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Sample records for impaired lung function

  1. Particulate air pollution and impaired lung function

    PubMed Central

    Paulin, Laura; Hansel, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world, particularly in individuals with existing lung disease. Of the most common air pollutants, particulate matter (PM) is associated with an increased risk of exacerbations and respiratory symptoms in individuals with existing lung disease, and to a lesser extent, in those without known respiratory issues. The majority of published research has focused on the effects of PM exposures on symptoms and health care utilization. Fewer studies focus on the impact of PM on objective measurements of pulmonary function. This review will focus on the effects of PM exposure on objective measurements of lung function in both healthy individuals and those with existing lung disease. PMID:26962445

  2. Pericardial Fat Is Associated With Impaired Lung Function and a Restrictive Lung Pattern in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiankang; Bidulescu, Aurelian; Burchfiel, Cecil M.; Taylor, Herman A.; Petrini, Marcy F.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Impaired lung function has been linked to obesity and systemic inflammation. Pericardial fat has been shown to be associated with anomalies in cardiac structure, function, and atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that pericardial fat may have a similar role in the impairment of lung function. Methods: Cross-sectional associations of pericardial fat volumes, quantified by multidetector CT scan, with FEV1 and FVC assessed by spirometry, were investigated in 1,293 participants (54.5 ± 10.8 years; 66.4% women) in the Jackson Heart Study. We also examined whether these associations were independent of visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Results: Pericardial fat was associated with impaired lung function after multivariable adjustment, but these associations generally did not remain after adjustment for VAT. An exception was the FEV1/FVC ratio. Higher pericardial fat volumes were associated with higher odds of a restrictive lung pattern and lower odds of airway obstruction. Participants in the highest quartile had the highest odds of a restrictive lung pattern (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.22-2.79, compared with quartile 1), even after adjustment for VAT. The odds of obstruction decreased across increasing quartiles of pericardial fat. These relationships were generally graded, suggesting dose-response trends. Conclusions: Pericardial fat is generally associated with lower lung function and independently associated with a restrictive lung pattern in middle-aged and elderly adults. Further research is needed to fully understand the mechanisms through which pericardial fat contributes to pulmonary anomalies. PMID:21737489

  3. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Physical Function after Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Shanholtz, Carl; Husain, Nadia; Dennison, Cheryl R.; Herridge, Margaret S.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Needham, Dale M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Survivors of acute lung injury (ALI) frequently have substantial depressive symptoms and physical impairment, but the longitudinal epidemiology of these conditions remains unclear. Objectives: To evaluate the 2-year incidence and duration of depressive symptoms and physical impairment after ALI, as well as risk factors for these conditions. Methods: This prospective, longitudinal cohort study recruited patients from 13 intensive care units (ICUs) in four hospitals, with follow-up 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after ALI. The outcomes were Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale depression score greater than or equal to 8 (“depressive symptoms”) in patients without a history of depression before ALI, and two or more dependencies in instrumental activities of daily living (“impaired physical function”) in patients without baseline impairment. Measurements and Main Results: During 2-year follow-up of 186 ALI survivors, the cumulative incidences of depressive symptoms and impaired physical function were 40 and 66%, respectively, with greatest incidence by 3-month follow-up; modal durations were greater than 21 months for each outcome. Risk factors for incident depressive symptoms were education 12 years or less, baseline disability or unemployment, higher baseline medical comorbidity, and lower blood glucose in the ICU. Risk factors for incident impaired physical function were longer ICU stay and prior depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Incident depressive symptoms and impaired physical function are common and long-lasting during the first 2 years after ALI. Interventions targeting potentially modifiable risk factors (e.g., substantial depressive symptoms in early recovery) should be evaluated to improve ALI survivors’ long-term outcomes. PMID:22161158

  4. Proteasome function is not impaired in healthy aging of the lung.

    PubMed

    Caniard, Anne; Ballweg, Korbinian; Lukas, Christina; Yildirim, Ali Ö; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2015-10-01

    Aging is the progressive loss of cellular function which inevitably leads to death. Failure of proteostasis including the decrease in proteasome function is one hallmark of aging. In the lung, proteasome activity was shown to be impaired in age-related diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, little is known on proteasome function during healthy aging. Here, we comprehensively analyzed healthy lung aging and proteasome function in wildtype, proteasome reporter and immunoproteasome knockout mice. Wildtype mice spontaneously developed senile lung emphysema while expression and activity of proteasome complexes and turnover of ubiquitinated substrates was not grossly altered in lungs of aged mice. Immunoproteasome subunits were specifically upregulated in the aged lung and the caspase-like proteasome activity concomitantly decreased. Aged knockout mice for the LMP2 or LMP7 immunoproteasome subunits showed no alteration in proteasome activities but exhibited typical lung aging phenotypes suggesting that immunoproteasome function is dispensable for physiological lung aging in mice. Our results indicate that healthy aging of the lung does not involve impairment of proteasome function. Apparently, the reserve capacity of the proteostasis systems in the lung is sufficient to avoid severe proteostasis imbalance during healthy aging.

  5. Proteasome function is not impaired in healthy aging of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Christina; Yildirim, Ali Ö.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the progressive loss of cellular function which inevitably leads to death. Failure of proteostasis including the decrease in proteasome function is one hallmark of aging. In the lung, proteasome activity was shown to be impaired in age‐related diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, little is known on proteasome function during healthy aging. Here, we comprehensively analyzed healthy lung aging and proteasome function in wildtype, proteasome reporter and immunoproteasome knockout mice. Wildtype mice spontaneously developed senile lung emphysema while expression and activity of proteasome complexes and turnover of ubiquitinated substrates was not grossly altered in lungs of aged mice. Immunoproteasome subunits were specifically upregulated in the aged lung and the caspase‐like proteasome activity concomitantly decreased. Aged knockout mice for the LMP2 or LMP7 immunoproteasome subunits showed no alteration in proteasome activities but exhibited typical lung aging phenotypes suggesting that immunoproteasome function is dispensable for physiological lung aging in mice. Our results indicate that healthy aging of the lung does not involve impairment of proteasome function. Apparently, the reserve capacity of the proteostasis systems in the lung is sufficient to avoid severe proteostasis imbalance during healthy aging. PMID:26540298

  6. Brain but not lung functions impaired after a chlorine incident.

    PubMed

    Kilburn, Kaye H

    2003-10-01

    A workplace bleach exposure incident was studied in 13 women to determine whether chlorine caused neurobehavioral and pulmonary functional effects. We compared neurophysiological and neuropsychological measurements in 13 chlorine-exposed women, 4.5 years after exposure, and 41 unexposed women. Reaction times, balance, blink reflex latency, color discrimination and several psychological tests were measured. Pulmonary function was assessed by spirometry. A profile of mood states and frequencies of 35 symptoms were obtained. Chlorine exposed women performed statistically significantly below unexposed women for simple and choice reaction times, balance with eyes open and eyes closed, color discrimination, grip strength, Culture Fair, digit symbol substitution, vocabulary, trail making B and pegboard. Profile of mood states scores and frequency symptoms were elevated. Respiratory symptoms were elevated but pulmonary volumes and flows were not reduced. Chlorine bleach exposure was associated with impaired neurobehavioral functions and elevated POMS scores and symptom frequencies. Alternatives to chlorine should be used.

  7. Impaired lung function in individuals chronically exposed to biomass combustion.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Saldiva, Silvia Regina Dias Médici; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Dolhnikoff, Marisa

    2012-01-01

    The use of biomass for cooking and heating is considered an important factor associated with respiratory diseases. However, few studies evaluate the amount of particulate matter less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5), symptoms and lung function in the same population. To evaluate the respiratory effects of biomass combustion and compare the results with those of individuals from the same community in Brazil using liquefied petroleum gas (Gas). 1402 individuals in 260 residences were divided into three groups according to exposure (Gas, Indoor-Biomass, Outside-Biomass). Respiratory symptoms were assessed using questionnaires. Reflectance of paper filters was used to assess particulate matter exposure. In 48 residences the amount of PM2.5 was also quantified. Pulmonary function tests were performed in 120 individuals. Reflectance index correlated directly with PM2.5 (r=0.92) and was used to estimate exposure (ePM2.5). There was a significant increase in ePM2.5 in Indoor-Biomass and Outside-Biomass, compared to Gas. There was a significantly increased odds ratio (OR) for cough, wheezing and dyspnea in adults exposed to Indoor-Biomass (OR=2.93, 2.33, 2.59, respectively) and Outside-Biomass (OR=1.78, 1.78, 1.80, respectively) compared to Gas. Pulmonary function tests revealed both Non-Smoker-Biomass and Smoker-Gas individuals to have decreased %predicted-forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) and FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) as compared to Non-Smoker-Gas. Pulmonary function tests data was inversely correlated with duration and ePM2.5. The prevalence of airway obstruction was 20% in both Non-Smoker-Biomass and Smoker-Gas subjects. Chronic exposure to biomass combustion is associated with increased prevalence of respiratory symptoms, reduced lung function and development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These effects are associated with the duration and magnitude of exposure and are exacerbated by tobacco smoke. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All

  8. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion in Rats Alters Lung Metabolism, Promotes Lipid Accumulation, and Impairs Alveolar Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Stafstrom, William; Hoek, Jan B.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism impairs pulmonary immune homeostasis and predisposes to inflammatory lung diseases, including infectious pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although alcoholism has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism, leading to lipid accumulation, hepatitis, and, eventually, cirrhosis, the effects of alcohol on pulmonary metabolism remain largely unknown. Because both the lung and the liver actively engage in lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that chronic alcoholism would impair pulmonary metabolic homeostasis in ways similar to its effects in the liver. We reasoned that perturbations in lipid metabolism might contribute to the impaired pulmonary immunity observed in people who chronically consume alcohol. We studied the metabolic consequences of chronic alcohol consumption in rat lungs in vivo and in alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. We found that chronic alcohol ingestion significantly alters lung metabolic homeostasis, inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase, increasing lipid synthesis, and suppressing the expression of genes essential to metabolizing fatty acids (FAs). Furthermore, we show that these metabolic alterations promoted a lung phenotype that is reminiscent of alcoholic fatty liver and is characterized by marked accumulation of triglycerides and free FAs within distal airspaces, AMs, and, to a lesser extent, alveolar epithelial type II cells. We provide evidence that the metabolic alterations in alcohol-exposed rats are mechanistically linked to immune impairments in the alcoholic lung: the elevations in FAs alter AM phenotypes and suppress both phagocytic functions and agonist-induced inflammatory responses. In summary, our work demonstrates that chronic alcohol ingestion impairs lung metabolic homeostasis and promotes pulmonary immune dysfunction. These findings suggest that therapies aimed at reversing alcohol-related metabolic alterations might be effective for preventing and

  9. Combined effect of urinary monohydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and impaired lung function on diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jian; Sun, Huizhen; Xiao, Lili; Zhou, Yun; Yin, Wenjun; Xu, Tian; Cheng, Juan; Chen, Weihong; Yuan, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Associations of type 2 diabetes with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and reduced lung function have been reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate effect of reduced lung function and exposure to background PAHs on diabetes. A total of 2730 individuals were drawn from the Wuhan-Zhuhai (WHZH) Cohort Study (n=3053). Participants completed physical examination, measurement of lung function and urinary monohydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OH-PAHs). Risk factors for type 2 diabetes were identified by multiple logistic regression analysis, and the presence of additive interaction between levels of urinary OH-PAHs and lower lung function was evaluated by calculation of the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) and attributable proportion due to interaction (AP). Urinary OH-PAHs levels was positively associated with type 2 diabetes among individuals with impaired lung function (p<0.05). Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1, odd ratio (OR): 0.664, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.491-0.900) and forced vital capacity (FVC, OR: 0.693, 95% CI: 0.537-0.893) were negatively associated with diabetes among individuals. Additive interaction of higher urinary levels of OH-PAHs and lower FVC (RERI: 0.679, 95% CI: 0.120-1.238); AP: 0.427, 95% CI: 0.072-0.782) was associated with diabetes. Exposure to background PAHs was related to diabetes among individuals with lower lung function. Urinary levels of OH-PAHs and reduced lung function had an additive effect on diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Serum p53 antibody detection in patients with impaired lung function.

    PubMed

    Mattioni, Manlio; Chinzari, Patrizia; Soddu, Silvia; Strigari, Lidia; Cilenti, Vincenzo; Mastropasqua, Eliuccia

    2013-02-06

    TP53 gene mutations can lead to the expression of a dysfunctional protein that in turn may enable genetically unstable cells to survive and change into malignant cells. Mutant p53 accumulates early in cells and can precociously induce circulating anti-p53 antibodies (p53Abs); in fact, p53 overexpression has been observed in pre-neoplastic lesions, such as bronchial dysplasia, and p53Abs have been found in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, before the diagnosis of lung and other tobacco-related tumors. A large prospective study was carried out, enrolling non-smokers, ex-smokers and smokers with or without the impairment of lung function, to analyze the incidence of serum p53Abs and the correlation with clinicopathologic features, in particular smoking habits and impairment of lung function, in order to investigate their possible role as early markers of the onset of lung cancer or other cancers. The p53Ab levels were evaluated by a specific ELISA in 675 subjects. Data showed that significant levels of serum p53Abs were present in 35 subjects (5.2%); no difference was observed in the presence of p53Abs with regard to age and gender, while p53Abs correlated with the number of cigarettes smoked per day and packs-year. Furthermore, serum p53Abs were associated with the worst lung function impairment. The median p53Ab level in positive subjects was 3.5 units/ml (range 1.2 to 65.3 units/ml). Only fifteen positive subjects participated in the follow-up, again resulting positive for serum p53Abs, and no evidence of cancer was found in these patients. The presence of serum p53Abs was found to be associated with smoking level and lung function impairment, both risk factors of cancer development. However, in our study we have not observed the occurrence of lung cancer or other cancers in the follow-up of positive subjects, therefore we cannot directly correlate the presence of serum p53Abs with cancer risk.

  11. Serum p53 antibody detection in patients with impaired lung function

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background TP53 gene mutations can lead to the expression of a dysfunctional protein that in turn may enable genetically unstable cells to survive and change into malignant cells. Mutant p53 accumulates early in cells and can precociously induce circulating anti-p53 antibodies (p53Abs); in fact, p53 overexpression has been observed in pre-neoplastic lesions, such as bronchial dysplasia, and p53Abs have been found in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, before the diagnosis of lung and other tobacco-related tumors. Methods A large prospective study was carried out, enrolling non-smokers, ex-smokers and smokers with or without the impairment of lung function, to analyze the incidence of serum p53Abs and the correlation with clinicopathologic features, in particular smoking habits and impairment of lung function, in order to investigate their possible role as early markers of the onset of lung cancer or other cancers. The p53Ab levels were evaluated by a specific ELISA in 675 subjects. Results Data showed that significant levels of serum p53Abs were present in 35 subjects (5.2%); no difference was observed in the presence of p53Abs with regard to age and gender, while p53Abs correlated with the number of cigarettes smoked per day and packs-year. Furthermore, serum p53Abs were associated with the worst lung function impairment. The median p53Ab level in positive subjects was 3.5 units/ml (range 1.2 to 65.3 units/ml). Only fifteen positive subjects participated in the follow-up, again resulting positive for serum p53Abs, and no evidence of cancer was found in these patients. Conclusion The presence of serum p53Abs was found to be associated with smoking level and lung function impairment, both risk factors of cancer development. However, in our study we have not observed the occurrence of lung cancer or other cancers in the follow-up of positive subjects, therefore we cannot directly correlate the presence of serum p53Abs with cancer risk. PMID:23384026

  12. Relationship Between Lung Function Impairment and Health-Related Quality of Life in COPD and Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Cristine E.; Drummond, M. Bradley; Han, MeiLan K.; Li, Daner; Fuller, Cathy; Limper, Andrew H.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Schwarz, Marvin I.; Sciurba, Frank C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Health-related quality-of-life (HRQL) measures have been correlated with lung function in patients with COPD and interstitial lung disease (ILD). However, different pathophysiologic mechanisms may influence how these distinct diseases affect HRQL, resulting in differing HRQL by pulmonary diagnosis among patients with similar severity of ventilatory impairment. Methods: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Lung Tissue Research Consortium provided data on well-characterized participants with COPD (n = 576) and ILD (n = 405) at four clinical sites. Using multiple linear regression, we examined the effects of FEV1 (% predicted) and diagnosis (ILD vs COPD) on HRQL scores, including total St. George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) scores and Short Form-12 (SF-12) physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores. Results: Participants with ILD had, on average, higher SGRQ scores (15.33 points; 95% CI, 12.46-18.19; P <.001) and lower SF-12 PCS scores ( − 4.73 points; 95% CI, − 6.31 to − 3.14; P <.001) compared with patients with COPD with similar FEV1 % predicted values, indicating worse HRQL. The specific diagnosis also modified the effect of FEV1 on the total SGRQ score (P = .003) and the SF-12 PCS score (P = .03). There was no relationship between lung function and SF-12 MCS scores. Conclusions: HRQL scores were worse for patients with ILD compared with patients with COPD with similar degrees of ventilatory impairment. Differences in dyspnea mechanism or in the rate of disease progression may account for these differences in HRQL. PMID:22576634

  13. Respiratory Impairment and the Aging Lung: A Novel Paradigm for Assessing Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Older persons have an increased risk of developing respiratory impairment because the aging lung is likely to have experienced exposures to environmental toxins as well as reductions in physiological capacity. Methods. Systematic review of risk factors and measures of pulmonary function that are most often considered when defining respiratory impairment in aging populations. Results. Across the adult life span, there are frequent exposures to environmental toxins, including tobacco smoke, respiratory infections, air pollution, and occupational dusts. Concurrently, there are reductions in physiological capacity that may adversely affect ventilatory control, respiratory muscle strength, respiratory mechanics, and gas exchange. Recent work has provided a strong rationale for defining respiratory impairment as an age-adjusted reduction in spirometric measures of pulmonary function that are independently associated with adverse health outcomes. Specifically, establishing respiratory impairment based on spirometric Z-scores has been shown to be strongly associated with respiratory symptoms, frailty, and mortality. Alternatively, respiratory impairment may be defined by the peak expiratory flow, as measured by a peak flow meter. The peak expiratory flow, when expressed as a Z-score, has been shown to be strongly associated with disability and mortality. However, because it has a reduced diagnostic accuracy, peak expiratory flow should only define respiratory impairment when spirometry is not readily available or an older person cannot adequately perform spirometry. Conclusions. Aging is associated with an increased risk of developing respiratory impairment, which is best defined by spirometric Z-scores. Alternatively, in selected cases, respiratory impairment may be defined by peak expiratory flow, also expressed as a Z-score. PMID:22138206

  14. Arsenic exposure and impaired lung function. Findings from a large population-based prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Parvez, Faruque; Chen, Yu; Yunus, Mahbub; Olopade, Christopher; Segers, Stephanie; Slavkovich, Vesna; Argos, Maria; Hasan, Rabiul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Akter, Mahmud M; Graziano, Joseph H; Ahsan, Habibul

    2013-10-01

    Exposure to arsenic through drinking water has been linked to respiratory symptoms, obstructive lung diseases, and mortality from respiratory diseases. Limited evidence for the deleterious effects on lung function exists among individuals exposed to a high dose of arsenic. To determine the deleterious effects on lung function that exist among individuals exposed to a high dose of arsenic. In 950 individuals who presented with any respiratory symptom among a population-based cohort of 20,033 adults, we evaluated the association between arsenic exposure, measured by well water and urinary arsenic concentrations measured at baseline, and post-bronchodilator-administered pulmonary function assessed during follow-up. For every one SD increase in baseline water arsenic exposure, we observed a lower level of FEV1 (-46.5 ml; P < 0.0005) and FVC (-53.1 ml; P < 0.01) in regression models adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, socioeconomic status, betel nut use, and arsenical skin lesions status. Similar inverse relationships were observed between baseline urinary arsenic and FEV1 (-48.3 ml; P < 0.005) and FVC (-55.2 ml; P < 0.01) in adjusted models. Our analyses also demonstrated a dose-related decrease in lung function with increasing levels of baseline water and urinary arsenic. This association remained significant in never-smokers and individuals without skin lesions, and was stronger in male smokers. Among male smokers and individuals with skin lesions, every one SD increase in water arsenic was related to a significant reduction of FEV1 (-74.4 ml, P < 0.01; and -116.1 ml, P < 0.05) and FVC (-72.8 ml, P = 0.02; and -146.9 ml, P = 0.004), respectively. This large population-based study confirms that arsenic exposure is associated with impaired lung function and the deleterious effect is evident at low- to moderate-dose range.

  15. Relationship between linear and nonlinear dynamics of heart rate and impairment of lung function in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Mazzuco, Adriana; Medeiros, Wladimir Musetti; Sperling, Milena Pelosi Rizk; de Souza, Aline Soares; Alencar, Maria Clara Noman; Arbex, Flávio Ferlin; Neder, José Alberto; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), functional and structural impairment of lung function can negatively impact heart rate variability (HRV); however, it is unknown if static lung volumes and lung diffusion capacity negatively impacts HRV responses. We investigated whether impairment of static lung volumes and lung diffusion capacity could be related to HRV indices in patients with moderate to severe COPD. Sixteen sedentary males with COPD were enrolled in this study. Resting blood gases, static lung volumes, and lung diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were measured. The RR interval (RRi) was registered in the supine, standing, and seated positions (10 minutes each) and during 4 minutes of a respiratory sinus arrhythmia maneuver (M-RSA). Delta changes (Δsupine-standing and Δsupine-M-RSA) of the standard deviation of normal RRi, low frequency (LF, normalized units [nu]) and high frequency (HF [nu]), SD1, SD2, alpha1, alpha2, and approximate entropy (ApEn) indices were calculated. HF, LF, SD1, SD2, and alpha1 deltas significantly correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second, DLCO, airway resistance, residual volume, inspiratory capacity/total lung capacity ratio, and residual volume/total lung capacity ratio. Significant and moderate associations were also observed between LF/HF ratio versus total gas volume (%), r=0.53; LF/HF ratio versus residual volume, %, r=0.52; and HF versus total gas volume (%), r=-0.53 (P<0.05). Linear regression analysis revealed that ΔRRi supine-M-RSA was independently related to DLCO (r=-0.77, r (2)=0.43, P<0.05). Responses of HRV indices were more prominent during M-RSA in moderate to severe COPD. Moreover, greater lung function impairment was related to poorer heart rate dynamics. Finally, impaired lung diffusion capacity was related to an altered parasympathetic response in these patients.

  16. Respiratory symptoms and lung functional impairments associated with occupational exposure to asphalt fumes.

    PubMed

    Neghab, M; Zare Derisi, F; Hassanzadeh, J

    2015-04-01

    Controversy exists as to the potential of asphalt fumes to induce respiratory symptoms and lung functional impairments. To examine the respiratory effects, if any, of occupational inhalation exposure to asphalt fumes. In this cross-sectional study, 74 asphalt workers and 110 unexposed employees were investigated. The prevalence of respiratory symptoms among subjects was investigated by a standard questionnaire. Additionally, the parameters of pulmonary function were measured both, prior to exposure and at the end of work-shift. Furthermore, to assess the extent to which workers were exposed to asphalt fumes, total particulate and the benzene-soluble fraction were measured in different worksites. The mean levels of exposure to total particulate and benzene-soluble fraction in asphalt fumes were estimated to be 0.9 (SD 0.2) and 0.3 (SD 0.1) mg/m^3, respectively. Mean values of FEV1, both prior to the exposure (89.58% [SD 18.69%] predicted value) and at the end of shift (85.38% [SD 19.4%]), were significantly (p<0.05) smaller than those of the comparison subjects (93.88% [SD 13.93%]). Similarly, pre-shift (87.05 [SD 8.57]) and postexposure (89.95 [SD 6.85]) FEV1/FVC ratio were both significantly (p<0.01) lower than those of the unexposed employees (107.56 [SD 9.64]). Moreover, the prevalence of respiratory symptoms such as cough and wheezing in exposed employees were 41% and 42%, respectively. The corresponding values for comparison subjects were 10.0% and 3.6%, respectively (p<0.001). The pattern of changes in parameters of lung function in asphalt workers was consistent with that of chronic obstructive lung disease. Significant decrements in the parameters of pulmonary function as well as, a significant increase in the prevalence of respiratory symptoms in asphalt paving workers compared to their unexposed counterparts provided evidence in favor of a significant association between exposure to asphalt fumes and lung function impairments.

  17. The Lung Function Impairment in Non-Atopic Patients With Chronic Rhinosinusitis and Its Correlation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linghao; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Chun-Hong; Fang, Xiao-Bi; Huang, Zhen-Xiao; Shi, Qing-Yuan; Wu, Li-Ping; Wu, Peng; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Liao, Zhi-Su

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is common disease in otorhinolaryngology and will lead to lower airway abnormality. However, the only lung function in CRS patients and associated factors have not been much studied. Methods One hundred patients with CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP group), 40 patients with CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP group), and 100 patients without CRS were enrolled. The difference in lung function was compared. Meanwhile, CRSwNP and CRSsNP group were required to undergo a bronchial provocation or dilation test. Additionally, subjective and objective outcomes were measured by the visual analogue scale (VAS), 20-item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-20), Lund-Mackay score, Lund-Kennedy endoscopic score. The correlation and regression methods were used to analyze the relationship between their lung function and the above parameters. Results The forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of forced vital capacity (FEF25-75) of CRSwNP group were significantly lower than other groups (P<0.05). On peak expiratory flow, there was no difference between three groups. In CRSwNP group, FEV1 was negatively correlated with peripheral blood eosinophil count (PBEC) and duration of disease (r=–0.348, P=0.013 and r=–0.344, P=0.014, respectively), FEF25-75 negatively with VAS, SNOT-20 (r=–0.490, P=0.028 and r=–0.478, P=0.033, respectively) in CRSsNP group. The incidence of positive bronchial provocation and dilation test was lower in CRSwNP group (10% and 0%, respectively), with both 0% in CRSsNP group. The multiple linear regression analysis indicated that change ratio of FEV1 before and after bronchial provocation or dilation test were correlated with PBEC in CRSwNP group (β=0.403, P=0.006). Conclusion CRS leading to impaired maximum ventilation and small airway is associated with the existence of nasal polyp. Lung function impairments can be reflected by PBEC, duration, VAS, and SNOT-20. In CRSw

  18. Arsenic Exposure and Impaired Lung Function. Findings from a Large Population-based Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Parvez, Faruque; Chen, Yu; Yunus, Mahbub; Olopade, Christopher; Segers, Stephanie; Slavkovich, Vesna; Argos, Maria; Hasan, Rabiul; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Akter, Mahmud M.; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Exposure to arsenic through drinking water has been linked to respiratory symptoms, obstructive lung diseases, and mortality from respiratory diseases. Limited evidence for the deleterious effects on lung function exists among individuals exposed to a high dose of arsenic. Objectives: To determine the deleterious effects on lung function that exist among individuals exposed to a high dose of arsenic. Methods: In 950 individuals who presented with any respiratory symptom among a population-based cohort of 20,033 adults, we evaluated the association between arsenic exposure, measured by well water and urinary arsenic concentrations measured at baseline, and post-bronchodilator–administered pulmonary function assessed during follow-up. Measurements and Main Results: For every one SD increase in baseline water arsenic exposure, we observed a lower level of FEV1 (−46.5 ml; P < 0.0005) and FVC (−53.1 ml; P < 0.01) in regression models adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, socioeconomic status, betel nut use, and arsenical skin lesions status. Similar inverse relationships were observed between baseline urinary arsenic and FEV1 (−48.3 ml; P < 0.005) and FVC (−55.2 ml; P < 0.01) in adjusted models. Our analyses also demonstrated a dose-related decrease in lung function with increasing levels of baseline water and urinary arsenic. This association remained significant in never-smokers and individuals without skin lesions, and was stronger in male smokers. Among male smokers and individuals with skin lesions, every one SD increase in water arsenic was related to a significant reduction of FEV1 (−74.4 ml, P < 0.01; and −116.1 ml, P < 0.05) and FVC (−72.8 ml, P = 0.02; and −146.9 ml, P = 0.004), respectively. Conclusions: This large population-based study confirms that arsenic exposure is associated with impaired lung function and the deleterious effect is evident at low- to moderate-dose range. PMID:23848239

  19. Gender differences in the effect of occupational endotoxin exposure on impaired lung function and death: the Shanghai Textile Worker Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng-ying; Lin, Xinyi; Zheng, Bu-yong; Dai, Hei-Lian; Su, Li; Cai, Tianxi; Christiani, David C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Airborne endotoxin exposure has both adverse and protective health effects. Studies show males have augmented acute inflammatory responses to endotoxin. In this longitudinal cohort study we investigated the effect of long-term exposure to endotoxin in cotton dust on health, and determined whether these effects differ by gender. METHODS In the Shanghai Textile Worker Study, 447 cotton and 472 control silk textile workers were followed from 1981 to 2011 with repeated measures of occupational endotoxin exposure, spirometry, and health questionnaires. Impaired lung function was defined as a decline in forced expiratory volume in one second to less than the 5th percentile of population predicted. Death was ascertained by death registries. We used Cox proportional hazards models to assess the effect of endotoxin exposure on the time to development of impaired lung function and death. RESULTS 128 deaths and 164 diagnoses of impaired lung function were ascertained between 1981 and 2011. Hazard ratios (HRs) for the composite endpoint of impaired lung function or death was 1.47 (95% CI 1.09-1.97) for cotton vs. silk workers and 1.04 (95% CI 1.01-1.07) per 10,000 endotoxin units (EU)/m3-years increase in exposure. HRs for all-cause mortality was 1.36 (95% CI 0.93-1.99) for cotton vs. silk workers and 1.04 (95% CI 0.99-1.08) per 10,000 EU/m3-years. The risk associated with occupational endotoxin exposure was elevated only in men. CONCLUSIONS Occupational endotoxin exposure is associated with an increase in the risk of impaired lung function and all-cause mortality in men. PMID:24297825

  20. Obesity-induced adipokine imbalance impairs mouse pulmonary vascular endothelial function and primes the lung for injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Duong, Michelle; Wang, Nadan; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Suratt, Benjamin T; Kallen, Caleb B; Sun, Jianxin; Zhu, Ying; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-06-12

    Obesity is a risk factor for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) but mechanisms mediating this association are unknown. While obesity is known to impair systemic blood vessel function, and predisposes to systemic vascular diseases, its effects on the pulmonary circulation are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the chronic low grade inflammation of obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and primes the lung for acute injury. The lung endothelium from obese mice expressed higher levels of leukocyte adhesion markers and lower levels of cell-cell junctional proteins when compared to lean mice. We tested whether systemic factors are responsible for these alterations in the pulmonary endothelium; treatment of primary lung endothelial cells with obese serum enhanced the expression of adhesion proteins and reduced the expression of endothelial junctional proteins when compared to lean serum. Alterations in pulmonary endothelial cells observed in obese mice were associated with enhanced susceptibility to LPS-induced lung injury. Restoring serum adiponectin levels reversed the effects of obesity on the lung endothelium and attenuated susceptibility to acute injury. Our work indicates that obesity impairs pulmonary vascular homeostasis and enhances susceptibility to acute injury and provides mechanistic insight into the increased prevalence of ARDS in obese humans.

  1. VARA attenuates hyperoxia-induced impaired alveolar development and lung function in newborn mice

    PubMed Central

    James, Masheika L.; Ross, A. Catharine; Nicola, Teodora; Steele, Chad

    2013-01-01

    We have recently shown that a combination of vitamin A (VA) and retinoic acid (RA) in a 10:1 molar ratio (VARA) synergistically increases lung retinoid content in newborn rodents, more than either VA or RA alone in equimolar amounts. We hypothesized that the increase in lung retinoids would reduce oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokines, resulting in attenuation of alveolar simplification and abnormal lung function in hyperoxia-exposed newborn mice. Newborn C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 85% O2 (hyperoxia) or air (normoxia) for 7 or 14 days from birth and given vehicle or VARA every other day. Lung retinol content was measured by HPLC, function was assessed by flexiVent, and development was evaluated by radial alveolar counts, mean linear intercept, and secondary septal crest density. Mediators of oxidative stress, inflammation, and alveolar development were evaluated in lung homogenates. We observed that VARA increased lung retinol stores and attenuated hyperoxia-induced alveolar simplification while increasing lung compliance and lowering resistance. VARA attenuated hyperoxia-induced increases in DNA damage and protein oxidation accompanied with a reduction in nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 protein but did not alter malondialdehyde adducts, nitrotyrosine, or myeloperoxidase concentrations. Interferon-γ and macrophage inflammatory protein-2α mRNA and protein increased with hyperoxia, and this increase was attenuated by VARA. Our study suggests that the VARA combination may be a potential therapeutic strategy in conditions characterized by VA deficiency and hyperoxia-induced lung injury during lung development, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants. PMID:23585226

  2. Association of perfluoroalkyl substances exposure with impaired lung function in children.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xiao-Di; Qian, Zhengmin Min; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Perret, Jennifer; Geiger, Sarah Dee; Rigdon, Steven E; Howard, Steven; Zeng, Xiao-Wen; Hu, Li-Wen; Yang, Bo-Yi; Zhou, Yang; Li, Meng; Xu, Shu-Li; Bao, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Ya-Zhi; Yuan, Ping; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Chuan; Tian, Yan-Peng; Nian, Min; Xiao, Xiang; Chen, Wen; Lee, Yungling Leo; Dong, Guang-Hui

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated associations between serum levels of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) and asthma or asthma related-biomarkers. However, no studies have reported a possible relationship between PFASs exposure and lung function among children. The objective of the present study is to test the association between PFASs exposure and lung function in children from a high exposure area by using a cross-sectional case-control study, which included 132 asthmatic children and 168 non-asthmatic controls recruited from 2009 to 2010 in the Genetic and Biomarkers study for Childhood Asthma. Structured questionnaires were administered face-to-face. Lung function was measured by spirometry. Linear regression models were used to examine the influence of PFASs on lung function. The results showed that asthmatics in our study had significantly higher serum PFAS concentrations than healthy controls. Logistic regression models showed a positive association between PFASs and asthma, with adjusted odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 0.99 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.80-1.21) to 2.76 (95% CI: 1.82-4.17). Linear regression modeling showed serum PFASs levels were significantly negatively associated with three pulmonary function measurements (forced vital capacity: FVC; forced expiratory volume in 1s: FEV1; forced expiratory flow 25-75%: FEF25-75) among children with asthma, the adjusted coefficients between lung function and PFASs exposure ranged from -0.055 (95%CI: -0.100 to -0.010) for FVC and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) to -0.223 (95%CI: -0.400 to -0.045) for FEF25-75 and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). PFASs were not, however, significantly associated with pulmonary function among children without asthma. In conclusion, this study suggests that serum PFASs are associated with decreased lung function among children with asthma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Gender differences in the association between C-reactive protein, lung function impairment, and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ólafsdóttir, Inga Sif; Gíslason, Thórarinn; Thjóđleifsson, Bjarni; Ólafsson, Ísleifur; Gíslason, Davíd; Jõgi, Rain; Janson, Christer

    2007-01-01

    Individuals with COPD have systemic inflammation that can be assessed by measuring C-reactive protein (CRP). In this paper we evaluated whether CRP is related to COPD, lung function and rate of lung function decline. We included 1237 randomly selected subjects (mean age 42, range 28–56 years) from three centers in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey: Reykjavik, Uppsala and Tartu. CRP was measured at the end of the follow-up (mean 8.3 years) and the values were divided into 4 quartiles. Fifty-three non-asthmatic subjects fulfilled spirometric criteria for COPD (FEV1/FVC < 70%). COPD occurred more often in the 4th CRP quartile (OR (95% CI) 3.21 (1.13–9.08)) after adjustment for age, gender, body weight and smoking. High CRP levels were related to lower FEV1 values in both men (−437 (−596, −279) mL) and women (−144 (−243, −44) mL). The negative association between CRP and FEV1 was significantly larger in men than women (p = 0.04). The decline in FEV1 was larger (16 (5, 27) mL) in men with high CRP levels whereas no significant association between CRP and FEV1 decline was found in women. Higher CRP values are significantly associated with COPD and lower lung function in men and women. In men higher CRP values are related to a larger decline in FEV1. PMID:18268938

  4. Unraveling the relationship between aeroallergen sensitization, gender, second-hand smoke exposure, and impaired lung function.

    PubMed

    Brunst, Kelly J; Ryan, Patrick H; Lockey, James E; Bernstein, David I; McKay, Roy T; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K; Villareal, Manuel; Biagini Myers, Jocelyn M; Levin, Linda; Burkle, Jeff; Evans, Sherry; Lemasters, Grace K

    2012-08-01

    Contradictory findings on the differential effects of second-hand smoke (SHS) on lung function in girls and boys may result from masked relationships between host and environmental factors. Allergic sensitization may augment the relationship between SHS and decreased lung function, although its role in relation to the inconsistent gender differences in children has not been elucidated. We hypothesize that there will be differences between boys and girls related to early-life allergic sensitization and exposure to SHS on pulmonary function later in childhood. Participants in this study (n = 486) were drawn from the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution (CCAAPS) birth cohort study consisting of 46% girls. Allergic sensitization was assessed by skin prick test (SPT) to 15 aeroallergens at ages 2, 4, and 7, while pulmonary function and asthma diagnosis occurred at age 7. SHS exposure was measured by hair cotinine at ages 2 and/or 4. Gender differences of SHS exposure on pulmonary function among children with positive SPTs at ages 2, 4, and 7 as well as first- and higher-order interactions were examined by multiple linear regression. Interactions significant in the multivariate models were also examined via stratification. Comparisons within and between stratified groups were assessed by examining the slope of the parameter estimates/beta coefficients and associated p-values and confidence intervals. Increased cotinine levels were significantly associated with decreases in FEV(1) (-0.03 l, p < 0.05), peak expiratory flow (-0.07 l/s, p < 0.05), and FEF (25-75%) (-0.06 l/s, p < 0.01). The interaction between cotinine and sensitization at age 2 was borderline significant (p = 0.10) in the FEF(25-75%) model and showed an exposure response effect according to the number of positive SPTs at age 2; zero (-0.06 l/s, p < 0.01), one (-0.09 l/s, p < 0.05), or two or more positive SPTs (-0.30 l/s, p < 0.01). Despite increased

  5. Lung function impairment in women exposed to biomass fuels during cooking compared to cleaner fuels in Uttar Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Vipin; Iqbal, S M; Srivastava, L P; Kesavachandran, C; Siddique, M J A

    2013-11-01

    A national survey has shown that approximately 75-80% use of fire wood and chips, 10% of dung cake rural women in Uttar Pradesh, India. Considering the respiratory health risk of biomass fuel exposure to women, a cross sectional study was conducted to elucidate the relationship between cooking smoke and lung function impairments. The present study showed significant decline in air flow limitation based on reduced PEFR (3.69 | sec(-1)) and FEV1 (1.34 | sec(-1)) in women cooking with biomass fuels compared to PEFR (4.26 | sec(-1)) and FEV1 (1.73 | sec(-1)) in women cooking with cleaner fuels. The noxious gases and particles generated from biomass fuels during cooking reported in earlier studies may be the reason for the slight decline in airway status PEFR (3.69 | sec(-1)) and lung volumes FEV1 (1.34 | sec(-1)). The higher mean bio-fuels exposure index (52.5 hr-yrs) can attribute to reduced lung function in rural women.

  6. 2,2'-Azobis (2-Amidinopropane) Dihydrochloride Is a Useful Tool to Impair Lung Function in Rats.

    PubMed

    Moreira Gomes, Maria D; Carvalho, Giovanna M C; Casquilho, Natalia V; Araújo, Andressa C P; Valença, Samuel S; Leal-Cardoso, Jose H; Zin, Walter A

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several studies have reported that respiratory disease may be associated with an increased production of free radicals. In this context, 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) is a free radical-generating compound widely used to mimic the oxidative stress state. We aimed to investigate whether AAPH can generate lung functional, inflammatory, histological and biochemical impairments in the lung. Wistar rats were divided into five groups and instilled with saline solution (714 μL/kg, CTRL group) or different amounts of AAPH (25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, 714 μL/kg, AAPH groups). Seventy-two hours later the animals were anesthetized, paralyzed, intubated and static elastance (Est), viscoelastic component of elastance (ΔE), resistive (ΔP1) and viscoelastic (ΔP2) pressures were measured. Oxidative damage, inflammatory markers and lung morphometry were analyzed. ΔP1 and Est were significantly higher in AAPH100 and AAPH200 than in the other groups. The bronchoconstriction indexes were larger in AAPH groups than in CTRL. The area occupied by collagen and elastic fibers, polymorpho- and mononuclear cells, malondialdehyde and carbonyl groups levels were significantly higher in AAPH200 than in CTRL. In comparison to CTRL, AAPH200 showed significant decrease and increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, respectively. AAPH augmented the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 e TNF-α. Hence, exposure to AAPH caused significant inflammatory alterations and redox imbalance accompanied by altered lung mechanics and histology. Furthermore, we disclosed that exposure to AAPH may represent a useful in vivo tool to trigger lung lesions.

  7. 2,2′-Azobis (2-Amidinopropane) Dihydrochloride Is a Useful Tool to Impair Lung Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moreira Gomes, Maria D.; Carvalho, Giovanna M. C.; Casquilho, Natalia V.; Araújo, Andressa C. P.; Valença, Samuel S.; Leal-Cardoso, Jose H.; Zin, Walter A.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several studies have reported that respiratory disease may be associated with an increased production of free radicals. In this context, 2,2′-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) is a free radical-generating compound widely used to mimic the oxidative stress state. We aimed to investigate whether AAPH can generate lung functional, inflammatory, histological and biochemical impairments in the lung. Wistar rats were divided into five groups and instilled with saline solution (714 μL/kg, CTRL group) or different amounts of AAPH (25, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, 714 μL/kg, AAPH groups). Seventy-two hours later the animals were anesthetized, paralyzed, intubated and static elastance (Est), viscoelastic component of elastance (ΔE), resistive (ΔP1) and viscoelastic (ΔP2) pressures were measured. Oxidative damage, inflammatory markers and lung morphometry were analyzed. ΔP1 and Est were significantly higher in AAPH100 and AAPH200 than in the other groups. The bronchoconstriction indexes were larger in AAPH groups than in CTRL. The area occupied by collagen and elastic fibers, polymorpho- and mononuclear cells, malondialdehyde and carbonyl groups levels were significantly higher in AAPH200 than in CTRL. In comparison to CTRL, AAPH200 showed significant decrease and increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, respectively. AAPH augmented the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 e TNF-α. Hence, exposure to AAPH caused significant inflammatory alterations and redox imbalance accompanied by altered lung mechanics and histology. Furthermore, we disclosed that exposure to AAPH may represent a useful in vivo tool to trigger lung lesions. PMID:27812337

  8. An epidemiological survey of respiratory morbidity among granite quarry workers in Singapore: chronic bronchitis and lung function impairment.

    PubMed

    Ng, T P; Phoon, W H; Lee, H S; Ng, Y L; Tan, K T

    1992-05-01

    Respiratory symptoms of chronic bronchitis and measurements of lung function were studied in an epidemiological survey of the total population of workers currently employed in granite quarries in Singapore. There were 85 rock drilling and crushing workers with current exposure in high levels of silica dust. Their respiratory parameters were studied with reference to an internal comparison group of 154 quarry maintenance and transport workers with low dust exposure, and an external comparison group of 148 Telecoms postal delivery workers with no granite dust exposure. The highly exposed workers showed greater prevalences of chronic cough and phlegm, a mean reduction of 5% in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC). The increased respiratory morbidity were independent of other factors such as age and smoking. Similar results were also noted after excluding those with silicosis (defined radiologically as profusion greater than 1/1 as read by at least two of three readers). This study strongly indicates a demonstrable risk of "occupational" bronchitis (mucus hypersecretion) and obstructive and restrictive lung function impairment, apart from the "classical" risk of silicosis. Measures taken to protect the health of workers exposed to silica dust should also be based on considerations taken to protect against the risk of these respiratory disorders as well.

  9. Lung-function impairment among US underground coal miners, 2005 to 2009: geographic patterns and association with coal workers' pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei Lin; Beeckman-Wagner, Lu-Ann; Wolfe, Anita L; Syamlal, Girija; Petsonk, Edward L

    2013-07-01

    To investigate contemporary geographic distributions of lung-function impairment and radiographic evidence of coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) and their associations. From 2005 to 2009, 6373 underground coal miners completed a health survey, including spirometry testing and chest radiography. Coal workers' pneumoconiosis and progressive massive fibrosis were determined by NIOSH B readers, using the International Labour Office classification. Prevalences of CWP and spirometry less than lower normal limits were mapped by county, and their association assessed. The prevalences of abnormal spirometry results and CWP were 13.1% and 4.0%, respectively. Counties with elevated prevalences for both the outcomes were located in contiguous areas of southeastern Kentucky, western Virginia, southern West Virginia, and eastern Pennsylvania. Prevalence of abnormal spirometry results increases with increasing category of simple CWP and progressive massive fibrosis. Abnormal spirometry in coal miners is associated with CWP; these two health outcomes have similar geographic distributions.

  10. Long-term ambient air pollution and lung function impairment in Chinese children from a high air pollution range area: The Seven Northeastern Cities (SNEC) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiao-Wen; Vivian, Elaina; Mohammed, Kahee A.; Jakhar, Shailja; Vaughn, Michael; Huang, Jin; Zelicoff, Alan; Xaverius, Pamela; Bai, Zhipeng; Lin, Shao; Hao, Yuan-Tao; Paul, Gunther; Morawska, Lidia; Wang, Si-Quan; Qian, Zhengmin; Dong, Guang-Hui

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent and inconclusive associations between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and lung function in children from Europe and America, where air pollution levels were typically low. The aim of the present study is to examine the relationship between air pollutants and lung function in children selected from heavily industrialized and polluted cities in northeastern China. During 2012, 6740 boys and girls aged 7-14 years were recruited in 24 districts of seven northeastern cities. Portable electronic spirometers were used to measure lung function. Four-year average concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) were measured at monitoring stations in the 24 districts. Two-staged regression models were used in the data analysis, controlling for covariates. Overall, for all subjects, the increased odds of lung function impairment associated with exposure to air pollutants, ranged from 5% (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01, 1.10) for FVC < 85% predicted per 46.3 μg/m3 for O3 to 81% (aOR = 1.81; 95%CI = 1.44, 2.28) for FEV1 < 85% predicted per 30.6 μg/m3 for PM10. The linear regression models consistently showed a negative relationship between all air pollutants and lung function measures across subjects. There were significant interaction terms indicating gender differences for lung function impairment and pulmonary function from exposure to some pollutants (P < 0.10). In conclusion, long term exposure to high concentrations of ambient air pollution is associated with decreased pulmonary function and lung function impairment, and females appear to be more susceptible than males.

  11. Diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and metabolic biomarkers in individuals with normal glucose tolerance are inversely associated with lung function: the Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Hickson, DeMarc A; Burchfiel, Cecil M; Liu, Jiankang; Petrini, Marcy F; Harrison, Kimystian; White, Wendy B; Sarpong, Daniel F

    2011-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the hypothesis that diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), diabetes control and diabetes duration, and metabolic biomarkers in adults with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) are inversely associated with spirometry-measured lung function. We conducted a cross-sectional observational cohort study that included nonsmoking African American adults (n = 2,945; mean age = 52.5 ± 12.6 years; 69.2% female), who were free of cardiovascular disease, from the Jackson Heart Study. The interventions were diabetes, metabolic biomarkers and lung function. We measured the associations of glycemia with forced expiratory volume (FEV) in 1 s, FEV in 6 s, and vital capacity. Multivariable adjusted mean lung function values were lower among adults with diabetes and IGT (in women only, but not after adjustment for waist circumference) than adults with NGT. Among adults with diabetes, no associations were observed between lung function and diabetes control or duration. In women with NGT, lower lung function was consistently associated with higher glucose levels and less consistently with higher insulin levels and insulin resistance. Lower lung function was consistently associated with higher insulin levels and insulin resistance and less consistently associated with insulin and hemoglobin A1c in men with NGT. Overall, our findings generally support the hypothesis that diabetes, IGT, and increased levels of metabolic biomarkers in individuals with NGT are inversely associated with lung function in African Americans, independent of adiposity.

  12. Alterations of serum biomarkers associated with lung ventilation function impairment in coal Workers: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that alterations in certain circulating biomarkers may be correlated with Coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP). This study investigated the relationship between changes of serum biomarkers and pulmonary function during the development of CWP. Methods Lung function parameters and specific serum indices were measured in 69 non-smoking coal workers, including 34 miners with CWP, 24 asymptomatic miners and 11 miners with minimal symptoms. The associations between changes in pulmonary function and serum indices were tested with Pearson's correlation coefficients. Multivariable analysis was used to estimate the predictive power of potential determinant variables for lung function. Results Compared to healthy miners, lung function (FVC, FEV1, FEF50, FEF75, FEF25-75 % of predicted values) was decreased in miners with CWP (p < 0.05). Increased serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was associated with decreased FVC% of predicted values in the asymptomatic miners (r = -0.503, p = 0.014). Conclusions In coal mine workers, alterations of lung function parameters are associated with the development of CWP and with changes in circulating MMP-9, TIMP-9, IL-13 and IL-18R. These serum biomarkers may likely reflect the pathogenesis and progression of CWP in coal workers, and may provide for the importance of serum indicators in the early diagnosis of lung function injury in coal miners. PMID:21943057

  13. Increased sputum endotoxin levels are associated with an impaired lung function response to oral steroids in asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    McSharry, Charles; Spears, Mark; Chaudhuri, Rekha; Cameron, Euan J; Husi, Holger; Thomson, Neil C

    2014-11-01

    Airway endotoxin might contribute to corticosteroid insensitivity in asthmatic patients. Because cigarette smoke contains endotoxin, we tested the hypothesis that sputum endotoxin concentrations are increased in cigarette smokers and that endotoxin concentrations are associated with corticosteroid insensitivity in asthmatic patients. Sixty-nine asthmatic patients (never smokers, smokers, and exsmokers) and 20 healthy subjects (never smokers and smokers) were recruited. Fifty-three asthmatic patients received a 2-week course of oral dexamethasone. Serum and induced sputum endotoxin and cytokine concentrations were quantified by using an enzyme immunoassay. Median (interquartile range [IQR]) sputum endotoxin concentration were not significantly different between asthmatic never smokers (184 endotoxin units [EU]/mL; IQR, 91-310 EU/mL), exsmokers (123 EU/mL; IQR, 39-207 EU/mL), and smokers (177 EU/mL; IQR, 41-772 EU/mL; P = .703) and healthy subjects (164 EU/mL; IQR, 106-373 EU/mL). The lung function response to oral corticosteroids decreased with increasing sputum endotoxin concentrations in the never smokers (linear regression α = .05, Spearman r = -0.503, P = .009) but not in smokers (α = .587, r = -0.282, P = .257), as confirmed by using multiple regression analysis. Asthmatic smokers had higher concentrations of serum endotoxin than asthmatic nonsmokers (0.25 EU/mL [IQR, 0.09-0.39 EU/mL] vs 0.08 EU/mL [IQR, 0.05-0.19 EU/mL], P = .042) unrelated to steroid insensitivity or serum cytokine concentrations. In the asthmatic group sputum endotoxin concentrations correlated with sputum IL-1 receptor antagonist concentrations (r = 0.510, P < .001), and serum endotoxin concentrations significantly correlated with sputum IL-6, IL-8, and chemokine motif ligand 2 concentrations. Asthmatic smokers have similar sputum endotoxin concentrations compared with those of asthmatic never smokers. The association between higher sputum endotoxin levels and an impaired lung function

  14. Lack of correlation between the ventilatory response to CO2 and lung function impairment in myotonic dystrophy patients: evidence for a dysregulation at central level.

    PubMed

    Poussel, Mathias; Thil, Catherine; Kaminsky, Pierre; Mercy, Magalie; Gomez, Emmanuel; Chaouat, Ari; Chabot, François; Chenuel, Bruno

    2015-05-01

    Myotonic dystrophy Type 1 (DM1) is the most common muscular dystrophy in adults. Respiratory failure is common but clinical findings support a dysregulation of the control of breathing at central level, furthermore contributing to alveolar hypoventilation independently of the severity of respiratory weakness. We therefore intended to study the relationship between the ventilatory response to CO2 and the impairment of lung function in DM1 patients. Sixty-nine DM1 patients were prospectively investigated (43.5 ± 12.7 years). Systematic pulmonary lung function evaluation including spirometry, plethysmography, measurements of respiratory muscle strength, arterial blood gas analysis and ventilatory response to CO2 were performed. Thirty-one DM1 patients (45%) presented a ventilatory restriction, 38 (55%) were hypoxaemic and 15 (22%) were hypercapnic. Total lung capacity decline was correlated to hypoxaemia (p = 0.0008) and hypercapnia (p = 0.0013), but not to a decrease in ventilatory response to CO2 (p = 0.194). Ventilatory response to CO2 was reduced to 0.85 ± 0.67 L/min/mmHg and not correlated to respiratory muscle weakness. Ventilatory response to CO2 was neither different among restricted/non-restricted patients (p = 0.2395) nor among normoxaemic/hypoxaemic subjects (p = 0.6380). The reduced ventilatory response to CO2 in DM1 patients appeared independent of lung function impairment and respiratory muscle weakness, suggesting a central cause of CO2 insensitivity.

  15. Matrix Metalloproteinases in Tuberculosis-Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome and Impaired Lung Function Among Advanced HIV/TB Co-infected Patients Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ravimohan, Shruthi; Tamuhla, Neo; Kung, Shiang-Ju; Nfanyana, Kebatshabile; Steenhoff, Andrew P.; Gross, Robert; Weissman, Drew; Bisson, Gregory P.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV-infected patients with pulmonary TB (pTB) can have worsening of respiratory symptoms as part of TB-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) following antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Thus, reconstitution of immune function on ART could drive incident lung damage in HIV/TB. Methods We hypothesized that increases in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which can degrade lung matrix, on ART are associated with TB-IRIS among a cohort of advanced, ART naïve, HIV-infected adults with pTB. Furthermore, we related early changes in immune measures and MMPs on ART to lung function in an exploratory subset of patients post-TB cure. This study was nested within a prospective cohort study. Rank sum and chi-square tests, Spearman's correlation coefficient, and logistic regression were used for analyses. Results Increases in MMP-8 following ART initiation were independently associated with TB-IRIS (p = 0.04; adjusted odds ratio 1.5 [95% confidence interval: 1.0–2.1]; n = 32). Increases in CD4 counts and MMP-8 on ART were also associated with reduced forced expiratory volume in one-second post-TB treatment completion (r = − 0.7, p = 0.006 and r = − 0.6, p = 0.02, respectively; n = 14). Conclusions ART-induced MMP increases are associated with TB-IRIS and may affect lung function post-TB cure. End-organ damage due to TB-IRIS and mechanisms whereby immune restoration impairs lung function in pTB deserve further investigation. PMID:27014741

  16. Matrix Metalloproteinases in Tuberculosis-Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome and Impaired Lung Function Among Advanced HIV/TB Co-infected Patients Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ravimohan, Shruthi; Tamuhla, Neo; Kung, Shiang-Ju; Nfanyana, Kebatshabile; Steenhoff, Andrew P; Gross, Robert; Weissman, Drew; Bisson, Gregory P

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected patients with pulmonary TB (pTB) can have worsening of respiratory symptoms as part of TB-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) following antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Thus, reconstitution of immune function on ART could drive incident lung damage in HIV/TB. We hypothesized that increases in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which can degrade lung matrix, on ART are associated with TB-IRIS among a cohort of advanced, ART naïve, HIV-infected adults with pTB. Furthermore, we related early changes in immune measures and MMPs on ART to lung function in an exploratory subset of patients post-TB cure. This study was nested within a prospective cohort study. Rank sum and chi-square tests, Spearman's correlation coefficient, and logistic regression were used for analyses. Increases in MMP-8 following ART initiation were independently associated with TB-IRIS (p = 0.04; adjusted odds ratio 1.5 [95% confidence interval: 1.0-2.1]; n = 32). Increases in CD4 counts and MMP-8 on ART were also associated with reduced forced expiratory volume in one-second post-TB treatment completion (r = - 0.7, p = 0.006 and r = - 0.6, p = 0.02, respectively; n = 14). ART-induced MMP increases are associated with TB-IRIS and may affect lung function post-TB cure. End-organ damage due to TB-IRIS and mechanisms whereby immune restoration impairs lung function in pTB deserve further investigation.

  17. Cross-sectional study on the endotoxin exposure and lung function impairment in the workers of textile industry near Lahore, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Nadia; Khalid, Anum; Tahir, Arifa

    2016-07-01

    To examine the effects of airborne endotoxin on lung function impairment in exposure-response relationships among the workers of textile industry. The cross-sectional study was conducted at Lahore College for Women University, Lahore, Pakistan, from January to August 2014, and comprised textile mill workers. The participants were divided into exposed and control groups. A questionnaire was used to ask workers about the potential adverse health effects of their occupation. The pulmonary function test was carried out by spirometer. Endotoxin levels in the samples were determined using the key quality characteristics limulus amebocyte lysate. The data was analysed to determine the correlation between the endotoxin exposure duration and pulmonary function test parameters. There were 200 subjects subdivided into 100 each inexposed and control groups. Overall, 160(80%) were not aware of safety measures and the remaining 40(20%) were partially practising. Changes in pulmonary function due to endotoxin exposure showed decreased force vital capacity, flow rate and peak expiratory flow parameters significantly different (p<0.05, p<0.001). The endotoxin concentration was between 12EU/m3 and 300EU/m3. Airborne endotoxin concentrations in textile plants exceeded the Dutch health-based guidance limit of 90EU/m3 and was associated with respiratory health effects. Prolonged exposure to airborne endotoxin caused constant lung impairment. Proper safety measures should be adopted to avoid the inhalation of cotton dust.

  18. The association between pulmonary function impairment and colon inflammation in ulcerative colitis patients: A scientific basis for exterior-interior correlation between lung and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Yun; Wang, Xin-Yue; Wu, Hua-Yang; Sun, Hui-Yi; Liu, Da-Ming; Zhang, Wen; Jin, Chen-Xi; Wang, Shuo-Ren

    2016-12-01

    To investigated the involvement of pulmonary function impairment in ulcerative colitis (UC), to explore a scientific basis for the Chinese medicine (CM) theory of exterior-interior correlation between Lung (Fei) and Large intestine (Dachang). Totally 120 patients with a diagnosis of UC were recruited and the demographics, clinical data, and blood samples were collected. C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) concentrations were measured. Every patient accepted pulmonary function test and took chest radiograph (CXR).> RESULTS: Pulmonary function abnormalities were present in 72 of 120 patients. The median (interquartile range) vital capacity (VC), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), carbon monoxide diffusion capacity (DLCO) of lung, total lung capacity (TLC) and functional residual volume (FRV) were decreased in distal UC and pancolitis compared with ulcerative prochitis (P <0.0005). Male patients had increased VC, FEV1/FVC, and residual volume (RV)/TLC compared with female (P <0.0005), but decreased DLCO and carbon monoxide iffusion capacity (KCO) of lung/alveolar ventilation (P <0.0005). Age was strongly correlated with RV (Spearman rank correlation coefficient (rs)=-0.57,P <0.0001), and RV/TLC (rs=0.48,P<0.0001). Age was also correlated with FEV1/FVC (rs=-0.29, P=0.001), forced expiratory flow in 75% vital capacity (FEF75%, rs=-0.20, P=0.03), DLCO (rs=-0.21, P=0.02), TLC (rs=-0.25, P=0.006), and FRV (rs=-0.28, P=0.002). The course of disease was correlated with FEF75% (rs=-0.18, P=0.049) and KCO (rs=-0.19, P=0.036). Chest radiograph abnormalities were presented in 38 of 120. Pulmonary symptoms were presented in 10 of 120. Other extraintestinal complications were presented in 21 of 120. Pulmonary function impairment was more frequently than other extraintestinal complications in UC patients, which may be affected by sex, age, extent and course of disease. These results may be a scientific basis for the

  19. Lung function in Pakistani wood workers.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan A

    2006-06-01

    The lung function impairment is the most common respiratory problem in industrial plants and their vicinity. Therefore, the purpose was to study the affects of wood dust and its duration of exposure on lung function. This was a matched cross-sectional study of Spirometry in 46 non-smoking wood workers with age range 20 - 60 years, who worked without the benefit of wood dust control ventilation or respiratory protective devices. Pulmonary function test was performed by using an electronic Spirometer. Significant reduction was observed in the mean values of Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1), and Maximum Voluntary Ventilation (MVV) in wood workers relative to their matched controls. This impairment was increased with the duration of exposure to wood industries. It is concluded that lung function in wood workers is impaired and stratification of results shows a dose-response effect of years of wood dust exposure on lung function.

  20. Regional lung function in asbestos workers.

    PubMed Central

    Seaton, D

    1977-01-01

    Regional lung function was measured using radioactive xenon-133 in a group of normal subjects and in two groups of asbestos workers. When compared with the normal group, patients with pulmonary asbestosis showed impaired ventilation of the lower zones. Subjects with calcified pleural plaques without radiological evidence of lung parenchymal fibrosis did not show this abnormality. PMID:841532

  1. Profiling posttraumatic functional impairment.

    PubMed

    Norman, Sonya B; Stein, Murray B; Davidson, Jonathan R T

    2007-01-01

    Many individuals who have been exposed to psychological trauma suffer from impaired functioning, regardless of whether they have PTSD. Our purpose was to identify a subset of PTSD symptoms linked to functional impairment to a) improve the likelihood that individuals with posttraumatic impairment receive treatment, and b) offer a method to assess cost-burden of trauma history in epidemiological studies. We examined patterns of trauma-related symptoms in two independent community surveys (N=1002 and 630). Rank ordering of symptoms and their associations with impairment guided construction of an impairment-related profile in the first data set. The profile was then tested in the second data set. The derived symptom profile, consisting of intense recollections and/or emotional symptoms upon exposure to reminders, plus one or more of numbing/detachment, avoidance, sleep problems, concentration problems, or hypervigilance, detected the majority (88% and 74%) of persons with posttraumatic functional impairment. The symptom profile can help identify traumatized individuals who may benefit from treatment but do not necessarily meet criteria for PTSD.

  2. Analysis of impulse oscillometric measures of lung function and respiratory system model parameters in small airway-impaired and healthy children over a 2-year period.

    PubMed

    Meraz, Erika G; Nazeran, Homer; Ramos, Carlos D; Nava, Pat; Diong, Bill; Goldman, Michael D; Goldman, Christine A

    2011-03-25

    Is Impulse Oscillometry System (IOS) a valuable tool to measure respiratory system function in Children? Asthma (A) is the most prevalent chronic respiratory disease in children. Therefore, early and accurate assessment of respiratory function is of tremendous clinical interest in diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of respiratory conditions in this subpopulation. IOS has been successfully used to measure lung function in children with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity to small airway impairments (SAI) and asthma. IOS measures of airway function and equivalent electrical circuit models of the human respiratory system have been developed to quantify the severity of these conditions. Previously, we have evaluated several known respiratory models based on the Mead's model and more parsimonious versions based on fitting IOS data known as extended RIC (eRIC) and augmented RIC (aRIC) models have emerged, which offer advantages over earlier models. IOS data from twenty-six children were collected and compared during pre-bronchodilation (pre-B) and post- bronchodilation (post-B) conditions over a period of 2 years. Are the IOS and model parameters capable of differentiating between healthy children and children with respiratory system distress? Children were classified into two main categories: Healthy (H) and Small Airway-Impaired (SAI). The IOS measures and respiratory model parameters analyzed differed consistently between H and SAI children. SAI children showed smaller trend of "growth" and larger trend of bronchodilator responses than H children.The two model parameters: peripheral compliance (Cp) and peripheral resistance (Rp) tracked IOS indices of small airway function well. Cp was a more sensitive index than Rp. Both eRIC and aRIC Cps and the IOS Reactance Area, AX, (also known as the "Goldman Triangle") showed good correlations. What are the most useful IOS and model parameters? In this work we demonstrate that IOS parameters such as resistance at 5 Hz

  3. Analysis of impulse oscillometric measures of lung function and respiratory system model parameters in small airway-impaired and healthy children over a 2-year period

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Is Impulse Oscillometry System (IOS) a valuable tool to measure respiratory system function in Children? Asthma (A) is the most prevalent chronic respiratory disease in children. Therefore, early and accurate assessment of respiratory function is of tremendous clinical interest in diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of respiratory conditions in this subpopulation. IOS has been successfully used to measure lung function in children with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity to small airway impairments (SAI) and asthma. IOS measures of airway function and equivalent electrical circuit models of the human respiratory system have been developed to quantify the severity of these conditions. Previously, we have evaluated several known respiratory models based on the Mead's model and more parsimonious versions based on fitting IOS data known as extended RIC (eRIC) and augmented RIC (aRIC) models have emerged, which offer advantages over earlier models. Methods IOS data from twenty-six children were collected and compared during pre-bronchodilation (pre-B) and post- bronchodilation (post-B) conditions over a period of 2 years. Results and Discussion Are the IOS and model parameters capable of differentiating between healthy children and children with respiratory system distress? Children were classified into two main categories: Healthy (H) and Small Airway-Impaired (SAI). The IOS measures and respiratory model parameters analyzed differed consistently between H and SAI children. SAI children showed smaller trend of "growth" and larger trend of bronchodilator responses than H children. The two model parameters: peripheral compliance (Cp) and peripheral resistance (Rp) tracked IOS indices of small airway function well. Cp was a more sensitive index than Rp. Both eRIC and aRIC Cps and the IOS Reactance Area, AX, (also known as the "Goldman Triangle") showed good correlations. Conclusions What are the most useful IOS and model parameters? In this work we

  4. Functional vascularized lung grafts for lung bioengineering

    PubMed Central

    Dorrello, N. Valerio; Guenthart, Brandon A.; O’Neill, John D.; Kim, Jinho; Cunningham, Katherine; Chen, Ya-Wen; Biscotti, Mauer; Swayne, Theresa; Wobma, Holly M.; Huang, Sarah X. L.; Snoeck, Hans-Willem; Bacchetta, Matthew; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2017-01-01

    End-stage lung disease is the third leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 400,000 deaths per year in the United States alone. To reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with lung disease, new therapeutic strategies aimed at promoting lung repair and increasing the number of donor lungs available for transplantation are being explored. Because of the extreme complexity of this organ, previous attempts at bioengineering functional lungs from fully decellularized or synthetic scaffolds lacking functional vasculature have been largely unsuccessful. An intact vascular network is critical not only for maintaining the blood-gas barrier and allowing for proper graft function but also for supporting the regenerative cells. We therefore developed an airway-specific approach to removing the pulmonary epithelium, while maintaining the viability and function of the vascular endothelium, using a rat model. The resulting vascularized lung grafts supported the attachment and growth of human adult pulmonary cells and stem cell–derived lung-specified epithelial cells. We propose that de-epithelialization of the lung with preservation of intact vasculature could facilitate cell therapy of pulmonary epithelium and enable bioengineering of functional lungs for transplantation. PMID:28875163

  5. Targeted disruption of the mouse Npal3 gene leads to deficits in behavior, increased IgE levels, and impaired lung function.

    PubMed

    Grzmil, P; Konietzko, J; Boehm, D; Hölter, S M; Hoelter, S M; Aguilar-Pimentel, A; Aguilar, A; Javaheri, A; Kalaydjiev, S; Adler, T; Bolle, I; Adham, I; Dixkens, C; Wolf, S; Fuchs, H; Gailus-Durner, V; Gailus-Durne, V; Wurst, W; Ollert, M; Busch, D H; Busch, D; Schulz, H; de Angelis, M Hrabe; Burfeind, P

    2009-01-01

    The non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome (NIPA) proteins are highly conserved receptors or transporters. Translocation of NIPA genes were found in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome, and loss-of-function of the NIPA1 gene was identified in hereditary spastic paraplegia. The family of NIPA-like domain containing (NPAL) proteins is closely related to the NIPA proteins, but to date nothing is known about their function. Here, we could demonstrate that both human NPAL3 and mouse NPAL3 are ubiquitously expressed and encode highly conserved proteins. To further elucidate the function of the Npal3 gene, knockout (Npal3(-/-)) mice were generated. Intensive phenotypic analyses revealed that disruption of the Npal3 gene results in a pleiotropic phenotype. The function of the nervous system was impaired in both mutant males and females which could be demonstrated in behavioral tests. In addition, in NPAL3 mutants the number of NK cells was decreased and changes in IgM, IgG(2), and IgA were observed, indicating that the immune system is also affected. Interestingly, increased IgE levels as well as impaired lung functions were observed in mutant males but not in mutant females. It should be noted that the human Npal3 gene is located at 1p36.12-->p35.1, and atopic diseases were previously linked to this genomic region. Thus, the Npal3(-/-) mice could serve as a valuable model system for studying atopic diseases. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Lymphocytic alveolitis is associated with the accumulation of functionally impaired HIV-specific T cells in the lung of antiretroviral therapy-naive subjects.

