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Sample records for impaired oral health

  1. The oral health status of adults with a visual impairment, their dental care and oral health information needs.

    PubMed

    Watson, E K; Moles, D R; Kumar, N; Porter, S R

    2010-04-24

    AIM There is little information available concerning the impact of visual impairment upon oral health. The present study sought to identify the oral health and experiences of adults with a visual impairment together with the nature, source and access to oral health information. In addition the study evaluated the oral health status of a group of individuals with a visual impairment with respect to oral health markers, treatment choice and attendance patterns in comparison to a reference group from the general population in the United Kingdom. METHOD One hundred adults with a visual impairment were examined and completed a questionnaire concerning their experience of oral health care and available information sources. The information collected was directly compared with data from the Adult Dental Health Survey 1998 for the south region of England. RESULTS The present group of individuals with a visual impairment had better oral hygiene practices, and similar levels of oral hygiene and hard tissue disease to those of a comparable group of the Adult Dental Health Survey 1998 (ADHS 1998). However 24% of those with a visual impairment were not registered with a dentist and 26% of the patients wished for appropriate information concerning oral health care. CONCLUSIONS There is a need to develop oral health promotion that ensures patients with a visual impairment have appropriate information regarding oral health care and its provision.

  2. Knowledge of Dental Health and Oral Hygiene Practices of Taiwanese Visually Impaired and Sighted Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chien-Huey Sophie; Shih, Yeng-Hung

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the dental health knowledge and oral hygiene practices of 95 students with visual impairments and 286 sighted students in Taiwan. It found that the students with visual impairments were less knowledgeable about dental health and less frequently completed oral hygiene practices than did the sighted students.

  3. Risk factors for impaired oral health among 18- to 34-year-old Australians.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Lisa M; Mejía, Gloria C; Slade, Gary D; Roberts-Thomson, Kaye F

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine risk factors for a summary measure of oral health impairment among 18- to 34-year-olds in Australia. Data were from Australia's National Survey of Adult Oral Health, a representative survey that utilized a three-stage, stratified, clustered sampling design. Oral health impairment was defined as reported experience of toothache, poor dental appearance, or food avoidance in the last 12 months. Multivariate Poisson regression models were used to evaluate effects of sociodemographic characteristics, self-perceived oral health, dental service utilization, and clinical oral disease indicators on oral health impairments. Effects were quantified as prevalence ratios (PR). The estimated percent of 18- to 34-year-olds with oral health impairment was 42.4 [95 percent confidence interval (CI) 37.7-47.2]. In the multivariate model, oral health impairment was associated with untreated dental decay (PR 1.38, 95 percent CI 1.13-1.68) and presence of periodontal pockets 4 mm+ (PR 1.29, 95 percent CI 1.03-1.61). In addition to those clinical indicators, greater prevalence of oral health impairment was associated with trouble paying a $100 dental bill (PR 1.37, 95 percent CI 1.12-1.68), usually visiting a dentist because of a dental problem (PR 1.46, 95 percent CI 1.15-1.86), reported cost barriers to dental care (PR 1.46, 95 percent CI 1.16-1.85), and dental fear (PR 1.43, 95 percent CI 1.18-1.73). Oral health impairment was highly prevalent in this population. The findings suggest that treatment of dental disease, reduction of financial barriers to dental care, and control of dental fear are needed to reduce oral health impairment among Australian young adults.

  4. Risk indicators for severe impaired oral health among indigenous Australian young adults

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Oral health impairment comprises three conceptual domains; pain, appearance and function. This study sought to: (1) estimate the prevalence of severe oral health impairment as assessed by a summary oral health impairment measure, including aspects of dental pain, dissatisfaction with dental appearance and difficulty eating, among a birth cohort of Indigenous Australian young adults (n = 442, age range 16-20 years); (2) compare prevalence according to demographic, socio-economic, behavioural, dental service utilisation and oral health outcome risk indicators; and (3) ascertain the independent contribution of those risk indicators to severe oral health impairment in this population. Methods Data were from the Aboriginal Birth Cohort (ABC) study, a prospective longitudinal investigation of Aboriginal individuals born 1987-1990 at an Australian regional hospital. Data for this analysis pertained to Wave-3 of the study only. Severe oral health impairment was defined as reported experience of toothache, poor dental appearance and food avoidance in the last 12 months. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate effects of demographic, socio-economic, behavioural, dental service utilisation and clinical oral disease indicators on severe oral health impairment. Effects were quantified as odds ratios (OR). Results The percent of participants with severe oral health impairment was 16.3 (95% CI 12.9-19.7). In the multivariate model, severe oral health impairment was associated with untreated dental decay (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.6-9.6). In addition to that clinical indicator, greater odds of severe oral health impairment were associated with being female (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.6), being aged 19-20 years (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.6), soft drink consumption every day or a few days a week (OR 2.6, 95% 1.2-5.6) and non-ownership of a toothbrush (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.4). Conclusions Severe oral health impairment was prevalent among this population. The findings suggest that

  5. Risk indicators for severe impaired oral health among indigenous Australian young adults.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Lisa M; Roberts-Thomson, Kaye F; Sayers, Susan M

    2010-01-27

    Oral health impairment comprises three conceptual domains; pain, appearance and function. This study sought to: (1) estimate the prevalence of severe oral health impairment as assessed by a summary oral health impairment measure, including aspects of dental pain, dissatisfaction with dental appearance and difficulty eating, among a birth cohort of Indigenous Australian young adults (n = 442, age range 16-20 years); (2) compare prevalence according to demographic, socio-economic, behavioural, dental service utilisation and oral health outcome risk indicators; and (3) ascertain the independent contribution of those risk indicators to severe oral health impairment in this population. Data were from the Aboriginal Birth Cohort (ABC) study, a prospective longitudinal investigation of Aboriginal individuals born 1987-1990 at an Australian regional hospital. Data for this analysis pertained to Wave-3 of the study only. Severe oral health impairment was defined as reported experience of toothache, poor dental appearance and food avoidance in the last 12 months. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate effects of demographic, socio-economic, behavioural, dental service utilisation and clinical oral disease indicators on severe oral health impairment. Effects were quantified as odds ratios (OR). The percent of participants with severe oral health impairment was 16.3 (95% CI 12.9-19.7). In the multivariate model, severe oral health impairment was associated with untreated dental decay (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.6-9.6). In addition to that clinical indicator, greater odds of severe oral health impairment were associated with being female (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.6), being aged 19-20 years (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.6), soft drink consumption every day or a few days a week (OR 2.6, 95% 1.2-5.6) and non-ownership of a toothbrush (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.4). Severe oral health impairment was prevalent among this population. The findings suggest that public health strategies that address

  6. Perception of Complete Visually Impaired Children to Three Different Oral Health Education Methods: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Mudunuri, S; Sharma, A; Subramaniam, P

    To evaluate the perception of visually impaired children to three different methods of oral health education. Sixty total visually impaired children were divided into three groups of 20 children each. Children in group-I received oral health education through a lecture. Children in group II received Demonstration on a Model by Tell and Touch method (DMTT) and children in group III were self trained on oral hygiene skills. All children received written instructions in Braille. Their knowledge and practice of oral hygiene methods were recorded by a questionnaire and their method of brushing and rinsing was assessed during a personal interview. Data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. Children in group II were able to brush and rinse significantly better (p <0.05) as compared to the other groups. Demonstration on a Model by Tell and Touch method was found to be the most preferred method of oral health education. Oral health education given through DMTT method was perceived well by the visually impaired children.

  7. Breaking the sound barrier: oral health education for children with hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Vabitha; Kumar, Jithendra; Hegde, Amitha

    2014-01-01

    In our study, a visual oral health education (OHE) program was specially designed for children with hearing impairment. Its efficacy in improving their oral health status was evaluated after periods of reinforcement and nonreinforcement. One hundred and ten institutionalized children with moderate-to-severe hearing impairment aged 6-14 years were selected for the study. Oral health status was evaluated at the start of the study (pre-OHE level) using the Modified Gingival Index (MGI) and the Turesky-Gilmore-Glickman modification of the Quigley Hein Plaque Index (MQPI). Salivary Streptococcus mutans levels of the children were also evaluated. Brushing skills were assessed using the Simmons index at the start of the study. Significant decreases were observed in the mean values of both the MGI and MQPI from the baseline up to the values obtained at the end of both periods of reinforcement and nonreinforcement. Significant reduction in S. mutans counts was observed, from Pre-OHE levels up to the levels at the end of the period of nonreinforcement. Brushing skills of children improved significantly at the end of study, notably in areas where brushing was previously deemed unsatisfactory. The OHE program specially formulated for the hearing impaired children was effective in improving their oral health status significantly.

  8. Association of overjet and overbite with esthetic impairments of oral health-related quality of life.

    PubMed

    Sierwald, Ira; John, Mike T; Schierz, Oliver; Jost-Brinkmann, Paul-Georg; Reissmann, Daniel R

    2015-09-01

    Esthetics is an important part of quality of life and a frequent reason for orthodontic treatment demand. It was the aim of this study to investigate whether esthetic impairments, related to overjet and overbite, can be assessed with an established oral health-related quality of life instrument. Data from 1968 participants (age: 16-90 years; 69.8% female) from three German surveys were analyzed. Esthetic impairments of oral health-related quality of life were measured with four questions of the Oral Health Impact profile (OHIP), which comprise esthetic aspects of oral health-related quality of life. Higher values represent greater esthetic impairment (sum score: 0-16). Overbite and overjet values were categorized (≤ - 1 mm, 0-1 mm, 2-3 mm, 4-5 mm, ≥ 6 mm). The specific impact of each category on esthetic impairment, in relation to the reference category (2-3 mm), was calculated in linear regression analyses. The type of relationship and the specific impact of overbite and overjet were evaluated in regression analyses with fractional polynomials. Overbite ranged from - 5 to 15 mm (mean: 3.2 mm) and overjet from - 7 to 19 mm (mean: 3.1 mm). Both an increase and a decrease in overjet, in relation to the reference category, resulted in more esthetic-related oral health-related quality of life impairments. However, in this model, only the effect for increased overjet was statistically significant (4-5 mm: + 0.4 OHIP points; ≥ 6 mm: + 0.9 OHIP points). In the regression analysis with fractional polynomials, both an increase and a decrease in overjet resulted in more esthetic impairments, characterized by a U-shaped relationship. No association could be verified for overbite. A substantial increase or decrease of overjet from the reference values is associated with esthetic impairments of oral health-related quality of life, whereas the extent of overbite seems to have no impact on esthetics.

  9. Patterns of impaired oral health-related quality of life dimensions.

    PubMed

    John, M T; Rener-Sitar, K; Baba, K; Čelebić, A; Larsson, P; Szabo, G; Norton, W E; Reissmann, D R

    2016-07-01

    How dental patients are affected by oral conditions can be described with the concept of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). This concept intends to make the patient experience measurable. OHRQoL is multidimensional, and Oral Function, Oro-facial Pain, Oro-facial Appearance and Psychosocial Impact were suggested as its four dimensions and consequently four scores are needed for comprehensive OHRQoL assessment. When only the presence of dimensional impact is measured, a pattern of affected OHRQoL dimensions would describe in a simple way how oral conditions influence the individual. By determining which patterns of impact on OHRQoL dimensions exist in prosthodontic patients and general population subjects, we aimed to identify in which combinations oral conditions' functional, painful, aesthetical and psychosocial impact occurs. Data came from the Dimensions of OHRQoL Project with Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP)-49 data from 6349 general population subjects and 2999 prosthodontic patients in the Learning Sample (N = 5173) and the Validation Sample (N = 5022). We hypothesised that all 16 patterns of OHRQoL dimensions should occur in these individuals who suffered mainly from tooth loss, its causes and consequences. A dimension was considered impaired when at least one item in the dimension was affected frequently. The 16 possible patterns of impaired OHRQoL dimensions were found in patients and general population subjects in both Learning and Validation Samples. In a four-dimensional OHRQoL model consisting Oral Function, Oro-facial Pain, Oro-facial Appearance and Psychosocial Impact, oral conditions' impact can occur in any combination of the OHRQoL dimensions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Patterns of impaired oral health-related quality of life dimensions

    PubMed Central

    John, Mike T.; Rener-Sitar, Ksenija; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Čelebić, Asja; Larsson, Pernilla; Szabo, Gyula; Norton, Wynne E.; Reissmann, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Background How dental patients are affected by oral conditions can be described with the concept of oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). This concept intends to make the patient experience measurable. OHRQoL is multidimensional and Oral Function, Orofacial Pain, Orofacial Appearance, and Psychosocial Impact were suggested as its four dimensions and consequently four scores are needed for comprehensive OHRQoL assessment. When only the presence of dimensional impact is measured, a pattern of affected OHRQoL dimensions would describe in a simple way how oral conditions’ influence the individual. Objective By determining which patterns of impact on OHRQoL dimensions (Oral Function-Orofacial Pain-Orofacial Appearance-Psychosocial Impact) exist in prosthodontic patients and general population subjects, we aimed to identify in which combinations oral conditions’ functional, painful, aesthetical, and psychosocial impact occurs. Methods Data came from the Dimensions of OHRQoL Project with OHIP-49 data from 6,349 general population subjects and 2,999 prosthodontic patients in the Learning Sample (N=5,173) and the Validation Sample (N=5,022). We hypothesized that all 16 patterns of OHRQoL dimensions should occur in these individuals who suffered mainly from tooth loss, its causes and consequences. A dimension was considered impaired when at least one item in the dimension was affected frequently. Results The 16 possible patterns of impaired OHRQoL dimensions were found in patients and general population subjects in both Learning and Validation Samples. Conclusions In a four-dimensional OHRQoL model consisting of Oral Function, Orofacial Pain, Orofacial Appearance, and Psychosocial Impact, oral conditions’ impact can occur in any combination of the OHRQoL dimensions. PMID:27027734

  11. Effectiveness of oral hygiene instruction media on periodontal health among hearing impaired children.

    PubMed

    Arunakul, Malee; Kuphasuk, Yosvimol; Boonyathanasit, Romcharee

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of oral hygiene instruction media on periodontal health in hearing impaired children over a period of three months. The study was carried out among 66 hearing impaired children (aged 6-10 years). The children were randomly divided into 4 groups by oral hygiene instruction media type: video presentation group, illustrated book group, both video presentation and illustrated book group, and control group. The gingival index (GI), gingival bleeding index (BI), and plaque index (PI) were recorded at baseline and at 3 months follow-up. After three months, there was a significant reduction from baseline in the mean values for GI, BI, and PI in all groups including the control group (p < 0.001). Further studies to determine what factors resulted in this reduction are accessary.

  12. Oral health conditions and behaviors among hearing impaired and normal hearing college students at Ratchasuda College, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Vichayanrat, Tippanart; Kositpumivate, Waritorn

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to explore oral health and oral health related behaviors among hearing impaired and normal hearing students at Rachasuda College. The association between socioeconomic factors, hearing status, oral health behaviors, oral hygiene levels and dental caries status were also examined. The students filled out a self-administered questionnaire with assistance of a sign language video to obtain personal and behavior information. A total of 180 students, 83 normal hearing and 97 hearing impaired students completed the questionnaire and underwent an oral examination. The prevalences of caries were 53.6% and 50.6% among students with hearing impairment and normal hearing, respectively (p=0.354). After age stratification, the hearing impaired students aged 18-21 years had significantly less filled teeth (p=0.012), and those older than 21 years had less missing teeth due to caries than normal-hearing students (p=0.023). Poor oral hygiene was found in 51.8% and 42.2% of normal and hearing-impaired students, respectively (p=0.365). Caries status was significantly associated with maternal education level (OR 3.56; 95% CI: 1.52-8.32) and oral hygiene (OR 3.26; 95% CI: 1.64-6.45). The high prevalence of dental caries and poor oral hygiene among college students is alarming. Hearing impairment did not appear to affect the prevalences of these conditions compared to those with normal hearing. Oral health education tools need to be developed and utilized for both normal hearing and hearing impaired college students in Thailand.

  13. Assessment of dental caries, oral hygiene status, traumatic dental injuries and provision of basic oral health care among visually impaired children of Eastern Odisha.

    PubMed

    Suresan, Vinay; Das, Diptajit; Jnaneswar, Avinash; Jha, Kunal; Kumar, Gunjan; Subramaniam, Goutham Bala

    2017-01-01

    The magnitude and severity of oral health problems in visually impaired population are worse than in general population, and they tend to have more untreated dental diseases and more problems accessing dental care. The aim of this study is to assess dentition status and treatment needs, oral hygiene status, and traumatic dental injuries among institutionalized children attending special schools for the visually impaired in eastern Odisha. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted using a universal sampling protocol. American Dental Association Type III clinical examination was carried out using plane mouth mirrors and community periodontal index probes under adequate natural illumination by a single examiner assisted by a trained recording assistant. After completion of the study, all participants were provided with basic oral health care through outreach programs. Comparisons were done using Student's t-test, analysis of variance, and Chi-square test. Caries prevalence for primary and permanent dentition was 15% and 46%, respectively. Mean oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S) was 2.43 ± 1.03. The prevalence of traumatic dental injuries was 11%. A statistically significant difference in mean decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT/dmft) was observed in children consuming liquid sugar as compared to solid and those consuming sticky sugars as compared to nonsticky. A statistically significant difference in mean OHI-S scores was observed when compared with frequency of changing toothbrush. This sample of visually impaired children has a high prevalence of dental caries, traumatic dental injuries, and poor oral hygiene. Unmet needs for dental caries were found to be high indicating very poor accessibility and availability of oral health care.

  14. Insomnia and depression impair oral health-related quality of life in the old-old.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Satoshi; Makino, Michiko; Haresaku, Satoru; Shimada, Kaoru; Naito, Toru

    2017-06-01

    A previous study reported that the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of Japanese individuals dropped sharply as they reached old-old age. The aim of present study was to explore the risk factors of OHRQoL by investigating the association of OHRQoL with oral indices, lifestyle and psychological distress. A questionnaire survey was carried out to assess the OHRQoL, oral indices, lifestyle, and psychological distress of patients who were of ≥75 years of age and who regularly visited a dental clinic for maintenance. OHRQoL and psychological distress were assessed using the General Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) and the General Health Questionnaire, respectively. The relationships between the GOHAI score and related factors were examined by non-parametric bivariate and logistic regression analyses using a GOHAI cut-off score of 45.0. A total of 187 old-old patients with a mean age of 77.9 ± 3.0 years participated in the present study. The average GOHAI score was 50.8 ± 8.0. In the bivariate analyses, the average sleeping hours, use of sleep medication, Short Form 8-Item Health Survey (SF-8), General Health Questionnaire score, and the number of teeth present were significantly correlated with the GOHAI score. A logistic regression analysis showed that the number of teeth present, General Health Questionnaire and the use of sleep medication were associated with the GOHAI score. The present study found that the OHRQoL was strongly associated with insomnia and depression. It is therefore suggested that oral healthcare professionals take general background information, such as the presence of insomnia and depression, into consideration to improve OHRQoL when they treat old-old patients. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 893-897. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Effect of oral health education in the form of Braille and oral health talk on oral hygiene knowledge, practices, and status of 12–17 years old visually impaired school girls in Pune city: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Bhor, K.; Shetty, V.; Garcha, V.; Nimbulkar, G. C.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To assess the effect of oral health education (OHE) in the form of Braille and combination with Oral health talk (OHT) on oral hygiene knowledge, practices, and status of 12–17 years old visually impaired school girls in Pune city. Materials and Methods: A 6-week comparative study was conducted among 74 residential visually impaired school girls aged 12–17 years, who were trained to read Braille. The participants were divided into two groups, namely, Group A (n = 37) receiving OHE only in the form of Braille and Group B (n = 37) receiving OHE in form of Braille and OHT at baseline, 2, and 4-week interval. Oral health knowledge was assessed using a self-administered, pre-validated, pre-tested questionnaire typed in Marathi Braille. Assessment of oral hygiene practices and status was done using standardized proforma and simplified oral hygiene index (OHI-S), respectively, at baseline and at the end of 6 weeks. Data was analyzed using paired and unpaired Student's t-test. Results: The results showed a statistically significant increase in oral health knowledge levels in Group B (4.95 ± 1.66) as compared to Group A (2.97 ± 1.28). There was a significant increase in the frequency of mouth-rinsing in Group B (97.3%) as compared to Group A (86.5%) as well as in the tongue cleaning practice in Group B (100%) as compared to Group A (81.1%) at the end of 6 weeks. Conclusion: OHE in the form of Braille and OHT was more effective than OHE using only Braille. PMID:27891313

  16. Deleterious oral habits in children with hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    SUHANI, RALUCA DIANA; SUHANI, MIHAI FLAVIU; MUNTEAN, ALEXANDRINA; MESAROS, MICHAELA; BADEA, MINDRA EUGENIA

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Deleterious oral habits represent a serious public health issue. The information available about this problem in children with hearing impairment is insufficient. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of deleterious oral habits among children with hearing impairment and comparing results against children without hearing impairment. Method This epidemiological study was carried out in a sample size of 315 children. We used a random sampling technique that included 150 children with hearing impairment and 165 without hearing impairment. All subjects were submitted to a clinical examination. The parents/legal guardians were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding the deleterious habits of their children. Results The data collected indicated a higher prevalence of deleterious oral habits among children with hearing impairment: 53.3% as opposed to 40.6% among children without hearing impairment. There was a higher incidence of malocclusion in children with hearing impairment (79.3%) compared to children without hearing impairment (57%). Conclusions This study highlighted the need to establish protocols for preventive orthodontic treatment at an early age, in order to reduce the deleterious oral habits and prevent malocclusion. Dental institutions/clinicians need to implement oral care programs including proper oral education aiming to promote oral health. PMID:26609277

  17. Disparities in Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips Disparities in Oral Health Oral Health Conditions Periodontal Disease Community Water Fluoridation Water Fluoridation Basics Over 70 ... 2% of U.S. adults have some form of periodontal disease. In adults aged 65 and older, 70.1% ...

  18. Oral health status and treatment need among institutionalised hearing-impaired and blind children and young adults in Udaipur, India. A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Jain, Manish; Bharadwaj, Surya Prakash; Kaira, Laxman Singh; Bharadwaj, Surya Prakash; Chopra, Devendra; Prabu, Duraiswamy; Kulkarni, Suhas

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare the oral health status and the treatment needs of the institutionalised hearing-impaired and blind children and young adults in the city of Udaipur, Rajasthan, India. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 498 institutionalised hearing-impaired and blind people, aged 4 to 23 years, in the city of Udaipur, Rajasthan. The World Health Organization oral health assessment basic methods and form (1997) were used for data collection. Clinical examinations were carried out in the institute's medical room or classroom by single examiner with the aid of a mouth mirror, explorer and Community Periodontal Index (CPI) probe under adequate natural light (Type III examination). The resulting data were entered into statistical software and analysed by applying the chi-square test, ANOVA, t-test and stepwise multiple linear regression analysis. The total mean DMFT (decayed-missing-filled teeth) and mean dft scores were 1.77 and 0.27 respectively. The largest component of DMFT was the D, with a mean of 1.49. The F component of 0.08 was very low. Mean DMFT/dft was greater among hearing-impaired than among blind subjects. Overall, 159 (32%) were periodontally healthy (CPI=0), 162 (32%) had shallow pockets (CPI=3) and 36 (7%) had deeper pockets (CPI=4). A higher percentage of the blind (87; 43%) than the hearing-impaired (72; 24%) subjects were periodontally healthy (CPI score=0). One-surface fillings were the most commonly provided form of past treatment. The findings in this study highlight the lack of dental treatment for this group. Overall oral health status was poorer in the hearing-impaired than in the blind subjects.

  19. Milk and oral health.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Ingegerd; Lif Holgerson, Pernilla

    2011-01-01

    Oral health includes freedom from disease in the gums, the mucosa and the teeth. There has been a striking reduction in dental caries and periodontitis in industrialized countries, although the proportion with severe disease has remained at 10-15%, and the prevalence increases in less developed countries. If left untreated, these diseases may lead to pain, and impaired quality of life and nutritional status. Prevention and treatment need, besides traditional implementation of proper oral hygiene, sugar restriction and use of fluoride, newer cost-effective strategies. Non-sweetened dairy products, which are proven non-cariogenic, or specific bioactive components from alike sources might prove to be part of such strategies. Thus, milk proteins, such as bovine and human caseins and lactoferrin, inhibit initial attachment of cariogenic mutans streptococci to hydroxyapatite coated with saliva or purified saliva host ligands. In contrast, both bovine and human milk coated on hydroxyapatite promotes attachment of commensal Actinomyces naeslundii and other streptococci in vitro, and phosphorylated milk-derived peptides promote maintenance of tooth minerals, as shown for the β-casein-derived caseino-phosphate peptide. Observational studies are promising, but randomized clinical trials are needed to reveal if dairy products could be a complementary treatment for oral health.

  20. Assessment of oral health-related quality of life in 9-15 year old children with visual impairment in Uttarakhand, India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Aditi; Dhawan, Preeti; Gaurav, Vivek; Rastogi, Pradeep; Singh, Shilpi

    2017-01-01

    Background: To assess the prevalence of dental diseases among 9–15-year-old visually impaired children and find out its impact on their daily activities using the Child-Oral Impact on Daily Performance (C-OIDP) questionnaire in districts of Uttarakhand, India. Materials and Methods: A total of 423 visually impaired institutionalized children between the age group of 9–15 years were included in the study. Stratified random sampling technique was used to obtain the study population. Dental caries was recorded using dmft for primary dentition and DMFT for permanent dentition, traumatic dental injuries were assessed using traumatic dental injury index, and dentofacial anomalies were recorded using Angle's classification of malocclusion. The Hindi braille version of C-OIDP questionnaire was used to gather information regarding oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). Results: There was a high dental caries prevalence of 57.7% in visually impaired children. The prevalence of traumatic dental injuries was 50.6%. Crowding (61.5%) was the most commonly seen dentofacial anomaly and the most commonly perceived oral health problem was toothache. There was less favorable OHRQoL in males as compared to females. Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of dental diseases in this group and higher C-OIDP scores suggestive of unfavorable OHRQoL. PMID:28348617

  1. Towards understanding oral health.

    PubMed

    Zaura, Egija; ten Cate, Jacob M

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term 'oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain microbial community stability in health. However, the oral ecosystem itself is not stable: throughout life an individual undergoes multiple physiological changes while progressing through infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Recent discussions on the definition of general health have led to the proposal that health is the ability of the individual to adapt to physiological changes, a condition known as allostasis. In this paper the allostasis principle is applied to the oral ecosystem. The multidimensionality of the host factors contributing to allostasis in the oral cavity is illustrated with an example on changes occurring in puberty. The complex phenomenon of oral health and the processes that prevent the ecosystem from collapsing during allostatic changes in the entire body are far from being understood. As yet individual components (e.g. hard tissues, microbiome, saliva, host response) have been investigated, while only by consolidating these and assessing their multidimensional interactions should we be able to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the ecosystem, which in turn could serve to develop rational schemes to maintain health. Adapting such a 'system approach' comes with major practical challenges for the entire research field and will require vast resources and large-scale multidisciplinary collaborations.

  2. Oral health and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Pla, G W

    1994-03-01

    The relationships between oral health conditions, dietary practices and nutritional status, and general health status in the older American are complex, with many interrelating factors. Just as inadequate nutrition can affect oral health, poor oral health status affects food choices and, thus, nutritional status. It is clearly essential that the primary care practitioner and/or screening health professionals always include an evaluation of oral status in assessment of an elderly person. Effective care for the elderly dental patient requires knowledge about the disease of aging and the impact of those diseases on oral health and nutrition, pharmacology and drug interactions and their impact on oral health status, the biology of aging including sensory changes, the relationship of general medicine and systemic diseases, and psychology and sociology. The attitudes of empathy and understanding, caring and compassion, respect and a positive attitude toward the older patient, and flexibility in treatment planning are also critical elements. The interdisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, nutrition professionals, dentists, and social service professionals must all work together to ensure that good oral health status and adequate nutrition are maintained in older Americans. Recognizing and treating oral health and nutrition problems are important in improving the health and quality of life for the elderly population. Research that can provide more answers to health care problems in this growing group; educating professionals with respect to the relationships between oral health and nutrition; and public policy changes with regard to provision and funding of nutrition services, especially when provided by registered and/or licensed nutrition professionals, contribute to improving the health and quality of life for elders.

  3. [Schizophrenia and oral health].

    PubMed

    Moullan, M; Denis, F

    2017-04-01

    Mental health is an essential component of general health. Schizophrenia is a severe and chronic mental illness that affects higher brain functions. It is characterized by the presence of a mental dissociation, dampened or inappropriate affects, hallucinations and delirium. Schizophrenia has also a negative impact on oral health. As schizophrenia affects 1% of the population, every practitioner concerned with oral sphere will be confronted one day or another with a patient suffering from this disease. It is therefore important to acquire essential notions. The aim of our work was to make an update about factors that may affect oral health in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Probiotics and Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Haukioja, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The number of products containing probiotics, viable bacteria with proven health benefits, entering the market is increasing. Traditionally, probiotics have been associated with gut health, and most clinical interest has been focused on their use for prevention or treatment of gastrointestinal infections and diseases; however, during the last decade several investigators have also suggested the use of probiotics for oral health purposes. The aim of this review is to examine potential mechanisms of probiotic bacteria in the oral cavity and summarize observed effects of probiotics with respect to oral health. The review focuses on probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, genera that are most used in various probiotic products. PMID:20613927

  5. Personality and oral health.

    PubMed

    Thomson, W Murray; Caspi, Avshalom; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E; Broadbent, Jonathan M

    2011-10-01

    We investigated age-26 personality characteristics and age-32 oral health in a prospective study of a complete birth cohort born in Dunedin, New Zealand. Personality was measured using the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ). Oral health was measured using the short-form Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14), a global measure, and dental examinations. Personality profiles were constructed for 916 individuals (50.8% men) using standardized MPQ scores, and multivariate analyses examined their association with oral health. Those reporting 1+ OHIP-14 impacts had higher Negative Emotionality scores (and lower Constraint and Positive Emotionality MPQ superfactor scores) than those who did not. After controlling for gender, clinical status, and the other two MPQ superfactors, those scoring higher on Negative Emotionality had a greater risk of reporting 1+ OHIP-14 impacts, as well as 3+ OHIP-14 impacts and worse-than-average oral health. They also had a greater risk of having lost at least one tooth from caries and of having 3+ decayed surfaces. Personality characteristics appear to shape self-reports of oral health. Personality is also a risk factor for clinical disease status, at least with respect to dental caries and its sequelae. Because the attitudes and values tapped into by personality tests can be altered by brief cognitive interventions, those might be useful in preventive dentistry. © 2011 Eur J Oral Sci.

  6. Maintaining women's oral health.

    PubMed

    McCann, A L; Bonci, L

    2001-07-01

    Women must adopt health-promoting strategies for both general health and the oral cavity, because the health of a woman's body and oral cavity are bidirectional. For general health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should actively advise women to minimize alcohol use, abstain from or cease smoking, stay physically active, and choose the right foods to nourish both the body and mind. For oral health-maintenance strategies, dental practitioners should advise women on how to prevent or control oral infections, particularly dental caries and periodontal diseases. Specifically, women need to know how to remove plaque from the teeth mechanically, use appropriate chemotherapeutic agents and dentifrices, use oral irrigation, and control halitosis. Dental practitioners also need to stress the importance of regular maintenance visits for disease prevention. Adolescent women are more prone to gingivitis and aphthous ulcers when they begin their menstrual cycles and need advice about cessation of tobacco use, mouth protection during athletic activities, cleaning orthodontic appliances, developing good dietary habits, and avoiding eating disorders. Women in early to middle adulthood may be pregnant or using oral contraceptives with concomitant changes in oral tissues. Dental practitioners need to advise them how to take care of the oral cavity during these changes and how to promote the health of their infants, including good nutrition. Older women experience the onset of menopause and increased vulnerability to osteoporosis. They may also experience xerostomia and burning mouth syndrome. Dental practitioners need to help women alleviate these symptoms and encourage them to continue good infection control and diet practices.

  7. Global Oral Health Inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Pitts, N.; Amaechi, B.; Niederman, R.; Acevedo, A.-M.; Vianna, R.; Ganss, C.; Ismail, A.; Honkala, E.

    2011-01-01

    The IADR Global Oral Health Inequalities Task Group on Dental Caries has synthesized current evidence and opinion to identify a five-year implementation and research agenda which should lead to improvements in global oral health, with particular reference to the implementation of current best evidence as well as integrated action to reduce caries and health inequalities between and within countries. The Group determined that research should: integrate health and oral health wherever possible, using common risk factors; be able to respond to and influence international developments in health, healthcare, and health payment systems as well as dental prevention and materials; and exploit the potential for novel funding partnerships with industry and foundations. More effective communication between and among the basic science, clinical science, and health promotion/public health research communities is needed. Translation of research into policy and practice should be a priority for all. Both community and individual interventions need tailoring to achieve a more equal and person-centered preventive focus and reduce any social gradient in health. Recommendations are made for both clinical and public health implementation of existing research and for caries-related research agendas in clinical science, health promotion/public health, and basic science. PMID:21490233

  8. Skylab oral health studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. R.; Frome, W. J.; Handler, S.; Wheatcroft, M. G.; Rider, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Evaluation of Skylab crewmembers for mission related effects on oral health in relation to possible dental injuries provided the following distinctive changes: (1) increased counts of specific anaerobic and streptococcal components; (2) elevations in levels of secretory IgA concurrent with diminutions of salivary lysozyme; and (3) increases in dental calculus and gingival inflammations. The clinical changes are considered to be more influenced by the preexisting state of dental health than by any mission related effects.

  9. Skylab oral health studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. R.; Frome, W. J.; Handler, S.; Wheatcroft, M. G.; Rider, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    Evaluation of Skylab crewmembers for mission related effects on oral health in relation to possible dental injuries provided the following distinctive changes: (1) increased counts of specific anaerobic and streptococcal components; (2) elevations in levels of secretory IgA concurrent with diminutions of salivary lysozyme; and (3) increases in dental calculus and gingival inflammations. The clinical changes are considered to be more influenced by the preexisting state of dental health than by any mission related effects.

  10. Hemophilia and oral health.

    PubMed

    Zaliuniene, Ruta; Peciuliene, Vytaute; Brukiene, Vilma; Aleksejuniene, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to overview the oral health aspects in hemophilia patients. An electronic search of Medline (Pub Med), Cochrane, SSCI (Social Citation Index), SCI (Science Citation Index) databases from 1982 to the present, using the following search words: hemophilia, oral health, dental caries, dental caries prevalence, gingivitis, periodontitis, primary dentition, permanent dentition, dental treatment and review, was performed. The search yielded 196 titles and abstracts on chosen words. All articles were full-text reviewed and 40 of publications were included. Nowadays coagulation factor abnormalities are the most common of inherited bleeding disorders, but occur much less frequently approximating 10000-50000 male births than acquired coagulation defects. Von Willebrand disease, Hemophilia A and Hemophilia B account for 95-97% of all coagulation deficiencies. Hemophilias A and B are subdivided according to the factor's activity levels in the blood: mild, moderate or severe. The two main oral diseases affecting patients with hemophilia are the same as for the rest of population, i.e. dental caries and gingivitis/periodontitis. Only a few studies concerning oral health aspects in hemophilia patients were carried out. Some controversy exists concerning caries prevalence in both primary and permanent dentitions in children with hemophilia. People with congenital hemorrhagic diatheses constitute a very small proportion of the total population. Due to that fact treatment of such patients becomes a challenge to the most of dentists due to the fact that most of them have no experience in dealing with dental problems in such patients. There is a lack of epidemiological studies in oral health status of hemophilia patient.

  11. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    PubMed

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  12. Caries experience and oral hygiene status of a group of visually impaired children in Istanbul, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bekiroglu, Nural; Acar, Nihan; Kargul, Betul

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the caries experience, oral hygiene status and oral health knowledge of a group of visually impaired students. The study was conducted at one of the largest visually impaired children's schools among students aged between 7 and 16 years (n = 178) in Istanbul, Turkey. A 16-item questionnaire was asked in addition to a clinical tooth examination. The 16-item verbal questionnaire was developed to record the students' general health, impairment, the socioeconomic profile and education level of their parents, oral health knowledge, sources of information about oral health and oral hygiene habits. Oral hygiene was assessed according to Greene and Vermillion's Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S). To measure the oral hygiene status, OHI-S index scores were recorded. Additionally, DMFT and dft indices were documented. Only 26.40% of children were caries free, and only 2.2% of students had good oral hygiene. A total of 3.3% of these students were mildly retarded and 2.8% of them had a developmental disability. Visually impaired children exhibited a fair-to-poor level of oral hygiene. Maintenance of oral hygiene remains the greatest challenge in the care of visually impaired children.

  13. Oral health problems and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ki; Baker, Lindsey A.; Davarian, Shieva; Crimmins, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    Background/purpose Previous studies have shown the relationship between individual oral health conditions and mortality; however, the relationship between mortality and multiple oral health conditions has not been examined. This study investigates the link between individual oral health problems and oral comorbidity and mortality risk. Materials and methods Data are derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2004, which is linked to the National Death Index for mortality follow-up through 2006. We estimated the risk of mortality among people with three individual oral health conditions—tooth loss, root caries, and periodontitis as well as with oral comorbidity—or having all three conditions. Results Significant tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease were associated with increased odds of dying. The relationship between oral health conditions and mortality disappeared when controlling for sociodemographic, health, and/or health behavioral indicators. Having multiple oral health problems was associated with an even higher rate of mortality. Conclusion Individual oral health conditions—tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease—were not related to mortality when sociodemographic, health, and/or health behavioral factors were considered, and there was no differential pattern between the three conditions. Multiple oral health problems were associated with a higher risk of dying. PMID:24416472

  14. Infant Oral Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, Michael J.; Levine, Norman

    1988-01-01

    The family physician/pediatrician who sees a child from birth as part of the well-baby visit program is in the best position to identify early dental problems and to educate the family about early oral preventive health care. Since children under three years of age are not seen routinely by dentists, they are at risk of developing dental disease. This paper briefly covers the areas of infant oral pathology, early preventive care, teething, suckling habits, and dental trauma in the toddler. The physician will then be in a better position to recommend to parents when they should seek dental advice and treatment for their young children. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21253204

  15. Partnerships for better oral health.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, E

    2003-05-01

    Improving oral health in populations who do not easily access the private dental office or the available community care site is a challenge to dental hygienists and others concerned with the health and well-being of all. Partnerships for improved oral health have been part of the community health efforts for many years and in many countries. With the knowledge, skills, and resources that are held by specific groups and organisations combined into a larger entity of a partnership or coalition, greater impact on oral health issue may be possible. Agencies and individuals interested in making improvements in oral health status in any particular target group may begin a process of working with others who have an interest in improving the health and well being of that target group. In a world that is increasingly synergistic and mutually dependent, improvements in oral health can be advanced by considering the elements of successful coalition building and forming partnerships with multiple organisations and individuals.

  16. Maintaining oral health after stroke.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Hazel

    Oral care is essential to maintain oral health and prevent complications such as tooth loss, gingivitis and periodontitis. Poor oral hygiene in dependent, hospitalised patients could lead to serious complications such as chest infection, pneumonia, poor nutritional intake and increased length of hospital stay. Patients who have had a stroke may have physical and cognitive problems that make them dependent on others for their personal care, including oral care. It is essential that nurses and carers understand why maintaining oral hygiene is important following stroke and the consequences of poor oral care.

  17. Good Oral Health and Diet

    PubMed Central

    Scardina, G. A.; Messina, P.

    2012-01-01

    An unhealthy diet has been implicated as risk factors for several chronic diseases that are known to be associated with oral diseases. Studies investigating the relationship between oral diseases and diet are limited. Therefore, this study was conducted to describe the relationship between healthy eating habits and oral health status. The dentistry has an important role in the diagnosis of oral diseases correlated with diet. Consistent nutrition guidelines are essential to improve health. A poor diet was significantly associated with increased odds of oral disease. Dietary advice for the prevention of oral diseases has to be a part of routine patient education practices. Inconsistencies in dietary advice may be linked to inadequate training of professionals. Literature suggests that the nutrition training of dentists and oral health training of dietitians and nutritionists is limited. PMID:22363174

  18. Oral health & HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, Susan; Naidoo, Sudeshi; Berthold, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Oral lesions are common in women and children with HIV/AIDS and may decrease the overall quality of life in these patients because of pain, dry mouth, and difficulty in eating. An oral cavity screening is an easy, noninvasive, quick, and inexpensive procedure that provides nurses with invaluable information about the need for referral, treatment, and health education. Nurses can use the information obtained from a careful oral screening to decrease the symptoms experienced with oral lesions and optimize a patient's ability to chew and enjoy food. Common oral manifestations of HIV infection include fungal, viral, and bacterial infections, although neoplasms, periodontal disease, salivary gland disease, and lesions of uncertain origin are also seen. Oral lesions such as candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia, herpetic ulcers, and Kaposi's sarcoma are often among the first symptoms of HIV infection.

  19. Multicultural Issues in Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Raul I.; Cadoret, Cindy; Henshaw, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Demographic changes over the coming decades will heighten the challenges to the dental profession and to the nation. The expected growth in the numbers of racial and ethnic minorities, and the concomitant growth of immigrant populations are likely to lead to worsening of oral health disparities. Their consequences are becoming increasingly evident as the profession strives to improve the oral health of all Americans. The increasing diversity of the population, together with the importance of cultural beliefs and behaviors that affect health outcomes, will require ways to enhance provider-patient communications and oral health literacy. We discuss the nature and challenges presented by multicultural patient populations. One important means by which to promote oral health in diverse populations is to develop a dental workforce that is both culturally and linguistically competent, as well as one that is as culturally diverse as the American population. PMID:18329446

  20. Geriatric Oral Health: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Razak, P Abdul; Richard, K M Jose; Thankachan, Rekha P; Hafiz, K A Abdul; Kumar, K Nanda; Sameer, K M

    2014-01-01

    Oral health is not separate from general health, but maintaining oral health is definitely difficult and different in old age. Even though, few elderly have physical and/or mental situation that call for particular interest in the dental workplace, one should not presume that all elderly community shares these circumstances. In order to achieve health, it is necessary to know few aspects of old age. In due course of old age body tissues get harder, collection of waste products in body cells and loss of lubrication leads to impaired functions of various organs. The design and implementation of comprehensive preventive dentistry protocols for elders presents the dental profession with many challenges. Although a specific protocol must be tailored to meet the unique needs of the individual patient, there are certain factors common to elderly segment of the population that may influence these protocols. PMID:25628498

  1. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    PubMed

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  2. Oral Health and Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and ill-fitting or loose dentures. Effects of Osteoporosis Treatments on Oral Health It is not known ... Resources For more information on osteoporosis, visit: NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center Website: ...

  3. No Mental Health without Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The poor physical health faced by people with mental illness has been the subject of growing attention, but there has been less focus on the issue of oral health even though it is an important part of physical health. This article discusses the two-way association between oral and mental health. In one direction, the prospect of dental treatment can lead to anxiety and phobia. In the other, many psychiatric disorders, such as severe mental illness, affective disorders, and eating disorders, are associated with dental disease: These include erosion, caries, and periodontitis. Left untreated, dental diseases can lead to teeth loss such that people with severe mental illness have 2.7 times the likelihood of losing all their teeth, compared with the general population. Possible interventions include oral health assessments using standard checklists that can be completed by nondental personnel, help with oral hygiene, management of iatrogenic dry mouth, and early dental referral. PMID:27254802

  4. Teaching Oral Hygiene Skills to Elementary Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Yeng-Hung; Chang, Chien-Huey Sophie

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a program that taught oral hygiene skills to students with visual impairments using group instruction and individual coaching. The results showed that the program enhanced the oral hygiene skills of the three participants significantly, and its effectiveness lasted for at least two months after the…

  5. Tools for evaluating oral health and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Bettie, Nirmal F.; Ramachandiran, Hari; Anand, Vijay; Sathiamurthy, Anusha; Sekaran, Preethi

    2015-01-01

    The seven dimensions of quality of life are required for a healthy living. Any impairment or disability affects any one or more of these dimensions resulting in functional impairment or handicap, which indicates the presence of disease. The success of any oral treatment depends on how far the individual is relieved of his disease process. Relief of symptoms provides patient comfort and enable functional activities. This well-being is considered as a measure of oral health and reflects patient satisfaction. This article presents various instruments or tools available in the form of a questionnaire that estimates patient satisfaction and thereby oral health. PMID:26538889

  6. The Oral Referential Communication Skills of Hearing-Impaired Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Julian; Lieven, Elena; Arnold, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on the oral referential communication skills of hearing-impaired (HI) children. A task based on that used with language impaired children by Leinonen and Letts (1997) was used to assess the speaking and listening skills of 20 HI children (mean age=10;2 years; mean better ear average hearing loss=88.85 dBHL). Their performance…

  7. Impaired polymorphonuclear neutrophils in the oral cavity of edentulous individuals.

    PubMed

    Rijkschroeff, Patrick; Loos, Bruno G; Nicu, Elena A

    2017-10-01

    Oral health is characterized by functional oral polymorphonuclear neutrophils (oPMNs). Edentulism might be associated with a loss of oPMNs because these cells enter the oral cavity primarily through the gingival crevices. The main aim of this study was to investigate the numbers of oPMNs in rinse samples obtained from edentulous (n = 21) and dentate (n = 20) subjects. A second study aim was to investigate possible differences between oPMNs and peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (cPMNs). Apoptosis/necrosis and cell-activation markers (CD11b, CD63 and CD66b) were analyzed using flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was determined either without stimulation (constitutive) or in response to 10 μM phorbol myristate acetate or Fusobacterium nucleatum. The edentulous subjects presented with lower oPMN counts and higher percentages of apoptotic/necrotic oPMNs compared with dentate subjects. Furthermore, oPMNs from edentulous donors expressed low levels of all three activation markers and low constitutive ROS. In contrast, oPMNs from dentate subjects expressed high levels of all three activation markers and a higher level of constitutive ROS than cPMNs. When challenged, oPMNs from edentulous subjects showed no upregulation in ROS production, whereas oPMNs from dentate subjects retained their ability to respond to stimulation. The functional characteristics of cPMNs were comparable between edentulous and dentate subjects. This study demonstrates that despite having functional cPMNs, edentulous subjects have low oPMN numbers that are functionally impaired. © 2017 The Authors. Eur J Oral Sci published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Oral health correlates of captivity.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Varsha; Antonelli, Tyler; Parkinson, Jennifer A; Hartstone-Rose, Adam

    2016-08-01

    The predominant diet fed to captive carnivores in North America consists of ground meat formulated to provide full nutritional requirements. However, this ground meat diet completely lacks the mechanical properties (i.e., toughness and hardness) of the foods these animals would consume in the wild. The goal of this study is to evaluate the effect of captivity on oral health by comparing the prevalence of periodontal disease and dental calculus accumulation in wild and captive lions and tigers (Panthera leo and Panthera tigris), and to also correlate oral health with cranial morphology in these specimens. To achieve this, 34 adult lion and 29 adult tiger skulls were scored for the presence and extent of dental calculus and periodontal disease. These oral health scores were also compared to cranial deformations examined in a previous study. We found that the occurrence and severity of calculus buildup and periodontal disease was significantly higher in captive felids compared to their wild counterparts. Further, higher calculus accumulation occurred on the posterior teeth when compared to the anterior teeth, while an opposite trend for periodontal disease was observed. We also found a significant correlation between oral health and cranial morphology of lions and tigers. The results suggest that food mechanical properties are significant factors contributing to oral health in felids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Oral health among the elderly].

    PubMed

    Siukosaari, Päivi; Nihtilä, Annamari

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of our population is ageing with own teeth in the mouth. Good oral health and an adequate number of teeth improve the functional capacity of an elderly person. Oral diseases are, however, becoming more common among the elderly population with the accumulation of risk factors such as insufficient self-care, cariogenic diet, reduced salivation, smoking and systemic diseases. Dryness of the mouth due to the adverse effects of drugs or systemic diseases makes eating and cleaning of the mouth more difficult. Prevention of oral diseases with good self-care and regular dental examinations is essential.

