygous mutant mice and found conduction system and cardiac output defects. In exploring the mechanism of Nkx2-5 interaction with Cdc42, we demonstrated that mouse Cdc42 was a target of, and negatively regulated by miR-1, which itself was negatively regulated by Nkx2-5 in the mouse heart and by Tinman in the fly heart. We conclude that Cdc42 plays a conserved role in regulating heart function and is an indirect target of Tinman/Nkx2-5 via miR-1. PMID:21690310

  17. Association between family functioning and cognitive impairment among Chinese nonagenarians/centenarians.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binyou; He, Ping; Dong, Birong

    2015-09-01

    We explored the association between family functioning and cognitive impairment in the very elderly aged 90-108 years. The present study comprised data from subjects included in the 2005 Project of Longevity and Aging in Dujiangyan, China. Sociodemographic and family functioning data were collected, and cognitive function was assessed in all subjects using the Mini-Mental State Examination. Data from 699 Chinese nonagenarians and centenarians were included. The prevalence of cognitive impairment was 62.8%. The prevalence of family dysfunction was 52.2%, including 8.6% severe and 43.6% moderate dysfunction. There were significant differences among individuals with different family functioning level with regard to cognitive function scores (P = 0.005) or cognitive impairment prevalence (P = 0.012). Subjects with cognitive impairment had lower family functioning scores than those without cognitive impairment (P = 0.004). Pearson's correlation analysis showed that family functioning scores were correlated with Mini-Mental State Examination scores (r = 0.13, P = 0.001). Multiple logistic regressions showed that severe family dysfunction was a risk factor for cognitive impairment. The effect remained after adjusting for sociodemographic status, life habits and metabolic indicators. Family functioning was related to cognitive impairment among Chinese nonagenarians and centenarians. We found that the higher the family functioning scores, the higher the Mini-Mental State Examination scores. Severe family dysfunction was associated with increased risk of cognitive impairment. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  18. Fish consumption, sleep, daily functioning, and heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anita L; Dahl, Lisbeth; Olson, Gina; Thornton, David; Graff, Ingvild E; Frøyland, Livar; Thayer, Julian F; Pallesen, Staale

    2014-05-15

    This study investigated the effects of fatty fish on sleep, daily functioning and biomarkers such as heart rate variability (HRV), vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) in red blood cells. Moreover the relationship among sleep, daily functioning, HRV, vitamin D status, and levels of EPA+DHA was investigated. Ninety-five male forensic patients from a secure forensic inpatient facility in the USA were randomly assigned into a Fish or a Control group. The Fish group received Atlantic salmon three times per week from September to February, and the Control group was provided an alternative meal (e.g., chicken, pork, beef), but with the same nutritional value as their habitual diet, three times per week during the same period. Sleep (sleep latency, sleep efficiency, actual sleep time, and actual wake time), self-perceived sleep quality and daily functioning, as well as vitamin D status, EPA+DHA, and HRV, were assessed pre- and post-intervention period. There was a significant increase in sleep latency from pre- to post-test in the Control group. The Fish group reported better daily functioning than the Control group during post-test. Fish consumption throughout the wintertime had also an effect on resting HRV and EPA+DHA, but not on vitamin D status. However, at post-test, the vitamin D status in the Fish group was still closer to the level regarded as optimal compared to the Control group. Vitamin D status correlated negatively with actual wake time and positively with sleep efficiency during pre-test, as well as positively with daily functioning and sleep quality during post-test. Finally, HRV correlated negatively with sleep latency and positively with daily functioning. Fish consumption seemed to have a positive impact on sleep in general and also on daily functioning, which may be related to vitamin D status and HRV.

  19. Right ventricular function during exercise in children after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cifra, B; Morgan, C T; Dragulescu, A; Guerra, V C; Slorach, C; Friedberg, M K; Manlhiot, C; McCrindle, B W; Dipchand, A I; Mertens, L

    2017-06-23

    Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction is a common problem after heart transplant (HTx). In this study, we used semi-supine bicycle ergometry (SSBE) stress echocardiography to evaluate RV systolic and diastolic reserve in paediatric HTx recipients. Thirty-nine pediatric HTx recipients and 23 controls underwent stepwise SSBE stress echocardiography. Colour tissue doppler imaging (TDI) peak systolic (s') and peak diastolic (e') velocities, myocardial acceleration during isovolumic contraction (IVA), and RV free wall longitudinal strain were measured at incremental heart rates (HR). The relationship with increasing HR was evaluated for each parameter by plotting values at each stage of exercise versus HR using linear and non-linear regression models. At rest, HTx recipients had higher HR with lower TDI velocities (s': 5.4 ± 1.7 vs. 10.4 ± 1.8 cm/s, P < 0.001; e': 6.4 ± 2.2 vs.12 ± 2.4 cm/s, P < 0.001) and RV IVA values (IVA: 1.2 ± 0.4 vs. 1.6 ± 0.8 m/s2, P = 0.04), while RV free wall longitudinal strain was similar between groups. At peak exercise, HR was higher in controls and all measurements of RV function were significantly lower in HTx recipients, except for RV free wall longitudinal strain. When assessing the increase in each parameter vs. HR, the slopes were not significantly different between patients and controls except for IVA, which was lower in HTx recipients. In pediatric HTx recipients RV systolic and diastolic functional response to exercise is preserved with a normal increase in TDI velocities and strain values with increasing HR. The blunted IVA response possibly indicates a mildly decreased RV contractile response but it requires further investigation.