    PubMed

    Neff, C Preston; Chain, Jennifer L; MaWhinney, Samantha; Martin, Allison K; Linderman, Derek J; Flores, Sonia C; Campbell, Thomas B; Palmer, Brent E; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2015-02-15

    Lymphocytic alveolitis in HIV-1-infected individuals is associated with multiple pulmonary complications and a poor prognosis. Although lymphocytic alveolitis has been associated with viremia and an increased number of CD8(+) T cells in the lung, its exact cause is unknown. To determine if HIV-1-specific T cells are associated with lymphocytic alveolitis in HIV-1-infected individuals. Using blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells from normal control subjects and untreated HIV-1-infected individuals, we examined the frequency and functional capacity of HIV-1-specific T cells. We found that HIV-1-specific T cells were significantly elevated in the BAL compared with blood of HIV-1-infected individuals and strongly correlated with T-cell alveolitis. Expression of Ki67, a marker of in vivo proliferation, was significantly reduced on HIV-1-specific T cells in BAL compared with blood, suggesting a diminished proliferative capacity. In addition, HIV-1-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in BAL had higher expression of programmed death 1 (PD-1) and lower cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) expression than those in the blood. A strong correlation between PD-1, but not CTLA-4, and HIV-1-specific T-cell proliferation was seen, and blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway augmented HIV-1-specific T-cell proliferation, suggesting that the PD-1 pathway was the main cause of reduced proliferation in the lung. These findings suggest that alveolitis associated with HIV-1 infection is caused by the recruitment of HIV-1-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells to the lung. These antigen-specific T cells display an impaired proliferative capacity that is caused by increased expression of PD-1.

  7. Lymphocytic Alveolitis Is Associated with the Accumulation of Functionally Impaired HIV-Specific T Cells in the Lung of Antiretroviral Therapy–Naive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Neff, C. Preston; Chain, Jennifer L.; MaWhinney, Samantha; Martin, Allison K.; Linderman, Derek J.; Flores, Sonia C.; Campbell, Thomas B.; Fontenot, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Lymphocytic alveolitis in HIV-1–infected individuals is associated with multiple pulmonary complications and a poor prognosis. Although lymphocytic alveolitis has been associated with viremia and an increased number of CD8+ T cells in the lung, its exact cause is unknown. Objectives: To determine if HIV-1–specific T cells are associated with lymphocytic alveolitis in HIV-1–infected individuals. Methods: Using blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells from normal control subjects and untreated HIV-1–infected individuals, we examined the frequency and functional capacity of HIV-1–specific T cells. Measurements and Main Results: We found that HIV-1–specific T cells were significantly elevated in the BAL compared with blood of HIV-1–infected individuals and strongly correlated with T-cell alveolitis. Expression of Ki67, a marker of in vivo proliferation, was significantly reduced on HIV-1–specific T cells in BAL compared with blood, suggesting a diminished proliferative capacity. In addition, HIV-1–specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in BAL had higher expression of programmed death 1 (PD-1) and lower cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) expression than those in the blood. A strong correlation between PD-1, but not CTLA-4, and HIV-1–specific T-cell proliferation was seen, and blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway augmented HIV-1–specific T-cell proliferation, suggesting that the PD-1 pathway was the main cause of reduced proliferation in the lung. Conclusions: These findings suggest that alveolitis associated with HIV-1 infection is caused by the recruitment of HIV-1–specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to the lung. These antigen-specific T cells display an impaired proliferative capacity that is caused by increased expression of PD-1. PMID:25536276

  8. Increased Risk of Lung Cancer Associated with a Functionally Impaired Polymorphic Variant of the Human DNA Glycosylase NEIL2

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Sanjib; Maiti, Amit K; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Hegde, Pavana M; Boldogh, Istvan; Sarkar, Partha S; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z; Sarker, Altaf H.; Hang, Bo; Xie, Jingwu; Tomkinson, Alan E; Zhou, Mian; Shen, Binghui; Wang, Guanghai; Wu, Chen; Yu, Dianke; Lin, Dongxin; Cardenas, Victor; Hazra, Tapas K

    2012-01-01

    Human NEIL2, one of five oxidized base-specific DNA glycosylases, is unique in preferentially repairing oxidative damage in transcribed genes. Here we show that depletion of NEIL2 causes a 6- to 7-fold increase in spontaneous mutation frequency in the HPRT gene of the V79 Chinese hamster lung cell line. This prompted us to screen for NEIL2 variants in lung cancer patients’ genomic DNA. We identified several polymorphic variants, among which R103Q and R257L were frequently observed in lung cancer patients. We then characterized these variants biochemically, and observed a modest decrease in DNA glycosylase activity relative to the wild type (WT) only with the R257L mutant protein. However, in reconstituted repair assays containing WT NEIL2 or its R257L and R103Q variants together with other DNA base excision repair (BER) proteins (PNKP, Polβ, Lig IIIα and XRCC1) or using NEIL2-FLAG immunocomplexes, an ~ 5-fold decrease in repair was observed with the R257L variant compared to WT or R103Q NEIL2, apparently due to the R257L mutant’s lower affinity for other repair proteins, particularly Polβ. Notably, increased endogenous DNA damage was observed in NEIL2 variant (R257L)-expressing cells relative to WT cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the decreased DNA repair capacity of the R257L variant can induce mutations that lead to lung cancer development. PMID:22497777

  9. Chronic ethanol ingestion impairs alveolar type II cell glutathione homeostasis and function and predisposes to endotoxin-mediated acute edematous lung injury in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Holguin, F; Moss, I; Brown, L A; Guidot, D M

    1998-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse increases the incidence and mortality of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in septic patients. To examine a potential mechanism, we hypothesized that ethanol ingestion predisposes to sepsis-mediated acute lung injury by decreasing alveolar type II cell glutathione homeostasis and function. Lungs isolated from rats fed ethanol (20% in water for >/= 3 wk), compared with lungs from control-fed rats, had greater (P < 0. 05) edematous injury (reflected by nonhydrostatic weight gain) after endotoxin (2 mg/kg intraperitoneally) and subsequent perfusion ex vivo with n-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (fMLP, 10(-7) M). Ethanol ingestion decreased (P < 0.05) glutathione levels in the plasma, lung tissue, and lung lavage fluid, and increased (P < 0.05) oxidized glutathione levels in the lung lavage fluid. Furthermore, ethanol ingestion decreased type II cell glutathione content by 95% (P < 0.05), decreased (P < 0.05) type II cell surfactant synthesis and secretion, and decreased (P < 0.05) type II cell viability, in vitro. Finally, treatment with the glutathione precursors S-adenosyl-L-methionine and N-acetylcysteine in the final week of ethanol ingestion significantly reduced lung edema during perfusion ex vivo. We conclude that ethanol ingestion in rats alters alveolar type II cell glutathione levels and function, thereby predisposing the lung to acute edematous injury after endotoxemia. We speculate that chronic alcohol abuse in humans predisposes to ARDS through similar mechanisms. PMID:9466970

  10. Minnelide/Triptolide Impairs Mitochondrial Function by Regulating SIRT3 in P53-Dependent Manner in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay; Corey, Catherine; Scott, Iain; Shiva, Sruti; D’Cunha, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Minnelide/Triptolide (TL) has recently emerged as a potent anticancer drug in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the precise mechanism of its action remains ambiguous. In this study, we elucidated the molecular basis for TL-induced cell death in context to p53 status. Cell death was attributed to dysfunction of mitochondrial bioenergetics in p53-deficient cells, which was characterized by decreased mitochondrial respiration, steady-state ATP level and membrane potential, but augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increased ROS production resulted in oxidative stress in TL-treated cells. This was exhibited by elevated nuclear levels of a redox-sensitive transcriptional factor, NF-E2-related factor-2 (NRF2), along with diminished cellular glutathione (GSH) content. We further demonstrated that in the absence of p53, TL blunted the expression of mitochondrial SIRT3 triggering increased acetylation of NDUAF9 and succinate dehydrogenase, components of complexes I and II of the electron transport chain (ETC). TL-mediated hyperacetylation of complexes I and II proteins and these complexes displayed decreased enzymatic activities. We also provide the evidence that P53 regulate steady-state level of SIRT3 through Proteasome-Pathway. Finally, forced overexpression of Sirt3, but not deacetylase-deficient mutant of Sirt3 (H243Y), restored the deleterious effect of TL on p53-deficient cells by rescuing mitochondrial bioenergetics. On contrary, Sirt3 deficiency in the background of wild-type p53 triggered TL-induced mitochondrial impairment that echoed TL effect in p53-deficeint cells. These findings illustrate a novel mechanism by which TL exerts its potent effects on mitochondrial function and ultimately the viability of NSCLC tumor. PMID:27501149

  11. Inadequate glucose control in type 2 diabetes is associated with impaired lung function and systemic inflammation: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Inadequate glucose control may be simultaneously associated with inflammation and decreased lung function in type 2 diabetes. We evaluated if lung function is worse in patients with inadequate glucose control, and if inflammatory markers are simultaneously increased in these subjects. Methods Subjects were selected at the Colombian Diabetes Association Center in Bogotá. Pulmonary function tests were performed and mean residual values were obtained for forced expiratory volume (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1/FVC, with predicted values based on those derived by Hankinson et al. for Mexican-Americans. Multiple least-squares regression was used to adjust for differences in known determinants of lung function. We measured blood levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HBA1c), interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), fibrinogen, ferritin, and C-reactive protein (C-RP). Results 495 diabetic patients were studied, out of which 352 had inadequate control (HBA1c > 7%). After adjusting for known determinants of lung function, those with inadequate control had lower FEV1 (-75.4 mL, IC95%: -92, -59; P < 0.0001) and FVC (-121 mL, IC95%: -134, -108; P < 0,0001) mean residuals, and higher FEV1/FVC (0.013%, IC95%: 0.009, 0.018, P < 0.0001) residuals than those with adequate control, as well as increased levels of all inflammatory markers (P < 0.05), with the exception of IL-6. Conclusions Subjects with type 2 diabetes and inadequate control had lower FVC and FEV1 than predicted and than those of subjects with adequate control. It is postulated that poorer pulmonary function may be associated with increased levels of inflammatory mediators. PMID:20659337

  12. Systemic inflammation and lung function: A longitudinal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hancox, Robert J.; Gray, Andrew R.; Sears, Malcolm R.; Poulton, Richie

    2016-01-01

    Background Systemic inflammation is associated with impaired lung function in healthy adults as well as in patients with lung disease. The mechanism for this association is unknown and it is unclear if systemic inflammation leads to impaired lung function or if poor lung function leads to inflammation. We explored the temporal associations between blood C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and white blood cells, and lung function in young adults. Methods Spirometry, plethysmography, and diffusion capacity were measured in a population-based cohort at ages 32 and 38 years. High-sensitivity CRP, fibrinogen, and white blood cells were measured at the same ages. Results Higher levels of CRP and, to a lesser extent, fibrinogen were associated with lower lung volumes in cross-sectional analyses at both ages 32 and 38 years. Higher CRP and fibrinogen at age 32 were associated with higher FEV1 and FEV1/FVC at age 38, but not other measures of lung function. Lower lung volumes (total lung capacity, functional residual capacity, and residual volume) but not airflow obstruction (FEV1/FVC) at age 32 were associated with higher CRP at age 38. Associations between age 32 lung function and fibrinogen at follow-up were weaker, but consistent. There were no longitudinal associations between white blood cells and lung function. Conclusions We found no evidence that systemic inflammation causes a decline in lung function. However, lower lung volumes were associated with higher CRP and fibrinogen at follow-up indicating that pulmonary restriction may be a risk factor for systemic inflammation. The mechanism for this association remains unclear. PMID:26733230

  13. HIV Impairs Lung Epithelial Integrity and Enters the Epithelium to Promote Chronic Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Fernanda; Mandke, Pooja; Chau, Eric; Aggarwal, Neil R.; D’Alessio, Franco R.; Lambert, Allison A.; Kirk, Gregory; Blankson, Joel; Drummond, M. Bradley; Tsibris, Athe M.

    2016-01-01

    epithelial cells and alter their function by impairing cell-cell adhesion and increasing the expression of inflammatory mediators. These observed changes may contribute local inflammation, which can lead to lung function decline and increased susceptibility to COPD in HIV patients. PMID:26930653

  14. HIV Impairs Lung Epithelial Integrity and Enters the Epithelium to Promote Chronic Lung Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brune, Kieran A; Ferreira, Fernanda; Mandke, Pooja; Chau, Eric; Aggarwal, Neil R; D'Alessio, Franco R; Lambert, Allison A; Kirk, Gregory; Blankson, Joel; Drummond, M Bradley; Tsibris, Athe M; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K

    2016-01-01

    epithelial cells and alter their function by impairing cell-cell adhesion and increasing the expression of inflammatory mediators. These observed changes may contribute local inflammation, which can lead to lung function decline and increased susceptibility to COPD in HIV patients.

  15. Lung function in insulation workers.

    PubMed

    Clausen, J; Netterstrøm, B; Wolff, C

    1993-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of working with modern insulation materials (rock and glass wool), the members of the Copenhagen Union of Insulation Workers were invited to participate in a study based on a health examination that included lung function tests. Three hundred and forty men (74%) agreed to participate, and 166 bus drivers served as the control group. Age distribution, height, and smoking habits were similar in the two groups. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were used as tests for lung function. There were no differences in FVC between the study and control groups, but the insulation workers had significantly lower values of FEV1 (mean 2.51) compared with the controls (mean 3.4 1), independent of smoking habits. Six years before the present study, 114 of the insulation workers participated in a similar study, and eight years after the initial study, the lung function of 59 of the bus drivers was tested. The decline in FVC in insulation workers who smoked was significantly higher (7.7 cl/year) than in bus drivers who smoked (3.1 cl/year); the decline in FEV1 was significantly higher in insulation workers independent of smoking habits (17.0 cl/year v 2.9 cl/year). Self assessed former exposure to asbestos was not associated with lung function in insulation workers. The study concludes that working with modern insulation materials is associated with increased risk of developing obstructive lung disease.

  16. The loss-of-function of DNA methyltransferase 1 by siRNA impairs the growth of non-small cell lung cancer with alleviated side effects via reactivation of RASSF1A and APC in vitro and vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Liang; Li, An-Gui; Zhang, Li-Fei; Zhang, Chun-Fang; Song, Jian-Fei; Du, Zhen-Zong

    2017-01-01

    Hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) promoters by DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) can be observed in almost all cancers which represent a hallmark of carcinogenesis, including lung cancer. DNMT inhibitors (e.g.5-Aza-CR/CdR) reactivate TSGs to exert anti-cancer activity and have been applied into the clinical. However, it is cytotoxic even at low concentrations, which might be not directly related to DNA methylation. We here investigated an alternative strategy in the lung cancer therapy and aimed to estimate and compare its efficiency and side effects of knockdown of DNMT1 in vitro and in vivo. Lung cancer tissues (n=20) showed enhanced expression of DNMT1 than corresponding non-neoplastic tissues. Similar results were found in lung cancer cell lines A549 and H538. The treatment of 5-Aza-CR or knockdown of DNMT1 in vitro could inhibit the expressions of DNMT1 but restore the TSGs expressions including the Ras association domain family 1A (RASSF1A) and the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) via the demethylation of its promoter region, which results in the decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis and impaired ability of migration. Importantly, knockdown of DNMT1 by siRNA in vivo also effectively demethylated the RASSF1A and APC promoter, elevated their expressions and limited tumor growth, which functioned like 5-Aza-CR but with alleviated side effects, suggesting that knockdown of DNMT1 might be potential strategy for the treatment of lung cancer with better tolerability. PMID:28938637

  17. The Fas/FasL pathway impairs the alveolar fluid clearance in mouse lungs

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Raquel; Tanino, Mishie; Smith, Lincoln S.; Kajikawa, Osamu; Wong, Venus A.; Mongovin, Steve; Matute-Bello, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial damage is a critical event that leads to protein-rich edema in acute lung injury (ALI), but the mechanisms leading to epithelial damage are not completely understood. Cell death by necrosis and apoptosis occurs in alveolar epithelial cells in the lungs of patients with ALI. Fas activation induces apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells, but its role in the formation of lung edema is unclear. The main goal of this study was to determine whether activation of the Fas/Fas ligand pathway in the lungs could alter the function of the lung epithelium, and the mechanisms involved. The results show that Fas activation alters the alveolar barrier integrity and impairs the ability of the lung alveolar epithelium to reabsorb fluid from the air spaces. This result was dependent on the presence of a normal Fas receptor and was not affected by inflammation induced by Fas activation. Alteration of the fluid transport properties of the alveolar epithelium was partially restored by β-adrenergic stimulation. Fas activation also caused apoptosis of alveolar endothelial cells, but this effect was less pronounced than the effect on the alveolar epithelium. Thus, activation of the Fas pathway impairs alveolar epithelial function in mouse lungs by mechanisms involving caspase-dependent apoptosis, suggesting that targeting apoptotic pathways could reduce the formation of lung edema in ALI. PMID:23812636

  18. Reduced Mastication Impairs Memory Function.

    PubMed

    Fukushima-Nakayama, Y; Ono, Takehito; Hayashi, M; Inoue, M; Wake, H; Ono, Takashi; Nakashima, T

    2017-08-01

    Mastication is an indispensable oral function related to physical, mental, and social health throughout life. The elderly tend to have a masticatory dysfunction due to tooth loss and fragility in the masticatory muscles with aging, potentially resulting in impaired cognitive function. Masticatory stimulation has influence on the development of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as the growth of maxillofacial tissue in children. Although the relationship between mastication and cognitive function is potentially important in the growth period, the cellular and molecular mechanisms have not been sufficiently elucidated. Here, we show that the reduced mastication resulted in impaired spatial memory and learning function owing to the morphological change and decreased activity in the hippocampus. We used an in vivo model for reduced masticatory stimuli, in which juvenile mice were fed with powder diet and found that masticatory stimulation during the growth period positively regulated long-term spatial memory to promote cognitive function. The functional linkage between mastication and brain was validated by the decrease in neurons, neurogenesis, neuronal activity, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the hippocampus. These findings taken together provide in vivo evidence for a functional linkage between mastication and cognitive function in the growth period, suggesting a need for novel therapeutic strategies in masticatory function-related cognitive dysfunction.

  19. Functional imaging in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harders, S W; Balyasnikowa, S; Fischer, B M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer represents an increasingly frequent cancer diagnosis worldwide. An increasing awareness on smoking cessation as an important mean to reduce lung cancer incidence and mortality, an increasing number of therapy options and a steady focus on early diagnosis and adequate staging have resulted in a modestly improved survival. For early diagnosis and precise staging, imaging, especially positron emission tomography combined with CT (PET/CT), plays an important role. Other functional imaging modalities such as dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) have demonstrated promising results within this field. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with a brief and balanced introduction to these three functional imaging modalities and their current or potential application in the care of patients with lung cancer. PMID:24289258

  20. Plasma angiopoietin-2 concentrations are related to impaired lung function, and organ failure in a clinical cohort receiving high dose interleukin-2 therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gores, Kathryn M.; Delsing, Angela S.; Kraus, Sara J.; Powers, Linda; Vaena, Daniel A.; Milhem, Mohammed M.; Monick, Martha; Doerschug, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The pathophysiology and therapeutic options in sepsis-induced lung injury remain elusive. High Dose Interleukin-2 therapy (HDIL-2) is an important protocol for advanced malignancies but is limited by systemic inflammation and pulmonary edema that is indistinguishable from sepsis. In pre-clinical models, IL-2 stimulates angiopoietin-2 secretion, which increases endothelial permeability and causes pulmonary edema. However, these relationships have not been fully elucidated in humans. Further, the relevance of plasma angiopoietin-2 to organ function is not clear. We hypothesized that plasma angiopoietin-2 concentrations increase during HDIL-2, and are relevant to clinical pathophysiology. Methods We enrolled 13 subjects with metastatic melanoma or renal cell carcinoma admitted to receive HDIL-2, and collected blood and spirometry data daily. The plasma concentrations of angiopoietin-2 and interleukin-6 were measured with ELISA. Results At baseline, the mean angiopoietin-2 concentration was 2.5 ng/mL (SD 1.0 ng/mL). Angiopoietin-2 concentrations increased during treatment: the mean concentration on the penultimate day was 16.0 ng/mL (SD 4.5 ng/mL) and increased further to 18.6 ng/mL (SD 4.9 ng/mL; p < 0.05 vs penultimate) during the last day of therapy. The Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV-1) decreased during treatment. Interestingly, plasma angiopoietin-2 concentrations correlated negatively with FEV-1 (Spearman r=−0.78, p < 0.0001). Plasma angiopoietin-2 concentrations also correlated with plasma interleukin-6 concentrations (r = 0.61, p < 0.0001) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores (r = 0.68, p < 0.0001). Conclusions Plasma angiopoietin-2 concentrations increase during HDIL-2 administration, and correlate with pulmonary dysfunction. HDIL-2 may serve as a clinical model of sepsis and acute lung injury. Further investigation is warranted. PMID:24727870

  1. Stairs climbing test with pulse oximetry as predictor of early postoperative complications in functionally impaired patients with lung cancer and elective lung surgery: prospective trial of consecutive series of patients.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Igor; Majerić-Kogler, Visnja; Plavec, Davor; Maloca, Ivana; Slobodnjak, Zoran

    2008-02-01

    To test the predictive value of stairs climbing test for the development of postoperative complications in lung cancer patients with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)<2 L, selected for an elective lung surgery. The prospective study was conducted in 101 consecutive patients with an FEV1<2 L selected for elective lung surgery for lung cancer. Preoperative examination included medical history and physical examination, lung function testing, electrocardiography, laboratory testing, and chest radiography. All patients underwent stairs climbing with pulse oximetry before the operation with the number of steps climbed and the time to complete the test recorded. Oxygen saturation and pulse rate were measured every 20 steps. Data on postoperative complications including oxygen use, prolonged mechanical ventilation, and early postoperative mortality were collected. Eighty-seven of 101 patients (86%) had at least one postoperative complication. The type of surgery was significantly associated with postoperative complications (25.5% patients with lobectomy had no early postoperative complications), while age, gender, smoking status, postoperative oxygenation, and artificial ventilation were not. There were more postoperative complications in more extensive and serious types of surgery (P<0.001). The stairs climbing test produced a significant decrease in oxygen saturation (-1%) and increase in pulse rate (by 10/min) for every 20 steps climbed. The stairs climbing test was predictive for postoperative complications only in lobectomy group, with the best predictive parameter being the quotient of oxygen saturation after 40 steps and test duration (positive likelihood ratio [LR], 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71-3.38; negative LR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.38-0.76). In patients with other types of surgery the only significant predictive parameter for incident severe postoperative complications was the number of days on artificial ventilation (P=0.006). Stairs climbing

  2. Stairs Climbing Test with Pulse Oximetry as Predictor of Early Postoperative Complications in Functionally Impaired Patients with Lung Cancer and Elective Lung Surgery: Prospective Trial of Consecutive Series of Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nikolić, Igor; Majerić-Kogler, Višnja; Plavec, Davor; Maloča, Ivana; Slobodnjak, Zoran

    2008-01-01

    Aim To test the predictive value of stairs climbing test for the development of postoperative complications in lung cancer patients with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)<2 L, selected for an elective lung surgery. Methods The prospective study was conducted in 101 consecutive patients with an FEV1<2 L selected for elective lung surgery for lung cancer. Preoperative examination included medical history and physical examination, lung function testing, electrocardiography, laboratory testing, and chest radiography. All patients underwent stairs climbing with pulse oximetry before the operation with the number of steps climbed and the time to complete the test recorded. Oxygen saturation and pulse rate were measured every 20 steps. Data on postoperative complications including oxygen use, prolonged mechanical ventilation, and early postoperative mortality were collected. Results Eighty-seven of 101 patients (86%) had at least one postoperative complication. The type of surgery was significantly associated with postoperative complications (25.5% patients with lobectomy had no early postoperative complications), while age, gender, smoking status, postoperative oxygenation, and artificial ventilation were not. There were more postoperative complications in more extensive and serious types of surgery (P<0.001). The stairs climbing test produced a significant decrease in oxygen saturation (-1%) and increase in pulse rate (by 10/min) for every 20 steps climbed. The stairs climbing test was predictive for postoperative complications only in lobectomy group, with the best predictive parameter being the quotient of oxygen saturation after 40 steps and test duration (positive likelihood ratio [LR], 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71-3.38; negative LR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.38-0.76). In patients with other types of surgery the only significant predictive parameter for incident severe postoperative complications was the number of days on artificial ventilation (P

  3. Lung function in sisal ropemakers.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, M D; Irwig, L M; Johnston, J R; Turner, D M; Bezuidenhout, B N

    1979-01-01

    Lung function was measured by spirometry in 66 workers in a sisal ropemaking factory, and in their matched controls. The major atmospheric contaminant was the lubricant (or a component part thereof) used to soften the fibre. The concentration of airborne matter was generally less than 1 mug m--3. There was no difference in lung function between the two groups before the start of the working shift, that is, the mixture of softening lubricant and sisal caused no long-term effects. Although there was no change in lung function over the working shift in the group making sisal rope, the control group did show a significant increase in lung function over the same period. This suggests that an effect attributable to the lubricant and sisal dust did exist. In previous studies little mention has been made of the softeners used in the processing of sisal fibre. These additives may exert a significant effect on ventilatory capacity and may act in conjunction with sisal dust. PMID:500780

  4. Histologic and functional evaluation of lungs reconditioned by ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Israel Lopes; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel; Mariani, Alessandro Wasum; Fernandes, Flávio Guimarães; do Vale Unterpertinger, Fernando; Canzian, Mauro; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2012-03-01

    Only about 15% of donor lungs are considered suitable for transplantation (LTx). Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has been developed as a method to reassess and repair damaged lungs. We report our experience with EVLP in non-acceptable donor lungs and evaluate its ability to recondition these lungs. We studied lungs from 16 brain-dead donors rejected for LTx. After harvesting, the lungs were stored at 4°C for 10 hours and subjected to normothermic EVLP with Steen Solution (Vitrolife, Göteborg, Sweden) for 60 minutes. For functional evaluation, the following variables were assessed: partial pressure of arterial oxygen (Pao(2)), pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), and lung compliance (LC). For histologic assessment, lung biopsy was done before harvest and after EVLP. Tissue samples were examined under light microscopy. To detect and quantify apoptosis, terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated deoxy uridine triphosphate nick-end labeling assay was used. Thirteen lung donors were refused for having impaired lung function. The mean Pao(2) obtained in the organ donor at the referring hospital was 193.7 mm Hg and rose to 489 mm Hg after EVLP. During EVLP, the mean PVR was 652.5 dynes/sec/cm(5) and the mean LC was 48 ml/cm H(2)O. There was no significant difference between the mean Lung Injury Score before harvest and after EVLP. There was a trend toward a reduction in the median number of apoptotic cells after EVLP. EVLP improved lung function (oxygenation capacity) of organs considered unsuitable for transplantation. Lung tissue structure did not deteriorate even after 1 hour of normothermic perfusion. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Lung function in insulation workers.

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, J; Netterstrøm, B; Wolff, C

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of working with modern insulation materials (rock and glass wool), the members of the Copenhagen Union of Insulation Workers were invited to participate in a study based on a health examination that included lung function tests. Three hundred and forty men (74%) agreed to participate, and 166 bus drivers served as the control group. Age distribution, height, and smoking habits were similar in the two groups. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were used as tests for lung function. There were no differences in FVC between the study and control groups, but the insulation workers had significantly lower values of FEV1 (mean 2.51) compared with the controls (mean 3.4 1), independent of smoking habits. Six years before the present study, 114 of the insulation workers participated in a similar study, and eight years after the initial study, the lung function of 59 of the bus drivers was tested. The decline in FVC in insulation workers who smoked was significantly higher (7.7 cl/year) than in bus drivers who smoked (3.1 cl/year); the decline in FEV1 was significantly higher in insulation workers independent of smoking habits (17.0 cl/year v 2.9 cl/year). Self assessed former exposure to asbestos was not associated with lung function in insulation workers. The study concludes that working with modern insulation materials is associated with increased risk of developing obstructive lung disease. PMID:8457492

  6. PINK1 deficiency impairs mitochondrial homeostasis and promotes lung fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Marta; Lai, Yen-Chun; Romero, Yair; Brands, Judith; St. Croix, Claudette M.; Kamga, Christelle; Corey, Catherine; Herazo-Maya, Jose D.; Sembrat, John; Lee, Janet S.; Duncan, Steve R.; Rojas, Mauricio; Shiva, Sruti; Chu, Charleen T.; Mora, Ana L.

    2014-01-01

    Although aging is a known risk factor for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), the pathogenic mechanisms that underlie the effects of advancing age remain largely unexplained. Some age-related neurodegenerative diseases have an etiology that is related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we found that alveolar type II cells (AECIIs) in the lungs of IPF patients exhibit marked accumulation of dysmorphic and dysfunctional mitochondria. These mitochondrial abnormalities in AECIIs of IPF lungs were associated with upregulation of ER stress markers and were recapitulated in normal mice with advancing age in response to stimulation of ER stress. We found that impaired mitochondria in IPF and aging lungs were associated with low expression of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1). Knockdown of PINK1 expression in lung epithelial cells resulted in mitochondria depolarization and expression of profibrotic factors. Moreover, young PINK1-deficient mice developed similarly dysmorphic, dysfunctional mitochondria in the AECIIs and were vulnerable to apoptosis and development of lung fibrosis. Our data indicate that PINK1 deficiency results in swollen, dysfunctional mitochondria and defective mitophagy, and promotes fibrosis in the aging lung. PMID:25562319

  7. ABLATION OF LUNG EPITHELIAL CELLS DEREGULATES FGF-10 EXPRESSION AND IMPAIRS LUNG BRANCHING MORPHOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Namjin; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Pauling, Michelle Haynes; Lorizio, Walter; Vu, Thiennu H.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions are essential for tissue patterning during organogenesis. Distal lung epithelium and its adjacent mesenchyme comprise the epithelial-mesenchymal signaling unit that regulates lung branching morphogenesis. Tissue recombination experiments have demonstrated the importance of mesenchymal signals in inducing lung epithelial differentiation and branching, but the role of the epithelium in regulating mesenchymal signals has not been well characterized. Using transgenic mice, we ablated distal lung epithelial cells during lung development by inducing the expression of a constitutively active proapoptotic Bax protein under the surfactant protein C (SP-C) promoter. We found that epithelial cell ablation results in impaired lung branching morphogenesis, which progresses to emphysematous airspaces in the adults. Mesenchymal expression of fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf-10), whose strict spatial and temporal expression is critical for proper lung branching morphogenesis, is disrupted and loses its localized pattern. Interestingly, the expression of sonic hedgehog (Shh), an epithelial gene known to modulate Fgf-10 expression, is unchanged, indicating the existence of other distal epithelial signals that regulate mesenchymal Fgf-10 expression. We propose that distal SP-C expressing lung epithelial cells provide essential signals for the downregulation of Fgf-10 expression in the distal mesenchyme during lung development. PMID:19115389

  8. Ablation of lung epithelial cells deregulates FGF-10 expression and impairs lung branching morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namjin; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Pauling, Michelle Haynes; Lorizio, Walter; Vu, Thiennu H

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions are essential for tissue patterning during organogenesis. Distal lung epithelium and its adjacent mesenchyme comprise the epithelial-mesenchymal signaling unit that regulates lung branching morphogenesis. Tissue recombination experiments have demonstrated the importance of mesenchymal signals in inducing lung epithelial differentiation and branching, but the role of the epithelium in regulating mesenchymal signals has not been well characterized. Using transgenic mice, we ablated distal lung epithelial cells during lung development by inducing the expression of a constitutively active proapoptotic Bax protein under the surfactant protein C (SP-C) promoter. We found that epithelial cell ablation results in impaired lung branching morphogenesis, which progresses to emphysematous airspaces in the adults. Mesenchymal expression of fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf-10), whose strict spatial and temporal expression is critical for proper lung branching morphogenesis, is disrupted and loses its localized pattern. Interestingly, the expression of sonic hedgehog (Shh), an epithelial gene known to modulate Fgf-10 expression, is unchanged, indicating the existence of other distal epithelial signals that regulate mesenchymal Fgf-10expression. We propose that distal SP-C expressing lung epithelial cells provide essential signals for the downregulation of Fgf-10 expression in the distal mesenchyme during lung development. 292:123-130, 2009. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Noncanonical WNT-5A signaling impairs endogenous lung repair in COPD.

    PubMed

    Baarsma, Hoeke A; Skronska-Wasek, Wioletta; Mutze, Kathrin; Ciolek, Florian; Wagner, Darcy E; John-Schuster, Gerrit; Heinzelmann, Katharina; Günther, Andreas; Bracke, Ken R; Dagouassat, Maylis; Boczkowski, Jorge; Brusselle, Guy G; Smits, Ron; Eickelberg, Oliver; Yildirim, Ali Ö; Königshoff, Melanie

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of death worldwide. One main pathological feature of COPD is the loss of functional alveolar tissue without adequate repair (emphysema), yet the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. Reduced WNT-β-catenin signaling is linked to impaired lung repair in COPD; however, the factors responsible for attenuating this pathway remain to be elucidated. Here, we identify a canonical to noncanonical WNT signaling shift contributing to COPD pathogenesis. We demonstrate enhanced expression of noncanonical WNT-5A in two experimental models of COPD and increased posttranslationally modified WNT-5A in human COPD tissue specimens. WNT-5A was increased in primary lung fibroblasts from COPD patients and induced by COPD-related stimuli, such as TGF-β, cigarette smoke (CS), and cellular senescence. Functionally, mature WNT-5A attenuated canonical WNT-driven alveolar epithelial cell wound healing and transdifferentiation in vitro. Lung-specific WNT-5A overexpression exacerbated airspace enlargement in elastase-induced emphysema in vivo. Accordingly, inhibition of WNT-5A in vivo attenuated lung tissue destruction, improved lung function, and restored expression of β-catenin-driven target genes and alveolar epithelial cell markers in the elastase, as well as in CS-induced models of COPD. We thus identify a novel essential mechanism involved in impaired mesenchymal-epithelial cross talk in COPD pathogenesis, which is amenable to therapy.

  10. Systemic inflammation and lung function in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Hancox, Robert J; Poulton, Richie; Greene, Justina M; Filsell, Susan; McLachlan, Christene R; Rasmussen, Finn; Taylor, D Robin; Williams, Michael J A; Williamson, Avis; Sears, Malcolm R

    2007-01-01

    Background Impaired lung function is associated with systemic inflammation and is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in older adults. It is unknown when these associations emerge and to what extent they are mediated by smoking, chronic airways disease, and/or established atherosclerosis. We explored the association between the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and the systemic inflammatory marker C‐reactive protein (CRP) in young adults. Methods Associations between spirometric lung function and blood CRP were assessed in a population based birth cohort of approximately 1000 New Zealanders at ages 26 and 32 years. Analyses adjusted for height and sex to account for differences in predicted lung function and excluded pregnant women. Results There were significant inverse associations between FEV1 and CRP at both ages. Similar results were found for the forced vital capacity. These associations were similar in men and women and were independent of smoking, asthma, and body mass index. Conclusions Reduced lung function is associated with systemic inflammation in young adults. This association is not related to smoking, asthma, or obesity. The reasons for the association are unexplained, but the findings indicate that the association between lower lung function and increased inflammation predates the development of either chronic lung disease or clinically significant atherosclerosis. The association between poor lung function and cardiovascular disease may be mediated by an inflammatory mechanism. PMID:17604302

  11. What Are Lung Function Tests?

    MedlinePlus

    ... COPD How the Lungs Work Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... the Lungs Work Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Oxygen Therapy Sarcoidosis Stress Testing Rate This Content: Updated: December 9, ...

  12. Lung function in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Low, A T; Medford, A R L; Millar, A B; Tulloh, R M R

    2015-10-01

    Breathlessness is a common symptom in pulmonary hypertension (PH) and an important cause of morbidity. Though this has been attributed to the well described pulmonary vascular abnormalities and subsequent cardiac remodelling, changes in the airways of these patients have also been reported and may contribute to symptoms. Our understanding of these airway abnormalities is poor with conflicting findings in many studies. The present review evaluates these studies for the major PH groups. In addition we describe the role of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in the assessment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by evaluating cardiopulmonary interaction during exercise. As yet, the reasons for the abnormalities in lung function are unclear, but potential causes and the possible role of inflammation are discussed. Future research is required to provide a better understanding of this to help improve the management of these patients.

  13. Marital Conflict, Depressive Symptoms, and Functional Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Heejeong; Marks, Nadine F

    2008-01-01

    Guided by a stress process perspective, we investigated (a) whether marital conflict might directly lead to changes in depression and functional impairment, (b) whether marital conflict might indirectly lead to changes in functional impairment via depression, and (c) whether marital conflict might indirectly lead to changes in depression via…

  14. Preschool oscillometry and lung function at adolescence in asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Knihtilä, Hanna; Kotaniemi-Syrjänen, Anne; Mäkelä, Mika J; Bondestam, Jonas; Pelkonen, Anna S; Malmberg, L Pekka

    2015-12-01

    Reduced lung function in early childhood is associated with persistent symptoms and low lung function later in life. Impulse oscillometry (IOS) is feasible for assessing lung function also in preschool children, and some of the parameters, such as respiratory resistance at 5 Hz (Rrs5) and the frequency dependence of resistance (dRrs/df), have been suggested to reflect small airway dysfunction. Whether changes in preschool IOS predict later lung function remains unknown. The medical data of 154 asthmatic children with IOS performed at 2-7 years and spirometry at 12-18 years were analyzed. IOS and post-bronchodilator spirometry parameters were compared, and the association was estimated in a multivariate model. Measured at preschool age, particularly Rrs5 and dRrs/df were significantly correlated with post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) at adolescence (Rrs5: r = -0.223, P = 0.005; dRrs/df: r = 0.234, P = 0.004). Although the number of children with decreased FEV1 was low, associations of increased Rrs5 (odds ratio (OR) 5.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7; 20.9) and decreased dRrs/df (OR 8.2, 95% CI 1.7; 39.6) with decreased FEV1 remained significant in multivariate analyses. Similar findings were observed also with other spirometric parameters. In asthmatic children, preschool IOS is associated with spirometric lung function at adolescence, but the scatter is wide. Normal preschool IOS seems to indicate favourable lung function outcome, whereas in some individuals IOS could potentially be of clinical use, at a younger age than spirometry, to screen lung function deficits and increased risk for later lung function impairment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Functional lung imaging using hyperpolarized gas MRI.

    PubMed

    Fain, Sean B; Korosec, Frank R; Holmes, James H; O'Halloran, Rafael; Sorkness, Ronald L; Grist, Thomas M

    2007-05-01

    The noninvasive assessment of lung function using imaging is increasingly of interest for the study of lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Hyperpolarized gas MRI (HP MRI) has demonstrated the ability to detect changes in ventilation, perfusion, and lung microstructure that appear to be associated with both normal lung development and disease progression. The physical characteristics of HP gases and their application to MRI are presented with an emphasis on current applications. Clinical investigations using HP MRI to study asthma, COPD, cystic fibrosis, pediatric chronic lung disease, and lung transplant are reviewed. Recent advances in polarization, pulse sequence development for imaging with Xe-129, and prototype low magnetic field systems dedicated to lung imaging are highlighted as areas of future development for this rapidly evolving technology.

  16. Early lung function abnormalities in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Benfante, A; Ciresi, A; Bellia, M; Cannizzaro, F; Bellia, V; Giordano, C; Scichilone, N

    2015-06-01

    Acromegaly is an insidious disorder caused by a pituitary growth hormone (GH)-secreting adenoma resulting in high circulating levels of GH and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). Respiratory disorders are common complications in acromegaly, and can severely impact on quality of life, eventually affecting mortality. The present study aimed to explore structural and functional lung alterations of acromegalic subjects. We enrolled 10 consecutive patients (M/F: 5/5) affected by acromegaly. In all patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the presence of pituitary tumor. All patients underwent clinical, lung functional, biological, and radiological assessments. Ten healthy age-matched subjects also served as controls. No statistically significant differences in lung function were detected between acromegalic and healthy subjects (p ≥ 0.05 for all analyses). However, the diffusing capacity for CO (TLCO) was significantly lower in the acromegalic group than in healthy subjects (TLCO% predicted: 78.1 ± 16 vs. 90 ± 6 %, respectively, p = 0.04; KCO% predicted: 77 ± 16 vs. 93 ± 5 %, p = 0.02, respectively). None of the lung function parameters correlated with duration of the disease, or with inflammatory marker of the airways. In acromegalics, biological (exhaled NO concentrations) and imaging (total lung volume, TLV, and mean lung density, MLD) evaluations were within normal values. The TLV measured by HRCT was 3540 ± 1555 ml in acromegalics, and the MLD was -711 ± 73 HU. None of the lung functional, radiological, and biological findings correlated with GH or IGF-I levels, and no correlation was found with duration of disease. In the current study, lung function evaluation allowed to detect early involvement of lung parenchyma, as assessed by TLCO and KCO, even in the absence of parenchymal density alterations of the lung by HRCT. These findings suggest to routinely include the carbon monoxide diffusing capacity in the lung function assessment for an

  17. [Functional impairment associated with cognitive impairment in hospitalised elderly].

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Chaparro, José Mauricio; Mosquera-Jiménez, José Ignacio; Davis, Annabelle S; Reyes-Ortiz, Carlos A

    2017-06-24

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of cognitive impairment on functional decline in hospitalised patients aged ≥60 years. Measurements at admission included demographic data, Charlson's comorbidity index, and cognitive impairment (according to education level). Data were also collected on hospital length of stay, depression, and delirium developed during hospitalisation. The outcome, Barthel Index (BI), was measured at admission, discharge, and 1-month post-discharge. Patients with BI≤75 at admission (n=54) or with a missing BI value were excluded (n=1). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to explore predictive factors with functional decline (BI≤75) from admission to discharge, and 1-month later. Of the 133 patients included, 24.8% and 19.6% had a BI≤75 at discharge and at 1-month, respectively. Compared with men, women had more than double risk for functional decline at discharge and 1-month (P<.05). Compared with those without delirium and without cognitive impairment, those with delirium and cognitive impairment had an increased risk for functional decline (BI≤75) at discharge (OR 5.15, 95% CI; 1.94-13.67), and at 1-month (OR 6.26, 95% CI; 2.30-17.03). Similarly, those with comorbidity (≥2) had increased functional decline at discharge (OR 2.36, 95% CI; 1.14-4.87), and at 1-month after discharge (OR 2.71, 95% CI; 1.25-5.89). Delirium during hospitalisation, together with cognitive impairment on admission, was a strong predictor of functional decline. Copyright © 2017 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Lung function in asbestos-exposed workers, a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A continuing controversy exists about whether, asbestos exposure is associated with significant lung function impairments when major radiological abnormalities are lacking. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis in order to assess whether asbestos exposure is related to impairment of lung function parameters independently of the radiological findings. Methods MEDLINE was searched from its inception up to April 2010. We included studies that assessed lung function parameters in asbestos exposed workers and stratified subjects according to radiological findings. Estimates of VC, FEV1 and FEV1/VC with their dispersion measures were extracted and pooled. Results Our meta-analysis with data from 9,921 workers exposed to asbestos demonstrates a statistically significant reduction in VC, FEV1 and FEV1/VC, even in those workers without radiological changes. Less severe lung function impairments are detected if the diagnoses are based on (high resolution) computed tomography rather than the less sensitive X-ray images. The degree of lung function impairment was partly related to the proportion of smokers included in the studies. Conclusions Asbestos exposure is related to restrictive and obstructive lung function impairment. Even in the absence of radiological evidence of parenchymal or pleural diseases there is a trend for functional impairment. PMID:21791077

  19. Inferential functioning in visually impaired children.

    PubMed

    Puche-Navarro, Rebeca; Millán, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The current study explores the inferential abilities of visually impaired children in a task presented in two formats, manipulative and verbal. The results showed that in the group of visually impaired children, just as with children with normal sight, there was a wide range of inference types. It was found that the visually impaired children perform slightly better in the use of inductive and relational inferences in the verbal format, while in the manipulative format children with normal sight perform better. These results suggest that in inferential functioning of young children, and especially visually impaired children, the format of the task influences performance more than the child's visual ability.

  20. Impaired Lung Mitochondrial Respiration Following Perinatal Nicotine Exposure in Rats.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Daniel T; Liu, Jie; Sakurai, Reiko; Rossiter, Harry B; Rehan, Virender K

    2016-04-01

    Perinatal smoke/nicotine exposure predisposes to chronic lung disease and morbidity. Mitochondrial abnormalities may contribute as the PPARγ pathway is involved in structural and functional airway deficits after perinatal nicotine exposure. We hypothesized perinatal nicotine exposure results in lung mitochondrial dysfunction that can be rescued by rosiglitazone (RGZ; PPARγ receptor agonist). Sprague-Dawley dams received placebo (CON), nicotine (NIC, 1 mg kg(-1)), or NIC + RGZ (3 mg kg(-1)) daily from embryonic day 6 to postnatal day 21. Parenchymal lung (~10 mg) was taken from adult male offspring for mitochondrial assessment in situ. ADP-stimulated O2 consumption was less in NIC and NIC + RGZ compared to CON (F[2,14] = 17.8; 4.5 ± 0.8 and 4.1 ± 1.4 vs. 8.8 ± 2.5 pmol s mg(-1); p < 0.05). The respiratory control ratio for ADP, an index of mitochondrial coupling, was reduced in NIC and remediated in NIC + RGZ (F[2,14] = 3.8; p < 0.05). Reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity and abnormal coupling were evident after perinatal nicotine exposure. RGZ improved mitochondrial function through tighter coupling of oxidative phosphorylation.

  1. Does acute exposure to aldehydes impair pulmonary function and structure?

    PubMed

    Abreu, Mariana de; Neto, Alcendino Cândido; Carvalho, Giovanna; Casquillo, Natalia Vasconcelos; Carvalho, Niedja; Okuro, Renata; Ribeiro, Gabriel C Motta; Machado, Mariana; Cardozo, Aléxia; Silva, Aline Santos E; Barboza, Thiago; Vasconcellos, Luiz Ricardo; Rodrigues, Danielle Araujo; Camilo, Luciana; Carneiro, Leticia de A M; Jandre, Frederico; Pino, Alexandre V; Giannella-Neto, Antonio; Zin, Walter A; Corrêa, Leonardo Holanda Travassos; Souza, Marcio Nogueira de; Carvalho, Alysson R

    2016-07-15

    Mixtures of anhydrous ethyl alcohol and gasoline substituted for pure gasoline as a fuel in many Brazilian vehicles. Consequently, the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as ketones, other organic compounds, and particularly aldehydes increased in many Brazilian cities. The current study aims to investigate whether formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, or mixtures of both impair lung function, morphology, inflammatory and redox responses at environmentally relevant concentrations. For such purpose, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to either medical compressed air or to 4 different mixtures of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Eight hours later animals were anesthetized, paralyzed and lung mechanics and morphology, inflammatory cells and IL-1β, KC, TNF-α, IL-6, CCL2, MCP-1 contents, superoxide dismutase and catalalase activities were determined. The extra pulmonary respiratory tract was also analyzed. No differences could be detected between any exposed and control groups. In conclusion, no morpho-functional alterations were detected in exposed mice in relation to the control group.

  2. Relation of ventilatory impairment and of chronic mucus hypersecretion to mortality from obstructive lung disease and from all causes.

    PubMed Central

    Lange, P; Nyboe, J; Appleyard, M; Jensen, G; Schnohr, P

    1990-01-01

    The relation of ventilatory impairment and chronic mucus hypersecretion to death from all causes and death from obstructive lung disease (chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma) was studied in 13,756 men and women randomly selected from the general population of the City of Copenhagen. During the 10 year follow up 2288 subjects died. In 164 subjects obstructive lung disease was considered to be an underlying or a contributory cause of death (obstructive lung disease related death); in 73 subjects it was considered to be the underlying cause of death (obstructive lung disease death). Forced expiratory volume in one second, expressed as a percentage of the predicted value (FEV1% pred), and the presence of chronic phlegm were used to characterise ventilatory function and chronic mucus hypersecretion respectively. For mortality analysis the proportional hazards regression model of Cox was used; it included age, sex, pack years, inhalation habit, body mass index, alcohol consumption, and the presence or absence of asthma, heart disease, and diabetes mellitus as confounding factors. By comparison with subjects with an FEV1 of 80% pred or more, subjects with an FEV1 below 40% pred had increased risk of dying from all causes (relative risk (RR) = 5.0 for women, 2.7 for men), a higher risk of obstructive lung disease related death (RR = 57 for women, 34 for men), and a higher risk of obstructive lung disease death (RR = 101 for women, 77 for men). Chronic mucus hypersecretion was associated with only a slightly higher risk of death from all causes (RR = 1.1 for women, 1.3 for men). The association between chronic mucus hypersecretion and obstructive lung disease death varied with the level of ventilatory function, being weak in subjects with normal ventilatory function (for an FEV1 of 80% pred the RR was 1.2), but more pronounced in subjects with reduced ventilatory function (for an FEV1 of 40% pred the RR was 4.2). A similar though statistically non-significant trend was

  3. Reduced Airway Surface pH Impairs Bacterial Killing in the Porcine Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Pezzulo, Alejandro A.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Hoegger, Mark J.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Ramachandran, Shyam; Moninger, Thomas O.; Karp, Phillip H.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Haagsman, Henk P.; van Eijk, Martin; Bánfi, Botond; Horswill, Alexander R.; Stoltz, David A.; McCray, Paul B.; Welsh, Michael J.; Zabner, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene 1. Although bacterial lung infection and the resulting inflammation cause most of the morbidity and mortality, how loss of CFTR first disrupts airway host defense has remained uncertain 2–6. We asked what abnormalities impair eradication when a bacterium lands on the pristine surface of a newborn CF airway? To investigate these defects, we interrogated the viability of individual bacteria immobilized on solid grids and placed on the airway surface. As a model we studied CF pigs, which spontaneously develop hallmark features of CF lung disease 7,8. At birth, their lungs lack infection and inflammation, but have a reduced ability to eradicate bacteria 8. Here we show that in newborn wild-type pigs, the thin layer of airway surface liquid (ASL) rapidly killed bacteria in vivo, when removed from the lung, and in primary epithelial cultures. Lack of CFTR reduced bacterial killing. We found that ASL pH was more acidic in CF, and reducing pH inhibited the antimicrobial activity of ASL. Reducing ASL pH diminished bacterial killing in wild-type pigs, and increasing ASL pH rescued killing in CF pigs. These results directly link the initial host defense defect to loss of CFTR, an anion channel that facilitates HCO3− transport 9–13. Without CFTR, airway epithelial HCO3− secretion is defective, ASL pH falls and inhibits antimicrobial function, and thereby impairs killing of bacteria that enter the newborn lung. These findings suggest that increasing ASL pH might prevent the initial infection in patients with CF and that assaying bacterial killing could report on the benefit of therapeutic interventions. PMID:22763554

  4. Shifting sources of functional limitation following extensive (70%) lung resection.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Connie C W; Dane, D Merrill; Estrera, Aaron S; Wagner, Harrieth E; Wagner, Peter D; Johnson, Robert L

    2008-04-01

    We previously found that, following surgical resection of approximately 58% of lung units by right pneumonectomy (PNX) in adult canines, oxygen-diffusing capacity (Dl(O(2))) fell sufficiently to become a major factor limiting exercise capacity, although the decline was mitigated by recruitment, remodeling, and growth of the remaining lung units. To determine whether an upper limit of compensation is reached following the loss of even more lung units, we measured pulmonary gas exchange, hemodynamics, and ventilatory power requirements in adult canines during treadmill exercise following two-stage resection of approximately 70% of lung units in the presence or absence of mediastinal distortion. Results were compared with that in control animals following right PNX or thoracotomy without resection (Sham). Following 70% lung resection, peak O(2) uptake was 45% below normal. Ventilation-perfusion mismatch developed, and pulmonary arterial pressure and ventilatory power requirements became markedly elevated. In contrast, the relationship of Dl(O(2)) to cardiac output remained normal, indicating preservation of Dl(O(2))-to-cardiac output ratio and alveolar-capillary recruitment up to peak exercise. The impairment in airway and vascular function exceeded the impairment in gas exchange and imposed the major limitation to exercise following 70% resection. Mediastinal distortion further reduced air and blood flow conductance, resulting in CO(2) retention. Results suggest that adaptation of extra-acinar airways and blood vessels lagged behind that of acinar tissue. As more lung units were lost, functional compensation became limited by the disproportionately reduced convective conductance rather than by alveolar diffusion disequilibrium.

  5. Menopause Is Associated with Accelerated Lung Function Decline.

    PubMed

    Triebner, Kai; Matulonga, Bobette; Johannessen, Ane; Suske, Sandra; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Demoly, Pascal; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Franklin, Karl A; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Gullón Blanco, José Antonio; Heinrich, Joachim; Holm, Mathias; Jarvis, Debbie; Jõgi, Rain; Lindberg, Eva; Moratalla Rovira, Jesús Martínez; Muniozguren Agirre, Nerea; Pin, Isabelle; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Puggini, Luca; Raherison, Chantal; Sánchez-Ramos, José Luis; Schlünssen, Vivi; Sunyer, Jordi; Svanes, Cecilie; Hustad, Steinar; Leynaert, Bénédicte; Gómez Real, Francisco

    2017-04-15

    Menopause is associated with changes in sex hormones, which affect immunity, inflammation, and osteoporosis and may impair lung function. Lung function decline has not previously been investigated in relation to menopause. To study whether lung function decline, assessed by FVC and FEV1, is accelerated in women who undergo menopause. The population-based longitudinal European Community Respiratory Health Survey provided serum samples, spirometry, and questionnaire data about respiratory and reproductive health from three study waves (n = 1,438). We measured follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone and added information on menstrual patterns to determine menopausal status using latent class analysis. Associations with lung function decline were investigated using linear mixed effects models, adjusting for age, height, weight, pack-years, current smoking, age at completed full-time education, spirometer, and including study center as random effect. Menopausal status was associated with accelerated lung function decline. The adjusted mean FVC decline was increased by -10.2 ml/yr (95% confidence interval [CI], -13.1 to -7.2) in transitional women and -12.5 ml/yr (95% CI, -16.2 to -8.9) in post-menopausal women, compared with women menstruating regularly. The adjusted mean FEV1 decline increased by -3.8 ml/yr (95% CI, -6.3 to -2.9) in transitional women and -5.2 ml/yr (95% CI, -8.3 to -2.0) in post-menopausal women. Lung function declined more rapidly among transitional and post-menopausal women, in particular for FVC, beyond the expected age change. Clinicians should be aware that respiratory health often deteriorates during reproductive aging.

  6. Genetic Ancestry in Lung-Function Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Seibold, Max A.; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Williams, L. Keoki; Reiner, Alex P.; Colangelo, Laura; Galanter, Joshua; Gignoux, Christopher; Hu, Donglei; Sen, Saunak; Choudhry, Shweta; Peterson, Edward L.; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Nalls, Michael A.; Leak, Tennille S.; O’Meara, Ellen; Meibohm, Bernd; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Li, Rongling; Harris, Tamara B.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Fornage, Myriam; Enright, Paul; Ziv, Elad; Smith, Lewis J.; Liu, Kiang; Burchard, Esteban González

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Self-identified race or ethnic group is used to determine normal reference standards in the prediction of pulmonary function. We conducted a study to determine whether the genetically determined percentage of African ancestry is associated with lung function and whether its use could improve predictions of lung function among persons who identified themselves as African American. METHODS We assessed the ancestry of 777 participants self-identified as African American in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study and evaluated the relation between pulmonary function and ancestry by means of linear regression. We performed similar analyses of data for two independent cohorts of subjects identifying themselves as African American: 813 participants in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition (HABC) study and 579 participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS). We compared the fit of two types of models to lung-function measurements: models based on the covariates used in standard prediction equations and models incorporating ancestry. We also evaluated the effect of the ancestry-based models on the classification of disease severity in two asthma-study populations. RESULTS African ancestry was inversely related to forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity in the CARDIA cohort. These relations were also seen in the HABC and CHS cohorts. In predicting lung function, the ancestry-based model fit the data better than standard models. Ancestry-based models resulted in the reclassification of asthma severity (based on the percentage of the predicted FEV1) in 4 to 5% of participants. CONCLUSIONS Current predictive equations, which rely on self-identified race alone, may misestimate lung function among subjects who identify themselves as African American. Incorporating ancestry into normative equations may improve lung-function estimates and more accurately categorize disease severity. (Funded by the National

  7. Risk factors for physical impairment after acute lung injury in a national, multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Needham, Dale M; Wozniak, Amy W; Hough, Catherine L; Morris, Peter E; Dinglas, Victor D; Jackson, James C; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A; Shanholtz, Carl; Ely, E Wesley; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Hopkins, Ramona O

    2014-05-15

    Existing studies of risk factors for physical impairments in acute lung injury (ALI) survivors were potentially limited by single-center design or relatively small sample size. To evaluate risk factors for three measures of physical impairments commonly experienced by survivors of ALI in the first year after hospitalization. A prospective, longitudinal study of 6- and 12-month physical outcomes (muscle strength, 6-minute-walk distance, and Short Form [SF]-36 Physical Function score) for 203 survivors of ALI enrolled from 12 hospitals participating in the ARDS Network randomized trials. Multivariable regression analyses evaluated the independent association of critical illness-related variables and intensive care interventions with impairments in each physical outcome measure, after adjusting for patient demographics, comorbidities, and baseline functional status. At 6 and 12 months, respectively, mean (± SD) values for strength (presented as proportion of maximum strength score evaluated using manual muscle testing) was 92% (± 8%) and 93% (± 9%), 6-minute-walk distance (as percent-predicted) was 64% (± 22%) and 67% (± 26%), and SF-36 Physical Function score (as percent-predicted) was 61% (± 36%) and 67% (± 37%). After accounting for patient baseline status, there was significant association and statistical interaction of mean daily dose of corticosteroids and intensive care unit length of stay with impairments in physical outcomes. Patients had substantial impairments, from predicted values, for 6-minute-walk distance and SF-36 Physical Function outcome measures. Minimizing corticosteroid dose and implementing existing evidence-based methods to reduce duration of intensive care unit stay and associated patient immobilization may be important interventions for improving ALI survivors' physical outcomes.

  8. Risk Factors for Physical Impairment after Acute Lung Injury in a National, Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Amy W.; Hough, Catherine L.; Morris, Peter E.; Dinglas, Victor D.; Jackson, James C.; Mendez-Tellez, Pedro A.; Shanholtz, Carl; Ely, E. Wesley; Colantuoni, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Existing studies of risk factors for physical impairments in acute lung injury (ALI) survivors were potentially limited by single-center design or relatively small sample size. Objectives: To evaluate risk factors for three measures of physical impairments commonly experienced by survivors of ALI in the first year after hospitalization. Methods: A prospective, longitudinal study of 6- and 12-month physical outcomes (muscle strength, 6-minute-walk distance, and Short Form [SF]-36 Physical Function score) for 203 survivors of ALI enrolled from 12 hospitals participating in the ARDS Network randomized trials. Multivariable regression analyses evaluated the independent association of critical illness–related variables and intensive care interventions with impairments in each physical outcome measure, after adjusting for patient demographics, comorbidities, and baseline functional status. Measurements and Main Results: At 6 and 12 months, respectively, mean (± SD) values for strength (presented as proportion of maximum strength score evaluated using manual muscle testing) was 92% (± 8%) and 93% (± 9%), 6-minute-walk distance (as percent-predicted) was 64% (± 22%) and 67% (± 26%), and SF-36 Physical Function score (as percent-predicted) was 61% (± 36%) and 67% (± 37%). After accounting for patient baseline status, there was significant association and statistical interaction of mean daily dose of corticosteroids and intensive care unit length of stay with impairments in physical outcomes. Conclusions: Patients had substantial impairments, from predicted values, for 6-minute-walk distance and SF-36 Physical Function outcome measures. Minimizing corticosteroid dose and implementing existing evidence-based methods to reduce duration of intensive care unit stay and associated patient immobilization may be important interventions for improving ALI survivors’ physical outcomes. PMID:24716641

  9. The Clinical Functional Impairment Scale Development.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Adrian; Wright, Mary Ellen; Denslow, Sheri

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the project was to review content validity and assess the span of responses for the newly developed Clinical Functional Impairment Scale (CFIS). A cross-sectional, content validity process using focus groups of developmental, behavioral pediatric clinicians was conducted. After qualitative analysis of the focus group data, adjustments were made in the CFIS based on the recommendations of the content experts. A survey was conducted of clinicians participating in the online Society of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics Discussion Board. Clinicians reviewed 2 case studies and used the CFIS to score severity and interval change of predetermined functional impairments. The amount of spread in the answers was assessed by calculating the index of dispersion. Qualitative analysis of the focus groups resulted in adjustment to the CFIS to 20 functional impairments, with a 5-point Likert scale of severity and a 7-point Likert scale of interval change. Ninety-four clinicians participated in the survey. The index of dispersion ranged from 0.49 to 0.88. The interval ratings of severity and interval change had lower dispersion ranges. The CFIS uses a mutual prioritization by the family and clinician of the child's functional impairments. The study demonstrated that the clinicians' ratings of the case studies were more variable in the initial symptom severity score than their ratings of symptom severity and interval change in symptoms. Further testing of the CFIS is planned using face-to-face clinical encounters and including parent/caregiver ratings of severity and interval change.

  10. Imaging Phenotype of Occupational Endotoxin-Related Lung Function Decline.

    PubMed

    Lai, Peggy S; Hang, Jing-Qing; Zhang, Feng-Ying; Sun, J; Zheng, Bu-Yong; Su, Li; Washko, George R; Christiani, David C

    2016-09-01

    Although occupational exposures contribute to a significant proportion of obstructive lung disease, the phenotype of obstructive lung disease associated with work-related organic dust exposure independent of smoking remains poorly defined. We identified the relative contributions of smoking and occupational endotoxin exposure to parenchymal and airway remodeling as defined by quantitative computed tomography (CT). The Shanghai Textile Worker Study is a longitudinal study of endotoxin-exposed cotton workers and endotoxin-unexposed silk workers that was initiated in 1981. Spirometry, occupational endotoxin exposure, and smoking habits were assessed at 5-year intervals. High-resolution computed tomography (CT) was performed in 464 retired workers in 2011, along with quantitative lung densitometric and airway analysis. Significant differences in all CT measures were noted across exposure groups. Occupational endotoxin exposure was associated with a decrease (-1.3%) in percent emphysema (LAAI-950), a 3.3-Hounsfield unit increase in 15th percentile density, an 18.1-g increase in lung mass, and a 2.3% increase in wall area percent. Current but not former smoking was associated with a similar CT phenotype. Changes in LAAI-950 were highly correlated with 15th percentile density (correlation -1.0). Lung mass was the only measure associated with forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) decline, with each 10-g increase in lung mass associated with an additional loss (-6.1 mL) of FEV1 (p = 0.001) between 1981 and 2011. There are many similarities between the effects of occupational endotoxin exposure and those of tobacco smoke exposure on lung parenchyma and airway remodeling. The effects of occupational endotoxin exposure appear to persist even after the cessation of exposure. LAAI-950 may not be a reliable indicator of emphysema in subjects without spirometric impairment. Lung mass is a CT-based biomarker of accelerated lung function decline. Lai PS, Hang J, Zhang F, Sun J

  11. Functional impairment and mental health functioning among Vietnamese children

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Hoang-Minh; Weiss, Bahr; Trung, Lam T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Functional impairment is a key indicator of need for mental health services among children and adolescents, often a stronger predictor of service usage than mental health symptoms themselves. Functional impairment may be of particular importance in low and middle income countries (LMIC) because of its potential to focus policy on treatment of child mental health problems which is generally given low priority in LMIC. However, few studies have assessed functional impairment in LMIC. The present study assessed rates of functional impairment among children in Vietnam, as a case example of an LMIC, as well as effects of other risk/protective factors of particular relevance to LMIC (e.g., whether the family lived in an urban or rural area; family structure variables such as grandparents living with the family). Methods 1,314 parents of children 6–16 years old from 10 Vietnamese provinces were interviewed. Results The overall rate of functional impairment among Vietnamese children was 20%, similar to rates in high income countries such as Germany and the United States, suggesting that LMIC status may not be associated with dramatic increases in functional impairment in children. Functional impairment was significantly greater among mental health cases than non-cases, with increases of over 550% associated with mental health caseness. A number of other risk factors (e.g., marital status) had smaller but significant effects. Conclusions Mental health problems are a major but not the sole contributor to functional impairment among Vietnamese children. The pragmatic significance of this research lies in its potential to affect public awareness and policy related to child mental health in LMIC. PMID:26315942

  12. Lung function, breathing pattern, and gas exchange in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed Central

    Javaheri, S; Sicilian, L

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to determine the relation between the severity of abnormalities in ventilatory function tests and tidal breathing pattern and gas exchange indices in interstitial lung disease. METHODS: Pulmonary function, ventilation, carbon dioxide production, oxygen consumption, arterial blood gas tensions, and pH were measured during resting steady state conditions in 60 patients with proved interstitial lung disease. Patients were categorised by forced vital capacity (FVC) (percentage of predicted values) as having a mild, moderate, or severe restrictive defect with means (SD) of 71% (4%), 57% (4%), and 41% (7%) of predicted values, respectively. RESULTS: FVC varied from 29% to 79% of predicted values and from 0.99 l to 4.32 l. The two measurements of FVC correlated strongly with most static lung volumes and with transfer factor for carbon monoxide. Mean respiratory rates (per minute) and tidal volumes (ml) were 17 (4) and 484 (131), 20 (4) and 460 (139), and 23 (5) and 377 (109) in mild, moderate, and severe restrictive defects, respectively. FVC correlated negatively with respiratory rate and positively with tidal volume. Arterial carbon dioxide tension ranged from 30 to 49 mm Hg; only two patients were hypercapnic. Mean arterial oxygen tensions were not significantly different among the three groups, and there were no significant correlations between forced expiratory volume in one second or FVC and arterial carbon dioxide tension or carbon dioxide production. CONCLUSION: Low values of FVC were associated with increased respiratory rate and decreased tidal volume; this pattern of breathing mimics external elastic loading, suggesting that mechanoreceptors may contribute to the rapid and shallow pattern of breathing in interstitial lung disease. Hypercapnia seems to be rare in interstitial lung disease even when functional impairment is severe and tidal volume is small. The increased respiratory rate is important in maintaining adequate

  13. Divers' lung function: small airways disease?

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, E; Segadal, K; Kambestad, B; Gulsvik, A

    1990-01-01

    Pulmonary function was measured in 152 professional saturation divers and in a matched control group of 106 subjects. Static lung volumes, dynamic lung volumes and flows, transfer factor for carbon monoxide (T1CO), transfer volume per unit alveolar volume (KCO), delta-N2, and closing volume (CV) were measured and compared with reference values from recent Scandinavian studies, British submariners, and the European Community for Coal and Steel (ECCS) recommended reference values. Diving exposure was assessed as years of diving experience, total number of days in saturation and depth, and as the product of days in saturation and mean depth. Divers had significantly lower values for forced expired volume in one second (FEV1), FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio, FEF25-75%, FEF75-85%, FEF50%, FEF75%, T1CO, and KCO compared with the controls and a significantly higher CV. There was a positive correlation between diving exposure and CV, whereas the other variables had negative correlations with diving exposure. Values for the control group were not different from the predictive values of Scandinavian reference studies or British submariners, although the ECCS standard predicted significantly lower values for the lung function variables both in divers and the control group. The pattern of the differences in lung function variables between the divers and controls is consistent with small airways dysfunction and with the transient changes in lung function found immediately after a single saturation dive. The association between reduced pulmonary function and previous diving exposure further indicates the presence of cumulative long term effects of diving on pulmonary function. PMID:2393630

  14. Neurobehavioral Functioning and Survival Following Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, James A.; Carney, Robert M.; Freedland, Kenneth E.; O’Hayer, C. Virginia F.; Trulock, Elbert P.; Martinu, Tereza; Schwartz, Todd A.; Hoffman, Benson M.; Koch, Gary G.; Davis, R. Duane; Palmer, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neurobehavioral functioning is widely recognized as being an important consideration in lung transplant candidates, but little is known about whether these factors are related to clinical outcomes. The present study examined the relationship of neurobehavioral functioning, including measures of executive function and memory, depression, and anxiety, to long-term survival among lung transplant recipients. Methods: The sample was drawn from 201 patients who underwent transplantation at Duke University and Washington University who participated in a dual-site clinical trial investigating medical and psychosocial outcomes in transplant candidates with end-stage lung disease. All patients completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory at baseline and again after 12 weeks, while a subset of 86 patients from Duke University also completed neurocognitive testing. Patients were followed for survival up to 12 years after completing baseline assessments. Results: One hundred eleven patients died over a mean follow-up of 10.8 years (SD = 0.8). Baseline depression, anxiety, and neurocognitive function were examined as predictors of posttransplant survival, controlling for age, 6-min walk distance, FEV, and native disease; education and cardiovascular risk factors were also included in the model for neurocognition. Lower executive function (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.09, P = .012) and memory performance (HR = 1.11, P = .030) were independently associated with greater mortality following lung transplant. Although pretransplant depression and anxiety were not predictive of mortality, patients who scored > 13 on the BDI-II at baseline and after 3 months pretransplant had greater mortality (HR = 1.85 [95% CI, 1.04, 3.28], P = .036). Conclusions: Neurobehavioral functioning, including persistently elevated depressive symptoms and lower neurocognitive performance, was associated with reduced survival after lung transplantation

  15. Pulmonary hypertension impairs alveolarization and reduces lung growth in the ovine fetus.

    PubMed

    Grover, Theresa R; Parker, Thomas A; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Markham, Neil E; Abman, Steven H

    2005-04-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) is a clinical disorder characterized by abnormal vascular structure, growth, and reactivity. Disruption of vascular growth during early postnatal lung development impairs alveolarization, and newborns with lung hypoplasia often have severe pulmonary hypertension. To determine whether pulmonary hypertension can directly impair vascular growth and alveolarization in the fetus, we studied the effects of chronic intrauterine pulmonary hypertension on lung growth in fetal lambs. We performed surgery, which included partial constriction of the ductus arteriosus (DA) to induce pulmonary hypertension (PH, n = 14) or sham surgery (controls, n = 13) in fetal lambs at 112-125 days (term = 147 days). Tissues were harvested near term for measurement of right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), radial alveolar counts (RAC), mean linear intercepts (MLI), wall thickness, and vessel density of small pulmonary arteries. Chronic DA constriction caused RVH (P < 0.0001), increased wall thickness of small pulmonary arteries (P < 0.002), and reduced small pulmonary artery density (P < 0.005). PH also reduced alveolarization, causing a 27% reduction in RAC and 20% increase in MLI. Furthermore, prolonged DA constriction (21 days) not only decreased RAC and increased MLI by 30% but also caused a 25% reduction of lung-body weight ratio. We conclude that chronic PH reduces pulmonary arterial growth, decreases alveolar complexity, and impairs lung growth. We speculate that chronic hypertension impairs vascular growth, which disrupts critical signaling pathways regulating lung vascular and alveolar development, thereby interfering with alveolarization and ultimately resulting in lung hypoplasia.