  10. Integrating oral health throughout cancer care.

    PubMed

    Hartnett, Erin

    2015-10-01

    Oral health is often not a priority during cancer treatment; however, patients with cancer are at increased risk for oral complications during and after treatment. This article focuses on the importance of oral health care before, during, and after cancer treatment using the head, eyes, ears, nose, oral cavity, and throat, or HEENOT, approach. AT A GLANCE: Oral health is linked to overall health, and healthcare providers must be cognizant of the oral-systemic connection with patients undergoing cancer treatment, which may cause acute and chronic oral health problems. 
Oral assessment, prevention, early recognition, and treatment of oral problems must be incorporated into cancer care, particularly with the aid of an interprofessional team to meet patients' oral care needs. 
The head, eyes, ears, nose, oral cavity, and throat, or HEENOT, approach integrates oral care into patients' history taking, physical examination, and plan of cancer care.
.

  11. Child, neglect and oral health

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite advancements in oral health policies, dental caries still a problem. The lack of parents/caregiver’s care regarding child’s oral health, which characterizes neglect, may lead to a high prevalence of caries. Therefore, the objective of this study was to analyze the relation between dental caries and neglect in five year-old children. Methods Quantitative study performed in two different moments. First, the children underwent oral examinations and physical inspection. Then, a semi-structured interview was performed with parents of children with high and low caries rate. Results In all, 149 physical inspections and oral exams were performed. The number of decayed, missing and filled teeth – dmf-t was 2.75 (SD 2.83); 16 children had extremely high values (dmf-t ≥7), 85 intermediate values (1 ≤ dmf-t ≥ 6) and 48 extremely low (dmf-t = 0). Nearly all caregivers were female (96.7%; n = 29), mostly mothers (93.3%; n = 28). Associations were found between caries experience and reason of the last consultation (p = 0.011), decayed teeth and child’s oral health perception (p = 0.001). There was a trend towards a significant association between general health and decayed teeth (p = 0.079), general hygiene and caries experience (p = 0.083), and caries experience and number of times the child brushes the teeth (p = 0.086). Conclusion There’s a relation between caries experience and children’s oral health perception by caregivers, as well as between caries experience and children’s access to dental care. There is a trend towards association between caries experience and risk factors suggestive of neglect. PMID:24238222

  12. Language Impairment and Reading Impairment: Do These Children Differ in Oral Language Processing Abilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesnick, M. A.; And Others

    This study investigated the development of oral metalinguistic abilities in 140 children (ages 5-12) with oral language or reading impairments. The study focused on determining the difficulties that children with these different types of problems have at different ages in the elementary school years and determining how metalinguistic abilities…

  13. The Impending Oral Health Crisis.

    PubMed

    Tegtmeier, Carl H; Miller, David J; Shub, Judith L

    2016-04-01

    Last May, the New York State Dental Association and the New York State Dental Foundation convened the first "Oral Health Stakeholders' Summit on the Future of Special Needs Dentistry, Hospital Dentistry and Dental Education." The summit was chaired by David J. Miller, then NYSDA President Elect, and Carl H. Tegtmeier, then chair of the NYSDA Council on Dental Health Planning and Hospital Dentistry. It brought together experts, called to frame the issues and provide information necessary for a reasoned response. And it sought input from attendees to develop recommendations to ensure that patients with intellectual and developmental disabilities, as well as an aging population with Alzheimer's disease and dementia, have access to appropriate oral health care in the years ahead. Over 100 participants, representing dentistry, hospital training programs, third-party payers, state government offices and related patient support associations, attended the two-day event in Albany. They focused on the impact of reductions in funding, the transition of Medicaid services into a managed care model, a loss of service providers and the need for expanded training programs. They heard from speakers epresenting a broad spectrum of those involved in he oral health care of patients with intellectual and evelopmental disabilities, the Alzheimer's Association, dental educators and researchers, hospital dentistry and the benefits industry, whose presentations focused on a looming oral health crisis threatening access to dental care for patients with disabilities.

  14. Oral health and mortality risk in the institutionalised elderly

    PubMed Central

    Sandvik, Leiv; Gil-Montoya, José A.; Willumsen, Tiril

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Examining oral health and oral hygiene as predictors of subsequent one-year survival in the institutionalized elderly. Design: It was hypothesized that oral health would be related to mortality in an institutionalized geriatric population. A 12-month prospective study of 292 elderly residing in nine geriatric institutions in Granada, Spain, was thus carried out to evaluate the association between oral health and mortality. Independent samples, T-test, chi-square test and Cox regression analysis were used to analyze the data. Sixty-three participants died during the 12-month follow-up. Results: Mortality was increased in denture users (RR = 2.18, p= 0.007) and in people suffering severe cognitive impairment (RR = 2. 24, p= 0.003). One-year mortality was 50% in participants having both these characteristics. Conclusions: Oral hygiene was not significantly associated with mortality. Cognitive impairment and wearing dentures increased the risk of death. One-year mortality was 50% in cognitively impaired residents wearing dentures as opposed to 10% in patients without dentures and cognitive impairment. Key words:Oral health, mortality risk, institutionalised elderly. PMID:22322487

  15. [Bipolar disorders and oral health].

    PubMed

    Schulte, P F J; Brand, H S

    2010-10-01

    A bipolar disorder is a mood disorder characterized by recurrent occurrences of manic, depressive or mixed episodes, separated by shorter or longer relatively symptom-free periods. In the Netherlands, the incidence of bipolar disorders is 1.9%. Bipolar disorders are usually treated with a combination of psycho-education, self-management and pharmacotherapy. Both the bipolar disorder and the drugs for treating this disorder have negative effects on oral health. Patients have, among other things, an increased risk of caries, xerostomia, taste abnormalities and bruxism. Extensive instruction in oral hygiene, supported frequently by professional oral health care, is therefore essential. Considering the possible interaction among different kinds of drugs, NSAIDs should only be prescribed after consulting the patient's psychiatrist.

  16. Impairment of mesenchymal stem cells derived from oral leukoplakia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihui; Song, Jiangyuan; Han, Ying; Mu, Dongdong; Su, Sha; Ji, Xiaoli; Liu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Oral leukoplakia is one of the common precancerous lesions in oral mucosa. To compare the biological characteristics and regenerative capacities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from oral leukoplakia (epithelial hyperplasia and dysplasia) and normal oral mucosa, MSCs were isolated by enzyme digestion. Then these cells were identified by the expression of MSC related markers, STRO-1, CD105 and CD90, with the absent for the hematopoietic stem cell marker CD34 by flow cytometric detection. The self-renewal ability of MSCs from oral leukoplakia was enhanced, while the multipotent differentiation was descended, compared with MSCs from normal oral mucosa. Fibrin gel was used as a carrier for MSCs transplanted into immunocompromised mice to detect their regenerative capacity. The regenerative capacities of MSCs from oral leukoplakia became impaired partly. Collagen IV (Col IV) and matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) were selected to analyze the potential mechanism for the functional changes of MSCs from oral leukoplakia by immunochemical and western blot analysis. The expression of Col IV was decreased and that of MMP-9 was increased by MSCs with the progression of oral leukoplakia, especially in MSCs from epithelial dysplasia. The imbalance between regenerative and metabolic self-regulatory functions of MSCs from oral leukoplakia may be related to the progression of this premalignant disorder.

  17. Oral health information systems--towards measuring progress in oral health promotion and disease prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Bratthall, Douglas; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the essential components of oral health information systems for the analysis of trends in oral disease and the evaluation of oral health programmes at the country, regional and global levels. Standard methodology for the collection of epidemiological data on oral health has been designed by WHO and used by countries worldwide for the surveillance of oral disease and health. Global, regional and national oral health databanks have highlighted the changing patterns of oral disease which primarily reflect changing risk profiles and the implementation of oral health programmes oriented towards disease prevention and health promotion. The WHO Oral Health Country/Area Profile Programme (CAPP) provides data on oral health from countries, as well as programme experiences and ideas targeted to oral health professionals, policy-makers, health planners, researchers and the general public. WHO has developed global and regional oral health databanks for surveillance, and international projects have designed oral health indicators for use in oral health information systems for assessing the quality of oral health care and surveillance systems. Modern oral health information systems are being developed within the framework of the WHO STEPwise approach to surveillance of noncommunicable, chronic disease, and data stored in the WHO Global InfoBase may allow advanced health systems research. Sound knowledge about progress made in prevention of oral and chronic disease and in health promotion may assist countries to implement effective public health programmes to the benefit of the poor and disadvantaged population groups worldwide. PMID:16211160

  18. Prevention of oral diseases and oral health promotion.

    PubMed

    Gift, H C

    1991-06-01

    Research and activities, as promoted in 1989 and 1990, in oral disease prevention and health promotion are summarized. Significant syntheses of research findings have occurred, as a result of planning and workship activities, which will direct oral health promotion in the 1990s. Original research on established and new preventive therapies for dental caries, periodontal diseases, oral mucosal alterations, soft-tissue lesions, precancers and cancers, and trauma are reported, opportunities to prevent oral diseases or maintain oral health through changes in individual behaviors, professional orientation, and social and environmental changes are addressed.

  19. Oral Health Promotion During Well Visits.

    PubMed

    Sanguino, Sandra M; Dhepyasuwan, Niramol; Church, Annamaria; Dabrow, Sharon; Serwint, Janet R; Bernstein, Henry H

    2017-09-01

    Training pediatric residents in Bright Futures and oral health concepts is critical to improving oral health. This study's objective was to determine the skill level of pediatric residents in integrating oral health promotion during health supervision visits of 12- to 35-month-old children. One hundred forty-three pediatric residents participated in an evaluation of the effectiveness of a Bright Futures oral health curriculum. Competencies assessed preintervention included partnership building, communication, and integration of oral health concepts. Pediatric residents' abilities to integrate oral health promotion into health supervision visits varied considerably. Residents demonstrated greater skill in communication and partnership building compared with oral health promotion behaviors and performance of an oral examination. Further education is needed at a national level if we are to meet Healthy People 2020 goals.

  20. Advancing oral health in physician assistant education: evaluation of an innovative interprofessional oral health curriculum.

    PubMed

    Bowser, Jonathan; Sivahop, Jacqueline; Glicken, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The impact of an oral health curriculum was evaluated by measuring increases in knowledge about oral health topics and implementation of oral health skills in the clinical year. A 3-year, longitudinal oral health curriculum was developed and implemented. Student knowledge of oral health concepts was evaluated before and 2 years after the curriculum was implemented. Student performance of oral health skills was evaluated in the clinical year by electronic patient logging. Students demonstrated significant and persistent gains in knowledge following the initiation of the curriculum. Students used oral health skills in the clinical year, particularly in the area of patient education about oral health. Incorporation of an oral health curriculum can lead to lasting knowledge about basic oral health concepts and increased performance of oral health skills in the clinical year.

  1. Syntactic Movement in Orally Trained Children with Hearing Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedmann, Naama; Szterman, Ronit

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the comprehension and production of sentences derived by syntactic movement, in orally trained school-age Hebrew-speaking children with moderate to profound hearing impairment, aged 7;8?9;9 years. Experiments 1 and 2 tested the comprehension of relative clauses and topicalization sentences (with word orders of OVS [object,…

  2. Healthy People 2010: Oral Health Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isman, Beverly

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this Toolkit is to provide guidance, technical tools, and resources to help states, territories, tribes and communities develop and implement successful oral health components of Healthy People 2010 plans as well as other oral health plans. These plans are useful for: (1) promoting, implementing and tracking oral health objectives;…

  3. Methamphetamine Use and Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    FOR THE DENTAL PATIENT ... Methamphetamine use and oral health M ethamphetamine is an inexpensive, easy-to-make illicit drug. It is known by several street names: “meth,” “speed,” “ice,” “chalk,” “crank,” “fire,” “glass,” “crystal” and “tina.” It is ...

  4. Are Stage of Change constructs relevant for subjective oral health in a vulnerable population?

    PubMed

    Jamieson, L M; Parker, E J; Broughton, J; Lawrence, H P; Armfield, J M

    2015-06-01

    Stage of Change constructs may be proxy markers of psychosocial health which, in turn, are related to oral health. To determine if Stage of Change constructs were associated with subjective oral health in a population at heightened risk of dental disease. Stage of Change constructs were developed from a validated 18-item scale and categorised into 'Pre-contemplative', 'Contemplative' and 'Active'. A convenience sample of 446 Australian non-Aboriginal women pregnant by an Aboriginal male (age range 14-43 years) provided data to evaluate the outcome variables (self-rated oral health and oral health impairment), the Stage of Change constructs and socio-demographic, behavioural and access-related factors. Factors significant at the p < 0.05 level in bivariate analysis were entered into prevalence regression models. Approximately 54% of participants had fair/poor self-rated oral health and 34% had oral health impairment. Around 12% were 'Pre-contemplative', 46% 'Contemplative' and 42% 'Active'. Being either 'pre-contemplative' or 'contemplative' was associated with poor self-rated oral health after adjusting for socio-demographic factors. 'Pre-contemplative' ceased being significant after adjusting for dentate status and dental behaviour. 'Pre-contemplative' remained significant when adjusting for dental cost, but not 'Contemplative'. The Stages of Change constructs ceased being associated with self-rated oral health after adjusting for all confounders. Only 'Contemplative' (reference: 'Active') was a risk indicator in the null model for oral health impairment which persisted after adding dentate status, dental behaviour and dental cost variables, but not socio-demographics. When adjusting for all confounders, 'Contemplative' was not a risk indicator for oral health impairment. Both the 'Pre-contemplative' and 'Contemplative' Stage of Change constructs were associated with poor self-rated oral health and oral health impairment after adjusting for some, but not all

  5. Oral health-related quality of life and oral status in a German working population.

    PubMed

    Walter, Michael H; Schuette, Ursula; Raedel, Michael; Koch, Rainer; Wolf, Burkhard; Scheuch, Klaus; Kirch, Wilhelm

    2011-12-01

    The study aim was to identify predictors of impaired oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). Employees of five companies were offered a clinical full-mouth examination. Oral health-related quality of life was measured with the German version of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) and summarized as additive scores (OHIP-ADD) and as prevalence of negative impacts (OHIP-SC). Two logistic regression models were developed for the odds of increased scores of the target variables OHIP-ADD and OHIP-SC. The target variables were dichotomized, and for the OHIP-ADD, the cut-off point for having impaired OHRQoL was heuristically defined as OHIP-ADD > 34. For the OHIP-SC, the corresponding threshold was OHIP-SC > 0. In the model for the OHIP-ADD, female gender, impaired aesthetics, few posterior occluding pairs, and painful masticatory muscles proved to be significant independent variables. For the OHIP-SC, female gender, impaired aesthetics, painful masticatory muscles, joint sounds, missing mandibular teeth, and carious teeth were significant. This cross-sectional study showed that within the models for both OHIP-ADD and OHIP-SC the high-risk person for impaired OHRQoL is a woman with impaired aesthetics and painful masticatory muscles.

  6. Utilisation of oral health services, oral health needs and oral health status in a peri-urban informal settlement.

    PubMed

    Westaway, M S; Viljoen, E; Rudolph, M J

    1999-04-01

    Interviews were conducted with 294 black residents (155 females and 138 males) of a peri-urban informal settlement in Gauteng to ascertain utilisation of oral health services, oral health needs and oral health status. Only 37 per cent of the sample had consulted a dentist or medical practitioner, usually for extractions. Teenagers and employed persons were significantly less likely to utilise dentists than the older age groups and unemployed persons. Forty per cent were currently experiencing oral health problems such as a sore mouth, tooth decay and bleeding/painful gums. Two hundred and twelve (73 per cent) interviewees wanted dental treatment or advice. Residents who rated their oral health status as fair or poor appeared to have the greatest need for oral health services. The use of interviews appears to be a cost-effective method of determining oral morbidity.

  7. Oral hygiene status in relation to sociodemographic factors of children and adults who are hearing impaired, attending a special school.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santhosh; Dagli, Rushabh Jayesh; Mathur, Anmol; Jain, Manish; Duraiswamy, Prabu; Kulkarni, Suhas

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the oral hygiene levels and periodontal status in a group of children and adults with hearing impairment attending a special school in Udaipur, India. Oral hygiene status was assessed by the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S) of Greene and Vermillion and periodontal status by the Community Periodontal Index. An analysis using a bivariate analysis revealed that all the oral hygiene variables varied significantly with age, economic status, and education of the parents. A multiple regression analysis showed that the education of the mother was the single best predictor for oral hygiene status and explained 92% of the variance. These findings show that children with hearing impairment have poor oral hygiene and high levels of periodontal disease. This may be due to a lack of communication; hence, appropriate oral health education should be tailored to the needs of these students with the support of their teachers and their parents.

  8. Oral Health in the District of Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Janice C.; Towe, Vivian; Donald, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Research suggests that there are significant barriers to oral health care for many children in Washington, D.C. This article assesses the perspectives of Washington, D.C., stakeholders, including parents and providers, about the oral health of children, particularly those insured by Medicaid. The authors present qualitative data from focus groups with parents and providers, from an oral health forum with primary care medical and oral health clinicians and representatives from the D.C. government, and from a provider survey. The opinions captured here provide a snapshot of the challenges to improving access to oral care for D.C. children and suggest recommendations for doing so. PMID:28083291

  9. Counseling the Chronically Health Impaired Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Brian, Comp.; And Others

    The role of counselors in working with chronically health impaired students is examined, and illustrations of the Chronic Health Impaired/Sickle Cell Anemia Program in Baltimore (MD) are presented. The importance of setting goals with the student is underlined, as is the necessity for counselors to have proper flexibility and time to devote to…

  10. Counseling the Chronically Health Impaired Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Brian, Comp.; And Others

    The role of counselors in working with chronically health impaired students is examined, and illustrations of the Chronic Health Impaired/Sickle Cell Anemia Program in Baltimore (MD) are presented. The importance of setting goals with the student is underlined, as is the necessity for counselors to have proper flexibility and time to devote to…

  11. Development of a new technique (ATP) for training visually impaired children in oral hygiene maintenance.

    PubMed

    Hebbal, M; Ankola, A V

    2012-10-01

    To develop a special oral health education technique and compare plaque scores before and after health education. Non-randomised before and after comparison trial without controls. The final study population comprised of 96 visually impaired children aged 6-18 years old. Silness and Loe plaque index scores were recorded at baseline. 'Audio tactile performance technique' (ATP Technique) a specially designed health education method was used to educate these children regarding oral hygiene maintenance. Periodic reinforcement of health education was performed at an interval of 9 months. Re-examination was carried out after 18 months of health education to assess plaque scores. Wilcoxon's sign rank test and paired t test was used to assess the difference between the scores before and after health education. There was increase in frequency of tooth brushing after health education. The mean plaque scores pre- and post-health education were 1.41 (+/-0.58) and 0.63 (+/-0.39) respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). Visually impaired children could maintain an acceptable level of oral hygiene when taught using special customised methods.

  12. Promotion of oral health by community nurses.

    PubMed

    Garry, Brendan; Boran, Sue

    2017-10-02

    To explore the enablers and barriers perceived by community nurses in the promotion of oral health in an adult community trust directorate. Oral health care promotion in community care settings is being neglected. England and Wales have witnessed marked improvements in periodontal disease; however, no improvements have been seen in older people. A qualitative methodology was employed, where eight nurses from Band 5 to 7 were interviewed using a semi-structured approach. The data was analysed thematically. Data analysis was organised into four themes: professional self-concept and the development of knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary in the promotion of oral health; the impact an organisation has on the promotion of oral health and an exploration of the enablers and barriers identified by the community nurses while delivering care; the relationships between the nurse and patient and the potential impact on oral health promotion; the concept of self-regard in relation to the promotion of oral health and its overall impact. A commitment to improving oral health and requests for additional educational input were apparent. Organisational enablers and barriers were identified, alongside the crucial role a positive self-regard for oral health care may play in the promotion of oral health. Nurses need relevant education, organisational support, adequate resources and support from a multidisciplinary team to deliver optimal oral health promotion.

  13. Oral Health and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Renata S.; Marlow, Nicole M.; Fernandes, Jyotika K.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been described as a new epidemic. Approximately 285 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes, and this number is predicted to increase by about 50% by year 2030.This article will review oral health manifestations of diabetes, and discuss associations between periodontal disease and diabetes. Although there is a strong body of evidence that supports the relationship between oral health and T2DM, oral health awareness is lacking among patients with diabetes and other health professionals. There is a need for the treating physician to be educated about the various oral manifestations of diabetes so that they can be diagnosed early and timely referrals to oral health specialists can be made. The established link between periodontitis and diabetes calls for an increased need to study ways to control both diseases, particularly among populations with health disparities and limited access to oral and health care. PMID:23531957

  14. Cognitive Impairment, Oral Self-care Function and Dental Caries Severity in Community-dwelling Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Clark, Jennifer JJ; Chen, Hong; Naorungroj, Supawadee

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether oral self-care function mediates the associations between cognitive impairment and caries severity in community-dwelling older adults. Background Cognitive impairment significantly affects activities of daily living and compromises oral health, systemic health and quality of life in older adults. However, the associations among cognitive impairment, oral self-care capacity and caries severity remain unclear. This increases difficulty in developing effective interventions for cognitively impaired patients. Materials and methods Medical, dental, cognitive and functional assessments were abstracted from the dental records of 600 community-dwelling elderly. 230 participants were selected using propensity score matching and categorised into normal, cognitive impairment but no dementia (CIND) and dementia groups based on their cognitive status and a diagnosis of dementia. Multivariable regressions were developed to examine the mediating effect of oral self-care function on the association between cognitive status and number of caries or retained roots. Results Cognitive impairment, oral self-care function and dental caries severity were intercorrelated. Multivariable analysis showed that without adjusting for oral self-care capacity, cognition was significantly associated with the number of caries or retained roots (p = 0.003). However, the association was not significant when oral self-care capacity was adjusted (p = 0.125). In contrast, individuals with impaired oral self-care capacity had a greater risk of having a caries or retained root (RR = 1.67, 95% CI 1.15, 2.44). Conclusion Oral care capacity mediates the association between cognition and dental caries severity in community-dwelling older adults. PMID:23758583

  15. Oral Health in Women During Preconception and Pregnancy: Implications for Birth Outcomes and Infant Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Burton L.

    2006-01-01

    The mouth is an obvious portal of entry to the body, and oral health reflects and influences general health and well being. Maternal oral health has significant implications for birth outcomes and infant oral health. Maternal periodontal disease, that is, a chronic infection of the gingiva and supporting tooth structures, has been associated with preterm birth, development of preeclampsia, and delivery of a small-for-gestational age infant. Maternal oral flora is transmitted to the newborn infant, and increased cariogenic flora in the mother predisposes the infant to the development of caries. It is intriguing to consider preconception, pregnancy, or intrapartum treatment of oral health conditions as a mechanism to improve women's oral and general health, pregnancy outcomes, and their children's dental health. However, given the relationship between oral health and general health, oral health care should be a goal in its own right for all individuals. Regardless of the potential for improved oral health to improve pregnancy outcomes, public policies that support comprehensive dental services for vulnerable women of childbearing age should be expanded so that their own oral and general health is safeguarded and their children's risk of caries is reduced. Oral health promotion should include education of women and their health care providers ways to prevent oral disease from occurring, and referral for dental services when disease is present. PMID:16816998

  16. A Comparison of the Oral Health Status of Children Who Are Blind and Children Who Are Sighted in Istanbul

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdemir-Ozenen, Didem; Sungurtekin, Elif; Cildir, Sule; Sandalli, Nuket

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining oral health is central to a high quality of life because it limits the risks of disease. The oral health status of children with visual impairments should be investigated so their health care needs can be determined and preventive dental procedures can be implemented. This paper presents a study that aimed to evaluate the oral health…

  17. A Comparison of the Oral Health Status of Children Who Are Blind and Children Who Are Sighted in Istanbul

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdemir-Ozenen, Didem; Sungurtekin, Elif; Cildir, Sule; Sandalli, Nuket

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining oral health is central to a high quality of life because it limits the risks of disease. The oral health status of children with visual impairments should be investigated so their health care needs can be determined and preventive dental procedures can be implemented. This paper presents a study that aimed to evaluate the oral health…

  18. Oral health problems in elderly rehabilitation patients.

    PubMed

    Andersson, P; Hallberg, I R; Lorefält, B; Unosson, M; Renvert, S

    2004-05-01

    A combination of poor oral hygiene and dry mouth may be hazardous to the oral health status. However, systematic assessments in order to detect oral health problems are seldom performed in the nursing care of the elderly. The aims of this study were to investigate the occurrence of oral health problems measured using the Revised Oral Assessment Guide (ROAG) and to analyse associations between oral health problems and age, gender, living conditions, cohabitation, reason for admission, number of drugs, and functional and nutritional status. One registered nurse performed oral health assessments using ROAG in 161 newly admitted elderly patients in rehabilitation care. Oral health problems were found in 71% of the patients. Thirty per cent of these patients had between four and eight problems. Low saliva flow and problems related to lips were the most frequent oral health problems. Problems in oral health status were significantly associated with presence of respiratory diseases (problems with gums, lips, alterations on the tongue and mucous membranes), living in special accommodation (low saliva flow, problems with teeth/dentures and alterations on the tongue), being undernourished (alterations on the tongue and low saliva flow) and being a woman (low saliva flow). The highest Odds ratio (OR) was found in problems with gums in relation with prevalence of respiratory diseases (OR 8.9; confidence interval (CI) 2.8-27.8; P < 0.0005). This study indicates the importance of standardised oral health assessments in order to detect oral health problems which can otherwise be hidden when the patients are admitted to the hospital ward.

  19. Salt fluoridation and oral health.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, Thomas M

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the caries-protective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich, and several other cantons followed suit. Studies initiated in the early seventies showed that fluoride, when added to salt, inhibits dental caries. The addition of fluoride to salt for human consumption was officially authorized in 1980-82. In Switzerland 85% of domestic salt consumed is fluoridated and 67% in Germany. Salt fluoridation schemes are reaching more than one hundred million in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Cuba. The cost of salt fluoridation is very low, within 0.02 and 0.05 € per year and capita. Children and adults of the low socio-economic strata tend to have substantially more untreated caries than higher strata. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method for improving oral health. Salt fluoridation has cariostatic potential like water fluoridation (caries reductions up to 50%). In Europe, meaningful percentages of users have been attained only in Germany (67%) and Switzerland (85%). In Latin America, there are more than 100 million users, and several countries have arrived at coverage of 90 to 99%. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method of caries prevention, and billions of people throughout the world could benefit from this method. Copyright © 2013 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  20. Addressing Adolescent Oral Health: A Review.

    PubMed

    Silk, Hugh; Kwok, Amy

    2017-02-01

    Oral health is one of the most unmet health care needs of adolescents. Oral disease can have a profound effect on overall health, including pain, missed school, heart disease, and even death. Adolescents have specific needs pertaining to oral health in addition to the usual lifelong issues of caries management, sports injury prevention, and dental referrals. Teen years are a higher risk time for oral piercings, increased sugar intake, nicotine initiation, and orthodontic considerations. Adolescents need a unique approach to motivate them about their oral health issues. This is particularly important because lifelong health habits are created during these formative years, and prevention opportunities for sealants and varnish are only available at this age. © American Academy of Pediatrics, 2017. All rights reserved.

  1. Oral motor deficits in speech-impaired children with autism.

    PubMed

    Belmonte, Matthew K; Saxena-Chandhok, Tanushree; Cherian, Ruth; Muneer, Reema; George, Lisa; Karanth, Prathibha

    2013-01-01

    Absence of communicative speech in autism has been presumed to reflect a fundamental deficit in the use of language, but at least in a subpopulation may instead stem from motor and oral motor issues. Clinical reports of disparity between receptive vs. expressive speech/language abilities reinforce this hypothesis. Our early-intervention clinic develops skills prerequisite to learning and communication, including sitting, attending, and pointing or reference, in children below 6 years of age. In a cohort of 31 children, gross and fine motor skills and activities of daily living as well as receptive and expressive speech were assessed at intake and after 6 and 10 months of intervention. Oral motor skills were evaluated separately within the first 5 months of the child's enrolment in the intervention programme and again at 10 months of intervention. Assessment used a clinician-rated structured report, normed against samples of 360 (for motor and speech skills) and 90 (for oral motor skills) typically developing children matched for age, cultural environment and socio-economic status. In the full sample, oral and other motor skills correlated with receptive and expressive language both in terms of pre-intervention measures and in terms of learning rates during the intervention. A motor-impaired group comprising a third of the sample was discriminated by an uneven profile of skills with oral motor and expressive language deficits out of proportion to the receptive language deficit. This group learnt language more slowly, and ended intervention lagging in oral motor skills. In individuals incapable of the degree of motor sequencing and timing necessary for speech movements, receptive language may outstrip expressive speech. Our data suggest that autistic motor difficulties could range from more basic skills such as pointing to more refined skills such as articulation, and need to be assessed and addressed across this entire range in each individual.

  2. Chem I Supplement: Chemistry in Oral Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents chemical information related to dental health: (1) the composition of toothpaste, (2) dental diseases, (3) the role of fluoride, (4) proper oral health care, (5) mouthwashes, and (6) adhesive sealants. (MA)

  3. Why Is Oral Health Important for Women?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Health Considerations for Women at All Life Stages Is Kissing Dangerous to Your Health? Menstruation, Pregnancy, Menopause and Teeth Saliva Test May Help Dentists Check for Breast Cancer games Home | InfoBites | Find a Dentist | Your Family's ...

  4. What psychosocial factors influence adolescents' oral health?

    PubMed

    Baker, S R; Mat, A; Robinson, P G

    2010-11-01

    Few studies have examined, comprehensively and prospectively, determinants of oral-health-related quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between psychosocial factors and oral health status, health perceptions, and quality of life. Measures of symptom and functional status, health perceptions, quality of life, oral health beliefs, and psychological (sense of coherence, self-esteem, health locus of control) and social factors (parents' income and education) were collected from 439 12- and 13-year-olds at baseline and six-month follow-up, together with a clinical examination at baseline. Structural equation modeling indicated that increased levels of caries and more symptoms predicted more functional limitations, and, cross-sectionally, greater functional impact was associated with worse health perceptions, which were linked to lower quality of life. Sense of coherence was the most important psychosocial predictor. These factors are important in understanding how oral health affects young people's daily lives.

  5. Chem I Supplement: Chemistry in Oral Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Presents chemical information related to dental health: (1) the composition of toothpaste, (2) dental diseases, (3) the role of fluoride, (4) proper oral health care, (5) mouthwashes, and (6) adhesive sealants. (MA)

  6. Accountable Care Organizations and Oral Health Accountability.

    PubMed

    Mayberry, Melanie E

    2017-05-01

    Accountable care organizations agree to be accountable for the cost and outcomes of an attributed population. However, in many, no provisions have been made to account for oral health. There are several social, medical, and financial implications for health care provider and payer systems and health care outcomes when oral health is not accounted for in patient management. How can an organization strive to improve population health without including the oral health system? Total systemic health for a population must include oral health. Accountable care organizations are positioned to change the course of oral health in the United States and close the disparities that exist among vulnerable populations, including seniors. Such efforts will reduce health care costs. Opportunities abound to expand points of entry into the health care system via dental or medical care. Closing the great divide between 2 historically isolated professions will position the United States to make gains in true population health. I provide evidence of the need to mandate access to oral health care services for all Americans-specifically adults, because legislation currently exists for pediatric dental coverage.

  7. Even small interventions can improve oral health.

    PubMed

    Vega, Lina; Carberry, Frank J

    2013-01-01

    When resources are scarce, authors of articles appearing in health publications have questioned the effectiveness of traditional interventions as a means of improving oral health. The experience in Delicias, Honduras, indicates that the principles of BPOC (Basic Package of Oral Care) may provide quicker and better results.

  8. A Comparison of Oral Narratives in Children with Specific Language and Non-Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Wendy M.; James, Deborah G. H.; McCormack, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    This research investigated whether children with specific language impairment (SLI) and non-specific language impairment (NLI) could be differentiated by their oral narrative characteristics. Oral narrative samples were collected from 69 children and comparisons were made among four groups of participants. The two language impairment groups (SLI…

  9. Basic oral health needs: A public priority.

    PubMed

    Ozar, David T

    2006-11-01

    Is there a way to support a special ethical status for unmet oral health needs within our pluralistic, liberty-loving American society? Some people in American society, perhaps many people, believe that some kinds of human needs have special ethical importance. But very few people outside the oral health professions have ever considered that unmet oral health needs might belong to this category. This article will examine why some kinds of needs are thought to have special ethical importance and propose that certain categories of oral health care are needs that fit this description. Without thinking these issues through, we who argue for improved access to oral health care will remain unable to provide an adequate answer to a very legitimate question, namely: improved access to what? When this task has been completed, the article will consider some of the implications of such a view for our society.

  10. Oral health beliefs in diverse populations.

    PubMed

    Nakazono, T T; Davidson, P L; Andersen, R M

    1997-05-01

    Using data from population-based samples of adults participating in the ICS-II USA study, and using principal components analysis, we constructed oral health belief measures corresponding to the Health Belief Model (HBM) dimensions. Tests of validity and reliability were performed. Scales measuring perceived benefit of preventive practices and seriousness of oral disease had the highest validity and reliability. We used multiple regression analysis to examine sociodemographic predictors of perceived benefits of preventive practices. Race-ethnicity and age cohort were significant predictors among Baltimore and San Antonio adults. White adults and middle-aged persons in both research locations were more likely to believe in the benefit of preventive practices. Female gender, higher educational attainment, and better self-rated health were significant indicators of more positive oral health beliefs in every research location. Results also characterize persons who place lower value on preventive practices (i.e., males, less-educated persons, and those reporting poorer self-rated health). The design of effective dental public health messages and outreach efforts requires an analysis of the individual's health orientation and the factors influencing oral health beliefs. Oral health education interventions designed to improve health beliefs should contain an evaluation component for assessing the impact of education on health practices and oral health status.

  11. Chapter Oral Health Advocates: A Nationwide Model for Pediatrician Peer Education and Advocacy about Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Charlotte W.; Barone, Lauren; Quinonez, Rocio B.; Boulter, Suzanne; Mouradian, Wendy E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. (1) To describe an innovative program training US pediatricians to be Chapter Oral Health Advocates (COHAs). (2) To provide insight into COHAs' experiences disseminating oral health knowledge to fellow pediatricians. Patients and Methods. Interviews with 40 COHAs who responded to an email request, from a total of 64 (62% response). Transcripts were analyzed for common themes about COHA activities, facilitators, and barriers. Results. COHAs reported positive experiences at the AAP oral health training program. A subset of academic COHAs focused on legislative activity and another on resident education about oral health. Residents had an easier time adopting oral health activities while practicing pediatricians cited time constraints. COHAs provided insights into policy, barriers, and facilitators for incorporating oral health into practice. Conclusions. This report identifies factors influencing pediatricians' adoption of oral health care into practice. COHAs reported successes in training peers on integrating oral health into pediatric practice, identified opportunities and challenges to oral health implementation in primary care, and reported issues about the state of children's oral health in their communities. With ongoing support, the COHA program has a potential to improve access to preventive oral health services in the Medical Home and to increase referrals to a Dental Home. PMID:24228032

  12. Health-promoting schools: an opportunity for oral health promotion.

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Stella Y. L.; Petersen, Poul Erik; Pine, Cynthia M.; Borutta, Annerose

    2005-01-01

    Schools provide an important setting for promoting health, as they reach over 1 billion children worldwide and, through them, the school staff, families and the community as a whole. Health promotion messages can be reinforced throughout the most influential stages of children's lives, enabling them to develop lifelong sustainable attitudes and skills. Poor oral health can have a detrimental effect on children's quality of life, their performance at school and their success in later life. This paper examines the global need for promoting oral health through schools. The WHO Global School Health Initiative and the potential for setting up oral health programmes in schools using the health-promoting school framework are discussed. The challenges faced in promoting oral health in schools in both developed and developing countries are highlighted. The importance of using a validated framework and appropriate methodologies for the evaluation of school oral health projects is emphasized. PMID:16211159

  13. Oral health status and health-related quality of life: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Naito, Mariko; Yuasa, Hidemichi; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Nakayama, Takeo; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2006-03-01

    This study was conducted in order to identify the literature on oral health status and health-related QOL, review the findings systematically, and assess the association between them. We performed a literature search of reports published between January 1973 and June 2004, using five databases including MEDLINE. Only studies that used validated generic health-related QOL instruments were selected. The reviewers evaluated selected articles independently and resolved disagreements by consensus. A total of 1,726 articles were retrieved and seven were selected for the review; five observational studies and two intervention studies. Four studies showed significant associations between oral health status and health-related QOL. Temporomandibular disorders were highly associated with reduced health-related QOL. Poor oral status linked to both craniomandibular and cervical spinal pain was associated with increased impairment of health-related QOL. Dissatisfaction with the teeth and mouth, and a sensation of dry mouth contributed to reduce health-related QOL. Providing edentulous patients with implant-supported full dentures contributed to improve health-related QOL. Assessment of health-related QOL in relation to oral health with validated instruments remains insufficient. The present findings suggest that oral health status could affect health-related QOL in some settings; however, further evidence is needed to support this interpretation.

  14. Quality Improvement Efforts in Pediatric Oral Health.

    PubMed

    Ng, Man Wai

    2016-04-01

    Quality improvement (QI) and measurement are increasingly used in health care to improve patient care and outcomes. Despite current barriers in oral health measurement, there are nascent QI and measurement efforts emerging. This paper describes the role that QI and measurement can play in improving oral health care delivery in clinical practice by presenting a QI initiative that aimed to test and implement a chronic disease management approach to address early childhood caries.

  15. Oral Health Beliefs in Adolescence and Oral Health in Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Broadbent, J.M.; Thomson, W.M.; Poulton, R.

    2008-01-01

    According to theory, health beliefs are related to health behaviors. We investigated whether individuals who hold favorable oral-health-related beliefs over time have better adult oral health than those who do not. Beliefs about the efficacy of water fluoridation, keeping the mouth clean, avoiding sweet foods, visiting the dentist, using dental floss, and using fluoridated toothpaste were assessed in a birth cohort at ages 15, 18, and 26 years. At each age, the majority of participants endorsed the importance of each practice. However, there was also evidence of instability across time. Individuals who held stable favorable dental beliefs from adolescence through adulthood had fewer teeth missing due to caries, less periodontal disease, better oral hygiene, better self-rated oral health, and more restorations. Dental beliefs can change between adolescence and young adulthood, and these changes are related to oral health. In particular, unfavorable dental health beliefs are related to poorer oral health. PMID:16567555

  16. Oral health and elite sport performance

    PubMed Central

    Needleman, Ian; Ashley, Paul; Fine, Peter; Haddad, Fares; Loosemore, Mike; de Medici, Akbar; Donos, Nikos; Newton, Tim; van Someren, Ken; Moazzez, Rebecca; Jaques, Rod; Hunter, Glenn; Khan, Karim; Shimmin, Mark; Brewer, John; Meehan, Lyndon; Mills, Steve; Porter, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    While the research base is limited, studies have consistently reported poor oral health in elite athletes since the first report from the 1968 Olympic Games. The finding is consistent both across selected samples attending dental clinics at major competitions and more representative sampling of teams and has led to calls from the International Olympic Committee for more accurate data on oral health. Poor oral health is an important issue directly as it can cause pain, negative effects on appearance and psychosocial effects on confidence and quality of life and may have long-term consequences for treatment burden. Self-reported evidence also suggests an impact on training and performance of athletes. There are many potential challenges to the oral health of athletes including nutritional, oral dehydration, exercise-induced immune suppression, lack of awareness, negative health behaviours and lack of prioritisation. However, in theory, oral diseases are preventable by simple interventions with good evidence of efficacy. The consensus statement aims to raise awareness of the issues of oral health in elite sport and recommends strategies for prevention and health promotion in addition to future research strategies. PMID:25263651

  17. Oral Health Literacy among Female Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Vann, W.F.; Lee, J.Y.; Baker, D.; Divaris, K.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of female caregivers’ oral health literacy with their knowledge, behaviors, and the reported oral health status of their young children. Data on caregivers’ literacy, knowledge, behaviors, and children’s oral health status were used from structured interviews with 1158 caregiver/child dyads from a low-income population. Literacy was measured with REALD-30. Caregivers’ and children’s median ages were 25 yrs (range = 17-65) and 15 mos (range = 1-59), respectively. The mean literacy score was 15.8 (SD = 5.3; range = 1-30). Adjusted for age, education, and number of children, low literacy scores (< 13 REALD-30) were associated with decreased knowledge (OR = 1.86; 95% CI = 1.41, 2.45) and poorer reported oral health status (OR = 1.44; 95% CI = 1.02, 2.05). Lower caregiver literacy was associated with deleterious oral health behaviors, including nighttime bottle use and no daily brushing/cleaning. Caregiver oral health literacy has a multidimensional impact on reported oral health outcomes in infants and young children. PMID:20924067

  18. Oral health considerations in older women receiving oral bisphosphonate therapy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Joan C; O'Ryan, Felice; Yang, Jingrong; Hararah, Mohammad K; Gonzalez, Joel R; Gordon, Nancy; Silver, Paula; Ansfield, Alice; Wang, Benjamin; Go, Alan S

    2011-05-01

    Recent reports of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) have increased awareness of oral health in patients receiving osteoporosis therapy. This study describes the demographic, oral health, and clinical characteristics of a contemporary population of women aged 50 and older undergoing oral bisphosphonate treatment who returned a mailed questionnaire pertaining to dental symptoms. The study, as previously reported, was conducted within Kaiser Permanente Northern California, a large, integrated healthcare delivery system. The cohort included 7,909 women with bisphosphonate exposure of at least 1 year, with a subset of 923 women reporting dental symptoms who underwent clinical examination. Overall, the average age was 71 ± 9; 70% were white, and 74% had at least some college education. Nearly two-thirds had received oral bisphosphonate therapy for 3 or more years. Most reported daily tooth brushing, 85% had had a dental examination in the past year, 22% reported denture use, and 6% reported moderate to severe periodontal disease. Oral healthcare patterns varied according to age and race and ethnicity. Five hundred seven (6.4%) women reported a tooth extraction in the prior year, of whom two developed BRONJ (0.4%). Tori or exostoses were found in 28% of examined participants with dental symptoms; these were predominantly in the lingual mandible and palate, with palatal BRONJ occurring in 1.6% of symptomatic participants with palatal tori. In summary, among older women with bisphosphonate exposure, oral health varied according to patient characteristics, and BRONJ occurred more frequently after tooth extraction or on palatal tori. These data support efforts to optimize oral health and to identify risk factors for BRONJ in older individuals receiving bisphosphonate drugs. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Oral health considerations in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Mawardi, Hani H; Al-Mohaya, Maha A; Treister, Nathaniel S

    2013-05-01

    Over the past decade, advances in cancer treatment have helped in prolonging the survival rate for cancer patients. However, the patients who undergo treatment for cancer are potentially at high-risk for developing a number of oral complications, including oral mucositis, infections, hyposalivation, dental caries, and jaw osteonecrosis. Cancer survivors may remain at life-long risk of developing oral complications, and therefore require long-term dental follow-up, well after completion of cancer therapy. Patients should typically undergo thorough oral examination prior to initiation of therapy, during and after therapy to identify any active infection. In addition, and in order to maintain adequate oral health throughout treatment, patients should continue normal oral hygiene with tooth brushing and interproximal cleaning. The aim of this review is to discuss potential oral complications as a result of cancer therapy, and the certain precautions we should be aware of these patients.

  20. Oral health survey and oral health questionnaire for high school students in Tibet, China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to identify the oral health status as well as oral health practices and access for care of graduating senior high school Tibetan students in Shannan prefecture of Tibet. Methods Based on standards of the 3rd Chinese National Oral Epidemiological Survey and WHO Oral Health Surveys, 1907 graduating students from three senior high schools were examined for caries, periodontitis, dental fluorosis, and oral hygiene status. The questionnaire to the students addressed oral health practices and present access to oral medical services. Results Dental caries prevalence (39.96%) and mean DMFT (0.97) were high in Tibetan students. In community periodontal indexes, the detection rate of gingivitis and dental calculus were 59.50% and 62.64%, respectively. Oral hygiene index-simplified was 0.69, with 0.36 and 0.33 in debris index-simplified and calculus index-simplified, respectively. Community dental fluorosis index was 0.29, with 8.13% in prevalence rate. The questionnaire showed students had poor oral health practices and unawareness for their needs for oral health services. It was also noted that the local area provides inadequate oral medical services. Conclusions Tibetan students had higher prevalence of dental diseases and lower awareness of oral health needs. The main reasons were geographical environment, dietary habit, students’ attitude to oral health, and lack of oral health promotion and education. Oral health education and local dentists training should be strengthened to get effective prevention of dental diseases. PMID:24884668

  1. Tobacco Use and Oral Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seffrin, John R.; Randall, B. Grove

    1982-01-01

    Oral disease risks regarding the use of tobacco arise not only from smoking but also from the oral use of tobacco in the form of snuff. Such diseases range from simple tooth decay to various forms of cancer. A fact list is suggested for presenting the risks to school-age youth. (JN)

  2. Tobacco Use and Oral Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seffrin, John R.; Randall, B. Grove

    1982-01-01

    Oral disease risks regarding the use of tobacco arise not only from smoking but also from the oral use of tobacco in the form of snuff. Such diseases range from simple tooth decay to various forms of cancer. A fact list is suggested for presenting the risks to school-age youth. (JN)

  3. National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care Institute and the National Oral Health Conference. Resource Highlights: Nutrition and Oral Health This collection of selected resources offers key facts and high-quality information about ...

  4. Cognitive impairment and preferences for current health

    PubMed Central

    King, Joseph T; Tsevat, Joel; Roberts, Mark S

    2009-01-01

    Background We assessed preferences for current health using the visual analogue scale (VAS), standard gamble (SG), time trade-off (TTO), and willingness to pay (WTP) in patients with cerebral aneurysms, a population vulnerable to cognitive deficits related to aneurysm bleeding or treatment. Methods We measured VAS, SG, TTO, and WTP values for current health in 165 outpatients with cerebral aneurysms. We assessed cognitive impairment with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE; scores < 24 = cognitive impairment). We examined the distributions of preference responses stratified by cognitive status, and the relationship between preferences and cognitive impairment, patient characteristics, and aneurysm history. Results Eleven patients (7%) had MMSE scores < 24. The distribution of preferences responses from patients with cognitive impairment had greater variance (SG, 0.39 vs. 0.21, P = 0.001; TTO, 0.36 vs. 0.24, P = 0.017) and altered morphology (VAS, P = 0.012; SG, P = 0.023) compared to the responses of unimpaired patients. There was good correlation between most preference measures for unimpaired patients (VAS:TTO, rho = 0.19, P = 0.018; SG:TTO, rho = 0.36, P < 0.001; SG:WTP, rho = -0.33, P < 0.001) and a trend towards significance with another pairing (VAS:WTP, rho = 0.16, P = 0.054). In subjects with cognitive impairment, there was a significant correlation only between VAS and TTO scores (rho = 0.76, P = 0.023). Separate regression models showed that cognitive impairment was associated with lower preferences on the VAS (β = -0.12, P = 0.048), SG (β = -0.23, P = 0.002), and TTO (β = -0.17, P = 0.035). Conclusion Cognitive impairment is associated with lower preferences for current health in patients with cerebral aneurysms. Cognitively impaired patients have poor inter-preference test correlations and different response distributions compared to unimpaired patients. PMID:19134191

  5. Teachers' knowledge about oral health and their interest in oral health education in Hail, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Aljanakh, Mohammad; Siddiqui, Ammar Ahmed; Mirza, Asaad Javaid

    2016-01-01

    To assess the dental health knowledge and the interest of secondary school teachers in imparting oral health education in Hail, Saudi Arabia. It was a questionnaire based cross-sectional survey of secondary school teachers in Hail, Saudi Arabia, carried out from November 2014 to January 2015. A validated self-administered questionnaire was used to determine teachers' oral health knowledge and their interest in participating in oral health education of school children. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 20 statistical software. Two hundred and twenty three secondary school teachers responded to the survey. Results showed that about 80 to 90 % of teachers had sufficient knowledge of causes and prevention of dental caries and gingivitis. About 94% of teachers agreed that they can play an effective role in oral health promotion while 96% were found to be interested in performing additional duty as oral health promoter. A large majority (91.9 %) had the opinion that oral health education must be included in school curriculum. Teachers in Hail region had adequate amount of knowledge regarding oral health, and they were interested to play their role in promoting oral health education. Based on the findings of this study, it is recommended to include dental health education in curriculum at secondary school level and to provide sufficient training to teachers to enable them to participate actively in oral health promotion activities.

