Science.gov

Sample records for impaired heart function

  1. Rbfox2 function in RNA metabolism is impaired in hypoplastic left heart syndrome patient hearts

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sunil K.; Deshmukh, Vaibhav; Nutter, Curtis A.; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Jin, Wenhao; Wadhwa, Lalita; Abata, Joshua; Ricci, Marco; Lincoln, Joy; Martin, James F.; Yeo, Gene W.; Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge N.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a fatal congenital heart disease in which the left side of the heart is underdeveloped, impairing the systemic circulation. Underdeveloped left ventricle exerts biomechanical stress on the right ventricle that can progress into heart failure. Genome-wide transcriptome changes have been identified at early stages in the right ventricle (RV) of infants with HLHS, although the molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the RNA binding protein Rbfox2, which is mutated in HLHS patients, is a contributor to transcriptome changes in HLHS patient RVs. Our results indicate that majority of transcripts differentially expressed in HLHS patient hearts have validated Rbfox2 binding sites. We show that Rbfox2 regulates mRNA levels of targets with 3’UTR binding sites contributing to aberrant gene expression in HLHS patients. Strikingly, the Rbfox2 nonsense mutation identified in HLHS patients truncates the protein, impairs its subcellular distribution and adversely affects its function in RNA metabolism. Overall, our findings uncover a novel role for Rbfox2 in controlling transcriptome in HLHS. PMID:27485310

  2. Oncometabolite d-2-hydroxyglutarate impairs α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and contractile function in rodent heart.

    PubMed

    Karlstaedt, Anja; Zhang, Xiaotian; Vitrac, Heidi; Harmancey, Romain; Vasquez, Hernan; Wang, Jing Han; Goodell, Margaret A; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2016-09-13

    Hematologic malignancies are frequently associated with cardiac pathologies. Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in a subset of acute myeloid leukemia patients, causing metabolic and epigenetic derangements. We have now discovered that altered metabolism in leukemic cells has a profound effect on cardiac metabolism. Combining mathematical modeling and in vivo as well as ex vivo studies, we found that increased amounts of the oncometabolite d-2-hydroxyglutarate (D2-HG), produced by IDH2 mutant leukemic cells, cause contractile dysfunction in the heart. This contractile dysfunction is associated with impaired oxidative decarboxylation of α-ketoglutarate, a redirection of Krebs cycle intermediates, and increased ATP citrate lyase (ACL) activity. Increased availability of D2-HG also leads to altered histone methylation and acetylation in the heart. We propose that D2-HG promotes cardiac dysfunction by impairing α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and induces histone modifications in an ACL-dependent manner. Collectively, our results highlight the impact of cancer cell metabolism on function and metabolism of the heart. PMID:27582470

  3. Bone Marrow-Derived Progenitor Cells Are Functionally Impaired in Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Nollet, Evelien; Hoymans, Vicky Y; Rodrigus, Inez R; De Bock, Dina; Dom, Marc; Vanassche, Bruno; Van Hoof, Viviane O M; Cools, Nathalie; Van Ackeren, Katrijn; Wouters, Kristien; Vermeulen, Katrien; Vrints, Christiaan J; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether the presence of ischemic heart disease (IHD) per se, or rather the co-presence of heart failure (HF), is the primum movens for less effective stem cell products in autologous stem cell therapy, we assessed numbers and function of bone marrow (BM)-derived progenitor cells in patients with coronary artery disease (n = 17), HF due to ischemic cardiomyopathy (n = 8), non-ischemic HF (n = 7), and control subjects (n = 11). Myeloid and erythroid differentiation capacity of BM-derived mononuclear cells was impaired in patients with underlying IHD but not with non-ischemic HF. Migration capacity decreased with increasing IHD severity. Hence, IHD, with or without associated cardiomyopathy, is an important determinant of progenitor cell function. No depletion of hematopoietic and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) within the BM was observed, while circulating EPC numbers were increased in the presence of IHD, suggesting active recruitment. The observed myelosuppression was not driven by inflammation and thus other mechanisms are at play. PMID:27456951

  4. B lymphocytes trigger monocyte mobilization and impair heart function after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zouggari, Yasmine; Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Bonnin, Philippe; Simon, Tabassome; Sage, Andrew P; Guérin, Coralie; Vilar, José; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Laurans, Ludivine; Dumeau, Edouard; Kotti, Salma; Bruneval, Patrick; Charo, Israel F; Binder, Christoph J; Danchin, Nicolas; Tedgui, Alain; Tedder, Thomas F; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Mallat, Ziad

    2013-10-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Here, we show that after acute myocardial infarction in mice, mature B lymphocytes selectively produce Ccl7 and induce Ly6C(hi) monocyte mobilization and recruitment to the heart, leading to enhanced tissue injury and deterioration of myocardial function. Genetic (Baff receptor deficiency) or antibody-mediated (CD20- or Baff-specific antibody) depletion of mature B lymphocytes impeded Ccl7 production and monocyte mobilization, limited myocardial injury and improved heart function. These effects were recapitulated in mice with B cell-selective Ccl7 deficiency. We also show that high circulating concentrations of CCL7 and BAFF in patients with acute myocardial infarction predict increased risk of death or recurrent myocardial infarction. This work identifies a crucial interaction between mature B lymphocytes and monocytes after acute myocardial ischemia and identifies new therapeutic targets for acute myocardial infarction. PMID:24037091

  5. B lymphocytes trigger monocyte mobilization and impair heart function after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zouggari, Yasmine; Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Bonnin, Philippe; Simon, Tabassome; Sage, Andrew P; Guérin, Coralie; Vilar, José; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Laurans, Ludivine; Dumeau, Edouard; Kotti, Salma; Bruneval, Patrick; Charo, Israel F; Binder, Christoph J; Danchin, Nicolas; Tedgui, Alain; Tedder, Thomas F; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Mallat, Ziad

    2014-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Here, we show that after acute myocardial infarction in mice, mature B lymphocytes selectively produce Ccl7 and induce Ly6Chi monocyte mobilization and recruitment to the heart, leading to enhanced tissue injury and deterioration of myocardial function. Genetic (Baff receptor deficiency) or antibody-mediated (CD20- or Baff-specific antibody) depletion of mature B lymphocytes impeded Ccl7 production and monocyte mobilization, limited myocardial injury and improved heart function. These effects were recapitulated in mice with B cell–selective Ccl7 deficiency. We also show that high circulating concentrations of CCL7 and BAFF in patients with acute myocardial infarction predict increased risk of death or recurrent myocardial infarction. This work identifies a crucial interaction between mature B lymphocytes and monocytes after acute myocardial ischemia and identifies new therapeutic targets for acute myocardial infarction. PMID:24037091

  6. The Prognostic Importance of Impaired Systolic Function in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction and the Impact of Spironolactone

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amil M.; Claggett, Brian; Sweitzer, Nancy K.; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Anand, Inder S.; Liu, Li; Pitt, Bertram; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Solomon, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Impairment in left ventricular (LV) systolic function has been described in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), but its prognostic relevance is not known. We determined whether LV longitudinal strain (LS) is predictive of cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in HFpEF beyond clinical and conventional echocardiographic measures. Methods and Results LS was assessed by 2D speckle-tracking echocardiography at baseline in 447 HFpEF patients enrolled in the Treatment Of Preserved Cardiac Function Heart Failure with an Aldosterone Antagonist (TOPCAT) trial. At a median follow-up of 2.6 (IQR 1.5–3.9) years, 115 patients experienced the primary composite outcome of CV death, HF hospitalization, or aborted cardiac arrest. Impaired LS, defined as an absolute LS<15.8%, was present in 52% of patients and was predictive of the composite outcome (adjusted HR 2.14, 95% CI 1.26–3.66; p=0.005), CV death alone (adjusted HR 3.20, 95% CI 1.44–7.12; p=0.004), and HF hospitalization alone (adjusted HR 2.23, 95% CI 1.16–4.28; p=0.016) after adjusting for clinical and conventional echocardiographic variables. LS was the strongest echocardiographic predictor of the composite outcome. Exploratory analysis in a subset of 131 patients with follow-up LS assessed after 12–18 months demonstrated a trend towards improvement in LS associated with spironolactone in patients enrolled in the Americas but not in Russia or Georgia. Conclusions Impaired LV systolic function is a powerful predictor of HF hospitalization, CV death, or aborted cardiac arrest in HFpEF, independent of clinical predictors. Impaired LS represents a novel imaging biomarker to identify HFpEF patients at particularly high risk for CV morbidity and mortality. Clinical Trial Registration Information Clinicaltrials.gov. Identifier NCT00094302. PMID:26130119

  7. Activation of lymphocyte autophagy/apoptosis reflects haemodynamic inefficiency and functional aerobic impairment in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Weng, Tzu-Pin; Fu, Tieh-Cheng; Wang, Chao-Hung; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Wang, Jong-Shyan

    2014-11-01

    Lymphocytopenia is associated with an adverse prognosis in heart failure (HF). The present study investigated whether lymphocytopenia results from activated lymphocyte autophagy/apoptosis, which reflects haemodynamic inefficiency and functional aerobic impairment in patients with HF. One hundred and twenty-seven patients with HF were divided into three groups: HF with non- (lymphocytes ≥2000 cells/μl; n=45), mild (lymphocytes between ≥1500 cells/μl and <2000 cells/μl; n=39) and severe (lymphocytes <1500 cells/μl; n=43) lymphocytopenia. Lymphocyte autophagy/apoptosis, ventilatory/haemodynamic efficiencies and generic/disease-specific quality of life were analysed in these patients with HF and 35 normal counterparts. The results demonstrated that patients with HF with severe lymphocytopenia had (i) increased G-protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK-2) levels, (ii) lower mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) levels with higher lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2) expression and Acridine Orange (AO) staining, (iii) lower mitochondrial transmembrane potential with higher caspase-3 activation and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, and (iv) greater extents of adrenaline (epinephrine)-induced apoptosis in lymphocytes, and higher plasma noradrenaline (norepinephrine)/adrenaline, myeloperoxidase and interleukin-6 concentrations than patients with HF without lymphocytopenia and normal counterparts did. Moreover, lymphocyte caspase-3 activation was an effect modifier, which modulated the correlation status between lymphocyte count and GRK-2 level. Lymphocyte count was positively correlated with peak cardiac output and peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) in patients with HF. In addition, HF with lymphocytopenia was accompanied by lower Short Form-36 physical/mental component scores and increased Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire scores. Therefore, we conclude that increased sympathetic activation and oxidative stress/pro-inflammatory status cause

  8. Cardiac-Restricted Expression of VCP/TER94 RNAi or Disease Alleles Perturbs Drosophila Heart Structure and Impairs Function

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Meera C.; Blice-Baum, Anna C.; Sang, Tzu-Kang; Cammarato, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a highly conserved mechanoenzyme that helps maintain protein homeostasis in all cells and serves specialized functions in distinct cell types. In skeletal muscle, it is critical for myofibrillogenesis and atrophy. However, little is known about VCP's role(s) in the heart. Its functional diversity is determined by differential binding of distinct cofactors/adapters, which is likely disrupted during disease. VCP mutations cause multisystem proteinopathy (MSP), a pleiotropic degenerative disorder that involves inclusion body myopathy. MSP patients display progressive muscle weakness. They also exhibit cardiomyopathy and die from cardiac and respiratory failure, which are consistent with critical myocardial roles for the enzyme. Nonetheless, efficient models to interrogate VCP in cardiac muscle remain underdeveloped and poorly studied. Here, we investigated the significance of VCP and mutant VCP in the Drosophila heart. Cardiac-restricted RNAi-mediated knockdown of TER94, the Drosophila VCP homolog, severely perturbed myofibrillar organization and heart function in adult flies. Furthermore, expression of MSP disease-causing alleles engendered cardiomyopathy in adults and structural defects in embryonic hearts. Drosophila may therefore serve as a valuable model for examining role(s) of VCP in cardiogenesis and for identifying novel heart-specific VCP interactions, which when disrupted via mutation, contribute to or elicit cardiac pathology. PMID:27500162

  9. Cognitive impairment in heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Leto, Laura; Feola, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive damage in heart failure (HF) involves different domains thus interfering with the ability for single patient to self-care and to cope with treatment regimens, modifying symptoms and health behaviours. Many cerebral and functional changes were detected in brain imaging, involving areas of both grey and white matter deputed to cognition. Although various instruments are available to explore cognition, no consensus was obtained on better tools to be used in HF population. Reduction in cerebral blood flow, decreased cardiac output, alterations of cerebrovascular reactivity and modification of blood pressure levels are the main features involved in the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of cognitive deficit. Several cardiac variables, laboratory parameters, demographic and clinical elements were studied for their possible relation with cognition and should be properly evaluated to define patients at increased risk of impairment. The present review gathers available data pointing out assured information and discussing possible areas of research development. PMID:25593581

  10. Cognitive impairment in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Leto, Laura; Feola, Mauro

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive damage in heart failure (HF) involves different domains thus interfering with the ability for single patient to self-care and to cope with treatment regimens, modifying symptoms and health behaviours. Many cerebral and functional changes were detected in brain imaging, involving areas of both grey and white matter deputed to cognition. Although various instruments are available to explore cognition, no consensus was obtained on better tools to be used in HF population. Reduction in cerebral blood flow, decreased cardiac output, alterations of cerebrovascular reactivity and modification of blood pressure levels are the main features involved in the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of cognitive deficit. Several cardiac variables, laboratory parameters, demographic and clinical elements were studied for their possible relation with cognition and should be properly evaluated to define patients at increased risk of impairment. The present review gathers available data pointing out assured information and discussing possible areas of research development. PMID:25593581

  11. Endocardial Remodeling in Heart Failure Patients with Impaired and Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function--A Magnetic Resonance Image Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lian-Yu; Su, Mao-Yuan M; Pham, Van-Truong; Tran, Thi-Thao; Wang, Yung-Hung; Tseng, Wen-Yih I; Lo, Men-Tzung; Lin, Jiunn-Lee

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) trabeculation has been studied in certain forms of cardiomyopathy. However, the changes of LV endocardial trabeculation during the remodeling process leading to heart failure (HF) are unclear. Seventy-four patients with systolic heart failure (SHF), 65 with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and 61 without HF were prospectively enrolled. All subjects received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study including cine, T1 and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images. Trabecular-papillary muscle (TPM) mass, fractal dimension (FD) and extracellular volume (ECV) were derived. The results showed that TPM mass index was higher in patients with SHF than that in patients with HFpEF and non-HF. The TPM mass-LV mass ratio (TPMm/LVM) was higher in SHF group than that in HFpEF and non-HF. FD was not different among groups. The presence of LGE was inversely associated with TPM mass index and TPMm/LVM while the ECV were positively associated with TPMm/LVM. The FD was positively associated with LV chamber size. In conclusion, TPM increases in patients with SHF and are probably related to myocardial cell hypertrophy and fibrotic repair during remodeling. The FD increases with the dilatation of LV chamber but remain unchanged with the deterioration of LV function. PMID:26876005

  12. Endocardial Remodeling in Heart Failure Patients with Impaired and Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function-A Magnetic Resonance Image Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lian-Yu; Su, Mao-Yuan M.; Pham, Van-Truong; Tran, Thi-Thao; Wang, Yung-Hung; Tseng, Wen-Yih I.; Lo, Men-Tzung; Lin, Jiunn-Lee

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) trabeculation has been studied in certain forms of cardiomyopathy. However, the changes of LV endocardial trabeculation during the remodeling process leading to heart failure (HF) are unclear. Seventy-four patients with systolic heart failure (SHF), 65 with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and 61 without HF were prospectively enrolled. All subjects received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study including cine, T1 and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images. Trabecular-papillary muscle (TPM) mass, fractal dimension (FD) and extracellular volume (ECV) were derived. The results showed that TPM mass index was higher in patients with SHF than that in patients with HFpEF and non-HF. The TPM mass-LV mass ratio (TPMm/LVM) was higher in SHF group than that in HFpEF and non-HF. FD was not different among groups. The presence of LGE was inversely associated with TPM mass index and TPMm/LVM while the ECV were positively associated with TPMm/LVM. The FD was positively associated with LV chamber size. In conclusion, TPM increases in patients with SHF and are probably related to myocardial cell hypertrophy and fibrotic repair during remodeling. The FD increases with the dilatation of LV chamber but remain unchanged with the deterioration of LV function. PMID:26876005

  13. The CopenHeartSF trial—comprehensive sexual rehabilitation programme for male patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillator or ischaemic heart disease and impaired sexual function: protocol of a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Pernille Palm; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Hastrup-Svendsen, Jesper; Frederiksen, Marianne; Lindschou, Jane; Winkel, Per; Gluud, Christian; Giraldi, Annamaria; Steinke, Elaine; Jaarsma, Tiny; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Sexuality is an important part of people’s physical and mental health. Patients with heart disease often suffer from sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunction has a negative impact on quality of life and well-being in persons with heart disease, and sexual dysfunction is associated with anxiety and depression. Treatment and care possibilities seem to be lacking. Studies indicate that non-pharmacological interventions such as exercise training and psychoeducation possess the potential of reducing sexual dysfunction in patients with heart disease. The CopenHeartSF trial will investigate the effect of a comprehensive sexual rehabilitation programme versus usual care. Methods and analysis CopenHeartSF is an investigator-initiated randomised clinical superiority trial with blinded outcome assessment, with 1:1 central randomisation to sexual rehabilitation plus usual care versus usual care alone. Based on sample size calculations, 154 male patients with impaired sexual function due to implantable cardioverter defibrillator or ischaemic heart disease will be included from two university hospitals in Denmark. All patients receive usual care and patients allocated to the experimental intervention group follow a 12-week sexual rehabilitation programme consisting of an individualised exercise programme and psychoeducative consultation with a specially trained nurse. The primary outcome is sexual function measured by the International Index of Erectile Function. The secondary outcome measure is psychosocial adjustment to illness by the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale, sexual domain. A number of explorative analyses will also be conducted. Ethics and dissemination CopenHeartSF is approved by the regional ethics committee (no H-4-2012-168) and the Danish Data Protection Agency (no 2007-58-0015) and is performed in accordance with good clinical practice and the Declaration of Helsinki in its latest form. Registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01796353

  14. Diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and metabolic biomarkers in individuals with normal glucose tolerance are inversely associated with lung function: the Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Hickson, DeMarc A; Burchfiel, Cecil M; Liu, Jiankang; Petrini, Marcy F; Harrison, Kimystian; White, Wendy B; Sarpong, Daniel F

    2011-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the hypothesis that diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), diabetes control and diabetes duration, and metabolic biomarkers in adults with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) are inversely associated with spirometry-measured lung function. We conducted a cross-sectional observational cohort study that included nonsmoking African American adults (n = 2,945; mean age = 52.5 ± 12.6 years; 69.2% female), who were free of cardiovascular disease, from the Jackson Heart Study. The interventions were diabetes, metabolic biomarkers and lung function. We measured the associations of glycemia with forced expiratory volume (FEV) in 1 s, FEV in 6 s, and vital capacity. Multivariable adjusted mean lung function values were lower among adults with diabetes and IGT (in women only, but not after adjustment for waist circumference) than adults with NGT. Among adults with diabetes, no associations were observed between lung function and diabetes control or duration. In women with NGT, lower lung function was consistently associated with higher glucose levels and less consistently with higher insulin levels and insulin resistance. Lower lung function was consistently associated with higher insulin levels and insulin resistance and less consistently associated with insulin and hemoglobin A1c in men with NGT. Overall, our findings generally support the hypothesis that diabetes, IGT, and increased levels of metabolic biomarkers in individuals with NGT are inversely associated with lung function in African Americans, independent of adiposity.

  15. Dimethylfumarate Impairs Neutrophil Functions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Susen; Behnen, Martina; Bieber, Katja; Möller, Sonja; Hellberg, Lars; Witte, Mareike; Hänsel, Martin; Zillikens, Detlef; Solbach, Werner; Laskay, Tamás; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2016-01-01

    Host defense against pathogens relies on neutrophil activation. Inadequate neutrophil activation is often associated with chronic inflammatory diseases. Neutrophils also constitute a significant portion of infiltrating cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, for example, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. Fumarates improve the latter diseases, which so far has been attributed to the effects on lymphocytes and dendritic cells. Here, we focused on the effects of dimethylfumarate (DMF) on neutrophils. In vitro, DMF inhibited neutrophil activation, including changes in surface marker expression, reactive oxygen species production, formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, and migration. Phagocytic ability and autoantibody-induced, neutrophil-dependent tissue injury ex vivo was also impaired by DMF. Regarding the mode of action, DMF modulates-in a stimulus-dependent manner-neutrophil activation using the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathways. For in vivo validation, mouse models of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, an organ-specific autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies to type VII collagen, were employed. In the presence of DMF, blistering induced by injection of anti-type VII collagen antibodies into mice was significantly impaired. DMF treatment of mice with clinically already-manifested epidermolysis bullosa acquisita led to disease improvement. Collectively, we demonstrate a profound inhibitory activity of DMF on neutrophil functions. These findings encourage wider use of DMF in patients with neutrophil-mediated diseases. PMID:26763431

  16. Impaired heart rate recovery in patients with endemic fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Adali, M Koray; Varol, Ercan; Aksoy, Fatih; Icli, Atilla; Ersoy, I Hakki; Ozaydin, Mehmet; Erdogan, Dogan; Dogan, Abdullah

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the heart rate recovery index (HRRI), a marker of autonomic nervous system function in patients with endemic fluorosis. Forty patients with endemic fluorosis (16 men/24 women) and 40 age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched healthy controls (16 men/24 women) with normal fluoride intake were enrolled in this study. HRRI was calculated by subtracting the heart rate values at the first, second, and third minutes of the recovery phase from the peak heart rate (HRRI 1, HRRI 2, HRRI 3). Urine fluoride levels of fluorosis patients were significantly (P < 0.001) higher than control subjects as expected. HRRI 2 was significantly lower in fluorosis patients than in the controls. The incidence of abnormal HRRI 1 was significantly higher in fluorosis patients than in the controls (P < 0.05). We observed that HRRI, a marker of autonomic nervous system function, is impaired in patients with chronic fluorosis.

  17. Functional Assessment for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Significant improvement in survival of children with congenital cardiac malformations has resulted in an increasing population of adolescent and adult patients with congenital heart disease. Of the long-term cardiac problems, ventricular dysfunction remains an important issue of concern. Despite corrective or palliative repair of congenital heart lesions, the right ventricle, which may be the subpulmonary or systemic ventricular chamber, and the functional single ventricle are particularly vulnerable to functional impairment. Regular assessment of cardiac function constitutes an important aspect in the long-term follow up of patients with congenital heart disease. Echocardiography remains the most useful imaging modality for longitudinal monitoring of cardiac function. Conventional echocardiographic assessment has focused primarily on quantification of changes in ventricular size and blood flow velocities during the cardiac cycles. Advances in echocardiographic technologies including tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking echocardiography have enabled direct interrogation of myocardial deformation. In this review, the issues of ventricular dysfunction in congenital heart disease, conventional echocardiographic and novel myocardial deformation imaging techniques, and clinical applications of these techniques in the functional assessment of congenital heart disease are discussed. PMID:24653734

  18. Diastolic Function in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Sándor J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure has reached epidemic proportions, and diastolic heart failure or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) constitutes about 50% of all heart failure admissions. Long-term prognosis of both reduced ejection fraction heart failure and HFpEF are similarly dismal. No pharmacologic agent has been developed that actually treats or repairs the physiologic deficit(s) responsible for HFpEF. Because the physiology of diastole is both subtle and counterintuitive, its role in heart failure has received insufficient attention. In this review, the focus is on the physiology of diastole in heart failure, the dominant physiologic laws that govern the process in all hearts, how all hearts work as a suction pump, and, therefore, the elucidation and characterization of what actually is meant by “diastolic function”. The intent is for the reader to understand what diastolic function actually is, what it is not, and how to measure it. Proper measurement of diastolic function requires one to go beyond the usual E/A, E/E′, etc. phenomenological metrics and employ more rigorous causality (mathematical modeling) based parameters of diastolic function. The method simultaneously provides new physiologic insight into the meaning of in vivo “equilibrium volume” of the left ventricle (LV), longitudinal versus transverse volume accommodation of the chamber, diastatic “ringing” of the mitral annulus, and the mechanism of L-wave generation, as well as availability of a load-independent index of diastolic function (LIIDF). One important consequence of understanding what diastolic function is, is the recognition that all that current therapies can do is basically alter the load, rather than actually “repair” the functional components (chamber stiffness, chamber relaxation). If beneficial (biological/structural/metabolic) remodeling due to therapy does manifest ultimately as improved diastolic function, it is due to resumption of normal physiology (as in

  19. Heart rhythm complexity impairment in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Hung; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Heng; Wu, Vin-Cent; Lo, Men-Tzung; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Liu, Li-Yu Daisy; Lin, Lian-Yu; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2016-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in patients with advanced renal disease. The objective of this study was to investigate impairments in heart rhythm complexity in patients with end-stage renal disease. We prospectively analyzed 65 patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) without prior cardiovascular disease and 72 individuals with normal renal function as the control group. Heart rhythm analysis including complexity analysis by including detrended fractal analysis (DFA) and multiscale entropy (MSE) were performed. In linear analysis, the PD patients had a significantly lower standard deviation of normal RR intervals (SDRR) and percentage of absolute differences in normal RR intervals greater than 20 ms (pNN20). Of the nonlinear analysis indicators, scale 5, area under the MSE curve for scale 1 to 5 (area 1–5) and 6 to 20 (area 6–20) were significantly lower than those in the control group. In DFA anaylsis, both DFA α1 and DFA α2 were comparable in both groups. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, scale 5 had the greatest discriminatory power for two groups. In both net reclassification improvement model and integrated discrimination improvement models, MSE parameters significantly improved the discriminatory power of SDRR, pNN20, and pNN50. In conclusion, PD patients had worse cardiac complexity parameters. MSE parameters are useful to discriminate PD patients from patients with normal renal function.

  20. Heart rhythm complexity impairment in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen-Hung; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Heng; Wu, Vin-Cent; Lo, Men-Tzung; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Liu, Li-Yu Daisy; Lin, Lian-Yu; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in patients with advanced renal disease. The objective of this study was to investigate impairments in heart rhythm complexity in patients with end-stage renal disease. We prospectively analyzed 65 patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) without prior cardiovascular disease and 72 individuals with normal renal function as the control group. Heart rhythm analysis including complexity analysis by including detrended fractal analysis (DFA) and multiscale entropy (MSE) were performed. In linear analysis, the PD patients had a significantly lower standard deviation of normal RR intervals (SDRR) and percentage of absolute differences in normal RR intervals greater than 20 ms (pNN20). Of the nonlinear analysis indicators, scale 5, area under the MSE curve for scale 1 to 5 (area 1–5) and 6 to 20 (area 6–20) were significantly lower than those in the control group. In DFA anaylsis, both DFA α1 and DFA α2 were comparable in both groups. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, scale 5 had the greatest discriminatory power for two groups. In both net reclassification improvement model and integrated discrimination improvement models, MSE parameters significantly improved the discriminatory power of SDRR, pNN20, and pNN50. In conclusion, PD patients had worse cardiac complexity parameters. MSE parameters are useful to discriminate PD patients from patients with normal renal function. PMID:27324066

  1. Dietary Habits Moderate the Association between Heart Failure and Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Colbert, Lisa H.; Josephson, Richard; van Dulmen, Manfred; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is common in heart failure patients. Poor dietary habits are associated with reduced neurocognitive function in other medical populations, including diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. This study examined whether dietary habits help moderate the relationship between heart failure severity and cognitive function. A total of 152 persons with heart failure completed neuropsychological testing and a fitness assessment. Dietary habits were assessed using the Starting the Conversation-Diet questionnaire, a nutrition measure suggested for use in primary care settings. Moderation analyses showed that better dietary habits attenuated the adverse impact of heart failure severity on frontal functioning (b =1.28, p < .05). Follow-up analyses revealed consumption of foods high in sodium was associated with reduced cognitive function (p < .05). This study suggests dietary habits can moderate the association between heart failure and performance on tests of attention and executive function. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm and clarify the mechanisms for our findings. PMID:23663211

  2. Deletion of neurturin impairs development of cholinergic nerves and heart rate control in postnatal mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Downs, Anthony M; Jalloh, Hawa B; Prater, Kayla J; Fregoso, Santiago P; Bond, Cherie E; Hampton, Thomas G; Hoover, Donald B

    2016-05-01

    The neurotrophic factor neurturin is required for normal cholinergic innervation of adult mouse heart and bradycardic responses to vagal stimulation. Our goals were to determine effects of neurturin deletion on development of cardiac chronotropic and dromotropic functions, vagal baroreflex response, and cholinergic nerve density in nodal regions of postnatal mice. Experiments were performed on postnatal C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and neurturin knockout (KO) mice. Serial electrocardiograms were recorded noninvasively from conscious pups using an ECGenie apparatus. Mice were treated with atenolol to evaluate and block sympathetic effects on heart rate (HR) and phenylephrine (PE) to stimulate the baroreflex. Immunohistochemistry was used to label cholinergic nerves in paraffin sections. WT and KO mice showed similar age-dependent increases in HR and decreases in PR interval between postnatal days (P) 2.5 and 21. Treatment with atenolol reduced HR significantly in WT and KO pups at P7.5. PE caused a reflex bradycardia that was significantly smaller in KO pups. Cholinergic nerve density was significantly less in nodal regions of P7.5 KO mice. We conclude that cholinergic nerves have minimal influence on developmental changes in HR and PR, QRS, and QTc intervals in mouse pups. However, cholinergic nerves mediate reflex bradycardia by 1 week postnatally. Deletion of neurturin impairs cholinergic innervation of the heart and the vagal efferent component of the baroreflex early during postnatal development.

  3. Cardiac ablation of Rheb1 induces impaired heart growth, endoplasmic reticulum-associated apoptosis and heart failure in infant mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yunshan; Tao, Lichan; Shen, Shutong; Xiao, Junjie; Wu, Hang; Li, Beibei; Wu, Xiangqi; Luo, Wen; Xiao, Qi; Hu, Xiaoshan; Liu, Hailang; Nie, Junwei; Lu, Shuangshuang; Yuan, Baiyin; Han, Zhonglin; Xiao, Bo; Yang, Zhongzhou; Li, Xinli

    2013-12-13

    Ras homologue enriched in brain 1 (Rheb1) plays an important role in a variety of cellular processes. In this study, we investigate the role of Rheb1 in the post-natal heart. We found that deletion of the gene responsible for production of Rheb1 from cardiomyocytes of post-natal mice resulted in malignant arrhythmias, heart failure, and premature death of these mice. In addition, heart growth impairment, aberrant metabolism relative gene expression, and increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis were observed in Rheb1-knockout mice prior to the development of heart failure and arrhythmias. Also, protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) signaling was enhanced in Rheb1-knockout mice, and removal of phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) significantly prolonged the survival of Rheb1-knockouts. Furthermore, signaling via the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) was abolished and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and phosphorylation levels of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) were increased in Rheb1 mutant mice. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Rheb1 is important for maintaining cardiac function in post-natal mice via regulation of mTORC1 activity and stress on the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, activation of Akt signaling helps to improve the survival of mice with advanced heart failure. Thus, this study provides direct evidence that Rheb1 performs multiple important functions in the heart of the post-natal mouse. Enhancing Akt activity improves the survival of infant mice with advanced heart failure.

  4. Reversible heart rhythm complexity impairment in patients with primary aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen-Hung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Lo, Men-Tzung; Wu, Xue-Ming; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Stowasser, Michael; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Excess aldosterone secretion in patients with primary aldosteronism (PA) impairs their cardiovascular system. Heart rhythm complexity analysis, derived from heart rate variability (HRV), is a powerful tool to quantify the complex regulatory dynamics of human physiology. We prospectively analyzed 20 patients with aldosterone producing adenoma (APA) that underwent adrenalectomy and 25 patients with essential hypertension (EH). The heart rate data were analyzed by conventional HRV and heart rhythm complexity analysis including detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and multiscale entropy (MSE). We found APA patients had significantly decreased DFAα2 on DFA analysis and decreased area 1–5, area 6–15, and area 6–20 on MSE analysis (all p < 0.05). Area 1–5, area 6–15, area 6–20 in the MSE study correlated significantly with log-transformed renin activity and log-transformed aldosterone-renin ratio (all p < = 0.01). The conventional HRV parameters were comparable between PA and EH patients. After adrenalectomy, all the altered DFA and MSE parameters improved significantly (all p < 0.05). The conventional HRV parameters did not change. Our result suggested that heart rhythm complexity is impaired in APA patients and this is at least partially reversed by adrenalectomy. PMID:26282603

  5. Reversible heart rhythm complexity impairment in patients with primary aldosteronism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yen-Hung; Wu, Vin-Cent; Lo, Men-Tzung; Wu, Xue-Ming; Hung, Chi-Sheng; Wu, Kwan-Dun; Lin, Chen; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Stowasser, Michael; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2015-08-01

    Excess aldosterone secretion in patients with primary aldosteronism (PA) impairs their cardiovascular system. Heart rhythm complexity analysis, derived from heart rate variability (HRV), is a powerful tool to quantify the complex regulatory dynamics of human physiology. We prospectively analyzed 20 patients with aldosterone producing adenoma (APA) that underwent adrenalectomy and 25 patients with essential hypertension (EH). The heart rate data were analyzed by conventional HRV and heart rhythm complexity analysis including detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and multiscale entropy (MSE). We found APA patients had significantly decreased DFAα2 on DFA analysis and decreased area 1-5, area 6-15, and area 6-20 on MSE analysis (all p < 0.05). Area 1-5, area 6-15, area 6-20 in the MSE study correlated significantly with log-transformed renin activity and log-transformed aldosterone-renin ratio (all p < = 0.01). The conventional HRV parameters were comparable between PA and EH patients. After adrenalectomy, all the altered DFA and MSE parameters improved significantly (all p < 0.05). The conventional HRV parameters did not change. Our result suggested that heart rhythm complexity is impaired in APA patients and this is at least partially reversed by adrenalectomy.

  6. Aspirate from human stented saphenous vein grafts induces epicardial coronary vasoconstriction and impairs perfusion and left ventricular function in rat bioassay hearts with pharmacologically induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lieder, Helmut R; Baars, Theodor; Kahlert, Philipp; Kleinbongard, Petra

    2016-08-01

    Stent implantation into aortocoronary saphenous vein grafts (SVG) releases particulate debris and soluble vasoactive mediators, for example, serotonin. We now analyzed effects of the soluble mediators released into the coronary arterial blood during stent implantation on vasomotion of isolated rat epicardial coronary artery segments and on coronary flow and left ventricular developed pressure in isolated perfused rat hearts. Coronary blood was retrieved during percutaneous SVG intervention using a distal occlusion/aspiration protection device in nine symptomatic patients with stable angina pectoris and a flow-limiting SVG stenosis. The blood was separated into particulate debris and plasma. Responses to coronary plasma were determined in isolated rat epicardial coronary arteries and in isolated, constant pressure-perfused rat hearts (±nitric oxide synthase [NOS] inhibition and ±serotonin receptor blockade, respectively). Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation induced a stronger vasoconstriction of rat epicardial coronary arteries (52 ± 8% of maximal potassium chloride induced vasoconstriction [% KClmax = 100%]) than plasma taken before stent implantation (12 ± 8% of KClmax); NOS inhibition augmented this vasoconstrictor response (to 110 ± 15% and 24 ± 9% of KClmax). Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation reduced in isolated perfused rat hearts only under NOS inhibition coronary flow by 17 ± 3% and left ventricular developed pressure by 25 ± 4%. Blockade of serotonin receptors abrogated these effects. Coronary aspirate plasma taken after stent implantation induces vasoconstriction in isolated rat epicardial coronary arteries and reduces coronary flow and left ventricular developed pressure in isolated perfused rat hearts with pharmacologically induced endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27482071

  7. Functional impairment in social anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Aderka, Idan M; Hofmann, Stefan G; Nickerson, Angela; Hermesh, Haggai; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva; Marom, Sofi

    2012-04-01

    The present study examined functional impairment among treatment seekers with social anxiety disorder (SAD). We investigated the effects of diagnostic subtypes of SAD and comorbidity with mood and anxiety disorders on impairment. In addition, we used cluster analysis procedures to empirically identify subgroups of individuals with distinct patterns of impairment. Participants were 216 treatment-seeking individuals with SAD. Clinical interviews were undertaken to determine diagnoses of anxiety disorders and major depressive disorder, and a battery of self-report measures was administered to index symptoms of social anxiety, depression and extent of impairment. Results indicated that individuals with the generalized subtype of SAD had greater impairment in all three life domains compared to individuals with the nongeneralized subtype. Comorbidity with mood disorders was associated with greater impairment than SAD alone, but comorbidity with anxiety disorders was not. Four distinct impairment profiles emerged from the cluster analysis: primary work/studies impairment, primary social life impairment, both work/studies and social impairment, and impairment in all domains. Findings from this study suggest that SAD is associated with substantial impairment across multiple domains, and that individuals with SAD present diverse impairment profiles. These profiles may inform subtyping of the disorder as well as therapeutic interventions.

  8. Cognitive Impairment Among Elderly Patients With Chronic Heart Failure and Related Factors

    PubMed Central

    Taraghi, Zohreh; Akbari Kamrani, Ahmad-Ali; Foroughan, Mahshid; Yazdani, Jamshid; Mahdavi, Ali; Baghernejad, Seied Kazem

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with heart failure (HF) older than 65 years have a two-fold increased risk of cognitive impairment than elders without HF. Identifying factors affecting cognitive impairment in HF may present targets for intervention. Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine cognitive function and related factors among elderly patients with heart failure. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, 184 elderly patients with heart failure were selected from four Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences teaching hospitals using convenience sampling. Data were collected from patients’ medical records and by interview, using the abbreviated mental test, geriatric depression scale, and Charlson comorbidity index. Results There were significant relationships between cognitive status and living arrangement (P < 0.001), education (P < 0.001), hypertension (P = 0.039), anemia (P = 0.046), Charlson comorbidity index (P < 0.001) and geriatric depression scale (P < 0.001). Conclusions Screening of cognitive impairment in elderly patients with heart failure seems necessary. PMID:27803723

  9. Impaired ADP channeling to mitochondria and elevated reactive oxygen species in hypertensive hearts.

    PubMed

    Power, Amelia S C; Pham, Toan; Loiselle, Denis S; Crossman, David H; Ward, Marie-Louise; Hickey, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Systemic hypertension initially promotes a compensatory cardiac hypertrophy, yet it progresses to heart failure (HF), and energetic deficits appear to be central to this failure. However, the transfer of energy between the mitochondria and the myofibrils is not often considered as part of the energetic equation. We compared hearts from old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and normotensive Wistar controls. SHR hearts showed a 35% depression in mitochondrial function, yet produced at least double the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in all respiration states in left ventricular (LV) homogenates. To test the connectivity between mitochondria and myofibrils, respiration was further tested in situ with LV permeabilized fibers by addition of multiple substrates and ATP, which requires hydrolysis to mediate oxidative phosphorylation. By trapping ADP using a pyruvate kinase enzyme system, we tested ADP channeling towards mitochondria, and this suppressed respiration and elevated ROS production more in the SHR fibers. The ADP-trapped state was also less relieved on creatine addition, likely reflecting the 30% depression in total CK activity in the SHR heart fibers. Confocal imaging identified a 34% longer distance between the centers of myofibril to mitochondria in the SHR hearts, which increases transverse metabolite diffusion distances (e.g., for ATP, ADP, and creatine phosphate). We propose that impaired connectivity between mitochondria and myofibrils may contribute to elevated ROS production. Impaired energy exchange could be the result of ultrastructural changes that occur with hypertrophy in this model of hypertension. PMID:27084386

  10. Impairment of cardiac function and energetics in experimental renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Raine, A E; Seymour, A M; Roberts, A F; Radda, G K; Ledingham, J G

    1993-01-01

    Cardiac function and energetics in experimental renal failure in the rat (5/6 nephrectomy) have been investigated by means of an isolated perfused working heart preparation and an isometric Langendorff preparation using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR). 4 wk after nephrectomy cardiac output of isolated hearts perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer was significantly lower (P < 0.0001) at all levels of preload and afterload in the renal failure groups than in the pair-fed sham operated control group. In control hearts, cardiac output increased with increases in perfusate calcium from 0.73 to 5.61 mmol/liter whereas uremic hearts failed in high calcium perfusate. Collection of 31P NMR spectra from hearts of renal failure and control animals during 30 min normoxic Langendorff perfusion showed that basal phosphocreatine was reduced by 32% to 4.7 mumol/g wet wt (P < 0.01) and the phosphocreatine to ATP ratio was reduced by 32% (P < 0.01) in uremic hearts. During low flow ischemia, there was a substantial decrease in phosphocreatine in the uremic hearts and an accompanying marked increase in release of inosine into the coronary effluent (14.9 vs 6.1 microM, P < 0.01). We conclude that cardiac function is impaired in experimental renal failure, in association with abnormal cardiac energetics and increased susceptibility to ischemic damage. Disordered myocardial calcium utilization may contribute to these derangements. PMID:8254048

  11. Marital Conflict, Depressive Symptoms, and Functional Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Heejeong; Marks, Nadine F.

    2008-01-01

    Guided by a stress process perspective, we investigated (a) whether marital conflict might directly lead to changes in depression and functional impairment, (b) whether marital conflict might indirectly lead to changes in functional impairment via depression, and (c) whether marital conflict might indirectly lead to changes in depression via functional impairment. We estimated a latent variable causal model using 3 waves of data from the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 1,832). Results indicated that marital conflict directly led to increases in depression and functional impairment and indirectly led to a rise in depression via functional impairment. Overall, findings suggest marital conflict is a significant risk factor for psychological and physical health among midlife and older adults. PMID:18698378

  12. Right heart function in COPD.

    PubMed

    Macnee, William

    2010-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a common complication in patients with severe hypoxic COPD, but the elevation in pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) is usually relatively mild, although its presence indicates a poor prognosis. A minority of patients have severe pulmonary hypertension, whose prognosis is very poor with the development of right heart failure. Pulmonary hypertension in COPD is thought to result from hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction leading to structural remodeling of all layers of the pulmonary arterial walls. The simple hypothesis that hypoxemia in patients with chronic lung disease results in pulmonary hypertension, which adversely affects right ventricular function and hence increases morbidity and decreases exercise tolerance, leading to the development of peripheral edema and increased mortality, is still somewhat controversial. Whether therapeutic interventions that directly affect PAP or right ventricular function have a significant effect on long-term survival in patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to hypoxic lung disease is still a matter of debate. Furthermore, whether such interventions will have an effect on symptoms or exercise tolerance remains unproven. Present therapies are limited to the correction of hypoxemia over the long term, which has been shown to have proven benefits on survival. Further studies are required of more specific pulmonary vasodilators or therapies to improve right ventricular function in these patients. PMID:20496299

  13. Inferential functioning in visually impaired children.

    PubMed

    Puche-Navarro, Rebeca; Millán, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The current study explores the inferential abilities of visually impaired children in a task presented in two formats, manipulative and verbal. The results showed that in the group of visually impaired children, just as with children with normal sight, there was a wide range of inference types. It was found that the visually impaired children perform slightly better in the use of inductive and relational inferences in the verbal format, while in the manipulative format children with normal sight perform better. These results suggest that in inferential functioning of young children, and especially visually impaired children, the format of the task influences performance more than the child's visual ability.

  14. Inferential functioning in visually impaired children.

    PubMed

    Puche-Navarro, Rebeca; Millán, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The current study explores the inferential abilities of visually impaired children in a task presented in two formats, manipulative and verbal. The results showed that in the group of visually impaired children, just as with children with normal sight, there was a wide range of inference types. It was found that the visually impaired children perform slightly better in the use of inductive and relational inferences in the verbal format, while in the manipulative format children with normal sight perform better. These results suggest that in inferential functioning of young children, and especially visually impaired children, the format of the task influences performance more than the child's visual ability. PMID:16647837

  15. Hormonal alterations in heart failure: anabolic impairment in chronic heart failure - diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic issues.

    PubMed

    Arcopinto, Michele; Cittadini, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Chronic heart failure represents a leading cause of mortality and health care expenditure in developed countries. In the last 20 years, medical therapy of heart failure has dramatically changed thanks to the introduction of agents able to significantly reduce the neurohormonal hyperactivation that underpins the syndrome, and to the growing opportunities of electrical therapies. Although major advances in terms of improved survival and quality of life have been achieved, the reduction in the burden of heart failure is still the primary goal of cardiovascular societies. In the last decades, other research lines have also grown to complement the neurohormonal paradigm. It is increasingly evident that several hormonal systems are down-regulated or impaired in patients with heart failure, including growth and thyroid hormones, androgens and insulin. These abnormalities could be considered interrelated and linked, in turn, to the neurohormonal and cytokine hyperactivation. Since most of these alterations provide prognostic information, these new lines of evidence support the extension of the classical neurohormonal scheme to a more comprehensive pathophysiological model that includes multiple hormonal and metabolic deficiencies. This chapter examines the evidence in support of this concept. Preliminary experience concerning targeted hormonal supplementation or metabolic modulation is also briefly reviewed in this article.

  16. Does lung diffusion impairment affect exercise capacity in patients with heart failure?

    PubMed Central

    Agostoni, P G; Bussotti, M; Palermo, P; Guazzi, M

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is a relation between impairment of lung diffusion and reduced exercise capacity in chronic heart failure. Design: 40 patients with heart failure in stable clinical condition and 40 controls participated in the study. All subjects underwent standard pulmonary function tests plus measurements of resting lung diffusion (carbon monoxide transfer, Tlco), pulmonary capillary volume (Vc), and membrane resistance (Dm), and maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing. In 20 patients and controls, the following investigations were also done: (1) resting and constant work rate Tlco; (2) maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing with inspiratory O2 fractions of 0.21 and 0.16; and (3) rest and peak exercise blood gases. The other subjects underwent Tlco, Dm, and Vc measurements during constant work rate exercise. Results: In normoxia, exercise induced reductions of haemoglobin O2 saturation never occurred. With hypoxia, peak exercise uptake (peak V̇o2) decreased from (mean (SD)) 1285 (395) to 1081 (396) ml/min (p < 0.01) in patients, and from 1861 (563) to 1771 (457) ml/min (p < 0.05) in controls. Resting Tlco correlated with peak V̇o2 in heart failure (normoxia < hypoxia). In heart failure patients and normal subjects, Tlco and peak V̇o2 correlated with O2 arterial content at rest and during peak exercise in both normoxia and hypoxia. Tlco, Vc, and Dm increased during exercise. The increase in Tlco was greater in patients who had a smaller reduction of exercise capacity with hypoxia. Alveolar–arterial O2 gradient at peak correlated with exercise capacity in heart failure during normoxia and, to a greater extent, during hypoxia. Conclusions: Lung diffusion impairment is related to exercise capacity in heart failure. PMID:12381630

  17. Regenerating functional heart tissue for myocardial repair

    PubMed Central

    Alcon, Andre; Bozkulak, Esra Cagavi; Qyang, Yibing

    2012-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and the number of patients with the disease is likely to grow with the continual decline in health for most of the developed world. Heart transplantation is one of the only treatment options for heart failure due to an acute myocardial infarction, but limited donor supply and organ rejection limit its widespread use. Cellular cardiomyoplasty, or cellular implantation, combined with various tissue-engineering methods aims to regenerate functional heart tissue. This review highlights the numerous cell sources that have been used to regenerate the heart as well as cover the wide range of tissue-engineering strategies that have been devised to optimize the delivery of these cells. It will probably be a long time before an effective regenerative therapy can make a serious impact at the bedside. PMID:22388688

  18. [Cognitive functions impairment in diabetes mellitus patient].

    PubMed

    Prikryl, R

    2007-01-01

    An increased research interest in the relation between diabetes mellitus and dementia or deterioration of cognitive functions has been recently noticed. The relatively rich scientific literature in this topic shows that diabetes mellitus itself can cause an impairment of cognitive functions regardless patient's age or the fact whether he has type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Type 1 diabetes mellitus leads to a psychomotor retardation while type 2 diabetes mellitus tends to be associated with impaired storage of new information. The exact mechanism through which diabetes impairs cognition has not been explained sufficiently yet, but several hypothetical mechanisms which might explain the relation between diabetes and impaired cognition have been proposed. To explain the etiopathogenetic mechanisms underlying the relation between diabetes and dementia, further research, especially research focused on process clinical-imaging studies or clinical-pathological studies is necessary. As far as clinical practice is concerned, it is important to bear in mind that prevention, timely diagnosis and optimum treatment of diabetes may help to reduce incidence of dementia or cognitive functions' impairment.

  19. In vivo 2D mapping of impaired murine cardiac energetics in NO-induced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Flögel, Ulrich; Jacoby, Christoph; Gödecke, Axel; Schrader, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    (31)P MRS studies in humans have shown that an impairment of cardiac energetics is characteristic of heart failure. Although numerous transgenic mouse models with a heart-failure phenotype have been generated, current methods to analyze murine high-energy phosphates (HEPs) in vivo are hampered by limited spatial resolution. Using acquisition-weighted 2D (31)P chemical shift imaging (CSI) at 9.4 Tesla, we were able to acquire (31)P MR spectra over the entire thorax of the mouse with high spatial resolution in defined regions of the heart (the anterior, lateral, posterior, and septal walls) within a reasonable acquisition time of about 75 min. Analysis of a transgenic cardiomyopathy model (double mutant: cardiospecific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) overexpression and lack of myoglobin (tg-iNOS(+)/myo(-/-)) revealed that cardiac dysfunction in the mutant was associated with an impaired energy state (phosphocreatine (PCr)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) 1.54 +/- 0.18) over the entire left ventricle (LV; wild-type (WT): PCr/ATP 2.06 +/- 0.22, N = 5, P < 0.05), indicating that in the absence of efficient cytosolic NO scavenging, iNOS-derived NO critically interferes with the respiratory chain. In vivo data were validated against (31)P MR spectra of perchloric acid extracts (PCr/ATP: 1.87 +/- 0.21 (WT), 1.39 +/- 0.17 (tg-iNOS(+)/myo(-/-), N = 5, P < 0.05). Future applications will substantially benefit studies on the cause-and-effect relationship between cardiac energetics and function in other genetically well-defined models of heart failure. PMID:17139621

  20. In vivo 2D mapping of impaired murine cardiac energetics in NO-induced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Flögel, Ulrich; Jacoby, Christoph; Gödecke, Axel; Schrader, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    (31)P MRS studies in humans have shown that an impairment of cardiac energetics is characteristic of heart failure. Although numerous transgenic mouse models with a heart-failure phenotype have been generated, current methods to analyze murine high-energy phosphates (HEPs) in vivo are hampered by limited spatial resolution. Using acquisition-weighted 2D (31)P chemical shift imaging (CSI) at 9.4 Tesla, we were able to acquire (31)P MR spectra over the entire thorax of the mouse with high spatial resolution in defined regions of the heart (the anterior, lateral, posterior, and septal walls) within a reasonable acquisition time of about 75 min. Analysis of a transgenic cardiomyopathy model (double mutant: cardiospecific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) overexpression and lack of myoglobin (tg-iNOS(+)/myo(-/-)) revealed that cardiac dysfunction in the mutant was associated with an impaired energy state (phosphocreatine (PCr)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) 1.54 +/- 0.18) over the entire left ventricle (LV; wild-type (WT): PCr/ATP 2.06 +/- 0.22, N = 5, P < 0.05), indicating that in the absence of efficient cytosolic NO scavenging, iNOS-derived NO critically interferes with the respiratory chain. In vivo data were validated against (31)P MR spectra of perchloric acid extracts (PCr/ATP: 1.87 +/- 0.21 (WT), 1.39 +/- 0.17 (tg-iNOS(+)/myo(-/-), N = 5, P < 0.05). Future applications will substantially benefit studies on the cause-and-effect relationship between cardiac energetics and function in other genetically well-defined models of heart failure.

  1. ON THE BIOMECHANICS OF HEART VALVE FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Michael S.; Merryman, W. David; Schmidt, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Heart valves (HVs) are fluidic control components of the heart that ensure unidirectional blood flow during the cardiac cycle. However, this description does not adequately describe the biomechanical ramifications of their function in that their mechanics are multi-modal. Moreover, they must replicate their cyclic function over an entire lifetime, with an estimated total functional demand of least 3×109 cycles. The focus of the present review is on the functional biomechanics of heart valves. Thus, the focus of the present review is on functional biomechanics, referring primarily to biosolid as well as several key biofluid mechanical aspects underlying heart valve physiological function. Specifically, we refer to the mechanical behaviors of the extra-cellular matrix structural proteins, underlying cellular function, and their integrated relation to the major aspects of valvular hemodynamic function. While we focus on the work from the author’s laboratories, relevant works of other investigators have been included whenever appropriate. We conclude with a summary of important future trends. PMID:19540499

  2. Congestive heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is associated with severely impaired dynamic Starling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Shigeki; Hastings, Jeff L.; Prasad, Anand; Fu, Qi; Bhella, Paul S.; Pacini, Eric; Krainski, Felix; Palmer, M. Dean; Zhang, Rong

    2011-01-01

    Sedentary aging leads to increased cardiovascular stiffening, which can be ameliorated by sufficient amounts of lifelong exercise training. An even more extreme form of cardiovascular stiffening can be seen in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), which comprises ∼40∼50% of elderly patients diagnosed with congestive heart failure. There are two major interrelated hypotheses proposed to explain heart failure in these patients: 1) increased left ventricular (LV) diastolic stiffness and 2) increased arterial stiffening. The beat-to-beat dynamic Starling mechanism, which is impaired with healthy human aging, reflects the interaction between ventricular and arterial stiffness and thus may provide a link between these two mechanisms underlying HFpEF. Spectral transfer function analysis was applied between beat-to-beat changes in LV end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP; estimated from pulmonary artery diastolic pressure with a right heart catheter) and stroke volume (SV) index. The dynamic Starling mechanism (transfer function gain between LVEDP and the SV index) was impaired in HFpEF patients (n = 10) compared with healthy age-matched controls (n = 12) (HFpEF: 0.23 ± 0.10 ml·m−2·mmHg−1 and control: 0.37 ± 0.11 ml·m−2·mmHg−1, means ± SD, P = 0.008). There was also a markedly increased (3-fold) fluctuation of LV filling pressures (power spectral density of LVEDP) in HFpEF patients, which may predispose to pulmonary edema due to intermittent exposure to higher pulmonary capillary pressure (HFpEF: 12.2 ± 10.4 mmHg2 and control: 3.8 ± 2.9 mmHg2, P = 0.014). An impaired dynamic Starling mechanism, even more extreme than that observed with healthy aging, is associated with marked breath-by-breath LVEDP variability and may reflect advanced ventricular and arterial stiffness in HFpEF, possibly contributing to reduced forward output and pulmonary congestion. PMID:21310890

  3. Gap junction modulation and its implications for heart function

    PubMed Central

    Kurtenbach, Stefan; Kurtenbach, Sarah; Zoidl, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction communication (GJC) mediated by connexins is critical for heart function. To gain insight into the causal relationship of molecular mechanisms of disease pathology, it is important to understand which mechanisms contribute to impairment of gap junctional communication. Here, we present an update on the known modulators of connexins, including various interaction partners, kinases, and signaling cascades. This gap junction network (GJN) can serve as a blueprint for data mining approaches exploring the growing number of publicly available data sets from experimental and clinical studies. PMID:24578694

  4. Progressive troponin I loss impairs cardiac relaxation and causes heart failure in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Du, Jianfeng; Zhang, Chi; Walker, Jeffery W; Huang, Xupei

    2007-08-01

    Cardiac troponin I (TnI) knockout mice exhibit a phenotype of sudden death at 17-18 days after birth due to a progressive loss of TnI. The objective of this study was to gain insight into the physiological consequences of TnI depletion and the cause of death in these mice. Cardiac function was monitored serially between 12 and 17 days of age by using high-resolution ultrasonic imaging and Doppler echocardiography. Two-dimensional B-mode and anatomical M-mode imaging and Doppler echocardiography were performed using a high-frequency ( approximately 20-45 MHz) ultrasound imaging system on homozygous cardiac TnI mutant mice (cTnI(-/-)) and wild-type littermates. On day 12, cTnI(-/-) mice were indistinguishable from wild-type mice in terms of heart rate, atrial and LV (LV) chamber dimensions, LV posterior wall thickness, and body weight. By days 16 through 17, wild-type mice showed up to a 40% increase in chamber dimensions due to normal growth, whereas cTnI(-/-) mice showed increases in atrial dimensions of up to 97% but decreases in ventricular dimensions of up to 70%. Mitral Doppler analysis revealed prolonged isovolumic relaxation time and pronounced inversion of the mitral E/A ratio (early ventricular filling wave-to-late atrial contraction filling wave) only in cTnI(-/-) mice indicative of impaired LV relaxation. cTnI(-/-) mouse hearts showed clear signs of failure on day 17, characterized by >50% declines in cardiac output, ejection fraction, and fractional shortening. B-mode echocardiography showed a profoundly narrowed tube-like LV and enlarged atria at this time. Our data are consistent with TnI deficiency causing impaired LV relaxation, which leads to diastolic heart failure in this model.

  5. Functional Hubs in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, Adrián; Papo, David; Boccaletti, Stefano; Del-Pozo, F.; Bajo, Ricardo; Maestú, Fernando; Martínez, J. H.; Gil, Pablo; Sendiña-Nadal, Irene; Buldú, Javier M.

    We investigate how hubs of functional brain networks are modified as a result of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a condition causing a slight but noticeable decline in cognitive abilities, which sometimes precedes the onset of Alzheimer's disease. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate the functional brain networks of a group of patients suffering from MCI and a control group of healthy subjects, during the execution of a short-term memory task. Couplings between brain sites were evaluated using synchronization likelihood, from which a network of functional interdependencies was constructed and the centrality, i.e. importance, of their nodes was quantified. The results showed that, with respect to healthy controls, MCI patients were associated with decreases and increases in hub centrality respectively in occipital and central scalp regions, supporting the hypothesis that MCI modifies functional brain network topology, leading to more random structures.

  6. How Do Cognitive Function and Knowledge Affect Heart Failure Self-Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Lee, Christopher S.; Riegel, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive patient education, few heart failure (HF) patients master self-care. Impaired cognitive function may explain why patient education is ineffective. A concurrent triangulation mixed methods design was used to explore how knowledge and cognitive function influence HF self-care. A total of 41 adults with HF participated in interviews…

  7. Genome-wide compendium and functional assessment of in vivo heart enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Dickel, Diane E.; Barozzi, Iros; Zhu, Yiwen; Fukuda-Yuzawa, Yoko; Osterwalder, Marco; Mannion, Brandon J.; May, Dalit; Spurrell, Cailyn H.; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Pickle, Catherine S.; Lee, Elizabeth; Garvin, Tyler H.; Kato, Momoe; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Afzal, Veena; Lee, Ah Young; Gorkin, David U.; Ren, Bing; Rubin, Edward M.; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing is identifying growing numbers of non-coding variants in human disease studies, but the lack of accurate functional annotations prevents their interpretation. We describe the genome-wide landscape of distant-acting enhancers active in the developing and adult human heart, an organ whose impairment is a predominant cause of mortality and morbidity. Using integrative analysis of >35 epigenomic data sets from mouse and human pre- and postnatal hearts we created a comprehensive reference of >80,000 putative human heart enhancers. To illustrate the importance of enhancers in the regulation of genes involved in heart disease, we deleted the mouse orthologs of two human enhancers near cardiac myosin genes. In both cases, we observe in vivo expression changes and cardiac phenotypes consistent with human heart disease. Our study provides a comprehensive catalogue of human heart enhancers for use in clinical whole-genome sequencing studies and highlights the importance of enhancers for cardiac function. PMID:27703156

  8. Complexity in caring for an ageing heart failure population: concomitant chronic conditions and age related impairments.

    PubMed

    De Geest, Sabina; Steeman, Els; Leventhal, Marcia E; Mahrer-Imhof, Romy; Hengartner-Kopp, Beatrice; Conca, Antoinette; Bernasconi, Arlette T; Petry, Heidi; Brunner-La Rocca, Hanspeter

    2004-12-01

    The complexity of caring for the ageing heart failure (HF) population is further complicated by concomitant chronic conditions (i.e., polypharmacy, depression), age related impairments (i.e., hearing, visual and cognitive impairments, impairments in activities of daily living (ADL/IADL), and other issues (e.g., health illiteracy, lack of social support). This paper provides an overview of these risk factors, outlines how they individually and in interplay endanger favourable outcome by putting patients at risk for poor self-management. Moreover, suggestions are made on how these issues could be addressed and integrated in heart failure management by applying gerontological care principles in caring for the ageing heart failure population.

  9. Resistance of Dynamin-related Protein 1 Oligomers to Disassembly Impairs Mitophagy, Resulting in Myocardial Inflammation and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Thomas J; Leo, Vincenzo; Kelly, Matthew; Stockenhuber, Alexander; Kennedy, Nolan W; Bao, Leyuan; Cereghetti, Grazia; Harper, Andrew R; Czibik, Gabor; Lao, Chunyan; Bellahcene, Mohamed; Steeples, Violetta; Ghaffari, Safar; Yavari, Arash; Mayer, Alice; Poulton, Joanna; Ferguson, David J P; Scorrano, Luca; Hettiarachchi, Nishani T; Peers, Chris; Boyle, John; Hill, R Blake; Simmons, Alison; Watkins, Hugh; Dear, T Neil; Ashrafian, Houman

    2015-10-23

    We have reported previously that a missense mutation in the mitochondrial fission gene Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) underlies the Python mouse model of monogenic dilated cardiomyopathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the consequences of the C452F mutation on Drp1 protein function and to define the cellular sequelae leading to heart failure in the Python monogenic dilated cardiomyopathy model. We found that the C452F mutation increased Drp1 GTPase activity. The mutation also conferred resistance to oligomer disassembly by guanine nucleotides and high ionic strength solutions. In a mouse embryonic fibroblast model, Drp1 C452F cells exhibited abnormal mitochondrial morphology and defective mitophagy. Mitochondria in C452F mouse embryonic fibroblasts were depolarized and had reduced calcium uptake with impaired ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation. In the Python heart, we found a corresponding progressive decline in oxidative phosphorylation with age and activation of sterile inflammation. As a corollary, enhancing autophagy by exposure to a prolonged low-protein diet improved cardiac function in Python mice. In conclusion, failure of Drp1 disassembly impairs mitophagy, leading to a downstream cascade of mitochondrial depolarization, aberrant calcium handling, impaired ATP synthesis, and activation of sterile myocardial inflammation, resulting in heart failure. PMID:26370078

  10. Heart Rate Variability and Drawing Impairment in Hypoxemic COPD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Corsonello, Andrea; Trojano, Luigi; Pedone, Claudio; Acanfora, Domenico; Spada, Aldo; D'Addio, Gianni; Maestri, Roberto; Rengo, Franco; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    We studied 54 patients with hypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The Mini Mental State Examination and the Mental Deterioration Battery were used for neuropsychological assessment. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed based on 24-h Holter ECG recording. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare HRV parameters of patients…

  11. Heart and brain interconnection - clinical implications of changes in brain function during heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Seok; Kim, Jae-Joong

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a highly prevalent disorder worldwide and, consequently, a burden on the healthcare systems of many nations. Although the effects of HF are systemic, many therapeutic targets are focused on cardiac dysfunction. The brain is closely related to the heart, but there are few reports on the relationship between these organs. We describe the effects of the brain on HF progression. Specific brain regions control sympathetic drive and neurohumoral factors, which play an important role in disease exacerbation. In addition, we review some of our previous studies on deranged cerebral metabolism and reduced cerebral blood flow during HF. Although the reasons underlying these effects during HF remain uncertain, we propose plausible mechanisms for these phenomena. In addition, the clinical implications of such conditions in terms of predicting prognosis are discussed. Finally, we investigate cognitive impairment in patients with HF. Cognitive impairment through cerebral infarction or hypoperfusion is associated with adverse outcomes, including death. This brief review of brain function during the development of HF should assist with future strategies to better manage patients with this condition.

  12. Impaired Serotonergic Brainstem Function during and after Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Qiong; Buchanan, Gordon F.; Motelow, Joshua E.; Andrews, John; Vitkovskiy, Petr; Chen, William C.; Serout, Florian; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Kundishora, Adam; Furman, Moran; Li, Wei; Bo, Xiao; Richerson, George B.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired breathing, cardiac function, and arousal during and after seizures are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Previous work suggests that these changes are associated with depressed brainstem function in the ictal and post-ictal periods. Lower brainstem serotonergic systems are postulated to play an important role in cardiorespiratory changes during and after seizures, whereas upper brainstem serotonergic and other systems regulate arousal. However, direct demonstration of seizure-associated neuronal activity changes in brainstem serotonergic regions has been lacking. Here, we performed multiunit and single-unit recordings from medullary raphe and midbrain dorsal raphe nuclei in an established rat seizure model while measuring changes in breathing rate and depth as well as heart rate. Serotonergic neurons were identified by immunohistochemistry. Respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute ventilation were all significantly decreased during and after seizures in this model. We found that population firing of neurons in the medullary and midbrain raphe on multiunit recordings was significantly decreased during the ictal and post-ictal periods. Single-unit recordings from identified serotonergic neurons in the medullary raphe revealed highly consistently decreased firing during and after seizures. In contrast, firing of midbrain raphe serotonergic neurons was more variable, with a mixture of increases and decreases. The markedly suppressed firing of medullary serotonergic neurons supports their possible role in simultaneously impaired cardiorespiratory function in seizures. Decreased arousal likely arises from depressed population activity of several neuronal pools in the upper brainstem and forebrain. These findings have important implications for preventing morbidity and mortality in people living with epilepsy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Seizures often cause impaired breathing, cardiac dysfunction, and loss of consciousness. The brainstem and

  13. Interplay between cardiac function and heart development.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Delgado, Laura; Mercader, Nadia

    2016-07-01

    Mechanotransduction refers to the conversion of mechanical forces into biochemical or electrical signals that initiate structural and functional remodeling in cells and tissues. The heart is a kinetic organ whose form changes considerably during development and disease. This requires cardiomyocytes to be mechanically durable and able to mount coordinated responses to a variety of environmental signals on different time scales, including cardiac pressure loading and electrical and hemodynamic forces. During physiological growth, myocytes, endocardial and epicardial cells have to adaptively remodel to these mechanical forces. Here we review some of the recent advances in the understanding of how mechanical forces influence cardiac development, with a focus on fluid flow forces. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  14. Methods to assess Drosophila heart development, function and aging

    PubMed Central

    Ocorr, Karen; Vogler, Georg; Bodmer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the Drosophila heart has become an established model of many different aspects of human cardiac disease. This model has allowed identification of disease-causing mechanisms underlying congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathies and has permitted the study underlying genetic, metabolic and age-related contributions to heart function. In this review we discuss methods currently employed in the analysis of the Drosophila heart structure and function, such as optical methods to infer heart function and performance, electrophysiological and mechanical approaches to characterize cardiac tissue properties, and conclude with histological techniques used in the study of heart development and adult structure. PMID:24727147

  15. Drug-induced impairment of renal function

    PubMed Central

    Pazhayattil, George Sunny; Shirali, Anushree C

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical agents provide diagnostic and therapeutic utility that are central to patient care. However, all agents also carry adverse drug effect profiles. While most of these are clinically insignificant, some drugs may cause unacceptable toxicity that impacts negatively on patient morbidity and mortality. Recognizing adverse effects is important for administering appropriate drug doses, instituting preventive strategies, and withdrawing the offending agent due to toxicity. In the present article, we will review those drugs that are associated with impaired renal function. By focusing on pharmaceutical agents that are currently in clinical practice, we will provide an overview of nephrotoxic drugs that a treating physician is most likely to encounter. In doing so, we will summarize risk factors for nephrotoxicity, describe clinical manifestations, and address preventive and treatment strategies. PMID:25540591

  16. Cognitive impairment and cardiovascular diseases in the elderly. A heart-brain continuum hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Abete, Pasquale; Della-Morte, David; Gargiulo, Gaetano; Basile, Claudia; Langellotto, Assunta; Galizia, Gianluigi; Testa, Gianluca; Canonico, Vincenzo; Bonaduce, Domenico; Cacciatore, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    The aging population is increasing and, therefore, a higher prevalence of cardiac disease is emerging; including hypertension, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation and chronic heart failure. Large cohort studies have revealed a relationship among increased risk for cognitive impairment and dementia in cardiovascular diseases probably due to embolic stroke or chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Thus, the aim of the present review is to overview the studies that investigate the presence and/or the development of cognitive impairments and dementia in patients with varied types of cardiovascular disease. Finally, a continuum among hypertension, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation and chronic heart failure with to the development of cognitive impairment and progression to dementia has been hypothesized.

  17. Executive Dysfunction is Independently Associated with Reduced Functional Independence in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Colbert, Lisa H.; Josephson, Richard; van Dulmen, Manfred; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives To examine the independent association between executive function with instrumental activities of daily living and health behaviors in older adults with heart failure. Background Executive function is an important contributor to functional independence as it consists of cognitive processes needed for decision-making, planning, organizing, and behavioral monitoring. Impairment in this domain is common in heart failure patients and associated with reduced performance of instrumental activities of daily living in many medical and neurological populations. However, the contribution of executive functions to functional independence and healthy lifestyle choices in heart failure patients has not been fully examined. Design Cross-sectional analyses. Methods 175 heart failure patients completed a neuropsychological battery and echocardiogram. Participants also completed the Lawton-Brody instrumental activities of daily living scale and reported current cigarette use. Results Hierarchical regressions revealed reduced executive function was independently associated with worse instrumental activity of daily living performance with a specific association for decreased ability to manage medications. Partial correlations showed executive dysfunction was associated with current cigarette use. Conclusions Our findings suggest that executive dysfunction is associated with poorer functional independence and contributes to unhealthy behaviors in heart failure. Future studies should examine whether heart failure patients benefit from formal organization schemae (i.e., pill organizers) to maintain independence. Relevance to Clinical Practice Screening of executive function in heart failure patients may provide key insight into their ability to perform daily tasks, including management of treatment recommendations. PMID:23650879

  18. Decreased long-chain fatty acid oxidation impairs postischemic recovery of the insulin-resistant rat heart.

    PubMed

    Harmancey, Romain; Vasquez, Hernan G; Guthrie, Patrick H; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2013-10-01

    Diabetic patients with acute myocardial infarction are more likely to die than nondiabetic patients. In the present study we examined the effect of insulin resistance on myocardial ischemia tolerance. Hearts of rats, rendered insulin resistant by high-sucrose feeding, were subjected to ischemia/reperfusion ex vivo. Cardiac power of control hearts from chow-fed rats recovered to 93%, while insulin-resistant hearts recovered only to 80% (P<0.001 vs. control). Unexpectedly, impaired contractile recovery did not result from an impairment of glucose oxidation (576±36 vs. 593±42 nmol/min/g dry weight; not significant), but from a failure to increase and to sustain oxidation of the long-chain fatty acid oleate on reperfusion (1878±56 vs. 2070±67 nmol/min/g dry weight; P<0.05). This phenomenon was due to a reduced ability to transport oleate into mitochondria and associated with a 38-58% decrease in the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) levels. Contractile function was rescued by replacing oleate with a medium-chain fatty acid or by restoring UCP3 levels with 24 h of food withdrawal. Lastly, the knockdown of UCP3 in rat L6 myocytes also decreased oleate oxidation by 13-18% following ischemia. Together the results expose UCP3 as a critical regulator of long-chain fatty acid oxidation in the stressed heart postischemia and identify octanoate as an intervention by which myocardial metabolism can be manipulated to improve function of the insulin-resistant heart.