  16. Lung function and bronchial reactivity in farmers.

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, M; Dahl, R; Jensen, E J; Korsgaard, J; Hallas, T

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and type of lung function disorders in Danish farmers. Three samples of farmers were drawn from a group of unselected farmers who had participated in an epidemiological study. Group I (47 persons) was a sample of the 8% of all farmers who had reported that they had asthma; group II (63 persons) was a sample of the 28% of farmers who had had wheezing, shortness of breath, or cough without phlegm; and group III (34 persons) a sample of the farmers (64% of the total) who had no asthma and no respiratory symptoms. The farmers with symptoms (groups I and II) had low mean levels of FEV1 and high values for residual volume, whereas the symptomless farmers had normal lung function and no airways obstruction. The proportion of farmers with an FEV1 below the 95% confidence limit for predicted values was 43% in group I and 23% in group II; there were none in group III. Bronchial hyperreactivity to histamine occurred in 96% of asthmatic farmers, 67% of farmers with wheezing or shortness of breath, and 59% of symptomless farmers. A low level of FEV1 was associated with the number of years in pig farming and bronchial hyperreactivity in group II but not group I or III. Most of the bronchial hyperreactivity was explained in the multiple regression analysis by a low FEV1, though this was significant only for farmers in group II. Thus farmers who reported asthma, wheezing, shortness of breath, or a dry cough in general had airways obstruction with an increased residual volume, whereas symptomless farmers had normal lung function. Severe bronchial hyperreactivity was mostly explained by a diagnosis of asthma and poor lung function, though some farmers with normal lung function and no respiratory symptoms had increased bronchial reactivity. PMID:2799744

  17. Hyperinsulinemia adversely affects lung structure and function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suchita; Bodas, Manish; Bhatraju, Naveen K; Pattnaik, Bijay; Gheware, Atish; Parameswaran, Praveen Kolumam; Thompson, Michael; Freeman, Michelle; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Gosens, Reinoud; Ghosh, Balaram; Pabelick, Christina; Linneberg, Allan; Prakash, Y S; Agrawal, Anurag

    2016-05-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the consequences of hyperinsulinemia on the lung. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and epidemiological associations with asthma, this is a critical lacuna, more so with inhaled insulin on the horizon. Here, we demonstrate that insulin can adversely affect respiratory health. Insulin treatment (1 μg/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proliferation of primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and induced collagen release. Additionally, ASM cells showed a significant increase in calcium response and mitochondrial respiration upon insulin exposure. Mice administered intranasal insulin showed increased collagen deposition in the lungs as well as a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K/Akt mediated activation of β-catenin, a positive regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis, was observed in the lungs of insulin-treated mice and lung cells. Our data suggests that hyperinsulinemia may have adverse effects on airway structure and function. Insulin-induced activation of β-catenin in lung tissue and the contractile effects on ASM cells may be causally related to the development of asthma-like phenotype. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Hyperinsulinemia adversely affects lung structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Suchita; Bodas, Manish; Bhatraju, Naveen K.; Pattnaik, Bijay; Gheware, Atish; Parameswaran, Praveen Kolumam; Thompson, Michael; Freeman, Michelle; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Gosens, Reinoud; Ghosh, Balaram; Pabelick, Christina; Linneberg, Allan; Prakash, Y. S.

    2016-01-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the consequences of hyperinsulinemia on the lung. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and epidemiological associations with asthma, this is a critical lacuna, more so with inhaled insulin on the horizon. Here, we demonstrate that insulin can adversely affect respiratory health. Insulin treatment (1 μg/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proliferation of primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and induced collagen release. Additionally, ASM cells showed a significant increase in calcium response and mitochondrial respiration upon insulin exposure. Mice administered intranasal insulin showed increased collagen deposition in the lungs as well as a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K/Akt mediated activation of β-catenin, a positive regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis, was observed in the lungs of insulin-treated mice and lung cells. Our data suggests that hyperinsulinemia may have adverse effects on airway structure and function. Insulin-induced activation of β-catenin in lung tissue and the contractile effects on ASM cells may be causally related to the development of asthma-like phenotype. PMID:26919895

  19. Renal Impairment Hampers Bisphosphonate Treatment in a Quarter of Lung Cancer Patients with Bone Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Fábián, Katalin; Puskás, Rita; Kakuk, Tímea; Prés, László; Fejes, Dorottya; Szegedi, Zsolt; Rojkó, Lívia; Szállási, Zoltán; Döme, Balázs; Pipek, Orsolya; Moldvay, Judit

    2017-08-21

    Renal function impairment in lung cancer patients with bone metastases was investigated, as this can limit the application of bisphosphonates representing the gold standard in the management of such cases. Clinicopathological data of 570 lung cancer patients were retrospectively analysed for changes in renal function parameters. Co-morbidities included hypertension (50%), COPD (33%) and diabetes mellitus (15%). Statistical analysis was performed with Fisher's exact tests and a Cox proportional hazards model. In patients suffering from hypertension, both median serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were higher (81.9 versus 75.8 μmol/l, p<0.001 and 6.0 versus 5.7 mmol/l, p=0.005, respectively). Such a difference could not be observed in patients with diabetes. In COPD patients, only serum creatinine was higher (81.1 versus 77.3 μmol/l, p=0.004). In the whole cohort, we found that while at the time of lung cancer diagnosis the ratio of patients in the pathological range (PRR) was 8.67% for serum creatinine (median: 75 μmol/l) and 14.16% for BUN (median: 5.4 mmol/l), at the time of bone metastasis the PRR for serum creatinine increased to 16.11% (median: 77.0 μmol/l) and for BUN to 24.07% (median: 6.0 mmol/l), which is a significant increase for both parameters (p<0.001). For the whole cohort, the last laboratory results showed a 26.37% PRR for serum creatinine and 45.66% PRR for BUN (significant increase for both, p<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that patients with hypertension had a higher chance for switching to the pathological range sooner (p=0.033, HR: 1.372, CI: 1.025-1.835). Also, the appearance of the bone metastasis correlated with an acceleration of the onset of such a switch (p<0.001, HR: 2.655, CI: 1.581-4.456). Our results suggest that renal function is impaired in a significant proportion of lung cancer patients and highlight the importance of non-nephrotoxic drug in the management of bone metastases. This article is protected by

  20. Lung inflammation biomarkers and lung function in children chronically exposed to arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Olivas-Calderón, Edgar; Recio-Vega, Rogelio; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Lantz, R. Clark; González-Cortes, Tania; Gonzalez-De Alba, Cesar; Froines, John R.; Espinosa-Fematt, Jorge A.

    2015-09-01

    Evidence suggests that exposure to arsenic in drinking water during early childhood or in utero has been associated with an increase in respiratory symptoms or diseases in the adulthood, however only a few studies have been carried out during those sensitive windows of exposure. Recently our group demonstrated that the exposure to arsenic during early childhood or in utero in children was associated with impairment in the lung function and suggested that this adverse effect could be due to a chronic inflammation response to the metalloid. Therefore, we designed this cross-sectional study in a cohort of children associating lung inflammatory biomarkers and lung function with urinary As levels. A total of 275 healthy children were partitioned into four study groups according with their arsenic urinary levels. Inflammation biomarkers were measured in sputum by ELISA and the lung function was evaluated by spirometry. Fifty eight percent of the studied children were found to have a restrictive spirometric pattern. In the two highest exposed groups, the soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products' (sRAGE) sputum level was significantly lower and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) concentration was higher. When the biomarkers were correlated to the urinary arsenic species, negative associations were found between dimethylarsinic (DMA), monomethylarsonic percentage (%MMA) and dimethylarsinic percentage (%DMA) with sRAGE and positive associations between %DMA with MMP-9 and with the MMP-9/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) ratio. In conclusion, chronic arsenic exposure of children negatively correlates with sRAGE, and positively correlated with MMP-9 and MMP-9/TIMP-1 levels, and increases the frequency of an abnormal spirometric pattern. Arsenic-induced alterations in inflammatory biomarkers may contribute to the development of restrictive lung diseases. - Highlights: • First study in children evaluating lung inflammatory biomarkers and As levels

  1. Trajectories of Lung Function during Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, Iain; Bishop, Christopher; Lowe, Lesley; Simpson, Angela; Custovic, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Developmental patterns of lung function during childhood may have major implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of respiratory disease throughout life. Objectives: To explore longitudinal trajectories of lung function during childhood and factors associated with lung function decline. Methods: In a population-based birth cohort, specific airway resistance (sRaw) was assessed at age 3 (n = 560), 5 (n = 829), 8 (n = 786), and 11 years (n = 644). Based on prospective data (questionnaires, skin tests, IgE), children were assigned to wheeze phenotypes (no wheezing, transient, late-onset, and persistent) and atopy phenotypes (no atopy, dust mite, non–dust mite, multiple early, and multiple late). We used longitudinal linear mixed models to determine predictors of change in sRaw over time. Measurements and Main Results: Contrary to the assumption that sRaw is independent of age and sex, boys had higher sRaw than girls (mean difference, 0.080; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.049–0.111; P < 0.001) and a higher rate of increase over time. For girls, sRaw increased by 0.017 kPa ⋅ s−1 per year (95% CI, 0.011–0.023). In boys this increase was significantly greater (P = 0.012; mean between-sex difference, 0.011 kPa ⋅ s−1; 95% CI, 0.003–0.019). Children with persistent wheeze (but not other wheeze phenotypes) had a significantly greater rate of deterioration in sRaw over time compared with never wheezers (P = 0.009). Similarly, children with multiple early, but not other atopy phenotypes had significantly poorer lung function than those without atopy (mean difference, 0.116 kPa ⋅ s−1; 95% CI, 0.065–0.168; P < 0.001). sRaw increased progressively with the increasing number of asthma exacerbations. Conclusions: Children with persistent wheeze, frequent asthma exacerbations, and multiple early atopy have diminished lung function throughout childhood, and are at risk of a progressive loss of lung function from age 3 to 11

  2. Modeling accumulations of particles in lung during chronic inhalation exposures that lead to impaired clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, R.K.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.; Cuddihy, R.G.; Snipes, M.B.; Henderson, R.F.; Mauderly, J.L.; McClellan, R.O. )

    1989-01-01

    Chronic inhalation of insoluble particles of low toxicity that produce substantial lung burdens of particles, or inhalation of particles that are highly toxic to the lung, can impair clearance. This report describes model calculations of accumulations in lung of inhaled low-toxicity diesel exhaust soot and high-toxicity Ga2O3 particles. Lung burdens of diesel soot were measured periodically during a 24-mo exposure to inhaled diesel exhaust at soot concentrations of 0, 0.35, 3.5, and 7 mg m-3, 7 h d-1, 5 d wk-1. Lung burdens of Ga2O3 were measured for 1 y after a 4-wk exposure to 23 mg Ga2O3 m-3, 2 h d-1, 5 d wk-1. Lung burdens of Ga2O3 were measured for 1 y both studies using inhaled radiolabeled tracer particles. Simulation models fit the observed lung burdens of diesel soot in rats exposed to the 3.5- and 7-mg m-3 concentrations of soot only if it was assumed that clearance remained normal for several months, then virtually stopped. Impaired clearance from high-toxicity particles occurred early after accumulations of a low burden, but that from low-toxicity particles was evident only after months of exposure, when high burdens had accumulated in lung. The impairment in clearances of Ga2O3 particles and radiolabeled tracers was similar, but the impairment in clearance of diesel soot and radiolabeled tracers differed in magnitude. This might have been related to differences in particle size and composition between the tracers and diesel soot. Particle clearance impairment should be considered both in the design of chronic exposures of laboratory animals to inhaled particles and in extrapolating the results to people.

  3. Lung function changes in wildland firefighters working at prescribed burns.

    SciTech Connect

    Adetona, Olorunfemi; Hall, Daniel, B.; Naeher, L,P.

    2011-10-01

    Although decline in lung function across workshift has been observed in wildland firefighters, measurements have been restricted to days when they worked at fires. Consequently, such results could have been confounded by normal circadian variation associated with lung function. We investigated the across-shift changes in lung function of wildland firefighters, and the effect of cumulative exposure on lung function during the burn season.

  4. Endothelin-1-Rho kinase interactions impair lung structure and cause pulmonary hypertension after bleomycin exposure in neonatal rat pups.

    PubMed

    Gien, Jason; Tseng, Nancy; Seedorf, Gregory; Kuhn, Katherine; Abman, Steven H

    2016-12-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the chronic lung disease associated with premature birth, characterized by impaired vascular and alveolar growth. In neonatal rats bleomycin decreases lung growth and causes pulmonary hypertension (PH), which is poorly responsive to nitric oxide. In the developing lung, through Rho kinase (ROCK) activation, ET-1 impairs endothelial cell function; however, whether ET-1-ROCK interactions contribute to impaired vascular and alveolar growth in experimental BPD is unknown. Neonatal rats were treated daily with intraperitoneal bleomycin with and without selective ETA (BQ123/BQ610) and ETB (BQ788) receptor blockers, nonselective ET receptor blocker (ETRB) (bosentan), or fasudil (ROCK inhibitor). At day 14, lungs were harvested for morphometrics, and measurements of Fulton's index (RV/LV+S), medial wall thickness (MWT), and vessel density. Lung ET-1 protein and ROCK activity (phospho-MYPT-1:total MYPT-1 ratio) were also measured by Western blot analysis. Bleomycin increased lung ET-1 protein expression by 65%, RV/LV+S by 60%, mean linear intercept (MLI) by 212%, and MWT by 140% and decreased radial alveolar count (RAC) and vessel density by 40 and 44%, respectively (P < 0.01 for each comparison). After bleomycin treatment, fasudil and bosentan partially restored RAC and vessel density and decreased MLI, RV/LV+S, and MWT to normal values. Bleomycin increased ROCK activity by 120%, which was restored to normal values by bosentan but not selective ETRB. We conclude that ET-1-ROCK interactions contribute to decreased alveolar and vascular growth and PH in experimental BPD. We speculate that nonselective ETRB and ROCK inhibitors may be effective in the treatment of infants with BPD and PH. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Rehabilitation of impaired speech function (dysarthria, dysglossia)

    PubMed Central

    Schröter-Morasch, Heidrun; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2005-01-01

    Speech disorders can result (1) from sensorimotor impairments of articulatory movements = dysarthria, or (2) from structural changes of the speech organs, in adults particularly after surgical and radiochemical treatment of tumors = dysglossia. The decrease of intelligibility, a reduced vocal stamina, the stigmatization of a conspicuous voice and manner of speech, the reduction of emotional expressivity all mean greatly diminished quality of life, restricted career opportunities and diminished social contacts. Intensive therapy based on the pathophysiological facts is absolutely essential: Functional exercise therapy plays a central role; according to symptoms and their progression it can be complemented with prosthetic and surgical approaches. In severe cases communicational aids have to be used. All rehabilitation measures have to take account of frequently associated disorders of body motor control and/or impairment of cognition and behaviour. PMID:22073063

  6. [Preoperative lung function tests using impulse oscillometry].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Kumiko

    2010-02-01

    Preoperative lung function tests are useful to evaluate the preoperative pulmonary condition and to detect a high risk of postoperative pulmonary complications. However, maximum expiratory effort by patients is necessary to determine lung function using spirometry and flow-volume curve measurements. When patients are not able to expire completely during the measurement, incorrect data regarding their respiratory system is obtained. On the other hand, respiratory system impedance using an impulse oscillatory system (IOS) can evaluate total airway resistance (R5), large airway resistance (R20), small airway resistance (R5-20) and reactance (X5) under breathing at rest within a few minutes. There are few reports that indicate the standard values for IOS. In addition, the effects of age on IOS value are not clear. In this study preoperative lung functions using IOS were studied to examine the standard value and effect of aging. Subjects were 420 patients aged from 20 to 89 years with normal pulmonary function (%VC > or = 80%, %FEV(1.0) > or = 70%), and scheduled for an elective surgery. Lung function measurements such as IOS, spirometry, maximum expiratory flow-volume curve and single N2 washout were done preoperatively. Subjects were divided into seven groups in decades from 20 to 80. Although there was no statistical change in R5, R20, R5-R20, Z5 and X5 in the decades from 20 to 60, there were statistically significant changes during the 70s and 80s. There were significant differences in IOS parameters between the adult group and the aged group. Changes due to aging were stronger on V25/Ht than those of IOS. This study indicates that there are differences between V25/Ht and IOS values because of the difference in breathing conditions during measurements.

  7. [Cannabis use and impairment of respiratory function].

    PubMed

    Underner, M; Urban, T; Perriot, J; Peiffer, G; Meurice, J-C

    2013-04-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly smoked illicit substance in many countries including France. It can be smoked alone in plant form (marijuana) but in our country it is mainly smoked in the form of cannabis resin mixed with tobacco. The technique of inhaling cannabis differs from that of tobacco, increasing the time that the smoke spends in contact with the bronchial mucosal and its impact on respiratory function. One cigarette composed of cannabis and tobacco is much more harmful than a cigarette containing only tobacco. In cannabis smokers there is an increased incidence of respiratory symptoms and episodes of acute bronchitis. Cannabis produces a rapid bronchodilator effect; chronic use provokes a reduction in specific conductance and increase in airways resistance. Studies on the decline of Forced Expiratory Volume are discordant. Cannabis smoke and tetrahydrocannabinol irritate the bronchial tree. They bring about histological signs of airways inflammation and alter the fungicidal and antibacterial activity of alveolar macrophages. Inhalation of cannabis smoke is a risk factor for lung cancer. Stopping smoking cannabis will bring about important benefits for lung function. This should encourage clinicians to offer patients support in quitting smoking. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Lung inflammation biomarkers and lung function in children chronically exposed to arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Olivas-Calderón, Edgar; Recio-Vega, Rogelio; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Lantz, R. Clark; González-Cortes, Tania; Alba, Cesar Gonzalez-De; Froines, John R.; Espinosa-Fematt, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that exposure to arsenic in drinking water during early childhood or in utero is associated with an increase in respiratory symptoms and diseases in adulthood, however only a few studies have been carried out during those sensitive windows of exposure. Recently our group demonstrated that exposure to arsenic during early childhood or in utero was associated with impairment in the lung function in children and suggested that this adverse effect could be due to a chronic inflammatory response to the metalloid. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was designed in a cohort of children associating lung inflammatory biomarkers and lung function with urinary As levels. A total of 275 healthy children were partitioned into four study groups according with their As levels. Inflammation biomarkers were measured in sputum by ELISA and the lung function was evaluated by spirometry. Fifty eight percent of the studied children were found to have a restrictive spirometric pattern. In the two highest exposed groups, the Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (sRAGE) sputum level was significantly lower and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) concentration was higher. When the biomarkers were correlated to the urinary arsenic species, negative associations were found between dimethylarsinic (DMA), monomethylarsenic percentage (%MMA) and dimethylarsinic percentage (%DMA) with sRAGE and positive associations between %DMA with MMP-9 and with the MMP-9/Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) ratio. In conclusion, chronic arsenic exposure of children negatively correlates with sRAGE, and positively correlated with MMP-9 and MMP-9/TIMP-1 levels, and increases the frequency of an abnormal spirometric pattern. PMID:26048584

  9. Functional Hubs in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas, Adrián; Papo, David; Boccaletti, Stefano; Del-Pozo, F.; Bajo, Ricardo; Maestú, Fernando; Martínez, J. H.; Gil, Pablo; Sendiña-Nadal, Irene; Buldú, Javier M.

    We investigate how hubs of functional brain networks are modified as a result of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a condition causing a slight but noticeable decline in cognitive abilities, which sometimes precedes the onset of Alzheimer's disease. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate the functional brain networks of a group of patients suffering from MCI and a control group of healthy subjects, during the execution of a short-term memory task. Couplings between brain sites were evaluated using synchronization likelihood, from which a network of functional interdependencies was constructed and the centrality, i.e. importance, of their nodes was quantified. The results showed that, with respect to healthy controls, MCI patients were associated with decreases and increases in hub centrality respectively in occipital and central scalp regions, supporting the hypothesis that MCI modifies functional brain network topology, leading to more random structures.

  10. Obesity and lung function: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Luciana Costa; da Silva, Maria Alayde Mendonça; Calles, Ana Carolina do Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obesity is a chronic disease characterized by the excessive accumulation of body fat that is harmful to the individuals. Respiratory disorders are among the comorbidities associated with obesity. This study had the objective of investigating the alterations in respiratory function that affect obese individuals. A systematic review was performed, by selecting publications in the science databases MEDLINE and LILACS, using PubMed and SciELO. The articles that assessed pulmonary function by plethysmography and/or spirometry in obese individuals aged under 18 years were included. The results demonstrated that the obese individuals presented with a reduction in lung volume and capacity as compared to healthy individuals. Reduction of total lung capacity and reduction of forced vital capacity, accompanied by reduction of the forced expiratory volume after one second were the most representative findings in the samples. The articles analyzed proved the presence of a restrictive respiratory pattern associated with obesity. PMID:24728258

  11. Lung Function Monitoring; A Randomized Agreement Study

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, Sveinung; Stølevik, Solvor B.; Mowinckel, Petter; Nystad, Wenche; Stensrud, Trine

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the agreement between devices and repeatability within devices of the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), peak expiratory flow (PEF) and forced expiratory flow at 50% of FVC (FEF50) values measured using the four spirometers included in the study. Methods: 50 (24 women) participants (20-64 years of age) completed maximum forced expiratory flow manoeuvres and measurements were performed using the following devices: MasterScreen, SensorMedics, Oxycon Pro and SpiroUSB. The order of the instruments tested was randomized and blinded for both the participants and the technicians. Re-testing was conducted on a following day within 72 hours at the same time of the day. Results: The devices which obtained the most comparable values for all lung function variables were SensorMedics and Oxycon Pro, and MasterScreen and SpiroUSB. For FEV1, mean difference was 0.04 L (95% confidence interval; -0.05, 0.14) and 0.00 L (-0.06, 0.06), respectively. When using the criterion of FVC and FEV1 ≤ 0.150 L for acceptable repeatability, 67% of the comparisons of the measured lung function values obtained by the four devices were acceptable. Overall, Oxycon Pro obtained most frequently values of the lung function variables with highest precision as indicated by the coefficients of repeatability (CR), followed by MasterScreen, SensorMedics and SpiroUSB (e.g. min-max CR for FEV1; 0.27-0.46). Conclusion: The present study confirms that measurements obtained by the same device at different times can be compared; however, measured lung function values may differ depending on spirometers used. PMID:27583055

  12. Lung function after acute chlorine exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.N.; Hughes, J.M.; Glindmeyer, H.; Weill, H.

    1986-12-01

    Chlorine gas, spreading from a train derailment, caused the deaths of 8 persons and the hospitalization of 23 with sublethal respiratory injuries. Twenty-five others had at least one sign of lower respiratory abnormality but were not hospitalized. One hundred thirteen who were examined for gas effects in the forty-eight hours after exposure, including 20 of 23 of those hospitalized and 21 of 25 of those not hospitalized but with respiratory abnormality, participated in follow-up studies. Probability of admission to hospital was related to distance from the spill, but by 3 wk after exposure there was no detectable difference in lung function relating to distance or apparent severity of injury. In 60 adults tested multiple times over the following 6 yr, longitudinal change in lung function showed expected differences related to smoking but none related to distance or severity of injury. The average annual change in FEV was -34 ml/yr in current smokers and -18 ml/yr in ex and never-smokers. The lack of a discernible chlorine effect in this cohort accords with the findings in most previous studies. Without pre-exposure measurements, a single, lasting reduction in lung function cannot be excluded, but there is no evidence for a persisting abnormal rate of decline.

  13. Lung Function in African Infants in the Drakenstein Child Health Study. Impact of Lower Respiratory Tract Illness.

    PubMed

    Gray, Diane M; Turkovic, Lidija; Willemse, Lauren; Visagie, Ane; Vanker, Aneesa; Stein, Dan J; Sly, Peter D; Hall, Graham L; Zar, Heather J

    2017-01-15

    Lower respiratory tract illness is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. It is unknown whether infants are predisposed to illness because of impaired lung function or whether respiratory illness reduces lung function. To investigate the impact of early life exposures, including lower respiratory tract illness, on lung function during infancy. Infants enrolled in the Drakenstein child health study had lung function at 6 weeks and 1 year. Testing during quiet natural sleep included tidal breathing, exhaled nitric oxide, and multiple breath washout measures. Risk factors for impaired lung health were collected longitudinally. Lower respiratory tract illness surveillance was performed and any episode investigated. Lung function was tested in 648 children at 1 year. One hundred and fifty (29%) infants had a lower respiratory tract illness during the first year of life. Lower respiratory tract illness was independently associated with increased respiratory rate (4%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.08; P = 0.02). Repeat episodes further increased respiratory rate (3%; 95% CI, 1.01-1.05; P = 0.004), decreased tidal volume (-1.7 ml; 95% CI, -3.3 to -0.2; P = 0.03), and increased the lung clearance index (0.13 turnovers; 95% CI, 0.04-0.22; P = 0.006) compared with infants without illness. Tobacco smoke exposure, lung function at 6 weeks, infant growth, and prematurity were other independent predictors of lung function at 1 year. Early life lower respiratory tract illness impairs lung function at 1 year, independent of baseline lung function. Preventing early life lower respiratory tract illness is important to optimize lung function and promote respiratory health in childhood.

  14. Caffeine impairs gastrointestinal function in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Christopher; Pan, Jingyi; Belik, Jaques

    2015-07-01

    Feeding intolerance is commonly documented in premature infants. Caffeine is routinely utilized for apnea of prematurity treatment and known to reduce the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) muscle tone, but the caffeine effect on the newborn gastrointestinal function is unknown. We hypothesized that caffeine impairs esophageal and gastrointestinal motor function. As such, we investigated the drug effect on the tissue's mechanical properties and the newborn rat's in vivo gastric emptying rate. The effects of caffeine on LES, gastric fundal and antrum, as well as ileal and colonic muscle force potential and relaxation response, were measured in newborn and adult rats. The caffeine-induced (10 mg/kg i.p.) newborn gastric emptying rate changes were evaluated following 3 h of fasting. Caffeine relaxed the precontracted LES and fundal muscle (P < 0.01), reduced the gastric and intestinal muscle contraction (P < 0.01), and delayed the pups' gastric emptying time (P < 0.01). The caffeine-induced muscle relaxant effect was independent of age and mediated via ryanodine receptors. Caffeine administration to newborn rats at a dose comparable to the one therapeutically used for preterm neonates impairs LES and gastrointestinal motor function. Further clinical investigation on the possible contribution of caffeine to neonatal feeding intolerance is warranted.

  15. Lung cancer tissue diagnosis in poor lung function: addressing the ongoing percutaneous lung biopsy FEV1 paradox using Heimlich valve.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, R; Tavare, A N; Creamer, A; Creer, D; Vancheeswaran, R; Hare, S S

    2016-08-01

    Many centres continue to decline percutaneous lung biopsy (PLB) in patients with poor lung function (particularly FEV1 <1 L) due to the theoretically increased risk of pneumothorax. This practice limits access to novel lung cancer therapies and minimally invasive surgical techniques. Our retrospective single-centre analysis of 212 patients undergoing PLB, all performed prospectively and blinded to lung function, demonstrates that using ambulatory Heimlich valve chest drain (HVCD) to treat significant postbiopsy pneumothorax facilitates safe, diagnostic, early discharge lung biopsy irrespective of lung function with neither FEV1 <1 L nor transfer coefficient for carbon monoxide (TLCO) <40% predicted shown to be independent predictors of HVCD insertion or pneumothorax outcomes. Incorporating ambulatory HVCD into standard PLB practice thereby elegantly bridges the gap that currently exists between tissue diagnosis in patients with poor lung function and the advanced therapeutic options available for this cohort.

  16. COPA mutations impair ER-Golgi transport causing hereditary autoimmune-mediated lung disease and arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Watkin, Levi B.; Jessen, Birthe; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Vece, Timothy; Jan, Max; Sha, Youbao; Thamsen, Maike; Santos-Cortez, Regie L. P.; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Gambin, Tomasz; Forbes, Lisa; Law, Christopher S.; Stray-Petersen, Asbjørg; Cheng, Mickie H.; Mace, Emily M.; Anderson, Mark S.; Liu, Dongfang; Tang, Ling Fung; Nicholas, Sarah K.; Nahmod, Karen; Makedonas, George; Canter, Debra; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Hicks, John; Jones, Kirk D.; Penney, Samantha; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Rosenblum, Michael D.; Dell, Sharon D.; Waterfield, Michael R.; Papa, Feroz R.; Muzny, Donna M.; Zaitlen, Noah; Leal, Suzanne M.; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Boerwinkle, Eric; Eissa, N. Tony; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Orange, Jordan S.; Shum, Anthony K.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in genomics have allowed unbiased genetic studies of human disease with unexpected insights into the molecular mechanisms of cellular immunity and autoimmunity1. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) and targeted sequencing in patients with an apparent Mendelian syndrome of autoimmune disease characterized by high-titer autoantibodies, inflammatory arthritis and interstitial lung disease (ILD). In five families, we identified four unique deleterious variants in the Coatomer subunit alpha (COPA) gene all located within the same functional domain. We hypothesized that mutant COPA leads to a defect in intracellular transport mediated by coat protein complex I (COPI)2–4. We show that COPA variants impair binding of proteins targeted for retrograde Golgi to ER transport and demonstrate that expression of mutant COPA leads to ER stress and the upregulation of Th17 priming cytokines. Consistent with this pattern of cytokine expression, patients demonstrated a significant skewing of CD4+ T cells toward a T helper 17 (Th17) phenotype, an effector T cell population implicated in autoimmunity5,6. Our findings uncover an unexpected molecular link between a vesicular transport protein and a syndrome of autoimmunity manifested by lung and joint disease. These findings provide a unique opportunity to understand how alterations in cellular homeostasis caused by a defect in the intracellular trafficking pathway leads to the generation of human autoimmune disease. PMID:25894502

  17. Ethnic Differences in Adolescent Lung Function

    PubMed Central

    Whitrow, Melissa J.; Harding, Seeromanie

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: The relative contribution of body proportion and social exposures to ethnic differences in lung function has not previously been reported in the United Kingdom. Objectives: To examine ethnic differences in lung function in relation to anthropometry and social and psychosocial factors in early adolescence. Methods: The subjects of this study were 3,924 pupils aged 11 to 13 years, of whom 80% were ethnic minorities with satisfactory lung function measures. Data were collected on economic disadvantage, psychological well-being, tobacco exposure, height, FEV1, and FVC. Measurements and Main Results: The lowest FEV1 was observed for Black Caribbean/African children after adjusting for standing height (SH) (white boys: 2.475 L; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.442–2.509; white girls: 2.449 L; 95% CI, 2.464–2.535]; Black Caribbean boys: −14% [95% CI, −16 to −12]; Black Caribbean girls: −13% [95% CI, −16 to −11]; Black African boys: −15% [95% CI, −17 to −13]; Black African girls: −17% [95% CI, −19 to −14]; Indian boys: −13% [95% CI, −16 to −11]; Indian girls: −11% [95% CI, −14 to −8]; Pakistani/Bangladeshi boys: −7% [95% CI, −9 to −5]; Pakistani/Bangladeshi girls: −9% [95% CI, −11 to −6]). Adjustment for upper body segment instead of SH achieved a further reduction in ethnic differences of 41 to 51% for children of Black African origin and 26 to 39% for the other groups. Overcrowding (boys) and poor psychological well-being (boys and girls) were independent correlates of FEV1, explaining up to a further 10% of ethnic differences. Similar patterns were observed for FVC. Social exposures were also related to height components. Conclusions: Differences in upper body segment explained more of the ethnic differences in lung function than SH, particularly among Black Caribbeans/African subjects. Social correlates had a smaller but significant impact. Future research needs to consider how differential development of

  18. Cognitive function, mental health, and health-related quality of life after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, David G; Christie, Jason D; Anderson, Brian J; Diamond, Joshua M; Judy, Ryan P; Shah, Rupal J; Cantu, Edward; Bellamy, Scarlett L; Blumenthal, Nancy P; Demissie, Ejigayehu; Hopkins, Ramona O; Mikkelsen, Mark E

    2014-05-01

    Cognitive and psychiatric impairments are threats to functional independence, general health, and quality of life. Evidence regarding these outcomes after lung transplantation is limited. Determine the frequency of cognitive and psychiatric impairment after lung transplantation and identify potential factors associated with cognitive impairment after lung transplantation. In a retrospective cohort study, we assessed cognitive function, mental health, and health-related quality of life using a validated battery of standardized tests in 42 subjects post-transplantation. The battery assessed cognition, depression, anxiety, resilience, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cognitive function was assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, a validated screening test with a range of 0 to 30. We hypothesized that cognitive function post-transplantation would be associated with type of transplant, cardiopulmonary bypass, primary graft dysfunction, allograft ischemic time, and physical therapy post-transplantation. We used multivariable linear regression to examine the relationship between candidate risk factors and cognitive function post-transplantation. Mild cognitive impairment (score, 18-25) was observed in 67% of post-transplant subjects (95% confidence interval [CI]: 50-80%) and moderate cognitive impairment (score, 10-17) was observed in 5% (95% CI, 1-16%) of post-transplant subjects. Symptoms of moderate to severe anxiety and depression were observed in 21 and 3% of post-transplant subjects, respectively. No transplant recipients reported symptoms of PTSD. Higher resilience correlated with less psychological distress in the domains of depression (P < 0.001) and PTSD (P = 0.02). Prolonged graft ischemic time was independently associated with worse cognitive performance after lung transplantation (P = 0.001). The functional gain in 6-minute-walk distance achieved at the end of post-transplant physical rehabilitation (P = 0.04) was independently associated

  19. Respiratory symptoms, exhaled nitric oxide, and lung function among workers in Tanzanian coffee factories.

    PubMed

    Sakwari, Gloria; Mamuya, Simon H D; Bråtveit, Magne; Moen, Bente E

    2013-05-01

    To compare chronic respiratory symptoms, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), and lung function between Robusta and Arabica coffee workers and a control group. Chronic respiratory symptoms were assessed by a questionnaire (n = 138 coffee workers and n = 120 controls). The FENO was measured by NIOX MINO device (Aerocrine AB, Solna, Sweden). Lung function was examined by a portable spirometer. Coffee workers had higher prevalence of chronic respiratory and asthma symptoms than controls. Robusta coffee workers were exposed to higher levels of endotoxin and had more asthma symptoms than Arabica coffee workers (38% vs. 18%). Coffee workers had reduced lung function associated with cumulative exposure to total dust and endotoxin. Work in coffee factories is associated with small but significant lung function impairment. These changes were not associated with the level of FENO.

  20. Systemic Metabolic Impairment and Lung Injury Following Acrolein Inhalation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single ozone exposure causes pulmonary injury and systemic metabolic alterations through neuronal and hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis activation. Metabolically impaired Goto Kakizaki (GK) rats with non-obese type-2 diabetes are more sensitive to ozone induced changes than h...

  1. Systemic Metabolic Impairment and Lung Injury Following Acrolein Inhalation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single ozone exposure causes pulmonary injury and systemic metabolic alterations through neuronal and hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis activation. Metabolically impaired Goto Kakizaki (GK) rats with non-obese type-2 diabetes are more sensitive to ozone induced changes than h...

  2. Abnormal lung function in adults with congenital heart disease: prevalence, relation to cardiac anatomy, and association with survival.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Gonzalez, Rafael; Borgia, Francesco; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Inuzuka, Ryo; Kempny, Aleksander; Martinez-Naharro, Ana; Tutarel, Oktay; Marino, Philip; Wustmann, Kerstin; Charalambides, Menelaos; Silva, Margarida; Swan, Lorna; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2013-02-26

    Restrictive lung defects are associated with higher mortality in patients with acquired chronic heart failure. We investigated the prevalence of abnormal lung function, its relation to severity of underlying cardiac defect, its surgical history, and its impact on outcome across the spectrum of adult congenital heart disease. A total of 1188 patients with adult congenital heart disease (age, 33.1±13.1 years) undergoing lung function testing between 2000 and 2009 were included. Patients were classified according to the severity of lung dysfunction based on predicted values of forced vital capacity. Lung function was normal in 53% of patients with adult congenital heart disease, mildly impaired in 17%, and moderately to severely impaired in the remainder (30%). Moderate to severe impairment of lung function related to complexity of underlying cardiac defect, enlarged cardiothoracic ratio, previous thoracotomy/ies, body mass index, scoliosis, and diaphragm palsy. Over a median follow-up period of 6.7 years, 106 patients died. Moderate to severe impairment of lung function was an independent predictor of survival in this cohort. Patients with reduced force vital capacity of at least moderate severity had a 1.6-fold increased risk of death compared with patients with normal lung function (P=0.04). A reduced forced vital capacity is prevalent in patients with adult congenital heart disease; its severity relates to the complexity of the underlying heart defect, surgical history, and scoliosis. Moderate to severe impairment of lung function is an independent predictor of mortality in contemporary patients with adult congenital heart disease.

  3. Do current OELs for silica protect from obstructive lung impairment? A critical review of epidemiological data.

    PubMed

    Hoet, Perrine; Desvallées, Laure; Lison, Dominique

    2017-09-01

    Inhalation of respirable crystalline silica (RCS) can lead to serious health effects such as silicosis and lung cancer. There also seems to be a general consensus to consider that RCS exposure is associated with obstructive lung impairment or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a leading cause of mortality, morbidity, and disability worldwide. It is, however, not clear whether occupational exposure levels (OELs), generally set to prevent silicosis, also protect workers from developing an obstructive impairment. This review aims at clarifying the potential relationship between RCS exposure and obstructive lung impairment as defined by spirometry. Eleven studies that reported both silica exposure levels and spirometry results were identified. We systematically extracted data pertaining to (a) the population studied, (b) level of exposure to RCS and other pollutants, (c) spirometry procedure and interpretation, and (d) methodology used to investigate the relationship between RCS exposure and spirometry. These studies add supporting evidence in favor of a qualitative association between occupational activities exposing to RCS and obstructive lung dysfunction. However, no well-founded quantitative estimate can be drawn from these investigations; the available relevant literature does not allow defining a RCS exposure threshold associated with an increased risk of obstructive lung dysfunction, as defined by spirometry, in workers without silicosis. Further research is needed, but, as highlighted in this review, conducting epidemiological studies with both valid exposure and outcome measurements is a real challenge.

  4. Drug-induced impairment of renal function

    PubMed Central

    Pazhayattil, George Sunny; Shirali, Anushree C

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceutical agents provide diagnostic and therapeutic utility that are central to patient care. However, all agents also carry adverse drug effect profiles. While most of these are clinically insignificant, some drugs may cause unacceptable toxicity that impacts negatively on patient morbidity and mortality. Recognizing adverse effects is important for administering appropriate drug doses, instituting preventive strategies, and withdrawing the offending agent due to toxicity. In the present article, we will review those drugs that are associated with impaired renal function. By focusing on pharmaceutical agents that are currently in clinical practice, we will provide an overview of nephrotoxic drugs that a treating physician is most likely to encounter. In doing so, we will summarize risk factors for nephrotoxicity, describe clinical manifestations, and address preventive and treatment strategies. PMID:25540591

  5. Pre-operative optimisation of lung function

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Naheed

    2015-01-01

    The anaesthetic management of patients with pre-existing pulmonary disease is a challenging task. It is associated with increased morbidity in the form of post-operative pulmonary complications. Pre-operative optimisation of lung function helps in reducing these complications. Patients are advised to stop smoking for a period of 4–6 weeks. This reduces airway reactivity, improves mucociliary function and decreases carboxy-haemoglobin. The widely used incentive spirometry may be useful only when combined with other respiratory muscle exercises. Volume-based inspiratory devices have the best results. Pharmacotherapy of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease must be optimised before considering the patient for elective surgery. Beta 2 agonists, inhaled corticosteroids and systemic corticosteroids, are the main drugs used for this and several drugs play an adjunctive role in medical therapy. A graded approach has been suggested to manage these patients for elective surgery with an aim to achieve optimal pulmonary function. PMID:26556913

  6. Impaired Elastin Deposition in Fstl1−/− Lung Allograft under the Renal Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yingying; Liu, Xue; Li, Xiao-He; Ning, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Lung alveolar development in late gestation is a process important to postnatal survival. Follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1) is a matricellular protein of the Bmp antagonist class, which is involved in the differentiation/maturation of alveolar epithelial cells during saccular stage of lung development. This study investigates the role of Fstl1 on elastin deposition in mesenchyme and subsequent secondary septation in the late gestation stage of terminal saccular formation. To this aim, we modified the renal capsule allograft model for lung organ culture by grafting diced E15.5 distal lung underneath the renal capsule of syngeneic host and cultured up to 7 days. The saccular development of the diced lung allografts, as indicated by the morphology, epithelial and vascular developments, occurred in a manner similar to that in utero. Fstl1 deficiency caused atelectatic phenotype companied by impaired epithelial differentiation in D3 Fstl1−/− lung allografts, which is similar to that of E18.5 Fstl1−/− lungs, supporting the role of Fstl1 during saccular stage. Inhibition of Bmp signaling by intraperitoneal injection of dorsomorphin in the host mice rescued the pulmonary atelectasis of D3 Fstl1−/− allografts. Furthermore, a marked reduction in elastin expression and deposition was observed in walls of air sacs of E18.5 Fstl1−/− lungs and at the tips of the developing alveolar septae of D7 Fstl1−/− allografts. Thus, in addition to its role on alveolar epithelium, Fstl1 is crucial for elastin expression and deposition in mesenchyme during lung alveologenesis. Our data demonstrates that the modified renal capsule allograft model for lung organ culture is a robust and efficient technique to increase our understanding of saccular stage of lung development. PMID:24282586

  7. Insulin resistance impairs nigrostriatal dopamine function.

    PubMed

    Morris, J K; Bomhoff, G L; Gorres, B K; Davis, V A; Kim, J; Lee, P-P; Brooks, W M; Gerhardt, G A; Geiger, P C; Stanford, J A

    2011-09-01

    Clinical studies have indicated a link between Parkinson's disease (PD) and Type 2 Diabetes. Although preclinical studies have examined the effect of high-fat feeding on dopamine function in brain reward pathways, the effect of diet on neurotransmission in the nigrostriatal pathway, which is affected in PD and parkinsonism, is less clear. We hypothesized that a high-fat diet, which models early-stage Type 2 Diabetes, would disrupt nigrostriatal dopamine function in young adult Fischer 344 rats. Rats were fed a high fat diet (60% calories from fat) or a normal chow diet for 12 weeks. High fat-fed animals were insulin resistant compared to chow-fed controls. Potassium-evoked dopamine release and dopamine clearance were measured in the striatum using in vivo electrochemistry. Dopamine release was attenuated and dopamine clearance was diminished in the high-fat diet group compared to chow-fed rats. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated increased iron deposition in the substantia nigra of the high fat group. This finding was supported by alterations in the expression of several proteins involved in iron metabolism in the substantia nigra in this group compared to chow-fed animals. The diet-induced systemic and basal ganglia-specific changes may play a role in the observed impairment of nigrostriatal dopamine function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Short-term lung function decline in tunnel construction workers.

    PubMed

    Ulvestad, Bente; Lund, May Brit; Bakke, Berit; Thomassen, Yngvar; Ellingsen, Dag G

    2015-02-01

    Tunnel construction workers are exposed to particulate and gaseous air contaminants. Previous studies carried out in the 1990s showed that tunnel construction workers were at increased risk of both short-term and long-term lung function decline. Since then, efforts have been made to reduce exposure. The objective of the present study was to investigate if current exposure may still cause short-term lung function impairment. Tunnel workers work 12 days consecutively, and then they are off for 9 days. Ninety tunnel workers and 51 referents were examined with spirometry and questionnaires before their work period started and again 11 days later. Personal exposure to particles and α-quartz in the thoracic aerosol subfraction, elemental carbon and organic carbon, oil mist, nitrogen dioxide and ammonia was assessed on two consecutive days between the two health examinations. The geometric means air concentrations for particulate matter in the thoracic mass aerosol subfraction, α-quartz, oil mist, organic carbon and elemental carbon for all workers were 561, 63, 210, 146 and 35 μg/m(3), respectively. After 11 days of work, the mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) in healthy participants had declined 73 mL (SD 173), p<0.001 in the tunnel workers, compared to 3 mL (SD 21), p=0.9 in the referents. Also, forced vital capacity (FVC) had declined significantly. Declines in FVC and FEV1 were significantly associated with exposure to organic carbon. In spite of reduced levels of exposure in modern tunnelling operations, a negative impact on lung function was still observed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Impaired accumulation of granulocytes in the lung during ozone adaptation.

    PubMed

    Fiévez, L; Kirschvink, N; Dogné, S; Jaspar, F; Merville, M P; Bours, V; Lekeux, P; Bureau, F

    2001-09-01

    Respiratory alterations induced by an acute exposure to ozone (O(3)) paradoxically resolve during multiday exposure. This adaptation is characteristically accompanied by a gradual attenuation of lung neutrophilia. As maintenance of neutrophilia at the site of inflammation is due to cytokine-mediated delayed neutrophil apoptosis, which is associated with reduced levels of Bax, a proapoptotic protein, we sought to determine whether defects in these mechanisms could account for O(3) adaptation. Lung granulocytes obtained at different time points from calves exposed to 0.75 ppm O(3) for 12 h/d for 7 consecutive days neither showed enhancement of survival nor Bax deficiency, when compared to blood granulocytes. To further investigate the effects of an exogenous oxidative stress on neutrophil survival, human granulocytes were treated with hydrogen peroxide alone, or in combination with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, an antiapoptotic cytokine. Both treatments led to rapid apoptosis associated with downregulation of Bcl-x(L) and Bcl-2, two antiapoptotic proteins. This study shows that O(3) adaptation is associated with a failure in the mechanisms leading to accumulation of neutrophils at the site of inflammation, and suggests that this defect is due to direct proapoptotic effects of exogenous oxidative stress on granulocytes.

  10. Lung transplantation in adults and children: putting lung function into perspective.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Bruce Robert; Westall, Glen Philip; Paraskeva, Miranda; Snell, Gregory Ian

    2014-11-01

    The number of lung transplants performed globally continues to increase year after year. Despite this growing experience, long-term outcomes following lung transplantation continue to fall far short of that described in other solid-organ transplant settings. Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) remains common and is the end result of exposure to a multitude of potentially injurious insults that include alloreactivity and infection among others. Central to any description of the clinical performance of the transplanted lung is an assessment of its physiology by pulmonary function testing. Spirometry and the evaluation of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity, remain core indices that are measured as part of routine clinical follow-up. Spirometry, while reproducible in detecting lung allograft dysfunction, lacks specificity in differentiating the different complications of lung transplantation such as rejection, infection and bronchiolitis obliterans. However, interpretation of spirometry is central to defining the different 'chronic rejection' phenotypes. It is becoming apparent that the maximal lung function achieved following transplantation, as measured by spirometry, is influenced by a number of donor and recipient factors as well as the type of surgery performed (single vs double vs lobar lung transplant). In this review, we discuss the wide range of variables that need to be considered when interpreting lung function testing in lung transplant recipients. Finally, we review a number of novel measurements of pulmonary function that may in the future serve as better biomarkers to detect and diagnose the cause of the failing lung allograft.

  11. [Impact of lung cancer treatments on renal function].

    PubMed

    Toffart, A-C; Belaiche, S; Moro-Sibilot, D; Couraud, S; Sakhri, L

    2014-12-01

    Renal failure in patients with lung cancer may be multifactorial: related to the patients and their comorbidities, direct tumor compression or the toxicity of cancer treatments and other associated medications. This literature review is intended to describe the state of knowledge regarding the nephrotoxicity of treatments used in thoracic oncology. The majority of chemotherapy treatments are potentially nephrotoxic. Cisplatin and pemetrexed exhibit mainly renal tubular toxicity, while vascular renal impairment is found with gemcitabine and bevacizumab. Cisplatin results in acute renal failure in 30% of patients. Renal protective strategies (compliance with recommendations, limitation of nephrotoxic treatments, hydration, magnesium supplementation) must be employed systematically. Targeted therapies do not require any adjustment of the dosage in case of moderate or severe renal insufficiency but adapting the doses of biphosphonates to renal function is necessary. This review highlights the need for monitoring of renal function in patients with lung cancer during treatment with chemotherapy or biphosphonates. Copyright © 2014 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Executive function impairments in depression and bipolar disorder: association with functional impairment and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Cotrena, Charles; Branco, Laura Damiani; Shansis, Flávio Milman; Fonseca, Rochele Paz

    2016-01-15

    The neuropsychological correlates of major depressive (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD), and their association with quality of life (QOL) and functioning, have not been sufficiently studied in the literature. The present study aimed to compare executive functions, attention, processing speed, QOL and disability between patients with BD type I, BD type II, MDD and healthy controls. 205 participants (n=37 BDI, 81% female; n=35 BDII, 80% female; n=45 MDD, 69% female; n=89C, 46% female) aged between 18 and 67 years were administered an extensive neurocognitive battery consisting of widely used standardized measures such as the Trail Making Test, the Stroop Color-Word Test and a modified version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task. Z-scores were compared between groups by ANCOVA. The prevalence of impairments on each measure (Z-score<1.5) was compared between groups using chi-square tests. The associations between cognition, quality of life and functioning were evaluated through correlational analysis. Patients with MDD showed poor selective and sustained attention, and exhibited impairments in timed tasks, suggesting low efficiency of executive processing. Patients with BDI displayed more widespread cognitive impairment than the remaining groups, and performed worse than subjects with MDD on measures of sustained attention and inhibitory control. Decision-making ability and attentional control were able to distinguish between patients with BDI and BDII. QOL and disability were most impaired in patients with BDI, and more closely associated with cognitive impairment than in the remaining groups. No control of pharmacological variables, clinical or demographic characteristics. Our results provide important information regarding the nature and severity of the cognitive alterations associated with different mood disorders, and may contribute to the diagnosis, rehabilitation and treatment of these conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. "Open lung ventilation optimizes pulmonary function during lung surgery".

    PubMed

    Downs, John B; Robinson, Lary A; Steighner, Michael L; Thrush, David; Reich, Richard R; Räsänen, Jukka O

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated an "open lung" ventilation (OV) strategy using low tidal volumes, low respiratory rate, low FiO2, and high continuous positive airway pressure in patients undergoing major lung resections. In this phase I pilot study, twelve consecutive patients were anesthetized using conventional ventilator settings (CV) and then OV strategy during which oxygenation and lung compliance were noted. Subsequently, a lung resection was performed. Data were collected during both modes of ventilation in each patient, with each patient acting as his own control. The postoperative course was monitored for complications. Twelve patients underwent open thoracotomies for seven lobectomies and five segmentectomies. The OV strategy provided consistent one-lung anesthesia and improved static compliance (40 ± 7 versus 25 ± 4 mL/cm H2O, P = 0.002) with airway pressures similar to CV. Postresection oxygenation (SpO2/FiO2) was better during OV (433 ± 11 versus 386 ± 15, P = 0.008). All postoperative chest x-rays were free of atelectasis or infiltrates. No patient required supplemental oxygen at any time postoperatively or on discharge. The mean hospital stay was 4 ± 1 d. There were no complications or mortality. The OV strategy, previously shown to have benefits during mechanical ventilation of patients with respiratory failure, proved safe and effective in lung resection patients. Because postoperative pulmonary complications may be directly attributable to the anesthetic management, adopting an OV strategy that optimizes lung mechanics and gas exchange may help reduce postoperative problems and improve overall surgical results. A randomized trial is planned to ascertain whether this technique will reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional MT + lesion impairs contralateral motion processing.

    PubMed

    Moo, Lauren R; Emerton, Britt C; Slotnick, Scott D

    2008-07-01

    Human motion processing region MT + is retinotopically organized with perception of and attention to motion in the right visual field preferentially associated with left MT + activity and vice versa. However, the degree to which MT + is crucial for motion processing is uncertain. We report an epilepsy patient with visual symptoms early in his seizure evolution and a left temporal-occipital seizure onset electrographically in whom we hypothesized a functional left MT + lesion. The patient was impaired in his right but not left visual field on a hemifield motion attention task and demonstrated worse performance on a hemifield picture identification task when pictures implying motion were presented in the right as opposed to the left visual field. Functional MRI (fMRI) during a full-field motion detection task activated right MT + but failed to activate left MT + despite activating both left and right MT + in each of 10 controls. Furthermore, fMRI during a hemifield motion attention task also showed a lack of left MT + attention effects in the patient. Together these results suggest that MT + is necessary for normal motion processing.

  15. Annual Research Review: Conceptualising Functional Impairment in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapee, Ronald M.; Bogels, Susan M.; van der Sluis, Cathy M.; Craske, Michelle G.; Ollendick, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Functional impairment is a key factor in the clinical importance of mental health problems in children. Yet, the nature of impairment and criteria for defining and assessing impairment in childhood disorders has been surprisingly overlooked in much of the literature. The current article examines the extant literature on the conceptualisation,…

  16. Annual Research Review: Conceptualising Functional Impairment in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapee, Ronald M.; Bogels, Susan M.; van der Sluis, Cathy M.; Craske, Michelle G.; Ollendick, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Functional impairment is a key factor in the clinical importance of mental health problems in children. Yet, the nature of impairment and criteria for defining and assessing impairment in childhood disorders has been surprisingly overlooked in much of the literature. The current article examines the extant literature on the conceptualisation,…

  17. A Proposed In Vitro Method to Assess Effects of Inhaled Particles on Lung Surfactant Function.

    PubMed

    Sørli, Jorid B; Da Silva, Emilie; Bäckman, Per; Levin, Marcus; Thomsen, Birthe L; Koponen, Ismo K; Larsen, Søren T

    2016-03-01

    The lung surfactant (LS) lining is a thin liquid film covering the air-liquid interface of the respiratory tract. LS reduces surface tension, enabling lung surface expansion and contraction with minimal work during respiration. Disruption of surface tension is believed to play a key role in severe lung conditions. Inhalation of aerosols that interfere with the LS may induce a toxic response and, as a part of the safety assessment of chemicals and inhaled medicines, it may be relevant to study their impact on LS function. Here, we present a novel in vitro method, based on the constrained drop surfactometer, to study LS functionality after aerosol exposure. The applicability of the method was investigated using three inhaled asthma medicines, micronized lactose, a pharmaceutical excipient used in inhaled medication, and micronized albumin, a known inhibitor of surfactant function. The surfactometer was modified to allow particles mixed in air to flow through the chamber holding the surfactant drop. The deposited dose was measured with a custom-built quartz crystal microbalance. The alterations allowed the study of continuously increasing quantified doses of particles, allowing determination of the dose of particles that affects the LS function. The tested pharmaceuticals did not inhibit the function of a model LS even at extreme doses--neither did lactose. Micronized albumin, however, impaired surfactant function. The method can discriminate between safe inhaled aerosols--as exemplified by the approved inhaled medicines and the pharmaceutical excipient lactose--and albumin known to impair lung functionality by inhibiting LS function.

  18. JWH-018 impairs sensorimotor functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Ossato, A; Vigolo, A; Trapella, C; Seri, C; Rimondo, C; Serpelloni, G; Marti, M

    2015-08-06

    Naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) is a synthetic cannabinoid agonist illegally marketed in "Spice" and "herbal blend" for its psychoactive effect greater than those produced by cannabis. In rodents JWH-018 reproduces typical effects of (-)-Δ(9)-THC or Dronabinol® (Δ(9)-THC) such as hypothermia, analgesia, hypolocomotion and akinesia, while its effects on sensorimotor functions are still unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of acute administration of JWH-018 (0.01-6mg/kg i.p.) on sensorimotor functions in male CD-1 mice and to compare its effects with those caused by the administration of Δ(9)-THC (0.01-6mg/kg i.p.). A specific battery of behavioral tests were adopted to investigate effects of cannabinoid agonists on sensorimotor functions (visual, auditory, tactile) and neurological changes (convulsion, myoclonia, hyperreflexia) while video-tracking analysis was used to study spontaneous locomotion. JWH-018 administration inhibited sensorimotor responses at lower doses (0.01-0.1mg/kg), reduced spontaneous locomotion at intermediate/high doses (1-6mg/kg) and induced convulsions, myoclonia and hyperreflexia at high doses (6mg/kg). Similarly, administration of Δ(9)-THC reduced sensorimotor responses in mice but it did not inhibit spontaneous locomotion and it did not induce neurological alterations. All behavioral effects and neurological alterations were prevented by the administration of the selective CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM 251). For the first time these data demonstrate that JWH-018 impairs sensorimotor responses in mice. This aspect should be carefully evaluated to better understand the potential danger that JWH-018 may pose to public health, with particular reference to decreased performance in driving and hazardous works.

  19. Early COPD patients with lung hyperinflation associated with poorer lung function but better bronchodilator responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunlan; Jian, Wenhua; Gao, Yi; Xie, Yanqing; Song, Yan; Zheng, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    Background It is unknown whether aggressive medication strategies should be used for early COPD with or without lung hyperinflation. We aimed to explore the characteristics and bronchodilator responsiveness of early COPD patients (stages I and II) with/without lung hyperinflation. Methods Four hundred and six patients with COPD who performed both lung volume and bronchodilation tests were retrospectively analyzed. Residual volume to total lung capacity >120% of predicted values indicated lung hyperinflation. The characteristics and bronchodilator responsiveness were compared between the patients with and without lung hyperinflation across all stages of COPD. Results The percentages of patients with lung hyperinflation were 72.7% in the entire cohort, 19.4% in stage I, 68.5% in stage II, 95.3% in stage III, and 100.0% in stage IV. The patients with lung hyperinflation exhibited poorer lung function but better bronchodilator responsiveness of both forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity than those without lung hyperinflation during early COPD (t=2.21–5.70, P=0.000–0.029), especially in stage I, while age, body mass index, smoking status, smoking history, and disease duration were similar between the two subgroups in the same stages. From stages I to IV of subgroups with lung hyperinflation, stage I patients had the best bronchodilator responsiveness. Use of bronchodilator responsiveness of forced vital capacity to detect the presence of lung hyperinflation in COPD patients showed relatively high sensitivities (69.5%–75.3%) and specificities (70.3%–75.7%). Conclusion We demonstrated the novel finding that early COPD patients with lung hyperinflation are associated with poorer lung function but better bronchodilator responsiveness and established a simple method for detecting lung hyperinflation. PMID:27785008

  20. Standard radiotherapy but not chemotherapy impairs systemic immunity in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Talebian Yazdi, Mehrdad; Schinkelshoek, Mink S.; Loof, Nikki M.; Taube, Christian; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Welters, Marij J. P.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is traditionally treated with platinum-based chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Since immunotherapy holds promise for treating advanced NSCLC, we assessed the systemic effects of the traditional therapies for NSCLC on immune cell composition and function. Methods: 84 pulmonary adenocarcinoma patients, treated either with chemotherapy or radiotherapy, were studied. A prospective study of 23 patients was conducted in which the myeloid and lymphoid cell compartments of peripheral blood were analyzed. Changes in cell populations were validated in a retrospective cohort of 61 adenocarcinoma patients using automated differential counts collected throughout therapy. Furthermore, the functional capacity of circulating T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APC) was studied. Blood samples of healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: In comparison to healthy controls, untreated adenocarcinoma patients display an elevated frequency of myeloid cells coinciding with relative lower frequencies of lymphocytes and dendritic cells. Standard chemotherapy had no overt effects on myeloid and lymphoid cell composition nor on T-cell and APC-function. In contrast, patients treated with radiotherapy displayed a decrease in lymphoid cells and a relative increase in monocytes/macrophages. Importantly, these changes were associated with a reduced APC function and an impaired response of T cells to recall antigens. Conclusions: Platinum-based standard of care chemotherapy for NSCLC has no profound negative effect on the immune cell composition and function. The negative effect of prolonged low-dose radiotherapy on the immune system warrants future studies on the optimal dose and fraction of radiotherapy when combined with immunotherapy. PMID:28123900

  1. Cigarette smoke induced autophagy-impairment accelerates lung aging, COPD-emphysema exacerbations and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vij, Neeraj; Chandramani, Prashanth; Westphal, Colin Van; Hole, Rachel; Bodas, Manish

    2016-07-13

    Cigarette-smoke (CS) exposure and aging are the leading causes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-emphysema development, although the molecular mechanism that mediates disease pathogenesis remains poorly understood. To investigate the impact of CS-exposure and aging on autophagy, and pathophysiological changes associated with lung aging (senescence) and emphysema progression. Beas2b cells, C57BL/6 mice and human (GOLD 0-IV) lung tissues were used to determine the central mechanism involved in CS/age-related COPD-emphysema pathogenesis. Beas2b cells and murine lungs exposed to CSE/CS showed a significant (p<0.05) accumulation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins and impaired-autophagy marker, p62, in aggresome-bodies. Moreover, treatment with autophagy-inducing antioxidant drug, cysteamine significantly (p<0.001) decreased CSE/CS-induced aggresome-bodies. We also found a significant (p<0.001) increase in levels of aggresome-bodies in the lungs of smokers and COPD-subjects in comparison to non-smoker controls. Furthermore, the presence and levels of aggresome-bodies statistically correlated with severity of emphysema and alveolar senescence. In addition to CS exposure, lungs from old mice also showed accumulation of aggresome-bodies, suggesting this as a common mechanism to initiate cellular senescence and emphysema. Additionally, Beas2b cells and murine lungs exposed to CSE/CS showed cellular apoptosis and senescence, which were both controlled by cysteamine treatment. In parallel, we evaluated the impact of CS on pulmonary exacerbation, using mice exposed to CS and/or infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), and confirmed cysteamine's potential as an autophagy-inducing antibacterial drug, based on its ability to control CS-induced pulmonary exacerbation (Pa-bacterial counts) and resulting inflammation. CS induced autophagy-impairment accelerates lung aging, COPD-emphysema exacerbations and pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016, American Journal of Physiology

  2. Profusion of Opacities in Simple Coal Worker’s Pneumoconiosis Is Associated With Reduced Lung Function

    PubMed Central

    Laney, A. Scott; Halldin, Cara N.; Cohen, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A large body of evidence demonstrates dose-response relationships of cumulative coal mine dust exposure with lung function impairment and with small-opacity profusion. However, medical literature generally holds that simple coal worker’s pneumoconiosis (CWP) is not associated with lung function impairment. This study examines the relationship between small-opacity profusion and lung function in US underground coal miners with simple CWP. METHODS: Miners were examined during 2005 to 2013 as part of the Enhanced Coal Workers’ Health Surveillance Program. Work histories were obtained, and chest radiographs and spirometry were administered. Lung parenchymal abnormalities consistent with CWP were classified according to International Labor Organization guidelines, and reference values for FEV1 and FVC were calculated using reference equations derived from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Differences in lung function were evaluated by opacity profusion, and regression models were fit to characterize associations between profusion and lung function. RESULTS: A total of 8,230 miners were eligible for analysis; 269 had category 1 or 2 simple CWP. Decrements in FEV1 % predicted were nearly consistent across profusion subcategories. Clear decrements in FVC % predicted and FEV1/FVC were also observed, although these were less consistent. Controlling for smoking status, BMI, and mining tenure, each 1-unit subcategory increase in profusion was associated with decreases of 1.5% (95% CI, 1.0%-1.9%), 1.0% (95% CI, 0.6%-1.3%), and 0.6% (95% CI, 0.4%-0.8%) in FEV1 % predicted, FVC % predicted, and FEV1/FVC, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We observed progressively lower lung function across the range of small-opacity profusion. These findings address a long-standing question in occupational medicine and point to the importance of medical surveillance and respiratory disease prevention in this workforce. PMID:25996896

  3. Detrimental effects of tobacco smoke exposure during development on postnatal lung function and asthma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2008-03-01

    Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) during fetal development and early postnatal life is perhaps the most ubiquitous and hazardous of children's environmental exposures. The developing lung is highly susceptible to ETS. A large body of literature links both prenatal maternal smoking and children's ETS exposure to decreased lung growth. This review summarizes the state of the knowledge, including both human epidemiology and laboratory animal experiments, linking ETS, lung development, and respiratory outcomes. Important issues discussed include lung development and lung function and asthma in relation to ETS exposure during critical windows of growth. Prenatal exposure to ETS is associated with impaired lung function and increased risk of developing asthma, whereas postnatal exposure mainly acts to trigger respiratory symptoms and asthma attacks, but it also plays an important role in the occurrence of asthma in children. This review provides evidence that avoidance of ETS exposure both before and after birth is beneficial to long-term respiratory health, because airway function in later life is believed to be largely determined by lung development occurring in utero and in early infancy.

  4. Cross sectional study on lung function of coke oven workers: a lung function surveillance system from 1978 to 1990

    PubMed Central

    Wu, J; Kreis, I; Griffiths, D; Darling, C

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To determine the association between lung function of coke oven workers and exposure to coke oven emissions. Methods: Lung function data and detailed work histories for workers in recovery coke ovens of a steelworks were extracted from a lung function surveillance system. Multiple regressions were employed to determine significant predictors for lung function indices. The first sets of lung function tests for 613 new starters were pooled to assess the selection bias. The last sets of lung function tests for 834 subjects with one or more year of coke oven history were pooled to assess determinants of lung function. Results: Selection bias associated with the recruitment process was not observed among the exposure groups. For subjects with a history of one or more years of coke oven work, each year of working in the most exposed "operation" position was associated with reductions in FEV1 of around 9 ml (p = 0.006, 95% CI: 3 ml to 16 ml) and in FVC of around 12 ml (p = 0.002, 95% CI: 4 ml to 19 ml). Negative effects of smoking on lung function were also observed. Conclusions: Exposure to coke oven emissions was found to be associated with lower FEV1 and FVC. Effects of work exposure on lung function are similar to those found in other studies. PMID:12468747

  5. Functional impairments as symptoms in the symptom cluster analysis of patients newly diagnosed with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Fodeh, Samah J; Lazenby, Mark; Bai, Mei; Ercolano, Elizabeth; Murphy, Terrence; McCorkle, Ruth

    2013-10-01

    Symptoms and subsequent functional impairment have been associated with the biological processes of disease, including the interaction between disease and treatment in a measurement model of symptoms. However, hitherto cluster analysis has primarily focused on symptoms. This study among patients within 100 days of diagnosis with advanced cancer explored whether self-reported physical symptoms and functional impairments formed clusters at the time of diagnosis. We applied cluster analysis to self-reported symptoms and activities of daily living of 111 patients newly diagnosed with advanced gastrointestinal (GI), gynecological, head and neck, and lung cancers. Based on content expert evaluations, the best techniques and variables were identified, yielding the best solution. The best cluster solution used a K-means algorithm and cosine similarity and yielded five clusters of physical as well as emotional symptoms and functional impairments. Cancer site formed the predominant organizing principle of composition for each cluster. The top five symptoms and functional impairments in each cluster were Cluster 1 (GI): outlook, insomnia, appearance, concentration, and eating/feeding; Cluster 2 (GI): appetite, bowel, insomnia, eating/feeding, and appearance; Cluster 3 (gynecological): nausea, insomnia, eating/feeding, concentration, and pain; Cluster 4 (head and neck): dressing, eating/feeding, bathing, toileting, and walking; and Cluster 5 (lung): cough, walking, eating/feeding, breathing, and insomnia. Functional impairments in patients newly diagnosed with late-stage cancers behave as symptoms during the diagnostic phase. Health care providers need to expand their assessments to include both symptoms and functional impairments. Early recognition of functional changes may accelerate diagnosis at an earlier cancer stage. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Selective ablation of lung epithelial IKK2 impairs pulmonary Th17 responses and delays the clearance of Pneumocystis.

    PubMed

    Perez-Nazario, Nelissa; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; O'Reilly, Michael A; Pasparakis, Manolis; Gigliotti, Francis; Wright, Terry W

    2013-11-01

    Pneumocystis is an atypical fungal pathogen that causes severe, often fatal pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. Healthy humans and animals also encounter this pathogen, but they generate a protective CD4(+) T cell-dependent immune response that clears the pathogen with little evidence of disease. Pneumocystis organisms attach tightly to respiratory epithelial cells, and in vitro studies have demonstrated that this interaction triggers NF-κB-dependent epithelial cell responses. However, the contribution of respiratory epithelial cells to the normal host response to Pneumocystis remains unknown. IκB kinase 2 (IKK2) is the upstream kinase that is critical for inducible NF-κB activation. To determine whether IKK2-dependent lung epithelial cell (LEC) responses contribute to the anti-Pneumocystis immune response in vivo, transgenic mice with LEC-specific deletion of IKK2 (IKK2(ΔLEC)) were generated. Compared to wild-type mice, IKK2(ΔLEC) mice exhibited a delayed onset of Th17 and B cell responses in the lung and delayed fungal clearance. Importantly, delayed Pneumocystis clearance in IKK2(ΔLEC) mice was associated with an exacerbated immune response, impaired pulmonary function, and altered lung histology. These data demonstrate that IKK2-dependent LEC responses are important regulators of pulmonary adaptive immune responses and are required for optimal host defense against Pneumocystis infection. LECs likely set the threshold for initiation of the pulmonary immune response and serve to prevent exacerbated lung inflammation by promoting the rapid control of respiratory fungal infection.