  20. Intramuscular Fat Infiltration Contributes to Impaired Muscle Function in COPD.

    PubMed

    Robles, Priscila Games; Sussman, Marshall S; Naraghi, Ali; Brooks, Dina; Goldstein, Roger S; White, Lawrence M; Mathur, Sunita

    2015-07-01

    Muscle weakness is a prevalent complication in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Atrophy does not fully explain muscle weakness in this population. The recent focus on fat infiltration and its clinical implications in age and diseased muscles are important because it may further explain the extent of declining muscle strength and mobility seen in COPD. The objectives of this study are to quantify fat infiltration (muscle quality) of lower-limb muscles in people with COPD and healthy older adults using magnetic resonance imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and to explore its relationship with muscle strength and walking capacity in COPD. T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy were performed in people with COPD (n = 10) and control subjects (n = 10) matched for age, gender, and body mass index. Maximal cross-sectional area (muscle size), isokinetic and isometric muscle peak torques, and 6-min walk distance were also assessed. In addition to muscle atrophy (mean between-group differences of 20% to 25%, P < 0.05), COPD group presented with fatty infiltration in thigh and calf muscles that were significantly greater than what was observed in their healthy counterparts (mean between-group differences of 74% to 89%, P = 0.001). There was a strong inverse correlation between intramuscular fat infiltration, muscle peak torque, and walking distance (r = -0.6 to -0.8, P < 0.001) in this group as opposed to fair-to-moderate correlations between muscle size and the same outcomes (r = 0.4-0.6, P < 0.01). Poor muscle quality accompanies atrophy in people with COPD. Intramuscular fat infiltration not only appears to have a strong correlation with impaired function but also is more profound than muscle atrophy in this group. Monitoring both muscle size and quality may enable a more comprehensive assessment of exercise programs in COPD.

  1. Angiotensin receptor-mediated oxidative stress is associated with impaired cardiac redox signaling and mitochondrial function in insulin-resistant rats

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Popovich, Irina; Thorwald, Max A.; Viscarra, Jose A.; Rodriguez, Ruben; Sonanez-Organis, Jose G.; Lam, Lisa; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Nakano, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Activation of angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) contributes to NADPH oxidase (Nox)-derived oxidative stress during metabolic syndrome. However, the specific role of AT1 in modulating redox signaling, mitochondrial function, and oxidative stress in the heart remains more elusive. To test the hypothesis that AT1 activation increases oxidative stress while impairing redox signaling and mitochondrial function in the heart during diet-induced insulin resistance in obese animals, Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats (n = 8/group) were treated with the AT1 blocker (ARB) olmesartan for 6 wk. Cardiac Nox2 protein expression increased 40% in OLETF compared with age-matched, lean, strain-control Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats, while mRNA and protein expression of the H2O2-producing Nox4 increased 40–100%. ARB treatment prevented the increase in Nox2 without altering Nox4. ARB treatment also normalized the increased levels of protein and lipid oxidation (nitrotyrosine, 4-hydroxynonenal) and increased the redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 by 30% and the activity of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, catalase, GPx) by 50–70%. Citrate synthase (CS) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities decreased 60–70%, whereas cardiac succinate levels decreased 35% in OLETF compared with LETO, suggesting that mitochondrial function in the heart is impaired during obesity-induced insulin resistance. ARB treatment normalized CS and SDH activities, as well as succinate levels, while increasing AMPK and normalizing Akt, suggesting that AT1 activation also impairs cellular metabolism in the diabetic heart. These data suggest that the cardiovascular complications associated with metabolic syndrome may result from AT1 receptor-mediated Nox2 activation leading to impaired redox signaling, mitochondrial activity, and dysregulation of cellular metabolism in the heart. PMID:23771688

  2. Angiotensin receptor-mediated oxidative stress is associated with impaired cardiac redox signaling and mitochondrial function in insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Popovich, Irina; Thorwald, Max A; Viscarra, Jose A; Rodriguez, Ruben; Sonanez-Organis, Jose G; Lam, Lisa; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Nakano, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Akira; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-08-15