  19. Association of Central Sleep Apnea with Impaired Heart Structure and Cardiovascular Hemodynamics in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kazimierczak, Anna; Krzesiński, Paweł; Gielerak, Grzegorz; Uziębło-Życzkowska, Beata; Smurzyński, Paweł; Ryczek, Robert; Cwetsch, Andrzej; Skrobowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Advanced heart failure (HF) is commonly accompanied by central sleep apnea (CSA) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between CSA/CSR and other clinical features of HF, with particular emphasis on cardiovascular hemodynamics. MATERIAL AND METHODS In 161 stable HF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% (NYHA class I-III; mean LVEF 32.8%) the clinical evaluation included: LVEF; left and right ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDd, RVDd); ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic septal mitral annulus velocity (E/e') assessed by echocardiography; stroke index (SI); heart rate (HR); cardiac index (CI); and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) assessed by impedance cardiography (ICG). The comparison was performed between 2 subgroups: one with moderate/severe CSA/CSR - CSR_ [+] (n=51), and one with mild or no CSA/CSR - CSR_ [-] (n=110). RESULTS CSR_ [+] patients presented more advanced NYHA class (p<0.001) and more frequently had permanent atrial fibrillation (p=0.018). Moreover, they had: lower LVEF (p<0.0001); higher LVDd (p<0.0001), RVDd (p<0.001), and E/e' (p<0.001); lower SI (p<0.001) and CI (p=0.009); and higher HR (p=0.044) and SVRI (p=0.016). The following predictors of CSR_ [+] were identified: NYHA class (OR=3.34 per class, p<0.001, which was the only independent predictor); atrial fibrillation (OR=2.29, p=0.019); RV enlargement (OR=2.75, p=0.005); LVEF<35% (OR=3.38, p=0.001); E/e' (OR=3.15; p=0.003); and SI<35 ml/m2 (OR=2.96, p=0.003). CONCLUSIONS Presence of CSA/CSR in HF is associated with NYHA class, atrial fibrillation and more advanced impairment of cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics. Patient functional state remains the main determinant of CSR. PMID:27558771

  20. Association of Central Sleep Apnea with Impaired Heart Structure and Cardiovascular Hemodynamics in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kazimierczak, Anna; Krzesiński, Paweł; Gielerak, Grzegorz; Uziebło-Życzkowska, Beata; Smurzyński, Paweł; Ryczek, Robert; Cwetsch, Andrzej; Skrobowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced heart failure (HF) is commonly accompanied by central sleep apnea (CSA) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between CSA/CSR and other clinical features of HF, with particular emphasis on cardiovascular hemodynamics. Material/Methods In 161 stable HF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% (NYHA class I–III; mean LVEF 32.8%) the clinical evaluation included: LVEF; left and right ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDd, RVDd); ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic septal mitral annulus velocity (E/e’) assessed by echocardiography; stroke index (SI); heart rate (HR); cardiac index (CI); and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) assessed by impedance cardiography (ICG). The comparison was performed between 2 subgroups: one with moderate/severe CSA/CSR - CSR_ [+] (n=51), and one with mild or no CSA/CSR – CSR_ [−] (n=110). Results CSR_ [+] patients presented more advanced NYHA class (p<0.001) and more frequently had permanent atrial fibrillation (p=0.018). Moreover, they had: lower LVEF (p<0.0001); higher LVDd (p<0.0001), RVDd (p<0.001), and E/e’ (p<0.001); lower SI (p<0.001) and CI (p=0.009); and higher HR (p=0.044) and SVRI (p=0.016). The following predictors of CSR_ [+] were identified: NYHA class (OR=3.34 per class, p<0.001, which was the only independent predictor); atrial fibrillation (OR=2.29, p=0.019); RV enlargement (OR=2.75, p=0.005); LVEF<35% (OR=3.38, p=0.001); E/e’ (OR=3.15; p=0.003); and SI<35 ml/m2 (OR=2.96, p=0.003). Conclusions Presence of CSA/CSR in HF is associated with NYHA class, atrial fibrillation and more advanced impairment of cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics. Patient functional state remains the main determinant of CSR. PMID:27558771

  1. Association of Central Sleep Apnea with Impaired Heart Structure and Cardiovascular Hemodynamics in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kazimierczak, Anna; Krzesiński, Paweł; Gielerak, Grzegorz; Uziębło-Życzkowska, Beata; Smurzyński, Paweł; Ryczek, Robert; Cwetsch, Andrzej; Skrobowski, Andrzej

    2016-08-25

    BACKGROUND Advanced heart failure (HF) is commonly accompanied by central sleep apnea (CSA) with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between CSA/CSR and other clinical features of HF, with particular emphasis on cardiovascular hemodynamics. MATERIAL AND METHODS In 161 stable HF patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% (NYHA class I-III; mean LVEF 32.8%) the clinical evaluation included: LVEF; left and right ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDd, RVDd); ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic septal mitral annulus velocity (E/e') assessed by echocardiography; stroke index (SI); heart rate (HR); cardiac index (CI); and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) assessed by impedance cardiography (ICG). The comparison was performed between 2 subgroups: one with moderate/severe CSA/CSR - CSR_ [+] (n=51), and one with mild or no CSA/CSR - CSR_ [-] (n=110). RESULTS CSR_ [+] patients presented more advanced NYHA class (p<0.001) and more frequently had permanent atrial fibrillation (p=0.018). Moreover, they had: lower LVEF (p<0.0001); higher LVDd (p<0.0001), RVDd (p<0.001), and E/e' (p<0.001); lower SI (p<0.001) and CI (p=0.009); and higher HR (p=0.044) and SVRI (p=0.016). The following predictors of CSR_ [+] were identified: NYHA class (OR=3.34 per class, p<0.001, which was the only independent predictor); atrial fibrillation (OR=2.29, p=0.019); RV enlargement (OR=2.75, p=0.005); LVEF<35% (OR=3.38, p=0.001); E/e' (OR=3.15; p=0.003); and SI<35 ml/m2 (OR=2.96, p=0.003). CONCLUSIONS Presence of CSA/CSR in HF is associated with NYHA class, atrial fibrillation and more advanced impairment of cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics. Patient functional state remains the main determinant of CSR.

  2. Annual Research Review: Conceptualising Functional Impairment in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapee, Ronald M.; Bogels, Susan M.; van der Sluis, Cathy M.; Craske, Michelle G.; Ollendick, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Functional impairment is a key factor in the clinical importance of mental health problems in children. Yet, the nature of impairment and criteria for defining and assessing impairment in childhood disorders has been surprisingly overlooked in much of the literature. The current article examines the extant literature on the conceptualisation,…

  3. Dietary Nitrate and Skeletal Muscle Contractile Function in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Coggan, Andrew R; Peterson, Linda R

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients suffer from exercise intolerance that diminishes their ability to perform normal activities of daily living and hence compromises their quality of life. This is due largely to detrimental changes in skeletal muscle mass, structure, metabolism, and function. This includes an impairment of muscle contractile performance, i.e., a decline in the maximal force, speed, and power of muscle shortening. Although numerous mechanisms underlie this reduction in contractility, one contributing factor may be a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Consistent with this, recent data demonstrate that acute ingestion of NO3 (-)-rich beetroot juice, a source of NO via the NO synthase-independent enterosalivary pathway, markedly increases maximal muscle speed and power in HF patients. This review discusses the role of muscle contractile dysfunction in the exercise intolerance characteristic of HF, and the evidence that dietary NO3 (-) supplementation may represent a novel and simple therapy for this currently underappreciated problem. PMID:27271563

  4. Chamber identity programs drive early functional partitioning of the heart.

    PubMed

    Mosimann, Christian; Panáková, Daniela; Werdich, Andreas A; Musso, Gabriel; Burger, Alexa; Lawson, Katy L; Carr, Logan A; Nevis, Kathleen R; Sabeh, M Khaled; Zhou, Yi; Davidson, Alan J; DiBiase, Anthony; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey; MacRae, Calum A; Zon, Leonard I

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate heart muscle (myocardium) develops from the first heart field (FHF) and expands by adding second heart field (SHF) cells. While both lineages exist already in teleosts, the primordial contributions of FHF and SHF to heart structure and function remain incompletely understood. Here we delineate the functional contribution of the FHF and SHF to the zebrafish heart using the cis-regulatory elements of the draculin (drl) gene. The drl reporters initially delineate the lateral plate mesoderm, including heart progenitors. Subsequent myocardial drl reporter expression restricts to FHF descendants. We harnessed this unique feature to uncover that loss of tbx5a and pitx2 affect relative FHF versus SHF contributions to the heart. High-resolution physiology reveals distinctive electrical properties of each heart field territory that define a functional boundary within the single zebrafish ventricle. Our data establish that the transcriptional program driving cardiac septation regulates physiologic ventricle partitioning, which successively provides mechanical advantages of sequential contraction. PMID:26306682

  5. JWH-018 impairs sensorimotor functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Ossato, A; Vigolo, A; Trapella, C; Seri, C; Rimondo, C; Serpelloni, G; Marti, M

    2015-08-01

    Naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) is a synthetic cannabinoid agonist illegally marketed in "Spice" and "herbal blend" for its psychoactive effect greater than those produced by cannabis. In rodents JWH-018 reproduces typical effects of (-)-Δ(9)-THC or Dronabinol® (Δ(9)-THC) such as hypothermia, analgesia, hypolocomotion and akinesia, while its effects on sensorimotor functions are still unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of acute administration of JWH-018 (0.01-6mg/kg i.p.) on sensorimotor functions in male CD-1 mice and to compare its effects with those caused by the administration of Δ(9)-THC (0.01-6mg/kg i.p.). A specific battery of behavioral tests were adopted to investigate effects of cannabinoid agonists on sensorimotor functions (visual, auditory, tactile) and neurological changes (convulsion, myoclonia, hyperreflexia) while video-tracking analysis was used to study spontaneous locomotion. JWH-018 administration inhibited sensorimotor responses at lower doses (0.01-0.1mg/kg), reduced spontaneous locomotion at intermediate/high doses (1-6mg/kg) and induced convulsions, myoclonia and hyperreflexia at high doses (6mg/kg). Similarly, administration of Δ(9)-THC reduced sensorimotor responses in mice but it did not inhibit spontaneous locomotion and it did not induce neurological alterations. All behavioral effects and neurological alterations were prevented by the administration of the selective CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM 251). For the first time these data demonstrate that JWH-018 impairs sensorimotor responses in mice. This aspect should be carefully evaluated to better understand the potential danger that JWH-018 may pose to public health, with particular reference to decreased performance in driving and hazardous works.

  6. Impaired water barrier function in acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, A; Takenouchi, K; Ito, M

    1995-01-01

    In acne vulgaris, abnormal follicular keratinization is important for comedo formation, yet the precise mechanisms of comedogenesis are not known. The present study examined the interrelationship between sebum secretion rate (SSR), lipid content and water barrier function (WBF) of the stratum corneum (SC) in 36 acne patients and 29 control subjects. All major SC lipid classes were separated and quantified by thin-layer chromatography/photodensitometry. WBF was evaluated by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and the hygroscopic properties and waterholding capacity of the SC. The SSR over a period of 3 h was significantly higher in patients with moderate acne than in control subjects, but no significant difference was noticed between patients with mild acne and control subjects. Significant differences between patients with both moderate and mild acne and control subjects were noted in the amount of sphingolipids (ceramides and free sphingosine), but not for any other lipid classes. Furthermore in acne patients, lower amounts of sphingolipids were observed corresponding with a diminished WBF. These results suggest that an impaired WBF caused by decreased amounts of ceramides may be responsible for comedo formation, since barrier dysfunction is accompanied by hyperkeratosis of the follicular epithelium.

  7. Performance of the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) in Detecting Cognitive Impairment in Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Susan S.; Goldstein, Carly M.; Gathright, Emily C.; Gunstad, John; Dolansky, Mary A.; Redle, Joseph; Hughes, Joel W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evaluate capacity of the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) to detect cognitive impairment (CI) in heart failure (HF) patients. Background CI is a key prognostic marker in HF. Though the most widely used cognitive screen in HF, the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) is insufficiently sensitive. The ANAM has demonstrated sensitivity to cognitive domains affected by HF, but has not been assessed in this population. Methods Investigators administered the ANAM and MMSE to 57 HF patients, compared against a composite model of cognitive function. Results ANAM efficiency (p < .05) and accuracy scores (p < .001) successfully differentiated CI and non-CI. ANAM efficiency and accuracy scores classified 97.7% and 93.0% of non-CI patients, and 14.3% and 21.4% with CI, respectively. Conclusions The ANAM is more effective than the MMSE for detecting CI, but further research is needed to develop a more optimal cognitive screen for routine use in HF patients. PMID:26354858

  8. Heart Failure Impairs Muscle Blood Flow and Endurance Exercise Tolerance in COPD.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Mayron F; Arbex, Flavio F; Alencar, Maria Clara; Souza, Aline; Sperandio, Priscila A; Medeiros, Wladimir M; Mazzuco, Adriana; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Medina, Luiz A; Santos, Rita; Hirai, Daniel M; Mancuso, Frederico; Almeida, Dirceu; O'Donnell, Denis E; Neder, J Alberto

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure, a prevalent and disabling co-morbidity of COPD, may impair cardiac output and muscle blood flow thereby contributing to exercise intolerance. To investigate the role of impaired central and peripheral hemodynamics in limiting exercise tolerance in COPD-heart failure overlap, cycle ergometer exercise tests at 20% and 80% peak work rate were performed by overlap (FEV1 = 56.9 ± 15.9% predicted, ejection fraction = 32.5 ± 6.9%; N = 16), FEV1-matched COPD (N = 16), ejection fraction-matched heart failure patients (N = 15) and controls (N = 12). Differences (Δ) in cardiac output (impedance cardiography) and vastus lateralis blood flow (indocyanine green) and deoxygenation (near-infrared spectroscopy) between work rates were expressed relative to concurrent changes in muscle metabolic demands (ΔO2 uptake). Overlap patients had approximately 30% lower endurance exercise tolerance than COPD and heart failure (p < 0.05). ΔBlood flow was closely proportional to Δcardiac output in all groups (r = 0.89-0.98; p < 0.01). Overlap showed the largest impairments in Δcardiac output/ΔO2 uptake and Δblood flow/ΔO2 uptake (p < 0.05). Systemic arterial oxygenation, however, was preserved in overlap compared to COPD. Blunted limb perfusion was related to greater muscle deoxygenation and lactate concentration in overlap (r = 0.78 and r = 0.73, respectively; p < 0.05). ΔBlood flow/ΔO2 uptake was related to time to exercise intolerance only in overlap and heart failure (p < 0.01). In conclusion, COPD and heart failure add to decrease exercising cardiac output and skeletal muscle perfusion to a greater extent than that expected by heart failure alone. Treatment strategies that increase muscle O2 delivery and/or decrease O2 demand may be particularly helpful to improve exercise tolerance in COPD patients presenting heart failure as co-morbidity. PMID:26790095

  9. Short-term Physical Inactivity Impairs Vascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Nosova, Emily V.; Yen, Priscilla; Chong, Karen C.; Alley, Hugh F.; Stock, Eveline O.; Quinn, Alex; Hellmann, Jason; Conte, Michael S.; Owens, Christopher D.; Spite, Matthew; Grenon, S. Marlene

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sedentarism, also termed physical inactivity, is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Mechanisms thought to be involved include insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and increased inflammation. It is unknown whether changes in vascular and endothelial function also contribute to this excess risk. We hypothesized that short-term exposure to inactivity would lead to endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffening and increased vascular inflammation. Methods Five healthy subjects (4 males and 1 female) underwent 5 days of bed rest (BR) to simulate inactivity. Measurements of vascular function [flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) to evaluate endothelial function; applanation tonometry to assess arterial resistance], inflammation and metabolism were made before BR, daily during BR and after 2 recovery days. Subjects maintained an isocaloric diet throughout. Results Bed rest led to significant decreases in brachial artery and femoral artery FMD [Brachial: 11 ± 3% pre-BR vs. 9 ± 2% end-BR, P=0.04; Femoral: 4 ± 1% vs. 2 ± 1%, P=0.04]. The central augmentation index increased with BR [−4 ± 9% vs. 5 ± 11%, P=0.03]. Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) increased [58 ± 7 mmHg vs. 62 ± 7 mmHg, P=0.02], while neither systolic blood pressure nor heart rate changed. 15-HETE, an arachidonic acid metabolite, increased but the other inflammatory and metabolic biomarkers were unchanged. Conclusions Our findings show that acute exposure to sedentarism results in decreased endothelial function, arterial stiffening, increased DBP, and an increase in 15-HETE. We speculate that inactivity promotes a vascular “deconditioning” state characterized by impaired endothelial function, leading to arterial stiffness and increased arterial tone. Although physiologically significant, the underlying mechanisms and clinical relevance of these findings need to be further explored. PMID:24630521

  10. [Association between function of selenium and heart disease].

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    An excessive oxidative stress is considered to be responsible for the development and progression of heart disease. Deficiency of trace elements with antioxidative activities is present in patients with heart disease. Selenium (Se) is an integral part of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase(GPx), one of the central players of the heart's antioxidant system, and it's deficiency is implicated in certain types of heart disease. Our study suggests that myocardial oxidative stress in chronic heart failure may be augmented at least in part by concomitant GPx deficiency, and that the administration of Se could rescue the exhaustion of this selenoprotein, resulting in improved left ventricular function. PMID:27455811

  11. Acyl-CoA synthetase 1 deficiency alters cardiolipin species and impairs mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Martin, Sarah A.; Katunga, Lalage; Cooper, Daniel E.; Anderson, Ethan J.; Murphy, Robert C.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) contributes more than 90% of total cardiac ACSL activity, but its role in phospholipid synthesis has not been determined. Mice with an inducible knockout of ACSL1 (Acsl1T−/−) have impaired cardiac fatty acid oxidation and rely on glucose for ATP production. Because ACSL1 exhibited a strong substrate preference for linoleate, we investigated the composition of heart phospholipids. Acsl1T−/− hearts contained 83% less tetralinoleoyl-cardiolipin (CL), the major form present in control hearts. A stable knockdown of ACSL1 in H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes resulted in low incorporation of linoleate into CL and in diminished incorporation of palmitate and oleate into other phospholipids. Overexpression of ACSL1 in H9c2 and HEK-293 cells increased incorporation of linoleate into CL and other phospholipids. To determine whether increasing the content of linoleate in CL would improve mitochondrial respiratory function in Acsl1T−/− hearts, control and Acsl1T−/− mice were fed a high-linoleate diet; this diet normalized the amount of tetralinoleoyl-CL but did not improve respiratory function. Thus, ACSL1 is required for the normal composition of several phospholipid species in heart. Although ACSL1 determines the acyl-chain composition of heart CL, a high tetralinoleoyl-CL content may not be required for normal function. PMID:26136511

  12. Structure and function relationship of human heart from DENSE MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Gharib, Morteza

    2007-03-01

    The study here, suggests a macroscopic structure for the Left Ventricle (LV), based on the heart kinematics which is obtained through imaging. The measurement of the heart muscle deformation using the Displacement ENcoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI, which describes the heart kinematics in the Lagrangian frame work, is used to determine the high resolution patterns of true myocardial strain. Subsequently, the tangential Shortening Index (SI) and the thickening of the LV wall are calculated for each data point. Considering the heart as a positive-displacement pump, the contribution of each segment of LV in the heart function, can be determined by the SI and thickening of the wall in the same portion. Hence the SI isosurfaces show the extent and spatial distribution of the heart activity and reveals its macro structure. The structure and function of the heart are, therefore, related which in turn results in a macroscopic model for the LV. In particular, it was observed that the heart functionality is not uniformly distributed in the LV, and the regions with greater effect on the pumping process, form a band which wraps around the heart. These results, which are supported by the established histological evidence, may be considered as a landmark in connecting the structure and function of the heart through imaging. Furthermore, the compatibility of this model with microscopic observations about the fiber direction is investigated. This method may be used for planning as well as post evaluation of the ventriculoplasty.

  13. [Heart and evolution--form and function of all mammalian hearts are identical].

    PubMed

    Meijler, Frits L; Meijler, Theo Dirk

    2009-01-01

    The 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin this year (2009) is a perfect reason to focus on the evolution of the mammalian heart. All life on earth is the result of a process called evolution. The human being is a product of evolution and has all the characteristics of a mammal. Size, form and function of the mammalian heart may be viewed in relation to evolution. All morphological and functional properties of the heart in all currently existing mammalian species are practically identical. This implies that during the eons in which all mammals had to adapt to climate and geological changes by which they differentiated into almost limitless varieties, whether they be mice, whales or humans, the heart hardly, if at all, participated in this process and remained unaffected. This must lead to the conclusion that the heart of the first mammals on earth was already well equipped to fulfil the functional demands of all future mammalian species.

  14. Adrenergic deficiency leads to impaired electrical conduction and increased arrhythmic potential in the embryonic mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Baker, Candice; Taylor, David G; Osuala, Kingsley; Natarajan, Anupama; Molnar, Peter J; Hickman, James; Alam, Sabikha; Moscato, Brittany; Weinshenker, David; Ebert, Steven N

    2012-07-01

    To determine if adrenergic hormones play a critical role in the functional development of the cardiac pacemaking and conduction system, we employed a mouse model where adrenergic hormone production was blocked due to targeted disruption of the dopamine β-hydroxylase (Dbh) gene. Immunofluorescent histochemical evaluation of the major gap junction protein, connexin 43, revealed that its expression was substantially decreased in adrenergic-deficient (Dbh-/-) relative to adrenergic-competent (Dbh+/+ and Dbh+/-) mouse hearts at embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5), whereas pacemaker and structural protein staining appeared similar. To evaluate cardiac electrical conduction in these hearts, we cultured them on microelectrode arrays (8×8, 200 μm apart). Our results show a significant slowing of atrioventricular conduction in adrenergic-deficient hearts compared to controls (31.4±6.4 vs. 15.4±1.7 ms, respectively, p<0.05). To determine if the absence of adrenergic hormones affected heart rate and rhythm, mouse hearts from adrenergic-competent and deficient embryos were cultured ex vivo at E10.5, and heart rates were measured before and after challenge with the β-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol (0.5 μM). On average, all hearts showed increased heart rate responses following isoproterenol challenge, but a significant (p<0.05) 225% increase in the arrhythmic index (AI) was observed only in adrenergic-deficient hearts. These results show that adrenergic hormones may influence heart development by stimulating connexin 43 expression, facilitating atrioventricular conduction, and helping to maintain cardiac rhythm during a critical phase of embryonic development.

  15. Negative pretransplant serostatus for Toxoplasma gondii is associated with impaired survival after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doesch, Andreas O; Ammon, Kerstin; Konstandin, Mathias; Celik, Sultan; Kristen, Arnt; Frankenstein, Lutz; Müller, Susanne; Sack, Falk-Udo; Katus, Hugo A; Dengler, Thomas J

    2010-04-01

    Chronic Toxoplasma gondii infection is known to trigger potentially adverse immunoregulatory changes, but limited data exist on long-term implications for heart transplant (HTX) recipients. We evaluated the risk of all cause mortality regarding T. gondii serostatus prior to HTX. Pre-HTX T. gondii serostatus was obtained in 344 recipients and 294 donors. Mean age was 52.1 +/- 10.2 years and mean follow-up time after HTX was 5.7 (+/-5.5, median 3.5) years. All seronegative patients received prophylaxis with pyrimethamine/sulfomethoxazole or cotrimoxazol for 6 months after transplantation. Multivariate survival analysis adjusted for diabetes mellitus, pre-HTX renal function, recipient age, type of primary immunosuppression (i.e. HTX before 2001), cytomegalovirus (CMV) high-risk status, ischemic time, and number of treated rejection episodes was performed. Overall, 190 recipients (55.2% of total) were seronegative and 154 (44.8% of total) were seropositive for T. gondii prior to HTX. One hundred and fifty-two recipients died during follow-up (44.2% of total). Negative recipient Toxoplasma serostatus was associated with a significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality (P = 0.0213). Recipient T. gondii serostatus did not influence the number of cellular or humoral rejection episodes. Analyses of specific causes of death showed a trend toward a higher number of infection-related deaths in the seronegative subgroup (P = 0.13). No statistically significant effects of T. gondii donor/recipient seropairing, or seroconversion were observed. Negative preoperative serostatus for T. gondii in HTX recipients appears to be an independent risk factor associated with increased all-cause mortality. The cause of impaired survival in Toxoplasma seronegative recipients is currently unclear; possible explanations include an alteration of immune-reactivity/-regulation or adverse effects of prophylactic medication. PMID:19912587

  16. The Additive Effects of Type-2 Diabetes on Cognitive Function in Older Adults with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; van Dulmen, Manfred; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Colbert, Lisa H.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2012-01-01

    Background. Medical comorbidity has been theorized to contribute to cognitive impairment in heart failure (HF) patients. Specifically, type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), a common coexisting condition among HF patients, may be an independent predictor of cognitive impairment. Nonetheless, the relationships between T2DM and other risk factors for cognitive impairment among persons with HF are unclear. Methods. Persons with HF (N = 169, 34.3% women, age 68.57 ± 10.28 years) completed neuropsychological testing within a framework of an ongoing study. History of T2DM, along with other medical characteristics, was ascertained through a review of participants' medical charts and self-report. Results. Many participants (34.9%) had a comorbid T2DM diagnosis. After adjustment for demographic and medical characteristics, HF patients with T2DM evidenced significantly greater impairments across multiple cognitive domains than HF patients without T2DM: λ = .92, F(5, 156) = 2.82, P = .018. Post hoc tests revealed significant associations between T2DM and attention (P = .003), executive function (P = .032), and motor functioning (P = .008). Conclusion. The findings suggest additive contributions of T2DM and HF to impairments in attention, executive function, and motor function. Future work is needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which T2DM exacerbates cognitive impairment in HF. PMID:22701196

  17. Right heart structural and functional remodeling in athletes.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Antonello; La Gerche, Andrè; Golia, Enrica; Teske, Arco J; Bossone, Eduardo; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Calabrò, Raffaele; Baggish, Aaron L

    2015-01-01

    Long-term intensive exercise training programs lead to numerous progressive cardiac adaptations, which are collectively termed "athlete's heart." Noninvasive diagnostic techniques, such as color Doppler echocardiography, have been widely used in the analysis of the athlete's heart. Initial experiences focused mainly on left heart adaptations to training. However, in recent years, substantial structural and functional adaptations of the right heart have been documented. The present review article focuses on recent data defining right heart adaptation to short- and long-term periods of exercise training. Right ventricular (RV) morphology and function may be more profoundly affected by intense exercise and, in some cases, functional recovery may be incomplete. Moreover, there is speculation that such changes may represent a substrate for proarrhythmic RV remodeling in some highly trained athletes, even in the absence of a known familial redisposition.

  18. Diosmin pretreatment improves cardiac function and suppresses oxidative stress in rat heart after ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Senthamizhselvan, Oomaidurai; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Silambarasan, Thangarasu; Raja, Boobalan

    2014-08-01

    Reperfusion of ischemic tissue leads to the generation of oxygen derived free radicals which plays an important role in cellular damage. Objective of the current study is to evaluate the cardio-protective and antioxidant effect of diosmin on ischemia-reperfusion related cardiac dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Diosmin (50 and 100 mg/kg body weight (bw)) was given every day to the rats orally throughout the experimental period. Ischemia/reperfusion protocol was carried out ex vivo using langendorff perfusion method and the cardiac functional recovery was assessed in terms of percentage rate pressure product. Coronary effluents of LDH and CK-MB activities, antioxidant enzyme activities, lipid peroxidation products, activity of TCA cycle enzymes were evaluated. Moreover, in vitro superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical scavenging potential of diosmin was also quantified. Finally, quantitative real-time PCR was used for assessing Bcl-2 mRNA expression in heart. Cardiac functional recovery was impaired after reperfusion compared with continuously perfused heart. It was significantly prevented by diosmin treatment. Impaired antioxidant enzyme activities and elevated lipid peroxidation products level were also significantly suppressed. The activity of TCA cycle enzymes was protected against reperfusion stress. Down regulated Bcl-2 was also significantly increased. This study concluded that diosmin pretreatment prevents all the impaired patterns including cardiac function, oxidative stress and apoptosis associated with reperfusion in control heart by its antioxidant role.

  19. Structure and function of the hearts of lizards and snakes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bjarke; Moorman, Antoon F M; Wang, Tobias

    2014-05-01

    With approximately 7000 species, snakes and lizards, collectively known as squamates, are by far the most species-rich group of reptiles. It was from reptile-like ancestors that mammals and birds evolved and squamates can be viewed as phylogenetically positioned between them and fishes. Hence, their hearts have been studied for more than a century yielding insights into the group itself and into the independent evolution of the fully divided four-chambered hearts of mammals and birds. Structurally the heart is complex and debates persist on rudimentary issues such as identifying structures critical to understanding ventricle function. In seeking to resolve these controversies we have generated three-dimensional (3D) models in portable digital format (pdf) of the anaconda and anole lizard hearts ('typical' squamate hearts) and the uniquely specialized python heart with comprehensive annotations of structures and cavities. We review the anatomy and physiology of squamate hearts in general and emphasize the unique features of pythonid and varanid lizard hearts that endow them with mammal-like blood pressures. Excluding pythons and varanid lizards it is concluded that the squamate heart has a highly consistent design including a disproportionately large right side (systemic venous) probably due to prevailing pulmonary bypass (intraventricular shunting). Unfortunately, investigations on rudimentary features are sparse. We therefore point out gaps in our knowledge, such as the size and functional importance of the coronary vasculature and of the first cardiac chamber, the sinus venosus, and highlight areas with implications for vertebrate cardiac evolution.

  20. The Brief Impairment Scale (Bis): A Multidimensional Scale of Functional Impairment for Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Hector R.; Canino, Glorisa J.; Davies, Mark; Ramirez, Rafael; Chavez, Ligia; Duarte, Cristiane; Shen, Sa

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This article provides the results of the psychometric testing of the Brief Impairment Scale (BIS). The BIS is a 23-item instrument that evaluates three domains of functioning: interpersonal relations, school/work functioning, and self-care/self-fulfilment. It capitalizes on the strengths of existing global measures while addressing some…

  1. Functional impairment and the economic consequences of female breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chirikos, Thomas N; Russell-Jacobs, Anita; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2002-01-01

    Recent trends in breast cancer diagnosis and mortality suggest that long-term survivors are now more likely to be functionally impaired and, hence, more likely to experience adverse economic outcomes. This study tests whether women who have survived breast cancer for at least five years exhibit more, or more severe, functional impairments than otherwise similar women without breast cancer. It also tests whether women with more severe impairments experience poorer economic outcomes attributable to their functional status. A group of 105 breast cancer survivors was interviewed to obtain data on health and economic changes in the five-year period since diagnosis and initial treatment. An age- and work-matched group of 105 women without cancer was also interviewed to obtain the same data over the same time period. Key changes in the functional status of the subjects as well as economic outcomes such as changes in market earnings, household income, and insurance coverage were measured. Whether impairment is more severe in the breast cancer group than the comparison group was then tested statistically; whether economic outcomes are more adverse in more impaired than less impaired women regardless of their breast cancer status was also tested. The analysis turned up statistically significant evidence in regard to each of these relationships. Breast cancer survivors were more likely than controls to be functionally impaired at the five-year benchmark. Impaired women, in turn, were more likely to reduce work effort and experience downturns in market earnings, among other things. Policy and research implications are discussed. PMID:12215000

  2. Impairment of Caloric Function after Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuang, Heide; Haversat, Heather H.; Michaelides, Elias M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article seeks to review current literature on caloric function following cochlear implantation while analyzing any correlations of caloric function changes with vestibular symptoms. Method: This article is a systematic review of evidence-based literature. English language articles published between 1980 and 2014 that presented some…

  3. [Function of cannabinoids in heart failure].

    PubMed

    Rudź, Radosław; Baranowska, Urszula; Malinowska, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids, substances derived from Cannabis sativa, have been used by humans as therapeutic agents for thousands of years. They act through the cannabinoid CB(1), CB(2), vanilloid TRPV1, and the as yet undefined putative endothelial cannabinoid receptors. Intensive research on the influence of cannabinoids on the cardiovascular system has been conducted since the 1990s after the discovery that cannabinoids are involved in hypotension connected with septic, cardiogenic, and hemorrhagic shock. One cannot exclude the future possibility of using cannabinoids as new therapeutic agents in diseases of the cardiovascular system. In the present paper the mechanisms of cannabinoids on heart failure are described. In the acute phase of myocardial infarction, cannabinoids protect the endothelium of coronary vessels and decrease the heart's necrotic area and the risk of arrhythmia. Cannabinoids also act in the chronic phase of myocardial infarction in the process of the heart remodeling. However, the present knowledge of the effects of cannabinoids on the acute and chronic phases of myocardial infarction and the possibility of using these agents in cardiovascular disease therapy is still insufficient. PMID:18464680

  4. Functional impairment, stress, and psychosocial intervention in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Miklowitz, David J

    2011-12-01

    The longitudinal course of bipolar disorder (BD) is highly impairing. This article reviews recent research on functional impairment in the course of BD, the roles of social and intrafamilial stress in relapse and recovery, and the role of adjunctive psychosocial interventions in reducing risk and enhancing functioning. Comparative findings in adult and childhood BD are highlighted. Life events and family-expressed emotion have emerged as significant predictors of the course of BD. Studies of social information processing suggest that impairments in the recognition of facial emotions may characterize both adult- and early-onset bipolar patients. Newly developed psychosocial interventions, particularly those that focus on family and social relationships, are associated with more rapid recovery from episodes and better psychosocial functioning. Family-based psychoeducational approaches are promising as early interventions for children with BD or children at risk of developing the disorder. For adults, interpersonal therapy, mindfulness-based strategies, and cognitive remediation may offer promise in enhancing functioning.

  5. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Santos, Hilton; Vicentino, Amanda R. R.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Meyer-Fernandes, José R.; Paula-Neto, Heitor A.; Medei, Emiliano; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Paiva, Claudia N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol’s actions using metformin (AMPK-activator) or tempol (SOD-mimetic). Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC. PMID:27788262

  6. Functional Impairment and Occupational Outcome in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjervan, Bjorn; Torgersen, Terje; Nordahl, Hans M.; Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Objective: ADHD is associated with poor functional outcomes. The objectives were to investigate the prevalence of functional impairment and occupational status in a clinically referred sample of adults with ADHD and explore factors predicting occupational outcome. Method: A sample of 149 adults with a confirmed diagnosis of ADHD participated in…

  7. Phonatory Function of Neurologically Impaired Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwirner, Petra; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This investigation compared five parameters of phonatory function in an examination of the use of acoustic measures in differential diagnosis in 39 subjects in 3 neuropathological groups (Parkinson, Huntington, cerebellar ataxia) and a normal control group. Results indicated higher variability in perturbation in all the neuropathological groups.…

  8. A functional genetic study identifies HAND1 mutations in septation defects of the human heart.

    PubMed

    Reamon-Buettner, Stella Marie; Ciribilli, Yari; Traverso, Ilaria; Kuhls, Beate; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Juergen

    2009-10-01

    Heart and neural crest derivatives expressed 1 (HAND1) is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor essential for mammalian heart development. Absence of Hand1 in mice results in embryonal lethality, as well as in a wide spectrum of cardiac abnormalities including failed cardiac looping, defective chamber septation and impaired ventricular development. Therefore, Hand1 is a strong candidate for the many cardiac malformations observed in human congenital heart disease (CHD). Recently, we identified a loss-of-function frameshift mutation (p.A126fs) in the bHLH domain of HAND1 frequent in hypoplastic hearts. This finding prompted us to continue our search for HAND1 gene mutations in a different cohort of malformed hearts affected primarily by septation defects. Indeed, in tissue samples of septal defects, we detected 32 sequence alterations leading to amino acid change, of which 12 are in the bHLH domain of HAND1. Interestingly, 10 sequence alterations, such as p.L28H and p.L138P, had been identified earlier in hypoplastic hearts, but the frequent p.A126fs mutation was absent except in one aborted case with ventricular septal defect and outflow tract abnormalities. Functional studies in yeast and mammalian cells enabled translation of sequence alterations to HAND1 transcriptional activity, which was reduced or abolished by certain mutations, notably p.L138P. Our results suggest that HAND1 may also be affected in septation defects of the human hearts, and thus has a broader role in human heart development and CHD.

  9. Particulate air pollution and impaired lung function

    PubMed Central

    Paulin, Laura; Hansel, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world, particularly in individuals with existing lung disease. Of the most common air pollutants, particulate matter (PM) is associated with an increased risk of exacerbations and respiratory symptoms in individuals with existing lung disease, and to a lesser extent, in those without known respiratory issues. The majority of published research has focused on the effects of PM exposures on symptoms and health care utilization. Fewer studies focus on the impact of PM on objective measurements of pulmonary function. This review will focus on the effects of PM exposure on objective measurements of lung function in both healthy individuals and those with existing lung disease. PMID:26962445

  10. Particulate air pollution and impaired lung function.

    PubMed

    Paulin, Laura; Hansel, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world, particularly in individuals with existing lung disease. Of the most common air pollutants, particulate matter (PM) is associated with an increased risk of exacerbations and respiratory symptoms in individuals with existing lung disease, and to a lesser extent, in those without known respiratory issues. The majority of published research has focused on the effects of PM exposures on symptoms and health care utilization. Fewer studies focus on the impact of PM on objective measurements of pulmonary function. This review will focus on the effects of PM exposure on objective measurements of lung function in both healthy individuals and those with existing lung disease. PMID:26962445

  11. Particulate air pollution and impaired lung function.

    PubMed

    Paulin, Laura; Hansel, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world, particularly in individuals with existing lung disease. Of the most common air pollutants, particulate matter (PM) is associated with an increased risk of exacerbations and respiratory symptoms in individuals with existing lung disease, and to a lesser extent, in those without known respiratory issues. The majority of published research has focused on the effects of PM exposures on symptoms and health care utilization. Fewer studies focus on the impact of PM on objective measurements of pulmonary function. This review will focus on the effects of PM exposure on objective measurements of lung function in both healthy individuals and those with existing lung disease.

  12. Assessment of cardiac autonomic functions by heart rate recovery, heart rate variability and QT dynamicity parameters in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Dural, Muhammet; Kabakcı, Giray; Cınar, Neşe; Erbaş, Tomris; Canpolat, Uğur; Gürses, Kadri Murat; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Oto, Ali; Kaya, Ergün Barış; Yorgun, Hikmet; Sahiner, Levent; Dağdelen, Selçuk; Aytemir, Kudret

    2014-04-01

    Cardiovascular complications are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in acromegaly. However, there is little data regarding cardiac autonomic functions in these patients. Herein, we aimed to investigate several parameters of cardiac autonomic functions in patients with acromegaly compared to healthy subjects. We enrolled 20 newly diagnosed acromegalic patients (55% female, age:45.7 ± 12.6 years) and 32 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent 24 h Holter recording. Heart rate recovery (HRR) indices were calculated by subtracting 1st, 2nd and 3rd minute heart rates from maximal heart rate. All patients underwent heart rate variability (HRV) and QT dynamicity analysis. Baseline characteristics were similar except diabetes mellitus and hypertension among groups. Mean HRR1 (29.2 ± 12.3 vs 42.6 ± 6.5, p = 0.001), HRR2 (43.5 ± 15.6 vs 61.1 ± 10.8, p = 0.001) and HRR3 (46.4 ± 16.2 vs 65.8 ± 9.8, p = 0.001) values were significantly higher in control group. HRV parameters as, SDNN [standard deviation of all NN intervals] (p = 0.001), SDANN [SD of the 5 min mean RR intervals] (p = 0.001), RMSSD [root square of successive differences in RR interval] (p = 0.001), PNN50 [proportion of differences in successive NN intervals >50 ms] (p = 0.001) and high-frequency [HF] (p = 0.001) were significantly decreased in patients with acromegaly; but low frequency [LF] (p = 0.046) and LF/HF (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in acromegaly patients. QTec (p = 0.009), QTac/RR slope (p = 0.017) and QTec/RR slope (p = 0.01) were significantly higher in patients with acromegaly. Additionally, there were significant negative correlation of disease duration with HRR2, HRR3, SDNN, PNN50, RMSSD, variability index. Our study results suggest that cardiac autonomic functions are impaired in patients with acromegaly. Further large scale studies are needed to exhibit the prognostic significance of impaired autonomic functions in patients with

  13. [Heart functions in monkeys during a 2-week antiorthostatic hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotov, V. P.; Convertino, V.; Korol'kov, V. I.; Latham, R.; Trambovetskii, E. V.; Fanton, J.; Crisman, R.; Truzhennikov, A. N.; Evert, D.; Nosovskii, A. M.; Conolly, J.

    1996-01-01

    Dynamics of the left heart ventricular muscle contractility and compliance was studied in 4 monkeys in the head down position (antiorthostatic hypokinesia) with the body angle 10 during 2 weeks. Functional tests on a tilt table and under two conditions of centrifuge rotation were performed prior to and after the antiorthostatic hypokinesia. No changes in the left heart ventricular muscle contractility was found. However, the sensitivity level of the baroreflex control decreased. Compliance of the left heart myocardial fibre increased in the first hours and days of the antiorthostatic hypokinesia.

  14. Fancb deficiency impairs hematopoietic stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Amarachintha, Surya; Erden, Ozlem; Wilson, Andrew; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Andreassen, Paul R; Namekawa, Satoshi H; Pang, Qishen

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, variable congenital malformations and a predisposition to malignancies. FANCB (also known as FAAP95), is the only X-linked FA gene discovered thus far. In the present study, we investigated hematopoiesis in adult Fancb deficient (Fancb(-/y)) mice and found that Fancb(-/y) mice have decreased hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence accompanied by reduced progenitor activity in vitro and reduced repopulating capacity in vivo. Like other FA mouse models previously reported, the hematopoietic system of Fancb(-/y) mice is hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C (MMC), which induces bone marrow failure in Fancb(-/y) mice. Furthermore, Fancb(-/y) BM exhibits slower recovery kinetics and less tolerance to myelotoxic stress induced by 5-fluorouracil than wild-type littermates. RNA-seq analysis reveals altered expression of genes involved in HSC function and cell cycle regulation in Fancb(-/y) HSC and progenitor cells. Thus, this Fancb(-/y) mouse model provides a novel approach for studying the critical role of the FA pathway not only in germ cell development but also in the maintenance of HSC function. PMID:26658157

  15. [Cannabis use and impairment of respiratory function].

    PubMed

    Underner, M; Urban, T; Perriot, J; Peiffer, G; Meurice, J-C

    2013-04-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly smoked illicit substance in many countries including France. It can be smoked alone in plant form (marijuana) but in our country it is mainly smoked in the form of cannabis resin mixed with tobacco. The technique of inhaling cannabis differs from that of tobacco, increasing the time that the smoke spends in contact with the bronchial mucosal and its impact on respiratory function. One cigarette composed of cannabis and tobacco is much more harmful than a cigarette containing only tobacco. In cannabis smokers there is an increased incidence of respiratory symptoms and episodes of acute bronchitis. Cannabis produces a rapid bronchodilator effect; chronic use provokes a reduction in specific conductance and increase in airways resistance. Studies on the decline of Forced Expiratory Volume are discordant. Cannabis smoke and tetrahydrocannabinol irritate the bronchial tree. They bring about histological signs of airways inflammation and alter the fungicidal and antibacterial activity of alveolar macrophages. Inhalation of cannabis smoke is a risk factor for lung cancer. Stopping smoking cannabis will bring about important benefits for lung function. This should encourage clinicians to offer patients support in quitting smoking.

  16. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Physical Function after Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Shanholtz, Carl; Husain, Nadia; Dennison, Cheryl R.; Herridge, Margaret S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and physical impairment, but the longitudinal epidemiology of these conditions remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate the 2-year incidence and duration of depressive symptoms and physical impairment after ALI, as well as risk factors for these conditions. Methods: This prospective, longitudinal cohort study recruited patients from 13 intensive care units (ICUs) in four hospitals, with follow-up 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI. The outcomes were Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score greater than or equal to 8 (“depressive symptoms”) in patients without a history of depression before ALI, and two or more dependencies in instrumental activities of daily living (“impaired physical function”) in patients without baseline impairment. Measurements and Main Results: During 2-year follow-up of 186 ALI survivors, the cumulative incidences of depressive symptoms and impaired physical function were 40 and 66%, respectively, with greatest incidence by 3-month follow-up; modal durations were greater than 21 months for each outcome. Risk factors for incident depressive symptoms were education 12 years or less, baseline disability or unemployment, higher baseline medical comorbidity, and lower blood glucose in the ICU. Risk factors for incident impaired physical function were longer ICU stay and prior depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Incident depressive symptoms and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting during the first 2 years after ALI. Interventions targeting potentially modifiable risk factors (e.g., substantial depressive symptoms in early recovery) should be evaluated to improve ALI survivors’ long-term outcomes. PMID:22161158

  17. Impaired reticuloendothelial function in patients treated with methyldopa

    SciTech Connect

    Kelton, J.G.

    1985-09-05

    In about 20 per cent of patients taking the antihypertensive agent methyldopa, IgG autoantibodies form against red cells, but most such patients do not have hemolysis. The reason for this is uncertain; it does not appear to be explained by known characteristics of the autoantibody. Since antibody-dependent reticuloendothelial function is an important determinant of cell clearance, the authors measured reticuloendothelial function in nine patients taking methyldopa. They did this by measuring the rate of clearance of radiolabeled autologous red cells sensitized with anti-D alloantibody. Five patients had a positive direct antiglobulin test, and four did not. Only one patient had laboratory evidence of hemolysis. The patients without hemolysis had significantly impaired reticuloendothelial clearance. In contrast, the patient with hemolysis did not have impaired reticuloendothelial function. This study suggests that in patients taking methyldopa who have a positive direct antiglobulin test the absence of hemolysis may be caused by an impairment in reticuloendothelial function. That the drug itself may be responsible for the impairment is suggested by the occurrence of abnormal reticuloendothelial function in patients taking the drug who have a negative direct antiglobulin test.

  18. Memory impairment in schizophrenia: its' relationship to executive function.

    PubMed

    Nathaniel-James, D A; Brown, R; Ron, M A

    1996-08-23

    The presence of memory impairment in schizophrenia has frequently been documented but much less attention has been given to the qualitative aspects of this impairment and its association to executive function. Using a cognitive-process approach, we examined memory and executive function in 25 patients who met DSM-III-R criteria for schizophrenia. Patients were matched with 25 healthy volunteers. The schizophrenic group was found to have a significant impairment in immediate memory, with relatively spared long-delay memory. Performance on verbal learning and recognition memory was similar to that of controls. Memory deficits were present irrespective of the encoding strategies used and were unrelated to chronicity. In addition, the schizophrenics performed worse than controls on tests of executive function, but the degree of impairment was greater on tests of response initiation and suppression. This pattern of performance resembled that found in patients with subcortical or frontal lesions which was supported by some significant correlations between aspects of memory and executive function. Our results suggest that in schizophrenia, specific executive functions may make a selective contribution to the pattern of memory performance in schizophrenia which is subserved by frontal and to a lesser extent hippocampal/diencephalic systems.

  19. Neural origins of psychosocial functioning impairments in major depression.

    PubMed

    Pulcu, Erdem; Elliott, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    Major depressive disorder, a complex neuropsychiatric condition, is associated with psychosocial functioning impairments that could become chronic even after symptoms remit. Social functioning impairments in patients could also pose coping difficulties to individuals around them. In this Personal View, we trace the potential neurobiological origins of these impairments down to three candidate domains-namely, social perception and emotion processing, motivation and reward value processing, and social decision making. We argue that the neural basis of abnormalities in these domains could be detectable at different temporal stages during social interactions (eg, before and after decision stages), particularly within frontomesolimbic networks (ie, frontostriatal and amygdala-striatal circuitries). We review some of the experimental designs used to probe these circuits and suggest novel, integrative approaches. We propose that an understanding of the interactions between these domains could provide valuable insights for the clinical stratification of major depressive disorder subtypes and might inform future developments of novel treatment options in return. PMID:26360902

  20. Altered distribution of ICa impairs Ca release at the t-tubules of ventricular myocytes from failing hearts

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Simon M.; Kong, Cherrie H.T.; Watson, Judy; Cannell, Mark B.; James, Andrew F.; Orchard, Clive H.

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cardiac ventricular myocytes, Ca influx and release occur predominantly at t-tubules, ensuring synchronous Ca release throughout the cell. Heart failure is associated with disrupted t-tubule structure, but its effect on t-tubule function is less clear. We therefore investigated Ca influx and release at the t-tubules of ventricular myocytes isolated from rat hearts ~ 18 weeks after coronary artery ligation (CAL) or corresponding Sham operation. L-type Ca current (ICa) was recorded using the whole-cell voltage-clamp technique in intact and detubulated myocytes; Ca release at t-tubules was monitored using confocal microscopy with voltage- and Ca-sensitive fluorophores. CAL was associated with cardiac and cellular hypertrophy, decreased ejection fraction, disruption of t-tubule structure and a smaller, slower Ca transient, but no change in ryanodine receptor distribution, L-type Ca channel expression, or ICa density. In Sham myocytes, ICa was located predominantly at the t-tubules, while in CAL myocytes, it was uniformly distributed between the t-tubule and surface membranes. Inhibition of protein kinase A with H-89 caused a greater decrease of t-tubular ICa in CAL than in Sham myocytes; in the presence of H-89, t-tubular ICa density was smaller in CAL than in Sham myocytes. The smaller t-tubular ICa in CAL myocytes was accompanied by increased latency and heterogeneity of SR Ca release at t-tubules, which could be mimicked by decreasing ICa using nifedipine. These data show that CAL decreases t-tubular ICa via a PKA-independent mechanism, thereby impairing Ca release at t-tubules and contributing to the altered excitation–contraction coupling observed in heart failure. PMID:26103619

  1. Action Potential-Evoked Calcium Release Is Impaired in Single Skeletal Muscle Fibers from Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    DiFranco, Marino; Quiñonez, Marbella; Shieh, Perry; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Cruz, Daniel; Deng, Mario C.; Vergara, Julio L.; Middlekauff, Holly R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise intolerance in chronic heart failure (HF) has been attributed to abnormalities of the skeletal muscles. Muscle function depends on intact excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), but ECC studies in HF models have been inconclusive, due to deficiencies in the animal models and tools used to measure calcium (Ca2+) release, mandating investigations in skeletal muscle from HF patients. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Ca2+ release is significantly impaired in the skeletal muscle of HF patients in whom exercise capacity is severely diminished compared to age-matched healthy volunteers. Methods and Findings Using state-of-the-art electrophysiological and optical techniques in single muscle fibers from biopsies of the locomotive vastus lateralis muscle, we measured the action potential (AP)-evoked Ca2+ release in 4 HF patients and 4 age-matched healthy controls. The mean peak Ca2+ release flux in fibers obtained from HF patients (10±1.2 µM/ms) was markedly (2.6-fold) and significantly (p<0.05) smaller than in fibers from healthy volunteers (28±3.3 µM/ms). This impairment in AP-evoked Ca2+ release was ubiquitous and was not explained by differences in the excitability mechanisms since single APs were indistinguishable between HF patients and healthy volunteers. Conclusions These findings prove the feasibility of performing electrophysiological experiments in single fibers from human skeletal muscle, and offer a new approach for investigations of myopathies due to HF and other diseases. Importantly, we have demonstrated that one step in the ECC process, AP-evoked Ca2+ release, is impaired in single muscle fibers in HF patients. PMID:25310188

  2. A Methodology for Quantifying Heart Function in the Embryonic Zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Brennan; Garrity, Deborah; Dasi, Lakshmi

    2012-11-01

    Several studies have linked epigenetic factors such as blood flow dynamics and cardiac function to proper heart development. To better understand this process, it is essential to develop robust quantitative methods to investigate the blood dynamics and wall kinematics in vivo. Here, we develop a methodology that can be used throughout the early stages of development which requires no specialized equipment other than a bright field microscope and high-speed camera. We use the embryonic zebrafish as our model due to its superb optical access and widespread acceptance as a powerful model for human heart development. Using these methods, we quantify blood flow rates, stroke volume, cardiac output, ejection fraction, and other important parameters related to heart function. We also investigate the pumping mechanics from heart tube to looped configuration. We show that although the mechanism changes fundamentally, it does so in a continuous fashion that can incorporate combined pumping mechanisms at intermediate stages. This work provides a basis for quantitatively comparing normal and abnormal heart development, and may help us gain a better understanding of congenital heart defects. Funded by NSF.

  3. Executive Functioning in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Lucy A.; Messer, David J.; Nash, Gilly

    2012-01-01

    Background: A limited range of evidence suggests that children with specific language impairment (SLI) have difficulties with higher order thinking and reasoning skills (executive functioning, EF). This study involved a comprehensive investigation of EF in this population taking into account the contributions of age, nonverbal IQ and verbal…

  4. Executive Function Impairments in High IQ Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Thomas E.; Reichel, Philipp C.; Quinlan, Donald M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To demonstrate that high IQ adults diagnosed with ADHD suffer from executive function (EF) impairments that: a) can be identified with a combination of standardized measures and self-report data; and b) occur more commonly in this group than in the general population. Method: 157 ADHD adults with IQ greater than or equal to 120 were…

  5. Androgenic anabolic steroids also impair right ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Kasikcioglu, Erdem; Oflaz, Huseyin; Umman, Berrin; Bugra, Zehra

    2009-05-01

    Chronic anabolic steroid use suppresses left ventricular functions. However, there is no information regarding the chronic effects of anabolic steroids on right ventricular function which also plays a key role in global cardiac function. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of androgenic anabolic steroids usage among athletes on remodeling the right part of the heart. Androgenic-anabolic steroids-using bodybuilders had smaller diastolic velocities of both ventricles than drug-free bodybuilders and sedentary counterparts. This study shows that androgenic anabolic steroids-using bodybuilders exhibited depressed diastolic functions of both ventricles.

  6. Trajectories of Work-Related Functional Impairment prior to Suicide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Work-related functional impairment in terms of sickness absence and disability pension (SA/DP) has been reported to be associated with subsequent suicide. However, there is only limited knowledge on SA/DP patterns prior to suicide. The aim was to identify trajectories of work-related functional impairment prior to suicide and to describe associations of socio-demographic and medical factors with such trajectories. Methods This is a population-based retrospective cohort study of the 4 209 individuals aged 22–65 years who committed suicide during 2007–2010 in Sweden. Work-related functional impairment was measured as mean annual number of months of SA/DP. We analyzed trajectories of SA/DP during five years prior to suicide (i.e., 2002–2009) by a group-based trajectory method. Associations between socio-demographic and medical factors with different groups of trajectories were estimated by chi2-test and multinomial logistic regression. Results Five different functional impairment trajectory groups were identified prior to suicide. One group had constant low levels of SA/DP (46%), while 30% had constant high levels of SA/DP. Two groups (16%) showed increasing number of SA/DP months. The remaining 7% showed decreasing number of SA/DP months before the suicide. Sex, age, educational level, family situation, and diagnosis-specific healthcare were significantly associated with different trajectory groups (Likelihood ratio X2 tests <0.05). A larger proportion of higher educated and younger men with a lower proportion of previous suicide attempts were found in the group with constant low levels. Opposite characteristics were displayed in the group with constant high levels. Conclusions This study identified five different groups of work-related functional impairment trajectories before suicide. These differences might be partly explained by the variations in socio-demographic profiles and health care consumptions five years before suicide. PMID:26444997

  7. The Living Heart Project: A robust and integrative simulator for human heart function

    PubMed Central

    Baillargeon, Brian; Rebelo, Nuno; Fox, David D.; Taylor, Robert L.; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The heart is not only our most vital, but also our most complex organ: Precisely controlled by the interplay of electrical and mechanical fields, it consists of four chambers and four valves, which act in concert to regulate its filling, ejection, and overall pump function. While numerous computational models exist to study either the electrical or the mechanical response of its individual chambers, the integrative electro-mechanical response of the whole heart remains poorly understood. Here we present a proof-of-concept simulator for a four-chamber human heart model created from computer topography and magnetic resonance images. We illustrate the governing equations of excitation-contraction coupling and discretize them using a single, unified finite element environment. To illustrate the basic features of our model, we visualize the electrical potential and the mechanical deformation across the human heart throughout its cardiac cycle. To compare our simulation against common metrics of cardiac function, we extract the pressure-volume relationship and show that it agrees well with clinical observations. Our prototype model allows us to explore and understand the key features, physics, and technologies to create an integrative, predictive model of the living human heart. Ultimately, our simulator will open opportunities to probe landscapes of clinical parameters, and guide device design and treatment planning in cardiac diseases such as stenosis, regurgitation, or prolapse of the aortic, pulmonary, tricuspid, or mitral valve. PMID:25267880

  8. The Living Heart Project: A robust and integrative simulator for human heart function.

    PubMed

    Baillargeon, Brian; Rebelo, Nuno; Fox, David D; Taylor, Robert L; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-11-01

    The heart is not only our most vital, but also our most complex organ: Precisely controlled by the interplay of electrical and mechanical fields, it consists of four chambers and four valves, which act in concert to regulate its filling, ejection, and overall pump function. While numerous computational models exist to study either the electrical or the mechanical response of its individual chambers, the integrative electro-mechanical response of the whole heart remains poorly understood. Here we present a proof-of-concept simulator for a four-chamber human heart model created from computer topography and magnetic resonance images. We illustrate the governing equations of excitation-contraction coupling and discretize them using a single, unified finite element environment. To illustrate the basic features of our model, we visualize the electrical potential and the mechanical deformation across the human heart throughout its cardiac cycle. To compare our simulation against common metrics of cardiac function, we extract the pressure-volume relationship and show that it agrees well with clinical observations. Our prototype model allows us to explore and understand the key features, physics, and technologies to create an integrative, predictive model of the living human heart. Ultimately, our simulator will open opportunities to probe landscapes of clinical parameters, and guide device design and treatment planning in cardiac diseases such as stenosis, regurgitation, or prolapse of the aortic, pulmonary, tricuspid, or mitral valve. PMID:25267880

  9. Aging Impairs Myocardial Fatty Acid and Ketone Oxidation and Modifies Cardiac Functional and Metabolic Responses to Insulin in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hyyti, Outi M.; Ledee, Dolena; Ning, Xue-Han; Ge, Ming; Portman, Michael A.

    2010-07-02

    Aging presumably initiates shifts in substrate oxidation mediated in part by changes in insulin sensitivity. Similar shifts occur with cardiac hypertrophy and may contribute to contractile dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that aging modifies substrate utilization and alters insulin sensitivity in mouse heart when provided multiple substrates. In vivo cardiac function was measured with microtipped pressure transducers in the left ventricle from control (4–6 mo) and aged (22–24 mo) mice. Cardiac function was also measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate and anaplerotic fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle (CAC) by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids (FFA), acetoacetate, lactate, and unlabeled glucose. Stroke volume and cardiac output were diminished in aged mice in vivo, but pressure development was preserved. Systolic and diastolic functions were maintained in aged isolated hearts. Insulin prompted an increase in systolic function in aged hearts, resulting in an increase in cardiac efficiency. FFA and ketone flux were present but were markedly impaired in aged hearts. These changes in myocardial substrate utilization corresponded to alterations in circulating lipids, thyroid hormone, and reductions in protein expression for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)4. Insulin further suppressed FFA oxidation in the aged. Insulin stimulation of anaplerosis in control hearts was absent in the aged. The aged heart shows metabolic plasticity by accessing multiple substrates to maintain function. However, fatty acid oxidation capacity is limited. Impaired insulin-stimulated anaplerosis may contribute to elevated cardiac efficiency, but may also limit response to acute stress through depletion of CAC intermediates.

  10. Freshly isolated mitochondria from failing human hearts exhibit preserved respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Reyes, Andrea M; Gupte, Anisha A; Youker, Keith A; Loebe, Matthias; Hsueh, Willa A; Torre-Amione, Guillermo; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Hamilton, Dale J

    2014-03-01

    In heart failure mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to be responsible for energy depletion and contractile dysfunction. The difficulties in procuring fresh left ventricular (LV) myocardium from humans for assessment of mitochondrial function have resulted in the reliance on surrogate markers of mitochondrial function and limited our understanding of cardiac energetics. We isolated mitochondria from fresh LV wall tissue of patients with heart failure and reduced systolic function undergoing heart transplant or left ventricular assist device placement, and compared their function to mitochondria isolated from the non-failing LV (NFLV) wall tissue with normal systolic function from patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing heart-lung transplant. We performed detailed mitochondrial functional analyses using 4 substrates: glutamate-malate (GM), pyruvate-malate (PM) palmitoyl carnitine-malate (PC) and succinate. NFLV mitochondria showed preserved respiratory control ratios and electron chain integrity with only few differences for the 4 substrates. In contrast, HF mitochondria had greater respiration with GM, PM and PC substrates and higher electron chain capacity for PM than for PC. Surprisingly, HF mitochondria had greater respiratory control ratios and lower ADP-independent state 4 rates than NFLV mitochondria for GM, PM and PC substrates demonstrating that HF mitochondria are capable of coupled respiration ex vivo. Gene expression studies revealed decreased expression of key genes in pathways for oxidation of both fatty acids and glucose. Our results suggest that mitochondria from the failing LV myocardium are capable of tightly coupled respiration when isolated and supplied with ample substrates. Thus energy starvation in the failing heart may be the result of dysregulation of metabolic pathways, impaired substrate supply or reduced mitochondrial number but not the result of reduced mitochondrial electron transport capacity. PMID:24412531

  11. Impaired coronary and retinal vasomotor function to hyperoxia in Individuals with Type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lott, Mary E.; Slocomb, Julia E.; Gao, Zhaohui; Gabbay, Robert A.; Quillen, David; Gardner, Thomas W.; Bettermann, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Adults with diabetes are at a high risk of developing coronary heart disease. The purpose of this study was to assess coronary artery vascular function non-invasively in individuals with and without Type 2 diabetes and to compare these coronary responses to another microvascular bed (i.e. retina). We hypothesized that individuals with diabetes would have impaired coronary reactivity and that these impairments would be associated with impairments in retinal reactivity. METHODS Coronary blood velocity (Transthoracic Doppler Echocardiography) and retinal diameters (Dynamic Vessel Analyzer) were measured continuously during five minutes of breathing 100% oxygen (i.e. hyperoxia) in 15 persons with Type 2 diabetes and 15 age-matched control subjects. Using fundus photographs, retinal vascular calibers were also measured (central retinal arteriole and venule equivalents). RESULTS Individuals with diabetes compared to controls had impaired coronary (−2.34 ± 16.64% vs. −14.27 ± 10.58%, P =0.03) and retinal (arteriole: −0.04 ± 3.34% vs. −3.65 ± 5.07%, P = 0.03; venule: −1.65 ± 3.68% vs. −5.23 ± 5.47%, P = 0.05) vasoconstrictor responses to hyperoxia, and smaller central arteriole-venule equivalent ratios (0.83 ± 0.07 vs. 0.90 ± 0.07, P = 0.014). Coronary reactivity was associated with central retinal arteriole equivalents (r = −0.516, P = 0.005) and retinal venular reactivity (r = 0.387, P = 0.034). CONCLUSION Diabetes impairs coronary and retinal microvascular function to hyperoxia. Impaired vasoconstrictor responses may be part of a systemic diabetic vasculopathy, which may contribute to adverse cardiovascular events in individuals with diabetes. PMID:26002545

  12. Electrohypersensitivity: a functional impairment due to an inaccessible environment.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Olle

    2015-01-01

    In Sweden, electrohypersensitivity is recognized as a functional impairment which implies only the environment as the culprit. The Swedish view provides persons with this impairment a maximal legal protection, it gives them the right to get accessibility measures for free, as well as governmental subsidies and municipality economic support, and to provide them with special Ombudsmen (at the municipality, the EU, and the UN level, respectively), the right and economic means to form disability organizations and allow these to be part of national and international counterparts, all with the simple and single aim to allow persons with the functional impairment electrohypersensitivity to live an equal life in a society based on equality. They are not seen as patients, the do not have an overriding medical diagnosis, but the 'patient' is only the inferior and potentially toxic environment. This does not mean that a subjective symptom of a functionally impaired can not be treated by a physician, as well as get sick-leave from their workplace as well as economic compensation, and already in the year 2000 such symptoms were identified in the Internal Code of Diagnoses, version 10 (ICD-10; R68.8/now W90), and have been since. But the underlying cause still remains only the environment.

  13. A loss-of-function mutation in the binding domain of HAND1 predicts hypoplasia of the human hearts.

    PubMed

    Reamon-Buettner, Stella Marie; Ciribilli, Yari; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Juergen

    2008-05-15

    Hypoplasia of the human heart is the most severe form of congenital heart disease (CHD) and usually lethal during early infancy. It is a leading cause of neonatal loss, especially in infants diagnosed with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a condition where the left side of the heart including the aorta, aortic valve, left ventricle (LV) and mitral valve are underdeveloped. The molecular causes of HLHS are unclear, but the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor heart and neural crest derivatives expressed 1 (Hand1), may be a candidate culprit for this condition. The absence of Hand1 in mice resulted in the failure of rightward looping of the heart tube, a severely hypoplastic LV and outflow tract abnormalities. Nonetheless, no HAND1 mutations associated with human CHD have been reported so far. We sequenced the human HAND1 gene in heart tissues derived from 31 unrelated patients diagnosed with hypoplastic hearts. We detected in 24 of 31 hypoplastic ventricles, a common frameshift mutation (A126fs) in the bHLH domain, which is necessary for DNA binding and combinatorial interactions. The resulting mutant protein, unlike wild-type (wt) HAND1, was unable to modulate transcription of reporter constructs containing specific DNA-binding sites. Thus, in hypoplastic human hearts HAND1 function is impaired.

  14. Acute inhibition of myoglobin impairs contractility and energy state of iNOS-overexpressing hearts.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Carsten; Flögel, Ulrich; Gödecke, Axel; Heger, Jacqueline; Schrader, Jürgen

    2003-06-27

    Elevated cardiac levels of nitric oxide (NO) generated by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) have been implicated in the development of heart failure. The surprisingly benign phenotype of recently generated mice with cardiac-specific iNOS overexpression (TGiNOS) provided the rationale to investigate whether NO scavenging by oxymyoglobin (MbO2) yielding nitrate and metmyoglobin (metMb) is involved in preservation of myocardial function in TGiNOS mice. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to monitor changes of cardiac myoglobin (Mb) metabolism in isolated hearts of wild-type (WT) and TGiNOS mice. NO formation by iNOS resulted in a significant decrease of the MbO2 signal and a concomitantly emerging metMb signal in spectra of TGiNOS hearts only (DeltaMbO2: -46.3+/-38.4 micromol/kg, DeltametMb: +41.4+/-17.6 micromol/kg, n=6; P<0.05) leaving contractility and energetics unaffected. Inhibition of the Mb-mediated NO degradation by carbon monoxide (20%) led to a deterioration of myocardial contractility in TGiNOS hearts (left ventricular developed pressure: 78.2+/-8.2% versus 96.7+/-4.6% of baseline, n=6; P<0.005), which was associated with a profound pertubation of cardiac energy state as assessed by 31P NMR spectroscopy (eg, phosphocreatine: 13.3+/-1.3 mmol/L (TGiNOS) versus 15.9+/-0.7 mmol/L (WT), n=6; P<0.005). These alterations could be fully antagonized by the NOS inhibitor S-ethylisothiourea. Our findings demonstrate that myoglobin serves as an important cytoplasmic buffer of iNOS-derived NO, which determines the functional consequences of iNOS overexpression. PMID:12775582

  15. Acute inhibition of myoglobin impairs contractility and energy state of iNOS-overexpressing hearts.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Carsten; Flögel, Ulrich; Gödecke, Axel; Heger, Jacqueline; Schrader, Jürgen

    2003-06-27

    Elevated cardiac levels of nitric oxide (NO) generated by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) have been implicated in the development of heart failure. The surprisingly benign phenotype of recently generated mice with cardiac-specific iNOS overexpression (TGiNOS) provided the rationale to investigate whether NO scavenging by oxymyoglobin (MbO2) yielding nitrate and metmyoglobin (metMb) is involved in preservation of myocardial function in TGiNOS mice. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to monitor changes of cardiac myoglobin (Mb) metabolism in isolated hearts of wild-type (WT) and TGiNOS mice. NO formation by iNOS resulted in a significant decrease of the MbO2 signal and a concomitantly emerging metMb signal in spectra of TGiNOS hearts only (DeltaMbO2: -46.3+/-38.4 micromol/kg, DeltametMb: +41.4+/-17.6 micromol/kg, n=6; P<0.05) leaving contractility and energetics unaffected. Inhibition of the Mb-mediated NO degradation by carbon monoxide (20%) led to a deterioration of myocardial contractility in TGiNOS hearts (left ventricular developed pressure: 78.2+/-8.2% versus 96.7+/-4.6% of baseline, n=6; P<0.005), which was associated with a profound pertubation of cardiac energy state as assessed by 31P NMR spectroscopy (eg, phosphocreatine: 13.3+/-1.3 mmol/L (TGiNOS) versus 15.9+/-0.7 mmol/L (WT), n=6; P<0.005). These alterations could be fully antagonized by the NOS inhibitor S-ethylisothiourea. Our findings demonstrate that myoglobin serves as an important cytoplasmic buffer of iNOS-derived NO, which determines the functional consequences of iNOS overexpression.

  16. A model of impairment and functional limitation in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Escalante, Agustín; Haas, Roy W; del Rincón, Inmaculada

    2005-01-01

    Background We have previously proposed a theoretical model for studying physical disability and other outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The purpose of this paper is to test a model of impairment and functional limitation in (RA), using empirical data from a sample of RA patients. We based the model on the disablement process framework. Methods We posited two distinct types of impairment in RA: 1) Joint inflammation, measured by the tender, painful and swollen joint counts; and 2) Joint deformity, measured by the deformed joint count. We hypothesized direct paths from the two impairments to functional limitation, measured by the shirt-button speed, grip strength and walking velocity. We used structural equation modeling to test the hypothetical relationships, using empirical data from a sample of RA patients recruited from six rheumatology clinics. Results The RA sample was comprised of 779 RA patients. In the structural equation model, the joint inflammation impairment displayed a strong significant path toward the measured variables of joint pain, tenderness and swelling (standardized regression coefficients 0.758, 0.872 and 0.512, P ≤ 0.001 for each). The joint deformity impairment likewise displayed significant paths toward the measured upper limb, lower limb, and other deformed joint counts (standardized regression coefficients 0.849, 0.785, 0.308, P ≤ 0.001 for each). Both the joint inflammation and joint deformity impairments displayed strong direct paths toward functional limitation (standardized regression coefficients of -0.576 and -0.564, respectively, P ≤ 0.001 for each), and explained 65% of its variance. Model fit to data was fair to good, as evidenced by a comparative fit index of 0.975, and the root mean square error of approximation = 0.058. Conclusion This evidence supports the occurrence of two distinct impairments in RA, joint inflammation and joint deformity, that together, contribute strongly to functional limitations in this disease

  17. Brief Exposure to Secondhand Smoke Reversibly Impairs Endothelial Vasodilatory Function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to determine the effects of brief exposures to low concentrations of tobacco secondhand smoke (SHS) on arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD, a nitric oxide-dependent measure of vascular endothelial function), in a controlled animal model never before exposed to smoke. In humans, SHS exposure for 30min impairs FMD. It is important to gain a better understanding of the acute effects of exposure to SHS at low concentrations and for brief periods of time. Methods: We measured changes in FMD in rats exposed to a range of real-world levels of SHS for durations of 30min, 10min, 1min, and 4 breaths (roughly 15 s). Results: We observed a dose-response relationship between SHS particle concentration over 30min and post-exposure impairment of FMD, which was linear through the range typically encountered in smoky restaurants and then saturated at higher concentrations. One min of exposure to SHS at moderate concentrations was sufficient to impair FMD. Conclusions: Brief SHS exposure at real-world levels reversibly impairs FMD. Even 1min of SHS exposure can cause reduction of endothelial function. PMID:24302638

  18. Heart-function studies in dogs after acute gamma irradiation of the precordium

    SciTech Connect

    Durakovic

    1986-05-01

    In order to study the development of post-irradiation cardiac dysfunction, we irradiated the precordia of 18 adult beagle dogs were irradiated with 30, 60, or 100 Gy of Co-60 photons, and cardiac histology, electrocardiograms, Tc-99, pyrophosphate cardiac tissue distribution, and serial left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were measured. Although the electrocardiograms and tissue distribution of Tc-99m were unaffected by these dose levels, the LVEF was reduced by day 58 for all the irradiated dogs. The delay in the onset of cardiac-function impairment parallels the delay in the onset of fibrosis in irradiated hearts.