  7. Impaired cardiovascular function in primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David E. J.; Hollingsworth, Kieren; Fattakhova, Gulnar; MacGowan, Guy; Taylor, Roy; Blamire, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular system dysregulation in the form of autonomic dysfunction is common at all stages of the disease process in the autoimmune liver disease primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and associates with the symptom of fatigue. The mechanisms underpinning autonomic dysfunction in PBC are, however, at present unclear. In this study we set out to explore, for the first time, cardiac structure and function in PBC using impedance cardiography (ICG) and magnetic resonance methodologies. ICG was assessed beat to beat in response to orthostasis (by head-up tilt) in age and sex case-matched high-fatigue and low-fatigue PBC groups (assessed by Fatigue Impact Scale), normal control subjects (n = 15 each group) and a liver disease control cohort (primary sclerosing cholangitis). Cardiac structure and bioenergetics were examined in 15 of the PBC subjects and 8 of the normal control subjects by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cine imaging. Capacity of the left ventricle to respond to orthostasis [left ventricular ejection time (LVET)] was impaired in PBC compared with matched normal control subjects (P = 0.05). This was a PBC-specific phenomenon unrelated to fatigue status. PBC patients exhibited significantly lower cardiac muscle phosphocreatine-to-ATP ratio (PCr/ATP ratio; measure of cardiac bioenergetic integrity) compared with control subjects (P < 0.01). PCr/ATP <1.6 (indicative of increased risk of death in cardiomyopathy) was present in 6/15 (40%) PBC patients (0/8 control subjects; P < 0.05). Cardiac structure and function were similar in all measures of left ventricular morphology between control subjects and PBC. The close relationship between PCr/ATP and LVET seen in normal subjects (r2 = 0.6; P < 0.05) was lost in PBC patients, a finding compatible with myocardial dysfunction. Significant correlation was seen between fatigue severity in PBC and fall in cardiac output on orthostasis (r2 = 0.25; P = 0.005). Our findings suggest the presence of altered myocardial

  8. Impaired NHEJ function in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Clara; Toor, Amir A.; Singh, Sheetal; Betti, Christopher; Vaughan, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is characterized by multiple chromosomal aberrations. To assess the contribution of DNA repair to this phenotype, ionizing radiation was used to induce DNA double strand breaks in three MM cell lines. Clonogenic survival assays showed U266 (SF4= 15.3+6.4%) and RPMI 8226 (SF4=12.6.0+1.7%) were radiation sensitive while OPM2 was resistant (SF4=78.9+4.1%). Addition of the DNA-PK inhibitor NU7026 showed the expected suppression in radiation survival in OPM2 but increased survival in both radiation sensitive cell lines. To examine NHEJ repair in these lines, the ability of protein extracts to support in vitro DNA repair was measured. Among the three MM cell lines analyzed, RPMI 8226 demonstrated impaired blunt ended DNA ligation using a ligation mediated PCR technique. In a bacterial based functional assay to rejoin a DNA break within the β-galactosidase gene, RPMI 8226 demonstrated a four fold reduction in rejoining fidelity compared to U266, with OPM2 showing an intermediate capacity. Ionizing radiation induced a robust γ-H2AX response in OPM2 but only a modest increase in each radiation sensitive cell line perhaps related to the high level of γ-H2AX in freshly plated cells. Examination of γ-H2AX foci in RPMI 8226 cells confirmed data from Western blots where a significant number of foci were present in freshly plated untreated cells which diminished over 24 h of culture. Based on the clonogenic survival and functional repair assays, all three cell lines exhibited corrupt NHEJ repair. We conclude that suppression of aberrant NHEJ function using the DNA-PK inhibitor NU7026 may facilitate access of DNA ends to an intact homologous recombination repair pathway, paradoxically increasing survival after irradiation. These data provide insight into the deregulation of DNA repair at the site of DNA breaks in MM that may underpin the characteristic genomic instability of this disease. PMID:19028508

  9. The influence of lung function on exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Yoshihiro; Hattori, Noboru; Yokoyama, Akihito; Yamane, Kiminori; Sekikawa, Kiyokazu; Inamizu, Tsutomu; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2010-03-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes have impaired exercise capacity. While numerous factors are known to contribute to impaired exercise capacity, the role of lung function remains unclear. We conducted the present study to investigate the influence of lung function on exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing was carried out in 31 male patients with type 2 diabetes without diabetic complications or cardiopulmonary diseases. Patients with abnormal spirometry results such as a percentage of predicted forced vital capacity (%FVC) < 80% and/or a ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) to FVC (FEV1/FVC) < 70% were excluded from the study. We used the percentage of predicted maximal oxygen uptake (%VO2max) as an index of exercise capacity. The correlations between %VO2max and lung function and other factors known to be associated with impaired exercise capacity were then assessed. Univariate analysis revealed %VO2max correlated significantly with percentage of predicted FEV1 (%FEV1), duration of type 2 diabetes, regular exercise habits, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures. In a multivariate analysis, %FEV1 and regular exercise habits were found to be independent determinants of %VO2max. A mild reduction in %FEV1, which may be a complication of diabetes, is associated with impaired exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes. When evaluating spirometric values in patients with type 2 diabetes, a reduction in %FEV1 should be noted even when both %FVC and FEV1/FVC are within normal limits.

  10. Linking lung function and inflammatory responses in ventilator-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, Vincenzo; Hantos, Zoltan; Sly, Peter D; Zosky, Graeme R

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the mechanisms of ventilator-induced lung injury are poorly understood. We used strain-dependent responses to mechanical ventilation in mice to identify associations between mechanical and inflammatory responses in the lung. BALB/c, C57BL/6, and 129/Sv mice were ventilated using a protective [low tidal volume and moderate positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and recruitment maneuvers] or injurious (high tidal volume and zero PEEP) ventilation strategy. Lung mechanics and lung volume were monitored using the forced oscillation technique and plethysmography, respectively. Inflammation was assessed by measuring numbers of inflammatory cells, cytokine (IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α) levels, and protein content of the BAL. Principal components factor analysis was used to identify independent associations between lung function and inflammation. Mechanical and inflammatory responses in the lung were dependent on ventilation strategy and mouse strain. Three factors were identified linking 1) pulmonary edema, protein leak, and macrophages, 2) atelectasis, IL-6, and TNF-α, and 3) IL-1β and neutrophils, which were independent of responses in lung mechanics. This approach has allowed us to identify specific inflammatory responses that are independently associated with overstretch of the lung parenchyma and loss of lung volume. These data provide critical insight into the mechanical responses in the lung that drive local inflammation in ventilator-induced lung injury and the basis for future mechanistic studies in this field.

  11. Treatment of Functional Impairment in Patients with Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Moreno, Jose; Martinez-Aran, Anabel; Vieta, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, functional impairment has received little attention in bipolar disorder, despite the fact that many patients experience significant impairments in daily life. In the last decade, research has changed its focus from clinical remission to functional recovery in bipolar patients as a priority. A literature review of this topic will allow us provide an overview of the relevance of functional impairment as well as the potential factors that can predict or contribute to low functioning in bipolar disorder (BD). Treatment approaches should consider not only euthymia as a goal but also cognitive and functional improvement of patients with such a complex disorder. Functional remediation and psychoeducation among psychological interventions may help to enhance functioning. The combination of cognitive enhancers and cognitive/functional remediation programs may help in improving cognitive and functional impairments. Early interventions are essential to prevent cognitive deficits and disability.

  12. Lung function predicts survival in a cohort of asbestos cement workers.

    PubMed

    Moshammer, H; Neuberger, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    To study the predictive power of respiratory screening examinations a cohort of asbestos workers was followed from active work in an asbestos cement plant until death. From a cohort with data on individual exposure since first employment 309 workers who had a preventive medical examination in 1989/1990 were observed until death or the end of 2006. The impact of asbestos exposure (fibre years) and of smoking history on lung function was examined by linear regression, on specific causes of death and total mortality by Cox regression. The prognostic value of lung function, chest X-ray, and various clinical findings regarding total mortality was also examined by Cox regression. Lung function proved to be the best predictor of survival apart from current smoking. Depending on the lung function variable an impairment by the interquartile range resulted in a hazard ratio of 1.5-1.6 while for current smokers it was 2.3. An increase of 70 fibre years (interquartile range) led to a hazard ratio of only 1.1. Lung function was influenced by asbestos exposure, current (but not former) smoking, and by pathological X-ray findings. The risk for pleural mesothelioma was dominated by time since first exposure to crocydolite in the pipe factory while the risk for bronchial cancer increased with smoking and total fibre years. An unexpected finding was an increase of gastric cancer in asbestos cement workers. Lung function decrease predicts risk of premature death better than exposure history and regular spirometry should therefore be offered as primary screening to all former asbestos workers. In workers with a history of high cumulative exposure or rapid lung function decrease or radiological signs (diffuse pleural thickening or small irregular opacities) more sensitive techniques (high resolution computer tomography) need to be applied. All smokers with a history of asbestos exposure should be given free smoking cessation therapy to prevent premature death and lung cancer in

  13. [Portable lung function parameters testing system based on DSP].

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhanshe; Yuan, Minzhong; Zhou, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Lung function monitoring is a critical technique for clinical medicine. Currently, the lung function testing devices used in our domestic hospitals are both expensive and bulky. A portable and accurate lung function parameters testing system is highly desired and is proposed in this paper. The hardware of the system is based on DSP technology. The breathing passage is designed with an aim suitable for the breathe and signal detection. We use the direct detection method to detect the gas flow, the breathing passage pressure and the breathing time. Thanks to the powerful data processing ability and the high operation speed of the DSP, breathing signals can be easily analyzed. Thus, several lung function parameters of clinical significance can be obtained. Experiments show that the accuracy of the system is better than 3%, and could meet the demand of the lung function testing.

  14. The effects of electronic cigarette aerosol exposure on inflammation and lung function in mice.

    PubMed

    Larcombe, Alexander N; Janka, Maxine A; Mullins, Benjamin J; Berry, Luke J; Bredin, Arne; Franklin, Peter J

    2017-07-01

    Electronic cigarette usage is increasing worldwide, yet there is a paucity of information on the respiratory health effects of electronic cigarette aerosol exposure. This study aimed to assess whether exposure to electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) aerosol would alter lung function and pulmonary inflammation in mice and to compare the severity of any alterations with mice exposed to mainstream tobacco smoke. Female BALB/c mice were exposed for 8 wk to tobacco smoke, medical air (control), or one of four different types of e-cigarette aerosol. E-cigarette aerosols varied depending on nicotine content (0 or 12 mg/ml) and the main excipient (propylene glycol or glycerin). Twenty-four hours after the final exposure, we measured pulmonary inflammation, lung volume, lung mechanics, and responsiveness to methacholine. Mice exposed to tobacco cigarette smoke had increased pulmonary inflammation and responsiveness to methacholine compared with air controls. Mice exposed to e-cigarette aerosol did not have increased inflammation but did display decrements in parenchymal lung function at both functional residual capacity and high transrespiratory pressures. Mice exposed to glycerin-based e-cigarette aerosols were also hyperresponsive to methacholine regardless of the presence or absence of nicotine. This study shows, for the first time, that exposure to e-cigarette aerosol during adolescence and early adulthood is not harmless to the lungs and can result in significant impairments in lung function. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Functional Impairment in Youth Three Years after Detention

    PubMed Central

    Abram, Karen M.; Choe, Jeanne Y.; Washburn, Jason J.; Romero, Erin G.; Teplin, Linda A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose This article examines functional impairment across global and specific dimensions among youth 3 years after their detention. Methods Functional impairment was assessed using the Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS) in a large, stratified, random sample of formerly detained youth (N = 1653). Results More than one-fifth of the sample were scored as having marked impairment that required, at minimum, “multiple sources of care” (CAFAS Total Score of 100 or higher); 7.0% required “intensive intervention” (CAFAS Total Score ≥140). Most of the sample had impairment; only 7.5% of the sample had “no noteworthy impairment” (CAFAS Total Score ≤10). Significantly more males were impaired than females. Among males living in the community at follow-up, African Americans and Hispanics were more likely to be impaired than non-Hispanic whites. In comparison to males living in the community, males who were incarcerated at follow-up were significantly more likely to have impaired thinking and impaired functioning at their place of residence but less likely to have substance use problems. Conclusions Three years after detention, most youth struggle in one or more life domains; more than one in five have marked impairment in functioning. These findings underscore the ongoing costs, to both youth and society, of our failure to provide effective rehabilitation to youth after detention. PMID:19465316

  16. Lung function in fragrance industry employees.

    PubMed

    Dix, G R

    2013-07-01

    Production employees in the UK fragrance industry are exposed to large numbers of chemical substances and mixtures. There is a lack of published literature describing the effects of occupational respiratory exposure in this industry. To investigate whether occupational respiratory exposure to chemicals in the UK fragrance industry is linked to a statistically significant change in lung function as measured using spirometry. A multi-site cross-sectional study in which five UK companies took part, comprising an exposed group (fragrance production and associated functions) and a control group (non-exposed industry employees, e.g. office staff). Spirometric measurements (forced expiratory volume in 1 second, forced vital capacity and peak expiratory flow) were taken pre- and post-shift. Participants provided information on potential confounding factors (smoking, history of respiratory problems and body mass index). Post-shift measurements were compared between groups, using analysis of covariance to adjust for the baseline pre-shift measurements. A total of 112 subjects participated: 60 in the exposed group and 52 in control group (response rate 33 and 24%, respectively). Adjusted mean differences in post-shift spirometric measurements between exposed and control groups were not statistically significant. No significant effects were observed on the spirometric performance of the study population. This work is the first step in a novel area of research, and the industry would benefit from further such research.

  17. Impaired lymphatic function accelerates cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Steinskog, Eli Sihn Samdal; Sagstad, Solfrid Johanne; Wagner, Marek; Karlsen, Tine Veronica; Yang, Ning; Markhus, Carl Erik; Yndestad, Synnøve; Wiig, Helge; Eikesdal, Hans Petter

    2016-01-01

    Increased lymphangiogenesis is a common feature of cancer development and progression, yet the influence of impaired lymphangiogenesis on tumor growth is elusive. C3HBA breast cancer and KHT-1 sarcoma cell lines were implanted orthotopically in Chy mice, harboring a heterozygous inactivating mutation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3, resulting in impaired dermal lymphangiogenesis. Accelerated tumor growth was observed in both cancer models in Chy mice, coinciding with reduced peritumoral lymphangiogenesis. An impaired lymphatic washout was observed from the peritumoral area in Chy mice with C3HBA tumors, and the number of macrophages was significantly reduced. While fewer macrophages were detected, the fraction of CD163+ M2 macrophages remained constant, causing a shift towards a higher M2/M1 ratio in Chy mice. No difference in adaptive immune cells was observed between wt and Chy mice. Interestingly, levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophage-associated cytokines were reduced in C3HBA tumors, pointing to an impaired innate immune response. However, IL-6 was profoundly elevated in the C3HBA tumor interstitial fluid, and treatment with the anti-IL-6 receptor antibody tocilizumab inhibited breast cancer growth. Collectively, our data indicate that impaired lymphangiogenesis weakens anti-tumor immunity and favors tumor growth at an early stage of cancer development. PMID:27329584

  18. Lung function status of workers exposed to wood dust in timber markets in Calabar, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okwari, O O; Antai, A B; Owu, D U; Peters, E J; Osim, E E

    2005-06-01

    The effect of chronic exposure to dust from local woods such as ebony, achi, and iroko on lung function of timber market workers in Calabar - Nigeria, was studied. Forced vital capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in one second, (FEV1), Forced Expiratory Volume as a percentage of forced vital capacity (FEV1 %), and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) were measured in 221 workers (aged 20-25 years) exposed to wood dust to assess their lung function and compared with 200 age- and sex- matched control subjects who were not exposed to any known air pollutant. The concentration of respirable dust was significantly higher in the test (P<0.001) than in control site. The mean values of FVC, FEV1, FEV1% and PEFR of the timber workers were significantly lower (P<0.01) than in control subjects. Respiratory symptoms such as cough, chest pain and nasal irritation had higher prevalence in the test group than in the control group. Non-respiratory symptoms (skin and eye irritation) were prevalent in the test group but not found in the control group. Workers exposed to wood dust had restrictive pattern of ventilatory function impairment. The lung function indices of the timber workers decreased with their length of service. Chronic exposure to wood dust impairs lung function.

  19. Changes in cystic fibrosis airway microbial community associated with a severe decline in lung function.

    PubMed

    Paganin, Patrizia; Fiscarelli, Ersilia Vita; Tuccio, Vanessa; Chiancianesi, Manuela; Bacci, Giovanni; Morelli, Patrizia; Dolce, Daniela; Dalmastri, Claudia; De Alessandri, Alessandra; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Taccetti, Giovanni; Mengoni, Alessio; Bevivino, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease resulting in chronic polymicrobial infections of the airways and progressive decline in lung function. To gain insight into the underlying causes of severe lung diseases, we aimed at comparing the airway microbiota detected in sputum of CF patients with stable lung function (S) versus those with a substantial decline in lung function (SD). Microbiota composition was investigated by using culture-based and culture-independent methods, and by performing multivariate and statistical analyses. Culture-based methods identified some microbial species associated with a worse lung function, i.e. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Rothia mucilaginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Candida albicans, but only the presence of S. pneumoniae and R. mucilaginosa was found to be associated with increased severe decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1). Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis revealed a higher bacterial diversity than that detected by culture-based methods. Molecular signatures with a statistically significant odds ratio for SD status were detected, and classified as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Shewanella, while for other Terminal Restriction Fragments (T-RFs) no species assignation was achieved. The analysis of T-RFLP data using ecological biodiversity indices showed reduced Evenness in SD patients compared to S ones, suggesting an impaired ecology of the bacterial community in SD patients. Statistically significant differences of the ecological biodiversity indices among the three sub-groups of FEV1 (normal/mild vs moderate vs severe) were also found, suggesting that the patients with moderate lung disease experienced changes in the airway assembly of taxa. Overall, changes in CF airway microbial community associated with a severe lung function decline were detected, allowing us to define some discriminatory species as well as some discriminatory T-RFs that represent good candidates for the

  20. Metabolic Functions of the Lung, Disorders and Associated Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The primary function of the lungs is gas exchange. Approximately 400 million years ago, the Earth’s atmosphere gained enough oxygen in the gas phase for the animals that emerged from the sea to breathe air. The first lungs were merely primitive air sacs with a few vessels in the walls that served as accessory organs of gas exchange to supplement the gills. Eons later, as animals grew accustomed to a solely terrestrial life, the lungs became highly compartmentalized to provide the vast air-blood surface necessary for O2 uptake and CO2 elimination, and a respiratory control system was developed to regulate breathing in accordance with metabolic demands and other needs. With the evolution and phylogenetic development, lungs were taking a variety of other specialized functions to maintain homeostasis, which we will call the non-respiratory functions of the lung and that often, and by mistake, are believed to have little or no connection with the replacement gas. In this review, we focus on the metabolic functions of the lung, perhaps the least known, and mainly, in the lipid metabolism and blood-adult lung vascular endothelium interaction. When these functions are altered, respiratory disorders or diseases appear, which are discussed concisely, emphasizing how they impact the most important function of the lungs: external respiration. PMID:27635172

  1. Metabolic Functions of the Lung, Disorders and Associated Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Alcibey; Arce, Isabel

    2016-10-01

    The primary function of the lungs is gas exchange. Approximately 400 million years ago, the Earth's atmosphere gained enough oxygen in the gas phase for the animals that emerged from the sea to breathe air. The first lungs were merely primitive air sacs with a few vessels in the walls that served as accessory organs of gas exchange to supplement the gills. Eons later, as animals grew accustomed to a solely terrestrial life, the lungs became highly compartmentalized to provide the vast air-blood surface necessary for O2 uptake and CO2 elimination, and a respiratory control system was developed to regulate breathing in accordance with metabolic demands and other needs. With the evolution and phylogenetic development, lungs were taking a variety of other specialized functions to maintain homeostasis, which we will call the non-respiratory functions of the lung and that often, and by mistake, are believed to have little or no connection with the replacement gas. In this review, we focus on the metabolic functions of the lung, perhaps the least known, and mainly, in the lipid metabolism and blood-adult lung vascular endothelium interaction. When these functions are altered, respiratory disorders or diseases appear, which are discussed concisely, emphasizing how they impact the most important function of the lungs: external respiration.

  2. Tiny Device Mimics Human Lung Function

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Rebecca; Harris, Jennifer; Nath, Pulak

    2016-04-25

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing a miniature, tissue-engineered artificial lung that mimics the response of the human lung to drugs, toxins and other agents. “We breathe in and out thousands of times every day. And while we have control over what we eat or drink, we don’t always have control over what we breathe in,” said Jennifer Harris of Biosecurity and Public Health at Los Alamos, "and so we’re making this miniature lung to be able to test on actual human cells whether something in the environment, or a drug, is toxic or harmful to us." Nicknamed “PuLMo” for Pulmonary Lung Model (Pulmo is also the Latin word for "lung")the device consists of two major parts, the bronchiolar unit and the alveolar unit—just like the human lung. The units are primarily made from various polymers and are connected by a microfluidic “circuit board” that manages fluid and air flow. “When we build our lung, we not only take into account the aspects of different cell types, the tissues that are involved, we also take into account that a lung is supposed to breathe, so PuLMo actually breathes,” said Pulak Nath of Applied Modern Physics, who leads engineering efforts for the project. The most exciting application of PuLMo is a potentially revolutionary improvement in the reliability of drug-toxicity assessments and the prediction of new pharmaceutical success in humans, according to Harris. The PuLMo may also be designed to mimic lung disease conditions, such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and asthma, and may be used to study lung air-flow dynamics to better understand the mechanisms of toxins and drug delivery and the effects of smoking, particularly the less-understood effects of e-cigarettes.

  3. Alveolar recruitment strategy during cardiopulmonary bypass does not improve postoperative gas exchange and lung function.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Mirela; Dettmer, Sebastian; Meininger, Dirk; Deschka, Heinz; Geyer, Galina; Regulla, Caroline; Moritz, Anton

    2009-03-01

    Pulmonary dysfunction with impairment of lung function and oxygenation is one of the most serious problems in the early postoperative period after cardiac surgery. In this study we investigated the effect of alveolar recruitment strategy during cardiopulmonary bypass on postoperative gas exchange and lung function. This prospective randomized study included 32 patients undergoing elective myocardial revascularization with cardiopulmonary bypass. In 16 patients 5 cm H(2)O of positive end-expiratory pressure was applied after intubation and maintained until extubation (Group I). In the other 16 patients (group II) a positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 5 cm H(2)O was maintained as well but was increased to 14 cm H(2)O every 20 min for 2 min during cross clamp. Measurements were taken preoperatively, before skin incision, before and after (3, 24, 48 h) cardiopulmonary bypass and before discharge (6th postoperative day). Postoperative gas exchange, extravascular lung water and lung function showed no significant difference between the groups. Postoperative pulmonary function variables were lower in both groups compared to baseline values. In patients with normal preoperative pulmonary function, application of an alveolar recruitment strategy during cardiopulmonary bypass does not improve postoperative gas exchange and lung function after cardiac surgery.

  4. Impact of rhinitis on lung function in children and adolescents without asthma.

    PubMed

    Saranz, R J; Lozano, A; Valero, A; Lozano, N A; Bovina Martijena, M D P; Agresta, F; Ianiero, L; Ponzio, M F

    Subclinical spirometric abnormalities may be detected in patients with rhinitis without asthma, proportional to the severity established by ARIA (Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Asthma) guidelines. New criteria of rhinitis classification were recently validated according to the ARIA modified (m-ARIA), which allow the discrimination between moderate to severe grades. The impact of rhinitis on lung function according to frequency and severity is unknown. To investigate subclinical spirometric impairment in children and adolescents with allergic and non-allergic rhinitis without overt symptoms of asthma, according to the frequency and severity criteria of rhinitis classified by m-ARIA. An observational cross-sectional study, including children and adolescents aged 5-18 years with allergic and non-allergic rhinitis without asthma. We analysed the functional abnormalities and bronchodilator response with spirometry in relation to the grade of rhinitis established by m-ARIA using an adjusted logistic model. A value of p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. We studied 189 patients; 22.2% showed spirometric abnormalities. Patients with persistent rhinitis had greater impairment of lung function compared to intermittent grade (p=0.026). Lung functional impairment was more frequent in severe and moderate rhinitis than mild grade (p=0.005) and was independent of the atopic status to both frequency (p=0.157) and severity (p=0.538). There was no difference in bronchodilator reversibility between groups (p>0.05). Impaired lung function was associated with persistence and severity of rhinitis and there was no significant difference between patients with moderate and severe rhinitis. The spirometric abnormality was demonstrated in patients with allergic and non-allergic rhinitis. Copyright © 2016 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Association Between RT-Induced Changes in Lung Tissue Density and Global Lung Function

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jinli; Zhang Junan; Zhou Sumin; Hubbs, Jessica L.; Foltz, Rodney J.; Hollis, Donna R.; Light, Kim L.; Wong, Terence Z.; Kelsey, Christopher R.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the association between radiotherapy (RT)-induced changes in computed tomography (CT)-defined lung tissue density and pulmonary function tests (PFTs). Methods and Materials: Patients undergoing incidental partial lung RT were prospectively assessed for global (PFTs) and regional (CT and single photon emission CT [SPECT]) lung function before and, serially, after RT. The percent reductions in the PFT and the average changes in lung density were compared (Pearson correlations) in the overall group and subgroups stratified according to various clinical factors. Comparisons were also made between the CT- and SPECT-based computations using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: Between 1991 and 2004, 343 patients were enrolled in this study. Of these, 111 patients had a total of 203 concurrent post-RT evaluations of changes in lung density and PFTs available for the analyses, and 81 patients had a total of 141 concurrent post-RT SPECT images. The average increases in lung density were related to the percent reductions in the PFTs, albeit with modest correlation coefficients (range, 0.20-0.43). The analyses also indicated that the association between lung density and PFT changes is essentially equivalent to the corresponding association with SPECT-defined lung perfusion. Conclusion: We found a weak quantitative association between the degree of increase in lung density as defined by CT and the percent reduction in the PFTs.

  6. Environmental exposures, lung function, and respiratory health in rural Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Jaime R; Somsamouth, Khamphithoune; Mounivong, Boualoy; Sinclair, Ryan; Soret, Sam; Knutsen, Synnove; Singh, Pramil N

    2014-01-01

    Although the individual contributions of smoked tobacco and indoor air pollution have been identified, there are very few studies that have characterized and measured the effects of inhaled particles from a wide range of personal, household, and community practices common in rural Asia. The objective of our study was to examine the association between environmental inhaled exposures and lung function among rural males of Lao PDR. In a sample of 92 males from rural Lao PDR, study subjects completed a survey on household exposures, a physical exam, and the following measures of lung function: FEV1, FVC, and the ratio of FEV1/FVC. Our findings were as follows: a) > 80% of the subjects were exposed to indoor cooking fires (wood fuel), animal handling, dust and dirt; b) 57.6% of subjects were in the impaired range (FEV1/FVC < 0.7); and c) animal handling was negatively associated (p < 0.03) with FEV1 and FVC. Among males in rural Lao PDR, we found a high prevalence of chronic exposure to inhaled particles (animal handling, dust/dirt, smoke) and a high prevalence of impaired lung function. Findings from this pilot study indicate that associations between exposure to multiple sources of particulate matter common in rural areas and lung function need further investigation.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES, LUNG FUNCTION, AND RESPIRATORY HEALTH IN RURAL LAO PDR

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Jaime R; Somsamouth, Khamphithoune; Mounivong, Boualoy; Sinclair, Ryan; Soret, Sam; Knutsen, Synnove; Singh, Pramil N

    2014-01-01

    Although the individual contributions of smoked tobacco and indoor air pollution have been identified, there are very few studies that have characterized and measured the effects of inhaled particles from a wide range of personal, household, and community practices common in rural Asia. The objective of our study was to examine the association between environmental inhaled exposures and lung function among rural males of Lao PDR. In a sample of 92 males from rural Lao PDR, study subjects completed a survey on household exposures, a physical exam, and the following measures of lung function: FEV1, FVC, and the ratio of FEV1/FVC. Our findings were as follows: a) > 80% of the subjects were exposed to indoor cooking fires (wood fuel), animal handling, dust and dirt; b) 57.6% of subjects were in the impaired range (FEV1/FVC < 0.7); and c) animal handling was negatively associated (p<0.03) with FEV1 and FVC. Among males in rural Lao PDR, we found a high prevalence of chronic exposure to inhaled particles (animal handling, dust/dirt, smoke) and a high prevalence of impaired lung function. Findings from this pilot study indicate that associations between exposure to multiple sources of particulate matter common in rural areas and lung function need further investigation. PMID:24964671

  8. Impact of the Loss of Hoxa5 Function on Lung Alveogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mandeville, Isabel; Aubin, Josée; LeBlanc, Michelle; Lalancette-Hébert, Mélanie; Janelle, Marie-France; Tremblay, Guy M.; Jeannotte, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    The involvement of genes controlling embryonic processes in the etiology of diseases often escapes attention because of the focus given to their inherent developmental role. Hoxa5 belongs to the Hox gene family encoding transcription factors known for their role in skeletal patterning. Hoxa5 is required for embryonic respiratory tract morphogenesis. We now show that the loss of Hoxa5 function has severe repercussions on postnatal lung development. Hoxa5−/− lungs present an emphysema-like morphology because of impaired alveogenesis. Chronic inflammation characteristics, including goblet cell hyperplasia, mucus hypersecretion, and recruitment of inflammatory cells, were also observed. Altered cell specification during lung morphogenesis triggered goblet cell anomalies. In addition, the defective motility of alveolar myofibroblast precursors in the embryonic lung led to the mispositioning of the alveolar myofibroblasts and to abnormal elastin deposition postnatally. Both goblet cell hyperplasia and elastic fiber abnormalities contributed to the chronic physiopathological features of Hoxa5−/− lungs. They constituted an attractive stimulus to recruit activated macrophages that in turn generated a positive feedback loop that perpetuated macrophage accumulation in the lung. The present work corroborates the notion that altered Hox gene expression may predispose to lung pathologies. PMID:17003488

  9. Association between the Type of Workplace and Lung Function in Copper Miners

    PubMed Central

    Gruszczyński, Leszek; Wojakowska, Anna; Ścieszka, Marek; Turczyn, Barbara; Schmidt, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the analysis was to retrospectively assess changes in lung function in copper miners depending on the type of workplace. In the groups of 225 operators, 188 welders, and 475 representatives of other jobs, spirometry was performed at the start of employment and subsequently after 10, 20, and 25 years of work. Spirometry Longitudinal Data Analysis software was used to estimate changes in group means for FEV1 and FVC. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess an association between workplace and lung function. Lung function assessed on the basis of calculation of longitudinal FEV1 (FVC) decline was similar in all studied groups. However, multiple linear regression model used in cross-sectional analysis revealed an association between workplace and lung function. In the group of welders, FEF75 was lower in comparison to operators and other miners as early as after 10 years of work. Simultaneously, in smoking welders, the FEV1/FVC ratio was lower than in nonsmokers (p < 0,05). The interactions between type of workplace and smoking (p < 0,05) in their effect on FVC, FEV1, PEF, and FEF50 were shown. Among underground working copper miners, the group of smoking welders is especially threatened by impairment of lung ventilatory function. PMID:27274987

  10. Adolescent lung function associated with incense burning and other environmental exposures at home.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y C; Ho, W C; Yu, Y H

    2016-11-17

    Incense burning is a popular cultural and religious practice, but whether exposure to incense smoke has effects on lung function is unclear. We investigated association between lung function and incense burning exposure and other household exposures in adolescents who participated in a mass asthma-screening program. Information on asthmatic status and associated factors was obtained from parent-completed questionnaires and student-completed video questionnaires. Approximately 10% of students received lung function examinations. Valid lung function data of 5010 students aged 14-16 years in northern Taiwan were analyzed. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory flow in 1 second (FEV1 ) were compared by incense burning status and other types of exposures for adolescents. Overall, 70.6% of students were exposed to incense smoke at home. The mean FVC and FEV1 measures were lower among adolescents with daily exposure to incense burning than those without such exposure (P<.05). Sharing bedroom was also associated with decreased FVC and FEV1 . After controlling for confounding factors, multivariable linear regression analysis with generalized estimation equation showed that FVC was negatively associated with daily exposure to incense burning, sharing a bedroom, and living in a house adjacent to a traffic road. Such associations were also observed in FEV1 . Daily exposure to incense burning is associated with impaired adolescent lung function.

  11. Dicer function is essential for lung epithelium morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Harris, Kelley S; Zhang, Zhen; McManus, Michael T; Harfe, Brian D; Sun, Xin

    2006-02-14

    DICER is a key enzyme that processes microRNA and small interfering RNA precursors into their short mature forms, enabling them to regulate gene expression. Only a single Dicer gene exists in the mouse genome, and it is broadly expressed in developing tissues. Dicer-null mutants die before gastrulation. Therefore, to study Dicer function in the later event of lung formation, we inactivated it in the mouse lung epithelium using a Dicer conditional allele and the Sonic Hedgehogcre (Shhcre) allele. Branching arrests in these mutant lungs, although epithelial growth continues in distal domains that are expanded compared with normal samples. These defects result in a few large epithelial pouches in the mutant lung instead of numerous fine branches present in a normal lung. Significantly, the initial phenotypes are apparent before an increase in epithelial cell death is observed, leading us to propose that Dicer plays a specific role in regulating lung epithelial morphogenesis independent of its requirement in cell survival. In addition, we found that the expression of Fgf10, a key gene involved in lung development, is up-regulated and expanded in the mesenchyme of Dicer mutant lungs. Previous studies support the hypothesis that precise localization of FGF10 in discrete sites of the lung mesenchyme serves as a chemoattractant for the outgrowth of epithelial branches. The aberrant Fgf10 expression may contribute to the Dicer morphological defects. However, the mechanism by which DICER functions in the epithelium to influence Fgf10 expression in the mesenchyme remains unknown.

  12. Associations of dairy intake with CT lung density and lung function

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rui; Jacobs, David R.; He, Ka; Hoffman, Eric; Hankinson, John; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Barr, R. Graham

    2013-01-01

    Objective Dairy products contain vitamin D and other nutrients that may be beneficial for lung function, but are also high in fats that may have mixed effects on lung function. However, the overall associations of dairy intake with lung density and lung function have not been studied. Methods We examined the cross-sectional relations between dairy intake and CT lung density and lung function in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Total, low-fat and high-fat dairy intakes were quantified from food frequency questionnaire responses of men and women, aged 45–84 years, free of clinical cardiovascular disease. The MESA-Lung Study assessed CT lung density from cardiac CT imaging and prebronchodilator spirometry among 3,965 MESA participants. Results Total dairy intake was inversely associated with apical-basilar difference in percent emphysema and positively associated with FVC (the multivariate-adjusted mean difference between the highest and the lowest quintile of total dairy intake was −0.92 (p for trend=0.04) for apical-basilar difference in percent emphysema and 72.0 mL (p=0.01) for FVC). Greater low-fat dairy intake was associated with higher alpha (higher alpha values indicate less emphysema) and lower apical-basilar difference in percent emphysema (corresponding differences in alpha and apical-basilar difference in percent emphysema were 0.04 (p=0.02) and −0.98 (p=0.01) for low-fat dairy intake, respectively). High-fat dairy intake was not associated with lung density measures. Greater low- or high-fat dairy intake was not associated with higher FEV1, FVC and FEV1/FVC. Conclusions Higher low-fat dairy intake but not high-fat dairy intake was associated with moderately improved CT lung density. PMID:21504976

  13. PREOPERATIVE PREDICTION OF LUNG FUNCTION IN PNEUMONECTOMY BY SPIROMETRY AND LUNG PERFUSION SCINTIGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays an increasing number of lung resections are being done because of the rising prevalence of lung cancer that occurs mainly in patients with limited lung function, what is caused by common etiologic factor - smoking cigarettes. Loss of lung tissue in such patients can worsen much the postoperative pulmonary function. So it is necessary to asses the postoperative pulmonary function especially after maximal resection, i.e. pneumonectomy. Objective: To check over the accuracy of preoperative prognosis of postoperative lung function after pneumonectomy using spirometry and lung perfusion scinigraphy. Material and methods: The study was done on 17 patients operated at the Clinic for thoracic surgery, who were treated previously at the Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases “Podhrastovi” in the period from 01. 12. 2008. to 01. 06. 2011. Postoperative pulmonary function expressed as ppoFEV1 (predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in one second) was prognosticated preoperatively using spirometry, i.e.. simple calculation according to the number of the pulmonary segments to be removed and perfusion lung scintigraphy. Results: There is no significant deviation of postoperative achieved values of FEV1 from predicted ones obtained by both methods, and there is no significant differences between predicted values (ppoFEV1) obtained by spirometry and perfusion scintigraphy. Conclusion: It is necessary to asses the postoperative pulmonary function before lung resection to avoid postoperative respiratory failure and other cardiopulmonary complications. It is absolutely necessary for pneumonectomy, i.e.. maximal pulmonary resection. It can be done with great possibility using spirometry or perfusion lung scintigraphy. PMID:23378687

  14. Influenza and dengue virus co-infection impairs monocyte recruitment to the lung, increases dengue virus titers, and exacerbates pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Michael A; González, Karla N; Shah, Sanjana; Peña, José; Mack, Matthias; Talarico, Laura B; Polack, Fernando P; Harris, Eva

    2017-03-01

    Co-infections of influenza virus and bacteria are known to cause severe disease, but little information exists on co-infections with other acute viruses. Seasonal influenza and dengue viruses (DENV) regularly co-circulate in tropical regions. The pandemic spread of influenza virus H1N1 (hereafter H1N1) in 2009 led to additional severe disease cases that were co-infected with DENV. Here, we investigated the impact of co-infection on immune responses and pathogenesis in a new mouse model. Co-infection of otherwise sublethal doses of a Nicaraguan clinical H1N1 isolate and two days later with a virulent DENV2 strain increased systemic DENV titers and caused 90% lethality. Lungs of co-infected mice carried both viruses, developed severe pneumonia, and expressed a unique pattern of host mRNAs, resembling only partial responses against infection with either virus alone. A large number of monocytes were recruited to DENV-infected but not to co-infected lungs, and depletion and adoptive transfer experiments revealed a beneficial role of monocytes. Our study shows that co-infection with influenza and DENV impairs host responses, which fail to control DENV titers and instead, induce severe lung damage. Further, our findings identify key inflammatory pathways and monocyte function as targets for future therapies that may limit immunopathology in co-infected patients.

  15. Tiny Device Mimics Human Lung Function

    ScienceCinema

    McDonald, Rebecca; Harris, Jennifer; Nath, Pulak

    2016-07-12

    Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing a miniature, tissue-engineered artificial lung that mimics the response of the human lung to drugs, toxins and other agents. “We breathe in and out thousands of times every day. And while we have control over what we eat or drink, we don’t always have control over what we breathe in,” said Jennifer Harris of Biosecurity and Public Health at Los Alamos, "and so we’re making this miniature lung to be able to test on actual human cells whether something in the environment, or a drug, is toxic or harmful to us." Nicknamed “PuLMo” for Pulmonary Lung Model (Pulmo is also the Latin word for "lung")the device consists of two major parts, the bronchiolar unit and the alveolar unit—just like the human lung. The units are primarily made from various polymers and are connected by a microfluidic “circuit board” that manages fluid and air flow. “When we build our lung, we not only take into account the aspects of different cell types, the tissues that are involved, we also take into account that a lung is supposed to breathe, so PuLMo actually breathes,” said Pulak Nath of Applied Modern Physics, who leads engineering efforts for the project. The most exciting application of PuLMo is a potentially revolutionary improvement in the reliability of drug-toxicity assessments and the prediction of new pharmaceutical success in humans, according to Harris. The PuLMo may also be designed to mimic lung disease conditions, such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and asthma, and may be used to study lung air-flow dynamics to better understand the mechanisms of toxins and drug delivery and the effects of smoking, particularly the less-understood effects of e-cigarettes.

  16. Impaired exercise capacity after lung transplantation is related to delayed recovery of muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Walsh, James R; Chambers, Daniel C; Davis, Rebecca J; Morris, Norman R; Seale, Helen E; Yerkovich, Stephanie T; Hopkins, Peter M A

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients report reduced exercise capacity despite satisfactory graft function. We analysed changes in lung function, six-min walk distance (6MWD), and quadriceps strength in the first 26-wk post-transplant and examined what factors predict 6MWD recovery. All lung transplant recipients at a single institution between June 2007 and January 2011 were considered for inclusion. Lung function, 6MWD, and quadriceps strength corrected for body weight (QS%) were recorded pre- and two-, six-, 13-, and 26-wk post-transplant. Fifty recipients, of mean (± SD) age 42 (± 13) yr, were studied. Mean FEV1 % and 6MWD improved from 26.4% to 88.9% and from 397 to 549 m at 26 wk, respectively (both p < 0.001). QS% declined in the first two wk but had improved to above pre-transplant levels by 26 wk (p = 0.027). On multivariate analysis (n = 35), lower pre-transplant exercise capacity and greater recovery in muscle strength explained most of the improvement in exercise capacity. Delayed recovery of exercise capacity after lung transplantation is unrelated to delay in improvement in graft function, but occurs secondary to the slow recovery of muscle strength. Our findings show that additional controlled trials are needed to better understand the influence of exercise rehabilitation on improvement in exercise capacity post-transplantation.

  17. Targeted disruption of NeuroD, a proneural basic helix-loop-helix factor, impairs distal lung formation and neuroendocrine morphology in the neonatal lung.

    PubMed

    Neptune, Enid R; Podowski, Megan; Calvi, Carla; Cho, Jang-Hyeon; Garcia, Joe G N; Tuder, Rubin; Linnoila, R Ilona; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Dietz, Harry C

    2008-07-25

    Despite the importance of airspace integrity in vertebrate gas exchange, the molecular pathways that instruct distal lung formation are poorly understood. Recently, we found that fibrillin-1 deficiency in mice impairs alveolar formation and recapitulates the pulmonary features of human Marfan syndrome. To further elucidate effectors involved in distal lung formation, we performed expression profiling analysis comparing the fibrillin-1-deficient and wild-type developing lung. NeuroD, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, fulfilled the expression criteria for a candidate mediator of distal lung development. We investigated its role in murine lung development using genetically targeted NeuroD-deficient mice. We found that NeuroD deficiency results in both impaired alveolar septation and altered morphology of the pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. NeuroD-deficient mice had enlarged alveoli associated with reduced epithelial proliferation in the airway and airspace compartments during development. Additionally, the neuroendocrine compartment in these mice manifested an increased number of neuroepithelial bodies but a reduced number of solitary pulmonary neuroendocrine cells in the neonatal lung. Overexpression of NeuroD in a murine lung epithelial cell line conferred a neuroendocrine phenotype characterized by the induction of neuroendocrine markers as well as increased proliferation. These results support an unanticipated role for NeuroD in the regulation of pulmonary neuroendocrine and alveolar morphogenesis and suggest an intimate connection between the neuroendocrine compartment and distal lung development.

  18. Altered lung function at mid-adulthood in mice following neonatal exposure to hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Sozo, Foula; Horvat, Jay C; Essilfie, Ama-Tawiah; O'Reilly, Megan; Hansbro, Philip M; Harding, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Infants born very preterm are usually exposed to high oxygen concentrations but this may impair lung function in survivors in later life. However, the precise changes involved are poorly understood. We determined how neonatal hyperoxia alters lung function at mid-adulthood in mice. Neonatal C57BL/6J mice inhaled 65% oxygen (HE group) from birth for 7 days. They then breathed room air until 11 months of age (P11mo); these mice experienced growth restriction. Controls breathed only room air. To exclude the effects of growth restriction, a group of dams was rotated between hyperoxia and normoxia during the exposure period (HE+DR group). Lung function was measured at P11mo. HE mice had increased inspiratory capacity, work of breathing and tissue damping. HE+DR mice had further increases in inspiratory capacity and work of breathing, and reduced FEV100/FVC. Total lung capacity was increased in HE+DR males. HE males had elevated responses to methacholine. Neonatal hyperoxia alters lung function at mid-adulthood, especially in males. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The relation between insulin resistance and lung function: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Sagun, Gul; Gedik, Canan; Ekiz, Esra; Karagoz, Engin; Takir, Mumtaz; Oguz, Aytekin

    2015-11-06

    Impaired lung function and insulin resistance have been associated and thereby have also been indicated to be powerful predictors of cardiovascular mortality. Therefore, the co-existence of insulin resistance and impaired lung function accompanied with cardiovascular risk factors should induce cardiovascular mortality even in patients without known respiratory disease in a cumulative pattern. It could be useful to determine the lung function of patients with insulin resistance in order to decrease cardiovascular mortality by means of taking measures that minimize the risk of decline in lung function. However, no prior studies have been done on association between insulin resistance and lung function in adults in Turkey. We aimed to determine if insulin resistance plays a detrimental role in lung function in outpatients admitted to internal medicine clinics in adults from Turkey. A total of 171 outpatients (mean ± SD) age: 43.1 ± 11.9) years) admitted to internal medicine clinics were included in this single-center cross-sectional study, and were divided into patients with (n = 63, mean ± SD) age: 43.2 ± 12.5) years, 83.5 % female) or without (n = 108, mean ± SD) age: 43.0 ± 11.6) years, 93.5 % female) insulin resistance. All patients were non-smokers. Data on gender, age, anthropometrics, blood pressure, blood biochemistry, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and lung function tests were collected in each patient. Correlates of insulin resistance were determined via logistic regression analysis. Insulin resistance was present in 36.8 % of patients. Logistic regression analysis revealed an increase in the likelihood of having insulin resistance of 1.07 times with every 1-point increase in waist circumference, 1.01 times with every 1-point increase in triglycerides, 0.93 times with every 1-point decrease in HDL (high density lipoprotein) cholesterol, and 0.86 times with every 1-point decrease in percentage of FEV1/FVC pre (FEV1%pre: Forced expiratory volume in the first

  20. Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Functional Lung Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dregely, Isabel

    Hyperpolarized 129Xe (HXe) is a non-invasive contrast agent for lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which upon inhalation follows the functional pathway of oxygen in the lung by dissolving into lung tissue structures and entering the blood stream. HXe MRI therefore provides unique opportunities for functional lung imaging of gas exchange which occurs from alveolar air spaces across the air-blood boundary into parenchymal tissue. However challenges in acquisition speed and signal-to-noise ratio have limited the development of a HXe imaging biomarker to diagnose lung disease. This thesis addresses these challenges by introducing parallel imaging to HXe MRI. Parallel imaging requires dedicated hardware. This work describes design, implementation, and characterization of a 32-channel phased-array chest receive coil with an integrated asymmetric birdcage transmit coil tuned to the HXe resonance on a 3 Tesla MRI system. Using the newly developed human chest coil, a functional HXe imaging method, multiple exchange time xenon magnetization transfer contrast (MXTC) is implemented. MXTC dynamically encodes HXe gas exchange into the image contrast. This permits two parameters to be derived regionally which are related to gas-exchange functionality by characterizing tissue-to-alveolar-volume ratio and alveolar wall thickness in the lung parenchyma. Initial results in healthy subjects demonstrate the sensitivity of MXTC by quantifying the subtle changes in lung microstructure in response to orientation and lung inflation. Our results in subjects with lung disease show that the MXTC-derived functional tissue density parameter exhibits excellent agreement with established imaging techniques. The newly developed dynamic parameter, which characterizes the alveolar wall, was elevated in subjects with lung disease, most likely indicating parenchymal inflammation. In light of these observations we believe that MXTC has potential as a biomarker for the regional quantification of 1

  1. Regional lung function and mechanics using image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kai

    The main function of the respiratory system is gas exchange. Since many disease or injury conditions can cause biomechanical or material property changes that can alter lung function, there is a great interest in measuring regional lung function and mechanics. In this thesis, we present a technique that uses multiple respiratory-gated CT images of the lung acquired at different levels of inflation with both breath-hold static scans and retrospectively reconstructed 4D dynamic scans, along with non-rigid 3D image registration, to make local estimates of lung tissue function and mechanics. We validate our technique using anatomical landmarks and functional Xe-CT estimated specific ventilation. The major contributions of this thesis include: (1) developing the registration derived regional expansion estimation approach in breath-hold static scans and dynamic 4DCT scans, (2) developing a method to quantify lobar sliding from image registration derived displacement field, (3) developing a method for measurement of radiation-induced pulmonary function change following a course of radiation therapy, (4) developing and validating different ventilation measures in 4DCT. The ability of our technique to estimate regional lung mechanics and function as a surrogate of the Xe-CT ventilation imaging for the entire lung from quickly and easily obtained respiratory-gated images, is a significant contribution to functional lung imaging because of the potential increase in resolution, and large reductions in imaging time, radiation, and contrast agent exposure. Our technique may be useful to detect and follow the progression of lung disease such as COPD, may be useful as a planning tool during RT planning, may be useful for tracking the progression of toxicity to nearby normal tissue during RT, and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment post-therapy.

  2. Bilateral lavage with diluted surfactant improves lung function after unilateral lung contusion in pigs.

    PubMed

    Strohmaier, Wolfgang; Trupka, Arnold; Pfeiler, Claudia; Thurnher, Martin; Khakpour, Zafar; Gippner-Steppert, Cornelia; Jochum, Marianne; Redl, Heinz

    2005-10-01

    This study evaluates the effects of bronchoalveolar lavage with diluted surfactant on unilateral lung contusion-induced lung dysfunction. Randomized prospective animal study. An animal laboratory. Twenty adult pigs, weighing 25-35 kg. Animals were randomly assigned to controls and surfactant treatment. Bilateral lavage with surfactant treatment began 30 mins after unilateral lung contusion. Then 25 mg/kg of body weight diluted Curosurf (5 mg/mL) was applied in a volume of 5 mL/kg of body weight. Observation time was 8 hrs postinjury. The Pao2/Fio2 ratio fell from 500 to 250 and then recovered gradually in controls and surfactant-treated pigs. After another 4 hrs, the Pao2/Fio2 ratio deteriorated again in controls, but not in surfactant-treated animals. Total compliance fell by 50% after injury but was completely restored by surfactant treatment. Lung contusion increased the median number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from 2% to 30% of total cells and peaked >60% at 480 mins in the contused lungs of control pigs. Surfactant-treated pigs had 40% neutrophils at 480 mins without reaching significant difference to controls. The leukocyte neutral proteinase inhibitor increased to 500 ng/mL at 30 mins postinjury in the contused lungs and increased to 2000 ng/mL after surfactant treatment. Bilateral bronchoalveolar lavage with diluted surfactant can effectively improve lung function after experimental unilateral lung contusion in pigs.

  3. Lung Function Abnormalities in Smokers with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Franssen, Frits M E; Soriano, Joan B; Roche, Nicolas; Bloomfield, Paul H; Brusselle, Guy; Fabbri, Leonardo M; García-Rio, Francisco; Kearney, Mark T; Kwon, Namhee; Lundbäck, Bo; Rabe, Klaus F; Raillard, Alice; Muellerova, Hana; Cockcroft, John R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the ALICE (Airflow Limitation in Cardiac Diseases in Europe) study was to investigate the prevalence of airflow limitation in patients with ischemic heart disease and the effects on quality of life, healthcare use, and future health risk. To examine prebronchodilator and post-bronchodilator spirometry in outpatients aged greater than or equal to 40 years with clinically documented ischemic heart disease who were current or former smokers. This multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 cardiovascular outpatient clinics in nine European countries. Airflow limitation was defined as post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC less than 0.70. Among the 3,103 patients with ischemic heart disease who were recruited, lung function was defined for 2,730 patients. Airflow limitation was observed in 30.5% of patients with ischemic heart disease: 11.3% had mild airflow limitation, 15.8% moderate airflow limitation, 3.3% severe airflow limitation, and 0.1% very severe airflow limitation. Most patients with airflow limitation (70.6%) had no previous spirometry testing or diagnosed pulmonary disease. Airflow limitation was associated with greater respiratory symptomatology, impaired health status, and more frequent emergency room visits (P < 0.05). Airflow limitation compatible with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease affects almost one-third of patients with ischemic heart disease. Although airflow limitation is associated with additional morbidity and societal burden, it is largely undiagnosed and untreated. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01485159).

  4. In utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water impairs early life lung mechanics in mice.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Larcombe, Alexander N; Sly, Peter D; Zosky, Graeme R

    2013-02-18

    Exposure to arsenic via drinking water is a significant environmental issue affecting millions of people around the world. Exposure to arsenic during foetal development has been shown to impair somatic growth and increase the risk of developing chronic respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to determine if in utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water is capable of altering lung growth and postnatal lung mechanics. Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were given drinking water containing 0, 10 (current World Health Organisation (WHO) maximum contaminant level) or 100 μg/L arsenic from gestational day 8 to birth. Birth outcomes and somatic growth were monitored. Plethysmography and the forced oscillation technique were used to collect measurements of lung volume, lung mechanics, pressure-volume curves and the volume dependence of lung mechanics in male and female offspring at two, four, six and eight weeks of age. In utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water resulted in low birth weight and impaired parenchymal lung mechanics during infancy. Male offspring were more susceptible to the effects of arsenic on growth and lung mechanics than females. All alterations to lung mechanics following in utero arsenic exposure were recovered by adulthood. Exposure to arsenic at the current WHO maximum contaminant level in utero impaired somatic growth and the development of the lungs resulting in alterations to lung mechanics during infancy. Deficits in growth and lung development in early life may contribute to the increased susceptibility of developing chronic respiratory disease in arsenic exposed human populations.

  5. In utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water impairs early life lung mechanics in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Exposure to arsenic via drinking water is a significant environmental issue affecting millions of people around the world. Exposure to arsenic during foetal development has been shown to impair somatic growth and increase the risk of developing chronic respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to determine if in utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water is capable of altering lung growth and postnatal lung mechanics. Methods Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were given drinking water containing 0, 10 (current World Health Organisation (WHO) maximum contaminant level) or 100μg/L arsenic from gestational day 8 to birth. Birth outcomes and somatic growth were monitored. Plethysmography and the forced oscillation technique were used to collect measurements of lung volume, lung mechanics, pressure-volume curves and the volume dependence of lung mechanics in male and female offspring at two, four, six and eight weeks of age. Results In utero exposure to low dose arsenic via drinking water resulted in low birth weight and impaired parenchymal lung mechanics during infancy. Male offspring were more susceptible to the effects of arsenic on growth and lung mechanics than females. All alterations to lung mechanics following in utero arsenic exposure were recovered by adulthood. Conclusions Exposure to arsenic at the current WHO maximum contaminant level in utero impaired somatic growth and the development of the lungs resulting in alterations to lung mechanics during infancy. Deficits in growth and lung development in early life may contribute to the increased susceptibility of developing chronic respiratory disease in arsenic exposed human populations. PMID:23419080

  6. Early airway infection, inflammation, and lung function in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, G; Armstrong, D; Carzino, R; Carlin, J; Olinsky, A; Robertson, C; Grimwood, K

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To determine the relation between lower airway infection and inflammation, respiratory symptoms, and lung function in infants and young children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods: A prospective study of children with CF aged younger than 3 years, diagnosed by a newborn screening programme. All were clinically stable and had testing as outpatients. Subjects underwent bronchial lavage (BL) and lung function testing by the raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression technique under general anaesthesia. BL fluid was cultured and analysed for neutrophil count, interleukin 8, and neutrophil elastase. Lung function was assessed by forced expiratory volume in 0.5, 0.75, and 1 second. Results: Thirty six children with CF were tested on 54 occasions. Lower airway infection shown by BL was associated with a 10% reduction in FEV0.5 compared with subjects without infection. No relation was identified between airway inflammation and lung function. Daily moist cough within the week before testing was reported on 20/54 occasions, but in only seven (35%) was infection detected. Independent of either infection status or airway inflammation, those with daily cough had lower lung function than those without respiratory symptoms at the time of BL (mean adjusted FEV0.5 195 ml and 236 ml respectively). Conclusions: In young children with CF, both respiratory symptoms and airway infection have independent, additive effects on lung function, unrelated to airway inflammation. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms of airway obstruction in these young patients. PMID:12244003

  7. Systematic review of pleural plaques and lung function

    PubMed Central

    Kerper, Laura E.; Lynch, Heather N.; Zu, Ke; Tao, Ge; Utell, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context US EPA proposed a Reference Concentration for Libby amphibole asbestos based on the premise that pleural plaques are adverse and cause lung function deficits. Objective We conducted a systematic review to evaluate whether there is an association between pleural plaques and lung function and ascertain whether results were dependent on the method used to identify plaques. Methods Using the PubMed database, we identified studies that evaluated pleural plaques and lung function. We assessed each study for quality, then integrated evidence and assessed associations based on the Bradford Hill guidelines. We also compared the results of HRCT studies to those of X-ray studies. Results We identified 16 HRCT and 36 X-ray studies. We rated six HRCT and 16 X-ray studies as higher quality based on a risk-of-bias analysis. Half of the higher quality studies reported small but statistically significant mean lung function decrements associated with plaques. None of the differences were clinically significant. Many studies had limitations, such as inappropriate controls and/or insufficient adjustment for confounders. There was little consistency in the direction of effect for the most commonly reported measurements. X-ray results were more variable than HRCT results. Pleural plaques were not associated with changes in lung function over time in longitudinal studies. Conclusion The weight of evidence indicates that pleural plaques do not impact lung function. Observed associations are most likely due to unidentified abnormalities or other factors. PMID:25518994

  8. Functional Assessment in Young Children with Neurological Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Stephen M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the role and practice of functional-status assessment in young children with neurological impairments, examines issues in selection of functional assessment measures, and describes functional assessment approaches developed in the fields of special education and pediatric rehabilitation, including adaptive scales,…

  9. Cognitive Impairment Precedes and Predicts Functional Impairment in Mild Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu-Seifert, Hong; Siemers, Eric; Price, Karen; Han, Baoguang; Selzler, Katherine J.; Henley, David; Sundell, Karen; Aisen, Paul; Cummings, Jeffrey; Raskin, Joel; Mohs, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The temporal relationship of cognitive deficit and functional impairment in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is not well characterized. Recent analyses suggest cognitive decline predicts subsequent functional decline throughout AD progression. Objective: To better understand the relationship between cognitive and functional decline in mild AD using autoregressive cross-lagged (ARCL) panel analyses in several clinical trials. Methods: Data included placebo patients with mild AD pooled from two multicenter, double-blind, Phase 3 solanezumab (EXPEDITION/2) or semagacestat (IDENTITY/2) studies, and from AD patients participating in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Cognitive and functional outcomes were assessed using AD Assessment Scale-Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog), AD Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living instrumental subscale (ADCS-iADL), or Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ), respectively. ARCL panel analyses evaluated relationships between cognitive and functional impairment over time. Results: In EXPEDITION, ARCL panel analyses demonstrated cognitive scores significantly predicted future functional impairment at 5 of 6 time points, while functional scores predicted subsequent cognitive scores in only 1 of 6 time points. Data from IDENTITY and ADNI programs yielded consistent results whereby cognition predicted subsequent function, but not vice-versa. Conclusions: Analyses from three databases indicated cognitive decline precedes and predicts subsequent functional decline in mild AD dementia, consistent with previously proposed hypotheses, and corroborate recent publications using similar methodologies. Cognitive impairment may be used as a predictor of future functional impairment in mild AD dementia and can be considered a critical target for prevention strategies to limit future functional decline in the dementia process. PMID:26402769

  10. Aspergillus fumigatus colonization in cystic fibrosis: implications for lung function?

    PubMed

    de Vrankrijker, A M M; van der Ent, C K; van Berkhout, F T; Stellato, R K; Willems, R J L; Bonten, M J M; Wolfs, T F W

    2011-09-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is commonly found in the respiratory secretions of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Although allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is associated with deterioration of lung function, the effects of A. fumigatus colonization on lung function in the absence of ABPA are not clear. This study was performed in 259 adults and children with CF, without ABPA. A. fumigatus colonization was defined as positivity of >50% of respiratory cultures in a given year. A cross-sectional analysis was performed to study clinical characteristics associated with A. fumigatus colonization. A retrospective cohort analysis was performed to study the effect of A. fumigatus colonization on lung function observed between 2002 and 2007. Longitudinal data were analysed with a linear mixed model. Sixty-one of 259 patients were at least intermittently colonized with A. fumigatus. An association was found between A. fumigatus colonization and increased age and use of inhaled antibiotics. In the longitudinal analysis, 163 patients were grouped according to duration of colonization. After adjustment for confounders, there was no significant difference in lung function between patients colonized for 0 or 1 year and patients with 2-3 or more than 3 years of colonization (p 0.40 and p 0.64) throughout the study. There was no significant difference in lung function decline between groups. Although colonization with A. fumigatus is more commonly found in patients with more severe lung disease and increased treatment burden, it is not independently associated with lower lung function or more severe lung function decline over a 5-year period.

  11. The effects of second-hand and direct exposure to tobacco smoke on asthma and lung function in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Tager, Ira B

    2008-03-01

    Cigarette smoking still is quite common in many parts of the world. In parallel, exposure to second-hand smoke continues to be common despite declines in smoking in developed countries and despite evidence of serious health effects in infants and children. This paper focuses on the effects of second-hand and direct exposure (personal smoking) on the respiratory health of adolescents, in particular effects on the occurrence of asthma and on lung function. Published data indicate that, in addition to whatever effects direct and postnatal second-hand tobacco smoke exposure have on the occurrence of asthma and impaired levels and growth of lung function in adolescents, there is an underlying alteration in the prenatal and early postnatal development of the structural and mechanical characteristics of the lung that contribute substantially to these deficits. These developmental effects may be important contributors to the future risks for impaired pulmonary function.

  12. The Brief Impairment Scale (Bis): A Multidimensional Scale of Functional Impairment for Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Hector R.; Canino, Glorisa J.; Davies, Mark; Ramirez, Rafael; Chavez, Ligia; Duarte, Cristiane; Shen, Sa

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This article provides the results of the psychometric testing of the Brief Impairment Scale (BIS). The BIS is a 23-item instrument that evaluates three domains of functioning: interpersonal relations, school/work functioning, and self-care/self-fulfilment. It capitalizes on the strengths of existing global measures while addressing some…

  13. The Brief Impairment Scale (Bis): A Multidimensional Scale of Functional Impairment for Children and Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Hector R.; Canino, Glorisa J.; Davies, Mark; Ramirez, Rafael; Chavez, Ligia; Duarte, Cristiane; Shen, Sa

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This article provides the results of the psychometric testing of the Brief Impairment Scale (BIS). The BIS is a 23-item instrument that evaluates three domains of functioning: interpersonal relations, school/work functioning, and self-care/self-fulfilment. It capitalizes on the strengths of existing global measures while addressing some…

  14. JAK2 variations and functions in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanjun; Jin, Juan; Xu, Jiawei; Shao, Yang W; Fan, Yun

    2017-06-01

    Lung cancer ranks as the first most common cancer and the first leading cause of cancer-related death in China and worldwide. Due to the difficulty in early diagnosis and the onset of cancer metastasis, the 5-year survival rate of lung cancer remains low. JAK2 has emerged as pivotal participant in biological processes, often dysregulated in a range of cancers. Recently our study found that JAK2 might play an important role in lung cancer pathogenesis. While our understanding of JAK2 in the onset and progression of lung cancer is still in its infancy, there is no doubt that understanding the variations and functions of JAK2 will certainly secure strong biomarkers and improve treatment options for lung cancer patients. The expression level of JAK2 mRNA was assayed using RT-PCR. JAK2 mutations and amplification were detected using next-generation sequencing (NGS). The shRNA and overexpression plasmids of JAK2 were conducted. MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazoliumbromide) assay, Trans-well migration and Matrigel invasion assay were conducted to study the proliferation, migration and invasion abilities of lung adenocarcinoma cells independently. We found that JAK2 mRNA was up-regulated in lung adenocarcinoma tissues when compared with their adjacent non-tumor tissues, and was associated with lymph node metastasis ( p < 0.05). JAK2 V617F and N30S mutations and JAK2 amplification were detected by NGS in plasmid samples in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Downregulation of JAK2 inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion abilities of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Moreover, overexpression of JAK2 induced the proliferation, migration and invasion abilities of A549 cells. Thus, the up-regulation, mutation and amplification of JAK2 detected in lung adenocarcinoma may participate in lung cancer progression by regulating cancer cells' proliferation, migration and invasion.

  15. Impairment of Caloric Function after Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuang, Heide; Haversat, Heather H.; Michaelides, Elias M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article seeks to review current literature on caloric function following cochlear implantation while analyzing any correlations of caloric function changes with vestibular symptoms. Method: This article is a systematic review of evidence-based literature. English language articles published between 1980 and 2014 that presented some…

  16. Impairment of Caloric Function after Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuang, Heide; Haversat, Heather H.; Michaelides, Elias M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article seeks to review current literature on caloric function following cochlear implantation while analyzing any correlations of caloric function changes with vestibular symptoms. Method: This article is a systematic review of evidence-based literature. English language articles published between 1980 and 2014 that presented some…

  17. Functional outcomes after lung transplant in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Cerón Navarro, José; de Aguiar Quevedo, Karol; Ansótegui Barrera, Emilio; Jordá Aragón, Carlos; Peñalver Cuesta, Juan Carlos; Mancheño Franch, Nuria; Vera Sempere, Francisco José; Padilla Alarcón, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Lung transplantation (LT) is a therapeutic option with controversial results in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We aimed to analyze the outcomes of transplantation in terms of lung function and to identify prognostic factors. A retrospective analysis of 107 patients with COPD receiving lung transplants in the La Fe Hospital between 1991 and 2008 was performed. Preoperative variables, pulmonary function tests before and after LT, surgical procedure variables and long-term monitoring, expressed as mean or percentage, as applicable, were analyzed. Spirometric results before and after LT were analyzed. Linear or logistic regression were used for multivariate analysis depending on the variable. Ninety-four men (87.9%) and 13 women (12.1%) were transplanted, with a mean age±standard deviation of 52.58±8.05 years; 71% of LTs were double-lung transplantations. Spirometric values improved after LT: FVC: +1.22L (+34.9%), FEV1: +1.66L (+56.7%) and FEF25-75: +1.85L (+50.8%); P=.001. This functional improvement was maintained after 5 years only in the group with BODE score >7 (P=.001). Recipient height, type of LT, use of extracorporeal circulation during the surgical procedure, presence of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and the age and cause of death of the donor significantly influenced lung function over time. LT improves lung function in COPD patients. This improvement was maintained at 5years only in patients with BODE>7. Double lung transplantation provides better functional results than single-lung transplantation. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. PTSD subclusters and functional impairment in Kosovo peacekeepers.

    PubMed

    Maguen, Shira; Stalnaker, Mark; McCaslin, Shannon; Litz, Brett T

    2009-08-01

    Peacekeepers deployed to Kosovo (N = 203) were evaluated prospectively, before the mission (August 2000) and at postdeployment, on a number of mental health and functional impairment variables. We examined the association between PTSD symptom subclusters and three indicators of functional impairment using hierarchical regression analyses, controlling for PTSD symptoms before the mission, and history of prior trauma. In the first model, avoidance and hyperarousal symptoms uniquely predicted a conglomerate of functional impact outcomes (e.g., employment, family relationships, social functioning). In the second model, emotional numbing was the only significant predictor of violent behaviors. In the third model, re-experiencing symptoms were the only significant predictor of alcohol abuse problems. Overall, the four PTSD subclusters are differentially associated with varying functional impairment outcomes, which is important to note for evaluation and treatment purposes for veterans returning from overseas deployments.