  6. Teachers’ knowledge about oral health and their interest in oral health education in Hail, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Aljanakh, Mohammad; Siddiqui, Ammar Ahmed; Mirza, Asaad Javaid

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the dental health knowledge and the interest of secondary school teachers in imparting oral health education in Hail, Saudi Arabia Methods It was a questionnaire based cross-sectional survey of secondary school teachers in Hail, Saudi Arabia, carried out from November 2014 to January 2015. A validated self-administered questionnaire was used to determine teachers’ oral health knowledge and their interest in participating in oral health education of school children. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 20 statistical software. Results Two hundred and twenty three secondary school teachers responded to the survey. Results showed that about 80 to 90 % of teachers had sufficient knowledge of causes and prevention of dental caries and gingivitis. About 94% of teachers agreed that they can play an effective role in oral health promotion while 96% were found to be interested in performing additional duty as oral health promoter. A large majority (91.9 %) had the opinion that oral health education must be included in school curriculum. Conclusion Teachers in Hail region had adequate amount of knowledge regarding oral health, and they were interested to play their role in promoting oral health education. Based on the findings of this study, it is recommended to include dental health education in curriculum at secondary school level and to provide sufficient training to teachers to enable them to participate actively in oral health promotion activities. PMID:27004061

  7. [Health risks of oral contraceptives].

    PubMed

    Meier, Christoph R

    2011-06-01

    Oral contraceptives (OC) are either composed of a combination of an estrogen derivative (usually ethinly estradiol) and a progestogen, or they contain a progestogen only. OC are characterized by a high effectiveness and have a low failure rate if taken correctly. Most women tolerate OC relatively well, but adverse effects do occur which are driven by the estrogen dose as well as by the type of progestogen. The most frequently reported adverse effects are nausea or vomiting, breast tenderness, headache or inbalanced mood, but these unwanted side effects are often transient. The fear of weight gain of many OC users is not necessarily supported by data from studies which report relatively little differences in body mass index on average during OC use. Nevertheless, substantial weight gain can occur in individual women. The widely discussed fear of breast cancer is also not justified, and the risk of developing ovarian or endometrial cancer is reduced for women who use OC on a regular basis. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the adverse effect with the greatest potential for serious harm if pulmonary embolism develops. This rare, but potentially dangerous adverse effect of OC has been discussed emotionally for many years and keeps attracting a lot of public interest. VTE is rare in young women, but the VTE risk is increased two- to sixfold for OC users as compared to non-users. The VTE risk increases with increasing estrogen dose, is highest in the first year of use, and is higher for OC from the third generation (containing desogestrel, gestodene or norgestimate) than for OC from the second generation (containing levonorgestrel) or than for the progestogen-only pill. According to most studies, OC containing the progestogens drospirenone or cyproterone acetate are similar with regard to VTE risks than OC from the third generation. Individual genetic susceptibility affecting the clotting system plays a major role in the risk of developing VTE in combination with OC, and

  8. Oral health in Florida nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Murray, P E; Ede-Nichols, D; Garcia-Godoy, F

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the oral health and hygiene status among 265 South Florida nursing home residents aged between 45 and 98 years. The oral health and hygiene status of the residents were assessed by noting the presence of calculus, caries, gingivitis, cheilitis, apthous ulcer, dry mouth and red or white lesions. The incidence of nursing home residents with calculus was 79.6% and the remaining 20.4% were edentulous. More than half of residents had oral problems (50.6%) the commonest was gingivitis (36.6%), followed by caries (26%) and tooth fracture (15.9%). Almost half the residents wore dentures (47.2%). Statistical analysis was conducted using analysis of variance (P-values). Ageing of the residents was statistically correlated to a worsening of oral hygiene status (P<0.0066), absence and presence of one or two dentures (P<0.0034) and a loss of teeth (P<0.0001). The ageing of residents is correlated to increasing oral health problems and the loss of teeth. Oral health neglect affects almost all of the nursing home residents. Care providers should receive education and training from dental hygienists to improve the standard of oral hygiene and health of the elderly.

  9. Oral Health in Rural Communities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Gateway Evidence-based Toolkits Rural Health Models & Innovations Supporting Rural Community Health Tools for Success Am ... FAQs Resources Organizations Funding & Opportunities News Models and Innovations About This Guide Rural Health Topics & States Topics ...

  10. California's state oral health infrastructure: opportunities for improvement and funding.

    PubMed

    Diringer, Joel; Phipps, Kathy R

    2012-01-01

    California has virtually no statewide dental public health infrastructure leaving the state without leadership, a surveillance program, an oral health plan, oral health promotion and disease prevention programs, and federal funding. Based on a literature review and interviews with 15 oral health officials nationally, the paper recommends hiring a state dental director with public health experience, developing a state oral health plan, and seeking federal and private funding to support an office of oral health.

  11. Policies for Improving Oral Health in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinkhorn, Anthony S.; Downer, Martin C.; Drugan, Caroline S.

    2005-01-01

    Background and Objective: The main purpose of this review was to rehearse the available evidence of good practice in dental public health in order to define policies that could improve oral health in the enlarged European Union and associated countries. Secondary objectives were to describe the basic principles of health service organisation and…

  12. Maintaining oral health across the life span.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Rita; Mertz, Elizabeth; Featherstone, John D B; Fulmer, Terry

    2014-06-15

    Oral health is directly related to systemic health, yet many Americans have limited to no access to dental health professionals. Nurse practitioners are in an excellent position to fill this void by providing caries risk assessments, chemical therapy to prevent progression of caries, and appropriate patient education to prevent caries.

  13. Oral health care after the National Policy on Oral Health - "Smiling Brazil": a case study.

    PubMed

    Aquilante, Aline Guerra; Aciole, Geovani Gurgel

    2015-01-01

    In 2004, the National Oral Health Policy (PNSB) - Smiling Brazil was launched. Its guidelines seek to qualify Primary Health Care, ensure comprehensive actions, work on the basis of health surveillance, plan actions in accordance with the epidemiology and information available on the territory, financing and scheduling the research agenda so that the work can be based on scientific evidence. The purpose of this case study was to investigate the perspectives of health care professionals and managers on oral health care after launching the PNSB. For the gathering of information, an oral interview was conducted with health care professionals and managers and direct observation of oral health services. The interpretation of meaning method was used for analysis of the interviews. Approximately 10 years after launching the PNSB, even though the care and the oral health actions have been amplified and qualified, the cities still find it difficult to implement their basic premises.

  14. Happiness, subjective and objective oral health status, and oral health behaviors among Korean elders.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyun-Seo; Kim, Hae-Young; Patton, Lauren L; Chun, Jin-Ho; Bae, Kwang-Hak; Lee, Mi-Ok

    2013-10-01

    This study aims to comprehensively assess the association of subjective and objective oral health status and oral health behaviors with happiness, under consideration of demographic, socioeconomic, and general health-related factors. This study also aims to test whether subjective oral health outcomes are better predictors of happiness compared with objective oral health outcomes. The data were collected from 479 community-dwelling elders aged 65 years or over selected by a cluster sampling method. A questionnaire and an oral examination were implemented. A multiple regression method was conducted to assess associations with happiness index (HI). The mean age of the elders was 74.6 years. Mean (standard deviation, SD) HI, EuroQol-visual analog scale (EQ-VAS) and 14-item oral health impact profile (OHIP-14) index were 5.7 (SD 2.3), 59.8 (SD 21.1), and 16.3 (SD 13.1). In the final model, a significant association with HI of the OHIP-14 index (P = 0.091) among all the participants and significant associations of oral symptoms (P = 0.038), wearing a removable denture (P = 0.039), and of the oral health behavior of daily toothbrushing (P = 0.007) among poorer oral health QoL group were confirmed under consideration of other related factors. While correlations of HI to subjective measures of health, EQ-VAS and OHIP-14 score were moderate to weak, those to objective measures of health were only weak or insignificant. Oral impacts which might persistently affect one's daily life need to be considered in designing and delivering public services aimed to promote people's happiness. With oral health impacts and behaviors accounting for 10% of happiness among elders, public and community services for the elderly that support oral health and daily toothbrushing for the dentate are critical for the well-being of our elders. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Oral health promotion in the community pharmacy: an evaluation of a pilot oral health promotion intervention.

    PubMed

    Sturrock, A; Cussons, H; Jones, C; Woodcock, C; Bird, L

    2017-09-15

    Introduction Poor oral health is a significant public health concern, costing the NHS in England £3.4 billion annually. Community pharmacies are easily accessible, frequently visited by patients and the community pharmacy contractual framework requires pharmacies to provide healthy living advice to patients - therefore offering a little explored avenue for the delivery of oral health interventions.Methodology A pilot oral health promotion intervention was introduced in five pharmacies in deprived areas of County Durham between September and December 2016. A mixed methods approach to the evaluation was performed, utilising a patient evaluation questionnaire and semi-structured qualitative interviews with pharmacy staff.Results One thousand and eighty-nine participants received the intervention. Following the intervention 72% of participants perceived their knowledge of oral health as much better, 66% definitely intended to change their oral health habits and 64% definitely thought a pharmacy was the right place to receive advice about oral health. Three themes emerged from the qualitative data: (1) intervention feedback, (2) knowledge gap and (3) service development.Discussion The data demonstrated the acceptability of patients to a community pharmacy based oral health intervention, with most patients reporting intentions to change their oral healthcare habits after receiving the intervention. Previous literature has identified a willingness of pharmacy staff to become involved with oral health; this study provides evidence that patients are also receptive to such services being delivered in the community pharmacy setting. Further work is required to assess the benefits of a community pharmacy based oral health intervention and the potential for further growth of this role.Conclusion A community pharmacy is perceived by patients as an acceptable provider of oral health interventions and has the potential to provide positive changes to the oral health of the

  16. Oral health and dental care during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Barbara J; Hilton, Irene V; Iida, Hiroko; Iada, Hiroko; Samelson, Renee

    2013-04-01

    Current research shows that women tend to receive less dental care than usual when they are pregnant. In 2012, the first national consensus statement on oral health care during pregnancy was issued, emphasizing both the importance and safety of routine dental care for pregnant women. This article reviews the current recommendations for perinatal oral health care and common oral manifestations during pregnancy. Periodontal disease and its association with preterm birth and low birth weight are also discussed, as is the role played by dental intervention in these adverse outcomes.

  17. Oral Health-related Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Sischo, L.; Broder, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite its relatively recent emergence over the past few decades, oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) has important implications for the clinical practice of dentistry and dental research. OHRQoL is a multidimensional construct that includes a subjective evaluation of the individual’s oral health, functional well-being, emotional well-being, expectations and satisfaction with care, and sense of self. It has wide-reaching applications in survey and clinical research. OHRQoL is an integral part of general health and well-being. In fact, it is recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) as an important segment of the Global Oral Health Program (2003). This paper identifies the what, why, and how of OHRQoL and presents an oral health theoretical model. The relevance of OHRQoL for dental practitioners and patients in community-based dental practices is presented. Implications for health policy and related oral health disparities are also discussed. A supplemental Appendix contains a Medline and ProQuest literature search regarding OHRQoL research from 1990-2010 by discipline and research design (e.g., descriptive, longitudinal, clinical trial, etc.). The search identified 300 articles with a notable surge in OHRQoL research in pediatrics and orthodontics in recent years. PMID:21422477

  18. Does maternal oral health predict child oral health-related quality of life in adulthood?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A parental/family history of poor oral health may influence the oral-health-related quality of life (OHRQOL) of adults. Objectives To determine whether the oral health of mothers of young children can predict the OHRQOL of those same children when they reach adulthood. Methods Oral examination and interview data from the Dunedin Study's age-32 assessment, as well as maternal self-rated oral health data from the age-5 assessment were used. The main outcome measure was study members' short-form Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) at age 32. Analyses involved 827 individuals (81.5% of the surviving cohort) dentally examined at both ages, who also completed the OHIP-14 questionnaire at age 32, and whose mothers were interviewed at the age-5 assessment. Results There was a consistent gradient of relative risk across the categories of maternal self-rated oral health status at the age-5 assessment for having one or more impacts in the overall OHIP-14 scale, whereby risk was greatest among the study members whose mothers rated their oral health as "poor/edentulous", and lowest among those with an "excellent/fairly good" rating. In addition, there was a gradient in the age-32 mean OHIP-14 score, and in the mean number of OHIP-14 impacts at age 32 across the categories of maternal self-rated oral health status. The higher risk of having one or more impacts in the psychological discomfort subscale, when mother rated her oral health as "poor/edentulous", was statistically significant. Conclusions These data suggest that maternal self-rated oral health when a child is young has a bearing on that child's OHRQOL almost three decades later. The adult offspring of mothers with poor self-rated oral health had poorer OHRQOL outcomes, particularly in the psychological discomfort subscale. PMID:21736754

  19. Oral Morphosyntactic Competence as a Predictor of Reading Comprehension in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buil-Legaz, Lucía; Aguilar-Mediavilla, Eva; Rodríguez-Ferreiro, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with a diagnosis of specific language impairment (SLI) present impaired oral comprehension. According to the simple view of reading, general amodal linguistic capacity accounts for both oral and reading comprehension. Considering this, we should expect SLI children to display a reading comprehension deficit. However, previous…

  20. Oral Morphosyntactic Competence as a Predictor of Reading Comprehension in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buil-Legaz, Lucía; Aguilar-Mediavilla, Eva; Rodríguez-Ferreiro, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with a diagnosis of specific language impairment (SLI) present impaired oral comprehension. According to the simple view of reading, general amodal linguistic capacity accounts for both oral and reading comprehension. Considering this, we should expect SLI children to display a reading comprehension deficit. However, previous…

  1. Probiotics and oral health: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Seminario-Amez, M; López-López, J; Estrugo-Devesa, A; Ayuso-Montero, R; Jané-Salas, E

    2017-05-01

    Probiotics are microorganisms, mainly bacteria, which benefit the host's health. Many studies support the role of probiotics as a contributor to gastrointestinal health, and nowadays many authors are trying to prove its influence in oral health maintenance. To review the published literature with the purpose of knowing the importance of using probiotics as a preventive and therapeutic method for oral infectious diseases management. An electronic search in PubMed database with the keywords "oral health AND probiotics AND dentistry" was conducted. The inclusion criteria were: randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that assess the action of any probiotic strain in the treatment and / or prevention of an infectious oral disease, RCTs that assess the action of any probiotic strain on counting colony forming units (CFU) of oral pathogens, systematic reviews and meta-analysis. The Jadad scale was used to assess the high quality of RCTs. Fifteen articles were considered for this review. Of which, 12 were RCTs of good / high quality (Jadad scale), two meta-analysis and one systematic review. The literature reviewed suggests probiotics usage could be beneficial for the maintenance of oral health, due to its ability to decrease the colony forming units (CFU) counts of the oral pathogens. However, randomized clinical trials with long-term follow-up periods are needed to confirm their efficacy in reducing the prevalence/incidence of oral infectious diseases. Furthermore, the recognition of specific strains with probiotic activity for each infectious oral disease is required, in order to determine exact dose, treatment time and ideal vehicles.

  2. Developing a pediatric oral health therapist to help address oral health disparities among children.

    PubMed

    Nash, David A

    2004-01-01

    Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General documented the profound and significant disparities that exist in the oral health of children in the United States. Recently, the country has been issued a National Call to Action to Promote Oral Health, under the leadership of the Office of the Surgeon General. Among the significant factors contributing to the disparities problem is the access to oral health care by disadvantaged populations. There are inadequate numbers of dentists able and willing to treat children, particularly poor and minority children. In the early part of the twentieth century, New Zealand faced a significant problem with oral disease among its children and introduced a School Dental Service staffed by allied dental professionals, known as "school dental nurses," who had received two years training in caring for the teeth of children. A number of other countries have since adopted this model. This article reviews attempts to develop a comparable approach in the United States. Furthermore, it justifies and advocates the development of pediatric oral health therapists in the United States as a means of addressing the disparities problem that exists in this nation. These pediatric oral health therapists would be trained in a two-year program to provide dental care services to children. The article concludes by asserting that such action is a practical and cost-effective way for dentistry to fulfill its professional obligation to care for the oral health of all children, thus ensuring justice in oral health for America's children.

  3. Validation of an innovative instrument of Positive Oral Health and Well-Being (POHW).

    PubMed

    Zini, Avraham; Büssing, Arndt; Chay, Cindy; Badner, Victor; Weinstock-Levin, Tamar; Sgan-Cohen, Harold D; Cochardt, Philip; Friedmann, Anton; Ziskind, Karin; Vered, Yuval

    2016-04-01

    Most existing measures of oral health focus solely on negative oral health, illness, and deficiencies and ignore positive oral health. In an attempt to commence exploration of this challenging field, an innovative instrument was developed, the "Positive Oral Health and Well-Being" (POHW) index. This study aimed to validate this instrument and to explore an initial model of the pathway between oral health attributes and positive oral health. A cross-sectional, multicenter study (Israel, USA, and Germany), was conducted. Our conceptual model suggests that positive oral health attributes, which integrate with positive unawareness or positive awareness on the one hand and with positive perception on the other hand, may result via appropriate oral health behavior on positive oral health. The 17-item self-administered index was built on a theoretical concept by four experts from Israel and Germany. Reliability, factor, and correlation analyses were performed. For external correlations and to measure construct validity of the instrument, we utilized the oral health impact profile-14, self-perceived oral impairment, life satisfaction, self-perceived well-being, sociodemographic and behavioral data, and oral health status indices. Four hundred and seventy participants took part in our three-center study. The combined data set reliability analyses detected two items which were not contributing to the index reliability. Thus, we tested a 15-item construct, and a Cronbach's α value of 0.933 was revealed. Primary factor analysis of the whole sample indicated three subconstructs which could explain 60 % of variance. Correlation analyses demonstrated that the POHW and OHIP-14 were strongly and negatively associated. The POHW correlated strongly and positively with general well-being, moderately with life satisfaction, and weakly with the perceived importance of regular dental checkups. It correlated moderately and negatively with perceived oral impairment, and marginally and

  4. Oral health of seafarers - a review.

    PubMed

    Sobotta, Bernhard A J; Reiber, Thomas; Nitschke, Ina

    2011-01-01

    Poor oral health of seafarers is known to cause pain and suffering for individuals and logistical complications for shipping companies during voyages. The aim of the study was to discuss the oral health of seafarers against the backdrop of available publications. A systematic review of all literature listed in PubMed up to August 2010 plus a hand search analysing origin of article, target group, data presented, and recommendations given. Excluded were papers on forensic dental identification and papers on mercy ships. Most articles deal with oral health issues in the military, are published in English, and originate from the US or Great Britain. Screening systems, organisation of dental services, and the provision of dental treatment ashore and aboard are dominant themes. Papers dealing with the merchant navy, fishing vessels, and cruise ships crews mostly present basic epidemiological data, focus on oral health at sea, and originate from industrialised countries. The growing numbers of cruise ship passengers is the subject of seven studies. Generally, dental care offered to navy crews appears more comprehensive than that offered to civilian crews. The research base needs to be expanded to cover all seafarers. Dental professional expertise should be sought in policy and guideline development relevant to oral health. A strategy comprising preventive, screening, and treatment service components should be developed and a certificate of dental health introduced. Funding strategies in a complex environment of transnational stakeholders for the improvement of oral-health services for seafarers are needed. Aspects of military oral health care systems could be an example for civilian operators.

  5. Food Avoidance and Food Modification Practices of Older Rural Adults: Association with Oral Health Status and Implications for Service Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quandt, Sara A.; Chen, Haiying; Bell, Ronny A.; Savoca, Margaret R.; Anderson, Andrea M.; Leng, Xiaoyan; Kohrman, Teresa; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Dietary variation is important for health maintenance and disease prevention among older adults. However, oral health deficits impair ability to bite and chew foods. This study examines the association between oral health and foods avoided or modified in a multiethnic rural population of older adults. It considers implications for…

  6. Food Avoidance and Food Modification Practices of Older Rural Adults: Association with Oral Health Status and Implications for Service Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quandt, Sara A.; Chen, Haiying; Bell, Ronny A.; Savoca, Margaret R.; Anderson, Andrea M.; Leng, Xiaoyan; Kohrman, Teresa; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Dietary variation is important for health maintenance and disease prevention among older adults. However, oral health deficits impair ability to bite and chew foods. This study examines the association between oral health and foods avoided or modified in a multiethnic rural population of older adults. It considers implications for…

  7. Oral health trends in the US.

    PubMed

    Danner, V

    2003-05-01

    In the US, dental hygienists are an integral part of the health care workforce. Dental hygienists are prevention specialists who understand that recognising the association between oral and total health can prevent disease. In the US, they also consider it as a part of their job to detect the presence of systemic illnesses. Although they cannot make a medical diagnosis, they can explain their findings to the patients and urge them to see a physician. This report explains the educational requirements for a dental hygienist, barriers and access-to-care issues, some oral health preventive methods, among other things.

  8. Substance abuse and oral health: an overview.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, A W

    2014-02-01

    Substance abuse is a worldwide phenomenon. It is on the increase in most countries and claims the lives of millions every year. Substance abuse may involve licit and illicit drugs, with licit substances claiming more lives than illicit drugs. Illicit substance abuse is on the increase, especially with new drugs emerging on the world market every year. These new drugs appear faster than scientific studies can keep pace in determining their possible detrimental influences on health. Many abused drugs do have oral health complications. For this reason, it is important for dentists to have a thorough knowledge of the oral environment to be able to detect any abnormalities, regardless of what the underlying cause may be. Due to the nature of illicit substance abuse, reliable information and science is hard to come by. This overview will focus on the direct consequences for oral health, whilst acknowledging that substance abuse may also have direct and indirect influences on general health.

  9. Knowledge and Attitude of Medical Nurses toward Oral Health and Oral Health Care of Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Suzana; Saddki, Norkhafizah; Yusoff, Azizah

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the knowledge and attitudes of medical nurses regarding oral health and oral health care of pregnant women. Methods This cross sectional study of 133 nurses in the district of Tumpat, Kelantan (Malaysia) used self-administered questionnaires. Results Most nurses knew that dental plaque is associated with periodontal disease (97.7%). However, most nurses erroneously believed that tooth decay (86.5%) and excessive sugar consumption (87.2%) led to periodontal disease. About half of the nurses knew about the relationship between periodontal disease of pregnant women and low birth weight (43.6%) and preterm birth (48.9%). Many nurses had the misconception that the developing foetus draws calcium from the mothers’ teeth (78.2%). Most nurses had good attitudes toward improving their oral health knowledge (97.0%) and agreed they should help to deliver oral health education to pregnant women (94.0%). Age, length of service as a nurse, and length of service in antenatal care had no effect on the scores for the nurses’ knowledge and attitude regarding oral health and oral health care of pregnant women. Conclusion Medical nurses had limited knowledge about oral health of pregnant women and had some misunderstandings about oral health, although they had good attitudes. Age, length of service as a nurse, and length service in antenatal care had no effect on the knowledge and attitude scores of the nurses. PMID:27540327

  10. Self-Esteem, Oral Health Behaviours, and Clinical Oral Health Status in Chinese Adults: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Luzy Siu-Hei; Chan, Joanne Chung-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This is an exploratory study to examine the relations among self-esteem, oral health behaviours and clinical oral health status in Chinese adults. In addition, gender differences in clinical oral health status and oral health behaviours were explored. Methods: Participants were 192 patients from a private dental clinic in Hong Kong…

  11. Self-Esteem, Oral Health Behaviours, and Clinical Oral Health Status in Chinese Adults: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Luzy Siu-Hei; Chan, Joanne Chung-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This is an exploratory study to examine the relations among self-esteem, oral health behaviours and clinical oral health status in Chinese adults. In addition, gender differences in clinical oral health status and oral health behaviours were explored. Methods: Participants were 192 patients from a private dental clinic in Hong Kong…

  12. Geography Matters: State-Level Variation in Children's Oral Health Care Access and Oral Health Status

    PubMed Central

    Fisher-Owens, Susan A.; Soobader, Mah-J; Gansky, Stuart A.; Isong, Inyang A.; Weintraub, Jane A.; Platt, Larry J.; Newacheck, Paul W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To ascertain differences across states in children's oral health care access and oral health status and the factors that contribute to those differences Study Design Observational study using cross-sectional surveys Methods Using the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, we examined state variation in parent's report of children's oral health care access (absence of a preventive dental visit) and oral health status. We assessed the unadjusted prevalences of these outcomes, then adjusted with child-, family-, and neighborhood-level variables using logistic regression; these results are presented directly and graphically. Using multilevel analysis, we then calculated the degree to which child-, family-, and community-level variables explained state variation. Finally, we quantified the influence of state-level variables on state variation. Results Unadjusted rates of no preventive dental care ranged 9.0-26.8% (mean 17.5%), with little impact of adjusting (10.3-26.7%). Almost 9% of population had fair/poor oral health; unadjusted range 4.1-14.5%. Adjusting analyses affected fair/poor oral health more than access (5.7-10.7%). Child, family and community factors explained ~¼ of the state variation in no preventive visit and ~½ of fair/poor oral health. State-level factors further contributed to explaining up to a third of residual state variation. Conclusion Geography matters: where a child lives has a large impact on his or her access to oral health care and oral health status, even after adjusting for child, family, community, and state variables. As state-level variation persists, other factors and richer data are needed to clarify the variation and drive changes for more egalitarian and overall improved oral health. PMID:26995567

  13. Oral health and the symptoms of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz, Ainara; Zumárraga, Mercedes; Díez-Altuna, Izaskun; Uriarte, Jose J; Moro, Juan; Pérez-Ansorena, Maria A

    2011-06-30

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the oral health of a group of schizophrenic outpatients and a control group without psychiatric illness. The study also aimed to assess the influence of positive and negative symptomatology on oral health among outpatients with schizophrenia. The DMF-T Index (sum of decayed, missing and filled teeth) and the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN) were assessed in both groups. We evaluated the psychopathological state of the patient group using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). The schizophrenic patients had higher scores than the control group with respect to decayed teeth (4.39 vs. 0.72), missing teeth (5.66 vs. 1.50), the DMF-T index (13.51 vs. 7.8) and CPITN (2.32 vs. 1.04); and lower scores for filled teeth (3.53 vs. 5.54). The PANSS negative subscale score correlated positively with the oral health variables studied, whereas the PANSS positive subscale score correlated negatively and exclusively with the number of missing teeth. Age and smoking status affected oral health in both groups, but even when the influence of these factors was considered, the oral health of the patients was poorer than that of the control group.

  14. Personal responsibility in oral health: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Albertsen, Andreas

    2012-11-30

    Personal responsibility is a powerful idea supported by many values central to West European thought. On the conceptual level personal responsibility is a complex notion. It is important to separate the concept of being responsible for a given state of affairs from the concept of holding people responsible by introducing measures that decrease their share of available resources. Introducing personal responsibility in oral health also has limitations of a more practical nature. Knowledge, social status and other diseases affect the degree to which people can be said to be responsible for their poor oral health. These factors affect people's oral health and their ability to take care of it. Both the conceptual and practical issues at stake are not reasons to abandon the idea of personal responsibility in oral health, but they do affect what the notion means and when it is reasonable to hold people responsible. They also commit people who support the idea of personal responsibility in oral health to supporting the idea of societal responsibility for mitigating the effects of factors that diminish people's responsibility and increase the available information and knowledge in the population.

  15. Prebiotics and Probiotics and Oral Health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurman, J. H.

    The first part of this chapter describes the unique characteristics of the mouth with special emphasis on the oral microbiota. Next, the highly prevalent dental diseases are briefly described together with more rare but still important diseases and symptoms of the mouth. Prevention and treatment of oral and dental diseases are also discussed focusing on aspects considered important with respect to the potential application of prebiotics and probiotics. The second part of the chapter then concentrates on research data on prebiotics and probiotics in the oral health perspective, ending up with conclusions and visions for future research.

  16. The oral metagenome in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Belda-Ferre, Pedro; Alcaraz, Luis David; Cabrera-Rubio, Raúl; Romero, Héctor; Simón-Soro, Aurea; Pignatelli, Miguel; Mira, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The oral cavity of humans is inhabited by hundreds of bacterial species and some of them have a key role in the development of oral diseases, mainly dental caries and periodontitis. We describe for the first time the metagenome of the human oral cavity under health and diseased conditions, with a focus on supragingival dental plaque and cavities. Direct pyrosequencing of eight samples with different oral-health status produced 1 Gbp of sequence without the biases imposed by PCR or cloning. These data show that cavities are not dominated by Streptococcus mutans (the species originally identified as the ethiological agent of dental caries) but are in fact a complex community formed by tens of bacterial species, in agreement with the view that caries is a polymicrobial disease. The analysis of the reads indicated that the oral cavity is functionally a different environment from the gut, with many functional categories enriched in one of the two environments and depleted in the other. Individuals who had never suffered from dental caries showed an over-representation of several functional categories, like genes for antimicrobial peptides and quorum sensing. In addition, they did not have mutans streptococci but displayed high recruitment of other species. Several isolates belonging to these dominant bacteria in healthy individuals were cultured and shown to inhibit the growth of cariogenic bacteria, suggesting the use of these commensal bacterial strains as probiotics to promote oral health and prevent dental caries. PMID:21716308

  17. An exploratory qualitative study of Otago adolescents' views of oral health and oral health care.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Ruth P; Thomson, W Murray; Schafer, Cyril T; Loose, Moragh A T H

    2004-09-01

    To investigate Otago adolescents' views of oral health and oral health care, in order to increase understanding of the influences on their use or non-use of free care. The study employed a qualitative approach, using focus groups and grounded theory analysis. Participants ranged in age from 13 to 18, and included both genders and a variety of educational attainments, ethnicities and family incomes. Focus groups were conducted in schools, training centres, a place of employment, a CYF (Child, Youth and Family) Home, and a University Hall of Residence. While aware of the normative pressure to attend for free dental care and engage in oral health care, Otago adolescents consider doing so to be "just so gay". They exhibit strongly held preconceptions about the expense of dentistry and the respective competence of dentists and dental therapists. The dental surgery environment was viewed as a major disincentive. Adolescent oral health beliefs centred on two models: the medicalised, pragmatic view of oral health (which valued the function of teeth); and the cosmetic view of oral health (which valued the aesthetics of teeth); or a combination of these two models. In both models, media advertising for oral health care products was a significant source of oral health information. The preferred oral health behaviour associated with the medicalised model was frequent use of chewing gum and rapid toothbrushing, and, for the cosmetic model frequent use of chewing gum and breath fresheners. These findings support the international literature on the use/non-use of dental services even when the financial barriers to seeking such services has been removed. New Zealand dental care has developed without reference to the changing norms of youth culture, and the conventional dental practice setting is not viewed by adolescents as being inviting or appropriate. Increasing the uptake of free oral health care by that group will require some innovative approaches.

  18. Probiotics for oral health: myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Bonifait, Laetitia; Chandad, Fatiha; Grenier, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    For some decades now, bacteria known as probiotics have been added to various foods because of their beneficial effects for human health. The mechanism of action of probiotics is related to their ability to compete with pathogenic microorganisms for adhesion sites, to antagonize these pathogens or to modulate the host"s immune response. The potential application of probiotics for oral health has recently attracted the attention of several teams of researchers. Although only a few clinical studies have been conducted so far, the results to date suggest that probiotics could be useful in preventing and treating oral infections, including dental caries, periodontal disease and halitosis. This article summarizes the currently available data on the potential benefits of probiotics for oral health.

  19. Oral health status of drug addicts in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Pilinová, A; Krutina, M; Salandová, M; Pilin, A

    2003-12-01

    Over the last decade, illicit drug use has become a very pronounced problem in the Czech Republic. Some branches of medicine such as psychiatry, internal medicine and neurology have tried to confront the situation by joint treatment of addicted patients. Dentistry has so far remained outside this multi-disciplinary care despite the fact that the status of dental and other tissues in the oral cavity influences general health and vice versa. The aim of the survey on the oral health of drug addicts that was conducted in the Czech Republic from 2000 to 2002 was to collect data to help dental professionals contribute to the complex care of drug addicts. The number of addicted persons examined was 400 and the subgroup of drug addicts consisted of 217 subjects (mean age 23.87 yrs, SD 6.70), all being treated in long term hospitals. Among other oral health features observed, the DMFT and CPITN indices are presented in this paper. The results show severe dental and periodontal tissue destruction in young addicts and two case reports are included. The above survey indicates that dental treatment should become a part of standard care for addicted patients in long-term hospitals. Furthermore, if severe oral tissue impairment in young persons whether in dental practice or during autopsy is encountered a drug addiction should be suspected. If so, the treatment of the person or examination of the dead body should accordingly be adjusted.

  20. Oral health in the agenda of priorities in public health

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, José Leopoldo Ferreira; Toporcov, Tatiana Natasha; Bastos, João Luiz; Frazão, Paulo; Narvai, Paulo Capel; Peres, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study describes the scientific production on oral health diffused in Revista de Saúde Pública, in the 50 years of its publication. A narrative review study was carried out using PubMed, as it is the search database that indexes all issues of the journal. From 1967 to 2015, 162 manuscripts specifically focused on oral health themes were published. This theme was present in all volumes of the journal, with increasing participation over the years. Dental caries was the most studied theme, constantly present in the journal since its first issue. Periodontal disease, fluorosis, malocclusions, and other themes emerged even before the decline of dental caries indicators. Oral health policy is the most recurring theme in the last two decades. Revista de Saúde Pública has been an important vehicle for dissemination, communication, and reflection on oral health, contributing in a relevant way to the technical-scientific interaction between professionals in this field. PMID:27598787

  1. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and oral health].

    PubMed

    Kobus, Agnieszka; Kierklo, Anna; Sielicka, Danuta; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2016-05-04

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory disease of connective tissue in children. It is characterized by progressive joint destruction which causes preserved changes in the musculoskeletal system. The literature describes fully clinical symptoms and radiological images in different subtypes of JIA. However, there is still a limited number of studies reporting on the medical condition of the oral cavity of ill children. JIA can affect hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity by: the general condition of the child's health, arthritis of the upper limbs, as the result of the pharmacotherapy, changes in secretion and composition of saliva, inflammation of the temporomandibular joint and facial deformity. The study summarizes the available literature on the condition of the teeth and periodontal and oral hygiene in the course of JIA. The presence of diverse factors that modify the oral cavity, such as facial growth, functioning of salivary glands, or the supervision and care provided by adults, prevents clear identification if JIA leads to severe dental caries and periodontal disease. Despite conflicting results in studies concerning the clinical oral status, individuals with JIA require special attention regarding disease prevention and maintenance of oral health.

  2. Health Literacy: A Pathway to Better Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Henrietta L.; Dodd, Virginia J.; Muller, Keith E.; Marks, John G.; Riley, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether health literacy was associated with self-rated oral health status and whether the relationship was mediated by patient–dentist communication and dental care patterns. Methods. We tested a path model with data collected from 2 waves of telephone surveys (baseline, 2009–2010; follow-up, 2011) of individuals residing in 36 rural census tracts in northern Florida (final sample size n = 1799). Results. Higher levels of health literacy were associated with better self-rated oral health status (B = 0.091; P < .001). In addition, higher levels of health literacy were associated with better patient–dentist communication, which in turn corresponded with patterns of regular dental care and better self-rated oral health (B = 0.003; P = .01). Conclusions. Our study showed that, beyond the often-reported effects of gender, race, education, financial status, and access to dental care, it is also important to consider the influence of health literacy and quality of patient–dentist communication on oral health status. Improved patient–dentist communication is needed as an initial step in improving the population’s oral health. PMID:24832423

  3. [Oral health perception and oral habits in children and teenagers].

    PubMed

    Artázcoz, J; Martinicorena, F J Cortés; Gallardo, E Rosel; Rodríguez, P González; Bravo, M

    2010-01-01

    To determine the self-perception of oral health levels and the need for treatment, hygienic habits and frequency of visits to the dentist amongst schoolchildren in Navarre. The population of the study was aged 6, 12 and 14 years. The sample was obtained from schools teaching 1st and 6th year in Primary Education and 2nd year in Compulsory Secondary Education. The data was gathered through self-answering questionnaires. Ninety-two percent of 6 and 12 year olds, and 82.9% of 14 year olds are satisfied with their oral health. Thirteen point one percent of 12 year olds and 19.3% of 14 year olds are dissatisfied, above all with misaligned teeth. Approximately one-third think they need some treatment, above all fillings at age 6 and orthodontics at 12 and 14 years. Nearly two-thirds say they brush their teeth more than once a day and between 80 and 90% say they have visited the dentist in the last year. More than 75% of those responsible for the schoolchildren aged 6 and 12 years make a positive evaluation of the contributions of the child dental care program (PADI) and more than 95% are satisfied with the care given by PADI dentists to their children. Sex, average residence and socioeconomic level barely influence the perception of health, frequency of brushing teeth or need for treatment. The study reveals that the subjective perception of oral health is good and that one-third of those surveyed think they need some type of treatment. It is very positive that they majority say that they have been to the dentist in the last year and that they brush their teeth more than once a day, which is an improvement on the results of previous studies.

  4. Oral health: locus of control, health behavior, self-rated oral health and socio-demographic factors in Istanbul adults.

    PubMed

    Peker, Kadriye; Bermek, Gulcin

    2011-01-01

    To determine oral health control beliefs of Istanbul adults using the Multidimensional Oral Health Locus of Control Scale (MOHLCS) after confirming its factorial validity and to examine the relationships between these beliefs, self-rated oral health, oral health behaviors and socio-demographic factors. The MOHLCS was administered to a sample of 1200 subjects aged ≥18 years in Istanbul chosen using a quota-sampling method (response 88%). The relationship between the MOHLCS and oral health behaviors, self-rated oral health and socio-demographic factors was assessed after confirming the factorial validity of the MOHLCS. The MOHLCS demonstrated satisfactory internal reliability. Factor analysis results showed a new four-factor solution, namely Internal, Dentist, Chance, and Socialization agents. Multivariate analysis showed that female gender, younger age, higher socioeconomic status, more frequent daily toothbrushing, and regular dental check-ups were associated with higher Internal beliefs, while older age, lower educational level, lower socioeconomic status, low toothbrushing frequency, and symptom-orientated dental attendance were associated with higher Chance beliefs. Being unmarried and low toothbrushing frequency were associated with lower Dentist beliefs. Males and older subjects had lower Socialization agents beliefs. Internal, Dentist and Chance beliefs were significantly associated with self-rated oral health. Compared with the original factor structure, the new factor structure had better goodness of fit for this sample. Self-rated oral health, socio-demographic factors, and oral health behaviors were significantly associated with oral health control beliefs. These beliefs may be useful for planning oral health promotion programs and for formulating advice given by oral health professionals about their patients' oral health behaviors.

  5. [Oral health of users of psychoactive substances].

    PubMed

    Cohen, Fabien

    2016-12-01

    This article reminds you that, whatever the psychoactive substance in question, it is not one that has repercussions on the oral health of its user. This affects both the tooth, the periodontal and oral mucosa. Drug addicts, especially those engaged in polydrug use, represent the population at the largest risk for oral cancer. Of all the factors, smoking is by far the largest risk. The alcohol has a synergistic effect with the tobacco, so that the combined effect is more than multiplied. Preventing risks of these products is possible through good oral hygiene and lifestyle, preventive care and followed by a regular dentist. Regaining self-esteem, however, should be one of the key dimensions of social reappropriation through his body.

  6. Oral health: something to smile about!

    PubMed

    Munro, Cindy L

    2014-07-01

    Oral health is integrally linked to overall well-being. This article describes a research program focused on the contribution of poor oral health to systemic illness. Initial investigations examined factors related to streptococcal virulence that were important in dental caries and endocarditis and led to development of immunization strategies in animal models to reduce risk of endocarditis. Clinical investigations related to critically ill adults began with descriptive and observational studies that established the importance of dental plaque in development of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and examined existing nursing practices in oral care. Subsequent intervention studies sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to test oral care protocols in critically ill adults have built on that foundation. The group's first NIH-funded randomized clinical trial tested the effects of toothbrushing and use of chlorhexidine in reducing risk of VAP in critically ill adults and showed that VAP was reduced by topical application of chlorhexidine initiated after intubation, although toothbrushing did not reduce VAP. The study had a rapid and dramatic effect on clinical practice. Results of the study were published in September 2009 in the American Journal of Critical Care, and in May 2010, the Institute for Health-care Improvement updated the recommendations for the care of patients receiving mechanical ventilation (the ventilator bundle) to include daily oral care with chlorhexidine, referencing the results of that study as evidence for the change. Chlorhexidine is now the standard of care for adults receiving mechanical ventilation. Because the effects of chlorhexidine after intubation were so beneficial, a second recently completed NIH-funded randomized clinical trial investigated the impact of chlorhexidine applied before intubation compared with after intubation. Currently a large randomized clinical trial is being launched to determine the optimal

  7. Improving oral health: current considerations.

    PubMed

    Ciancio, S

    2003-01-01

    The high incidence of periodontal disease among adults in the Western world indicates that in most cases, routine dental care could be considerably improved. The progressive effect of the disease suggests that improvements in oral cleanliness are mandatory if large numbers of adults are to retain their teeth into old age. Data show that periodontal disease can be minimized through effective plaque control, and that a combination of brushing, interdental cleaning, and chemotherapeutic agents (e.g. mouthwash) is beneficial to patients with plaque control problems. The vast majority of adults do not follow an adequate home-care routine. Average brushing times are low, and only a minority of patients regularly floss. In addition, in those patients who do regularly brush and floss, a deterioration of plaque control occurs over time, suggesting that compliance is a major issue. The principal challenge for dental professionals is to identify how best to elicit an improvement.

  8. Global oral health inequalities: task group--implementation and delivery of oral health strategies.

    PubMed

    Sheiham, A; Alexander, D; Cohen, L; Marinho, V; Moysés, S; Petersen, P E; Spencer, J; Watt, R G; Weyant, R

    2011-05-01

    This paper reviews the shortcomings of present approaches to reduce oral diseases and inequalities, details the importance of social determinants, and links that to research needs and policies on implementation of strategies to reduce oral health inequalities. Inequalities in health are not narrowing. Attention is therefore being directed at determinants of major health conditions and the extent to which those common determinants vary within, between, and among groups, because if inequalities in health vary across groups, then so must underlying causes. Tackling inequalities in health requires strategies tailored to determinants and needs of each group along the social gradient. Approaches focusing mainly on downstream lifestyle and behavioral factors have limited success in reducing health inequalities. They fail to address social determinants, for changing people's behaviors requires changing their environment. There is a dearth of oral health research on social determinants that cause health-compromising behaviors and on risk factors common to some chronic diseases. The gap between what is known and implemented by other health disciplines and the dental fraternity needs addressing. To re-orient oral health research, practice, and policy toward a 'social determinants' model, a closer collaboration between and integration of dental and general health research is needed. Here, we suggest a research agenda that should lead to reductions in global inequalities in oral health.

  9. Could Ethical Tensions in Oral Healthcare Management Revealed by Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Caregivers Explain Unmet Oral Health Needs? Participatory Research with Focus Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaizot, Alessandra; Hamel, Olivier; Folliguet, Marysette; Herve, Christian; Meningaud, Jean-Paul; Trentesaux, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cognitively impaired patients often present poor oral health status that may be explained by ethical tensions in oral healthcare management. This participatory study explored such tensions among adults with intellectual disabilities and with caregivers. The second objective was to specify, with caregivers, the points that should be…

  10. Could Ethical Tensions in Oral Healthcare Management Revealed by Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Caregivers Explain Unmet Oral Health Needs? Participatory Research with Focus Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaizot, Alessandra; Hamel, Olivier; Folliguet, Marysette; Herve, Christian; Meningaud, Jean-Paul; Trentesaux, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cognitively impaired patients often present poor oral health status that may be explained by ethical tensions in oral healthcare management. This participatory study explored such tensions among adults with intellectual disabilities and with caregivers. The second objective was to specify, with caregivers, the points that should be…

  11. The Impact of Oral Health on Taste Ability in Acutely Hospitalized Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Solemdal, Kirsten; Sandvik, Leiv; Willumsen, Tiril; Mowe, Morten; Hummel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate to what extent various oral health variables are associated with taste ability in acutely hospitalized elderly. Background Impaired taste may contribute to weight loss in elderly. Many frail elderly have poor oral health characterized by caries, poor oral hygiene, and dry mouth. However, the possible influence of such factors on taste ability in acutely hospitalized elderly has not been investigated. Materials and Methods The study was cross-sectional. A total of 174 (55 men) acutely hospitalized elderly, coming from their own homes and with adequate cognitive function, were included. Dental status, decayed teeth, oral bacteria, oral hygiene, dry mouth and tongue changes were recorded. Growth of oral bacteria was assessed with CRT® Bacteria Kit. Taste ability was evaluated with 16 taste strips impregnated with sweet, sour, salty and bitter taste solutions in 4 concentrations each. Correct identification was given score 1, and maximum total taste score was 16. Results Mean age was 84 yrs. (range 70–103 yrs.). Total taste score was significantly and markedly reduced in patients with decayed teeth, poor oral hygiene, high growth of oral bacteria and dry mouth. Sweet and salty taste were particularly impaired in patients with dry mouth. Sour taste was impaired in patients with high growth of oral bacteria. Conclusion This study shows that taste ability was reduced in acutely hospitalized elderly with caries activity, high growth of oral bacteria, poor oral hygiene, and dry mouth. Our findings indicate that good oral health is important for adequate gustatory function. Maintaining proper oral hygiene in hospitalized elderly should therefore get high priority among hospital staff. PMID:22570725

  12. Women's oral health: the evolving science.

    PubMed

    Sinkford, Jeanne C; Valachovic, Richard W; Harrison, Sonja G

    2008-02-01

    The evidence base for women's oral health is emerging from legislative action, clinical research, and survey documentation. The Women's Health in the Dental School Curriculum study (1999) followed a similar study (1996) of medical school curricula. Both of these major efforts resulted from statutory mandates in the National Institutes of Health Revitalization Act of 1993 (updated October 2000). A major study of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) National Academy of Sciences in 2001 concluded that "the study of sex differences is evolving into a mature science." This IOM study documented the scientific basis for gender-related policy and research and challenged the dental research enterprise to conduct collaborative, cross-disciplinary research on gender-related issues in oral health, disease, and disparities. This report chronicles some of the factors that have and continue to influence concepts of women's oral health in dental education, research, and practice. Gender issues related to women's health are no longer restricted to reproductive issues but are being considered across the life span and include psychosocial factors that impact women's health and treatment outcomes.

  13. Probiotics and oral health: an update.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, K; Kuttappa, M A; Prasana, K R

    2014-02-01

    Probiotics are micro-organisms, principally bacteria, which, when ingested, confer health benefits beyond basic nutrition. Probiotics have been extensively studied for their health promoting effects. The main feld of research has been focussed on the gastro-intestinal tract. However, in the past few years probiotics have also been investigated from an oral health perspective and their use has shown promising results with respect to control of chronic conditions, such as dental caries, periodontitis, halitosis and candidial infections. Despite the immense potential of probiotics, hardly any randomised, controlled trials have been conducted on their action and application and studies on their effects on oral health are still in early stages. Hence, more research is needed before any evidence-based conclusions can be drawn. This paper considers some recent literature and insights on which further investigations could be based.