  19. Impairment of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Bree, L.; van Iwaarden, J.F.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J. )

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibited phagocytosis and superoxide anion production by rat alveolar macrophages. The inhibition was irreversible and concentration and exposure time dependent. The potential relationship between H2O2-induced biochemical perturbations and impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytic functions was investigated. Alveolar macrophage viability and Fc receptor binding capacity were not affected by H2O2. There was probably no correlation between a H2O2-induced rise in cytosolic (Ca2+) ((Ca2+)i) and the impairment of phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages, as was suggested by the following findings. First, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i could be inhibited by chelation of extracellular Ca2+, whereas the H2O2-induced impairment of phagocytosis could not. Second, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was reversible, whereas the impairment of phagocytosis was not. And finally, a rise in (Ca2+)i by incubation of alveolar macrophages with the calcium ionophore A23187 did not affect phagocytosis. Various experiments suggested that ATP depletion may play an important role in the H2O2 toxicity for alveolar macrophages. Comparable concentrations of H2O2 caused an irreversible decrease both in cellular ATP and in phagocytosis and superoxide production by alveolar macrophages. In addition, time course of ATP depletion and induction of impaired alveolar macrophage function were similar. In view of the fact that the strong oxidant H2O2 may react with a large variety of biological substances, possible other toxic lesions may not be excluded as underlying mechanism for H2O2-induced inhibition of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages.

  20. What is "functional impairment"? Disentangling disability from clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Ustün, Bedirhan; Kennedy, Cille

    2009-06-01

    The formulation of disability (or "functional impairment") is currently not operationalized in either the ICD or the DSM. In the DSM system, making a diagnosis depends on a conjoint assessment of symptoms and functioning, whereas the ICD keeps the disability construct separate from the diagnosis of mental disorders. We need an internationally agreed conceptualization between ICD and DSM in terms of better operationalization of disease and disability components. No functioning or disability should appear as part of the threshold of the diagnosis in either system.

  1. Biomarkers of renal injury and function: diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic implications in heart failure.

    PubMed

    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Ruilope, Luis M; Maisel, Alan S; Damman, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Heart failure guidelines suggest evaluating renal function as a routine work-up in every patient with heart failure. Specifically, it is advised to calculate glomerular filtration rate and determine blood urea nitrogen. The reason for this is that renal impairment and worsening renal function (WRF) are common in heart failure, and strongly associate with poor outcome. Renal function, however, consists of more than glomerular filtration alone, and includes tubulointerstitial damage and albuminuria. For each of these renal entities, different biomarkers exist that have been investigated in heart failure. Hypothetically, and in parallel to data in nephrology, these markers may aid in the diagnosis of renal dysfunction, or for risk stratification, or could help in therapeutic decision-making. However, as reviewed in the present manuscript, while these markers may carry prognostic information (although not always additive to established markers of renal function), their role in predicting WRF is limited at best. More importantly, none of these markers have been evaluated as a therapeutic target nor have their serial values been used to guide therapy. The evidence is most compelling for the oldest-serum creatinine (in combination with glomerular filtration rate)-but even for this biomarker, evidence to guide therapy to improve outcome is circumstantial at best. Although many new renal biomarkers have emerged at the horizon, they have only limited usefulness in clinical practice until thoroughly and prospectively studied. For now, routine measurement of (novel) renal biomarkers can help to determine cardiovascular risk, but there is no role for these biomarkers to change therapy to improve clinical outcome in heart failure.

  2. Renal Function and Genetic Polymorphisms in Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, Brian; Brooks, Maria M; Zeevi, Adriana; Ohmann, Erin L.; Burckart, Gilbert J.; Ferrell, Robert E.; Chinnock, Richard; Canter, Charles; Addonizio, Linda; Bernstein, Daniel; Kirklin, James K.; Naftel, David C.; Webber, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Common genetic variations influence rejection, infection, drug metabolism, and side effect profiles after pediatric heart transplantation. Reports in adults suggest that genetic background may influence post-transplant renal function. In this multicenter study we investigated the association of genetic polymorphisms (GP) in a panel of candidate genes on renal function in 453 pediatric heart transplant recipients. Methods We performed genotyping for functional GPs in 19 candidate genes. Renal function was determined annually after transplantation by calculation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Mixed effects and Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess recipient characteristics and the effect of GPs on longitudinal eGFR and time to eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2. Results Mean age at transplantation was 6.2 ± 6.1 years and mean follow-up was 5.1 ± 2.5 years. Older age at transplant and black race were independently associated with post-transplant renal dysfunction. In univariate analyses, FASL (C-843T) T allele (p=0.014) and HO-1 (A326G) G allele (p=0.0017) were associated with decreased renal function. After adjusting for age and race, these associations were attenuated [FASL (p=0.075), HO-1 (p=0.053)]. We found no associations of other GPs, including GPs in TGFβ1, CYP3A5, ABCB1, and ACE, with post-transplant renal function. Conclusions In this multicenter, large sample of pediatric heart transplant recipients we found no strong associations between GPs in 19 candidate genes and post-transplant renal function. Our findings contradict reported associations of CYP3A5 and TGFβ1 with renal function and suggest that genotyping for these GPs will not facilitate individualized immunosuppression for the purpose of protecting renal function after pediatric heart transplantation. PMID:22789135

  3. Functions of miRNAs during Mammalian Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shun; Jiao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play essential roles during mammalian heart development and have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets for cardiovascular diseases. The mammalian embryonic heart is mainly derived from four major cell types during development. These include cardiomyocytes, endocardial cells, epicardial cells, and neural crest cells. Recent data have identified various miRNAs as critical regulators of the proper differentiation, proliferation, and survival of these cell types. In this review, we briefly introduce the contemporary understanding of mammalian cardiac development. We also focus on recent developments in the field of cardiac miRNAs and their functions during the development of different cell types. PMID:27213371

  4. Extracommunicative functions of language: verbal interference causes selective categorization impairments.

    PubMed

    Lupyan, Gary

    2009-08-01

    In addition to its communicative functions, language has been argued to have a variety of extracommunicative functions, as assessed by its causal involvement in putatively nonlinguistic tasks. In the present work, I argue that language may be critically involved in the ability of human adults to categorize objects on a specific dimension (e.g., color) while abstracting over other dimensions (e.g., size). This ability is frequently impaired in aphasic patients. The present work demonstrates that normal participants placed under conditions of verbal interference show a pattern of deficits strikingly similar to that of aphasic patients: impaired taxonomic categorization along perceptual dimensions, and preserved thematic categorization. A control experiment using a visuospatial-interference task failed to find this selective pattern of deficits. The present work has implications for understanding the online role of language in normal cognition and supports the claim that language is causally involved in nonverbal cognition.

  5. Extracommunicative functions of language: verbal interference causes selective categorization impairments.

    PubMed

    Lupyan, Gary

    2009-08-01

    In addition to its communicative functions, language has been argued to have a variety of extracommunicative functions, as assessed by its causal involvement in putatively nonlinguistic tasks. In the present work, I argue that language may be critically involved in the ability of human adults to categorize objects on a specific dimension (e.g., color) while abstracting over other dimensions (e.g., size). This ability is frequently impaired in aphasic patients. The present work demonstrates that normal participants placed under conditions of verbal interference show a pattern of deficits strikingly similar to that of aphasic patients: impaired taxonomic categorization along perceptual dimensions, and preserved thematic categorization. A control experiment using a visuospatial-interference task failed to find this selective pattern of deficits. The present work has implications for understanding the online role of language in normal cognition and supports the claim that language is causally involved in nonverbal cognition. PMID:19648457

  6. Optical investigation of functional structures in isolated perfused pig heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauh, Robert; Boehnert, Markus; Mahlke, Christine; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2000-11-01

    Light scattering in tissue of mammals and humans is affected by subcellular structures. Since these structures correlate well with the status of cells and tissue, light scattering seems to be ideal for monitoring of functional tissue state. By use of EMPHO SSK Oxyscan we investigated functional parameters in a novel kind of isolated perfused pig heart model. In this perfusion model we use organs obtained by the local slaughterhouse that are reanimated at our institute by application of a heart-lung machine. By creating 3D-images of tissue scattering we found an interesting relation between anatomical structures of myocardium and the 3D-images. Additionally, we detected coherence between backscattered light intensity and functional tissue status. Furthermore, we got a sight into the redox state of cytochrome aa3, b and c by creating difference spectra. We believe that this new kind of tissue imaging method will give us the opportunity to get new insights into myocardial function.

  7. Functional Literacy for Students with Visual Impairments and Significant Cognitive Disabilities: The Perspective of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebehazy, Kim T.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports opinions and practices of teachers of students with visual impairments (TSVIs) in 34 states regarding functional literacy for students with visual impairments (VIs) and significant cognitive disabilities (SCDs). The survey asked TSVIs to select a definition of functional literacy, indicate agreement with a series of literacy…

  8. The Effects of Heart Failure on Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Udani, Suneel M; Koyner, Jay L

    2010-01-01

    Summary Heart-kidney interactions have been increasingly recognized by clinicians and researchers involved in the study and treatment of heart failure and kidney disease. A classification system has been developed to categorize the different manifestations of cardiac and renal dysfunction. Recent work has highlighted the significant negative prognostic effect of worsening renal function on outcomes for individuals with heart failure. The etiology of the concomitant cardiac and renal dysfunction remains unclear; however, increasing evidence supports alternatives to the established theory of underfilling, including effects of venous congestion and changes in intra-abdominal pressure. Conventional therapy focuses on blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with expanding use of direct renin and aldosterone antagonists. Novel therapeutic interventions using extracorporeal therapy and antagonists of the adenosine pathway show promise and require further investigation. PMID:20621250

  9. Impairment of Endothelial Function by Little Cigar Secondhand Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangtao; Wang, Xiaoyin; Narayan, Shilpa; Glantz, Stanton A.; Schick, Suzaynn F.; Springer, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Little cigars and cigarillos are gaining in popularity as cigarette use wanes, mainly due to relaxed regulatory standards that make them cheaper, easier to buy individually, and available in a variety of flavors not allowed in cigarettes. To address whether they should be regulated as strictly as cigarettes, we investigated whether little cigar secondhand smoke (SHS) decreases vascular endothelial function like that of cigarettes. Methods We exposed rats to SHS from little cigars, cigarettes, or chamber air, for 10 minutes and measured the resulting acute impairment of arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Results SHS from both little cigars and cigarettes impaired FMD. Impairment was greater after exposure to little cigar SHS than by cigarette SHS relative to pre-exposure values, although the post-exposure FMD values were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions Exposure to little cigar SHS leads to impairment of FMD that is at least equal to that resulting from similar levels of cigarette SHS. Our findings support the need to prevent even brief exposure to little cigar SHS, and support tobacco control policies that regulate little cigars as strictly as cigarettes. PMID:26753171

  10. Posttraumatic stress symptom clusters associations with psychopathology and functional impairment.

    PubMed

    Heir, Trond; Piatigorsky, Auran; Weisæth, Lars

    2010-12-01

    We examined posttraumatic stress symptom clusters associations with psychopathology and functional impairment in 899 Norwegian survivors of the 2004 South-East Asia tsunami six months post-disaster. Posttraumatic stress symptoms were assessed with the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) with intrusion, avoidance, and hyper-arousal subscales. For criterion variables, we used 10 indicators of psychopathology and functional impairment, e.g. having mental health problems, seeing mental health professionals, and use of medication or sick leave. Hyper-arousal had stronger correlations than avoidance with all criterion variables (p values<0.001) and stronger correlations than intrusion with seven of the 10 criterion variables (p values<0.01). Also, intrusion had stronger correlations than avoidance with seven of 10 criterion variables (p values<0.05). Thus, our findings indicate that symptoms of hyper-arousal may be more closely linked to psychopathology and functional impairment than other symptoms of posttraumatic stress following a sudden onset, short duration, natural disaster event.

  11. Exploring Heart and Lung Function in Space: ARMS Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuipers, Andre; Cork, Michael; LeGouic, Marine

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Respiratory Monitoring System (ARMS) is a suite of monitoring instruments and supplies used to study the heart, lungs, and metabolism. Many experiments sponsored by the European Space Agency (ESA) will be conducted using ARMS during STS-107. The near-weightless environment of space causes the body to undergo many physiological adaptations, and the regulation of blood pressure is no exception. Astronauts also experience a decrease in blood volume as an adaptation to microgravity. Reduced blood volume may not provide enough blood pressure to the head during entry or landing. As a result, astronauts often experience light-headedness, and sometimes even fainting, when they stand shortly after returning to Earth. To help regulate blood pressure and heart rate, baroreceptors, sensors located in artery walls in the neck and near the heart, control blood pressure by sending information to the brain and ensuring blood flow to organs. These mechanisms work properly in Earth's gravity but must adapt in the microgravity environment of space. However, upon return to Earth during entry and landing, the cardiovascular system must readjust itself to gravity, which can cause fluctuation in the control of blood pressure and heart rate. Although the system recovers in hours or days, these occurrences are not easily predicted or understood - a puzzle investigators will study with the ARMS equipment. In space, researchers can focus on aspects of the cardiovascular system normally masked by gravity. The STS-107 experiments using ARMS will provide data on how the heart and lungs function in space, as well as how the nervous system controls them. Exercise will also be combined with breath holding and straining (the Valsalva maneuver) to test how heart rate and blood pressure react to different stresses. This understanding will improve astronauts' cardiopulmonary function after return to Earth, and may well help Earthbound patients who experience similar effects after long

  12. Impaired carotid artery elastic function in patients with tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    László, Andrea; Pintér, Alexandra; Horváth, Tamás; Kádár, Krisztina; Temesvári, András; Kollai, Márk; Studinger, Péter

    2011-09-01

    Complex congenital heart diseases with abnormal formation of the aorticopulmonary septum are also associated with defective large artery elastogenesis. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that carotid artery elastic function was impaired in patients with tetralogy of Fallot (ToF). The study included 45 Fallot-patients (male:female 27:18; age 21.0 ± 11.8 years) and 45 age- and gender-matched healthy control individuals. Carotid artery diameter, pulsatile distension, and intima-media thickness (IMT) were measured by echotracking device, and carotid blood pressure was determined using applanation tonometry. Carotid artery elasticity was characterized by compliance and distensibility coefficients, stiffness index β, and incremental elastic modulus. All carotid artery elastic parameters showed significant differences between groups. The compliance coefficient was 36%, and the distensibility coefficient was 33% smaller, whereas stiffness index β was 46% and incremental elastic modulus was 40% larger in Fallot-patients. Fallot-patients also had larger carotid artery IMT as compared to that of healthy individuals. Carotid artery is markedly stiffer in Fallot-patients suggesting that impaired elastogenesis is a component of the congenital abnormality. Increased large artery stiffness might contribute directly and indirectly (through impairment of baroreflex function) to the higher mortality found in ToF patients.

  13. Aberrant Functional Connectivity and Structural Atrophy in Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Relationship with Cognitive Impairments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Haibao; Zhu, Xiaoqun; Xu, Liyan; Sun, Zhongwu; Yu, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal structures in the cortical and subcortical regions have been identified in subcortical vascular cognition impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the functional alterations in SVCI, and no study refers to the functional connectivity in the prefrontal and subcortical regions in this context. The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is an important region of the executive network and default mode network, and the subcortical thalamus plays vital roles in mediating or modulating these two networks. To investigate both thalamus- and MPFC-related functional connectivity as well as its relationship with cognition in SVCI, 32 SVCI patients and 23 control individuals were administered neuropsychological assessments. They also underwent structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity analysis were performed to detect gray matter (GM) atrophy and to characterize the functional alterations in the thalamus and the MPFC. For structural data, we observed that GM atrophy was distributed in both cortical regions and subcortical areas. For functional data, we observed that the thalamus functional connectivity in SVCI was significantly decreased in several cortical regions [i.e., the orbitofrontal lobe (OFL)], which are mainly involved in executive function and memory function. However, connectivity was increased in several frontal regions (i.e., the inferior frontal gyrus), which may be induced by the compensatory recruitment of the decreased functional connectivity. The MPFC functional connectivity was also decreased in executive- and memory-related regions (i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex) along with a motor region (i.e., the supplementary motor area). In addition, the cognitive performance was closely correlated with functional connectivity between the left thalamus and the left OFL in SVCI. The present study, thus, provides evidence for an association between structural and functional alterations

  14. Aberrant Functional Connectivity and Structural Atrophy in Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Relationship with Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xia; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Haibao; Zhu, Xiaoqun; Xu, Liyan; Sun, Zhongwu; Yu, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal structures in the cortical and subcortical regions have been identified in subcortical vascular cognition impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the functional alterations in SVCI, and no study refers to the functional connectivity in the prefrontal and subcortical regions in this context. The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is an important region of the executive network and default mode network, and the subcortical thalamus plays vital roles in mediating or modulating these two networks. To investigate both thalamus- and MPFC-related functional connectivity as well as its relationship with cognition in SVCI, 32 SVCI patients and 23 control individuals were administered neuropsychological assessments. They also underwent structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity analysis were performed to detect gray matter (GM) atrophy and to characterize the functional alterations in the thalamus and the MPFC. For structural data, we observed that GM atrophy was distributed in both cortical regions and subcortical areas. For functional data, we observed that the thalamus functional connectivity in SVCI was significantly decreased in several cortical regions [i.e., the orbitofrontal lobe (OFL)], which are mainly involved in executive function and memory function. However, connectivity was increased in several frontal regions (i.e., the inferior frontal gyrus), which may be induced by the compensatory recruitment of the decreased functional connectivity. The MPFC functional connectivity was also decreased in executive- and memory-related regions (i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex) along with a motor region (i.e., the supplementary motor area). In addition, the cognitive performance was closely correlated with functional connectivity between the left thalamus and the left OFL in SVCI. The present study, thus, provides evidence for an association between structural and functional alterations

  15. Aberrant Functional Connectivity and Structural Atrophy in Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment: Relationship with Cognitive Impairments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Haibao; Zhu, Xiaoqun; Xu, Liyan; Sun, Zhongwu; Yu, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal structures in the cortical and subcortical regions have been identified in subcortical vascular cognition impairment (SVCI). However, little is known about the functional alterations in SVCI, and no study refers to the functional connectivity in the prefrontal and subcortical regions in this context. The medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is an important region of the executive network and default mode network, and the subcortical thalamus plays vital roles in mediating or modulating these two networks. To investigate both thalamus- and MPFC-related functional connectivity as well as its relationship with cognition in SVCI, 32 SVCI patients and 23 control individuals were administered neuropsychological assessments. They also underwent structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Voxel-based morphometry and functional connectivity analysis were performed to detect gray matter (GM) atrophy and to characterize the functional alterations in the thalamus and the MPFC. For structural data, we observed that GM atrophy was distributed in both cortical regions and subcortical areas. For functional data, we observed that the thalamus functional connectivity in SVCI was significantly decreased in several cortical regions [i.e., the orbitofrontal lobe (OFL)], which are mainly involved in executive function and memory function. However, connectivity was increased in several frontal regions (i.e., the inferior frontal gyrus), which may be induced by the compensatory recruitment of the decreased functional connectivity. The MPFC functional connectivity was also decreased in executive- and memory-related regions (i.e., the anterior cingulate cortex) along with a motor region (i.e., the supplementary motor area). In addition, the cognitive performance was closely correlated with functional connectivity between the left thalamus and the left OFL in SVCI. The present study, thus, provides evidence for an association between structural and functional alterations

  16. [The Starr-Edwards heart valve: one of the oldest mechanical heart valves still functioning today].

    PubMed

    Schoenaker, Michiel H; van Wetten, Herbert B; Morshuis, Wim J

    2015-01-01

    In the 1960s, the Starr-Edwards valve was the first artificial heart valve to be successfully implanted in humans. This valve has now been in use for decades with outstanding results: patients whose life expectancy had previously been short acquired a good prognosis with this development. Nowadays the Starr-Edwards valve is not used anymore, but patients are being described today in whom these valves are still functioning well after more than 40 years.

  17. A patient with heart failure and worsening kidney function.

    PubMed

    Sarnak, Mark J

    2014-10-01

    There is high prevalence of CKD, defined by reduced GFR, in patients with heart failure. Reduced kidney function is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in this patient population. The cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) involves a bidirectional relationship between the heart and kidneys whereby dysfunction in either may exacerbate the function of the other, but this syndrome has been difficult to precisely define because it has many complex physiologic, biochemical, and hormonal abnormalities. The pathophysiology of CRS is not completely understood, but potential mechanisms include reduced kidney perfusion due to decreased forward flow, increased right ventricular and venous pressure, and neurohormonal adaptations. Treatment options include inotropic medications; diuretics; ultrafiltration; and medications, such as β-blockers, inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and more novel treatments that focus on unique aspects of the pathophysiology. Recent observational studies suggest that treatments that result in a decrease in venous pressure and lead to hemoconcentration may be associated with improved outcomes. Patients with CRS that is not responsive to medical interventions should be considered for ventricular assist devices, heart transplantation, or combined heart and kidney transplantation.

  18. Stability and function of glycosaminoglycans in porcine bioprosthetic heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Lovekamp, Joshua J.; Simionescu, Dan T.; Mercuri, Jeremy J.; Zubiate, Brett; Sacks, Michael S.; Vyavahare, Narendra R.

    2007-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are important structural and functional components in native aortic heart valves and in glutaraldehyde (Glut)-fixed bioprosthetic heart valves (BHVs). However, very little is known about the fate of GAGs within the extracellular matrix of BHVs and their contribution to BHV longevity. BHVs used in heart valve replacement surgery have limited durability due to mechanical failure and pathologic calcification. In the present study we bring evidence for the dramatic loss of GAGs from within the BHV cusp structure during storage in saline and both short- and long-term Glut fixation. In order to gain insight into role of GAGs, we compared properties of fresh and Glut-fixed porcine heart valve cusps before and after complete GAG removal. GAG removal resulted in significant morphological and functional tissue alterations, including decreases in cuspal thickness, reduction of water content and diminution of rehydration capacity. By virtue of this diminished hydration, loss of GAGs also greatly increased the ‘‘with-curvature’’ flexural rigidity of cuspal tissue. However, removal of GAGs did not alter calcification potential of BHV cups when implanted in the rat subdermal model. Controlling the extent of pre-implantation GAG degradation in BHVs and development of improved GAG crosslinking techniques are expected to improve the mechanical durability of future cardiovascular bioprostheses. PMID:16144707

  19. Functional MRI in investigating cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rocca, M A; De Meo, E; Filippi, M

    2016-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that the severity of the clinical manifestations of multiple sclerosis (MS) does not simply result from the extent of tissue destruction, but it rather represents a complex balance between tissue damage, tissue repair, and cortical reorganization. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides information about the plasticity of the human brain. Therefore, it has the potential to provide important pieces of information about brain reorganization following MS-related structural damage. When investigating cognitive systems, fMRI changes have been described in virtually all patients with MS and different clinical phenotypes. These functional changes have been related to the extent of brain damage within and outside T2-visible lesions as well as to the involvement of specific central nervous system structures. It has also been suggested that a maladaptive recruitment of specific brain regions might be associated with the appearance of clinical symptoms in MS, such as fatigue and cognitive impairment. fMRI studies from clinically (and cognitively) impaired MS patients may be influenced by different task performances between patients and controls. As a consequence, new strategies have been introduced to assess the role, if any, of brain reorganization in severely impaired patients, including the analysis of resting-state networks. The enhancement of any beneficial effects of this brain adaptive plasticity should be considered as a potential target of therapy for MS. PMID:27580905

  20. Functional engineered human cardiac patches prepared from nature's platform improve heart function after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingjie; Yang, Hui; Bai, Aobing; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xiuya; Wang, Xinhong; Mao, Yishen; Lu, Chao; Qian, Ruizhe; Guo, Feng; Ding, Tianling; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Sifeng; Zhang, Jianyi; Liu, Chen; Sun, Ning

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of induced pluripotent stem cells and directed differentiation techniques, it is now feasible to derive individual-specific cardiac cells for human heart tissue engineering. Here we report the generation of functional engineered human cardiac patches using human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived cardiac cells and decellularized natural heart ECM as scaffolds. The engineered human cardiac patches can be tailored to any desired size and shape and exhibited normal contractile and electrical physiology in vitro. Further, when patching on the infarct area, these patches improved heart function of rats with acute myocardial infarction in vivo. These engineered human cardiac patches can be of great value for normal and disease-specific heart tissue engineering, drug screening, and meet the demands for individual-specific heart tissues for personalized regenerative therapy of myocardial damages in the future. PMID:27509303

  1. Functional engineered human cardiac patches prepared from nature's platform improve heart function after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingjie; Yang, Hui; Bai, Aobing; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xiuya; Wang, Xinhong; Mao, Yishen; Lu, Chao; Qian, Ruizhe; Guo, Feng; Ding, Tianling; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Sifeng; Zhang, Jianyi; Liu, Chen; Sun, Ning

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of induced pluripotent stem cells and directed differentiation techniques, it is now feasible to derive individual-specific cardiac cells for human heart tissue engineering. Here we report the generation of functional engineered human cardiac patches using human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived cardiac cells and decellularized natural heart ECM as scaffolds. The engineered human cardiac patches can be tailored to any desired size and shape and exhibited normal contractile and electrical physiology in vitro. Further, when patching on the infarct area, these patches improved heart function of rats with acute myocardial infarction in vivo. These engineered human cardiac patches can be of great value for normal and disease-specific heart tissue engineering, drug screening, and meet the demands for individual-specific heart tissues for personalized regenerative therapy of myocardial damages in the future.

  2. Assessing Depression Related Severity and Functional Impairment: The Overall Depression Severity and Impairment Scale (ODSIS)

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Masaya; Bentley, Kate H.; Oe, Yuki; Nakajima, Shun; Fujisato, Hiroko; Kato, Noriko; Miyamae, Mitsuhiro; Kanie, Ayako; Horikoshi, Masaru; Barlow, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Overall Depression Severity and Impairment Scale (ODSIS) is a brief, five-item measure for assessing the frequency and intensity of depressive symptoms, as well as functional impairments in pleasurable activities, work or school, and interpersonal relationships due to depression. Although this scale is expected to be useful in various psychiatric and mental health settings, the reliability, validity, and interpretability have not yet been fully examined. This study was designed to examine the reliability, factorial, convergent, and discriminant validity of a Japanese version of the ODSIS, as well as its ability to distinguish between individuals with and without a major depressive disorder diagnosis. Methods From a pool of registrants at an internet survey company, 2830 non-clinical and clinical participants were selected randomly (619 with major depressive disorder, 619 with panic disorder, 576 with social anxiety disorder, 645 with obsessive–compulsive disorder, and 371 non-clinical panelists). Participants were asked to respond to the ODSIS and conventional measures of depression, functional impairment, anxiety, neuroticism, satisfaction with life, and emotion regulation. Results Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of three split subsamples indicated the unidimensional factor structure of ODSIS. Multi-group confirmatory factor analysis showed invariance of factor loadings between non-clinical and clinical subsamples. The ODSIS also showed excellent internal consistency and test–retest intraclass correlation coefficients. Convergence and discriminance of the ODSIS with various measures were in line with our expectations. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed that the ODSIS was able to detect a major depressive syndrome accurately. Conclusions This study supports the reliability and validity of ODSIS in a non-western population, which can be interpreted as demonstrating cross-cultural validity. PMID:25874558

  3. Strongmen sport is associated with larger absolute heart size and impaired cardiac relaxation.

    PubMed

    Venckunas, Tomas; Vasiliauskas, Donatas; Marcinkeviciene, Jolanta E; Grizas, Vytautas; Stasiulis, Arvydas; Malkova, Dalia

    2011-10-01

    This study was carried out to compare cardiac structure and function and blood lipids among Strongmen, sedentary controls, and marathoners. Echocardiography was performed, and endothelial function, blood lipids and maximal oxygen uptake were measured in 27 Caucasian adult men (8 Strongmen, 10 marathoners, 9 controls). Absolute cardiac size parameters such as left ventricular (LV) diameter and wall thickness of Strongmen were higher (p < 0.05), but relative (body surface area indexed) parameters were not different between controls and Strongmen. In Strongmen, the relative LV diameter (p < 0.05), wall thickness (p < 0.001), and LV mass index (p < 0.01) were lower than in marathoners. The absolute but not relative right ventricular diameter was larger in Strongmen as compared with controls, whereas all of the measured relative cardiac size parameters were higher in marathoners as opposed to in controls. The endothelial function and the ratio of wall thickness to chamber diameter were similar among the groups (p > 0.05). Maximal oxygen uptake of Strongmen was lower than in controls (p < 0.05) and marathoners (p < 0.001). Global diastolic LV function of Strongmen was impaired in comparison to controls (p < 0.05) and marathoners (p < 0.05). Plasma lipids were not different between Strongmen and sedentary controls, but in comparison to runners, Strongmen had higher low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (p < 0.05) and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p < 0.01). Participation in Strongmen sport is associated with higher absolute but not relative cardiac size parameters, impaired myocardial relaxation, and low cardiorespiratory fitness. Therefore, Strongmen may demand greater attention as an extreme group of athletes with regard to cardiovascular risk.

  4. The Early Indicators of Functional Decrease in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kubicki, Alexandre; Fautrelle, Lilian; Bourrelier, Julien; Rouaud, Olivier; Mourey, France

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Motor deficiency is associated with cognitive frailty in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairments (MCI). In this study we aimed to test the integrity in muscle synergies involved in an arm-pointing movement in functionally unimpaired MCI patients. We hypothesized that early motor indicators exist in this population at a preclinical level. Methods: Electromyographic signals were collected for 11 muscles in 3 groups: Young Adults (YA), Older Adults (OA), and MCI patients. The OA and MCI groups presented the same functional status. Each subject performed 20 arm-pointing movements from a standing position. Results: The main differences were (1) an earlier activation of the left Obliquus internus in MCI compared with OA group, (2) an earlier activation for the MCI compared with both OA and YA. The temporal differences in muscle synergies between MCI and OA groups were linked with executive functions of MCI patients, assessed by the trail making test. Moreover, the results show a delayed activation of the right Biceps Femoris and the right Erector Spinae at l3 in MCI and OA compared with YA. Interpretation: The motor program changes highlighted in our patient MCI group suggest that discrete modifications of the motor command seem to exist even in the absence of functional impairment. Instead of showing an indication of delayed muscle activation in the MCI patients, our results highlight some early activation of several trunk muscles. PMID:27570509

  5. Impairments that Influence Physical Function among Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Carmen L.; Gawade, Prasad L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2015-01-01

    Children treated for cancer are at increased risk of developing chronic health conditions, some of which may manifest during or soon after treatment while others emerge many years after therapy. These health problems may limit physical performance and functional capacity, interfering with participation in work, social, and recreational activities. In this review, we discuss treatment-induced impairments in the endocrine, musculoskeletal, neurological, and cardiopulmonary systems and their influence on mobility and physical function. We found that cranial radiation at a young age was associated with a broad range of chronic conditions including obesity, short stature, low bone mineral density and neuromotor impairments. Anthracyclines and chest radiation are associated with both short and long-term cardiotoxicity. Although numerous chronic conditions are documented among individuals treated for childhood cancer, the impact of these conditions on mobility and function are not well characterized, with most studies limited to survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and brain tumors. Moving forward, further research assessing the impact of chronic conditions on participation in work and social activities is required. Moreover, interventions to prevent or ameliorate the loss of physical function among children treated for cancer are likely to become an important area of survivorship research. PMID:25692094

  6. Impaired protection against diabetes and coronary heart disease by high-density lipoproteins in Turks.

    PubMed

    Onat, Altan; Can, Günay; Ayhan, Erkan; Kaya, Zekeriya; Hergenç, Gülay

    2009-10-01

    The issue of whether or not incident type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease (CHD) can be predicted by high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in both sexes needs investigation. A representative sample of 3035 middle-aged Turkish adults free of CHD at baseline was studied with this purpose prospectively over a mean of 7.8 years. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were found to be correlated in women positively with plasma fibrinogen and weakly with waist girth and C-reactive protein, and to be not correlated with fasting insulin. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol protected men against future CHD risk (for a 12-mg/dL increment: relative risk = 0.80 [95% confidence interval, 0.69-0.95]) after multivariable adjustment in logistic regression analyses for age, smoking status, physical activity grade, hypertension, abdominal obesity, diabetes, and lipid-lowering drugs. However, men were not protected against risk of diabetes. In women, HDL cholesterol was not associated with risk for CHD, whereas intermediate (40-60 mg/dL) compared with lower HDL cholesterol levels proved protective against risk of diabetes (relative risk = 0.57 [95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.90]) after adjustments that included apolipoprotein A-I tertiles. Yet higher serum concentrations failed to yield protection against diabetes. It was concluded that HDL particles confer partially lacking protection against cardiometabolic risk among Turks, and this impairment is modulated by sex. This highly important observation may result from a setting of prevailing chronic subclinical inflammation.

  7. Balance Functional Assessment in People with Visual Impairment.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska, Izabela; Bednarczuk, Grzegorz; Molik, Bartosz; Morgulec-Adamowicz, Natalia; Marszałek, Jolanta; Kaźmierska-Kowalewska, Kalina; Koc, Krzysztof

    2015-11-22

    The aims of this study were twofold: to assess the level of balance of people with visual impairment against the BOT-2 standard scores for the able-bodied, and to identify in which trials subjects had the greatest difficulties in maintaining balance with respect to the degree of vision loss and age categories. One hundred twenty-seven subjects with visual impairment aged 6-16 years, participated in the study (68 girls and 59 boys). The division for partially sighted people (61) and the blind (66) was made according to the WHO classification. Functional balance assessment was made using a balance subtest from the Bruininks-Oseretsky test. Significant relationships were noticed between age and the level of balance (χ2 = 8.35 p <0,05), as well as between the degree of vision loss and the level of balance (χ2 = 24.53 p <0,001). The level of balance of almost all blind subjects was below (20%) or well-below (60%) the average for the able-bodied. The subjects' ability to maintain balance was not dependent on gender and was associated primarily with the degree of visual impairment and age. Partially sighted people had better balance than the blind and the decrease in visual acuity resulted in reduction of balance skills. The lowest level of balance was observed in blind students aged 7-11 years. Elaborating physical fitness improvement programs for children and adolescents with visual impairment, diversity of age, the degree of vision loss and limitations of ablility to maintain balance should be taken into account. PMID:26834878

  8. Ethanol exposure alters early cardiac function in the looping heart: a mechanism for congenital heart defects?

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, Ganga; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Peterson, Lindsy M; Mai, Katherine; McHale, Quinn; Jenkins, Michael W; Linask, Kersti K; Rollins, Andrew M; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-02-01

    Alcohol-induced congenital heart defects are frequently among the most life threatening and require surgical correction in newborns. The etiology of these defects, collectively known as fetal alcohol syndrome, has been the focus of much study, particularly involving cellular and molecular mechanisms. Few studies have addressed the influential role of altered cardiac function in early embryogenesis because of a lack of tools with the capability to assay tiny beating hearts. To overcome this gap in our understanding, we used optical coherence tomography (OCT), a nondestructive imaging modality capable of micrometer-scale resolution imaging, to rapidly and accurately map cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics in real time under physiological conditions. In this study, we exposed avian embryos to a single dose of alcohol/ethanol at gastrulation when the embryo is sensitive to the induction of birth defects. Late-stage hearts were analyzed using standard histological analysis with a focus on the atrio-ventricular valves. Early cardiac function was assayed using Doppler OCT, and structural analysis of the cardiac cushions was performed using OCT imaging. Our results indicated that ethanol-exposed embryos developed late-stage valvuloseptal defects. At early stages, they exhibited increased regurgitant flow and developed smaller atrio-ventricular cardiac cushions, compared with controls (uninjected and saline-injected embryos). The embryos also exhibited abnormal flexion/torsion of the body. Our evidence suggests that ethanol-induced alterations in early cardiac function have the potential to contribute to late-stage valve and septal defects, thus demonstrating that functional parameters may serve as early and sensitive gauges of cardiac normalcy and abnormalities.

  9. Impaired cognitive function and mental performance in mild dehydration.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M-M G; Morley, J E

    2003-12-01

    Dehydration is a reliable predictor of impaired cognitive status. Objective data, using tests of cortical function, support the deterioration of mental performance in mildly dehydrated younger adults. Dehydration frequently results in delirium as a manifestation of cognitive dysfunction. Although, the occurrence of delirium suggests transient acute global cerebral dysfunction, cognitive impairment may not be completely reversible. Animal studies have identified neuronal mitochondrial damage and glutamate hypertransmission in dehydrated rats. Additional studies have identified an increase in cerebral nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase activity (nitric oxide synthase, NOS) with dehydration. Available evidence also implicates NOS as a neurotransmitter in long-term potentiation, rendering this a critical enzyme in facilitating learning and memory. With ageing, a reduction of NOS activity has been identified in the cortex and striatum of rats. The reduction of NOs synthase activity that occurs with ageing may blunt the rise that occurs with dehydration, and possibly interfere with memory processing and cognitive function. Dehydration has been shown to be a reliable predictor of increasing frailty, deteriorating mental performance and poor quality of life. Intervention models directed toward improving outcomes in dehydration must incorporate strategies to enhance prompt recognition of cognitive dysfunction.

  10. Gallium arsenide exposure impairs splenic B cell accessory function.

    PubMed

    Gondre-Lewis, Timothy A; Hartmann, Constance B; Caffrey, Rebecca E; McCoy, Kathleen L

    2003-03-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is utilized in industries for its semiconductor and optical properties. Chemical exposure of animals systemically suppresses several immune functions. The ability of splenic B cells to activate antigen-specific helper CD4(+) T cell hybridomas was assessed, and various aspects of antigen-presenting cell function were examined. GaAs-exposed murine B cells were impaired in processing intact soluble protein antigens, and the defect was antigen dependent. In contrast, B cells after exposure competently presented peptides to the T cells, which do not require processing. Cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and several costimulatory molecules on splenic B cells, which are critical for helper T cell activation, was not affected by chemical exposure. GaAs exposure also did not influence the stability of MHC class II heterodimers, suggesting that the defect may precede peptide exchange. GaAs-exposed B cells contained a normal level of aspartyl cathepsin activity; however, proteolytic activities of thiol cathepsins B and L were approximately half the control levels. Furthermore, two cleavage fragments of invariant chain, a molecular chaperone of MHC class II molecules, were increased in GaAs-exposed B cells, indicative of defective degradation. Thus, diminished thiol proteolytic activity in B cells may be responsible for their impaired antigen processing and invariant chain degradation, which may contribute to systemic immunosuppression caused by GaAs exposure.

  11. Impaired endothelial function and blood flow in repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Brunnekreef, J; Brunnekreef, J J; Benda, N; Benda, N M M; Schreuder, T; Schreuder, T H A; Hopman, M; Hopman, M T E; Thijssen, D; Thijssen, D H J

    2012-10-01

    Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) is a disabling upper extremity overuse injury that may be associated with pathophysiological changes in the vasculature. In this study we investigated whether RSI is associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired exercise-induced blood flow in the affected forearm. 10 patients with RSI (age, 40.2 ± 10.3; BMI, 23.8 ± 3.3) and 10 gender- and age-matched control subjects (age, 38.0 ± 12.4; BMI, 22.7 ± 3.4) participated in this study. Brachial artery blood flow was measured at rest and during 3-min periods of isometric handgrip exercise at 15%, 30% and 45% of the individual maximal voluntary contraction. Brachial artery endothelial function was assessed as the flow mediated dilation (FMD), by measuring brachial artery diameter and velocity before and after 5-min ischemic occlusion. We found a lower exercise-induced brachial artery blood flow in patients with RSI than in controls (p=0.04). Brachial artery FMD was significantly lower in patients with RSI than in controls (p<0.01), whilst a lower FMD was also found in patient with unilateral RSI when comparing the affected arm with the non-affected arm (p=0.04). Our results suggest that patients with RSI have an attenuated exercise-induced blood flow and an impaired endothelial function in the affected arm. These findings importantly improve our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanism of RSI.

  12. Structural Equation Modeling of Motor Impairment, Gross Motor Function, and the Functional Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study…

  13. Functional evolution of cardiac microRNAs in heart development and functions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen-Ching; Chang, Yao-Ming; Pan, Cheng-Tsung; Chen, Chien-Chang; Ling, Li; Tsao, Ku-Chi; Yang, Ruey-Bing; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression either by degrading target mRNAs or by suppressing protein translation. miRNAs have been found to be involved in many biological processes, such as development, differentiation, and growth. However, the evolution of miRNA regulatory functions and networks has not been well studied. In this study, we conducted a cross-species analysis to study the evolution of cardiac miRNAs and their regulatory functions and networks. We found that conserved cardiac miRNA target genes have maintained highly conserved cardiac functions. Additionally, most of cardiac miRNA target genes in human with annotations of cardiac functions evolved from the corresponding homologous targets, which are also involved in heart development-related functions. On the basis of these results, we investigated the functional evolution of cardiac miRNAs and presented a functional evolutionary map. From this map, we identified the evolutionary time at which the cardiac miRNAs became involved in heart development or function and found that the biological processes of heart development evolved earlier than those of heart functions, for example, heart contraction/relaxation or cardiac hypertrophy. Our study of the evolution of the cardiac miRNA regulatory networks revealed the emergence of new regulatory functional branches during evolution. Furthermore, we discovered that early evolved cardiac miRNA target genes tend to participate in the early stages of heart development. This study sheds light on the evolution of developmental features of genes regulated by cardiac miRNAs.

  14. The Reliability of the CVI Range: A Functional Vision Assessment for Children with Cortical Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Children who are identified as visually impaired frequently have a functional vision assessment as one way to determine how their visual impairment affects their educational performance. The CVI Range is a functional vision assessment for children with cortical visual impairment. The purpose of the study presented here was to examine the…

  15. Functional connectivity correlates of response inhibition impairment in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Collantoni, Enrico; Michelon, Silvia; Tenconi, Elena; Degortes, Daniela; Titton, Francesca; Manara, Renzo; Clementi, Maurizio; Pinato, Claudia; Forzan, Monica; Cassina, Matteo; Santonastaso, Paolo; Favaro, Angela

    2016-01-30

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a disorder characterized by high levels of cognitive control and behavioral perseveration. The present study aims at exploring inhibitory control abilities and their functional connectivity correlates in patients with AN. Inhibitory control - an executive function that allows the realization of adaptive behavior according to environmental contingencies - has been assessed by means of the Stop-Signal paradigm. The study involved 155 patients with lifetime AN and 102 healthy women. A subsample underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and was genotyped for COMT and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms. AN patients showed an impaired response inhibition and a disruption of the functional connectivity of the ventral attention circuit, a neural network implicated in behavioral response when a stimulus occurs unexpected. The 5-HTTLPR genotype appears to significantly interact with the functional connectivity of ventral attention network in explaining task performance in both patients and controls, suggesting a role of the serotoninergic system in mechanisms of response selection. The disruption of the ventral attention network in patients with AN suggests lower efficiency of bottom-up signal filtering, which might be involved in difficulties to adapt behavioral responses to environmental needs. Our findings deserve further research to confirm their scientific and therapeutic implications.

  16. Executive functioning in preschoolers with specific language impairment

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Constance; Koolen, Sophieke; Hermans, Daan; Scheper, Annette; Knoors, Harry

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Specific Language Impairment (SLI) is still largely beyond our understanding. In this review, a neuropsychological perspective on language impairments in SLI is taken, focusing specifically on executive functioning (EF) in preschoolers (age range: 2.6–6.1 years) with SLI. Based on the studies described in this review, it can be concluded that similar to school-aged children with SLI, preschoolers with SLI show difficulties in working memory, inhibition and shifting, as revealed by both performance based measures and behavioral ratings. It seems plausible that a complex, reciprocal relationship exists between language and EF throughout development. Future research is needed to examine if, and if yes how, language and EF interact in SLI. Broad neuropsychological assessment in which both language and EF are taken into account may contribute to early detection of SLI. This in turn can lead to early and tailored treatment of children with (suspected) SLI aimed not only at stimulating language development but also at strengthening EF. PMID:26539136

  17. The Influence of Motor Impairment on Autonomic Heart Rate Modulation among Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamuner, Antonio Roberto; Cunha, Andrea Baraldi; da Silva, Ester; Negri, Ana Paola; Tudella, Eloisa; Moreno, Marlene Aparecida

    2011-01-01

    The study of heart rate variability is an important tool for a noninvasive evaluation of the neurocardiac integrity. The present study aims to evaluate the autonomic heart rate modulation in supine and standing positions in 12 children diagnosed with cerebral palsy and 16 children with typical motor development (control group), as well as to…

  18. Overexpression of glutathione peroxidase attenuates myocardial remodeling and preserves diastolic function in diabetic heart.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Shouji; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Ide, Tomomi; Matsusaka, Hidenori; Inoue, Naoki; Ohta, Yukihiro; Yokota, Takashi; Sunagawa, Kenji; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2006-11-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the structural and functional abnormalities of diabetic heart. Glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) is a critical antioxidant enzyme that removes H(2)O(2) in both the cytosol and mitochondia. We hypothesized that the overexpression of GSHPx gene could attenuate left ventricular (LV) remodeling in diabetes mellitus (DM). We induced DM by injection of streptozotocin (160 mg/kg ip) in male GSHPx transgenic mice (TG+DM) and nontransgenic wildtype littermates (WT+DM). GSHPx activity was higher in the hearts of TG mice compared with WT mice, with no significant changes in other antioxidant enzymes. LV thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances measured in TG+DM at 8 wk were significantly lower than those in WT+DM (58 +/- 3 vs. 71 +/- 5 nmol/g, P < 0.05). Heart rate and aortic blood pressure were comparable between groups. Systolic function was preserved normal in WT+DM and TG+DM mice. In contrast, diastolic function was impaired in WT+DM and was improved in TG+DM as assessed by the deceleration time of peak velocity of transmitral diastolic flow and the time needed for relaxation of 50% maximal LV pressure to baseline value (tau; 13.5 +/- 1.2 vs. 8.9 +/- 0.7 ms, P < 0.01). The TG+DM values were comparable with those of WT+Control (tau; 7.8 +/- 0.2 ms). Improvement of LV diastolic function was accompanied by the attenuation of myocyte hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and apoptosis. Overexpression of GSHPx gene ameliorated LV remodeling and diastolic dysfunction in DM. Therapies designed to interfere with oxidative stress might be beneficial to prevent cardiac abnormalities in DM. PMID:16844917

  19. Decreased function of survival motor neuron protein impairs endocytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadi, Maria; Derdowski, Aaron; Kalloo, Geetika; Maginnis, Melissa S; O'Hern, Patrick; Bliska, Bryn; Sorkaç, Altar; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Cook, Steven J; Poulogiannis, George; Atwood, Walter J; Hall, David H; Hart, Anne C

    2016-07-26

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by depletion of the ubiquitously expressed survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, with 1 in 40 Caucasians being heterozygous for a disease allele. SMN is critical for the assembly of numerous ribonucleoprotein complexes, yet it is still unclear how reduced SMN levels affect motor neuron function. Here, we examined the impact of SMN depletion in Caenorhabditis elegans and found that decreased function of the SMN ortholog SMN-1 perturbed endocytic pathways at motor neuron synapses and in other tissues. Diminished SMN-1 levels caused defects in C. elegans neuromuscular function, and smn-1 genetic interactions were consistent with an endocytic defect. Changes were observed in synaptic endocytic proteins when SMN-1 levels decreased. At the ultrastructural level, defects were observed in endosomal compartments, including significantly fewer docked synaptic vesicles. Finally, endocytosis-dependent infection by JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) was reduced in human cells with decreased SMN levels. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that SMN depletion causes defects in endosomal trafficking that impair synaptic function, even in the absence of motor neuron cell death. PMID:27402754

  20. Impaired orofacial motor functions on chronic temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Cláudia Lúcia Pimenta; Machado, Bárbara Cristina Zanandréa; Borges, Carina Giovana Pissinatti; Rodrigues Da Silva, Marco Antonio M; Sforza, Chiarella; De Felício, Cláudia Maria

    2014-08-01

    Because temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) rehabilitation continues to be a challenge, a more comprehensive picture of the orofacial functions in patients with chronic pain is required. This study assessed the orofacial functions, including surface electromyography (EMG) of dynamic rhythmic activities, in patients with moderate-severe signs and symptoms of chronic TMD. It was hypothesized that orofacial motor control differs between patients with moderate-severe chronic TMD and healthy subjects. Seventy-six subjects (46 with TMD and 30 control) answered questionnaires of severity of TMD and chewing difficulties. Orofacial functions and EMG during chewing were assessed. Standardized EMG indices were obtained by quantitative analysis of the differential EMG signals of the paired masseter and temporal muscles, and used to describe muscular action during chewing. TMD patients showed significant greater difficulty in chewing; worse orofacial scores; longer time for free mastication; a less accurate recruitment of the muscles on the working and balancing sides, reduced symmetrical mastication index (SMI) and increased standardized activity during EMG test than healthy subjects. SMI, TMD severity and orofacial myofunctional scores were correlated (P<0.01). Impaired orofacial functions and increased activity of the muscles of balancing sides during unilateral chewing characterized the altered orofacial motor control in patients with moderate-severe chronic TMD. Implications for rehabilitation are discussed.

  1. Expression and Function of Ccbe1 in the Chick Early Cardiogenic Regions Are Required for Correct Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Elizabeth; Inácio, José Manuel; Belo, José António

    2014-01-01

    During the course of a differential screen to identify transcripts specific for chick heart/hemangioblast precursor cells, we have identified Ccbe1 (Collagen and calcium-binding EGF-like domain 1). While the importance of Ccbe1 for the development of the lymphatic system is now well demonstrated, its role in cardiac formation remained unknown. Here we show by whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis that cCcbe1 mRNA is initially detected in early cardiac progenitors of the two bilateral cardiogenic fields (HH4), and at later stages on the second heart field (HH9-18). Furthermore, cCcbe1 is expressed in multipotent and highly proliferative cardiac progenitors. We characterized the role of cCcbe1 during early cardiogenesis by performing functional studies. Upon morpholino-induced cCcbe1 knockdown, the chick embryos displayed heart malformations, which include aberrant fusion of the heart fields, leading to incomplete terminal differentiation of the cardiomyocytes. cCcbe1 overexpression also resulted in severe heart defects, including cardia bifida. Altogether, our data demonstrate that although cardiac progenitors cells are specified in cCcbe1 morphants, the migration and proliferation of cardiac precursors cells are impaired, suggesting that cCcbe1 is a key gene during early heart development. PMID:25545279

  2. Acrylamide exposure impairs blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xue; Yan, Licheng; Yao, Lin; Guan, Weijun; Zeng, Fanxu; Cao, Fuyuan; Zhang, Yanshu

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies show that chronic acrylamide exposure leads to central and peripheral neu-ropathy. However, the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. In this study, we examined the permeability of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and its ability to secrete transthyretin and transport leptin of rats exposed to acrylamide for 7, 14, 21 or 28 days. Transthyretin levels in cerebrospinal fluid began to decline on day 7 after acrylamide exposure. The sodium fluorescein level in cerebrospinal fluid was increased on day 14 after exposure. Evans blue concentration in cerebrospinal fluid was increased and the cerebrospinal fluid/serum leptin ratio was decreased on days 21 and 28 after exposure. In comparison, the cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratio was increased on day 28 after exposure. Our findings show that acrylamide exposure damages the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and impairs secretory and transport functions. These changes may underlie acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:25206854

  3. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    SciTech Connect

    Asdonk, Tobias; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 {mu}g of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5 Prime end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  4. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  5. Melamine Impairs Renal and Vascular Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiao Yu; Wong, Wing Tak; Lau, Chi Wai; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Cheang, Wai San; Liu, Jian; Lu, Ye; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Chen, Zhen Yu; Mok, Chuen-Shing; Lau, Chau-Ming; Huang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Melamine incident, linked to nephrotoxicity and kidney stone in infants previously exposed to melamine-contaminated milk products, was unprecedentedly grave in China in 2008 as little was known about the mechanistic process leading to renal dysfunction in affected children. This study investigates whether neonatal ingestion of melamine leads to renal and vascular dysfunction in adulthood; and whether ingestion of melamine in pregnant rats leads to renal dysfunction in their offspring. A combination of approaches employed includes functional studies in rat renal arteries, renal blood flow measurement by functional magnetic resonance imaging, assay for pro-inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry, and detection of plasma and renal melamine. We provide mechanistic evidence showing for the first time that melamine reduces renal blood flow and impairs renal and vascular function associated with overexpression of inflammatory markers, transforming growth factor-β1, bone morphogenic protein 4 and cyclooxygenase-2 in kidney and renal vasculature. Melamine also induces renal inflammation and fibrosis. More importantly, melamine causes nephropathies in offsprings from pregnant rat exposed to melamine during pregnancy, as well as in neonatal rat exposed to melamine afterbirth, thus supporting the clinical observations of kidney stone and acute renal failure in infants consuming melamine-contaminated milk products. PMID:27324576

  6. Impairment of T Cell Function in Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Vasco; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela; Laforge, Mireille; Ouaissi, Ali; Akharid, Khadija; Silvestre, Ricardo; Estaquier, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    In mammals subverted as hosts by protozoan parasites, the latter and/or the agonists they release are detected and processed by sensors displayed by many distinct immune cell lineages, in a tissue(s)-dependent context. Focusing on the T lymphocyte lineage, we review our present understanding on its transient or durable functional impairment over the course of the developmental program of the intracellular parasites Leishmania spp., Plasmodium spp., Toxoplasma gondii, and Trypanosoma cruzi in their mammalian hosts. Strategies employed by protozoa to down-regulate T lymphocyte function may act at the initial moment of naïve T cell priming, rendering T cells anergic or unresponsive throughout infection, or later, exhausting T cells due to antigen persistence. Furthermore, by exploiting host feedback mechanisms aimed at maintaining immune homeostasis, parasites can enhance T cell apoptosis. We will discuss how infections with prominent intracellular protozoan parasites lead to a general down-regulation of T cell function through T cell anergy and exhaustion, accompanied by apoptosis, and ultimately allowing pathogen persistence. PMID:24551250

  7. Assistive Devices for Children with Functional Impairments: Impact on Child and Caregiver Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Stacey; Skelton, Heather; Rosenbaum, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Functional impairments can limit a child's ability to participate in the experiences of childhood. This "deprivation" can, in turn, have a negative effect on such children's development, academic performance, and quality of life, as well as on the lives of their caregivers and families. Many adults use assistive devices to overcome functional…

  8. Compensating for Executive Function Impairments after TBI: A Single Case Study of Functional Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkstra, Lyn S.; Flora, Tracy L.

    2002-01-01

    Compensatory strategies were designed to enable a client with traumatic brain injury to obtain professional employment. In a series of speech-language therapy sessions, compensatory strategies targeting impairments in executive function were developed, refined, and trained in mock-interview situations. Significant improvements were noted in…

  9. Functional role of voltage gated Ca2+ channels in heart automaticity

    PubMed Central

    Mesirca, Pietro; Torrente, Angelo G.; Mangoni, Matteo E.

    2015-01-01

    Pacemaker activity of automatic cardiac myocytes controls the heartbeat in everyday life. Cardiac automaticity is under the control of several neurotransmitters and hormones and is constantly regulated by the autonomic nervous system to match the physiological needs of the organism. Several classes of ion channels and proteins involved in intracellular Ca2+ dynamics contribute to pacemaker activity. The functional role of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in heart automaticity and impulse conduction has been matter of debate for 30 years. However, growing evidence shows that VGCCs are important regulators of the pacemaker mechanisms and play also a major role in atrio-ventricular impulse conduction. Incidentally, studies performed in genetically modified mice lacking L-type Cav1.3 (Cav1.3−/−) or T-type Cav3.1 (Cav3.1−/−) channels show that genetic inactivation of these channels strongly impacts pacemaking. In cardiac pacemaker cells, VGCCs activate at negative voltages at the beginning of the diastolic depolarization and importantly contribute to this phase by supplying inward current. Loss-of-function of these channels also impairs atrio-ventricular conduction. Furthermore, inactivation of Cav1.3 channels promotes also atrial fibrillation and flutter in knockout mice suggesting that these channels can play a role in stabilizing atrial rhythm. Genomic analysis demonstrated that Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels are widely expressed in pacemaker tissue of mice, rabbits and humans. Importantly, human diseases of pacemaker activity such as congenital bradycardia and heart block have been attributed to loss-of-function of Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels. In this article, we will review the current knowledge on the role of VGCCs in the generation and regulation of heart rate and rhythm. We will discuss also how loss of Ca2+ entry through VGCCs could influence intracellular Ca2+ handling and promote atrial arrhythmias. PMID:25698974

  10. hnRNP U protein is required for normal pre-mRNA splicing and postnatal heart development and function.

    PubMed

    Ye, Junqiang; Beetz, Nadine; O'Keeffe, Sean; Tapia, Juan Carlos; Macpherson, Lindsey; Chen, Weisheng V; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N; Maniatis, Tom

    2015-06-01

    We report that mice lacking the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP U) in the heart develop lethal dilated cardiomyopathy and display numerous defects in cardiac pre-mRNA splicing. Mutant hearts have disorganized cardiomyocytes, impaired contractility, and abnormal excitation-contraction coupling activities. RNA-seq analyses of Hnrnpu mutant hearts revealed extensive defects in alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding proteins known to be critical for normal heart development and function, including Titin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (Camk2d). Loss of hnRNP U expression in cardiomyocytes also leads to aberrant splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding the excitation-contraction coupling component Junctin. We found that the protein product of an alternatively spliced Junctin isoform is N-glycosylated at a specific asparagine site that is required for interactions with specific protein partners. Our findings provide conclusive evidence for the essential role of hnRNP U in heart development and function and in the regulation of alternative splicing.

  11. hnRNP U protein is required for normal pre-mRNA splicing and postnatal heart development and function

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Junqiang; Beetz, Nadine; O’Keeffe, Sean; Tapia, Juan Carlos; Macpherson, Lindsey; Chen, Weisheng V.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.; Maniatis, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We report that mice lacking the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP U) in the heart develop lethal dilated cardiomyopathy and display numerous defects in cardiac pre-mRNA splicing. Mutant hearts have disorganized cardiomyocytes, impaired contractility, and abnormal excitation–contraction coupling activities. RNA-seq analyses of Hnrnpu mutant hearts revealed extensive defects in alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding proteins known to be critical for normal heart development and function, including Titin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (Camk2d). Loss of hnRNP U expression in cardiomyocytes also leads to aberrant splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding the excitation–contraction coupling component Junctin. We found that the protein product of an alternatively spliced Junctin isoform is N-glycosylated at a specific asparagine site that is required for interactions with specific protein partners. Our findings provide conclusive evidence for the essential role of hnRNP U in heart development and function and in the regulation of alternative splicing. PMID:26039991

  12. Structural equation modeling of motor impairment, gross motor function, and the functional outcome in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-05-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study confirmed the construct of motor impairment and performed structural equation modeling (SEM) between motor impairment, gross motor function, and functional outcomes of regarding activities of daily living in children with CP. 98 children (59 boys, 39 girls) with CP participated in this cross-sectional study. Mean age was 11 y 5 mo (SD 1 y 9 mo). The Manual Muscle Test (MMT), the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), range of motion (ROM) measurement, and the selective motor control (SMC) scale were used to assess motor impairments. Gross motor function and functional outcomes were measured using the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and the Functional Skills domain of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) respectively. Measurement of motor impairment was consisted of strength, spasticity, ROM, and SMC. The construct of motor impairment was confirmed though an examination of a measurement model. The proposed SEM model showed good fit indices. Motor impairment effected gross motor function (β=-.0869). Gross motor function and motor impairment affected functional outcomes directly (β=0.890) and indirectly (β=-0.773) respectively. We confirmed that the construct of motor impairment consist of strength, spasticity, ROM, and SMC and it was identified through measurement model analysis. Functional outcomes are best predicted by gross motor function and motor impairments have indirect effects on functional outcomes. PMID:23500167

  13. The 2-Minute Step Test is Independently Associated with Cognitive Function in Older Adults with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Colbert, Lisa H.; Josephson, Richard; Waechter, Donna; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Cognitive impairment is common in persons with heart failure (HF), and measures like the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) are known to correspond to level of impairment. The 2-minute step test (2MST) has been suggested as a more practical alternative to the 6MWT, though no study has examined whether it is associated with cognitive impairment in persons with HF. This study examined whether the 2MST is associated with cognitive function in older adults with HF. Methods Older adults with HF (N = 145; 68.97±9.31 years) completed the 2MST and a neuropsychological test battery that assessed function in multiple cognitive domains. Results Consistent with past work, HF patients exhibited high rates of cognitive impairment. Hierarchical regression analyses adjusting for demographic and medical characteistics found that the 2MST accounted for unique variance in global cognitive function (ΔR2 = .09, p < .001), executive function (ΔR2 = .03, p < .05), and language (ΔR2 = .10, p < .001). A trend emerged for attention (ΔR2 = .02, p = .09), Follow-up tests indicated that better 2MST performance was significantly correlated with better global, attention, executive, and language test performance. Conclusion The current results indicate that the 2MST is associated with cognitive function in older adults with HF. Further work is needed to clarify underlying mechanisms for this association and the value of implementing the 2MST during routine visits. PMID:22182711

  14. Protective Mechanisms of Mitochondria and Heart Function in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tocchetti, Carlo G.; Bhatt, Niraj; Paolocci, Nazareno; Cortassa, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The heart depends on continuous mitochondrial ATP supply and maintained redox balance to properly develop force, particularly under increased workload. During diabetes, however, myocardial energetic-redox balance is perturbed, contributing to the systolic and diastolic dysfunction known as diabetic cardiomyopathy (DC). Critical Issues: How these energetic and redox alterations intertwine to influence the DC progression is still poorly understood. Excessive bioavailability of both glucose and fatty acids (FAs) play a central role, leading, among other effects, to mitochondrial dysfunction. However, where and how this nutrient excess affects mitochondrial and cytoplasmic energetic/redox crossroads remains to be defined in greater detail. Recent Advances: We review how high glucose alters cellular redox balance and affects mitochondrial DNA. Next, we address how lipid excess, either stored in lipid droplets or utilized by mitochondria, affects performance in diabetic hearts by influencing cardiac energetic and redox assets. Finally, we examine how the reciprocal energetic/redox influence between mitochondrial and cytoplasmic compartments shapes myocardial mechanical activity during the course of DC, focusing especially on the glutathione and thioredoxin systems. Future Directions: Protecting mitochondria from losing their ability to generate energy, and to control their own reactive oxygen species emission is essential to prevent the onset and/or to slow down DC progression. We highlight mechanisms enforced by the diabetic heart to counteract glucose/FAs surplus-induced damage, such as lipid storage, enhanced mitochondria-lipid droplet interaction, and upregulation of key antioxidant enzymes. Learning more on the nature and location of mechanisms sheltering mitochondrial functions would certainly help in further optimizing therapies for human DC. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1563–1586. PMID:25674814

  15. Does acute exposure to aldehydes impair pulmonary function and structure?

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mariana de; Neto, Alcendino Cândido; Carvalho, Giovanna; Casquillo, Natalia Vasconcelos; Carvalho, Niedja; Okuro, Renata; Ribeiro, Gabriel C Motta; Machado, Mariana; Cardozo, Aléxia; Silva, Aline Santos E; Barboza, Thiago; Vasconcellos, Luiz Ricardo; Rodrigues, Danielle Araujo; Camilo, Luciana; Carneiro, Leticia de A M; Jandre, Frederico; Pino, Alexandre V; Giannella-Neto, Antonio; Zin, Walter A; Corrêa, Leonardo Holanda Travassos; Souza, Marcio Nogueira de; Carvalho, Alysson R

    2016-07-15

    Mixtures of anhydrous ethyl alcohol and gasoline substituted for pure gasoline as a fuel in many Brazilian vehicles. Consequently, the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as ketones, other organic compounds, and particularly aldehydes increased in many Brazilian cities. The current study aims to investigate whether formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, or mixtures of both impair lung function, morphology, inflammatory and redox responses at environmentally relevant concentrations. For such purpose, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either medical compressed air or to 4 different mixtures of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Eight hours later animals were anesthetized, paralyzed and lung mechanics and morphology, inflammatory cells and IL-1β, KC, TNF-α, IL-6, CCL2, MCP-1 contents, superoxide dismutase and catalalase activities were determined. The extra pulmonary respiratory tract was also analyzed. No differences could be detected between any exposed and control groups. In conclusion, no morpho-functional alterations were detected in exposed mice in relation to the control group. PMID:27102012

  16. Left ventricular function impairment in pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vázquez Blanco, M; Roisinblit, J; Grosso, O; Rodriguez, G; Robert, S; Berensztein, C S; Vega, H R; Lerman, J

    2001-03-01

    The changes induced by transient hypertension on cardiac structure and function are unclear. Pregnancy-induced hypertension offers a natural and spontaneous model of this condition. To assess the potential of echocardiographic Doppler to unmask left ventricular function impairment, we studied 28 women aged 26.4 +/- 7.2 years with pregnancy-induced hypertension defined as blood pressure higher than 140/90 mm Hg in the third trimester of pregnancy without a history of hypertension. Twenty normal pregnant women, aged 27.5 +/- 6.4 years, were the controls. Left ventricular diastolic diameter, fractional shortening, E velocity, A velocity, E/A ratio, isovolumetric relaxation time (IRT), isovolumetric contraction time (ICT), ejection time (ET), and the combined index of myocardial performance (Tei index = IRT + ICT/ET), were calculated by echocardiography Doppler 2 to 4 days postpartum. There were statistically significant differences between groups in the following parameters: E/A ratio: 1.3 +/- 0.3 in pregnancy-induced hypertension v 1.5 +/- 0.3 in normal pregnant women (P < .05), IRT: 104 +/- 14 msec v 84 +/- 7 msec (P < .000), and the Tei index: 0.51 +/- 0.15 v 0.35 +/- 0.04 (P < .00), respectively. According to this data pregnancy-induced hypertension evaluated 2 to 4 days after delivery showed left ventricular dysfunction, mainly diastolic. The IRT and the Tei index are the most useful echocardiographic parameters to unmask left ventricular dysfunction in pregnancy-induced hypertension.

  17. Sleep Restriction Impairs Blood–Brain Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    He, Junyun; Hsuchou, Hung; He, Yi; Kastin, Abba J.; Wang, Yuping

    2014-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a large regulatory and exchange interface between the brain and peripheral circulation. We propose that changes of the BBB contribute to many pathophysiological processes in the brain of subjects with chronic sleep restriction (CSR). To achieve CSR that mimics a common pattern of human sleep loss, we quantified a new procedure of sleep disruption in mice by a week of consecutive sleep recording. We then tested the hypothesis that CSR compromises microvascular function. CSR not only diminished endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase, endothelin1, and glucose transporter expression in cerebral microvessels of the BBB, but it also decreased 2-deoxy-glucose uptake by the brain. The expression of several tight junction proteins also was decreased, whereas the level of cyclooxygenase-2 increased. This coincided with an increase of paracellular permeability of the BBB to the small tracers sodium fluorescein and biotin. CSR for 6 d was sufficient to impair BBB structure and function, although the increase of paracellular permeability returned to baseline after 24 h of recovery sleep. This merits attention not only in neuroscience research but also in public health policy and clinical practice. PMID:25355222

  18. Immunomodulation of phloretin by impairing dendritic cell activation and function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Chen; Chu, Ching-Liang; Ng, Chin-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yen; Chen, Der-Yuan; Pan, I-Hong; Huang, Kao-Jean

    2014-05-01

    Dietary compounds in fruits and vegetables have been shown to exert many biological activities. In addition to antioxidant effects, a number of flavonoids are able to modulate inflammatory responses. Here, we demonstrated that phloretin (PT), a natural dihydrochalcone found in many fruits, suppressed the activation and function of mouse dendritic cells (DCs). Phloretin disturbed the multiple intracellular signaling pathways in DCs induced by the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS), including ROS, MAPKs (ERK, JNK, p38 MAPK), and NF-κB, and thereby reducing the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Phloretin also effectively suppressed the activation of DCs treated with different dosages of LPS or various TLR agonists. The LPS-induced DC maturation was attenuated by phloretin because the expression levels of the MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecules were down-regulated, which then inhibited the LPS-stimulating DCs and the subsequent naïve T cell activation in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. Moreover, in vivo administration of phloretin suppressed the phenotypic maturation of the LPS-challenged splenic DCs and decreased the IFN-γ production from the activated CD4 T cells. Thus, we suggest that phloretin may potentially be an immunomodulator by impairing the activation and function of DCs and phloretin-contained fruits may be helpful in the improvement of inflammation and autoimmune diseases. PMID:24651121

  19. Acrolein impairs the cholesterol transport functions of high density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Holme, Rebecca L; Chen, Yiliang; Thomas, Michael J; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Silverstein, Roy L; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Sahoo, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are considered athero-protective, primarily due to their role in reverse cholesterol transport, where they transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. The current study was designed to determine the impact of HDL modification by acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde found in high abundance in cigarette smoke, on the cholesterol transport functions of HDL. HDL was chemically-modified with acrolein and immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed apolipoprotein crosslinking, as well as acrolein adducts on apolipoproteins A-I and A-II. The ability of acrolein-modified HDL (acro-HDL) to serve as an acceptor of free cholesterol (FC) from COS-7 cells transiently expressing SR-BI was significantly decreased. Further, in contrast to native HDL, acro-HDL promotes higher neutral lipid accumulation in murine macrophages as judged by Oil Red O staining. The ability of acro-HDL to mediate efficient selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters (CE) into SR-BI-expressing cells was reduced compared to native HDL. Together, the findings from our studies suggest that acrolein modification of HDL produces a dysfunctional particle that may ultimately promote atherogenesis by impairing functions that are critical in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway.