  19. Impaired physical function following pediatric LT.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Amy G; Neighbors, Katie; Mukherjee, Shubhra; Rak, Melanie; Varni, James W; Alonso, Estella M

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the spectrum of physical function of pediatric liver transplantation (LT) recipients 12-24 months after LT. Review data were collected through the functional outcomes group, an ancillary study of the Studies of Pediatric Liver Transplantation registry. Patients were eligible if they had survived LT by 12-24 months. Children ≥ 8 years and parents completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ 4.0 generic core scales, which includes 8 questions assessing physical function. Scores were compared to a matched healthy child population (n = 1658) and between survivors with optimal versus nonoptimal health. A total of 263 patients were included. Median age at transplant and survey was 4.8 years (interquartile range [IQR], 1.3-11.4 years) and 5.9 years (IQR, 2.6-13.1 years), respectively. The mean physical functioning score on child and parent reports were 81.2 ± 17.3 and 77.1 ± 23.7, respectively. Compared to a matched healthy population, transplant survivors and their parents reported lower physical function scores (P < 0.001); 32.9% of patients and 35.0% of parents reported a physical function score <75, which is > 1 standard deviation below the mean of a healthy population. Physical functioning scores were significantly higher in survivors with optimal health than those with nonoptimal health (P < 0.01). There was a significant relationship between emotional functioning and physical functioning scores for LT recipients (r = 0.69; P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, primary disease, height z score < -1.64 at longterm follow-up (LTF) visit,  > 4 days of hospitalization since LTF visit, and not being listed as status 1 were predictors of poor physical function. In conclusion, pediatric LT recipients 1-2 years after LT and their parents report lower physical function than a healthy population. Findings suggest practitioners need to routinely assess physical function, and

  20. Impaired Physical Function Following Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Amy G.; Neighbors, Katie; Mukherjee, Shubra; Rak, Melanie; Varni, James W.; Alonso, Estella M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Investigate the spectrum of physical function of pediatric liver transplant (LT) recipients 12–24 months post-LT. Study design Review data collected through the Functional Outcomes Group, an ancillary study of Studies of Pediatric Liver Transplantation registry. Patients were eligible if they had survived LT by 12–24 months. Children ≥ 8 years and parents completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales, which includes 8 questions assessing physical function. Scores were compared to a matched healthy child population (n=1658), and between survivors with optimal versus non-optimal health. Results A total of 263 patients were included. Median age at transplant and survey was 4.8 years (IQR 1.3–11.4) and 5.9 years (IQR 2.6–13.1), respectively. The mean Physical Functioning Score on child and parent reports were 81.2± 17.3 and 77.1± 23.7, respectively. Compared to a matched healthy population, transplant survivors and their parents reported lower physical function scores (p<0.01). 32.9% of patients and 35.0% of parents reported a physical function score <75, which is >1 SD below the mean of a healthy population. Physical Function Scores were significantly higher in survivors with optimal health than those with non-optimal health (p<0.01). There was a significant relationship between Emotional Functioning and Physical Functioning Scores for LT recipients (r=0.69, p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, primary disease, height Z score<−1.64 at long term follow-up (LTF) visit, ≥4 days of hospitalization since LTF visit, and not listed as Status 1 were predictors of poor physical function. Conclusions Pediatric LT recipients 1–2 years post-LT and their parents report lower physical function than a healthy population. Findings suggest practitioners need to routinely assess physical function, and development of rehabilitation programs may be important. PMID:26850789

  1. Exercise testing in severe emphysema: association with quality of life and lung function.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cynthia D; Benditt, Joshua O; Sciurba, Frank C; Lee, Shing M; Criner, Gerard J; Mosenifar, Zab; Shade, David M; Slivka, William A; Wise, Robert A

    2008-04-01

    Six-minute walk testing (6MWT) and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) are used to evaluate impairment in emphysema. However, the extent of impairment in these tests as well as the correlation of these tests with each other and lung function in advanced emphysema is not well characterized. During screening for the National Emphysema Treatment Trial, maximum ergometer CPX and 6MWT were performed in 1,218 individuals with severe COPD with an average FEV(1) of 26.9 +/- 7.1 % predicted. Predicted values for 6MWT and CPX were calculated from reference equations. Correlation coefficients and multivariable regression models were used to determine the association between lung function, quality of life (QOL) scores, and exercise measures. The two forms of exercise testing were correlated with each other (r = 0.57, p < 0.0001). However, the impairment of performance on CPX was greater than on the 6MWT (27.6 +/- 16.8 vs. 67.9 +/- 18.9 % predicted). Both exercise tests had similar correlation with measures of QOL, but maximum exercise capacity was better correlated with lung function measures than 6-minute walk distance. After adjustment, 6MWD had a slightly greater association with total SGRQ score than maximal exercise (effect size 0.37 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.25 +/- 0.03 %predicted/unit). Despite advanced emphysema, patients are able to maintain 6MWD to a greater degree than maximum exercise capacity. Moreover, the 6MWT may be a better test of functional capacity given its greater association with QOL measures whereas CPX is a better test of physiologic impairment.

  2. Common cold decreases lung function in infants with recurrent wheezing.

    PubMed

    Mallol, J; Aguirre, V; Wandalsen, G

    2010-01-01

    Common acute viral respiratory infections (colds) are the most frequent cause of exacerbations in infants with recurrent wheezing (RW). However, there is no quantitative information about the effect of colds on the lung function of infants with RW. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of common cold on forced expiratory parameters measured from raised lung volume in infants with RW. Spirometric lung function (expiratory flows from raised lung volume) was randomly assessed in 28 infants with RW while they had a common cold and when asymptomatic. It was found that during colds there was a significant decrease in all forced expiratory parameters and this was much more evident for flows (FEF(50%), FEF(75%) and FEF(25-75%)) which were definitively abnormal (less than -1.65 z-score) in the majority of infants. There was not association between family asthma, tobacco exposure, and other factors, with the extent of lung function decrease during colds. Tobacco during pregnancy but not a history of family asthma was significantly associated to lower expiratory flows; however, the association was significant only when infants were asymptomatic. This study shows that common colds cause a marked reduction of lung function in infants with RW. 2009 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Validating Excised Rodent Lungs for Functional Hyperpolarized Xenon-129 MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lilburn, David M. L.; Hughes-Riley, Theodore; Six, Joseph S.; Stupic, Karl F.; Shaw, Dominick E.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Ex vivo rodent lung models are explored for physiological measurements of respiratory function with hyperpolarized (hp) 129Xe MRI. It is shown that excised lung models allow for simplification of the technical challenges involved and provide valuable physiological insights that are not feasible using in vivo MRI protocols. A custom designed breathing apparatus enables MR images of gas distribution on increasing ventilation volumes of actively inhaled hp 129Xe. Straightforward hp 129Xe MRI protocols provide residual lung volume (RV) data and permit for spatially resolved tracking of small hp 129Xe probe volumes during the inhalation cycle. Hp 129Xe MRI of lung function in the excised organ demonstrates the persistence of post mortem airway responsiveness to intravenous methacholine challenges. The presented methodology enables physiology of lung function in health and disease without additional regulatory approval requirements and reduces the technical and logistical challenges with hp gas MRI experiments. The post mortem lung functional data can augment histological measurements and should be of interest for drug development studies. PMID:24023683

  4. Cannabidiol improves lung function and inflammation in mice submitted to LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A; Almeida, V I; Costola-de-Souza, C; Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Pinheiro, M L; Vitoretti, L B; Gimenes-Junior, J A; Akamine, A T; Crippa, J A; Tavares-de-Lima, W; Palermo-Neto, J

    2015-02-01

    We have previously shown that the prophylactic treatment with cannabidiol (CBD) reduces inflammation in a model of acute lung injury (ALI). In this work we analyzed the effects of the therapeutic treatment with CBD in mice subjected to the model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI on pulmonary mechanics and inflammation. CBD (20 and 80 mg/kg) was administered (i.p.) to mice 6 h after LPS-induced lung inflammation. One day (24 h) after the induction of inflammation the assessment of pulmonary mechanics and inflammation were analyzed. The results show that CBD decreased total lung resistance and elastance, leukocyte migration into the lungs, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, protein concentration and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) in the bronchoalveolar lavage supernatant. Thus, we conclude that CBD administered therapeutically, i.e. during an ongoing inflammatory process, has a potent anti-inflammatory effect and also improves the lung function in mice submitted to LPS-induced ALI. Therefore the present and previous data suggest that in the future cannabidiol might become a useful therapeutic tool for the attenuation and treatment of inflammatory lung diseases.

  5. Tobacco Carcinogen NNK Transporter MRP2 Regulates CFTR Function in Lung Epithelia: Implications for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunying; Schuetz, John D.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. About 85% of all lung cancers are linked to tobacco smoke, in which more than 50 lung carcinogens have been identified and one of the most abundant is 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)- 1-butanone (NNK). The human lung epithelium constitutes the first line of defense against tobacco specific carcinogens, in which apically-localized receptors, transporters, and ion channels in the airway may play a critical role in this native defense against tobacco smoke. Here we showed that multidrug resistance protein-2 (MRP2) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, are localized to the apical surfaces of plasma membrane in polarized lung epithelial cells. We observed that there is a functional coupling between CFTR and MRP2 that may be mediated by PDZ proteins. We also observed the existence of a macromolecular complex containing CFTR, MRP2, and PDZ proteins, which might form the basis for the regulatory cooperation between these two ABC transporters. Our results have important implications for cigarette smoke-associated lung diseases (such as smoke-related emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer). PMID:20089353

  6. Lung morphometry: the link between structure and function.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Ewald R

    2017-03-01

    The study of the structural basis of gas exchange function in the lung depends on the availability of quantitative information that concerns the structures establishing contact between the air in the alveoli and the blood in the alveolar capillaries, which can be entered into physiological equations for predicting oxygen uptake. This information is provided by morphometric studies involving stereological methods and allows estimates of the pulmonary diffusing capacity of the human lung that agree, in experimental studies, with the maximal oxygen consumption. The basis for this "machine lung" structure lies in the complex design of the cells building an extensive air-blood barrier with minimal cell mass.

  7. Use of quantitative lung scintigraphy to predict postoperative pulmonary function in lung cancer patients undergoing lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Win, Thida; Laroche, Clare M; Groves, Ashley M; White, Carol; Wells, Francis C; Ritchie, Andrew J; Tasker, Angela D

    2004-10-01

    In patients with non-small cell lung cancer, the only realistic chance of cure is surgical resection. However, in some of these patients there is such poor respiratory reserve that surgery can result in an unacceptable quality of life. In order to identify these patients, various pulmonary function tests and scintigraphic techniques have been used. The current American College of Physicians and British Thoracic Society guidelines do not recommend the use of quantitative ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy to predict postoperative function in lung cancer patients undergoing lobectomy. These guidelines may have been influenced by previous scintigraphic studies performed over a decade ago. Since then there have been advances in both surgical techniques and scintigraphic techniques, and the surgical population has become older and more female represented. We prospectively performed spirometry and quantitative ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy on 61 consecutive patients undergoing lobectomy for lung cancer. Spirometry was repeated one-month postsurgery. Both a simple segment counting technique alone and scintigraphy were used to predict the postoperative lung function. There was statistically significant correlation (p < 0.01) between the predicted postoperative lung function using both the simple segment counting technique and the scintigraphic techniques. However, the correlation using simple segment counting was of negligible difference compared to scintigraphy. In keeping with current American Chest Physician and British Thoracic Society guidelines, our results suggest that quantitative ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy is not necessary in the preoperative assessment of lung cancer patients undergoing lobectomy. The simple segmenting technique can be used to predict postoperative lung function in lobectomy patients.

  8. Impaired Pulmonary Defense Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in VEGF Gene Inactivated Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Ellen C.; Malloy, Jaret L.; Tang, Kechun; Xia, Feng; Fu, Zhenxing; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Overhage, Joerg; Wagner, Peter D.; Spragg, Roger G.

    2012-01-01

    Repeated bacterial and viral infections are known to contribute to worsening lung function in several respiratory diseases, including asthma, cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Previous studies have reported alveolar wall cell apoptosis and parenchymal damage in adult pulmonary VEGF gene ablated mice. We hypothesized that VEGF expressed by type II cells is also necessary to provide an effective host defense against bacteria in part by maintaining surfactant homeostasis. Therefore, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) levels were evaluated in mice following lung-targeted VEGF gene inactivation, and alterations in VEGF-dependent type II cell function were evaluated by measuring surfactant homeostasis in mouse lungs and isolated type II cells. In VEGF-deficient lungs increased PAO1 levels and pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-6, were detected 24 hours after bacterial instillation compared to control lungs. In vivo lung-targeted VEGF gene deletion (57% decrease in total pulmonary VEGF) did not alter alveolar surfactant or tissue disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) levels. However, sphingomyelin content, choline phosphate cytidylyltransferase (CCT) mRNA and SP-D expression were decreased. In isolated type II cells an 80% reduction of VEGF protein resulted in decreases in total phospholipids (PL), DSPC, DSPC synthesis, surfactant associated proteins (SP)-B and -D, and the lipid transporters, ABCA1 and Rab3D. TPA-induced DSPC secretion and apoptosis were elevated in VEGF-deficient type II cells. These results suggest a potential protective role for type II cell-expressed VEGF against bacterial initiated infection. PMID:22718316

  9. Impairment of Immunoproteasome Function by Cigarette Smoke and in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Kammerl, Ilona E; Dann, Angela; Mossina, Alessandra; Brech, Dorothee; Lukas, Christina; Vosyka, Oliver; Nathan, Petra; Conlon, Thomas M; Wagner, Darcy E; Overkleeft, Hermen S; Prasse, Antje; Rosas, Ivan O; Straub, Tobias; Krauss-Etschmann, Susanne; Königshoff, Melanie; Preissler, Gerhard; Winter, Hauke; Lindner, Michael; Hatz, Rudolf; Behr, Jürgen; Heinzelmann, Katharina; Yildirim, Ali Ö; Noessner, Elfriede; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2016-06-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and in particular smokers are more susceptible to respiratory infections contributing to acute exacerbations of disease. The immunoproteasome is a specialized type of proteasome destined to improve major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-mediated antigen presentation for the resolution of intracellular infections. To characterize immunoproteasome function in COPD and its regulation by cigarette smoke. Immunoproteasome expression and activity were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lungs of human donors and patients with COPD or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), as well as in cigarette smoke-exposed mice. Smoke-mediated alterations of immunoproteasome activity and MHC I surface expression were analyzed in human blood-derived macrophages. Immunoproteasome-specific MHC I antigen presentation was evaluated in spleen and lung immune cells that had been smoke-exposed in vitro or in vivo. Immunoproteasome and MHC I mRNA expression was reduced in BAL cells of patients with COPD and in isolated alveolar macrophages of patients with COPD or IPF. Exposure of immune cells to cigarette smoke extract in vitro reduced immunoproteasome activity and impaired immunoproteasome-specific MHC I antigen presentation. In vivo, acute cigarette smoke exposure dynamically regulated immunoproteasome function and MHC I antigen presentation in mouse BAL cells. End-stage COPD lungs showed markedly impaired immunoproteasome activities. We here show that the activity of the immunoproteasome is impaired by cigarette smoke resulting in reduced MHC I antigen presentation. Regulation of immunoproteasome function by cigarette smoke may thus alter adaptive immune responses and add to prolonged infections and exacerbations in COPD and IPF.

  10. Phonatory Function of Neurologically Impaired Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwirner, Petra; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This investigation compared five parameters of phonatory function in an examination of the use of acoustic measures in differential diagnosis in 39 subjects in 3 neuropathological groups (Parkinson, Huntington, cerebellar ataxia) and a normal control group. Results indicated higher variability in perturbation in all the neuropathological groups.…

  11. Phonatory Function of Neurologically Impaired Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwirner, Petra; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This investigation compared five parameters of phonatory function in an examination of the use of acoustic measures in differential diagnosis in 39 subjects in 3 neuropathological groups (Parkinson, Huntington, cerebellar ataxia) and a normal control group. Results indicated higher variability in perturbation in all the neuropathological groups.…

  12. Functional Impairment and Occupational Outcome in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjervan, Bjorn; Torgersen, Terje; Nordahl, Hans M.; Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Objective: ADHD is associated with poor functional outcomes. The objectives were to investigate the prevalence of functional impairment and occupational status in a clinically referred sample of adults with ADHD and explore factors predicting occupational outcome. Method: A sample of 149 adults with a confirmed diagnosis of ADHD participated in…

  13. Functional Impairment and Occupational Outcome in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gjervan, Bjorn; Torgersen, Terje; Nordahl, Hans M.; Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Objective: ADHD is associated with poor functional outcomes. The objectives were to investigate the prevalence of functional impairment and occupational status in a clinically referred sample of adults with ADHD and explore factors predicting occupational outcome. Method: A sample of 149 adults with a confirmed diagnosis of ADHD participated in…

  14. Executive Function Impairment in Adolescence: TBI and ADHD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ylvisaker, Mark; Debonis, David

    2000-01-01

    This article presents a functional understanding of the executive system, its development in childhood, its relation to communication effectiveness, and an everyday approach to intervention for adolescents with executive function impairments associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The role of…

  15. Adenosine promotes vascular barrier function in hyperoxic lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Jonathan; Karmouty‐Quintana, Harry; Le, Thuy T.; Chen, Ning‐Yuan; Weng, Tingting; Luo, Fayong; Molina, Jose; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hyperoxic lung injury is characterized by cellular damage from high oxygen concentrations that lead to an inflammatory response in the lung with cellular infiltration and pulmonary edema. Adenosine is a signaling molecule that is generated extracellularly by CD73 in response to injury. Extracellular adenosine signals through cell surface receptors and has been found to be elevated and plays a protective role in acute injury situations. In particular, ADORA2B activation is protective in acute lung injury. However, little is known about the role of adenosine signaling in hyperoxic lung injury. We hypothesized that hyperoxia‐induced lung injury leads to CD73‐mediated increases in extracellular adenosine, which is protective through ADORA2B signaling pathways. To test this hypothesis, we exposed C57BL6, CD73−/−, and Adora2B−/− mice to 95% oxygen or room air and examined markers of pulmonary inflammation, edema, and monitored lung histology. Hyperoxic exposure caused pulmonary inflammation and edema in association with elevations in lung adenosine levels. Loss of CD73‐mediated extracellular adenosine production exacerbated pulmonary edema without affecting inflammatory cell counts. Furthermore, loss of the ADORA2B had similar results with worsening of pulmonary edema following hyperoxia exposure without affecting inflammatory cell infiltration. This loss of barrier function correlated with a decrease in occludin in pulmonary vasculature in CD73−/− and Adora2B−/− mice following hyperoxia exposure. These results demonstrate that exposure to a hyperoxic environment causes lung injury associated with an increase in adenosine concentration, and elevated adenosine levels protect vascular barrier function in hyperoxic lung injury through the ADORA2B‐dependent regulation of occludin. PMID:25263205

  16. Relationship between birth weight and adult lung function: controlling for maternal factors

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, C; Osman, L; Godden, D; Campbell, D; Douglas, J

    2003-01-01

    Methods: In 2001 the cohort was assessed for current lung function, smoking status, and respiratory symptoms. Birth details obtained from the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank recorded birth weight, gestation, parity, and mother's age and height. Results: 381 subjects aged 45–50 years were traced and tested for lung function; 323 (85%) had birth details available. A significant linear trend (p<0.01) was observed between birth weight and current forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) values (adjusted for height, age, sex, weight, deprivation category (Depcat), childhood group, and smoking status). This trend remained significant after adjusting birth weight for gestation, parity, sex, mother's height and weight (p = 0.01). The relationship between birth weight and FEV1 and FVC remained significant when adjusted for smoking history. There was no association between birth weight and current wheezing symptoms. Conclusion: There is a positive linear trend between birth weight, adjusted for maternal factors, and lung function in adulthood. The strength of this association supports the "fetal origins hypothesis" that impairment of fetal growth is a significant influence on adult lung function. PMID:14645976

  17. Parental education and lung function of children in the PATY study.

    PubMed

    Slachtova, Hana; Gehring, Ulrike; Hoek, Gerard; Tomaskova, Hana; Luttmann-Gibson, Heike; Moshammer, Hanns; Paldy, Anna; Pattenden, Sam; Slotova, Katarina; Speizer, Frank; Zlotkowska, Renata; Heinrich, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Studies of the relationships between low socio-economic status and impaired lung function were conducted mainly in Western European countries and North America. East-West differences remain unexplored. Associations between parental education and lung function were explored using data on 24,010 school-children from eight cross-sectional studies conducted in North America, Western and Eastern Europe. Parental education was defined as low and high using country-specific classifications. Country-specific estimates of effects of low parental education on volume and flow parameters were obtained using linear and logistic regression, controlling for early life and other individual risk factors. Meta-regressions were used for assessment of heterogeneity between country-specific estimates. The association between low parental education and lung function was not consistent across the countries, but showed a more pronounced inverse gradient in the Western countries. The most consistent decrease associated with low parental education was found for peak expiratory flow (PEF), ranging from -2.80 to -1.14%, with statistically significant associations in five out of eight countries. The mean odds ratio for low PEF (<75% of predicted) was 1.34 (95% CI 1.06-1.70) after all adjustments. Although social gradients were attenuated after adjusting for known risk factors, these risk factors could not completely explain the social gradient in lung function.

  18. Supine changes in lung function correlate with chronic respiratory failure in myotonic dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Poussel, Mathias; Kaminsky, Pierre; Renaud, Pierre; Laroppe, Julien; Pruna, Lelia; Chenuel, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    Quality of life and prognosis of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (MD1) often depend on the degree of lung function impairment. This study was designed to assess the respective prevalence of ventilatory restriction, hypoxaemia and hypercapnia in MD1 patients and to determine whether postural changes in lung function could contribute to the early diagnosis of poor respiratory outcome. Fifty-eight patients (42.6±12.9 years) with MD1 were prospectively evaluated from April 2008 to June 2010 to determine their supine and upright lung function and arterial blood gases. The prevalence of ventilatory restriction was 36% and increased with the severity of muscular disability (from 7.7% to 70.6%). The prevalence of hypoxaemia and hypercapnia was 37.9% and 25.9%, respectively. Multiple regression analysis showed that the supine fall in FEV1 was the only variable associated with ventilatory restriction, hypoxaemia and hypercapnia. Our data indicate that supine evaluation of lung function could be helpful to predict poor respiratory outcome, which is closely correlated with hypoxaemia and/or hypercapnia.

  19. Lung function in post-poliomyelitis syndrome: a cross-sectional study*

    PubMed Central

    de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Minozzo, Fábio Carderelli; Sousa, Bolivar Saldanha; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; Andrade, Marília dos Santos; Quadros, Abrahão Augusto Juviniano; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; da Silva, Antonio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare lung function between patients with post-poliomyelitis syndrome and those with sequelae of paralytic poliomyelitis (without any signs or symptoms of post-poliomyelitis syndrome), as well as between patients with post-poliomyelitis syndrome and healthy controls. METHODS: Twenty-nine male participants were assigned to one of three groups: control; poliomyelitis (comprising patients who had had paralytic poliomyelitis but had not developed post-poliomyelitis syndrome); and post-poliomyelitis syndrome. Volunteers underwent lung function measurements (spirometry and respiratory muscle strength assessment). RESULTS: The results of the spirometric assessment revealed no significant differences among the groups except for an approximately 27% lower mean maximal voluntary ventilation in the post-poliomyelitis syndrome group when compared with the control group (p = 0.0127). Nevertheless, the maximal voluntary ventilation values for the post-poliomyelitis group were compared with those for the Brazilian population and were found to be normal. No significant differences were observed in respiratory muscle strength among the groups. CONCLUSIONS: With the exception of lower maximal voluntary ventilation, there was no significant lung function impairment in outpatients diagnosed with post-poliomyelitis syndrome when compared with healthy subjects and with patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis without post-poliomyelitis syndrome. This is an important clinical finding because it shows that patients with post-poliomyelitis syndrome can have preserved lung function. PMID:24068267

  20. Air pollution and fuel vapour induced changes in lung functions: are fuel handlers safe?

    PubMed

    Chawla, Anuj; Lavania, A K

    2008-01-01

    Automobile exhaust derived air pollutants have become a major health hazard. Coupled with the inhalation of fuel vapour, as occurs in petrol station workers, this may lead to significant impairment of lung function. Spirometric lung functions were studied in 58 petrol station workers to examine this possibility. The forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), forced expiratory flow 25%-75% (FEF25-75) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) were recorded and analysed separately for smokers and non-smokers. The workers were divided into 5 groups for analysis of data based on the number of years of work in the petrol pumps. Outdoor air analysis was also carried out. The FVC, FEV1 and PEF declined significantly with increasing years of work in petrol stations in both smokers and non-smokers. Smoking as an independent variable was found to affect the FEV1 significantly but not FVC or PEF. The FEF25-75 was found to be the most affected spirometric value with a significant reduction with increasing years of work. Smoking as such did not affect it. Oxides of nitrogen (NOx), suspended particulate matter (SPM) and particulate matter less than 10 microns (PM10) in outdoor air were higher than the national ambient air quality standards. Exposure to automobile exhaust and fuel vapour impairs lung function in a time-dependent manner. Cigarette smoking appears to accelerate the decline.

  1. Functional impairment and hospital readmission in Medicare seniors.

    PubMed

    Greysen, S Ryan; Stijacic Cenzer, Irena; Auerbach, Andrew D; Covinsky, Kenneth E

    2015-04-01

    Medicare currently penalizes hospitals for high readmission rates for seniors but does not account for common age-related syndromes, such as functional impairment. To assess the effects of functional impairment on Medicare hospital readmissions given the high prevalence of functional impairments in community-dwelling seniors. We created a nationally representative cohort of 7854 community-dwelling seniors in the Health and Retirement Study, with 22,289 Medicare hospitalizations from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2010. Outcome was 30-day readmission assessed by Medicare claims. The main predictor was functional impairment determined from the Health and Retirement Study interview preceding hospitalization, stratified into the following 5 levels: no functional impairments, difficulty with 1 or more instrumental activities of daily living, difficulty with 1 or more activities of daily living (ADL), dependency (need for help) in 1 to 2 ADLs, and dependency in 3 or more ADLs. Adjustment variables included age, race/ethnicity, sex, annual income, net worth, comorbid conditions (Elixhauser score from Medicare claims), and prior admission. We performed multivariable logistic regression to adjust for clustering at the patient level to characterize the association of functional impairments and readmission. Patients had a mean (SD) age of 78.5 (7.7) years (range, 65-105 years); 58.4% were female, 84.9% were white, 89.6% reported 3 or more comorbidities, and 86.0% had 1 or more hospitalizations in the previous year. Overall, 48.3% had some level of functional impairment before admission, and 15.5% of hospitalizations were followed by readmission within 30 days. We found a progressive increase in the adjusted risk of readmission as the degree of functional impairment increased: 13.5% with no functional impairment, 14.3% with difficulty with 1 or more instrumental activities of daily living (odds ratio [OR], 1.06; 95% CI, 0.94-1.20), 14.4% with difficulty with 1 or more

  2. Prolonged Injury and Altered Lung Function after Ozone Inhalation in Mice with Chronic Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Angela M.; Gow, Andrew J.; Massa, Christopher B.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant protein–D (Sftpd) is a pulmonary collectin important in down-regulating macrophage inflammatory responses. In these experiments, we analyzed the effects of chronic macrophage inflammation attributable to loss of Sftpd on the persistence of ozone-induced injury, macrophage activation, and altered functioning in the lung. Wild-type (Sftpd+/+) and Sftpd−/− mice (aged 8 wk) were exposed to air or ozone (0.8 parts per million, 3 h). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and tissue were collected 72 hours later. In Sftpd−/− mice, but not Sftpd+/+ mice, increased BAL protein and nitrogen oxides were observed after ozone inhalation, indicating prolonged lung injury and oxidative stress. Increased numbers of macrophages were also present in BAL fluid and in histologic sections from Sftpd−/− mice. These cells were enlarged and foamy, suggesting that they were activated. This conclusion was supported by findings of increased BAL chemotactic activity, and increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in lung macrophages. In both Sftpd+/+ and Sftpd−/− mice, inhalation of ozone was associated with functional alterations in the lung. Although these alterations were limited to central airway mechanics in Sftpd+/+ mice, both central airway and parenchymal mechanics were modified by ozone exposure in Sftpd−/− mice. The most notable changes were evident in resistance and elastance spectra and baseline lung function, and in lung responsiveness to changes in positive end-expiratory pressure. These data demonstrate that a loss of Sftpd is associated with prolonged lung injury, oxidative stress, and macrophage accumulation and activation in response to ozone, and with more extensive functional changes consistent with the loss of parenchymal integrity. PMID:22878412

  3. Lung physiology during ECS resuscitation of DCD donors followed by in situ assessment of lung function.

    PubMed

    Reoma, Junewai L; Rojas, Alvaro; Krause, Eric M; Obeid, Nabeel R; Lafayette, Nathan G; Pohlmann, Joshua R; Padiyar, Niru P; Punch, Jeffery D; Cook, Keith E; Bartlett, Robert H

    2009-01-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support (ECS) of donors after cardiac death (DCD) has been shown to improve abdominal organs for transplantation. This study assesses whether pulmonary congestion occurs during ECS with the heart arrested and describes an in vivo method to assess if lungs are suitable for transplantation from DCD donors after ECS resuscitation. Cardiac arrest was induced in 30 kg pigs, followed by 10 min of warm ischemia. Cannulae were placed into the right atrium (RA) and iliac artery, and veno-arterial ECS was initiated for 90 min with lungs inflated, group 1 (n = 5) or deflated, group 2 (n = 3). Left atrial pressures were measured as a marker for pulmonary congestion. After 90 min of ECS, lung function was evaluated. Cannulae were placed into the pulmonary artery (PA) and left ventricle (LV). A second pump was included, and ECS was converted to a bi-ventricular (bi-VAD) system. The RVAD drained from the RA and pumped into the PA, and the LVAD drained the LV and pumped into the iliac. This brought the lungs back into circulation for a 1-hr assessment period. The oxygenator was turned off, and ventilation was restarted. Flows, blood gases, PA and left atrial pressures, and compliance were recorded. In both the groups, LA pressure was <15 mm Hg during ECS. During the lung assessment period, PA flows were 1.4-2.2 L/min. PO2 was >300 mm Hg, with normal PCO2. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support resuscitation of DCD donors is feasible and allows for assessment of function before procurement. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary support does not cause pulmonary congestion, and the lungs retain adequate function for transplantation. Compliance correlated with lung function.

  4. Computed Tomography Measure of Lung at Risk and Lung Function Decline in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Surya P; Bodduluri, Sandeep; Hoffman, Eric A; Newell, John D; Sieren, Jessica C; Dransfield, Mark T; Reinhardt, Joseph M

    2017-09-01

    The rate of decline of lung function is greater than age-related change in a substantial proportion of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, even after smoking cessation. Regions of the lung adjacent to emphysematous areas are subject to abnormal stretch during respiration, and this biomechanical stress likely influences emphysema initiation and progression. To assess whether quantifying this penumbra of lung at risk would predict FEV1 decline. We analyzed paired inspiratory-expiratory computed tomography images at baseline of 680 subjects participating in a large multicenter study (COPDGene) over approximately 5 years. By matching inspiratory and expiratory images voxel by voxel using image registration, we calculated the Jacobian determinant, a measure of local lung expansion and contraction with respiration. We measured the distance between each normal voxel to the nearest emphysematous voxel, and quantified the percentage of normal voxels within each millimeter distance from emphysematous voxels as mechanically affected lung (MAL). Multivariable regression analyses were performed to assess the relationship between the Jacobian determinant, MAL, and FEV1 decline. The mean (SD) rate of decline in FEV1 was 39.0 (58.6) ml/yr. There was a progressive decrease in the mean Jacobian determinant of both emphysematous and normal voxels with increasing disease stage (P < 0.001). On multivariable analyses, the mean Jacobian determinant of normal voxels within 2 mm of emphysematous voxels (MAL2) was significantly associated with FEV1 decline. In mild-moderate disease, for participants at or above the median MAL2 (threshold, 36.9%), the mean decline in FEV1 was 56.4 (68.0) ml/yr versus 43.2 (59.9) ml/yr for those below the median (P = 0.044). Areas of normal-appearing lung are mechanically influenced by emphysematous areas and this lung at risk is associated with lung function decline. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00608764).

  5. Association of area socioeconomic status with lung function in children.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Fan; Wu, Cho-Kai; Chen, Duan-Rung; Chie, Wei-Chu; Lee, Yungling Leo

    2012-12-01

    The study investigates the association between area-level socioeconomic status (SES) and children's lung function. Participants were 3994 seventh grade students from the Taiwan Children Health Study living in 14 communities in Taiwan and were recruited in 2007. Area-level SES predictors were population size, occupation type, income and education level. Hierarchical linear models (HLM) were used to examine the effects of area-level SES on lung function, after accounting for area air pollution and individual SES (parental education and family income). Areas with high income were independently associated with lower child lung function. The coefficients for log transformation of area tax per person in HLM were -47.8 (95% confidence interval (CI): -80.9, -14.8) in FEV(1), -43.8 (95% CI: -75.2, -12.5) in FVC, -93.4 (95% CI: -179.3, -7.5) in FEF(25-75) and -203.2 (95% CI: -349.1, -57.2) in PEF. All SES predictors influenced in the same direction and affected males more. The interaction of area tax per person with parental educational level was significant on PEF, suggesting significant association of greater parental education with lower lung function in children. High area SES was inversely associated with lung function in Taiwanese children. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Amiodarone lung toxicity: role of pulmonary function tests.

    PubMed

    Foresti, V; Carini, L; Lovagnini-Scher, C A; Parisio, E; Scolari, N; Pozzi, G; Clini, V

    1987-01-01

    Forty-three patients treated with amiodarone hydrochloride with an average daily dose of 204.7 +/- 79.4 mg/day for a mean period of 37.1 +/- 25.3 months, were studied by clinical examination, chest roentgenograms, pulmonary function tests and blood gas analyses. The habits of cigarette smoking were also recorded and expressed as cigarette pack/years. Pulmonary function tests did not show any differences from control subjects and no correlation was found between exposure to drug and lung function. However, one patient developed abnormalities in the chest X-ray (interstitial type) and a reduction of carbon monoxide diffusion capacity as a possible manifestation of amiodarone lung toxicity. Nine patients (22%) had a 20% decrease from normal in carbon monoxide diffusion capacity and three (7%) had a 15% decrease in total lung capacity. More treated patients had interstitial abnormalities in the chest X-ray (14%) than controls (5.5%). Although pulmonary function test abnormalities could be detected in patients taking amiodarone, they were not usually severe enough to interfere with gas exchange. Our results confirm the rarity of amiodarone lung toxicity when a low dosage is used, and suggest the advisability of periodical monitoring, including clinical examination, chest X-ray and pulmonary function tests in order to detect the earliest signs of amiodarone lung toxicity.

  7. Nuclear Factor-Kappa-B Signaling in Lung Development and Disease: One Pathway, Numerous Functions

    PubMed Central

    Alvira, Cristina M

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to other organs, the lung completes a significant portion of its development after term birth. During this stage of alveolarization, division of the alveolar ducts into alveolar sacs by secondary septation, and expansion of the pulmonary vasculature by means of angiogenesis markedly increase the gas exchange surface area of the lung. However, postnatal completion of growth renders the lung highly susceptible to environmental insults such as inflammation that disrupt this developmental program. This is particularly evident in the setting of preterm birth, where impairment of alveolarization causes bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a chronic lung disease associated with significant morbidity. The nuclear factor κ-B (NFκB) family of transcription factors are ubiquitously expressed, and function to regulate diverse cellular processes including proliferation, survival, and immunity. Extensive evidence suggests that activation of NFκB is important in the regulation of inflammation and in the control of angiogenesis. Therefore, NFκB-mediated downstream effects likely influence the lung response to injury and may also mediate normal alveolar development. This review summarizes the main biologic functions of NFκB, and highlights the regulatory mechanisms that allow for diversity and specificity in downstream gene activation. This is followed by a description of the pro and anti-inflammatory functions of NFκB in the lung, and of NFκB-mediated angiogenic effects. Finally, this review summarizes the clinical and experimental data that support a role for NFκB in mediating postnatal angiogenesis and alveolarization, and discusses the challenges that remain in developing therapies that can selectively block the detrimental functions of NFκB yet preserve the beneficial effects. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 100:202–216, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24639404

  8. Hyperpolarized helium-3 mouse lung MRI: Studies of lung structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugas, Joseph Paul

    Hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of human and animal lungs has displayed promising and useful applications to studies of lung structure and function in both healthy and diseased lungs. Hyperpolarized 3He MRI allows the visualization of gas in the gas-exchange spaces of the lungs (as opposed to tissue) and has proven especially effective in studying diseases that are characterized by ventilation defects, such as emphysema. In particular, in-vivo measurements of the 3He apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) can quantify lung structure by measuring its restrictive effects on the motion of 3He spins. This allows for detection and longitudinal tracking of changes in micro-architecture that result from disease destruction of alveolar walls. Due, in part, to the difficulties inherent in administering and imaging hyperpolarized 3He within the small (0.5 cc volume) mouse lung, applications of hyperpolarized 3He MRI techniques to laboratory mice are scarce. We have been able to implement and improve the techniques of hyperpolarized 3He mouse lung MRI and subsequently apply them to studies of several mouse models of disease, including elastase-induced emphysema, smoking-induced emphysema, and lung cancer. Here we detail the design, development, and implementation of a versatile, electronically-controlled, small animal ventilator that is capable of delivering tiny volumes of hyperpolarized 3He, mixed with oxygen, to the mouse and is also compatible with both the easily depolarized 3He gas and the highly magnetic environment within and around an imaging magnet. Also described are NM techniques developed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of our images and effectively utilize the gas hyperpolarization. Applications of these technologies and techniques to small animal models of disease are presented wherein we have measured up to a 35% increase in 3He ADC in mice with elastase-induced emphysema as compared to healthy mice. We also demonstrate the potential

  9. Treatment Concerns and Functional Impairment in Pediatric Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Wu, Monica S; Salloum, Alison; Lewin, Adam B; Selles, Robert R; McBride, Nicole M; Crawford, Erika A; Storch, Eric A

    2016-08-01

    Although there are efficacious, evidence-based treatments for anxiety disorders, youth often experience delays in seeking therapy. Myriad reasons may contribute to this lag in treatment initiation, with some youth possessing concerns about therapy. Treatment concerns are broadly characterized by worries/ambivalence about seeking treatment, including concerns about the negative reactions, consequences, and inconvenience of treatment. As no studies exist for youth with anxiety disorders, this study examined the phenomenology of treatment concerns in 119 treatment-seeking, anxious youth and utilized a structural equation model to examine the relationship between child anxiety, depressive symptoms, treatment concerns, and anxiety-related functional impairment. Over 90 % of the children positively endorsed some type of treatment-related fear, with the most frequently expressed concern being that therapy would take too much time (50.4 %). Based on the model, both child anxiety and depressive symptoms predicted functional impairment, and treatment concerns mediated the relationship between child anxiety and functional impairment.

  10. [Lung function testing in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Escribano, P Martín; Sánchez, M A Gómez; de Atauri, M J Díaz; Frade, J Palomera; García, I Martín

    2005-07-01

    The main objective was to describe the results of lung function testing in a series of 120 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, and the secondary objective was to compare these findings with hemodynamic variables. This was a descriptive study of lung function in 120 patients with stable pulmonary arterial hypertension (Evian/Venice groups 1 and 4) studied until January 2002 in the Pulmonary Hypertension and Lung Transplant Working Group attached to the Cardiology Department of the Hospital Universtario 12 de Octubre in Madrid, Spain. Data were collected retrospectively for the first 47 patients (1981 to 1995) and prospectively thereafter for the remaining 73 patients. The diagnosis was idiopathic arterial hypertension or hypertension associated with collagenosis, chronic pulmonary embolism, cardiac shunt, or toxic oil syndrome (30 cases). In the group as a whole, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and total lung capacity were normal; mean (SD) values revealed low carbon dioxide diffusing capacity (67.6% [23.2%]), and moderate hypoxemia (65.8 [15.4] mm Hg). No significant associations were observed between lung function and hemodynamic parameters. Mean age in the toxic oil syndrome group was lower (33.7 [11.4] years), and these patients had higher mean scores on the New York Heart Association scale (3.3 [0.5]) and for pulmonary vascular resistance (20.3 [8.1] kPa.L(-1).s). Lung function was studied in a series of 120 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (Evian/ Venice groups 1 and 4), 30 of whom had toxic oil syndrome. No significant associations were found between lung function and hemodynamic parameters.

  11. Obstructive and Restrictive Lung Function Measures and CKD: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2012.

    PubMed

    Navaneethan, Sankar D; Mandayam, Sreedhar; Arrigain, Susana; Rahman, Mahboob; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Schold, Jesse D

    2016-09-01

    Prevalence and factors associated with obstructive and restrictive lung function in people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are unknown. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Participants aged 40 to 79 years from NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) 2007 to 2012 who underwent spirometry testing. CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] >15-<60mL/min/1.73m(2) or urinary albumin-creatinine ratio ≥ 30mg/g). Restrictive lung function (defined as FEV1/FVC≥0.70 and baseline FVC<80% predicted), obstructive lung function (defined as FEV1/FVC<0.70 based on postbronchodilator spirometric results), and mortality data (available for 2007-2008 and 2009-2010 survey periods). 7,610 participants (CKD=1,338; non-CKD=6,272) were included. Prevalences of obstructive lung function adjusted to the mean age of 55 years and 50% men in the CKD and non-CKD groups were 15.6% and 13.3%, respectively (P=0.2). Similarly, adjusted prevalences of restrictive lung function in the CKD and non-CKD groups were 9.8% and 6.7%, respectively (P=0.01). Presence of albumin-creatinine ratio ≥ 30mg/g was associated with obstructive (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.07-1.88) and restrictive lung function (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.01-2.03) in the entire study cohort. eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m(2) was associated with higher odds of obstructive lung function. In a multivariable Cox model, age (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.04-1.11) and presence of obstructive lung function (HR, 2.68; 95% CI, 1.80-3.97), but not CKD measures, were associated with death. Small proportion of participants with advanced kidney disease. In a representative sample of US adults, impaired lung function is common in those with and without CKD. Albuminuria was independently associated with both obstructive and restrictive lung function, and eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m(2) was associated with higher odds of obstructive lung function. Older age and obstructive lung function were associated with higher likelihood of death. Further studies

  12. Perceived Cognitive Impairment among African American elders: health and functional impairments in daily life

    PubMed Central

    Ficker, Lisa J.; Lysack, Cathy L.; Hanna, Mena; Lichtenberg, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The Center for Disease Control began to assess Perceived Cognitive Impairment in 2009, yet there has been no in-depth study of how perceived decline in thinking or memory skills may be associated to the health and lifestyle of an independent community-dwelling older person. Among urban-dwelling older African Americans who are at elevated risk for cognitive impairment and dementia, we know even less regarding the interaction of these risk factors. Method Five hundred and one African American elders (n = 501) between the ages of 55 and 95 with an average age of 70.73 years (SD = 8.6 years) participated in telephone interviews. Results Approximately one-third of the elders reported that their memory, thinking skills, or ability to reason was worse than a year ago (n = 150; 29.9%) and 25% of this group (n = 38) reported that this Perceived Cognitive Impairment impacted their daily activities and/or warranted a consultation with their doctor. Bivariate analyses indicated that Perceived Cognitive Impairment was associated with increased health problems, mobility limitations, depressed mood, and lower social functioning. Conclusion Elders who reported that cognitive problems impacted their daily functioning reported the greatest health and mental health problems. Perceived Cognitive Impairment is an important health variable with implications for an older adult’s overall health, mobility, and mental health. PMID:24328435

  13. COPA mutations impair ER-Golgi transport and cause hereditary autoimmune-mediated lung disease and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Watkin, Levi B; Jessen, Birthe; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Vece, Timothy J; Jan, Max; Sha, Youbao; Thamsen, Maike; Santos-Cortez, Regie L P; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Gambin, Tomasz; Forbes, Lisa R; Law, Christopher S; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Cheng, Mickie H; Mace, Emily M; Anderson, Mark S; Liu, Dongfang; Tang, Ling Fung; Nicholas, Sarah K; Nahmod, Karen; Makedonas, George; Canter, Debra L; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Hicks, John; Jones, Kirk D; Penney, Samantha; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Rosenblum, Michael D; Dell, Sharon D; Waterfield, Michael R; Papa, Feroz R; Muzny, Donna M; Zaitlen, Noah; Leal, Suzanne M; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Boerwinkle, Eric; Eissa, N Tony; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Orange, Jordan S; Shum, Anthony K

    2015-06-01

    Unbiased genetic studies have uncovered surprising molecular mechanisms in human cellular immunity and autoimmunity. We performed whole-exome sequencing and targeted sequencing in five families with an apparent mendelian syndrome of autoimmunity characterized by high-titer autoantibodies, inflammatory arthritis and interstitial lung disease. We identified four unique deleterious variants in the COPA gene (encoding coatomer subunit α) affecting the same functional domain. Hypothesizing that mutant COPA leads to defective intracellular transport via coat protein complex I (COPI), we show that COPA variants impair binding to proteins targeted for retrograde Golgi-to-ER transport. Additionally, expression of mutant COPA results in ER stress and the upregulation of cytokines priming for a T helper type 17 (TH17) response. Patient-derived CD4(+) T cells also demonstrate significant skewing toward a TH17 phenotype that is implicated in autoimmunity. Our findings uncover an unexpected molecular link between a vesicular transport protein and a syndrome of autoimmunity manifested by lung and joint disease.

  14. Functions and mechanisms of long noncoding RNAs in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhenzi; Zhang, Chunfang; Duan, Chaojun

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and there is a lack of adequate biomarkers for diagnosis. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as an important set of molecules because of their roles in various key pathophysiological pathways, including cell growth, apoptosis, and metastasis. We review the current knowledge of the lncRNAs in lung cancer. In-depth analyses of lncRNAs in lung cancer have increased the number of potential effective biomarkers, thus providing options to increase the therapeutic benefit. In this review, we summarize the functions, mechanisms, and regulatory networks of lncRNAs in lung cancer, providing a basis for further research in this field. PMID:27499635

  15. Peak weight velocity in infancy is negatively associated with lung function in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Claudia, Flexeder; Thiering, Elisabeth; von Berg, Andrea; Berdel, Dietrich; Hoffmann, Barbara; Koletzko, Sibylle; Bauer, Carl-Peter; Koletzko, Berthold; Heinrich, Joachim; Schulz, Holger

    2016-02-01

    Rapid weight gain during infancy increases childhood asthma risk, which might be related to impaired lung function. This study investigated associations between peak weight velocity (PWV) during the first two years of life and spirometric lung function indices at 15 years of age. Data from 1842 children participating in the GINIplus German birth cohort who underwent spirometry at age 15 were analysed. PWV was calculated from weight measurements obtained between birth and two years of age. Generalised additive models were fitted after adjustment for potential confounding factors (birth weight, height, and age at lung function testing). Results are presented per interquartile range increase (3.5 kg/year) in PWV. PWV was negatively associated with pre-bronchodilation flow rates after extensive adjustment for potential confounders including asthma: forced expiratory flow at 50% of forced vital capacity (FEF50 ) decreased by 141 ml/s (95%CI = [-225;-57]), FEF75 by 84 ml/s [-144;-24] and FEF25-75 by 118 ml/s [-192;-44]. FEV1 /FVC was also negatively associated with PWV (-0.750% [-1.273;-0.226]) whereas forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1 ) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were not. Similar results were found for measurements post-bronchodilation. Early life weight gain was negatively associated with flow indices in adolescence, suggesting structural changes in peripheral lungs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Reduced lung function in smokers in a lung cancer screening cohort with asbestos exposure and pleural plaques.

    PubMed

    Lopatin, Sarah; Tsay, Jun-Chieh; Addrizzo-Harris, Doreen; Munger, John S; Pass, Harvey; Rom, William N

    2016-03-01

    While low dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening for lung cancer is recommended for high-risk smokers, ages 55-74 years, information about asbestos exposure may not be routinely elicited. Asbestos exposure is associated with declining respiratory function over time; however, the effect of a history of asbestos exposure in LDCT screening cohorts is limited. We report the relationship between asbestos exposure and pulmonary function in a cohort of heavy smokers with a history of occupational asbestos exposure, hypothesizing that these subjects will have additional decreased pulmonary function. We also examined relationships between spirometric measurements and the presence of isolated pleural plaques. A cross-sectional study was performed using data from the NYU Lung Cancer Biomarker Center cohort to compare study subjects with a history asbestos exposure primarily in the period since 1970 when tighter federal standards were in place (n = 359) to those without asbestos exposure (n = 1038) with respect to pulmonary function, LDCT lung imaging findings, and clinical symptoms. We further classified individuals with asbestos exposure by length of exposure time to examine the effect of duration of exposure on pulmonary function. Lastly, for asbestos-exposed participants, we examined the association of spirometric measurements with the presence of absence of isolated pleural plaques. Individuals with asbestos exposure had decreased FVC % predicted compared to those with no asbestos exposure (76% vs. 85% predicted, P < 0.01) and FEV1 % predicted (64% vs. 67% predicted, P < 0.01). Since there was no change in FEV1 /FVC ratio, the findings are consistent with restrictive impairment. Those with ≥20 years of exposure had a lower mean FVC % predicted compared to those with less than 20 years of exposure (74% vs. 78% predicted, P = 0.017). Individuals with asbestos exposure were more likely to have pleural plaques (P < 0.001) on CT. Those with

  17. Hypercholesterolemia Impaired Sperm Functionality in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Monclus, Maria A.; Cabrillana, Maria E.; Clementi, Marisa A.; Espínola, Leandro S.; Cid Barría, Jose L.; Vincenti, Amanda E.; Santi, Analia G.; Fornés, Miguel W.

    2010-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia represents a high risk factor for frequent diseases and it has also been associated with poor semen quality that may lead to male infertility. The aim of this study was to analyze semen and sperm function in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Twelve adult White New Zealand male rabbits were fed ad libitum a control diet or a diet supplemented with 0.05% cholesterol. Rabbits under cholesterol-enriched diet significantly increased total cholesterol level in the serum. Semen examination revealed a significant reduction in semen volume and sperm motility in hypercholesterolemic rabbits (HCR). Sperm cell morphology was seriously affected, displaying primarily a “folded head”-head fold along the major axe-, and the presence of cytoplasmic droplet on sperm flagellum. Cholesterol was particularly increased in acrosomal region when detected by filipin probe. The rise in cholesterol concentration in sperm cells was determined quantitatively by Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses. We also found a reduction of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in sperm incubated under capacitating conditions from HCR. Interestingly, the addition of Protein Kinase A pathway activators -dibutyryl-cyclic AMP and iso-butylmethylxanthine- to the medium restored sperm capacitation. Finally, it was also reported a significant decrease in the percentage of reacted sperm in the presence of progesterone. In conclusion, our data showed that diet-induced hypercholesterolemia adversely affects semen quality and sperm motility, capacitation and acrosomal reaction in rabbits; probably due to an increase in cellular cholesterol content that alters membrane related events. PMID:20976152

  18. Dietary phosphorus acutely impairs endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Shuto, Emi; Taketani, Yutaka; Tanaka, Rieko; Harada, Nagakatsu; Isshiki, Masashi; Sato, Minako; Nashiki, Kunitaka; Amo, Kikuko; Yamamoto, Hironori; Higashi, Yukihito; Nakaya, Yutaka; Takeda, Eiji

    2009-07-01

    Excessive dietary phosphorus may increase cardiovascular risk in healthy individuals as well as in patients with chronic kidney disease, but the mechanisms underlying this risk are not completely understood. To determine whether postprandial hyperphosphatemia may promote endothelial dysfunction, we investigated the acute effect of phosphorus loading on endothelial function in vitro and in vivo. Exposing bovine aortic endothelial cells to a phosphorus load increased production of reactive oxygen species, which depended on phosphorus influx via sodium-dependent phosphate transporters, and decreased nitric oxide production via inhibitory phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Phosphorus loading inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation of rat aortic rings. In 11 healthy men, we alternately served meals containing 400 mg or 1200 mg of phosphorus in a double-blind crossover study and measured flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery before and 2 h after the meals. The high dietary phosphorus load increased serum phosphorus at 2 h and significantly decreased flow-mediated dilation. Flow-mediated dilation correlated inversely with serum phosphorus. Taken together, these findings suggest that endothelial dysfunction mediated by acute postprandial hyperphosphatemia may contribute to the relationship between serum phosphorus level and the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  19. Dietary Phosphorus Acutely Impairs Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Shuto, Emi; Taketani, Yutaka; Tanaka, Rieko; Harada, Nagakatsu; Isshiki, Masashi; Sato, Minako; Nashiki, Kunitaka; Amo, Kikuko; Yamamoto, Hironori; Higashi, Yukihito; Nakaya, Yutaka; Takeda, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    Excessive dietary phosphorus may increase cardiovascular risk in healthy individuals as well as in patients with chronic kidney disease, but the mechanisms underlying this risk are not completely understood. To determine whether postprandial hyperphosphatemia may promote endothelial dysfunction, we investigated the acute effect of phosphorus loading on endothelial function in vitro and in vivo. Exposing bovine aortic endothelial cells to a phosphorus load increased production of reactive oxygen species, which depended on phosphorus influx via sodium-dependent phosphate transporters, and decreased nitric oxide production via inhibitory phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Phosphorus loading inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation of rat aortic rings. In 11 healthy men, we alternately served meals containing 400 mg or 1200 mg of phosphorus in a double-blind crossover study and measured flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery before and 2 h after the meals. The high dietary phosphorus load increased serum phosphorus at 2 h and significantly decreased flow-mediated dilation. Flow-mediated dilation correlated inversely with serum phosphorus. Taken together, these findings suggest that endothelial dysfunction mediated by acute postprandial hyperphosphatemia may contribute to the relationship between serum phosphorus level and the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:19406976

  20. Comparative study of lung functions in swimmers and runners.

    PubMed

    Sable, Meenakshi; Vaidya, S M; Sable, S S

    2012-01-01

    In the present study pulmonary function tests of two different groups of athletes, swimmers and runners were studied and compared. Thirty swimmers who used to swim a distance of two to three kilometers per day regularly were compared with age, sex, height, and weight matched thirty middle distance runners. Runners and swimmers selected for this study were undergoing training since last three years. Tidal Volume (TV), forced Vital Capacity (FVC). Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) were higher in swimmers than runners. Swimming exercise affects lung volume measurements as respiratory muscles including diaphragm of swimmers are required to develop greater pressure as a consequence of immersion in water during respiratory cycle, thus may lead to functional improvement in these muscles and also alterations in elasticity of lung and chest wall or of ventilatory muscles, leading to an improvement in forced vital capacity and other lung functions of swimmers than runners.

  1. Exogenous surfactant preserves lung function and reduces alveolar Evans blue dye influx in a rat model of ventilation-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Verbrugge, S J; Vazquez de Anda, G; Gommers, D; Neggers, S J; Sorm, V; Böhm, S H; Lachmann, B

    1998-08-01

    Changes in pulmonary edema infiltration and surfactant after intermittent positive pressure ventilation with high peak inspiratory lung volumes have been well described. To further elucidate the role of surfactant changes, the authors tested the effect of different doses of exogenous surfactant preceding high peak inspiratory lung volumes on lung function and lung permeability. Five groups of Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6 per group) were subjected to 20 min of high peak inspiratory lung volumes. Before high peak inspiratory lung volumes, four of these groups received intratracheal administration of saline or 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg body weight surfactant; one group received no intratracheal administration. Gas exchange was measured during mechanical ventilation. A sixth group served as nontreated, nonventilated controls. After death, all lungs were excised, and static pressure-volume curves and total lung volume at a transpulmonary pressure of 5 cm H2O were recorded. The Gruenwald index and the steepest part of the compliance curve (Cmax) were calculated. A bronchoalveolar lavage was performed; surfactant small and large aggregate total phosphorus and minimal surface tension were measured. In a second experiment in five groups of rats (n = 6 per group), lung permeability for Evans blue dye was measured. Before 20 min of high peak inspiratory lung volumes, three groups received intratracheal administration of 100, 200, or 400 mg/ kg body weight surfactant; one group received no intratracheal administration. A fifth group served as nontreated, nonventilated controls. Exogenous surfactant at a dose of 200 mg/kg preserved total lung volume at a pressure of 5 cm H2O, maximum compliance, the Gruenwald Index, and oxygenation after 20 min of mechanical ventilation. The most active surfactant was recovered in the group that received 200 mg/kg surfactant, and this dose reduced minimal surface tension of bronchoalveolar lavage to control values. Alveolar influx of Evans blue dye

  2. Birth weight, childhood lower respiratory tract infection, and adult lung function

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, S; Sterne, J; Tucker, J; Florey, C

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Historical cohort studies in England have found that impaired fetal growth and lower respiratory tract infections in early childhood are associated with lower levels of lung function in late adult life. These relations are investigated in a similar study in Scotland.
METHODS—In 1985-86 a follow up study was carried out of 1070 children who had been born in St Andrew's from 1921 to 1935 and followed from birth to 14 years of age by the Mackenzie Institute for Medical Research. Recorded information included birth weight and respiratory illnesses. The lung function of 239 of these individuals was measured.
RESULTS—There was no association between birth weight and lung function. Pneumonia before two years of age was associated with a difference in mean forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of −0.39 litres (95% confidence interval (CI) −0.67, −0.11; p = 0.007) and in mean forced vital capacity (FVC) of −0.60 litres (95% CI −0.92, −0.28; p<0.001), after controlling for age, sex, height, smoking, type of spirometer, and other illnesses before two years. Similar reductions were seen in men and women. Bronchitis before two years was associated with smaller deficits in FEV1 and FVC. Asthma or wheeze at two years and older and cough after five years were also associated with a reduction in FEV1.
CONCLUSIONS—The relation between impaired fetal growth and lower lung function in late adult life seen in previous studies was not confirmed in this cohort. The deficits in FEV1 and FVC associated with pneumonia and bronchitis in the first two years of life are consistent with a causal relation.

 PMID:9797752

  3. [Pediatric lung resection. A case series and evaluation of postoperative lung function].

    PubMed

    Caussade, S; Zúñiga, S; García, C; González, S; Campos, E; Soto, G; Zúñiga, F; Sánchez, I

    2001-12-01

    The most common causes of pulmonary lobectomy in children are congenital lung malformations (CLM) and bronchiectasias. Our aim was to present the causes and clinical course and lung function of lobectomized patients. Between 1990 and July 1999 27 lobectomies were performed on patients whose ages ranged from newborn to 14 years. Lobectomies were performed to correct CLM in 124 cases and for acquired pulmonary disease (APD) in 13. Among CLM cases, half (n = 7) had cystic adenomatoid malformation. Among the APD patients, 10 had bronchiectasias, with etiological confirmation in 6 cases (3 secondary to serious adenovirus infection). Mean hospital stay was 4.6 days among those who experienced no postoperative complications. Symptoms resolved after surgery for most symptomatic patients. Lung function tests could be carried out with 8 patients over 6 years old whose operations had taken place 7 to 78 months earlier (x = 35 months) and whose age at the time of surgery was a mean 7 years 6 months (range 60 to 144 months). Spirometry showed normal forced vital capacity for 7 of 8 patients (87 to 143% of theoretical value). Arterial oxygen saturation measured during and after a 6-minute walking test was normal for 7 of 8 patients. Chest films showed reduced lung volume on the affected side in 5 of 8 patients. In summary, lobectomy is a procedure with few complications. It requires a short hospital stay and has good postoperative prognosis. Function and x-ray studies show adequate lung growth and development, with normal lung function in those who could be so examined because they were old enough to cooperate.

  4. Mediterranean Dietary Patterns and Impaired Physical Function in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Struijk, Ellen A; Guallar-Castillón, Pilar; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; López-García, Esther

    2016-10-19

    Information about nutritional risk factors of functional limitation is scarce. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the Mediterranean diet and risk of physical function impairment in older adults. We used data from 1,630 participants in the Seniors-ENRICA cohort aged ≥60 years. In 2008-2010, adherence to the Mediterranean diet pattern was measured with the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) and the Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS). Study participants were followed up through 2012 to assess incident impairment in agility and mobility as well as impairment in overall physical functioning, defined as a ≥5-point decrease from baseline to follow-up in the physical component summary of the 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Over a median follow-up of 3.5 years, we identified 343 individuals with agility limitation, 212 with mobility limitation, and 457 with decreased overall physical functioning. No association was found between the MDS score and the likelihood of impaired agility or mobility, although a 2-point increment in the MDS score was marginally associated with lower likelihood for decreased overall physical function. Compared to individuals in the lowest tertile of the MEDAS score, those in the highest tertile showed a lower odds of agility limitation (odds ratio: 0.67, 95% confidence interval: 0.48; 0.94, p trend = .02), mobility limitation (odds ratio: 0.69, 95% confidence interval: 0.40; 0.88, p trend = .01), and decreased overall physical functioning (odds ratio: 0.60, 95% confidence interval: 0.45; 0.79, p trend < .001). In this prospective cohort study, a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern, especially when measured with the MEDAS, was associated with a lower likelihood of physical function impairment in older adults.

  5. Role of second-hand smoke (SHS)-induced proteostasis/autophagy impairment in pediatric lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neel; Trumph, Christopher D; Bodas, Manish; Vij, Neeraj

    2017-12-01

    Exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke (SHS) is one of the prime risk factors for chronic lung disease development. Smoking during pregnancy may lead to birth defects in the newborn that include pulmonary dysfunction, increased susceptibility to opportunistic pathogens, or initiation of childhood respiratory manifestations such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Moreover, exposure to SHS in early childhood can have negative impact on lung health, although the exact mechanisms are unclear. Autophagy is a crucial proteostatic mechanism modulated by cigarette smoke (CS) in adult lungs. Here, we sought to investigate whether SHS exposure impairs autophagy in pediatric lungs. Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were exposed to room air or SHS for 14 days. The newborn pups were subsequently exposed to room air or SHS (5 h/day) for 1 or 14 days, and lungs were harvested. Soluble and insoluble protein fractions isolated from pediatric mice lungs were subjected to immunoblotting for ubiquitin (Ub), p62, VCP, HIF-1α, and β-actin. Our data shows that short-term exposure to SHS (1 or 14 days) leads to proteostasis and autophagy-impairment as evident by significant increase in accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins (Ub), p62 (impaired-autophagy marker) and valosin-containing protein (VCP) in the insoluble protein fractions of pediatric mice lungs. Moreover, increased HIF-1α levels in SHS-exposed mice lungs points towards a novel mechanism for SHS-induced lung disease initiation in the pediatric population. Validating the in vivo studies, we demonstrate that treatment of human bronchial epithelial cells (Beas2b cells) with the proteasome inhibitor (MG-132) induces HIF-1α expression that is controlled by co-treatment with autophagy-inducing drug, cysteamine. SHS-exposure induced proteostasis/autophagy impairment can mediate the initiation of chronic lung disease in pediatric subjects. Hence, our data warrants the evaluation of proteostasis/autophagy-inducing drugs, such as cysteamine

  6. Lung function in asphalt pavers: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Ulvestad, Bente; Randem, Britt Grethe; Skare, Øivind; Aaløkken, Trond Mogens; Myranek, Georg Karl; Elihn, Karine; Lund, May Brit

    2017-01-01

    To study longitudinal changes in lung function in asphalt pavers and a reference group of road maintenance workers, and to detect possible signs of lung disease by high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans. Seventy-five asphalt pavers and 71 road maintenance workers were followed up with questionnaires and measurements of lung function. Not every worker was tested every year, but most of them had four or more measurement points. The 75 asphalt pavers were also invited to have HRCT scans of the lungs at the end of the follow-up period. Mean annual decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of the asphalt pavers was 58 and 35 ml, respectively. Adjusted for age at baseline, packyears of smoking and BMI, the asphalt pavers had a significant excess annual decline in FVC and FEV1 compared to the references. The screedmen, the most exposed group of the asphalt pavers, showed a significantly larger decline in FVC than the other asphalt pavers (P = 0.029). Fine intralobular fibrosis without evident cysts was identified with HRCT in three subjects (4 %). We conclude that our findings may indicate an excess annual decline in FVC and FEV1 related to exposure to asphalt fumes. The screedmen, who carry out their work behind and close to the paving machine, had the largest decline in lung function. The finding of adverse pulmonary effects in asphalt pavers calls for better technological solutions to prevent exposure.

  7. Dendritic Cell Trafficking and Function in Rare Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Jakubzick, Claudia; Osterburg, Andrew R; Nelson, Rebecca L; Gupta, Nishant; McCormack, Francis X; Borchers, Michael T

    2017-10-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly specialized immune cells that capture antigens and then migrate to lymphoid tissue and present antigen to T cells. This critical function of DCs is well defined, and recent studies further demonstrate that DCs are also key regulators of several innate immune responses. Studies focused on the roles of DCs in the pathogenesis of common lung diseases, such as asthma, infection, and cancer, have traditionally driven our mechanistic understanding of pulmonary DC biology. The emerging development of novel DC reagents, techniques, and genetically modified animal models has provided abundant data revealing distinct populations of DCs in the lung, and allow us to examine mechanisms of DC development, migration, and function in pulmonary disease with unprecedented detail. This enhanced understanding of DCs permits the examination of the potential role of DCs in diseases with known or suspected immunological underpinnings. Recent advances in the study of rare lung diseases, including pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, sarcoidosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and pulmonary fibrosis, reveal expanding potential pathogenic roles for DCs. Here, we provide a review of DC development, trafficking, and effector functions in the lung, and discuss how alterations in these DC pathways contribute to the pathogenesis of rare lung diseases.

  8. Paraquat increases connective tissue growth factor expression and impairs lung fibroblast proliferation and viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Xie, Y-P; Pang, L; Zang, X-X; Wang, J; Shi, D; Wu, Y; Liu, X-L; Wang, G-H

    2014-12-01

    This in vitro study was designed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of paraquat-induced damage using cultured human fetal lung fibroblasts (MRC-5 cells), in order to promote the development of improved therapies for paraquat poisoning. Paraquat's effects on proliferation were examined by flow cytometry, on viscoelasticity by the micropipette aspiration technique, and on connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Paraquat was found to significantly reduce the proliferation index of MRC-5 cells in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.05) and to significantly impair the viscoelastic properties in a time-independent manner (p < 0.05). Exposure to paraquat led to a significant and time-dependent increase in CTGF expression (p < 0.05) and induced changes in the morphology and biomechanical characteristics of the MRC-5 cells. These findings not only provide novel insights into the mechanisms of paraquat-induced lung fibrosis but may represent useful targets of improved molecular-based therapies for paraquat poisoning.

  9. Assessing Functional Impairment in Siblings Living With Children With Disability

    PubMed Central

    Havercamp, Susan; Jamieson, Barry; Sahr, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to empirically test if siblings of children with disability had higher levels of parent-reported behavioral and emotional functional impairment compared with a peer group of siblings residing with only typically developing children. METHODS: This was a retrospective secondary analysis of data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. We included only households with at least 2 children to ensure sibling relationships. Two groups of siblings were formed: 245 siblings resided in households with a child with disability and 6564 siblings resided in households with typically developing children. Parents responded to questions from the Columbia Impairment Scale to identify functional impairment in their children. RESULTS: On the basis of parent reports and after adjusting for sibling demographic characteristics and household background, siblings of children with disability were more likely than siblings residing with typically developing children to have problems with interpersonal relationships, psychopathological functioning, functioning at school, and use of leisure time (P < .05). The percentage of siblings of children with disability classified with significant functional impairment was 16.0% at the first measurement period and 24.2% at the second (P < .001). For siblings of typically developing children there was a smaller percentage increase from 9.5% to 10.3% (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Functional impairment is a key indicator for the need of mental health services and, as such, early assessment and interventions to limit increasing severity and short- to long-term consequences need to be addressed. Health care professionals need to consider a family-based health care approach for families raising children with disability. PMID:23897909

  10. Assessing functional impairment in siblings living with children with disability.

    PubMed

    Goudie, Anthony; Havercamp, Susan; Jamieson, Barry; Sahr, Timothy

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically test if siblings of children with disability had higher levels of parent-reported behavioral and emotional functional impairment compared with a peer group of siblings residing with only typically developing children. This was a retrospective secondary analysis of data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. We included only households with at least 2 children to ensure sibling relationships. Two groups of siblings were formed: 245 siblings resided in households with a child with disability and 6564 siblings resided in households with typically developing children. Parents responded to questions from the Columbia Impairment Scale to identify functional impairment in their children. On the basis of parent reports and after adjusting for sibling demographic characteristics and household background, siblings of children with disability were more likely than siblings residing with typically developing children to have problems with interpersonal relationships, psychopathological functioning, functioning at school, and use of leisure time (P < .05). The percentage of siblings of children with disability classified with significant functional impairment was 16.0% at the first measurement period and 24.2% at the second (P < .001). For siblings of typically developing children there was a smaller percentage increase from 9.5% to 10.3% (P < .001). Functional impairment is a key indicator for the need of mental health services and, as such, early assessment and interventions to limit increasing severity and short- to long-term consequences need to be addressed. Health care professionals need to consider a family-based health care approach for families raising children with disability.