    Activation of angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1) contributes to NADPH oxidase (Nox)-derived oxidative stress during metabolic syndrome. However, the specific role of AT1 in modulating redox signaling, mitochondrial function, and oxidative stress in the heart remains more elusive. To test the hypothesis that AT1 activation increases oxidative stress while impairing redox signaling and mitochondrial function in the heart during diet-induced insulin resistance in obese animals, Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats (n = 8/group) were treated with the AT1 blocker (ARB) olmesartan for 6 wk. Cardiac Nox2 protein expression increased 40% in OLETF compared with age-matched, lean, strain-control Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats, while mRNA and protein expression of the H₂O₂-producing Nox4 increased 40-100%. ARB treatment prevented the increase in Nox2 without altering Nox4. ARB treatment also normalized the increased levels of protein and lipid oxidation (nitrotyrosine, 4-hydroxynonenal) and increased the redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 by 30% and the activity of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, catalase, GPx) by 50-70%. Citrate synthase (CS) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activities decreased 60-70%, whereas cardiac succinate levels decreased 35% in OLETF compared with LETO, suggesting that mitochondrial function in the heart is impaired during obesity-induced insulin resistance. ARB treatment normalized CS and SDH activities, as well as succinate levels, while increasing AMPK and normalizing Akt, suggesting that AT1 activation also impairs cellular metabolism in the diabetic heart. These data suggest that the cardiovascular complications associated with metabolic syndrome may result from AT1 receptor-mediated Nox2 activation leading to impaired redox signaling, mitochondrial activity, and dysregulation of cellular metabolism in the heart.

  3. Functional Impairment in Latino Children with ADHD: Implications for Culturally Appropriate Conceptualization and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haack, Lauren Marie; Gerdes, Alyson C.

    2011-01-01

    Conceptualizing and measuring functional impairment related to childhood ADHD, particularly within the rapidly growing, yet underserved, Latino population, is an important area of research that is in its infancy in the field of psychology. The functional impairments related to academic achievement, social competence, and familial relations…

  4. Functional Impairment in Latino Children with ADHD: Implications for Culturally Appropriate Conceptualization and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haack, Lauren Marie; Gerdes, Alyson C.

    2011-01-01

    Conceptualizing and measuring functional impairment related to childhood ADHD, particularly within the rapidly growing, yet underserved, Latino population, is an important area of research that is in its infancy in the field of psychology. The functional impairments related to academic achievement, social competence, and familial relations…

  5. Executive Function and Behavioral Problems in Students with Visual Impairments at Mainstream and Special Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyl, Vera; Hintermair, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, executive function of school-aged children with visual impairments (that is, those who are blind or have low vision) is examined in the context of behavioral problems and communicative competence. Methods: Teachers assessed the executive function of a sample of 226 visually impaired students from mainstream schools and…

  6. Commentary: Using Scales Assessing Functional Impairment in Supplemental Security Income Eligibility Determination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelsohn, Gail A.

    2005-01-01

    The 10-year review of scales assessing functional impairment by Winters in this issue provides an informative, well-organized, and exhaustive review of the literature. The construct of functional impairment is differentiated from the severity of disorder. Scales in each category are reviewed in a uniform manner covering the following headings:…

  7. Obesity's Effects on the Onset of Functional Impairment among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Kristi Rahrig

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study has two purposes. First, it determines if there is a relationship between body weight and the onset of functional impairment across time among this sample of older adults. More specifically, it examines if obese older adults are more likely to experience the onset of functional impairment. Second, it explores how health…

  8. Effects of Functional Impairment on Internalizing Symptom Trajectories in Adolescence: A Longitudinal, Growth Curve Modelling Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleverley, Kristin; Bennett, Kathryn; Duku, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that psychosocial and functional impairment has long been acknowledged as an important aspect of psychiatric diagnosis and treatment, relatively little is known about the longitudinal relationship between psychiatric symptoms and functional impairment. This is particularly true in childhood and adolescence. Understanding how…

  9. Functional impairments in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: the mediating role of neuropsychological functioning.

    PubMed

    Sjöwall, Douglas; Thorell, Lisa B

    2014-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with multiple neuropsychological deficits and the present study aimed to investigate to what extent these deficits are related to the functional impairments associated with the disorder. The results showed that all executive functioning deficits and reaction time variability acted as mediators in the relation between ADHD and academic achievement. However, only the effect of working memory for language skills, and the effects of reaction time variability and working memory for mathematics, remained significant when studying independent effects. Regulation of anger was a significant mediator for peer problems. Gender or symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) or conduct disorder (CD) did not moderate these findings.

  10. Functional Impairments in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: The Mediating Role of Neuropsychological Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Sjöwall, Douglas; Thorell, Lisa B.

    2014-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with multiple neuropsychological deficits and the present study aimed to investigate to what extent these deficits are related to the functional impairments associated with the disorder. The results showed that all executive functioning deficits and reaction time variability acted as mediators in the relation between ADHD and academic achievement. However, only the effect of working memory for language skills, and the effects of reaction time variability and working memory for mathematics, remained significant when studying independent effects. Regulation of anger was a significant mediator for peer problems. Gender or symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) or conduct disorder (CD) did not moderate these findings. PMID:24742310

  11. Mitochondrial function in heart and kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rats: influence of captopril treatment.