  20. Impaired reproductive function of male rats infected with Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Abdoli, A; Dalimi, A; Movahedin, M

    2012-05-01

    Toxoplasmosis is one of the classical conditions known to have an adverse effect on female reproductive functions, but a few investigations into male reproductive parameters have been performed. This work was carried out to study the effects of Toxoplasma gondii on reproductive function in male rats. Male rats were infected with the RH strain of T. gondii tachyzoites, and following every 10 days from 10 to 70 postinfection (PI), the percentage of body weight to testis weight ratio as well as epididymal sperm parameters (number, motility, viability, and morphology rates), serum testosterone (ST), intratesticular testosterone (ITT), serum lactate dehydrogenase (SLDH), intratesticular lactate dehydrogenase and fructose in seminal vesicles and coagulating glands were measured. The results of the study showed sperm motility, viability and concentration rates were significantly decreased temporary after infection up to 70 days. Sperm abnormality was also increased during these days. In addition, temporary alteration in ST, ITT, SLDH, intratesticular LDH and fructose in seminal vesicle and coagulating gland was observed PI. These findings suggest that toxoplasmosis can cause impermanent impairment on the reproductive parameters of male rats.

  1. Sleep restriction impairs blood-brain barrier function.

    PubMed

    He, Junyun; Hsuchou, Hung; He, Yi; Kastin, Abba J; Wang, Yuping; Pan, Weihong

    2014-10-29

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a large regulatory and exchange interface between the brain and peripheral circulation. We propose that changes of the BBB contribute to many pathophysiological processes in the brain of subjects with chronic sleep restriction (CSR). To achieve CSR that mimics a common pattern of human sleep loss, we quantified a new procedure of sleep disruption in mice by a week of consecutive sleep recording. We then tested the hypothesis that CSR compromises microvascular function. CSR not only diminished endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase, endothelin1, and glucose transporter expression in cerebral microvessels of the BBB, but it also decreased 2-deoxy-glucose uptake by the brain. The expression of several tight junction proteins also was decreased, whereas the level of cyclooxygenase-2 increased. This coincided with an increase of paracellular permeability of the BBB to the small tracers sodium fluorescein and biotin. CSR for 6 d was sufficient to impair BBB structure and function, although the increase of paracellular permeability returned to baseline after 24 h of recovery sleep. This merits attention not only in neuroscience research but also in public health policy and clinical practice.

  2. Fish Consumption, Sleep, Daily Functioning, and Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anita L.; Dahl, Lisbeth; Olson, Gina; Thornton, David; Graff, Ingvild E.; Frøyland, Livar; Thayer, Julian F.; Pallesen, Staale

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: This study investigated the effects of fatty fish on sleep, daily functioning and biomarkers such as heart rate variability (HRV), vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) in red blood cells. Moreover the relationship among sleep, daily functioning, HRV, vitamin D status, and levels of EPA+DHA was investigated. Methods: Ninety-five male forensic patients from a secure forensic inpatient facility in the USA were randomly assigned into a Fish or a Control group. The Fish group received Atlantic salmon three times per week from September to February, and the Control group was provided an alternative meal (e.g., chicken, pork, beef), but with the same nutritional value as their habitual diet, three times per week during the same period. Sleep (sleep latency, sleep efficiency, actual sleep time, and actual wake time), self-perceived sleep quality and daily functioning, as well as vitamin D status, EPA+DHA, and HRV, were assessed pre- and post-intervention period. Results: There was a significant increase in sleep latency from pre- to post-test in the Control group. The Fish group reported better daily functioning than the Control group during post-test. Fish consumption throughout the wintertime had also an effect on resting HRV and EPA+DHA, but not on vitamin D status. However, at post-test, the vitamin D status in the Fish group was still closer to the level regarded as optimal compared to the Control group. Vitamin D status correlated negatively with actual wake time and positively with sleep efficiency during pre-test, as well as positively with daily functioning and sleep quality during post-test. Finally, HRV correlated negatively with sleep latency and positively with daily functioning. Conclusions: Fish consumption seemed to have a positive impact on sleep in general and also on daily functioning, which may be related to vitamin D status and HRV. Citation

  3. Functional MRI detects perfusion impairment in renal allografts with delayed graft function.

    PubMed

    Hueper, Katja; Gueler, Faikah; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Gutberlet, Marcel; Jang, Mi-Sun; Lehner, Frank; Richter, Nicolas; Hanke, Nils; Peperhove, Matti; Martirosian, Petros; Tewes, Susanne; Vo Chieu, Van Dai; Großhennig, Anika; Haller, Hermann; Wacker, Frank; Gwinner, Wilfried; Hartung, Dagmar

    2015-06-15

    Delayed graft function (DGF) after kidney transplantation is not uncommon, and it is associated with long-term allograft impairment. Our aim was to compare renal perfusion changes measured with noninvasive functional MRI in patients early after kidney transplantation to renal function and allograft histology in biopsy samples. Forty-six patients underwent MRI 4-11 days after transplantation. Contrast-free MRI renal perfusion images were acquired using an arterial spin labeling technique. Renal function was assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and renal biopsies were performed when indicated within 5 days of MRI. Twenty-six of 46 patients had DGF. Of these, nine patients had acute rejection (including borderline), and eight had other changes (e.g., tubular injury or glomerulosclerosis). Renal perfusion was significantly lower in the DGF group compared with the group with good allograft function (231 ± 15 vs. 331 ± 15 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1), P < 0.001). Living donor allografts exhibited significantly higher perfusion values compared with deceased donor allografts (P < 0.001). Renal perfusion significantly correlated with eGFR (r = 0.64, P < 0.001), resistance index (r = -0.57, P < 0.001), and cold ischemia time (r = -0.48, P < 0.01). Furthermore, renal perfusion impairment early after transplantation predicted inferior renal outcome and graft loss. In conclusion, noninvasive functional MRI detects renal perfusion impairment early after kidney transplantation in patients with DGF.

  4. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (ogg1) maintains the function of cardiac progenitor cells during heart formation in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lifeng; Zhou, Yong; Yu, Shanhe; Ji, Guixiang; Liu, Wei; Gu, Aihua

    2013-11-15

    Genomic damage may devastate the potential of progenitor cells and consequently impair early organogenesis. We found that ogg1, a key enzyme initiating the base-excision repair, was enriched in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. So far, little is known about DNA repair in cardiogenesis. Here, we addressed the critical role of ogg1 in cardiogenesis for the first time. ogg1 mainly expressed in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), the primary heart tube, and subsequently the embryonic myocardium by in situ hybridisation. Loss of ogg1 resulted in severe cardiac morphogenesis and functional abnormalities, including the short heart length, arrhythmia, decreased cardiomyocytes and nkx2.5{sup +} cardiac progenitor cells. Moreover, the increased apoptosis and repressed proliferation of progenitor cells caused by ogg1 deficiency might contribute to the heart phenotype. The microarray analysis showed that the expression of genes involved in embryonic heart tube morphogenesis and heart structure were significantly changed due to the lack of ogg1. Among those, foxh1 is an important partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage. Our work demonstrates the requirement of ogg1 in cardiac progenitors and heart development in zebrafish. These findings may be helpful for understanding the aetiology of congenital cardiac deficits. - Highlights: • A key DNA repair enzyme ogg1 is expressed in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. • We found that ogg1 is essential for normal cardiac morphogenesis in zebrafish. • The production of embryonic cardiomyocytes requires appropriate ogg1 expression. • Ogg1 critically regulated proliferation of cardiac progenitor cells in zebrafish. • foxh1 is a partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage.

  5. Dynamic heart-in-thorax phantom for functional SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Celler, A.; Lyster, D.; Farncombe, T.

    1996-12-31

    We have designed and built a dynamic heart-in-thorax phantom to be used as a primary tool during the experimental verification of the performance of the quantitative dynamic functional imaging method we are developing for standard rotating single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cameras. The phantom consists of two independent parts (i) a dynamic heart model with the possibility of mounting {open_quotes}defects{close_quotes} inside it and (ii) a non-uniform thorax model with lungs and spinal cord, and uses the fact that the washout of a tracer by dilution is governed by a linear first order equation, the same type of equation as is used to model time-activity distribution in myocardial viability studies. Tests of the dynamic performance of the phantom in planar scanning mode have confirmed the validity of these assumptions. Also the preliminary results obtained in SPECT mode show that the values of characteristic times could be experimentally determined and that these values agreed well with the values preset on the phantom. We consider that the phantom is ready for extensive use in studies into development of the dynamic SPECT method.

  6. Autonomic functions in acrocyanosis assessed by heart rate variability

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Sedat; Yokuşoğlu, Mehmet; Çınar, Muhammet; Şimşek, İsmail; Baysan, Oben; Öz, Bilgehan Savaş; Erdem, Hakan; Pay, Salih; Dinç, Ayhan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the autonomic activity of patients with acrocyanosis by using heart rate variability indices. Material and Methods The study group consisted of 24 patients with acrocyanosis and the control group contained 22 sex- and age-matched healthy subjects. All subjects underwent 24-hour Holter monitoring. Among the heart rate variability (HRV) parameters, time-domain and frequency-domain indices were analysed. Results The time-domain indices of HRV indicating global autonomic functions were found to be increased, and indices indicating parasympathetic activity showed a significant decrease in the patient group. Power-spectral analysis of HRV revealed that the low frequency and high frequency power were higher in the patient group than in controls. However, the ratio of Low Frequency/High Frequency was found to be lower in the patient group than in controls. Conclusion In acrocyanosis, both sympathetic and parasympathetic systems seem to be disrupted. Therefore, we may conclude that acrocyanosis may be resulted of systemic autonomic imbalance rather than pure sympathetic over-activation. Also, these results suggest that acrocyanosis is not a localised disorder; on the contrary, it is associated with various abnormalities of the systemic autonomic nervous system.

  7. Ten-Year Review of Rating Scales, VII: Scales Assessing Functional Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Nancy C.; Collett, Brent R.; Myers, Kathleen M.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This is the seventh in a series of 10-year reviews of rating scales. Here the authors present scales measuring functional impairment, a sequela of mental illness. The measurement of functional impairment has assumed importance with the recognition that symptom resolution does not necessarily correlate with functional improvement.…

  8. Reconstructive procedures for impaired upper airway function: laryngeal respiration

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    The larynx is the "bottleneck" of the human airway. For this reason, the effects of stenosing laryngeal pathologies on the vital factor respiratory gas exchange are particularly critical. Internal stabilization is a prerequisite for recovery of the laryngeal respiratory function in severe forms of inspiratory collapse (laryngomalacia). Effective laser surgery techniques have been developed to this end in recent years. Glottis-dilating surgery in cases of bilateral vocal cord motion impairment is now moving in the direction of endoscopic laser cordotomy or cordectomy, whereas arytenoidectomy and open surgical procedures are now used only rarely due to higher secondary morbidity rates. In individual cases, in particular if functional recovery is expected, temporary laterofixation of a vocal cord using an endoscopic suturing technique can be a helpful approach. Extensive laryngeal defects can be covered by means of composite grafts with mucosal lining, a supporting skeleton and their own vascularization. Autologous transplantation of the larynx, with its complex surgical and immunological problems, has become a manageable procedure. The problems of post-transplantation reinnervation and risk assessment of immunosuppression-induced recurrence of the tumor are still under consideration. Reanimation of the bilaterally paralyzed larynx by means of neurorrhaphy (neurosuture), neural grafting and, more recently, functional electrostimulation (pacemaker) represents a challenge for the coming years. In most cases of paralysis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, a part of the muscles is maintained by synkinetic reinnervation when therapy is carried out, which however also prevents effective vocal cord movement due to simultaneous activity of agonists and antagonists. Modulation of reinnervation by means of electrostimulation and modern genetic therapy approaches justify hopes of better outcomes in the future. PMID:22073057

  9. Assistive devices for children with functional impairments: impact on child and caregiver function.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Stacey; Skelton, Heather; Rosenbaum, Peter

    2008-02-01

    Functional impairments can limit a child's ability to participate in the experiences of childhood. This'deprivation'can, in turn, have a negative effect on such children's development, academic performance, and quality of life, as well as on the lives of their caregivers and families. Many adults use assistive devices to overcome functional impairments and enable them to participate in daily activities; however, such devices may be underutilized by children. Each of the 54 studies reviewed in this report identified one or more functional impairments towards which an assistive device was targeted: accessing a computer (n=3 [studies]), activity assistance (n=2), behaviour changes (n=3), communication (n=30), independent feeding (n=1), living skills (n=1), mobility (n=9), modifying the environment (n=1), nutrition (n=4), and postural stability (n=2). The aim of this review was to determine the impact of assistive devices on the components of functioning defined by the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. The impact of these devices was found to be overwhelmingly positive. Study outcomes reported were mainly child-focused and could be classified as influencing activity, participation, and personal contextual factors, with relatively little attention paid to caregiver-focused outcomes. Few studies provided either qualitative evidence or experimentally-based quantitative research evidence using controls.

  10. Monocyte function is severely impaired by the fluorochrome calcein acetomethylester

    SciTech Connect

    Czepluch, Frauke S.; Olieslagers, Serve J.F.; Waltenberger, Johannes . E-mail: j.waltenberger@cardio.azm.nl

    2007-09-21

    For rapid chemotaxis quantification, cell prelabelling is often performed with the fluorochrome calcein acetomethylester (calcein AM). We investigated whether calcein AM-prelabelling is reliable for monocyte migration analysis. Human monocytes were either preexposed to calcein AM or unlabelled. Monocyte migration towards the potent chemoattractants transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and N-formyl-Methionin-Leucin-Phenylalanin (fMLP) was assessed using a 48-well micro-chemotaxis chamber. For quantification, cells were visualized by light microscopy and counted. Surprisingly, random migration of calcein AM-prelabelled cells was significantly impaired compared to the unlabelled control. Accordingly, monocyte chemotaxis towards either TGF-{beta}1 or fMLP dramatically declined. Adherence of calcein AM-labelled monocytes on plastic was also significantly decreased compared to control cells. As adhesion is regarded as an essential component of monocyte migration, the reduced migration observed in calcein AM-labelled monocytes might be explained by a fluorochrome-induced adhesion defect. Therefore, use of the fluorochrome calcein AM cannot be recommended for functional testing of monocytes.

  11. Elevated copper impairs hepatic nuclear receptor function in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wooton-Kee, Clavia Ruth; Jain, Ajay K; Wagner, Martin; Grusak, Michael A; Finegold, Milton J; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Moore, David D

    2015-09-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in accumulation of copper in the liver as a consequence of mutations in the gene encoding the copper-transporting P-type ATPase (ATP7B). WD is a chronic liver disorder, and individuals with the disease present with a variety of complications, including steatosis, cholestasis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. Similar to patients with WD, Atp7b⁻/⁻ mice have markedly elevated levels of hepatic copper and liver pathology. Previous studies have demonstrated that replacement of zinc in the DNA-binding domain of the estrogen receptor (ER) with copper disrupts specific binding to DNA response elements. Here, we found decreased binding of the nuclear receptors FXR, RXR, HNF4α, and LRH-1 to promoter response elements and decreased mRNA expression of nuclear receptor target genes in Atp7b⁻/⁻ mice, as well as in adult and pediatric WD patients. Excessive hepatic copper has been described in progressive familial cholestasis (PFIC), and we found that similar to individuals with WD, patients with PFIC2 or PFIC3 who have clinically elevated hepatic copper levels exhibit impaired nuclear receptor activity. Together, these data demonstrate that copper-mediated nuclear receptor dysfunction disrupts liver function in WD and potentially in other disorders associated with increased hepatic copper levels.

  12. Aspects of studies on the functional impairment electrohypersensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Olle

    2010-04-01

    Persons, claiming to suffer from exposure to electromagnetic fields, have been described in the literature. In Sweden, electrohypersensitivity (EHS) is an officially fully recognized functional impairment (i.e., it is not regarded as a disease). Survey studies show that somewhere between 230,000 - 290,000 Swedish men and women - out of a population of 9,000,000 - report a variety of symptoms when being in contact with electromagnetic field (EMF) sources. Swedish electrohypersensitive people have their own handicap organization, The Swedish Association for the Electrohypersensitive, which has its own website in both Swedish and English. This organization is included in the Swedish Disability Federation (Handikappförbundens SamarbetsOrgan; HSO). One aim of our studies has been to investigate possible alterations, in the cellular and neuronal systems of these persons' skin. In summary, it is evident from our preliminary data that various alterations are present in the electrohypersensitive persons' skin that are not indicated in the skin of normal healthy volunteers.

  13. Impairments of neural circuit function in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Busche, Marc Aurel; Konnerth, Arthur

    2016-08-01

    An essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in the brain, many years to decades before the onset of overt cognitive symptoms. We suggest that during this very extended early phase of the disease, soluble Aβ oligomers and amyloid plaques alter the function of local neuronal circuits and large-scale networks by disrupting the balance of synaptic excitation and inhibition (E/I balance) in the brain. The analysis of mouse models of AD revealed that an Aβ-induced change of the E/I balance caused hyperactivity in cortical and hippocampal neurons, a breakdown of slow-wave oscillations, as well as network hypersynchrony. Remarkably, hyperactivity of hippocampal neurons precedes amyloid plaque formation, suggesting that hyperactivity is one of the earliest dysfunctions in the pathophysiological cascade initiated by abnormal Aβ accumulation. Therapeutics that correct the E/I balance in early AD may prevent neuronal dysfunction, widespread cell loss and cognitive impairments associated with later stages of the disease.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377723

  14. Concurrent silent strokes impair motor function by limiting behavioral compensation.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Jamshid; Kurio, Kristyn; Metz, Gerlinde A

    2012-08-01

    Silent strokes occur more frequently than classic strokes; however, symptoms may go unreported in spite of lasting tissue damage. A silent stroke may indicate elevated susceptibility to recurrent stroke, which may eventually result in apparent and lasting impairments. Here we investigated if multiple silent strokes to the motor system challenge the compensatory capacity of the brain to cumulatively result in permanent functional deficits. Adult male rats with focal ischemia received single focal ischemic mini-lesions in the sensorimotor cortex (SMC) or the dorsolateral striatum (DLS), or multiple lesions affecting both SMC and DLS. The time course and outcome of motor compensation and recovery were determined by quantitative and qualitative assessment of skilled reaching and skilled walking. Rats with SMC or DLS lesion alone did not show behavioral deficits in either task. However, the combination of focal ischemic lesions in SMC and DLS perturbed skilled reaching accuracy and disrupted forelimb placement in the ladder rung walking task. These observations suggest that multiple focal infarcts, each resembling a silent stroke, gradually compromise the plastic capacity of the motor system to cause permanent motor deficits. Moreover, these findings support the notion that cortical and subcortical motor systems cooperate when adopting beneficial compensatory movement strategies. PMID:22609330

  15. Dexamethasone impairs hypoxia-inducible factor-1 function

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, A.E.; Huck, G.; Stiehl, D.P.; Jelkmann, W.; Hellwig-Buergel, T.

    2008-07-25

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimeric transcription-factor composed of {alpha}- and {beta}-subunits. HIF-1 is not only necessary for the cellular adaptation to hypoxia, but it is also involved in inflammatory processes and wound healing. Glucocorticoids (GC) are therapeutically used to suppress inflammatory responses. Herein, we investigated whether GC modulate HIF-1 function using GC receptor (GR) possessing (HepG2) and GR deficient (Hep3B) human hepatoma cell cultures as model systems. Dexamethasone (DEX) treatment increased HIF-1{alpha} levels in the cytosol of HepG2 cells, while nuclear HIF-1{alpha} levels and HIF-1 DNA-binding was reduced. In addition, DEX dose-dependently lowered the hypoxia-induced luciferase activity in a reporter gene system. DEX suppressed the hypoxic stimulation of the expression of the HIF-1 target gene VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) in HepG2 cultures. DEX did not reduce hypoxically induced luciferase activity in HRB5 cells, a Hep3B derivative lacking GR. Transient expression of the GR in HRB5 cells restored the susceptibility to DEX. Our study discloses the inhibitory action of GC on HIF-1 dependent gene expression, which may be important with respect to the impaired wound healing in DEX-treated patients.

  16. Chlorpheniramine impairs functional recovery in Carassius auratus after telencephalic ablation.

    PubMed

    Garção, D C; Canto-de-Souza, L; Romaguera, F; Mattioli, R

    2009-04-01

    We determined the effect of an H1 receptor antagonist on the functional recovery of Carassius auratus submitted to telencephalic ablation. Five days after surgery the fish underwent a spatial-choice learning paradigm test. The fish, weighing 6-12 g, were divided into four groups: telencephalic ablation (A) or sham lesion (S) and saline (SAL) or chlorpheniramine (CPA, ip, 16 mg/kg). For eight consecutive days each animal was trained individually in sessions separated by 24 h (alternate days). Training trials (T1-T8) consisted of finding the food in one of the feeders, which were randomly blocked for each subject. Animals received an intraperitoneal injection of SAL or CPA 10 min after the training trials. The time spent by the animals in each group to find the food (latency) was analyzed separately at T1 and T8 by the Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by the Student Newman-Keuls test. At T1 the latencies (mean +/- SEM) of the A-SAL (586.3 +/- 13.6) and A-CPA (600 +/- 0) groups were significantly longer than those of the S-SAL (226.14 +/- 61.15) and S-CPA (356.33 +/- 68.8) groups. At T8, the latencies of the A-CPA group (510.11 +/- 62.2) remained higher than those of the other groups, all of which showed significantly shorter latencies (A-SAL = 301.91 +/- 78.32; S-CPA = 191.58 +/- 73.03; S-SAL = 90.28 +/- 41) compared with T1. These results support evidence that training can lead to functional recovery of spatial-choice learning in telencephalonless fish and also that the antagonist of the H1 receptor impairs it.

  17. Functional Impairment in Adult Sleepwalkers: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Regis; Jaussent, Isabelle; Scholz, Sabine; Bayard, Sophie; Montplaisir, Jacques; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the restorative quality of sleep and daytime functioning in sleepwalking adult patients in comparison with controls. Design: Prospective case-control study. Setting: Data were collected at the Sleep Disorders Center, Hôpital-Gui-de Chauliac, Montpellier, France between June 2007 and January 2011. Participants: There were 140 adult sleepwalkers (100 (median age 30 y, 55% male) in whom primary SW was diagnosed) who underwent 1 night of video polysomnography. All patients participated in a standardized clinical interview and completed a battery of questionnaires to assess clinical characteristics of parasomnia, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, insomnia, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and health-related quality of life. Results were compared with those of 100 sex- and age-matched normal controls. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Of the sleepwalkers, 22.3% presented with daily episodes and 43.5% presented with weekly episodes. Median age at sleepwalking onset was 9 y. Familial history of sleepwalking was reported in 56.6% of sleepwalkers and violent sleep related behaviors in 57.9%, including injuries requiring medical care for at least one episode in 17%. Significant associations were found between sleepwalking and daytime sleepiness, fatigue, insomnia, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and altered quality of life. Early-onset sleepwalkers had higher frequency of violent behaviors and injuries. Sleepwalkers with violent behaviors had higher frequency of sleep terrors and triggering factors, with greater alteration in health-related quality of life. Conclusion: Adult sleepwalking is a potentially serious condition that may induce violent behaviors, self-injury or injury to bed partners, sleep disruption, excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and psychological distress, all of which affect health-related quality of life. Citation: Lopez R; Jaussent I; Scholz S; Bayard S; Montplaisir J; Dauvilliers Y. Functional impairment in

  18. Quality of Life and Functional Impairment in Compulsive Hoarding

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Sanjaya; Ayers, Catherine R.; Maidment, Karron M.; Vapnik, Tanya; Wetherell, Julie L.; Bystritsky, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Compulsive hoarding patients have been found in previous studies to have substantial disability and functional impairment. However, no prior study has examined subjective and objective quality of life (QOL) in patients with compulsive hoarding. This present study compared compulsive hoarders and non-hoarding OCD patients across a variety of QOL domains. Subjects were 171 consecutive adult patients (34 compulsive hoarders, 137 non-hoarding patients with DSM-IV OCD) treated openly between 1998 and 2004 in the UCLA OCD Partial Hospitalization Program (OCD PHP), a specialized, intensive, multi-modal treatment program for treatment-refractory patients. Scores on the Quality of Life Scale and other symptom severity measures on admission were compared between compulsive hoarders and non-hoarding OCD patients. Compulsive hoarders were older and had lower global functioning than non-hoarding OCD patients. Both groups had low overall QOL scores across multiple domains. Compulsive hoarders had significantly lower levels of satisfaction with their safety than non-hoarding OCD patients, were more often the victims of both violent and non-violent crime, felt less safe in their neighborhoods, and felt less protected against attack. Compulsive hoarders were also much less satisfied with their living arrangements than non-hoarding OCD patients. No differences were found on financial variables, but the vast majority of patients in both groups were unemployed. Compulsive hoarders have lower QOL than non-hoarding OCD patients in the domains of safety and living situation. Psychosocial rehabilitation that focuses on problems with victimization, safety, employment, and financial areas may be a beneficial augmentation to treatment for compulsive hoarding. PMID:20822778

  19. Capture-related stressors impair immune system function in sablefish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lupes, S.C.; Davis, M.W.; Olla, B.L.; Schreck, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    The sablefish Anoplopoma fimbria is a valuable North Pacific Ocean species that, when not targeted in various commercial fisheries, is often a part of discarded bycatch. Predictions of the survival of discarded fish are dependent on understanding how a fish responds to stressful conditions. Our objective was to describe the immunological health of sablefish exposed to capture stressors. In laboratory experiments designed to simulate the capture process, we subjected sablefish to various stressors that might influence survival: towing in a net, hooking, elevated seawater and air temperatures, and air exposure time. After stress was imposed, the in vitro mitogen-stimulated proliferation of sablefish leukocytes was used to evaluate the function of the immune system in an assay we validated for this species. The results demonstrated that regardless of fishing gear type, exposure to elevated seawater temperature, or time in air, the leukocytes from stressed sablefish exhibited significantly diminished proliferative responses to the T-cell mitogen, concanavalin A, or the B-cell mitogen, lipopolysaccharide. There was no difference in the immunological responses associated with seawater or air temperature. The duration and severity of the capture stressors applied in our study were harsh enough to induce significantly elevated levels of plasma cortisol and glucose, but there was no difference in the magnitude of levels among stressor treatments. These data suggest that immunological suppression occurs in sablefish subjected to capture-related stressors. The functional impairment of the immune system after capture presents a potential reason why delayed mortality is possible in discarded sablefish. Further studies are needed to determine whether delayed mortality in discarded sablefish can be caused by increased susceptibility to infectious agents resulting from stressor-mediated immunosuppression.

  20. Functional representation of olfactory impairment in early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Förster, Stefan; Vaitl, Andreas; Teipel, Stefan J; Yakushev, Igor; Mustafa, Mona; la Fougère, Christian; Rominger, Axel; Cumming, Paul; Bartenstein, Peter; Hampel, Harald; Hummel, Thomas; Buerger, Katharina; Hundt, Walter; Steinbach, Silke

    2010-01-01

    We used [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET analysis to determine performance in different olfactory domains of patients with early AD compared to cognitively healthy subjects, and to map the functional metabolic representation of olfactory impairment in the patient sample. A cohort of patients with early AD (n=24), consisting of 6 subjects with incipient AD and 18 subjects with mild AD, and a control group of 28 age-matched non-demented individuals were assembled. Patients and controls were tested for olfactory performance using the "Sniffin' Sticks" test battery [odor identification (ID), discrimination (DIS) and threshold (THR)], while patients additionally underwent resting state FDG-PET. Voxel-wise PET results in the patients were correlated with olfaction scores using the general linear model in SPM5. Patients with early AD showed significantly reduced function in all three olfactory subdomains compared to controls. After controlling for effects due to patients' age, gender, cognitive status, and treating scores in the two other olfactory subdomains as nuisance variables, ID scores correlated with normalized FDG uptake in clusters with peaks in the right superior parietal lobule, fusiform gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and precuneus, while DIS scores correlated with a single cluster in the left postcentral cortex, and THR scores correlated with clusters in the right thalamus and cerebellum. The subtests employed in the "Sniffin' Sticks" test battery are complementary indicators of different aspects of olfactory dysfunction in early AD, and support the theory of a parallel organized olfactory system, revealed by FDG-PET correlation analysis. PMID:20847402

  1. Effect of in vivo heart irradiation on the development of antioxidant defenses and cardiac functions in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Benderitter, M.; Assem, M.; Maupoil, V.

    1995-10-01

    During radiotherapy of thoracic tumors, the heart is often included in the primary treatment volume, and chronic impairment of myocardial function occurs. The cellular biomolecules are altered directly by radiation or damaged indirectly by free radical production. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the biochemical and functional response of the rat heart to a single high dose of radiation. The effect of 20 Gy local X irradiation was determined in the heart of Wistar rats under general anesthesia. Mechanical performances were measured in vitro using an isolated perfused working heart model, and cardiac antioxidant defenses were also evaluated. Hearts were studied at 1 and 4 months after irradiation. This single dose of radiation induced a marked drop in the mechanical activity of the rat heart: aortic output was significantly reduced (18% less than control values) at 1 month postirradiation and remained depressed for the rest of the experimental period (21% less than control 4 months after treatment). This suggests the development of myocardial failure after irradiation. The decline of functional parameters was associated with changes in antioxidant defenses. The decrease in cardiac levels of vitamin E (-30%) was associated with an increase in the levels of Mn-SOD and glustathione peroxidase (+45.5% and +32%, respectively, at 4 months postirradiation). However, cardiac vitamin C and catalase levels remained constant. Since these antioxidant defenses were activated relatively long after irradiation, it is suggested that this was probable due to the production of free radical species associated with the development of inflammation. 49 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. SFAs do not impair endothelial function and arterial stiffness123

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Thomas AB; Lewis, Fiona J; Goff, Louise M; Chowienczyk, Philip J

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is uncertain whether saturated fatty acids (SFAs) impair endothelial function and contribute to arterial stiffening. Objective: We tested the effects of replacing SFAs with monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) or carbohydrates on endothelial function and arterial stiffness. Design: With the use of a parallel-designed randomized controlled trial in 121 insulin-resistant men and women, we measured vascular function after 1 mo of consumption of a high-SFA (HS) diet and after 24 wk after random assignment to the HS diet or diets that contained <10% SFAs and were high in either MUFAs or carbohydrates. The primary outcome was a change in flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and secondary outcomes were changes in carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) and plasma 8-isoprostane F2α-III concentrations. Results: For 112 participants with data available for analysis on the specified outcomes, no significant differences were shown. FMD with the HS reference diet was 6.7 ± 2.2%, and changes (95% CIs) after 6 mo of intervention were +0.3 (−0.4, 1.1), −0.2 (−0.8, 0.5), and −0.1 (−0.6, 0.7) with HS, high-MUFA (HM), and high-carbohydrate (HC) diets, respectively. After consumption of the HS reference diet, the geometric mean (±SD) PWV was 7.67 ± 1.62 m/s, and mean percentages of changes (95% CIs) were −1.0 (−6.2, 4.3) with the HS diet, 2.7 (−1.4, 6.9) with the HM diet, and −1.0 (−5.5, 3.4) with the HC diet. With the HS reference diet, the geometric mean (±SD) plasma 8-isoprostane F2α-III concentration was 176 ± 85 pmol/L, and mean percentage of changes (95% CIs) were 1 (−12, 14) with the HS diet, 6 (−5, 16) with the HM diet, and 4 (−7, 16) with the HC diet. Conclusion: The replacement of SFAs with MUFAs or carbohydrates in healthy subjects does not affect vascular function. This trial was registered at Current Controlled Trials (http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN) as ISRCTN 29111298. PMID:23964054

  3. Impaired Error Monitoring and Correction Function in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Sokhadze, Estate; Baruth, Joshua; El-Baz, Ayman; Horrell, Timothy; Sokhadze, Guela; Carroll, Thomas; Tasman, Allan; Sears, Lonnie; Casanova, Manuel F.

    2010-01-01

    result in reduced error awareness and failure in adjustment when dealing with situations where erroneous responses may occur. This deficit might be manifested in the perseverative behaviors often seen in individuals with ASD. The results are discussed in terms of a general impairment in self-monitoring and other executive functions underlying behavioral and social disturbances in ASD. PMID:20523752

  4. Dynamic heart phantom with functional mitral and aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannelli, Claire; Moore, John; McLeod, Jonathan; Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac valvular stenosis, prolapse and regurgitation are increasingly common conditions, particularly in an elderly population with limited potential for on-pump cardiac surgery. NeoChord©, MitraClipand numerous stent-based transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices provide an alternative to intrusive cardiac operations; performed while the heart is beating, these procedures require surgeons and cardiologists to learn new image-guidance based techniques. Developing these visual aids and protocols is a challenging task that benefits from sophisticated simulators. Existing models lack features needed to simulate off-pump valvular procedures: functional, dynamic valves, apical and vascular access, and user flexibility for different activation patterns such as variable heart rates and rapid pacing. We present a left ventricle phantom with these characteristics. The phantom can be used to simulate valvular repair and replacement procedures with magnetic tracking, augmented reality, fluoroscopy and ultrasound guidance. This tool serves as a platform to develop image-guidance and image processing techniques required for a range of minimally invasive cardiac interventions. The phantom mimics in vivo mitral and aortic valve motion, permitting realistic ultrasound images of these components to be acquired. It also has a physiological realistic left ventricular ejection fraction of 50%. Given its realistic imaging properties and non-biodegradable composition—silicone for tissue, water for blood—the system promises to reduce the number of animal trials required to develop image guidance applications for valvular repair and replacement. The phantom has been used in validation studies for both TAVI image-guidance techniques1, and image-based mitral valve tracking algorithms2.

  5. American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7: Avoiding Heart Failure and Preserving Cardiac Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Folsom, Aaron R.; Shah, Amil M.; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Roetker, Nicholas S.; Alonso, Alvaro; Avery, Christy L.; Miedema, Michael D.; Konety, Suma; Chang, Patricia P.; Solomon, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many people may underappreciate the role of lifestyle in avoiding heart failure. We estimated whether greater adherence in middle age to American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 guidelines -- on smoking, body mass, physical activity, diet, cholesterol, blood pressure, and glucose -- is associated with lower lifetime risk of heart failure and greater preservation of cardiac structure and function in old age. METHODS We studied the population-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study cohort of 13,462 adults aged 45-64 years in 1987-89. From the 1987-89 risk factor measurements, we created a Life’s Simple 7 score (range 0-14, giving 2 points for ideal, 1 point for intermediate, and 0 points for poor components). We identified 2,218 incident heart failure events using surveillance of hospital discharge and death codes through 2011. In addition, in 4,855 participants free of clinical cardiovascular disease in 2011-13, we performed echocardiography from which we quantified left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. RESULTS One in four participants (25.5%) developed heart failure through age 85. Yet, this lifetime heart failure risk was 14.4% for those with a middle-age Life’s Simple 7 score of 10-14 (optimal), 26.8% for a score of 5-9 (average), and 48.6% for a score of 0-4 (inadequate). Among those with no clinical cardiovascular event, the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy in late life was approximately 40% as common, and diastolic dysfunction was approximately 60% as common, among those with an optimal middle-age Life’s Simple 7 score compared with an inadequate score. CONCLUSIONS Greater achievement of American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 in middle-age is associated with a lower lifetime occurrence of heart failure and greater preservation of cardiac structure and function. PMID:25908393

  6. Can pain intensity in osteoarthritis joint be indicator of the impairment of endothelial function?

    PubMed

    Laskarin, Gordana; Persic, Viktor; Kukic, Sandra Rusac; Massari, Drazen; Legovic, Anita; Boban, Marko; Miskulin, Rajko; Rogoznica, Marija; Kehler, Tatjana

    2016-09-01

    We propose that pathological remodeling in joint tissues of osteoarthritis (OA) patients persistently stimulates local secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators, which overflow into the blood, activating leukocytes that impair endothelial function and accelerate the atherosclerotic process. During periods of pain, endothelial dysfunction progresses more aggressively due to elevated secretion of these pro-inflammatory mediators, which are involved in both atherosclerosis and the sensation of pain. Concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines and their antagonists, activating and decoy receptors of the broad interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-17 families, IL-15, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 should be measured in peripheral blood samples of OA patients and compared with (I) OA clinical severity; (II) subclinical parameters of atherosclerosis; (III) ischemic heart disease risk factors; (IV) soluble factors indicating endothelial dysfunction; (V) degree of bone destruction; and (VI) results of a six-minute walk test. Arthroscopy and joint replacement surgery provide an opportunity to estimate mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory mediators in specimens of synovial fluid, synovial membrane, cartilage, and/or subarticular bone. A range of methods, including questionnaires, X-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunohistology, immunofluorescence, and reverse transcription and in situ polymerase chain reaction are available. Understanding the inflammatory and immune mechanisms underlying OA may allow the early identification of patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease, independently of classical coronary risk factors. Pain may constitute an extrinsic indicator of currently worsening endothelial function. PMID:27515191

  7. Executive Function and Behavioral Problems in Students with Visual Impairments at Mainstream and Special Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyl, Vera; Hintermair, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, executive function of school-aged children with visual impairments (that is, those who are blind or have low vision) is examined in the context of behavioral problems and communicative competence. Methods: Teachers assessed the executive function of a sample of 226 visually impaired students from mainstream schools and…

  8. Obesity's Effects on the Onset of Functional Impairment among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Kristi Rahrig

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study has two purposes. First, it determines if there is a relationship between body weight and the onset of functional impairment across time among this sample of older adults. More specifically, it examines if obese older adults are more likely to experience the onset of functional impairment. Second, it explores how health…

  9. 15 CFR 265.38 - Intoxication or other impairment of function.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Intoxication or other impairment of function. 265.38 Section 265.38 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... § 265.38 Intoxication or other impairment of function. No person shall enter or remain on the site...

  10. 15 CFR 265.38 - Intoxication or other impairment of function.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Intoxication or other impairment of function. 265.38 Section 265.38 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign... § 265.38 Intoxication or other impairment of function. No person shall enter or remain on the site...

  11. Hyperglycemia impairs left–right axis formation and thereby disturbs heart morphogenesis in mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Hachisuga, Masahiro; Oki, Shinya; Kitajima, Keiko; Ikuta, Satomi; Sumi, Tomoyuki; Kato, Kiyoko; Wake, Norio; Meno, Chikara

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects with heterotaxia are associated with pregestational diabetes mellitus. To provide insight into the mechanisms underlying such diabetes-related heart defects, we examined the effects of high-glucose concentrations on formation of the left–right axis in mouse embryos. Expression of Pitx2, which plays a key role in left–right asymmetric morphogenesis and cardiac development, was lost in the left lateral plate mesoderm of embryos of diabetic dams. Embryos exposed to high-glucose concentrations in culture also failed to express Nodal and Pitx2 in the left lateral plate mesoderm. The distribution of phosphorylated Smad2 revealed that Nodal activity in the node was attenuated, accounting for the failure of left–right axis formation. Consistent with this notion, Notch signal-dependent expression of Nodal-related genes in the node was also down-regulated in association with a reduced level of Notch signaling, suggesting that high-glucose concentrations impede Notch signaling and thereby hinder establishment of the left–right axis required for heart morphogenesis. PMID:26351675

  12. Hyperglycemia impairs left-right axis formation and thereby disturbs heart morphogenesis in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Hachisuga, Masahiro; Oki, Shinya; Kitajima, Keiko; Ikuta, Satomi; Sumi, Tomoyuki; Kato, Kiyoko; Wake, Norio; Meno, Chikara

    2015-09-22

    Congenital heart defects with heterotaxia are associated with pregestational diabetes mellitus. To provide insight into the mechanisms underlying such diabetes-related heart defects, we examined the effects of high-glucose concentrations on formation of the left-right axis in mouse embryos. Expression of Pitx2, which plays a key role in left-right asymmetric morphogenesis and cardiac development, was lost in the left lateral plate mesoderm of embryos of diabetic dams. Embryos exposed to high-glucose concentrations in culture also failed to express Nodal and Pitx2 in the left lateral plate mesoderm. The distribution of phosphorylated Smad2 revealed that Nodal activity in the node was attenuated, accounting for the failure of left-right axis formation. Consistent with this notion, Notch signal-dependent expression of Nodal-related genes in the node was also down-regulated in association with a reduced level of Notch signaling, suggesting that high-glucose concentrations impede Notch signaling and thereby hinder establishment of the left-right axis required for heart morphogenesis.

  13. Hyperglycemia impairs left-right axis formation and thereby disturbs heart morphogenesis in mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Hachisuga, Masahiro; Oki, Shinya; Kitajima, Keiko; Ikuta, Satomi; Sumi, Tomoyuki; Kato, Kiyoko; Wake, Norio; Meno, Chikara

    2015-09-22

    Congenital heart defects with heterotaxia are associated with pregestational diabetes mellitus. To provide insight into the mechanisms underlying such diabetes-related heart defects, we examined the effects of high-glucose concentrations on formation of the left-right axis in mouse embryos. Expression of Pitx2, which plays a key role in left-right asymmetric morphogenesis and cardiac development, was lost in the left lateral plate mesoderm of embryos of diabetic dams. Embryos exposed to high-glucose concentrations in culture also failed to express Nodal and Pitx2 in the left lateral plate mesoderm. The distribution of phosphorylated Smad2 revealed that Nodal activity in the node was attenuated, accounting for the failure of left-right axis formation. Consistent with this notion, Notch signal-dependent expression of Nodal-related genes in the node was also down-regulated in association with a reduced level of Notch signaling, suggesting that high-glucose concentrations impede Notch signaling and thereby hinder establishment of the left-right axis required for heart morphogenesis. PMID:26351675

  14. Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate Targeting Myocardial Reactive Oxygen Species Production Improves Left Ventricular Remodeling and Function in Rats With Ischemic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fraccarollo, Daniela; Galuppo, Paolo; Neuser, Jonas; Bauersachs, Johann; Widder, Julian D

    2015-11-01

    Reduced nitric oxide bioavailability contributes to progression of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in ischemic heart failure. Clinical use of organic nitrates as nitric oxide donors is limited by development of nitrate tolerance and reactive oxygen species formation. We investigated the effects of long-term therapy with pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), an organic nitrate devoid of tolerance, in rats with congestive heart failure after extensive myocardial infarction. Seven days after coronary artery ligation, rats were randomly allocated to treatment with PETN (80 mg/kg BID) or placebo for 9 weeks. Long-term PETN therapy prevented the progressive left ventricular dilatation and improved left ventricular contractile function and relaxation in rats with congestive heart failure. Mitochondrial superoxide anion production was markedly increased in the failing left ventricular myocardium and nearly normalized by PETN treatment. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that PETN beneficially modulated the dysregulation of mitochondrial genes involved in energy metabolism, paralleled by prevention of uncoupling protein-3, thioredoxin-2, and superoxide dismutase-2 downregulation. Moreover, PETN provided a remarkable protective effect against reactive fibrosis in chronically failing hearts. Mechanistically, induction of heme oxygenase-1 by PETN prevented mitochondrial superoxide generation, NOX4 upregulation, and ensuing formation of extracellular matrix proteins in fibroblasts from failing hearts. In summary, PETN targeting reactive oxygen species generation prevented the changes of mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes and progressive fibrotic remodeling, leading to amelioration of cardiac functional performance. Therefore, PETN might be a promising therapeutic option in the treatment of ischemic heart diseases involving oxidative stress and impairment in nitric oxide bioactivity.

  15. Functional impairments in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: the mediating role of neuropsychological functioning.

    PubMed

    Sjöwall, Douglas; Thorell, Lisa B

    2014-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with multiple neuropsychological deficits and the present study aimed to investigate to what extent these deficits are related to the functional impairments associated with the disorder. The results showed that all executive functioning deficits and reaction time variability acted as mediators in the relation between ADHD and academic achievement. However, only the effect of working memory for language skills, and the effects of reaction time variability and working memory for mathematics, remained significant when studying independent effects. Regulation of anger was a significant mediator for peer problems. Gender or symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) or conduct disorder (CD) did not moderate these findings. PMID:24742310

  16. Functional Impairments in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: The Mediating Role of Neuropsychological Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Sjöwall, Douglas; Thorell, Lisa B.

    2014-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with multiple neuropsychological deficits and the present study aimed to investigate to what extent these deficits are related to the functional impairments associated with the disorder. The results showed that all executive functioning deficits and reaction time variability acted as mediators in the relation between ADHD and academic achievement. However, only the effect of working memory for language skills, and the effects of reaction time variability and working memory for mathematics, remained significant when studying independent effects. Regulation of anger was a significant mediator for peer problems. Gender or symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) or conduct disorder (CD) did not moderate these findings. PMID:24742310

  17. Digitalis pharmacokinetics and therapy with respect to impaired renal function.

    PubMed

    Kramer, P

    1977-01-01

    with respect to the daily dose, but it is rather increased in relation to the plasma concentration required to maintain the positive inotropic effect. The combination of hyperkalemia, hypermagnesemia, bypocalcemia and acidosis which is found almost exclusively with chronic renal failure, may explain the reduced myocardial sensitivity. Dosage regimens based on the measurement of creatinine-clearance are of little help in "effective digitalisation". Serial measurements of steady-state plasma concentration of cardiac glycosides may be the only way to reduce the risk of under- and overtreatment in patients with impaired renal function.

  18. Digitalis pharmacokinetics and therapy with respect to impaired renal function.

    PubMed

    Kramer, P

    1977-01-01

    with respect to the daily dose, but it is rather increased in relation to the plasma concentration required to maintain the positive inotropic effect. The combination of hyperkalemia, hypermagnesemia, bypocalcemia and acidosis which is found almost exclusively with chronic renal failure, may explain the reduced myocardial sensitivity. Dosage regimens based on the measurement of creatinine-clearance are of little help in "effective digitalisation". Serial measurements of steady-state plasma concentration of cardiac glycosides may be the only way to reduce the risk of under- and overtreatment in patients with impaired renal function. PMID:319291

  19. Residential Proximity to Major Roadways Is Not Associated with Cardiac Function in African Americans: Results from the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Anne M.; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Wu, Wen-Chih; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Kamalesh, Masoor; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), including heart failure, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly among African Americans. Exposure to ambient air pollution, such as that produced by vehicular traffic, is believed to be associated with heart failure, possibly by impairing cardiac function. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between residential proximity to major roads, a marker of long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution, and echocardiographic indicators of left and pulmonary vascular function in African Americans enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS): left ventricular ejection fraction, E-wave velocity, isovolumic relaxation time, left atrial diameter index, and pulmonary artery systolic pressure. We examined these associations using multivariable linear or logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Of 4866 participants at study enrollment, 106 lived <150 m, 159 lived 150–299 m, 1161 lived 300–999 m, and 3440 lived ≥1000 m from a major roadway. We did not observe any associations between residential distance to major roads and these markers of cardiac function. Results were similar with additional adjustment for diabetes and hypertension, when considering varying definitions of major roadways, or when limiting analyses to those free from cardiovascular disease at baseline. Overall, we observed little evidence that residential proximity to major roads was associated with cardiac function among African Americans. PMID:27304962

  20. Rescue of heart lipoprotein lipase-knockout mice confirms a role for triglyceride in optimal heart metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Khan, Raffay S; Lin, Yan; Hu, Yunying; Son, Ni-Huiping; Bharadwaj, Kalyani G; Palacios, Carla; Chokshi, Aalap; Ji, Ruiping; Yu, Shuiqing; Homma, Sunichi; Schulze, P Christian; Tian, Rong; Goldberg, Ira J

    2013-12-01

    Hearts utilize fatty acids as a primary source of energy. The sources of those lipids include free fatty acids and lipoprotein triglycerides. Deletion of the primary triglyceride-hydrolyzing enzyme lipoprotein lipase (LPL) leads to cardiac dysfunction. Whether heart LPL-knockout (hLPL0) mice are compromised due a deficiency in energetic substrates is unknown. To test whether alternative sources of energy will prevent cardiac dysfunction in hLPL0 mice, two different models were used to supply nonlipid energy. 1) hLPL0 mice were crossed with mice transgenically expressing GLUT1 in cardiomyocytes to increase glucose uptake into the heart; this cross-corrected cardiac dysfunction, reduced cardiac hypertrophy, and increased myocardial ATP. 2) Mice were randomly assigned to a sedentary or training group (swimming) at 3 mo of age, which leads to increased skeletal muscle production of lactate. hLPL0 mice had greater expression of the lactate transporter monocarboxylate transporter-1 (MCT-1) and increased cardiac lactate uptake. Compared with hearts from sedentary hLPL0 mice, hearts from trained hLPL0 mice had adaptive hypertrophy and improved cardiac function. We conclude that defective energy intake and not the reduced uptake of fat-soluble vitamins or cholesterol is responsible for cardiac dysfunction in hLPL0 mice. In addition, our studies suggest that adaptations in cardiac metabolism contribute to the beneficial effects of exercise on the myocardium of patients with heart failure. PMID:24085031

  1. Miniature implantable instrument measures and transmits heart function data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Heart diameter is derived from measured transit time of 2.25 MHz ultrasonic pulse between two piezoelectric crystals attached to diametrically opposite heart surfaces. Miniature instrument implanted in chest telemeters information to external receiver-converter. System permits continual dimensional data recording taken from awake animals during long-term experiments.

  2. Eplerenone in chronic heart failure with depressed systolic function.

    PubMed

    Volterrani, Maurizio; Iellamo, Ferdinando

    2015-12-01

    Eplerenone is a selective mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist that has been recently included in the treatment of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and reduced systolic function. This brief review aims to summarize current evidence on the role of eplerenone in the therapy of patients with CHF. In the EPHESUS trial, 6632 post-myocardial infarction patients with ejection fraction (EF) <40% and clinical HF signs were randomized to eplerenone or placebo added to standard therapy 3 to 14 days after the event. After a 16 month follow-up period, eplerenone given early (<7 days) reduced the primary endpoints of all-cause mortality by 15% and cardiovascular death or cardiovascular hospitalization by 13%. In the subsequent EMPHASIS-HF trial, the efficacy and tolerability of eplerenone were tested in patients with mild CHF (NYHA functional class II) and EF ≤ 30% or between 30 and 35% with QRS duration >130 ms. After a median follow-up of 21 months eplerenone significantly reduced (by 37%) the primary composite outcome of risk of death from CV causes and first hospitalization for HF. Based on the above findings, the addition of eplerenone to standard therapy, at doses to be titrated from 25 to 50mg per day, is currently recommended in CHF patients with functional classes II to IV closely resembling those enrolled in these large clinical trials, with adequate monitoring for side effects (mainly hyperkalemia and renal failure). Whether the same beneficial effects of eplerenone extend to CHF patients with mild symptoms and no additional risk factors are unknown.

  3. Novel heart rate parameters for the assessment of autonomic nervous system function in premature infants.

    PubMed

    Lucchini, M; Fifer, W P; Sahni, R; Signorini, M G

    2016-09-01

    Autonomic nervous system (ANS) balance is a key factor in homeostatic control of cardiac activity, breathing and certain reflex reactions such as coughing, sneezing and swallowing and thus plays a crucial role for survival. ANS impairment has been related to many neonatal pathologies, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Moreover, some conditions have been identified as risk factors for SIDS, such as prone sleep position. There is an urgent need for timely and non-invasive assessment of ANS function in at-risk infants. Systematic measurement of heart rate variability (HRV) offers an optimal approach to access indirectly both sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on ANS functioning. In this paper, data from premature infants collected in a sleep physiology laboratory in the NICU are presented: traditional and novel approaches to HRV analyses are applied and compared in order to evaluate their relative merits in the assessment of ANS activity and the influence of sleep position. Indices from time domain and nonlinear approaches contributed as markers of physiological development in premature infants. Moreover, significant differences were observed as a function of sleep position. PMID:27480495

  4. Aerobic Exercise as an Adjunct Therapy for Improving Cognitive Function in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gary, Rebecca A.; Brunn, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Persons with heart failure (HF) are typically older and are at a much higher risk for developing cognitive impairment (CI) than persons without HF. Increasingly, CI is recognized as a significant, independent predictor of worse clinical outcomes, more frequent hospital readmissions, and higher mortality rates in persons with HF. CI can have devastating effects on ability to carry out HF effective self-care behaviors. If CI occurs, however, there are currently no evidence based guidelines on how to manage or improve cognitive function in this population. Improvement in cognition has been reported following some therapies in HF and is thought to be the consequence of enhanced cerebral perfusion and oxygenation, suggesting that CI may be amenable to intervention. Because there is substantial neuronal loss with dementia and no effective restorative therapies, interventions that slow, reverse, or prevent cognitive decline are essential. Aerobic exercise is documented to increase cerebral perfusion and oxygenation by promoting neuroplasticity and neurogenesis and, in turn, cognitive functioning. Few studies have examined exercise as a potential adjunct therapy for attenuating or alleviating cognitive decline in HF. In this review, the potential benefit of aerobic exercise on cognitive functioning in HF is presented along with future research directions. PMID:25105053

  5. Global Functioning of COPD Patients With and Without Functional Balance Impairment: An Exploratory Analysis Based on the ICF Framework.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Joana; Marques, Alda; Jácome, Cristina; Gabriel, Raquel; Figueiredo, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    Balance impairment is a common manifestation in older people with COPD and may contribute to overall functional decline; however, the relationship between balance and global functioning has not been studied. This study aimed to explore the global functioning of COPD patients with and without functional balance impairment. Functional balance was assessed with the Timed Up-and-Go (TUG) test and global functioning with the Comprehensive ICF Core Set for Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases. Participants (n = 134) were divided in 2 groups according to their performance in TUG (with and without balance impairment) and the ICF Core Set results were compared between groups. Fifty-four (40.3%) participants had functional balance impairment. The groups presented a similar extent of problems in several categories of the ICF components. However, participants with balance impairment were more severely affected (p < 0.05) in energy, pain, respiratory system, weight maintenance, exercise tolerance, neuromusculoskeletal and movement-related functions, and structure of head and neck. They also presented a significantly worse performance in handling psychological demands and activities related to mobility, self-care, domestic, community and social life, and a more negative perception of Environmental factors related to products and technology of buildings for private use and social support services (p < 0.05). Patients with functional balance impairment have more functional problems and are more severely restricted in daily life than patients without compromised balance. Understanding the relationship between balance control and global functioning will contribute to guide interventions aimed at maintaining functioning and minimizing disability.

  6. Hemodynamics of a functional centrifugal-flow total artificial heart with functional atrial contraction in goats.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Takuya; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Sano, Kyosuke; Taira, Yasunori; Tsuboko, Yusuke; Yamada, Akihiro; Miura, Hidekazu; Katahira, Shintaro; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2016-03-01

    Implantation of a total artificial heart (TAH) is one of the therapeutic options for the treatment of patients with end-stage biventricular heart failure. There is no report on the hemodynamics of the functional centrifugal-flow TAH with functional atrial contraction (fCFTAH). We evaluated the effects of pulsatile flow by atrial contraction in acute animal models. The goats received fCFTAH that we created from two centrifugal-flow ventricular assist devices. Some hemodynamic parameters maintained acceptable levels: heart rate 115.5 ± 26.3 bpm, aortic pressure 83.5 ± 10.1 mmHg, left atrial pressure 18.0 ± 5.9 mmHg, pulmonary pressure 28.5 ± 9.7 mmHg, right atrial pressure 13.6 ± 5.2 mmHg, pump flow 4.0 ± 1.1 L/min (left) 3.9 ± 1.1 L/min (right), and cardiac index 2.13 ± 0.14 L/min/m(2). fCFTAH with atrial contraction was able to maintain the TAH circulation by forming a pulsatile flow in acute animal experiments. Taking the left and right flow rate balance using the low internal pressure loss of the VAD pumps may be easier than by other pumps having considerable internal pressure loss. We showed that the remnant atrial contraction effected the flow rate change of the centrifugal pump, and the atrial contraction waves reflected the heart rate. These results indicate that remnant atria had the possibility to preserve autonomic function in fCFTAH. We may control fCFTAH by reflecting the autonomic function, which is estimated with the flow rate change of the centrifugal pump.

  7. Displacement as a predictor of functional impairment in tsunami-exposed children.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher; Du, Ye Beverly; Christina, Desy; Palfrey, Judith; O'Rourke, Edward; Belfer, Myron

    2015-01-01

    Thirty months after the Indian Ocean tsunami of 26 December 2004, thousands of families in Aceh Province, Indonesia, remained in temporary barracks while sanitation conditions and non-governmental organisation support deteriorated. This study sought to determine the factors associated with functional impairment in a sample of 138 displaced and non-displaced Acehnese children. Using multivariate linear regression models, it was found that displacement distance was a consistent predictor of impairment using the Brief Impairment Scale. Exposure to tsunami-related trauma markers was not significantly linked with impairment in the model. Paternal employment was a consistent protective factor for child functioning. These findings suggest that post-disaster displacement and the subsequent familial economic disruption are significant predictors of impaired functioning in children's daily activities. Post-disaster interventions should consider the disruption of familiar environments for families and children when relocating vulnerable populations to avoid deleterious impacts on children's functioning.

  8. Cognitive and motor function of neurologically impaired extremely low birth weight children

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Janine; Friedman, Harriet; Minich, Nori; Taylor, H Gerry; Wilson-Costello, Deanne; Hack, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rates of neurological impairment among extremely low birth weight children (ELBW [<1 kg]) have decreased since 2000; however, their functioning is unexamined. OBJECTIVE: To compare motor and cognitive functioning of ELBW children with neurological impairment, including cerebral palsy and severe hypotonia/hypertonia, between two periods: 1990 to 1999 (n=83) and 2000 to 2005 (n=34). METHODS: Measures of function at 20 months corrected age included the Mental and Psychomotor Developmental Indexes of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development and the Gross Motor Functional Classification System as primary outcomes and individual motor function items as secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Analysis failed to reveal significant differences for the primary outcomes, although during 2000 to 2005, sitting significantly improved in children with neurological impairment (P=0.003). CONCLUSION: Decreases in rates of neurological impairment among ELBW children have been accompanied by a suggestion of improved motor function, although cognitive function has not changed. PMID:26435676

  9. The overall impairment of core executive function components in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It remains unclear how executive function (EF) is affected in the stage of amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Previous studies using different methods to assess EF in patients with aMCI have reached inconsistent conclusions. The aim of the study was to explore the characteristics of EF impairments in patients with aMCI. Methods We investigated three core components of EF (i.e., working memory, response inhibition and task switching) based on the theoretical model of EF proposed by Miyake et al. (2000) in 34 aMCI patients and 36 healthy elderly controls using computerized tasks programmed with E-prime (the 2-back task and the keep track task for working memory, the stop-signal task and the Stroop task for response inhibition and the more-odd shifting task for task switching). The overall EF and the three individual EF components were compared between groups. For EF components that were impaired, the extent of impairment was compared using a paired analysis. The aMCI group was further divided into EF-intact and EF-deficit groups according to their performances on the EF tests in clinical neuropsychological assessments. We tested for group differences among the normal controls and the EF-intact and EF-deficit aMCI groups and paid special attention to the comparisons between the EF-intact aMCI group and the control group. Results Compared to the control group, overall EF was significantly impaired in patients with aMCI (Wilks’ λ=0.572,P<0.001). Four tasks (the 2-back task, the keep track task, the stop-signal task and the more-odd shifting task) that tapped the three core components of EF displayed group differences that favored the normal controls. The results of the Stroop task revealed no differences in performance between the two groups. The EF-intact aMCI patients also exhibited significantly impaired capabilities in the four tasks compared to the normal controls. There were no significant differences in the extent of impairment between the

  10. Heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation enhances cardiac function and longevity.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Zachary A; Hsieh, Jo-Lin; Li, Andrew; Wang, William; Bhatt, Dhelni T; Lee, Angela; Kim, Sae Yeon; Fan, David; Shah, Veevek; Siddiqui, Emaad; Ragam, Radhika; Park, Kristen; Ardeshna, Dev; Park, Kunwoo; Wu, Rachel; Parikh, Hardik; Parikh, Ayush; Lin, Yuh-Ru; Park, Yongkyu

    2015-09-01

    Downregulation of Rpd3, a homologue of mammalian Histone Deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), extends lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster. Once revealed that long-lived fruit flies exhibit limited cardiac decline, we investigated whether Rpd3 downregulation would improve stress resistance and/or lifespan when targeted in the heart. Contested against three different stressors (oxidation, starvation and heat), heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation significantly enhanced stress resistance in flies. However, these higher levels of resistance were not observed when Rpd3 downregulation was targeted in other tissues or when other long-lived flies were tested in the heart-specific manner. Interestingly, the expressions of anti-aging genes such as sod2, foxo and Thor, were systemically increased as a consequence of heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation. Showing higher resistance to oxidative stress, the heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation concurrently exhibited improved cardiac functions, demonstrating an increased heart rate, decreased heart failure and accelerated heart recovery. Conversely, Rpd3 upregulation in cardiac tissue reduced systemic resistance against heat stress with decreased heart function, also specifying phosphorylated Rpd3 levels as a significant modulator. Continual downregulation of Rpd3 throughout aging increased lifespan, implicating that Rpd3 deacetylase in the heart plays a significant role in cardiac function and longevity to systemically modulate the fly's response to the environment.

  11. Heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation enhances cardiac function and longevity

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Zachary A.; Hsieh, Jo-Lin; Li, Andrew; Wang, William; Bhatt, Dhelni T.; Lee, Angela; Kim, Sae Yeon; Fan, David; Shah, Veevek; Siddiqui, Emaad; Ragam, Radhika; Park, Kristen; Ardeshna, Dev; Park, Kunwoo; Wu, Rachel; Parikh, Hardik; Parikh, Ayush; Lin, Yuh-Ru; Park, Yongkyu

    2015-01-01

    Downregulation of Rpd3, a homologue of mammalian Histone Deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), extends lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster. Once revealed that long-lived fruit flies exhibit limited cardiac decline, we investigated whether Rpd3 downregulation would improve stress resistance and/or lifespan when targeted in the heart. Contested against three different stressors (oxidation, starvation and heat), heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation significantly enhanced stress resistance in flies. However, these higher levels of resistance were not observed when Rpd3 downregulation was targeted in other tissues or when other long-lived flies were tested in the heart-specific manner. Interestingly, the expressions of anti-aging genes such as sod2, foxo and Thor, were systemically increased as a consequence of heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation. Showing higher resistance to oxidative stress, the heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation concurrently exhibited improved cardiac functions, demonstrating an increased heart rate, decreased heart failure and accelerated heart recovery. Conversely, Rpd3 upregulation in cardiac tissue reduced systemic resistance against heat stress with decreased heart function, also specifying phosphorylated Rpd3 levels as a significant modulator. Continual downregulation of Rpd3 throughout aging increased lifespan, implicating that Rpd3 deacetylase in the heart plays a significant role in cardiac function and longevity to systemically modulate the fly's response to the environment. PMID:26399365

  12. Association between Functional Variables and Heart Failure after Myocardial Infarction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Polegato, Bertha F.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Azevedo, Paula S.; Gonçalves, Andréa F.; Lima, Aline F.; Martinez, Paula F.; Okoshi, Marina P.; Okoshi, Katashi; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart failure prediction after acute myocardial infarction may have important clinical implications. Objective To analyze the functional echocardiographic variables associated with heart failure in an infarction model in rats. Methods The animals were divided into two groups: control and infarction. Subsequently, the infarcted animals were divided into groups: with and without heart failure. The predictive values were assessed by logistic regression. The cutoff values predictive of heart failure were determined using ROC curves. Results Six months after surgery, 88 infarcted animals and 43 control animals were included in the study. Myocardial infarction increased left cavity diameters and the mass and wall thickness of the left ventricle. Additionally, myocardial infarction resulted in systolic and diastolic dysfunction, characterized by lower area variation fraction values, posterior wall shortening velocity, E-wave deceleration time, associated with higher values of E / A ratio and isovolumic relaxation time adjusted by heart rate. Among the infarcted animals, 54 (61%) developed heart failure. Rats with heart failure have higher left cavity mass index and diameter, associated with worsening of functional variables. The area variation fraction, the E/A ratio, E-wave deceleration time and isovolumic relaxation time adjusted by heart rate were functional variables predictors of heart failure. The cutoff values of functional variables associated with heart failure were: area variation fraction < 31.18%; E / A > 3.077; E-wave deceleration time < 42.11 and isovolumic relaxation time adjusted by heart rate < 69.08. Conclusion In rats followed for 6 months after myocardial infarction, the area variation fraction, E/A ratio, E-wave deceleration time and isovolumic relaxation time adjusted by heart rate are predictors of heart failure onset. PMID:26815462

  13. Clinical Assessment of Functional Movement in Adults with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Christopher T.; Horvat, Michael; Williams, Michael; Blasch, Bruce B.

    2007-01-01

    Adults with visual impairments have significantly more health risks than do sighted adults because of a number of factors, including the lower mineral density of their femoral neck bones, which is indicative of reduced weight-bearing exercise; their lesser maximal strength; and their higher rates of stroke, osteoporosis, depression, hypertension,…

  14. Understanding Pervasive Language Impairment in Young Children: Exploring Patterns in Narrative Language and Functional Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Anna Jeddeloh

    2013-01-01

    Research has identified language impairment as a pervasive disability (Bishop & Edmundson, 1987; Greenhalgh & Strong, 2001). Classroom communication behaviors have a role in the maintenance of special education eligibility and functional communication difficulties for young children with language impairment. This paper reviews the…

  15. Functional Impairment as a Predictor of Depressive Symptomatology: The Role of Race, Religiosity, and Social Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Sherry M.; Neff, James Alan; Husaini, Baqar A.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the relationship between depression symptomatology and functional impairment among white and African American elderly people. Results indicate that although African American elderly people were more impaired in the performance of daily living activities, they did not experience higher levels of depression. However, African Americans did…

  16. A Comparison of Psychometric Functions for Detection in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart, Kathryn Hoberg; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Psychometric functions (PFD) for the detection of pure tones were obtained from 10 adolescent and young adult listeners with normal hearing and 10 adult listeners with sensorineural impairments of presumed cochlear origin. The slopes of the PFDs were abnormally steep in some of the hearing-impaired listeners but were statistically significant only…

  17. Distinct Patterns of Brain Function in Children with Isolated Spelling Impairment: New Insights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebauer, Daniela; Enzinger, Christian; Kronbichler, Martin; Schurz, Matthias; Reishofer, Gernot; Koschutnig, Karl; Kargl, Reinhard; Purgstaller, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Fink, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Studies investigating reading and spelling difficulties heavily focused on the neural correlates of reading impairments, whereas spelling impairments have been largely neglected so far. Hence, the aim of the present study was to investigate brain structure and function of children with isolated spelling difficulties. Therefore, 31 children, aged…

  18. Impaired Executive Functions in Subjects with Frequent Nightmares as Reflected by Performance in Different Neuropsychological Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simor, Peter; Pajkossy, Peter; Horvath, Klara; Bodizs, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Nightmare disorder is a prevalent parasomnia characterized by vivid and highly unpleasant dream experiences during night time sleep. The neural background of disturbed dreaming was proposed to be associated with impaired prefrontal and fronto-limbic functioning during REM sleep. We hypothesized that the impaired prefrontal and fronto-limbic…

  19. Impaired functional differentiation for categories of objects in the ventral visual stream: A case of developmental visual impairment.

    PubMed

    Martinaud, Olivier; Pouliquen, Dorothée; Parain, Dominique; Goldenberg, Alice; Gérardin, Emmanuel; Hannequin, Didier; Altarelli, Irène; Ramus, Franck; Hertz-Pannier, Lucie; Dehaene-Lambertz, Ghislaine; Cohen, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of a 14-year-old girl suffering from severe developmental visual impairment along with delayed language and cognitive development, and featuring a clear-cut dissociation between spared dorsal and impaired ventral visual pathways. Visual recognition of objects, including faces and printed words, was affected. In contrast, movement perception and visually guided motor control were preserved. Structural MRI was normal on inspection, but Voxel Based Morphometry (VBM) revealed reduced grey matter density in the mesial occipital and ventral occipito-temporal cortex. Functional MRI during the perception of line drawings uncovered impaired differentiation which is normally observed at even younger ages: no local category preferences could be identified within the occipito-temporal cortex for faces, houses, words or tools. In contrast, movement-related activations appeared to be normal. Finally, those abnormalities evolved on the background of chronic bilateral occipital epileptic activity, including continuous spike-wave discharges during sleep, which may be considered as the primary cause of non-specific intellectual disability and visual impairment. PMID:26272240

  20. Multiple impairments of cutaneous nociceptor function induced by cardiotoxic doses of Adriamycin in the rat.

    PubMed

    Boros, Krisztina; Jancsó, Gábor; Dux, Mária; Fekécs, Zoltán; Bencsik, Péter; Oszlács, Orsolya; Katona, Márta; Ferdinandy, Péter; Nógrádi, Antal; Sántha, Péter

    2016-09-01

    Besides their deleterious action on cardiac muscle, anthracycline-type cytostatic agents exert significant neurotoxic effects on primary sensory neurons. Since cardiac sensory nerves confer protective effects on heart muscle and share common traits with cutaneous chemosensitive nerves, this study examined the effects of cardiotoxic doses of adriamycin on the function and morphology of epidermal nerves. Sensory neurogenic vasodilatation, plasma extravasation, and the neural CGRP release evoked by TRPV1 and TRPA1 agonists in vitro were examined by using laser Doppler flowmetry, the Evans blue technique, and ELISA, respectively. Carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia was assessed with the Hargreaves method. Immunohistochemistry was utilized to study cutaneous innervation. Adriamycin treatment resulted in profound reductions in the cutaneous neurogenic sensory vasodilatation and plasma extravasation evoked by the TRPV1 and TRPA1 agonists capsaicin and mustard oil, respectively. The in vitro capsaicin-, but not high potassium-evoked neural release of the major sensory neuropeptide, CGRP, was markedly attenuated after adriamycin treatment. Carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia was largely abolished following the administration of adriamycin. Immunohistochemistry revealed a substantial loss of epidermal TRPV1-expressing nociceptive nerves and a marked thinning of the epidermis. These findings indicate impairments in the functions of TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors expressed on cutaneous chemosensitive nociceptive nerves and the loss of epidermal axons following the administration of cardiotoxic doses of adriamycin. Monitoring of the cutaneous nociceptor function in the course of adriamycin therapy may well be of predictive value for early detection of the deterioration of cardiac nerves which confer protection against the deleterious effects of the drug. PMID:27342418

  1. Assessment of systolic and diastolic function in heart failure using ambulatory monitoring with acoustic cardiography.