  11. Executive Function Impairments in High IQ Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Thomas E.; Reichel, Philipp C.; Quinlan, Donald M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To demonstrate that high IQ adults diagnosed with ADHD suffer from executive function (EF) impairments that: a) can be identified with a combination of standardized measures and self-report data; and b) occur more commonly in this group than in the general population. Method: 157 ADHD adults with IQ greater than or equal to 120 were…

  12. Executive Function in Preschoolers with Primary Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Hui-Chun; Gray, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether preschoolers with primary language impairment (PLI) show deficits in executive function (EF) compared with their peers with typical development (TD) when inhibition, updating, and mental-set shifting are examined using both linguistically based and visually based tasks. Method: Twenty-two…

  13. Executive Functioning in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Lucy A.; Messer, David J.; Nash, Gilly

    2012-01-01

    Background: A limited range of evidence suggests that children with specific language impairment (SLI) have difficulties with higher order thinking and reasoning skills (executive functioning, EF). This study involved a comprehensive investigation of EF in this population taking into account the contributions of age, nonverbal IQ and verbal…

  14. Integrative pathway genomics of lung function and airflow obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Sina A.; Loth, Daan W.; Soler Artigas, María; Birkland, Timothy P.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Wain, Louise V.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Obeidat, Ma'en; Hancock, Dana B.; Tang, Wenbo; Rawal, Rajesh; Boezen, H. Marike; Imboden, Medea; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Lahousse, Lies; Alves, Alexessander C.; Manichaikul, Ani; Hui, Jennie; Morrison, Alanna C.; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Smith, Albert Vernon; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Surakka, Ida; Vitart, Veronique; Evans, David M.; Strachan, David P.; Deary, Ian J.; Hofman, Albert; Gläser, Sven; Wilson, James F.; North, Kari E.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heckbert, Susan R.; Jarvis, Deborah L.; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Schulz, Holger; Barr, R. Graham; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; O'Connor, George T.; Kähönen, Mika; Cassano, Patricia A.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Dupuis, Josée; Hayward, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M.; Hall, Ian P.; Parks, William C.; Tobin, Martin D.; London, Stephanie J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic respiratory disorders are important contributors to the global burden of disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of lung function measures have identified several trait-associated loci, but explain only a modest portion of the phenotypic variability. We postulated that integrating pathway-based methods with GWASs of pulmonary function and airflow obstruction would identify a broader repertoire of genes and processes influencing these traits. We performed two independent GWASs of lung function and applied gene set enrichment analysis to one of the studies and validated the results using the second GWAS. We identified 131 significantly enriched gene sets associated with lung function and clustered them into larger biological modules involved in diverse processes including development, immunity, cell signaling, proliferation and arachidonic acid. We found that enrichment of gene sets was not driven by GWAS-significant variants or loci, but instead by those with less stringent association P-values. Next, we applied pathway enrichment analysis to a meta-analyzed GWAS of airflow obstruction. We identified several biologic modules that functionally overlapped with those associated with pulmonary function. However, differences were also noted, including enrichment of extracellular matrix (ECM) processes specifically in the airflow obstruction study. Network analysis of the ECM module implicated a candidate gene, matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP10), as a putative disease target. We used a knockout mouse model to functionally validate MMP10's role in influencing lung's susceptibility to cigarette smoke-induced emphysema. By integrating pathway analysis with population-based genomics, we unraveled biologic processes underlying pulmonary function traits and identified a candidate gene for obstructive lung disease. PMID:26395457

  15. Integrative pathway genomics of lung function and airflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Sina A; Loth, Daan W; Soler Artigas, María; Birkland, Timothy P; Wilk, Jemma B; Wain, Louise V; Brody, Jennifer A; Obeidat, Ma'en; Hancock, Dana B; Tang, Wenbo; Rawal, Rajesh; Boezen, H Marike; Imboden, Medea; Huffman, Jennifer E; Lahousse, Lies; Alves, Alexessander C; Manichaikul, Ani; Hui, Jennie; Morrison, Alanna C; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Smith, Albert Vernon; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Surakka, Ida; Vitart, Veronique; Evans, David M; Strachan, David P; Deary, Ian J; Hofman, Albert; Gläser, Sven; Wilson, James F; North, Kari E; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heckbert, Susan R; Jarvis, Deborah L; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Schulz, Holger; Barr, R Graham; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; O'Connor, George T; Kähönen, Mika; Cassano, Patricia A; Hysi, Pirro G; Dupuis, Josée; Hayward, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M; Hall, Ian P; Parks, William C; Tobin, Martin D; London, Stephanie J

    2015-12-01

    Chronic respiratory disorders are important contributors to the global burden of disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of lung function measures have identified several trait-associated loci, but explain only a modest portion of the phenotypic variability. We postulated that integrating pathway-based methods with GWASs of pulmonary function and airflow obstruction would identify a broader repertoire of genes and processes influencing these traits. We performed two independent GWASs of lung function and applied gene set enrichment analysis to one of the studies and validated the results using the second GWAS. We identified 131 significantly enriched gene sets associated with lung function and clustered them into larger biological modules involved in diverse processes including development, immunity, cell signaling, proliferation and arachidonic acid. We found that enrichment of gene sets was not driven by GWAS-significant variants or loci, but instead by those with less stringent association P-values. Next, we applied pathway enrichment analysis to a meta-analyzed GWAS of airflow obstruction. We identified several biologic modules that functionally overlapped with those associated with pulmonary function. However, differences were also noted, including enrichment of extracellular matrix (ECM) processes specifically in the airflow obstruction study. Network analysis of the ECM module implicated a candidate gene, matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP10), as a putative disease target. We used a knockout mouse model to functionally validate MMP10's role in influencing lung's susceptibility to cigarette smoke-induced emphysema. By integrating pathway analysis with population-based genomics, we unraveled biologic processes underlying pulmonary function traits and identified a candidate gene for obstructive lung disease.

  16. Combined Effects of in Utero and Adolescent Tobacco Smoke Exposure on Lung Function in C57Bl/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, David; Baravalle-Einaudi, Mélissa; Lezmi, Guillaume; Vibhushan, Shamila; Franco-Montoya, Marie-Laure; Hadchouel, Alice; Boczkowski, Jorge; Delacourt, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fetal determinants of airway function, such as in utero exposure to maternal cigarette smoke (CS), may create a predisposition to adult airflow obstruction and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adulthood. It has been suggested that active smoking in adolescence and preexisting airflow obstruction have synergistic deleterious effects. Objective: We used a mouse model to investigate whether there is a synergistic effect of exposure to CS in utero and during adolescence on lung function. Methods: Female C57Bl/6J mice were exposed to CS or to filtered room air during pregnancy. Exposure to CS began 2 weeks before mating and continued until delivery. After birth, the pups were not exposed to CS until day 21 (D21). Between D21 and D49, corresponding to “adolescence,” litters were randomized for an additional 4 weeks of exposure to CS. Lung morphometry, lung mechanics, and the expression of genes involved in senescence were evaluated in different subsets of mice on D21 and D49. Results: In utero exposure to CS induced significant lung function impairment by D21. CS exposure between D21 and D49 induced significant functional impairment only in mice exposed to CS prenatally. On D49, no difference was observed between subgroups in terms of lung p53, p16, p21, and Bax mRNA levels. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that prenatal and adolescent CS exposure have a synergistic effect on lung function in mice. The combined effect did not appear to be a consequence of early pulmonary senescence. Citation: Drummond D, Baravalle-Einaudi M, Lezmi G, Vibhushan S, Franco-Montoya ML, Hadchouel A, Boczkowski J, Delacourt C. 2017. Combined effects of in utero and adolescent tobacco smoke exposure on lung function in C57Bl/6J mice. Environ Health Perspect 125:392–399; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP54 PMID:27814244

  17. Combined Effects of in Utero and Adolescent Tobacco Smoke Exposure on Lung Function in C57Bl/6J Mice.

    PubMed

    Drummond, David; Baravalle-Einaudi, Mélissa; Lezmi, Guillaume; Vibhushan, Shamila; Franco-Montoya, Marie-Laure; Hadchouel, Alice; Boczkowski, Jorge; Delacourt, Christophe

    2017-03-01

    Fetal determinants of airway function, such as in utero exposure to maternal cigarette smoke (CS), may create a predisposition to adult airflow obstruction and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adulthood. It has been suggested that active smoking in adolescence and preexisting airflow obstruction have synergistic deleterious effects. We used a mouse model to investigate whether there is a synergistic effect of exposure to CS in utero and during adolescence on lung function. Female C57Bl/6J mice were exposed to CS or to filtered room air during pregnancy. Exposure to CS began 2 weeks before mating and continued until delivery. After birth, the pups were not exposed to CS until day 21 (D21). Between D21 and D49, corresponding to "adolescence," litters were randomized for an additional 4 weeks of exposure to CS. Lung morphometry, lung mechanics, and the expression of genes involved in senescence were evaluated in different subsets of mice on D21 and D49. In utero exposure to CS induced significant lung function impairment by D21. CS exposure between D21 and D49 induced significant functional impairment only in mice exposed to CS prenatally. On D49, no difference was observed between subgroups in terms of lung p53, p16, p21, and Bax mRNA levels. Our findings suggest that prenatal and adolescent CS exposure have a synergistic effect on lung function in mice. The combined effect did not appear to be a consequence of early pulmonary senescence. Citation: Drummond D, Baravalle-Einaudi M, Lezmi G, Vibhushan S, Franco-Montoya ML, Hadchouel A, Boczkowski J, Delacourt C. 2017. Combined effects of in utero and adolescent tobacco smoke exposure on lung function in C57Bl/6J mice. Environ Health Perspect 125:392-399; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP54.

  18. Altered lung function test in asymptomatic women using biomass fuel for cooking.

    PubMed

    Raj T, Jeneth Berlin

    2014-10-01

    One third of the world's population use biomass fuel like wood, dung or charcoal for cooking. The smoke from these organic materials increases the incidence of respiratory illness including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. To evaluate forced expiratory lung volumes in asymptomatic women previously exposed to biomass fuel smoke. The study was done in 74 healthy asymptomatic women divided into two age matched groups of 37 each. Pulmonary function tests (PFT) were assessed by computerised spirometry and statistical comparisons done on women using biomass fuel (study group) and women using other sources of fuel (LPG/ electric stove) for cooking (control group). The PFT results showed significant reduction in forced expiratory lung volumes like Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in 1(st) sec (FEV1), Forced Expiratory Flow between 25-75% (FEF 25-75%) and Forced Expiratory Volume percentage (FEV1%) in biomass fuel users as compared to those not exposed to biomass fuel smoke. The results of this study suggest that biomass fuel smoke may produce definite impairment in lung function, especially with regard to the smaller airways.

  19. Normalization of Lung Function Following Treatment of Secondary Usual Interstitial Pneumonia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hohberger, Laurie A; Montero-Arias, Felicia; Roden, Anja C; Vassallo, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) is the most common idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) and is associated with a poor prognosis and poor responsiveness to immunosuppressive therapy. We present a case of a woman with steroid-responsive biopsy-proven UIP with significant and sustained improvement in pulmonary function. A female in her 40s presented following a one-year history of progressive dyspnea, a 20 lb weight loss, and fatigue. Imaging of the chest with computed tomography (CT) showed bibasilar subpleural reticular opacities and minimal peripheral honeycombing. Comprehensive connective tissue disease (CTD) antibody testing was negative. Pulmonary function testing showed moderate impairment with reduction in forced vital capacity (FVC, 69% predicted), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 73% predicted), and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO, 52% predicted). Surgical lung biopsy showed UIP with prominent inflammatory infiltrates. Following treatment with prednisone and azathioprine, the patient’s symptoms resolved, while objective pulmonary function testing showed normalization of lung function, which is sustained at >4 years of follow-up. Improvement in lung function following immunosuppressive therapy is distinctly uncommon in either idiopathic or secondary UIP. This report suggests that occasionally, patients with secondary UIP occurring in the context of otherwise undefinable autoimmune clinical syndromes may be responsive to immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:25922588

  20. Impairment and Functional Interventions for Aphasia: Having it All

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Aphasia, a cognitive-linguistic disorder secondary to stroke, is a frequent and often chronic consequence of stroke with detrimental effects on autonomy and health-related quality of life. Treatment of aphasia can be approached in a number of ways. Impairment-based approaches that focus on training a specific linguistic form can be implemented. Additionally, functionally oriented intervention such as supported conversation and aphasia groups are also frequently utilized when providing a treatment program for an individual with aphasia. Creating a treatment approach that includes both impairment and functional methodologies and considers how these relate to the three domains proposed by the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF)—body functions and structure, activity, and participation—can provide an individual with aphasia an optimal treatment program that is person-centered and multi-faceted. PMID:25133085

  1. Diabetes mellitus induced impairment of male reproductive functions: a review.

    PubMed

    Jangir, Ram Niwas; Jain, Gyan Chand

    2014-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) represents one of the greatest threats to human health all over the world. The incidence of DM is rising rapidly also including children and young persons of reproductive age. Diabetes has been associated with reproductive impairment in both men and women. Diabetes may affect male reproductive functions at multiple levels as a result of its effects on the endocrine control of spermatogenesis, steroidogenesis, sperm maturation, impairment of penile erection and ejaculation. A large number of studies both on diabetic men and experimental diabetic animals have been published on the impact of DM on male reproductive functions during the past few years but many of them have conflicting results. The present review summarizes the research finding of a large number of research papers on the reproductive functions especially on hypothalmo-pituitary-gonadal axis, spermatogenesis, histopathology of testis, synthesis and secretion of testosterone, sperm quality, ejaculatory function and fertility both in diabetic men and experimental diabetic animals.

  2. Lung function in young Nigerian adults.

    PubMed

    Jaja, S I

    1991-01-01

    Static and dynamic long volumes have been measured in 181 (123 males and 58 females) apparently healthy Nigerian adults. The age range in both sexes was between 17 and 34 years (22.0 +/- 3.2 years in males and 21.3 +/- 3.2 years in females). In the male subjects mean height, weight and body surface area were 170.0 +/- 6.0 cm, 62.0 +/- 8.5 kg and 1.72 +/- 0.19 m2 respectively. In the female subjects mean height, was 162.3 +/- 15.3 cm, mean weight was 57.2 +/- 8.4 kg and mean body surface area was 1.60 +/- 0.12 m2. In both sexes, caucasian prediction formulae overestimated the TLC, FVC and RV/TLC% of the subjects. Observed FEV % in our subjects was higher than in the caucasians. The elevated FEV1 % and reduced FVC, RV/TLC % and TLC in Nigerian subjects may suggest and increased elastic recoil of the lungs and chestwall in them. Regression coefficients and constants for predicting TLC, FVC, FEV1, IC, ERV and RV in Nigerian subjects are presented.

  3. Lung function in infants and young children with chronic lung disease of infancy: the next steps?

    PubMed

    Stocks, Janet; Coates, Allan; Bush, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Over the past year, a series of papers have reviewed the literature concerning assessment and interpretation of lung function in infants and young children with chronic lung disease of infancy. This manuscript, which represents the final paper in that series, summarizes the findings to date and highlights key areas for future research. Despite the huge literature in this field, interpretation of results and their use in guiding clinical management are still limited by difficulties in 'normalizing data' according to body size and maturation and selection of appropriate control groups. Furthermore, sensitive tests that more closely reflect the underlying pathophysiology of 'new' bronchopulmonary dysplasia, together with simple and reliable methods of assessing lung maturity at birth and true oxygen requirements at specified time points are urgently required. Research in this field is also challenged by the need to separate the independent effects of genetic predisposition, gene-environment interactions, preterm delivery, neonatal respiratory disorders and various treatment strategies on the growing lung. The extent to which disruption of lung growth following premature exposure to the extra-uterine environment leads to an earlier or more aggravated decline in respiratory function in later adult life remains to be elucidated. Whatever its origin, given the increasing survival of smaller and more immature infants, the long term sequelae of neonatal lung disease, are likely to continue to change, requiring ongoing, carefully designed longitudinal studies. Future research strategies need to encompass a multicenter, multi-disciplinary, collaborative approach with closer links between clinicians and basic scientists, to ensure that the most relevant research questions are addressed using appropriate methodology and that findings are implemented into clinical practice in a more timely fashion.

  4. Can Particulate Pollution Affect Lung Function in Healthy Adults?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accompanying editorial to paper from Harvard by Rice et al. entitled "Long-Term Exposure to Traffic Emissions and Fine Particulate Matter and Lung Function Decline in the Framingham Heart StudyBy almost any measure the Clean Air Act and its amendments has to be considered as one...

  5. Feasibility of measuring lung function in preschool children

    PubMed Central

    Nystad, W; Samuelsen, S; Nafstad, P; Edvardsen, E; Stensrud, T; Jaakkola, J

    2002-01-01

    Background: There have been difficulties in applying spirometric tests to children of preschool age. Methods: The feasibility of measuring lung function was examined in 652 children aged 3–6 years using dynamic spirometry with an animation programme and the guidelines approved by the European Respiratory Society. Results: Data from 603 (92%) children with at least two acceptable forced expiratory manoeuvres were analysed; 408 (68%) achieved at least three acceptable manoeuvres. Children with only two acceptable manoeuvres were younger, shorter, and weighed less (p<0.001). The lower levels of lung function in this group were partly explained by body size. 63% of those with three acceptable manoeuvres had a difference of ≤5% between the highest and second highest forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1); when a difference of ≤10% was applied, 91% of the children were included. A similar trend was seen for forced vital capacity (FVC). The acceptability and reproducibility increased with increasing age, and levels of lung function increased linearly with age. The linear regression model showed that standing height was a satisfactory predictor of lung function; the explained fraction of variance (R2) was 59% for FEV1. Most FVC manoeuvres in children older than 3 years were acceptable and reproducible. Conclusions: Spirometric testing is feasible in preschool children and may be useful for both clinical practice and research. This study may fill the deficiency in reference values for European preschool children. PMID:12454295

  6. Socioeconomic Status and Longitudinal Lung Function of Healthy Mexican Children

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Briseño, David; Fernández-Plata, Rosario; Gochicoa-Rangel, Laura; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Rojas-Martínez, Rosalba; Mendoza-Alvarado, Laura; García-Sancho, Cecilia; Pérez-Padilla, Rogelio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Our aim was to estimate the longitudinal effect of Socioeconomic status (SES) on lung function growth of Mexican children and adolescents. Materials and Methods A cohort of Mexican children in third grade of primary school was followed with spirometry twice a year for 6 years through secondary school. Multilevel mixed-effects lineal models were fitted for the spirometric variables of 2,641 respiratory-healthy Mexican children. Monthly family income (in 2002 U.S. dollars [USD]) and parents’ years completed at school were used as proxies of SES. Results Individuals with higher SES tended to have greater height for age, and smaller sitting height/standing height and crude lung function. For each 1-year increase of parents’ schooling, Forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) and Forced vital capacity (FVC) increased 8.5 (0.4%) and 10.6 mL (0.4%), respectively (p <0.05) when models were adjusted for gender. Impact of education on lung function was reduced drastically or abolished on adjusting by anthropometric variables and ozone. Conclusions Higher parental schooling and higher monthly family income were associated with higher lung function in healthy Mexican children, with the majority of the effect likely due to the increase in height-for-age. PMID:26379144

  7. Can Particulate Pollution Affect Lung Function in Healthy Adults?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accompanying editorial to paper from Harvard by Rice et al. entitled "Long-Term Exposure to Traffic Emissions and Fine Particulate Matter and Lung Function Decline in the Framingham Heart StudyBy almost any measure the Clean Air Act and its amendments has to be considered as one...

  8. Gas cooking and reduced lung function in school children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshammer, Hanns; Hutter, Hans-Peter; Neuberger, Manfred

    RationaleOutdoor nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) is associated with reduced respiratory health. This could be due to a unique biological effect of this gaseous pollutant or because it serves as a surrogate of fine particles from incineration sources. Cooking with gas in small kitchens produces high concentrations of gaseous irritants (mainly nitrogen dioxide), but not fine particles. ObjectivesTo study the relative impact of cooking with gas on lung function parameters in a cross sectional study of school children. MethodsNearly all elementary school children (2898 children aged 6-10 years) living in the city of Linz (capital of Upper Austria) underwent lung function testing. In a questionnaire administered simultaneously to their parents, information on household conditions including cooking and tobacco smoke exposure was collected. Impact of cooking with gas on lung function controlling for various confounders was analyzed using loglinear multiple regression. ResultsGas cooking reduced lung function parameters ranging from 1.1% (not significant) for MEF 25 up to 3.4% ( p=0.01) for peak expiratory flow (PEF). ConclusionsGas stoves can have an adverse impact on children's respiratory health. Parents and caretakers should be advised to insure good ventilation while and after cooking, especially in small and poorly ventilated rooms. This study adds to the growing evidence that gaseous pollutants from incineration sources affect respiratory health directly.

  9. Effects of nanoparticles on the mechanical functioning of the lung.

    PubMed

    Arick, Davis Q; Choi, Yun Hwa; Kim, Hyun Chang; Won, You-Yeon

    2015-11-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly expanding field that has very promising applications that will improve industry, medicine, and consumer products. However, despite the growing widespread use of engineered nanoparticles in these areas, very little has been done to assess the potential health risks they may pose to high-risk areas of the body, particularly the lungs. In this review we first briefly discuss the structure of the lungs and establish that the pulmonary surfactant (PS), given its vulnerability and huge contribution to healthy lung function, is a mechanism of great concern when evaluating potential nanoparticle interactions within the lung. To warrant that these interactions can occur, studies on the transport of nanoaerols are reviewed to highlight that a plethora of factors contribute to a nanoparticle's ability to travel to the deep regions of the lung where PS resides. The focus of this review is to determine the extent that physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, hydrophobicity, and surface charge effect PS function. Numerous nanoparticle types are taken into consideration in order to effectively evaluate observed consistencies across numerous nanoparticle types and develop general trends that exist among the physicochemical characteristics of interest. Biological responses from other mechanisms/components of the lung are briefly discussed to provide further insights on how the toxicology of different nanoparticles is determined. We conclude by discussing general trends that summarize consistencies observed among the studies in regard to physicochemical properties and their effects on monolayer function, addressing current gaps in our understanding, and discussing the future outlook of this field of research.

  10. Lung Function in South African Adolescents Infected Perinatally with HIV and Treated Long-Term with Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Githinji, Leah Nyawira; Gray, Diane M; Hlengwa, Sipho; Myer, Landon; Zar, Heather J

    2017-05-01

    Lung disease is a common cause of mortality and morbidity in HIV-infected adolescents, but there is limited information on the spectrum of lung function impairment in adolescents on antiretroviral therapy. To investigate lung function in HIV-infected adolescents on antiretroviral therapy in the Cape Town Adolescent Antiretroviral Cohort (Cape Town, South Africa). A total of 515 South African adolescents, aged 9-14 years, stable on antiretroviral therapy for at least 6 months, underwent baseline lung function testing. Measures included spirometry, nitrogen multiple-breath washout, forced oscillation technique, 6-minute walk test, single-breath carbon monoxide diffusion testing, and bronchodilator response testing. A comparator group of 110 age- and ethnicity-matched HIV-uninfected adolescents was also tested. For the HIV-infected adolescents (mean [SD] age 12 [1.6] years, 52% male), the median (interquartile range) duration of antiretroviral therapy was 7.6 (4.6-9.2) years. The median (interquartile range) nadir CD4 was 510.5 (274-903) cells/mm(3). HIV-infected adolescents had significantly lower FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide, respiratory system compliance, and functional residual capacity than HIV-uninfected adolescents (P < 0.05 for all associations). HIV-infected adolescents had higher airway resistance and lung clearance index than HIV-uninfected adolescents (P < 0.05 for all associations). Although generally small in magnitude, these differences remained significant after adjusting for age, sex, and height. In addition, age, sex, height, and history of past lower respiratory tract infection or pulmonary tuberculosis were associated with reduced lung function. Perinatally infected South African HIV-infected adolescents on antiretroviral therapy have lower lung function than uninfected adolescents. Prior lower respiratory tract infection or pulmonary tuberculosis is associated with lower lung function.

  11. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses. PMID:25978669

  12. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses.

  13. Translating Lung Function Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) Findings: New Insights for Lung Biology.

    PubMed

    Kheirallah, A K; Miller, S; Hall, I P; Sayers, I

    2016-01-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases are a major cause of worldwide mortality and morbidity. Although hereditary severe deficiency of α1 antitrypsin (A1AD) has been established to cause emphysema, A1AD accounts for only ∼ 1% of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) cases. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful at detecting multiple loci harboring variants predicting the variation in lung function measures and risk of COPD. However, GWAS are incapable of distinguishing causal from noncausal variants. Several approaches can be used for functional translation of genetic findings. These approaches have the scope to identify underlying alleles and pathways that are important in lung function and COPD. Computational methods aim at effective functional variant prediction by combining experimentally generated regulatory information with associated region of the human genome. Classically, GWAS association follow-up concentrated on manipulation of a single gene. However association data has identified genetic variants in >50 loci predicting disease risk or lung function. Therefore there is a clear precedent for experiments that interrogate multiple candidate genes in parallel, which is now possible with genome editing technology. Gene expression profiling can be used for effective discovery of biological pathways underpinning gene function. This information may be used for informed decisions about cellular assays post genetic manipulation. Investigating respiratory phenotypes in human lung tissue and specific gene knockout mice is a valuable in vivo approach that can complement in vitro work. Herein, we review state-of-the-art in silico, in vivo, and in vitro approaches that may be used to accelerate functional translation of genetic findings.

  14. Violence exposure, a chronic psychosocial stressor, and childhood lung function

    PubMed Central

    Suglia, Shakira Franco; Ryan, Louise; Laden, Francine; Dockery, Douglas; Wright, Rosalind J

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic psychosocial stressors, including violence, have been linked to neuropsychological and behavioral development in children as well as physiologic alterations that may lead to broader health effects. Methods We examined the relationship between violence and childhood lung function in a prospective birth cohort of 313 urban children 6 and 7 years of age. Mothers reported on their child’s lifetime exposure to community violence (ETV) and interparental conflict in the home [Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS)] within one year of the lung function assessment. Results In linear regression analyses, adjusting for maternal education, child’s age, race, birthweight, tobacco smoke exposure, and medical history, girls in the highest CTS verbal aggression tertile had a 5.5% (95% CI: −9.6, −1.5) decrease in percent predicted FEV1 and a 5.4% (95% CI: −9.7, −1.1) decrease in FVC compared to girls in the lowest tertile. The CTS verbal aggression subscale was associated with lung function among boys in the same direction, albeit this was not statistically significant. Boys in the highest ETV tertile had a 3.4% (95% CI: −8.0, 1.1) lower FEV1 and 5.3% lower (95% CI: −10.2, −0.4) FVC compared to boys in the lowest tertile. The ETV score was not a significant predictor of girl’s lung function. Conclusions Interparental conflict, specifically verbal aggression, and exposure to community violence were associated with decreased childhood lung function independent of socioeconomic status, tobacco smoke exposure, birthweight and respiratory illness history. Gender differences were noted based on the type of violence exposure which may warrant further exploration. PMID:18158365

  15. Effects of Lung Expansion Therapy on Lung Function in Patients with Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Huey; Yeh, Ming-Chu; Hu, Han-Chung; Lee, Chung-Shu; Li, Li-Fu; Chen, Ning-Hung; Huang, Chung-Chi; Kao, Kuo-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Common complications in PMV include changes in the airway clearance mechanism, pulmonary function, and respiratory muscle strength, as well as chest radiological changes such as atelectasis. Lung expansion therapy which includes IPPB and PEEP prevents and treats pulmonary atelectasis and improves lung compliance. Our study presented that patients with PMV have improvements in lung volume and oxygenation after receiving IPPB therapy. The combination of IPPB and PEEP therapy also results in increase in respiratory muscle strength. The application of IPPB facilitates the homogeneous gas distribution in the lung and results in recruitment of collapsed alveoli. PEEP therapy may reduce risk of respiratory muscle fatigue by preventing premature airway collapse during expiration. The physiologic effects of IPPB and PEEP may result in enhancement of pulmonary function and thus increase the possibility of successful weaning from mechanical ventilator during weaning process. For patients with PMV who were under the risk of atelectasis, the application of IPPB may be considered as a supplement therapy for the enhancement of weaning outcome during their stay in the hospital.

  16. Effects of Lung Expansion Therapy on Lung Function in Patients with Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Huey; Yeh, Ming-Chu; Hu, Han-Chung; Lee, Chung-Shu; Li, Li-Fu; Chen, Ning-Hung; Huang, Chung-Chi; Kao, Kuo-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Common complications in PMV include changes in the airway clearance mechanism, pulmonary function, and respiratory muscle strength, as well as chest radiological changes such as atelectasis. Lung expansion therapy which includes IPPB and PEEP prevents and treats pulmonary atelectasis and improves lung compliance. Our study presented that patients with PMV have improvements in lung volume and oxygenation after receiving IPPB therapy. The combination of IPPB and PEEP therapy also results in increase in respiratory muscle strength. The application of IPPB facilitates the homogeneous gas distribution in the lung and results in recruitment of collapsed alveoli. PEEP therapy may reduce risk of respiratory muscle fatigue by preventing premature airway collapse during expiration. The physiologic effects of IPPB and PEEP may result in enhancement of pulmonary function and thus increase the possibility of successful weaning from mechanical ventilator during weaning process. For patients with PMV who were under the risk of atelectasis, the application of IPPB may be considered as a supplement therapy for the enhancement of weaning outcome during their stay in the hospital. PMID:27445550

  17. Functional assessment taxonomy relevant to low-back impairments.

    PubMed

    Halpern, M

    2001-09-01

    A taxonomy of functional assessment constructs was developed to help the Social Security Administration refine the measurements of work disability. This report addresses content validity of the new taxonomy by examining the relevance of its constructs to a specific disability, and by examining the relationship between these constructs and constructs in other taxonomies. Seven experts linked the new taxonomy to consequences of low-back impairments. The selected constructs were compared to those reported independently by patients (Harper AC, Harper DA, Lambert L, Andrews HB, Lo SK, Ross FM, Straker LM. Pain 1992; 50(2): 189-195). The International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps served to bridge the two exercises. The findings reveal that it is feasible to use the taxonomy to define the impact of a specific disability and consequently link it to a set of standard measurements. Low-back impairments may be best assessed through measures of physical functional limitations, vocational impact, and interpersonal and emotional behavior. The study did not yield cognitive and intellectual measures that were relevant to this impairment.

  18. Limb distribution, motor impairment, and functional classification of cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Gorter, Jan Willem; Rosenbaum, Peter L; Hanna, Steven E; Palisano, Robert J; Bartlett, Doreen J; Russell, Dianne J; Walter, Stephen D; Raina, Parminder; Galuppi, Barbara E; Wood, Ellen

    2004-07-01

    This study explored the relationships between the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), limb distribution, and type of motor impairment. Data used were collected in the Ontario Motor Growth study, a longitudinal cohort study with a population-based sample of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in Canada (n=657; age 1 to 13 years at study onset). The majority (87.8%) of children with hemiplegia were classified as level I. Children with a bilateral syndrome were represented in all GMFCS levels, with most in levels III, IV, and V. Classifications by GMFCS and 'limb distribution' or by GMFCS and 'type of motor impairment' were statistically significantly associated (Pearson's chi2 p<0.001), though the correlation for limb distribution (two categories) by GMFCS was low (tau-b=0.43). An analysis of function (GMFCS) by impairment (limb distribution) indicates that the latter clinical characteristic does not add prognostic value over GMFCS. Although classification of CP by impairment level is useful for clinical and epidemiological purposes, the value of these subgroups as an indicator of mobility is limited in comparison with the classification of severity with the GMFCS.

  19. Brief Exposure to Secondhand Smoke Reversibly Impairs Endothelial Vasodilatory Function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to determine the effects of brief exposures to low concentrations of tobacco secondhand smoke (SHS) on arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD, a nitric oxide-dependent measure of vascular endothelial function), in a controlled animal model never before exposed to smoke. In humans, SHS exposure for 30min impairs FMD. It is important to gain a better understanding of the acute effects of exposure to SHS at low concentrations and for brief periods of time. Methods: We measured changes in FMD in rats exposed to a range of real-world levels of SHS for durations of 30min, 10min, 1min, and 4 breaths (roughly 15 s). Results: We observed a dose-response relationship between SHS particle concentration over 30min and post-exposure impairment of FMD, which was linear through the range typically encountered in smoky restaurants and then saturated at higher concentrations. One min of exposure to SHS at moderate concentrations was sufficient to impair FMD. Conclusions: Brief SHS exposure at real-world levels reversibly impairs FMD. Even 1min of SHS exposure can cause reduction of endothelial function. PMID:24302638

  20. Impairment of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages by hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Oosting, R.S.; van Bree, L.; van Iwaarden, J.F.; van Golde, L.M.; Verhoef, J. )

    1990-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhibited phagocytosis and superoxide anion production by rat alveolar macrophages. The inhibition was irreversible and concentration and exposure time dependent. The potential relationship between H2O2-induced biochemical perturbations and impaired alveolar macrophage phagocytic functions was investigated. Alveolar macrophage viability and Fc receptor binding capacity were not affected by H2O2. There was probably no correlation between a H2O2-induced rise in cytosolic (Ca2+) ((Ca2+)i) and the impairment of phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages, as was suggested by the following findings. First, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i could be inhibited by chelation of extracellular Ca2+, whereas the H2O2-induced impairment of phagocytosis could not. Second, the H2O2-induced rise in (Ca2+)i was reversible, whereas the impairment of phagocytosis was not. And finally, a rise in (Ca2+)i by incubation of alveolar macrophages with the calcium ionophore A23187 did not affect phagocytosis. Various experiments suggested that ATP depletion may play an important role in the H2O2 toxicity for alveolar macrophages. Comparable concentrations of H2O2 caused an irreversible decrease both in cellular ATP and in phagocytosis and superoxide production by alveolar macrophages. In addition, time course of ATP depletion and induction of impaired alveolar macrophage function were similar. In view of the fact that the strong oxidant H2O2 may react with a large variety of biological substances, possible other toxic lesions may not be excluded as underlying mechanism for H2O2-induced inhibition of phagocytic functions of alveolar macrophages.

  1. Impaired exercise capacity and skeletal muscle function in a mouse model of pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kechun; Murano, George; Wagner, Harrieth; Nogueira, Leonardo; Wagner, Peter D.; Tang, Alisa; Dalton, Nancy D.; Gu, Yusu; Peterson, Kirk L.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary TNFα has been linked to reduced exercise capacity in a subset of patients with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We hypothesized that prolonged, high expression of pulmonary TNFα impairs cardiac and skeletal muscle function, and both contribute to exercise limitation. Using a surfactant protein C promoter-TNFα construct, TNFα was overexpressed throughout life in mouse lungs (SP-C/TNFα+). TNFα levels in wild-type (WT) female serum and lung were two- and threefold higher than in WT male mice. In SP-C/TNFα+ mice, TNFα increased similarly in both sexes. Treadmill exercise was impaired only in male SP-C/TNFα+ mice. While increases in lung volume and airspace size induced by TNFα were comparable in both sexes, pulmonary hypertension along with lower body and muscle mass were evident only in male mice. Left ventricular (LV) function (cardiac output, stroke volume, LV maximal pressure, and LV maximal pressure dP/dt) was not altered by TNFα overexpression. Fatigue measured in isolated soleus and EDL was more rapid only in soleus of male SP-C/TNFα+ mice and accompanied by a loss of oxidative IIa fibers, citrate synthase activity, and PGC-1α mRNA and increase in atrogin-1 and MuRF1 expression also only in male mice. In situ gastrocnemius fatigue resistance, reflecting both oxygen availability and contractility, was decreased similarly in female and male SP-C/TNFα+ mice. These data indicate that male, but not female, mice overexpressing pulmonary TNFα are susceptible to exercise limitation, possibly due to muscle wasting and loss of the oxidative muscle phenotype, with protection in females possibly due to estrogen. PMID:23449936

  2. Deterioration in lung function following hemithorax irradiation for pleural mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Maasilta, P. )

    1991-03-01

    Thirty-four patients receiving high-dose hemithorax irradiation as part of the treatment for pleural mesothelioma were studied with regard to changes in lung function following irradiation, and these changes were correlated with the radiologically-assessed lung injury. The latter was scored from 0 to 500 and found to be severe by 6 months (mean score 360), very severe by 9 months (mean score 430), and nearly total by 12 months (mean score 480) after treatment. Forced vital capacity and diffusing capacity both showed a significant decline at 1.5-2 months following the end of radiotherapy and thereafter up to the end of the 1 year follow-up period. Neither of these variables could be correlated consistently with the radiologically-assessed changes. Hypoxemia and pathological physiological shunting increased transiently 1-2 months after irradiation in 2 of the 6 patients monitored. The observed radiologically-assessed final effects of high-dose hemithorax irradiation are compatible with a total loss of lung function on the irradiated side. Before this form of treatment is used, lung function should be evaluated as for pneumonectomy.

  3. A multivariate analysis of serum nutrient levels and lung function

    PubMed Central

    McKeever, Tricia M; Lewis, Sarah A; Smit, Henriette A; Burney, Peter; Cassano, Patricia A; Britton, John

    2008-01-01

    Background There is mounting evidence that estimates of intakes of a range of dietary nutrients are related to both lung function level and rate of decline, but far less evidence on the relation between lung function and objective measures of serum levels of individual nutrients. The aim of this study was to conduct a comprehensive examination of the independent associations of a wide range of serum markers of nutritional status with lung function, measured as the one-second forced expiratory volume (FEV1). Methods Using data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a US population-based cross-sectional study, we investigated the relation between 21 serum markers of potentially relevant nutrients and FEV1, with adjustment for potential confounding factors. Systematic approaches were used to guide the analysis. Results In a mutually adjusted model, higher serum levels of antioxidant vitamins (vitamin A, beta-cryptoxanthin, vitamin C, vitamin E), selenium, normalized calcium, chloride, and iron were independently associated with higher levels of FEV1. Higher concentrations of potassium and sodium were associated with lower FEV1. Conclusion Maintaining higher serum concentrations of dietary antioxidant vitamins and selenium is potentially beneficial to lung health. In addition other novel associations found in this study merit further investigation. PMID:18823528

  4. Measuring lung function in mice: the phenotyping uncertainty principle.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jason H T; Irvin, Charles G

    2003-04-01

    Measuring lung function in mice is essential for establishing the relevance of murine models to human lung disease. However, making such measurements presents particular technical challenges due to the small size of the animal, particularly with regard to the measurement of respiratory flows. In this review, we examine the various methods currently available for assessment of lung function in mice and contrast them in terms of a concept we call the phenotyping uncertainty principle; each method can be considered to lie somewhere along a continuum on which noninvasiveness must be traded off against experimental control and measurement precision. Unrestrained plethysmography in conscious mice represents the extreme of noninvasiveness and is highly convenient but provides respiratory measures that are so tenuously linked to respiratory mechanics that they cannot be considered as meaningful indicators of lung function. At the other extreme, the measurement of input impedance in anesthetized, paralyzed, tracheostomized mice is precise and specific but requires that an animal be studied under conditions far from natural. In between these two extremes lie methods that sacrifice some precision for a reduction in the level of invasiveness, a promising example being the measurement of transfer impedance in conscious, restrained mice. No method is optimal in all regards; therefore, the appropriate technique to use depends on the application.

  5. Thoracic dust exposure is associated with lung function decline in cement production workers

    PubMed Central

    Notø, Hilde; Eduard, Wijnand; Skogstad, Marit; Fell, Anne Kristin; Thomassen, Yngvar; Skare, Øivind; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Abderhalden, Rolf; Kongerud, Johny; Kjuus, Helge

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesised that exposure to workplace aerosols may lead to lung function impairment among cement production workers. Our study included 4966 workers in 24 cement production plants. Based on 6111 thoracic aerosol samples and information from questionnaires we estimated arithmetic mean exposure levels by plant and job type. Dynamic lung volumes were assessed by repeated spirometry testing during a mean follow-up time of 3.5 years (range 0.7–4.6 years). The outcomes considered were yearly change of dynamic lung volumes divided by the standing height squared or percentage of predicted values. Statistical modelling was performed using mixed model regression. Individual exposure was classified into quintile levels limited at 0.09, 0.89, 1.56, 2.25, 3.36, and 14.6 mg·m−3, using the lowest quintile as the reference. Employees that worked in administration were included as a second comparison group. Exposure was associated with a reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced expiratory volume in 6 s and forced vital capacity. For FEV1 % predicted a yearly excess decline of 0.84 percentage points was found in the highest exposure quintile compared with the lowest. Exposure at the higher levels found in this study may lead to a decline in dynamic lung volumes. Exposure reduction is therefore warranted. PMID:27103386

  6. Ciprofloxacin pharmacokinetics in patients with normal and impaired renal function.

    PubMed Central

    Gasser, T C; Ebert, S C; Graversen, P H; Madsen, P O

    1987-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin following single oral doses of 500 and 750 mg in 32 patients with various degrees of renal function impairment were investigated in an open, randomized crossover fashion. Ciprofloxacin was administered after overnight fasting; the washout time between the two doses was 1 week. Serum and urine samples were collected serially between 0 and 24 h and subjected to bioassay and high-performance liquid chromatography. Pharmacokinetic parameters were analyzed, assuming an open two-compartment model with first-order input and elimination. A distinct difference was observed in pharmacokinetic parameters between patients with impaired renal function (creatinine clearance, less than 50 ml/min per 1.73 m2) and those with normal renal function (creatinine clearance, greater than or equal to 50 ml/min per 1.73 m2). For the former group, the area under the curve of serum concentration versus time was doubled, the renal clearance of ciprofloxacin was cut to one-fourth, the total and nonrenal ciprofloxacin clearance was reduced by 50%, and the elimination half-life was prolonged by a factor of approximately 1.7. The correlation between renal drug clearance and creatinine clearance was highly significant (r = 0.890; P less than 0.001). On the basis of these findings, it appears that a 50% dose reduction of ciprofloxacin in patients with impaired renal function (creatinine clearance, less than 50 ml/min per 1.73 m2) may be indicated to achieve concentrations in serum similar to those observed in normal individuals. As the concentration of ciprofloxacin in urine after 24 h remained above the MIC for most urinary pathogens, this drug appears to be of potential benefit for the treatment of urinary tract infections in patients with impaired renal function. PMID:3300537

  7. Abnormalities of lung function in hay fever.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, E J; Hall, D R

    1976-01-01

    Twenty subjects with symptoms of hay fever were studied to see whether abnormalities could be detected in the function of small airways. The investigations included dynamic compliance at varying respiratory frequencies, closing capacity, residual volume, transfer factor, and maximal expiratory flow-volume curves. The tests were repeated in the winter when symptoms had resolved. Frequency dependence of compliance was found in eight subjects with symptoms (40%), closing capacities being abnormal in only two instances. Conventional pulmonary function tests, including expiratory flow rates at mid vital capacity, were within the predicted range of all subjects. When tests were repeated in the winter, frequency dependence of compliance was no longer present in subjects whose symptoms had resolved. The study suggests that reversible small airway abnormalities are present in a significant proportion of subjects with symptoms of hay fever and that such abnormalities are best detected by the measurement of dynamic compliance at varying respiratory frequencies. PMID:769243

  8. X-ray findings, lung function, and respiratory symptoms in black South African vermiculite workers

    SciTech Connect

    Hessel, P.A.; Sluis-Cremer, G.K.

    1989-01-01

    Health effects have been documented among American vermiculite workers who mined and processed vermiculite contaminated with amphibole asbestos, viz., tremolite-actinolite. Workers mining and processing South Africa vermiculite (N = 172), which contains very little asbestos, underwent x-ray examination and lung function testing and completed a respiratory symptom questionnaire. The vermiculite workers were compared with other workers involved in the mining or refining of copper. Only two of the vermiculite workers showed evidence of small opacities of 1/0 or more (according to the ILO 1980 classification); lung function was comparable with the other groups of workers, and there was no excess of respiratory symptoms among the vermiculite workers. It is concluded that workers exposed to vermiculite that is minimally contaminated with asbestos are probably not at risk for pneumoconiosis, lung function impairment, or respiratory symptoms. It is likely that the health effects observed in other studies of vermiculite workers are the result of concomitant asbestos exposure. A risk of mesothelioma caused by the fiber content of the vermiculite cannot be excluded by this study.

  9. Effects of long term exposure to occupational noise on textile industry workers' lung function.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, António Paes; Oliveira, Maria João R; Silva, Alvaro Moreira da; Aguas, Artur P; Pereira, António Sousa

    2006-01-01

    Vibroacoustic disease is a pathology caused by long occupational exposure to large pressure amplitude and low frequency noise. It is a systemic disease, with evolvement of respiratory structures. The exposure workers to this noise of textile industry may favour alterations in lung function. We studied 28 women working more than ten years in cotton-mill rooms to evaluate their lung function, including Spirometry, forced oscillation technique (I.O.S.) and Diffusion capacity. These results were compared with those of 30 women of similar ages not exposed to similar noise and not presenting respiratory disease. Statistical significance (P<0.05) was found with FEV25, R5 and Delta Rs5-Rs20. There was a resistance frequency dependence in 36% of the population exposed to noise, not statistically confirmed. Neither restriction nor changes in diffusing capacity where detected. The analysis of global alterations of lung function parameters suggests small airways aggression by noise. However we cannot definitively exclude the influence of cotton dust inhalation in itself which effects could be increased by the loss of ciliated cells and impairment of airways clearance caused by noise.

  10. Relationship between exhaled NO, respiratory symptoms, lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and blood eosinophilia in school children

    PubMed Central

    Steerenberg, P; Janssen, N; de Meer, G; Fischer, P; Nierkens, S; van Loveren, H; Opperhuizen, A; Brunekreef, B; van Amsterdam, J G C

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Levels of eNO in a sample of 450 children aged 7–12 years out of a total sample of 2504 school children living in different urban areas near motorways were determined. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore the relationship between eNO, impairment of lung function (PEF, FVC, FEV1 and MMEF), bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), and blood eosinophilia in children with and without atopy as assessed by skin prick testing. Results: Regression analysis showed that wheezing and nasal discharge and conjunctivitis that had occurred during the previous 12 months were positively associated with eNO levels in atopic children (relative increase of 1.48 and 1.41, respectively; p<0.05) but not in non-atopic children. Similarly, BHR and the number of blood eosinophils per ml were positively associated with eNO levels in atopic children (relative increase of 1.55 and 2.29, respectively; p<0.05) but not in non-atopic children. The lung function indices PEF, FVC, FEV1 and MMEF were not associated with eNO levels. Conclusions: In addition to conventional lung function tests and symptom questionnaires, eNO is a suitable measure of airway inflammation and its application may reinforce the power of epidemiological surveys on respiratory health. PMID:12612304

  11. Ethnic Differences in Perception of Lung Function

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Gregory K.; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Kopel, Sheryl J.; Seifer, Ronald; Klein, Robert B.; Mitchell, Daphne Koinis; Esteban, Cynthia A.; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose; Colon, Angel; Alvarez, Maria; Canino, Glorisa

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Disparities in pediatric asthma exist in that Latino children have higher prevalence and greater morbidity from asthma than non–Latino white children. The factors behind these disparities are poorly understood, but ethnic-related variations in children's ability to accurately recognize and report their pulmonary functioning may be a contributing process. Objectives: To determine (1) if differences exist between Latino and non–Latino white children's perceptual accuracy and (2) whether these differences are related to asthma outcomes. Methods: Five hundred and twelve children, aged 7–16 years (290 island Puerto Ricans, 115 Rhode Island Latinos, and 107 Rhode Island non-Latino white children) participated in a 5-week home-based protocol in which twice daily they entered subjective estimates of their peak expiratory flow rate into a hand-held, programmable spirometer and then performed spirometry. Their accuracy was summarized as three perceptual accuracy scores. Demographic data, asthma severity, intelligence, emotional expression, and general symptom-reporting tendencies were assessed and covaried in analyses of the relationship of perceptual accuracy to asthma morbidity and health care use. Measurements and Main Results: Younger age, female sex, lower intelligence, and poverty were associated with lower pulmonary function perception scores. Island Puerto Rican children had the lowest accuracy and highest magnification scores, followed by Rhode Island Latinos; both differed significantly from non–Latino white children. Perceptual accuracy scores were associated with most indices of asthma morbidity. Conclusions: Controlling for other predictive variables, ethnicity was related to pulmonary function perception ability, as Latino children were less accurate than non–Latino white children. This difference in perceptual ability may contribute to recognized asthma disparities. PMID:20299534

  12. Factors affecting the development of lung function in Tunisian children.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Y; Pariès, J; Harrabi, I; Zbidi, A; Tabka, Z; Richalet, J P; Buvry, A

    2008-01-01

    We undertook to evaluate the impacts of morphology at birth, physical activity, anthropometric, socioeconomic and environmental factors on lung function in healthy Tunisian children. Pulmonary function parameters were measured with a Minato portable spirometer in a randomized population of 756 healthy children (388 males and 368 females) aged between 6 and 16. The morphology at birth, the gestational age, the physical activity, the socioeconomic status, the type of habitation, and the environmental factors were all assessed by a standard questionnaire. Using univariate analysis, we found that: (1) morphometric parameters (height, weight, maximal inspiratory, and expiratory perimeter), as well as sex were highly associated with pulmonary function parameters; (2) Height at birth showed strong significant relations with FVC, FEV(1), and FEV(1)/FVC; (3) lung function parameters were influenced by physical training of our children, socioeconomic status, indoor pollution, and passive smoking; and (4) we did not observe any association between the gestational age and the weight at their birth and lung function parameters. Using a general linear model analysis, morphometric parameters, age, sex, type of heating, and maximal inspiratory and expiratory perimeters had significant relation with respiratory parameters. In our population of healthy Tunisian children, the main predictive factors of the pulmonary development were the morphological factors such as height, weight, maximal inspiratory, and expiratory thoracic perimeter, sex and age, and the environmental conditions such as type of heating but not morphology at birth, physical activity, or socioeconomic status.

  13. High Mobility Group Box-1 mediates hyperoxia-induced impairment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clearance and inflammatory lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vivek S; Sitapara, Ravikumar A; Gore, Ashwini; Phan, Binh; Sharma, Lokesh; Sampat, Vaishali; Li, Jian Hua; Yang, Huan; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Wang, Haichao; Tracey, Kevin J; Mantell, Lin L

    2013-03-01

    Mechanical ventilation with supraphysiological concentrations of oxygen (hyperoxia) is routinely used to treat patients with respiratory distress. However, a significant number of patients on ventilators exhibit enhanced susceptibility to infections and develop ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is one of the most common species of bacteria found in these patients. Previously, we demonstrated that prolonged exposure to hyperoxia can compromise the ability of alveolar macrophages (AMs), an essential part of the innate immunity, to phagocytose PA. This study sought to investigate the potential molecular mechanisms underlying hyperoxia-compromised innate immunity against bacterial infection in a murine model of PA pneumonia. Here, we show that exposure to hyperoxia (≥ 99% O2) led to a significant elevation in concentrations of airway high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) and increased mortality in C57BL/6 mice infected with PA. Treatment of these mice with a neutralizing anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) resulted in a reduction in bacterial counts, injury, and numbers of neutrophils in the lungs, and an increase in leukocyte phagocytic activity compared with mice receiving control mAb. This improved phagocytic function was associated with reduced concentrations of airway HMGB1. The correlation between phagocytic activity and concentrations of extracellular HMGB1 was also observed in cultured macrophages. These results indicate a pathogenic role for HMGB1 in hyperoxia-induced impairment with regard to a host's ability to clear bacteria and inflammatory lung injury. Thus, HMGB1 may provide a novel molecular target for improving hyperoxia-compromised innate immunity in patients with VAP.

  14. Air pollution and lung function among susceptible adult subjects: a panel study

    PubMed Central

    Lagorio, Susanna; Forastiere, Francesco; Pistelli, Riccardo; Iavarone, Ivano; Michelozzi, Paola; Fano, Valeria; Marconi, Achille; Ziemacki, Giovanni; Ostro, Bart D

    2006-01-01

    Background Adverse health effects at relatively low levels of ambient air pollution have consistently been reported in the last years. We conducted a time-series panel study of subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and ischemic heart disease (IHD) to evaluate whether daily levels of air pollutants have a measurable impact on the lung function of adult subjects with pre-existing lung or heart diseases. Methods Twenty-nine patients with COPD, asthma, or IHD underwent repeated lung function tests by supervised spirometry in two one-month surveys. Daily samples of coarse (PM10–2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particulate matter were collected by means of dichotomous samplers, and the dust was gravimetrically analyzed. The particulate content of selected metals (cadmium, chrome, iron, nickel, lead, platinum, vanadium, and zinc) was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Ambient concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), and sulphur dioxide (SO2) were obtained from the regional air-quality monitoring network. The relationships between concentrations of air pollutants and lung function parameters were analyzed by generalized estimating equations (GEE) for panel data. Results Decrements in lung function indices (FVC and/or FEV1) associated with increasing concentrations of PM2.5, NO2 and some metals (especially zinc and iron) were observed in COPD cases. Among the asthmatics, NO2 was associated with a decrease in FEV1. No association between average ambient concentrations of any air pollutant and lung function was observed among IHD cases. Conclusion This study suggests that the short-term negative impact of exposure to air pollutants on respiratory volume and flow is limited to individuals with already impaired respiratory function. The fine fraction of ambient PM seems responsible for the observed effects among COPD cases, with zinc and iron having a potential role via oxidative stress. The respiratory function

  15. Pharmacotherapy of impaired mucociliary clearance in non-CF pediatric lung disease. A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Boogaard, Ruben; de Jongste, Johan C; Merkus, Peter J F M

    2007-11-01

    Mucoactive agents are used to treat a variety of lung diseases involving impaired mucociliary clearance or mucus hypersecretion. The mucoactive agents studied most frequently are N-acetylcysteine (NAC), recombinant human DNase (rhDNase), and hypertonic saline. Studies on the efficacy of these have been mainly conducted in adults, and in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The exact role of mucoactive agents in children with non-CF lung disease is not well established. We present an overview of the current literature reporting clinical outcome measures of treatment with NAC, rhDNase, and hypertonic saline in children. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Impaired function of Fanconi anemia type C-deficient macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Ballman, Kimberly; Li, Deqiang; Khan, Shehnaz; Derr-Yellin, Ethel; Shou, Weinian; Haneline, Laura S

    2012-02-01

    FA is a genetic disorder characterized by BM failure, developmental defects, and cancer predisposition. Previous studies suggest that FA patients exhibit alterations in immunologic function. However, it is unclear whether the defects are immune cell-autonomous or secondary to leukopenia from evolving BM failure. Given the central role that macrophages have in the innate immune response, inflammation resolution, and antigen presentation for acquired immunity, we examined whether macrophages from Fancc-/- mice exhibit impaired function. Peritoneal inflammation induced by LPS or sodium periodate resulted in reduced monocyte/macrophage recruitment in Fancc-/- mice compared with WT controls. Fancc-/- mice also had decreased inflammatory monocytes mobilized into the peripheral blood after LPS treatment compared with controls. Furthermore, Fancc-/- peritoneal macrophages displayed cell-autonomous defects in function, including impaired adhesion to FN or endothelial cells, reduced chemoattractant-mediated migration, and decreased phagocytosis. Moreover, dysregulated F-actin rearrangement was detected in Fancc-/- macrophages after adhesion to FN, which was consistent with an observed reduction in RhoA-GTP levels. Importantly, these data suggest that impaired cytoskeletal rearrangements in Fancc-/- macrophages may be the common mechanism responsible for cell-autonomous defects detected in vitro, as well as altered monocyte/macrophage trafficking in vivo.

  17. Functional Literacy for Students with Visual Impairments and Significant Cognitive Disabilities: The Perspective of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebehazy, Kim T.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports opinions and practices of teachers of students with visual impairments (TSVIs) in 34 states regarding functional literacy for students with visual impairments (VIs) and significant cognitive disabilities (SCDs). The survey asked TSVIs to select a definition of functional literacy, indicate agreement with a series of literacy…

  18. Functional Literacy for Students with Visual Impairments and Significant Cognitive Disabilities: The Perspective of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zebehazy, Kim T.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports opinions and practices of teachers of students with visual impairments (TSVIs) in 34 states regarding functional literacy for students with visual impairments (VIs) and significant cognitive disabilities (SCDs). The survey asked TSVIs to select a definition of functional literacy, indicate agreement with a series of literacy…

  19. Wound Healing in Patients With Impaired Kidney Function.

    PubMed

    Maroz, Natallia; Simman, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Renal impairment has long been known to affect wound healing. However, information on differences in the spectrum of wound healing depending on the type of renal insufficiency is limited. Acute kidney injury (AKI) may be observed with different wound types. On one hand, it follows acute traumatic conditions such as crush injury, burns, and post-surgical wounds, and on the other hand, it arises as simultaneous targeting of skin and kidneys by autoimmune-mediated vasculitis. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) often occur in older people, who have limited physical mobility and predisposition for developing pressure-related wounds. The common risk factors for poor wound healing, generally observed in patients with CKD and ESRD, include poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, chronic venous insufficiency, and aging. ESRD patients have a unique spectrum of wounds related to impaired calcium-phosphorus metabolism, including calciphylaxis, in addition to having the risk factors presented by CKD patients. Overall, there is a wide range of uremic toxins: they may affect local mechanisms of wound healing and also adversely affect the functioning of multiple systems. In the present literature review, we discuss the association between different types of renal impairments and their effects on wound healing and examine this association from different aspects related to the management of wounds in renal impairment patients.

  20. Impairments of Motor Function While Multitasking in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kronemer, Sharif I.; Mandel, Jordan A.; Sacktor, Ned C.; Marvel, Cherie L.

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) became a treatable illness with the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (CART). As a result, patients with regular access to CART are expected to live decades with HIV. Long-term HIV infection presents unique challenges, including neurocognitive impairments defined by three major stages of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The current investigation aimed to study cognitive and motor impairments in HIV using a novel multitasking paradigm. Unlike current standard measures of cognitive and motor performance in HIV, multitasking increases real-world validity by mimicking the dual motor and cognitive demands that are part of daily professional and personal settings (e.g., driving, typing and writing). Moreover, multitask assessments can unmask compensatory mechanisms, normally used under single task conditions, to maintain performance. This investigation revealed that HIV+ participants were impaired on the motor component of the multitask, while cognitive performance was spared. A patient-specific positive interaction between motor performance and working memory recall was driven by poor HIV+ multitaskers. Surprisingly, HAND stage did not correspond with multitask performance and a variety of commonly used assessments indicated normal motor function among HIV+ participants with poor motor performance during the experimental task. These results support the use of multitasks to reveal otherwise hidden impairment in chronic HIV by expanding the sensitivity of clinical assessments used to determine HAND stage. Future studies should examine the capability of multitasks to predict performance in personal, professional and health-related behaviors and prognosis of patients living with chronic HIV. PMID:28503143

  1. Impairment of Endothelial Function by Little Cigar Secondhand Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangtao; Wang, Xiaoyin; Narayan, Shilpa; Glantz, Stanton A.; Schick, Suzaynn F.; Springer, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Little cigars and cigarillos are gaining in popularity as cigarette use wanes, mainly due to relaxed regulatory standards that make them cheaper, easier to buy individually, and available in a variety of flavors not allowed in cigarettes. To address whether they should be regulated as strictly as cigarettes, we investigated whether little cigar secondhand smoke (SHS) decreases vascular endothelial function like that of cigarettes. Methods We exposed rats to SHS from little cigars, cigarettes, or chamber air, for 10 minutes and measured the resulting acute impairment of arterial flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Results SHS from both little cigars and cigarettes impaired FMD. Impairment was greater after exposure to little cigar SHS than by cigarette SHS relative to pre-exposure values, although the post-exposure FMD values were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions Exposure to little cigar SHS leads to impairment of FMD that is at least equal to that resulting from similar levels of cigarette SHS. Our findings support the need to prevent even brief exposure to little cigar SHS, and support tobacco control policies that regulate little cigars as strictly as cigarettes. PMID:26753171

  2. Impairments of Motor Function While Multitasking in HIV.

    PubMed

    Kronemer, Sharif I; Mandel, Jordan A; Sacktor, Ned C; Marvel, Cherie L

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) became a treatable illness with the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (CART). As a result, patients with regular access to CART are expected to live decades with HIV. Long-term HIV infection presents unique challenges, including neurocognitive impairments defined by three major stages of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The current investigation aimed to study cognitive and motor impairments in HIV using a novel multitasking paradigm. Unlike current standard measures of cognitive and motor performance in HIV, multitasking increases real-world validity by mimicking the dual motor and cognitive demands that are part of daily professional and personal settings (e.g., driving, typing and writing). Moreover, multitask assessments can unmask compensatory mechanisms, normally used under single task conditions, to maintain performance. This investigation revealed that HIV+ participants were impaired on the motor component of the multitask, while cognitive performance was spared. A patient-specific positive interaction between motor performance and working memory recall was driven by poor HIV+ multitaskers. Surprisingly, HAND stage did not correspond with multitask performance and a variety of commonly used assessments indicated normal motor function among HIV+ participants with poor motor performance during the experimental task. These results support the use of multitasks to reveal otherwise hidden impairment in chronic HIV by expanding the sensitivity of clinical assessments used to determine HAND stage. Future studies should examine the capability of multitasks to predict performance in personal, professional and health-related behaviors and prognosis of patients living with chronic HIV.

  3. Effect of breastfeeding on lung function in asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwan Soo; Kim, Yoon Hee; Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Hee Seon; Han, Yoon Ki; Kim, Kyung Won; Sohn, Myung Hyun; Kim, Kyu-Earn

    2015-01-01

    Effect of breastfeeding on the protective effect on asthma has been studied extensively but remains controversial. Studies regarding the effect of breastfeeding on lung function have also been conflicting. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of breastfeeding on lung function in asthmatic children. We included 555 patients who visited Severance Children's Hospital Allergy Clinic with asthma. Pulmonary function, its bronchodilator response (BDR), fractional nitric oxide, and sputum eosinophils were measured. Parents completed questionnaires with information on feeding practices, family history of allergic disease, exposure to tobacco smoke, and presence of pets. Breastfeeding duration was categorized as not breastfed, breastfed <6 months, and breastfed ≥6 months. Within the asthma group, we stratified by atopic sensitization. We also investigated whether exclusivity of breastfeeding had any modifying effect on lung function. In the asthma group, ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) significantly increased according to breastfeeding duration: 86.6 ± 8.7 for not breastfed group, 87.2 ± 8.6 for <6 months group, and 88.8 ± 7.7 for ≥6 months group. Within asthma group, only the nonatopic subjects showed a significant increase of FEV1/FVC, maximal midexpiratory flow, and decrease of maximal response to BD according to breastfeeding duration. Increase in FEV1/FVC was seen in the exclusive breastfeeding for ≥6 months group compared with those partially breastfed but FVC was significantly lower in those exclusively breastfed <6 months group compared with those partially breastfed. BDR decreased with breastfeeding duration in the nonatopic asthma group. In conclusion, longer duration of breastfeeding appears to have a favorable effect on lung function in asthmatic children, especially in nonatopic subjects.

  4. Targeting Functional Impairments in the Treatment of Children and Adolescents with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Sasser, Tyler; Schoenfelder, Erin N; Stein, Mark A

    2017-02-01

    The diagnostic criteria for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) require both symptoms and impairment to be present. Impairment in functioning is commonly the primary reason for referral, and is also a better predictor of long-term outcomes than ADHD symptoms. And yet, only recently has research begun to examine the impact of ADHD treatments on functional impairment using efficient and psychometrically sound outcome measures. In this article, we identify several noteworthy multidimensional measures of functional impairment (ADHD FX, Barkley Functional Impairment Scale [BFIS], Impairment Rating Scale [IRS], Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale [WFIRS]) utilized in recent clinical trials for ADHD, and describe their psychometric properties and clinical utility. We also review existing evidence on the impact of pharmacological and behavioral treatments on different domains of functional impairment in ADHD youth as measured by these specific measures. Further research is needed to evaluate longitudinal effects of ADHD treatments on functional impairment, and the use of these measures in adaptive treatment designs.

  5. Chronic hypertension impairs flow-induced vasodilation and augments the myogenic response in fetal lung.

    PubMed

    Storme, Laurent; Parker, Thomas A; Kinsella, John P; Rairigh, Robyn L; Abman, Steven H

    2002-01-01

    We hypothesized that altered vasoreactivity in perinatal pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by abnormal responses to hemodynamic stress, including the loss of flow-induced vasodilation and an augmented myogenic response. Therefore, we studied the acute hemodynamic effects of brief compression of the ductus arteriosus (DA) in control fetal lambs and in lambs during exposure to chronic PH. In both groups, acute DA compression decreased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) by 20% at baseline (day 0). After 2 days of hypertension, acute DA compression paradoxically increased PVR by 50% in PH lambs, whereas PVR decreased by 25% in controls. During the 8-day study period, PVR increased during acute DA compression in PH lambs, whereas acute DA compression continued to cause vasodilation in controls. Brief treatment with the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor nitro-L-arginine (L-NA) increased basal PVR in control but not PH lambs, suggesting decreased NO production in PH lambs. Chronic hypertension increased the myogenic response after L-NA in PH lambs, whereas the myogenic response remained unchanged in controls. The myogenic response was inhibited by nifedipine in PH lambs, suggesting that the myogenic response is dependent upon the influx of extracellular calcium. We conclude that chronic PH impairs flow-induced vasodilation and increases the myogenic response in fetal lung. We speculate that decreased NO signaling and an augmented myogenic response contributes to abnormal vasoreactivity in PH.

  6. Lung function and heart disease in American Indian adults with high frequency of metabolic abnormalities (from the Strong Heart Study).

    PubMed

    Yeh, Fawn; Dixon, Anne E; Best, Lyle G; Marion, Susan M; Lee, Elisa T; Ali, Tauqeer; Yeh, Jeunliang; Rhoades, Everett R; Howard, Barbara V; Devereux, Richard B

    2014-07-15

    The associations of pulmonary function with cardiovascular disease (CVD) independent of diabetes mellitus (DM) and metabolic syndrome have not been examined in a population-based setting. We examined prevalence and incidence CVD in relation to lower pulmonary function in the Strong Heart Study second examination (1993 to 1995) in 352 CVD and 2,873 non-CVD adults free of overt lung disease (mean age 60 years). Lung function was assessed by standard spirometry. Participants with metabolic syndrome or DM with or without CVD had lower pulmonary function than participants without these conditions after adjustment for hypertension, age, gender, abdominal obesity, smoking, physical activity index, and study field center. CVD participants with DM had significantly lower forced vital capacity than participants with CVD alone. Significant associations were observed between reduced pulmonary function, preclinical CVD, and prevalent CVD after adjustment for multiple CVD risk factors. During follow-up (median 13.3 years), pulmonary function did not predict CVD incidence, it predicted CVD mortality. Among 3,225 participants, 412 (298 without baseline CVD) died from CVD by the end of 2008. In models adjusted for multiple CVD risk factors, DM, metabolic syndrome, and baseline CVD, compared with highest quartile of lung function, lower lung function predicted CVD mortality (relative risk up to 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.0, p<0.05). In conclusion, a population with a high prevalence of DM and metabolic syndrome and lower lung function was independently associated with prevalent clinical and preclinical CVD, and its impairment predicted CVD mortality. Additional research is needed to identify mechanisms linking metabolic abnormalities, low lung function, and CVD.

  7. Executive Function Is Selectively Impaired in Old Age Bipolar Depression.

    PubMed

    Caixeta, Leonardo; Soares, Vânia L D; Vieira, Renata T; Soares, Cândida D; Caixeta, Victor; Ferreira, Sandra B; Aversi-Ferreira, Tales A

    2017-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the cognitive signature of bipolar disorder (BD) in elderly brains. The neuropsychological features of depressive elderly with early-onset BD are largely unknown. This issue is relevant because cognitive impairment can produce an additional impact on the already compromised functionality of elderly with BD. The aim of this study is to assess executive functions (EFs) in the depressive phase of elderly outpatients with early-onset BD. Methods: Forty-nine elderly outpatients with early-onset BD were assessed with several neuropsychological tests for EF in the depressive phase of the disorder. Results: Executive dysfunction is very common in old age bipolar depression. Thirteen patients (26.5%) had a pseudodementia presentation. The worst performances were observed in the following tests: Trail Making B, Stroop Test 3, Backward Digit Span and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Conclusion: Executive dysfunction profile in elderly BD is complex and heterogeneous, but most cases display difficulties in working memory, inhibitory control, mental flexibility, and information processing speed. The performance of elderly with bipolar depression in executive assessment can be divided into two main categories: (1) Single EF domain impairment; and (2) Multiple EF domain impairment with or without a pseudodementia syndrome. Executive dysfunction in old age bipolar depression may be explained by lack of sufficient mental energy to run those cognitive processes that require larger amounts of effort to be performed.

  8. Impairment of B-cell functions during HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Amu, Sylvie; Ruffin, Nicolas; Rethi, Bence; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-09-24

    A variety of B-cell dysfunctions are manifested during HIV-1 infection, as reported early during the HIV-1 epidemic. It is not unusual that the pathogenic mechanisms presented to elucidate impairment of B-cell responses during HIV-1 infection focus on the impact of reduced T-cell numbers and functions, and lack of germinal center formation in lymphoid tissues. To our understanding, however, perturbation of B-cell phenotype and function during HIV-1 infection may begin at several different B-cell developmental stages. These impairments can be mediated by intrinsic B-cell defects as well as by the lack of proper T-cell help. In this review, we will highlight some of the pathways and molecular interactions leading to B-cell impairment prior to germinal center formation and B-cell activation mediated through the B-cell receptor in response to HIV-1 antigens. Recent studies indicate a regulatory role for B cells on T-cell biology and immune responses. We will discuss some of these novel findings and how these regulatory mechanisms could potentially be affected by the intrinsic defects of B cells taking place during HIV-1 infection.