  14. Oral health behavior of parents as a predictor of oral health status of their children.

    PubMed

    Bozorgmehr, Elham; Hajizamani, Abolghasem; Malek Mohammadi, Tayebeh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. It is widely acknowledged that the behavior of parents affects their children's health. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between oral health behavior of parents and oral health status and behavior of their children in a sample of preschool children in Iran. Method and Material. A random sample of over-five-year-old preschool children and their parents were enrolled in the study. Selection of schools was by clustering method. Parents were asked to fill a piloted questionnaire which included demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, oral health behaviors of children and their parents. Oral health status of children was examined. The parent and their children oral health relationship were tested using regression and correlation analysis. Results. About 222 parents and children participated in the study. There was a significant relationship between history of having dental problems in parents and dmft index in their children (P = 0.01). There was a significant relationship between parental frequency of tooth brushing and child frequency of tooth brushing (P = 0.05); however, there was no significant relationship between parental frequency of dental visits and those of their children (P = 0.1). Conclusion. The study concluded that some important health behaviors in parents, such as tooth brushing habits are important determinants of these behaviors in their young children. So promoting parent knowledge and attitude could affect their children oral health behavior and status.

  15. Domestic Violence and its Effect on Oral Health Behaviour and Oral Health Status

    PubMed Central

    P, Basavaraj; Singla, Ashish; Kote, Sunder; Singh, Shilpi; Jain, Swati; Singh, Khushboo; Vashishtha, Vaibhav

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Violence against women is one of the major public health and human rights problem in the world today. Hence, the present study was conducted with the aim to assess the effect of domestic violence on oral health behavior and oral health status of females attending community outreach programmes in and around Modinagar. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted through the community outreach programmes organized in Modinagar. A structured questionnaire was used to illicit information regarding socio demographic characteristics, oral health behavior and domestic violence. The dental health examination was done to record dental health status, intraoral and extraoral soft tissue injury, tooth fracture and tooth avulsion due to the injury. Results: Out of the total 304 women, 204(67.1%) reported positive domestic violence. Psychological violence was found to be severe whereas sexual violence was found to be mild in most of the cases. Significant difference was found between oral hygiene aids used , frequency of tooth brushing, periodontal status, missing teeth, intraoral soft tissue injuries and fractures between both the groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: The present study confirmed that domestic violence had significant influence on oral health behavior and oral health status of women. Thus, the dental professionals also should make an attempt to help victims gain access to support and referral services and to provide adequate treatment to them so as to make a positive difference in their lives. PMID:25584297

  16. Oral health of the methamphetamine abuser.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Mark; Goodchild, Jason H

    2006-11-01

    The pharmacology of methamphetamine is reviewed, and the effects of methamphetamine use on oral health are described. Methamphetamine is a highly addictive amphetamine analogue, initially synthesized in 1919. Illicit methamphetamine use leads to devastating effects on health, particularly the dentition. Illegal production of methamphetamine has skyrocketed in recent years, as have the number of users. The chief complaint of methamphetamine users is xerostomia. Without the protective effects of saliva, caries development in these patients is rampant. The typical pattern of decay involves the facial and cervical areas of both the maxillary and mandibular teeth, with eventual progression to frank coronal involvement. The acidic substances used to manufacture this drug have also been implicated as a cause of tooth decay and wear in users, as has bruxism as a result of drug-induced hyperactivity. When possible, these patients should be referred to a dentist to improve their oral health status and minimize the potential for adverse cardiovascular sequelae. Other preventive measures for methamphetamine users include stimulating saliva flow and increasing fluoride supplementation. Pharmacists should also counsel users to avoid carbohydrate-rich soft drinks in favor of water. Oral moisturizers may also be effective. Methamphetamine use causes xerostomia secondary to sympathetic central nervous system activation, rampant caries caused by high-sugar intake in the absence of protective saliva, and bruxism as a result of hyperactivity. Practitioners should know how to recognize the signs of and manage the oral health of patients with a history of methamphetamine use.

  17. Oral health promotion in Gauteng: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Molete, Mpho Primrose; Daly, Blanaid; Hlungwani, Tintswalo Mercy

    2013-03-01

    One of the aims of the South African Oral Health Promotion Framework is to integrate oral health promotion activities into general health promotion using the Common Risk Factor Approach (CRFA). Though policies have directed that oral health should be integrated into general health promotion in South Africa, little is known about the implementation of the CRFA in daily oral health promotion practice. This study aimed to assess how health promoters in Gauteng integrate oral health into their general health promotion activities. The objectives were (i) to describe how health promoters undertake health promotion in Gauteng; (ii) to describe how health promoters incorporate oral health promotion into health promotion activities; and (iii) to describe the opportunities and challenges for health promoters in applying the CRFA. This was a qualitative study and data were collected using semi-structured interviews. A purposive sample of 10 formally trained health promoters agreed to be interviewed. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Participants' work was centred mostly on healthy lifestyle campaigns and there was little integration of oral health into health promotion activities. While most health promoters had an understanding of the CRFA, this understanding was not common amongst other levels of management. Oral health literacy was low and health promoters perceived few opportunities for using a CRFA when weighed against other priorities such as poverty and HIV/AIDS. Currently there is little evidence of integration of oral health into general health promotion activities.

  18. Oral Health Status in Haemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Swapna, Lingam Amara; Reddy, Reddy Sudhakara; Ramesh, Tatapudi; Reddy, Reddy Lavanya; Vijayalaxmi, Nimma; Karmakar, Partha; Pradeep, Koppolu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the oral and dental manifestations in non- diabetic and diabetic uraemic patients who were undergoing haemodialysis and to estimate and compare the salivary pH in these two groups. Material and Methods: Ninety Seven uraemic patients who were undergoing maintenance haemodialysis were included in the study. Subjective and objective findings were evaluated and recorded in a specially designed proforma. Predialytic unstimulated whole salivary pH was recorded by using pH-measuring strips. Dental health assessment consisted of DMFT and CPITN indices. Results: A subjective oral manifestation of dysguesia was found to be more significant in non-diabetic patients (p<0.008). Statistically, a high significance was observed with mucosal petechiae in 31.9% patients of diabetic group .The overall DMFT score was significantly higher in diabetic group. A moderate significance was found with a CPI score of 5 (p<0.015). The pH of saliva was significantly higher among diabetic patients. Conclusion: The diabetic subjects who were on haemodialysis were at a high risk for developing periodontal disease and they exhibited a potential threat for dental decay and xerostomia. A lower salivary pH and a poor glycaemic control may affect their oral health. Further research is required to clarify the combined influence of diabetic nephropathy on oral health. PMID:24179940

  19. Adverse Oral Health and Cognitive Decline: The Health, Aging and Body Composition Study

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Robert; Weyant, Robert J.; Garcia, Melissa E.; Harris, Tamara; Launer, Lenore J.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Yaffe, Kristine; Newman, Anne B.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objectives Periodontal disease has been associated with poorer cross-sectional cognitive function and is correlated with adverse vascular outcomes, but has received little prospective investigation in relation to cognitive decline. Design Analysis of a prospective cohort study. Setting The Health, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study Participants and measurements We examined the prospective association between a range of oral health parameters and cognitive function using data on 1053 participants who were administered the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination (3MS) at year 1 (baseline) and year 3, and had participated in a comprehensive periodontal examination at year 2. We investigated 3MS decline from year 3 to 5 in 947 (89.9%) participants. Covariates included age, sex, education, race, cardiovascular disease/risk and depressive symptoms. Results Most indicators of adverse oral health at year 2 were associated with cognitive impairment based on averaged 3MS scores <80 for years 1 and 3, but these associations were substantially confounded by education and race. Higher gingival index, a measure of gingival inflammation, at year 2 remained independently associated with this definition of cognitive impairment and, in fully adjusted analyses, was also an independent predictor of a 5+ point cognitive decline from years 3 to 5. Conclusion Periodontitis may be a risk factor for cognitive decline. Gingivitis is reversible and periodontitis to some degree is preventable and controllable when manifest. Therefore, further research is needed to clarify potential underlying mechanisms and oral health interventions that potentially might ameliorate cognitive decline. PMID:23405916

  20. Views on oral health care strategies.

    PubMed

    Beiruti, N

    2005-01-01

    The Oral Health Programme (ORH) is a health promotion and disease prevention initiative. ORH should be integrated into primary health care programmes by building policies suited to each country and based on the common risk factor approach. Dental caries and periodontal diseases are highly prevalent in recommended. Although cost-effective, water and salt fluoridation are often unavailable and topical fluorides are recommended. Governments and industry must ensure availability of affordable fluoride toothpaste. Fluoride toothpaste should also be used to control periodontal diseases. The atraumatic restorative treatment approach should be used to treat dental caries. The Basic Package of Oral Care (BPOC) for deprived communities outlines this approach in detail. Continuous training and research are recommended for personnel to keep pace with changes in methods of prevention and treatment procedures.

  1. Women's oral health: growing evidence for enhancing perspectives.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Leslie R; Kaste, Linda M; Briggs, Charlotte; DiPietro, Luisa A; Erwin, Katherine; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Gordon, Sara; Heaton, Brenda; Henshaw, Michelle M; Joskow, Renée; Reisine, Susan T; Sinkford, Jeanne C

    2013-04-01

    Women's health, including oral health, is an evolving science with foundation knowledge from many disciplines. Key milestones, particularly in the last decade, provide a roadmap towards the necessary inclusion of gender into dental practice. Such focus is especially important for the evolving role of oral health care providers as primary health care providers. Continued progress of the vibrant incorporation of evidence-based women's oral health into the standard practice of oral health care is encouraged. This expanded preface provides an introduction to this DCNA issue, a brief history and timeline of major women's oral health events, and resources for further consideration.

  2. Impact of rare diseases in oral health

    PubMed Central

    Molina-García, Ana; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Posada-de la Paz, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Rare diseases (RD) are those that present a lower prevalence than 5 cases per 10.000 population. The main objective of this review was to study the effect on oral health in rare diseases, while the secondary objective of the study is theme upgrade. Material and Methods Comparative observational case-control studies were analysed and a systematic review was conducted in PubMed. Each rare disease listed on the statistical data record of the Health Portal of the Ministry of Equality, Health and Social Policies Board of Andalusia was associated with “oral health”. The variables studied included dental, oral mucosa and occlusion alterations, oral pathologies (caries, periodontal disease) and other alterations (mouth breathing, parafunctional habits, etc). A bias analysis of the variable caries was conducted. Results Six RD were selected through our inclusion and exclusion criteria (hypogammaglobulinemia, Rett syndrome, Marfan syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, cystic fibrosis and Cri du chat syndrome) in a total of 8 publications, of which four trials were classified as high risk of bias and one of them as medium risk. There were not trials with low risk of bias. Conclusions The main statistically significant differences found by Syndrome compared to a control group were in Hypogammaglobulinemia with a greater tendency to enamel hypoplasia and dry mouth. The Rett syndrome had, as well, a greater tendency to an anterior open bite, ogival palate, bruxism, mouth breathing and tongue thrusting. Prader-Willi syndrome had a tendency of dental erosion, and Cri du chat syndrome showed a higher association to Tannerella forsythia. Key words:Rare diseases, oral health. PMID:27475682

  3. Disparities in mental health among adolescents with and without impairments.

    PubMed

    Lindén-Boström, Margareta; Persson, Carina

    2015-11-01

    To analyse whether there are differences in mental health among adolescents with and without various kinds of impairments, taking into account the number of impairments and gender. Data from the study Life & Health - Young People conducted in a Swedish county in 2011 was used. The survey included all students in grades 7 (13-14 years) and 9 (15-16 years) in compulsory school and grade 2 (17-18 years) in upper secondary school; there were 7793 respondents (81.0%). The students answered a questionnaire anonymously during school hours. Various measures of mental health were assessed in the groups: hard of hearing, visual impairment, motor impairment, difficulties in reading/writing/dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactive disorder/attention deficit disorder, other impairment, no impairment. Of the studied impairments, difficulties in reading/writing/dyslexia are the most common (6.3%), followed by hard of hearing (5.4%). To have at least one impairment is more common among boys (18.2%) than girls (15.4%). In the impairment group, 21.5% have multiple impairments. Adolescents with impairments have worse mental health than those without, and those with multiple impairments have particularly higher odds ratio to have worse mental health. There are also differences in mental health between number and various kinds of impairments and between girls and boys. Adolescents with impairments, particularly girls and those with multiple impairments, have considerably worse mental health than others. These inequalities in health are an immense challenge, not only for those directly involved with the impaired: they affect everyone involved with the goal health equity for the whole population. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  4. National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... of fluoride varnish, including materials and organizations. Promoting Oral Health During Pregnancy The latest update on programs, policy, ... the release of the national consensus statement on oral health care during pregnancy . Fluoride Vanish Resource Highlights A ...

  5. Development of Oral Reading Fluency in Children with Speech or Language Impairments: A Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puranik, Cynthia S.; Petscher, Yaacov; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Catts, Hugh W.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    This longitudinal study used piece-wise growth curve analyses to examine growth patterns in oral reading fluency for 1,991 students with speech impairments (SI) or language impairments (LI) from first through third grade. The main finding of this study was that a diagnosis of SI or LI can have a detrimental and persistent effect on early reading…

  6. The global burden of oral diseases and risks to oral health.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Bourgeois, Denis; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Estupinan-Day, Saskia; Ndiaye, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    This paper outlines the burden of oral diseases worldwide and describes the influence of major sociobehavioural risk factors in oral health. Despite great improvements in the oral health of populations in several countries, global problems still persist. The burden of oral disease is particularly high for the disadvantaged and poor population groups in both developing and developed countries. Oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease, tooth loss, oral mucosal lesions and oropharyngeal cancers, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS)-related oral disease and orodental trauma are major public health problems worldwide and poor oral health has a profound effect on general health and quality of life. The diversity in oral disease patterns and development trends across countries and regions reflects distinct risk profiles and the establishment of preventive oral health care programmes. The important role of sociobehavioural and environmental factors in oral health and disease has been shown in a large number of socioepidemiological surveys. In addition to poor living conditions, the major risk factors relate to unhealthy lifestyles (i.e. poor diet, nutrition and oral hygiene and use of tobacco and alcohol), and limited availability and accessibility of oral health services. Several oral diseases are linked to noncommunicable chronic diseases primarily because of common risk factors. Moreover, general diseases often have oral manifestations (e.g. diabetes or HIV/AIDS). Worldwide strengthening of public health programmes through the implementation of effective measures for the prevention of oral disease and promotion of oral health is urgently needed. The challenges of improving oral health are particularly great in developing countries. PMID:16211157

  7. Commonly used drugs impair oral tolerance in mice.

    PubMed

    Pecquet, Sophie; Prioult, Guénolée; Campbell, John; German, Bruce; Turini, Marco

    2004-12-01

    Ibuprofen and antibiotics are commonly prescribed during early childhood. When given to mice at the time at which oral tolerance is induced, both treatments affect either the induction or the maintenance of oral tolerance. These results suggest that the coadministration of these and similarly acting drugs should be considered cautiously for infants at risk of allergy.

  8. The Group Oral Health Movement in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Soares, Catharina Leite Matos; Paim, Jairnilson Silva; Chaves, Sonia Cristina de Lima; Rossi, Thais Regis Aranha; Barros, Sandra Garrido; Cruz, Denise Nogueira

    2017-06-01

    Group Oral Health (GOH) is a specific phenomenon in time, separate from other "Alternative Odontology", and a theoretical reference for dental practice in healthcare services. This study is an attempt to understand how long "Alternative Odontology" will remain with the social context of struggling for oral health in Brazil, based on the positions of the founding agents and their precursors, bearing in mind the concepts of GOH, GH (Group Health) and the SUS (Unified Healthcare System). We started out with Pierre Bourdieu's Practice Theory, complemented with Gramsci's concept of hegemony and counter-hegemony. We completed 12 in-depth interviews, reviewed the literature and analyzed the scientific output. We also looked at the trajectories of the agents and their capital between 1980 and 2013. The results show that the concept of GOC and GH as a breach with health practices, which gave rise to "Alternative Odontology", prevailed among those with the political will to defend democracy and Healthcare Reforms. Although GOC is a critical proposal, the older "Odontology" remains in scientific journals, and in the practice of oral care.

  9. School Oral Health Program in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Jitendra; Al-Mutawa, Sabiha; Nazar, Huda

    2014-01-01

    The School Oral Health Program (SOHP), Kuwait, is a joint venture between the Ministry of Health, Kuwait, and Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, Mass., USA. This program provides oral health education, prevention and treatment to almost 280,000 public school children in Kuwait. Services are delivered through a system of center- and school-based clinics and preventive mobile teams. One of the recent developments is the effective use of portable dental units for the delivery of preventive care to children in schools without the need for children to go to dental clinics. Preventive procedures performed under this program are the biannual application of fluoride varnish and the placement of pit and fissure sealants on newly erupted permanent molars and premolars. During recent years, the SOHP has improved its coverage of children, with prevention up to 80%. This has resulted in a considerable reduction in treatment needs, which is evident from the reduced number of composite restorations performed under this program during the last 6 years. This indicates that the disease level is on a decline, which can be confirmed from the results of the ongoing National Oral Health Survey on Kuwaiti school children.

  10. Informing the debate on oral health care for older people: a qualitative study of older people's views on oral health and oral health care.

    PubMed

    Borreani, E; Jones, K; Scambler, S; Gallagher, J E

    2010-03-01

    Older people represent a growing and diverse section of the population. As age increases, people are more likely to experience health and mobility problems and be at higher risk of developing oral disease. Nevertheless, few older people utilise primary oral healthcare services. It is therefore important to understand the value older people place on oral health and dental services to inform providers and planners of oral health care. This research was conducted as part of a study to identify potential ways of minimising barriers to oral health care in older people. To explore perceptions of oral health and oral healthcare services amongst older people living in a socially deprived inner city area and how these are related to service utilisation. A qualitative approach was utilised to explore the range of issues related to older people's perceptions of oral health and their views on health care. This involved a combination of focus groups and semi-structured individual interviews with older people and their carers. Data analysis was conducted using the Framework approach. * Thirty-nine older people and/or their carers participated in focus groups. * Oral health perception: Oral health was associated with the presence of natural teeth, the absence of pain, practical/social functioning, preferably supported by positive assessment by a dentist. * Oral health life-course: Older people have a long and complex dental history. Past negative experiences with oral health care, especially in childhood, strongly influenced present attitudes towards dentistry and dental personnel. * Citizenship and right to health care: There was a strong perception that, as 'British citizens', older people should have a right to free health care and that the National Health Service (NHS) should support them in this phase of their life. The oral health life-course of older people is an important influence on their perceptions of oral health and dental attendance. They consider oral health of

  11. The influence of aging on oral health and consequences for taste and smell.

    PubMed

    Ship, J A

    1999-04-01

    Oral diseases that are commonly seen in older adults can impair chemosensory function. Many stomatological conditions are preventable and treatable, yet unmanaged, they can cause significant morbidity and a diminished quality of life. Importantly, many oral diseases are not necessarily an inevitable consequence of growing old, and are frequently attributed to systemic diseases and their treatment. Although gustation may undergo mild age-related decrements, olfaction declines dramatically with greater age. The oral-facial region is intimately involved in the sensations of taste and smell, and diseases affecting this region in an older person could adversely affect an already compromised chemosensory system. Older adults with impaired taste and/or smell should be thoroughly evaluated for oral and pharyngeal diseases. It is reasonable to expect that a healthy adult can grow older with good oral health and function, and can continue to experience the hedonic pleasures of taste and smell associated with eating and drinking.

  12. Global oral health inequalities: the view from a research funder.

    PubMed

    Garcia, I; Tabak, L A

    2011-05-01

    Despite impressive worldwide improvements in oral health, inequalities in oral health status among and within countries remain a daunting public health challenge. Oral health inequalities arise from a complex web of health determinants, including social, behavioral, economic, genetic, environmental, and health system factors. Eliminating these inequalities cannot be accomplished in isolation of oral health from overall health, or without recognizing that oral health is influenced at multiple individual, family, community, and health systems levels. For several reasons, this is an opportune time for global efforts targeted at reducing oral health inequalities. Global health is increasingly viewed not just as a humanitarian obligation, but also as a vehicle for health diplomacy and part of the broader mission to reduce poverty, build stronger economies, and strengthen global security. Despite the global economic recession, there are trends that portend well for support of global health efforts: increased globalization of research and development, growing investment from private philanthropy, an absolute growth of spending in research and innovation, and an enhanced interest in global health among young people. More systematic and far-reaching efforts will be required to address oral health inequalities through the engagement of oral health funders and sponsors of research, with partners from multiple public and private sectors. The oral health community must be "at the table" with other health disciplines and create opportunities for eliminating inequalities through collaborations that can harness both the intellectual and financial resources of multiple sectors and institutions.

  13. [Does orthodontic treatment contribute to oral health?].

    PubMed

    van Beek, H

    2008-09-01

    The first part of this article is an edited Dutch summary of the paper "Oral-health-related benefits of orthodontic treatment" by Donald J. Burden in the special issue''Orthodontics: quality of care, quality of life'' in Seminars in Orthodontics (June 2007). Burden carried out a systematic review of the literature on some, historically claimed, beneficial influences of orthodontic treatment, such as reduced susceptibility to dental caries, periodontal disease, temporomandibular dysfunction, and traumatic injury. Based on the results of this review, Burden concludes that the oral health benefits of orthodontic intervention have not been demonstrated. The second part is a critical and balanced commentary on the content of the paper and on Burden's conclusions.

  14. Oral health care in pediatric AIDS.

    PubMed

    Davis, M J

    1990-02-01

    At the time of this writing, over 1500 cases of HIV infection in children under 13 have been documented. Estimates have been made that ten times that number exist. The oral manifestations of HIV infection in these children, the management of these problems, and access to care pose significant issues for the dentist who treats children. In Washington, D.C., in March of 1989, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and the Office of Maternal Child Health funded a conference and workshop on oral complications of HIV infection in the pediatric population. This report uses information presented at the workshop and certain recent key papers to provide an overview of current knowledge about pediatric AIDS.

  15. Oral Health Scales: Design of an Oral Health Scale of Infectious Potential

    PubMed Central

    Relvas, Marta; Diz, Pedro; Seoane, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: In this paper we propose a new Global Oral Health Scale that will allow the infectious potential of the oral cavity, clinically manifest as local and focal infections, to be condensed into a single parameter. Study Design: Based on a number of oral health scales previously designed by our group, we designed a final version that incorporates dental and periodontal variables (some of them evaluated using corroborated objective indices) that reflect the presence of caries and periodontal disease. Results: The application of the proposed oral health scale requires the examination of 6 sites per tooth (mesio-buccal, medio-buccal, disto-buccal, disto-lingual, medio-lingual and mesio-lingual). The following variables are analysed: number of tooth surfaces with supragingival plaque, determined using the O’Leary index; number of teeth with caries and the severity of the caries; number of tooth surfaces with gingival inflammation, determined using the Ainamo and Bay index; and number of tooth surfaces with pockets ?4 mm and severity of the pockets. These variables are then grouped into 2 categories, dental and periodontal. The final grades of dental and periodontal health correspond to the grades assigned to a least 2 of the 3 variables analysed in each of these categories. The category (dental or periodontal) with the highest grade is the one that determines the grade of the Global Oral Health Scale. Conclusion: This scale could be particularly useful for the epidemiological studies comparing different populations and for analysis of the influence of distinct degrees of oral health on the development of certain systemic diseases. Key words:Scale, oral health, infectious potential, systemic disease. PMID:23524418

  16. Oral health of schoolchildren in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Arrow, P

    2016-09-01

    The West Australian School Dental Service (SDS) provides free, statewide, primary dental care to schoolchildren aged 5-17 years. This study reports on an evaluation of the oral health of children examined during the 2014 calendar year. Children were sampled, based on their date of birth, and SDS clinicians collected the clinical information. Weighted mean values of caries experience were presented. Negative binomial regression modelling was undertaken to test for factors of significance in the rate of caries occurrence. Data from children aged 5-15 years were used (girls = 4616, boys = 4900). Mean dmft (5-10-year-olds), 1.42 SE 0.03; mean DMFT (6-15-year-olds), 0.51 SE 0.01. Negative binomial regression model of permanent tooth caries found higher rates of caries in children who were from non-fluoridated areas (RR 2.1); Aboriginal (RR 2.4); had gingival inflammation (RR 1.5); lower ICSEA level (RR 1.4); and recalled at more than 24-month interval (RR 1.8). The study highlighted poor dental health associated with living in non-fluoridated areas, Aboriginal identity, poor oral hygiene, lower socioeconomic level and having extended intervals between dental checkups. Timely assessments and preventive measures targeted at groups, including extending community water fluoridation, may assist in further improving the oral health of children in Western Australia. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Oral-systemic health during pregnancy: exploring prenatal and oral health providers' information, motivation and behavioral skills.

    PubMed

    Vamos, Cheryl A; Walsh, Margaret L; Thompson, Erika; Daley, Ellen M; Detman, Linda; DeBate, Rita

    2015-06-01

    Pregnancy is identified as a sensitive period of increased risk for poor oral health among mothers and offspring. Subsequently, both medical and dental associations have re-endorsed consolidated, inter-professional guidelines promoting oral health during pregnancy. The objective was to explore prenatal and oral health providers' information, motivation and practice behaviors related to oral health during pregnancy. Twenty-two in-depth interviews were conducted with prenatal and oral health providers based on the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method in NVivo 10. Providers held variable knowledge with regards to identified oral-systemic connections and implications. Most providers were unaware of the guidelines; however, some oral health providers reported avoiding specific treatment behaviors during this period. Motivation to address oral-systemic health during pregnancy included: prevention; healthy pregnancy/birth outcomes; patient's complaint/question as cue to action; comprehensive, patient-centered, and family-centered care; ethical duty; and professional governing body. Oral health providers reported assessing, educating, and communicating with patients about oral health issues; whereas prenatal providers rarely addressed oral health but reported signing approval forms to receive such care. A few oral health providers highlighted lifecourse implications and the need for family-centered care when addressing poor oral health among pregnant patients. Findings suggest gaps in oral health prevention information and behaviors among prenatal and oral health providers. Future efforts should examine effective dissemination and implementation strategies that translate evidence-based guidelines into clinical practice, with the ultimate goal of improve oral-systemic health among women and their offspring across the lifecourse.

  18. Promoting Oral Health Using Social Media Platforms: Seeking Arabic Online Oral Health Related Information (OHRI).

    PubMed

    Almaiman, Sarah; Bahkali, Salwa; Alabdulatif, Norah; Bahkaly, Ahlam; Al-Surimi, Khaled; Househ, Mowafa

    2016-01-01

    Access to oral health care services around the world is limited by a lack of universal coverage. The internet and social media can be an important source for patients to access supplementary oral health related information (OHRI). Online OHRI presents an opportunity to enhance dental public health education about innumerable oral health issues and promote dental self-care. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of social media users among the Saudi population and identify the preferred social media platform for seeking Arabic OHRI and its impact on seekers' knowledge, attitude, and behavior. A total of 2652 Twitter followers were surveyed, using a web-based self-administered questionnaire to collect data on demographic characteristics and online OHRI seeking behavior More than two thirds, 67.7% (n= 1796), of the participants reported they were seeking Arabic online OHRI, while 41.1% of the participants reported they had no preference for using a specific social media platform. These results emphasize the need and importance of supporting the content of social media with trusted and high quality online OHRI resources to promote a high level of public awareness about oral health and dental health services. Further studies in this regard are highly recommended on a larger scale of nationalities to explore the role of social media platform preference in promoting health promotion and dental public health awareness.

  19. Vitamin A Deficiency Impairs Induction of Oral Tolerance in Mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Akiko; Shuto, Emi; Tsutsumi, Rie; Nakamoto, Mariko; Nii, Yoshitaka; Sakai, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Oral tolerance is a phenomenon of induction of systemic unresponsiveness to antigens ingested by the oral route and loss of immune response. Studies have shown the importance of vitamin A in oral tolerance in vitro but not in an in vivo experimental model. Therefore, we carried out experiments to determine how vitamin A deficiency affects tolerance induction and the ability of mesenteric lymph node (MLN) CD11c(+) cells to induce regulatory T cells (Tregs). Immunological tolerance was induced by oral ovalbumin (OVA) administration in vitamin A-sufficient mice. OVA-specific antibody and cytokine production were significantly reduced. On the other hand, in vitamin A-deficient mice, both OVA-specific antibody and cytokine production were not suppressed by oral OVA administration. Regarding induction of Tregs, the conversion rate of Foxp3(+) cells from naïve CD4(+) cell by CD11c(+) cells was decreased in vitamin A-deficient mice. Our study indicates that vitamin A deficiency causes the breakdown of oral tolerance in vivo.

  20. The Canadian systemic sclerosis oral health study: orofacial manifestations and oral health-related quality of life in systemic sclerosis compared with the general population

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Tatibouet, Solène; Steele, Russell; Lo, Ernest; Gravel, Sabrina; Gyger, Geneviève; Sayegh, Tarek El; Pope, Janet; Fontaine, Audrey; Masseto, Ariel; Matthews, Debora; Sutton, Evelyn; Thie, Norman; Jones, Niall; Copete, Maria; Kolbinson, Dean; Markland, Janet; Nogueira-Filho, Getulio; Robinson, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare oral abnormalities and oral health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients with SSc with the general population. Methods. SSc patients and healthy controls were enrolled in a multisite cross-sectional study. A standardized oral examination was performed. Oral HRQoL was measured with the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP). Multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify associations between SSc, oral abnormalities and oral HRQoL. Results. We assessed 163 SSc patients and 231 controls. SSc patients had more decayed teeth (SSc 0.88, controls 0.59, P = 0.0465) and periodontal disease [number of teeth with pocket depth (PD) >3 mm or clinical attachment level (CAL) ≥5.5 mm; SSc 5.23, controls 2.94, P < 0.0001]. SSc patients produced less saliva (SSc 147.52 mg/min, controls 163.19 mg/min, P = 0.0259) and their interincisal distance was smaller (SSc 37.68 mm, controls 44.30 mm, P < 0.0001). SSc patients had significantly reduced oral HRQoL compared with controls (mean OHIP score: SSc 41.58, controls 26.67, P < 0.0001). Multivariate regression analyses confirmed that SSc was a significant independent predictor of missing teeth, periodontal disease, interincisal distance, saliva production and OHIP scores. Conclusion. Subjects with SSc have impaired oral health and oral HRQoL compared with the general population. These data can be used to develop targeted interventions to improve oral health and HRQoL in SSc. PMID:24464709

  1. Oral health and oral health-related behaviour in preschool children: evidence for a social gradient.

    PubMed

    Van den Branden, S; Van den Broucke, S; Leroy, R; Declerck, D; Hoppenbrouwers, K

    2013-02-01

    This study aims to investigate the social gradient in the reported oral health-related behaviour and oral health status of preschool children. Participants were 1,057 children born between October 2003 and July 2004 in Flanders, Belgium. Oral health examinations were performed by trained dentists when the children were 3 and 5 years old (respectively, in 2007 and 2009); data on dietary habits, oral hygiene habits and dental attendance of the children were obtained through structured questionnaires completed by the parents. Maternal educational level, measured in four categories, was used as a proxy of socio-economic status. Logistic and ordinal regressions showed a social gradient for the oral health-related behaviours: a lower educational level of the mother was related to a higher consumption of sugared drinks between meals and to a lower brushing frequency and dental attendance of the child. Children from low-educated mothers also had seven times more chance to present with caries experience than children from mothers with a bachelor degree. Contrary to the expectations, there was a deviation from the gradient in 3-year-olds from the highest educational group showing an increased risk for caries experience (OR = 3.84, 95 % CI = 1.08-13.65). Conclusion. Already in very young children, a graded relationship is observed between socio-economic position, oral health and related behaviours. The results suggest that different approaches are required to promote oral health during early childhood depending on the mother's educational background. As children from the highest social group also have an increased caries risk, specific techniques may be needed.

  2. Oral Health Status of Patients with Lysosomal Storage Diseases in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Drążewski, Damian; Grzymisławska, Małgorzata; Korybalska, Katarzyna; Czepulis, Natasza; Grzymisławski, Marian; Witowski, Janusz; Surdacka, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Patients with lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) suffer from physical and mental disabilities, which together with poor access to professional care may lead to impaired oral health. This cross-sectional case-control study characterized the status of oral health in patients with LSDs in Poland. Thirty-six children and young adults with various forms of LSDs were examined. The data were compared with those from age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Exemplary cases were presented to highlight typical problems in oral care associated with LSDs. When possible, saliva was collected and analyzed for total protein, inflammatory mediators, and antioxidant status. Generally, patients with LSDs had significantly higher prevalence of caries, inferior gingival status, and inadequate oral hygiene. The severity of oral health impairment in mucopolysaccaridoses, the most common LSD in Poland, was similar to that seen in patients with mannosidoses or Pompe disease. Saliva could be collected only from few less handicapped patients. In MPS, it did not appear to differ significantly from the controls, but in patients with Pompe disease it contained lower concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), but higher levels of tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (TNF-R1, TNF-R2) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). In conclusion, Polish patients with LSDs have an inadequate level of oral hygiene and substantially deteriorated oral health. PMID:28282939

  3. Addressing geriatric oral health concerns through national oral health policy in India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhinav; Purohit, Bharathi M

    2015-01-01

    There is an escalating demand for geriatric oral healthcare in all developed and developing countries including India. Two-thirds of the world’s elderly live in developing countries. This is a huge population that must receive attention from policy-makers who will be challenged by the changing demands for social and health services including oral health services. Resources are limited thus rather than being aspirational in wanting to provide all treatment needed for everybody, this critique presents a road map of how we might answer the present and future geriatric oral health concerns in a most efficient manner in a developing country. Viewing the recent Indian demographic profile and the trends in oral health, pertinent policy subjects have been discussed concerning the oral health needs of the elderly and also the associated challenges which include strategies to improve quality of life, strategies to train and educate the dental workforce and above all the role of healthcare systems towards realization of better aged society in India and other developing countries. PMID:25584351

  4. [The effect of oral health education on oral health in kindergarten children].

    PubMed

    Song, Byung-Sun

    2004-02-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of oral health education on kindergarten children. The study was designed as a quasi-experimental, nonequivalent control group pre -post test design. Data was collected from April 1st to November 30th, 2001. The total samples were sixty seven healthy kindergarten children; the experiment group consisted of thirty three and the control group was thirty four children. The experimental group received an oral health education program daily for 20 minutes for four weeks. There was significant improvements on oral health behavior in the experimental group. Streptococcus mutans and lactobacilli of the salivary variables in the experimental group were significantly higher than the control group. The dmft was lower in the experimental group than the control group, but there was no significant difference between the two groups. However it was significantly lower in the experimental group than control group over time. Oral health education for kindergarten children showed an increase in the use of tooth paste and practicing correct tooth brush usage. Also, it decreased the rate of eating cariogenic food and had a positive effect on oral health through suppressing dental cavities.

  5. Improving oral health in women: nurses' call to action.

    PubMed

    Clemmens, Donna A; Kerr, A Ross

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the most significant oral health and related problems experienced by women, and to provide a Nurse's Plan of Action to respond to these largely preventable diseases. Oral health is integral to women's overall health and well-being, with poor oral health being associated with cancer, heart disease, diabetes, depression, and the birth of preterm, low-birthweight babies. Poor nutrition and lifestyle, principally tobacco and heavy alcohol use, can further increase the risk for oral diseases. Disparities are evident in women's reported poor access of regular dental care related to lack of dental insurance and low income. These facts are disturbing because most oral diseases are preventable. The Surgeon General's report on oral health in America (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2000) and, more recently, the "National Call to Action to Promote Oral Health" (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003) emphasized the need for partnerships of key stakeholders, including nurses, to get involved in oral disease prevention. Nurses are in an ideal position to provide health promotion education and screening across the multitude of settings in which they work regarding oral health and risk factors for oral disease. Nursing interventions aimed at promoting healthy outcomes and preventing disease should include a focus on oral health.

  6. Oral Health Knowledge and Behavior among Adults with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Hon K.; Wolf, Bethany J.; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Magruder, Kathryn M.; Salinas, Carlos F.; London, Steven D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine levels of oral health knowledge and factors associated with adequate oral health knowledge in adults with diabetes. A convenience sample of 253 adult US residents with diabetes completed an oral health survey to assess their knowledge. Results showed that only 47% of the participants answered five or more (out of a maximum of seven) oral health knowledge items related to diabetes correctly. Participants who received oral health information related to diabetes have 2.9 times the odds of possessing adequate oral health knowledge (i.e., answered five or more items correctly) compared to participants who did not received that information controlling for education and race (OR = 2.86, 95% CI 1.26–6.24, P = 0.008). Given that oral health information provided by health professionals (dental and/or medical) contributes to improve oral health knowledge among adults with diabetes, health professionals should take the opportunity to educate patients with diabetes about the oral manifestations (e.g., dry mouth) and complications (e.g., periodontitis and oral candidiasis) of diabetes and to promote proper oral health behaviors. PMID:19800143

  7. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in preschool children with cerebral palsy: oral phase impairments.

    PubMed

    Benfer, Katherine A; Weir, Kelly A; Bell, Kristie L; Ware, Robert S; Davies, Peter S W; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to document the prevalence and patterns of oral phase oropharyngeal dysphagia (OPD) in preschool children with cerebral palsy (CP), and its association with mealtime duration, frequency and efficiency. Cross-sectional population-based cohort study of 130 children diagnosed with CP at 18-36 months ca (mean = 27.4 months, 81 males) and 40 children with typical development (mean = 26.2, 18 males). Functional abilities of children with CP were representative of a population sample (GMFCS I = 57, II = 15, III = 23, IV = 12, V = 23). Oral phase impairment was rated from video using the Dyspahgia Disorders Survey, Schedule for Oral Motor Impairment, and Pre-Speech Assessment Scale. Parent-report was collected on a feeding questionnaire. Mealtime frequency, duration and efficiency were calculated from a three day weighed food record completed by parents. Gross motor function was classified using the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). Overall, 93.8% of children had directly assessed oral phase impairments during eating or drinking, or in controlling saliva (78.5% with modified cut-points). Directly assessed oral phase impairments were associated with declining gross motor function, with children from GMFCS I having a 2-fold increased likelihood of oral phase impairment compared to the children with TD (OR = 2.0, p = 0.18), and all children from GMFCS II-V having oral phase impairments. Difficulty biting (70%), cleaning behaviours (70%) and chewing (65%) were the most common impairments on solids, and difficulty sipping from a cup (60%) for fluids. OPD severity and GMFCS were not related to mealtime frequency, duration or efficiency, although children on partial tube feeds had significantly reduced mealtime efficiency. Oral phase impairments were common in preschool children with CP, with severity increasing stepwise with declining gross motor function. The prevalence and severity of oral phase impairments were significantly greater for most

  8. Narrative production by children with and without specific language impairment: oral narratives and emergent readings.

    PubMed

    Kaderavek, J N; Sulzby, E

    2000-02-01

    The research reported in this paper was based on the premise that oral and written language development are intertwined. Further, the research was motivated by research demonstrating that narrative ability is an important predictor of school success for older children with language impairment. The authors extended the inquiry to preschool children by analyzing oral narratives and "emergent storybook reading" (retelling of a familiar storybook) by two groups of 20 children (half with, half without language impairment) age 2;4 (years;months) to 4;2. Comparative analyses of the two narrative genres using a variety of language and storybook structure parameters revealed that both groups of children used more characteristics of written language in the emergent storybook readings than in the oral narratives, demonstrating that they were sensitive to genre difference. The children with language impairment were less able than children developing typically to produce language features associated with written language. For both groups, middles and ends of stories were marked significantly more often within the oral narratives than the emergent readings. The children with language impairment also had difficulty with other linguistic features: less frequent use of past-tense verbs in both contexts and the use of personal pronouns in the oral narratives. Emergent storybook reading may be a useful addition to language sampling protocols because it can reveal higher order language skills and contribute to understanding the relationship between language impairment and later reading disability.

  9. Clinical trial registration in oral health journals.

    PubMed

    Smaïl-Faugeron, V; Fron-Chabouis, H; Durieux, P

    2015-03-01

    Prospective registration of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) represents the best solution to reporting bias. The extent to which oral health journals have endorsed and complied with RCT registration is unknown. We identified journals publishing RCTs in dentistry, oral surgery, and medicine in the Journal Citation Reports. We classified journals into 3 groups: journals requiring or recommending trial registration, journals referring indirectly to registration, and journals providing no reference to registration. For the 5 journals with the highest 2012 impact factors in each group, we assessed whether RCTs with results published in 2013 had been registered. Of 78 journals examined, 32 (41%) required or recommended trial registration, 19 (24%) referred indirectly to registration, and 27 (35%) provided no reference to registration. We identified 317 RCTs with results published in the 15 selected journals in 2013. Overall, 73 (23%) were registered in a trial registry. Among those, 91% were registered retrospectively and 32% did not report trial registration in the published article. The proportion of trials registered was not significantly associated with editorial policies: 29% with results in journals that required or recommended registration, 15% in those that referred indirectly to registration, and 21% in those providing no reference to registration (P = 0.05). Less than one-quarter of RCTs with results published in a sample of oral health journals were registered with a public registry. Improvements are needed with respect to how journals inform and require their authors to register their trials. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  10. Strategies and approaches in oral disease prevention and health promotion.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Richard G.

    2005-01-01

    Oral health is an important element of general health and well-being. Although largely preventable, many people across the world still suffer unnecessarily from the pain and discomfort associated with oral diseases. In addition, the costs of dental treatment are high, both to the individual and to society. Effective evidence-based preventive approaches are needed to address this major public health problem. The aim of this paper is to outline public health strategies to promote oral health and reduce inequalities. An extensive collection of public health policy documents produced by WHO are reviewed to guide the development of oral health strategies. In addition a range of Cochrane and other systematic reviews assessing the evidence base for oral health interventions are summarized. Public health strategies should tackle the underlying social determinants of oral health through the adoption of a common risk approach. Isolated interventions which merely focus on changing oral health behaviours will not achieve sustainable improvements in oral health. Radical public health action on the conditions which determine unhealthy behaviours across the population is needed rather than relying solely on the high-risk approach. Based upon the Ottawa Charter, a range of complementary strategies can be implemented in partnership with relevant local, national and international agencies. At the core of this public health approach is the need to empower local communities to become actively involved in efforts to promote their oral health. PMID:16211164

  11. Oral health in the Pacific Islands.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Mary A H; Blinkhorn, Anthony S; Vane, Ellison S

    2010-04-01

    To assess the variability of caries prevalence throughout the Pacific Islands region. Search conducted using Medline database for relevant journal articles (in English) from 1970 documenting oral health status in the region. Further material and statistics accessed through World Health Organization website and Secretariat of the Pacific Community. Available literature reviewed. There is a lack of recent data. Marked geographical differences in caries experience were reported with high DMFT values in urban areas compared to rural areas. The rise in caries prevalence was linked to an increase in sugar consumption. This was demonstrated in Tokelau where the mean number of decayed and filled teeth of children aged 5-10 years rose from approximately 3 in 1963 to 5 in 1999; sugar imports increased by up to 8 times over this period. IMPLICATIONS FOR ACTION: Standardised epidemiological surveys are needed to document current oral health status in the region. A collaborative approach to health promotion should be adopted with cooperation between nations, healthcare professionals and other agencies to ensure effective preventative strategies are developed.

  12. A Population Health Management Approach to Oral Health.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Jeff; Phillips, Kathryn E

    2016-03-01

    Clinical outcomes have been shown to be better, and total costs lower, when patients with chronic illness such as diabetes are managed using a population health strategy in a primary care setting that includes structured coordination of care with specialty services. This "population health management approach" offers a promising new vision for addressing oral disease as a chronic illness through a collaborative partnership between primary care teams and dental professionals.

  13. Oral health promotion in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Slayton, Rebecca

    2005-05-01

    One of the primary goals of dental health professionals is to prevent disease in our patients. As our knowledge of the disease process improves, so does our ability to manage the consequences of disease. Oral diseases, such as dental caries, can be devastating to both children and adolescents. Dental caries may interfere with a child's ability to eat, sleep, and learn, and it can have a significant impact on their self-esteem. Because caries affects individuals disproportionately, it is essential that those at the highest risk are identified early so that preventive therapies can be targeted toward those who are most likely to benefit. This article discusses the consequences of oral diseases in school-aged children, the factors that contribute to an individual's risk for dental caries, and the most effective therapies to prevent caries in this age group.

  14. Review of the Evidence for Oral Health Promotion Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satur, Julie G.; Gussy, Mark G.; Morgan, Michael V.; Calache, Hanny; Wright, Clive

    2010-01-01

    Dental caries, periodontal diseases, tooth loss and oral cancers have significant burden of disease effects, quality of life and cost implications for the Australian community. Oral health promotion is a key approach to addressing these conditions endorsed as part of the National Oral Health Plan. Understanding the evidence for effectiveness of…

  15. NIH Research Addresses Aging Issues and Disparities in Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... oral conditions are more common in older adults; periodontal disease is one example. And the risk of oral ... OralHealthInformation/OlderAdults NIHSeniorHealth (search for Dry Mouth and Periodontal Disease) : http://nihseniorhealth.gov/ MedlinePlus: (search by topic) : medlineplus. ...

  16. Review of the Evidence for Oral Health Promotion Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satur, Julie G.; Gussy, Mark G.; Morgan, Michael V.; Calache, Hanny; Wright, Clive

    2010-01-01

    Dental caries, periodontal diseases, tooth loss and oral cancers have significant burden of disease effects, quality of life and cost implications for the Australian community. Oral health promotion is a key approach to addressing these conditions endorsed as part of the National Oral Health Plan. Understanding the evidence for effectiveness of…

  17. Oral Health Knowledge of Pregnant Women on Pregnancy Gingivitis and Children's Oral Health.

    PubMed

    Zhong, C; Ma, K N; Wong, Y S; So, Y; Lee, P C; Yang, Y

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy gingivitis and early childhood caries remain prevalent in Hong Kong. The aim of this study was to assess pregnant women's knowledge and beliefs related to pregnancy gingivitis and children's oral health. An outreach survey was carried out in a clinic that provided antenatal examination. A written oral health questionnaire related to pregnancy gingivitis and early childhood caries was administered to pregnant women. Of the 106 pregnant women who enrolled in the study, 100 completed the questionnaires. Among the 100 subjects, only 39% correctly identified that hormonal changes contribute to pregnancy gingivitis. Only 36% identified red and swollen gums as signs of gingivitis. Furthermore, 53% of the surveyed pregnant women were not sure about the amount of toothpaste to administer to a child aged 18 months to 5 years. Almost 50% assumed that a replanted avulsed tooth would probably not survive within a short extra-alveolar period of less than 60 minutes. Prenatal women generally lack knowledge of a common oral disease that occurs during pregnancy and of what constitutes adequate oral health care for children. Oral health care education should be implemented as part of a prenatal care program.