    PubMed

    Dillier, Roger; Zuber, Michel; Arand, Patricia; Erne, Susanne; Erne, Paul

    2011-08-01

    INTRODUCTION. The circadian variation of heart function and heart sounds in patients with and without heart failure (HF) is poorly understood. We hypothesized HF patients would exhibit less circadian variation with worsened cardiac function and sleep apnea. METHODS. We studied 67 HF patients (age 67.4 ± 8.2 years; 42% acute HF) and 63 asymptomatic control subjects with no history of HF (age 61.6 ± 7.7 years). Subjects wore a heart sound/ECG/respiratory monitor. The data were analyzed for sleep apnea, diastolic heart sounds, and systolic time intervals. RESULTS. The HF group had significantly greater prevalence of the third heart sound and prolongation of electro-mechanical activation time, while the control group had an age-related increase in the prevalence of the fourth heart sound. The control group showed more circadian variation in cardiac function. The HF subjects had more sleep apnea and higher occurrence of heart rate non-dipping. CONCLUSIONS. The control subjects demonstrated an increasing incidence of diastolic dysfunction with age, while systolic function was mostly unchanged with aging. Parameters related to systolic function were significantly worse in the HF group with little diurnal variation, indicating a constant stimulation of sympathetic tone in HF and reduction of diurnal regulation. PMID:21361859

  2. Worsening renal function in heart failure: the need for a consensus definition.

    PubMed

    Sheerin, Noella J; Newton, Phillip J; Macdonald, Peter S; Leung, Dominic Y C; Sibbritt, David; Spicer, Stephen Timothy; Johnson, Kay; Krum, Henry; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-07-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure is a common cause of hospitalisation. This is a period of vulnerability both in altered pathophysiology and also the potential for iatrogenesis due to therapeutic interventions. Renal dysfunction is often associated with heart failure and portends adverse outcomes. Identifying heart failure patients at risk of renal dysfunction is important in preventing progression to chronic kidney disease or worsening renal function, informing adjustment to medication management and potentially preventing adverse events. However, there is no working or consensus definition in international heart failure management guidelines for worsening renal function. In addition, there appears to be no concordance or adaptation of chronic kidney disease guidelines by heart failure guideline development groups for the monitoring of chronic kidney disease in heart failure. Our aim is to encourage the debate for an agreed definition given the prognostic impact of worsening renal function in heart failure. We present the case for the uptake of the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria for acute kidney injury with some minor alterations. This has the potential to inform study design and meta-analysis thereby building the knowledgebase for guideline development. Definition consensus supports data element, clinical registry and electronic algorithm innovation as instruments for quality improvement and clinical research for better patient outcomes. In addition, we recommend all community managed heart failure patients have their baseline renal function classified and routinely monitored in accordance with established renal guidelines to help identify those at increased risk for worsening renal function or progression to chronic kidney disease.

  3. Recycling Energy to Restore Impaired Ankle Function during Human Walking

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Steven H.; Kuo, Arthur D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Humans normally dissipate significant energy during walking, largely at the transitions between steps. The ankle then acts to restore energy during push-off, which may be the reason that ankle impairment nearly always leads to poorer walking economy. The replacement of lost energy is necessary for steady gait, in which mechanical energy is constant on average, external dissipation is negligible, and no net work is performed over a stride. However, dissipation and replacement by muscles might not be necessary if energy were instead captured and reused by an assistive device. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a microprocessor-controlled artificial foot that captures some of the energy that is normally dissipated by the leg and “recycles” it as positive ankle work. In tests on subjects walking with an artificially-impaired ankle, a conventional prosthesis reduced ankle push-off work and increased net metabolic energy expenditure by 23% compared to normal walking. Energy recycling restored ankle push-off to normal and reduced the net metabolic energy penalty to 14%. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that reduced ankle push-off contributes to the increased metabolic energy expenditure accompanying ankle impairments, and demonstrate that energy recycling can be used to reduce such cost. PMID:20174659

  4. Musical tasks targeting preserved and impaired functions in two dementias

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Andrea R; Golden, Hannah L; Magdalinou, Nadia; Witoonpanich, Pirada; Warren, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    Studies of musical abilities in dementia have for the most part been rather general assessments of abilities, for instance, assessing retention of music learned premorbidly. Here, we studied patients with dementias with contrasting cognitive profiles to explore specific aspects of music cognition under challenge. Patients suffered from Alzheimer's disease (AD), in which a primary impairment is in forming new declarative memories, or Lewy body disease (PD/LBD), a type of parkinsonism in which executive impairments are prominent. In the AD patients, we examined musical imagery. Behavioral and neural evidence confirms involvement of perceptual networks in imagery, and these are relatively spared in early stages of the illness. Thus, we expected patients to have relatively intact imagery in a mental pitch comparison task. For the LBD patients, we tested whether executive dysfunction would extend to music. We probed inhibitory skills by asking for a speeded pitch or timbre judgment when the irrelevant dimension was held constant or also changed. Preliminary results show that AD patients score similarly to controls in the imagery tasks, but PD/LBD patients are impaired relative to controls in suppressing some irrelevant musical dimensions, particularly when the required judgment varies from trial to trial. PMID:25773640

  5. Brain Injury Impairs Working Memory and Prefrontal Circuit Function

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Colin J.; Xiong, Guoxiang; Elkind, Jaclynn A.; Putnam, Brendan; Cohen, Akiva S.

    2015-01-01

    More than 2.5 million Americans suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year. Even mild to moderate TBI causes long-lasting neurological effects. Despite its prevalence, no therapy currently exists to treat the underlying cause of cognitive impairment suffered by TBI patients. Following lateral fluid percussion injury (LFPI), the most widely used experimental model of TBI, we investigated alterations in working memory and excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance in the prefrontal cortex. LFPI impaired working memory as assessed with a T-maze behavioral task. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials recorded in the prefrontal cortex were reduced in slices derived from brain-injured mice. Spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents onto layer 2/3 neurons were more frequent in slices derived from LFPI mice, while inhibitory currents onto layer 2/3 neurons were smaller after LFPI. Additionally, an increase in action potential threshold and concomitant decrease in firing rate was observed in layer 2/3 neurons in slices from injured animals. Conversely, no differences in excitatory or inhibitory synaptic transmission onto layer 5 neurons were observed; however, layer 5 neurons demonstrated a decrease in input resistance and action potential duration after LFPI. These results demonstrate synaptic and intrinsic alterations in prefrontal circuitry that may underlie working memory impairment caused by TBI. PMID:26617569

  6. Cognitive Function in Heart Failure is Associated with Nonsomatic Symptoms of Depression but Not Somatic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Misty A. W.; Dolansky, Mary A.; Schaefer, Julie T.; Fulcher, Michael J.; Gunstad, John; Redle, Joseph D.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with heart failure (HF) have high rates of cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms have been associated with greater cognitive impairments in HF; however, it is not known whether particular clusters of depressive symptoms are more detrimental to cognition than others. Objective To identify whether somatic and/or nonsomatic depressive symptom clusters were associated with cognitive function in persons with HF. Methods Participants were 326 HF patients (40.5% female, 26.7% race-ethnicity, aged 68.6±9.7 years). Depressive symptoms were measured using a depression questionnaire commonly used in medical populations: the Patient Health Questionnatire-9 (PHQ-9). Somatic and Nonsomatic subscales scores were created using previous factor analytic results. A neuropsychological battery tested attention, executive function, and memory. Composites were created using averages of age-adjusted scaled scores. Regressions adjusting for demographic and clinical factors were conducted. Results Regressions revealed that PHQ-9 Total was associated with Attention (β=−.14, p=.008) and Executive Function (β=−.17, p=.001). When analyzed separately, the Nonsomatic subscale – but not the Somatic symptoms subscale (ps ≥.092) – was associated with Attention scores (β=−.15, p=.004) and Memory (β=−.11, p=.044). Both Nonsomatic (β=−.18, p<.001) and Somatic symptoms (β=−.11, p=.048) were related to Executive Function. When included together, only the Nonsomatic symptom cluster was associated with Attention (β=−.15, p=.020) and Executive Function (β=−.19, p=.003). Conclusions Greater overall depressive symptom severity was associated with poorer performance on multiple cognitive domains, an effect driven primarily by the nonsomatic symptoms of depression. Clinical Implications These findings suggest that screening explicitly for nonsomatic depressive symptoms may be warranted and that the mechanisms underlying the

  7. [The effect of argan oil on heart function during ischemia and reperfusion].

    PubMed

    Benajiba, N; Morel, S; De Leiris, J; Boucher, F; Charrouf, Z; Mokhtar, N; Aguenaou, H

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of organ oil on isolated heart function before and after ischemia and on the activity of cardiac antioxidant enzymes. 16 Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups; control group and treated group receiving 5 mL/kg/day of organ oil. After 8 weeks of treatment, hearts were perfused and subjected to a global ischemia followed by reperfusion. Activity of cardiac antioxidant enzymes was assessed in freeze-clamped hearts at the end of reperfusion. Results showed that organ oil induces: 1--damage to heart function during the preischemic period, 2--decreased functional recovery during reperfusion and 3--significant increase in catalase activity. It seems that, in our experimental conditions, organ oil increases heart sensitivity to ischemia and reperfusion. However, the mechanism involved has yet to be understood.

  8. Comorbidity between reading disability and math disability: concurrent psychopathology, functional impairment, and neuropsychological functioning.

    PubMed

    Willcutt, Erik G; Petrill, Stephen A; Wu, Sarah; Boada, Richard; Defries, John C; Olson, Richard K; Pennington, Bruce F

    2013-01-01

    Reading disability (RD) and math disability (MD) frequently co-occur, but the etiology of this comorbidity is not well understood. Groups with RD only (N = 241), MD only (N = 183), and RD + MD (N = 188) and a control group with neither disorder (N = 411) completed a battery of measures of internalizing and externalizing psychopathology, social and academic functioning, and 10 neuropsychological processes. Groups with RD only, MD only, and RD + MD were significantly impaired versus the control group on nearly all measures, and the group with RD + MD was more impaired than the groups with MD and RD alone on measures of internalizing psychopathology, academic functioning, and 7 of 10 neuropsychological constructs. Multiple regression analyses of the neuropsychological measures indicated that deficits in reading and math were associated with shared weaknesses in working memory, processing speed, and verbal comprehension. In contrast, reading difficulties were uniquely associated with weaknesses in phoneme awareness and naming speed, and math deficits were uniquely associated with weaknesses in set shifting. These results support multiple-deficit neuropsychological models of RD and MD and suggest that RD and MD are distinct but related disorders that co-occur because of shared neuropsychological weaknesses in working memory, processing speed, and verbal comprehension. PMID:23449727

  9. Characterization of mitochondrial function in cells with impaired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function.

    PubMed

    Atlante, Anna; Favia, Maria; Bobba, Antonella; Guerra, Lorenzo; Casavola, Valeria; Reshkin, Stephan Joel

    2016-06-01

    Evidence supporting the occurrence of oxidative stress in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is well established and the literature suggests that oxidative stress is inseparably linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we have characterized mitochondrial function, in particular as it regards the steps of oxidative phosphorylation and ROS production, in airway cells either homozygous for the F508del-CFTR allele or stably expressing wt-CFTR. We find that oxygen consumption, ΔΨ generation, adenine nucleotide translocator-dependent ADP/ATP exchange and both mitochondrial Complex I and IV activities are impaired in CF cells, while both mitochondrial ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation increase. Importantly, treatment of CF cells with the small molecules VX-809 and 4,6,4'-trimethylangelicin, which act as "correctors" for F508del CFTR by rescuing the F508del CFTR-dependent chloride secretion, while having no effect per sè on mitochondrial function in wt-CFTR cells, significantly improved all the above mitochondrial parameters towards values found in the airway cells expressing wt-CFTR. This novel study on mitochondrial bioenergetics provides a springboard for future research to further understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for the involvement of mitochondria in CF and identify the proteins primarily responsible for the F508del-CFTR-dependent mitochondrial impairment and thus reveal potential novel targets for CF therapy. PMID:27146408

  10. Structure and function of gap junction proteins: role of gap junction proteins in embryonic heart development.

    PubMed

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular (cell-to-cell) communication is a crucial and complex mechanism during embryonic heart development. In the cardiovascular system, the beating of the heart is a dynamic and key regulatory process, which is functionally regulated by the coordinated spread of electrical activity through heart muscle cells. Heart tissues are composed of individual cells, each bearing specialized cell surface membrane structures called gap junctions that permit the intercellular exchange of ions and low molecular weight molecules. Gap junction channels are essential in normal heart function and they assist in the mediated spread of electrical impulses that stimulate synchronized contraction (via an electrical syncytium) of cardiac tissues. This present review describes the current knowledge of gap junction biology. In the first part, we summarise some relevant biochemical and physiological properties of gap junction proteins, including their structure and function. In the second part, we review the current evidence demonstrating the role of gap junction proteins in embryonic development with particular reference to those involved in embryonic heart development. Genetics and transgenic animal studies of gap junction protein function in embryonic heart development are considered and the alteration/disruption of gap junction intercellular communication which may lead to abnormal heart development is also discussed.

  11. Diabetes Mellitus-Associated Functional Hypercortisolism Impairs Sexual Function in Male Late-Onset Hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Tirabassi, G; Corona, G; Lamonica, G R; Lenzi, A; Maggi, M; Balercia, G

    2016-01-01

    Functional hypercortisolism is generated by conditions able to chronically activate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and has been proven to have a negative role in several complications. However, no study has evaluated the possible influence of diabetes mellitus-associated functional hypercortisolism on male hypogonadism and sexual function. We aimed to identify any association of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation measures with testosterone and sexual function in men simultaneously affected by diabetes mellitus and late-onset hypogonadism. Fifteen diabetes mellitus and late-onset hypogonadism subjects suffering from functional hypercortisolism and fifteen diabetes mellitus and late-onset hypogonadism subjects who were free of functional hypercortisolism were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical, hormonal, and sexual parameters were considered. Hypercortisolemic subjects showed higher values of body mass index, waist, and glycated hemoglobin and lower ones of testosterone compared to normocortisolemic ones. All sexual parameters, except for orgasmic function, were significantly worse in hypercortisolemic than in normocortisolemic subjects. Hypercortisolemic patients showed higher values of cortisol after dexamethasone and urinary free cortisol as well as a lesser ACTH response after corticotropin releasing hormone test (ACTH area under curve) compared to normocortisolemic ones. No significant association was found at Poisson regression analysis between hormonal and sexual variables in normocortisolemic patients. In hypercortisolemic subjects, negative and significant associations of cortisol response after corticotropin releasing hormone (cortisol area under curve) with erectile function (β: -0.0008; p: 0.015) and total international index of erectile function score (β: -0.0006; p: 0.001) were evident. This study suggests for the first time the impairing influence of the dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on sexual function in

  12. Visual impairment, visual functioning, and quality of life assessments in patients with glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, R K

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: To determine the relation between visual impairment, visual functioning, and the global quality of life in patients with glaucoma. METHODS: Visual impairment, defined with the American Medical Association Guides to the Evaluation of Permanent Impairment; visual functioning, measured with the VF-14 and the Field Test Version of the National Eye Institute-Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ); and the global quality of life, assessed with the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), were determined in 147 consecutive patients with glaucoma. RESULTS: None of the SF-36 domains demonstrated more than a weak correlation with visual impairment. The VF-14 scores were moderately correlated with visual impairment. Of the twelve NEI-VFQ scales, distance activities and vision specific dependency were moderately correlated with visual impairment. Of the twelve NEI-VFQ scales, distance activities and vision specific dependency were moderately correlated with visual field impairment; vision specific social functioning, near activities, vision specific role difficulties, general vision, vision specific mental health, color vision, and driving were modestly correlated; visual pain was weakly correlated; and two were not significantly correlated. Correcting for visual actuity weakened the strength of the correlation coefficients. CONCLUSIONS: The SF-36 is unlikely to be useful in determining visual impairment in patients with glaucoma. Based on the moderate correlation between visual field impairment and the VF-14 score, this questionnaire may be generalizable to patients with glaucoma. Several of the NEI-VFQ scales correlate with visual field impairment scores in patients with a wide range of glaucomatous damage. PMID:8981717

  13. [Comparative evaluation of the cardiac functional reserve in operated and nonoperated congenital heart defect patients].

    PubMed

    Gritsenko, V V; Gavrilenkov, V I; Mochalov, O Iu

    1981-02-01

    The functional cardiac reserve was studied in 26 non-operated and 42 operated patients with congenital heart diseases. The ratio of the maximum utilization of oxygen (VO2 max) to the heart volume (HV) was shown to be an objective quantitative index of the functional cardiac reserve. The authors believe that the value of the functional cardiac reserve may be used for the determination of risk as well as for the assessment of the rehabilitation of the rehabilitation significance of operations in patients with congenital heart diseases. PMID:7233699

  14. Impaired neural structure and function contributing to autonomic symptoms in congenital central hypoventilation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Ronald M.; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M.; Harper, Rebecca K.; Ogren, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) patients show major autonomic alterations in addition to their better-known breathing deficiencies. The processes underlying CCHS, mutations in the PHOX2B gene, target autonomic neuronal development, with frame shift extent contributing to symptom severity. Many autonomic characteristics, such as impaired pupillary constriction and poor temperature regulation, reflect parasympathetic alterations, and can include disturbed alimentary processes, with malabsorption and intestinal motility dyscontrol. The sympathetic nervous system changes can exert life-threatening outcomes, with dysregulation of sympathetic outflow leading to high blood pressure, time-altered and dampened heart rate and breathing responses to challenges, cardiac arrhythmia, profuse sweating, and poor fluid regulation. The central mechanisms contributing to failed autonomic processes are readily apparent from structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, which reveal substantial cortical thinning, tissue injury, and disrupted functional responses in hypothalamic, hippocampal, posterior thalamic, and basal ganglia sites and their descending projections, as well as insular, cingulate, and medial frontal cortices, which influence subcortical autonomic structures. Midbrain structures are also compromised, including the raphe system and its projections to cerebellar and medullary sites, the locus coeruleus, and medullary reflex integrating sites, including the dorsal and ventrolateral medullary nuclei. The damage to rostral autonomic sites overlaps metabolic, affective and cognitive regulatory regions, leading to hormonal disruption, anxiety, depression, behavioral control, and sudden death concerns. The injuries suggest that interventions for mitigating hypoxic exposure and nutrient loss may provide cellular protection, in the same fashion as interventions in other conditions with similar malabsorption, fluid turnover, or hypoxic exposure

  15. Health functioning impairments associated with posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety disorders, and depression.

    PubMed

    Zayfert, Claudia; Dums, Aricca R; Ferguson, Robert J; Hegel, Mark T

    2002-04-01

    Although anxiety disorders have been associated with impairments in self-reported health functioning, the relative effect of various anxiety disorders has not been studied. We compared health functioning of patients with a principal diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), panic disorder (PD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and major depressive disorder (MDD). Patients with PTSD and MDD were equally impaired on overall mental health functioning, and both were significantly worse than patients with PD and GAD. PTSD was associated with significantly worse physical health functioning relative to PD, GAD, and MDD. Hierarchical regression showed that the association of PTSD with physical health functioning was unique and was not caused by the effects of age, depression, or comorbid anxiety disorders. Both PTSD and comorbid anxiety accounted for unique variance in mental functioning. These results highlight the association of PTSD with impaired physical and mental functioning and suggest that effective treatment of PTSD may affect overall health.

  16. The effect of negative affect on cognition: Anxiety, not anger, impairs executive function.

    PubMed

    Shields, Grant S; Moons, Wesley G; Tewell, Carl A; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2016-09-01

    It is often assumed that negative affect impairs the executive functions that underlie our ability to control and focus our thoughts. However, support for this claim has been mixed. Recent work has suggested that different negative affective states like anxiety and anger may reflect physiologically separable states with distinct effects on cognition. However, the effects of these 2 affective states on executive function have never been assessed. As such, we induced anxiety or anger in participants and examined the effects on executive function. We found that anger did not impair executive function relative to a neutral mood, whereas anxiety did. In addition, self-reports of induced anxiety, but not anger, predicted impairments in executive function. These results support functional models of affect and cognition, and highlight the need to consider differences between anxiety and anger when investigating the influence of negative affect on fundamental cognitive processes such as memory and executive function. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27100367

  17. Hypertension-associated C825T polymorphism impairs the function of Gβ3 to target GRK2 ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Zhengyu; Han, Xiao-Ran; Smith, Matthew D; Lei, Qun-Ying; Guan, Kun-Liang; Xiong, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Population-based and case–control studies in different ethnicities have linked a polymorphism, C825T, in exon 10 of GNB3 gene to hypertension and several additional diseases. The 825T allele is associated with alternative splicing and results in a shortened Gβ3 protein, referred to as Gβ3s, which loses 41 amino acids encompassing one WD40 repeat domain. The mechanism of how Gβ3 C825T polymorphism is associated with hypertension has remained unclear, but an impairment of its canonical function in G-protein-coupled receptor signaling has been ruled out. Here, we report that Gβ3, like other Gβ proteins, binds to DDB1 and assembles a DDB1-CUL4A-ROC1 E3 ubiquitin ligase (CRL4AGβ3) to target GRK2 ubiquitination. The loss of the 41 amino-acid residues disrupts the Gβ3-DDB1 binding and impairs the function of Gβ3s to ubiquitinate GRK2. GRK2 ubiquitination levels were decreased and protein levels were accumulated in the blood samples of Gβ3 825T allele carriers. Deletion of Cul4a in mice resulted in systolic pressure increased and weakened heart function in male mice that can be partially rescued by the deletion of one Grk2 allele. These results reveal a mechanism explaining the link between Gβ3 C825T polymorphism and hypertension. PMID:27462452

  18. The Role of Mitochondrial Functional Proteins in ROS Production in Ischemic Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Haifeng; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Heng; Li, Xiuchuan; Yang, Dachun; Li, De; Yang, Yongjian

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic heart diseases (IHD) have become the leading cause of death around the world, killing more than 7 million people annually. In IHD, the blockage of coronary vessels will cause irreversible cell injury and even death. As the “powerhouse” and “apoptosis center” in cardiomyocytes, mitochondria play critical roles in IHD. Ischemia insult can reduce myocardial ATP content, resulting in energy stress and overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus, mitochondrial abnormality has been identified as a hallmark of multiple cardiovascular disorders. To date, many studies have suggested that these mitochondrial proteins, such as electron transport chain (ETC) complexes, uncoupling proteins (UCPs), mitochondrial dynamic proteins, translocases of outer membrane (Tom) complex, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), can directly or indirectly influence mitochondria-originated ROS production, consequently determining the degree of mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial impairment. Here, the focus of this review is to summarize the present understanding of the relationship between some mitochondrial functional proteins and ROS production in IHD. PMID:27119006

  19. Levomilnacipran Extended-Release Treatment in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder: Improvements in Functional Impairment Categories

    PubMed Central

    Gommoll, Carl P.; Chen, Changzheng; Greenberg, William M.; Ruth, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this post hoc analysis, improvement in functional impairment in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) treated with levomilnacipran extended release (ER) was evaluated by assessing shifts from more severe to less severe functional impairment categories on individual Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) subscales. Method: SDS data were pooled from 5 phase II/III studies conducted between December 2006 and March 2012 of levomilnacipran ER versus placebo in adult patients with MDD (DSM-IV-TR criteria). Proportions of patients shifting from moderate-extreme baseline impairment (score ≥ 4) to mild-no impairment (score ≤ 3) at end of treatment were assessed for each SDS subscale. Proportions of patients shifting from marked-extreme (score ≥ 7) baseline impairment to moderate-no (score ≤ 6) or mild-no impairment (score ≤ 3) at end of treatment, and shifts in which patients worsened from moderate-no to marked-extreme impairment, were also evaluated. Results: A significantly higher proportion of patients treated with levomilnacipran ER than placebo-treated patients improved from more severe categories of functional impairment at baseline to less severe impairment categories across all SDS subscales: work/school, social life, and family life/home responsibilities (P < .01). Depending on the SDS subscale, 48%–55% of levomilnacipran ER–treated patients with moderate-extreme impairment at baseline improved to mild or no impairment, compared with no more than 40% of placebo patients on any subscale. Almost half (42%–47%) of levomilnacipran ER–treated patients versus only about one-third (29%–34%) of placebo patients improved from marked-extreme to mild or no impairment across functional domains. Conclusions: These results suggest that functional improvement was observed across the SDS functional domains. To our knowledge, this is the first such categorical analysis of functional improvement, as measured by the SDS, for an antidepressant. Trial

  20. ASSESSMENT OF UPPER EXTREMITY IMPAIRMENT, FUNCTION, AND ACTIVITY FOLLOWING STROKE: FOUNDATIONS FOR CLINICAL DECISION MAKING

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Catherine E.; Bland, Marghuretta D.; Bailey, Ryan R.; Schaefer, Sydney Y.; Birkenmeier, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive approach for assessing the upper extremity (UE) after stroke. First, common upper extremity impairments and how to assess them are briefly discussed. While multiple UE impairments are typically present after stroke, the severity of one impairment, paresis, is the primary determinant of UE functional loss. Second, UE function is operationally defined and a number of clinical measures are discussed. It is important to consider how impairment and loss of function affect UE activity outside of the clinical environment. Thus, this review also identifies accelerometry as an objective method for assessing UE activity in daily life. Finally, the role that each of these levels of assessment should play in clinical decision making is discussed in order to optimize the provision of stroke rehabilitation services. PMID:22975740

  1. Anxiety symptoms and functional impairment: A systematic review of the correlation between the two measures.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Patrick E; Monfort, Samuel S; Kashdan, Todd B; Blalock, Dan V; Calton, Jenna M

    2016-04-01

    Researchers and clinicians assume a strong, positive correlation between anxiety symptoms and functional impairment. That assumption may be well-justified since diagnostic criteria typically include functional impairment. Still, the relationship remains largely unavailable in any systematic review. Our aim with this paper was to provide empirical evidence for this assumed relationship and to document the observed correlations between anxiety symptom measures and functional impairment measures. Correlations existed for symptoms of six anxiety disorders (Panic Disorder, Agoraphobia, Social Anxiety Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) across four functional domains (global, social, occupational, and physical). Overall, the mean of 497 correlations across all disorders and functional domains was modest (r=.34); since the variability between disorders and functional domains tended to be rather large, we explored these correlations further. We presented these results and the potential explanations for unexpected findings along with the clinical and research implications. PMID:26953005

  2. The aftermath of terrorism: posttraumatic stress and functional impairment after the 2011 Oslo bombing

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Øivind; Blix, Ines; Heir, Trond

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In the present study we wanted to investigate the link between exposure, posttraumatic stress symptomatology, and functional impairment in the aftermath of terrorism. Method: Posttraumatic stress symptomatology and functional impairment related to the Oslo bombing 22nd of July, 2011, in directly and indirectly exposed individuals (N = 1927) were assessed together with demographics, exposure, peri-traumatic reactions, and event centrality approximately 1 year after the attack. Results: Directly and indirectly exposed individuals qualifying for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) reported similar peri-traumatic reactions, event centrality, and functional impairment. However, clusters within the PTSD symptomatology were differentially associated with impairment as a function of their exposure. In the directly exposed group, all clusters within the PTSD symptomatology were associated with impairment in function, while only emotional numbing was associated with impairment within the indirectly exposed group. Conclusion: Considering that terror attacks frequently involve directly exposed individuals and a larger population of indirectly exposed individuals, this finding is of importance, especially in the design of intervention programs and the development of treatment policies. PMID:26300833

  3. Abnormal Functional Lateralization and Activity of Language Brain Areas in Typical Specific Language Impairment (Developmental Dysphasia)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guibert, Clement; Maumet, Camille; Jannin, Pierre; Ferre, Jean-Christophe; Treguier, Catherine; Barillot, Christian; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Allaire, Catherine; Biraben, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Atypical functional lateralization and specialization for language have been proposed to account for developmental language disorders, yet results from functional neuroimaging studies are sparse and inconsistent. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared children with a specific subtype of specific language impairment affecting…

  4. High-fat, low-carbohydrate diet alters myocardial oxidative stress and impairs recovery of cardiac function after ischemia and reperfusion in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Lloyd, Steven G

    2013-04-01

    Obesity is associated with elevated risk of heart disease. A solid understanding of the safety and potential adverse effects of high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet (HFLCD) similar to that used by humans for weight loss on the heart is crucial. High fat intake is known to promote increases in reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial damage. We hypothesized that there would be adverse effects of HFLCD on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury through enhancing oxidative stress injury and impairing mitochondrial biogenesis in a nongenetic, diet-induced rat model of obesity. To test the hypothesis, 250-g male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed an obesity-promoting diet for 7 weeks to induce obesity, then switched to HFLCD or a low-fat control diet for 2 weeks. Isolated hearts underwent global low flow ischemia for 60 minutes and reperfusion for 60 minutes. High-fat, low-carbohydrate diet resulted in greater weight gain and lower myocardial glycogen, plasma adiponectin, and insulin. Myocardial antioxidant gene transcript and protein expression of superoxide dismutase and catalase were reduced in HFLCD, along with increased oxidative gene NADPH oxidase-4 transcript and xanthine oxidase activity, and a 37% increase in nitrated protein (nitrotyrosine) in HFLCD hearts. The cardiac expression of key mitochondrial regulatory factors such as nuclear respiratory factor-1 and transcription factor A-mitochondrial were inhibited and myocardial mitochondrial DNA copy number decreased. The cardiac expression of adiponectin and its receptors was down-regulated in HFLCD. High-fat, low-carbohydrate diet impaired recovery of left ventricular rate-pressure product after ischemia/reperfusion and led to 3.5-fold increased injury as measured by lactate dehydrogenase release. In conclusion, HFLCD leads to increased ischemic myocardial injury and impaired recovery of function after reperfusion and was associated with attenuation of mitochondrial biogenesis and enhanced oxidative stress in obese rats

  5. Autacoid 14S,21R-dihydroxy-docosahexaenoic acid counteracts diabetic impairment of macrophage prohealing functions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haibin; Lu, Yan; Shah, Shraddha P; Hong, Song

    2011-10-01

    Impaired macrophage functions imposed by diabetic complications and the suppressed formation of 14S,21R-dihydroxydocosa-4Z,7Z,10Z,12E,16Z,19Z-hexaenoic acid (14S,21R-diHDHA) in wounds contribute significantly to deficient wound healing in diabetics, but how are macrophage functions and 14S,21R-diHDHA formation associated? We studied 14S,21R-diHDHA generation from macrophages using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The role in macrophage-mediated wound healing functions was determined using a murine splinted excisional wound healing model and in vitro assays. 14S,21R-diHDHA acts as a macrophage-generated autacoid, and its attenuated formation in macrophages of diabetic db/db mice was accompanied by impairment of macrophage prohealing functions. 14S,21R-diHDHA restored db/db macrophage-impaired prohealing functions by promoting wound re-epithelialization, formulation of granulation tissue, and vascularization. Additionally, 12/15-lipoxygenase-deficient macrophages, which are unable to produce 14S,21R-diHDHA, exhibited impaired prohealing functions, which also were restored by 14S,21R-diHDHA treatment. The molecular mechanism for 14S,21R-diHDHA-induced recovery of impaired prohealing functions of db/db macrophages involves enhancing their secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor BB, decreasing hyperglycemia-induced generation of reactive oxygen species, and increasing IL-10 expression under inflammatory stimulation. Taken together, these results indicate that deficiency of 14S,21R-diHDHA formation by diabetic macrophages contributes to their impaired prohealing functions. Our findings provide mechanistic insights into wound healing in diabetics and suggest the possibility of using autologous macrophages/monocytes, treated with 14S,21R-diHDHA, or related compounds, to promote diabetes-impaired wound healing.

  6. Comorbid Cognitive Impairment and Functional Trajectories in Low Vision Rehabilitation for Macular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Whitson, Heather E.; Ansah, Deidra; Sanders, Linda L; Whitaker, Diane; Potter, Guy G.; Cousins, Scott W.; Steffens, David C.; Landerman, Lawrence R.; Pieper, Carl F.; Cohen, Harvey Jay

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Comorbid cognitive impairment is common among visually impaired older adults. This study investigated whether baseline cognitive status predicts functional trajectories among older adults in low vision rehabilitation (LVR) for macular disease. Methods The Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status – modified (TICS-m) was administered to macular disease patients aged ≥ 65 years receiving outpatient LVR. Mixed models assessed the rate of change in instrumental activities of daily living and visual function measures over a mean follow-up of 115 days. Results Of 91 participants, 17 (18.7%) had cognitive impairment (TICS-m score ≤ 27) and 23 (25.3%) had marginal impairment (TICS-m scores 28 to 30). Controlling for age and gender, baseline cognitive status did not predict most functional outcomes. However, participants with marginal cognitive impairment experienced worse functional trajectories in ability to prepare meals (p=0.03).and activities that require distance vision (p = 0.05). Conclusion Patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment should not be excluded from LVR, but programs should be prepared to detect and accommodate a range of cognitive ability. PMID:22526069

  7. Immune cell function assay in pediatric heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Man-Shun; Boucek, Robert; Kemna, Mariska; Rutledge, Joe; Law, Yuk

    2014-08-01

    The ImmuKnow ICFA reports ex vivo CD4 lymphocyte activation to quantify immunosuppression. Limited organ and age-specific data exist for pediatric heart transplant recipients. We sought to examine their normative values and ICFA's association with rejection/infection. A total of 380 ICFAs from 58 heart transplant recipients (6.5/recipient) were studied retrospectively. The median age at the time of their first ICFA was 5.3 yr (IQR 2.4-12.1 yr). ICFA levels during immunologic stability (n = 311) were a median of 305 (IQR: 172-483) and mean of 353 (s.d. ± 224) ng ATP/mL. ICFA levels trended lower with advancing age. ICFA levels during immunologic stability increased over time from transplant after the first six months but were not correlated with calcineurin inhibitor levels or the type used. There is no association between ICFA values during stability and rejection (median 368 ATP ng/mL; IQR 153-527) or infection (median 293 ATP ng/mL; IQR 198-432). In contrast to the manufacturer's suggested ranges, the immunologic stable ranges in pediatric cardiac recipients were very different. ICFA values during immunologic stability are related to time from transplant in pediatric heart recipients. ICFA's ability to discriminate rejection or infection from immunologic stability was not demonstrated.

  8. Anticoagulation in patients with impaired renal function and with haemodialysis. Anticoagulant effects, efficacy, safety, therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Harenberg, J; Hentschel, V A-T; Du, S; Zolfaghari, S; Krämer, R; Weiss, C; Krämer, B K; Wehling, M

    2015-01-01

    Patients with impaired renal function are exposed to an increased risk for bleeding complications depending on the amount of the anticoagulant eliminated by the kidneys. The elimination of unfractionated heparins, vitamin K antagonists and argatroban is only minimally influenced by a reduced renal function. Low-molecular weight heparins, fondaparinux, danaparoid, hirudins and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOAC) cause a variably increased bleeding risk in renal impairment. Dose reductions are recommended for all of these anticoagulants in renal impairment, some are even contraindicated at certain levels of renal impairment. Their benefit over the conventional anticoagulants is preserved if renal dosing is employed. For end-stage renal disease patients specific treatment regimens are required. PMID:25405246

  9. Spectral transfer function analysis of respiratory hemodynamic fluctuations predicts end-diastolic stiffness in preserved ejection fraction heart failure.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Mahmoud; Leite, Sara; Alaa, Mohamed; Oliveira-Pinto, José; Tavares-Silva, Marta; Fontoura, Dulce; Falcão-Pires, Inês; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Lourenço, André P

    2016-01-01

    Preserved ejection fraction heart failure (HFpEF) diagnosis remains controversial, and invasive left ventricular (LV) hemodynamic evaluation and/or exercise testing is advocated by many. The stiffer HFpEF myocardium may show impaired stroke volume (SV) variation induced by fluctuating LV filling pressure during ventilation. Our aim was to investigate spectral transfer function (STF) gain from end-diastolic pressure (EDP) to indexed SV (SVi) in experimental HFpEF. Eighteen-week-old Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and ZSF1 lean (ZSF1 Ln) and obese rats (ZSF1 Ob) randomly underwent LV open-chest (OC, n = 8 each group) or closed-chest hemodynamic evaluation (CC, n = 6 each group) under halogenate anesthesia and positive-pressure ventilation at constant inspiratory pressure. Beat-to-beat fluctuations in hemodynamic parameters during ventilation were assessed by STF. End-diastolic stiffness (βi) and end-systolic elastance (Eesi) for indexed volumes were obtained by inferior vena cava occlusion in OC (multibeat) or single-beat method estimates in CC. ZSF1 Ob showed higher EDP spectrum (P < 0.001), higher STF gain between end-diastolic volume and EDP, and impaired STF gain between EDP and SVi compared with both hypertensive ZSF1 Ln and normotensive WKY controls (P < 0.001). Likewise βi was only higher in ZSF1 Ob while Eesi was raised in both ZSF1 groups. On multivariate analysis βi and not Eesi correlated with impaired STF gain from EDP to SVi (P < 0.001), and receiver-operating characteristics analysis showed an area under curve of 0.89 for higher βi prediction (P < 0.001). Results support further clinical testing of STF analysis from right heart catheterization-derived EDP surrogates to noninvasively determined SV as screening/diagnostic tool to assess myocardial stiffness in HFpEF.

  10. Impaired cortico-striatal functional connectivity in prodromal Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Unschuld, Paul G; Joel, Suresh E; Liu, Xinyang; Shanahan, Megan; Margolis, Russell L; Biglan, Kevin M; Bassett, Susan S; Schretlen, David J; Redgrave, Graham W; van Zijl, Peter C M; Pekar, James J; Ross, Christopher A

    2012-04-18

    Huntington's Disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG triplet-repeat expansion-mutation in the Huntingtin gene. Subjects at risk for HD can be identified by genetic testing in the prodromal phase. Structural changes of basal-ganglia nuclei such as the caudate nucleus are well-replicated findings observable early in prodromal-HD subjects and may be preceded by distinct functional alterations of cortico-striatal circuits. This study aims to assess functional integrity of the motor system as a cortico-striatal circuit with particular clinical relevance in HD. Ten subjects in the prodromal phase of HD and ten matched controls were administered blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at rest (3T). Functional connectivity was measured as synchrony of BOLD activity between the caudate nucleus and thirteen cortical brain regions (seeds). Basal-ganglia volumes were assessed as established markers of disease progression in prodromal-HD. Linear regression analysis was performed to test for a relationship between structural changes and group differences in functional connectivity. Prodromal-HD subjects showed reduced BOLD synchrony between two seeds in the premotor cortex (BA6) and the caudate nucleus. While similar effect sizes could be observed for reduced basal-ganglia volumes and differences in functional connectivity, coefficients of determination indicate a moderate relationship between functional connectivity and striatal atrophy. Our data show reduced cortico-striatal functional connectivity at rest in prodromal-HD and suggest a relation to early structural brain changes. Additional longitudinal studies are necessary to elucidate the temporal relationship between functional alterations and earliest structural brain changes in prodromal-HD.

  11. Targeted mutation of plakoglobin in mice reveals essential functions of desmosomes in the embryonic heart

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Plakoglobin (gamma-catenin), a member of the armadillo family of proteins, is a constituent of the cytoplasmic plaque of desmosomes as well as of other adhering cell junctions, and is involved in anchorage of cytoskeletal filaments to specific cadherins. We have generated a null mutation of the plakoglobin gene in mice. Homozygous -/- mutant animals die between days 12-16 of embryogenesis due to defects in heart function. Often, heart ventricles burst and blood floods the pericard. This tissue instability correlates with the absence of desmosomes in heart, but not in epithelia organs. Instead, extended adherens junctions are formed in the heart, which contain desmosomal proteins, i.e., desmoplakin. Thus, plakoglobin is an essential component of myocardiac desmosomes and seems to play a crucial role in the sorting out of desmosomal and adherens junction components, and consequently in the architecture of intercalated discs and the stabilization of heart tissue. PMID:8858175

  12. Targeting the unfolded protein response in heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Man; Dudley, Samuel C

    2014-07-01

    In neurological disease and diabetes, the unfolded protein response (UPR) has been investigated for years, while its function in heart disease is less well understood. All three branches of the UPR are involved in ischaemia/reperfusion and can either protect or impair heart function. Recently, UPR has been found to play a role in arrhythmogenesis during human heart failure, and blocking UPR has an antiarrhythmic effect. This review will discuss the rationale for and challenges to targeting UPR in heart disease.

  13. Pathophysiology of impaired hand function in children with unilateral cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Andrew M; Bleyenheuft, Yannick; Steenbergen, Bert

    2013-11-01

    Unilateral spastic cerebral palsy, caused by damage to the developing central nervous system, is characterized by motor impairments mainly lateralized to one side of the body, with hand impairments greatly contributing to functional limitations. The integrity of the motor areas and the corticospinal tract (CST) is often compromised. The specific etiology may drastically influence subsequent development of CST pathways. Here we describe the pathophysiology underlying impaired upper extremity function, with particular emphasis on the relation between CST damage and hand function. We also describe the resulting sensory and motor deficits, with an emphasis on studies of precision grip, which highlight impairments in motor execution, sensorimotor integration, motor planning, and bimanual coordination beyond dexterity impairments. We show that the type and extent of early brain damage and/or CST reorganization is highly predictive of the severity of these impairments. We discuss the clinical implications of these findings, including the intriguing possibility that the specific pathophysiology is predictive of treatment outcomes. We suggest that a 'one-treatment fits all approach' may be insufficient, and that future rehabilitation efforts will be best guided by closely relating treatment efficacy with the specific pathophysiology. PMID:24237277

  14. [Review of functional impairment associated with acute illness in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Osuna-Pozo, Carmen María; Ortiz-Alonso, Javier; Vidán, Maite; Ferreira, Guillermo; Serra-Rexach, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Hospitalization is a risk for elderly population, with a high probability of having adverse events. The most important one is functional impairment, due to its high prevalence and the serious impact it has on the quality of life. The main risk factors for functional decline associated with hospitalization are, age, immobility, cognitive impairment, and functional status prior to admission. It is necessary to detect patients at risk in order to implement the necessary actions to prevent this deterioration, with physical exercise and multidisciplinary geriatric care being the most important.

  15. Differential Item Functioning Comparisons on a Performance-Based Alternate Assessment for Students with Severe Cognitive Impairments, Autism and Orthopedic Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laitusis, Cara Cahalan; Maneckshana, Behroz; Monfils, Lora; Ahlgrim-Delzell, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Differential Item Functioning (DIF) by disability groups on an on-demand performance assessment for students with severe cognitive impairments. Researchers examined the presence of DIF for two comparisons. One comparison involved students with severe cognitive impairments who served as the reference group…

  16. The Ways of the Hand: A Study of Hand Function among Blind, Visually Impaired and Visually Impaired Multi-Handicapped Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogow, Sally M.

    1987-01-01

    The manual development of 148 blind, visually impaired, and visually impaired multi-handicapped students, aged 3-19, was studied. Results indicated a significant relationship between object manipulation and speech, and an inverse relationship between object manipulation and stereotypic hand mannerisms. Optimal development of manual functions and…

  17. Altered Intranetwork and Internetwork Functional Connectivity in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With and Without Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shi-Qi; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Xiong, Ying; Zhan, Ya-Feng; Guo, Lin-Ying; Zhang, Shun; Jiang, Ri-Feng; Yao, Yi-Hao; Qin, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Yong; Zhu, Wen-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with cognitive impairment. We investigated whether alterations of intranetwork and internetwork functional connectivity with T2DM progression exist, by using resting-state functional MRI. MRI data were analysed from 19 T2DM patients with normal cognition (DMCN) and 19 T2DM patients with cognitive impairment (DMCI), 19 healthy controls (HC). Functional connectivity among 36 previously well-defined brain regions which consisted of 5 resting-state network (RSN) systems [default mode network (DMN), dorsal attention network (DAN), control network (CON), salience network (SAL) and sensorimotor network (SMN)] was investigated at 3 levels (integrity, network and connectivity). Impaired intranetwork and internetwork connectivity were found in T2DM, especially in DMCI, on the basis of the three levels of analysis. The bilateral posterior cerebellum, the right insula, the DMN and the CON were mainly involved in these changes. The functional connectivity strength of specific brain architectures in T2DM was found to be associated with haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), cognitive score and illness duration. These network alterations in intergroup differences, which were associated with brain functional impairment due to T2DM, indicate that network organizations might be potential biomarkers for predicting the clinical progression, evaluating the cognitive impairment, and further understanding the pathophysiology of T2DM. PMID:27622870

  18. Altered Intranetwork and Internetwork Functional Connectivity in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With and Without Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Qi; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Xiong, Ying; Zhan, Ya-Feng; Guo, Lin-Ying; Zhang, Shun; Jiang, Ri-Feng; Yao, Yi-Hao; Qin, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Yong; Zhu, Wen-Zhen

    2016-09-13

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with cognitive impairment. We investigated whether alterations of intranetwork and internetwork functional connectivity with T2DM progression exist, by using resting-state functional MRI. MRI data were analysed from 19 T2DM patients with normal cognition (DMCN) and 19 T2DM patients with cognitive impairment (DMCI), 19 healthy controls (HC). Functional connectivity among 36 previously well-defined brain regions which consisted of 5 resting-state network (RSN) systems [default mode network (DMN), dorsal attention network (DAN), control network (CON), salience network (SAL) and sensorimotor network (SMN)] was investigated at 3 levels (integrity, network and connectivity). Impaired intranetwork and internetwork connectivity were found in T2DM, especially in DMCI, on the basis of the three levels of analysis. The bilateral posterior cerebellum, the right insula, the DMN and the CON were mainly involved in these changes. The functional connectivity strength of specific brain architectures in T2DM was found to be associated with haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), cognitive score and illness duration. These network alterations in intergroup differences, which were associated with brain functional impairment due to T2DM, indicate that network organizations might be potential biomarkers for predicting the clinical progression, evaluating the cognitive impairment, and further understanding the pathophysiology of T2DM.

  19. Altered Intranetwork and Internetwork Functional Connectivity in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus With and Without Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Qi; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Xiong, Ying; Zhan, Ya-Feng; Guo, Lin-Ying; Zhang, Shun; Jiang, Ri-Feng; Yao, Yi-Hao; Qin, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Yong; Zhu, Wen-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with cognitive impairment. We investigated whether alterations of intranetwork and internetwork functional connectivity with T2DM progression exist, by using resting-state functional MRI. MRI data were analysed from 19 T2DM patients with normal cognition (DMCN) and 19 T2DM patients with cognitive impairment (DMCI), 19 healthy controls (HC). Functional connectivity among 36 previously well-defined brain regions which consisted of 5 resting-state network (RSN) systems [default mode network (DMN), dorsal attention network (DAN), control network (CON), salience network (SAL) and sensorimotor network (SMN)] was investigated at 3 levels (integrity, network and connectivity). Impaired intranetwork and internetwork connectivity were found in T2DM, especially in DMCI, on the basis of the three levels of analysis. The bilateral posterior cerebellum, the right insula, the DMN and the CON were mainly involved in these changes. The functional connectivity strength of specific brain architectures in T2DM was found to be associated with haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), cognitive score and illness duration. These network alterations in intergroup differences, which were associated with brain functional impairment due to T2DM, indicate that network organizations might be potential biomarkers for predicting the clinical progression, evaluating the cognitive impairment, and further understanding the pathophysiology of T2DM. PMID:27622870

  20. Israeli adolescents with ongoing exposure to terrorism: suicidal ideation, posttraumatic stress disorder, and functional impairment.

    PubMed

    Chemtob, Claude M; Pat-Horenczyk, Ruth; Madan, Anita; Pitman, Seth R; Wang, Yanping; Doppelt, Osnat; Burns, Kelly Dugan; Abramovitz, Robert; Brom, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we examined the relationships among terrorism exposure, functional impairment, suicidal ideation, and probable partial or full posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from exposure to terrorism in adolescents continuously exposed to this threat in Israel. A convenience sample of 2,094 students, aged 12 to 18, was drawn from 10 Israeli secondary schools. In terms of demographic factors, older age was associated with increased risk for suicidal ideation, OR = 1.33, 95% CI [1.09, 1.62], p < .01, but was protective against probable partial or full PTSD, OR = 0.72, 95% CI [0.54, 0.95], p < .05; female gender was associated with greater likelihood of probable partial or full PTSD, OR = 1.57, 95% CI [1.02, 2.40], p < .05. Exposure to trauma due to terrorism was associated with increased risk for each of the measured outcomes including probable partial or full PTSD, functional impairment, and suicidal ideation. When age, gender, level of exposure to terrorism, probable partial or full PTSD, and functional impairment were examined together, only terrorism exposure and functional impairment were associated with suicidal ideation. This study underscores the importance and feasibility of examining exposure to terrorism and functional impairment as risk factors for suicidal ideation.

  1. High signal intensity in dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1‐weighted MR images in three patients with impaired renal function and vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Sebastiano; Schroeder, Christophe; Froehlich, Johannes M.; Pasch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium‐based contrast agents (primarily those with linear chelates) are associated with a dose‐dependent signal hyperintensity in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus on unenhanced T1‐weighted MRI following administration to selected patients with normal renal function. The accumulation of gadolinium has also been reported in the skin, heart, liver, lung, and kidney of patients with impaired renal function suffering from nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Here we report on three patients with impaired renal function and vascular calcification (two with confirmed NSF) whose unenhanced T1‐weighted MRIs showed conspicuous high signal intensity in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus after they had been exposed to relatively low doses of linear gadolinium‐based contrast agents (0.27, 0.45, and 0.68 mmol/kg). Signal ratios between dentate nucleus and pons and between globus pallidus and thalamus were comparable with previously reported measurements in subjects without renal impairment. Of note, all three analysed patients suffered from transient signs of neurological disorders of undetermined cause. In conclusion, the exposure to 0.27‐0.68 mmol/kg of linear gadolinium‐based contrast agent was associated with probable gadolinium accumulation in the brain of three patients suffering from impaired renal function and vascular calcification. © 2016 The Authors. Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26929131

  2. High signal intensity in dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted MR images in three patients with impaired renal function and vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Sebastiano; Schroeder, Christophe; Froehlich, Johannes M; Pasch, Andreas; Thoeny, Harriet C

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (primarily those with linear chelates) are associated with a dose-dependent signal hyperintensity in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted MRI following administration to selected patients with normal renal function. The accumulation of gadolinium has also been reported in the skin, heart, liver, lung, and kidney of patients with impaired renal function suffering from nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Here we report on three patients with impaired renal function and vascular calcification (two with confirmed NSF) whose unenhanced T1-weighted MRIs showed conspicuous high signal intensity in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus after they had been exposed to relatively low doses of linear gadolinium-based contrast agents (0.27, 0.45, and 0.68 mmol/kg). Signal ratios between dentate nucleus and pons and between globus pallidus and thalamus were comparable with previously reported measurements in subjects without renal impairment. Of note, all three analysed patients suffered from transient signs of neurological disorders of undetermined cause. In conclusion, the exposure to 0.27-0.68 mmol/kg of linear gadolinium-based contrast agent was associated with probable gadolinium accumulation in the brain of three patients suffering from impaired renal function and vascular calcification. © 2016 The Authors. Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26929131

  3. Functional Neuro-Imaging and Post-Traumatic Olfactory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Richard J.; Sheehan, William; Thurber, Steven; Roberts, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate via a research literature survey the anterior neurological significance of decreased olfactory functioning following traumatic brain injuries. Materials and Methods: A computer literature review was performed to locate all functional neuro-imaging studies on patients with post-traumatic anosmia and other olfactory deficits. Results: A convergence of findings from nine functional neuro-imaging studies indicating evidence for reduced metabolic activity at rest or relative hypo-perfusion during olfactory activations. Hypo-activation of the prefrontal regions was apparent in all nine post-traumatic samples, with three samples yielding evidence of reduced activity in the temporal regions as well. Conclusions: The practical ramifications include the reasonable hypothesis that a total anosmic head trauma patient likely has frontal lobe involvement. PMID:21716782

  4. Impaired Function is a Common Feature of Neuropathy-Associated Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Laurie B.; Sakaguchi, Reiko; McGuigan, David; Gonzalez, Michael A.; Searby, Charles; Züchner, Stephan; Hou, Ya-Ming; Antonellis, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2D (CMT2D) is an autosomal dominant axonal peripheral neuropathy characterized by impaired motor and sensory function in the distal extremities. Mutations in the glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) gene cause CMT2D. GARS is a member of the ubiquitously expressed aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (ARS) family and is responsible for charging tRNA with glycine. To date, thirteen GARS mutations have been identified in patients with CMT disease. While functional studies have revealed loss-of-function characteristics, only four GARS mutations have been rigorously studied. Here, we report the functional evaluation of nine CMT-associated GARS mutations in tRNA charging, yeast complementation, and subcellular localization assays. Our results demonstrate that impaired function is a common characteristic of CMT-associated GARS mutations. Additionally, one mutation previously associated with CMT disease (p.Ser581Leu) does not demonstrate impaired function, was identified in the general population, and failed to segregate with disease in two newly identified families with CMT disease. Thus, we propose that this variant is not a disease-causing mutation. Together, our data indicate that impaired function is a key component of GARS-mediated CMT disease and emphasize the need for careful genetic and functional evaluation before implicating a variant in disease onset. PMID:25168514

  5. Family Functioning, Social Impairment, and Symptoms Among Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan-Miller, Danielle; Peris, Tara; Axelson, David; Kowatch, Robert A.; Miklowitz, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Impaired social functioning is common among youth with bipolar disorder (BD), emerges in multiple settings, and persists over time. However, little is known about factors associated with poor peer and family functioning in the early-onset form of BD. Using a sample of adolescents with BD I or II, we examined which symptoms of BD,…

  6. Tallying Reference Errors in Narratives: Integrative Language Function, Impairment, and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, John C.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the construct validity of a new measure of Integrative Language functioning, "Tallying Reference Errors In Narratives" (TREIN), by examining the association between previously existing CNS impairment and Expressive Language functioning and elevated outcomes on the TREIN measure "rate of Nominal Reference Errors" (rNRE). The…

  7. Cardiac and coronary function in the Langendorff-perfused mouse heart model.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Melissa E; Willems, Laura; Hack, Benjamin A; Peart, Jason N; Headrick, John P

    2009-01-01

    The Langendorff mouse heart model is widely employed in studies of myocardial function and responses to injury (e.g. ischaemia). Nonetheless, marked variability exists in its preparation and functional properties. We examined the impact of early growth (8, 16, 20 and 24 weeks), sex, perfusion fluid [Ca(2+)] and pacing rate on contractile function and responses to 20 min ischaemia followed by 45 min reperfusion. We also assessed the impact of strain, and tested the utility of the model in studying coronary function. Under normoxic conditions, hearts from 8-week-old male C57BL/6 mice (2 mm free perfusate [Ca(2+)], 420 beats min(-1)) exhibited 145 +/- 2 mmHg left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP). Force development declined by approximately 15% (126 +/- 5 mmHg) with a reduction in free [Ca(2+)] to 1.35 mm, and by 25% (108 +/- 3 mmHg) with increased pacing to 600 beats min(-1). While elevated heart rate failed to modify ischaemic outcome, the lower [Ca(2+)] significantly improved contractile recovery (by >30%). We detected minimal sex-dependent differences in normoxic function between 8 and 24 weeks, although age modified contractile function in males (increased LVDP at 24 versus 8 weeks) but not females. Both male and female hearts exhibited age-related reductions in ischaemic tolerance, with a significant decline in recovery evident at 16 weeks in males and later, at 20-24 weeks, in females (versus recoveries in hearts at 8 weeks). Strain also modified tolerance to ischaemia, with similar responses in hearts from C57BL/6, 129/sv, Quackenbush Swiss and FVBN mice, but substantially greater tolerance in BALB/c hearts. In terms of vascular function, baseline coronary flow (20-25 ml min(-1) g(-1)) was 50-60% of maximally dilated flows, and coronary reactive and functional hyperaemic responses were pronounced (up to 4-fold elevations in flow in hearts lacking ventricular balloons). These data indicate that attention to age (and sex) of mice will reduce variability in

  8. Toad heart utilizes exclusively slow skeletal muscle troponin T: an evolutionary adaptation with potential functional benefits.

    PubMed

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Chen, Xuequn; Hossain, M Moazzem; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2012-08-24

    The three isoforms of vertebrate troponin T (TnT) are normally expressed in a muscle type-specific manner. Here we report an exception that the cardiac muscle of toad (Bufo) expresses exclusively slow skeletal muscle TnT (ssTnT) together with cardiac forms of troponin I and myosin as determined using immunoblotting, cDNA cloning, and/or LC-MS/MS. Using RT-PCR and 3'- and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends on toad cardiac mRNA, we cloned full-length cDNAs encoding two alternatively spliced variants of ssTnT. Expression of the cloned cDNAs in Escherichia coli confirmed that the toad cardiac muscle expresses solely ssTnT, predominantly the low molecular weight variant with the exon 5-encoded NH(2)-terminal segment spliced out. Functional studies were performed in ex vivo working toad hearts and compared with the frog (Rana) hearts. The results showed that toad hearts had higher contractile and relaxation velocities and were able to work against a significantly higher afterload than that of frog hearts. Therefore, the unique evolutionary adaptation of utilizing exclusively ssTnT in toad cardiac muscle corresponded to a fitness value from improving systolic function of the heart. The data demonstrated a physiological importance of the functional diversity of TnT isoforms. The structure-function relationship of TnT may be explored for the development of new treatment of heart failure.

  9. Toad heart utilizes exclusively slow skeletal muscle troponin T: an evolutionary adaptation with potential functional benefits.

    PubMed

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Chen, Xuequn; Hossain, M Moazzem; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2012-08-24

    The three isoforms of vertebrate troponin T (TnT) are normally expressed in a muscle type-specific manner. Here we report an exception that the cardiac muscle of toad (Bufo) expresses exclusively slow skeletal muscle TnT (ssTnT) together with cardiac forms of troponin I and myosin as determined using immunoblotting, cDNA cloning, and/or LC-MS/MS. Using RT-PCR and 3'- and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends on toad cardiac mRNA, we cloned full-length cDNAs encoding two alternatively spliced variants of ssTnT. Expression of the cloned cDNAs in Escherichia coli confirmed that the toad cardiac muscle expresses solely ssTnT, predominantly the low molecular weight variant with the exon 5-encoded NH(2)-terminal segment spliced out. Functional studies were performed in ex vivo working toad hearts and compared with the frog (Rana) hearts. The results showed that toad hearts had higher contractile and relaxation velocities and were able to work against a significantly higher afterload than that of frog hearts. Therefore, the unique evolutionary adaptation of utilizing exclusively ssTnT in toad cardiac muscle corresponded to a fitness value from improving systolic function of the heart. The data demonstrated a physiological importance of the functional diversity of TnT isoforms. The structure-function relationship of TnT may be explored for the development of new treatment of heart failure. PMID:22778265

  10. Longitudinal renal function in pediatric heart transplant recipients: 20-years experience.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Punkaj; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna; Gossett, Jeffrey M; Gardner, Megan; Bryant, Janet C; Noel, Tommy R; Knecht, Kenneth R

    2015-03-01

    This study was initiated to assess the temporal trends of renal function, and define risk factors associated with worsening renal function in pediatric heart transplant recipients in the immediate post-operative period. We performed a single-center retrospective study in children ≤18 yr receiving OHT (1993-2012). The AKIN's validated, three-tiered AKI staging system was used to categorize the degree of WRF. One hundred sixty-four patients qualified for inclusion. Forty-seven patients (28%) were classified as having WRF after OHT. Nineteen patients (11%) required dialysis after heart transplantation. There was a sustained and steady improvement in renal function in children following heart transplantation in all age groups, irrespective of underlying disease process. The significant factors associated with risk of WRF included body surface area (OR: 1.89 for 0.5 unit increase, 95% CI: 1.29-2.76, p = 0.001) and use of ECMO prior to and/or after heart transplantation (OR: 3.50, 95% CI: 1.51-8.13, p = 0.004). Use of VAD prior to heart transplantation was not associated with WRF (OR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.17-1.51, p = 0.22). On the basis of these data, we demonstrate that worsening renal function improves early after orthotopic heart transplantation.

  11. Functioning in First-Episode Schizophrenia: MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB) Profile of Impairment

    PubMed Central

    McCleery, A.; Ventura, J.; Kern, R. S.; Subotnik, K. L.; Gretchen-Doorly, D.; Green, M. F.; Hellemann, G. S.; Nuechterlein, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although many studies have assessed cognitive functioning in first-episode schizophrenia (FESz), the pattern and severity of impairment across cognitive domains remains unclear. Moreover, few studies have directly compared the pattern of cognitive performance between FESz and chronic schizophrenia (CSz). In this study we examined the cognitive impairment profile in FESz using a standardized neurocognitive battery (MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery; MCCB). Methods MCCB data were compared from 105 FESz patients, 176 CSz patients and 300 non-psychiatric (NP) participants. Mixed models analysis evaluated group differences in MCCB profiles and relative strengths and weaknesses in the MCCB profiles of patients. Clinical implications of MCCB performance were also examined; we compared the proportion of participants from each group who exhibited clinically-significant global cognitive impairment based on the MCCB Overall Composite score. Results FESz and CSz showed impaired performance across all MCCB domains relative to NP. With the exception of relative preservation of working memory and social cognition in FESz, the MCCB domain scores were similar in FESz and CSz. The distribution of impairment on the Overall Composite score did not significantly differ between FESz and CSz; compared to NP, both patient groups were overrepresented in moderate and severe impairment categories. Conclusion The pattern, magnitude, and distribution of severity of impairment in FESz were similar to that observed in CSz. However, early in the illness there may be relative sparing of working memory and social cognition. PMID:24888526

  12. Impaired T cell function in argininosuccinate synthetase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tarasenko, Tatyana N.; Gomez-Rodriguez, Julio; McGuire, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    ASS1 is a cytosolic enzyme that plays a role in the conversion of citrulline to arginine. In human and mouse tissues, ASS1 protein is found in several components of the immune system, including the thymus and T cells. However, the role of ASS1 in these tissues remains to be defined. Considerable attention has been focused recently on the role of metabolism in T cell differentiation and function. Based on the expression of ASS1 in the immune system, we hypothesized that ASS1 deficiency would result in T cell defects. To evaluate this question, we characterized immune function in hypomorphic fold/fold mice. Analysis of splenic T cells by flow cytometry showed a marked reduction in T cell numbers with normal expression of activation surface markers. Gene therapy correction of liver ASS1 to enhance survival resulted in a partial recovery of splenic T cells for characterization. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated the persistence of the ASS1 enzyme defect in T cells and abnormal T cell differentiation and function. Overall, our work suggests that ASS1 plays a role in T cell function, and deficiency produces primary immune dysfunction. In addition, these data suggest that patients with ASS1 deficiency (citrullinemia type I) may have T cell dysfunction. PMID:25492936

  13. Abnormal calcium homeostasis in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is related to both reduced contractile function and incomplete relaxation: an electromechanically detailed biophysical modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Adeniran, Ismail; MacIver, David H.; Hancox, Jules C.; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) accounts for about 50% of heart failure cases. It has features of incomplete relaxation and increased stiffness of the left ventricle. Studies from clinical electrophysiology and animal experiments have found that HFpEF is associated with impaired calcium homeostasis, ion channel remodeling and concentric left ventricle hypertrophy (LVH). However, it is still unclear how the abnormal calcium homeostasis, ion channel and structural remodeling affect the electro-mechanical dynamics of the ventricles. In this study we have developed multiscale models of the human left ventricle from single cells to the 3D organ, which take into consideration HFpEF-induced changes in calcium handling, ion channel remodeling and concentric LVH. Our simulation results suggest that at the cellular level, HFpEF reduces the systolic calcium level resulting in a reduced systolic contractile force, but elevates the diastolic calcium level resulting in an abnormal residual diastolic force. In our simulations, these abnormal electro-mechanical features of the ventricular cells became more pronounced with the increase of the heart rate. However, at the 3D organ level, the ejection fraction of the left ventricle was maintained due to the concentric LVH. The simulation results of this study mirror clinically observed features of HFpEF and provide new insights toward the understanding of the cellular bases of impaired cardiac electromechanical functions in heart failure. PMID:25852567

  14. Impairment in occupational functioning and adult ADHD: the predictive utility of executive function (EF) ratings versus EF tests.

    PubMed

    Barkley, Russell A; Murphy, Kevin R

    2010-05-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with deficits in executive functioning (EF). ADHD in adults is also associated with impairments in major life activities, particularly occupational functioning. We investigated the extent to which EF deficits assessed by both tests and self-ratings contributed to the degree of impairment in 11 measures involving self-reported occupational problems, employer reported workplace adjustment, and clinician rated occupational adjustment. Three groups of adults were recruited as a function of their severity of ADHD: ADHD diagnosis (n = 146), clinical controls self-referring for ADHD but not diagnosed with it (n = 97), and community controls (n = 109). Groups were combined and regression analyses revealed that self-ratings of EF were significantly predictive of impairments in all 11 measures of occupational adjustment. Although several tests of EF also did so, they contributed substantially less than did the EF ratings, particularly when analyzed jointly with the ratings. We conclude that EF deficits contribute to the impairments in occupational functioning that occur in conjunction with adult ADHD. Ratings of EF in daily life contribute more to such impairments than do EF tests, perhaps because, as we hypothesize, each assesses a different level in the hierarchical organization of EF as a meta-construct.

  15. Temporal cohesion of the structural, functional and molecular characteristics of the developing zebrafish heart.

    PubMed

    Matrone, Gianfranco; Wilson, Kathryn S; Mullins, John J; Tucker, Carl S; Denvir, Martin A

    2015-06-01

    Heart formation is a complex, dynamic and highly coordinated process of molecular, morphogenetic and functional factors with each interacting and contributing to formation of the mature organ. Cardiac abnormalities in early life can be lethal in mammals but not in the zebrafish embryo which has been widely used to study the developing heart. While early cardiac development in the zebrafish has been well characterized, functional changes during development and how these relate to architectural, cellular and molecular aspects of development have not been well described previously. To address this we have carefully characterised cardiac structure, function, cardiomyocyte proliferation and cardiac-specific gene expression between 48 and 120 hpf in the zebrafish. We show that the zebrafish heart increases in volume and changes shape significantly between 48 and 72 hpf accompanied by a 40% increase in cardiomyocyte number. Between 96 and 120 hpf, while external heart expansion slows, there is rapid formation of a mature and extensive trabecular network within the ventricle chamber. While ejection fraction does not change during the course of development other determinants of contractile function increase significantly particularly between 72 and 96 hpf leading to an increase in cardinal vein blood flow. This study has revealed a number of novel aspects of cardiac developmental dynamics with striking temporal orchestration of structure and function within the first few days of development. These changes are associated with changes in expression of developmental and maturational genes. This study provides important insights into the complex temporal relationship between structure and function of the developing zebrafish heart.

  16. Alternative splicing impairs soluble guanylyl cyclase function in aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emil; Golunski, Eva; Laing, Susan T; Estrera, Anthony L; Sharina, Iraida G

    2014-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) receptor soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a key regulator of several important vascular functions and is important for maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis and vascular plasticity. Diminished sGC expression and function contributes to pathogenesis of several cardiovascular diseases. However, the processes that control sGC expression in vascular tissue remain poorly understood. Previous work in animal and cell models revealed the complexity of alternative splicing of sGC genes and demonstrated its importance in modulation of sGC function. The aim of this study was to examine the role of alternative splicing of α1 and β1 sGC in healthy and diseased human vascular tissue. Our study found a variety of α1 and β1 sGC splice forms expressed in human aorta. Their composition and abundance were different between samples of aortic tissue removed during surgical repair of aortic aneurysm and samples of aortas without aneurysm. Aortas with aneurysm demonstrated decreased sGC activity, which correlated with increased expression of dysfunctional sGC splice variants. In addition, the expression of 55-kDa oxidation-resistant α1 isoform B sGC (α1-IsoB) was significantly lower in aortic samples with aneurysm. The α1-IsoB splice variant was demonstrated to support sGC activity in aortic lysates. Together, our results suggest that alternative splicing contributes to diminished sGC function in vascular dysfunction. Precise understanding of sGC splicing regulation could help to design new therapeutic interventions and to personalize sGC-targeting therapies in treatments of vascular disease.

  17. Pulmonary functional impairment from years of arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.; Warshaw, R.H.

    1989-07-01

    The adverse effects of arc welding on pulmonary function have been previously documented. However, in many of these studies, the effects of welding exposure and smoking were not separated. Also, some studies did not adjust for or ignored the effects of asbestosis on pulmonary function. We assessed the long-term effects of welding on pulmonary function in welders who had no evidence of asbestosis on chest radiographs, and adjusted each individual value for height, age, and years of cigarette smoking. The study consisted of 226 male construction welders who had never worked in shipyards. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and flows were measured by spirometry, chest radiographs were obtained and examined for evidence of asbestosis using, and thoracic gas volume (TGV) was determined by planimetry. The subjects were also administered an occupational and respiratory questionnaire. Data on workers with asbestosis (ILO profusion 1/0 or greater) and pleural abnormalities were excluded. The mean age for the 226 subjects without asbestosis was 45 years, mean height was 175.7 cm, and mean duration of welding was 21.3 years. Pulmonary function measurements are presented as mean percentage of predicted (pop) and adjusted for height, age, and years of smoking. In 151 current cigarette smokers, mean midflows and terminal flows were decreased, FEF25-75 to 93.2 pop and FEF75-85 to 91.2 pop, but FVC, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and TGV were normal. The 43 nonsmokers also had reductions in flows but normal FVC and TGV. Flows in both groups were significantly (p less than 0.05) below those of the referent group. The regression coefficient was -0.0031 for years of welding and FVC pop, -0.0035 for FEV1 pop, and -0.0080 for midflow pop (FEF25-75) (all significant at p less than 0.05), but the coefficient for FEF75-85 pop was not significant.

  18. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is associated with broad impairments in executive function: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Hannah R.; Kaiser, Roselinde H.; Warren, Stacie L.; Heller, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a serious and often chronically disabling condition. The current dominant model of OCD focuses on abnormalities in prefrontal-striatal circuits that support executive function (EF). While there is growing evidence for EF impairments associated with OCD, results have been inconsistent, making the nature and magnitude of these impairments controversial. The current meta-analysis uses random-effects models to synthesize 110 previous studies that compared participants with OCD to healthy control participants on at least one neuropsychological measure of EF. The results indicate that individuals with OCD are impaired on tasks measuring most aspects of EF, consistent with broad impairment in EF. EF deficits were not explained by general motor slowness or depression. Effect sizes were largely stable across variation in demographic and clinical characteristics of samples, although medication use, age, and gender moderated some effects. PMID:25755918

  19. Impaired Functional Connectivity in the Prefrontal Cortex: A Mechanism for Chronic Stress-Induced Neuropsychiatric Disorders.