  9. Executive Function Is Selectively Impaired in Old Age Bipolar Depression

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Leonardo; Soares, Vânia L. D.; Vieira, Renata T.; Soares, Cândida D.; Caixeta, Victor; Ferreira, Sandra B.; Aversi-Ferreira, Tales A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the cognitive signature of bipolar disorder (BD) in elderly brains. The neuropsychological features of depressive elderly with early-onset BD are largely unknown. This issue is relevant because cognitive impairment can produce an additional impact on the already compromised functionality of elderly with BD. The aim of this study is to assess executive functions (EFs) in the depressive phase of elderly outpatients with early-onset BD. Methods: Forty-nine elderly outpatients with early-onset BD were assessed with several neuropsychological tests for EF in the depressive phase of the disorder. Results: Executive dysfunction is very common in old age bipolar depression. Thirteen patients (26.5%) had a pseudodementia presentation. The worst performances were observed in the following tests: Trail Making B, Stroop Test 3, Backward Digit Span and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. Conclusion: Executive dysfunction profile in elderly BD is complex and heterogeneous, but most cases display difficulties in working memory, inhibitory control, mental flexibility, and information processing speed. The performance of elderly with bipolar depression in executive assessment can be divided into two main categories: (1) Single EF domain impairment; and (2) Multiple EF domain impairment with or without a pseudodementia syndrome. Executive dysfunction in old age bipolar depression may be explained by lack of sufficient mental energy to run those cognitive processes that require larger amounts of effort to be performed. PMID:28243220

  10. Serum vitamin D and functional impairment in octogenarian women.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Martínez, Rut; Fernández-Garrido, Julio; Buigues, Cristina; Martinez-Martinez, Mary; Cantero-Díaz, Liliana; Santamaría-Carrillo, Yolanda; Serra-Catalá, Nuria; Peris, Carlos; Cauli, Omar

    2016-05-01

    Serum vitamin D deficiency has been associated with frailty in people aged 65 and over, however its relationship with functional impairment has not been investigated in octogenerian (aged 80-90 years) institutionalized women. We assessed functional impairment in this latter group by measuring frailty syndrome and other geriatric and psychological assessment scales: the Tinetti gait and balance index to determine the risk for falls, the Barthel index to measure the basic activities of daily living, the Lawton index for instrumental activities, the mini-mental score examination test for cognitive impairment, the Yesavage scale for geriatric depression, and the Norton scale for the risk of ulceration. Frail individuals had significantly reduced serum vitamin D concentrations (measured as total 25-hydroxyvitamin D; 25(OH)D) compared to robust individuals, but reduced 25(OH)D concentration did not significantly correlate with frailty syndrome severity, and mean 25(OH)D concentrations were within the recommended levels in all groups. The 25(OH)D concentration did not correlate with any of the blood analytical parameters measured and with the geriatric assessment scales used, suggesting a selective relationship with frailty. These results highlight the need to individualize treatment such as vitamin D supplementation in order to treat frailty syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impaired functional integration in multiple sclerosis: a graph theory study.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Maria A; Valsasina, Paola; Meani, Alessandro; Falini, Andrea; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was to explore the topological organization of functional brain network connectivity in a large cohort of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and to assess whether its disruption contributes to disease clinical manifestations. Graph theoretical analysis was applied to resting state fMRI data from 246 MS patients and 55 matched healthy controls (HC). Functional connectivity between 116 cortical and subcortical brain regions was estimated using a bivariate correlation analysis. Global network properties (network degree, global efficiency, hierarchy, path length and assortativity) were abnormal in MS patients vs HC, and contributed to distinguish cognitively impaired MS patients (34%) from HC, but not the main MS clinical phenotypes. Compared to HC, MS patients also showed: (1) a loss of hubs in the superior frontal gyrus, precuneus and anterior cingulum in the left hemisphere; (2) a different lateralization of basal ganglia hubs (mostly located in the left hemisphere in HC, and in the right hemisphere in MS patients); and (3) a formation of hubs, not seen in HC, in the left temporal pole and cerebellum. MS patients also experienced a decreased nodal degree in the bilateral caudate nucleus and right cerebellum. Such a modification of regional network properties contributed to cognitive impairment and phenotypic variability of MS. An impairment of global integration (likely to reflect a reduced competence in information exchange between distant brain areas) occurs in MS and is associated with cognitive deficits. A regional redistribution of network properties contributes to cognitive status and phenotypic variability of these patients.

  12. Parieto-motor functional connectivity is impaired in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Palomar, Francisco J; Conde, Virginia; Carrillo, Fátima; Fernández-del-Olmo, Miguel; Koch, Giacomo; Mir, Pablo

    2013-03-01

    Bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease is associated with a difficulty in selecting and executing motor actions, likely due to alterations in the functional connectivity of cortico-cortical circuits. Our aims were to analyse the functional interplay between the posterior parietal cortex and the ipsilateral primary motor area in Parkinson's disease using bifocal transcranial magnetic stimulation, to evaluate its modulation by dopaminergic treatment and its relationship to a simple choice reaction task. We studied 12 Parkinson's disease patients with and without dopaminergic treatment and 12 healthy controls. A paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol was applied over the right posterior parietal cortex and the right primary motor area using different conditioning stimulus intensities and interstimulus intervals. Reaction and movement times were studied by a simple choice reaction task. In controls, we observed a significant facilitation of motor evoked potential amplitudes at 4 ms interstimulus interval when conditioning stimulus intensity was set to 90% of resting motor threshold. This functional interaction was not observed in Parkinson's disease patients without dopaminergic treatment and was not restored with treatment. Moreover, correlation analyses revealed that Parkinson's disease patients with less impaired parieto-motor interaction were faster in executing reaching movements in a choice reaction time task, suggesting that the functional parieto-motor impairment described here could be related to bradykinesia observed in Parkinson's disease patients. Parieto-motor functional connectivity is impaired in Parkinson's disease. The reduced efficacy of this connection could be related to presence of bradykinesia previously observed in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of budesonide on the lung functions, inflammation and apoptosis in a saline-lavage model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mokra, D; Kosutova, P; Balentova, S; Adamkov, M; Mikolka, P; Mokry, J; Antosova, M; Calkovska, A

    2016-12-01

    Diffuse alveolar injury, edema, and inflammation are fundamental signs of acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Whereas the systemic administration of corticosteroids previously led to controversial results, this study evaluated if corticosteroids given intratracheally may improve lung functions and reduce edema formation, migration of cells into the lung and their activation in experimentally-induced ALI. In oxygen-ventilated rabbits, ALI was induced by repetitive saline lung lavage, until PaO2 decreased to < 26.7 kPa in FiO2 1.0. Then, one group of animals was treated with corticosteroid budesonide (Pulmicort susp inh, AstraZeneca; 0.25 mg/kg) given intratracheally by means of inpulsion regime of high-frequency jet ventilation, while another group was non-treated, and both groups were oxygen-ventilated for following 5 hours. Another group of animals served as healthy controls. After sacrifice of animals, left lung was saline-lavaged and protein content was measured and cells in the lavage fluid were determined microscopically. Right lung tissue was used for estimation of edema formation (expressed as wet/dry weight ratio), for histomorphological investigation, immunohistochemical determination of apoptosis of lung cells, and for determination of markers of inflammation and lung injury (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IFNγ, esRAGE, caspase-3) by ELISA methods. Levels of several cytokines were estimated also in plasma. Repetitive lung lavage worsened gas exchange, induced lung injury, inflammation and lung edema and increased apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. Budesonide reduced lung edema, cell infiltration into the lung and apoptosis of epithelial cells and decreased concentrations of proinflammatory markers in the lung and blood. These changes resulted in improved ventilation. Concluding, curative intratracheal treatment with budesonide alleviated lung injury, inflammation, apoptosis of lung epithelial cells and lung edema and

  14. A Function of Lung Surfactant Protein SP-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, M. L.; Bisagno, A. M.; Zasadzinski, J. A. N.; Bruni, R.; Waring, A. J.

    1993-07-01

    The primary function of lung surfactant is to form monolayers at the alveolar interface capable of lowering the normal surface tension to near zero. To accomplish this process, the surfactant must be capable of maintaining a coherent, tightly packed monolayer that avoids collapse during expiration. The positively charged amino-terminal peptide SP-B1-25 of lung surfactant-specific protein SP-B increases the collapse pressure of an important component of lung surfactant, palmitic acid (PA), to nearly 70 millinewtons per meter. This alteration of the PA isotherms removes the driving force for "squeeze-out" of the fatty acids from the primarily dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayers of lung surfactant. An uncharged mutant of SP-B1-25 induced little change in the isotherms, suggesting that a specific charge interaction between the cationic peptide and the anionic lipid is responsible for the stabilization. The effect of SP-B1-25 on fatty acid isotherms is remarkably similar to that of simple poly-cations, suggesting that such polymers might be useful as components of replacement surfactants for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome.

  15. Changes in Functional Lung Regions During the Course of Radiation Therapy and Their Potential Impact on Lung Dosimetry for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xue; Frey, Kirk; Matuszak, Martha; Paul, Stanton; Ten Haken, Randall; Yu, Jinming; Kong, Feng-Ming

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To study changes in functional activity on ventilation (V)/perfusion (Q) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) during radiation therapy (RT) and explore the impact of such changes on lung dosimetry in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifteen NSCLC patients with centrally located tumors were enrolled. All patients were treated with definitive RT dose of ≥60 Gy. V/Q SPECT-CT scans were performed prior to and after delivery of 45 Gy of fractionated RT. SPECT images were used to define temporarily dysfunctional regions of lung caused by tumor or other potentially reversible conditions as B3. The functional lung (FL) was defined on SPECT by 2 separate approaches: FL1, a threshold of 30% of the maximum uptake of the patient's lung; and FL2, FL1 plus B3 region. The impact of changes in FL between initiation of RT and delivery of 45 Gy on lung dosimetry were analyzed. Results: Fourteen patients (93%) had larger FL2 volumes than FL1 pre-RT (P<.001). Dysfunctional lung became functional in 11 patients (73%) on V SPECT and in 10 patients (67%) on Q SPECT. The dosimetric parameters generated from CT-based anatomical lung had significantly lower values in FL1 than FL2, with a median reduction in the volume of lung receiving a dose of at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) of 3%, 5.6%, and mean lung dose of 0.95 and 1.55 on V and Q SPECT respectively. Conclusions: Regional ventilation and perfusion function improve significantly during RT in centrally located NSCLC. Lung dosimetry values vary notably between different definitions of functional lung.

  16. Oligopeptides impairing the Myc-Max heterodimerization inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation by reducing Myc transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    D'Agnano, Igea; Valentini, Alessandra; Gatti, Giuliana; Chersi, Alberto; Felsani, Armando

    2007-01-01

    Deregulated CMYC gene causes cell transformation and is often correlated with tumor progression and a worse clinical outcome of cancer patients. The transcription factor Myc functions by heterodimerizing with its partner, Max. As a strategy to inhibit Myc activity, we have synthesized three small peptides corresponding to segments of the leucine zipper (LZ) region of Max. The purpose of these peptides is to occupy the site of recognition between Myc and Max located in the LZ and inhibit-specific heterodimerization between these proteins. We have used the synthesized oligopeptides in two lung cancer cell lines with different levels of Myc expression. Results demonstrate that: (i) the three peptides resulted equally effective in competing the interaction between Myc and Max in vitro; (ii) they were efficiently internalized into the cells and significantly inhibited cell growth in the cells showing the highest Myc expression; (iii) one specific peptide, only nine aminoacids long, efficiently impaired the transcriptional activity of Myc in vivo, showing a more stable interaction with this protein. Our results are relevant to the development of novel anti-tumoral therapeutic strategies, directed to Myc-overexpressing tumors.

  17. Genetic ancestry influences asthma susceptibility and lung function among Latinos.

    PubMed

    Pino-Yanes, Maria; Thakur, Neeta; Gignoux, Christopher R; Galanter, Joshua M; Roth, Lindsey A; Eng, Celeste; Nishimura, Katherine K; Oh, Sam S; Vora, Hita; Huntsman, Scott; Nguyen, Elizabeth A; Hu, Donglei; Drake, Katherine A; Conti, David V; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Sandoval, Karla; Winkler, Cheryl A; Borrell, Luisa N; Lurmann, Fred; Islam, Talat S; Davis, Adam; Farber, Harold J; Meade, Kelley; Avila, Pedro C; Serebrisky, Denise; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Lenoir, Michael A; Ford, Jean G; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Thyne, Shannon M; Sen, Saunak; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R; Bustamante, Carlos D; Williams, L Keoki; Gilliland, Frank D; Gauderman, W James; Kumar, Rajesh; Torgerson, Dara G; Burchard, Esteban G

    2015-01-01

    Childhood asthma prevalence and morbidity varies among Latinos in the United States, with Puerto Ricans having the highest and Mexicans the lowest. To determine whether genetic ancestry is associated with the odds of asthma among Latinos, and secondarily whether genetic ancestry is associated with lung function among Latino children. We analyzed 5493 Latinos with and without asthma from 3 independent studies. For each participant, we estimated the proportion of African, European, and Native American ancestry using genome-wide data. We tested whether genetic ancestry was associated with the presence of asthma and lung function among subjects with and without asthma. Odds ratios (OR) and effect sizes were assessed for every 20% increase in each ancestry. Native American ancestry was associated with lower odds of asthma (OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.66-0.78, P = 8.0 × 10(-15)), while African ancestry was associated with higher odds of asthma (OR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.14-1.72, P = .001). These associations were robust to adjustment for covariates related to early life exposures, air pollution, and socioeconomic status. Among children with asthma, African ancestry was associated with lower lung function, including both pre- and post-bronchodilator measures of FEV1 (-77 ± 19 mL; P = 5.8 × 10(-5) and -83 ± 19 mL; P = 1.1 x 10(-5), respectively) and forced vital capacity (-100 ± 21 mL; P = 2.7 × 10(-6) and -107 ± 22 mL; P = 1.0 x 10(-6), respectively). Differences in the proportions of genetic ancestry can partially explain disparities in asthma susceptibility and lung function among Latinos. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  18. Association between lung function and airway wall density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken; Zheng, Bin; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Tedrow, John; Park, Sang C.; Tan, Jun; Pu, Jiantao; Drescher, John M.; Gur, David; Sciurba, Frank C.

    2009-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) examination is often used to quantify the relation between lung function and airway remodeling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this preliminary study, we examined the association between lung function and airway wall computed attenuation ("density") in 200 COPD screening subjects. Percent predicted FVC (FVC%), percent predicted FEV1 (FEV1%), and the ratio of FEV1 to FVC as a percentage (FEV1/FVC%) were measured post-bronchodilator. The apical bronchus of the right upper lobe was manually selected from CT examinations for evaluation. Total airway area, lumen area, wall area, lumen perimeter and wall area as fraction of the total airway area were computed. Mean HU (meanHU) and maximum HU (maxHU) values were computed across pixels assigned membership in the wall and with a HU value greater than -550. The Pearson correlation coefficients (PCC) between FVC%, FEV1%, and FEV1/FVC% and meanHU were -0.221 (p = 0.002), -0.175 (p = 0.014), and -0.110 (p = 0.123), respectively. The PCCs for maxHU were only significant for FVC%. The correlations between lung function and the airway morphometry parameters were slightly stronger compared to airway wall density. MeanHU was significantly correlated with wall area (PCC = 0.720), airway area (0.498) and wall area percent (0.611). This preliminary work demonstrates that airway wall density is associated with lung function. Although the correlations in our study were weaker than a recent study, airway wall density initially appears to be an important parameter in quantitative CT analysis of COPD.

  19. Ambient particulate matter and lung function growth in Chinese children

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ananya; Hu, Wei; Wei, Fusheng; Korn, Leo; Chapman, Robert S.; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim)

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposure to particulate matter (PM) has been associated with deficits in lung function growth among children in Western countries. However, few studies have explored this association in developing countries, where PM levels are often substantially higher. Methods Children (n=3273) aged 6–12 years were recruited from eight schools in four cities. The lung function parameters of forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) were measured using computerized spirometers twice a year for up to three years (1993–1996). Dichotomous samplers placed in each schoolyard were used to measure PM2.5 and PM10 (PM with diameter ≤ 2.5 and ≤ 10, respectively). Multivariable generalized estimating equations were used to examine the association between the quarterly average PM levels and lung function growth over the period of follow-up. Results Annual average PM2.5 and PM10 levels in the four cities ranged from 57 to 158 μg/m3 and 95 to 268 μg/m3, respectively. In multivariable models, an increase of 10 μg/m3 of PM2.5 was associated with decreases of 2.7 ml FEV1 (95% confidence interval= −3.5 to −2.0), 3.5 ml FVC (−4.3 to −2.7), 1.4 ml/year FEV1 growth (−1.8 to −0.9), and 1.5 ml/year FVC growth (−2.0 to −1.0). Similar results were seen with PM10 exposure. Conclusions Exposure to ambient particulate matter was associated with decreased growth in lung function among Chinese children. PMID:22407138

  20. Genetic Ancestry Influences Asthma Susceptibility and Lung Function Among Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Pino-Yanes, Maria; Thakur, Neeta; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Galanter, Joshua M.; Roth, Lindsey A.; Eng, Celeste; Nishimura, Katherine K.; Oh, Sam S.; Vora, Hita; Huntsman, Scott; Nguyen, Elizabeth A.; Hu, Donglei; Drake, Katherine A.; Conti, David V.; Moreno-Estrada, Andres; Sandoval, Karla; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Borrell, Luisa N.; Lurmann, Fred; Islam, Talat S.; Davis, Adam; Farber, Harold J.; Meade, Kelley; Avila, Pedro C.; Serebrisky, Denise; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Lenoir, Michael A.; Ford, Jean G.; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Thyne, Shannon M.; Sen, Saunak; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Williams, L. Keoki; Gilliland, Frank D.; Gauderman, W. James; Kumar, Rajesh; Torgerson, Dara G.; Burchard, Esteban G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood asthma prevalence and morbidity varies among Latinos in the United States, with Puerto Ricans having the highest and Mexicans the lowest. Objective To determine whether genetic ancestry is associated with the odds of asthma among Latinos, and secondarily whether genetic ancestry is associated with lung function among Latino children. Methods We analyzed 5,493 Latinos with and without asthma from three independent studies. For each participant we estimated the proportion of African, European, and Native American ancestry using genome-wide data. We tested whether genetic ancestry was associated with the presence of asthma and lung function among subjects with and without asthma. Odds ratios (OR) and effect sizes were assessed for every 20% increase in each ancestry. Results Native American ancestry was associated with lower odds of asthma (OR=0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.66–0.78, p=8.0×10−15), while African ancestry was associated with higher odds of asthma (OR=1.40, 95%CI: 1.14–1.72, p=0.001). These associations were robust to adjustment for covariates related to early life exposures, air pollution and socioeconomic status. Among children with asthma, African ancestry was associated with lower lung function, including both pre- and post-bronchodilator measures of forced expiratory volume in the first second (−77±19 ml, p=5.8×10−5 and −83±19 ml, p=1.1×10−5, respectively) and forced vital capacity (−100±21 ml, p=2.7×10−6 and −107±22 ml, p=1.0×10−6, respectively). Conclusion Differences in the proportions of genetic ancestry can partially explain disparities in asthma susceptibility and lung function among Latinos. PMID:25301036

  1. Severe exacerbations and decline in lung function in asthma.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, Paul M; Pedersen, Søren; Lamm, Carl Johan; Tan, Wan C; Busse, William W

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the association between asthma exacerbations and the decline in lung function, as well as the potential effects of an inhaled corticosteroid, budesonide, on exacerbation-related decline in patients with asthma. To determine whether severe asthma exacerbations are associated with a persistent decline in lung function. The START (inhaled steroid treatment as regular therapy in early asthma) study was a 3-year, randomized, double-blind study of 7,165 patients (5-66 yr) with persistent asthma for less than 2 years, to determine whether early intervention with low-dose inhaled budesonide prevents severe asthma-related events (exacerbations requiring hospitalization or emergency treatment) and decline in lung function. There were 315 patients who experienced at least one severe asthma exacerbation, of which 305 were analyzable, 190 in the placebo group and 115 in the budesonide group. In the placebo group, the change in post-bronchodilator FEV(1) % predicted from baseline to the end of the study, in patients who did or did not experience a severe exacerbation was -6.44% and -2.43%, respectively (P < 0.001). A significant difference was seen in both children and in adults, but not in adolescents. In the budesonide group, the change in the post-bronchodilator FEV(1) % predicted in patients who did or did not experience a severe exacerbation was -2.48% and -1.72%, respectively (P = 0.57). The difference in magnitude of reduction afforded by budesonide, in patients who experienced at least one severe asthma-related event compared with those who did not, was statistically significant (P = 0.042). Severe asthma exacerbations are associated with a more rapid decline in lung function. Treatment with low doses of inhaled corticosteroid is associated with an attenuation of the decline.

  2. The relation of airway size to lung function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, J. Ken; Zheng, Bin; Sciurba, Frank C.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Bon, Jessica M.; Park, Sang C.; Pu, Jiantao; Gur, David

    2008-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may cause airway remodeling, and small airways are the mostly likely site of associated airway flow obstruction. Detecting and quantifying airways depicted on a typical computed tomography (CT) images is limited by spatial resolution. In this study, we examined the association between lung function and airway size. CT examinations and spirometry measurement of forced expiratory volume in one second as a percent predicted (FEV I%) from 240 subjects were used in this study. Airway sections depicted in axial CT section were automatically detected and quantified. Pearson correlation coefficients (PCC) were computed to compare lung function across three size categories: (1) all detected airways, (2) the smallest 50% of detected airways, and (3) the largest 50% of detected airways using the CORANOVA test. The mean number of all airways detected per subject was 117.4 (+/- 40.1) with mean size ranging from 20.2 to 50.0 mm2. The correlation between lung function (i.e., FEV I) and airway morphometry associated with airway remodeling and airflow obstruction (i.e., lumen perimeter and wall area as a percent of total airway area) was significantly stronger for smaller compared to larger airways (p < 0.05). The PCCs between FEV I and all airways, the smallest 50%, and the largest 50% were 0.583, 0.617, 0.523, respectively, for lumen perimeter and -0.560, -0.584, and -0.514, respectively, for wall area percent. In conclusion, analyzing a set of smaller airways compared to larger airways may improve detection of an association between lung function and airway morphology change.

  3. Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Model Incorporating Lung Function: Development and Validation in the UK Biobank Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Muller, David C; Johansson, Mattias; Brennan, Paul

    2017-03-10

    Purpose Several lung cancer risk prediction models have been developed, but none to date have assessed the predictive ability of lung function in a population-based cohort. We sought to develop and internally validate a model incorporating lung function using data from the UK Biobank prospective cohort study. Methods This analysis included 502,321 participants without a previous diagnosis of lung cancer, predominantly between 40 and 70 years of age. We used flexible parametric survival models to estimate the 2-year probability of lung cancer, accounting for the competing risk of death. Models included predictors previously shown to be associated with lung cancer risk, including sex, variables related to smoking history and nicotine addiction, medical history, family history of lung cancer, and lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]). Results During accumulated follow-up of 1,469,518 person-years, there were 738 lung cancer diagnoses. A model incorporating all predictors had excellent discrimination (concordance (c)-statistic [95% CI] = 0.85 [0.82 to 0.87]). Internal validation suggested that the model will discriminate well when applied to new data (optimism-corrected c-statistic = 0.84). The full model, including FEV1, also had modestly superior discriminatory power than one that was designed solely on the basis of questionnaire variables (c-statistic = 0.84 [0.82 to 0.86]; optimism-corrected c-statistic = 0.83; pFEV1 = 3.4 × 10(-13)). The full model had better discrimination than standard lung cancer screening eligibility criteria (c-statistic = 0.66 [0.64 to 0.69]). Conclusion A risk prediction model that includes lung function has strong predictive ability, which could improve eligibility criteria for lung cancer screening programs.

  4. Postoperative complications do not influence the pattern of early lung function recovery after lung resection for lung cancer in patients at risk.

    PubMed

    Ercegovac, Maja; Subotic, Dragan; Zugic, Vladimir; Jakovic, Radoslav; Moskovljevic, Dejan; Bascarevic, Slavisa; Mujovic, Natasa

    2014-05-19

    The pattern and factors influencing the lung function recovery in the first postoperative days are still not fully elucidated, especially in patients at increased risk. Prospective study on 60 patients at increased risk, who underwent a lung resection for primary lung cancer. complete resection and one or more known risk factors in form of COPD, cardiovascular disorders, advanced age or other comorbidities. Previous myocardial infarction, myocardial revascularization or stenting, cardiac rhythm disorders, arterial hypertension and myocardiopathy determined the increased cardiac risk. The severity of COPD was graded according to GOLD criteria. The trend of the postoperative lung function recovery was assessed by performing spirometry with a portable spirometer. Cardiac comorbidity existed in 55%, mild and moderate COPD in 20% and 35% of patients respectively. Measured values of FVC% and FEV1% on postoperative days one, three and seven, showed continuous improvement, with significant difference between the days of measurement, especially between days three and seven. There was no difference in the trend of the lung function recovery between patients with and without postoperative complications. Whilst pO2 was decreasing during the first three days in a roughly parallel fashion in patients with respiratory, surgical complications and in patients without complications, a slight hypercapnia registered on the first postoperative day was gradually abolished in all groups except in patients with cardiac complications. Extent of the lung resection and postoperative complications do not significantly influence the trend of the lung function recovery after lung resection for lung cancer.

  5. Postoperative complications do not influence the pattern of early lung function recovery after lung resection for lung cancer in patients at risk

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The pattern and factors influencing the lung function recovery in the first postoperative days are still not fully elucidated, especially in patients at increased risk. Methods Prospective study on 60 patients at increased risk, who underwent a lung resection for primary lung cancer. Inclusion criteria: complete resection and one or more known risk factors in form of COPD, cardiovascular disorders, advanced age or other comorbidities. Previous myocardial infarction, myocardial revascularization or stenting, cardiac rhythm disorders, arterial hypertension and myocardiopathy determined the increased cardiac risk. The severity of COPD was graded according to GOLD criteria. The trend of the postoperative lung function recovery was assessed by performing spirometry with a portable spirometer. Results Cardiac comorbidity existed in 55%, mild and moderate COPD in 20% and 35% of patients respectively. Measured values of FVC% and FEV1% on postoperative days one, three and seven, showed continuous improvement, with significant difference between the days of measurement, especially between days three and seven. There was no difference in the trend of the lung function recovery between patients with and without postoperative complications. Whilst pO2 was decreasing during the first three days in a roughly parallel fashion in patients with respiratory, surgical complications and in patients without complications, a slight hypercapnia registered on the first postoperative day was gradually abolished in all groups except in patients with cardiac complications. Conclusion Extent of the lung resection and postoperative complications do not significantly influence the trend of the lung function recovery after lung resection for lung cancer. PMID:24884793

  6. Sleep quality and daytime function in adults with cystic fibrosis and severe lung disease.

    PubMed

    Dancey, D R; Tullis, E D; Heslegrave, R; Thornley, K; Hanly, P J

    2002-03-01

    It was hypothesized that adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with severe lung disease have impaired daytime function related to nocturnal hypoxaemia and sleep disruption. Nineteen CF patients (forced expiratory volume in one second 28+/-7% predicted) and 10 healthy subjects completed sleep diaries, overnight polysomnography (PSG), and assessment of daytime sleepiness and neurocognitive function. CF patients tended to report more awakenings (0.7+/-0.5 versus 0.3+/-0.2 x h(-1), p=0.08), and PSG revealed reduced sleep efficiency (71+/-25 versus 93+/-4%, p=0.004) and a higher frequency of awakenings (4.2+/-2.7 versus 2.4+/-1.4 x h(-1), p=0.06). Mean arterial oxygen saturation during sleep was lower in CF patients (84.4+/-6.8 versus 94.3+/-1.5%, p<0.0001) and was associated with reduced sleep efficiency (regression coefficient (r)=0.57, p=0.014). CF patients had short sleep latency on the multiple sleep latency test (6.7+/-3 min). The CF group reported lower levels of activation and happiness and greater levels of fatigue (p<0.01), which correlated with indices of sleep loss, such as sleep efficiency (r=0.47, p=10.05). Objective neurocognitive performance was also impaired in CF patients, reflected by lower throughput for simple addition/subtraction, serial reaction and colour-word conflict. The authors concluded that adult cystic fibrosis patients with severe lung disease have impaired neurocognitive function and daytime sleepiness, which is partly related to chronic sleep loss and nocturnal hypoxaemia.

  7. The association between personal care products and lung function.

    PubMed

    Dales, Robert E; Cakmak, Sabit; Leech, Judith; Liu, Ling

    2013-02-01

    Chemical exposures are important determinants of respiratory health. The objective of the present study was to determine the association between the use of personal care products, which may contain respirable components, and lung function. Using questionnaire and spirometry data collected during the Canadian Health Measures population survey, the association was tested between 1-second forced expiratory volume (FEV(l)) and forced vital capacity (FVC) expressed as a percentage of predicted, and the frequency of use of personal care products categorized as eye makeup, fragrances, hairstyle products, lipstick, and scented body products. Five thousand sixteen of the 5604 participants in the survey reported using at least one personal care product in the past 3 months. Among men and women, an interquartile increase in hairstyle products was associated with an approximate 2% decrease in both FEV(1) and FVC (P < .05). Among women, each product category was associated with a significant decrease in lung function with the largest observed effect being a 4.08% (95% confidence interval, 7.71-0.45) decrease in FVC associated with an interquartile range increase in the frequency of use of scented body products. This study provides data suggesting that using personal care products may have a small adverse effect on lung function. Further research is warranted to investigate this possibility. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Rubberwood dust and lung function among Thai furniture factory workers.

    PubMed

    Thetkathuek, Anamai; Yingratanasuk, Tanongsak; Demers, Paul A; Thepaksorn, Phayong; Saowakhontha, Sastri; Keifer, Matthew C

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess factors affecting lung function among 685 workers in the rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis) furniture industry in the Chonburi and Rayung provinces of eastern Thailand. Study data were gathered using questionnaires, by sampling wood dust, and by spirometry. The mean wood dust exposure level in the factories was 4.08 mg/m3 (SD = 1.42, range: 1.15-11.17 mg/m3). The mean overall percent of predicted forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and FEV1/FVC values were 84 % (SD = 13.41), 86 % (SD = 14.40), and 99% (SD = 10.42), respectively. Significant negative correlations were found between mean dust exposure levels and FVC (p = 0.0008), and FEV1/FVC% (p < 0.001), but not FEV1 (p = 0.074). An association between decline in lung function and wood dust levels among wood workers suggests that rubberwood dust exposure negatively affects lung function.

  9. African ancestry, lung function and the effect of genetics.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Ana Maria B; Wehrmeister, Fernando C; Hartwig, Fernando P; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Gigante, Denise P; Barros, Fernando C; Oliveira, Isabel O; Ferreira, Gustavo D; Horta, Bernardo L

    2015-06-01

    African-Americans have smaller lung function compared with European-Americans. The aim of this study was to disentangle the contribution of genetics from other variables on lung function. A cohort was followed from birth to 30 years of age in Brazil. Several variables were collected: genomic analysis based on DNA; forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) obtained by spirometry; height measured by anthropometrists; and thorax circumference evaluated by photonic scanner. Crude and adjusted linear regression models were calculated according to African ancestry. The sample comprised 2869 participants out of 3701 members of the cohort. Males with higher African ancestry by DNA analysis had a smaller FEV1 (-0.13 L, 95% CI -0.23- -0.03 L) and FVC (-0.21 L, 95% CI -0.32- -0.09 L) compared with those with less African ancestry, having accounted for height, sitting to standing height ratio and other confounders. Similar effects were seen in females. After adjustment, ancestry remained significantly associated with lung function, but the large effect of adjustment for confounding among males (but not females) does not allow us to exclude the possibility that residual confounding may still account for these findings. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  10. Lung function and radiographic change in chrysotile workers in Swaziland.

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, M; Bevan, M M; Elmes, P C; Allardice, J T; Bradley, A C

    1982-01-01

    The effect on lung function and radiographic indices of exposure to chrysotile asbestos was investigated by cross-sectional studies in two groups of men at Havelock Mine, Swaziland. The first group consisted of 214 employees and ex-employees, mean age 52, who had been employed for at least 10 years, and whose dust exposure ranged from minimal for surface workers to very heavy for those in the grading and bagging sections of the mill. In this group 29% had category 1 or more simple pneumoconiosis and 4.5% category 2 or more. For surface and mine workers, the estimated annual deterioration in FEV1 and FVC and the increase in category of pneumoconiosis was similar to that due to age alone, while the heaviest exposure almost doubled the decline in lung function and trebled the rate of progression of pneumoconiosis. The second group consisted of 224 men, mean age 33, all currently working in the mill and having been employed there for at least a year. In this group 30% had category 1 or more simple pneumoconiosis, and 2.7% category 2. Exposure in the dustiest sections of the mill more than doubled the estimated annual decline in lung function and doubled the rate of progression of pneumoconiosis. PMID:6291579

  11. African ancestry, lung function and the effect of genetics

    PubMed Central

    Wehrmeister, Fernando C.; Hartwig, Fernando P.; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Gigante, Denise P.; Barros, Fernando C.; Oliveira, Isabel O.; Ferreira, Gustavo D.; Horta, Bernardo L.

    2015-01-01

    African-Americans have smaller lung function compared with European-Americans. The aim of this study was to disentangle the contribution of genetics from other variables on lung function. A cohort was followed from birth to 30 years of age in Brazil. Several variables were collected: genomic analysis based on DNA; forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) obtained by spirometry; height measured by anthropometrists; and thorax circumference evaluated by photonic scanner. Crude and adjusted linear regression models were calculated according to African ancestry. The sample comprised 2869 participants out of 3701 members of the cohort. Males with higher African ancestry by DNA analysis had a smaller FEV1 (−0.13 L, 95% CI −0.23– −0.03 L) and FVC (−0.21 L, 95% CI −0.32– −0.09 L) compared with those with less African ancestry, having accounted for height, sitting to standing height ratio and other confounders. Similar effects were seen in females. After adjustment, ancestry remained significantly associated with lung function, but the large effect of adjustment for confounding among males (but not females) does not allow us to exclude the possibility that residual confounding may still account for these findings. PMID:25700383

  12. Mechanical ventilation with 40% oxygen reduces pulmonary expression of genes that regulate lung development and impairs alveolar septation in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Bland, Richard D; Mokres, Lucia M; Ertsey, Robert; Jacobson, Berit E; Jiang, Shu; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Xu, Liwen; Shinwell, Eric S; Zhang, Feijie; Beasley, Matthew A

    2007-11-01

    Mechanical ventilation with 40% oxygen reduces pulmonary expression of genes that regulate lung development and impairs alveolar septation in newborn mice. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 293: , 2007. First published August 17, 2007; - Mechanical ventilation (MV) with O(2)-rich gas offers life-saving treatment for extremely premature infants with respiratory failure but often leads to neonatal chronic lung disease (CLD), characterized by defective formation of alveoli and blood vessels in the developing lung. We discovered that MV of 2- to 4-day-old mice with 40% O(2) for 8 h, compared with unventilated control pups, reduced lung expression of genes that regulate lung septation and angiogenesis (VEGF-A and its receptor, VEGF-R2; PDGF-A; and tenascin-C). MV with air for 8 h yielded similar results for PDGF-A and tenascin-C but did not alter lung mRNA expression of VEGF or VEGF-R2. MV of 4- to 6-day-old mice with 40% O(2) for 24 h reduced lung protein abundance of VEGF-A, VEGF-R2, PDGF-A, and tenascin-C and resulted in lung structural abnormalities consistent with evolving CLD. After MV with 40% O(2) for 24 h, lung volume was similar to unventilated controls, whereas distal air space size, assessed morphometrically, was greater in lungs of ventilated pups, indicative of impaired septation. Immunostaining for vimentin, which is expressed in myofibroblasts, was reduced in distal lung after 24 h of MV with 40% O(2). These molecular, cellular, and structural changes occurred without detectable lung inflammation as evaluated by histology and assays for proinflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase activity, and water content in lung. Thus lengthy MV of newborn mice with O(2)-rich gas reduces lung expression of genes and proteins that are critical for normal lung growth and development. These changes yielded lung structural defects similar to those observed in evolving CLD.

  13. Impairments that Influence Physical Function among Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Carmen L.; Gawade, Prasad L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2015-01-01

    Children treated for cancer are at increased risk of developing chronic health conditions, some of which may manifest during or soon after treatment while others emerge many years after therapy. These health problems may limit physical performance and functional capacity, interfering with participation in work, social, and recreational activities. In this review, we discuss treatment-induced impairments in the endocrine, musculoskeletal, neurological, and cardiopulmonary systems and their influence on mobility and physical function. We found that cranial radiation at a young age was associated with a broad range of chronic conditions including obesity, short stature, low bone mineral density and neuromotor impairments. Anthracyclines and chest radiation are associated with both short and long-term cardiotoxicity. Although numerous chronic conditions are documented among individuals treated for childhood cancer, the impact of these conditions on mobility and function are not well characterized, with most studies limited to survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and brain tumors. Moving forward, further research assessing the impact of chronic conditions on participation in work and social activities is required. Moreover, interventions to prevent or ameliorate the loss of physical function among children treated for cancer are likely to become an important area of survivorship research. PMID:25692094

  14. The Early Indicators of Functional Decrease in Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kubicki, Alexandre; Fautrelle, Lilian; Bourrelier, Julien; Rouaud, Olivier; Mourey, France

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Motor deficiency is associated with cognitive frailty in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairments (MCI). In this study we aimed to test the integrity in muscle synergies involved in an arm-pointing movement in functionally unimpaired MCI patients. We hypothesized that early motor indicators exist in this population at a preclinical level. Methods: Electromyographic signals were collected for 11 muscles in 3 groups: Young Adults (YA), Older Adults (OA), and MCI patients. The OA and MCI groups presented the same functional status. Each subject performed 20 arm-pointing movements from a standing position. Results: The main differences were (1) an earlier activation of the left Obliquus internus in MCI compared with OA group, (2) an earlier activation for the MCI compared with both OA and YA. The temporal differences in muscle synergies between MCI and OA groups were linked with executive functions of MCI patients, assessed by the trail making test. Moreover, the results show a delayed activation of the right Biceps Femoris and the right Erector Spinae at l3 in MCI and OA compared with YA. Interpretation: The motor program changes highlighted in our patient MCI group suggest that discrete modifications of the motor command seem to exist even in the absence of functional impairment. Instead of showing an indication of delayed muscle activation in the MCI patients, our results highlight some early activation of several trunk muscles. PMID:27570509

  15. Lung function and gas exchange in Eisenmenger syndrome and their impact on exercise capacity and survival.

    PubMed

    Broberg, Craig S; Van Woerkom, Ryan C; Swallow, Elizabeth; Dimopoulos, Kostas; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Allada, Gopal; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2014-01-15

    Eisenmenger physiology may contribute to abnormal pulmonary mechanics and gas exchange and thus impaired functional capacity. We explored the relationship between lung function and gas exchange parameters with exercise capacity and survival. Stable adult patients with Eisenmenger syndrome (N=32) were prospectively studied using spirometry, lung volumes, diffusion capacity, and blood gas analysis, as well as same day measurement of 6-minute walk distance and cardiopulmonary maximal treadmill exercise. Patients were followed prospectively to determine survival (7.4 ± 0.5 years). Abnormalities were identified and appropriate comparisons were made between affected and unaffected individuals between respiratory mechanics, exercise function, and survival. Obstruction (FEV1/FVC ratio <0.70) was found in 13 patients (41%), who were older but not otherwise different. Restriction was uncommon. Diffusion transfer coefficient, which was <80% in half the patients, correlated with exercise duration (r=0.542, P=0.005), and was worse in non-survivors (N=6). Nearly all patients had a compensated respiratory alkalosis (PaCO2 32 ± 4.4 mm Hg). PaCO2 was less reduced in older patients (r=0.438, P=0.022), and correlated independently with exercise duration (R=-0.463, P=0.03), yet PaO2, not PaCO2, was associated with survival. Eisenmenger patients show evidence of obstructive lung disease, diffusion abnormalities, and hypocapnia; likely from hyperventilation. Understanding expected lung mechanics and gas exchange may facilitate more appropriate clinical management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A cross sectional study of the independent effect of occupation on lung function in British coal miners.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, S; Bennett, J; Richards, K; Britton, J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic bronchitis and emphysema are now recognised complications of occupational exposure to coal dust, and since 1992 compensation has been available for miners with impaired lung function provided that they also have x ray film evidence of pneumoconiosis. However, many miners with heavy exposure to coal dust and impairment of lung function therefore do not qualify for compensation because they do not have simple pneumoconiosis. In the present study attempts were made to determine whether coal mining is an independent risk factor for impairment of lung function in a group of Nottinghamshire miners with no evidence of simple pneumoconiosis, by comparing these men with a group of local controls who were not occupationally exposed. METHOD: Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were obtained on 1286 miners with no evidence of pneumoconiosis on x ray film. Lung function data were also obtained from a random sample of 567 men aged between 40 and 70 living in a district of Nottingham and who had never worked in the mining industry or in any other dusty occupation. Multiple linear regression in SPSS was used to estimate the mean independent effect of mining on FEV1 and FVC after adjustment for age, height, and smoking, in all miners and controls, and in a subgroup of men of 45 and under. In men of 45 and under, the independent effects of mining and smoking on the probability of a deficit of one litre or more from modelled predicted FEV1 values were computed with logistic regression in EGRET. RESULTS: There was a significant mean effect of mining on FEV1 after adjustment for age, height, and smoking of -155 ml (95% confidence interval (95% CI) -74 to -236 ml, P < 0.001), but the size of effect was inversely related to age such that in men of 45 and under the estimated mean effect of mining was -251 ml (95% CI -140 to -361 ml, P < 0.001). In this subgroup of younger men, 4.7% of miners and 0.7% of controls had a deficit

  17. Influence of Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Cancer on Pulmonary Function

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Akihiro Hiraki, Takao; Iguchi, Toshihiro; Gobara, Hideo; Mimura, Hidefumi; Toyooka, Shinichi; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Tsuda, Toshihide; Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate altered pulmonary function retrospectively after RFA. Methods: This retrospective study comprised 41 ablation sessions for 39 patients (22 men and 17 women; mean age, 64.8 years). Vital capacity (VC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) at 1 and 3 months after RFA were compared with the baseline (i.e., values before RFA). To evaluate the factors that influenced impaired pulmonary function, univariate analysis was performed by using multiple variables. If two or more variables were indicated as statistically significant by univariate analysis, these variables were subjected to multivariate analysis to identify independent factors. Results: The mean VC and FEV{sub 1} before RFA and 1 and 3 months after RFA were 3.04 and 2.24 l, 2.79 and 2.11 l, and 2.85 and 2.13 l, respectively. The values at 1 and 3 months were significantly lower than the baseline. Severe pleuritis after RFA was identified as the independent factor influencing impaired VC at 1 month (P = 0.003). For impaired FEV{sub 1} at 1 month, only severe pleuritis (P = 0.01) was statistically significant by univariate analysis. At 3 months, severe pleuritis (VC, P = 0.019; FEV{sub 1}, P = 0.003) and an ablated parenchymal volume {>=}20 cm{sup 3} (VC, P = 0.047; FEV{sub 1}, P = 0.038) were independent factors for impaired VC and FEV{sub 1}. Conclusions: Pulmonary function decreased after RFA. RFA-induced severe pleuritis and ablation of a large volume of marginal parenchyma were associated with impaired pulmonary function.

  18. Influence of cognitive impairment, functional impairment and care setting on dementia care mapping results.

    PubMed

    Edelman, P; Kuhn, D; Fulton, B R

    2004-11-01

    Quality of life (QOL) for people with dementia has become a major focus over the past decade. Dementia care mapping (DCM) is an observational measure of quality of care given by staff in formal care settings, as well as a measure of QOL that has been used in many studies of people with dementia in residential care settings. However, the method itself has not been rigorously studied in a scientific manner. For this report, mapping data were collected for 166 persons with dementia in three types of care settings: special care facilities that are licensed nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and adult day centers. The relationships between DCM and several independent variables including cognitive status, functional status, care setting, depression, length of stay, and co-morbid illnesses were assessed. Both cognitive status and functional status were found to be associated with DCM scores. Moreover, DCM was sensitive in differentiating among persons with four levels of cognitive impairment. Implications for practice are discussed.

  19. Endothelial NOS (NOS3) impairs myocardial function in developing sepsis.

    PubMed

    van de Sandt, Annette M; Windler, Rainer; Gödecke, Axel; Ohlig, Jan; Zander, Simone; Reinartz, Michael; Graf, Jürgen; van Faassen, Ernst E; Rassaf, Tienush; Schrader, Jürgen; Kelm, Malte; Merx, Marc W

    2013-03-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS)3-derived nitric oxide (NO) modulates inotropic response and diastolic interval for optimal cardiac performance under non-inflammatory conditions. In sepsis, excessive NO production plays a key role in severe hypotension and myocardial dysfunction. We aimed to determine the role of NOS3 on myocardial performance, NO production, and time course of sepsis development. NOS3(-/-) and C57BL/6 wildtype mice were rendered septic by cecum ligation and puncture (CLP). Cardiac function was analyzed by serial echocardiography, in vivo pressure and isolated heart measurements. Cardiac output (CO) increased to 160 % of baseline at 10 h after sepsis induction followed by a decline to 63 % of baseline after 18 h in wildtype mice. CO was unaltered in septic NOS3(-/-) mice. Despite the hyperdynamic state, cardiac function and mean arterial pressure were impaired in septic wildtype as early as 6 h post CLP. At 12 h, cardiac function in septic wildtype was refractory to catecholamines in vivo and respective isolated hearts showed impaired pressure development and limited coronary flow reserve. Hemodynamics remained stable in NOS3(-/-) mice leading to significant survival benefit. Unselective NOS inhibition in septic NOS3(-/-) mice diminished this survival benefit. Plasma NO( x )- and local myocardial NO( x )- and NO levels (via NO spin trapping) demonstrated enhanced NO( x )- and bioactive NO levels in septic wildtype as compared to NOS3(-/-) mice. Significant contribution by inducible NOS (NOS2) during this early phase of sepsis was excluded. Our data suggest that NOS3 relevantly contributes to bioactive NO pool in developing sepsis resulting in impaired cardiac contractility.

  20. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis: lung function in five cases 1

    PubMed Central

    Fuleihan, F. J. D.; Abboud, R. T.; Balikian, J. P.; Nucho, C. K. N.

    1969-01-01

    Pulmonary function was investigated in five patients with pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis. Four male cases occurred in two families. This contrasts with previous reports that females predominate in familial cases. Only one patient had respiratory symptoms. Total lung capacity was reduced in all patients and vital capacity was less than normal in four of five patients. The ratio of residual volume to total lung capacity and the one second forced expiratory volume was normal in all patients. Frequency of respiration and ventilatory equivalent were greater than normal and tidal volume was less than normal in the symptomatic patient. Minute volume of ventilation, O2 consumption, and alveolar O2 tension were normal in all patients. Arterial O2 tension was less than normal in one patient and became less than normal during exercise in another patient. Arterial CO2 was low in one patient and arterial pH was normal in all. The alveolar arterial O2 gradient was greater than normal in all patients; and the venous admixture-like effect was increased in three patients. The ratio of physiological dead space to tidal volume was greater than normal in two patients and the O2 diffusing capacity was less than normal in one of three patients. Pulmonary function studies reported previously showed no specific pattern. All patients reported herein revealed a definite restrictive pattern with decreased lung volumes, absent airway obstruction, and uneven distribution of pulmonary capillary blood evidenced by an increased alveolar arterial O2 tension gradient. Images PMID:5763514

  1. GENETIC ASSOCIATION BETWEEN HUMAN CHITINASES AND LUNG FUNCTION IN COPD

    PubMed Central

    Aminuddin, F.; Akhabir, L.; Stefanowicz, D.; Paré, P.D.; Connett, J.E.; Anthonisen, N.R.; Fahy, J.V.; Seibold, M.A.; Burchard, E.G.; Eng, C.; Gulsvik, A.; Bakke, P.; Cho, M. H.; Litonjua, A.; Lomas, D.A.; Anderson, W. H.; Beaty, T.H.; Crapo, J.D.; Silverman, E.K.; Sandford, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Two primary chitinases have been identified in humans – acid mammalian chitinase (AMCase) and chitotriosidase (CHIT1). Mammalian chitinases have been observed to affect the host’s immune response. The aim of this study was to test for association between genetic variation in the chitinases and phenotypes related to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Polymorphisms in the chitinase genes were selected based on previous associations with respiratory diseases. Polymorphisms that were associated with lung function level or rate of decline in the Lung Health Study (LHS) cohort were analyzed for association with COPD affection status in four other COPD case-control populations. Chitinase activity and protein levels were also related to genotypes. In the Caucasian LHS population, the baseline forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was significantly different between the AA and GG genotypic groups of the AMCase rs3818822 polymorphism. Subjects with the GG genotype had higher AMCase protein and chitinase activity compared with AA homozygotes. For CHIT1 rs2494303, a significant association was observed between rate of decline in FEV1 and the different genotypes. In the African American LHS population, CHIT1 rs2494303 and AMCase G339T genotypes were associated with rate of decline in FEV1. Although a significant effect of chitinase gene alleles was found on lung function level and decline in the LHS, we were unable to replicate the associations with COPD affection status in the other COPD study groups. PMID:22200767

  2. Shape of small opacities and lung function in coalworkers.

    PubMed

    Cockcroft, A; Berry, G; Cotes, J E; Lyons, J P

    1982-10-01

    Lung function and chest radiographs were reviewed in 357 coalworkers who had been referred from the Cardiff Pneumoconiosis Medical Panel. The chest films were read according to the 1980 ILO classification of radiographs by three experienced readers. An irregularity score, reflecting the shape of the small opacities, was derived from the readings and compared with the lung function variables. Men with higher irregularity scores had significant reductions in ventilatory capacity and gas transfer factor, with no change in total lung capacity, after age, height, profusion of small opacities, and smoking habit had been taken into account. The effects were present both in those with and in those without large opacities. The agreement between readers over the shape of opacities was almost as good as for their profusion. Men with rounded opacities had a lower gas transfer factor if they were predominantly of the "p" type. The results are consistent with those for a combination of emphysema and interstitial fibrosis, which has been found in coalworkers with irregular opacities.

  3. Balance Functional Assessment in People with Visual Impairment.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska, Izabela; Bednarczuk, Grzegorz; Molik, Bartosz; Morgulec-Adamowicz, Natalia; Marszałek, Jolanta; Kaźmierska-Kowalewska, Kalina; Koc, Krzysztof

    2015-11-22

    The aims of this study were twofold: to assess the level of balance of people with visual impairment against the BOT-2 standard scores for the able-bodied, and to identify in which trials subjects had the greatest difficulties in maintaining balance with respect to the degree of vision loss and age categories. One hundred twenty-seven subjects with visual impairment aged 6-16 years, participated in the study (68 girls and 59 boys). The division for partially sighted people (61) and the blind (66) was made according to the WHO classification. Functional balance assessment was made using a balance subtest from the Bruininks-Oseretsky test. Significant relationships were noticed between age and the level of balance (χ2 = 8.35 p <0,05), as well as between the degree of vision loss and the level of balance (χ2 = 24.53 p <0,001). The level of balance of almost all blind subjects was below (20%) or well-below (60%) the average for the able-bodied. The subjects' ability to maintain balance was not dependent on gender and was associated primarily with the degree of visual impairment and age. Partially sighted people had better balance than the blind and the decrease in visual acuity resulted in reduction of balance skills. The lowest level of balance was observed in blind students aged 7-11 years. Elaborating physical fitness improvement programs for children and adolescents with visual impairment, diversity of age, the degree of vision loss and limitations of ablility to maintain balance should be taken into account.

  4. Balance Functional Assessment in People with Visual Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowska, Izabela; Bednarczuk, Grzegorz; Molik, Bartosz; Morgulec-Adamowicz, Natalia; Marszałek, Jolanta; Kaźmierska-Kowalewska, Kalina; Koc, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were twofold: to assess the level of balance of people with visual impairment against the BOT-2 standard scores for the able-bodied, and to identify in which trials subjects had the greatest difficulties in maintaining balance with respect to the degree of vision loss and age categories. One hundred twenty-seven subjects with visual impairment aged 6–16 years, participated in the study (68 girls and 59 boys). The division for partially sighted people (61) and the blind (66) was made according to the WHO classification. Functional balance assessment was made using a balance subtest from the Bruininks-Oseretsky test. Significant relationships were noticed between age and the level of balance (χ2 = 8.35 p <0,05), as well as between the degree of vision loss and the level of balance (χ2 = 24.53 p <0,001). The level of balance of almost all blind subjects was below (20%) or well-below (60%) the average for the able-bodied. The subjects’ ability to maintain balance was not dependent on gender and was associated primarily with the degree of visual impairment and age. Partially sighted people had better balance than the blind and the decrease in visual acuity resulted in reduction of balance skills. The lowest level of balance was observed in blind students aged 7–11 years. Elaborating physical fitness improvement programs for children and adolescents with visual impairment, diversity of age, the degree of vision loss and limitations of ablility to maintain balance should be taken into account. PMID:26834878

  5. Anaesthesia for the patient with impaired renal function.

    PubMed

    Maddern, P J

    1983-11-01

    Patients with renal disease are at risk of further deterioration of renal function and acute tubular necrosis when subjected to anaesthesia and surgery. Optimal fluid loading and careful selection of anaesthetic techniques and agents, appropriate monitoring and the use of mannitol and dopamine assist in the maintenance of renal blood flow and help preserve renal function in these patients. In association with renal failure, physiological changes in other systems result in reduced oxygen supply to the tissues, metabolic disturbances, impairment of the coagulation and immune defence mechanisms and an increased risk of cardiac and cerebrovascular catastrophe. Although many anaesthetic techniques including regional analgesia may be used successfully in these patients caution with most drugs, especially pethidine, phenoperidine, suxamethonium and all non-depolarising neuromuscular relaxants is recommended. Of the volatile anaesthetics currently available, halothane is the agent of choice. Oxygen therapy and close monitoring of cardiorespiratory function are necessary postoperatively.

  6. Cryopreservation of human skeletal muscle impairs mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Larsen, S; Wright-Paradis, C; Gnaiger, E; Helge, J W; Boushel, R

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated if cryopreservation is a viable approach for functional mitochondrial analysis. Different tissues have been studied, and conflicting results have been published. The aim of the present study was to investigate if mitochondria in human skeletal muscle maintain functionality after long term cryopreservation (1 year). Skeletal muscle samples were preserved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for later analysis. Human skeletal muscle fibres were thawed and permeabilised with saponin, and mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry. The capacity of oxidative phosphorylation was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in cryopreserved human skeletal muscle samples. Cryopreservation impaired respiration with substrates linked to Complex I more than for Complex II (P < 0.05). Addition of cytochrome c revealed an increase in respiration indicating cytochrome c loss from the mitochondria. The results from this study demonstrate that normal mitochondrial functionality is not maintained in cryopreserved human skeletal muscle samples.

  7. Impaired Pancreatic Beta Cell Function by Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Khan, Shakil A.; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Nanduri, Jayasri

    2013-01-01

    Breathing disorders with recurrent apnea produce periodic decreases in arterial blood O2 or chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). Recurrent apnea patients and CIH-exposed rodents exhibit several co-morbidities including diabetes. However, the effects of CIH on pancreatic beta cell function are not known. In the present study, we investigated pancreatic beta cell function in C57BL6 mice exposed to 30 days of CIH. CIH-exposed mice exhibited elevated levels of fasting plasma insulin, but comparable glucose levels, and higher homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), indicating insulin resistance. Pancreatic beta cell morphology was unaltered in CIH- exposed mice. Insulin content was decreased in CIH-exposed beta cells, and this effect was associated with increased proinsulin levels. mRNA and protein levels of the enzyme pro-hormone convertase 1 (PC1) which converts proinsulin to insulin were down regulated in CIH-treated islets. More importantly, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was impaired in CIH-exposed mice and in isolated islets. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were elevated in CIH-exposed pancreatic islets. Treatment of mice with mito-tempol, a scavenger of mitochondrial ROS during CIH exposure, prevented the augmented insulin secretion and restored the proinsulin as well as HOMA values to control levels. These results demonstrate that CIH leads to pancreatic beta cell dysfunction manifested by augmented basal insulin secretion, insulin resistance, defective proinsulin processing, impaired GSIS and mitochondrial ROS mediates the effects of CIH on pancreatic beta cell function. PMID:23709585

  8. The role of female hormones on lung function in chronic lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of inflammatory lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis (CF) are increasing in women. There is a dearth of data on the biological mechanisms to explain such observations. However, some large epidemiologic studies suggest that lung function fluctuates during the menstrual cycle in female patients with airways disease but not in women without disease, suggesting that circulating estradiol and progesterone may be involved in this process. Discussion In asthma, estradiol shuttles adaptive immunity towards the TH2 phenotype while in smokers estrogens may be involved in the generation of toxic intermediate metabolites in the airways of female smokers, which may be relevant in COPD pathogenesis. In CF, estradiol has been demonstrated to up-regulate MUC5B gene in human airway epithelial cells and inhibit chloride secretion in the airways. Progesterone may augment airway inflammation. Summary Taken together, clinical and in-vivo data have demonstrated a sex-related difference in that females may be more susceptible to the pathogenesis of lung diseases. In this paper, we review the effect of female sex hormones in the context of these inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:21639909

  9. Impaired Right Ventricular Function in Long-Term Lymphoma Survivors.

    PubMed

    Murbraech, Klaus; Holte, Espen; Broch, Kaspar; Smeland, Knut B; Holte, Harald; Rösner, Assami; Lund, May Brit; Dalen, Håvard; Kiserud, Cecilie; Aakhus, Svend

    2016-06-01

    Cardiotoxicity from anthracyclines or cardiac radiation therapy is detrimental to left ventricular (LV) function. However, the long-term effects on right ventricular (RV) performance are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term impact of cardiotoxic treatment on RV function among adult cancer survivors. Adult lymphoma survivors (LSs) who underwent autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Norway from 1987 to 2008 were invited to undergo cardiovascular evaluation by echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. In total, 274 LSs participated. The mean age was 56 ± 12 years, and the mean follow-up time since lymphoma diagnosis was 13 ± 6 years. Echocardiographic parameters were compared with those of age- and gender-matched control subjects from an existing large Norwegian database. RV systolic dysfunction was indicated by two or more abnormal RV systolic parameters according to current recommendations. LV systolic dysfunction was indicated by LV global longitudinal strain > -17%. All parameters of RV systolic function were impaired in LSs compared with control subjects (P < .01 for all). The most pronounced difference was observed for tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion: 22.9 ± 4.1 versus 27.1 ± 4.2 mm. Greater cardiotoxic treatment burden was associated with larger RV functional impairment. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion correlated with peak oxygen consumption (r = 0.23, P = .001). RV systolic performance was associated with LV systolic function (r = 0.49, P < .001 for tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion vs LV global longitudinal strain), but a greater proportion of patients had LV dysfunction (30.8%) compared with RV dysfunction (6.2%) (P < .001). RV systolic function was impaired in LSs. The association between RV and LV function indicates a global, long-term cardiotoxic effect. However, RV dysfunction was less prevalent than LV dysfunction. Copyright

  10. Long-term effects of severe acute malnutrition on lung function in Malawian children: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lelijveld, Natasha; Kerac, Marko; Seal, Andrew; Chimwezi, Emmanuel; Wells, Jonathan C; Heyderman, Robert S; Nyirenda, Moffat J; Stocks, Janet; Kirkby, Jane

    2017-04-01

    Early nutritional insults may increase risk of adult lung disease. We aimed to quantify the impact of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) on spirometric outcomes 7 years post-treatment and explore predictors of impaired lung function.Spirometry and pulse oximetry were assessed in 237 Malawian children (median age: 9.3 years) who had been treated for SAM and compared with sibling and age/sex-matched community controls. Spirometry results were expressed as z-scores based on Global Lung Function Initiative reference data for the African-American population.Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were low in all groups (mean FEV1 z-score: -0.47 for cases, -0.48 for siblings, -0.34 for community controls; mean FVC z-score: -0.32, -0.38, and -0.15 respectively). There were no differences in spirometric or oximetry outcomes between SAM survivors and controls. Leg length was shorter in SAM survivors but inter-group sitting heights were similar. HIV positive status or female sex was associated with poorer FEV1, by 0.55 and 0.31 z-scores, respectively.SAM in early childhood was not associated with subsequent reduced lung function compared to local controls. Preservation of sitting height and compromised leg length suggest "thrifty" or "lung-sparing" growth. Female sex and HIV positive status were identified as potentially high-risk groups.

  11. Indacaterol add-on therapy improves lung function, exercise capacity and life quality of COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Mroz, R M; Minarowski, L; Chyczewska, E

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive, inflammatory condition, involving airways and lung parenchyma. The disease leads to airflow limitation, and pulmonary hyperinflation, resulting in dyspnea, decreased exercise tolerance, and impaired quality of life. COPD pharmacotherapy guidelines are based on a combination of long-acting beta2-agonists (LABA), long-acting antimuscarinic agents (LAMA) and methyloxantins. Recently, indacaterol, ultralong acting beta2-agonist, has been introduced. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of indacaterol add-on therapy on lung function, exercise tolerance and quality of life of COPD patients. Thirty four COPD patients, receiving stable bronchodilator therapy were randomly allocated into two arms of add-on treatment (1:1 - indacaterol:placebo) for 3 months. Indacaterol replaced LABA in all patients receiving LABA. Spirometry, lung volumes, DLCO, St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and 6 min Walk Distance (6MWD) were performed before and after therapy. We found that in the indacaterol group FEV1 did not changed significantly. However, there were significant improvements in ERV, 6MWD, and 6MWD-related dyspnea score. We also found that the degree of desaturation before and after 6MWD, and fatigue levels significantly improved in the indacaterol group. The patients' quality of life also changed favorably in the indacaterol treatment arm. We conclude that the add-on therapy with indacaterol exerts positive effects in COPD patients.

  12. Impaired Left Ventricular Filling in COPD and Emphysema: Is It the Heart or the Lungs?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Benjamin M.; Prince, Martin R.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Bluemke, David A.; Liu, Chia-Ying; Rabinowitz, Dan; Hueper, Katja; Parikh, Megha A.; Gomes, Antoinette S.; Michos, Erin D.; Lima, João A. C.; Barr, R. Graham

    2013-01-01

    Background: COPD and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction overlap clinically, and impaired left ventricular (LV) filling is commonly reported in COPD. The mechanism underlying these observations is uncertain, but may include upstream pulmonary dysfunction causing low LV preload or intrinsic LV dysfunction causing high LV preload. The objective of this study is to determine if COPD and emphysema are associated with reduced pulmonary vein dimensions suggestive of low LV preload. Methods: The population-based Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) COPD Study recruited smokers aged 50 to 79 years who were free of clinical cardiovascular disease. COPD was defined by spirometry. Percent emphysema was defined as regions < −910 Hounsfield units on full-lung CT scan. Ostial pulmonary vein cross-sectional area was measured by contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance and expressed as the sum of all pulmonary vein areas. Linear regression was used to adjust for age, sex, race/ethnicity, body size, and smoking. Results: Among 165 participants, the mean (± SD) total pulmonary vein area was 558 ± 159 mm2 in patients with COPD and 623 ± 145 mm2 in control subjects. Total pulmonary vein area was smaller in patients with COPD (−57 mm2; 95% CI, −106 to −7 mm2; P = .03) and inversely associated with percent emphysema (P < .001) in fully adjusted models. Significant decrements in total pulmonary vein area were observed among participants with COPD alone, COPD with emphysema on CT scan, and emphysema without spirometrically defined COPD. Conclusions: Pulmonary vein dimensions were reduced in COPD and emphysema. These findings support a mechanism of upstream pulmonary causes of underfilling of the LV in COPD and in patients with emphysema on CT scan. PMID:23764937

  13. Measuring the lung function in the mouse: the challenge of size

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, Charles G; Bates, Jason HT

    2003-01-01

    Measurement of the effects of drugs, mediators and infectious agents on various models of lung disease, as well as assessment of lung function in the intact mouse has the potential for significantly advancing our knowledge of lung disease. However, the small size of the mouse presents significant challenges for the assessment of lung function. Because of compromises made between precision and noninvasiveness, data obtained may have an uncertain bearing on the mechanical response of the lung. Nevertheless, considerable recent progress has been made in developing valid and useful measures of mouse lung function. These advances, resulting in our current ability to measure sophisticated indices of lung function in laboratory animals, are likely to lead to important insights into the mechanisms of lung disease. PMID:12783622

  14. Exercise tolerance, lung function abnormalities, anemia, and cardiothoracic ratio in sickle cell patients.

    PubMed

    van Beers, Eduard J; van der Plas, Mart N; Nur, Erfan; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; van Steenwijk, Reindert P; Biemond, Bart J; Bresser, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Many patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) have a reduced exercise capacity and abnormal lung function. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) can identify causes of exercise limitation. Forty-four consecutive SCD patients (27 HbSS, 11 HbSC, and 6 HbS-beta thalassemia) with a median age (interquartile range) of 26 (21-41) years underwent pulmonary function tests, CPET, chest x-ray, and echocardiography to further characterize exercise limitation in SCD. Peak oxygen uptake (V'O2 -peak), expressing maximum exercise capacity, was decreased in 83% of the studied patients. V'O2 -peak correlated with hemoglobin levels (R = 0.440, P = 0.005), forced vital capacity (FVC) (R = 0.717, P < 0.0001). Cardiothoracic ratio on chest x-ray inversely correlated with FVC (R = -0.637, P < 0.001). According to criteria for exercise limitation, the patients were limited in exercise capacity due to anemia (n = 17), cardiovascular dysfunction (n = 2), musculoskeletal function (n = 10), pulmonary ventilatory abnormalities (n = 1), pulmonary vascular exercise limitation (n = 1), and poor effort (n = 3). In the present study we demonstrate that anemia is the most important determinant of reduced exercise tolerance observed in SCD patients without signs of pulmonary hypertension. We found a strong correlation between various parameters of lung volume and cardiothoracic ratio and we hypothesize that cardiomegaly and relative small chest size may be important causes of the impairment in pulmonary function, that is, reduced long volumes and diffusion capacity, in SCD. Taking into account anthropomorphic differences between SCD patients and controls could help to interpret lung function studies in SCD better.

  15. Impaired Serotonergic Brainstem Function during and after Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Qiong; Buchanan, Gordon F.; Motelow, Joshua E.; Andrews, John; Vitkovskiy, Petr; Chen, William C.; Serout, Florian; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Kundishora, Adam; Furman, Moran; Li, Wei; Bo, Xiao; Richerson, George B.

    2016-01-01

    Impaired breathing, cardiac function, and arousal during and after seizures are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Previous work suggests that these changes are associated with depressed brainstem function in the ictal and post-ictal periods. Lower brainstem serotonergic systems are postulated to play an important role in cardiorespiratory changes during and after seizures, whereas upper brainstem serotonergic and other systems regulate arousal. However, direct demonstration of seizure-associated neuronal activity changes in brainstem serotonergic regions has been lacking. Here, we performed multiunit and single-unit recordings from medullary raphe and midbrain dorsal raphe nuclei in an established rat seizure model while measuring changes in breathing rate and depth as well as heart rate. Serotonergic neurons were identified by immunohistochemistry. Respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute ventilation were all significantly decreased during and after seizures in this model. We found that population firing of neurons in the medullary and midbrain raphe on multiunit recordings was significantly decreased during the ictal and post-ictal periods. Single-unit recordings from identified serotonergic neurons in the medullary raphe revealed highly consistently decreased firing during and after seizures. In contrast, firing of midbrain raphe serotonergic neurons was more variable, with a mixture of increases and decreases. The markedly suppressed firing of medullary serotonergic neurons supports their possible role in simultaneously impaired cardiorespiratory function in seizures. Decreased arousal likely arises from depressed population activity of several neuronal pools in the upper brainstem and forebrain. These findings have important implications for preventing morbidity and mortality in people living with epilepsy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Seizures often cause impaired breathing, cardiac dysfunction, and loss of consciousness. The brainstem and

  16. Temafloxacin pharmacokinetics in subjects with normal and impaired renal function.

    PubMed Central

    Granneman, G R; Braeckman, R; Kraut, J; Shupien, S; Craft, J C

    1991-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of temafloxacin were investigated following oral administration of single 400-mg doses to 6 normal subjects and 18 subjects with various degrees of impaired renal function. Renal impairment did not significantly affect the peak concentration, time to peak concentration, or the nonrenal clearance of temafloxacin. Both renal clearance (CLR) and total apparent clearance (CLT/F, where F represents the fraction of dose absorbed) of temafloxacin were highly correlated with creatinine clearance (CLCR). The regression equations were as follows: CLR = 0.85.CLCR, with R2 = 0.907, and CLT/F = 56.0 + 0.92.CLCR, with R2 = 0.656. The half-life (mean +/- standard deviation) increased from 10.6 +/- 2.4 h in the normal volunteers to 24.6 +/- 7.3 h in the subjects with a CLCR of less than 10 ml/min; the respective CLT/F decreased from 169 +/- 58 to 70 +/- 27 ml/min. Compared with the CLT/F in the subjects with normal renal function, CLT/F was reduced 60% in subjects with a CLCR of less than 40 ml/min, indicating that the dosage should be reduced by at least one-half for patients with comparable impairment. For the subjects on chronic hemodialysis, most of the variability in the nonrenal clearance and the terminal-phase rate constant of temafloxacin was associated with the quantity of calcium carbonate and related medication taken for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia. Supplemental dosage is not required for patients undergoing hemodialysis, since the distribution of temafloxacin in tissue is extensive and the recoveries from 4-h dialysis sessions accounted for less than 10% of the drug present at the start of the dialysis. PMID:1666497

  17. Perfusion lung scintigraphy for the prediction of postoperative residual pulmonary function in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kovacević-Kuśmierek, Katarzyna; Kozak, Józef; Pryt, Łukasz; Bieńkiewicz, Małgorzata; Cichocki, Paweł; Kuśmierek, Jacek; Płachcińska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Accurate prediction of postoperative pulmonary function in patients with non-small cell lung cancer is crucial for proper qualification for surgery, the only effective therapeutic method. The aim of the study was to select the most accurate method for acquisition and processing of lung perfusion scintigraphy (LPS) combined with spirometry for prediction of postoperative pulmonary function in patients qualified for surgery. LPS was performed in 70 patients (40 males, 30 females), with preoperative spirometry (mean FEV1preop = 2.26 ± 0.72 L), after administration of 185 MBq of 99mTc-microalbumin/macroaggregate, using planar (appa) and SPECT/CT methods. Predicted postoperative lung function (FEV1pred) was calculated as a part of active lung parenchyma to remain after surgery. A non-imaging segment counting method was also applied. FEV1pred(appa, SPECT, SPECT/CT, segm.) were further compared with actual FEV1postop values obtained from postoperative spirometry. In the whole studied group (47 lobectomies, 23 pneumonectomies) mean value of FEV1postop was equal to 1.76 (± 0.56) L. FEV1pred(appa, SPECT, SPECT/CT, segm.) were equal to 1.75 (± 0.58) L, 1.71 (± 0.57) L, 1.72 (± 0.57) L and 1.57 (± 0.58) L, respectively. A segment counting method systematically lowered predicted FEV1 values (p < 10-5). Moreover, in 31 patients with FEV1preop < 2 L error of predicted values was assessed with Bland-Altman method. Mean absolute differences FEV1postop - FEV1pred amounted to: appa - (0.04 ± 0.13) L, SPECT - (0.07 ± 0.14) L, SPECT/CT - (0.06 ± 0.14) L and segm. - (0.21 ± 0.19) L, respectively. Lower limit of 95% confidence interval calculated for planar - optimal method, was equal to -220 mL (also determined separately in subgroups after lobectomy and pneumonectomy). This study shows that planar LPS may be applied for prediction of postoperative pulmonary function in patients qualified for pneumonectomy and lobectomy. If actual FEV1postop value is to be ≥ 800 m

  18. Impaired endothelial function and blood flow in repetitive strain injury.

    PubMed

    Brunnekreef, J; Brunnekreef, J J; Benda, N; Benda, N M M; Schreuder, T; Schreuder, T H A; Hopman, M; Hopman, M T E; Thijssen, D; Thijssen, D H J

    2012-10-01

    Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) is a disabling upper extremity overuse injury that may be associated with pathophysiological changes in the vasculature. In this study we investigated whether RSI is associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired exercise-induced blood flow in the affected forearm. 10 patients with RSI (age, 40.2 ± 10.3; BMI, 23.8 ± 3.3) and 10 gender- and age-matched control subjects (age, 38.0 ± 12.4; BMI, 22.7 ± 3.4) participated in this study. Brachial artery blood flow was measured at rest and during 3-min periods of isometric handgrip exercise at 15%, 30% and 45% of the individual maximal voluntary contraction. Brachial artery endothelial function was assessed as the flow mediated dilation (FMD), by measuring brachial artery diameter and velocity before and after 5-min ischemic occlusion. We found a lower exercise-induced brachial artery blood flow in patients with RSI than in controls (p=0.04). Brachial artery FMD was significantly lower in patients with RSI than in controls (p<0.01), whilst a lower FMD was also found in patient with unilateral RSI when comparing the affected arm with the non-affected arm (p=0.04). Our results suggest that patients with RSI have an attenuated exercise-induced blood flow and an impaired endothelial function in the affected arm. These findings importantly improve our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanism of RSI.