  18. Oral health in the elderly patient and its impact on general well-being: a nonsystematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Montoya, José Antonio; Ferreira de Mello, Ana Lucia; Barrios, Rocío; Gonzalez-Moles, Miguel Angel; Bravo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Data on the oral health of the elderly depict a worrying situation, with an elevated prevalence of caries and moderate periodontal disease, frequent edentulism, and numerous cases of dry mouth and oral cancer. There is wide evidence that periodontitis is a risk factor for certain systemic diseases, and impaired oral health has been associated with mastication and nutritional problems, especially among the elderly, with highly negative effects on their quality of life. In this nonsystematic review, the authors discuss the importance of evaluating the oral health of the geriatric population in a comprehensive manner, beyond simple clinical assessments. PMID:25709420

  19. Oral health in the elderly patient and its impact on general well-being: a nonsystematic review.

    PubMed

    Gil-Montoya, José Antonio; de Mello, Ana Lucia Ferreira; Barrios, Rocío; Gonzalez-Moles, Miguel Angel; Bravo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Data on the oral health of the elderly depict a worrying situation, with an elevated prevalence of caries and moderate periodontal disease, frequent edentulism, and numerous cases of dry mouth and oral cancer. There is wide evidence that periodontitis is a risk factor for certain systemic diseases, and impaired oral health has been associated with mastication and nutritional problems, especially among the elderly, with highly negative effects on their quality of life. In this nonsystematic review, the authors discuss the importance of evaluating the oral health of the geriatric population in a comprehensive manner, beyond simple clinical assessments.

  20. Quality Improvement: Indigenous Influence in Oral Health Policy, Process, and Practice.

    PubMed

    Makowharemahihi, Charrissa; Wall, Justin; Keay, Greg; Britton, Cheryl; McGibbon, Minnie; LeGeyt, Patrick; Maipi, Joyce; Signal, Virginia

    2016-02-01

    A Quality Improvement Group for Māori oral health providers [Indigenous New Zealand oral health services] has been an effective and necessary mechanism for engaging Indigenous oral health expertise in decision-making for Indigenous oral health policy and sector developments to reduce oral health inequalities and improve Indigenous oral health outcomes.

  1. Nutrition and oral health considerations in children with special health care needs: implications for oral health care providers.

    PubMed

    Moursi, Amr M; Fernandez, Jill B; Daronch, Marcia; Zee, Lena; Jones, Cassandra L

    2010-01-01

    Children with special health care needs are at increased risk for oral diseases. The purpose of this article was to discuss: nutritional and oral health factors routinely observed in most chronic childhood disorders; dietary modifications associated with select systemic disorders and how they may impact oral health in children; and the following factors common to chronic disorders associated with diet modifications-decreased appetite and increased nutritional risk; frequency of food intake; parental overindulgence; long-term use of cariogenic medications; and xerostomia. Characteristics of childhood disorders that require dietary modifications (congenital heart disease, cystic fibrosis, cancer, AIDS/HIV, diabetes mellitus, and phenylketonuria) are summarized. In addition, healthy dietary modifications and oral health recommendations are suggested. Implementation of these recommendations can assist the dentist and dental team as they join physicians and nutritionists in delivering the best possible care to children with special health care needs.

  2. Oral health with fixed appliances orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Frank, Wilhelm; Pfaller, Karin; Konta, Brigitte

    2008-03-11

    Orthodontic treatment represents an important fraction in dental interventions. According to other medical methods the question for scientific evidence for the effectiveness of these treatments arises. The question of the effectiveness is connected with the question what is understood as an effect. In principle, the effect of the intervention is understood on the basis of the occlusion or dental health, what disregards further functions of oral health. The generalization to oral health is therefore a necessary consideration in science now. If one appreciates this further development, then there is no one single randomised study available which examines the long-term effect of the orthodontic intervention or for the effects on the oral health.The question, whether the application of a fixed appliance in an orthodontic treatment causes a long-term improvement in oral health, cannot be answered at the present time. The scientific status is the definition of oral health at present. Also the question, whether in the long run the dental health can be improved by fixed appliances cannot be answered with a quality usually achieved by evidence-based medicine. Whether correction of a dental malposition is an effective prerequisite for the preservation of the natural teeth, cannot be answered. There is no generalizing study with sufficient scientific background for Europe or Germany to this topic. The risk for caries cannot be quantified. Caries is identified as a central topic in general but due to numerous factors influencing the risk it is not quantified. The question of the indications is completely open from the scientific literature. For the question of the therapy need or therapy priority some indexes were developed, which lead to a quantification. These indices however are fundamentally criticised by recent research in their meaning and the empirical relevance.There is an impression that there exists a big gap between the practical application and the scientific

  3. Network science and oral health research.

    PubMed

    Maupome, Gerardo; McCranie, Ann

    2015-01-01

    The present overview of research methods describes a scientific enquiry paradigm that is well established in other disciplines, including health research, but that is fairly new to oral health research. Social networks analysis (SNA) or network science research is a set of relational methods purporting to identify and characterize the connections between members of a system or network, as well as the structure of the network. Persons and communities making up the members of networks have commonly been the focus of SNA studies but corporations or living organisms might just as well be organized in networks. SNA is grounded in both graphic imagery and computational models. SNA is based on the assumptions that features and structure of networks are amenable to characterization, that such information sheds light on the ways members of the network relate to each other (sharing information, diseases, norms, and so on), and that through these connections between members the overall network structure and characteristics are shaped. The overview resorts to examples specific to oral health themes and proposes a few general avenues for population-based research.

  4. Exploring professionalization among Brazilian oral health technicians.

    PubMed

    Sanglard-Oliveira, Carla Aparecida; Werneck, Marcos Azeredo Furquim; Lucas, Simone Dutra; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães

    2012-04-20

    Professional dental auxiliaries emerged in the early 20th century in the United States of America and quickly spread to Europe and other regions of the world. In Brazil, however, oral health technicians (OHTs), who occupy a similar role as dental hygienists, had a long journey before the occupation achieved legal recognition: Brazilian Law 11.889, which regulates this occupation in the country, was only enacted in 2008. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on the professionalization of OHTs, highlighting the triggering, limiting and conflicting aspects that exerted an influence on the historical progress of these professionals in Brazil. We have tested Abbott's and Larson's theory on professionalization, against the history of OHTs. A number of different dental corporative interests exerted an influence over professionalization, especially in discussions regarding the permissible activities of these professionals in the oral cavity of patients. With primary health care advances in Brazil, the importance of these professionals has once again come to the forefront. This seems to be a key point in the consolidation of OHTs in the area of human resources for health in Brazil.

  5. Basic oral health needs: A professional priority?

    PubMed

    Garetto, Lawrence P; Yoder, Karen M

    2006-11-01

    The inadequacy of access to oral health care is a complex problem facing society. Many in society who need care are unable to obtain it or do not seek it for a variety of reasons. Most commonly, these are the unfunded, who simply have inadequate resources; the "unaccepted," who may not have dental coverage or have types of coverage that are not accepted by private practitioners; the inaccessible, who may be homebound or live in sparsely populated or low-income geographic areas without dental providers; the unconvinced, who may have resources but do not believe in or recognize the need for treatment; and the unmotivated, who may realize that they need care but for them it is not a priority. While the oral health care professions cannot be expected to shoulder the entire burden to "fix" inadequate access to care, we believe that they have important responsibilities. True professions have a unique relationship with society that places them in positions of trust. With this trust comes the responsibility for public policy advocacy and to actively participate in identifying realistic ways to reduce the access problem. The leadership of organized dentistry, as well as educational institutions, and practitioners themselves must be committed to improving access and thereby the health of those currently underserved.

  6. Exploring professionalization among Brazilian oral health technicians

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Professional dental auxiliaries emerged in the early 20th century in the United States of America and quickly spread to Europe and other regions of the world. In Brazil, however, oral health technicians (OHTs), who occupy a similar role as dental hygienists, had a long journey before the occupation achieved legal recognition: Brazilian Law 11.889, which regulates this occupation in the country, was only enacted in 2008. The aim of this paper is to review the literature on the professionalization of OHTs, highlighting the triggering, limiting and conflicting aspects that exerted an influence on the historical progress of these professionals in Brazil. We have tested Abbott’s and Larson’s theory on professionalization, against the history of OHTs. A number of different dental corporative interests exerted an influence over professionalization, especially in discussions regarding the permissible activities of these professionals in the oral cavity of patients. With primary health care advances in Brazil, the importance of these professionals has once again come to the forefront. This seems to be a key point in the consolidation of OHTs in the area of human resources for health in Brazil. PMID:22520155

  7. The midwifery initiated oral health-dental service protocol: an intervention to improve oral health outcomes for pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Maree; George, Ajesh; Dahlen, Hannah; Ajwani, Shilpi; Bhole, Sameer; Blinkhorn, Anthony; Ellis, Sharon; Yeo, Anthony

    2015-01-15

    Evidence is emerging that women's poor oral health and health practices during pregnancy are associated with poor oral health in their children and potentially an increased risk of pre-term or low-birth weight infants. The Midwifery Initiated Oral Health-Dental Service (MIOH-DS) trial is a three arm multicentre randomised controlled trial which will recruit women from three metropolitan hospitals aimed at improving women's oral health and service access and indirectly reducing perinatal morbidity. All three arms of the trial will deliver oral health promotion material, although a midwife oral assessment and referral to private/public/health fund dental services pathway (Intervention Group 1) and the midwife oral assessment and referral to local free public dental services pathway (Intervention Group 2) will be compared to the control group of oral health promotional material only. Midwives will undergo specific oral health education and competency testing to undertake this novel intervention. This efficacy trial will promote a new partnership between midwives and dentists focused on enhancing the oral health of women and their infants. Should the intervention be found effective, this intervention, with existing on-line educational program for midwives, can be easily transferred into practice for large metropolitan health services within and beyond Australia. Further cost-benefit analysis is proposed to inform national health policy. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612001271897.

  8. Brazilian immigrants' oral health literacy and participation in oral health care in Canada.

    PubMed

    Calvasina, Paola; Lawrence, Herenia P; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie; Norman, Cameron D

    2016-02-15

    Inadequate functional health literacy is a common problem in immigrant populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between oral (dental) health literacy (OHL) and participation in oral health care among Brazilian immigrants in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The study used a cross-sectional design and a convenience sample of 101 Brazilian immigrants selected through the snowball sampling technique. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression modeling. Most of the sample had adequate OHL (83.1 %). Inadequate/marginal OHL was associated with not visiting a dentist in the preceding year (OR = 3.61; p = 0.04), not having a dentist as the primary source of dental information (OR = 5.55; p < 0.01), and not participating in shared dental treatment decision making (OR = 1.06; p = 0.05; OHL as a continuous variable) in multivariate logistic regressions controlling for covariates. A low average annual family income was associated with two indicators of poor participation in oral health care (i.e., not having visited a dentist in the previous year, and not having a dentist as regular source of dental information). Limited OHL was linked to lower participation in the oral health care system and with barriers to using dental services among a sample of Brazilian immigrants. More effective knowledge transfer will be required to help specific groups of immigrants to better navigate the Canadian dental care system.

  9. Current status of oral health research in Africa: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kanoute, Aïda; Faye, Daouda; Bourgeois, Denis

    2012-12-01

    Research in oral health contributes effectively to decisions and strategies aimed at improving the oral health of populations. Further contributions to enhance current knowledge of oral health in Africa are required. The principal objective of this study was to produce an analysis of oral health research published from different subregions of Africa and to estimate bilateral and multilateral international cooperation in oral health research during the period 2005-2010. The PubMed database was searched for published articles on topics related to oral health in Africa. A total of 935 oral health-related articles were retrieved during April and May 2011. Publications emanating from Nigeria and South Africa accounted for a striking 68% of all oral health-related material published from Africa during the study period. Researchers from 30 different countries had participated in collaboration on at least one published article. A total of 262 journals had published at least one item examining oral health in Africa, but only 29 journals had published more than seven articles. These 29 journals accounted for 66% of all published material and induced non-African reviews (26%) and African reviews (40%). This study shows strong variation among countries in the production of articles on oral health whereby rich countries produce greater quantities of published research and poorer nations more frequently develop research partnerships with other countries. © 2012 FDI World Dental Federation.

  10. Oral health status in epileptic children.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, Taskin; Tan, Huseyin

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the oral hygiene status and dental treatment requirements in children with epilepsy. The treatment group consisted of 211 children with epilepsy (120 boys and 91 girls, 4-15 years old, mean age 7.85 + or - 2.98 years). The control group consisted of healthy children, matched by age and gender. Clinical features of the patients were obtained from hospital records. Clinical examinations were conducted, under standard light, using a plane buccal mirror, a dental probe and air drying to evaluate caries experience and to record the periodontal health of each child. Statistical analysis was performed using chi(2) test, Fisher exact test and anova. The number of decayed and missing teeth, the degree of abrasion and periodontal indexes were significantly worse in patients with epilepsy, compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Gingival enlargement was documented in 42% of patients on valproate monotherapy compared to only in 16% of patients on phenobarbital. Dental caries and halitosis were the most common oral disorders. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures often cause minor oral injuries and traumatized anterior teeth. Epileptic children are at an increased risk of developing caries and gingivitis compared with healthy subjects.

  11. Oral health of foreign domestic workers: exploring the social determinants.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoli; Chan, Chi Wai; Mak, Siu Lun; Ng, Zevon; Kwong, Wai Hang; Kot, Ching Ching Shirley

    2014-10-01

    Foreign domestic helpers constitute a significant proportion of migrant workers worldwide. This population subgroup provides an opportunity for understanding social determinants of oral health in immigrant community. A random sample of 122 Indonesian domestic helpers in Hong Kong completed a questionnaire on their demographic background, social characteristics (competency in local languages, immigration history, living condition, social connections, and leisure activities) and oral health behaviours (knowledge, attitudes, practice and self-efficacy). Their tooth status and periodontal health were assessed. Participants tended to start flossing after settling in Hong Kong. Favourable oral health knowledge was found in more acculturated participants, as indicated by proficiency in local languages and immigration history. Engagement in social and/or religious activities and decent living condition provided by employers were associated with favourable oral health behaviours and/or better oral health. Social determinants explained 13.2 % of variance in caries severity. Our findings support the significant impact of social circumstances on oral health of domestic workers.

  12. Women's health and oral health implications of the curriculum study.

    PubMed

    Silverton, S F

    2001-07-01

    This article discusses the effect of medical school and dental school curriculum surveys, which allowed interdisciplinary analysis of the status of women's issues in the health profession. With this documentation of the status of women's health and oral issues, changes in the curriculum can now occur to close the gaps in education and training exposed in the surveys. Changes in the curriculum are aimed at improving clinical practice by practitioners and lowering barriers to care experienced by women. These changes must be incorporated into not only the medical school and dental school curriculums, but also into the practices of the current health care practitioners to be effective.

  13. Other Health Impairment. NICHCY Disability Fact Sheet #15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Other Health Impairment" is one of the 14 categories of disability listed in the nation's special education law, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Under IDEA, a child who has an "other health impairment" is likely to be eligible for special services to help the child address his or her educational,…

  14. Perceptions of oral health by the WV community.

    PubMed

    Veselicky, Louise T; Sharps, Gina; Veselicky, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    This survey was undertaken to establish baseline measurements in regards to the oral health beliefs and practices of the general public throughout West Virginia as a starting point to create an effective educational initiative fostering oral health as an integral component of health. A population based 37 item telephonic opinion survey on a representative sample of WV state wide residents was conducted to understand practices, habits and experiences with oral health, to identify barriers to oral health, and determine the perception of its importance to other health conditions. West Virginians rank obesity as the most serious health problem and dental health a significantly less serious concern. Half admitted to less than good dental health. Cost was most commonly cited for not accessing oral care. A unified health promotion message among all health care providers is vital if general health of West Virginia citizens is to be improved. The links between oral health, coronary artery disease, diabetes, and pulmonary conditions can be used as a common starting point to embrace health advancement in general with the ultimate goal of changing current attitudes and practices and develop sustainable health programs that result in positive oral health/overall health in individuals and communities.

  15. Examination of intensive care unit patients' oral health.

    PubMed

    Celik, Gul Gunes; Eser, Ismet

    2017-09-28

    Oral health problems are common complications that most intensive care unit patients experience. There are many factors that affect oral health negatively and nurses have important responsibilities in this regard. The aim of this study was assessment of the intensive care unit patients' oral health and risk factors. This study was planned as a descriptive study and conducted between December 2015 and June 2016, with 202 patients in 20 intensive care units of 6 hospitals in Turkey. Data were collected via Data Collection Form and Bedside Oral Exam guide. Oral health assessment of patients was made using a source of light and a tongue depressor. We observed a significant difference in score of the Bedside Oral Exam guide by age, consciousness, type of respiration and feeding, the frequency of oral health, the total number of drugs, and technique of oral care (P < 0.05). None of the intensive care units were using the oral assessment guide. The result of this study shows that there are various risk factors that adversely affect the oral health of intensive care unit patients. Nurses should undertake assessments on the basis of oral care protocols for patients at risk and carry out evidence-based individualized oral care applications. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Position of the American Dietetic Association: oral health and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Touger-Decker, Riva; Mobley, Connie C

    2007-08-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that nutrition is an integral component of oral health. The American Dietetic Association supports the integration of oral health with nutrition services, education, and research. Collaboration between dietetics and dental professionals is recommended for oral health promotion and disease prevention and intervention. Scientific and epidemiological data suggest a lifelong synergy between nutrition and the integrity of the oral cavity in health and disease. Oral health and nutrition have a synergistic bidirectional relationship. Oral infectious diseases, as well as acute, chronic, and terminal systemic diseases with oral manifestations, impact the functional ability to eat as well as diet and nutrition status. Likewise, nutrition and diet may affect the development and integrity of the oral cavity as well as the progression of oral diseases. As we advance in our discoveries of the links between oral and nutrition health, practitioners of both disciplines must learn to provide screening, baseline education, and referral to each other as part of comprehensive client/patient care. Dietetics practice requires registered dietitians to provide medical nutrition therapy that incorporates a person's total health needs, including oral health. Inclusion of both didactic and clinical practice concepts that illustrate the role of nutrition in oral health is essential in both dental and dietetic education programs. Collaborative endeavors between dietetics and dentistry in research, education, and delineation of health provider practice roles are needed to ensure comprehensive health care. The multifaceted interactions between diet, nutrition, and oral health in practice, education, and research in both dietetics and dentistry merit continued, detailed delineation.

  17. Oral health promotion for our ageing Australian population.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, J M

    2003-03-01

    The ageing Australian population living in the new millennium has dental needs that are very different and more complex than those experienced by previous older adult cohorts during the twentieth century. A summary of the oral health status of older Australians is presented, together with a review of the important relationships between general health and oral health. The key to maintaining and improving older adults' oral health status is the use of oral health promotion strategies that focus not only on dental characteristics, but also on the life characteristics of older adults, and on their quality of life issues. Traditionally, there has been very limited geriatric oral health promotion, with several myths contributing to this situation. Contemporary geriatric oral health promotion in the new millenium has an evidence-based and planned approach. It encompasses not only the treatment of oral diseases and conditions, but has an increased focus on the prevention of oral diseases and conditions to enhance oral health status and older adults' quality of life. Using the Ottawa Charter and a functional dependence classification, a geriatric oral health promotion matrix is presented, using a specific example of Australian residential care.

  18. Oral health promotion by the oral health products industry: unrecognised and unappreciated?

    PubMed

    Barnett, M L

    2008-03-01

    There is often ambivalence in the way dentists view the oral health care industry. On the one hand, there are the skeptics who view corporate activities as suspect, calling into question the validity of industry-sponsored research and considering all promotional activities as self-serving. On the other hand, there are those who will evaluate research, whether industry sponsored or not, on its merits and appreciate corporate philanthropy that aims to give something back to the profession, although at times the expectations of the amount of financial support available are markedly in excess of the actual amount based on dental product sales. (Yes--and don't let your young children see this!--the tooth fairy who goes around dispensing endless number of dollars or pounds or euros does not actually exist!) Recognizing that, of necessity, corporations exist to make a profit, I would submit that the relationship of responsible companies to the profession can often be looked at as a partnership in which both sides benefit. Ultimately, all have as a goal the improvement of the oral health of our patients (or consumers) which is facilitated by the availability of effective products. In addition to marketing products, the oral care industry plays a large, though oftentimes unnoticed, role in oral health promotion. For the most part, this involves targeted financial support or contributions of products that serve to enhance patients' understanding of oral diseases and the need for good oral care, and/or provide access to care for underserved groups. In the following sections, I will give some examples of industry-supported health promotion activities, most of which will be activities in the United States with which I am most familiar. These are examples only--the list is not intended to be exhaustive and a company's name will be included in only the few instances in which it is an integral part of the programme title.

  19. Oral health in China – trends and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hu, De-yu; Hong, Xiao; Li, Xue

    2011-01-01

    For a long time, oral disease is one of the major problems of the public health for its high prevalence and incidence throughout the world, which is especially true for low-income populations. Since China's economic reform in 1978, great changes have taken place in China. These changes have significant impact on and have been reflected in oral disease trends in China. This paper provides an overview and assessment of the oral health status in China. It focuses on changes in the nation's demographic profile, in the marketplace, the oral disease status and trends. The paper also suggests some possible measures and strategies for bettering oral health in future China. PMID:21449210

  20. Application of metagenomics in understanding oral health and disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ping; Gunsolley, John

    2014-04-01

    Oral diseases including periodontal disease and caries are some of the most prevalent infectious diseases in humans. Different microbial species cohabitate and form a polymicrobial biofilm called dental plaque in the oral cavity. Metagenomics using next generation sequencing technologies has produced bacterial profiles and genomic profiles to study the relationships between microbial diversity, genetic variation, and oral diseases. Several oral metagenomic studies have examined the oral microbiome of periodontal disease and caries. Gene annotations in these studies support the association of specific genes or metabolic pathways with oral health and with specific diseases. The roles of pathogenic species and functions of specific genes in oral disease development have been recognized by metagenomic analysis. A model is proposed in which three levels of interactions occur in the oral microbiome that determines oral health or disease.

  1. Application of metagenomics in understanding oral health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ping; Gunsolley, John

    2014-01-01

    Oral diseases including periodontal disease and caries are some of the most prevalent infectious diseases in humans. Different microbial species cohabitate and form a polymicrobial biofilm called dental plaque in the oral cavity. Metagenomics using next generation sequencing technologies has produced bacterial profiles and genomic profiles to study the relationships between microbial diversity, genetic variation, and oral diseases. Several oral metagenomic studies have examined the oral microbiome of periodontal disease and caries. Gene annotations in these studies support the association of specific genes or metabolic pathways with oral health and with specific diseases. The roles of pathogenic species and functions of specific genes in oral disease development have been recognized by metagenomic analysis. A model is proposed in which three levels of interactions occur in the oral microbiome that determines oral health or disease. PMID:24642489

  2. Transcultural oral health care: 2. Developing transcultural oral health promotional materials.

    PubMed

    Kwan, S Y

    2000-09-01

    This paper discusses the common problems involved in developing transcultural oral health promotional materials, and describes the best ways to avoid them. Translation errors and poor illustrations are by far the most frequently encountered problems followed by cultural incompatibility, inadequate information, and text and layout mistakes.

  3. Oral Health Knowledge, Past Oral Health Behaviors, and Barriers to Preventive Oral Care of Head Start Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay remains the most common chronic disease of childhood. The CincySmiles Foundation (CSF) developed an instrument to evaluate Head Start parents' knowledge of oral health care practices and to identify barriers Head Start parents face when seeking dental treatment for their children. Data from Head Start parents (n = 675) across 3…

  4. Oral Health Knowledge, Past Oral Health Behaviors, and Barriers to Preventive Oral Care of Head Start Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Hill, Lawrence F.; Alles-White, Monica L.; Cottrell, Randall R.

    2012-01-01

    Tooth decay remains the most common chronic disease of childhood. The CincySmiles Foundation (CSF) developed an instrument to evaluate Head Start parents' knowledge of oral health care practices and to identify barriers Head Start parents face when seeking dental treatment for their children. Data from Head Start parents (n = 675) across 3…

  5. [Self-rating of oral health according to the Oral Health Impact Profile and associated factors: a systematic review].

    PubMed

    Gabardo, Marilisa Carneiro Leão; Moysés, Simone Tetu; Moysés, Samuel Jorge

    2013-06-01

    To systematically evaluate the literature to investigate associations between social, demographic, economic, psychosocial, and behavioral factors and the self-perception of oral health measured using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP). In this systematic review of the literature, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews (PRISMA) were adapted for the performance of a qualitative metasummary, without meta-analysis. Articles about oral health and associated factors with implications for quality of life were selected, with a focus on the tool for self-rating of the oral health-disease process, the OHIP. Pubmed/National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the Virtual Health Library (Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde - BVS/BIREME) were searched. Articles published between 2001 and 2011 were included. The following Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) were employed: oral health, quality of life, sickness impact profile, and socioeconomic factors. Of 57 articles identified, 20 met the inclusion criteria. The metasummary revealed that a poor self-perception of oral health was associated with unfavorable social, economic, demographic, and psychosocial factors, as well as with undesirable habits and poor clinical oral conditions. There is consensus in the literature about the influence of the investigated factors on the self-perception of oral health and on quality of life. The OHIP is an important aid for determining oral health needs and for developing strategies to control/reduce disease and promote oral health, with a consequent positive impact on quality of life.

  6. Implementation of Oral Health Education to Orphan Children.

    PubMed

    Khedekar, Mikhila; Suresh, K V; Parkar, M I; Malik, Neelima; Patil, Snehal; Taur, Swapnil; Pradhan, Debapriya

    2015-12-01

    To determine the knowledge and oral hygiene status of orphanage children in Pune and changes in them after health education. Interventional study. Centers for Orphan Children in Pune, India, from April to June 2014. A specially designed questionnaire was used to assess the dental problems and existing oral hygiene maintenance practice among children between 5 - 12 years of age (n=100) in an orphanage center. Pre- and postinterventional intra-oral examination was carried out to check their oral hygiene status which included DMFS [Decayed Missing Filled Tooth Surfaces index (for permanent teeth)], OHIS (Simplified Oral Hygiene Index) and gingival indices. Intervention was in the form of oral health education, demonstration of correct brushing technique, diet counselling and maintenance of overall oral hygiene. Present study shows that the orphans had multiple dental problems along with improper oral hygiene practices and careless attitude towards oral health. Pre- and post-interventional DMFS was compared using Wilcoxon sign rank test, which was not significant; while OHIS and gingival indices were compared by using repeat measures ANOVA(p < 0.001) which was significant for each, respectively. There was considerable improvement in the oral hygiene status of orphans due to educational intervention. Oral health education at right age can help to cultivate healthy oral hygiene practices in orphans which will benefit them for lifelong. Caretakers should be educated and trained about oral hygiene practices so that they can implement it and supervise the orphan children.

  7. Oral health perceptions of paediatric palliative care nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Couch, Elizabeth; Mead, Jean Marie; Walsh, Margaret M

    2013-01-01

    Systematic oral care reduces oral complications among children in paediatric palliative care (PPC), yet little is known about the oral health perceptions of PPC nursing staff. This qualitative cross-sectional study used semi-structured interviews based on phenomenography to explore PPC nursing staff's perceptions of oral health and the relationship of oral care to comfort and quality of life. A purposive sample of nine nursing staff employed at a California PPC facility participated. Five themes emerged from the analysis of the interviews: signs of oral health, reasons for oral care, adaptation of oral care on a case-by-case basis, barriers to providing oral care, and facilitators of improving oral care. The perceived importance of oral health was the underlining similarity between the themes. A need for further research in the area of oral PPC is indicated. Collaboration with dental professionals may be needed to create oral PPC guidelines that fit the complex needs of children with life-limiting illnesses.

  8. Effectiveness of professional oral health care intervention on the oral health of residents with dementia in residential aged care facilities: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Yi Mohammadi, Joanna Jin; Franks, Kay; Hines, Sonia

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this review is to critically appraise and synthesize evidence on the effectiveness of professional oral health care intervention on the oral health of aged care residents with dementia.More specifically the objectives are to identify the efficacy of professional oral health care interventions on general oral health, the presence of plaque and the number of decayed or missing teeth. Dementia poses a significant challenge for health and social policy in Australia. The quality of life of individuals, their families and friends is impacted by dementia. Older people with dementia often have other health comorbidities resulting in the need for a higher level of care. From 2009 to 2010, 53% of permanent residents in Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs) had dementia on admission. Older Australians are retaining more of their natural teeth, therefore residents entering RACFs will have more of their natural teeth and require complex dental work than they did in previous generations. Data from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare showed that more than half the residents in RACFs are now partially dentate with an average of 12 teeth each. Furthermore, coronal and root caries are significant problems, especially in older Australians who are cognitively impaired.Residents in aged care facilities frequently have poor oral health and hygiene with moderate to high levels of oral disease and overall dental neglect. This is reinforced by aged care staff who acknowledge that the demands of feeding, toileting and behavioral issues amongst residents often take precedence over oral health care regimens. Current literature shows that there is a general reluctance on the part of aged care staff to prioritize oral care due to limited knowledge as well as existing psychological barriers to working on another person's mouth. Although staff routinely deal with residents' urinary and faecal incontinence, deep psychological barriers exist when working on someone

  9. Parental self-efficacy and oral health-related knowledge are associated with parent and child oral health behaviors and self-reported oral health status.

    PubMed

    de Silva-Sanigorski, Andrea; Ashbolt, Rosie; Green, Julie; Calache, Hanny; Keith, Benedict; Riggs, Elisha; Waters, Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    This study sought to advance understanding of the influence of psychosocial factors on oral health by examining how parental self-efficacy (with regard to acting on their child's oral health needs) and oral health knowledge relate to parental and child oral health behaviors and self-rated oral health. Parents of children in grades 0/1 and 5/6 (n = 804) and children in grades 5/6 (n = 377, mean age 11.5 ± 1.0, 53.9% female) were recruited from a stratified random sample of 11 primary (elementary) schools. Participants completed surveys capturing psychosocial factors, oral health-related knowledge, and parental attitudes about oral health. Parents also rated their own oral health status and the oral health of their child. Correlations and logistic regression analysis (adjusted for socioeconomic status, child age, and gender) examined associations between psychosocial factors and the outcomes of interest (parent and child behaviors and self-rated oral health status). Higher parental self-efficacy was associated with more frequent toothbrushing (by parent and child), and more frequent visits to a dental professional. These associations were particularly strong with regard to dental visits for children, with parents with the highest tertile for self-efficacy 4.3 times more likely to report that their child attended a dentist for a checkup at least once a year (95%CI 2.52-7.43); and 3 times more likely to report their child brushing their teeth at least twice a day (Adjusted Odds Ratio 3.04, 95%CI 1.64-5.64) compared with those parents in the lowest tertile for self-efficacy. No associations with oral health knowledge were found when examined by tertile of increasing knowledge. Oral health self-efficacy and knowledge are potentially modifiable risk factors of oral health outcomes, and these findings suggest that intervening on these factors could help foster positive dental health habits in families. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Negative impact of oral health conditions on oral health related quality of life of community dwelling elders in Mexico city, a population based study.

    PubMed

    Castrejón-Pérez, Roberto Carlos; Borges-Yáñez, S Aída; Irigoyen-Camacho, Ma Esther; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo

    2017-05-01

    Oral health in old persons is frequently poor; non-functional prostheses are common and negatively affect quality of life. The objective of this study was to estimate the impact of oral health problems on oral health related quality of life in a sample of home dwelling Mexican elders. Household survey in 655 persons 70 years old and over residing in one county in Mexico City. Oral Health Related Quality of Life (Short version of the Oral Health Impact Profile validated in Mexico-OHIP-14-sp), self-perception of general and oral health, xerostomia, utilization of dental services, utilization and functionality of removable dental prostheses, dental and periodontal conditions, age, gender, marital status, schooling, depression, cognitive impairment and independence in activities of daily living (ADL). A negative binomial regression model was fitted. Mean age was 79.2 ± 7.1 years; 54.2% were women. Mean OHIP-14-Sp score was 6.8 ± 8.7, median was 4. The final model showed that men (RR = 1.30); persons with xerostomia (RR = 1.41); no utilization of removable prostheses (RR = 1.55); utilization of non-functional removable prostheses (RR = 1.69); fair self-perception of general health (RR = 1.34); equal (RR = 1.43) or worse (RR = 2.32) self-perception of oral health compared with persons of the same age; and being dependent for at least one ADL (RR = 1.71) increased the probability of higher scores of the OHIP-14-sp. Age, schooling, depression, cognitive impairment and periodontal conditions showed no association. Oral rehabilitation can improve quality of life, health education and health promotion for the elder and their caregivers may reduce the risk of dental problems. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 744-752. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  11. [Quality of life and oral health in children].

    PubMed

    Versloot, J; Klaassen, M A

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, research on the influence of oral health on quality of life among children has become increasingly popular Half of the children and adolescents will have had moments of diminished oral health and that can lead to functional problems, pain and decreased quality of life. While measuring oral health-related quality of life of children, reports of parents are frequently used as a proxy. Diminished oral health not only has an impact on the child's quality of life, but also on that of his family members. Results from studies on oral health-related quality of life in children may be used as the basis for useful guidance for parents and children on improving oral health and quality of life.

  12. Eliminating oral health disparities: Ethics workshop reactor comments.

    PubMed

    Evans, Caswell A

    2006-11-01

    Oral health encompasses dentistry and is broader in concept. Dentistry alone appears insufficient to ensure oral health for the population at large. Troubling disparities in oral health status and access to care have been documented. The segment of the population that has little or no access to care is growing; aging baby-boomers are adding to this problem. As suggested in Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General, partnerships and collaboration are essential to improving oral health. The ethics of dental practice and the profession are being called into question. Who will provide the necessary leadership to address and resolve these issues, so that oral health is attainable by all?

  13. Reflections on cultural diversity in oral health promotion and prevention.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Elisha; van Gemert, Caroline; Gussy, Mark; Waters, Elizabeth; Kilpatrick, Nicky

    2012-03-01

    Dental caries is an extremely debilitating disease with lifelong consequences. In most developed countries significant oral health inequalities exist in disadvantaged communities, including refugee and migrant populations. Addressing these inequalities is becoming increasingly challenging as communities become more culturally diverse. An awareness of traditional oral health practices would enable the dental and broader health professions, to understand these differences and consequently better meet the needs of disadvantaged communities. The use of miswak is a common traditional oral hygiene practice used by a number of culturally diverse groups. Further research is required into the use and effectiveness of traditional oral health practices within developed countries. Such practices need to be understood, respected and incorporated within oral health care, policies and practices in order to reduce significant inequalities experienced in our communities. This commentary describes the current literature on miswak, its effectiveness and the implications for promoting oral health.

  14. Visionaries or dreamers? The story of infant oral health.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Arthur J; Quiñonez, Rocio B

    2011-01-01

    To review the early history of the promotion of oral health for infants and toddlers, the impact of the AAPD guideline on infant oral health care and ways to maximize health outcomes. Review of the literature. Concepts on primary prevention and early intervention were reported as early as the 19th century. Progress to positively impact the oral health of children has been made. Nevertheless, the advice of early scholars and clinicians that oral care and prevention must begin early with the caregivers and the emergence of the infant's first tooth have not been fully embraced by the profession. A historical perspective on oral health care for infants and toddlers has been presented. There is a need to move away from the surgical approach of managing oral disease and embrace the concepts of primary care beginning perinatally while more broadly addressing social determinants of health.

  15. Oral health needs of HIV/AIDS orphans in Gauteng, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Blignaut, E

    2007-04-01

    To care for HIV/AIDS orphans will put health and social services in South Africa before a major challenge. Published clinical information on South and Southern African HIV-positive children is limited to hospitalized children. A cross-sectional, prospective study was conducted on a convenience sample of HIV-positive children, living in orphanages in Gauteng, South Africa, in order to determine the oral health needs of the children. Five homes for abandoned/orphaned HIV/AIDS children were visited, 11 caregivers, excluding the nursing sisters (registered nurses), were interviewed to determine their knowledge regarding oral health. An oral examination was performed on 87 children who were not receiving antiretroviral treatment. The caregivers were knowledgeable regarding pseudomembranous candidiasis but all lacked knowledge on oral hygiene procedures and the cariogenic potential of a baby bottle. The mean age of the children ranged between 3.2 and 7 years, with one home having children older than 11 years. Rampant early childhood caries in 19 (21.8%) children was the major finding, with 5 children suffering severe pain from multiple carious teeth. In the hospice section of the homes all 12 children had clinically detectable candidiasis, while in 4 (33.3%) there was an associated bleeding and ulceration of the oral mucosa, impairing their ability to eat. The findings indicate a training need among caregivers regarding the oral health of children and a role for health professionals in preventing oral diseases and reducing suffering.

  16. Oral morphosyntactic competence as a predictor of reading comprehension in children with specific language impairment.

    PubMed

    Buil-Legaz, Lucía; Aguilar-Mediavilla, Eva; Rodríguez-Ferreiro, Javier

    2016-07-01

    Children with a diagnosis of specific language impairment (SLI) present impaired oral comprehension. According to the simple view of reading, general amodal linguistic capacity accounts for both oral and reading comprehension. Considering this, we should expect SLI children to display a reading comprehension deficit. However, previous research regarding the association between reading disorders and SLI has yielded inconsistent results. To study the influence of prior oral comprehension competence over reading comprehension during the first years of reading acquisition of bilingual Catalan-Spanish children with SLI (ages 7-8). We assessed groups of bilingual Catalan-Spanish SLI and matched control children at ages 7 and 8 with standardized reading comprehension tasks including grammatical structures, sentence and text comprehension. Early oral competence and prior non-verbal intelligence were also measured and introduced into regression analyses with the participants' reading results in order to state the relation between the comprehension of oral and written material. Although we found no significant differences between the scores of our two participant groups in the reading tasks, data regarding their early oral competence, but not non-verbal intelligence measures, significantly influence their reading outcome. The results extend our knowledge regarding the course of literacy acquisition of children with SLI and provide evidence in support of the theories that assume common linguistic processes to be responsible for both oral and reading comprehension. © 2016 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  17. Oral and craniofacial manifestations of multiple sclerosis: implications for the oral health care provider.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G-Q; Meng, Y

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex neurological condition affecting sensory and motor nerve transmission. Its progression and symptoms are unpredictable and vary from person to person as well as over time. Symptoms of orofacial pain, trigeminal neuralgia, spasticity, spasms, tremor, fatigue, depression and progressive disability, impact on the individual's ability to maintain oral health, cope with dental treatment and access dental services. Also, many of the medications used in the symptomatic management of the condition have the potential to cause dry mouth and associated oral disease. There is no cure for multiple sclerosis, and treatment focuses on prevention of disability and maintenance of quality of life. The oral health care team plays an essential role in ensuring that oral health impacts positively on general health. This review highlights the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, oral and craniofacial manifestations and their management, and oral health care considerations in patients with MS.

  18. Oral health risks of tobacco use and effects of cessation.

    PubMed

    Warnakulasuriya, Saman; Dietrich, Thomas; Bornstein, Michael M; Casals Peidró, Elías; Preshaw, Philip M; Walter, Clemens; Wennström, Jan L; Bergström, Jan

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the epidemiologic evidence for the effects of tobacco use and tobacco use cessation on a variety of oral diseases and conditions. Exposures considered include cigarette and bidi smoking, pipe and cigar smoking, and smokeless tobacco use. Oral diseases and disorders considered include oral cancer and precancer, periodontal disease, caries and tooth loss, gingival recession and other benign mucosal disorders as well as implant failure. Particular attention is given to the impact of tobacco use cessation on oral health outcomes. We conclude that robust epidemiologic evidence exists for adverse oral health effects of tobacco smoking and other types of tobacco use. In addition, there is compelling evidence to support significant benefits of tobacco use cessation with regard to various oral health outcomes. Substantial oral health benefits can be expected from abstention and successful smoking cessation in a variety of populations across all ages.

  19. Vision and Oral Health Needs of Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Pamela L.; Kerker, Bonnie D.; Zigler, Edward; Horwitz, Sarah M.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there has been an increased emphasis on health promotion, including prevention activities related to vision and oral health, for the general population, but not for individuals with intellectual disability (ID). This review explores what is known about the prevalence of vision problems and oral health conditions among…

  20. Oral Health Promotion in Schools: Rationale and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kizito, Alex; Caitlin, Meredith; Wang, Yili; Kasangaki, Arabat; Macnab, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explain the rationale and potential for the WHO health promoting schools (HPS) to improve children's oral health, and describe validated quantitative methodologies and qualitative approaches to measure program impact. Design/Methodology/Approach: Critical discussion of the impact of poor oral health and…

  1. Oral Health Promotion in Schools: Rationale and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kizito, Alex; Caitlin, Meredith; Wang, Yili; Kasangaki, Arabat; Macnab, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explain the rationale and potential for the WHO health promoting schools (HPS) to improve children's oral health, and describe validated quantitative methodologies and qualitative approaches to measure program impact. Design/Methodology/Approach: Critical discussion of the impact of poor oral health and…

  2. The Cambodian National Oral Health Plan 1992-2000.

    PubMed

    Durward, C S; Todd, R V

    1993-06-01

    The reconstruction of dental services and training in Cambodia following the devastation of the country during the reign of the Khmer Rouge has been limited by minimal help from other countries for political reasons. Following the recent signing of a peace treaty, a National Conference on Oral Health has been held, and a National Oral Health Plan formulated, outlining goals for the year 2000, and strategies to improve the oral health status in the country.

  3. Oral health and oromotor function in rare diseases--a database study.

    PubMed

    Sjögreen, Lotta; Andersson-Norinder, Jan; Bratel, John

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to study oral health and oromotor function in individuals with rare diseases. A disease is defined as rare when it affects no more than 100 individuals per million population and leads to a marked degree of disability. An affected nervous or musculoskeletal system, cognitive impairment, neuropsychiatric disorders and craniofacial malformations are common in rare diseases and may all be risk factors for oral health and oromotor function. In 1996-2008, 1,703 individuals with 169 rare diseases, aged 3-67 years, answered a questionnaire about general health, oral health and orofacial function and 1,614 participated in a clinical examination. A control group of 135 healthy children, aged 3-14 years, was also included in the study. Oral health was examined by a dentist and oromotor function by a speech-language pathologist. The participants with rare diseases were recruited via family programmes, referrals to the clinic and research projects, while the controls were randomly selected from a Swedish municipality. In the diagnosis group, 40% had moderate or severe problems coping with dental treatment, 43% were receiving specialised dental care. Difficulties related to tooth brushing were common compared with the controls. Approximately two thirds of the study group and the control group were caries free. Frontal open bite, long face and high palate were common in individuals with rare diseases compared with controls. Oromotor impairment was a frequent finding (43%) and was absent among the controls. There was a significant correlation between oromotor impairment and certain structural deviations and oral-health issues. Compared with healthy controls, individuals with rare diseases often have difficulty coping with dental treatment and managing tooth brushing. Dysmorphology and oromotor dysfunction are frequent findings in this population and they often require extra prophylactic dental care and access to specialised dental care in order to prevent oral disease.

  4. Ventilator-associated pneumonia risk decreased by use of oral moisture gel in oral health care.

    PubMed

    Takeyasu, Yoshihiro; Yamane, Gen-Yuki; Tonogi, Morio; Watanabe, Yutaka; Nishikubo, Shuichi; Serita, Ryohei; Imura, Kumiko

    2014-01-01

    Although oral health care has a preventive effect against ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), the most effective method of oral health care in this respect remains to be established. The objective of this single-center, randomized, controlled trial was to investigate the relationship between VAP and various methods of oral health care. All patients included in the study (n=142) were on mechanical ventilation with oral intubation at the intensive care unit of the Tokyo Dental College Ichikawa General Hospital. They were divided into two groups, one receiving standard oral health care (Standard group), and the other receiving oral health care using an oral moisture gel instead of water (Gel group). After removal of the intubation tube, biofilm on cuff of the tube was stained with a disclosing agent to determine the contamination level. Factors investigated included sex, age, number of remaining teeth, intubation time, fever ≥38.5°C, VAP, cuff contamination level, and time required for one oral health care session. No VAP occurred in either group during the study period. The level of cuff contamination was significantly lower in the Gel group than the Standard group, and the time required for one session of oral health care was shorter (p<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed use of the oral moisture gel as a factor affecting cuff contamination level. Use of an oral moisture gel decreased invasion of the pharynx by bacteria and contaminants together with biofilm formation on the intubation tube cuff. These results suggest that oral health care using an oral moisture gel is effective in preventing cuff contamination.

  5. Oral health of adults with serious mental illnesses: a review.

    PubMed

    Matevosyan, Naira Roland

    2010-12-01

    (A) To assess the prevalence of suboptimal oral health in adults with SMI in studies published in 1971-2009; (B) To describe approaches that promote oral health among adults with SMI. A total of 57 randomized, quasi-randomized, cross-section, and cohort studies from samples of 38-4,769 mental health consumers are identified through database, journal, and Internet searches (Cochrane, FASTSTATS, PUBMED, WHO.int). Selected studies are inclusive for the sample, reported statistical power, and external validity. Oral health adverse outcomes (xerostomia, sialorrhoea, dental caries, extracted teeth, malocclusion, periodontal disease, edentulous, oral cancer) are considered as measurable outcomes. This review suggests a substantial prevalence of suboptimal oral health (61%) among individuals with serious mental illnesses. The following outcomes are mostly met: xerostomia, gross caries, decayed teeth, and periodontal disease. Poor oral hygiene, higher intake of carbonates, poor perception of oral health self-needs, length of psychotropic treatment, and less access to dental care determine suboptimal oral health among this population. Further replication of this research should generate gender-wise ethnic cohorts, including detailed observations of environmental factors, and medical problems that contribute to suboptimal oral health. This review highlights the importance of bridging dental health education to psychiatric rehabilitation programs.

  6. Combined oral contraceptives: health benefits beyond contraception.

    PubMed

    Caserta, D; Ralli, E; Matteucci, E; Bordi, G; Mallozzi, M; Moscarini, M

    2014-09-01

    It has been recognized for over 50 years that combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are also capable of offering health benefits beyond contraception through the treatment and prevention of several gynaecological and medical disorders. During the last years a constant attention was given to the adverse effects of COCs, whereas their non-contraceptive benefits were underestimated. To date, most women are still unaware of the therapeutic uses of hormonal contraceptives, while on the contrary there is an extensive and constantly increasing of these non-contraceptive health benefits. This review summarizes the conditions of special interest for physicians, including dysmenorrhoea, menorrhagia, hyperandrogenism (acne, hirsutism, polycystic ovary syndrome), functional ovarian cysts, endometriosis, premenstrual syndrome, myomas, pelvic inflammatory disease, bone mineral density, benign breast disease and endometrial/ovarian and colorectal cancer. The benefits of COCs in rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, menstrual migraine and in perimenopause have also been treated for more comprehensive information. Using COCs specifically for non-contraceptive indications is still outside the product licence in the majority of cases. We strongly believe that these aspects are not of minor relevance and they deserve a special consideration by health providers and by the mass media, which have the main responsibility in the diffusion of scientific information. Thus, counseling and education are necessary to help women make well-informed health-care decisions and it is also crucial to increase awareness among general practitioners and gynaecologists.

  7. Constructing public oral health policies in Brazil: issues for reflection.

    PubMed

    Soares, Catharina Leite Matos

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the construction of public oral health policies in Brazil by reviewing the available literature. It includes a discussion of the social responses given by the Brazilian State to oral health policies and the relationship of these responses with the ideological oral health movements that have developed globally, and that have specifically influenced oral health policies in Brazil. The influence of these movements has affected a series of hegemonic practices originating from both Market Dentistry and Preventive and Social Dentistry in Brazil. Among the state activities that have been set into motion, the following stand out: the drafting of a law to regulate the fluoridation of the public water supply, and the fluoridation of commercial toothpaste in Brazil; epidemiological surveys to analyze the status of the Brazilian population's oral health; the inclusion of oral health in the Family Health Strategy (Estratégia de Saúde da Família - ESF); the drawing up of the National Oral Health Policy, Smiling Brazil (Brasil Sorridente). From the literature consulted, the progressive expansion of state intervention in oral health policies is observed. However, there remains a preponderance of hegemonic "dental" practices reproduced in the Unified Public Health Service (Sistema Único de Saúde - SUS) and the Family Health Strategy.