    PubMed

    Mujkosová, Jana; Ulicná, Olga; Waczulíková, Iveta; Vlkovicová, Jana; Vancová, Ol'ga; Ferko, Miroslav; Polák, Stefan; Ziegelhöffer, Attila

    2010-06-01

    Effect of captopril treatment on capability of heart and kidney mitochondria to produce ATP was investigated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Heart mitochondria from SHR responded to hypertension with tendency to compensate the elevated energy demands of cardiac cells by moderate increase in mitochondrial Mg2+-ATPase activity, membrane fluidity (MF) and in majority of functional parameters of the mitochondria (p>0.05). Significant increase exhibited only the oxygen consumption (QO2; p<0.01-0.001) and oxidative phosphorylation rate (OPR; p<0.003) with glutamate+malate (GLUT+MAL) as substrates. Lowering the blood pressure (p<0.02) captopril also eliminated the above compensatory response and impaired the oxidative ATP production by decreasing OPR (p<0.001). Kidney mitochondria of SHR experienced serious disarrangement in parameters of oxidative ATP production: increase in Mg2+-ATPase activity (p<0.05) but, also scattered QO2 values (p<0.03-0.01) leading to decrease in OPR and the ADP:O (p<0.05-0.01) values with both GLUT+MAL and succinate as substrates. Captopril treatment does not alleviated but even worsened the above alterations. Mg2+-ATPase became also decreased and the depression of ADP:O became aggravated (p<0.0001).

  12. Nocturia, sleep and daytime function in stable heart failure.

    PubMed

    Redeker, Nancy S; Adams, Laura; Berkowitz, Robert; Blank, Lenore; Freudenberger, Ronald; Gilbert, Michele; Walsleben, Joyce; Zucker, Mark J; Rapoport, David

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate nocturia severity and nocturia-related differences in sleep, daytime symptoms and functional performance among patients with stable heart failure (HF). In this cross-sectional observational study, we recruited 173 patients [mean age 60.3 ± 16.8 years; female n = 60 (35%); mean left ventricular ejection fraction 32 ± 14.6%] with stable chronic HF from HF disease management programs in the northeastern United States. Participants reported nocturia and completed a 6-minute walk test (6MWT), 1 night of ambulatory polysomnography, and the SF-36 Medical Outcomes Study, Epworth Sleepiness, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue, and Centers for the Epidemiological Studies of Depression scales. Participants reported 0 (n = 30; 17.3%), 1-2 (n = 87; 50.2%), and ≥3 (n = 56; 32.4%) nightly episodes of nocturia. There were decreases in sleep duration and efficiency, REM and stage 3-4 sleep, physical function, and 6MWT distance and increases in the percentage of wake time after sleep onset, insomnia symptoms, fatigue, and sleepiness across levels of nocturia severity. Nocturia is common, severe, and closely associated with decrements in sleep and functional performance and increases in fatigue and sleepiness in patients with stable HF. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Heart rate variability biofeedback improves cardiorespiratory resting function during sleep.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Masahito; Hayano, Junichiro; Oikawa, Leo O; Katsamanis, Maria; Lehrer, Paul

    2013-12-01

    The present study was designed to examine the effect of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback on the cardiorespiratory resting function during sleep in daily life. Forty-five healthy young adults were randomly assigned to one of three groups: HRV biofeedback, Autogenic Training(AT), and no-treatment control. Participants in the HRV biofeedback were instructed to use a handheld HRV biofeedback device before their habitual bedtime, those in the AT were asked to listen to an audiotaped instruction before bedtime,and those in the control were asked to engage in their habitual activity before bedtime. Pulse wave signal during sleep at their own residences was measured continuously with a wrist watch-type transdermal photoelectric sensor for three time points. Baseline data were collected on the first night of measurements, followed by two successive nights for HRV biofeedback, AT, or control. Cardiorespiratory resting function was assessed quantitatively as the amplitude of high frequency(HF) component of pulse rate variability, a surrogate measure of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. HF component increased during sleep in the HRV biofeedback group,although it remained unchanged in the AT and control groups. These results suggest that HRV biofeedback before sleep may improve cardiorespiratory resting function during sleep.

  14. Effect of in vivo heart irradiation on the development of antioxidant defenses and cardiac functions in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Benderitter, M.; Assem, M.; Maupoil, V.

    1995-10-01

    During radiotherapy of thoracic tumors, the heart is often included in the primary treatment volume, and chronic impairment of myocardial function occurs. The cellular biomolecules are altered directly by radiation or damaged indirectly by free radical production. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the biochemical and functional response of the rat heart to a single high dose of radiation. The effect of 20 Gy local X irradiation was determined in the heart of Wistar rats under general anesthesia. Mechanical performances were measured in vitro using an isolated perfused working heart model, and cardiac antioxidant defenses were also evaluated. Hearts were studied at 1 and 4 months after irradiation. This single dose of radiation induced a marked drop in the mechanical activity of the rat heart: aortic output was significantly reduced (18% less than control values) at 1 month postirradiation and remained depressed for the rest of the experimental period (21% less than control 4 months after treatment). This suggests the development of myocardial failure after irradiation. The decline of functional parameters was associated with changes in antioxidant defenses. The decrease in cardiac levels of vitamin E (-30%) was associated with an increase in the levels of Mn-SOD and glustathione peroxidase (+45.5% and +32%, respectively, at 4 months postirradiation). However, cardiac vitamin C and catalase levels remained constant. Since these antioxidant defenses were activated relatively long after irradiation, it is suggested that this was probable due to the production of free radical species associated with the development of inflammation. 49 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Adaptations of the autonomous nervous system controlling heart rate are impaired by a mutant thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Jens; Davis, Benjamin; Vujovic, Milica; Arner, Anders; Vennström, Björn