  19. Gallium arsenide exposure impairs splenic B cell accessory function.

    PubMed

    Gondre-Lewis, Timothy A; Hartmann, Constance B; Caffrey, Rebecca E; McCoy, Kathleen L

    2003-03-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) is utilized in industries for its semiconductor and optical properties. Chemical exposure of animals systemically suppresses several immune functions. The ability of splenic B cells to activate antigen-specific helper CD4(+) T cell hybridomas was assessed, and various aspects of antigen-presenting cell function were examined. GaAs-exposed murine B cells were impaired in processing intact soluble protein antigens, and the defect was antigen dependent. In contrast, B cells after exposure competently presented peptides to the T cells, which do not require processing. Cell surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and several costimulatory molecules on splenic B cells, which are critical for helper T cell activation, was not affected by chemical exposure. GaAs exposure also did not influence the stability of MHC class II heterodimers, suggesting that the defect may precede peptide exchange. GaAs-exposed B cells contained a normal level of aspartyl cathepsin activity; however, proteolytic activities of thiol cathepsins B and L were approximately half the control levels. Furthermore, two cleavage fragments of invariant chain, a molecular chaperone of MHC class II molecules, were increased in GaAs-exposed B cells, indicative of defective degradation. Thus, diminished thiol proteolytic activity in B cells may be responsible for their impaired antigen processing and invariant chain degradation, which may contribute to systemic immunosuppression caused by GaAs exposure.

  20. Functional Imaging of the Lungs with Gas Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Stanley J.; Nagle, Scott K.; Couch, Marcus J.; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Albert, Mitchell; Fain, Sean B.

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the state-of-the-art of the three major classes of gas contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) – hyperpolarized (HP) gas, molecular oxygen, and fluorinated gas – and their application to clinical pulmonary research. During the past several years there has been accelerated development of pulmonary MRI. This has been driven in part by concerns regarding ionizing radiation using multi-detector computed tomography (CT). However, MRI also offers capabilities for fast multi-spectral and functional imaging using gas agents that are not technically feasible with CT. Recent improvements in gradient performance and radial acquisition methods using ultra-short echo time (UTE) have contributed to advances in these functional pulmonary MRI techniques. Relative strengths and weaknesses of the main functional imaging methods and gas agents are compared and applications to measures of ventilation, diffusion, and gas exchange are presented. Functional lung MRI methods using these gas agents are improving our understanding of a wide range of chronic lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and cystic fibrosis (CF) in both adults and children. PMID:26218920

  1. Functional imaging of the lungs with gas agents.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Stanley J; Nagle, Scott K; Couch, Marcus J; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Albert, Mitchell; Fain, Sean B

    2016-02-01

    This review focuses on the state-of-the-art of the three major classes of gas contrast agents used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-hyperpolarized (HP) gas, molecular oxygen, and fluorinated gas--and their application to clinical pulmonary research. During the past several years there has been accelerated development of pulmonary MRI. This has been driven in part by concerns regarding ionizing radiation using multidetector computed tomography (CT). However, MRI also offers capabilities for fast multispectral and functional imaging using gas agents that are not technically feasible with CT. Recent improvements in gradient performance and radial acquisition methods using ultrashort echo time (UTE) have contributed to advances in these functional pulmonary MRI techniques. The relative strengths and weaknesses of the main functional imaging methods and gas agents are compared and applications to measures of ventilation, diffusion, and gas exchange are presented. Functional lung MRI methods using these gas agents are improving our understanding of a wide range of chronic lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and cystic fibrosis in both adults and children.

  2. Impaired cholesterol efflux capacity and vasculoprotective function of high-density lipoprotein in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neha; Jacobs, Frank; Rader, Daniel J; Vanhaecke, Johan; Van Cleemput, Johan; De Geest, Bart

    2014-05-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism is significantly altered in heart transplant recipients. We hypothesized that HDL function may be impaired in these patients. Fifty-two patients undergoing coronary angiography between 5 and 15 years after heart transplantation were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Cholesterol efflux capacity of apolipoprotein B-depleted plasma was analyzed using a validated assay. The vasculoprotective function of HDL was studied by means of an endothelial progenitor cell migration assay. HDL cholesterol levels were similar in heart transplant patients compared with healthy controls. However, normalized cholesterol efflux and vasculoprotective function were reduced by 24.1% (p < 0.001) and 27.0% (p < 0.01), respectively, in heart transplant recipients compared with healthy controls. HDL function was similar in patients with and without cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) and was not related to C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. An interaction effect (p = 0.0584) was observed between etiology of heart failure before transplantation and steroid use as factors of HDL cholesterol levels. Lower HDL cholesterol levels occurred in patients with prior ischemic cardiomyopathy who were not taking steroids. However, HDL function was independent of the etiology of heart failure before transplantation and steroid use. The percentage of patients with a CRP level ≥6 mg/liter was 3.92-fold (p < 0.01) higher in patients with CAV than in patients without CAV. HDL function is impaired in heart transplant recipients, but it is unrelated to CAV status. The proportion of patients with a CRP level ≥6 mg/liter is prominently higher in CAV-positive patients. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Short-Term Effects of Fine Particulate Matter and Temperature on Lung Function among Healthy College Students in Wuhan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunquan; He, Mingquan; Wu, Simin; Zhu, Yaohui; Wang, Suqing; Shima, Masayuki; Tamura, Kenji; Ma, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Ambient fine particulate matter (PM) has been associated with impaired lung function, but the effect of temperature on lung function and the potential interaction effect between PM and temperature remain uncertain. To estimate the short-term effects of PM2.5 combined with temperature on lung function, we measured the daily peak expiratory flow (PEF) in a panel of 37 healthy college students in four different seasons. Meanwhile, we also monitored daily concentrations of indoor and outdoor PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm), ambient temperature and relative humidity of the study area, where the study participants lived and attended school. Associations of air pollutants and temperature with lung function were assessed by generalized estimating equations (GEEs). A 10 μg/m3 increase of indoor PM2.5 was associated with a change of −2.09 L/min in evening PEF (95%CI: −3.73 L/min–−0.51 L/min) after adjusting for season, height, gender, temperature and relative humidity. The changes of −2.17 L/min (95%CI: −3.81 L/min– −0.52 L/min) and −2.18 L/min (95%CI: −3.96 L/min–−0.41 L/min) in evening PEF were also observed after adjusting for outdoor SO2 and NO2 measured by Environmental Monitoring Center 3 kilometers away, respectively. An increase in ambient temperature was found to be associated with a decrease in lung function and our results revealed a small but significant antagonistic interactive effect between PM2.5 and temperature. Our findings suggest that ambient PM2.5 has an acute adverse effect on lung function in young healthy adults, and that temperature also plays an important role. PMID:26184254

  4. Short-Term Effects of Fine Particulate Matter and Temperature on Lung Function among Healthy College Students in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunquan; He, Mingquan; Wu, Simin; Zhu, Yaohui; Wang, Suqing; Shima, Masayuki; Tamura, Kenji; Ma, Lu

    2015-07-10

    Ambient fine particulate matter (PM) has been associated with impaired lung function, but the effect of temperature on lung function and the potential interaction effect between PM and temperature remain uncertain. To estimate the short-term effects of PM2.5 combined with temperature on lung function, we measured the daily peak expiratory flow (PEF) in a panel of 37 healthy college students in four different seasons. Meanwhile, we also monitored daily concentrations of indoor and outdoor PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm), ambient temperature and relative humidity of the study area, where the study participants lived and attended school. Associations of air pollutants and temperature with lung function were assessed by generalized estimating equations (GEEs). A 10 μg/m3 increase of indoor PM2.5 was associated with a change of -2.09 L/min in evening PEF (95%CI: -3.73 L/min--0.51 L/min) after adjusting for season, height, gender, temperature and relative humidity. The changes of -2.17 L/min (95%CI: -3.81 L/min- -0.52 L/min) and -2.18 L/min (95%CI: -3.96 L/min--0.41 L/min) in evening PEF were also observed after adjusting for outdoor SO2 and NO2 measured by Environmental Monitoring Center 3 kilometers away, respectively. An increase in ambient temperature was found to be associated with a decrease in lung function and our results revealed a small but significant antagonistic interactive effect between PM2.5 and temperature. Our findings suggest that ambient PM2.5 has an acute adverse effect on lung function in young healthy adults, and that temperature also plays an important role.

  5. Lung function and cytokine levels in professional athletes.

    PubMed

    Rong, Cui; Bei, He; Yun, Ma; Yuzhu, Wang; Mingwu, Zhao

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that exercise-induced asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness commonly occur in athletes. The present study investigates pulmonary function and cytokine levels in professional athletes to explore the impact of various sports on respiratory system function and to evaluate the possible role of systemic anaphylaxis. Lung function was measured at rest in professional athletes without a history of smoking. Athletes were recruited from 10 different sports including swimming, water ballet, shooting, volleyball, softball, football, kickboxing, fencing, judo, and track and field. Measurements included forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)), vital capacity (VC), peak expiratory flow (PEF), maximal mid-expiratory flow curve (MMEF), and forced expiratory flow rate (FEF(25-75)%). In addition, the medical history of all athletes was recorded. Correlations between lung function measurements and the different sports, age, gender, height and weight were analyzed. In some athletes, serum was sampled to detect IL-4 and IL-10 concentrations. In these subjects, the correlation between pulmonary function and cytokine levels was analyzed. A total of 147 professional athletes and 30 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. Allergic rhinitis and asthma were detected only in swimmers with an incidence of 56.52% (13/23) and 8.70% (2/23), respectively. Lung function measures were significantly correlated with sport, age, gender, height, and weight. Ventilation functions (including FVC, FEV(1), FEV(1)/FVC, and MMV) in male athletes were superior to those in females, and the ventilation functions in swimmers were superior to those in others. However, the small airway functions (MMEF, FEF(50), FEF(75)) in swimmers and in track and field athletes were lower than predicted (swimmers: 72%, 70%, and 78%, respectively; track and field athletes: 79%, 75%, and 99%, respectively). Serum analyses for IL-4 and IL-10 revealed

  6. Time-series analysis of lung texture on bone-suppressed dynamic chest radiograph for the evaluation of pulmonary function: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Rie; Matsuda, Hiroaki; Sanada, Shigeru

    2017-03-01

    The density of lung tissue changes as demonstrated on imagery is dependent on the relative increases and decreases in the volume of air and lung vessels per unit volume of lung. Therefore, a time-series analysis of lung texture can be used to evaluate relative pulmonary function. This study was performed to assess a time-series analysis of lung texture on dynamic chest radiographs during respiration, and to demonstrate its usefulness in the diagnosis of pulmonary impairments. Sequential chest radiographs of 30 patients were obtained using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD; 100 kV, 0.2 mAs/pulse, 15 frames/s, SID = 2.0 m; Prototype, Konica Minolta). Imaging was performed during respiration, and 210 images were obtained over 14 seconds. Commercial bone suppression image-processing software (Clear Read Bone Suppression; Riverain Technologies, Miamisburg, Ohio, USA) was applied to the sequential chest radiographs to create corresponding bone suppression images. Average pixel values, standard deviation (SD), kurtosis, and skewness were calculated based on a density histogram analysis in lung regions. Regions of interest (ROIs) were manually located in the lungs, and the same ROIs were traced by the template matching technique during respiration. Average pixel value effectively differentiated regions with ventilatory defects and normal lung tissue. The average pixel values in normal areas changed dynamically in synchronization with the respiratory phase, whereas those in regions of ventilatory defects indicated reduced variations in pixel value. There were no significant differences between ventilatory defects and normal lung tissue in the other parameters. We confirmed that time-series analysis of lung texture was useful for the evaluation of pulmonary function in dynamic chest radiography during respiration. Pulmonary impairments were detected as reduced changes in pixel value. This technique is a simple, cost-effective diagnostic tool for the evaluation of regional

  7. Pulmonary Function Testing After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Bishawi, Muath; Kim, Bong; Moore, William H.; Bilfinger, Thomas V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical resection remains the standard of care for operable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, some patients are not fit for surgery because of comorbidites such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other medical conditions. We aimed to evaluate pulmonary function and tumor volume before and after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with and without COPD in early-stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A review of prospectively collected data of Stage I and II lung cancers, all treated with SBRT, was performed. The total SBRT treatment was 60 Gy administered in three 20 Gy fractions. The patients were analyzed based on their COPD status, using their pretreatment pulmonary function test cutoffs as established by the American Thoracic Society guidelines (forced expiratory volume [FEV]% {<=}50% predicted, FEV%/forced vital capacity [FVC]% {<=}70%). Changes in tumor volume were also assessed by computed tomography. Results: Of a total of 30 patients with Stage I and II lung cancer, there were 7 patients in the COPD group (4 men, 3 women), and 23 in t he No-COPD group (9 men, 14 women). At a mean follow-up time of 4 months, for the COPD and No-COPD patients, pretreatment and posttreatment FEV% was similar: 39 {+-} 5 vs. 40 {+-} 9 (p = 0.4) and 77 {+-} 0.5 vs. 73 {+-} 24 (p = 0.9), respectively. The diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DL{sub CO}) did significantly increase for the No-COPD group after SBRT treatment: 60 {+-} 24 vs. 69 {+-} 22 (p = 0.022); however, DL{sub CO} was unchanged for the COPD group: 49 {+-} 13 vs. 50 {+-} 14 (p = 0.8). Although pretreatment tumor volume was comparable for both groups, tumor volume significantly shrank in the No-COPD group from 19 {+-} 24 to 9 {+-} 16 (p < 0.001), and there was a trend in the COPD patients from 12 {+-} 9 to 6 {+-} 5 (p = 0.06). Conclusion: SBRT did not seem to have an effect on FEV{sub 1} and FVC, but it shrank tumor volume and

  8. Impaired pulmonary function after treatment for tuberculosis: the end of the disease?

    PubMed

    Chushkin, Mikhail Ivanovich; Ots, Oleg Nikolayevich

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of pulmonary function abnormalities and to investigate the factors affecting lung function in patients treated for pulmonary tuberculosis. A total of 214 consecutive patients (132 men and 82 women; 20-82 years of age), treated for pulmonary tuberculosis and followed at a local dispensary, underwent spirometry and plethysmography at least one year after treatment. Pulmonary impairment was present in 102 (47.7%) of the 214 patients evaluated. The most common functional alteration was obstructive lung disease (seen in 34.6%). Of the 214 patients, 60 (28.0%) showed reduced pulmonary function (FEV1 below the lower limit of normal). Risk factors for reduced pulmonary function were having had culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in the past, being over 50 years of age, having recurrent tuberculosis, and having a lower level of education. Nearly half of all tuberculosis patients evolve to impaired pulmonary function. That underscores the need for pulmonary function testing after the end of treatment. Avaliar a prevalência de alterações da função pulmonar e investigar os fatores que afetam a função pulmonar em pacientes tratados para tuberculose pulmonar. Um total de 214 pacientes consecutivos (132 homens e 82 mulheres; 20-82 anos de idade), tratados para tuberculose pulmonar e acompanhados em um dispensário local, foi submetido a espirometria e pletismografia pelo menos um ano após o tratamento. O comprometimento pulmonar estava presente em 102 (47,7%) dos 214 pacientes avaliados. A alteração funcional mais comum foi o distúrbio ventilatório obstrutivo (observado em 34,6%). Dos 214 pacientes, 60 (28,0%) apresentaram função pulmonar reduzida (VEF1 abaixo do limite inferior de normalidade). Os fatores de risco para função pulmonar reduzida foram tuberculose pulmonar com cultura positiva no passado, idade acima de 50 anos, recidiva de tuberculose e menor nível de escolaridade. Quase metade de todos os pacientes com tuberculose

  9. Effects of pulmonary rehabilitation on lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the FIRST study.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, C; Russo, A; Foresi, A; Berra, D; Elia, R; Passalacqua, G; Riario-Sforza, G G; Ridolo, E

    2014-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) causes an impairment of respiratory function, well reflected by the progressive decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1). The only interventions able to slow down the FEV1 decline are smoking cessation and drug treatment. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR), is claimed to improve exercise tolerance, symptoms and quality of life, but its effects on lung function have been scantly investigated. The aim of this paper was to evaluate, by the study named "FEV1 as an Index of Rehabilitation Success over Time" (FIRST), the effects of PR on lung function in patients with COPD, under drug treatment with inhaled corticosteroids or long-acting β2-agonists and/or tiotropium in various combinations, according to guidelines, during a 3-year period. Observational, prospective, with two parallel groups study. PR setting in an urban hospital. Two hundred fifty-seven COPD patients, 190 (103 males, mean age 71.1 ± 7.1 years range 57-86 years) underwent PR and 67 (49 males, mean age 67.9 ± 7.9 years, range 58-79 years) were treated only with drugs. Lung function was measured at baseline and at one-year intervals up to 3 years. The postbronchodilator FEV1 was used for statistical analysis. In the PR group, FEV1 increased from 1240 mL (57.3% of predicted value) to 1252.4 mL (60.8%) after 3 years, whereas in the controls the values were 1367 mL (55% of predicted) at baseline and 1150 mL (51%) after 3 years. This difference was statistically significant (P<0.001). In patients with COPD on standard pharmacotherapy, PR significantly affected the decline of FEV1 over time. The ability to substantially stop the FEV1 decline seems exclusive of PR when added to drug treatment. This finding warrants confirmation from randomized trials.

  10. Respiratory health and lung function in Chinese restaurant kitchen workers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tze Wai; Wong, Andromeda H S; Lee, Frank S C; Qiu, Hong

    2011-10-01

    To measure air pollutant concentrations in Chinese restaurant kitchens using different stove types and assess their influence on workers' respiratory health. 393 kitchen workers from 53 Chinese restaurants were surveyed over 16 months: 115 workers from 21 restaurants using only electric stoves and 278 workers from 32 restaurants using only gas stoves. Workers were interviewed about their respiratory symptoms and had their lung function tested. Concentrations of nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)), carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO(2)), methane (CH(4)), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) and fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) were measured using portable monitors and air-bag sampling. Temperature and noise levels were assessed. Median concentrations of NO, NO(2) and CO were 7.4, 1.5 and 1.6 times higher in gas-fuelled kitchens than in electric ones and average concentrations of PM(2.5) and TVOC were 81% and 78% higher, respectively. Differences were smaller for CH(4) and NMHC. Electricity-run kitchens were 4.5°C cooler and 9 dBA less noisy than gas-fuelled ones. Workers using electric cookers had significantly better lung function than their gas-using counterparts and their mean FEV(1) and FVC values were 5.4% and 3.8% higher, respectively, after adjustment for confounders. Wheeze, phlegm, cough and sore throat were more prevalent in workers using gas. The adjusted OR for having phlegm regularly was significantly higher. The poorer lung function and higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms among workers in gas-fuelled kitchens compared to those in electricity-powered kitchens may be associated with exposure to higher concentrations of toxic air pollutants generated during gas cooking.

  11. Enforced mouth breathing decreases lung function in mild asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Hallani, Mervat; Wheatley, John R; Amis, Terence C

    2008-06-01

    Nasal breathing provides a protective influence against exercise-induced asthma. We hypothesized that enforced oral breathing in resting mild asthmatic subjects may lead to a reduction in lung function. Asymptomatic resting mild asthmatic volunteers (n = 8) were instructed to breathe either nasally only (N; tape over lips) or orally only (O; nose clip) for 1 h each, on separate days. Lung function (% predicted FEV(1)) was measured using standard spirometry at baseline and every 10 min for 1 h. 'Difficulty in breathing' was rated using a Borg scale at the conclusion of the N and O periods. Baseline FEV(1) on the N (101.2 +/- 3.8% predicted) and O (102.7 +/- 3.9% predicted) days was not significantly different (P > 0.3). At 60 min, FEV(1) on the O day (96.5 +/- 4.1% predicted) was significantly less than on the N day (101.0 +/- 3.5% predicted; P < 0.009). On the N day, FEV(1) did not change with time (P > 0.3), whereas on the O day, FEV(1) fell progressively (slope = -0.06 +/- 0.01% FEV(1)/min, P < 0.0001; linear mixed effects modelling). Three subjects experienced coughing/wheezing at the end of the O day but none experienced symptoms at the end of the N day. Subjects perceived more 'difficulty breathing in' at the end of the O day (1.5 +/- 0.4 arbitrary units) than on the N day (0.4 +/- 0.3 arbitrary unit; P < 0.05). Enforced oral breathing causes a decrease in lung function in mild asthmatic subjects at rest, initiating asthma symptoms in some. Oral breathing may play a role in the pathogenesis of acute asthma exacerbations.

  12. Postnatal Hyperoxia Exposure Durably Impairs Right Ventricular Function and Mitochondrial Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goss, Kara N; Kumari, Santosh; Tetri, Laura H; Barton, Greg; Braun, Rudolf K; Hacker, Timothy A; Eldridge, Marlowe W

    2017-05-01

    Prematurity complicates 12% of births, and young adults with a history of prematurity are at risk to develop right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy and impairment. The long-term risk for pulmonary vascular disease, as well as mechanisms of RV dysfunction and ventricular-vascular uncoupling after prematurity, remain poorly defined. Using an established model of prematurity-related lung disease, pups from timed-pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to normoxia or hyperoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen, 0.85) exposure for the first 14 days of life. After aging to 1 year in standard conditions, rats underwent hemodynamic assessment followed by tissue harvest for biochemical and histological evaluation. Aged hyperoxia-exposed rats developed significantly greater RV hypertrophy, associated with a 40% increase in RV systolic pressures. Although cardiac index was similar, hyperoxia-exposed rats demonstrated a reduced RV ejection fraction and significant RV-pulmonary vascular uncoupling. Hyperoxia-exposed RV cardiomyocytes demonstrated evidence of mitochondrial dysregulation and mitochondrial DNA damage, suggesting potential mitochondrial dysfunction as a cause of RV dysfunction. Aged rats exposed to postnatal hyperoxia recapitulate many features of young adults born prematurely, including increased RV hypertrophy and decreased RV ejection fraction. Our data suggest that postnatal hyperoxia exposure results in mitochondrial dysregulation that persists into adulthood with eventual RV dysfunction. Further evaluation of long-term mitochondrial function is warranted in both animal models of premature lung disease and in human adults who were born preterm.

  13. Functional connectivity correlates of response inhibition impairment in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Collantoni, Enrico; Michelon, Silvia; Tenconi, Elena; Degortes, Daniela; Titton, Francesca; Manara, Renzo; Clementi, Maurizio; Pinato, Claudia; Forzan, Monica; Cassina, Matteo; Santonastaso, Paolo; Favaro, Angela

    2016-01-30

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a disorder characterized by high levels of cognitive control and behavioral perseveration. The present study aims at exploring inhibitory control abilities and their functional connectivity correlates in patients with AN. Inhibitory control - an executive function that allows the realization of adaptive behavior according to environmental contingencies - has been assessed by means of the Stop-Signal paradigm. The study involved 155 patients with lifetime AN and 102 healthy women. A subsample underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and was genotyped for COMT and 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms. AN patients showed an impaired response inhibition and a disruption of the functional connectivity of the ventral attention circuit, a neural network implicated in behavioral response when a stimulus occurs unexpected. The 5-HTTLPR genotype appears to significantly interact with the functional connectivity of ventral attention network in explaining task performance in both patients and controls, suggesting a role of the serotoninergic system in mechanisms of response selection. The disruption of the ventral attention network in patients with AN suggests lower efficiency of bottom-up signal filtering, which might be involved in difficulties to adapt behavioral responses to environmental needs. Our findings deserve further research to confirm their scientific and therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural Equation Modeling of Motor Impairment, Gross Motor Function, and the Functional Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study…

  15. Structural Equation Modeling of Motor Impairment, Gross Motor Function, and the Functional Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study…

  16. Paracrine Functions of Fibrocytes to Promote Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kleaveland, Kathryn R.; Moore, Bethany B.; Kim, Kevin K.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrocytes derive from the bone marrow and are found in the circulation. They can be recruited to sites of injury and contribute to repair/remodeling. In vitro evidence suggests that fibrocytes may differentiate into fibroblasts to promote lung fibrosis. However, in vivo evidence for this is sparse. This review summarizes recent literature which may suggest that fibrocytes function to promote fibrosis via paracrine actions. In this way, secretion of growth factors, proteases and matricellular proteins may strongly influence the actions of resident epithelial and mesenchymal cells to promote repair and resolution or to tip the scale towards pathologic remodeling. PMID:24451025

  17. MiR-564 functions as a tumor suppressor in human lung cancer by targeting ZIC3

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Jia, Lin; Guo, Qiaojuan; Ren, Hui; Hu, Desheng; Zhou, Xiaoyi; Ren, Qingrong; Hu, Yanping; Xie, Tao

    2015-11-27

    Although miR-564 was reported to be dysregulated in human malignancy, the function and mechanism of miR-564 in tumorigenesis remains unknown. In the present study, we found that miR-564 frequently downregulated in lung cancer cells and significantly inhibited cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, motility, and the tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells. Moreover, we identified zic family member 3 (ZIC3) as a direct target of miR-564. ZIC3 overexpression impaired the suppressive effects of miR-564 on the capacity of lung cancer cells for proliferation and motility. Finally, we detected the expression level of miR-564 and ZIC3 protein in tissue specimens, and found a significant negative correlation between them. Patients with low levels of miR-564 showed a poorer overall survival. Taken together, our present study revealed the tumor suppressor role of miR-564, indicating restoration of miR-564 as a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of lung cancer. - Highlights: • MiR-564 inhibits cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, migration, and invasion. • miR-564 suppresses the tumorigenicity of lung cancer cell in vivo. • ZIC3 is a direct and functional target of miR-564. • The expression of miR-564 was negatively correlated with ZIC3 protein in tumors. • Both low miR-564 and high ZIC3 was associated with tumor stage and prognosis.

  18. Relation between dust exposure and lung function in miners and ex-miners.

    PubMed Central

    Soutar, C A; Hurley, J F

    1986-01-01

    A sample of men working in the British coal industry in the 1950s has been followed up and examined 22 years later. The relations between lung function and individual cumulative exposure to respirable dust have been studied in 1867 men who were still working in the industry at the time of follow up and 2192 men who had left. Levels of forced expired volume in one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and FEV1/FVC ratio at follow up were found to be inversely related to exposure to respirable dust after allowing for other factors, even in men without pneumoconiosis. The magnitude of this estimated effect was equivalent to a loss of 228 ml FEV1 in response to an exposure of 300 gh/m3, a moderately high exposure for this group. Ex-miners aged under 65 had worse lung function than miners on average, suggesting that ill health had encouraged some of these men to leave the industry. Whereas a more severe response to dust exposure among ex-miners under 65 was suggested, this difference could easily have arisen by chance. The presence of symptoms of chronic bronchitis was associated with reduced levels of lung function, however, and, additionally, ex-miners under 65 with chronic bronchitis showed a more severe response of the FVC to dust exposure than miners without these symptoms. Among these ex-miners with chronic bronchitis a small group of men who had taken other jobs showed a much more severe effect of dust exposure on their lung function than the average, likely in heavily exposed men to contribute importantly to disability. Men in this group who had given up smoking showed and even more severe effect of dust exposure, equivalent to a loss of 940 ml FEV1 in response to an exposure of 300 gh/m3. These results indicate that exposure to respirable dust can occasionally cause severe respiratory impairment in the absence of progressive massive fibrosis. Dust exposure was related to a parallel reduction of FEV1 and FVC, implying that the pathology of dust induced

  19. Association of prenatal and early childhood stress with reduced lung function in 7-year-olds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alison G; Chiu, Yueh-Hsiu M; Rosa, Maria J; Cohen, Sheldon; Coull, Brent A; Wright, Robert O; Morgan, Wayne J; Wright, Rosalind J

    2017-08-01

    No prior study has examined associations between prenatal and early-life stress on childhood lung function or identified critical windows of exposure. To prospectively examine associations between prenatal and early-life stress and childhood lung function. Stress was indexed by a maternal negative life events (NLEs) score ascertained during pregnancy and between 1 and 2 years post partum. Spirometry was performed when children were a mean (SD) of 6.99 (0.89) years old. Associations of prenatal and early postnatal stress with spirometry z scores were examined in 199 children using linear regression. Effect modification by child sex was explored. Most mothers were minorities (65% Hispanic, 21% African American), had 12 years or less of education (67%), and did not smoke prenatally (78%). The highest level of prenatal stress (≥5 NLEs) was associated with lower levels of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (z score = -0.53, P = .03), forced vital capacity (FVC) (z score = -0.49, P = .04), and forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% (FEF25%-75%) (z score = -0.68, P = .01) after covariate adjustment; effects were similar for postnatal stress considered separately. In sex-stratified analyses, high postnatal stress (≥5 NLEs) was associated with lower FEV1 (z score = -0.76, P = .01), FVC (z score = -0.77, P = .01), and FEF25%-75% (z score = -0.67, P = .02) in boys but not girls, although the interaction term was not significant (P for interaction >.10). These are the first prospective data that link perinatal stress with reduced child lung function. High levels of stress in the prenatal and postnatal periods were associated with symmetric reductions in FEV1 and FVC consistent with impaired lung growth. Given that lung function growth patterns are established by 7 years of age, these findings have lifelong implications. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Medroxyprogesterone acetate impairs human dendritic cell activation and function.

    PubMed

    Quispe Calla, N E; Ghonime, M G; Cherpes, T L; Vicetti Miguel, R D

    2015-05-01

    Does medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) impair human dendritic cell (DC) activation and function? In vitro MPA treatment suppressed expression of CD40 and CD80 by human primary DCs responding to Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) agonist stimulation (i.e. DC activation). Moreover, this MPA-mediated decrease in CD40 expression impaired DC capacity to stimulate T cell proliferation (i.e. DC function). MPA is the active molecule in Depo-Provera(®) (DMPA), a commonly used injectable hormonal contraceptive (HC). Although DMPA treatment of mice prior to viral mucosal tissue infection impaired the capacity of DCs to up-regulate CD40 and CD80 and prime virus-specific T cell proliferation, neither DC activation marker expression nor the ability of DCs to promote T cell proliferation were affected by in vitro progesterone treatment of human DCs generated from peripheral blood monocytes. This cross-sectional study examined MPA-mediated effects on the activation and function of human primary untouched peripheral blood DCs. Human DCs isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells by negative immunomagnetic selection were incubated for 24 h with various concentrations of MPA. After an additional 24 h incubation with the TLR3 agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), flow cytometry was used to evaluate DC phenotype (i.e. expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DR). In separate experiments, primary untouched human DCs were sequentially MPA-treated, poly I:C-activated, and incubated for 7 days with fluorescently labeled naïve allogeneic T cells. Flow cytometry was then used to quantify allogeneic T cell proliferation. Several pharmacologically relevant concentrations of MPA dramatically reduced CD40 and CD80 expression in human primary DCs responding to the immunostimulant poly I:C. In addition, MPA-treated DCs displayed a reduced capacity to promote allogeneic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation. In other DC: T cell co-cultures, the addition of antibody blocking the CD40

  1. Does airway pressure release ventilation alter lung function after acute lung injury?

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Smith, D B

    1995-03-01

    weighing 33.3 +/- 4.1 kg while they were spontaneously breathing room air. After induction of lung injury, the swine received CPAP (14.7 +/- 3.3 cm H2O) with or without APRV at 10 breaths per minute with a release time of 1.1 +/- 0.2 s. Although mean transpulmonary pressure was significantly greater during CPAP (11.7 +/- 3.3 cm H2O) vs APRV (9.4 +/- 3.8 cm H2O) (p < 0.001), there were no differences in hemodynamic variables. PaCO2 was decreased and pHa was increased during APRV vs CPAP (p = 0.003 and p = 0.005). PaO2 declined from 83 +/- 4 mm Hg to 79 +/- 4 mm Hg (p = 0.004) during APRV, but arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (96.6 +/- 1.4% vs 96.9 +/- 1.3%) did not. Intrapulmonary venous admixture (9 +/- 3% vs 11 +/- 5%) and oxygen delivery (469 +/- 67 mL/min vs 479 +/- 66 mL/min) were not altered. After treatment periods and removal of CPAP for 60 min, PaO2 and intrapulmonary venous admixture returned to baseline values. Intrapulmonary venous admixture, arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation, and oxygen delivery were maintained by APRV at levels induced by CPAP despite the presence of unstable alveoli. Decrease in PaO2 was caused by increase in pHa and decrease in PaCO2, not by deterioration of pulmonary function. We conclude that periodic decrease of airway pressure created by APRV does not cause significant deterioration in oxygenation or lung mechanics.

  2. Role of exercise and lung function in predicting work status in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Frangolias, Despina D; Holloway, Caroline L; Vedal, Sverre; Wilcox, Pearce G

    2003-01-15

    With larger numbers of adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) in the workplace, the issue of disability has arisen increasingly. We examined relationships between measures of pulmonary impairment and work/school capability and then determined whether quantification of aerobic fitness improved predictability of disease-related disability. We studied 73 patients with CF who performed lung function and exercise capacity tests, completed a work/education questionnaire, and were scored for clinical and chest radiographic status. Patients who were characterized as unemployed and in poor health had more severe pulmonary disease according to American Thoracic Society impairment/disability criteria. Subjects were further classified into three groups based on employment or education status over the preceding 12 months. FEV1, maximal oxygen consumption, Schwachman-Kulczycki clinical and Brasfield radiographic scores, and frequency of pulmonary exacerbations over 2 years were associated with disability, but change in FEV1 over 2 years and oxygen saturation at rest or exertion were not. FEV1 and Schwachman-Kulczycki scores were the best independent predictors of impairment/disability; specific thresholds used in other pulmonary diseases were of limited utility. We conclude that after accounting for either current level of FEV1 or Schwachman-Kulczycki scores, no other physiological or clinical measures contribute to predicting limitation in a work or school environment.

  3. The Reliability of the CVI Range: A Functional Vision Assessment for Children with Cortical Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Children who are identified as visually impaired frequently have a functional vision assessment as one way to determine how their visual impairment affects their educational performance. The CVI Range is a functional vision assessment for children with cortical visual impairment. The purpose of the study presented here was to examine the…

  4. 75 FR 13562 - Revised Draft Guidance for Industry on Pharmacokinetics in Patients With Impaired Renal Function...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Patients With Impaired Renal Function--Study Design, Data Analysis, and Impact on Dosing and Labeling... ``Pharmacokinetics in Patients With Impaired Renal Function--Study Design, Data Analysis, and Impact on Dosing and... influence of renal impairment on the pharmacokinetics of an investigational drug. It...

  5. The Reliability of the CVI Range: A Functional Vision Assessment for Children with Cortical Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Children who are identified as visually impaired frequently have a functional vision assessment as one way to determine how their visual impairment affects their educational performance. The CVI Range is a functional vision assessment for children with cortical visual impairment. The purpose of the study presented here was to examine the…

  6. Therapeutic inhibition of TRF1 impairs the growth of p53-deficient K-RasG12V-induced lung cancer by induction of telomeric DNA damage.

    PubMed

    García-Beccaria, María; Martínez, Paula; Méndez-Pertuz, Marinela; Martínez, Sonia; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Cañamero, Marta; Mulero, Francisca; Ambrogio, Chiara; Flores, Juana M; Megias, Diego; Barbacid, Mariano; Pastor, Joaquín; Blasco, Maria A

    2015-07-01

    Telomeres are considered anti-cancer targets, as telomere maintenance above a minimum length is necessary for cancer growth. Telomerase abrogation in cancer-prone mouse models, however, only decreased tumor growth after several mouse generations when telomeres reach a critically short length, and this effect was lost upon p53 mutation. Here, we address whether induction of telomere uncapping by inhibition of the TRF1 shelterin protein can effectively block cancer growth independently of telomere length. We show that genetic Trf1 ablation impairs the growth of p53-null K-Ras(G12V)-induced lung carcinomas and increases mouse survival independently of telomere length. This is accompanied by induction of telomeric DNA damage, apoptosis, decreased proliferation, and G2 arrest. Long-term whole-body Trf1 deletion in adult mice did not impact on mouse survival and viability, although some mice showed a moderately decreased cellularity in bone marrow and blood. Importantly, inhibition of TRF1 binding to telomeres by small molecules blocks the growth of already established lung carcinomas without affecting mouse survival or tissue function. Thus, induction of acute telomere uncapping emerges as a potential new therapeutic target for lung cancer.

  7. Weight gain after lung reduction surgery is related to improved lung function and ventilatory efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kim, Victor; Kretschman, Dana M; Sternberg, Alice L; DeCamp, Malcolm M; Criner, Gerard J

    2012-12-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) is associated with weight gain in some patients, but the group that gains weight after LVRS and the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not been well characterized. To describe the weight change profiles of LVRS patients enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) and to correlate alterations in lung physiological parameters with changes in weight. We divided 1,077 non-high-risk patients in the NETT into groups according to baseline body mass index (BMI): underweight (<21 kg/m(2)), normal weight (21-25 kg/m(2)), overweight (25-30 kg/m(2)), and obese (>30 kg/m(2)). We compared BMI groups and LVRS and medical groups within each BMI stratum with respect to baseline characteristics and percent change in BMI (%ΔBMI) from baseline. We examined patients with (ΔBMI ≥ 5%) and without (ΔBMI < 5%) significant weight gain at 6 months and assessed changes in lung function and ventilatory efficiency (Ve/Vco(2)). The percent change in BMI was greater in the LVRS arm than in the medical arm in the underweight and normal weight groups at all follow-up time points, and at 12 and 24 months in the overweight group. In the LVRS group, patients with ΔBMI ≥ 5% at 6 months had greater improvements in FEV(1) (11.53 ± 9.31 vs. 6.58 ± 8.68%; P < 0.0001), FVC (17.51 ± 15.20 vs. 7.55 ± 14.88%; P < 0.0001), residual volume (-66.20 ± 40.26 vs. -47.06 ± 39.87%; P < 0.0001), 6-minute walk distance (38.70 ± 69.57 vs. 7.57 ± 73.37 m; P < 0.0001), maximal expiratory pressures (12.73 ± 49.08 vs. 3.54 ± 32.22; P = 0.0205), and Ve/Vco(2) (-1.58 ± 6.20 vs. 0.22 ± 8.20; P = 0.0306) at 6 months than patients with ΔBMI < 5% at 6 months. LVRS leads to weight gain in nonobese patients, which is associated with improvement in lung function, exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, and ventilatory efficiency. These physiological changes may be partially responsible for weight gain in patients who undergo LVRS.

  8. Weight Gain after Lung Reduction Surgery Is Related to Improved Lung Function and Ventilatory Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kretschman, Dana M.; Sternberg, Alice L.; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Criner, Gerard J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) is associated with weight gain in some patients, but the group that gains weight after LVRS and the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not been well characterized. Objectives: To describe the weight change profiles of LVRS patients enrolled in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) and to correlate alterations in lung physiological parameters with changes in weight. Methods: We divided 1,077 non–high-risk patients in the NETT into groups according to baseline body mass index (BMI): underweight (<21 kg/m2), normal weight (21–25 kg/m2), overweight (25–30 kg/m2), and obese (>30 kg/m2). We compared BMI groups and LVRS and medical groups within each BMI stratum with respect to baseline characteristics and percent change in BMI (%ΔBMI) from baseline. We examined patients with (ΔBMI ≥ 5%) and without (ΔBMI < 5%) significant weight gain at 6 months and assessed changes in lung function and ventilatory efficiency (V̇e/V̇co2). Measurements and Main Results: The percent change in BMI was greater in the LVRS arm than in the medical arm in the underweight and normal weight groups at all follow-up time points, and at 12 and 24 months in the overweight group. In the LVRS group, patients with ΔBMI ≥ 5% at 6 months had greater improvements in FEV1 (11.53 ± 9.31 vs. 6.58 ± 8.68%; P < 0.0001), FVC (17.51 ± 15.20 vs. 7.55 ± 14.88%; P < 0.0001), residual volume (–66.20 ± 40.26 vs. –47.06 ± 39.87%; P < 0.0001), 6-minute walk distance (38.70 ± 69.57 vs. 7.57 ± 73.37 m; P < 0.0001), maximal expiratory pressures (12.73 ± 49.08 vs. 3.54 ± 32.22; P = 0.0205), and V̇e/V̇co2 (–1.58 ± 6.20 vs. 0.22 ± 8.20; P = 0.0306) at 6 months than patients with ΔBMI < 5% at 6 months. Conclusions: LVRS leads to weight gain in nonobese patients, which is associated with improvement in lung function, exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, and ventilatory efficiency. These physiological changes may be

  9. Impaired cortical mitochondrial function following TBI precedes behavioral changes

    PubMed Central

    Watson, William D.; Buonora, John E.; Yarnell, Angela M.; Lucky, Jessica J.; D’Acchille, Michaela I.; McMullen, David C.; Boston, Andrew G.; Kuczmarski, Andrew V.; Kean, William S.; Verma, Ajay; Grunberg, Neil E.; Cole, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) pathophysiology can be attributed to either the immediate, primary physical injury, or the delayed, secondary injury which begins minutes to hours after the initial injury and can persist for several months or longer. Because these secondary cascades are delayed and last for a significant time period post-TBI, they are primary research targets for new therapeutics. To investigate changes in mitochondrial function after a brain injury, both the cortical impact site and ipsilateral hippocampus of adult male rats 7 and 17 days after a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury were examined. State 3, state 4, and uncoupler-stimulated rates of oxygen consumption, respiratory control ratios (RCRs) were measured and membrane potential quantified, and all were significantly decreased in 7 day post-TBI cortical mitochondria. By contrast, hippocampal mitochondria at 7 days showed only non-significant decreases in rates of oxygen consumption and membrane potential. NADH oxidase activities measured in disrupted mitochondria were normal in both injured cortex and hippocampus at 7 days post-CCI. Respiratory and phosphorylation capacities at 17 days post-CCI were comparable to naïve animals for both cortical and hippocampus mitochondria. However, unlike oxidative phosphorylation, membrane potential of mitochondria in the cortical lining of the impact site did not recover at 17 days, suggesting that while diminished cortical membrane potential at 17 days does not adversely affect mitochondrial capacity to synthesize ATP, it may negatively impact other membrane potential-sensitive mitochondrial functions. Memory status, as assessed by a passive avoidance paradigm, was not significantly impaired until 17 days after injury. These results indicate pronounced disturbances in cortical mitochondrial function 7 days after CCI which precede the behavioral impairment observed at 17 days. PMID:24550822

  10. Lung surfactant: Function and composition in the context of development and respiratory physiology.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Wolfgang

    2016-11-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex with a unique phospholipid and protein composition. Its specific function is to reduce surface tension at the pulmonary air-liquid interface. The underlying Young-Laplace equation, applying to the surface of any geometrical structure, is the more important the smaller its radii are. It therefore applies to the alveoli and bronchioli of mature lungs, as well as to the tubules and saccules of immature lungs. Surfactant comprises 80% phosphatidylcholine (PC), of which dipalmitoyl-PC, palmitoyl-myristoyl-PC and palmitoyl-palmitoleoyl-PC together are 75%. Anionic phosphatidylglycerol and cholesterol are about 10% each, whereas surfactant proteins SP-A to -D comprise 2-5%. Maturation of the surfactant system is not essentially due to increased synthesis but to decreased turnover of specific components. Molecular differences correlate with resting respiratory rate (RR), where PC16:0/16:0 is the lower the higher RR is. PC16:0/14:0 is increased during alveolar formation, and decreases immune reactions that might impair alveolar development. In rigid bird lungs, with air-capillaries rather than alveoli, and no surface area changes during the respiratory cycle, PC16:0/16:0 is highest and PC16:0/14:0 absent. As there is no need for a surface-associated surfactant reservoir, SP-C is absent in birds as well. Airflow is lowest and particle sedimentation highest in the extrapulmonary air-sacs, rather than in the gas-exchange area. Consequently, SP-A and -D for particle opsonization are absent in bird surfactant. In essence, comparative analysis is consistent with the concept that surfactant is adapted to the physiologic needs of a given vertebrate species at a given developmental stage.

  11. Executive functioning in preschoolers with specific language impairment

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Constance; Koolen, Sophieke; Hermans, Daan; Scheper, Annette; Knoors, Harry

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Specific Language Impairment (SLI) is still largely beyond our understanding. In this review, a neuropsychological perspective on language impairments in SLI is taken, focusing specifically on executive functioning (EF) in preschoolers (age range: 2.6–6.1 years) with SLI. Based on the studies described in this review, it can be concluded that similar to school-aged children with SLI, preschoolers with SLI show difficulties in working memory, inhibition and shifting, as revealed by both performance based measures and behavioral ratings. It seems plausible that a complex, reciprocal relationship exists between language and EF throughout development. Future research is needed to examine if, and if yes how, language and EF interact in SLI. Broad neuropsychological assessment in which both language and EF are taken into account may contribute to early detection of SLI. This in turn can lead to early and tailored treatment of children with (suspected) SLI aimed not only at stimulating language development but also at strengthening EF. PMID:26539136

  12. Impaired quality and efficiency of sleep impairs cognitive functioning in Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Henry, Michelle; Ross, Ian Louis; Wolf, Pedro Sofio Abril; Thomas, Kevin Garth Flusk

    2017-04-01

    Standard replacement therapy for Addison's disease (AD) does not restore a normal circadian rhythm. Periods of sub- and supra- physiological cortisol levels experienced by patients with AD likely induce disrupted sleep. Given that healthy sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation, the novelty of the current study was to characterise, using objective measures, the relationship between sleep and memory in patients with AD, and to examine the hypothesis that poor sleep is a biological mechanism underlying memory impairment in those patients. We used a within-subjects design. Ten patients with AD and 10 matched healthy controls completed standardised neuropsychological tests assessing declarative memory (Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test) and procedural memory (Finger Tapping Task) before and after a period of actigraphy-measured sleep, and before and after a period of waking. Relative to healthy controls, patients with AD experienced disrupted sleep characterised by poorer sleep efficiency and more time spent awake. Patients also showed impaired verbal learning and memory relative to healthy controls (p=0.007). Furthermore, whereas healthy controls' declarative memory performance benefited from a period of sleep compared to waking (p=0.032), patients with AD derived no such benefit from sleep (p=0.448). Regarding the procedural memory task, analyses detected no significant between-group differences (all p's<0.065), and neither group showed significant sleep-enhanced performance. We demonstrated, using actigraphy and standardized measures of memory performance, an association between sleep disturbances and cognitive deficits in patients with AD. These results suggest that, in patients with AD, the source of memory deficits is, at least to some extent, disrupted sleep patterns that interfere with optimal consolidation of previously-learned declarative information. Hence, treating the sleep disturbances that are frequently experienced by patients with AD may

  13. Lung function indices for predicting mortality in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Boutou, Afroditi K.; Shrikrishna, Dinesh; Tanner, Rebecca J.; Smith, Cayley; Kelly, Julia L.; Ward, Simon P.; Polkey, Michael I.; Hopkinson, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by high morbidity and mortality. It remains unknown which aspect of lung function carries the most prognostic information and if simple spirometry is sufficient. Survival was assessed in COPD outpatients whose data had been added prospectively to a clinical audit database from the point of first full lung function testing including spirometry, lung volumes, gas transfer and arterial blood gases. Variables univariately associated with survival were entered into a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. 604 patients were included (mean±sd age 61.9±9.7 years; forced expiratory volume in 1 s 37±18.1% predicted; 62.9% males); 229 (37.9%) died during a median follow-up of 83 months. Median survival was 91.9 (95% CI 80.8–103) months with survival rates at 3 and 5 years 0.83 and 0.66, respectively. Carbon monoxide transfer factor % pred quartiles (best quartile (>51%): HR 0.33, 95% CI 0.172–0.639; and second quartile (51–37.3%): HR 0.52, 95% CI 0.322–0.825; versus lowest quartile (<27.9%)), age (HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02–1.06) and arterial oxygen partial pressure (HR 0.85, 95% CI 0.77–0.94) were the only parameters independently associated with mortality. Measurement of gas transfer provides additional prognostic information compared to spirometry in patients under hospital follow-up and could be considered routinely. PMID:23349449

  14. Effects of bronchoscopy on lung function in asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Christina; Bleecker, Eugene R; Peters, Stephen; Pascual, Rodolfo; Krings, Jeffrey; Smith, Regina; Hastie, Annette T; Moore, Wendy C

    2017-01-05

    To better understand the changes in pulmonary physiology related to asthma severity following bronchoscopy, we performed scheduled pre- and post-procedure spirometry on subjects undergoing bronchoscopy in our research program. Control subjects and asthma subjects were recruited for bronchoscopy. On the day of bronchoscopy, subjects underwent spirometry pre-bronchoscopy and then up to three sets within 2 hour following the completion of bronchoscopy. A subset of patients had a second bronchoscopy after 2 weeks of treatment with oral prednisolone (40mg daily). A total of 92 subjects had at least one bronchoscopy (12 control subjects, 56 nonsevere asthma (NSA), 24 severe asthma (SA)). The SA and NSA groups had similar decreases in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (-20±13% vs.-19±16%, p = 0.92) and forced vital capacity (FVC) (-20±12% vs.-20±14%, p = 0.80), but no change in FEV1/FVC ratio. The control and NSA group had more rapid recovery of both FEV1 and FVC by 2 hour compared to the SA group (p = 0.01). In the subset of 36 subjects (22 NSA, 14 SA) who underwent a second bronchoscopy following the administration of oral prednisolone for 14 days, steroids resulted in more rapid recovery of lung function (p < 0.04). Following bronchoscopy the lung function of NSA subjects recovered more quickly than SA subjects. Treatment with oral corticosteroids was associated with a quicker recovery of FEV1 which suggests an inflammatory mechanism for these changes in lung compliance.

  15. Effects of air pollution on changes in lung function induced by exercise in children with chronic respiratory symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Timonen, K; Pekkanen, J; Tiittanen, P; Salonen, R

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate how daily variations in ambient air pollution, especially in particles, during the cold of winter affect repeated measurements of baseline lung function and exercise induced bronchial responsiveness among primary school children with chronic respiratory symptoms. Methods: During alternate school weeks (mamimum five) from February to April 1994, 33 children took part in exercise challenge tests (n=141 tests). The exercise challenges were conducted outdoors in a school yard in the centre of Kuopio, Finland. Spirometric lung functions were measured indoors before the exercise, and 3 and 10 minutes after. Daily mean concentrations of PM10, black smoke (BS), NO2, CO, SO2, and particle size and numbers were monitored at a nearby fixed monitoring site. Results: Daily variations in ambient air pollution were not associated with enhanced bronchial responsiveness. However, increased concentrations of BS, PM10, particle numbers, NO2, and CO were consistently associated with an impairment of baseline lung functions. The reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) were 0.5% and 0.6%, respectively, for each 10 µg/m3 increase in BS (lag 2). Conclusion: Particles derived from combustion affect baseline lung function rather than bronchial responsiveness among children with chronic respiratory symptoms. PMID:11850557

  16. Decreased function of survival motor neuron protein impairs endocytic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriadi, Maria; Derdowski, Aaron; Kalloo, Geetika; Maginnis, Melissa S.; O’Hern, Patrick; Bliska, Bryn; Sorkaç, Altar; Nguyen, Ken C. Q.; Cook, Steven J.; Poulogiannis, George; Atwood, Walter J.; Hall, David H.; Hart, Anne C.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by depletion of the ubiquitously expressed survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, with 1 in 40 Caucasians being heterozygous for a disease allele. SMN is critical for the assembly of numerous ribonucleoprotein complexes, yet it is still unclear how reduced SMN levels affect motor neuron function. Here, we examined the impact of SMN depletion in Caenorhabditis elegans and found that decreased function of the SMN ortholog SMN-1 perturbed endocytic pathways at motor neuron synapses and in other tissues. Diminished SMN-1 levels caused defects in C. elegans neuromuscular function, and smn-1 genetic interactions were consistent with an endocytic defect. Changes were observed in synaptic endocytic proteins when SMN-1 levels decreased. At the ultrastructural level, defects were observed in endosomal compartments, including significantly fewer docked synaptic vesicles. Finally, endocytosis-dependent infection by JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) was reduced in human cells with decreased SMN levels. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that SMN depletion causes defects in endosomal trafficking that impair synaptic function, even in the absence of motor neuron cell death. PMID:27402754

  17. Impaired orofacial motor functions on chronic temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Cláudia Lúcia Pimenta; Machado, Bárbara Cristina Zanandréa; Borges, Carina Giovana Pissinatti; Rodrigues Da Silva, Marco Antonio M; Sforza, Chiarella; De Felício, Cláudia Maria

    2014-08-01

    Because temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) rehabilitation continues to be a challenge, a more comprehensive picture of the orofacial functions in patients with chronic pain is required. This study assessed the orofacial functions, including surface electromyography (EMG) of dynamic rhythmic activities, in patients with moderate-severe signs and symptoms of chronic TMD. It was hypothesized that orofacial motor control differs between patients with moderate-severe chronic TMD and healthy subjects. Seventy-six subjects (46 with TMD and 30 control) answered questionnaires of severity of TMD and chewing difficulties. Orofacial functions and EMG during chewing were assessed. Standardized EMG indices were obtained by quantitative analysis of the differential EMG signals of the paired masseter and temporal muscles, and used to describe muscular action during chewing. TMD patients showed significant greater difficulty in chewing; worse orofacial scores; longer time for free mastication; a less accurate recruitment of the muscles on the working and balancing sides, reduced symmetrical mastication index (SMI) and increased standardized activity during EMG test than healthy subjects. SMI, TMD severity and orofacial myofunctional scores were correlated (P<0.01). Impaired orofacial functions and increased activity of the muscles of balancing sides during unilateral chewing characterized the altered orofacial motor control in patients with moderate-severe chronic TMD. Implications for rehabilitation are discussed.

  18. [Fetal lung development on MRT. Normal course and impairment due to premature rupture of membranes].

    PubMed

    Kasprian, G; Brugger, P C; Helmer, H; Langer, M; Balassy, C; Prayer, D

    2006-02-01

    A well-organized interplay between many molecular factors as well as mechanical forces influence fetal lung development. At the end of this complex process a sufficiently sized and structurally mature organ should ensure the postnatal survival of the newborn. Besides prenatal ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can now be used to investigate normal and pathological human lung growth in utero. Oligohydramnios, due to premature rupture of membranes (PROM), is an important risk factor for compromised fetal lung growth. In these situations MR volumetry can be used to measure the size of the fetal lung quite accurately. Together with the evaluation of lung signal intensities on T2-weighted sequences, fetuses with pulmonary hypoplasia can be readily detected.

  19. Increased Risk of Wheeze and Decreased Lung Function after Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zomer-Kooijker, Kim; van der Ent, Cornelis K.; Ermers, Marieke J. J.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; Bont, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Background A relationship between hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis and asthma development has been suggested in case-control studies. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the risk of current wheeze, asthma, and lung function at school age in infants previously hospitalized for RSV bronchiolitis compared to non-hospitalized children. Methods For this study, data from a prospective birth cohort of unselected, term-born infants (n = 553), of whom 4 (0.7%) were hospitalized for RSV bronchiolitis, and a prospective patient cohort of 155 term infants hospitalized for RSV bronchiolitis were used. Respiratory outcomes at age 6 in children hospitalized for RSV bronchiolitis were compared to non-hospitalized children. Results The risk of current wheeze was higher in hospitalized patients (n = 159) compared to non-hospitalized children (n = 549) (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.2 (95% CI 1.2–8.1). Similarly, the risk of current asthma, defined as a doctor’s diagnosis of asthma plus current symptoms or medication use, was higher in hospitalized patients (adjusted OR 3.1 (95% CI 1.3–7.5). Compared to non-hospitalized children, RSV bronchiolitis hospitalization was associated with lower lung function (mean difference FEV1% predicted −6.8 l (95% CI (−10.2 to −3.4). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance This is the first study showing that hospitalization for RSV bronchiolitis during infancy is associated with increased risk of wheezing, current asthma, and impaired lung function as compared to an unselected birth cohort at age 6. PMID:24498037

  20. A systematic review of the association between pleural plaques and changes in lung function

    PubMed Central

    Kopylev, Leonid; Christensen, Krista Yorita; Brown, James S; Cooper, Glinda S

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a systematic review of changes in lung function in relation to presence of pleural plaques in asbestos-exposed populations. Methods Database searches of PubMed and Web of Science were supplemented by review of papers’ reference lists and journals’ tables of contents. Methodological features (eg, consideration of potential confounding by smoking) of identified articles were reviewed by ≥two reviewers. Meta-analyses of 20 studies estimated a summary effect of the decrements in per cent predicted (%pred) forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) associated with presence of pleural plaques. Results Among asbestos-exposed workers, the presence of pleural plaques was associated with statistically significant decrements in FVC (4.09%pred, 95% CI 2.31 to 5.86) and FEV1 (1.99%pred, 95% CI 0.22 to 3.77). Effects of similar magnitude were seen when stratifying by imaging type (X-ray or high-resolution CT) and when excluding studies with potential methodological limitations. Undetected asbestosis was considered as an unlikely explanation of the observed decrements. Several studies provided evidence of an association between size of pleural plaques and degree of pulmonary decrease, and presence of pleural plaques and increased rate or degree of pulmonary impairment. Conclusions The presence of pleural plaques is associated with a small, but statistically significant mean difference in FVC and FEV1 in comparison to asbestos-exposed individuals without plaques or other abnormalities. From a public health perspective, small group mean decrements in lung function coupled with an increased rate of decline in lung function of the exposed population may be consequential. PMID:25504898

  1. Occupational Health Hazards among Sewage Workers: Oxidative Stress and Deranged Lung Functions.

    PubMed

    Shadab, Mohammad; Agrawal, Dhirendra Kumar; Aslam, Mohammad; Islam, Najmul; Ahmad, Zuber

    2014-04-01

    Sewage workers, because of their occupation, are exposed to different types of dusts, bio-aerosols, fumes and gases like methane, hydrogen sulfide, sulphur dioxide, etc, which contribute towards oxidative stress and detrimental effects on various body functions, especially lung functions. This study was carried out on sewage workers (who had been working for more than five years). We wanted to study the role of oxidative stress in development of impaired lung functions among sewage workers. This cross sectional study was done in a tertiary care hospital (J.N. Medical College) in Aligarh, U.P. Study was done from March 2008 to December 2009. The study group comprised of 62 sewage workers who had been working for more than five years (32 non-smokers and 30 smokers) and 60 control subjects (30 smokers and 30 non-smokers). The pulmonary functions of these workers were assessed by using a MIR (Medical International Lab) Spiro Lab II Spirometer, with subjects in sitting position. Valid written consents were obtained from all the subjects. Malondialdehyde (MDA) is produced as a result of the action of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the lipids present in the membranes of the cells, especially, contracting muscle cells. Serum MDA levels were assessed as an indirect measure of oxidative stress in these sewage workers and they were compared with serum MDA levels of control subjects. Appropriate statistical tests were applied for analysis of the data which was generated. There were statistically significant decreases in Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR), Forced Expiratory Volume in first second (FEV1) and FEV1/FVC percent ratio (<80%) and Forced Expiratory Flow at 25%-75% of volume as percentage of Vital Capacity (FEF 25%-75%). Also, we found statistically significant increased levels of serum MDA in these sewage workers as compared to those in control subjects (with a p-value of <0.05 with a confidence interval of 95%). Our study found that the occupational exposure of the

  2. Recovery from silver-nanoparticle-exposure-induced lung inflammation and lung function changes in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyung Seuk; Sung, Jae Hyuck; Ji, Jun Ho; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jong Seong; Ryu, Hyeon Ryol; Lee, Jin Kyu; Chung, Yong Hyun; Park, Hyun Min; Shin, Beom Soo; Chang, Hee Kyung; Kelman, Bruce; Yu, Il Je

    2013-03-01

    In a previous study, the lung function, as indicated by the tidal volume, minute volume, and peak inspiration flow, decreased during 90 days of exposure to silver nanoparticles and was accompanied by inflammatory lesions in the lung morphology. Therefore, this study investigated the recovery from such lung function changes in rats following the cessation of 12 weeks of nanoparticle exposure. Male and female rats were exposed to silver nanoparticles (14-15 nm diameter) at concentrations of 0.66 × 10(6) particles/cm(3) (49 μg/m(3), low dose), 1.41 × 10(6) particles/cm(3) (117 μg/m(3), middle dose), and 3.24 × 10(6) particles/cm(3) (381 μg/m(3), high dose) for 6 h/day in an inhalation chamber for 12 weeks. The rats were then allowed to recover. The lung function was measured every week during the exposure period and after the cessation of exposure, plus animals were sacrificed after the 12-week exposure period, and 4 weeks and 12 weeks after the exposure cessation. An exposure-related lung function decrease was measured in the male rats after the 12-week exposure period and 12 weeks after the exposure cessation. In contrast, the female rats did not show a consistent lung function decrease either during the exposure period or following the exposure cessation. The histopathology showed a gradual recovery from the lung inflammation in the female rats, whereas the male rats in the high-dose group exhibited persistent inflammation throughout the 12-week recovery period. Therefore, the present results suggest a potential persistence of lung function changes and inflammation induced by silver nanoparticle exposure above the no observed adverse effect level.

  3. Pulmonary physiology: future directions for lung function testing in COPD.

    PubMed

    Brusasco, Vito; Barisione, Giovanni; Crimi, Emanuele

    2015-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a term that encompasses different pathological conditions having excessive airflow limitation in common. A wide body of knowledge has been accumulated over the last century explaining the mechanisms by which airway (chronic bronchitis) and parenchymal (emphysema) diseases lead to an indistinguishable spirometric abnormality. Although the definition of emphysema is anatomical, early studies showed that its presence can be inferred with good approximation from measurements of lung mechanics and gas exchange, in addition to simple spirometry. Studies using tests of ventilation distribution showed that abnormalities are present in smokers with normal spirometry, although these tests were not predictive of development of COPD. At the beginning of the third millennium, new documents and guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of COPD were developed, in which the functional diagnosis of COPD was restricted, for the sake of simplicity, to simple spirometry. In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in separating bronchitic from emphysematous phenotype of COPD. For this purpose, high-resolution computed tomography scanning has been added to diagnostic work-up. At the same time, methods for lung function testing have been refined and seem promising for detection of early small airways abnormalities. Among them are the forced oscillation technique and the nitrogen phase III slope analysis of the multiple-breath washout test, which may provide information on ventilation inhomogeneity. Moreover, the combined assessment of diffusing capacity for nitric oxide and carbon monoxide may be more sensitive than the latter alone for partitioning diffusive components at parenchymal level.

  4. Monitoring asthma in childhood: lung function, bronchial responsiveness and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Alexander; Carlsen, Kai-Hakon; Sly, Peter D; Baraldi, Eugenio; Piacentini, Giorgio; Pavord, Ian; Lex, Christiane; Saglani, Sejal

    2015-06-01

    This review focuses on the methods available for measuring reversible airways obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and inflammation as hallmarks of asthma, and their role in monitoring children with asthma. Persistent bronchial obstruction may occur in asymptomatic children and is considered a risk factor for severe asthma episodes and is associated with poor asthma outcome. Annual measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s using office based spirometry is considered useful. Other lung function measurements including the assessment of BHR may be reserved for children with possible exercise limitations, poor symptom perception and those not responding to their current treatment or with atypical asthma symptoms, and performed on a higher specialty level. To date, for most methods of measuring lung function there are no proper randomised controlled or large longitudinal studies available to establish their role in asthma management in children. Noninvasive biomarkers for monitoring inflammation in children are available, for example the measurement of exhaled nitric oxide fraction, and the assessment of induced sputum cytology or inflammatory mediators in the exhaled breath condensate. However, their role and usefulness in routine clinical practice to monitor and guide therapy remains unclear, and therefore, their use should be reserved for selected cases.

  5. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    SciTech Connect

    Asdonk, Tobias; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 {mu}g of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5 Prime end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  6. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  7. Endotoxin and gender modify lung function recovery after occupational organic dust exposure: a 30 year study

    PubMed Central

    Valeri, Linda; Zhang, Feng-ying; Zheng, Bu-Yong; Mehta, Amar J.; Shi, Jing; Su, Li; Brown, Dan; Eisen, Ellen A; Christiani, David C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study is to determine the trajectory of lung function change after exposure cessation to occupational organic dust exposure, and to identify factors that modify improvement. METHODS The Shanghai Textile Worker Study is a longitudinal study of 447 cotton workers exposed to endotoxin-containing dust and 472 silk workers exposed to non-endotoxin-containing dust. Spirometry was performed at 5 year intervals. Air sampling was performed to estimate individual cumulative exposures. The effect of work cessation on FEV1 was modeled using generalized additive mixed effects models to identify the trajectory of FEV1 recovery. Linear mixed effects models incorporating interaction terms were used to identify modifiers of FEV1 recovery. Loss to follow-up was accounted for with inverse probability of censoring weights. RESULTS 74.2% of the original cohort still alive participated in 2011. Generalized additive mixed models identified a non-linear improvement in FEV1 for all workers after exposure cessation, with no plateau noted 25 years after retirement. Linear mixed effects models incorporating interaction terms identified prior endotoxin exposure (p=0.01) and male gender (p=0.002) as risk factors for impaired FEV1 improvement after exposure cessation. After adjusting for gender, smoking delayed the onset of FEV1 gain but did not affect the overall magnitude of change. CONCLUSIONS Lung function improvement after cessation of exposure to organic dust is sustained. Endotoxin exposure and male gender are risk factors for less FEV1 improvement. PMID:25666844

  8. Chronic Respiratory Symptoms and Lung Function in Agricultural Workers - Influence of Exposure Duration and Smoking.

    PubMed

    Stoleski, Saso; Minov, Jordan; Mijakoski, Dragan; Karadzinska-Bislimovska, Jovanka

    2015-03-15

    Job exposure in agricultural workers often leads to respiratory impairment. To assess the influence of exposure duration and smoking on chronic respiratory symptoms and ventilatory capacity in agricultural workers. A cross-sectional study covered 75 agricultural workers, compared with an equal number of office workers matched by age, exposure duration and smoking status. Standardized questionnaire was used to obtain data on chronic respiratory symptoms, job and smoking history. Lung functional testing was performed by spirometry. The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was higher in agricultural workers, with significant difference for cough (P = 0.034), and dyspnea (P = 0.028). Chronic respiratory symptoms among agricultural workers were significantly associated with duration of exposure (P < 0.05) and daily smoking (P < 0.01), as well as with daily smoking in controls (P < 0.01). The average values of spirometric parameters in exposed workers were significantly different for MEF50 (P = 0.002), MEF75 (P = 0.000), and MEF25-75 (P = 0.049). Obstructive changes in small airways in exposed workers were strongly related to exposure duration (P < 0.05) and smoking (P < 0.01). Agricultural workers with job exposure more than 15 years had more expressed adverse respiratory symptoms and lung function decline. The results confirmed the influence of agricultural exposure and daily smoking on chronic respiratory symptoms and airflow limitation, primarily targeting the small airways.

  9. Anti-tissue antibodies are related to lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Belén; Sauleda, Jaume; Antó, Josep Maria; Julià, Maria Rosa; Orozco, Mauricio; Monsó, Eduard; Noguera, Aina; Gómez, Federico P; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Agustí, Alvar

    2011-04-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multicomponent disease. Autoimmunity can contribute to the pathogenesis of COPD. This study investigates the prevalence of circulating antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and anti-tissue (AT) antibodies, two common markers of autoimmunity, in COPD and their relationship with several components of the disease. We determined