  8. Does Pure Oralism Cause Atrophy of the Hearing-Impaired Child's Brain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Paul

    1983-01-01

    The question of whether the exclusive use of spoken English (i.e., oralism) causes brain atrophy for the hearing impaired child is examined in light of data presented by R. Conrad and other researchers. It is concluded that deafness itself is the fundamental cause of performance deficits. (SEW)

  9. Individual Differences in Anatomy Predict Reading and Oral Language Impairments in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Christiana; Eckert, Mark; Given, Barbara; Virginia, Berninger; Eden, Guinevere

    2006-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia (DD) and specific language impairment (SLI) are disorders of language that differ in diagnostic criteria and outcome. DD is defined by isolated reading deficits. SLI is defined by poor receptive and expressive oral language skills. Reading deficits, although prevalent, are not necessary for the diagnosis of SLI. An enduring…

  10. The Health Trade-Off of Rural Residence for Impaired Older Adults: Longer Life, More Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laditka, James N.; Laditka, Sarah B.; Olatosi, Bankole; Elder, Keith T.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Years lived with and without physical impairment are central measures of public health. Purpose: We sought to determine whether these measures differed between rural and urban residents who were impaired at the time of a baseline measurement. We examined 16 subgroups defined by rural/urban residence, gender, race, and education. Methods:…

  11. The Health Trade-Off of Rural Residence for Impaired Older Adults: Longer Life, More Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laditka, James N.; Laditka, Sarah B.; Olatosi, Bankole; Elder, Keith T.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Years lived with and without physical impairment are central measures of public health. Purpose: We sought to determine whether these measures differed between rural and urban residents who were impaired at the time of a baseline measurement. We examined 16 subgroups defined by rural/urban residence, gender, race, and education. Methods:…

  12. Oral Sexual Experience among Young Adolescents Receiving General Health Examinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boekeloo, Bradley O.; Howard, Donna E.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed young adolescents receiving general health examinations regarding oral sex occurrence. Overall, 18 percent reported having oral sex, and of that 18 percent, 25 percent reported no vaginal sex. Few adolescents used barrier protection during oral sex. Most adolescents thought that penile-anal sex could transmit HIV, but only 68 percent…

  13. Correlation between upper limb function and oral health impact in stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Fernanda C.; da Silva, Daniela F. T.; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel A.; Fernandes, Kristianne P. S.; Bussadori, Sandra K.

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between upper limb impairment and oral health impact in individuals with hemiparesis stemming from a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were conducted with a sample of 27 stroke survivors with complete or partial hemiparesis with brachial or crural predominance. The 14-item short version of the Oral Health Impact Profile was used to evaluate perceptions of oral health. The Brazilian version of the Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale was used to evaluate perceptions regarding quality of life. [Results] A statistically significant association was found between the upper extremity function subscale of the SSQOL-Brazil and the impact of oral health evaluated using the OHIP-14, with a strong correlation found for the physical pain subscale, moderate correlations with the functional limitation, psychological discomfort, physical disability, social disability and social handicap subscales as well as a weak correlation with the psychological disability subscale. Analyzing the OHIP-14 scores with regard to the impact of oral health on quality of life, the most frequent classification was weak impact, with small rates of moderate and strong impact. [Conclusion] Compromised upper limb function and self-perceived poor oral health, whether due to cultural resignation or functional disability, exert a negative impact on the quality of life of individuals with hemiparesis stemming from a stroke. PMID:26310352

  14. Missing Oral Health-Related Data in the interRAI-HC - Associations with Selected Variables of General Health and the Effect of Multiple Imputation on the Relationship between Oral and General Health

    PubMed Central

    Lesaffre, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Missing data within the comprehensive geriatric assessment of the interRAI suite of assessment instruments potentially imply the under-detection of conditions that require care as well as the risk of biased statistical results. Impaired oral health in older individuals has to be registered accurately as it causes pain and discomfort and is related to the general health status. Objective This study was based on interRAI-Home Care (HC) baseline data from 7590 subjects (mean age 81.2 years, SD 6.9) in Belgium. It was investigated if missingness of the oral health-related items was associated with selected variables of general health. It was also determined if multiple imputation of missing data affected the associations between oral and general health. Materials and Methods Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine if the prevalence of missingness in the oral health-related variables was associated with activities of daily life (ADLH), cognitive performance (CPS2) and depression (DRS). Associations between oral health and ADLH, CPS2 and DRS were determined, with missing data treated by 1. the complete-case technique and 2. by multiple imputation, and results were compared. Results The individual oral health-related variables had a similar proportion of missing values, ranging from 16.3% to 17.2%. The prevalence of missing data in all oral health-related variables was significantly associated with symptoms of depression (dental prosthesis use OR 1.66, CI 1.41–1.95; damaged teeth OR 1.74, CI 1.48–2.04; chewing problems OR 1.74, CI 1.47–2.05; dry mouth OR 1.65, CI 1.40–1.94). Missingness in damaged teeth (OR 1.27, CI 1.08–1.48), chewing problems (OR 1.22, CI 1.04–1.44) and dry mouth (OR 1.23, CI 1.05–1.44) occurred more frequently in cognitively impaired subjects. ADLH was not associated with the prevalence of missing data. When comparing the complete-case technique with the multiple imputation approach, nearly identical odds ratios

  15. Missing Oral Health-Related Data in the interRAI-HC - Associations with Selected Variables of General Health and the Effect of Multiple Imputation on the Relationship between Oral and General Health.

    PubMed

    Krausch-Hofmann, Stefanie; Bogaerts, Kris; Hofmann, Michael; de Almeida Mello, Johanna; Fávaro Moreira, Nádia Cristina; Lesaffre, Emmanuel; Declerck, Dominique; Declercq, Anja; Duyck, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Missing data within the comprehensive geriatric assessment of the interRAI suite of assessment instruments potentially imply the under-detection of conditions that require care as well as the risk of biased statistical results. Impaired oral health in older individuals has to be registered accurately as it causes pain and discomfort and is related to the general health status. This study was based on interRAI-Home Care (HC) baseline data from 7590 subjects (mean age 81.2 years, SD 6.9) in Belgium. It was investigated if missingness of the oral health-related items was associated with selected variables of general health. It was also determined if multiple imputation of missing data affected the associations between oral and general health. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine if the prevalence of missingness in the oral health-related variables was associated with activities of daily life (ADLH), cognitive performance (CPS2) and depression (DRS). Associations between oral health and ADLH, CPS2 and DRS were determined, with missing data treated by 1. the complete-case technique and 2. by multiple imputation, and results were compared. The individual oral health-related variables had a similar proportion of missing values, ranging from 16.3% to 17.2%. The prevalence of missing data in all oral health-related variables was significantly associated with symptoms of depression (dental prosthesis use OR 1.66, CI 1.41-1.95; damaged teeth OR 1.74, CI 1.48-2.04; chewing problems OR 1.74, CI 1.47-2.05; dry mouth OR 1.65, CI 1.40-1.94). Missingness in damaged teeth (OR 1.27, CI 1.08-1.48), chewing problems (OR 1.22, CI 1.04-1.44) and dry mouth (OR 1.23, CI 1.05-1.44) occurred more frequently in cognitively impaired subjects. ADLH was not associated with the prevalence of missing data. When comparing the complete-case technique with the multiple imputation approach, nearly identical odds ratios characterized the associations between oral and general health

  16. Assessment of relationship between oral health behavior, oral hygiene and gingival status of dental students.

    PubMed

    Lalani, Afsheen; Dasar, Pralhad L; Sandesh, N; Mishra, Prashant; Kumar, Sandeep; Balsaraf, Swati

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of oral health providers toward their own oral health reflects their understanding of the importance of preventive dental procedures and of improving the oral health of their target population. This study was done with an aim to assess the relationship between oral health behavior, oral hygiene and gingival status of third and final year dental students from a Dental College in Indore City, India. A total of 137 dental students participated in the study. The students were invited to complete the Hiroshima University-Dental Behavioral Inventory (HU-DBI) questionnaire. The HU-DBI questionnaire consisted of twenty polar responses (agree/disagree) regarding oral health-related behavior. In addition, two further questions about the frequency of brushing and flossing were included. Subsequently, oral health examination was conducted to assess plaque and gingival status. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test, Independent sample t-test, and Pearson's correlation. The significance level was set at P ≤ 0.05. The results showed that about 66.6% of the students checked their teeth in the mirror after brushing. Only 20.1% of the students reported bleeding from gums. The mean oral heath behavior score (HU-DBI) was 6.47 ± 2.0. A negative correlation of HU-DBI scores with plaque (r = -0.501) and gingival scores (r = -0.580) was observed. Thus, it is concluded that there is a significant relationship between the oral health behavior, oral hygiene, and gingival status of dental students. Dental students with better self-reported oral health behavior had lower plaque and gingival scores indicating a better attitude toward oral health.

  17. Primary oral health care: a missing link in public health in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Basharat, S; Shaikh, B T

    2016-12-12

    In Pakistan, the limited availability of oral health care and the high level of unmet oral health care needs are well documented. The recorded prevalence of dental caries is 50-70% and that of oral cancer is among the highest in the world. Although oral health care has been declared to be part of the primary health care system, oral health disparities between rich and poor, and emerging problems of access to and use of appropriate care have never been addressed, reflecting a lack of awareness among both patients and health system decisionmakers. Oral cancer screening and atraumatic restorative treatment for tooth decay could be included in a basic package of oral care that does not require qualified dental surgeons. This article develops an argument, based on literature review and an analysis of the health system in Pakistan, for how a basic oral health programme could be an accessible, affordable and acceptable component of the primary health care system.

  18. Influence of hepatic impairment on lenvatinib pharmacokinetics following single-dose oral administration.

    PubMed

    Shumaker, Robert; Aluri, Jagadeesh; Fan, Jean; Martinez, Gresel; Pentikis, Helen; Ren, Min

    2015-03-01

    This open-label, single-dose study assessed lenvatinib pharmacokinetics (PK) in subjects with normal hepatic function (n = 8) and mild, moderate, or severe hepatic impairment (n = 6 each). Subjects received 10 mg oral lenvatinib, except those with severe hepatic impairment (5 mg). Plasma and urine samples were collected over 14 days; free and total lenvatinib and its metabolites were analyzed using validated chromatography/spectrometry. PK parameters were estimated using noncompartmental analysis. There were no clinically meaningful effects of mild or moderate hepatic impairment on lenvatinib PK. Dose-normalized Cmax for free lenvatinib was 7.0, 3.7, 5.7, and 5.6 ng/mL in subjects with normal hepatic function, mild, moderate, and severe hepatic impairment, respectively. There was no consistent trend, although dose-normalized Cmax was lower for all subjects with hepatic impairment. AUCs increased 170% and t1/2 increased (37 versus 23 hours) in subjects with severe hepatic impairment. Changes in exposure based on total plasma concentrations were generally less than those based on free concentrations, suggesting changes in plasma protein binding in subjects with severe hepatic impairment. Lenvatinib was generally well tolerated. Subjects with severe hepatic impairment should begin lenvatinib treatment at a reduced dose of 14 mg versus 24 mg for subjects with normal liver function and subjects with mild or moderate hepatic impairment.

  19. Association of parental health literacy with oral health of Navajo Nation preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Brega, A. G.; Thomas, J. F.; Henderson, W. G.; Batliner, T. S.; Quissell, D. O.; Braun, P. A.; Wilson, A.; Bryant, L. L.; Nadeau, K. J.; Albino, J.

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy is ‘the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions’. Although numerous studies show a link between health literacy and clinical outcomes, little research has examined the association of health literacy with oral health. No large-scale studies have assessed these relationships among American Indians, a population at risk for limited health literacy and oral health problems. This analysis was conducted as part of a clinical trial aimed at reducing dental decay among preschoolers in the Navajo Nation Head Start program. Using baseline data for 1016 parent–child dyads, we examined the association of parental health literacy with parents’ oral health knowledge, attitudes, and behavior, as well as indicators of parental and pediatric oral health. More limited health literacy was associated with lower levels of oral health knowledge, more negative oral health attitudes, and lower levels of adherence to recommended oral health behavior. Parents with more limited health literacy also had significantly worse oral health status (OHS) and reported their children to have significantly worse oral health-related quality of life. These results highlight the importance of oral health promotion interventions that are sensitive to the needs of participants with limited health literacy. PMID:26612050

  20. Association of parental health literacy with oral health of Navajo Nation preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Brega, A G; Thomas, J F; Henderson, W G; Batliner, T S; Quissell, D O; Braun, P A; Wilson, A; Bryant, L L; Nadeau, K J; Albino, J

    2016-02-01

    Health literacy is 'the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions'. Although numerous studies show a link between health literacy and clinical outcomes, little research has examined the association of health literacy with oral health. No large-scale studies have assessed these relationships among American Indians, a population at risk for limited health literacy and oral health problems. This analysis was conducted as part of a clinical trial aimed at reducing dental decay among preschoolers in the Navajo Nation Head Start program. Using baseline data for 1016 parent-child dyads, we examined the association of parental health literacy with parents' oral health knowledge, attitudes, and behavior, as well as indicators of parental and pediatric oral health. More limited health literacy was associated with lower levels of oral health knowledge, more negative oral health attitudes, and lower levels of adherence to recommended oral health behavior. Parents with more limited health literacy also had significantly worse oral health status (OHS) and reported their children to have significantly worse oral health-related quality of life. These results highlight the importance of oral health promotion interventions that are sensitive to the needs of participants with limited health literacy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Auto-inflammatory syndromes and oral health.

    PubMed

    Scully, C; Hodgson, T; Lachmann, H

    2008-11-01

    Auto-inflammatory diseases (periodic syndromes) are rare childhood-onset disorders which are characterized by fluctuating or recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation affecting serosal surfaces, joints, eyes and/or skin without significant autoantibody production or an identifiable underlying infection. They are disorders of innate immunity and the underlying genetic defect has been identified in most of the syndromes. Diagnosis relies on clinical symptoms and evidence of an elevated acute phase response during attacks, supported by finding mutations in the relevant genes. Several syndromes can lead to systemic AA amyloidosis. Aphthous-like oral ulceration has been reported as one manifestation in several of the syndromes, including periodic fever, aphthous-stomatitis, pharyngitis, adenitis (PFAPA) familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome, tumour necrosis factor receptor associated periodic syndrome and pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA). Chronic jaw recurrent osteomyelitis has been recorded in chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis. Advances in the molecular pathogenesis of these syndromes and the regulation of innate immunity have enhanced diagnosis, and rationalized therapies. This article reviews the periodic fever syndromes relevant to oral health and the suggested association of FMF with Behçet's disease.

  2. What explains health in persons with visual impairment?

    PubMed

    Leissner, Juliane; Coenen, Michaela; Froehlich, Stephan; Loyola, Danny; Cieza, Alarcos

    2014-05-03

    Visual impairment is associated with important limitations in functioning. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) adopted by the World Health Organisation (WHO) relies on a globally accepted framework for classifying problems in functioning and the influence of contextual factors. Its comprehensive perspective, including biological, individual and social aspects of health, enables the ICF to describe the whole health experience of persons with visual impairment. The objectives of this study are (1) to analyze whether the ICF can be used to comprehensively describe the problems in functioning of persons with visual impairment and the environmental factors that influence their lives and (2) to select the ICF categories that best capture self-perceived health of persons with visual impairment. Data from 105 persons with visual impairment were collected, including socio-demographic data, vision-related data, the Extended ICF Checklist and the visual analogue scale of the EuroQoL-5D, to assess self-perceived health. Descriptive statistics and a Group Lasso regression were performed. The main outcome measures were functioning defined as impairments in Body functions and Body structures, limitations in Activities and restrictions in Participation, influencing Environmental factors and self-perceived health. In total, 120 ICF categories covering a broad range of Body functions, Body structures, aspects of Activities and Participation and Environmental factors were identified. Thirteen ICF categories that best capture self-perceived health were selected based on the Group Lasso regression. While Activities-and-Participation categories were selected most frequently, the greatest impact on self-perceived health was found in Body-functions categories. The ICF can be used as a framework to comprehensively describe the problems of persons with visual impairment and the Environmental factors which influence their lives. There are plenty of

  3. Oral Histories as Critical Qualitative Inquiry in Community Health Assessment.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Sarah Gabriella; Genkova, Ana; Castañeda, Yvette; Alexander, Simone; Hebert-Beirne, Jennifer

    2017-10-01

    Qualitative methods such as focus groups and interviews are common methodologies employed in participatory approaches to community health assessment to develop effective community health improvement plans. Oral histories are a rarely used form of qualitative inquiry that can enhance community health assessment in multiple ways. Oral histories center residents' lived experiences, which often reveal more complex social and health phenomena than conventional qualitative inquiry. This article examines an oral history research component of the Little Village Community Health Assessment, a collaborative research effort to promote health equity in an urban, Mexican ethnic enclave. We collected of 32 oral histories from residents to provide deeper, more grounded insight on community needs and assets. We initially used thematic data analysis. After analytic peer debriefings with the analysis team, we found the process inadvertently reductionist and instead opted for community listening events for participatory data analysis, knowledge translation, and dissemination of findings. Oral histories were most meaningful in their original audio form, adding to a holistic understanding of health by giving voice to complex problems while also naming and describing concepts that were culturally unique. Moreover, the oral histories collectively articulated a counternarrative that celebrated community cultural wealth and opposed the mainstream narrative of the community as deprived. We argue for the recognition and practice of oral histories as a more routine form of qualitative inquiry in community health assessment. In the pursuit of health equity and collaboratively working toward social justice, oral histories can push the boundaries of community health assessment research and practice.

  4. Influences on children's oral health: a conceptual model.

    PubMed

    Fisher-Owens, Susan A; Gansky, Stuart A; Platt, Larry J; Weintraub, Jane A; Soobader, Mah-J; Bramlett, Matthew D; Newacheck, Paul W

    2007-09-01

    Despite marked improvements over the past century, oral health in America is a significant problem: caries is the most common chronic disease of childhood. Much oral health research examines influences primarily in the oral cavity or focuses on a limited number of individual-level factors. The purpose of this article was to present a more encompassing conceptual model of the influences on children's oral health. The conceptual model presented here was derived from the population health and social epidemiology fields, which have moved toward multilevel, holistic approaches to analyze the complex and interactive causes of children's health problems. It is based on a comprehensive review of major population and oral health literatures. A multilevel conceptual model is described, with the individual, family, and community levels of influence on oral health outcomes. This model incorporates the 5 key domains of determinants of health as identified in the population health literature: genetic and biological factors, the social environment, the physical environment, health behaviors, and dental and medical care. The model recognizes the presence of a complex interplay of causal factors. Last, the model incorporates the aspect of time, recognizing the evolution of oral health diseases (eg, caries) and influences on the child-host over time. This conceptual model represents a starting point for thinking about children's oral health. The model incorporates many of the important breakthroughs by social epidemiologists over the past 25 years by including a broad range of genetic, social, and environmental risk factors; multiple pathways by which they operate; a time dimension; the notion of differential susceptibility and resilience; and a multilevel approach. The study of children's oral health from a global perspective remains largely in its infancy and is poised for additional development. This work can help inform how best to approach and improve children's oral health.

  5. Building better oral health: a dental home for all Texans.

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    Poor oral health affects more than just the mouth. It can seriously compromise a person's general health, quality of life and life expectancy. Oral diseases can and do lead to systemic problems--damaging other parts of the body and resulting in the need for expensive emergency department visits, hospital stays and medications. The consequences of poor oral health, however, go far beyond damaging medical effects. Oral disease can also wreak economic havoc--keeping children out of school and adults home from work--not to mention lower productivity of workers in pain. Untreated oral diseases can also drive up health care costs in general. The good news is that with proper oral health care, both at home and in professional settings, many of the negative consequences associated with poor oral health can be prevented. The State of Texas has a unique and unprecedented opportunity to significantly increase access to oral health care for all Texans. Complying with the Frew agreement is a key priority. However, there are additional ways that Texas policymakers can improve the oral health of the state. In an effort to begin a constructive dialogue about improving the oral health of all Texans, the Texas Dental Association (TDA) with grant funding from the American Dental Association (ADA) commissioned an independent third-party report on the issue of access to oral health care in Texas modeled after the 2000 groundbreaking surgeon general's report, Oral Health in America. The TDA assembled a team of five nationally recognized dentists from both academia and private practice to oversee the project. The dentists (hereafter called the editorial review board or ERB) were asked to identify the state's most pressing issues, needs and challenges associated with improving the oral health of all Texans, with a special focus on the state's most vulnerable. The ERB looked carefully at the economic, medical and social consequences of untreated oral disease in Texas. It reviewed the

  6. Oral health status of children with autistic disorder in Chennai.

    PubMed

    Vishnu Rekha, C; Arangannal, P; Shahed, H

    2012-06-01

    To assess the oral health status of autistic children in Chennai. Oral health status was assessed for 483 children with autism, solicited from special education schools, autistic child centres and therapy centres. Conditions assessed were plaque accumulation, gingival health, dental caries, malocclusion, developmental anomalies, oral injuries and restorations. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests of significance were used to compare groups. Proportions test was used to compare the significance of the parameters between boys and girls. Autistic children with primary dentition showed significantly higher incidence of dental caries (24%), when compared to other oral conditions. Children with mixed dentition had more gingivitis (50%) and children with permanent dentition had more gingivitis (48.96%) and malocclusion (71.15%). All the oral conditions were seen more in boys than girls. Autistic children have significantly poor oral hygiene and higher incidence of malocclusion and dental caries when compared to other oral conditions.

  7. Oral Health of Down Syndrome Adults in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    PubMed Central

    Porovic, Selma; Zukanovic, Amila; Juric, Hrvoje; Dinarevic, Senka Mesihovic

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to determine the oral health condition Down syndrome (DS) adults in Bosnia and Herzegovina, by analyzing oral health of Down syndrome individuals in two largest regions, Sarajevo and Tuzla Canton. Patients and Methods: Caries and oral health status of 33 Down syndrome adults aged 19-45 years were examined and assessed according WHO 1997 criteria. Results: The mean DMFT index is 15,96±8,08. The analysis of oral hygiene of Down syndrome children by using the debris index, is found that 42,4% have very good oral hygiene, 21,2% respondents have good oral hygiene, 27,3% are with poor oral hygiene, while the very poor hygiene have 9,1% subjects. The Value of CPI index is 0,82. PMID:28144195

  8. Caregivers’ oral health literacy and their young children's oral health-related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    DIVARIS, KIMON; LEE, JESSICA YUNA; BAKER, ARNETT DIANE; VANN, WILLIAM FELIX

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association of caregivers’ oral health literacy (OHL) with their children's oral health related-quality of life (C-OHRQoL) and explore literacy as a modifier in the association between children's oral health status (COHS) and C-OHRQoL. Methods We relied upon data from structured interviews with 203 caregivers of children ages 3-5 from the Carolina Oral Health Literacy (COHL) Project. Data were collected for OHL using REALD-30, caregiver-reported COHS using the NHANES-item, and COHRQoL using the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS). We also measured oral health behaviors (OHBs) and socio-demographic characteristics and calculated overall/stratified summary estimates for OHL and C-OHRQoL. We computed Spearman's rho and 95% confidence limits (CL) as measures of correlation of OHL/COHS with C-OHRQoL. To determine whether OHL modified the association between COHS and C-OHRQoL, we compared literacy-specific summary and regression estimates. Results Reported COHS was: excellent—50%, very good—28%, good—14%, fair—6%, poor—2%. The aggregate C-OHRQoL mean score was 2.0 (95% CL:1.4, 2.6), and the mean OHL score 15.9 (95% CL:15.2, 16.7). There was an inverse relationship between COHS and C-OHRQoL: rho=-0.32 (95% CL:-0.45, -0.18). There was no important association between OHL and C-OHRQoL; however, deleterious OHBs were associated with worse C-OHRQoL. Literacy-specific linear and Poisson regression estimates of the association between COHS and C-OHRQoL departed from homogeneity (Wald X2 P<0.2). Conclusion In this community-based sample of caregiver/child dyads, we found a strong correlation between OHS and C-OHRQoL. The association's magnitude and gradient were less pronounced among caregivers with low literacy. PMID:22150574

  9. Oral administration of d-galactose induces cognitive impairments and oxidative damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Budni, Josiane; Pacheco, Robson; da Silva, Sabrina; Garcez, Michelle Lima; Mina, Francielle; Bellettini-Santos, Tatiani; de Medeiros, Jesiel; Voss, Bruna Constantino; Steckert, Amanda Valnier; Valvassori, Samira da Silva; Quevedo, João

    2016-04-01

    d-Galactose (d-gal) is a reducing sugar that can be used to mimic the characteristics of aging in rodents; however, the effects of d-gal administration by oral route are not clear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate if the oral administration of d-gal induces cognitive impairments, neuronal loss, and oxidative damage, mimicking an animal model of aging. Male adult Wistar rats (4 months old) received d-gal (100mg/kg) via the oral route for a period of 1, 2, 4, 6 or 8 weeks. The results showed cognitive impairments in the open-field test in the 4th and 6th weeks after d-gal administration, as well as an impairment in spatial memory in the radial maze test after the 6th week of d-gal administration. The results indicated increase of levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive species-TBARS-and carbonyl group content in the prefrontal cortex from the 4th week, and in all weeks of d-gal administration, respectively. An increase in the levels of TBARS and carbonyl group content was observed in the hippocampus over the entire period of d-gal treatment. In the 8th week of d-gal administration, we also observed reductions in synaptophysin and TAU protein levels in the prefrontal cortex. Thus, d-gal given by oral route caused cognitive impairments which were accompanied by oxidative damage. Therefore, these results indicate that orally administered d-gal can induce the behavioral and neurochemical alterations that are observed in the natural aging process. However, oral d-gal effect in rats deserve further studies to be better described. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Oral Health of Drug Abusers: A Review of Health Effects and Care.

    PubMed

    Shekarchizadeh, Hajar; Khami, Mohammad R; Mohebbi, Simin Z; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Virtanen, Jorma I

    2013-09-01

    Oral health problems, among the most prevalent comorbidities related to addiction, require more attention by both clinicians and policy-makers. Our aims were to review oral complications associated with drugs, oral health care in addiction rehabilitation, health services available, and barriers against oral health promotion among addicts. Drug abuse is associated with serious oral health problems including generalized dental caries, periodontal diseases, mucosal dysplasia, xerostomia, bruxism, tooth wear, and tooth loss. Oral health care has positive effects in recovery from drug abuse: patients' need for pain control, destigmatization, and HIV transmission. Health care systems worldwide deliver services for addicts, but most lack oral health care programs. Barriers against oral health promotion among addicts include difficulty in accessing addicts as a target population, lack of appropriate settings and of valid assessment protocols for conducting oral health studies, and poor collaboration between dental and general health care sectors serving addicts. These interfere with an accurate picture of the situation. Moreover, lack of appropriate policies to improve access to dental services, lack of comprehensive knowledge of and interest among dental professionals in treating addicts, and low demand for non-emergency dental care affect provision of effective interventions. Management of drug addiction as a multi-organ disease requires a multidisciplinary approach. Health care programs usually lack oral health care elements. Published evidence on oral complications related to addiction emphasizes that regardless of these barriers, oral health care at various levels including education, prevention, and treatment should be integrated into general care services for addicts.

  11. Oral Health of Drug Abusers: A Review of Health Effects and Care

    PubMed Central

    SHEKARCHIZADEH, Hajar; KHAMI, Mohammad R.; MOHEBBI, Simin Z.; EKHTIARI, Hamed; VIRTANEN, Jorma I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Oral health problems, among the most prevalent comorbidities related to addiction, require more attention by both clinicians and policy-makers. Our aims were to review oral complications associated with drugs, oral health care in addiction rehabilitation, health services available, and barriers against oral health promotion among addicts. Drug abuse is associated with serious oral health problems including generalized dental caries, periodontal diseases, mucosal dysplasia, xerostomia, bruxism, tooth wear, and tooth loss. Oral health care has positive effects in recovery from drug abuse: patients’ need for pain control, destigmatization, and HIV transmission. Health care systems worldwide deliver services for addicts, but most lack oral health care programs. Barriers against oral health promotion among addicts include difficulty in accessing addicts as a target population, lack of appropriate settings and of valid assessment protocols for conducting oral health studies, and poor collaboration between dental and general health care sectors serving addicts. These interfere with an accurate picture of the situation. Moreover, lack of appropriate policies to improve access to dental services, lack of comprehensive knowledge of and interest among dental professionals in treating addicts, and low demand for non-emergency dental care affect provision of effective interventions. Management of drug addiction as a multi-organ disease requires a multidisciplinary approach. Health care programs usually lack oral health care elements. Published evidence on oral complications related to addiction emphasizes that regardless of these barriers, oral health care at various levels including education, prevention, and treatment should be integrated into general care services for addicts. PMID:26060654

  12. Research directions in oral health promotion for older adults.

    PubMed

    Gift, H C

    1992-09-01

    Health education and health promotion facilitate voluntary adoption of behaviors and provide educational, organizational, economic, and environmental supports for behaviors conductive to health. Health education and health promotion are complementary and any effort to eliminate oral disease requires both activities. Federal research initiatives in oral health promotion have encouraged more biomedical and behavioral research on oral health and aging through the establishment of research centers. Other initiatives have been established to speed the generation of basic and clinical research. Recent initiatives encourage research on aging and provide opportunities for oral health promotion during the coming decade. These include Healthy People 2000, the nation's health objectives for the decade; the NIH framework for the development of a strategic plan, and the NIDR Long-Range Research Plan, Broadening the Scope.

  13. Oral health problems in Finnish conscripts.

    PubMed

    Rajasuo, A; Murtomaa, H; Meurman, J H; Ankkuriniemi, O

    1991-01-01

    The frequency of oral health problems in 353 Finnish conscripts aged 21.0 (SD 1.2 years) was studied by means of a questionnaire and by investigating the dental records. One hundred five (30%) conscripts had seeked dental help during their 8 months' military service. Forty-four percent of these patients had dental caries as their main diagnosis; endodontic problems comprised 9% of all cases. The problems related to third molars were second in frequency, accounting for 27% of the conscripts treated. Six and one-half percent of the patients had lost serving time on dental grounds (mean absence 3.6 days), most often (90%) due to acute pericoronitis or post-operative status following third molar surgery.

  14. Poor oral health and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Joshipura, K J; Rimm, E B; Douglass, C W; Trichopoulos, D; Ascherio, A; Willett, W C

    1996-09-01

    A few recent studies have shown associations between poor oral health and coronary heart disease (CHD). The objective of this study was to examine the incidence of CHD in relation to number of teeth present and periodontal disease, and to explore potential mediators of this association, in a prospective cohort study. This study is a part of the ongoing Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS). Participants included a US national sample of 44,119 male health professionals (58% of whom were dentists), from 40 to 75 years of age, who reported no diagnosed CHD, cancer, or diabetes at baseline. We recorded 757 incident cases of CHD, including fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction and sudden death, in six years of follow-up. Among men who reported pre-existing periodontal disease, those with 10 or fewer teeth were at increased risk of CHD compared with men with 25 or more teeth (relative risk = 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 2.71), after adjustment for standard CHD risk factors. Among men without pre-existing periodontal disease, no relationship was found (relative risk = 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.74 to 1.68). The associations were only slightly attenuated after we controlled for dietary factors. No overall associations were found between periodontal disease and coronary heart disease. Tooth loss may be associated with increased risk of CHD, primarily among those with a positive periodontal disease history; diet was only a small mediator of this association.

  15. Evaluating student learning outcomes in oral health knowledge and skills.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Adrienne; Edwards, Suzanne; Whiting, Glenda; Donnelly, Frank

    2017-09-22

    The aim was to evaluate whether a set of oral health resources designed for workforce training was relevant for students undertaking an entry-level nursing or aged care qualification. Oral health is one of the most neglected aspects of nursing care experienced by older people. Despite efforts to improve aged care worker oral health knowledge and skills, one-off training and rapid staff turnover have hindered the success of workplace programs. Inadequate oral health content in entry-level nursing and aged care qualifications has perpetuated this. Kirkpatrick's training and evaluation model was used to evaluate the resources developed by a project called Building Better Oral Health Communities. Students used them as prescribed study materials and completed pre- and post-intervention questionnaires. Educators were interviewed to obtain their feedback. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Qualitative data were collated according to relevance to learning, presentation style and interest. Evaluation showed high levels of student and educator satisfaction. Student learning outcomes demonstrated consistently positive attitudes and significant self-reported improvements in oral health knowledge and skills. Irrespective of course type, students gained similar levels of oral health knowledge and skills following use of the resources. Nurses and care workers must be able to provide consistent standards of oral health care as a fundamental part of caring for patients. Validated as an effective learning and teaching package, it is recommended that these resources be utilised to strengthen the oral health content of entry-level nursing and aged care qualifications. Building the oral health capacity of nurses and care workers is one way of reversing oral health neglect and improving the quality of care provided to older people. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights

  16. Inequalities in oral health: the role of sociology.

    PubMed

    Gibson, L B; Blake, M; Baker, S

    2016-06-01

    This paper seeks to identify an important point of contact between the literature on inequalities in oral health and the sociology of power. The paper begins by exploring the problem of social inequalities in oral health from the point of view of human freedom. It then goes on to briefly consider why inequalities in oral health matter before providing a brief overview of current approaches to reducing inequalities in oral health. After this the paper briefly introduces the problem of power in sociology before going on to outline why the problem of power matters in the problem of inequalities in oral health. Here the paper discusses how two key principles associated with the social bond have become central to how we think about health related inequalities. These principles are the principle of treating everyone the same (the principle of autonomy) and the related principle of allowing everyone to pursue their own goals (the principle of intimacy). These principles are outlined and subsequently discussed in detail with application to debates about interventions to reduce oral health related inequalities including that of water fluoridation. The paper highlights how the 'Childsmile' programme in Scotland appears to successfully negotiate the tensions inherent in attempting to do something about inequalities in oral health. It then concludes by highlighting some of the tensions that remain in attempting to alleviate oral health related inequalities.

  17. Predictors of oral health counseling by WIC providers.

    PubMed

    Butani, Yogita; Kuthy, Raymond A; Qian, Fang; Lampiris, Lewis

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess selected predictors for the inclusion of oral health counseling by Illinois Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) providers. A questionnaire was developed and mailed to all 166 WIC sites to assess attitudes towards oral health counseling. Variables that revealed significant associations in bivariate analysis (P< or =.05) were considered as candidates for building a final logistic regression model in which frequency of oral health counseling was the outcome. A response rate of 76% was achieved after 1 mailing, with 27% of the WIC providers having some form of oral health training. There were no statistically significant differences in the frequency of WIC providers discussing oral health with their clients by age, gender, and level of education of the provider. In the final logistic regression analysis, variables significantly associated with the frequency of WIC providers' dicussing oral health with their clients were having: (1) oral health training; and (2) nursing training. The results suggest that Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) providers, who have had some oral health training, are more likely to provide counseling about dental disease and its prevention. This information was used to develop an educational tool for these nondental, health care providers.

  18. Oral health indicators poorly predict coronary heart disease deaths.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, R; Reunanen, A; Paunio, M; Paunio, I; Aromaa, A

    2003-09-01

    Several earlier studies have suggested that development of coronary heart disease (CHD) is causally related to oral infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between oral health indicators and CHD deaths. Out of a nationally representative sample, 6527 men and women aged 30-69 years participated in the health examination with a dental check. Detailed oral health data included caries, periodontal and dental plaque status, presence of remaining teeth, and various types of dentures. Over a mean 12-year follow-up, persons dying of CHD were older and more often smoked, had hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, and only a basic education compared with other persons. In univariate analyses, several oral health indicators were associated with CHD deaths. Adjustment for the established CHD risk factors reduced all these associations to statistical non-significance. The associations between oral health indicators and CHD are mostly explained by confounding factors, particularly those relating to health behavior.

  19. Oral health in Libya: addressing the future challenges.

    PubMed

    Peeran, Syed Wali; Altaher, Omar Basheer; Peeran, Syed Ali; Alsaid, Fatma Mojtaba; Mugrabi, Marei Hamed; Ahmed, Aisha Mojtaba; Grain, Abdulgader

    2014-01-01

    Libya is a vast country situated in North Africa, having a relatively better functioning economy with a scanty population. This article is the first known attempt to review the current state of oral health care in Libya and to explore the present trends and future challenges. Libyan health system, oral health care, and human resources with the present status of dental education are reviewed comprehensively. A bibliographic study of oral health research and publications has been carried out. The results point toward a common indicator that oral health-related research is low. Strategies have to be developed to educate the medical and dental professionals, to update the current curriculum and enable the system to be competent in all aspects of oral health care management.

  20. Oral health promotion interventions on oral yeast in hospitalised and medically compromised patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lam, Otto L T; Bandara, H M H N; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; McGrath, Colman; Li, Leonard S W

    2012-03-01

    Yeast are major aetiological agents of localised oral mucosal lesions, and are also leading causes of nosocomial bloodstream infections. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of oral health promotion interventions on the prevalence and incidence of these opportunistic oral pathogens in hospitalised and medically compromised patients. The PubMed, ISI Web of Science and Cochrane Library databases were searched for clinical trials assessing the effect of oral health promotion interventions on oral yeast. Chlorhexidine delivered in a variety of oral hygiene products appeared to have some effect on oral yeast, although some studies found equivocal effects. Although a wide array of other compounds have also been investigated, their clinical effectiveness remains to be substantiated. Likewise, the utility of mechanical oral hygiene interventions and other oral health promotion measures such as topical application of salivary substitute, remains unsettled. Although many chemical agents contained in oral hygiene products have proven in vitro activity against oral yeast, their clinical effectiveness and potential role as adjuncts or alternative therapies to conventional treatment remains to be confirmed by further high-quality randomised controlled trials. This is pertinent, given the recent emergence of yeast resistance to conventional antifungal agents.

  1. [The relationship between the infant nursing bottle caries and the feeding patterns, oral health behavior and parents' oral health information].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhao-qi

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between the infant nursing bottle caries in city community and the feeding patterns, oral health behavior, parents' oral health information, and to provide scientific basis for future infant nursing bottle caries prevention. Three hundred infants aged 6, 7, 12, 18 months in April 2009 in Bai Guan Street Community Hospital Shangyu City were enrolled in this study, nursing bottle caries were examined and recorded. Questionnaires on infant basic data, feeding patterns, oral health behavior, parents' oral health information were asked and recorded in these 300 parents. The relationship was analyzed between the infant nursing bottle caries and the questionnaires by Chi-square test with the SPSS14.0 software package. The infant nursing bottle caries correlated obviously with the habit of sleeping with the nursing bottle or mammary papilla in mouth, and did not correlate with the breast or artificial feeding patterns. The occurrence rate of infant nursing bottle caries was significantly lower in the infants with oral health behavior than those without oral health behavior. After feeding food, more parents feed the infants with little plain boiled water than clean the infant oral cavity with finger cap wet carbasus. 56.7% of parents had no acknowledge of danger of infant nursing bottle caries. There is some correlation between the infant nursing bottle caries and the feeding patterns, oral health behavior, parents' oral health information.

  2. On self-perceived oral health in Swedish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ostberg, Anna-Lena

    2002-01-01

    Aiming to investigate adolescents' perceptions of oral health, with a focus on gender differences, quantitative and qualitative studies were conducted in Skaraborg County, Sweden. Adolescents (13-18 years; n = 17,280) answered a school questionnaire, epidemiological indices on oral health were collected, and 17 semi-structured interviews were conducted. Most adolescents perceived their oral health as good, girls more often than boys. The oral behavior of girls was also more often healthy (floss usage: girls 31%, boys 21%), and they were consistently less satisfied with the appearance of their teeth than boys. Girls considered their own consumption of candy to be too high more often than boys. Acknowledging the importance of sound teeth was strongly associated with self-perceived oral health: boys, odds ratio (OR) 8.58 [confidence interval (CI) 7.12-10.34]; girls, OR 5.56 [CI 4.23-7.30]. Adolescents living with a single mother (13-15-yr-olds OR 1.37 [CI 1.20-1.57], 16-18-yr-olds OR 1.51 [CI 1.28-1.77]), or with neither parent, more often reported bleeding gums than those who lived with both parents, while adolescents who lived with a single father did not. Weak correlations between epidemiological indices and self-perceived oral health were found at the school level. In the interviews, adolescents perceived the possibilities to influence their own oral health as limited. Perceptions of influences on oral health were related to personal and professional care, social support, social impact, and external factors such as time and economy. Support from the mother--more than from the father--was emphasized. This thesis showed that positive oral health attitudes and parental support are of great importance if oral health is to be perceived as good. There were gender differences in all issues related to self-perceived oral health.

  3. (A1) Identification of oral health care needs in children and adults, management of oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, T A; Naidoo, S; Chidzonga, M; Ramos-Gomez, F; Shiboski, C

    2006-04-01

    The workshop considered five questions reviewing the identification of international oral health care needs of children and adults, and the management of oral diseases in resource-poor countries: (1) What is the role of the dental profession in the management of the HIV-infected individual? (2) Identifying health care needs-What are the epidemiology and disparities of HIV-associated oral lesions in children from different continents? (3) How effective is HIV treatment in controlling oral diseases? (4) Could we develop basic inexpensive oral and dental care protocols for economically deprived HIV-infected patients? and (5) What is the best method of arranging resources to meet the oral health care needs of people with HIV disease? The consensus of the workshop participants was that there is a need to re-target research efforts to non-established market economy countries and prioritize research in these regions to children with HIV disease. It will be important to assess commonalities and variations in oral health needs across geographical and cultural boundaries, and research efforts should be centralized in resource-poor countries to support multi-center longitudinal standardized studies. It is essential that oral health research be integrated into other health care research programs, to make these research priorities and public health initiatives feasible.

  4. Nutritional Aspects of Essential Trace Elements in Oral Health and Disease: An Extensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mohsina

    2016-01-01

    Human body requires certain essential elements in small quantities and their absence or excess may result in severe malfunctioning of the body and even death in extreme cases because these essential trace elements directly influence the metabolic and physiologic processes of the organism. Rapid urbanization and economic development have resulted in drastic changes in diets with developing preference towards refined diet and nutritionally deprived junk food. Poor nutrition can lead to reduced immunity, augmented vulnerability to various oral and systemic diseases, impaired physical and mental growth, and reduced efficiency. Diet and nutrition affect oral health in a variety of ways with influence on craniofacial development and growth and maintenance of dental and oral soft tissues. Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) are treated with antioxidants containing essential trace elements like selenium but even increased dietary intake of trace elements like copper could lead to oral submucous fibrosis. The deficiency or excess of other trace elements like iodine, iron, zinc, and so forth has a profound effect on the body and such conditions are often diagnosed through their early oral manifestations. This review appraises the biological functions of significant trace elements and their role in preservation of oral health and progression of various oral diseases. PMID:27433374

  5. Nutritional Aspects of Essential Trace Elements in Oral Health and Disease: An Extensive Review.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Preeti Tomar; Misra, Satya Ranjan; Hussain, Mohsina

    2016-01-01

    Human body requires certain essential elements in small quantities and their absence or excess may result in severe malfunctioning of the body and even death in extreme cases because these essential trace elements directly influence the metabolic and physiologic processes of the organism. Rapid urbanization and economic development have resulted in drastic changes in diets with developing preference towards refined diet and nutritionally deprived junk food. Poor nutrition can lead to reduced immunity, augmented vulnerability to various oral and systemic diseases, impaired physical and mental growth, and reduced efficiency. Diet and nutrition affect oral health in a variety of ways with influence on craniofacial development and growth and maintenance of dental and oral soft tissues. Oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) are treated with antioxidants containing essential trace elements like selenium but even increased dietary intake of trace elements like copper could lead to oral submucous fibrosis. The deficiency or excess of other trace elements like iodine, iron, zinc, and so forth has a profound effect on the body and such conditions are often diagnosed through their early oral manifestations. This review appraises the biological functions of significant trace elements and their role in preservation of oral health and progression of various oral diseases.

  6. Policy analysis of oral health promotion in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shenuka; Myburgh, Neil G; Lalloo, Ratilal

    2010-03-01

    This article reports an analysis of oral health promotion in South African health policy. The central aim of this research was to determine the form and coherence of oral health promotion elements within health policies of post-apartheid South Africa. The study set out to test the hypothesis that oral health promotion elements are fully integrated into health policy and programmatic efforts. A conceptual framework was developed to systematically analyse oral health promotion policy and subsequent decision-making across the country at national and provincial levels. The information was drawn from policy documents, protocols and programme plans, complemented by interviews. The results indicate distinct contradictions between the policy formulation process and its impact on health system decision-making. South African health policy was found to be strong on the rhetoric of equity, health promotion, integration and several other features of the Primary Health Care Approach, but showed little evidence of translating this into action. The development and implementation of oral health promotion appears to be dominated by the influence of dental professionals that perpetuate a curative focus on service delivery. There is an urgent need to re-examine the process and content of oral health policy-making in South Africa. The conceptual framework developed for this study could facilitate further research in this area.

  7. An Oral Health Education Program for Latino Immigrant Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ruth M.; Canham, Daryl; Cureton, Virginia Young

    2005-01-01

    A high prevalence of dental caries in the pediatric population is a major health problem. At highest risk are low-income minority groups, including refugee and immigrant populations. Consequences of oral disease include pain, difficulty eating and speaking, poor school performance, and poor self-esteem. Parent involvement in oral health education…

  8. An Oral Health Education Program for Latino Immigrant Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ruth M.; Canham, Daryl; Cureton, Virginia Young

    2005-01-01

    A high prevalence of dental caries in the pediatric population is a major health problem. At highest risk are low-income minority groups, including refugee and immigrant populations. Consequences of oral disease include pain, difficulty eating and speaking, poor school performance, and poor self-esteem. Parent involvement in oral health education…

  9. Oral Health and Aging | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Oral Health and Aging Oral Health and Aging Past Issues / Summer 2016 Table ... been your experience in seeing patients with dry mouth? Most dry mouth cases I’ve seen seem ...

  10. Impact of Caregiver Literacy on Children's Oral Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Elizabeth; Lee, Jessica Y.; DeWalt, Darren A.; Vann, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship of primary caregivers’ literacy with children's oral health outcomes. Design We performed a cross-sectional study of children ages six and younger who presented for an initial dental appointment in the teaching clinics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Dentistry. Caregiver literacy was measured using the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Dentistry (REALD-30). The outcome measures included oral health knowledge, oral health behaviors, primary caregiver's reports of their child's oral health status, and the clinical oral health status of the child as determined by a clinical exam completed by trained, calibrated examiners. Results Among the 106 caregiver/child dyads enrolled, 59% of the children were male, 52% were white, and 86% caregivers were the biological mothers. The bivariate results showed no significant relationships between literacy and oral health knowledge (p=0.16) and behaviors (p=0.24); however, there was an association between literacy and oral health status (p<0.05). The multivariate analysis controlled for race, and income; this analysis revealed a significant relationship between caregiver literacy scores and clinical oral health status as determined using a standardized clinical exam. Caregivers of children with mild to moderate treatment needs were more likely to have higher REALD-30 scores than those with severe treatment needs (OR=1.14; 95%CI 1.05:1.25, p=0.003). Conclusions Caregiver literacy is significantly associated with children's dental disease status. PMID:20547644

  11. Oral health status of older adults in Kentucky: results from the Kentucky Elder Oral Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Bush, Heather M; Dickens, Noel E; Henry, Robert G; Durham, Lisa; Sallee, Nancy; Skelton, Judith; Stein, Pam S; Cecil, James C

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the Kentucky Elder Oral Health Survey (KEOHS) was to assess the oral health status of Kentuckians 65 and older. The KEOHS consisted of a self-administered questionnaire and a clinical examination. Recruitment occurred from May 2002 through March 2005 of persons aged 65 and older (n = 1,386) whose functional ability was classified by residential setting. Independent elders living in their own homes were designated as "well-elders," those who lived in skilled nursing facilities and who were functionally dependent were designated as "nursing home elders," and those older adults who were considered frail were designated as "homebound elders." Significant associations were found between the functional ability of the elders and demographic characteristics. While elders who were homebound reported the highest rate of barriers to care, dental insurance, affordability, and transportation were consistently reported as barriers for all groups of elders. This study has established the baseline oral health status of older adults in Kentucky and the data show differences that exist for various community living situations.