    2010-05-01

    Thyroid hormone has profound direct effects on cardiac function, but the hormonal interactions with the autonomic control of heart rate are unclear. Because thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-alpha1 has been implicated in the autonomic control of brown adipose energy metabolism, it might also play an important role in the central autonomic control of heart rate. Thus, we aimed to analyze the role of TRalpha1 signaling in the autonomic control of heart rate using an implantable radio telemetry system. We identified that mice expressing the mutant TRalpha1R384C (TRalpha1+m mice) displayed a mild bradycardia, which becomes more pronounced during night activity or on stress and is accompanied by a reduced expression of nucleotide-gated potassium channel 2 mRNA in the heart. Pharmacological blockage with scopolamine and the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist timolol revealed that the autonomic control of cardiac activity was similar to that in wild-type mice at room temperature. However, at thermoneutrality, in which the regulation of heart rate switches from sympathetic to parasympathetic in wild-type mice, TRalpha1+m mice maintained sympathetic stimulation and failed to activate parasympathetic signaling. Our findings demonstrate a novel role for TRalpha1 in the adaptation of cardiac activity by the autonomic nervous system and suggest that human patients with a similar mutation in TRalpha1 might exhibit a deficit in cardiac adaptation to stress or physical activity and an increased sensitivity to beta-blockers.

  16. Loss of Axin2 results in impaired heart valve maturation and subsequent myxomatous valve disease.

    PubMed

    Hulin, Alexia; Moore, Vicky; James, Jeanne M; Yutzey, Katherine E

    2017-01-01

    Myxomatous valve disease (MVD) is the most common aetiology of primary mitral regurgitation. Recent studies suggest that defects in heart valve development can lead to heart valve disease in adults. Wnt/β-catenin signalling is active during heart valve development and has been reported in human MVD. The consequences of increased Wnt/β-catenin signalling due to Axin2 deficiency in postnatal valve remodelling and pathogenesis of MVD were determined. To investigate the role of Wnt/β-catenin signalling, we analysed heart valves from mice deficient in Axin2 (KO), a negative regulator of Wnt/β-catenin signalling. Axin2 KO mice display enlarged mitral and aortic valves (AoV) after birth with increased Wnt/β-catenin signalling and cell proliferation, whereas Sox9 expression and collagen deposition are decreased. At 2 months in Axin2 KO mice, the valve extracellular matrix (ECM) is stratified but distal AoV leaflets remain thickened and develop aortic insufficiency. Progressive myxomatous degeneration is apparent at 4 months with extensive ECM remodelling and focal aggrecan-rich areas, along with increased BMP signalling. Infiltration of inflammatory cells is also observed in Axin2 KO AoV prior to ECM remodelling. Overall, these features are consistent with the progression of human MVD. Finally, Axin2 expression is decreased and Wnt/β-catenin signalling is increased in myxomatous mitral valves in a murine model of Marfan syndrome, supporting the importance of Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the development of MVD. Altogether, these data indicate that Axin2 limits Wnt/β-catenin signalling after birth and allows proper heart valve maturation. Moreover, dysregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling resulting from loss of Axin2 leads to progressive MVD. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Dynamic heart phantom with functional mitral and aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannelli, Claire; Moore, John; McLeod, Jonathan; Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac valvular stenosis, prolapse and regurgitation are increasingly common conditions, particularly in an elderly population with limited potential for on-pump cardiac surgery. NeoChord©, MitraClipand numerous stent-based transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices provide an alternative to intrusive cardiac operations; performed while the heart is beating, these procedures require surgeons and cardiologists to learn new image-guidance based techniques. Developing these visual aids and protocols is a challenging task that benefits from sophisticated simulators. Existing models lack features needed to simulate off-pump valvular procedures: functional, dynamic valves, apical and vascular access, and user flexibility for different activation patterns such as variable heart rates and rapid pacing. We present a left ventricle phantom with these characteristics. The phantom can be used to simulate valvular repair and replacement procedures with magnetic tracking, augmented reality, fluoroscopy and ultrasound guidance. This tool serves as a platform to develop image-guidance and image processing techniques required for a range of minimally invasive cardiac interventions. The phantom mimics in vivo mitral and aortic valve motion, permitting realistic ultrasound images of these components to be acquired. It also has a physiological realistic left ventricular ejection fraction of 50%. Given its realistic imaging properties and non-biodegradable composition—silicone for tissue, water for blood—the system promises to reduce the number of animal trials required to develop image guidance applications for valvular repair and replacement. The phantom has been used in validation studies for both TAVI image-guidance techniques1, and image-based mitral valve tracking algorithms2.

  18. [UCP2 and UCP3 gene expression, heart function and oxygen cost of myocardial work changes during aging and ischemia-reperfusion].