    PubMed

    Negrón-Oyarzo, Ignacio; Aboitiz, Francisco; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress-related psychiatric diseases, such as major depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and schizophrenia, are characterized by a maladaptive organization of behavioral responses that strongly affect the well-being of patients. Current evidence suggests that a functional impairment of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is implicated in the pathophysiology of these diseases. Therefore, chronic stress may impair PFC functions required for the adaptive orchestration of behavioral responses. In the present review, we integrate evidence obtained from cognitive neuroscience with neurophysiological research with animal models, to put forward a hypothesis that addresses stress-induced behavioral dysfunctions observed in stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. We propose that chronic stress impairs mechanisms involved in neuronal functional connectivity in the PFC that are required for the formation of adaptive representations for the execution of adaptive behavioral responses. These considerations could be particularly relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of chronic stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26904302

  20. Impaired Functional Connectivity in the Prefrontal Cortex: A Mechanism for Chronic Stress-Induced Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Negrón-Oyarzo, Ignacio; Aboitiz, Francisco; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress-related psychiatric diseases, such as major depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and schizophrenia, are characterized by a maladaptive organization of behavioral responses that strongly affect the well-being of patients. Current evidence suggests that a functional impairment of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is implicated in the pathophysiology of these diseases. Therefore, chronic stress may impair PFC functions required for the adaptive orchestration of behavioral responses. In the present review, we integrate evidence obtained from cognitive neuroscience with neurophysiological research with animal models, to put forward a hypothesis that addresses stress-induced behavioral dysfunctions observed in stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. We propose that chronic stress impairs mechanisms involved in neuronal functional connectivity in the PFC that are required for the formation of adaptive representations for the execution of adaptive behavioral responses. These considerations could be particularly relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of chronic stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26904302

  1. Importance of anemia in the chronic Cardiorenal syndrome: Effects on renal function after heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Libório, Alexandre Braga; Uchoa, Russian Soares; Aragão, Alessa Peixoto; de Sousa Neto, João David; Valdivia, Juan Miguel Cosquillo; de Alencar Matos, Filipe; Mont’Alverne, Ricardo Everton Dias; de Sá Filho, Francisco Ivan Benício; Mejia, Juan Alberto Cosquillo

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Cardiorenal syndrome has been recently divided into 5 categories, according to acute or chronic evolution and primary organ dysfunction. Anemia can also accompany this disorder, leading to a more complex situation. This study aims to analyze the renal outcomes of patients, specifically patients with chronic Cardiorenal syndrome, with or without anemia, long-term after heart transplantation. Material/Methods This was a retrospective cohort study on chronic Cardiorenal syndrome patients submitted to heart transplantation. Patients were divided according to presence of anemia and renal dysfunction before heart transplantation. Results A total of 108 patients (92 males) with the mean age of 45±12 years were included. The etiologies of the heart failure were hypertensive dilated myocardiopathy (66%), ischemic (14%) and Chagasic (12%). Before the heart transplantation, 51 patients had an eGFR less than 60 mL/min. From these, 24 had concomitant anemia. One year after the transplantation, patients with previous isolated renal dysfunction ameliorates eGFR (45±11 vs. 65±26 mL/min, p<0.001), while those patients with previous renal dysfunction and anemia presented no improvement (eGFR 44±14 vs. 47±13 mL/min, p=0.619) 1 year after heart transplantation. Moreover, higher hemoglobin was an independent predictor of eGFR improvement after heart transplantation when associated with previous renal dysfunction (OR 1.8; CI 1.2–3.6, p<0.01 for each hemoglobin increment of 1 g/dL). Conclusions Patients with isolated Cardiorenal syndrome presented partial renal function recovery after heart transplantation, while the presence of cardiorenal anemia was a marker of renal function non-recovery 1 year after heart transplantation. PMID:23018354

  2. Impaired insight into illness and cognitive insight in schizophrenia spectrum disorders: Resting state functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Gerretsen, Philip; Menon, Mahesh; Mamo, David C.; Fervaha, Gagan; Remington, Gary; Pollock, Bruce G.; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired insight into illness (clinical insight) in schizophrenia has negative effects on treatment adherence and clinical outcomes. Schizophrenia is described as a disorder of disrupted brain connectivity. In line with this concept, resting state networks (RSNs) appear differentially affected in persons with schizophrenia. Therefore, impaired clinical, or the related construct of cognitive insight (which posits that impaired clinical insight is a function of metacognitive deficits), may reflect alterations in RSN functional connectivity (fc). Based on our previous research, which showed that impaired insight into illness was associated with increased left hemisphere volume relative to right, we hypothesized that impaired clinical insight would be associated with increased connectivity in the DMN with specific left hemisphere brain regions. Methods Resting state MRI scans were acquired for participants with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (n = 20). Seed-to-voxel and ROI-to-ROI fc analyses were performed using the CONN-fMRI fc toolbox v13 for established RSNs. Clinical and cognitive insight were measured with the Schedule for the Assessment of Insight—Expanded Version and Beck Cognitive Insight Scale, respectively, and included as the regressors in fc analyses. Results As hypothesized, impaired clinical insight was associated with increased connectivity in the default mode network (DMN) with the left angular gyrus, and also in the self-referential network (SRN) with the left insula. Cognitive insight was associated with increased connectivity in the dorsal attention network (DAN) with the right inferior frontal cortex (IFC) and left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Conclusion Increased connectivity in DMN and SRN with the left angular gyrus and insula, respectively, may represent neural correlates of impaired clinical insight in schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and is consistent with the literature attributing impaired insight to left

  3. Respiratory muscle function and exercise intolerance in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jorge P; Chiappa, Gaspar R; Neder, J Alberto; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2009-06-01

    Inspiratory muscle weakness (IMW) is prevalent in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) caused by left ventricular systolic dysfunction, which contributes to reduced exercise capacity and the presence of dyspnea during daily activities. Inspiratory muscle strength (estimated by maximal inspiratory pressure) has independent prognostic value in CHF. Overall, the results of trials with inspiratory muscle training (IMT) indicate that this intervention improves exercise capacity and quality of life, particularly in patients with CHF and IMW. Some benefit from IMT may be accounted for by the attenuation of the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex. Moreover, IMT results in improved cardiovascular responses to exercise and to those obtained with standard aerobic training. These findings suggest that routine screening for IMW is advisable in patients with CHF, and specific IMT and/or aerobic training are of practical value in the management of these patients. PMID:19486593

  4. Respiratory muscle function and exercise intolerance in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jorge P; Chiappa, Gaspar R; Neder, J Alberto; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2009-06-01

    Inspiratory muscle weakness (IMW) is prevalent in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) caused by left ventricular systolic dysfunction, which contributes to reduced exercise capacity and the presence of dyspnea during daily activities. Inspiratory muscle strength (estimated by maximal inspiratory pressure) has independent prognostic value in CHF. Overall, the results of trials with inspiratory muscle training (IMT) indicate that this intervention improves exercise capacity and quality of life, particularly in patients with CHF and IMW. Some benefit from IMT may be accounted for by the attenuation of the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex. Moreover, IMT results in improved cardiovascular responses to exercise and to those obtained with standard aerobic training. These findings suggest that routine screening for IMW is advisable in patients with CHF, and specific IMT and/or aerobic training are of practical value in the management of these patients.

  5. Impaired Right Ventricular-Pulmonary Vascular Function in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Emir C.; Park, Margaret M.; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Thomas, James D.; Asosingh, Kewal; Kalaycio, Matt; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Farha, Samar

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased bone marrow hemangioblast numbers, alterations in erythroid/myeloid lineages, increased reticulin, and greater circulating bone marrow progenitor cells are present in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The data suggest that myeloid progenitors contribute to the pathogenesis of PAH, but there is little data on prevalence of pulmonary vascular disease among different forms of myeloid diseases. We hypothesized that there would be a higher prevalence of pulmonary vascular disease in myeloproliferative neoplasms that have high circulating progenitor cells, such as myelofibrosis and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), as compared to those with low circulating progenitors, as in aplastic anemia. Methods Patients with myelofibrosis, CML and aplastic anemia who underwent echocardiographic evaluation of cardiac function in preparation for bone marrow transplantation at the Cleveland Clinic between 1997–2012 were identified using electronic medical records for demographic data, blood cell counts, and pulmonary function tests. All echocardiograms were uniformly analyzed in a blinded fashion by an advanced sonographer and cardiologist for measures of right and left ventricular function and estimation of pulmonary vascular disease. Results Gender and race distribution between disease groups were similar. Myelofibrosis [N=19] and aplastic anemia [N=30] had increased right ventricle (RV) wall thickness compared to CML [N=82] [RV Thickness (cm): aplastic anemia 0.7 ± 0.1, CML 0.5 ± 0.1 and myelofibrosis 0.7 ± 0.1; p = 0.02]. Patients with myelofibrosis had higher levels of estimated RV systolic pressure as compared to the other groups [RVSP (mmHg): aplastic anemia 29.9 ± 1.5, CML 26.2 ± 1.1 and myelofibrosis 36.7 ± 3.7; p < 0.01]. Conclusion The findings suggest an important role for myeloid progenitors in maintenance of pulmonary-vascular health, in which abnormal myeloproliferative progenitors are associated with right ventricle

  6. Exposure to low mercury concentration in vivo impairs myocardial contractile function

    SciTech Connect

    Furieri, Lorena Barros; Fioresi, Mirian; Junior, Rogerio Faustino Ribeiro; Bartolome, Maria Visitacion; Fernandes, Aurelia Araujo; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Lahera, Vicente; Salaices, Mercedes; Stefanon, Ivanita; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim

    2011-09-01

    Increased cardiovascular risk after mercury exposure has been described but cardiac effects resulting from controlled chronic treatment are not yet well explored. We analyzed the effects of chronic exposure to low mercury concentrations on hemodynamic and ventricular function of isolated hearts. Wistar rats were treated with HgCl{sub 2} (1st dose 4.6 {mu}g/kg, subsequent dose 0.07 {mu}g/kg/day, im, 30 days) or vehicle. Mercury treatment did not affect blood pressure (BP) nor produced cardiac hypertrophy or changes of myocyte morphometry and collagen content. This treatment: 1) in vivo increased left ventricle end diastolic pressure (LVEDP) without changing left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and heart rate; 2) in isolated hearts reduced LV isovolumic systolic pressure and time derivatives, and {beta}-adrenergic response; 3) increased myosin ATPase activity; 4) reduced Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase (NKA) activity; 5) reduced protein expression of SERCA and phosphorylated phospholamban on serine 16 while phospholamban expression increased; as a consequence SERCA/phospholamban ratio reduced; 6) reduced sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX) protein expression and {alpha}-1 isoform of NKA, whereas {alpha}-2 isoform of NKA did not change. Chronic exposure for 30 days to low concentrations of mercury does not change BP, heart rate or LVSP but produces small but significant increase of LVEDP. However, in isolated hearts mercury treatment promoted contractility dysfunction as a result of the decreased NKA activity, reduction of NCX and SERCA and increased PLB protein expression. These findings offer further evidence that mercury chronic exposure, even at small concentrations, is an environmental risk factor affecting heart function. - Highlights: > Unchanges blood pressure, heart rate, systolic pressure. > Increases end diastolic pressure. > Promotes cardiac contractility dysfunction. > Decreases NKA activity, NCX and SERCA, increases PLB protein expression. > Small

  7. Heart visualization based on hybrid transfer function using size and gradient.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong; Liu, Yixuan; Wang, Kuanquan

    2014-01-01

    Having the ability to visualize the heart clearly and precisely would be beneficial for pathology research, presurgical planning, and clinical approaches. Multi-dimensional transfer functions were employed to improve the overall performance of images. To provide a satisfactory visualization quality on the shape and boundaries of the heart, a new hybrid transfer function combining structure size with gradient was designed to highlight the area of the heart. Initially, a histogram of gradient and histogram of size was computed and then classification was performed for providing the spatial information. Finally, several hybrid strategies were presented for the design of the transfer function, including opacity and color. By experimental evaluation, the proposed hybrid transfer function visualized the cardiac outline and internal structure more clearly and easily.

  8. Impaired mitochondrial function in human placenta with increased maternal adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Mele, James; Muralimanoharan, Sribalasubashini; Maloyan, Alina

    2014-01-01

    The placenta plays a key role in regulation of fetal growth and development and in mediating in utero developmental programming. Obesity, which is associated with chronic inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction in many tissues, exerts a programming effect in pregnancy. We determined the effect of increasing maternal adiposity and of fetal sex on placental ATP generation, mitochondrial biogenesis, expression of electron transport chain subunits, and mitochondrial function in isolated trophoblasts. Placental tissue was collected from women with prepregnancy BMI ranging from 18.5 to 45 following C-section at term with no labor. Increasing maternal adiposity was associated with excessive production of reactive oxygen species and a significant reduction in placental ATP levels in placentae with male and female fetuses. To explore the potential mechanism of placental mitochondrial dysfunction, levels of transcription factors regulating the expression of genes involved in electron transport and mitochondrial biogenesis were measured. Our in vitro studies showed significant reduction in mitochondrial respiration in cultured primary trophoblasts with increasing maternal obesity along with an abnormal metabolic flexibility of these cells. This reduction in placental mitochondrial respiration in pregnancies complicated by maternal obesity could compromise placental function and potentially underlie the increased susceptibility of these pregnancies to fetal demise in late gestation and to developmental programming. PMID:25028397

  9. Cholesterol overload impairing cerebellar function: the promise of natural products.

    PubMed

    El-Sayyad, Hassan I H

    2015-05-01

    The cerebellum is the part of the brain most involved in controlling motor and cognitive function. The surface becomes convoluted, forming folia that have a characteristic internal structure of three layers including molecular, Purkinje cell, and granular layer. This complex neural network gives rise to a massive signal-processing capability. Cholesterol is a major constituent, derived by de novo synthesis and the blood-brain barrier. Cholesterol is tightly regulated between neurons and glia-that is, astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes-and is essential for normal brain development. The axon is wrapped by myelin (cholesterol, phospholipids, and glycosphingolipids) and made up of membranes of oligodendrocytes, separated by periodic gaps in the myelin sheath, called nodes of Ranvier. Hypercholesterolemia is associated with increased oxidative stress and the development of neurotoxicity and Alzheimer's disease. Treatment with natural products has been found to support improved brain function and reduce low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol level. Fish oil is one such product; among the many plant products are: Morus alba leaves, fruit, and bark; pomegranate fruit and peel; Barley β - glucans; date palm; and Allium sativum. The therapeutic potential was discussed in relation with the antilipidemic drugs, statins (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors).

  10. Age-related impairment of mesenchymal progenitor cell function.

    PubMed

    Stolzing, Alexandra; Scutt, Andrew

    2006-06-01

    In most mesenchymal tissues a subcompartment of multipotent progenitor cells is responsible for the maintenance and repair of the tissue following trauma. With increasing age, the ability of tissues to repair themselves is diminished, which may be due to reduced functional capacity of the progenitor cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aging on rat mesenchymal progenitor cells. Mesenchymal progenitor cells were isolated from Wistar rats aged 3, 7, 12 and 56 weeks. Viability, capacity for differentiation and cellular aging were examined. Cells from the oldest group accumulated raised levels of oxidized proteins and lipids and showed decreased levels of antioxidative enzyme activity. This was reflected in decreased fibroblast colony-forming unit (CFU-f) numbers, increased levels of apoptosis and reduced proliferation and potential for differentiation. These data suggest that the reduced ability to maintain mesenchymal tissue homeostasis in aged mammals is not purely due to a decline in progenitor cells numbers but also to a loss of progenitor functionality due to the accumulation of oxidative damage, which may in turn be a causative factor in a number of age-related pathologies such as arthritis, tendinosis and osteoporosis.

  11. Impaired function of bone marrow stromal cells in systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Krisztian; Wilson, Todd M; Ren, Jiaqiang J; Sabatino, Marianna; Stroncek, David M; Krepuska, Miklos; Bai, Yun; Robey, Pamela G; Metcalfe, Dean D; Mezey, Eva

    2015-07-01

    Patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM) have a wide variety of problems, including skeletal abnormalities. The disease results from a mutation of the stem cell receptor (c-kit) in mast cells and we wondered if the function of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs; also known as MSCs or mesenchymal stem cells) might be affected by the invasion of bone marrow by mutant mast cells. As expected, BMSCs from SM patients do not have a mutation in c-kit, but they proliferate poorly. In addition, while osteogenic differentiation of the BMSCs seems to be deficient, their adipogenic potential appears to be increased. Since the hematopoietic supportive abilities of BMSCs are also important, we also studied the engraftment in NSG mice of human CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors, after being co-cultured with BMSCs of healthy volunteers vs. BMSCs derived from patients with SM. BMSCs derived from the bone marrow of patients with SM could not support hematopoiesis to the extent that healthy BMSCs do. Finally, we performed an expression analysis and found significant differences between healthy and SM derived BMSCs in the expression of genes with a variety of functions, including the WNT signaling, ossification, and bone remodeling. We suggest that some of the symptoms associated with SM might be driven by epigenetic changes in BMSCs caused by dysfunctional mast cells in the bone marrow of the patients.

  12. Docetaxel does not impair cardiac autonomic function in breast cancer patients previously treated with anthracyclines.

    PubMed

    Ekholm, Eeva; Rantanen, Virpi; Syvänen, Kari; Jalonen, Jarmo; Antila, Kari; Salminen, Eeva

    2002-04-01

    The effects of docetaxel treatment on autonomic cardiac function was studied with 24-h ECG recordings in breast cancer patients pretreated with anthracyclines. Twenty-four women were evaluated before docetaxel treatment and after 3-4 courses of docetaxel 100 mg/m(2). The heart rate, cardiac extrasystoles and heart rate variability (HRV) in both the time and frequency domain were assessed from 24-h ECG recordings. The acute effects of docetaxel were calculated from 1-h recordings immediately prior to, during and after infusion. Long-term effects were evaluated from 24-h recordings performed before treatment and after 3-4 courses of docetaxel. There was no increase in the number of cardiac extrasystoles during docetaxel infusion. The number of ventricular extrasystoles decreased from 14 (23) to 7 (14) during and 5 (10) after the first infusion (p=0.02). The heart rate, HRV and extrasystoles were similar before and after 3-4 courses of docetaxel. The treatment did not abolish circadian variability of the heart rate. Docetaxel did not deteriorate autonomic cardiac function. In conclusion, our findings suggest that docetaxel does not have harmful cumulative effects on autonomic control of the heart and is therefore unlikely to be cardiotoxic.

  13. White Matter Damage Disorganizes Brain Functional Networks in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Garcés, Pilar; López, María Eugenia; Aurtenetxe, Sara; Cuesta, Pablo; Marcos, Alberto; Montejo, Pedro; Yus, Miguel; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; del Pozo, Francisco; Becker, James T.; Maestú, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although progressive functional brain network disruption has been one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's Disease, little is known about the origin of this functional impairment that underlies cognitive symptoms. We investigated how the loss of white matter (WM) integrity disrupts the organization of the functional networks at different frequency bands. The analyses were performed in a sample of healthy elders and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects. Spontaneous brain magnetic activity (measured with magnetoencephalography) was characterized with phase synchronization analysis, and graph theory was applied to the functional networks. We identified WM areas (using diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging) that showed a statistical dependence between the fractional anisotropy and the graph metrics. These regions are part of an episodic memory network and were also related to cognitive functions. Our data support the hypothesis that disruption of the anatomical networks influences the organization at the functional level resulting in the prodromal dementia syndrome of MCI. PMID:24617580

  14. Major Depressive Disorder Is Associated with Broad Impairments on Neuropsychological Measures of Executive Function: A Meta-Analysis and Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Hannah R.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairments are now widely acknowledged as an important aspect of major depressive disorder (MDD), and it has been proposed that executive function (EF) may be particularly impaired in patients with MDD. However, the existence and nature of EF impairments associated with depression remain strongly debated. Although many studies have…

  15. Structural and Functional Brain Correlates of Cognitive Impairment in Euthymic Patients with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Goikolea, José M.; Bonnin, Caterina M.; Sarró, Salvador; Segura, Barbara; Amann, Benedikt L.; Monté, Gemma C.; Moro, Noemi; Fernandez-Corcuera, Paloma; Maristany, Teresa; Salvador, Raymond; Vieta, Eduard; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; McKenna, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cognitive impairment in the euthymic phase is a well-established finding in bipolar disorder. However, its brain structural and/or functional correlates are uncertain. Methods Thirty-three euthymic bipolar patients with preserved memory and executive function and 28 euthymic bipolar patients with significant memory and/or executive impairment, as defined using two test batteries, the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test (RBMT) and the Behavioural Assessment of the Dysexecutive Syndrome (BADS), plus 28 healthy controls underwent structural MRI using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Twenty-seven of the cognitively preserved patients, 23 of the cognitively impaired patients and 28 controls also underwent fMRI during performance of the n-back working memory task. Results No clusters of grey or white matter volume difference were found between the two patient groups. During n-back performance, the cognitively impaired patients showed hypoactivation compared to the cognitively preserved patients in a circumscribed region in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Both patient groups showed failure of de-activation in the medial frontal cortex compared to the healthy controls. Conclusions Cognitive impairment in euthymic bipolar patients appears from this study to be unrelated to structural brain abnormality, but there was some evidence for an association with altered prefrontal function. PMID:27448153

  16. Functional and structural regeneration in the axolotl heart (Ambystoma mexicanum) after partial ventricular amputation.

    PubMed

    Cano-Martínez, Agustina; Vargas-González, Alvaro; Guarner-Lans, Verónica; Prado-Zayago, Esteban; León-Oleda, Martha; Nieto-Lima, Betzabé

    2010-01-01

    "In the present study we evaluated the effect of partial ventricular amputation (PVA) in the heart of the adult urodele amphibian (Ambystoma mexicanum) in vivo on spontaneous heart contractile activity recorded in vitro in association to the structural recovery at one, five, 30 and 90 days after injury. One day after PVA, ventricular-tension (VT) (16 ± 3%), atrium-tension (AT) (46 ± 4%) and heart rate (HR) (58+10%) resulted lower in comparison to control hearts. On days five, 30 and 90 after damage, values achieved a 61 ± 5, 93 ± 3, and 98 ± 5% (VT), 60 ± 4, 96 ± 3 and 99 ± 5% (AT) and 74 ± 5, 84 ± 10 and 95 ± 10% (HR) of the control values, respectively. Associated to contractile activity recovery we corroborated a gradual tissue restoration by cardiomyocyte proliferation. Our results represent the first quantitative evidence about the recovery of heart of A. mexicanum restores its functional capacity concomitantly to the structural recovery of the myocardium by proliferation of cardiomyocytes after PVA. These properties make the heart of A. mexicanum a potential model to study the mechanisms underlying heart regeneration in adult vertebrates in vivo.

  17. Arginylation regulates myofibrils to maintain heart function and prevent dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, Satoshi; Leu, N. Adrian; Pavlov, Ivan; Han, Xuemei; Ribeiro, Paula Aver Bretanha; Xu, Tao; Bunte, Ralph; Saha, Sougata; Wang, Junling; Cornachione, Anabelle; Mai, Wilfried; Yates, John R; Rassier, Dilson E.; Kashina, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Protein arginylation mediated by arginyltransferase (ATE1) is essential for heart formation during embryogenesis, however its cell-autonomous role in cardiomyocytes and the differentiated heart muscle has never been investigated. To address this question, we generated cardiac muscle-specific Ate1 knockout mice, in which Ate1 deletion was driven by α-myosin heavy chain promoter (αMHC-Ate1 mouse). These mice were initially viable, but developed severe cardiac contractility defects, dilated cardiomyopathy, and thrombosis over time, resulting in high rates of lethality after 6 months of age. These symptoms were accompanied by severe ultrastructural defects in cardiac myofibrils, seen in the newborns and far preceding the onset of cardiomyopathy, suggesting that these defects were primary and likely underlay the development of the future heart defects. Several major sarcomeric proteins were arginylated in vivo. Moreover, Ate1 deletion in the hearts resulted in a significant reduction of active and passive myofibril forces, suggesting that arginylation is critical for both myofibril structural integrity and contractility. Thus, arginylation is essential for maintaining the heart function by regulation of the major myofibril proteins and myofibril forces, and its absence in the heart muscle leads to progressive heart failure through cardiomyocyte-specific defects. PMID:22626847

  18. Heart wall myofibers are arranged in minimal surfaces to optimize organ function

    PubMed Central

    Savadjiev, Peter; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Bakermans, Adrianus J.; Piuze, Emmanuel; Zucker, Steven W.; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2012-01-01

    Heart wall myofibers wind as helices around the ventricles, strengthening them in a manner analogous to the reinforcement of concrete cylindrical columns by spiral steel cables [Richart FE, et al. (1929) Univ of Illinois, Eng Exp Stn Bull 190]. A multitude of such fibers, arranged smoothly and regularly, contract and relax as an integrated functional unit as the heart beats. To orchestrate this motion, fiber tangling must be avoided and pumping should be efficient. Current models of myofiber orientation across the heart wall suggest groupings into sheets or bands, but the precise geometry of bundles of myofibers is unknown. Here we show that this arrangement takes the form of a special minimal surface, the generalized helicoid [Blair DE, Vanstone JR (1978) Minimal Submanifolds and Geodesics 13–16], closing the gap between individual myofibers and their collective wall structure. The model holds across species, with a smooth variation in its three curvature parameters within the myocardial wall providing tight fits to diffusion magnetic resonance images from the rat, the dog, and the human. Mathematically it explains how myofibers are bundled in the heart wall while economizing fiber length and optimizing ventricular ejection volume as they contract. The generalized helicoid provides a unique foundation for analyzing the fibrous composite of the heart wall and should therefore find applications in heart tissue engineering and in the study of heart muscle diseases. PMID:22645368

  19. Acute Hypoglycemia Impairs Executive Cognitive Function in Adults With and Without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Graveling, Alex J.; Deary, Ian J.; Frier, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Acute hypoglycemia impairs cognitive function in several domains. Executive cognitive function governs organization of thoughts, prioritization of tasks, and time management. This study examined the effect of acute hypoglycemia on executive function in adults with and without diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Thirty-two adults with and without type 1 diabetes with no vascular complications or impaired awareness of hypoglycemia were studied. Two hyperinsulinemic glucose clamps were performed at least 2 weeks apart in a single-blind, counterbalanced order, maintaining blood glucose at 4.5 mmol/L (euglycemia) or 2.5 mmol/L (hypoglycemia). Executive functions were assessed with a validated test suite (Delis-Kaplan Executive Function). A general linear model (repeated-measures ANOVA) was used. Glycemic condition (euglycemia or hypoglycemia) was the within-participant factor. Between-participant factors were order of session (euglycemia-hypoglycemia or hypoglycemia-euglycemia), test battery used, and diabetes status (with or without diabetes). RESULTS Compared with euglycemia, executive functions (with one exception) were significantly impaired during hypoglycemia; lower test scores were recorded with more time required for completion. Large Cohen d values (>0.8) suggest that hypoglycemia induces decrements in aspects of executive function with large effect sizes. In some tests, the performance of participants with diabetes was more impaired than those without diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Executive cognitive function, which is necessary to carry out many everyday activities, is impaired during hypoglycemia in adults with and without type 1 diabetes. This important aspect of cognition has not received previous systematic study with respect to hypoglycemia. The effect size is large in terms of both accuracy and speed. PMID:23780950

  20. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Obesity and Overweight as Predictors of the Onset of Functional Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Liang; Wu, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine racial/ethnic differences in the effects of body mass index (BMI) on the onset of functional impairment over 10 years of follow-up. Design Longitudinal analyses of a cohort from a nationally representative survey of community-dwelling American adults. Setting Six waves (1996-2006) of US Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Participants Two groups of HRS participants aged ≥50 without functional impairment at baseline (1996): 5,884 with no mobility difficulty, and 8,484 with no Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) difficulty. Measurements Mobility difficulty was a composite measure of difficulty in walking several blocks, walking one block, climbing several flights of stairs, and climbing one floor of stairs. ADL difficulty was measured by difficulty in dressing, bathing or showing, eating, and getting in or out of bed without help. The association between the baseline BMI categories and risk to develop functional impairment was estimated using generalized estimating equations (GEE) models. Results Overweight and obesity were significant predictors for functional impairment. Compared to the Whites in the same overweight and obese categories, Hispanics were 41% and 91% more likely to develop ADL disability. Blacks in the overweight and severely obese categories were also more likely than their White counterparts to develop ADL disability. Risk of developing ADL difficulty was higher for Hispanics than for Blacks in the obese category. For onset of mobility difficulty, no significant differences were found across racial/ethnic groups within any BMI Category. Conclusion Blacks and Hispanics were at higher risk than Whites for ADL but not mobility impairment. In addition to weight control, prevention efforts should promote exercise to reduce functional impairment, especially for Blacks and Hispanics, who are at higher risk. PMID:24384026

  1. Self-awareness of functional impairment in individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Olvet, Doreen M.; Carrión, Ricardo E.; Auther, Andrea M.; Cornblatt, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims A major public health concern associated with schizophrenia is the long-term disability that involves an inability to function independently in the community. An individual’s self-awareness of functional impairment may be a significant factor contributing to long-term disability. In fact, subjective interpretation of one’s illness impacts treatment participation and adherence, and is linked to poor outcomes. However, it remains unclear how illness-related functional impairment is perceived by individuals prior to the onset of psychosis. This study aims to examine the relationship between clinician-based and self-report assessments of functioning, as well as the contribution of clinical symptoms to this relationship in individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis. Methods The Sheehan Disability Scale, a self-rated instrument, was used to measure disruption in daily functioning in social and role functioning due to symptoms in a sample of 73 treatment-seeking patients at clinical high-risk for psychosis and 50 healthy controls. Results Relative to healthy controls, clinical high-risk patients self-reported significant disruptions in social and role functioning. In addition, a specific relationship emerged in that clinician-rated measures of functioning and depression were related to disability scores. Conclusions These findings suggest that clinical high-risk patients are significantly disturbed by their illness. Self-reported disruption of daily functioning was associated with clinician-rated functioning and depressive symptoms, further highlighting the impact of functional impairments on the level of distress experienced by patients in the early phases of the illness. Intervention strategies that repair functional impairment before the onset of psychosis may prevent long-term disability. PMID:23968457

  2. The Impact of Family Functioning on Caregiver Burden among Caregivers of Veterans with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Crystal Dea

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study of 76 family caregivers of older veterans with congestive heart failure utilized the McMaster model of family functioning to examine the impact of family functioning variables (problem solving, communication, roles, affective responsiveness, and affective involvement) on caregiver burden dimensions (relationship burden,…

  3. Cardiac Structure and Function Across the Glycemic Spectrum in Elderly Men and Women Free of Prevalent Heart Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk In the Community (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Skali, Hicham; Shah, Amil; Gupta, Deepak K.; Cheng, Susan; Claggett, Brian; Liu, Jiankang; Bello, Natalie; Aguilar, David; Vardeny, Orly; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Selvin, Elizabeth; Solomon, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background Individuals with diabetes mellitus and pre-diabetes are at particularly high risk of incident heart failure or death, even after accounting for known confounders. Nevertheless, the extent of impairments in cardiac structure and function in elderly individuals with diabetes and pre-diabetes is not well known. We aimed to assess the relationship between echocardiographic measures of cardiac structure and function and dysglycemia Methods and Results We assessed measures of cardiac structure and function in 4419 participants without prevalent coronary heart disease or heart failure who attended the ARIC Visit 5 examination (2011-2013) and underwent transthoracic echocardiography (age 75±6 years; 61% female, 23% African-American). Subjects were grouped across the dysglycemia spectrum as normal (39%), pre-diabetes (31%), or diabetes (30%) based on medical history, antidiabetic medication use, and HbA1c levels. Glycemic status was related to measures of cardiac structure and function. Worsening dysglycemia was associated with increased LV mass, worse diastolic function, and subtle reduction in left ventricular systolic function (p ≤ 0.01 for all). For every 1% higher HbA1c, LV mass was higher by 3.0 grams (95% CI: 1.5-4.6 grams), E/E’ by 0.5 (95% CI: 0.4-0.7), and global longitudinal strain by 0.3% (95% CI: 0.2-0.4) in multivariable analyses. Conclusions In a large contemporary bi-racial cohort of elderly subjects without prevalent cardiovascular disease or heart failure, dysglycemia was associated with subtle and subclinical alterations of cardiac structure, and left ventricular systolic and diastolic function. It remains unclear whether these are sufficient to explain the heightened risk of heart failure in individuals with diabetes. PMID:25759458

  4. Calcineurin proteolysis in astrocytes: Implications for impaired synaptic function.

    PubMed

    Pleiss, Melanie M; Sompol, Pradoldej; Kraner, Susan D; Abdul, Hafiz Mohmmad; Furman, Jennifer L; Guttmann, Rodney P; Wilcock, Donna M; Nelson, Peter T; Norris, Christopher M

    2016-09-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that astrocyte activation, found in most forms of neural injury and disease, is linked to the hyperactivation of the protein phosphatase calcineurin. In many tissues and cell types, calcineurin hyperactivity is the direct result of limited proteolysis. However, little is known about the proteolytic status of calcineurin in activated astrocytes. Here, we developed a polyclonal antibody to a high activity calcineurin proteolytic fragment in the 45-48kDa range (ΔCN) for use in immunohistochemical applications. When applied to postmortem human brain sections, the ΔCN antibody intensely labeled cell clusters in close juxtaposition to amyloid deposits and microinfarcts. Many of these cells exhibited clear activated astrocyte morphology. The expression of ΔCN in astrocytes near areas of pathology was further confirmed using confocal microscopy. Multiple NeuN-positive cells, particularly those within microinfarct core regions, also labeled positively for ΔCN. This observation suggests that calcineurin proteolysis can also occur within damaged or dying neurons, as reported in other studies. When a similar ΔCN fragment was selectively expressed in hippocampal astrocytes of intact rats (using adeno-associated virus), we observed a significant reduction in the strength of CA3-CA1 excitatory synapses, indicating that the hyperactivation of astrocytic calcineurin is sufficient for disrupting synaptic function. Together, these results suggest that proteolytic activation of calcineurin in activated astrocytes may be a central mechanism for driving and/or exacerbating neural dysfunction during neurodegenerative disease and injury. PMID:27212416

  5. Calcineurin proteolysis in astrocytes: Implications for impaired synaptic function.

    PubMed

    Pleiss, Melanie M; Sompol, Pradoldej; Kraner, Susan D; Abdul, Hafiz Mohmmad; Furman, Jennifer L; Guttmann, Rodney P; Wilcock, Donna M; Nelson, Peter T; Norris, Christopher M

    2016-09-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that astrocyte activation, found in most forms of neural injury and disease, is linked to the hyperactivation of the protein phosphatase calcineurin. In many tissues and cell types, calcineurin hyperactivity is the direct result of limited proteolysis. However, little is known about the proteolytic status of calcineurin in activated astrocytes. Here, we developed a polyclonal antibody to a high activity calcineurin proteolytic fragment in the 45-48kDa range (ΔCN) for use in immunohistochemical applications. When applied to postmortem human brain sections, the ΔCN antibody intensely labeled cell clusters in close juxtaposition to amyloid deposits and microinfarcts. Many of these cells exhibited clear activated astrocyte morphology. The expression of ΔCN in astrocytes near areas of pathology was further confirmed using confocal microscopy. Multiple NeuN-positive cells, particularly those within microinfarct core regions, also labeled positively for ΔCN. This observation suggests that calcineurin proteolysis can also occur within damaged or dying neurons, as reported in other studies. When a similar ΔCN fragment was selectively expressed in hippocampal astrocytes of intact rats (using adeno-associated virus), we observed a significant reduction in the strength of CA3-CA1 excitatory synapses, indicating that the hyperactivation of astrocytic calcineurin is sufficient for disrupting synaptic function. Together, these results suggest that proteolytic activation of calcineurin in activated astrocytes may be a central mechanism for driving and/or exacerbating neural dysfunction during neurodegenerative disease and injury.

  6. Modafinil treatment prevents REM sleep deprivation-induced brain function impairment by increasing MMP-9 expression.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Peng, Hua; Zhao, Ying; Zhou, Hui; Zhao, Zhongxin

    2011-12-01

    Previous work showed that sleep deprivation (SD) impairs hippocampal-dependent cognitive function and synaptic plasticity, and a novel wake-promoting agent modafinil prevents SD-induced memory impairment in rat. However, the mechanisms by which modafinil prevented REM-SD-induced impairment of brain function remain poorly understood. In the present study, rats were sleep-deprived by using the modified multiple platform method and brain function was detected. The results showed that modafinil treatment prevented REM-SD-induced impairment of cognitive function. Modafinil significantly reduced the number of errors compared to placebo and upregulated synapsin I expression in the dorsal hippocampal CA3 region. A synaptic plasticity-related gene, MMP-9 expression was also upregulated in modafinil-treated rats. Importantly, downregulation of MMP-9 expression by special siRNA decreased synapsin I protein levels and synapse numbers. Therefore, we demonstrated that modafinil increased cognition function and synaptic plasticity, at least in part by increasing MMP-9 expression in REM-SD rats.

  7. Functional limitations in older adults who have cognitive impairment without dementia

    PubMed Central

    Gure, Tanya Ruff; Langa, Kenneth M.; Fisher, Gwenith G.; Piette, John D.; Plassman, Brenda L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Characterize the prevalence of functional limitations among older adults with cognitive impairment without dementia (CIND). METHODS Secondary data analysis was performed using the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study (ADAMS) dataset. 856 individuals ≥ 71 years old were assigned to 3 diagnostic cognitive categories. A questionnaire was completed by a proxy informant regarding functional limitations for 744 of 856 respondents. RESULTS Of the 744 subjects, 263 (13.9%) had dementia, 201 (21.3%) had CIND, and 280 (64.8%) had normal cognition. Informants reported ≥ 1 IADL limitation in 45% of subjects with CIND compared to 13% of subjects with normal cognition and 85% of subjects with dementia (p < .001). The ADL impairments among individuals with CIND were primarily attributed to physical health problems (n=41; 40%). CONCLUSIONS Many individuals with CIND have impairment in a range of complex and basic daily activities, largely due to physical health problems. PMID:23559664

  8. Enhanced conditioned approach responses in transgenic mice with impaired glucocorticoid receptor function.

    PubMed

    Steckler, T; Holsboer, F

    1999-07-01

    The long-term consequences of impaired glucocorticoid receptor (GR) function on reward-related learning were studied in transgenic mice with impaired GR function in a series of experiments taxing conditioned and unconditioned approach responses to stimuli predictive of food. There was a double-dissociation in that transgenic mice with impaired GR activity showed enhanced conditioned exploration in situations when stimuli predicted reward, while free-feeding food consumption over 24 h was reduced. Previous experiments have shown altered accumbens dopaminergic activity in these animals. In line with these findings, we observed an enhanced behavioural stimulation of transgenic mice following administration of d-amphetamine (2 mg/kg). This suggests that the increase in preparatory responses in transgenic mice may be mediated via an enhanced accumbens dopaminergic activity, possibly secondary to alterations in other brain systems. PMID:10403023

  9. [Anesthesiological management in transplantation of the heart after temporary mechanical substitution of its function].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, I A; Piliaeva, I E; Matveev, Iu G; Kormer, A Ia

    1994-01-01

    The first experience of anesthesiological management of three two-step orthotopic heart transplantations is reviewed. As the first step of surgical treatment one recipient was implanted an artificial heart "POISK-IOM" (Russia), in 2 other patients left ventricular bypass was achieved using a "Biopump" ("Biomedics", USA). Anesthesia techniques, methods of infusion-transfusion therapy, and other components of intraoperative management are described. Hemodynamics, donor heart function recovery, and other homeostasis parameters have been analysed. It has been noted that high doses of fentanyl in combination with ketamine and diazepam ensured satisfactory course of general anesthesia. There were no cases of intraoperative lethality. A more complex aspect of anesthesiological management was correction of various homeostasis disturbances which progressed during surgery in patients with left ventricular bypass. In two cases the intraoperative period was characterized by the onset of multiorgan failure (heart, respiratory, renal failure, metabolic disorders, coagulopathy), which played a negative part for the postoperative period of heart transplantations. It is concluded that prediction of possible complications during temporary mechanical replacement of the cardiac function and timely determination of contraindications for the second step of two-step heart transplantations are the most important trends of investigations for anesthesiologists, intensive care specialists, and transplantologists. PMID:8010503

  10. Echocardiography: future developments. What is diastole and how to assess it? Impaired left ventricular systolic function.

    PubMed

    Luers, C; Maisch, B

    2011-08-01

    Epidemiologic data show that diastolic heart failure is responsible for 38% to 54% of all heart failure cases. Left ventricular diastolic function can be characterized invasively in the catheter laboratory and non-invasively by echocardiography. Although echocardiography does not directly measure hemodynamic parameters, it is the most practical routine clinical approach for the evaluation of left ventricular diastolic function with given clinical and experimental evidence supporting its use as well as its safety, versatility, and portability. A set of echocardiographic paramters suitable for the description of diastolic function has been investigated or is still under investigation. Two guideline-papers exist with regard to the assessment of diastolic function, diastolic dysfunction and diastolic heart failure. Mitral inflow pattern, isovolumetric relaxation time, flow propagation velocity, tissue Doppler imaging and pulmonary vein flow pattern are central parameters established for the assessment of diastolic function, estimation of left atrial pressure and left ventricular enddiastolic pressure. Furthermore, calculated parameters, e.g. like E/E´, E/Vp, AR-A, for a more accurate determination of diastolic dysfunction have been evaluated. With respect to recent guidelines and recommendations, this review summarizes the physiology and pathophysiology of diastole, current echocardiographic methods and calculated echocardiographic parameters for the assessment of left ventricular diastolic function and dysfunction. In addition, an overview of the current state of research with regard to the echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular diastolic function will be given.

  11. Protein-energy malnutrition impairs functional outcome in global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Bobyn, P Joan; Corbett, Dale; Saucier, Deborah M; Noyan-Ashraf, M Hossein; Juurlink, Bernhard H J; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2005-12-01

    We investigated whether protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) exacerbates brain injury in global ischemia. It was hypothesized that PEM would increase secondary brain damage by worsening ischemia-induced depletion of glutathione (GSH) and increasing oxidative stress. Adult male gerbils were fed an adequate protein (12.5%; C) or low protein (2%; PEM) diet for 4 weeks and subjected to 5 min of bilateral carotid artery occlusion (Ischemia) or sham surgery (Sham). At 12 h post-ischemia, GSH and markers of oxidative stress were measured in hippocampus and neocortex. The remaining gerbils were tested in the open field on days 3, 7, and 10, with viable hippocampal CA1 neurons assessed on day 10. Although the habituation of C-Ischemia gerbils in the open field was normal by day 7, PEM-Ischemia gerbils failed to habituate even by day 10 and spent greater time in the outer zone (P < 0.05). Mean (+/-SEM) total number of viable CA1 neurons at 10 days post-ischemia were C-Sham = 713 (13), C-Ischemia = 264 (48), PEM-Sham = 716 (12), and PEM-Ischemia = 286 (66). Although PEM did not increase CA1 neuron loss caused by ischemia, a subset (4/12) of PEM-Ischemia gerbils showed dramatic reactive gliosis accompanied by extensive neuronal loss. Hippocampal protein thiols were decreased by PEM and ischemia. Although the mechanism is yet to be established, the finding that PEM worsens functional outcome following global ischemia is clinically relevant since 16% of elderly are nutritionally compromised at the time of admission for stroke.

  12. Protein Carbamylation in Chronic Systolic Heart Failure: Relation to Renal Impairment and Adverse Long-Term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson Tang, W. H.; Shrestha, Kevin; Wang, Zeneng; Borowski, Allen G.; Troughton, Richard W.; Klein, Allan L.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein carbamylation, a post-translational modification promoted during uremia and catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) at sites of inflammation, is linked to altered protein structure, vascular dysfunction, and poor prognosis. We examine the relationship between plasma protein-bound homocitrulline (PBHCit) levels, a marker of protein lysine residue carbamylation, with cardio-renal function and long-term outcomes in chronic systolic heart failure. Methods and Results In 115 patients with chronic systolic HF (LVEF≤35%), we measured plasma PBHCit by quantitative mass spectrometry and performed comprehensive echocardiography with assessment of cardiac structure and performance. Adverse long-term events (death, cardiac transplant) were tracked for 5 years. In our study cohort, the median PBHCit level was 87 [IQR: 59, 128] μmol/mol Lysine. Higher plasma PBHcit levels were associated with poorer renal function (eGFR Spearman’s r= −0.37, p<0.001); cystatin C (r=0.31, p=0.001), and elevated plasma NT-proBNP levels (r= 0.26, 0.006), but not with markers of systemic inflammation or oxidant stress (hsCRP and MPO, p>0.10 for each). Furthermore, elevated plasma PBHCit levels were not related to indices of cardiac structure or function (p>0.10 for all examined) except modestly with increased right atrial volume index (RAVi; r=0.31, p=0.002). PBHCit levels predicted adverse long-term events (Hazard ratio [HR]: 1.8, 95% CI 1.3– 2.6, p<0.001), including following adjustment for age, eGFR, MPO and NT-proBNP (HR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2–3.1, p=0.006). Conclusions In chronic systolic HF, protein carbamylation is associated with poorer renal but not cardiac function, and portends poorer long-term adverse clinical outcomes even when adjusted for cardio-renal indices of adverse prognosis. PMID:23582087

  13. Heterogeneity and Function of KATP Channels in Canine Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai Xia; Silva, Jonathan R.; Lin, Yu-Wen; Verbsky, John W.; Lee, Urvi S.; Kanter, Evelyn M.; Yamada, Kathryn A.; Schuessler, Richard B.; Nichols, Colin G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The concept that pore-forming Kir6.2 and regulatory SUR2A subunits form cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels is challenged by recent reports that SUR1 is predominant in mouse atrial KATP channels. Objective To assess SUR subunit composition of KATP channels and consequence of KATP activation for action potential duration (APD) in dog heart. Methods Patch-clamp techniques were used on isolated dog cardiomyocytes to investigate KATP channel properties. Dynamic current-clamp, by injection of a linear K+ conductance to simulate activation of the native current, was employed to study consequences of KATP activation on APD. Results Metabolic inhibitor (MI)-activated current was not significantly different from pinacidil (SUR2A-specific)-activated current, and both currents were larger than diazoxide (SUR1- specific)-activated current, in both atrium and ventricle. Mean KATP conductance (activated by MI) did not differ significantly between chambers although, within the ventricle, both MI-induced and pinacidil-induced currents tended to decrease from epicardium to endocardium. Dynamic current-clamp results indicate that myocytes with longer baseline APDs are more susceptible to injected “KATP” current, a result reproduced in silico using a canine AP model to simulate Epi and Endo (HRd). Conclusions Even a small fraction of KATP activation significantly shortens APD in a manner that depends on existing heterogeneity in KATP current and APD. PMID:23871704

  14. Chronic Hindlimb Ischemia Impairs Functional Vasodilation and Vascular Reactivity in Mouse Feed Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, Trevor R.; Struthers, Kyle R.; Kesler, Thomas J.; Yocum, Matthew D.; Kurjiaka, David T.; Hoying, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Vasodilation of lower leg arterioles is impaired in animal models of chronic peripheral ischemia. In addition to arterioles, feed arteries are a critical component of the vascular resistance network, accounting for as much as 50% of the pressure drop across the arterial circulation. Despite the critical importance of feed arteries in blood flow control, the impact of ischemia on feed artery vascular reactivity is unknown. At 14 days following unilateral resection of the femoral–saphenous artery–vein pair, functional vasodilation of the profunda femoris artery was severely impaired, 11 ± 9 versus 152 ± 22%. Although endothelial and smooth muscle-dependent vasodilation were both impaired in ischemic arteries compared to control arteries (Ach: 40 ± 14 versus 81 ± 11%, SNP: 43 ± 12 versus and 85 ± 11%), the responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were similar, implicating impaired smooth muscle-dependent vasodilation. Conversely, vasoconstriction responses to norepinephrine were not different between ischemic and control arteries, −68 ± 3 versus −66 ± 3%, indicating that smooth muscle cells were functional following the ischemic insult. Finally, maximal dilation responses to acetylcholine, ex vivo, were significantly impaired in the ischemic artery compared to control, 71 ± 9 versus 97 ± 2%, despite a similar generation of myogenic tone to the same intravascular pressure (80 mmHg). These data indicate that ischemia impairs feed artery vasodilation by impairing the responsiveness of the vascular wall to vasodilating stimuli. Future studies to examine the mechanistic basis for the impact of ischemia on vascular reactivity or treatment strategies to improve vascular reactivity following ischemia could provide the foundation for an alternative therapeutic paradigm for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. PMID:22164145

  15. The Munich Triathlon Heart Study: ventricular function, myocardial velocities, and two-dimensional strain in healthy children before and after endurance stress.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Michael; Petzuch, Kurt; Kühn, Andreas; Schön, Patrick; Elmenhorst, Julia; Schönfelder, Martin; Oberhoffer, Renate; Vogt, Manfred O

    2013-03-01

    Intense exercise has been shown to have negative effects on systolic and diastolic ventricular function in adults. Very little is known about the normal reaction of the growing heart to endurance stress. For this study, 26 healthy children (18 males) with a mean age of 12.61 years (range, 7.92-16.42 years) took part in an age-adapted triathlon circuit. The athletes were investigated by two-dimensional (2D) echocardiographic/speckle tracking, M-mode, pulse-wave Doppler, color Doppler, and color-coded tissue Doppler at 2-4 weeks before and immediately after the race. After the competition, cardiac output increased, mediated by an increase in heart rate and not by an elevated preload, according the Frank-Starling mechanism. Two-dimensional speckle tracking showed a reduced longitudinal strain in the right and left ventricles and additionally reduced circumferential strain in the left ventricle. The late diastolic inflow velocities were increased in both ventricles, indicating reduced diastolic function due to an impairment of myocardial relaxation. Immediately after endurance exercise, systolic and diastolic functions were attenuated in children and adolescents. In contrast to adult studies, this study could show a heart rate-mediated increase in cardiac output. The sequelae of these alterations are unclear, and the growing heart especially may be more susceptible to myocardial damage caused by intense endurance stress.

  16. Impaired executive function following ischemic stroke in the rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Chris A; Jackson, Danielle; Langdon, Kristopher D; Hewlett, Krista A; Corbett, Dale

    2014-01-01

    Small (lacunar) infarcts frequently arise in frontal and midline thalamic regions in the absence of major stroke. Damage to these areas often leads to impairment of executive function likely as a result of interrupting connections of the prefrontal cortex. Thus, patients experience frontal-like symptoms such as impaired ability to shift ongoing behavior and attention. In contrast, executive dysfunction has not been demonstrated in rodent models of stroke, thereby limiting the development of potential therapies for human executive dysfunction. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=40) underwent either sham surgery or bilateral endothelin-1 injections in the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus or in the medial prefrontal cortex. Executive function was assessed using a rodent attention set shifting test that requires animals to shift attention to stimuli in different stimulus dimensions. Medial prefrontal cortex ischemia impaired attention shift performance between different stimulus dimensions while sparing stimulus discrimination and attention shifts within a stimulus dimension, indicating a selective attention set-shift deficit. Rats with mediodorsal thalamic lacunar damage did not exhibit a cognitive impairment relative to sham controls. The selective attention set shift impairment observed in this study is consistent with clinical data demonstrating selective executive disorders following stroke within specific sub-regions of frontal cortex. These data contribute to the development and validation of a preclinical animal model of executive dysfunction, that can be employed to identify potential therapies for ameliorating cognitive deficits following stroke.

  17. The Interactive Effects of Cerebral Perfusion and Depression on Cognitive Function in Older Adults with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Garcia, Sarah; Josephson, Richard; van Dulmen, Manfred; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Depression is common among persons with heart failure (HF) and has been linked to cognitive impairment in this population. The mechanisms of this relationship are unclear, and the current study examined whether cerebral perfusion moderates the association between depressive symptomatology and cognitive impairment in patients with HF. Methods Persons with HF (N=89; 67.61 (SD = 11.78) years of age) completed neuropsychological testing and impedance cardiography. Depressive symptomatology was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory-II and transcranial doppler was used to quantify cerebral perfusion. Results Depression was associated with reduced performance on tasks assessing attention/executive function (r=−0.28), language (r=−.0.30) and motor function (r=−.28) in unadjusted models (p-values < 0.05). Global cerebral blood flow was correlated with memory performance (r=0.22, p=.040) but not to other tasks. A moderation analysis was performed using hierarchical regression models for attention/executive function, memory, language, and motor function. For each model, medical and demographic characteristics were entered into the initial blocks, and the final block consisted of an interaction term between global cerebral blood flow velocity (CBF-V) and the BDI-II. The interaction between greater depressive symptomatology and decreased global CBF-V was associated with greater deficits in attention/executive function (β = .32, ΔR2 = .08, p = .003). Conclusion Depressive symptomatology and cerebral hypoperfusion interact to adversely affect cognitive performance in older adults with HF. Longitudinal studies are needed to clarify this relationship and elucidate subsequent neuropathology. PMID:23873714

  18. Defeatist Beliefs as a Mediator of Cognitive Impairment, Negative Symptoms, and Functioning in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Paul M.; Beck, Aaron T.

    2009-01-01

    Poor social and vocational outcomes have long been observed in schizophrenia. Two of the most consistent predictors are negative symptoms and cognitive impairment. We investigate the hypothesis that cognitive content—defeatist beliefs regarding performance—provides a link between cognitive impairment, negative symptoms, and poor functioning in schizophrenia. A total of 77 individuals (55 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 22 healthy controls) participated in a cross-sectional study of psychopathology. Tests of memory, abstraction, attention, and processing speed, as well as current psychopathology, functioning, and endorsement of defeatist beliefs, were employed. Greater neurocognitive impairment was associated with elevated defeatist belief endorsement, higher negative symptom levels, and worse social and vocational functioning. Notably, statistical modeling indicated that defeatist belief endorsements were mediators in the relationship between cognitive impairment and both negative symptoms and functioning. These effects were independent of depression and positive symptom levels. The results add to the emerging biopsychosocial understanding of negative symptoms and introduce defeatist beliefs as a new psychotherapeutic target. PMID:18308717

  19. Brief Report: Biochemical Correlates of Clinical Impairment in High Functioning Autism and Asperger's Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinhans, Natalia M.; Richards, Todd; Weaver, Kurt E.; Liang, Olivia; Dawson, Geraldine; Aylward, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Amygdala dysfunction has been proposed as a critical contributor to social impairment in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The current study investigated biochemical abnormalities in the amygdala in 20 high functioning adults with autistic disorder or Asperger's disorder and 19 typically developing adults matched on age and IQ. Magnetic resonance…

  20. Developmental Language Impairment through the Lens of the ICF: An Integrated Account of Children's Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Lynn; Skarakis-Doyle, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The conceptual framework of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) has the potential to advance understanding of developmental language impairment (LI) and enhance clinical practice. The framework provides a systematic way of unifying numerous lines of research, which have linked a…

  1. The Oralingua Social Studies Curriculum in a Functional Approach to Language for Preschool Hearing Impaired Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter-Brinton, Kathryn

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the positive effects on young deaf children's and teachers' communicative attitudes of a functional approach to language intervention (developed in the Preschool Program for the Hearing Impaired at the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) used in combination with the Oralingua preschool social studies…

  2. Aberrant Topologies and Reconfiguration Pattern of Functional Brain Network in Children with Second Language Reading Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Lanfang; Li, Hehui; Zhang, Manli; Wang, Zhengke; Wei, Na; Liu, Li; Meng, Xiangzhi; Ding, Guosheng

    2016-01-01

    Prior work has extensively studied neural deficits in children with reading impairment (RI) in their native language but has rarely examined those of RI children in their second language (L2). A recent study revealed that the function of the local brain regions was disrupted in children with RI in L2, but it is not clear whether the disruption…

  3. Working Memory Functioning in Children with Learning Disorders and Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuchardt, Kirsten; Bockmann, Ann-Katrin; Bornemann, Galina; Maehler, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: On the basis of Baddeley's working memory model (1986), we examined working memory functioning in children with learning disorders with and without specific language impairment (SLI). We pursued the question whether children with learning disorders exhibit similar working memory deficits as children with additional SLI. Method: In…

  4. A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Investigation of Verbal Working Memory in Adolescents with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weismer, Susan Ellis; Plante, Elena; Jones, Maura; Tomblin, Bruce J.

    2005-01-01

    This study used neuroimaging and behavioral techniques to examine the claim that processing capacity limitations underlie specific language impairment (SLI). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate verbal working memory in adolescents with SLI and normal language (NL) controls. The experimental task involved a modified…

  5. Cerebral Visual Impairment in Children: A Longitudinal Case Study of Functional Outcomes beyond the Visual Acuities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Fook Chang; Lovett, Fiona; Dutton, Gordon N.

    2010-01-01

    Damage to the areas of the brain that are responsible for higher visual processing can lead to severe cerebral visual impairment (CVI). The prognosis for higher cognitive visual functions in children with CVI is not well described. We therefore present our six-year follow-up of a boy with CVI and highlight intervention approaches that have proved…

  6. Visuo-Spatial Processing and Executive Functions in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marton, Klara

    2008-01-01

    Background: Individual differences in complex working memory tasks reflect simultaneous processing, executive functions, and attention control. Children with specific language impairment (SLI) show a deficit in verbal working memory tasks that involve simultaneous processing of information. Aims: The purpose of the study was to examine executive…

  7. Does Change in Functional Performance Affect Quality of Life in Persons with Orthopaedic Impairment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostir, Glenn V.; Berges, Ivonne-Marie; Smith, Pamela M.; Smith, David; Rice, Janida L.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Examine the association between change in functional status and quality of life for individuals with orthopaedic impairments approximately 90 days after discharge from in-patient medical rehabilitation. Methods: A retrospective study from 2001 to 2002 using information from the IT HealthTrack database. The study included…

  8. Co-Localisation of Abnormal Brain Structure and Function in Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badcock, Nicholas A.; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.; Hardiman, Mervyn J.; Barry, Johanna G.; Watkins, Kate E.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between brain structure and function in 10 individuals with specific language impairment (SLI), compared to six unaffected siblings, and 16 unrelated control participants with typical language. Voxel-based morphometry indicated that grey matter in the SLI group, relative to controls, was increased in the left inferior…

  9. Assessing ADHD Symptomatic Behaviors and Functional Impairment in School Settings: Impact of Student and Teacher Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPaul, George J.; Reid, Robert; Anastopoulos, Arthur D.; Power, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine (a) the teacher-reported prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and associated impairment in a nationally representative sample of children and adolescents and (b) the degree to which prevalence varied as a function of student and teacher characteristics.…

  10. Self-Regulation of Emotion, Functional Impairment, and Comorbidity among Children with AD/HD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastopoulos, Arthur D.; Smith, Taylor F.; Garrett, Melanie E.; Morrissey-Kane, Erin; Schatz, Nicole K.; Sommer, Jennifer L.; Kollins, Scott H.; Ashley-Koch, Allison

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the role of self-regulation of emotion in relation to functional impairment and comorbidity among children with and without AD/HD. Method: A total of 358 probands and their siblings participated in the study, with 74% of the sample participants affected by AD/HD. Parent-rated levels of emotional lability served…

  11. Degree of Exposure to Domestic Violence, Psychopathology, and Functional Impairment in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Eduard Bayarri; Ezpeleta, Lourdes; Granero, Roser; de la Osa, Nuria; Domenech, Josep Maria

    2011-01-01

    There are discrepancies about whether children who witness and suffer domestic violence (DV) have similar outcomes in terms of psychopathology. This work examines the relationship between different types of exposure to DV and child psychopathology and functional impairment. One hundred and forty-four Spanish children aged from 4 to 17 years and…

  12. Distinguishing Sluggish Cognitive Tempo from ADHD in Children and Adolescents: Executive Functioning, Impairment, and Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Russell A.

    2013-01-01

    Controversy continues as to whether sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) is a subtype of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or a distinct disorder. This study examined differences between these disorders in demographics, executive functioning (EF), impairment, and prior professional diagnoses to address the issue. There were 1,800 children…

  13. Cognitive Function in Ambulatory Patients with Systolic Heart Failure: Insights from the Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction (WARCEF) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Susan; Ye, Siqin; Qian, Min; Sanford, Alexandra R.; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Mann, Douglas L.; Levin, Bruce; Pullicino, Patrick M.; Freudenberger, Ronald S.; Teerlink, John R.; Mohr, J. P.; Labovitz, Arthur J.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Estol, Conrado J.; Lok, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.; Thompson, John L. P.; Homma, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine whether cognitive function in stable outpatients with heart failure (HF) is affected by HF severity. A retrospective, cross-sectional analysis was performed using data from 2, 043 outpatients with systolic HF and without prior stroke enrolled in the Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction (WARCEF) Trial. Multivariable regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between cognitive function measured using the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE) and markers of HF severity (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF], New York Heart Association [NYHA] functional class, and 6-minute walk distance). The mean (SD) for the MMSE was 28.6 (2.0), with 64 (3.1%) of the 2,043 patients meeting the cut-off of MMSE <24 that indicates need for further evaluation of cognitive impairment. After adjustment for demographic and clinical covariates, 6-minute walk distance (β-coefficient 0.002, p<0.0001), but not LVEF or NYHA functional class, was independently associated with the MMSE as a continuous measure. Age, education, smoking status, body mass index, and hemoglobin level were also independently associated with the MMSE. In conclusion, six-minute walk distance, but not LVEF or NYHA functional class, was an important predictor of cognitive function in ambulatory patients with systolic heart failure. PMID:25426862

  14. Cognitive function in ambulatory patients with systolic heart failure: insights from the warfarin versus aspirin in reduced cardiac ejection fraction (WARCEF) trial.

    PubMed

    Graham, Susan; Ye, Siqin; Qian, Min; Sanford, Alexandra R; Di Tullio, Marco R; Sacco, Ralph L; Mann, Douglas L; Levin, Bruce; Pullicino, Patrick M; Freudenberger, Ronald S; Teerlink, John R; Mohr, J P; Labovitz, Arthur J; Lip, Gregory Y H; Estol, Conrado J; Lok, Dirk J; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D; Thompson, John L P; Homma, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine whether cognitive function in stable outpatients with heart failure (HF) is affected by HF severity. A retrospective, cross-sectional analysis was performed using data from 2, 043 outpatients with systolic HF and without prior stroke enrolled in the Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction (WARCEF) Trial. Multivariable regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between cognitive function measured using the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE) and markers of HF severity (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF], New York Heart Association [NYHA] functional class, and 6-minute walk distance). The mean (SD) for the MMSE was 28.6 (2.0), with 64 (3.1%) of the 2,043 patients meeting the cut-off of MMSE <24 that indicates need for further evaluation of cognitive impairment. After adjustment for demographic and clinical covariates, 6-minute walk distance (β-coefficient 0.002, p<0.0001), but not LVEF or NYHA functional class, was independently associated with the MMSE as a continuous measure. Age, education, smoking status, body mass index, and hemoglobin level were also independently associated with the MMSE. In conclusion, six-minute walk distance, but not LVEF or NYHA functional class, was an important predictor of cognitive function in ambulatory patients with systolic heart failure. PMID:25426862

  15. MR evaluation of cardiovascular physiology in congenital heart disease: flow and function.

    PubMed

    Weber, Oliver M; Higgins, Charles B

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become the method of choice in the evaluation of a number of questions in congenital heart disease. In addition to morphology, modern CMR techniques allow the visualization of function and flow in a temporally resolved manner. Among the pathologies where these methods play a major role are shunts, septal defects, aortic coarctation, anomalies of the pulmonary arteries, and valvular regurgitation. This paper explains the basics of functional and flow encoded CMR and discusses their application in the assessment of several types of congenital heart disease.

  16. Effect of Ivabradine on Endothelial Function in Diastolic and Right Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Balderas-Muñoz, Karla; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Infante-Vázquez, Oscar; Martínez Memije, Raúl; Keirns-Davis, Candace; Dorantes-García, Joel; Narváez-David, René; Vázquez-Ortíz, Zuilma

    2013-01-01

    Background. Ivabradine is an If ion current inhibitor that has proved to reduce mortality in patients with systolic heart failure by slowing heart rate without decreasing myocardial contractility. Photoplethysmography is a simple, low-cost optical technique that can evaluate vascular function and detect changes in blood flow, pulse, and swelling of tissular microvascular space. Objective. To evaluate the effect of ivabradine on endothelial function by photoplethysmography in diastolic and right heart failure patients. Methodology. 15 patients were included (mean age of 78.1 ± 9.2 years) with optimally treated diastolic and right heart failure. They underwent photoplethysmography before and after induced ischemia to evaluate the wave blood flow on the finger, using the maximum amplitude time/total time (MAT/TT) index. Two measurements were made before and after oral Ivabradine (mean 12.5 mg a day during 6 months of followup). Results. In the study group, the MAT/TT index was 29.1 ± 2.2 versus 24.3 ± 3.2 (P = 0.05) in basal recording and 30.4 ± 2.1 versus 23.3 ± 2.9 (P = 0.002), before versus after ischemia and before versus after Ivabradine intervention, respectively. Conclusions. Ivabradine administration improves endothelial function (shear stress) in diastolic and right heart failure patients. PMID:24222884

  17. The role of executive functions in social impairment in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Leung, Rachel C; Vogan, Vanessa M; Powell, Tamara L; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Taylor, Margot J

    2016-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by socio-communicative impairments. Executive dysfunction may explain some key characteristics of ASD, both social and nonsocial hallmarks. Limited research exists exploring the relations between executive function and social impairment in ASD and few studies have used a comparison control group. Thus, the objective of the present study was to investigate the relations between executive functioning using the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Functioning (BRIEF), social impairment as measured by the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS), and overall autistic symptomology as measured by the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) in children and adolescents with and without ASD. Seventy children and adolescents diagnosed with ASD and 71 typically developing controls were included in this study. Findings showed that behavioral regulation executive processes (i.e., inhibition, shifting, and emotional control) predicted social function in all children. However, metacognitive executive processes (i.e., initiation, working memory, planning, organization, and monitoring) predicted social function only in children with ASD and not in typically developing children. Our findings suggest a distinct metacognitive executive function-social symptom link in ASD that is not present in the typical population. Understanding components of executive functioning that contribute to the autistic symptomology, particularly in the socio-communicative domain, is crucial for developing effective interventions that target key executive processes as well as underlying behavioral symptoms.

  18. Elevation of serum sphingosine-1-phosphate attenuates impaired cardiac function in experimental sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Coldewey, Sina M.; Benetti, Elisa; Collino, Massimo; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Sponholz, Christoph; Bauer, Michael; Huwiler, Andrea; Thiemermann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Serum levels of the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are reduced in septic patients and are inversely associated with disease severity. We show that serum S1P is reduced in human sepsis and in murine models of sepsis. We then investigated whether pharmacological or genetic approaches that alter serum S1P may attenuate cardiac dysfunction and whether S1P signaling might serve as a novel theragnostic tool in sepsis. Mice were challenged with lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan (LPS/PepG). LPS/PepG resulted in an impaired systolic contractility and reduced serum S1P. Administration of the immunomodulator FTY720 increased serum S1P, improved impaired systolic contractility and activated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-pathway in the heart. Cardioprotective effects of FTY720 were abolished following administration of a S1P receptor 2 (S1P2) antagonist or a PI3K inhibitor. Sphingosine kinase-2 deficient mice had higher endogenous S1P levels and the LPS/PepG-induced impaired systolic contractility was attenuated in comparison with wild-type mice. Cardioprotective effects of FTY720 were confirmed in polymicrobial sepsis. We show here for the first time that the impaired left ventricular systolic contractility in experimental sepsis is attenuated by FTY720. Mechanistically, our results indicate that activation of S1P2 by increased serum S1P and the subsequent activation of the PI3K-Akt survival pathway significantly contributes to the observed cardioprotective effect of FTY720. PMID:27277195

  19. Elevation of serum sphingosine-1-phosphate attenuates impaired cardiac function in experimental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Coldewey, Sina M; Benetti, Elisa; Collino, Massimo; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Sponholz, Christoph; Bauer, Michael; Huwiler, Andrea; Thiemermann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Serum levels of the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are reduced in septic patients and are inversely associated with disease severity. We show that serum S1P is reduced in human sepsis and in murine models of sepsis. We then investigated whether pharmacological or genetic approaches that alter serum S1P may attenuate cardiac dysfunction and whether S1P signaling might serve as a novel theragnostic tool in sepsis. Mice were challenged with lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan (LPS/PepG). LPS/PepG resulted in an impaired systolic contractility and reduced serum S1P. Administration of the immunomodulator FTY720 increased serum S1P, improved impaired systolic contractility and activated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-pathway in the heart. Cardioprotective effects of FTY720 were abolished following administration of a S1P receptor 2 (S1P2) antagonist or a PI3K inhibitor. Sphingosine kinase-2 deficient mice had higher endogenous S1P levels and the LPS/PepG-induced impaired systolic contractility was attenuated in comparison with wild-type mice. Cardioprotective effects of FTY720 were confirmed in polymicrobial sepsis. We show here for the first time that the impaired left ventricular systolic contractility in experimental sepsis is attenuated by FTY720. Mechanistically, our results indicate that activation of S1P2 by increased serum S1P and the subsequent activation of the PI3K-Akt survival pathway significantly contributes to the observed cardioprotective effect of FTY720. PMID:27277195

  20. Gross and fine motor function and accompanying impairments in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Himmelmann, K; Beckung, E; Hagberg, G; Uvebrant, P

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and analyze gross and fine motor function and accompanying neurological impairments in children with cerebral palsy (CP) born between 1991 and 1998 in western Sweden. A population-based study comprised 411 children with a diagnosis of CP ascertained at 4 to 8 years of age. Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels were documented in 367 children (205 males, 162 females). Bimanual Fine Motor Function (BFMF) classification levels of 345 of the children and information on learning disability, epilepsy, visual and hearing impairments, and hydrocephalus from 353 children were obtained. For spastic CP, a new classification according to the Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe of uni- and bilateral spastic CP was applied. GMFCS was distributed at Level I in 32%, Level II in 29%, Level III in 8%, Level IV in 15%, and Level V in 16%. The corresponding percentages for BFMF were 30.7%, 31.6%, 12.2%, 11.9%, and 13.6% respectively. Learning disability was present in 40%, epilepsy in 33%, and severe visual impairment in 19% of the children. Motor function differed between CP types. More severe GMFCS levels correlated with larger proportions of accompanying impairments and, in children born at term, to the presence of adverse peri/neonatal events in the form of intracranial haemorrhage/stroke, cerebral infection, and hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. GMFCS Level I correlated positively to increasing gestational age. We conclude that the classification of CP should be based on CP type and motor function, as the two combine to produce an indicator of total impairment load. PMID:16700930

  1. Functional impairment of activated protein C in breast cancer - relationship to survival outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Roselli, Mario; Ferroni, Patrizia; Riondino, Silvia; Mariotti, Sabrina; Portarena, Ilaria; Alessandroni, Jhessica; Ialongo, Cristiano; Massoud, Renato; Costarelli, Leopoldo; Cavaliere, Francesco; Bernardini, Sergio; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2016-01-01

    An impairment of the activated protein C (APC) system has been occasionally reported in breast cancer (BC). However, the clinical significance and prognostic value of an impaired APC functionality in BC patients is still poorly understood. Thus, the present study was aimed at investigating the prognostic value of altered APC functionality for progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in a cohort study of BC patients. APC functionality was retrospectively analyzed by a coagulation inhibition assay (ThromboPath) in 290 consecutive patients with primary (n=246) or relapsing/recurrent (n=44) BC. All patients were prospectively followed for a median time of 3.5 years (14% recurrence rate). As control group, 145 age-matched healthy women were also investigated. The results obtained demonstrated that APC function was impaired in roughly 20% of all BC at baseline. BC women with stage I/II had a significantly lower rate of APC impairment (13%) than women with stage III (22%) or distant metastases (44%, p=0.001). At univariate analyses, an impairment of APC function had a negative prognostic impact in terms of PFS (5-year PFS rates 53% vs. 70%; HR=2.5; p<0.001) and OS (5-year OS rates 79% vs. 93%; HR=3.9; p=0.005). However, prognostic significance was retained in multivariate models only for PFS (HR=2.0; p=0.017). We may, thus, conclude that BC patients are in a prothrombotic condition, which could play a role in the progression of the disease. Monitoring coagulation changes in BC women could provide important prognostic information especially in patients with advanced stages. PMID:27429857

  2. Functional impairment of activated protein C in breast cancer - relationship to survival outcomes.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Mario; Ferroni, Patrizia; Riondino, Silvia; Mariotti, Sabrina; Portarena, Ilaria; Alessandroni, Jhessica; Ialongo, Cristiano; Massoud, Renato; Costarelli, Leopoldo; Cavaliere, Francesco; Bernardini, Sergio; Guadagni, Fiorella

    2016-01-01

    An impairment of the activated protein C (APC) system has been occasionally reported in breast cancer (BC). However, the clinical significance and prognostic value of an impaired APC functionality in BC patients is still poorly understood. Thus, the present study was aimed at investigating the prognostic value of altered APC functionality for progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in a cohort study of BC patients. APC functionality was retrospectively analyzed by a coagulation inhibition assay (ThromboPath) in 290 consecutive patients with primary (n=246) or relapsing/recurrent (n=44) BC. All patients were prospectively followed for a median time of 3.5 years (14% recurrence rate). As control group, 145 age-matched healthy women were also investigated. The results obtained demonstrated that APC function was impaired in roughly 20% of all BC at baseline. BC women with stage I/II had a significantly lower rate of APC impairment (13%) than women with stage III (22%) or distant metastases (44%, p=0.001). At univariate analyses, an impairment of APC function had a negative prognostic impact in terms of PFS (5-year PFS rates 53% vs. 70%; HR=2.5; p<0.001) and OS (5-year OS rates 79% vs. 93%; HR=3.9; p=0.005). However, prognostic significance was retained in multivariate models only for PFS (HR=2.0; p=0.017). We may, thus, conclude that BC patients are in a prothrombotic condition, which could play a role in the progression of the disease. Monitoring coagulation changes in BC women could provide important prognostic information especially in patients with advanced stages. PMID:27429857

  3. Cognitive impairment and functional outcome after stroke associated with small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Mok, V; Wong, A; Lam, W; Fan, Y; Tang, W; Kwok, T; Hui, A; Wong, K

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Although stroke associated with small vessel disease (SSVD) can induce both motor and cognitive impairment, the latter has received less attention. We aimed to evaluate the frequency of the varying severity levels of cognitive impairment, the determinants of severe cognitive impairment, and the association of cognitive impairment with functional outcome after SSVD. Methods: Consecutive patients admitted to hospital because of SSVD were assessed at 3 months after stroke. We performed a semi-structured clinical interview to screen for cognitive symptoms. Severity of cognitive symptoms was graded according to the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR). Performance on psychometric tests (Mini-Mental State Examination, Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (cognition subscale), Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (initiation/perseverence subscale; MDRS I/P)) of patients of different CDR gradings was compared with that of 42 healthy controls. Basic demographic data, vascular risk factors, stroke severity (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale; NIHSS), pre-stroke cognitive decline (Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly; IQCODE), functional outcome (Barthel index; BI), Instrumental Activities Of Daily Living; IADL), and neuroimaging features (site of recent small infarcts, number of silent small infarcts, white matter changes) were also compared among the groups. Regression analyses were performed to find predictors of severe cognitive impairment and poor functional outcome. Results: Among the 75 included patients, 39 (52%) complained of cognitive symptoms. The number of patients in each CDR grading was as follows: 39 (52%) had a CDR of 0, 26 (34.7%) had a CDR of 0.5, 10 (13.3%) had a CDR of ⩾1. Pre-stroke IQCODE and previous stroke predicted CDR⩾1. The NIHSS was associated with more impaired BI. The NIHSS and MDRS I/P contributed most to impaired IADL. Conclusions: Half of the patients with SSVD complained of varying severity of cognitive

  4. Arachidonic acid-derived signaling lipids and functions in impaired healing

    PubMed Central

    Dhall, Sandeep; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan Shanaka; Karim, Zubair A.; Castro, Anthony; Vemana, Hari Priya; Khasawneh, Fadi T.; Chalfant, Charles E.; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Very little is known about lipid function during wound healing, and much less during impaired healing. Such understanding will help identify what roles lipid signaling plays in the development of impaired/chronic wounds. We took a lipidomics approach to study the alterations in lipid profile in the LIGHT−/− mouse model of impaired healing which has characteristics that resemble those of impaired/chronic wounds in humans, including high levels of oxidative stress, excess inflammation, increased extracellular matrix degradation and blood vessels with fibrin cuffs. The latter suggests excess coagulation and potentially increased platelet aggregation. We show here that in these impaired wounds there is an imbalance in the arachidonic acid (AA) derived eicosonoids that mediate or modulate inflammatory reactions and platelet aggregation. In the LIGHT−/− impaired wounds there is a significant increase in enzymatically derived breakdown products of AA. We found that early after injury there was a significant increase in the eicosanoids 11-, 12-, and 15-hydroxyeicosa-tetranoic acid, and the proinflammatory leukotrienes (LTD4 and LTE) and prostaglandins (PGE2 and PGF2α). Some of these eicosanoids also promote platelet aggregation. This led us to examine the levels of other eicosanoids known to be involved in the latter process. We found that thromboxane (TXA2/B2), and prostacyclins 6kPGF1α are elevated shortly after wounding and in some cases during healing. To determine whether they have an impact in platelet aggregation and hemostasis, we tested LIGHT−/− mouse wounds for these two parameters and found that, indeed, platelet aggregation and hemostasis are enhanced in these mice when compared with the control C57BL/6 mice. Understanding lipid signaling in impaired wounds can potentially lead to development of new therapeutics or in using existing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents to help correct the course of healing. PMID:26135854

  5. Impact of cold ischemia on mitochondrial function in porcine hearts and blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Dominik; Schachner, Thomas; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Dorn, Melissa; Andreas, Martin; Kocher, Alfred; Kuznetsov, Andrey V

    2013-11-07

    The effects of cold storage using Custodiol® (Histidine-Tryptophan-Ketoglutarate, HTK) or isotonic saline solution on mitochondrial function in hearts (left and rights ventricles) and various blood vessels of pigs were investigated. Hearts, saphenous veins, internal-mammary-arteries and aortas of male landrace pigs were harvested and exposed to cold ischemia in either saline or Custodiol-HTK solution. Mitochondrial function was measured in situ in permeabilized fibers by high-resolution respirometry. Mitochondrial respiratory capacities (maximal respiration rates) were similar in the right and left ventricle in controls and after 14 h of cold storage were significantly better preserved in Custodiol-HTK than in saline solution. Mitochondrial respiration rates in various blood vessels including aorta, arteries and veins were less than 5% of myocardium rates. In contrast to the pig heart, in some blood vessels, like veins, mitochondrial function remained stable even after 24 h of cold ischemia. HTK-Custodiol protection of mitochondrial function after prolonged cold ischemia was observed in the myocardium but not in blood vessels. HTK-Custodiol solution thus offers significant protection of myocardial mitochondria against cold ischemic injury and can be used as efficient preservation solution in organ transplantation but probably has no benefit for blood vessels preservation. Analysis of mitochondrial function can be used as a valuable approach for the assessment of cold ischemic injury in various tissues including pig heart and various blood vessels.