  12. Oral Health Status of Older Adults in Kentucky: Results from the Kentucky Elder Oral Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Heather M.; Dickens, Noel E.; Henry, Robert G.; Durham, Lisa; Sallee, Nancy; Skelton, Judith; Stein, Pam S.; Cecil, James C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the Kentucky Elder Oral Health Survey (KEOHS) was to assess the oral health status of Kentuckians 65 and older. The KEOHS consisted of a self-administered questionnaire and a clinical examination. Recruitment occurred from May 2002 through March 2005 of persons aged 65 and older (n=1386) whose functional ability was classified by residential setting. Independent elders living in their own homes were designated as “well-elders,” those who lived in skilled nursing facilities and who were functionally dependent were designated as “nursing home elders,” and those older adults who were considered frail were designated as “homebound elders.” Significant associations were found between the functional ability of the elders and demographic characteristics. While elders who were homebound reported the highest rate of barriers to care, dental insurance, affordability, and transportation were consistently reported as barriers for all groups of elders. This study has established the baseline oral health status of older adults in Kentucky and the data shows-differences that exist for various community living situations. PMID:20831736

  13. Perceived Cognitive Impairment among African American elders: health and functional impairments in daily life

    PubMed Central

    Ficker, Lisa J.; Lysack, Cathy L.; Hanna, Mena; Lichtenberg, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The Center for Disease Control began to assess Perceived Cognitive Impairment in 2009, yet there has been no in-depth study of how perceived decline in thinking or memory skills may be associated to the health and lifestyle of an independent community-dwelling older person. Among urban-dwelling older African Americans who are at elevated risk for cognitive impairment and dementia, we know even less regarding the interaction of these risk factors. Method Five hundred and one African American elders (n = 501) between the ages of 55 and 95 with an average age of 70.73 years (SD = 8.6 years) participated in telephone interviews. Results Approximately one-third of the elders reported that their memory, thinking skills, or ability to reason was worse than a year ago (n = 150; 29.9%) and 25% of this group (n = 38) reported that this Perceived Cognitive Impairment impacted their daily activities and/or warranted a consultation with their doctor. Bivariate analyses indicated that Perceived Cognitive Impairment was associated with increased health problems, mobility limitations, depressed mood, and lower social functioning. Conclusion Elders who reported that cognitive problems impacted their daily functioning reported the greatest health and mental health problems. Perceived Cognitive Impairment is an important health variable with implications for an older adult’s overall health, mobility, and mental health. PMID:24328435

  14. Workforce requirements for a primary oral health care system.

    PubMed

    van Palenstein Helderman, W; Mikx, F; Truin, G J; Hoang, T H; Pham, H L

    2000-12-01

    To present the case for a primary health care (PHC) approach for dental care in Vietnam, and thereby contribute to a better understanding of the oral health problems that exist in many developing countries. Information was obtained in Vietnam through discussions with dental and medical authorities of provincial health offices, educational institutions, hospitals, health centres and schools and by collecting data from record books and reports. Dentistry lacks a PHC strategy and consequently urgent oral care and oral disease prevention and control are not available for the majority of the population in Vietnam. The curriculum of dental students and dental auxiliaries is not adequately directed to the oral health needs of the population. The present number of dental personnel is too low. A basic oral health care package (BOHCP) advocated by the WHO which could be incorporated into primary health services at sub-district level and in the school dental service would be most suitable to meet the oral health needs of the population in Vietnam. The oral health education component of the BOHCP may have more impact when it is conducted in close collaboration with non-dental health personnel and lay persons. The curriculum of dental personnel should be adjusted to meet the requirements of their future tasks. Dental auxiliaries, provided they are well trained can carry out the BOHCP. Consequently, there is a large need for this type of dental personnel in Vietnam.

  15. The Impact of an Interprofessional Oral Health Curriculum on Trainees.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Oren; Brisotti, Madeline F; Gascon, Leslie; Henshaw, Michelle; Kaufman, Laura B

    2017-03-01

    Despite the prevalence of oral disease, the subject of oral health historically has been absent from medical education. We have developed an interprofessional curriculum in collaboration with our school of dentistry to teach oral health in the primary care setting to physician assistant (PA) students. The goal was to create and assess the impact of a curricular model that would be adaptable to various academic settings. A blend of classroom, clinical skills lab, observations in the dental clinic, and observed structured clinical examinations was used to teach oral health to first-year (didactic year) PA students. The objectives were created in collaboration between the medical and dental faculties and included topics on general oral health, oral cancer, geriatrics, pediatrics, and fluoride varnish. A total of 12 hours of instructional time was delivered to 23 students over 3 semesters from 2014 to 2015. Pretesting and posttesting demonstrated long-term knowledge retention that was 14% better than baseline at 8 months (P < .001). Student surveys demonstrated that satisfaction levels were high and that the students felt better prepared and motivated to incorporate oral health into their practice of medicine. Analyses of students' write-ups of the history and the physical examination demonstrated that the students incorporated oral health concepts. A significant impact on trainees can occur after a short, focused amount of instructional time in oral health. Students demonstrate enthusiasm and begin using oral health skills early on. A focused interprofessional oral health curriculum can likely be successfully integrated into various academic settings with a positive effect on learning and improved patient care.

  16. Oral health literacy: at the intersection of K-12 education and public health.

    PubMed

    Braun, Bonnie; Horowitz, Alice M; Kleinman, Dushanka V; Gold, Robert S; Radice, Sarah D; Maybury, Catherine

    2012-04-01

    The link between a student's health and their ability to learn is well-established. Schools are the intersection of public health programs, dental care, and self-care. This position affords them a unique role and opportunity to enhance health literacy, including oral health literacy. This paper explores the potential of K-12 school programs and the dental profession to address oral health literacy, and, in so doing, provide future participants with essential skills to promote their oral health.

  17. When can oral health education begin? Relative effectiveness of three oral health education strategies starting pre-partum.

    PubMed

    Clifford, H; Johnson, N W; Brown, C; Battistutta, D

    2012-06-01

    To test the impact of oral health education provided to pregnant mothers on subsequent practices within the infant's family. A quasi-experimental intervention trial comparing the effectiveness of 'usual care' to one, or both, of two oral health education resources: a 'sample bag' of information and oral health care products; and/or a nine-minute "Healthy Teeth for Life" video on postnatal oral health issues. Women attending the midwife clinic at approximately 30 weeks gestation were recruited (n=611) in a public hospital providing free maternity services. Four months after the birth of their infant, relative to the usual care condition, each of the oral health education interventions had independent or combined positive impacts on mother's knowledge of oral health practices. However young, single, health care card-holder or unemployed mothers were less likely to apply healthy behaviours or to improve knowledge of healthy choices, as a result of these interventions. The video intervention provided the strongest and most consistent positive impact on mothers' general and infant oral health knowledge. While mothers indicated that the later stage of pregnancy was a good time to receive oral health education, many suggested that this should also be provided after birth at a time when teeth were a priority issue, such as when "baby teeth" start to erupt.

  18. Pregnancy and oral health: utilization of the oral health care system by pregnant women in North Dakota.

    PubMed

    Mangskau, K A; Arrindell, B

    1996-01-01

    There is little data on the oral health of pregnant women in North Dakota. In response, the Dental Program of the North Dakota Department of Health included two oral health questions on a survey sent to 2,250 new mothers in the state. The oral health questions were designed to gather information on the proportion of pregnant women using the oral health care system and to identify major barriers to receiving oral health care services. The survey response rate was 65 percent. Just under half of the women responding (43.2%) had visited the dentist during their pregnancy. The major reason cited for not visiting the dentist was that they were not having any problems. There appears to be a lack of knowledge regarding the need for this particular aspect of prenatal care.

  19. Oral health in Libya: addressing the future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Peeran, Syed Wali; Altaher, Omar Basheer; Peeran, Syed Ali; Alsaid, Fatma Mojtaba; Mugrabi, Marei Hamed; Ahmed, Aisha Mojtaba; Grain, Abdulgader

    2014-01-01

    Libya is a vast country situated in North Africa, having a relatively better functioning economy with a scanty population. This article is the first known attempt to review the current state of oral health care in Libya and to explore the present trends and future challenges. Libyan health system, oral health care, and human resources with the present status of dental education are reviewed comprehensively. A bibliographic study of oral health research and publications has been carried out. The results point toward a common indicator that oral health–related research is low. Strategies have to be developed to educate the medical and dental professionals, to update the current curriculum and enable the system to be competent in all aspects of oral health care management. PMID:24666627

  20. Oral health in the agenda of priorities in public health.

    PubMed

    Antunes, José Leopoldo Ferreira; Toporcov, Tatiana Natasha; Bastos, João Luiz; Frazão, Paulo; Narvai, Paulo Capel; Peres, Marco Aurélio

    2016-09-01

    This study describes the scientific production on oral health diffused in Revista de Saúde Pública, in the 50 years of its publication. A narrative review study was carried out using PubMed, as it is the search database that indexes all issues of the journal. From 1967 to 2015, 162 manuscripts specifically focused on oral health themes were published. This theme was present in all volumes of the journal, with increasing participation over the years. Dental caries was the most studied theme, constantly present in the journal since its first issue. Periodontal disease, fluorosis, malocclusions, and other themes emerged even before the decline of dental caries indicators. Oral health policy is the most recurring theme in the last two decades. Revista de Saúde Pública has been an important vehicle for dissemination, communication, and reflection on oral health, contributing in a relevant way to the technical-scientific interaction between professionals in this field. RESUMO Este estudo descreve a produção científica sobre saúde bucal veiculada na Revista de Saúde Pública, nos cinquenta anos de sua publicação. Foi realizado estudo de revisão narrativa, utilizando o PubMed como mecanismo de busca que indexa todos os fascículos da revista. De 1967 a 2015, foram publicados 162 manuscritos com foco específico em temas de saúde bucal. Essa temática esteve presente em todos os volumes da revista, com participação crescente ao longo dos anos. Cárie dentária foi o tema mais estudado, marcando presença constante na revista desde seu primeiro fascículo. Doença periodontal, fluorose, oclusopatias e outros temas emergiram antes mesmo do declínio dos indicadores de cárie. Políticas de saúde bucal é o tema mais recorrente nas duas últimas décadas. A Revista de Saúde Pública tem sido importante veículo de divulgação, comunicação e reflexão sobre saúde bucal, contribuindo de modo relevante para a interação técnico-científica entre os

  1. Oral health education for pediatric nurse practitioner students.

    PubMed

    Golinveaux, Jay; Gerbert, Barbara; Cheng, Jing; Duderstadt, Karen; Alkon, Abbey; Mullen, Shirin; Lin, Brent; Miller, Arthur; Zhan, Ling

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether an interdisciplinary, multifaceted oral health education program delivered to pediatric nurse practitioner students at the University of California, San Francisco, would improve their knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and behaviors regarding the provision of oral health assessments, consultations, referrals, and services to young children during well-child visits. Thirty pediatric nurse practitioner students were included in the study. Participants completed a written survey before and after receiving an interdisciplinary educational intervention that included didactic education, simulation exercises, and clinical observation by a pediatric dental resident. Between pre-intervention and post-intervention, a significant improvement was seen in the pediatric nurse practitioners' knowledge of oral health topics (p<0.001), confidence when providing oral health counseling (p<0.001), and attitudes about including oral health counseling in their examinations (p=0.006). In the post-intervention survey, 83 percent of the subjects reported having incorporated oral examinations into their well-child visits. Our study suggests that providing an interdisciplinary oral health educational program for pediatric nurse practitioner students can improve their knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and behaviors regarding the incorporation of oral health care services during routine well-child visits.

  2. Oral Health Education for Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Students

    PubMed Central

    Golinveaux, Jay; Gerbert, Barbara; Cheng, Jing; Duderstadt, Karen; Alkon, Abbey; Mullen, Shirin; Lin, Brent; Miller, Arthur; Zhan, Ling

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether an interdisciplinary, multifaceted oral health education program delivered to pediatric nurse practitioner students at the University of California, San Francisco, would improve their knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and behaviors regarding the provision of oral health assessments, consultations, referrals, and services to young children during well-child visits. Thirty pediatric nurse practitioner students were included in the study. Participants completed a written survey before and after receiving an interdisciplinary educational intervention that included didactic education, simulation exercises, and clinical observation by a pediatric dental resident. Between pre-intervention and post-intervention, a significant improvement was seen in the pediatric nurse practitioners’ knowledge of oral health topics (p<0.001), confidence when providing oral health counseling (p<0.001), and attitudes about including oral health counseling in their examinations (p=0.006). In the post-intervention survey, 83 percent of the subjects reported having incorporated oral examinations into their well-child visits. Our study suggests that providing an interdisciplinary oral health educational program for pediatric nurse practitioner students can improve their knowledge, confidence, attitudes, and behaviors regarding the incorporation of oral health care services during routine well-child visits. PMID:23658403

  3. Filling the gap: strategies for improving oral health.

    PubMed

    2001-05-16

    As part of its continuing mission to serve trustees and staff of health foundations and corporate giving programs, Grantmakers In Health (GIH) convened, with the Children's Dental Health Project (CDHP), a select group of grantmakers and national experts who have made a major commitment to improving oral health. This Issue Dialogue - held on May 16,2001, in Washington, DC - explored current challenges related to oral health in the United States, and highlighted public and private sector initiatives to overcome these challenges. The roundtable also illustrated current activities and future opportunities for foundations in the area of oral health. This Issue Brief synthesizes key points from the day's discussion with a background paper previously prepared for Issue Dialogue participants. It includes quantitative and qualitative information on oral health as well as profiles of public sector, private sector, and grantmaker strategies for promoting improvements.

  4. Oral health finance and expenditure in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, L C; Stephen, L X

    1997-12-01

    The objective of this paper was to examine the cost of oral health in South Africa over the past decade Particular emphasis was placed on the contribution made by medical schemes which is the main source of private health care funding. Some of the problems facing this huge industry were also briefly explored. Primary aggregate data on oral health expenditure were obtained from the Department of Health, Pretoria and from the offices of the Registrar of Medical Schemes, Pretoria. The results show that in 1994, 4.7 per cent of the total health care budget was allocated to oral health. Of this amount, 14.2 per cent came from the state, 71.9 per cent from medical schemes and the remainder calculated to be from direct out-of-pocket payments. Furthermore, real expenditure for oral health by medical schemes grew robustly and almost continuously from 1984 through to 1994, generally outstripping medical inflation.

  5. Assessing oral health promotion determinants in active Greek elderly.

    PubMed

    Naka, Olga; Anastassiadou, Vassiliki

    2012-06-01

    To explore older adults' patterns and risk behaviours to be invoked in the allocation of strategies to promote oral health. to dental services is determined by factors that serve as barriers to or enablers of older adults' behaviour and attitudes towards oral health. Appropriate oral health promotion activities are of particular importance among the elderly in altering oral health behaviour through education, prevention and health protection. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 108 dentate elderly subjects. They were attending a University Prosthetic Dentistry Clinic in Greece as patients seeking treatment. Participants underwent a clinical examination and an interview. Data extracted revealed that cost and no disease awareness were the most frequently mentioned barriers to regular dental visits. Most of the participants presented low level of income and education and reduced presence of adverse dental health symptoms compared with the actual oral health status. Besides some predisposing factors, enabling and need variables significantly affected access to dental care services, participants' number of remaining teeth and as a consequence oral health status. Profiling older adults' demographics, economic, social and cultural status and their attitudes and beliefs could further contribute in developing universal activities and strategies for oral health promotion so as ageing challenges are favoured. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Oral health promotion interventions on oral reservoirs of staphylococcus aureus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lam, O L T; McGrath, C; Bandara, H M H N; Li, L S W; Samaranayake, L P

    2012-04-01

    The oral cavity serves as a reservoir of Staphylococcus aureus for infection of the lower respiratory tract and cross-infection to other patients. This systematic review was designed to examine the effectiveness of oral health promotion interventions on this pathogen. The PubMed, ISI Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for clinical trials assessing the effect of oral health promotion interventions on oral and oropharyngeal carriage of S. aureus. Oral health promotion interventions on oral reservoirs of S. aureus in both systemically healthy and medically compromised groups consisted of oral hygiene interventions only. There was a lack of evidence pertaining to the effectiveness of mechanical oral hygiene interventions against this pathogen. Chlorhexidine delivered in oral hygiene products such as mouthrinses, gels, and sprays appeared to have some utility against S. aureus, although some studies found equivocal effects. There was a dearth of studies investigating the efficacy of other chemical agents. Although many chemical agents contained in oral hygiene products have proven in vitro activity against S. aureus, their clinical effectiveness and potential role as adjuncts or alternative therapies to conventional treatment remain to be confirmed by further high-quality randomized controlled trials.

  7. Combined Use of Self-Efficacy Scale for Oral Health Behaviour and Oral Health Questionnaire: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soutome, Sakiko; Kajiwara, Kazumi; Oho, Takahiko

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether the combined use of a task-specific self-efficacy scale for oral health behaviour (SEOH) and an oral health questionnaire (OHQ) would be useful for evaluating subjects' behaviours and cognitions. Design: Questionnaires. Methods: One hundred and eighty-five students completed the SEOH and OHQ. The 30-item OHQ uses a…

  8. Combined Use of Self-Efficacy Scale for Oral Health Behaviour and Oral Health Questionnaire: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soutome, Sakiko; Kajiwara, Kazumi; Oho, Takahiko

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether the combined use of a task-specific self-efficacy scale for oral health behaviour (SEOH) and an oral health questionnaire (OHQ) would be useful for evaluating subjects' behaviours and cognitions. Design: Questionnaires. Methods: One hundred and eighty-five students completed the SEOH and OHQ. The 30-item OHQ uses a…

  9. Impaired Black Health Professionals: Vulnerabilities and Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Carl C.

    1986-01-01

    The impaired black health professional is in a unique position in American society. Factors that contribute to this uniqueness include: the small number of black health professionals, which limits resources for program development and referrals; overt and covert racism in society and in medical school curriculums; differences in black and white drug and alcohol abuse and suicide patterns; and upward mobility, which tends to isolate the black professional from black support systems. These factors need to be recognized by the health care profession. Bias-free investigations are needed to provide more information on ethnic differences so that impaired health professional programs and services may give more appropriate treatment. PMID:3783748

  10. Functional impairment and mental health functioning among Vietnamese children

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Hoang-Minh; Weiss, Bahr; Trung, Lam T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Functional impairment is a key indicator of need for mental health services among children and adolescents, often a stronger predictor of service usage than mental health symptoms themselves. Functional impairment may be of particular importance in low and middle income countries (LMIC) because of its potential to focus policy on treatment of child mental health problems which is generally given low priority in LMIC. However, few studies have assessed functional impairment in LMIC. The present study assessed rates of functional impairment among children in Vietnam, as a case example of an LMIC, as well as effects of other risk/protective factors of particular relevance to LMIC (e.g., whether the family lived in an urban or rural area; family structure variables such as grandparents living with the family). Methods 1,314 parents of children 6–16 years old from 10 Vietnamese provinces were interviewed. Results The overall rate of functional impairment among Vietnamese children was 20%, similar to rates in high income countries such as Germany and the United States, suggesting that LMIC status may not be associated with dramatic increases in functional impairment in children. Functional impairment was significantly greater among mental health cases than non-cases, with increases of over 550% associated with mental health caseness. A number of other risk factors (e.g., marital status) had smaller but significant effects. Conclusions Mental health problems are a major but not the sole contributor to functional impairment among Vietnamese children. The pragmatic significance of this research lies in its potential to affect public awareness and policy related to child mental health in LMIC. PMID:26315942

  11. Research and Practice Communications Between Oral Health Providers and Prenatal Health Providers: A Bibliometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Skvoretz, John; Dyer, Karen; Daley, Ellen; Debate, Rita; Vamos, Cheryl; Kline, Nolan; Thompson, Erika

    2016-08-01

    Objectives We aimed to examine scholarly collaboration between oral health and prenatal providers. Oral disease is a silent epidemic with significant public health implications for pregnant women. Evidence linking poor oral health during pregnancy to adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes requires oral health and prenatal providers to communicate on the prevention, treatment and co-management matters pertaining to oral health issues among their pregnant patients. The need for inter-professional collaboration is highlighted by guidelines co-endorsed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Dental Association, stressing the importance of oral health care during pregnancy. Methods To assess if interdisciplinary communication occurs between oral health and prenatal disciplines, we conducted a network analysis of research on pregnancy-related periodontal disease. Results Social Network analysis allowed us to identify communication patterns between communities of oral health and prenatal professionals via scientific journals. Analysis of networks of citations linking journals in different fields reveals a core-periphery pattern dominated by oral health journals with some participation from medicine journals. However, an analysis of dyadic ties of citation reveals statistically significant "inbreeding" tendencies in the citation patterns: both medical and oral health journals tend to cite their own kind at greater-than-chance levels. Conclusions Despite evidence suggesting that professional collaboration benefits patients' overall health, findings from this research imply that little collaboration occurs between these two professional groups. More collaboration may be useful in addressing women's oral-systemic health concerns that result in adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  12. A global oral health course: isn't it time?

    PubMed

    Karim, Asef; Mascarenhas, Ana Karina; Dharamsi, Shafik

    2008-11-01

    This article examines current global oral health initiatives to underserved dental populations and assesses the level of familiarity with these initiatives among dental students. The World Health Organization (WHO)'s basic package of oral care (BPOC) is described, as well as successes and difficulties in global oral health initiatives. A survey was conducted of third-year dental students at a North American dental school to determine their familiarity with global oral health initiatives set out by the WHO and the World Dental Federation (FDI). The majority of the surveyed students (87 percent) expressed interest in volunteering their professional services in international settings. However, none of the surveyed students knew about the BPOC or the FDI's role in global oral health. The findings indicate that predoctoral dental public health courses in dental schools ought to include a course on global oral health to expose students to global oral health issues and equip them with interventions like the BPOC so they can provide better care to globally underserved dental populations.

  13. Hospitalisation impacts on oral hygiene: an audit of oral hygiene in a metropolitan health service.

    PubMed

    Danckert, Rachael; Ryan, Anna; Plummer, Virginia; Williams, Cylie

    2016-03-01

    Poor oral health has been associated with systemic diseases, morbidity and mortality. Many patients in hospital environments are physically compromised and rely upon awareness and assistance from health professionals for the maintenance or improvement of their oral health. This study aimed to identify whether common individual and environment factors associated with hospitalisation impacted on oral hygiene. Data were collected during point prevalence audits of patients in the acute and rehabilitation environments on three separate occasions. Data included demographic information, plaque score, presence of dental hygiene products, independence level and whether nurse assistance was documented in the health record. Data were collected for 199 patients. A higher plaque score was associated with not having a toothbrush (p = 0.002), being male (p = 0.007), being acutely unwell (p = 0.025) and requiring nursing assistance for oral hygiene (p = 0.002). There was fair agreement between the documentation of requiring assistance for oral care and the patient independently able to perform oral hygiene (ICC = 0.22). Oral hygiene was impacted by factors arising from hospitalisation, for those without a toothbrush and male patients of acute wards. Establishment of practices that increase awareness and promote good oral health should be prioritised. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  14. [Indicating analgesics in oral health care].

    PubMed

    Allard, R H B; Bruers, J M M; Baart, J A

    2012-01-01

    A representative survey amongst Dutch dentists and oral and maxillofacial surgeons showed that almost all of them indicated analgesics regularly. Thirty-five% of the dentists advised their patients in case of one or several tooth extractions to use analgesics. Forty-seven % of these dentists advised using the analgesics before the pain starts. After similar treatments, 89% of the oral and maxillofacial surgeons indicated analgesics and 73% advised taking the analgesic preventatively. Also in the case of other treatments oral and maxillofacial surgeons advised more often than dentists using analgesics preventatively. Dentists usually advised paracetamol and oral and maxillofacial surgeons a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Most dentists and all oral and maxillofacial surgeons thought that they had enough knowledge about the side-effects and interactions of analgesics. The majority of the dentists and oral and maxillofacial surgeons indicated that they would like to be updated on analgesia by post-graduate education occasionally

  15. The genesis of a catalog of oral health-related surveys: locating oral health-related datasets.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pamela J; Hyman, Jeffrey; Reichman, Marsha E

    2002-01-01

    The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), in collaboration with the Division of Oral Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (DOH, CDC), has established a Dental, Oral and Craniofacial Data Resource Center (DRC). One element of the DRC is the Catalog of Surveys Related to Oral Health. The Catalog is a searchable electronic database that includes federal, state, international, and privately sponsored surveys and other datasets. Its purpose is to make researchers aware of surveys that have been conducted and to highlight features of complex surveys that relate to oral health. Other components of the DRC include an Archive of Procedures and Methods, Archive of Procedures and Methods Used in Oral Health Surveys, which is linked to the Catalog; an Annual Report, Oral Health U.S., 2002; and a data warehouse of acquired datasets. A Web-based statistical query system related to oral health is also under development. It is the intention of the DRC to meet the needs of NIDCR and DOH, CDC staff as well as other researchers interested in the status of oral health. The Catalog is available on CD-ROM at no cost and in the future will be made available through the NIDCR Web site.

  16. Parents' dental anxiety and oral health literacy: effects on parents' and children's oral health-related experiences.

    PubMed

    Shin, William K; Braun, Thomas M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2014-01-01

    To explore a) the relationship between parents'/guardians' dental anxiety and oral health literacy and b) those between these variables and background and oral health-related characteristics. Survey data were collected from 187 parents/guardians (81% female; average age 37 years). Dental anxiety was measured with the Dental Anxiety Scale - Revised (DAS-R) and oral health literacy with the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Dentistry (REALD-30). Children's dental charts were reviewed to collect information about their dental treatment. DAS-R and REALD-30 scores were correlated (r = -0.22; P = 0.003). A multivariate regression model with DAS-R score as the dependent variable showed that the DAS-R score has a significant multivariate association with REALD-30, oral health, income, and presence of fillings. Dental anxiety and oral health literacy are related. However, DAS score has a significant multivariate association with the four variables REALD-30 score, oral health, income, and presence of fillings. These findings show that among socioeconomically disadvantaged patients, the contributors to poor oral health are interrelated and multidetermined and include poor oral health literacy and dental anxiety. The public health message is that in order to improve the overall oral health of socioeconomically disadvantaged patients, public health stakeholders need to consider how to communicate with these patients effectively and how to reduce dental anxiety. Gaining a better understanding of how to communicate with parents a) at an appropriate literacy level and b) in a way that it reduces dental anxiety is therefore crucial. © 2013 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  17. Oral Health Inequalities: Relationships between Environmental and Individual Factors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, E; Robinson, P G; Marya, C M; Baker, S R

    2015-10-01

    Recent research has emphasized the relationships between environmental and individual factors that may influence population oral health and lead to health inequalities. However, little is known about the effect of interactions between environmental and individual factors on inequalities in clinical (e.g., decayed teeth) and subjective oral health outcomes (e.g., oral health-related quality of life [OHQoL]). This cohort study aimed to explore the direct and mediated longitudinal interrelationships between key environmental and individual factors on clinical and subjective oral health outcomes in adults. Self-reported measures of OHQoL and individual (sense of coherence [SOC], social support, stress, oral health beliefs, dental behaviors, and subjective socioeconomic status [SES]) and environmental factors (SES and social network) were collected at baseline and 3-mo follow-up, together with a baseline clinical examination of 495 adult employees of an automobile parts manufacturer in India. Lagged structural equation modeling was guided by the adapted Wilson and Cleary/Brunner and Marmot model linking clinical, individual, and environmental variables to quality of life. The study provides tentative evidence that SES may influence levels of resources such as social support and SOC, which mediate stress and in turn may influence subjective oral health outcomes. Accordingly, the present findings and the adapted Wilson and Cleary/Brunner and Marmot model on which they are predicted provide support for the psychosocial pathway being key in the SES-oral health relationship. The pathways through which environmental factors interact with individual factors to impact subjective oral health outcomes identified here may bring opportunities for more targeted oral health promotion strategies.

  18. Opportunities and challenges to promoting oral health in primary schools.

    PubMed

    Gill, P; Chestnutt, I G; Channing, D

    2009-09-01

    Inequalities in oral health in areas of socio-economic disadvantage are well recognised. As children spend a considerable proportion of their lives in education, schools can play a significant role in promoting children's health and oral health. However, to what extent schools are able to do this is unclear. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate opportunities and challenges to promoting oral health in primary schools. A purposive sample of 20 primary schools from socially and economically disadvantaged areas of Cardiff, UK were selected to participate in this qualitative study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews conducted with head teachers or their nominated deputies. General awareness of health and oral health was good, with all schools promoting the consumption of fruit, water and milk and discouraging products such as carbonated drinks and confectionaries. Health promotion schemes wereimplemented primarily to improve the health of the children, although schools felt they also offered the potential to improve classroom behaviour and attendance. However, oral health was viewed as a separate entity to general health and perceived to be inadequately promoted. Successful health promotion schemes were also influenced by the attitudes of headteachers. Most schools had no or limited links with local dental services and, or oral health educators, although such input, when it occurred, was welcomed and highly valued. Knowledge of how to handle dental emergencies was limited and only two schools operated toothbrushing schemes, although all expressed an interest in such programmes. This study identified a positive predisposition to promoting health in primary schools. The challenge for the dental team, however, is to promote and integrate oral health into mainstream health promotion activities in schools. The paper also makes recommendations for further research.

  19. Do current sports nutrition guidelines conflict with good oral health?

    PubMed

    Broad, Elizabeth M; Rye, Leslie A

    2015-01-01

    For optimal athletic performance, an athlete requires good oral health to reduce the risk of oral pain, inflammation, and infection and thereby minimize the use of analgesics and antimicrobial agents. Increased intake, frequency, and dental contact time of carbohydrate-rich foods, sports nutrition products, and acidic carbohydrate-containing sports and energy drinks may contribute to risks of dental erosion, caries, and inflammatory periodontal conditions in the athlete, especially when he or she also exhibits dehydration and poor oral hygiene habits. Examining the athlete before he or she begins participating in a sport allows the dental care provider to determine the patient's existing oral health, hygiene, and susceptibility to risk factors for erosion, caries, and inflammatory periodontal disease. This oral profile, in conjunction with the individual athlete's dietary needs, can be used to establish a treatment and preventive program, including oral health education. Good oral hygiene practices and application of topical fluoride, especially via fluoridated toothpastes and topical fluoride varnishes, must be available to the athlete. Rinsing with water or a neutral beverage after exposure to carbohydrates or acidic sports nutrition products may reduce carbohydrate contact time and bring oral pH levels back to neutral more quickly, reducing the risk of caries and erosion. Finally, the dentist should encourage the athlete to consult with an experienced sports dietitian to ensure that principles of sports nutrition are being appropriately applied for the type, frequency, and duration of exercise in consideration of the individual's oral health needs.

  20. Associations between school deprivation indices and oral health status.

    PubMed

    Da Rosa, Patricia; Nicolau, Belinda; Brodeur, Jean-Marc; Benigeri, Mike; Bedos, Christophe; Rousseau, Marie-Claude

    2011-06-01

    Despite an overall improvement in oral health status in several countries over the past decades, chronic oral diseases (COD) remain a public health problem, occurring mostly among children in the lower social strata. The use of publicly available indicators at the school level may be an optimal strategy to identify children at high risk of COD in order to organize oral health promotion and intervention in schools. To investigate whether school deprivation indices were associated with schoolchildren oral health status. This ecological study used a sample of 316 elementary public schools in the province of Quebec, Canada. Data from two sources were linked using school identifiers: (i) Two school deprivation indices (in deciles) from the Ministry of Education, a poverty index based on the low income cut-offs established by Statistics Canada and a socioeconomic environment index defined by the proportions of maternal under-schooling and of unemployed parents and (ii) Oral health outcomes from the Quebec Schoolchildren Oral Health Survey 1998-99 aggregated at the school level. These included proportions of children with dental caries and reporting oral pain. The relation between school deprivation indices and oral health outcomes was assessed with linear regression for dental caries experience and logistic regression for oral pain. The mean DMF-S (mean number of decayed, missing and filled permanent teeth surfaces) by school was 0.7 (SD = 0.5); the average proportions of children with dental caries and reporting oral pain were 25.0% and 3.0%, respectively. The poverty index was not associated with oral health outcomes. For the socioeconomic environment index, dental caries experience was 6.9% higher when comparing schools in unfavourable socioeconomic environments to the most favourable ones [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.1, 11.7%]. Furthermore, the most deprived schools, as compared to least deprived ones, were almost three times as likely to have children reporting

  1. Global oral health of older people--call for public health action.

    PubMed

    Petersen, P E; Kandelman, D; Arpin, S; Ogawa, H

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this report is (1) to provide a global overview of oral health conditions in older people, use of oral health services, and self care practices; (2) to explore what types of oral health services are available to older people, and (3) to identify some major barriers to and opportunities for the establishment of oral health services and health promotion programmes. A postal questionnaire designed by the World Health Organization (WHO) was distributed worldwide to the Chief Dental Officers or country oral health focal points at ministries of health. WHO received 46 questionnaires from countries (39% response rate). In addition, systematic data were collected from the WHO Global Oral Health Data Bank and the World Health Survey in order to include oral health information on the remaining countries. In total, the data base covers 136 out 193 countries, i.e., 71% of all WHO Member States. Dental caries and periodontal disease comprise a considerable public health problem in the majority of countries. Significant disparities within and between regions are observed in epidemiologic indicators of oral disease. The prevalence rates of tooth loss and experience of oral problems vary substantially by WHO Region and national income. Experience of oral problems among older people is high in low income countries; meanwhile, access to health care is poor, in particular in rural areas. Although tooth brushing is the most popular oral hygiene practice across the world, regular tooth brushing appears less common among older people than the population at large. In particular, this practice is less frequent in low income countries; in contrast, traditional oral self-care is prevalent in several countries of Africa and Asia. While fluoridated toothpaste is widely used in developed countries, it is extremely infrequent in most developing countries. Oral health services are available in developed countries; however, the use of such services is low among the older people. Lack

  2. The Impact of Edentulism on Oral and General Health

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Elham; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Kabawat, Marla; Feine, Jocelyne S.

    2013-01-01

    An adequate dentition is of importance for well-being and life quality. Despite advances in preventive dentistry, edentulism is still a major public health problem worldwide. In this narrative review, we provide a perspective on the pathways that link oral to general health. A better understanding of disease indicators is necessary for establishing a solid strategy through an organized oral health care system to prevent and treat this morbid chronic condition. PMID:23737789

  3. Sensory Impairment and Health-Related Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    KWON, Hye-Jin; KIM, Ji-su; KIM, Yoon-jung; KWON, Su-jin; YU, Jin-Na

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sensory impairment is a common condition that exerts negative effects on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the elderly. This study aimed to determine the relationship between sensory impairment and HRQoL and identify sensory-specific differences in the HRQoL of elderly. Methods: This study used data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V (2010–2012), analyzing 5,260 subjects over 60 years of age who completed ophthalmic and otologic examinations. Vision and hearing impairment were measured and classified. HRQoL was determined according to the European QoL five dimension test (EQ-5D). Multivariate logistic regression analysis and analysis of covariance were performed to identify relationships between sensory impairment and HRQoL dimensions as well as differences in HRQoL scores. Results: In the final adjusted multivariate model, there was a statistically higher proportion of those with dual sensory impairment who reported problems with mobility (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45–5.03), usual activities (aOR 2.32, 95% CI 1.16–4.64), and pain/discomfort among EQ-5D subcategories (aOR 1.79, 95% CI 1.07–2.97). In the EQ-5D dimensions, the means and standard deviations of vision impairment (0.86 [0.01]) and dual sensory impairment (0.84 [0.02]) appeared meaningfully lower than those for no sensory impairment (0.88 [0.00]) or hearing impairment (0.88 [0.01]); P = .02). Conclusion: Sensory impairment reduces HRQoL in the elderly. Improvement of HRQoL in the elderly thus requires regular screening and appropriate management of sensory impairment. PMID:26258089

  4. Impairing oral tolerance promotes allergy and anaphylaxis: A new murine food allergy model

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshan, Kirthana; Neilsen, Colleen V.; Hadsaitong, April; Schleimer, Robert P.; Luo, Xunrong; Bryce, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Food allergy is a disorder in which antigenic food proteins elicit immune responses. Animal models of food allergy have several limitations that influence their utility, including failure to recapitulate several key immunologic hallmarks. Consequently, little is known regarding the pathogenesis and mechanisms leading to food allergy. Staphylococcus aureus–derived enterotoxins, a common cause of food contamination, are associated with antigen responses in atopic dermatitis. Objective We hypothesized that S aureus–derived enterotoxins might influence the development of food allergy. We examined the influence of administration of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) with food allergens on immunologic responses and compared these responses with those elicited by a cholera toxin–driven food allergy model. Methods Oral administration of ovalbumin or whole peanut extract with or without SEB was performed once weekly. After 8 weeks, mice were challenged with oral antigen alone, and the physiologic and immunologic responses to antigen were studied. Results SEB administered with antigen resulted in immune responses to the antigen. Responses were highly TH2 polarized, and oral challenge with antigen triggered anaphylaxis and local and systemic mast cell degranulation. SEB-driven sensitization induced eosinophilia in the blood and intestinal tissues not observed with cholera toxin sensitization. SEB impaired tolerance specifically by impairing expression of TGF-b and regulatory T cells, and tolerance was restored with high-dose antigen. Conclusions We demonstrate a new model of food allergy to oral antigen in common laboratory strains of mice that recapitulates many features of clinical food allergy that are not seen in other models. We demonstrate that SEB impairs oral tolerance and permits allergic responses. PMID:19022495

  5. Rationale for the prevention of oral diseases in primary health care: an international collaborative study in oral health education.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Denis M; Phantumvanit, Prathip; Llodra, Juan Carlos; Horn, Virginie; Carlile, Monica; Eiselé, Jean-Luc

    2014-10-01

    Ensuring that members of society are healthy and reaching their full potential requires the prevention of oral diseases through the promotion of oral health and well-being. The present article identifies the best policy conditions of effective public health and primary care integration and the actors who promote and sustain these efforts. In this review, arguments and recommendations are provided to introduce an oral health collaborative promotion programme called Live.Learn.Laugh. phase 2, arising from an unique partnership between FDI World Dental Federation, the global company Unilever plc and an international network of National Dental Associations, health-care centres, schools and educators populations. © 2014 FDI World Dental Federation.

  6. [Self-perception of oral health status by the elderly].

    PubMed

    da Silva, S R; Castellanos Fernandes, R A

    2001-08-01

    To assess the self-perception of oral health status of the elderly and to analize the clinics, subjectives and sociodemographic factors that interfer in this perception. Results are based on interviews and clinical assessment of 201 subjects aged 60 years and over, who were dentate, functionally independents and used to go to a health care center in the town of Araraquara, SP, Brazil. A questionnaire with questions about social characteristics of the sampled population, their oral health status self-perception and the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) was applied. All subject underwent a clinical examination to determine the prevalence of the main oral diseases. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the association between social and clinic variables, and the GOHAI index with their oral health self-perceptions. In addition, analyses were made to identify self-assessment predictors. The clinical examination revealed that dental caries and periodontal disease had a significant prevalence, though 42.7% of the sample assessed their oral health status as regular. Social class, the GOHAI index, and the decayed and missing teeth were all associated with the self-assessment. The multivariate analysis showed that the self-assessment predictors were the GOHAI index, missing teeth and Community Periodontal Index and Treatment Needs index. These predictors accounted for 30% of the self-assessment variability. As the oral health self-perception had minor influence on the clinical conditions, developing educational and preventive actions for the elderly population are recommended.

  7. Understanding the Research–Policy Divide for Oral Health Inequality

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Erica; Crocombe, Leonard; Campbell, Steven; Goldberg, Lynette R.; Seidel, Bastian M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: No studies exist of the congruence of research in oral health to policy. This study aimed to examine the broad congruence of oral health research to policy, and implications for developing oral health research that is more policy relevant, particularly for the wider challenge of addressing unequal oral health outcomes, rather than specific policy translation issues. Methods: Bayesian-based software was used in a multi-layered method to compare the conceptual content of 127,193 oral health research abstracts published between 2000–2012 with eight current oral health policy documents from Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. Findings: Fifty-five concepts defined the research abstracts, of which only eight were policy-relevant, and six of which were minor research concepts. Conclusions The degree of disconnection between clinical concepts and healthcare system and workforce development concepts was striking. This study shows that, far from being “lost in translation,” oral health research and policy are so different as to raise doubts about the extent to which research is policy-relevant and policy is research-based. The notion of policy relevance encompasses the lack of willingness of policy makers to embrace research, and the need for researchers to develop research that is, and is seen to be, policy-relevant. PMID:25617516

  8. Understanding the research-policy divide for oral health inequality.

    PubMed

    Bell, Erica; Crocombe, Leonard; Campbell, Steven; Goldberg, Lynette R; Seidel, Bastian M

    2014-11-01

    No studies exist of the congruence of research in oral health to policy. This study aimed to examine the broad congruence of oral health research to policy, and implications for developing oral health research that is more policy relevant, particularly for the wider challenge of addressing unequal oral health outcomes, rather than specific policy translation issues. Bayesian-based software was used in a multi-layered method to compare the conceptual content of 127,193 oral health research abstracts published between 2000-2012 with eight current oral health policy documents from Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. Fifty-five concepts defined the research abstracts, of which only eight were policy-relevant, and six of which were minor research concepts. The degree of disconnection between clinical concepts and healthcare system and workforce development concepts was striking. This study shows that, far from being "lost in translation," oral health research and policy are so different as to raise doubts about the extent to which research is policy-relevant and policy is research-based. The notion of policy relevance encompasses the lack of willingness of policy makers to embrace research, and the need for researchers to develop research that is, and is seen to be, policy-relevant. Copyright © 2014 Longwoods Publishing.

  9. Significant Unmet Oral Health Needs Among the Homebound Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Ornstein, Katherine A.; DeCherrie, Linda; Gluzman, Rima; Scott, Elizabeth S.; Kansal, Jyoti; Shah, Tushin; Katz, Ralph; Soriano, Theresa A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Older adults with serious illness are increasingly becoming homebound. By nature of their homebound status they lack access to basic services including dental care. We conducted a study to assess the oral health status, dental utilization and dental needs of the homebound elderly and to determine whether medical diagnoses or demographic factors influenced perceived oral health. Design Cross-sectional analysis Methods A total of 125 homebound patients received a comprehensive clinical examination in their home by a trained dental research team and completed a dental utilization and needs survey as well as the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI). Results Patients who reported a high level of unmet oral health needs were more likely to be non-white, although this effect was not significant in multivariate analysis. Individual medical diagnoses and the presence of multiple comorbidities were not associated with unmet oral health needs. Conclusions The oral health status of the homebound elderly regardless of their medical diagnoses was poor. High unmet oral health needs combined with strong desire to receive dental care suggests there is an imperative need to improve access to dental care for this growing population. In addition to improving awareness among geriatricians and primary care providers who care for the homebound, the medical community must partner with the dental community to develop home-based programs for older adults. PMID:25537919

  10. Oral health awareness in Croatian and Italian urban adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cuković-Bagić, Ivana; Dumancić, Jelena; Nuzzolese, Emilio; Marusić, Miljenko; Lepore, Maria Maddalena

    2012-03-01

    Purpose of this study was to investigate and compare differences in oral health awareness between Croatian and Italian urban adolescents. The sample consisted of primary school last grade students aged between 13 and 15 years, 300 children from Zagreb (Croatia) and 298 children from Bari (Italy). Oral health awareness was evaluated using a self-administered standardized questionnaire. Self-perception of oral health proved to be different between the two groups (p < 0.001). The Croatians reported that their oral health was "excellent" or "very-good" more often than the Italians (68.6% vs. 50.2%). The reasons given for visiting a dentist were different (p < 0.001). The Italians cleaned their teeth more often than the Croatians ("two or more times a day", 83.1% vs. 72.2%, p < 0.003). Wooden toothpicks were preferred by the Croatians (p < 0.001), while floss was preferred by the Italians (p = 0.03). The awareness regarding the use of fluoridated toothpaste was higher in the Italian group (95.6% vs. 72.5%, p < 0.001). The Croatians were consuming sweetened foods more often than the Italians (p < 0.001). Croatian adolescents reported more indicators of a lower level of oral health awareness than the Italians, while on the contrary Croatians had higher esteem of their oral health. Defining national preventive strategies is essential for improving adolescents' attitudes toward oral health in both countries, particularly in Croatia.

  11. Effects of SMEAT on the oral health of crewmen (DTO 71-2). [dental hygiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. R.; Wheatcroft, M. G.

    1973-01-01

    The oral health status of three astronauts was monitored before, during and after a 56-day simulation of the Skylab mission. Laboratory and clinical parameters which are considered to be ultimately related to dental impairments were evaluated. The most notable changes were observed in increased counts of mycoplasma and S. mutans, decreased counts of enteric bacilli, decreased saliva flow rates, increased secretory IgA and salivary lysozyme levels, and increased clinical scores of dental plaque, calculus and inflammation.

  12. Effects of SMEAT on the oral health of crewmen (DTO 71-2). [dental hygiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, L. R.; Wheatcroft, M. G.

    1973-01-01

    The oral health status of three astronauts was monitored before, during and after a 56-day simulation of the Skylab mission. Laboratory and clinical parameters which are considered to be ultimately related to dental impairments were evaluated. The most notable changes were observed in increased counts of mycoplasma and S. mutans, decreased counts of enteric bacilli, decreased saliva flow rates, increased secretory IgA and salivary lysozyme levels, and increased clinical scores of dental plaque, calculus and inflammation.

  13. Dental health status among sensory impaired and blind institutionalized children aged 6 to 20 years.

    PubMed

    Sanjay, Venkataraam; Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Managoli, Noopur A; Gugawad, Sachin C; Hitesh, D

    2014-02-01

    This study was planned to assess the dental caries status among disabled children as dental health is an integral part of general body health and this group is deprived of health care needs. A sample of 310 disabled children was gathered including 195- Hearing impaired, 115 - blind. Of which 226 were males and 84 were females. A study questionnaire was prepared to include demographic information and WHO oral health assessment form (1997) to record dental caries status.Data was analysed using student's test and ANOVA test was used at p≤0.05. The overall mean for DMFT scores for males and females was 2.11 (1.753) and 1.75 (1.275) respectively. Similarly overall mean for dft was 0.31 (0.254) for males and 0.27 (0.143) for females. Mean DMFT of blind students was more as compared to hearing impaired ones as 2.16 (2.005) and 1.80 (1.264) respectively. Age factor showed a significant increase in the mean DMFT scores with advancing age at p ≤ 0.001. Overall mean scores of caries was very high and it increased with increasing age. Blind children experienced more caries then hearing impaired children in permanent, whereas it was opposite in primary dentition. So there is urgent need of both comprehensive and incremental dental care for this subgroup of population. How to cite the article: Sanjay V, Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Managoli NA, Gugawad SC, Hitesh D. Dental health status among sensory impaired and blind institutionalized children aged 6 to 20 years. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):55-8.