    PubMed

    Hoshovs'ka, Iu V; Lisovyĭ, O O; Shymans'ka, T V; Sahach, V F

    2009-01-01

    To examine the effects of ischemia/reperfusion on UCPs genes expression, heart function and oxygen cost of myocardial work, hearts of adult (6 mo) and old (24 mo) rats were perfused by Langendorf preparation and subjected to 20 min ischemia followed by 40 min reperfusion. Mitochondrial permeability transition due to ischemic stimuli was evaluated by release of mitochondrial factor (lambda 250 nm) which was previously shown as a marker of MPTP opening. Expression of UCPs was detected by reverse transcriptional polymerase chain reaction. Mitochondrial membrane potential (deltaphi(m)) and oxygen consumption in isolated heart mitochondria of adult and old rats were measured. It was shown that impaired function of aging rat hearts was accompanied with an increased oxygen cost of myocardial work and lower mitochondrial membrane potential compared with adult rats. Reperfusion disturbances of cardiodynamic, contractile activity of myocardium and noneffective oxygen utilization in early period of reperfusion were less intensive in aged hearts than in adult ones. Therefore, the levels of mRNA of UCP2 in aging hearts were higher and mRNA levels of UCP3 were tended to increase. At the same time ischemia/reperfusion increased the expression of UCP2 and UCP3 in adult myocardium: mRNA levels of UCPs were significantly higher that those in control, whereas there was no such effect in aging hearts. It is concluded that uncoupling proteins are implicated in the age-depended heart dysfunction and development of the pathological mechanisms during ischemia-reperfusion.

  19. Maternal high-fat diet impairs cardiac function in offspring of diabetic pregnancy through metabolic stress and mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mdaki, Kennedy S.; Larsen, Tricia D.; Wachal, Angela L.; Schimelpfenig, Michelle D.; Weaver, Lucinda J.; Dooyema, Samuel D. R.; Louwagie, Eli J.

    2016-01-01

    Offspring of diabetic pregnancies are at risk of cardiovascular disease at birth and throughout life, purportedly through fuel-mediated influences on the developing heart. Preventative measures focus on glycemic control, but the contribution of additional offenders, including lipids, is not understood. Cellular bioenergetics can be influenced by both diabetes and hyperlipidemia and play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of adult cardiovascular disease. This study investigated whether a maternal high-fat diet, independently or additively with diabetes, could impair fuel metabolism, mitochondrial function, and cardiac physiology in the developing offspring's heart. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a control or high-fat diet were administered placebo or streptozotocin to induce diabetes during pregnancy and then delivered offspring from four groups: control, diabetes exposed, diet exposed, and combination exposed. Cardiac function, cellular bioenergetics (mitochondrial stress test, glycolytic stress test, and palmitate oxidation assay), lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial histology, and copy number were determined. Diabetes-exposed offspring had impaired glycolytic and respiratory capacity and a reduced proton leak. High-fat diet-exposed offspring had increased mitochondrial copy number, increased lipid peroxidation, and evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction. Combination-exposed pups were most severely affected and demonstrated cardiac lipid droplet accumulation and diastolic/systolic cardiac dysfunction that mimics that of adult diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study is the first to demonstrate that a maternal high-fat diet impairs cardiac function in offspring of diabetic pregnancies through metabolic stress and serves as a critical step in understanding the role of cellular bioenergetics in developmentally programmed cardiac disease. PMID:26801311

  20. Maternal high-fat diet impairs cardiac function in offspring of diabetic pregnancy through metabolic stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mdaki, Kennedy S; Larsen, Tricia D; Wachal, Angela L; Schimelpfenig, Michelle D; Weaver, Lucinda J; Dooyema, Samuel D R; Louwagie, Eli J; Baack, Michelle L

    2016-03-15

    Offspring of diabetic pregnancies are at risk of cardiovascular disease at birth and throughout life, purportedly through fuel-mediated influences on the developing heart. Preventative measures focus on glycemic control, but the contribution of additional offenders, including lipids, is not understood. Cellular bioenergetics can be influenced by both diabetes and hyperlipidemia and play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of adult cardiovascular disease. This study investigated whether a maternal high-fat diet, independently or additively with diabetes, could impair fuel metabolism, mitochondrial function, and cardiac physiology in the developing offspring's heart. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a control or high-fat diet were administered placebo or streptozotocin to induce diabetes during pregnancy and then delivered offspring from four groups: control, diabetes exposed, diet exposed, and combination exposed. Cardiac function, cellular bioenergetics (mitochondrial stress test, glycolytic stress test, and palmitate oxidation assay), lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial histology, and copy number were determined. Diabetes-exposed offspring had impaired glycolytic and respiratory capacity and a reduced proton leak. High-fat diet-exposed offspring had increased mitochondrial copy number, increased lipid peroxidation, and evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction. Combination-exposed pups were most severely affected and demonstrated cardiac lipid droplet accumulation and diastolic/systolic cardiac dysfunction that mimics that of adult diabetic cardiomyopathy. This study is the first to demonstrate that a maternal high-fat diet impairs cardiac function in offspring of diabetic pregnancies through metabolic stress and serves as a critical step in understanding the role of cellular bioenergetics in developmentally programmed cardiac disease. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Cognitive and motor function of neurologically impaired extremely low birth weight children