  6. Abnormal functioning of the left temporal lobe in language-impaired children.

    PubMed

    Helenius, Päivi; Sivonen, Päivi; Parviainen, Tiina; Isoaho, Pia; Hannus, Sinikka; Kauppila, Timo; Salmelin, Riitta; Isotalo, Leena

    2014-03-01

    Specific language impairment is associated with enduring problems in language-related functions. We followed the spatiotemporal course of cortical activation in SLI using magnetoencephalography. In the experiment, children with normal and impaired language development heard spoken real words and pseudowords presented only once or two times in a row. In typically developing children, the activation in the bilateral superior temporal cortices was attenuated to the second presentation of the same word. In SLI children, this repetition effect was nearly nonexistent in the left hemisphere. Furthermore, the activation was equally strong to words and pseudowords in SLI children whereas in the typically developing children the left hemisphere activation persisted longer for pseudowords than words. Our results indicate that the short-term maintenance of linguistic activation that underlies spoken word recognition is defective in SLI particularly in the left language-dominant hemisphere. The unusually rapid decay of speech-evoked activation can contribute to impaired vocabulary growth.

  7. Abnormal functioning of the left temporal lobe in language-impaired children.

    PubMed

    Helenius, Päivi; Sivonen, Päivi; Parviainen, Tiina; Isoaho, Pia; Hannus, Sinikka; Kauppila, Timo; Salmelin, Riitta; Isotalo, Leena

    2014-03-01

    Specific language impairment is associated with enduring problems in language-related functions. We followed the spatiotemporal course of cortical activation in SLI using magnetoencephalography. In the experiment, children with normal and impaired language development heard spoken real words and pseudowords presented only once or two times in a row. In typically developing children, the activation in the bilateral superior temporal cortices was attenuated to the second presentation of the same word. In SLI children, this repetition effect was nearly nonexistent in the left hemisphere. Furthermore, the activation was equally strong to words and pseudowords in SLI children whereas in the typically developing children the left hemisphere activation persisted longer for pseudowords than words. Our results indicate that the short-term maintenance of linguistic activation that underlies spoken word recognition is defective in SLI particularly in the left language-dominant hemisphere. The unusually rapid decay of speech-evoked activation can contribute to impaired vocabulary growth. PMID:24568877

  8. Intravenous AAV8 Encoding Urocortin-2 Increases Function of the Failing Heart in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lai, N. Chin; Gao, Mei Hua; Giamouridis, Dimosthenis; Suarez, Jorge; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Parikh, Jay; Hightower, Stephen; Guo, Tracy; Dillmann, Wolfgang; Kim, Young-Chul; Diaz-Juarez, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Urocortin-2 (UCn2) peptide infusion increases cardiac function in patients with heart failure, but chronic peptide infusion is cumbersome, is costly, and provides only short-term benefits. Gene transfer would circumvent these shortcomings. We previously showed that a single intravenous (IV) injection of AAV8.UCn2 increases plasma UCn2 and left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function for at least 7 months in normal mice. Here we test the hypothesis that IV delivery of AAV8.UCn2 increases function of the failing heart. Myocardial infarction (MI, by coronary ligation) was used to induce heart failure, which was assessed by echocardiography 3 weeks after MI. Mice with LV ejection fraction (EF) <25% received IV delivery of AAV8.UCn2 (5×1011 gc) or saline, and 5 weeks later echocardiography showed increased LV EF in mice that received UCn2 gene transfer (p=0.01). In vivo physiological studies showed a 2-fold increase in peak rate of LV pressure development (LV +dP/dt; p<0.0001) and a 1.6-fold increase in peak rate of LV pressure decay (LV −dP/dt; p=0.0007), indicating increased LV systolic and diastolic function in treated mice. UCn2 gene transfer was associated with increased peak systolic Ca2+ transient amplitude and rate of Ca2+ decline and increased SERCA2a expression. In addition, UCn2 gene transfer reduced Thr286 phosphorylation of Cam kinase II, and increased expression of cardiac myosin light chain kinase, findings that would be anticipated to increase function of the failing heart. We conclude that a single IV injection of AAV8.UCn2 increases function of the failing heart. The simplicity of IV injection of a vector encoding a gene with beneficial paracrine effects to increase cardiac function is an attractive potential clinical strategy. PMID:25760560

  9. Use of Loop Diuretics is Associated with Increased Mortality in Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease, but without Systolic Heart Failure or Renal Impairment: An Observational Study Using Propensity Score Matching

    PubMed Central

    Schartum-Hansen, Hall; Løland, Kjetil H.; Svingen, Gard F. T.; Seifert, Reinhard; Pedersen, Eva R.; Nordrehaug, Jan E.; Bleie, Øyvind; Ebbing, Marta; Berge, Christ; Nilsen, Dennis W. T.; Nygård, Ottar

    2015-01-01

    Background Loop diuretics are widely used in patients with heart and renal failure, as well as to treat hypertension and peripheral edema. However, there are no randomized, controlled trials (RCT) evaluating their long term safety, and several observational reports have indicated adverse effects. We sought to evaluate the impact of loop diuretics on long term survival in patients with suspected coronary artery disease, but without clinical heart failure, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction or impaired renal function. Method and Findings From 3101 patients undergoing coronary angiography for suspected stable angina pectoris, subjects taking loop diuretics (n=109) were matched with controls (n=198) in an attempted 1:2 ratio, using propensity scores based on 59 baseline variables. During median follow-up of 10.1 years, 37.6% in the loop diuretics group and 23.7% in the control group died (log-rank p-value 0.005). Treatment with loop diuretics was associated with a hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of 1.82 (1.20, 2.76), and the number needed to harm was 7.2 (4.1, 30.3). Inclusion of all 3101 patients using propensity score weighting and adjustment for numerous covariates provided similar estimates. The main limitation is the potential of confounding from unmeasured patient characteristics. Conclusions The use of loop diuretics in patients with suspected coronary artery disease, but without systolic heart failure or renal impairment, is associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality. Considering the lack of randomized controlled trials to evaluate long term safety of loop diuretics, our data suggest caution when prescribing these drugs to patients without a clear indication. PMID:26030195

  10. Sleep impairment, mood symptoms, and psychosocial functioning in adolescent bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lunsford-Avery, Jessica R.; Judd, Charles M.; Axelson, David A.; Miklowitz, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Few empirical studies have investigated the role of sleep impairment in the course of adolescent bipolar spectrum disorders (BSD). The present study examined the longitudinal associations between sleep disruption, mood symptom severity, and psychosocial functioning in a 2-year follow-up of patients with adolescent BSD. Fifty-three adolescents with BSD (mean [SD] age: 14.6 [1.6]) participated in a two-site randomized trial of family focused treatment for adolescents (FFT-A) or enhanced care, a briefer psychoeducational treatment; both treatments were administered with pharmacotherapy. Sleep disturbance was assessed with the Adolescent Sleep Habits Questionnaire (ASHQ) filled out by patients every 6 weeks in the first study year and every 3 months in the second year. Main outcomes included clinician-rated measures of mania, depression and psychosocial impairment over 2 years. Sleep impairment was significantly associated with mania and depression severity scores and psychosocial impairment ratings across the 2-year follow-up. Despite its efficaciousness in reducing mood symptoms, FFT-A was not more effective than enhanced care in improving sleep habits. Sleep impairment may play a substantial role in the course of adolescent BSD. Youth with BSDs may benefit from targeted psychosocial interventions that emphasize sleep regularity. PMID:22884306

  11. Skeletal muscle microvascular oxygenation dynamics in heart failure: exercise training and nitric oxide-mediated function.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Daniel M; Copp, Steven W; Holdsworth, Clark T; Ferguson, Scott K; McCullough, Danielle J; Behnke, Bradley J; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2014-03-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) impairs nitric oxide (NO)-mediated regulation of skeletal muscle O2 delivery-utilization matching such that microvascular oxygenation falls faster (i.e., speeds PO2mv kinetics) during increases in metabolic demand. Conversely, exercise training improves (slows) muscle PO2mv kinetics following contractions onset in healthy young individuals via NO-dependent mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that exercise training would improve contracting muscle microvascular oxygenation in CHF rats partly via improved NO-mediated function. CHF rats (left ventricular end-diastolic pressure = 17 ± 2 mmHg) were assigned to sedentary (n = 11) or progressive treadmill exercise training (n = 11; 5 days/wk, 6-8 wk, final workload of 60 min/day at 35 m/min; -14% grade downhill running) groups. PO2mv was measured via phosphorescence quenching in the spinotrapezius muscle at rest and during 1-Hz twitch contractions under control (Krebs-Henseleit solution), sodium nitroprusside (SNP; NO donor; 300 μM), and N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nonspecific NO synthase blockade; 1.5 mM) superfusion conditions. Exercise-trained CHF rats had greater peak oxygen uptake and spinotrapezius muscle citrate synthase activity than their sedentary counterparts (p < 0.05 for both). The overall speed of the PO2mv fall during contractions (mean response time; MRT) was slowed markedly in trained compared with sedentary CHF rats (sedentary: 20.8 ± 1.4, trained: 32.3 ± 3.0 s; p < 0.05), and the effect was not abolished by L-NAME (sedentary: 16.8 ± 1.5, trained: 31.0 ± 3.4 s; p > 0.05). Relative to control, SNP increased MRT in both groups such that trained CHF rats had slower kinetics (sedentary: 43.0 ± 6.8, trained: 55.5 ± 7.8 s; p < 0.05). Improved NO-mediated function is not obligatory for training-induced improvements in skeletal muscle microvascular oxygenation (slowed PO2mv kinetics) following contractions onset in rats with CHF.

  12. [A failed improvement in pulmonary function and exercise capacity with carvedilol in congestive heart failure despite an excellent effect on left ventricular function].

    PubMed

    Guazzi, M; Pontone, G; Trevisi, N; Lomanto, M; Matturri, M; Agostoni, P

    1998-02-01

    This study was aimed at investigating in chronic heart failure (CHF) the effects that beta-blockade with carvedilol may have on lung function, and their relationship with left ventricular (LV) performance and peak exercise oxygen uptake (VO2p). CHF causes disturbances in ventilation and pulmonary gas transfer (stress failure of alveolar-capillary membrane) that participate in limiting VO2p. Carvedilol improves LV function and not VO2p. Twenty-one NYHA functional class II-III patients were randomized (2 to 1) to carvedilol (25 mg bid., 14 patients) or placebo (7 patients) for 6 months. Rest forced expiratory volume (FEV1), vital capacity (VC), total lung capacity (TLC), carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO), its alveolar-capillary membrane component (DM), pulmonary venous and transmitral flows (for monitoring changes in LV end-diastolic pressure, EDP), LV diastolic (EDD) and systolic (ESD) dimensions, stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF), fiber shortening velocity (VCF) were measured at baseline and at 3 and 6 months. VO2p, peak ratio of dead space to tidal volume (VD/VTp), ventilatory equivalent for CO2 production (VE/VCO2), VO2 at anaerobic threshold (VO2at) were also determined. FEV1, VC, TLC, DLCO, DM were impaired in CHF compared to 14 volunteers, and did not vary with treatment. Carvedilol reduced EDP, EDD, ESD, and increased EF, SV, VCF, without affecting VO2p, VO2at, VD/VTp, VE/VCO2, at 3 and 6 months. Placebo was ineffective. In CHF, carvedilol exerts neutral effects on ventilation and pulmonary gas transfer and ameliorates LV function at rest. This proves that antifailure treatment may not be similarly effective on cardiac and pulmonary function; and does not contradict the possibility that persistence of lung impairment may contribute to lack of improvement in exercise performance with carvedilol.

  13. Atrial BNP endocrine function during chronic unloading of the normal canine heart.

    PubMed

    Lisy, Ondrej; Redfield, Margaret M; Schirger, John A; Burnett, John C

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the study was to define the effect of chronic unloading of the normal heart on atrial endocrine function with a focus on brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), specifically addressing the role of load and neurohumoral stimulation. Although produced primarily by atrial myocardium in the normal heart, controversy persists with regard to load-dependent vs. neurohumoral mechanisms controlling atrial BNP synthesis and storage. We used a unique canine model of chronic unloading of the heart produced by thoracic inferior vena caval constriction (TIVCC), which also resulted in activation of plasma endothelin (ET-1), ANG II, and norepinephrine (NE), known activators of BNP synthesis, compared with sham. TIVCC was produced by banding of the inferior vena cava for 10 days (n = 6), whereas in control (n = 5) the band was not constricted (sham). In a third group (n = 7), the band was released on day 11, thus acutely reloading the heart. Chronic TIVCC decreased cardiac output and right atrial pressure with a decrease in atrial mass index consistent with atrial atrophy. Atrial BNP mRNA decreased compared with sham. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed an increase in BNP in atrial granules consistent with increased storage. Acute reloading increased cardiac filling pressures and resulted in an increase in plasma BNP. We conclude that chronic unloading of the normal heart results in atrial atrophic remodeling and in suppression of atrial BNP mRNA despite intense stimulation by ET, ANG II, and NE, underscoring the primacy of load in the control of atrial endocrine function and structure.

  14. Impairment and recovery of left motor function in patients with right hemiplegia.

    PubMed Central

    Marque, P; Felez, A; Puel, M; Demonet, J F; Guiraud-Chaumeil, B; Roques, C F; Chollet, F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the motor function of the left, supposedly unaffected, limbs of patients with an acute right vascular hemiplegia. METHODS: Fifteen patients with an acute vascular right hemiplegia and 16 matched healthy controls were studied. Motor function of the left limbs of each patient was evaluated on days 20 and 90 after their stroke using four validated tools (hand dynamometer, isokinetic dynamometer, finger tapping, and nine hole peg test). RESULTS: There was a significant impairment of motor function of the left limbs of patients at day 20 compared with controls. The impairment had recovered almost completely at day 90 after the stroke. CONCLUSION: These results show the bilateral cerebral representation of the human motor system and suggest the participation of ipsilateral motor pathways in recovery after a stroke. PMID:9010404

  15. Impaired language function in generalized epilepsy: inadequate suppression of the default mode network.

    PubMed

    Gauffin, Helena; van Ettinger-Veenstra, Helene; Landtblom, Anne-Marie; Ulrici, Daniel; McAllister, Anita; Karlsson, Thomas; Engström, Maria

    2013-07-01

    We aimed to study the effect of a potential default mode network (DMN) dysfunction on language performance in epilepsy. Language dysfunction in focal epilepsy has previously been connected to brain damage in language-associated cortical areas. In this work, we studied generalized epilepsy (GE) without focal brain damage to see if the language function was impaired. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate if the DMN was involved. Eleven persons with GE and 28 healthy controls were examined with fMRI during a sentence-reading task. We demonstrated impaired language function, reduced suppression of DMN, and, specifically, an inadequate suppression of activation in the left anterior temporal lobe and the posterior cingulate cortex, as well as an aberrant activation in the right hippocampal formation. Our results highlight the presence of language decline in people with epilepsy of not only focal but also generalized origin. PMID:23648277

  16. Capturing structure and function in an embryonic heart with biophotonic tools

    PubMed Central

    Karunamuni, Ganga H.; Gu, Shi; Ford, Matthew R.; Peterson, Lindsy M.; Ma, Pei; Wang, Yves T.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-01-01

    Disturbed cardiac function at an early stage of development has been shown to correlate with cellular/molecular, structural as well as functional cardiac anomalies at later stages culminating in the congenital heart defects (CHDs) that present at birth. While our knowledge of cellular and molecular steps in cardiac development is growing rapidly, our understanding of the role of cardiovascular function in the embryo is still in an early phase. One reason for the scanty information in this area is that the tools to study early cardiac function are limited. Recently developed and adapted biophotonic tools may overcome some of the challenges of studying the tiny fragile beating heart. In this chapter, we describe and discuss our experience in developing and implementing biophotonic tools to study the role of function in heart development with emphasis on optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT can be used for detailed structural and functional studies of the tubular and looping embryo heart under physiological conditions. The same heart can be rapidly and quantitatively phenotyped at early and again at later stages using OCT. When combined with other tools such as optical mapping (OM) and optical pacing (OP), OCT has the potential to reveal in spatial and temporal detail the biophysical changes that can impact mechanotransduction pathways. This information may provide better explanations for the etiology of the CHDs when interwoven with our understanding of morphogenesis and the molecular pathways that have been described to be involved. Future directions for advances in the creation and use of biophotonic tools are discussed. PMID:25309451

  17. Capturing structure and function in an embryonic heart with biophotonic tools.

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, Ganga H; Gu, Shi; Ford, Matthew R; Peterson, Lindsy M; Ma, Pei; Wang, Yves T; Rollins, Andrew M; Jenkins, Michael W; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-01-01

    Disturbed cardiac function at an early stage of development has been shown to correlate with cellular/molecular, structural as well as functional cardiac anomalies at later stages culminating in the congenital heart defects (CHDs) that present at birth. While our knowledge of cellular and molecular steps in cardiac development is growing rapidly, our understanding of the role of cardiovascular function in the embryo is still in an early phase. One reason for the scanty information in this area is that the tools to study early cardiac function are limited. Recently developed and adapted biophotonic tools may overcome some of the challenges of studying the tiny fragile beating heart. In this chapter, we describe and discuss our experience in developing and implementing biophotonic tools to study the role of function in heart development with emphasis on optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT can be used for detailed structural and functional studies of the tubular and looping embryo heart under physiological conditions. The same heart can be rapidly and quantitatively phenotyped at early and again at later stages using OCT. When combined with other tools such as optical mapping (OM) and optical pacing (OP), OCT has the potential to reveal in spatial and temporal detail the biophysical changes that can impact mechanotransduction pathways. This information may provide better explanations for the etiology of the CHDs when interwoven with our understanding of morphogenesis and the molecular pathways that have been described to be involved. Future directions for advances in the creation and use of biophotonic tools are discussed. PMID:25309451

  18. In Your Eyes: Does Theory of Mind Predict Impaired Life Functioning in Bipolar Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Amanda L.; Phillips, Mary; Gruber, June

    2013-01-01

    Background Deficits in emotion perception and social functioning are strongly implicated in bipolar disorder (BD). Examining theory of mind (ToM) may provide one potential mechanism to explain observed socio-emotional impairments in this disorder. The present study prospectively investigated the relationship between theory of mind performance and life functioning in individuals diagnosed with BD compared to unipolar depression and healthy control groups. Methods Theory of mind (ToM) performance was examined in 26 individuals with remitted bipolar I disorder (BD), 29 individuals with remitted unipolar depression (UD), and 28 healthy controls (CTL) using a well-validated advanced theory of mind task. Accuracy and response latency scores were calculated from the task. Life functioning was measured during a 12 month follow-up session. Results No group differences for ToM accuracy emerged. However, the BD group exhibited significantly shorter response times than the UD and CTL groups. Importantly, quicker response times in the BD group predicted greater life functioning impairment at a 12-month follow-up, even after controlling for baseline symptoms. Limitations The stimuli were static representations of emotional states and do not allow for evaluating the appropriateness of context during emotional communication; due to sample size, neither specific comorbidities nor medication effects were analyzed for the BD and UD groups; preliminary status of theory of mind as a construct. Conclusions Results suggest that quickened socio-emotional decision making may represent a risk factor for future functional impairment in BD. PMID:23896318

  19. High fat fed heart failure animals have enhanced mitochondrial function and acyl-coa dehydrogenase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously shown that administration of high fat in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and did not alter left ventricular (LV) function. PPARalpha is a nuclear transcription factor that activates expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and utilization. We hypoth...

  20. Association of the Functional MICA-129 Polymorphism With the Severity of Chronic Chagas Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ayo, Christiane Maria; Oliveira, Amanda Priscila de; Camargo, Ana Vitória da Silveira; Mattos, Cinara Cássia Brandão de; Bestetti, Reinaldo Bulgarelli; Mattos, Luiz Carlos de

    2015-10-15

    MICA-129 polymorphism affects the binding affinity of MICA molecules with the NKG2D receptor and influences effector cell function. The genotype met/met was associated with the severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) in patients with chronic Chagas heart disease, while the val/val genotype was associated with the absence of LVSD.

  1. Renal function, serum sodium level, and outcomes in hospitalized systolic heart failure patients: An analysis of the COAST study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Joo; Chae, In-Ho; Choi, Dong-Ju; Kang, Seok-Min; Yoo, Byung-Su; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Lin, Shing-Jong; Wen, Ming-Shien; Zhang, Jian; Ge, Junbo

    2016-06-01

    Both renal function and serum sodium level are well-known prognostic markers in heart failure (HF) patients. We investigated the prognostic value of the renal impairment (RI) stratified by the serum sodium level in systolic HF patients.The Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes in Relation with Serum Sodium Level in Asian Patients Hospitalized for Heart Failure (the COAST) Study enrolled hospitalized systolic HF patients (ejection fraction<45%) in South Korea, Taiwan, and China. Twelve-month mortality was stratified according to the renal function and serum sodium level.Of 1462 enrolled patients, 716 patients (49%) had RI (GFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m), and they had higher 12-month mortality than those without RI (22.8% vs. 10.9%, P<0.001). Furthermore, 676 patients (46%) had low sodium level defined as Nafunction and high sodium level (7.4%), but highest in those with RI and low sodium level (26.1%) (P<0.001). Patients with both RI and low sodium level had a 3.8-times increased hazard for 12-month mortality (HR 3.80, 95% CI 2.06-7.05), whereas the low sodium level (HR, 2.95; 95% CI, 1.51-5.75) and RI (HR 3.08; 95% CI, 1.63-5.82) had similar hazard, suggesting that they might be equivalent risk factors.In hospitalized Asian HF-patients both RI and low sodium level are independent risk factors. Patients with both RI and low serum sodium level are at the highest risk and may require meticulous medical care.

  2. The contribution of executive functions deficits to impaired episodic memory in individuals with alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Noël, Xavier; Van der Linden, Martial; Brevers, Damien; Campanella, Salvatore; Hanak, Catherine; Kornreich, Charles; Verbanck, Paul

    2012-06-30

    Individuals with alcoholism commonly exhibit impaired performance on episodic memory tasks. However, the contribution of their impaired executive functioning to poor episodic memory remains to be clarified. Thirty-six recently detoxified and sober asymptomatic alcoholic men and 36 matched non-alcoholic participants were tested for processing speed, prepotent response inhibition, mental flexibility, coordination of dual-task and a verbal episodic memory task. Compared with non-alcoholic individuals, the alcoholic patients showed impaired executive functions combined with below normal performance on both free and delayed recall. In contrast, processing speed, cued recall and recognition were preserved. Regression analyses revealed that 47% of alcoholics' episodic memory's free recall performance was predicted by mental flexibility and that 49% of their delayed recall performance was predicted by mental flexibility, manipulation of dual-task and prepotent response inhibition. Regarding participants' executive predictors of episodic memory performance, the slopes of β coefficients were significantly different between the two groups, with alcoholics requiring more their executive system than non-alcoholics. Once detoxified, alcoholic patients showed episodic memory deficits mainly characterized by impaired effortful (executive) processes. Compared with controls, patients used effortful learning strategies, which are nonetheless less efficient. PMID:22377577

  3. Functional Impairment, Illness Burden, and Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults: Does Type of Social Relationship Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, Joshua P.; Hirsch, Jameson K.; Lyness, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The nature of interpersonal relationships, whether supportive or critical, may affect the association between health status and mental health outcomes. We examined the potential moderating effects of social support, as a buffer, and family criticism, as an exacerbating factor, on the association between illness burden, functional impairment and depressive symptoms. Methods Our sample of 735 older adults, aged 65 and older, was recruited from internal and family medicine primary care offices. Trained interviewers administered the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Duke Social Support Inventory, and Family Emotional Involvement and Criticism Scale. Physician-rated assessments of health, including the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale and Cumulative Illness Rating Scale were also completed. Results Linear multivariable hierarchical regression results indicate that social interaction was a significant buffer, weakening the association between illness burden and depressive symptoms, whereas perceived social support buffered the relationship between functional impairment and depressive symptoms. Family criticism and instrumental social support were not significant moderators. Conclusions Type of medical dysfunction, whether illness or impairment, may require different therapeutic and supportive approaches. Enhancement of perceived social support, for those who are impaired, and encouragement of social interactions, for those who are ill, may be important intervention targets for treatment of depressive symptoms in older adult primary care patients. PMID:22495689

  4. The Effect of Impaired Angiogenesis on Intestinal Function Following Massive Small Bowel Resection

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Miron, Jose; Sun, Raphael; Choi, Pamela; Sommovilla, Joshua; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R.; Mei, Junjie; Worthen, G. Scott; Warner, Brad W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intestinal adaptation involves villus lengthening, crypt deepening, and increased capillary density following small bowel resection (SBR). Mice lacking the proangiogenic chemokine CXCL5 have normal structural adaptation but impaired angiogenesis. This work evaluates the impact of incomplete adaptive angiogenesis on the functional capacity of the intestine after SBR. Methods CXCL5 knockout (KO) and C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice underwent 50% SBR. Magnetic resonance imaging measured weekly body composition. Intestinal absorptive capacity was evaluated through fecal fat analysis. Gene expression profiles for select macronutrient transporters were measured via RT-PCR. Postoperative crypt and villus measurements assessed for structural adaptation. Submucosal capillary density was measured through CD31 immunohistochemistry. Results Comparable postoperative weight gain occurred initially. Diminished weight gain, impaired fat absorption, and elevated steatorrhea occurred in KO mice after instituting high-fat diet. Greater postoperative upregulation of ABCA1 fat transporter occurred in WT mice, while PEPT1 protein transporter was significantly downregulated in KO mice. KO mice had impaired angiogenesis but intact structural adaptation. Conclusion After SBR, KO mice display an inefficient intestinal absorption profile with perturbed macronutrient transporter expression, impaired fat absorption, and slower postoperative weight gain. In addition to longer villi and deeper crypts, an intact angiogenic response may be required to achieve functional adaptation to SBR. PMID:25818317

  5. A new twist on an old idea part 2: cyclosporine preserves normal mitochondrial but not cardiomyocyte function in mini‐swine with compensated heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Jessica A.; Gutiérrez‐Aguilar, Manuel; Marshall, Kurt D.; McCommis, Kyle S.; Zgoda, Pamela J.; Cruz‐Rivera, Noelany; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Krenz, Maike; Domeier, Timothy L.; Baines, Christopher P.; Emter, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We recently developed a clinically relevant mini‐swine model of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), in which diastolic dysfunction was associated with increased mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Early diastolic function is ATP and Ca2+‐dependent, thus, we hypothesized chronic low doses of cyclosporine (CsA) would preserve mitochondrial function via inhibition of MPT and subsequently maintain normal cardiomyocyte Ca2+ handling and contractile characteristics. Left ventricular cardiomyocytes were isolated from aortic‐banded Yucatan mini‐swine divided into three groups; control nonbanded (CON), HFpEF nontreated (HF), and HFpEF treated with CsA (HF‐CsA). CsA mitigated the deterioration of mitochondrial function observed in HF animals, including functional uncoupling of Complex I‐dependent mitochondrial respiration and increased susceptibility to MPT. Attenuation of mitochondrial dysfunction in the HF‐CsA group was not associated with commensurate improvement in cardiomyocyte Ca2+ handling or contractility. Ca2+ transient amplitude was reduced and transient time to peak and recovery (tau) prolonged in HF and HF‐CsA groups compared to CON. Alterations in Ca2+ transient parameters observed in the HF and HF‐CsA groups were associated with decreased cardiomyocyte shortening and shortening rate. Cellular function was consistent with impaired in vivo systolic and diastolic whole heart function. A significant systemic hypertensive response to CsA was observed in HF‐CsA animals, and may have played a role in the accelerated the development of heart failure at both the whole heart and cellular levels. Given the significant detriment to cardiac function observed in response to CsA, our findings suggest chronic CsA treatment is not a viable therapeutic option for HFpEF. PMID:24963034

  6. Functional properties and responses to ischaemia-reperfusion in Langendorff perfused mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Headrick, J P; Peart, J; Hack, B; Flood, A; Matherne, G P

    2001-11-01

    Despite minimal model characterisation Langendorff perfused murine hearts are increasingly employed in cardiovascular research, and particularly in studies of myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion. Reported contractility remains poor and ischaemic recoveries variable. We characterised function in C57/BL6 mouse hearts using a ventricular balloon or apicobasal displacement and assessed responses to 10-30 min global ischaemia. We examined the functional effects of pacing, ventricular balloon design, perfusate filtration, [Ca(2+)] and temperature. Contractility was high in isovolumically functioning mouse hearts (measured as the change in pressure with time (+dP/dt), 6000-7000 mmHg s(-1)) and was optimal at a heart rate of approximately 420 beats min(-1), with the vasculature sub-maximally dilated, and the cellular energy state high. Post-ischaemic recovery (after 40 min reperfusion) was related to the ischaemic duration: developed pressure recovered by 82 +/- 5 %, 73 +/- 4 %, 68 +/- 3 %, 57 +/- 2 % and 41 +/- 5 % after 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 min ischaemia, respectively. Ventricular compliance and elastance were both reduced post-ischaemia. Post-ischaemic recoveries were lower in the apicobasal model (80 +/- 4 %, 58 +/- 7 %, 40 +/- 3 %, 32 +/- 7 % and 25 +/- 5 %) despite greater reflow and lower metabolic rate (pre-ischaemic myocardial O(2) consumption (V(O2,myo)) 127 +/- 15 vs. 198 +/- 17 microl O(2) min(-1) g(-1)), contracture, enzyme and purine efflux. Electrical pacing slowed recovery in both models, small ventricular balloons (unpressurised volumes < 50-60 microl) artificially depressed ventricular function and recovery from ischaemia, and failure to filter the perfusion fluid to < 0.45 microm depressed pre- and post-ischaemic function. With attention to these various experimental factors, the buffer perfused isovolumically contracting mouse heart is shown to be stable and highly energized, and to possess a high level of contractility. The isovolumic model is more

  7. Impaired Exercise Performance and Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Rats with Secondary Carnitine Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bouitbir, Jamal; Haegler, Patrizia; Singh, François; Joerin, Lorenz; Felser, Andrea; Duthaler, Urs; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of carnitine depletion upon exercise performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function remain largely unexplored. We therefore investigated the effect of N-trimethyl-hydrazine-3-propionate (THP), a carnitine analog inhibiting carnitine biosynthesis and renal carnitine reabsorption, on physical performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in rats. Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were treated daily with water (control rats; n = 12) or with 20 mg/100 g body weight THP (n = 12) via oral gavage for 3 weeks. Following treatment, half of the animals of each group performed an exercise test until exhaustion. Results: Distance covered and exercise performance were lower in THP-treated compared to control rats. In the oxidative soleus muscle, carnitine depletion caused atrophy (–24%) and impaired function of complex II and IV of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The free radical leak (ROS production relative to oxygen consumption) was increased and the cellular glutathione pool decreased. Moreover, mRNA expression of markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial DNA were decreased in THP-treated compared to control rats. In comparison, in the glycolytic gastrocnemius muscle, carnitine depletion was associated with impaired function of complex IV and increased free radical leak, whilst muscle weight and cellular glutathione pool were maintained. Markers of mitochondrial proliferation and mitochondrial DNA were unaffected. Conclusions: Carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired exercise capacity in rats treated with THP. THP-induced carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired function of the electron transport chain in oxidative and glycolytic muscle as well as with atrophy and decreased mitochondrial DNA in oxidative muscle. PMID:27559315

  8. Multi-walled carbon nanotube instillation impairs pulmonary function in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are widely used in many disciplines due to their unique physical and chemical properties. Therefore, some concerns about the possible human health and environmental impacts of manufactured MWCNTs are rising. We hypothesized that instillation of MWCNTs impairs pulmonary function in C57BL/6 mice due to development of lung inflammation and fibrosis. Methods MWCNTs were administered to C57BL/6 mice by oropharyngeal aspiration (1, 2, and 4 mg/kg) and we assessed lung inflammation and fibrosis by inflammatory cell infiltration, collagen content, and histological assessment. Pulmonary function was assessed using a FlexiVent system and levels of Ccl3, Ccl11, Mmp13 and IL-33 were measured by RT-PCR and ELISA. Results Mice administered MWCNTs exhibited increased inflammatory cell infiltration, collagen deposition and granuloma formation in lung tissue, which correlated with impaired pulmonary function as assessed by increased resistance, tissue damping, and decreased lung compliance. Pulmonary exposure to MWCNTs induced an inflammatory signature marked by cytokine (IL-33), chemokine (Ccl3 and Ccl11), and protease production (Mmp13) that promoted the inflammatory and fibrotic changes observed within the lung. Conclusions These results further highlight the potential adverse health effects that may occur following MWCNT exposure and therefore we suggest these materials may pose a significant risk leading to impaired lung function following environmental and occupational exposures. PMID:21851604

  9. Alterations in left ventricular diastolic function in conscious dogs with pacing-induced heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Komamura, K; Shannon, R P; Pasipoularides, A; Ihara, T; Lader, A S; Patrick, T A; Bishop, S P; Vatner, S F

    1992-01-01

    We investigated in conscious dogs (a) the effects of heart failure induced by chronic rapid ventricular pacing on the sequence of development of left ventricular (LV) diastolic versus systolic dysfunction and (b) whether the changes were load dependent or secondary to alterations in structure. LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction were evident within 24 h after initiation of pacing and occurred in parallel over 3 wk. LV systolic function was reduced at 3 wk, i.e., peak LV dP/dt fell by -1,327 +/- 105 mmHg/s and ejection fraction by -22 +/- 2%. LV diastolic dysfunction also progressed over 3 wk of pacing, i.e., tau increased by +14.0 +/- 2.8 ms and the myocardial stiffness constant by +6.5 +/- 1.4, whereas LV chamber stiffness did not change. These alterations were associated with increases in LV end-systolic (+28.6 +/- 5.7 g/cm2) and LV end-diastolic stresses (+40.4 +/- 5.3 g/cm2). When stresses and heart rate were matched at the same levels in the control and failure states, the increases in tau and myocardial stiffness were no longer observed, whereas LV systolic function remained depressed. There were no increases in connective tissue content in heart failure. Thus, pacing-induced heart failure in conscious dogs is characterized by major alterations in diastolic function which are reversible with normalization of increased loading condition. Images PMID:1601992

  10. Tetradecylthioacetic acid increases fat metabolism and improves cardiac function in experimental heart failure.

    PubMed

    Øie, Erik; Berge, Rolf K; Ueland, Thor; Dahl, Christen P; Edvardsen, Thor; Beitnes, Jan Otto; Bohov, Pavol; Aukrust, Pål; Yndestad, Arne

    2013-02-01

    Changes in myocardial metabolism, including a shift from fatty acid to glucose utilization and changes in fatty acid availability and composition are characteristics of heart failure development. Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) is a fatty acid analogue lacking the ability to undergo mitochondrial β-oxidation. TTA promotes hepatic proliferation of mitochondria and peroxisomes and also decreases serum triglycerides and cholesterol in animals. We investigated the effect of TTA, in combination with a high-fat or regular diet, in a rat model of post-myocardial infarction heart failure. TTA had a beneficial effect on cardiac function in post-myocardial infarction heart failure without affecting myocardial remodeling. These effects of TTA on myocardial function were accompanied by decreased free fatty acids in plasma, increased myocardial proportion of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and a decreased proportion of n-6 PUFA. Myocardial enzyme gene expression during TTA treatment suggested that the increase in n-3 PUFA could reflect increased n-3 PUFA synthesis and inadequately increased n-3 PUFA β-oxidation. Based on our data, it is unlikely that the changes are secondary to alterations in other tissues as plasma and liver showed an opposite pattern with decreased n-3 PUFA during TTA treatment. The present study suggests that TTA may improve myocardial function in heart failure, potentially involving its ability to decrease the availability of FFA and increase the myocardial proportion of n-3 PUFA. PMID:23266898

  11. Alterations in left ventricular diastolic function in conscious dogs with pacing-induced heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komamura, K.; Shannon, R. P.; Pasipoularides, A.; Ihara, T.; Lader, A. S.; Patrick, T. A.; Bishop, S. P.; Vatner, S. F.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated in conscious dogs (a) the effects of heart failure induced by chronic rapid ventricular pacing on the sequence of development of left ventricular (LV) diastolic versus systolic dysfunction and (b) whether the changes were load dependent or secondary to alterations in structure. LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction were evident within 24 h after initiation of pacing and occurred in parallel over 3 wk. LV systolic function was reduced at 3 wk, i.e., peak LV dP/dt fell by -1,327 +/- 105 mmHg/s and ejection fraction by -22 +/- 2%. LV diastolic dysfunction also progressed over 3 wk of pacing, i.e., tau increased by +14.0 +/- 2.8 ms and the myocardial stiffness constant by +6.5 +/- 1.4, whereas LV chamber stiffness did not change. These alterations were associated with increases in LV end-systolic (+28.6 +/- 5.7 g/cm2) and LV end-diastolic stresses (+40.4 +/- 5.3 g/cm2). When stresses and heart rate were matched at the same levels in the control and failure states, the increases in tau and myocardial stiffness were no longer observed, whereas LV systolic function remained depressed. There were no increases in connective tissue content in heart failure. Thus, pacing-induced heart failure in conscious dogs is characterized by major alterations in diastolic function which are reversible with normalization of increased loading condition.

  12. Age-associated pro-inflammatory remodeling and functional phenotype in the heart and large arteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyi; Shah, Ajay M

    2015-06-01

    The aging population is increasing dramatically. Aging-associated stress simultaneously drives proinflammatory remodeling, involving angiotensin II and other factors, in both the heart and large arteries. The structural remodeling and functional changes that occur with aging include cardiac and vascular wall stiffening, systolic hypertension and suboptimal ventricular-arterial coupling, features that are often clinically silent and thus termed a silent syndrome. These age-related effects are the result of responses initiated by cardiovascular proinflammatory cells. Local proinflammatory signals are coupled between the heart and arteries due to common mechanical and humoral messengers within a closed circulating system. Thus, targeting proinflammatory signaling molecules would be a promising approach to improve age-associated suboptimal ventricular-arterial coupling, a major predisposing factor for the pathogenesis of clinical cardiovascular events such as heart failure.

  13. Cardiosphere-derived cell sheet primed with hypoxia improves left ventricular function of chronically infarcted heart.

    PubMed

    Hosoyama, Tohru; Samura, Makoto; Kudo, Tomoaki; Nishimoto, Arata; Ueno, Koji; Murata, Tomoaki; Ohama, Takashi; Sato, Koichi; Mikamo, Akihito; Yoshimura, Koichi; Li, Tao-Sheng; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2015-01-01

    Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) isolated from postnatal heart tissue are a convenient and efficientresource for the treatment of myocardial infarction. However, poor retention of CDCs in infarcted hearts often causes less than ideal therapeutic outcomes. Cell sheet technology has been developed as a means of permitting longer retention of graft cells, and this therapeutic strategy has opened new avenues of cell-based therapy for severe ischemic diseases. However, there is still scope for improvement before this treatment can be routinely applied in clinical settings. In this study, we investigated whether hypoxic preconditioning enhances the therapeutic efficacy of CDC monolayer sheets. To induce hypoxia priming, CDC monolayer sheets were placed in an incubator adjusted to 2% oxygen for 24 hours, and then preconditioned mouse CDC sheets were implanted into the infarcted heart of old myocardial infarction mouse models. Hypoxic preconditioning of CDC sheets remarkably increased the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor through the PI3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway. Implantation of preconditioned CDC sheets improved left ventricular function inchronically infarcted hearts and reduced fibrosis. The therapeutic efficacy of preconditioned CDC sheets was higher than the CDC sheets that were cultured under normaxia condition. These results suggest that hypoxic preconditioning augments the therapeutic angiogenic and anti-fibrotic activity of CDC sheets. A combination of cell sheets and hypoxic preconditioning offers an attractive therapeutic protocol for CDC transplantation into chronically infarcted hearts. PMID:26885271

  14. Alterations in left ventricular diastolic function in chronic ischemic heart failure. Assessment by radionuclide angiography.

    PubMed

    Bareiss, P; Facello, A; Constantinesco, A; Demangeat, J L; Brunot, B; Arbogast, R; Roul, G

    1990-02-01

    Using radionuclide angiography at rest, we studied several parameters of left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in 60 patients divided into three groups, a control group (G1) of 15 patients and two groups of patients with chronic ischemic heart disease and previous anterior wall myocardial infarction but without aneurysm or dyskinetic wall motion, a second group (G2) of 23 patients with no history of heart failure, and a third group (G3) of 22 patients in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II or III of heart failure. Ejection fraction, peak emptying, and peak filling rates, in addition to times to reach peak rates, were evaluated after constructing a global time-activity curve and its first time derivative. In addition, we computed the first time-derivative curves for each image pixel and obtained functional images (MIN/MAX images) representing the distribution of times to peak emptying or filling rates Using a left ventricular region of interest, time histograms were generated, and indexes of dispersion of times to peak rates, defined as the full width at half maximum of the histograms, were obtained. Significant (p less than or equal to 0.01) differences were observed among all groups for ejection fraction, peak emptying rate, and peak filling rate. The decrease of the peak filling rate still remained significant from group G1 to group G3 even after adjustment for differences in ejection fraction and heart rate. Peak filling rate was linearly correlated with ejection fraction in the population with ischemic heart disease (G2 + G3) (r = 0.68, p less than or equal to 0.0001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2297884

  15. Impaired Development of Left Anterior Heart Field by Ectopic Retinoic Acid Causes Transposition of the Great Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Narematsu, Mayu; Kamimura, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Toshiyuki; Fukui, Mitsuru; Nakajima, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Background Transposition of the great arteries is one of the most commonly diagnosed conotruncal heart defects at birth, but its etiology is largely unknown. The anterior heart field (AHF) that resides in the anterior pharyngeal arches contributes to conotruncal development, during which heart progenitors that originated from the left and right AHF migrate to form distinct conotruncal regions. The aim of this study is to identify abnormal AHF development that causes the morphology of transposition of the great arteries. Methods and Results We placed a retinoic acid–soaked bead on the left or the right or on both sides of the AHF of stage 12 to 14 chick embryos and examined the conotruncal heart defect at stage 34. Transposition of the great arteries was diagnosed at high incidence in embryos for which a retinoic acid–soaked bead had been placed in the left AHF at stage 12. Fluorescent dye tracing showed that AHF exposed to retinoic acid failed to contribute to conotruncus development. FGF8 and Isl1 expression were downregulated in retinoic acid–exposed AHF, and differentiation and expansion of cardiomyocytes were suppressed in cultured AHF in medium supplemented with retinoic acid. Conclusions The left AHF at the early looped heart stage, corresponding to Carnegie stages 10 to 11 (28 to 29 days after fertilization) in human embryos, is the region of the impediment that causes the morphology of transposition of the great arteries. PMID:25929268

  16. Loss of hippocampal function impairs pattern separation on a mouse touch-screen operant paradigm.

    PubMed

    Josey, Megan; Brigman, Jonathan L

    2015-11-01

    The hippocampus is heavily involved in the learning and memory processes necessary to successfully encode environmental stimuli and representations over time. Impairment of hippocampal function is associated with numerous neuropsychiatric diseases and can lead to detriments in the quality of life. In order to take full advantage of preclinical models of these disorders, there is a need for the development of more refined measures of clinically relevant hippocampal behaviors. While arena-based navigation tasks have provided fundamental information regarding the role of the hippocampus in spatial memory, the development of automated operant variants have had mixed results. Recently, an automated touch-screen paradigm has been shown to be highly sensitive to hippocampal function in the rat and eliminated mediating strategies that arose in previous tasks. Here we show that mice with lesions encompassing the entire ventral portion of the dorsal hippocampus are impaired on pattern separation behavior using a delayed nonmatching-to-location (TUNL) adapted for mice. Lesioned mice readily acquired the task at control rates when separations were maximal and delay periods were short while decreasing separations significantly impaired lesion mice. However, in contrast to previously reported results in the rat, consistently increasing delays did not significantly impair performance in the lesion group. Presentation of a variable delay within a session significantly impaired performance in lesion mice across delay periods. The current results demonstrate the utility of a touch-screen paradigm for measuring hippocampal-dependent pattern separation in the mouse and establish the paradigm as an important platform for future studies in disease models.

  17. Loss of hippocampal function impairs pattern separation on a mouse touch-screen operant paradigm.

    PubMed

    Josey, Megan; Brigman, Jonathan L

    2015-11-01

    The hippocampus is heavily involved in the learning and memory processes necessary to successfully encode environmental stimuli and representations over time. Impairment of hippocampal function is associated with numerous neuropsychiatric diseases and can lead to detriments in the quality of life. In order to take full advantage of preclinical models of these disorders, there is a need for the development of more refined measures of clinically relevant hippocampal behaviors. While arena-based navigation tasks have provided fundamental information regarding the role of the hippocampus in spatial memory, the development of automated operant variants have had mixed results. Recently, an automated touch-screen paradigm has been shown to be highly sensitive to hippocampal function in the rat and eliminated mediating strategies that arose in previous tasks. Here we show that mice with lesions encompassing the entire ventral portion of the dorsal hippocampus are impaired on pattern separation behavior using a delayed nonmatching-to-location (TUNL) adapted for mice. Lesioned mice readily acquired the task at control rates when separations were maximal and delay periods were short while decreasing separations significantly impaired lesion mice. However, in contrast to previously reported results in the rat, consistently increasing delays did not significantly impair performance in the lesion group. Presentation of a variable delay within a session significantly impaired performance in lesion mice across delay periods. The current results demonstrate the utility of a touch-screen paradigm for measuring hippocampal-dependent pattern separation in the mouse and establish the paradigm as an important platform for future studies in disease models. PMID:26265370

  18. Neurocognitive Function in HIV-Infected Patients: Comparison of Two Methods to Define Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Pinto, Alejandro; Winston, Alan; Stöhr, Wolfgang; Day, John; Wiggins, Rebecca; Quah, Say Pheng; Ainsworth, Jonathan; Fleck, Sue; Dunn, David; Accoroni, Alex; Paton, Nicholas I.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare two definitions of neurocognitive impairment (NCI) in a large clinical trial of effectively-treated HIV-infected adults at baseline. Methods Hopkins Verbal Learning test-Revised (HVLT-R), Colour Trail (CTT) and Grooved Pegboard (GPT) tests were applied exploring five cognitive domains. Raw scores were transformed into Z-scores and NCI defined as summary NPZ-5 score one standard deviation below the mean of the normative dataset (i.e. <−1SD) or Z-scores <−1SD in at least two individual domains (categorical scale). Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to explore the contribution of individual tests to the total variance. Results Mean NPZ-5 score was −0.72 (SD 0.98) and 178/548 (32%) participants had NPZ-5 scores <−1SD. When impairment was defined as <−1SD in at least two individual tests, 283 (52%) patients were impaired. Strong correlations between the two components of the HVLT-R test (learning/recall) (r = 0.73), and the CTT and (attention/executive functioning) (r = 0.66) were observed. PCA showed a clustering with three components accounting for 88% of the total variance. When patients who scored <−1SD only in two correlated tests were considered as not impaired, prevalence of NCI was 43%. When correlated test scores were averaged, 36% of participants had NPZ-3 scores <−1SD and 32% underperformed in at least two individual tests. Conclusion Controlling for differential contribution of individual test-scores on the overall performance and the level of correlation between components of the test battery used appear to be important when testing cognitive function. These two factors are likely to affect both summary scores and categorical scales in defining cognitive impairment. Trial registration EUDRACT: 2007-006448-23 and ISRCTN04857074. PMID:25078406

  19. An Autonomic Link Between Inhaled Diesel Exhaust and Impaired Cardiac Performance: Insight From Treadmill and Dobutamine Challenges in Heart Failure–Prone Rats

    PubMed Central

    Farraj, Aimen K.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac disease exacerbation is associated with short-term exposure to vehicular emissions. Diesel exhaust (DE) might impair cardiac performance in part through perturbing efferent sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic nervous system (ANS) input to the heart. We hypothesized that acute changes in ANS balance mediate decreased cardiac performance upon DE inhalation. Young adult heart failure–prone rats were implanted with radiotelemeters to measure heart rate (HR), HR variability (HRV), blood pressure (BP), core body temperature, and pre-ejection period (PEP, a contractility index). Animals pretreated with sympathetic antagonist (atenolol), parasympathetic antagonist (atropine), or saline were exposed to DE (500 µg/m3 fine particulate matter, 4h) or filtered air and then treadmill exercise challenged. At 1 day postexposure, separate rats were catheterized for left ventricular pressure (LVP), contractility, and lusitropy and assessed for autonomic influence using the sympathoagonist dobutamine and surgical vagotomy. During DE exposure, atenolol inhibited increases in HR, BP, and contractility, but not body temperature, suggesting a role for sympathetic dominance. During treadmill recovery at 4h post-DE exposure, HR and HRV indicated parasympathetic dominance in saline- and atenolol-pretreated groups that atropine inhibited. Conversely, at treadmill recovery 21h post-DE exposure, HRV and PEP indicated sympathetic dominance and subsequently diminished contractility that only atenolol inhibited. LVP at 1 day postexposure indicated that DE impaired contractility and lusitropy while abolishing parasympathetic-regulated cardiac responses to dobutamine. This is the first evidence that air pollutant inhalation both causes time-dependent oscillations between sympathetic and parasympathetic dominance and decreases cardiac performance via aberrant sympathetic dominance. PMID:23872579

  20. The association between cognitive function and objective adherence to dietary sodium guidelines in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Dolansky, Mary A; Schaefer, Julie T; Hawkins, Misty AW; Gunstad, John; Basuray, Anup; Redle, Joseph D; Fang, James C; Josephson, Richard A; Moore, Shirley M; Hughes, Joel W

    2016-01-01

    Background Although cognitive impairment is common in heart failure (HF) patients, its effects on sodium adherence recommendations are unknown. Purpose Our aim is to examine if cognitive function is associated with patient sodium adherence. Methods Sodium collection/excretion and cognitive function were assessed for 339 HF patients over a 5–8-week period. Neuropsychological testing was performed at baseline (Visit 1), whereas two 24-hour urine samples were collected within 7 weeks postbaseline. The ability to collect two 24-hour urine samples and the estimation of sodium excretion levels from these samples were used to estimate sodium adherence recommendations. Results Nearly half (47%) of the study participants (n=159) were unable to give two valid 24-hour urine samples. Participants who were unable to adhere to two valid 24-hour urine samples had significantly poorer attention and global cognition tests (P<0.044), with a trend for poorer executive function (P=0.064). Among those with valid samples, urine sodium level was not associated with global cognitive function, attention, executive function, or memory after adjusting for covariates. Female sex was associated with lower sodium excretion (all P<0.01); individuals with knowledge of sodium guidelines had less intake of sodium, resulting in excretion of less sodium (all P≤0.03). Conversely, higher socioeconomic status (SES) and body mass index (BMI) were associated with greater sodium (all P≤0.02 and P≤0.01). Conclusion Adherence to urine sodium collection was poor, especially among those with poorer cognitive function. Sodium consumption exceeded recommended amounts and was unrelated to cognitive function. Interventions for improving sodium adherence should focus on at-risk groups (high SES and BMI) and at improving knowledge of recommended salt intake. PMID:27042017

  1. Small-World Brain Network and Dynamic Functional Distribution in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yongqiang; Zhou, Xia; Wang, Haibao; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhu, Xiaoqun; Xu, Liyan; Zhang, Chao; Sun, Zhongwu

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the topological properties of the functional connectivity and their relationships with cognition impairment in subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (SVCI) patients, resting-state fMRI and graph theory approaches were employed in 23 SVCI patients and 20 healthy controls. Functional connectivity between 90 brain regions was estimated using bivariate correlation analysis and thresholded to construct a set of undirected graphs. Moreover, all of them were subjected to a battery of cognitive assessment, and the correlations between graph metrics and cognitive performance were further analyzed. Our results are as follows: functional brain networks of both SVCI patients and controls showed small-world attributes over a range of thresholds(0.15≤sparsity≤0.40). However, global topological organization of the functional brain networks in SVCI was significantly disrupted, as indicated by reduced global and local efficiency, clustering coefficients and increased characteristic path lengths relative to normal subjects. The decreased activity areas in SVCI predominantly targeted in the frontal-temporal lobes, while subcortical regions showed increased topological properties, which are suspected to compensate for the inefficiency of the functional network. We also demonstrated that altered brain network properties in SVCI are closely correlated with general cognitive and praxis dysfunction. The disruption of whole-brain topological organization of the functional connectome provides insight into the functional changes in the human brain in SVCI. PMID:26132397

  2. Inefficient DMN Suppression in Schizophrenia Patients with Impaired Cognitive Function but not Patients with Preserved Cognitive Function.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Pu, Weidan; Wang, Jingjuan; Liu, Haihong; Wu, Guowei; Liu, Chang; Mwansisya, Tumbwene E; Tao, Haojuan; Chen, Xudong; Huang, Xiaojun; Lv, Dongsheng; Xue, Zhimin; Shan, Baoci; Liu, Zhening

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have observed reduced suppression of the default mode network (DMN) during cognitive tasks in schizophrenia, suggesting inefficient DMN suppression is critical for the cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Cognitive function in schizophrenia patients, however, varies from relatively intact to severely impaired. This study, which compared the DMN suppression patterns between first-episode schizophrenia patients with (SZ-Imp) and without (SZ-Pre) impaired cognitive function, may provide further insight into the role of DMN dysfunction in cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to resting-state fMRI data to identify the DMN in each subject, and then general linear modeling based on the task-fMRI data was used to examine the different DMN activation patterns between groups. We observed that the SZ-Imp group, but not the SZ-Pre group, showed reduced suppression in the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulated cortex when compared to the healthy controls (HC) group. Moreover, less DMN suppression was associated with poorer task performance in both HC and patient groups. Our findings provide the first direct evidence that disrupted DMN activity only exists in schizophrenia patients with impaired cognitive function, supporting the specific neuro-pathological role of inefficient DMN suppression in cognitive deficits of first-episode schizophrenia. PMID:26882844

  3. Inefficient DMN Suppression in Schizophrenia Patients with Impaired Cognitive Function but not Patients with Preserved Cognitive Function.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Pu, Weidan; Wang, Jingjuan; Liu, Haihong; Wu, Guowei; Liu, Chang; Mwansisya, Tumbwene E; Tao, Haojuan; Chen, Xudong; Huang, Xiaojun; Lv, Dongsheng; Xue, Zhimin; Shan, Baoci; Liu, Zhening

    2016-02-17

    Previous studies have observed reduced suppression of the default mode network (DMN) during cognitive tasks in schizophrenia, suggesting inefficient DMN suppression is critical for the cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Cognitive function in schizophrenia patients, however, varies from relatively intact to severely impaired. This study, which compared the DMN suppression patterns between first-episode schizophrenia patients with (SZ-Imp) and without (SZ-Pre) impaired cognitive function, may provide further insight into the role of DMN dysfunction in cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to resting-state fMRI data to identify the DMN in each subject, and then general linear modeling based on the task-fMRI data was used to examine the different DMN activation patterns between groups. We observed that the SZ-Imp group, but not the SZ-Pre group, showed reduced suppression in the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulated cortex when compared to the healthy controls (HC) group. Moreover, less DMN suppression was associated with poorer task performance in both HC and patient groups. Our findings provide the first direct evidence that disrupted DMN activity only exists in schizophrenia patients with impaired cognitive function, supporting the specific neuro-pathological role of inefficient DMN suppression in cognitive deficits of first-episode schizophrenia.

  4. Impaired mitochondrial function in microvesicular steatosis. Effects of drugs, ethanol, hormones and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Fromenty, B; Pessayre, D

    1997-01-01

    Microvesicular steatosis occurs in conditions characterized by severe impairment of the mitochondrial beta-oxidation process, due to genetic and/or acquired causes. Drugs and some endogenous compounds can sequester coenzyme A (aspirin, valproic acid), inhibit mitochondrial beta-oxidation enzymes (tetracyclines, several 2-arylpropionate anti-inflammatory drugs, amineptine and tianeptine), or inhibit both mitochondrial beta-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation (endogenous bile acids, amiodarone, perhexiline and diethylaminoethoxyhexestrol), while female sex hormones have complex, but moderate, effects on mitochondrial structure and function. Other substances impair mitochondrial DNA transcription (interferon-alpha) or mitochondrial DNA replication (dideoxynucleosides), while alcohol abuse might accelerate the normal oxidative aging of mitochondrial DNA. When beta-oxidation is severely impaired, fatty acids, which are poorly oxidized by mitochondria, are mainly esterified into triglycerides, but there is a residual increase in non-esterified fatty acids. Triglycerides (possibly emulsified by a rim of non-esterified fatty acids) accumulate as small vesicles. Impairment of energy production, and the mitochondrial and general toxicity of both non-esterified fatty acids and dicarboxylic acids, may contribute to liver failure, coma and death in severe forms. Although milder forms of microvesicular steatosis have a good short-term prognosis, they can lead to chronic lipid peroxidation and the development of steatohepatitis lesions. Investigational molecules with a carboxylic group or a protonatable amine, or those which might interfere with mitochondrial DNA, should be screened for possible mitochondrial effects.

  5. Environmental Exposure to Cadmium: Health Risk Assessment and its Associations with Hypertension and Impaired Kidney Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haiyun; Liao, Qilin; Chillrud, Steven N.; Yang, Qiang; Huang, Lei; Bi, Jun; Yan, Beizhan

    2016-07-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic metal. This study was aimed to estimate the potential health risks in a Cd-polluted district in China, and examine the relationship between urinary cadmium(UCd) and hypertension and impaired kidney function at low exposure levels (UCd: GM 1.3 μg/g creatinine). Blood pressure measurement, questionnaires, and collection of urinary samples were conducted from 217 residents. Environmental samples, food, and cigarette samples were collected and detected to estimate the risks posed by Cd and the contribution of inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact pathways to these risks. A logistic regression model was used in examining associations between exposure and hypertension and impaired kidney function. Results show that this population is at high risk. For non-smokers, incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) and hazard quotient (HQ) are 1.74E-04 and 2.96, and for smokers, they are 1.07E-03 and 52.5, respectively. Among all exposure pathways, smoking and foods cause the major increases in ILCR and HQ. UCd is significantly associated with hypertension (odds ratio (OR) = 1.468 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.104, 1.953; P = 0.008) and impaired kidney function (OR = 1.902, 95% CI: 1.054, 3.432; P = 0.033). The results demonstrate that Cd can potentially lead to adverse health effects.

  6. Environmental Exposure to Cadmium: Health Risk Assessment and its Associations with Hypertension and Impaired Kidney Function.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiyun; Liao, Qilin; Chillrud, Steven N; Yang, Qiang; Huang, Lei; Bi, Jun; Yan, Beizhan

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic metal. This study was aimed to estimate the potential health risks in a Cd-polluted district in China, and examine the relationship between urinary cadmium(UCd) and hypertension and impaired kidney function at low exposure levels (UCd: GM 1.3 μg/g creatinine). Blood pressure measurement, questionnaires, and collection of urinary samples were conducted from 217 residents. Environmental samples, food, and cigarette samples were collected and detected to estimate the risks posed by Cd and the contribution of inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact pathways to these risks. A logistic regression model was used in examining associations between exposure and hypertension and impaired kidney function. Results show that this population is at high risk. For non-smokers, incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) and hazard quotient (HQ) are 1.74E-04 and 2.96, and for smokers, they are 1.07E-03 and 52.5, respectively. Among all exposure pathways, smoking and foods cause the major increases in ILCR and HQ. UCd is significantly associated with hypertension (odds ratio (OR) = 1.468; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.104, 1.953; P = 0.008) and impaired kidney function (OR = 1.902, 95% CI: 1.054, 3.432; P = 0.033). The results demonstrate that Cd can potentially lead to adverse health effects. PMID:27411493

  7. Environmental Exposure to Cadmium: Health Risk Assessment and its Associations with Hypertension and Impaired Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haiyun; Liao, Qilin; Chillrud, Steven N.; Yang, Qiang; Huang, Lei; Bi, Jun; Yan, Beizhan

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic metal. This study was aimed to estimate the potential health risks in a Cd-polluted district in China, and examine the relationship between urinary cadmium(UCd) and hypertension and impaired kidney function at low exposure levels (UCd: GM 1.3 μg/g creatinine). Blood pressure measurement, questionnaires, and collection of urinary samples were conducted from 217 residents. Environmental samples, food, and cigarette samples were collected and detected to estimate the risks posed by Cd and the contribution of inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact pathways to these risks. A logistic regression model was used in examining associations between exposure and hypertension and impaired kidney function. Results show that this population is at high risk. For non-smokers, incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) and hazard quotient (HQ) are 1.74E-04 and 2.96, and for smokers, they are 1.07E-03 and 52.5, respectively. Among all exposure pathways, smoking and foods cause the major increases in ILCR and HQ. UCd is significantly associated with hypertension (odds ratio (OR) = 1.468; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.104, 1.953; P = 0.008) and impaired kidney function (OR = 1.902, 95% CI: 1.054, 3.432; P = 0.033). The results demonstrate that Cd can potentially lead to adverse health effects. PMID:27411493

  8. Impact of impaired morning function on the lives and well-being of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, J A P; Phillips, S; Buttgereit, F

    2011-01-01

    Morning joint stiffness and pain are prominent features in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and contribute to impaired function. A survey was conducted across 11 European countries to assess the impact of impaired morning function on patients' quality of life. A total of 518 rheumatologists, and 750 patients aged 18-75 years with RA for ≥ 6 months and impaired morning function at least three times a week, completed the structured questionnaires. Impaired morning function was defined as 'stiffness and pain in the joints first thing in the morning that results in difficulty to function or perform tasks'. The mean duration of morning stiffness and pain was 83 min according to patients, slightly longer than that estimated by rheumatologists (70 min). Impaired morning function lasting more than 30 min/day was reported by 75% of patients, with 76% of rheumatologists estimating this duration for their patients. Most respondents (82% of patients and 96% of rheumatologists) considered that impaired morning function had a significant effect on patient quality of life. Around two-thirds of patients reported changes in how they carry out usual morning activities. Patients who were unable to function normally in the morning reported feeling frustrated (58%) and angry (32%). Almost one in five patients in the survey (18%) was unable to work as a direct result of their RA. Of the 274 patients included in the survey who were in paid work, 73% reported that impaired morning function had a significant impact on their job; 40% missed time from work in the past 6 months due to impairment in morning function, resulting in a mean of 4.5 days lost from work/employed person. In conclusion, the survey shows that impaired morning function has a considerable impact on the lives and well-being of patients with RA.

  9. Association between arterial stiffness, disease activity and functional impairment in ankylosing spondylitis patients: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Avram, Claudiu; Drăgoi, Răzvan Gabriel; Popoviciu, Horațiu; Drăgoi, Mihai; Avram, Adina; Amaricăi, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular risk is an important factor for increased morbidity and mortality in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The aim of this study is to assess arterial stiffness in relation to the disease activity and functional limitation in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Twenty-four patients (mean age 45.8 ± 11.7 years) suffering of ankylosing spondylitis (disease duration 11.1 ± 5.1 years) and 24 gender and age-matched healthy controls were included in the study. Clinical, biological, and functional status of ankylosing spondylitis patients was recorded. Arterial stiffness was assessed by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis (PWA) was performed using applanation tonometry. We found significant differences between ankylosing spondylitis patients and healthy controls in regard to PWV (p = 0.047), aortic augmentation pressure-AP (p = 0.028), augmentation index-AIx (p = 0.038) and aortic augmentation index adjusted for heart rate-AIx75 (p = 0.011). PWV and AIx75 were significantly associated with the disease functioning score-BASFI (p = 0.012, r = 0.504; p = 0.041, r = 0.421). Aortic AP and augmentation indexes (AIx and AIx75) were all associated to ASDAS score (p = 0.028, r = 0.448; p = 0.005, r = 0.549; p = 0.025, r = 0.455). Our study showed that ankylosing spondylitis patients have a higher arterial stiffness than the age-matched controls, leading to an increased cardiovascular risk. We found that arterial stiffness is positively associated with disease activity and functional impairment. Chronic spondiloarthropaties should be screened for arterial stiffness, even in the absence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, in order to benefit from primary prevention measures.