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Janine; Friedman, Harriet; Minich, Nori; Taylor, H Gerry; Wilson-Costello, Deanne; Hack, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rates of neurological impairment among extremely low birth weight children (ELBW [<1 kg]) have decreased since 2000; however, their functioning is unexamined. OBJECTIVE: To compare motor and cognitive functioning of ELBW children with neurological impairment, including cerebral palsy and severe hypotonia/hypertonia, between two periods: 1990 to 1999 (n=83) and 2000 to 2005 (n=34). METHODS: Measures of function at 20 months corrected age included the Mental and Psychomotor Developmental Indexes of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development and the Gross Motor Functional Classification System as primary outcomes and individual motor function items as secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Analysis failed to reveal significant differences for the primary outcomes, although during 2000 to 2005, sitting significantly improved in children with neurological impairment (P=0.003). CONCLUSION: Decreases in rates of neurological impairment among ELBW children have been accompanied by a suggestion of improved motor function, although cognitive function has not changed. PMID:26435676

  2. Cognitive and motor function of neurologically impaired extremely low birth weight children.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Janine; Friedman, Harriet; Minich, Nori; Taylor, H Gerry; Wilson-Costello, Deanne; Hack, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Rates of neurological impairment among extremely low birth weight children (ELBW [<1 kg]) have decreased since 2000; however, their functioning is unexamined. To compare motor and cognitive functioning of ELBW children with neurological impairment, including cerebral palsy and severe hypotonia/hypertonia, between two periods: 1990 to 1999 (n=83) and 2000 to 2005 (n=34). Measures of function at 20 months corrected age included the Mental and Psychomotor Developmental Indexes of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development and the Gross Motor Functional Classification System as primary outcomes and individual motor function items as secondary outcomes. Analysis failed to reveal significant differences for the primary outcomes, although during 2000 to 2005, sitting significantly improved in children with neurological impairment (P=0.003). Decreases in rates of neurological impairment among ELBW children have been accompanied by a suggestion of improved motor function, although cognitive function has not changed.

  3. American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7: Avoiding Heart Failure and Preserving Cardiac Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Folsom, Aaron R.; Shah, Amil M.; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Roetker, Nicholas S.; Alonso, Alvaro; Avery, Christy L.; Miedema, Michael D.; Konety, Suma; Chang, Patricia P.; Solomon, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many people may underappreciate the role of lifestyle in avoiding heart failure. We estimated whether greater adherence in middle age to American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 guidelines -- on smoking, body mass, physical activity, diet, cholesterol, blood pressure, and glucose -- is associated with lower lifetime risk of heart failure and greater preservation of cardiac structure and function in old age. METHODS We studied the population-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study cohort of 13,462 adults aged 45-64 years in 1987-89. From the 1987-89 risk factor measurements, we created a Life’s Simple 7 score (range 0-14, giving 2 points for ideal, 1 point for intermediate, and 0 points for poor components). We identified 2,218 incident heart failure events using surveillance of hospital discharge and death codes through 2011. In addition, in 4,855 participants free of clinical cardiovascular disease in 2011-13, we performed echocardiography from which we quantified left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. RESULTS One in four participants (25.5%) developed heart failure through age 85. Yet, this lifetime heart failure risk was 14.4% for those with a middle-age Life’s Simple 7 score of 10-14 (optimal), 26.8% for a score of 5-9 (average), and 48.6% for a score of 0-4 (inadequate). Among those with no clinical cardiovascular event, the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy in late life was approximately 40% as common, and diastolic dysfunction was approximately 60% as common, among those with an optimal middle-age Life’s Simple 7 score compared with an inadequate score. CONCLUSIONS Greater achievement of American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 in middle-age is associated with a lower lifetime occurrence of heart failure and greater preservation of cardiac structure and function. PMID:25908393

  4. FUNCTIONAL COLLAGEN FIBER ARCHITECTURE OF THE PULMONARY HEART VALVE CUSP

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Erinn M.; Liao, Jun; Schoen, Frederick J.; Mayer, John E.; Sacks, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Defects in the pulmonary valve (PV) occur in a variety of forms of congenital heart diseases. Quantitative information on PV collagen fiber architecture, and particularly its response to diastolic forces, is necessary for the design and functional assessment of approaches for PV repair and replacement. This is especially the case for novel tissue engineered PV, which rely on extensive in-vivo remodeling for long-term function. Methods Porcine PV and aortic valves (AV) were fixed 0 to 90 mmHg transvalvular under a 0 to 90 mmHg transvalvular pressure. After dissection from the root, small angle light scattering (SALS) measurements were conducted to quantify the collagen fiber architecture and changes with increasing applied transvalvular pressure over the entire cusp. Histomorphologic measurements were also performed to assess changes in cuspal layer thickness with pressure. Results While the PV and AV displayed anticipated structural similarities, they also presented important functionally related differences. In the unloaded state, the AV cusp demonstrated substantial regional variations in fiber alignment, whereas the PV was surprisingly uniform. Further, the AV demonstrated substantially larger changes in collagen fiber alignment with applied transvalvular pressure compared to the PV. Overall, the AV collagen fiber network demonstrated greater ability to respond to applied transvalvular pressure. A decrease in crimp amplitude was the predominant mechanism for improvement in the degree of orientation of the collagen fibers in both valves. Conclusions This study clarified the major similarities and differences between the PV and AV. While underscoring how the PV can serve as an appropriate replacement of the diseased aortic valve, the observed structural differences may also indicate limits to the PV's ability to fully duplicate the AV. Moreover, quantitative data from this study on PV functional architecture will benefit development of tissue engineered

  5. Functional collagen fiber architecture of the pulmonary heart valve cusp.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Erinn M; Liao, Jun; Schoen, Frederick J; Mayer, John E; Sacks, Michael S

    2009-04-01

    Defects in the pulmonary valve (PV) occur in a variety of forms of congenital heart diseases. Quantitative information on PV collagen fiber architecture, and particularly its response to diastolic forces, is necessary for the design and functional assessment of approaches for PV repair and replacement. This necessity is especially the case for novel tissue-engineered PV, which rely on extensive in-vivo remodeling for long-term function. Porcine PV and aortic valves (AV) were fixed under a 0 to 90 mm Hg transvalvular pressure. After dissection from the root, small-angle light-scattering measurements were conducted to quantify the collagen fiber architecture and changes with increasing applied transvalvular pressure over the entire cusp. Histomorphologic measurements were also performed to assess changes in cuspal layer thickness with pressure. While the PV and AV displayed anticipated structural similarities, they also presented important functionally related differences. In the unloaded state, the AV cusp demonstrated substantial regional variations in fiber alignment, whereas the PV was surprisingly uniform. Further, the AV demonstrated substantially larger changes in collagen fiber alignment with applied transvalvular pressure compared with the PV. Overall, the AV collagen fiber network demonstrated greater ability to respond to applied transvalvular pressure. A decrease in crimp amplitude was the predominant mechanism for improvement in the degree of orientation of the collagen fibers in both valves. This study clarified the major similarities and differences between the PV and the AV. While underscoring how the PV can serve as an appropriate replacement of the diseased AV, the observed structural differences may also indicate limits to the ability of the PV to fully duplicate the AV. Moreover, quantitative data from this study on PV functional architecture will benefit development of tissue-engineered PV by defining the critical fiber architectural

  6. Impaired HDL2-mediated cholesterol efflux is associated with metabolic syndrome in families with early onset coronary heart disease and low HDL-cholesterol level.

    PubMed

    Paavola, Timo; Kuusisto, Sanna; Jauhiainen, Matti; Kakko, Sakari; Kangas-Kontio, Tiia; Metso, Jari; Soininen, Pasi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Bloigu, Risto; Hannuksela, Minna L; Savolainen, Markku J; Salonurmi, Tuire

    2017-01-01

    The potential of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to facilitate cholesterol removal from arterial foam cells is a key function of HDL. We studied whether cholesterol efflux to serum and HDL subfractions is impaired in subjects with early coronary heart disease (CHD) or metabolic syndrome (MetS) in families where a low HDL-cholesterol level (HDL-C) predisposes to early CHD. HDL subfractions were isolated from plasma by sequential ultracentrifugation. THP-1 macrophages loaded with acetyl-LDL were used in the assay of cholesterol efflux to total HDL, HDL2, HDL3 or serum. While cholesterol efflux to serum, total HDL and HDL3 was unchanged, the efflux to HDL2 was 14% lower in subjects with MetS than in subjects without MetS (p<0.001). The efflux to HDL2 was associated with components of MetS such as plasma HDL-C (r = 0.76 in men and r = 0.56 in women, p<0.001 for both). The efflux to HDL2 was reduced in men with early CHD (p<0.01) only in conjunction with their low HDL-C. The phospholipid content of HDL2 particles was a major correlate with the efflux to HDL2 (r = 0.70, p<0.001). A low ratio of HDL2 to total HDL was associated with MetS (p<0.001). Our results indicate that impaired efflux to HDL2 is a functional feature of the low HDL-C state and MetS in families where these risk factors predispose to early CHD. The efflux to HDL2 related to the phospholipid content of HDL2 particles but the phospholipid content did not account for the impaired efflux in cardiometabolic disease, where a combination of low level and poor quality of HDL2 was observed.

  7. Impaired HDL2-mediated cholesterol efflux is associated with metabolic syndrome in families with early onset coronary heart disease and low HDL-cholesterol level

    PubMed Central

    Paavola, Timo; Kuusisto, Sanna; Jauhiainen, Matti; Kakko, Sakari; Kangas-Kontio, Tiia; Metso, Jari; Soininen, Pasi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Bloigu, Risto; Hannuksela, Minna L.; Savolainen, Markku J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The potential of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to facilitate cholesterol removal from arterial foam cells is a key function of HDL. We studied whether cholesterol efflux to serum and HDL subfractions is impaired in subjects with early coronary heart disease (CHD) or metabolic syndrome (MetS) in families where a low HDL-cholesterol level (HDL-C) predisposes to early CHD. Methods HDL subfractions were isolated from plasma by sequential ultracentrifugation. THP-1 macrophages loaded with acetyl-LDL were used in the assay of cholester