  10. The relation between cardiac output kinetics and skeletal muscle oxygenation during moderate exercise in moderately impaired patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Spee, Ruud F; Niemeijer, Victor M; Schoots, Thijs; Wijn, Pieter F; Doevendans, Pieter A; Kemps, Hareld M

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen uptake (V̇o2) kinetics are prolonged in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). This may be caused by impaired oxygen delivery or skeletal muscle derangements. We investigated whether impaired cardiac output (Q̇) kinetics limit skeletal muscle oxygen delivery relative to the metabolic demands at submaximal exercise in CHF patients by evaluating the relation between Q̇ kinetics and skeletal muscle deoxygenation. Forty-three CHF patients, NYHA II-III, performed a constant-load exercise test at 80% of the ventilatory aerobic threshold (VAT) to assess V̇o2 kinetics (τV̇o2). Q̇ kinetics (τQ̇) were assessed by a radial artery pulse contour analysis method. Skeletal muscle deoxygenation was assessed by near infrared spectroscopy at the m. vastus lateralis, using the minimal value of the tissue saturation index during onset of exercise (TSImin). Patients were categorized in slow and normal Q̇ responders relative to metabolic demands (τQ̇/V̇o2 ≥1 and τQ̇/V̇o2 <1, respectively), τQ̇ (62 ± 29 s), and τV̇o2 (60 ± 21 s) were significantly related (r = 0.66, P = 0.001). There was a significant correlation between τQ̇ and TSImin in the slow Q̇ responders [rs= -0.57, P = 0.005, n = 22 (51%)]. In conclusion, in moderately impaired CHF patients with relatively slow Q̇ kinetics, central hemodynamics may limit skeletal muscle oxygenation during moderate-intensity exercise. PMID:27283909

  11. Arginase induction and activation during ischemia and reperfusion and functional consequences for the heart

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Klaus-Dieter; Schulz, Rainer; Schreckenberg, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Induction and activation of arginase is among the fastest responses of the heart to ischemic events. Induction of arginase expression and enzyme activation under ischemic conditions shifts arginine consumption from nitric oxide formation (NO) to the formation of ornithine and urea. In the heart such a switch in substrate utilization reduces the impact of the NO/cGMP-pathway on cardiac function that requires intact electromechanical coupling but at the same time it induces ornithine-dependent pathways such as the polyamine metabolism. Both effects significantly reduce the recovery of heart function during reperfusion and thereby limits the success of reperfusion strategies. In this context, changes in arginine consumption trigger cardiac remodeling in an unfavorable way and increases the risk of arrhythmia, specifically in the initial post-ischemic period in which arginase activity is dominating. However, during the entire ischemic period arginase activation might be a meaningful adaptation that is specifically relevant for reperfusion following prolonged ischemic periods. Therefore, a precise understanding about the underlying mechanism that leads to arginase induction as well as of it's mechanistic impact on post-ischemic hearts is required for optimizing reperfusion strategies. In this review we will summarize our current understanding of these processes and give an outlook about possible treatment options for the future. PMID:25814956

  12. MELAS syndrome and cardiomyopathy: linking mitochondrial function to heart failure pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ying-Han R; Yogasundaram, Haran; Parajuli, Nirmal; Valtuille, Lucas; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure remains an important clinical burden, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in its pathogenesis. The heart has a high metabolic demand, and mitochondrial function is a key determinant of myocardial performance. In mitochondrial disorders, hypertrophic remodeling is the early pattern of cardiomyopathy with progression to dilated cardiomyopathy, conduction defects and ventricular pre-excitation occurring in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiac dysfunction occurs in approximately a third of patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, a stereotypical example of a mitochondrial disorder leading to a cardiomyopathy. We performed unique comparative ultrastructural and gene expression in a MELAS heart compared with non-failing controls. Our results showed a remarkable increase in mitochondrial inclusions and increased abnormal mitochondria in MELAS cardiomyopathy coupled with variable sarcomere thickening, heterogeneous distribution of affected cardiomyocytes and a greater elevation in the expression of disease markers. Investigation and management of patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy should follow the well-described contemporary heart failure clinical practice guidelines and include an important role of medical and device therapies. Directed metabolic therapy is lacking, but current research strategies are dedicated toward improving mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial disorders. PMID:26712328

  13. Acute heart inflammation: ultrastructural and functional aspects of macrophages elicited by Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rossana C N

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The heart is the main target organ of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas' disease, a significant public health issue and still a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Latin America. During the acute disease, tissue damage in the heart is related to the intense myocardium parasitism. To control parasite multiplication, cells of the monocytic lineage are highly mobilized. In response to inflammatory and immune stimulation, an intense migration and extravasation of monocytes occurs from the bloodstream into heart. Monocyte differentiation leads to the formation of tissue phagocytosing macrophages, which are strongly activated and direct host defence. Newly elicited monocyte-derived macrophages both undergo profound physiological changes and display morphological heterogeneity that greatly differs from originally non-inflammatory macrophages, and underlie their functional activities as potent inflammatory cells. Thus, activated macrophages play a critical role in the outcome of parasite infection. This review covers functional and ultrastructural aspects of heart inflammatory macrophages triggered by the acute Chagas' disease, including recent discoveries on morphologically distinct, inflammation-related organelles, termed lipid bodies, which are actively formed in vivo within macrophages in response to T. cruzi infection. These findings are defining a broader role for lipid bodies as key markers of macrophage activation during innate immune responses to infectious diseases and attractive targets for novel anti-inflammatory therapies. Modulation of macrophage activation may be central in providing therapeutic benefits for Chagas' disease control. PMID:18624767

  14. MELAS syndrome and cardiomyopathy: linking mitochondrial function to heart failure pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ying-Han R; Yogasundaram, Haran; Parajuli, Nirmal; Valtuille, Lucas; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure remains an important clinical burden, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in its pathogenesis. The heart has a high metabolic demand, and mitochondrial function is a key determinant of myocardial performance. In mitochondrial disorders, hypertrophic remodeling is the early pattern of cardiomyopathy with progression to dilated cardiomyopathy, conduction defects and ventricular pre-excitation occurring in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiac dysfunction occurs in approximately a third of patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, a stereotypical example of a mitochondrial disorder leading to a cardiomyopathy. We performed unique comparative ultrastructural and gene expression in a MELAS heart compared with non-failing controls. Our results showed a remarkable increase in mitochondrial inclusions and increased abnormal mitochondria in MELAS cardiomyopathy coupled with variable sarcomere thickening, heterogeneous distribution of affected cardiomyocytes and a greater elevation in the expression of disease markers. Investigation and management of patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy should follow the well-described contemporary heart failure clinical practice guidelines and include an important role of medical and device therapies. Directed metabolic therapy is lacking, but current research strategies are dedicated toward improving mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial disorders.

  15. Proteasome function is not impaired in healthy aging of the lung.

    PubMed

    Caniard, Anne; Ballweg, Korbinian; Lukas, Christina; Yildirim, Ali Ö; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2015-10-01

    Aging is the progressive loss of cellular function which inevitably leads to death. Failure of proteostasis including the decrease in proteasome function is one hallmark of aging. In the lung, proteasome activity was shown to be impaired in age-related diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, little is known on proteasome function during healthy aging. Here, we comprehensively analyzed healthy lung aging and proteasome function in wildtype, proteasome reporter and immunoproteasome knockout mice. Wildtype mice spontaneously developed senile lung emphysema while expression and activity of proteasome complexes and turnover of ubiquitinated substrates was not grossly altered in lungs of aged mice. Immunoproteasome subunits were specifically upregulated in the aged lung and the caspase-like proteasome activity concomitantly decreased. Aged knockout mice for the LMP2 or LMP7 immunoproteasome subunits showed no alteration in proteasome activities but exhibited typical lung aging phenotypes suggesting that immunoproteasome function is dispensable for physiological lung aging in mice. Our results indicate that healthy aging of the lung does not involve impairment of proteasome function. Apparently, the reserve capacity of the proteostasis systems in the lung is sufficient to avoid severe proteostasis imbalance during healthy aging. PMID:26540298

  16. Proteasome function is not impaired in healthy aging of the lung.

    PubMed

    Caniard, Anne; Ballweg, Korbinian; Lukas, Christina; Yildirim, Ali Ö; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2015-10-01

    Aging is the progressive loss of cellular function which inevitably leads to death. Failure of proteostasis including the decrease in proteasome function is one hallmark of aging. In the lung, proteasome activity was shown to be impaired in age-related diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, little is known on proteasome function during healthy aging. Here, we comprehensively analyzed healthy lung aging and proteasome function in wildtype, proteasome reporter and immunoproteasome knockout mice. Wildtype mice spontaneously developed senile lung emphysema while expression and activity of proteasome complexes and turnover of ubiquitinated substrates was not grossly altered in lungs of aged mice. Immunoproteasome subunits were specifically upregulated in the aged lung and the caspase-like proteasome activity concomitantly decreased. Aged knockout mice for the LMP2 or LMP7 immunoproteasome subunits showed no alteration in proteasome activities but exhibited typical lung aging phenotypes suggesting that immunoproteasome function is dispensable for physiological lung aging in mice. Our results indicate that healthy aging of the lung does not involve impairment of proteasome function. Apparently, the reserve capacity of the proteostasis systems in the lung is sufficient to avoid severe proteostasis imbalance during healthy aging.

  17. Di-(2-Ethylhexyl)-Phthalate (DEHP) Causes Impaired Adipocyte Function and Alters Serum Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Klöting, Nora; Hesselbarth, Nico; Gericke, Martin; Kunath, Anne; Biemann, Ronald; Chakaroun, Rima; Kosacka, Joanna; Kovacs, Peter; Kern, Matthias; Stumvoll, Michael; Fischer, Bernd; Rolle-Kampczyk, Ulrike; Feltens, Ralph; Otto, Wolfgang; Wissenbach, Dirk K.; von Bergen, Martin; Blüher, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP), an ubiquitous environmental contaminant, has been shown to cause adverse effects on glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in epidemiological studies, but the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. We therefore tested the hypothesis that chronic DEHP exposure causes impaired insulin sensitivity, affects body weight, adipose tissue (AT) function and circulating metabolic parameters of obesity resistant 129S6 mice in vivo. An obesity-resistant mouse model was chosen to reduce a potential obesity bias of DEHP effects on metabolic parameters and AT function. The metabolic effects of 10-weeks exposure to DEHP were tested by insulin tolerance tests and quantitative assessment of 183 metabolites in mice. Furthermore, 3T3-L1 cells were cultured with DEHP for two days, differentiated into mature adipocytes in which the effects on insulin stimulated glucose and palmitate uptake, lipid content as well as on mRNA/protein expression of key adipocyte genes were investigated. We observed in female mice that DEHP treatment causes enhanced weight gain, fat mass, impaired insulin tolerance, changes in circulating adiponectin and adipose tissue Pparg, adiponectin and estrogen expression. Serum metabolomics indicated a general increase in phospholipid and carnitine concentrations. In vitro, DEHP treatment increases the proliferation rate and alters glucose uptake in adipocytes. Taken together, DEHP has significant effects on adipose tissue (AT) function and alters specific serum metabolites. Although, DEHP treatment led to significantly impaired insulin tolerance, it did not affect glucose tolerance, HOMA-IR, fasting glucose, insulin or triglyceride serum concentrations. This may suggest that DEHP treatment does not cause impaired glucose metabolism at the whole body level. PMID:26630026

  18. Impaired High-Density Lipoprotein Anti-Oxidant Function Predicts Poor Outcome in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schrutka, Lore; Goliasch, Georg; Meyer, Brigitte; Wurm, Raphael; Koller, Lorenz; Kriechbaumer, Lukas; Heinz, Gottfried; Pacher, Richard; Lang, Irene M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oxidative stress affects clinical outcome in critically ill patients. Although high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles generally possess anti-oxidant capacities, deleterious properties of HDL have been described in acutely ill patients. The impact of anti-oxidant HDL capacities on clinical outcome in critically ill patients is unknown. We therefore analyzed the predictive value of anti-oxidant HDL function on mortality in an unselected cohort of critically ill patients. Method We prospectively enrolled 270 consecutive patients admitted to a university-affiliated intensive care unit (ICU) and determined anti-oxidant HDL function using the HDL oxidant index (HOI). Based on their HOI, the study population was stratified into patients with impaired anti-oxidant HDL function and the residual study population. Results During a median follow-up time of 9.8 years (IQR: 9.2 to 10.0), 69% of patients died. Cox regression analysis revealed a significant and independent association between impaired anti-oxidant HDL function and short-term mortality with an adjusted HR of 1.65 (95% CI 1.22–2.24; p = 0.001) as well as 10-year mortality with an adj. HR of 1.19 (95% CI 1.02–1.40; p = 0.032) when compared to the residual study population. Anti-oxidant HDL function correlated with the amount of oxidative stress as determined by Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (r = 0.38; p<0.001). Conclusion Impaired anti-oxidant HDL function represents a strong and independent predictor of 30-day mortality as well as long-term mortality in critically ill patients. PMID:26978526

  19. Mild Cognitive Impairment is Associated with Selected Functional Markers: Integrating Concurrent, Longitudinal, and Stability Effects

    PubMed Central

    Dolcos, Sanda; MacDonald, Stuart W.S.; Braslavsky, Anna; Camicioli, Richard; Dixon, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We examined functional performance on multiple indicators for two cognitive status groups: (a) not impaired controls (NIC) and (b) mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We identified functional markers associated with differences, changes, and stability in cognitive status. Method In the Victoria Longitudinal Study (VLS) we examined cognitive status group effects in (a) cross-sectional functional performance, (b) longitudinal stability, (c) longitudinal functional performance change, and (d) functional marker prediction of later cognitive status. We assembled markers from five continuous clusters of MCI-related functional factors: biological vitality, activity lifestyle, psychosocial affect, subjective health, and global cognition. We used a cross-sectional sample and a two-wave longitudinal sample, stratified by age (mid-old, old-old) and cognitive status (MCI, NIC). Results First, cross-sectional results showed that eight markers differentiated MCI and NIC adults, with the latter performing uniformly better. The groups differed on diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, positive and negative affect, MMSE, and the lifestyle indicators of self-maintenance, travel, and novel cognitive activities. Second, Wave1 to Wave2 stabilities in cognitive status classification were high. Third, several markers differentiated the stable (NIC-to-NIC, MCI-to-MCI) from the unstable (NIC-to-MCI, MCI-to-NIC) cognitive status groups. Fourth, five relevant markers for identifying older adults at risk for cognitive status changes were: diastolic blood pressure, self-maintenance activities, novel cognitive activities, positive affect, and global cognitive status. Conclusion Selected risk and protective factors differentiate persons classified with MCI from those not currently cognitively impaired, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. PMID:22251311

  20. Pharmacokinetics and safety of olodaterol administered with the Respimat Soft Mist inhaler in subjects with impaired hepatic or renal function

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Christina; Luedtke, Doreen; Unseld, Anna; Hamilton, Alan; Halabi, Atef; Wein, Martina; Formella, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In two trials, the influences of hepatic and renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of olodaterol, a novel long-acting inhaled β2-agonist for treatment of COPD, were investigated. Subjects and methods The first trial included eight subjects with mild hepatic function impairment (Child–Pugh A), eight subjects with moderate impairment (Child–Pugh B), and 16 matched healthy subjects with normal hepatic function. The second trial included eight subjects with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance <30 mL·min−1) and 14 matched healthy subjects with normal renal function. Subjects received single doses of 20 or 30 μg olodaterol administered with the Respimat Soft Mist inhaler. Results Olodaterol was well tolerated in all subjects. The geometric mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals of dose-normalized area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to 4 hours (AUC0–4) for subjects with mild and moderate hepatic impairment compared to healthy subjects were 97% (75%–125%) and 105% (79%–140%), respectively. Corresponding values for dose-normalized maximum concentration (Cmax) were 112% (84%–151%) (mild impairment) and 99% (73%–135%) (moderate impairment). The geometric mean ratio (90% confidence interval) of AUC0–4 for subjects with severe renal impairment compared to healthy subjects was 135% (94%–195%), and for Cmax was 137% (84%–222%). There was no significant relationship between creatinine clearance and AUC0–4 or Cmax. Renal clearance of olodaterol was reduced to 20% of normal in severe renal impairment. Conclusion Mild to moderate hepatic function impairment or severe renal function impairment did not result in a clinically relevant increase of olodaterol systemic exposure after a single inhaled dose. PMID:27051282

  1. The Relationship of Metabolic Syndrome with Stress, Coronary Heart Disease and Pulmonary Function - An Occupational Cohort-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Nowobilski, Roman; Dropinski, Jerzy; Kotula-Horowitz, Katarzyna; Laskowicz, Bartosz; Stanisz, Andrzej; Lelakowski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Higher levels of stress impact the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and coronary heart disease. The association between MetS, impaired pulmonary function and low level of physical activity is still pending assessment in the subjects exposed to stress. The study aimed to examine whether higher levels of stress might be related to MetS and the plaque presence, as well as whether MetS might affect pulmonary function. Design and Methods The study embraced 235 police officers (mean age 40.97 years) from the south of Poland. The anthropometrics and biochemical variables were measured; MetS was diagnosed using the International Diabetes Federation criteria. Computed tomography coronary angiography of coronary arteries, exercise ECG, measurements of brachial flow-mediated dilation, and carotid artery intima-media thickness were completed. In order to measure the self-perception of stress, 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) was applied. Pulmonary function and physical activity levels were also addressed. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to determine the relationships between: 1/ incidence of coronary plaque and MetS per se, MetS components and the number of classical cardiovascular risk factors, 2/ perceived stress and MetS, 3/ MetS and pulmonary function parameters. Results Coronary artery atherosclerosis was less associated with MetS (OR = 2.62, 95%CI 1.24–5.52; p = 0.011) than with a co-existence of classical cardiovascular risk factors (OR = 5.67, 95% CI 1.07–29.85, p = 0.03; for 3 risk factors and OR = 9.05; 95% CI 1.24–66.23, p = 0.02; for 6 risk factors, respectively). Perceived stress increased MetS prevalence (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.03–1.13; p = 0.03), and impacted coronary plaque prevalence (OR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.001–1.10; p = 0.04). Leisure-time physical activity reduced the chances of developing MetS (OR = 0.98 95% CI 0.96–0.99; p = 0.02). MetS subjects had significantly lower values of certain

  2. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion in Rats Alters Lung Metabolism, Promotes Lipid Accumulation, and Impairs Alveolar Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Stafstrom, William; Hoek, Jan B.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism impairs pulmonary immune homeostasis and predisposes to inflammatory lung diseases, including infectious pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although alcoholism has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism, leading to lipid accumulation, hepatitis, and, eventually, cirrhosis, the effects of alcohol on pulmonary metabolism remain largely unknown. Because both the lung and the liver actively engage in lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that chronic alcoholism would impair pulmonary metabolic homeostasis in ways similar to its effects in the liver. We reasoned that perturbations in lipid metabolism might contribute to the impaired pulmonary immunity observed in people who chronically consume alcohol. We studied the metabolic consequences of chronic alcohol consumption in rat lungs in vivo and in alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. We found that chronic alcohol ingestion significantly alters lung metabolic homeostasis, inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase, increasing lipid synthesis, and suppressing the expression of genes essential to metabolizing fatty acids (FAs). Furthermore, we show that these metabolic alterations promoted a lung phenotype that is reminiscent of alcoholic fatty liver and is characterized by marked accumulation of triglycerides and free FAs within distal airspaces, AMs, and, to a lesser extent, alveolar epithelial type II cells. We provide evidence that the metabolic alterations in alcohol-exposed rats are mechanistically linked to immune impairments in the alcoholic lung: the elevations in FAs alter AM phenotypes and suppress both phagocytic functions and agonist-induced inflammatory responses. In summary, our work demonstrates that chronic alcohol ingestion impairs lung metabolic homeostasis and promotes pulmonary immune dysfunction. These findings suggest that therapies aimed at reversing alcohol-related metabolic alterations might be effective for preventing and

  3. Executive functions in mono- and bilingual children with language impairment - issues for speech-language pathology.

    PubMed

    Sandgren, Olof; Holmström, Ketty

    2015-01-01

    The clinical assessment of language impairment (LI) in bilingual children imposes challenges for speech-language pathology services. Assessment tools standardized for monolingual populations increase the risk of misinterpreting bilingualism as LI. This Perspective article summarizes recent studies on the assessment of bilingual LI and presents new results on including non-linguistic measures of executive functions in the diagnostic assessment. Executive functions shows clinical utility as less subjected to language use and exposure than linguistic measures. A possible bilingual advantage, and consequences for speech-language pathology practices and future research are discussed.

  4. Impaired Transcriptional Response of the Murine Heart to Cigarette Smoke in the Setting of High Fat Diet and Obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Mikheev, Vladimir B.; Lee, K. M.; Corley, Richard A.; Pounds, Joel G.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2013-07-01

    Smoking and obesity are each well-established risk factors for cardiovascular heart disease, which together impose earlier onset and greater severity of disease. To identify early signaling events in the response of the heart to cigarette smoke exposure within the setting of obesity, we exposed normal weight and high fat diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6 mice to repeated inhaled doses of mainstream (MS) or sidestream (SS) cigarette smoke administered over a two week period, monitoring effects on both cardiac and pulmonary transcriptomes. MS smoke (250 μg wet total particulate matter (WTPM)/L, 5 h/day) exposures elicited robust cellular and molecular inflammatory responses in the lung with 1466 differentially expressed pulmonary genes (p < 0.01) in normal weight animals and a much-attenuated response (463 genes) in the hearts of the same animals. In contrast, exposures to SS smoke (85 μg WTPM/L) with a CO concentration equivalent to that of MS smoke (250 CO ppm) induced a weak pulmonary response (328 genes) but an extensive cardiac response (1590 genes). SS smoke and to a lesser extent MS smoke preferentially elicited hypoxia- and stress-responsive genes as well as genes predicting early changes of vascular smooth muscle and endothelium, precursors of cardiovascular disease. The most sensitive smoke-induced cardiac transcriptional changes of normal weight mice were largely absent in DIO mice after smoke exposure, while genes involved in fatty acid utilization were unaffected. At the same time, smoke exposure suppressed multiple proteome maintenance genes induced in the hearts of DIO mice. Together, these results underscore the sensitivity of the heart to SS smoke and reveal adaptive responses in healthy individuals that are absent in the setting of high fat diet and obesity.

  5. Trbp regulates heart function through miRNA-mediated Sox6 repression

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jian; Chen, Jinghai; Wang, Yanqun; Kataoka, Masaharu; Ma, Lixin; Zhou, Pingzhu; Hu, Xiaoyun; Lin, Zhiqiang; Nie, Mao; Deng, Zhong-Liang; Pu, William T; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is associated with altered expression of genes encoding contractile proteins. Here we show that Trbp (Tarbp2), an RNA binding protein, is required for normal heart function. Cardiac-specific inactivation of Trbp (TrbpcKO) caused progressive cardiomyopathy and lethal heart failure. Trbp loss of function resulted in upregulation of Sox6, repression of genes encoding normal cardiac slow-twitch myofiber proteins, and pathologically increased expression of skeletal fast-twitch myofiber genes. Remarkably, knockdown of Sox6 fully rescued the Trbp mutant phenotype, whereas Sox6 overexpression phenocopied the TrbpcKO phenotype. Trbp inactivation was mechanistically linked to Sox6 upregulation through altered processing of miR-208a, which is a direct inhibitor of Sox6. Transgenic overexpression of miR-208a sufficiently repressed Sox6, restored the balance of fast- and slow- twitch myofiber gene expression, and rescued cardiac function in TrbpcKO mice. Together, our studies reveal a novel Trbp-mediated microRNA processing mechanism in regulating a linear genetic cascade essential for normal heart function. PMID:26029872

  6. Heme oxygenase-2 deletion impairs macrophage function: implication in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Bellner, Lars; Marrazzo, Giuseppina; van Rooijen, Nico; Dunn, Michael W; Abraham, Nader G; Schwartzman, Michal L

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-2 deficiency impairs wound healing and exacerbates inflammation following injury. We examine the impact of HO-2 deficiency on macrophage function and the contribution of macrophage HO-2 to inflammatory and repair responses to injury. Corneal epithelial debridement was performed in control and macrophage-depleted HO-2(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice and in bone marrow chimeras. Peritoneal macrophages were collected for determination of phagocytic activity and classically activated macrophage (M1)-alternatively activated macrophage (M2) polarization. Depletion of macrophages delayed corneal healing (13.2%) and increased neutrophil infiltration (54.1%) by day 4 in WT mice, whereas in HO-2(-/-) mice, it did not worsen the already impaired wound healing and exacerbated inflammation. HO-2(-/-) macrophages displayed an altered M1 phenotype with no significant expression of M2 or M2-like activated cells and a 31.3% reduction in phagocytic capacity that was restored by inducing HO-1 activity or supplementing biliverdin. Macrophage depletion had no effect, whereas adoptive transfer of WT bone marrow improved wound healing (34% on day 4) but did not resolve the exaggerated inflammatory response in HO-2(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that HO-2-deficient macrophages are dysfunctional and that macrophage HO-2 is required for proper macrophage function but is insufficient to correct the impaired healing of the HO-2(-/-) cornea, suggesting that corneal epithelial expression of HO-2 is a key to resolution and repair in wound healing.

  7. Relationship of structural to functional impairment during alveolar-capillary membrane development.

    PubMed

    Ahlfeld, Shawn K; Gao, Yong; Conway, Simon J; Tepper, Robert S

    2015-04-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia is a chronic lung disease of extreme preterm infants and results in impaired gas exchange. Although bronchopulmonary dysplasia is characterized histologically by alveolar-capillary simplification in animal models, it is clinically defined by impaired gas diffusion. With the use of a developmentally relevant model, we correlated alveolar-capillary structural simplification with reduced functional gas exchange as measured by the diffusing factor for carbon monoxide (DFCO). Neonatal mouse pups were exposed to >90% hyperoxia or room air during postnatal days 0 to 7, and then all pups were returned to room air from days 7 to 56. At day 56, DFCO was measured as the ratio of carbon monoxide uptake to neon dilution, and lungs were fixed for histologic assessment of alveolar-capillary development. Neonatal hyperoxia exposure inhibited alveolar-capillary septal development as evidenced by significantly increased mean linear intercept, increased airspace-to-septal ratio, decreased nodal density, and decreased pulmonary microvasculature. Importantly, alveolar-capillary structural deficits in hyperoxia-exposed pups were accompanied by a significant 28% decrease in DFCO (0.555 versus 0.400; P < 0.0001). In addition, DFCO was highly and significantly correlated with structural measures of reduced alveolar-capillary growth. Simplification of alveolar-capillary structure is highly correlated with impaired gas exchange function. Current mechanistic and therapeutic animal models of inhibited alveolar development may benefit from application of DFCO as an alternative physiologic indicator of alveolar-capillary development. PMID:25661110

  8. Is the behavior rating inventory of executive function more strongly associated with measures of impairment or executive function?

    PubMed

    McAuley, Tara; Chen, Shirley; Goos, Lisa; Schachar, Russell; Crosbie, Jennifer

    2010-05-01

    The Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) is commonly used in the assessment of children and adolescents presenting with a wide range of concerns. It is unclear, however, whether the questionnaire is more closely related to general measures of behavioral disruption and impairment or to specific measures of executive function. In the present study, associations between the Behavioral Regulation Index and Metacognition Index of the BRIEF and cognitive, behavioral, and academic measures were examined in a sample of clinic-referred youth (n = 60) and healthy youth (n = 37) 6-15 years of age. Measures included ratings of inattentive and hyperactive-impulsive symptoms in youth, ratings of how well youth functioned in their everyday environments, youth's scores on measures of reading and math, and youth's scores on measures of inhibition, performance monitoring, and working memory. Although both BRIEF indices were strongly related to parent and teacher ratings of behavioral disruption and impairment, neither was associated with youth's scores on the performance-based tasks of executive function. These findings support the use of the BRIEF as a clinical tool for assessing a broad range of concerns, but raise questions about the relation of the BRIEF to performance-based tasks that are commonly used to assess executive function.

  9. The Effectiveness of a Multidisciplinary Group Rehabilitation Program on the Psychosocial Functioning of Elderly People Who Are Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alma, Manna A.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Melis-Dankers, Bart J. M.; Suurmeijer, Theo P. B. M.; van der Mei, Sijrike F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The pilot study reported here determined the effectiveness of a multidisciplinary group rehabilitation program, Visually Impaired Elderly Persons Participating (VIPP), on psychosocial functioning. Methods: The single-group pretest-posttest pilot study included 29 persons with visual impairments (aged 55 and older) who were referred…

  10. Is impaired kidney function an independent predictor of the risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-infected individuals?

    PubMed

    Lang, Sylvie; Mary-Krause, Murielle; Partisani, Marialuisa; Gilquin, Jacques; Simon, Anne; Cotte, Laurent; Boccara, Franck; Costagliola, Dominique

    2014-08-24

    We examined whether impaired kidney function is an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction in HIV-infected individuals without pre-existing coronary artery disease. The odds ratio for impaired kidney function fell from 1.22 (95% confidence interval 0.90-1.66) to 0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.69-1.41) after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors and HIV-related parameters, with hypertension, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking and the CD4 T-cell nadir as most influential confounders. In this setting, no association was found between impaired kidney function and the risk of myocardial infarction.

  11. Why do interracial interactions impair executive function? A resource depletion account.

    PubMed

    Richeson, Jennifer A; Trawalter, Sophie

    2005-06-01

    Three studies investigated the veracity of a resource depletion account of the impairment of inhibitory task performance after interracial contact. White individuals engaged in either an interracial or same-race interaction, then completed an ostensibly unrelated Stroop color-naming test. In each study, the self-regulatory demands of the interaction were either increased (Study 1) or decreased (Studies 2 and 3). Results revealed that increasing the self-regulatory demands of an interracial interaction led to greater Stroop interference compared with control, whereas reducing self-regulatory demands led to less Stroop interference. Manipulating self-regulatory demands did not affect Stroop performance after same-race interactions. Taken together, the present studies point to resource depletion as the likely mechanism underlying the impairment of cognitive functioning after interracial dyadic interactions. PMID:15982114

  12. Aldioxa improves delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric compliance, pathophysiologic mechanisms of functional dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Teita; Aida, Shuji; Suemasu, Shintaro; Tahara, Kayoko; Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Mizushima, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric accommodation (decreased gastric compliance) play important roles in functional dyspepsia (FD). Here we screen for a clinically used drug with an ability to improve delayed gastric emptying in rats. Oral administration of aldioxa (dihydroxyaluminum allantoinate) partially improved clonidine- or restraint stress-induced delayed gastric emptying. Administration of allantoin, but not aluminium hydroxide, restored the gastric emptying. Both aldioxa and allantoin inhibited clonidine binding to the α-2 adrenergic receptor, suggesting that antagonistic activity of the allantoin moiety of aldioxa on this receptor is involved in the restoration of gastric emptying activity. Aldioxa or aluminium hydroxide but not allantoin restored gastric compliance with restraint stress, suggesting that aluminium hydroxide moiety is involved in this restoration. We propose that aldioxa is a candidate drug for FD, because its safety in humans has already been confirmed and its ameliorating effect on both of delayed gastric emptying and impaired gastric compliance are confirmed here. PMID:26620883

  13. Advancing understanding of executive function impairments and psychopathology: bridging the gap between clinical and cognitive approaches

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Hannah R.; Miyake, Akira; Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Executive function (EF) is essential for successfully navigating nearly all of our daily activities. Of critical importance for clinical psychological science, EF impairments are associated with most forms of psychopathology. However, despite the proliferation of research on EF in clinical populations, with notable exceptions clinical and cognitive approaches to EF have remained largely independent, leading to failures to apply theoretical and methodological advances in one field to the other field and hindering progress. First, we review the current state of knowledge of EF impairments associated with psychopathology and limitations to the previous research in light of recent advances in understanding and measuring EF. Next, we offer concrete suggestions for improving EF assessment. Last, we suggest future directions, including integrating modern models of EF with state of the art, hierarchical models of dimensional psychopathology as well as translational implications of EF-informed research on clinical science. PMID:25859234

  14. Age-related changes in tissue macrophages precede cardiac functional impairment.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Alexander R; Godwin, James W; Chandran, Anjana; Hersey, Lucy; Ilinykh, Alexei; Debuque, Ryan; Wang, Lina; Rosenthal, Nadia A

    2014-05-01

    Cardiac tissue macrophages (cTMs) are abundant in the murine heart but the extent to which the cTM phenotype changes with age is unknown. This study characterizes aging-dependent phenotypic changes in cTM subsets. Using theCx3cr1(GFP/+) mouse reporter line where GFP marks cTMs, and the tissue macrophage marker Mrc1, we show that two major cardiac tissue macrophage subsets, Mrc1-GFP(hi) and Mrc1+GFP(hi) cTMs, are present in the young (<10 week old) mouse heart, and a third subset, Mrc1+GFP(lo), comprises ~50% of total Mrc1+ cTMs from 30 weeks of age. Immunostaining and functional assays show that Mrc1+ cTMs are the principal myeloid sentinels in the mouse heart and that they retain proliferative capacity throughout life. Gene expression profiles of the two Mrc1+ subsets also reveal that Mrc1+GFP(lo) cTMs have a decreased number of immune response genes (Cx3cr1, Lpar6, CD9, Cxcr4, Itga6 and Tgfβr1), and an increased number of fibrogenic genes (Ltc4s, Retnla, Fgfr1, Mmp9 and Ccl24), consistent with a potential role for cTMs in cardiac fibrosis. These findings identify early age-dependent gene expression changes in cTMs, with significant implications for cardiac tissue injury responses and aging-associated cardiac fibrosis. PMID:24861132

  15. [The effect of transvenous laser therapy on lipid peroxidation function in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Vakhliaev, V D; Smirnova, I E; Uchaĭkina, L V; Barsel', V A; Aksiutina, M S; Matveeva, S A; Paramonova, M A; Shchedrina, I S; Syrkin, A L

    1992-07-01

    The papers deals with changes in the levels of lipid peroxidation products in patients with stable angina of effort, which occurred with intravenous helium-neon blood irradiation. The therapy was highly effective in patients with lower functional classes and persons with normal circulation, resulting in a reduction in lipid peroxidation intensity. Predictors are recommended to determine the efficiency and expediency of laser therapy in patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:1487878

  16. Effects of nocturnal oxygen therapy on heart function in SDB patients undergoing dialysis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Fumitaka; Furumatsu, Yoshiyuki; Yurugi, Takatomi; Amari, Yoshifumi; Iida, Takeshi; Uehara, Mitsuru; Fukunaga, Megumu

    2015-06-01

    There is a close relationship between sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and heart failure. We performed home oxygen therapy (HOT) in patients with SAS undergoing dialysis, and investigated its effects on the heart function. The subjects were 10 SDB patients on dialysis. On retiring at night, oxygen was transnasally administered at 1.0 L/min. The human atrial natriuretic peptide (hANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), total protein, Alb, cholesterol and phosphorus levels were measured before the start of oxygen therapy and after 6 weeks. The mean SpO2 increased from 93.5% [91.5, 97.0] to 96.3% [94.8, 97.4] (median [interquartile range]) (p = 0.015). The hANP (p = 0.0039), BNP (p = 0.0098) and serum Alb (p = 0.015) levels significantly improved. There were no significant changes in the cholesterol, phosphorus or total protein levels. These results suggest that nocturnal oxygen therapy improves indices of heart failure, contributing to the prevention and treatment of heart failure in dialysis patients with SDB.

  17. SRC-2 Coactivator Deficiency Decreases Functional Reserve in Response to Pressure Overload of Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Reineke, Erin L.; York, Brian; Stashi, Erin; Chen, Xian; Tsimelzon, Anna; Xu, Jianming; Newgard, Christopher B.; Taffet, George E.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Entman, Mark L.; O’Malley, Bert W.

    2012-01-01

    A major component of the cardiac stress response is the simultaneous activation of several gene regulatory networks. Interestingly, the transcriptional regulator steroid receptor coactivator-2, SRC-2 is often decreased during cardiac failure in humans. We postulated that SRC-2 suppression plays a mechanistic role in the stress response and that SRC-2 activity is an important regulator of the adult heart gene expression profile. Genome-wide microarray analysis, confirmed with targeted gene expression analyses revealed that genetic ablation of SRC-2 activates the “fetal gene program” in adult mice as manifested by shifts in expression of a) metabolic and b) sarcomeric genes, as well as associated modulating transcription factors. While these gene expression changes were not accompanied by changes in left ventricular weight or cardiac function, imposition of transverse aortic constriction (TAC) predisposed SRC-2 knockout (KO) mice to stress-induced cardiac dysfunction. In addition, SRC-2 KO mice lacked the normal ventricular hypertrophic response as indicated through heart weight, left ventricular wall thickness, and blunted molecular signaling known to activate hypertrophy. Our results indicate that SRC-2 is involved in maintenance of the steady-state adult heart transcriptional profile, with its ablation inducing transcriptional changes that mimic a stressed heart. These results further suggest that SRC-2 deletion interferes with the timing and integration needed to respond efficiently to stress through disruption of metabolic and sarcomeric gene expression and hypertrophic signaling, the three key stress responsive pathways. PMID:23300926

  18. Treadmill performance and cardiac function in selected patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKirnan, M.D.; Sullivan, M.; Jensen, D.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1984-02-01

    To investigate the cardiac determinants of treadmill performance in patients able to exercise to volitional fatigue, 88 patients with coronary heart disease free of angina pectoris were tested. The exercise tests included supine bicycle radionuclide ventriculography, thallium scintigraphy and treadmill testing with expired gas analysis. The number of abnormal Q wave locations, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output, exercise-induced ST segment depression and thallium scar and ischemia scores were the cardiac variables considered. Rest and exercise ejection fractions were highly correlated to thallium scar score (r . -0.72 to -0.75, p less than 0.001), but not to maximal oxygen consumption (r . 0.19 to 0.25, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the variability in predicting treadmill time or estimated maximal oxygen consumption was explained by treadmill test-induced change in heart rate (39%), thallium ischemia score (12%) and cardiac output at rest (4%). The change in heart rate induced by the treadmill test explained only 27% of the variability in measured maximal oxygen consumption. Myocardial damage predicted ejection fraction at rest and the ability to increase heart rate with treadmill exercise appeared as an essential component of exercise capacity. Exercise capacity was only minimally affected by asymptomatic ischemia and was relatively independent of ventricular function.

  19. Impaired mitochondrial biogenesis is a common feature to myocardial hypertrophy and end-stage ischemic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Pisano, Annalinda; Cerbelli, Bruna; Perli, Elena; Pelullo, Maria; Bargelli, Valentina; Preziuso, Carmela; Mancini, Massimiliano; He, Langping; Bates, Matthew GD; Lucena, Joaquin R; Della Monica, Paola Lilla; Familiari, Giuseppe; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Nediani, Chiara; Taylor, Robert W; d’Amati, Giulia; Giordano, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial (mt) DNA depletion and oxidative mtDNA damage have been implicated in the process of pathological cardiac remodeling. Whether these features are present in the early phase of maladaptive cardiac remodeling, that is, during compensated cardiac hypertrophy, is still unknown. We compared the morphologic and molecular features of mt biogenesis and markers of oxidative stress in human heart from adult subjects with compensated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and heart failure. We have shown that mtDNA depletion is a constant feature of both conditions. A quantitative loss of mtDNA content was associated with significant down-regulation of selected modulators of mt biogenesis and decreased expression of proteins involved in mtDNA maintenance. Interestingly, mtDNA depletion characterized also the end-stage phase of cardiomyopathies due to a primary mtDNA defect. Oxidative stress damage was detected only in failing myocardium. PMID:26764143

  20. The impact of hypertension as a road to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: diagnostic value of two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography for the early impairment of left atrial-left ventricular-arterial coupling.

    PubMed

    Oki, Takashi; Miyoshi, Hirokazu; Oishi, Yoshifumi; Mizuguchi, Yukio; Ara, Nusrat; Iuchi, Arata

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) is a syndrome that frequently occurs in older people and patients with cardiovascular risk factors, particularly hypertension. This syndrome is not a specific disease process, whereas is associated with high morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFREF) as well. Therefore, a "one size fits all" diagnosis strategy is unlikely to operate for patients with HFPEF. Assessment of left atrial (LA)-left ventricular (LV)-arterial coupling seems to have a clinical impact on hypertensive patients, because HF signs and symptoms have been found to be significantly related to inappropriate LA-LV interaction during diastole and LV-arterial interaction during systole. Two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography (2DSTE) is a new tool that may have a role in earlier detecting the impaired LA, LV, and arterial function in asymptomatic patients. This review explored the impact of LA-LV-arterial coupling in understanding the pathophysiology of hypertension as a road to HFPEF, and the possibilities of clinical application by using 2DSTE.

  1. Impaired cerebral haemodynamic function associated with chronic traumatic brain injury in professional boxers.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Damian M; Jones, Daniel W; Sinnott, Andrew; Brugniaux, Julien V; New, Karl J; Hodson, Danielle; Marley, Christopher J; Smirl, Jonathan D; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Ainslie, Philip N

    2013-02-01

    The present study examined to what extent professional boxing compromises cerebral haemodynamic function and its association with CTBI (chronic traumatic brain injury). A total of 12 male professional boxers were compared with 12 age-, gender- and physical fitness-matched non-boxing controls. We assessed dCA (dynamic cerebral autoregulation; thigh-cuff technique and transfer function analysis), CVRCO₂ (cerebrovascular reactivity to changes in CO₂: 5% CO₂ and controlled hyperventilation), orthostatic tolerance (supine to standing) and neurocognitive function (psychometric tests). Blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler ultrasound), mean arterial blood pressure (finger photoplethysmography), end-tidal CO₂ (capnography) and cortical oxyhaemoglobin concentration (near-IR spectroscopy) were continuously measured. Boxers were characterized by fronto-temporal neurocognitive dysfunction and impaired dCA as indicated by a lower rate of regulation and autoregulatory index (P<0.05 compared with controls). Likewise, CVRCO₂ was also reduced resulting in a lower CVRCO₂ range (P<0.05 compared with controls). The latter was most marked in boxers with the highest CTBI scores and correlated against the volume and intensity of sparring during training (r=-0.84, P<0.05). These impairments coincided with more marked orthostatic hypotension, cerebral hypoperfusion and corresponding cortical de-oxygenation during orthostatic stress (P<0.05 compared with controls). In conclusion, these findings provide the first comprehensive evidence for chronically impaired cerebral haemodynamic function in active boxers due to the mechanical trauma incurred by repetitive, sub-concussive head impact incurred during sparring training. This may help explain why CTBI is a progressive disease that manifests beyond the active boxing career.

  2. Altered functional connectivity networks in acallosal and socially impaired BTBR mice.

    PubMed

    Sforazzini, Francesco; Bertero, Alice; Dodero, Luca; David, Gergely; Galbusera, Alberto; Scattoni, Maria Luisa; Pasqualetti, Massimo; Gozzi, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC) is a congenital condition associated with wide-ranging emotional and social impairments often overlapping with the diagnostic criteria for autism. Mapping functional connectivity in the acallosal brain can help identify neural correlates of the deficits associated with this condition, and elucidate how congenital white matter alterations shape the topology of large-scale functional networks. By using resting-state BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI), here we show that acallosal BTBR T+tpr3tf/J (BTBR) mice, an idiopathic model of autism, exhibit impaired intra-hemispheric connectivity in fronto-cortical, but not in posterior sensory cortical areas. We also document profoundly altered subcortical and intra-hemispheric connectivity networks, with evidence of marked fronto-thalamic and striatal disconnectivity, along with aberrant spatial extension and strength of ipsilateral and local connectivity. Importantly, inter-hemispheric tracing of monosynaptic connections in the primary visual cortex using recombinant rabies virus confirmed the absence of direct homotopic pathways between posterior cortical areas of BTBR mice, suggesting a polysynaptic origin for the synchronous rsfMRI signal observed in these regions. Collectively, the observed long-range connectivity impairments recapitulate hallmark neuroimaging findings in autism, and are consistent with the behavioral phenotype of BTBR mice. In contrast to recent rsfMRI studies in high functioning AgCC individuals, the profound fronto-cortical and subcortical disconnectivity mapped suggest that compensatory mechanism may not necessarily restore the full connectional topology of the brain, resulting in residual connectivity alterations that serve as plausible substrates for the cognitive and emotional deficits often associated with AgCC. PMID:25445840

  3. The impact of behavioral impairment of functional ability in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Green, C R; Marin, D B; Mohs, R C; Schmeidler, J; Aryan, M; Fine, E; Davis, K L

    1999-04-01

    This study sought to determine the relationship between behavioral disturbance and functional status in a longitudinally studied sample of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). One hundred and forty-nine patients meeting NINCDS-ADRDA criteria for probable AD were followed for an average of 37.3 months, with follow-up assessments every 6 months. Subjects were seen at the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center clinics at the Mt Sinai Medical Center, New York, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bronx, New York. Measures included the Physical and Self-Maintenance Scale (PSMS) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale (IADLS) of Lawton and Brody and the cognitive and non-cognitive subscales of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS). For each patient the assessment at which they had their most severe non-cognitive symptoms as measured by the non-cognitive part of the ADAS (ADAS-NC) was determined. ADAS-NC scores at that assessment were correlated with IADLS and PSMS scores at the same assessment and at the next assessment 6 months later. While there was some modest association of ADAS-NC scores with functional impairment using pairwise correlation coefficients, none of the correlations remained significant when the severity of cognitive impairment was controlled statistically. Findings were not significantly changed when drug status was controlled. These results suggest that behavioral disturbance, while very troubling to caregivers and patients, does not substantially worsen functional ability beyond the contribution of cognitive impairment in AD. Together with previous results indicating that non-cognitive symptoms in AD are episodic and fluctuating rather than progressive, the present data suggest that interventions for non-cognitive disturbances in AD should be viewed as ways to increase patient comfort, safety and ease of care and not as ways to improve functional autonomy. The latter can be achieved only by improving the progressive cognitive

  4. Pneumonia in Childhood and Impaired Lung Function in Adults: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Johnny Y.C.; Stern, Debra A.; Guerra, Stefano; Wright, Anne L.; Morgan, Wayne J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diminished lung function and increased prevalence of asthma have been reported in children with a history of early lower respiratory illnesses (LRIs), including pneumonia. Whether these associations persist up to adulthood has not been established. METHODS: As part of the prospective Tucson Children's Respiratory Study, LRIs during the first 3 years of life were ascertained by pediatricians. Spirometry was performed at ages 11, 16, 22, and 26 years. The occurrence of asthma/wheeze during the previous year was ascertained at ages 11, 13, 16, 18, 22, 24, 26, and 29 years. Longitudinal random effects models and generalized estimating equations were used to assess the relation of LRIs to lung function and asthma. RESULTS: Compared with participants without early-life LRIs, those with pneumonia had the most severe subsequent lung function impairment, with mean ± SE deficits of −3.9% ± 0.9% (P < .001) and −2.5% ± 0.8% (P = .001) for pre- and post-bronchodilator FEV1:FVC ratio from age 11 to 26 years, respectively. Pneumonia was associated with increased risk for asthma (odds ratio [OR]: 1.95; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11–3.44) and wheeze (OR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.28–2.95) over the same age range. Early non-pneumonia LRIs were associated with mildly impaired pre-bronchodilator FEV1 (−62.8 ± 27.9mL, P = .024) and FEV1:FVC ratio (−1.1 ± 0.5%, P = .018), and wheeze (OR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.09–1.72). CONCLUSIONS: Early pneumonia is associated with asthma and impaired airway function, which is partially reversible with bronchodilators and persists into adulthood. Early pneumonia may be a major risk factor for adult chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:25733757

  5. Disorganized symptoms and executive functioning predict impaired social functioning in subjects at risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Ali; Jahshan, Carol; Cadenhead, Kristin S

    2011-01-01

    Predictors of social functioning deficits were assessed in 22 individuals "at risk" for psychosis. Disorganized symptoms and executive functioning predicted social functioning at follow-up. Early intervention efforts that focus on social and cognitive skills are indicated in this vulnerable population.

  6. Relationship between cognitive impairment and nutritional assessment on functional status in Calabrian long-term-care

    PubMed Central

    Malara, Alba; Sgrò, Giovanni; Caruso, Chiara; Ceravolo, Francesco; Curinga, Giuseppe; Renda, Grazia Francesca; Spadea, Fausto; Garo, Michele; Rispoli, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Objective The interaction between dementia and nutritional state is very complex and not yet fully understood. The aim of the present study was to assess the interaction between cognitive impairment and nutritional state in a cohort of residential elderly in relationship with functional condition of patients and their load of assistance in long-term-care facilities of the National Association of Third Age Structures (ANASTE) Calabria. Methods One hundred seventy-four subjects (122 female and 52 male) were admitted to the long-term-care ANASTE Calabria study. All patients underwent multidimensional geriatric assessment. Nutritional state was assessed with the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), whereas cognitive performance was evaluated by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The functional state was assessed by Barthel Index (BI) and Activity Daily Living (ADL). The following nutritional biochemical parameters were also evaluated: albumin, cholesterol, iron, and hemoglobin. All patients were reassessed 180 days later. Results A severe cognitive impairment in MMSE performance was displayed in 49.7% patients, while 39.8% showed a moderate deficit; 6.9% had a slight deficit; and 3.4% evidenced no cognitive impairment. In MNA, 30% of patients exhibited an impairment of nutritional state; 56% were at risk of malnutrition; and 14% showed no nutritional problems. Malnutrition was present in 42% of patients with severe cognitive impairment, but only 4% of malnourished patients showed moderate cognitive deficit. The statistical analysis displayed a significant correlation between MNA and MMSE (P<0.001), as did MMSE correlated with Activity Daily Living (P<0.001) and BI (P<0.05). MNA correlated with BI (P<0.001) and albumin (P<0.001). The follow-up showed a strong correlation between cognitive deterioration and worsening of nutritional state (P<0.005) as well as with the functional state (P<0.05) and mortality (P<0.01). Conclusion The present study clearly shows that

  7. Multiple sclerosis associated genetic variants of CD226 impair regulatory T cell function.

    PubMed

    Piédavent-Salomon, Melanie; Willing, Anne; Engler, Jan Broder; Steinbach, Karin; Bauer, Simone; Eggert, Britta; Ufer, Friederike; Kursawe, Nina; Wehrmann, Sabine; Jäger, Jan; Reinhardt, Stefanie; Friese, Manuel A

    2015-11-01

    Recent association studies have linked numerous genetic variants with an increased risk for multiple sclerosis, although their functional relevance remains largely unknown. Here we investigated phenotypical and functional consequences of a genetic variant in the CD226 gene that, among other autoimmune diseases, predisposes to multiple sclerosis. Phenotypically, effector and regulatory CD4(+) memory T cells of healthy individuals carrying the predisposing CD226 genetic variant showed, in comparison to carriers of the protective variant, reduced surface expression of CD226 and an impaired induction of CD226 after stimulation. This haplotype-dependent reduction in CD226 expression on memory T cells was abrogated in patients with multiple sclerosis, as CD226 expression was comparable to healthy risk haplotype carriers irrespective of genetic variant. Functionally, FOXP3-positive regulatory T cells from healthy carriers of the genetic protective variant showed superior suppressive capacity, which was again abrogated in multiple sclerosis patients. Mimicking the phenotype of human CD226 genetic risk variant carriers, regulatory T cells derived from Cd226-deficient mice showed similarly reduced inhibitory activity, eventually resulting in an exacerbated disease course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the animal model of multiple sclerosis. Therefore, by combining human and mouse analyses we show that CD226 exhibits an important role in the activation of regulatory T cells, with its genetically imposed dysregulation impairing regulatory T cell function.

  8. PPAR-γ Impairment Alters Peroxisome Functionality in Primary Astrocyte Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Zanardelli, Matteo; Micheli, Laura; Ghelardini, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisomes provide glial cells with protective functions against the harmful effects of H2O2 on neurons and peroxisome impairment results in nervous lesions. Agonists of the γ-subtype of the Peroxisome-Proliferator-Activated-Receptors (PPAR) have been proposed as neuroprotective agents in neurodegenerative disorders. Nevertheless, the role of PPAR-γ alterations in pathophysiological mechanisms and the relevance of peroxisome functions in the PPAR-γ effects are not yet clear. In a primary cell culture of rat astrocytes, the irreversible PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662 concentration-dependently decreased the activity of catalase, the most important antioxidant defense enzyme in peroxisomes. Catalase functionality recovered in a few days and the PPAR-γ agonist rosiglitazone promoted reversal of enzymatic damage. The reversible antagonist G3335 reduced both the activity and expression of catalase in a rosiglitazone-prevented manner. G3335 reduced also the glutathione reductase expression, indicating that enzyme involved in glutathione regeneration was compromised. Neither the PPAR-α target gene Acyl-Coenzyme-A-oxidase-1 nor the mitochondrial detoxifying enzyme NADH:ubiquinone-oxidoreductase (NDFUS3) was altered by PPAR-γ inhibition. In conclusion, PPAR-γ inhibition induced impairment of catalase in astrocytes. A general decrease of the antioxidant defenses of the cell suggests that a PPAR-γ hypofunction could participate in neurodegenerative mechanisms through peroxisomal damage. This series of experiments could be a useful model for studying compounds able to restore peroxisome functionality. PMID:24729976

  9. Impaired subendocardial contractile myofiber function in asymptomatic aged humans, as detected using MRI.

    PubMed

    Lumens, Joost; Delhaas, Tammo; Arts, Theo; Cowan, Brett R; Young, Alistair A

    2006-10-01

    With aging, structural and functional changes occur in the myocardium without obvious impairment of systolic left ventricular (LV) function. Transmural differences in myocardial vulnerability for these changes may result in increase of transmural inhomogeneity in contractile myofiber function. Subendocardial fibrosis and impairment of subendocardial perfusion due to hypertension might change the transmural distribution of contractile myofiber function. The ratio of LV torsion to endocardial circumferential shortening (torsion-to-shortening ratio; TSR) during systole reflects the transmural distribution of contractile myofiber function. We investigated whether the transmural distribution of systolic contractile myofiber function changes with age. Magnetic resonance tissue tagging was performed to derive LV torsion and endocardial circumferential shortening. TSR was quantified in asymptomatic young [age 23.2 (SD 2.6) yr, n = 15] and aged volunteers [age 68.8 (SD 4.4) yr, n = 16]. TSR and its standard deviation were significantly elevated in the aged group [0.47 (SD 0.12) aged vs. 0.34 (SD 0.05) young; P = 0.0004]. In the aged group, blood pressure and the ratio of LV wall mass to end-diastolic volume were mildly elevated but could not be correlated to the increase in TSR. There were no significant differences in other indexes of systolic LV function such as end-systolic volume and ejection fraction. The elevated systolic TSR in the asymptomatic aged subjects suggests that aging is associated with local loss of contractile myofiber function in the subendocardium relative to the subepicardium potentially caused by subclinical pathological incidents.

  10. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ETHINYLESTRADIOL-MEDIATED CHANGES IN ENDOCRINE FUNCTION AND REPRODUCTION IMPAIRMENT IN JAPANESE MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many biochemical endpoints currently are used to describe endocrine function in fish; however, the sensitivity of these parameters as biomarkers of impaired reproduction or sexual development is not well understood. In the present study, adult Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) we...

  11. Hypothermic continuous machine perfusion improves metabolic preservation and functional recovery in heart grafts.

    PubMed

    Van Caenegem, Olivier; Beauloye, Christophe; Vercruysse, Jonathan; Horman, Sandrine; Bertrand, Luc; Bethuyne, Noëlla; Poncelet, Alain J; Gianello, Pierre; Demuylder, Peter; Legrand, Eric; Beaurin, Gwen; Bontemps, Françoise; Jacquet, Luc M; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis

    2015-02-01

    The number of heart transplants is decreasing due to organ shortage, yet the donor pool could be enlarged by improving graft preservation. Hypothermic machine perfusion (MP) has been shown to improve kidney, liver, or lung graft preservation. Sixteen pig hearts were recovered following cardioplegia and randomized to two different groups of 4-hour preservation using either static cold storage (CS) or MP (Modified LifePort© System, Organ Recovery Systems, Itasca, Il). The grafts then underwent reperfusion on a Langendorff for 60 min. Energetic metabolism was quantified at baseline, postpreservation, and postreperfusion by measuring lactate and high-energy phosphates. The contractility index (CI) was assessed both in vivo prior to cardioplegia and during reperfusion. Following reperfusion, the hearts preserved using CS exhibited higher lactate levels (56.63 ± 23.57 vs. 11.25 ± 3.92 μmol/g; P < 0.001), increased adenosine monophosphate/adenosine triphosphate (AMP/ATP) ratio (0.4 ± 0.23 vs. 0.04 ± 0.04; P < 0.001), and lower phosphocreatine/creatine (PCr/Cr) ratio (33.5 ± 12.6 vs. 55.3 ± 5.8; P <0.001). Coronary flow was similar in both groups during reperfusion (107 ± 9 vs. 125 + /-9 ml/100 g/min heart; P = ns). CI decreased in the CS group, yet being well-preserved in the MP group. Compared with CS, MP resulted in improved preservation of the energy state and more successful functional recovery of heart graft.

  12. Affecting Rhomboid-3 Function Causes a Dilated Heart in Adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin; Lee, Teresa; Lin, Na; Wolf, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila is a well recognized model of several human diseases, and recent investigations have demonstrated that Drosophila can be used as a model of human heart failure. Previously, we described that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to rapidly examine the cardiac function in adult, awake flies. This technique provides images that are similar to echocardiography in humans, and therefore we postulated that this approach could be combined with the vast resources that are available in the fly community to identify new mutants that have abnormal heart function, a hallmark of certain cardiovascular diseases. Using OCT to examine the cardiac function in adult Drosophila from a set of molecularly-defined genomic deficiencies from the DrosDel and Exelixis collections, we identified an abnormally enlarged cardiac chamber in a series of deficiency mutants spanning the rhomboid 3 locus. Rhomboid 3 is a member of a highly conserved family of intramembrane serine proteases and processes Spitz, an epidermal growth factor (EGF)–like ligand. Using multiple approaches based on the examination of deficiency stocks, a series of mutants in the rhomboid-Spitz–EGF receptor pathway, and cardiac-specific transgenic rescue or dominant-negative repression of EGFR, we demonstrate that rhomboid 3 mediated activation of the EGF receptor pathway is necessary for proper adult cardiac function. The importance of EGF receptor signaling in the adult Drosophila heart underscores the concept that evolutionarily conserved signaling mechanisms are required to maintain normal myocardial function. Interestingly, prior work showing the inhibition of ErbB2, a member of the EGF receptor family, in transgenic knock-out mice or individuals that received herceptin chemotherapy is associated with the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. Our results, in conjunction with the demonstration that altered ErbB2 signaling underlies certain forms of mammalian cardiomyopathy, suggest that an

  13. Remote at-home detection and monitoring of functional chronotropic incompetence in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Katra, Rodolphe P; Chakravarthy, Niranjan; Libbus, Imad

    2011-02-01

    Chronotropic incompetence (CI) is common in heart failure (HF) patients and is associated with worsening outcome. Detecting and tracking functional CI during activities of daily living could provide insight into its contribution to HF symptoms and facilitate effective HF patient management. HF patients (n = 180, NYHA Class III/IV, ejection fraction (EF) ≤40%) were enrolled in a multi-center prospective monitoring study and had an external multi-sensor system applied to the chest and replaced weekly during a 90-day study. Medical information was collected at baseline and study close. Heart rate, respiration, activity, and body fluid data from the system were transmitted at regular intervals and used for offline analysis. Patients were primarily male (70%), with 61 ± 13 years mean age, 25 ± 5 kg/m(2) BMI, and 28 ± 7% EF. By correlating age-adjusted activity level and heart rate adaptation with a proprietary algorithm, functional CI was detected in 45% and ruled out in 29% of patients under conditions of daily living. In the remaining patients (26%), functional CI assessment was indeterminate due to insufficient age-adjusted activity level. Functional CI and No-CI groups were not significantly different in terms of baseline demographics, characteristics or HF outcome over the study period. β-blocker use was 16% in the CI group and 82% in the no-CI group (p < 0.001), and therefore, could not explain the manifestation of functional CI. This proof-of-concept study suggests that a chronotropic response that may be functionally debilitating during activities of daily living in HF patients can be detected and tracked in a point-of-care telemonitoring approach using a non-invasive, adherent device. PMID:20931310

  14. High CO2 Levels Impair Alveolar Epithelial Function Independently of pH

    PubMed Central

    Briva, Arturo; Vadász, István; Lecuona, Emilia; Welch, Lynn C.; Chen, Jiwang; Dada, Laura A.; Trejo, Humberto E.; Dumasius, Vidas; Azzam, Zaher S.; Myrianthefs, Pavlos M.; Batlle, Daniel; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2007-01-01

    Background In patients with acute respiratory failure, gas exchange is impaired due to the accumulation of fluid in the lung airspaces. This life-threatening syndrome is treated with mechanical ventilation, which is adjusted to maintain gas exchange, but can be associated with the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the lung. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a by-product of cellular energy utilization and its elimination is affected via alveolar epithelial cells. Signaling pathways sensitive to changes in CO2 levels were described in plants and neuronal mammalian cells. However, it has not been fully elucidated whether non-neuronal cells sense and respond to CO2. The Na,K-ATPase consumes ∼40% of the cellular metabolism to maintain cell homeostasis. Our study examines the effects of increased pCO2 on the epithelial Na,K-ATPase a major contributor to alveolar fluid reabsorption which is a marker of alveolar epithelial function. Principal Findings We found that short-term increases in pCO2 impaired alveolar fluid reabsorption in rats. Also, we provide evidence that non-excitable, alveolar epithelial cells sense and respond to high levels of CO2, independently of extracellular and intracellular pH, by inhibiting Na,K-ATPase function, via activation of PKCζ which phosphorylates the Na,K-ATPase, causing it to endocytose from the plasma membrane into intracellular pools. Conclusions Our data suggest that alveolar epithelial cells, through which CO2 is eliminated in mammals, are highly sensitive to hypercapnia. Elevated CO2 levels impair alveolar epithelial function, independently of pH, which is relevant in patients with lung diseases and altered alveolar gas exchange. PMID:18043745

  15. Recovery of ovary function impaired by chemotherapy using Chinese herbal medicine in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tian; Fu, Yu; Gao, Hui; Zhao, Zhimei; Zhao, Liying; Han, Bing

    2014-10-01

    The ovary is not only involved in female germ cell development and maturation, but also adjusts female endocrinology. Its function is severely impaired during chemotherapy, and premature ovarian failure may be induced. Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has displayed significant potential in the treatment of female endocrine disorders; however, it is unknown whether it can recover ovarian function impaired by chemotherapy. In the present study, CHM was used to treat rat models of ovarian dysfunction impaired by chemotherapeutic drugs. Three groups were included in this study: a prevention group, a treatment group, and a prevention-treatment group. Routine gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) treatment was used as a control. The results showed that body weight, fertility, estrus days, hormone levels, and ovary weight were restored when CHM was administered in these rat models. Moreover, in the prevention-treatment group, the number of follicles at each developmental stage significantly increased compared with the prevention or treatment group. Furthermore, the number of apoptotic cells significantly decreased, and the relative mRNA expression of caspase-3 significantly decreased, in the prevention-treatment group. The results of gene expression analysis indicated that the expression of anti-Müllerianhormone (AMH) which indicates ovarian preservation was significantly up-regulated in the prevention-treatment group and was similar to normal rats. The expression of growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) was significantly enhanced in both the prevention-treatment group and the GnRHa group, which suggested that the oocytes were of better quality. Finally, we found that there were no differences in body weight and fertility in the offspring conceived by the drug-treated rats, which partly indicated the safety of the medicine. In conclusion, Chinese herbal medicine showed a beneficial role in the recovery of ovary function in these rat models and has significant

  16. Impaired Phenotype and Function of T Follicular Helper Cells in HIV-1-Infected Children Receiving ART

    PubMed Central

    Bekele, Yonas; Amu, Sylvie; Bobosha, Kidist; Lantto, Rebecka; Nilsson, Anna; Endale, Birtukan; Gebre, Meseret; Aseffa, Abraham; Rethi, Bence; Howe, Rawleigh; Chiodi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Abstract T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are important components in development of specific humoral immune responses; whether the number and biology of Tfh cells is impaired in HIV-1-infected children is not yet studied. The frequency, phenotype, and function of Tfh cells and B cells were determined in blood of HIV-1-infected children receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) and age-matched controls. Flow cytometry was used to characterize the frequency of Tfh cells and B cell subsets. Cytokine expression was measured after in vitro activation of Tfh cells. A reduced frequency of memory Tfh cells (P < 0.001) was identified in HIV-1-infected children and, on these cells, a reduced expression of programmed death-1 (PD-1) and inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS) (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01). Upon activation, the capacity of Tfh cells to express IL-4, an important cytokine for B cell function, was impaired in HIV-1-infected children. B cell subpopulations in HIV-1-infected children displayed significant differences from the control group: the frequency of resting memory (RM) B cells was reduced (P < 0.01) whereas the frequency of exhausted memory B cells increased (P < 0.001). Interestingly, the decline of RM cells correlated with the reduction of memory Tfh cells (P = 0.02). Our study shows that function and phenotype of Tfh cells, pivotal cells for establishment of adaptive B cell responses, are impaired during HIV-1 infection in children. A consistent reduction of memory Tfh cells is associated with declined frequencies of RM B cells, creating a novel link between dysfunctional features of these cell types, major players in establishment of humoral immunity. PMID:26166114

  17. Impaired nigrostriatal function precedes behavioral deficits in a genetic mitochondrial model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Good, Cameron H.; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Hoffer, Barry J.; Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.; Bäckman, Cristina M.; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Olson, Lars; Gellhaar, Sandra; Galter, Dagmar; Lupica, Carl R.

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) involves progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) neurons over an extended period of time. Mitochondrial damage may lead to PD, and neurotoxins affecting mitochondria are widely used to produce degeneration of the nigrostriatal circuitry. Deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A gene (Tfam) in C57BL6 mouse DA neurons leads to a slowly progressing parkinsonian phenotype in which motor impairment is first observed at ∼12 wk of age. l-DOPA treatment improves motor dysfunction in these “MitoPark” mice, but this declines when DA neuron loss is more complete. To investigate early neurobiological events potentially contributing to PD, we compared the neurochemical and electrophysiological properties of the nigrostriatal circuit in behaviorally asymptomatic 6- to 8-wk-old MitoPark mice and age-matched control littermates. Release, but not uptake of DA, was impaired in MitoPark mouse striatal brain slices, and nigral DA neurons lacked characteristic pacemaker activity compared with control mice. Also, hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channel function was reduced in MitoPark DA neurons, although HCN messenger RNA was unchanged. This study demonstrates altered nigrostriatal function that precedes behavioral parkinsonian symptoms in this genetic PD model. A full understanding of these presymptomatic cellular properties may lead to more effective early treatments of PD.—Good, C. H., Hoffman, A. F., Hoffer, B. J., Chefer, V. I., Shippenberg, T. S., Bäckman, C. M., Larsson, N.-G., Olson, L., Gellhaar, S., Galter, D., Lupica, C. R. Impaired nigrostriatal function precedes behavioral deficits in a genetic mitochondrial model of Parkinson's disease. PMID:21233488

  18. Changes in expression of a functional G sub i protein in cultured rat heart cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, I.S.; Gaa, S.T.; Rogers, T.B. )

    1988-07-01

    The muscarinic cholinergic agonist, carbachol, and pertussis toxin were used to examine the functional status of the guanine nucleotide-binding protein that inhibits adenylate cyclase (G{sub i}) in cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes. The isoproterenol stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in myocyte membranes and adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in intact cells (4 days in culture) were insensitive to carbachol. However, in cells cultured for 11 days, carbachol inhibited isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation by 30%. Angiotensin II (ANG II) was also found to inhibit isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation in day 11 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Pertussis toxin treatment reversed the inhibitory effects of both ANG II and carbachol, suggesting a role for G{sub i} in the process. Carbachol binding to membranes from day 4 cells was relatively insensitive to guanine nucleotides when compared with binding to membranes from day 11 or adult cells. Furthermore, pertussis toxin-mediated {sup 32}P incorporation into a 39- to 41-kDa substrate in day 11 membranes was increased 3.2-fold over that measured in day 4 membranes. These findings support the view that, although G{sub i} is expressed, it is nonfunctional in 4-day-old cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes and acquisition of functional G{sub i} is dependent on culture conditions. Furthermore, the ANG II receptor can couple to G{sub i} in heart.

  19. Age-Related Impairment of Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function: Pathophysiological and Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    De Tata, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes significantly increases with age. The relevance of this association is dramatically magnified by the concomitant global aging of the population, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Here, some recent advances in this field are reviewed at the level of both the pathophysiology of glucose homeostasis and the cellular senescence of pancreatic islets. Overall, recent results highlight the crucial role of beta-cell dysfunction in the age-related impairment of pancreatic endocrine function and delineate the possibility of new original therapeutic interventions. PMID:25232350

  20. Luteolin improves the impaired nerve functions in diabetic neuropathy: behavioral and biochemical evidences.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Li, Qiang; Zhao, Qingsong; Zhang, Jinchao; Lin, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are a major cause of morbidity in patients with diabetes mellitus. Up to now, drugs for improving the impaired nerve functions has been lacking for diabetic neuropathy. The antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of luteolin make it an attractive candidate for diabetic neuropathy. The present study was designed to investigate the putative beneficial effect of luteolin on diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic rats were intraperitoneally treated with daily luteolin (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg) or vehicle for 3 weeks from the 28(th) day after streptozotocin injection. Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical studies were performed to evaluate the effect of luteolin on the impaired nerve functions in diabetic neuropathy. It was found that luteolin dose dependently alleviated abnormal sensation, improved nerve conduction velocities and nerve blood flow in diabetic rats. Biochanical analysis showed that luteolin significantly lowered the reactive oxygen species production and malondialdehyde level, as well as increased antioxidants activities in a dose dependent manner. In addition, luteolin significantly up-regulated the protein levels of nuclear factor-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in diabetic nerves. Taken together, luteolin is capable of improving diabetes-induced deficit in motor and sensory functions, which could be attributable, at least in part, to its Nrf2-dependent antioxidant capacity. The findings in the present study highlight the therapeutic value of luteolin for diabetic neuropathy.

  1. Aberrant topologies and reconfiguration pattern of functional brain network in children with second language reading impairment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lanfang; Li, Hehui; Zhang, Manli; Wang, Zhengke; Wei, Na; Liu, Li; Meng, Xiangzhi; Ding, Guosheng

    2016-07-01

    Prior work has extensively studied neural deficits in children with reading impairment (RI) in their native language but has rarely examined those of RI children in their second language (L2). A recent study revealed that the function of the local brain regions was disrupted in children with RI in L2, but it is not clear whether the disruption also occurs at a large-scale brain network level. Using fMRI and graph theoretical analysis, we explored the topology of the whole-brain functional network during a phonological rhyming task and network reconfigurations across task and short resting phases in Chinese children with English reading impairment versus age-matched typically developing (TD) children. We found that, when completing the phonological task, the RI group exhibited higher local network efficiency and network modularity compared with the TD group. When switching between the phonological task and the short resting phase, the RI group showed difficulty with network reconfiguration, as reflected in fewer changes in the local efficiency and modularity properties and less rearrangement of the modular communities. These findings were reproducible after controlling for the effects of in-scanner accuracy, participant gender, and L1 reading performance. The results from the whole-brain network analyses were largely replicated in the task-activated network. These findings provide preliminary evidence supporting that RI in L2 is associated with not only abnormal functional network organization but also poor flexibility of the neural system in responding to changing cognitive demands. PMID:27321248

  2. Luteolin improves the impaired nerve functions in diabetic neuropathy: behavioral and biochemical evidences

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Li, Qiang; Zhao, Qingsong; Zhang, Jinchao; Lin, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are a major cause of morbidity in patients with diabetes mellitus. Up to now, drugs for improving the impaired nerve functions has been lacking for diabetic neuropathy. The antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of luteolin make it an attractive candidate for diabetic neuropathy. The present study was designed to investigate the putative beneficial effect of luteolin on diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic rats were intraperitoneally treated with daily luteolin (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg) or vehicle for 3 weeks from the 28th day after streptozotocin injection. Behavioral, electro