  14. Dental health status among sensory impaired and blind institutionalized children aged 6 to 20 years

    PubMed Central

    Sanjay, Venkataraam; Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Managoli, Noopur A; Gugawad, Sachin C; Hitesh, D

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study was planned to assess the dental caries status among disabled children as dental health is an integral part of general body health and this group is deprived of health care needs. Materials & Methods: A sample of 310 disabled children was gathered including 195- Hearing impaired, 115 – blind. Of which 226 were males and 84 were females. A study questionnaire was prepared to include demographic information and WHO oral health assessment form (1997) to record dental caries status.Data was analysed using student’s test and ANOVA test was used at p≤0.05. Results: The overall mean for DMFT scores for males and females was 2.11 (1.753) and 1.75 (1.275) respectively. Similarly overall mean for dft was 0.31 (0.254) for males and 0.27 (0.143) for females. Mean DMFT of blind students was more as compared to hearing impaired ones as 2.16 (2.005) and 1.80 (1.264) respectively. Age factor showed a significant increase in the mean DMFT scores with advancing age at p ≤ 0.001. Conclusion: Overall mean scores of caries was very high and it increased with increasing age. Blind children experienced more caries then hearing impaired children in permanent, whereas it was opposite in primary dentition. So there is urgent need of both comprehensive and incremental dental care for this subgroup of population. How to cite the article: Sanjay V, Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Managoli NA, Gugawad SC, Hitesh D. Dental health status among sensory impaired and blind institutionalized children aged 6 to 20 years. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):55-8. PMID:24653604

  15. The effectiveness of dental health education tools for visually impaired students in Bukit Mertajam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahabudin, Saadiah; Hashim, Hasnah; Omar, Maizurah

    2016-12-01

    Oral health is a vital component of overall health. It is important in adults and children alike, however, it is even more crucial for children with special needs as they have limited ability to perform oral health practices. Disabled children deserve the same opportunity for oral health as normal children. Unfortunately, oral health care is the most unattended health needs of the disabled children. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of dental health education tools for visually impaired students in two schools in Bukit Mertajam, Penang. The project utilized dental health education tools consisting of an oral health module (printed in braille for the blind and in font 18px for the partially blind), an audio narration of the module were prepared and content-validated by an expert panel. Baseline plaque scores of 38 subjects aged 6-17 years were determined by a trained dental staff nurse. The module was then administered to the subjects facilitated by the teachers. Post intervention plaque scores were recorded again after one month. The pre and post intervention data were analyzed using Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test with a significant p value set at < 0.05. The results showed that there was a reduction in the overall median plaque score in both partially blind (n = 22) and totally blind (n = 16) subjects (2.2 (IQR 0.7) to 1.8 (IQR 0.5) and 2.1 (IQR 0.4) to 2.0 0 (IQR 0.7) respectively). The score difference in the totally blind group was significant (p=0.025). Reductions in plaque scores were also observed in stratified data (based on age); with the partially blind aged 12-17 years showing the greatest reduction. However, the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.067). At younger age, tooth brushing should be supervised by parents as their manual dexterity and cognitive ability is still low. In addition, the younger subjects are less motivated if compared to the older ones. These factors could affect the result of the overall mean OHI-score in this

  16. Green Tea (Camellia Sinensis): Chemistry and Oral Health.

    PubMed

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zafar, Muhammad S; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Naseem, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Green tea is a widely consumed beverage worldwide. Numerous studies have suggested about the beneficial effects of green tea on oral conditions such as dental caries, periodontal diseases and halitosis. However, to date there have not been many review articles published that focus on beneficial effects of green tea on oral disease. The aim of this publication is to summarize the research conducted on the effects of green tea on oral cavity. Green tea might help reduce the bacterial activity in the oral cavity that in turn, can reduce the aforementioned oral afflictions. Furthermore, the antioxidant effect of the tea may reduce the chances of oral cancer. However, more clinical data is required to ascertain the possible benefits of green tea consumption on oral health.

  17. Green Tea (Camellia Sinensis): Chemistry and Oral Health

    PubMed Central

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zafar, Muhammad S.; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Naseem, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Green tea is a widely consumed beverage worldwide. Numerous studies have suggested about the beneficial effects of green tea on oral conditions such as dental caries, periodontal diseases and halitosis. However, to date there have not been many review articles published that focus on beneficial effects of green tea on oral disease. The aim of this publication is to summarize the research conducted on the effects of green tea on oral cavity. Green tea might help reduce the bacterial activity in the oral cavity that in turn, can reduce the aforementioned oral afflictions. Furthermore, the antioxidant effect of the tea may reduce the chances of oral cancer. However, more clinical data is required to ascertain the possible benefits of green tea consumption on oral health. PMID:27386001

  18. Impact of oral health care needs on health-related quality of life in adult HIV+ patients.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Gabriel A; D'Eramo, Luciana R; Lecumberri, Rodolfo; Squassi, Aldo F

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the social impact of oral conditions on health-related quality of life in adult HIV+ patients and create a predictive model. The oral health impact profile questionnaire OHIP-49 was randomly administered to 200 HIV+ adults patients of any age and either sex at the High Risk Patients Dental Care Unit (CLAPAR I), School of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires. Argentina. For each of the 49 items, participants indicated their responses on a five point Likert-type frequency scale ranging from "never" to "very often". Oral health needs were assessed through the CCITN (Community Caries Index of Treatment Need) and CPITN (Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Need). The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare the OHIP-49 score between male and female respondents. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to assess score differences among the OHIP-49 domains. Altogether, 50% of the respondents were male and 50% were female, aged 36.45 +/- 0.70 years and 38.03 +/- 0.78 years respectively. The assessment of oral health care needs revealed a great need for treatment. Mean CCITN was 11.15 +/- 0.35 and CPITN was 2.41 +/- 0.12. The average total OHIP-49 score (83) revealed a high level of social impact, which was higher for female compared to male respondents (Z(T) = 2.08, p = 0.037). The domains concerning functional limitation (domain 1), physical pain (domain 2) and psychological discomfort (domain 3) showed higher levels of social impact (H = 395.06, p < 0.0001). The social impact observed in these domains was higher for female compared to male patients. In the correlation analysis, oral conditions, age, gender and social impact were significantly associated. These results demonstrate that unmet oral health care need impairs the quality of life of HIV+ patients and suggest the need of comprehensive oral health care interventions.

  19. Cooling out Undergraduates with Health Impairments: The Freshman Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Jamie M.; Muller, Chandra; Pattison, Evangeleen

    2016-01-01

    Students with health impairments represent a growing sector of the college population, but health-based disparities in bachelor's degree completion persist. The classes students pass and the grades they receive during the first year of college provides signals of degree progress and academic fit that shape educational expectations, potentially…

  20. Cooling out Undergraduates with Health Impairments: The Freshman Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Jamie M.; Muller, Chandra; Pattison, Evangeleen

    2016-01-01

    Students with health impairments represent a growing sector of the college population, but health-based disparities in bachelor's degree completion persist. The classes students pass and the grades they receive during the first year of college provides signals of degree progress and academic fit that shape educational expectations, potentially…

  1. Unemployment Impairs Mental Health: Meta-Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Karsten I.; Moser, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The effect of unemployment on mental health was examined with meta-analytic methods across 237 cross-sectional and 87 longitudinal studies. The average overall effect size was d = 0.51 with unemployed persons showing more distress than employed persons. A significant difference was found for several indicator variables of mental health (mixed…

  2. Unemployment Impairs Mental Health: Meta-Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Karsten I.; Moser, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The effect of unemployment on mental health was examined with meta-analytic methods across 237 cross-sectional and 87 longitudinal studies. The average overall effect size was d = 0.51 with unemployed persons showing more distress than employed persons. A significant difference was found for several indicator variables of mental health (mixed…

  3. Women's oral health: why sex and gender matter.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Linda C; Gibson, Gretchen; Kinnunen, Taru H

    2013-04-01

    This article examines the differences and interaction between sex and gender, and how they affect women's oral and general health. The authors provide a definition of women's health, and examples of how this definition can be used to describe various oral health conditions and diseases in women. The article reviews the research on sex and gender and provides examples of their interactions. Examples of oral diseases that affect primarily women are reviewed. Advice for clinicians on the diagnosis, management, and prevention of these conditions is provided.

  4. The sugar tax - An opportunity to advance oral health.

    PubMed

    Wordley, V; Lee, H; Lomazzi, M; Bedi, R

    2017-07-07

    The new sugar tax was recently announced by Government, aiming to combat obesity through investment in school sports. Dental professionals should seize this rare opportunity to raise awareness of the other adverse effects of sugar; young children continue to suffer alarmingly high rates of dental cavities in the UK. A significant amount of money raised through the levy must be reinvested into ensuring fluoride toothpaste is more affordable. Since daily use of fluoride toothpaste is the most effective evidence-based oral health preventative measure that is widely used, this should receive tax exemption status from the government as a means of universal oral health prevention. There must also be a re-investment in innovative oral health education so that the next generation of children will alter their mind set about sugar. Oral health prevention advice must be tightly integrated into general health messages.

  5. Oral and written story composition skills of children with language impairment.

    PubMed

    Fey, Marc E; Catts, Hugh W; Proctor-Williams, Kerry; Tomblin, J Bruce; Zhang, Xuyang

    2004-12-01

    In this study 538 children composed 1 oral and 1 written fictional story in both 2nd and 4th grades. Each child represented 1 of 4 diagnostic groups: typical language (TL), specific language impairment (SLI), nonspecific language impairment (NLI), or low nonverbal IQ (LNIQ). The stories of the TL group had more different words, more grammatical complexity, fewer errors, and more overall quality than either language-impaired group at either grade. Stories of the SLI and LNIQ groups were consistently stronger than were those of the NLI group. Kindergarten children with language impairment (LI) whose standardized test performance suggested normalization by 2nd grade also appeared to have recovered in storytelling abilities at that point. By 4th grade, however, these children's stories were less like the children with TL and more like those of children with persistent LI than they had been in 2nd grade. Oral stories were better than written stories in both grades, although the greatest gains from 2nd to 4th grade were generally made on written stories. Girls told stronger stories than did boys at both grades, regardless of group placement. It is concluded that story composition tasks are educationally relevant and should play a significant role in the evaluation of children with developmental LI.

  6. Oral health protocol for the dependent institutionalized elderly.

    PubMed

    Gil-Montoya, Jose Antonio; de Mello, Ana Lucia Ferreira; Cardenas, Ciro Barreto; Lopez, Inmaculada Guardia

    2006-01-01

    Establishing an oral hygiene protocol for the frail and functionally dependent elderly should be of special concern to health care providers. The previous assessment of a care center, including patients or residents and staff, allows an effective strategy to be designed. Oral health protocols are mainly based on the daily removal of bacterial plaque from teeth or prostheses (or both), cleaning of oral mucosa, and continual oral hydration. These practices are facilitated by the use of electric toothbrushes and products such as chlorhexidine, fluoride toothpastes, and rinses or gels for dry mouth. This type of protocol should include regular collaboration with dental professionals and provide a program of continuous training for nursing staff on oral health issues.

  7. Oral Health in the US: Key Facts

    MedlinePlus

    Home Topics Disparities Policy Global Health Policy Health Costs Health Reform HIV/AIDS Medicaid Medicare Private Insurance Uninsured Women’s Health Policy Polling Perspectives State Health Facts Graphics & Interactives ...

  8. What explains health in persons with visual impairment?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Visual impairment is associated with important limitations in functioning. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) adopted by the World Health Organisation (WHO) relies on a globally accepted framework for classifying problems in functioning and the influence of contextual factors. Its comprehensive perspective, including biological, individual and social aspects of health, enables the ICF to describe the whole health experience of persons with visual impairment. The objectives of this study are (1) to analyze whether the ICF can be used to comprehensively describe the problems in functioning of persons with visual impairment and the environmental factors that influence their lives and (2) to select the ICF categories that best capture self-perceived health of persons with visual impairment. Methods Data from 105 persons with visual impairment were collected, including socio-demographic data, vision-related data, the Extended ICF Checklist and the visual analogue scale of the EuroQoL-5D, to assess self-perceived health. Descriptive statistics and a Group Lasso regression were performed. The main outcome measures were functioning defined as impairments in Body functions and Body structures, limitations in Activities and restrictions in Participation, influencing Environmental factors and self-perceived health. Results In total, 120 ICF categories covering a broad range of Body functions, Body structures, aspects of Activities and Participation and Environmental factors were identified. Thirteen ICF categories that best capture self-perceived health were selected based on the Group Lasso regression. While Activities-and-Participation categories were selected most frequently, the greatest impact on self-perceived health was found in Body-functions categories. The ICF can be used as a framework to comprehensively describe the problems of persons with visual impairment and the Environmental factors which influence their

  9. Oral health disparities in Appalachia: orthodontic treatment need and demand.

    PubMed

    Martin, Chris A; McNeil, Daniel W; Crout, Richard J; Ngan, Peter W; Weyant, Robert J; Heady, Hilda R; Marazita, Mary L

    2008-05-01

    Significant oral health disparities affect people in West Virginia and elsewhere in Appalachia. Although oral diseases such as caries are a major problem, little is known about the occlusal status of this under-served group. Fifty-eight adolescents (ages 12-17 years) and 78 of their parents underwent an orthodontic examination as part of a larger study on oral health in two rural West Virginia counties. Two orthodontists used a standardized index to rate their need for orthodontic care. Participants were interviewed regarding their demand for and history of orthodontic care. The study results show that parents had a high rate of complete or partial edentulism, an infrequent history of orthodontic treatment, great unmet orthodontic need and less demand for orthodontic care than was suggested by their clinically determined need. The adolescents were similar to national norms with regard to orthodontic treatment history and need, but lower with regard to demand. The adolescents' similarity to general population norms with regard to previous orthodontic care and level of occlusal status is promising. Nevertheless, their lower recognition of a need for treatment suggests possible future oral health problems and a lower oral health quality of life. Their parents, however, were considerably worse off, in comparison with their adolescent children and adult comparison samples, with regard to orthodontic care and other oral health status measures. Culturally sensitive psychoeducational methods to promote recognition of oral health needs may be required among adolescents in Appalachia to have an impact on oral health values and to prevent oral health problems. Issues of orthodontic care utilization and, perhaps, access to care need to be addressed among adults in Appalachia.

  10. Evidence summary: the relationship between oral health and pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Manger, D; Walshaw, M; Fitzgerald, R; Doughty, J; Wanyonyi, K L; White, S; Gallagher, J E

    2017-04-07

    Introduction This paper is the second of four reviews exploring the relationships between oral health and general medical conditions, in order to support teams within Public Health England, health practitioners and policymakers.Aim This review aimed to explore the most contemporary evidence on whether poor oral health and pulmonary disease occurs in the same individuals or populations, to outline the nature of the relationship between these two health outcomes, and discuss the implication of any findings for health services and future research.Methods The work was undertaken by a group comprising consultant clinicians from medicine and dentistry, trainees, public health, and academics. The methodology involved a streamlined rapid review process and synthesis of the data.Results The results identified a number of systematic reviews of medium to high quality which provide evidence that oral health and oral hygiene habits have an impact on incidence and outcomes of lung diseases, such as pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in people living in the community and in long-term care facilities. The findings are discussed in relation to the implications for service and future research.Conclusion The cumulative evidence of this review suggests an association between oral and pulmonary disease, specifically COPD and pneumonia, and incidence of the latter can be reduced by oral hygiene measures such as chlorhexidine and povidone iodine in all patients, while toothbrushing reduces the incidence, duration, and mortality from pneumonia in community and hospital patients.

  11. An oral health study of centenarians and children of centenarians.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Laura B; Setiono, Tiffany K; Doros, Gheorghe; Andersen, Stacy; Silliman, Rebecca A; Friedman, Paula K; Perls, Thomas T

    2014-06-01

    To determine whether oral health is better in centenarians than in a published birth cohort-matched sample and to compare oral health in centenarian offspring with a case-controlled reference sample. Observational cross-sectional study. New England Centenarian Study (NECS). Seventy-three centenarians, 467 offspring, and 251 offspring generation-reference cohort subjects from the NECS. A self-report questionnaire was administered to measure oral health in all three groups, with edentulous rate as the primary outcome measure. The NECS made information on sociodemographic characteristics and medical history available. Centenarian results were compared with published birth cohort-matched results. Data from offspring and reference cohorts were analyzed to determine differences in oral health and associations between oral health measures and specific medical conditions. The edentulous rate of centenarians (36.5%) was lower than that of their birth cohort (46%) when they were aged 65 to 74 in 1971 to 1974 (according to National Center of Health Statistics). Adjusting for confounding factors, the reference cohort was more likely to be edentulous (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.78, 95% confidence interval CI = 1.17-6.56), less likely to have all or more than half of their own teeth (AOR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.3-0.76), and less likely to report excellent or very good oral health (AOR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.45-0.94) than the centenarian offspring. Centenarians and their offspring have better oral health than their respective birth cohorts. Oral health may prove to be a helpful marker for systemic health and healthy aging. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  12. Oral health and medical conditions among Amish children

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Marc-Allen; Milgrom, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Amish are a growing population who live a traditional, rural way of life, which makes them less accepting of modernism. Most Amish live in poverty and are detached from modern health care. In addition, the recent change of their lifestyle has been reported, such as consuming a nontraditional diet and the usage of electronic devices. As a result, their lifestyle change may have impacted their oral health. However, since only a single report about oral health among Amish children has been published approximately three decades ago it has not yet been updated. This study describes oral health among Amish children and their medical conditions during visits to a mobile dental unit (MDU). Material and Methods: The dental records of all patients (N=216) who visited a mobile dental unit were reviewed, which covers 1 year from May 20, 2011, the first date of service. The following factors were taken into consideration during the review process: parental perceptions of their children’s oral health care, dental care experiences, and general health information. Results: Fifty-four (27.8%) children, ages 3 to 17, have never received dental treatment before visiting the MDU; the average number of untreated decayed teeth was 6.8. In spite of this, most parents rated their children’s oral health as good or very good (87.7%). The high cost and long distance travel associated with routine, professional dental care makes it difficult for children to maintain good oral hygiene. Our analysis revealed that bleeding disorders were more prevalent among this gene pool compared to the nation at large; however, asthma was less common. Conclusions: There are oral and general health disparities among Amish children. There is a lack of awareness among Amish parents with regard to their children’s oral health. Key words:Amish, child, dental caries, mobile health units. PMID:28298971

  13. Relationships between self-rated oral health, subjective symptoms, oral health behavior and clinical conditions in Japanese university students: a cross-sectional survey at Okayama University

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-rated oral health is a valid and useful summary indicator of overall oral health status and quality of life. However, few studies on perception of oral health have been conducted among Japanese young adults. This study investigated whether oral health behavior, subjective oral symptoms, or clinical oral status were associated with self-rated oral health in Japanese young adults. Methods This cross-sectional survey included 2,087 students (1,183 males, 904 females), aged 18 and 19 years, at Okayama University, Japan. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed and an oral examination was performed. Results In a structural equation modeling analysis, the score of decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) significantly affected self-rated oral health (p <0.05) and the effect size was highest. Malocclusion, subjective symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and stomatitis, and poor oral health behavior significantly induced self-rated poor oral health with small effect sizes (p <0.05). Clinical periodontal conditions and Oral Hygiene Index-simplified were not related to self-rated oral health. Conclusion Self-rated oral health was influenced by subjective symptoms of TMD and stomatitis, oral health behavior, the score of DMFT, and malocclusion. The evaluation of these parameters may be a useful approach in routine dental examination to improve self-rated oral health in university students. PMID:24195632

  14. Do dentists have better oral health compared to general population: a study on oral health status and oral health behavior in Kathmandu, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dentists are considered role models by the general population in regards to oral hygiene and oral health behavior. This study aimed to access the oral health status of dentists and laypersons, and compare the dentists’ practice of preventive dentistry and oral self-care behaviors to that of the laypersons. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 472 participants (195 dentists and 277 laypersons from the general population). Their oral health/hygiene behavior was assessed using a standardized close-ended multiple choice questionnaire. Oral examination was performed to assess caries using Decayed Missed Filled teeth (DMFT) index and periodontal status using Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN). Results Ninety-six percent of dentists brushed their teeth at least once daily, using fluoridated toothpaste and 80.5% twice daily. Although 94% of laypersons brushed their teeth once daily, they seldom used fluoridated toothpaste. Ten percent of participants in each group were caries free. The mean number of teeth present in the oral cavity (27.4 versus 25.4), mean number of teeth with caries (1.8 versus 3.7) and fillings (2.5 versus 0.4) were significantly different (p < 0.0001) between dentists and laypersons, respectively. Regarding the periodontal status, 82% of dentists had CPITN score of 0 whereas 71% of laypersons had the highest score 3 (p = 0.007), and 81% of the laypersons reported tooth mobility compared to 1% of dentists (p < 0.0001). Conclusions The participating dentists had better periodontal status and better self-reported oral health behaviors than the laypersons. Despite similar prevalence of caries in the two groups, the prevalence of decayed and unfilled teeth was lower among the dentists. PMID:24655533

  15. Do dentists have better oral health compared to general population: a study on oral health status and oral health behavior in Kathmandu, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Wagle, Madhu; Trovik, Tordis A; Basnet, Purusotam; Acharya, Ganesh

    2014-03-22

    Dentists are considered role models by the general population in regards to oral hygiene and oral health behavior. This study aimed to access the oral health status of dentists and laypersons, and compare the dentists' practice of preventive dentistry and oral self-care behaviors to that of the laypersons. This cross-sectional study recruited 472 participants (195 dentists and 277 laypersons from the general population). Their oral health/hygiene behavior was assessed using a standardized close-ended multiple choice questionnaire. Oral examination was performed to assess caries using Decayed Missed Filled teeth (DMFT) index and periodontal status using Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN). Ninety-six percent of dentists brushed their teeth at least once daily, using fluoridated toothpaste and 80.5% twice daily. Although 94% of laypersons brushed their teeth once daily, they seldom used fluoridated toothpaste. Ten percent of participants in each group were caries free. The mean number of teeth present in the oral cavity (27.4 versus 25.4), mean number of teeth with caries (1.8 versus 3.7) and fillings (2.5 versus 0.4) were significantly different (p < 0.0001) between dentists and laypersons, respectively. Regarding the periodontal status, 82% of dentists had CPITN score of 0 whereas 71% of laypersons had the highest score 3 (p = 0.007), and 81% of the laypersons reported tooth mobility compared to 1% of dentists (p < 0.0001). The participating dentists had better periodontal status and better self-reported oral health behaviors than the laypersons. Despite similar prevalence of caries in the two groups, the prevalence of decayed and unfilled teeth was lower among the dentists.

  16. Oral Health Screening Using a Caries Detection Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetuan, Theresa M.; McGlasson, Dawn; Meyer, Ileen

    2005-01-01

    Children from low-income families are more likely to have dental disease and less likely to have regular dental care. Children's dental-related illnesses are responsible for more than 880,000 lost school days each year. The lack of reliable state-level data often makes monitoring the oral health of children a challenge. By conducting oral health…

  17. Oral Health Screening Using a Caries Detection Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetuan, Theresa M.; McGlasson, Dawn; Meyer, Ileen

    2005-01-01

    Children from low-income families are more likely to have dental disease and less likely to have regular dental care. Children's dental-related illnesses are responsible for more than 880,000 lost school days each year. The lack of reliable state-level data often makes monitoring the oral health of children a challenge. By conducting oral health…

  18. [Sleep impairment is a threat to good health].

    PubMed

    Clark, Alice Jessie; Jørgensen, Thea Suldrup; Bonke, Jens; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Garde, Anne Helene; Hermansen, Kjeld; Krogholm, Kirstine; Møller, Morten; Sjödin, Anders; Zachariae, Bobby; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2016-05-09

    Long-term sleep impairment is related to an increased risk of somatic health problems, e.g. overweight, Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and premature death. Avoidance of caffeine, alcohol, energy-rich or fatty foods and light from computer screens close to bedtime may counteract impaired sleep. A quiet, dark and well-tempered bedroom and physical activity during the day may have a positive impact on sleep. Impaired sleep may be related to stress and conditions at home or at work. Psychological sleep treatment is free of adverse side effects with effects comparable to effects of medical treatment.

  19. Oral Health Related Quality of Life in Young Individuals with Dental Anxiety and Exaggerated Gag Reflex.

    PubMed

    Almoznino, Galit; Zini, Avraham; Aframian, Doron J; Kaufman, Eliezer; Lvovsky, Alex; Hadad, Avraham; Levin, Liran

    2015-01-01

    To measure the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among young individuals presenting with dental anxiety and exaggerated gag reflex and to compare it to the OHRQoL among young individuals attending restorative dental treatment. Patients with dental anxiety and/or exaggerated gag reflex who were referred to the Department of Oral Medicine were included. Clinical examinations included DMFT index (Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth) according to the WHO criteria and oral hygiene was assessed with the plaque index (PI). The survey included the validated Hebrew version of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). Overall, 322 patients completed the study. The dental anxiety group consisted of 68 patients, the exaggerated gag reflex group of 54 patients and the control group of 200 patients. Control group patients presented with lower PI and DMFT values. Patients with dental anxiety and/or exaggerated gag exhibited worse OHIP-14 scores overall as well as on each separate subscale. PI and DMFT were found to be in strong relation to the OHIP-14. Multivariable logistic regression analysis of factors influencing the OHIP-14 scores revealed a significant influence of the DMFT score. Patients with dental anxiety and exaggerated gag reflex were shown to suffer considerably from impaired oral health-related quality of life. This impairment may be attributed to a higher prevalence of caries and avoidance of dental treatment. Those populations should be identified and monitored carefully as well as encouraged to seek the appropriate behavioural treatment in order to improve their dental heath and oral health related quality of life.

  20. Knowledge and beliefs regarding oral health among pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Boggess, Kim A.; Urlaub, Diana M.; Moos, Merry-K; Polinkovsky, Margaret; El-Khorazaty, Jill; Lorenz, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Background Racial or ethnic and economic disparities exist in terms of oral diseases among pregnant women and children. The authors hypothesized that women of a racial or ethnic minority have less oral health knowledge than do women not of a racial or ethnic minority. Therefore, the authors conducted a study to assess and compare maternal oral health knowledge and beliefs and to determine if maternal race and ethnicity or other maternal factors contributed to women’s knowledge or beliefs. Methods The authors administered a written oral health questionnaire to pregnant women. The authors calculated the participants’ knowledge and belief scores on the basis of correct answers or answers supporting positive oral health behaviors. They conducted multivariable analysis of variance to assess associations between oral health knowledge and belief scores and characteristics. Results The authors enrolled 615 women in the study, and 599 (97.4 percent) completed the questionnaire. Of 599 participants, 573 (95.7 percent) knew that sugar intake is associated with caries. Almost one-half (295 participants [49.2 percent]) did not know that caries and periodontal disease are oral infections. Median (interquartile range) knowledge and belief scores were 6.0 (5.5–7.0) and 6.0 (5.0–7.0), respectively. Hispanic women had median (interquartile range) knowledge and belief scores significantly lower than those of white or African American women (6.0 [4.0–7.0] versus 7.0 [6.0–7.0] versus 7.0 [6.0–7.0], respectively [P < .001]; and 5.0 [4.0–6.0] versus 6.0 [5.0–7.0] versus 6.0 [5.0–7.0], respectively [P < .001]). Multivariable analysis of variance results showed that being of His-panic ethnicity was associated significantly with a lower knowledge score, and that an education level of eighth grade or less was associated significantly with a lower belief score. Conclusions Pregnant women have some oral health knowledge. Knowledge varied according to maternal race or

  1. Knowledge and beliefs regarding oral health among pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Boggess, Kim A; Urlaub, Diana M; Moos, Merry-K; Polinkovsky, Margaret; El-Khorazaty, Jill; Lorenz, Carol

    2011-11-01

    Racial or ethnic and economic disparities exist in terms of oral diseases among pregnant women and children. The authors hypothesized that women of a racial or ethnic minority have less oral health knowledge than do women not of a racial or ethnic minority. Therefore, the authors conducted a study to assess and compare maternal oral health knowledge and beliefs and to determine if maternal race and ethnicity or other maternal factors contributed to women's knowledge or beliefs. The authors administered a written oral health questionnaire to pregnant women. The authors calculated the participants' knowledge and belief scores on the basis of correct answers or answers supporting positive oral health behaviors. They conducted multivariable analysis of variance to assess associations between oral health knowledge and belief scores and characteristics. The authors enrolled 615 women in the study, and 599 (97.4 percent) completed the questionnaire. Of 599 participants, 573 (95.7 percent) knew that sugar intake is associated with caries. Almost one-half (295 participants [49.2 percent]) did not know that caries and periodontal disease are oral infections. Median (interquartile range) knowledge and belief scores were 6.0 (5.5-7.0) and 6.0 (5.0-7.0), respectively. Hispanic women had median (interquartile range) knowledge and belief scores significantly lower than those of white or African American women (6.0 [4.0-7.0] versus 7.0 [6.0-7.0] versus 7.0 [6.0-7.0], respectively [P < .001]; and 5.0 [4.0-6.0] versus 6.0 [5.0-7.0] versus 6.0 [5.0-7.0], respectively [P < .001]). Multivariable analysis of variance results showed that being of Hispanic ethnicity was associated significantly with a lower knowledge score, and that an education level of eighth grade or less was associated significantly with a lower belief score. Pregnant women have some oral health knowledge. Knowledge varied according to maternal race or ethnicity, and beliefs varied according to maternal education

  2. Family history and oral health: findings from the Dunedin Study.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Dara M; Thomson, W Murray; Caspi, Avshalom; Moffitt, Terrie E; Broadbent, Jonathan M; Poulton, Richie

    2012-04-01

    The effects of the oral health status of one generation on that of the next within families are unclear.   To determine whether parental oral health history is a risk factor for oral disease. Oral examination and interview data were collected during the age-32 assessments in the Dunedin Study. Parental data were also collected on this occasion. The sample was divided into two familial-risk groups for caries/tooth loss (high risk and low risk) based on parents' self-reported history of tooth loss at the age-32 assessment interview. Probands' dental caries and tooth loss status at age 32, together with lifelong dental caries trajectory (age 5-32). Caries/tooth loss risk analysis was conducted for 640 proband-parent groups. Reference groups were the low-familial-risk groups. After controlling for confounding factors (sex, episodic use of dental services, socio-economic status and plaque trajectory), the prevalence ratio (PR) for having lost 1+ teeth by age 32 for the high-familial-risk group was 1.41 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05, 1.88] and the rate ratio for DMFS at age 32 was 1.41 (95% CI 1.24, 1.60). In the high-familial-risk group, the PR of following a high caries trajectory was 2.05 (95% CI 1.37, 3.06). Associations were strongest when information was available about both parents' oral health. Nonetheless, when information was available for one parent only, associations were significant for some outcomes. People with poor oral health tend to have parents with poor oral health. Family/parental history of oral health is a valid representation of the intricacies of the shared genetic and environmental factors that contribute to an individual's oral health status. Associations are strongest when data from both parents can be obtained. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Improving the oral health of frail and functionally dependent elderly.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A; Wallace, J; Deutsch, A; King, P

    2015-03-01

    The Australian Government endorsed a national evidence based oral health model when it introduced the first Nursing Home Oral and Dental Health Plan in 2010. Called Better Oral Health in Residential Care, it promotes a multidisciplinary approach with doctors, nurses, care workers and dental professionals sharing responsibility for the four key processes of oral health screening, oral health care planning, daily oral hygiene and access to dental treatment. Frail and dependent residents are most conveniently treated on-site, hence an aged care/dental partnership is encouraged to facilitate the use of portable dental equipment in the delivery of dental care. Currently, few dentists provide services to residential aged care facilities (RACFs), with loss of clinical time in practice, difficulty in providing clinical care in a non-dental environment and lack of referral pathways from the RACFs to the dentists contributing to the problem. The need to establish a model of care involving dental hygienists/oral health therapists in RACFs has merit. Minimal intervention treatment using glass ionomer cement (GIC) and silver fluoride is ideal in aged care. However, GIC has limitation in dry mouths with low pH caused by polypharmacy or disease. Palliative and definitive treatment techniques need to be individualized with consideration of a patient's ability to maintain their own mouths as well as their mental and physical competence. The range of products available to address the oral diseases common to the frail elderly is growing. The oral health care provider is required to establish a preventive regime that is tailored to the patient's needs, is realistic and under revision as the patient's needs change. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  4. The impact of oral health literacy on periodontal health status

    PubMed Central

    Wehmeyer, Meggan M. H.; Corwin, Caleb L.; Guthmiller, Janet M.; Lee, Jessica Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe oral health literacy (OHL) among periodontal patients and to examine its association with periodontal health status. Methods This cross-sectional study included new and referred patients presenting to the University of North Carolina Graduate Periodontology Clinic. Sociodemographic and dental history information were collected. OHL was measured using a dental word recognition instrument, Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy-30 (REALD-30). Clinical periodontal examinations were completed. Results One hundred and twenty-eight participants enrolled and 121 completed all study examinations and instruments. Despite a high level of education among participants in our study, low levels of OHL were found in one-third (33 percent) of the study population. Thirty-one percent had moderate OHL (score of 22–25), 37 percent had high OHL (score ≥ 26). The mean REALD-30 score was 23. Fifty-three percent of participants had severe periodontitis, 29 percent had moderate periodontitis, and 18 percent had mild or no periodontitis. Bivariate analysis showed a significant association between OHL and periodontal status (P < 0.05). The effect of OHL on periodontal health status remained statistically significant (P < 0.002) even after controlling for smoking, race, and dental insurance. Conclusion Lower OHL was associated with more severe periodontal disease among new and referred patients presenting to the University of North Carolina Graduate Periodontology Clinics. PMID:23121152

  5. Motivational interviewing in an oral health promotion programme.

    PubMed

    Yeung, C Albert

    2010-01-01

    This was a randomised controlled trial (RCT). From a group of patients with mental health problems participants in the motivational interviewing (MI) arm received a brief MI session (15-20 min) conducted by a doctoral psychology student trained in MI, prior to an oral health education session which was focused on exploring advantages and disadvantages, motivation and confidence, and personal values related to daily toothbrushing and oral health. All participants received two pamphlets summarising the information from the education session, instruction in using a mechanical toothbrush, a reminder system, and weekly telephone calls (for 4 weeks). Plaque scores, oral health knowledge and self-regulation were assessed at baseline and at 4 and 8 weeks. Sixty participants consented, and 56 (93%) completed the study. Those who did not complete the study discontinued for personal reasons (eg, moving, hospitalisation). Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed improvement (P <0.05) in plaque levels, autonomous regulation and oral health knowledge over time for both groups. Individuals receiving MI improved significantly more, however, compared with people receiving oral health education alone. Results suggest that MI is effective at enhancing short-term oral health behaviour change for people with severe mental illness and may be useful for the general population.

  6. The oral health status of patients on oral bisphosphonates for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Kunchur, R; Goss, A N

    2008-12-01

    The oral health status of patients on bisphosphonates is the key to the patient's ongoing health and well-being. If they are orally healthy, invasive bone procedures, particularly extractions can be avoided, then the risk of osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ) is low. The records of 49 consecutive patients on oral bisphosphonates, referred to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Unit (OMSU) for an oral health check and probable extractions, were retrospectively reviewed. The DMFT, periodontal and pathologic state were calculated from the OPG radiographs. An age and gender matched control group, from patients referred to the OMSU but who were not on oral bisphosphonates, were similarly assessed. Community data were also obtained. The DMFT score for the oral bisphosphonate group was 29: Decayed 3, Missing 10, Filled 16. The control group DMFT score was 24: Decayed 5, Missing 11, Filled 8. Both groups had advanced periodontal disease (over 95 per cent) and were medically compromised (over 90 per cent). The DMFT for general community data for age matched government pensioners was 19.1: Decayed 0.8, Missing 10.4, Filled 7.9. With severe periodontal disease 23 per cent. Thus, the oral health of the oral bisphosphonate group was similar to the control group and both had more decayed teeth and periodontal disease than community values. This study confirms that one cannot assume that a patient on an oral bisphosphonate for osteoporosis has a healthy mouth. It supports the view that all patients on bisphosphonates need to be seen by a dentist either before or soon after commencement of bisphosphonate therapy.

  7. Oral disease experience of older adults seeking oral health services.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Kavita P; Cheng, Bin; Josephs, Philip K; Lalla, Evanthia; Lamster, Ira B

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to describe the dental disease (dental caries and alveolar bone loss) experience in a sample of community-dwelling older adults who regularly utilize dental services in New York City. Public financing for dental care directed at older adults in the United States is minimal. Improved preventive methods, primarily the use of fluorides, have resulted in declines in tooth loss, and concomitant increase in risk for dental diseases among older adults. While the oral disease burden in institutionalized elderly and those unable to access services is well-documented, the dental care needs of older adults who access dental services are not well documented. Radiographic and record review were used to determine prevalence of dental caries, alveolar bone loss, frequency of service utilization, and medical status in this cross-sectional investigation of a sample of older adults (N = 200) using dental services at Columbia University College of Dental Medicine. Only 9% of the sample was completely edentulous, the mean DMFT was 19.9 and mean alveolar bone loss was 3.6 mm. Missing and Decayed Teeth accounted for 57.8% and 6.5% of the total caries burden respectively. Missing Teeth and alveolar bone loss increased with increasing age, but there was no increase in Decayed Teeth. While access to and utilization of dental services may result in improved tooth retention, older adults who use dental services continue to have dental care needs, especially periodontal care needs.

  8. Pregnancy Cravings Can Harm Your Oral Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... their baby's arrival. Other women suffering from an eating disorder called pica, will have cravings for ice, freezer frost, or even soil. Pica combined with bulimia can have adverse effects on an individual's oral ...

  9. The oral microbiome in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Wade, William G

    2013-03-01

    The human mouth harbours one of the most diverse microbiomes in the human body, including viruses, fungi, protozoa, archaea and bacteria. The bacteria are responsible for the two commonest bacterial diseases of man: dental caries (tooth decay) and the periodontal (gum) diseases. Archaea are restricted to a small number of species of methanogens while around 1000 bacterial species have been found, with representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Spirochaetes, Synergistetes and Tenericutes and the uncultured divisions GN02, SR1 and TM7. Around half of oral bacteria are as yet uncultured and culture-independent methods have been successfully used to comprehensively describe the oral bacterial community. The human oral microbiome database (HOMD, www.homd.org) provides a comprehensive resource consisting of descriptions of oral bacterial taxa, a 16S rRNA identification tool and a repository of oral bacterial genome sequences. Individuals' oral microbiomes are highly specific at the species level, although overall the human oral microbiome shows few geographical differences. Although caries and periodontitis are clearly bacterial diseases, they are not infectious diseases in the classical sense because they result from a complex interaction between the commensal microbiota, host susceptibility and environmental factors such as diet and smoking. Periodontitis, in particular, appears to result from an inappropriate inflammatory reaction to the normal microbiota, exacerbated by the presence of some disease-associated bacterial species. In functional terms, there appears to considerable redundancy among the oral microbiota and a focus on functional rather than phylogenetic diversity may be required in order to fully understand host-microbiome interactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chronic conditions policies: oral health, a felt absence.

    PubMed

    Luis Schwab, Gerson; Tetu Moysés, Simone; Helena Sottile França, Beatriz; Iani Werneck, Renata; Frank, Erica; Jorge Moysés, Samuel

    2014-04-01

    The global health scenario shows an epidemic of non-communicable diseases that lead to long-term chronic conditions, some of which are incurable. Many infectious diseases, owing to their development and length, also generate chronic conditions. Similarly, non-morbid states, such as pregnancy, and some life cycles such as adolescence and ageing, follow the same logic. Among all these chronic conditions there is a significant interrelationship with oral health, both in parallel events and common risk factors. This article presents cross-sectional qualitative research into World Health Organisation recommended health policies to address chronic conditions. Several documents published by the organisation were analysed to verify the presence of references to oral health in relation to chronic conditions, particularly cardiovascular diseases and diabetes as these most frequently have oral manifestations. The analysis showed no significant references to oral health or its indicators within the published texts. The study recognises the value of the work developed by the World Health Organisation, as well as its worldwide leadership role in the development of health policies for chronic conditions. This article proposes a coalition of dentistry organisations that could, in a more forceful and collective way, advocate for a greater presence of oral health in drafting policies addressing chronic conditions.

  11. Social capital: theory, evidence, and implications for oral health.

    PubMed

    Rouxel, Patrick L; Heilmann, Anja; Aida, Jun; Tsakos, Georgios; Watt, Richard G

    2015-04-01

    In the last two decades, there has been increasing application of the concept of social capital in various fields of public health, including oral health. However, social capital is a contested concept with debates on its definition, measurement, and application. This study provides an overview of the concept of social capital, highlights the various pathways linking social capital to health, and discusses the potential implication of this concept for health policy. An extensive and diverse international literature has examined the relationship between social capital and a range of general health outcomes across the life course. A more limited but expanding literature has also demonstrated the potential influence of social capital on oral health. Much of the evidence in relation to oral health is limited by methodological shortcomings mainly related to the measurement of social capital, cross-sectional study designs, and inadequate controls for confounding factors. Further research using stronger methodological designs should explore the role of social capital in oral health and assess its potential application in the development of oral health improvement interventions.

  12. Interdisciplinary Delivery of Oral Health Care Student-Training Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roe, Sandy; Branson, Bonnie G.; Lackey, Nancy R.

    2001-01-01

    Responses from 23 of 37 area health education center project directors revealed that dental and dental hygiene students participated in interdisciplinary allied health studies. Oral health care education was delivered across disciplines; methods included problem-based learning and reflection. (SK)

  13. [Oral health care by utilizing food function].

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yuuki

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of spices and herbs on Candida albicans to develop therapeutic tools against oral diseases such as oral candidiasis. C. albicans, a dimorphic fungus, is a component of the healthy human microbial flora. However, the excessive overgrowth of C. albicans causes oral candidiasis, and the symptoms, accompanied by severe inflammation, reduce the quality of life of elderly people. We found that spices such as clove (Syzygium aromaticum) and cassia (Cinnamomum aromaticum) exhibit inhibitory activity against Candida mycelial growth and show therapeutic efficacy in a murine oral candidiasis model. Our studies also demonstrated that the inhibitory activity of cinnamaldehyde was strengthened in parallel with a prolonged treatment time. Furthermore, when cinnamaldehyde in combination with methylcellulose was administered to the model mice, the therapeutic effect was potentiated. Here, we summarize up-to-date findings on how to use spices and herbs on a daily basis to improve or prevent oral problems such as oral candidiasis with the presentation of our recent data.

  14. Reducing Oral Health Disparities: A Focus on Social and Cultural Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Donald L; Lee, Rosanna Shuk Yin; Nucci, Michele; Grembowski, David; Jolles, Carol Zane; Milgrom, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Oral health is essential to the general health and well-being of individuals and the population. Yet significant oral health disparities persist in the U.S. population because of a web of influences that include complex cultural and social processes that affect both oral health and access to effective dental health care. This paper introduces an organizing framework for addressing oral health disparities. We present and discuss how the multiple influences on oral health and oral health disparities operate using this framework. Interventions targeted at different causal pathways bring new directions and implications for research and policy in reducing oral health disparities. PMID:16934121

  15. Oral health determinants among female addicts in Iran.

    PubMed

    Pourhashemi, S Jalal; Ghane, Mehrdad; Shekarchizadeh, Hajar; Jafari, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Addiction results in a range of health problems especially in the oral cavity. This study assessed the oral health status among women with a history of drug abuse in Tehran, Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted through structured interviews and clinical examinations of women at three rehabilitation centers in Tehran. Data on background characteristics, addiction history, knowledge, attitudes and behaviors, and oral health indices were collected. We used MANOVA test and multiple logistic regression models to analyze the data. We assessed 95 participants aged 37.88 ± 10.65 years. The most commonly reported drugs used prior to treatment were opiates (77.2%). The mean knowledge and attitude score among the patients was 80.83 ± 12.89 (37.5-100). Less than half of the dentate women reported tooth brushing as "rarely or never" (44.2%). Most of them (81.8%) had never used dental floss and 76.1% were daily smokers. The mean score of dental caries index (decayed, missed and filled teeth) of the participants was 20.2 ± 7.18 and 17 subjects were edentulous (17.9%). Factors such as age, drug type, duration of addiction, time of last dental visit, and frequency of brushing were associated with oral health status among these women. Women with a history of drug abuse in our study suffered from poor oral health. Although they had an acceptable level of knowledge and attitude toward oral health, their oral health, and hygiene was poor. These results call for more attention in designing and implementing oral health programs for addicts.

  16. Oral health determinants among female addicts in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pourhashemi, S. Jalal; Ghane, Mehrdad; Shekarchizadeh, Hajar; Jafari, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Context: Addiction results in a range of health problems especially in the oral cavity. Aims: This study assessed the oral health status among women with a history of drug abuse in Tehran, Iran. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted through structured interviews and clinical examinations of women at three rehabilitation centers in Tehran. Materials and Methods: Data on background characteristics, addiction history, knowledge, attitudes and behaviors, and oral health indices were collected. Statistical Analysis Used: We used MANOVA test and multiple logistic regression models to analyze the data. Results: We assessed 95 participants aged 37.88 ± 10.65 years. The most commonly reported drugs used prior to treatment were opiates (77.2%). The mean knowledge and attitude score among the patients was 80.83 ± 12.89 (37.5–100). Less than half of the dentate women reported tooth brushing as “rarely or never” (44.2%). Most of them (81.8%) had never used dental floss and 76.1% were daily smokers. The mean score of dental caries index (decayed, missed and filled teeth) of the participants was 20.2 ± 7.18 and 17 subjects were edentulous (17.9%). Factors such as age, drug type, duration of addiction, time of last dental visit, and frequency of brushing were associated with oral health status among these women. Conclusions: Women with a history of drug abuse in our study suffered from poor oral health. Although they had an acceptable level of knowledge and attitude toward oral health, their oral health, and hygiene was poor. These results call for more attention in designing and implementing oral health programs for addicts. PMID:26321838

  17. Building a Pediatric Oral Health Training Curriculum for Community Health Workers.

    PubMed

    Martin, Molly; Frese, William; Lumsden, Christie; Sandoval, Anna

    2017-06-16

    Community health workers (CHWs) are a promising approach to oral health promotion in high-risk populations. This article describes the process of creating a pediatric oral health CHW training curriculum. Existing curricula were identified through outreach efforts to experts in the oral health and CHW fields, as well as PubMed and Google searches. After coding basic information, curricula were mapped to define oral health domains. Then group discussion was employed to determine final curriculum contents. United States. Curricula were included if they addressed oral health, were in English or Spanish, involved US populations, did not target dental clinicians, and whether sufficient data could be obtained. Curricula were evaluated for delivery format, number of hours, target audience, inclusion of CHWs, completeness, and oral health content. Eighteen unique curricula were identified; 14 (78%) were CHW specific. Pathologic factors, caries formation, toothbrushing basics, flossing, nutrition, sugar-sweetened beverages, oral health recommendations, baby bottle tooth decay, fluoride treatments, and fluoride were covered to some extent in 75% of curricula. More than half did not mention types of teeth, oral health during pregnancy, antifluoride, cultural humility, and special needs populations. After comparing CHW curricula with non-CHW curricula, the original 26 oral health domains were condensed into 10 CHW training domains. Using existing evidence and expert insight, an oral health CHW training curriculum outline was created that emphasizes behaviors, social support, and navigation assistance to promote preventive oral health behaviors in families of young children. This has implications beyond oral health. CHW programs are expanding to address the social determinants of health. The process of creating this curriculum and its basic elements can be applied to other disease areas. Clearly defined trainings that are made publicly available, such as this one, support

  18. Drinking water fluoridation and oral health inequities in Canadian children.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Lindsay; Emery, J C Herbert

    2012-02-01

    One argument made in favour of drinking water fluoridation is that it is equitable in its impact on oral health. We examined the association between exposure to fluoridation and oral health inequities among Canadian children.PARTICIPANTS, SETTING AND INTERVENTION: We analyzed data from 1,017 children aged 6-11 from Cycle 1 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey, a cross-sectional, nationally representative survey that included a clinic oral health examination and a household interview. The outcome measure was a count of the number of decayed, missing (because of caries or periodontal disease) or filled teeth, either deciduous or permanent (dmftDMFT). Data were analyzed using linear (ordinary least squares) and multinomial logistic regression; we also computed the concentration index for education-related inequity in oral health. Water fluoridation status (the intervention) was assigned on the basis of the site location of data collection. Fluoridation was associated with better oral health (fewer dmftDMFT), adjusting for socio-economic and behavioural variables, and the effect was particularly strong for more severe oral health problems (three or more dmftDMFT). The effect of fluoridation on dmftDMFT was observed across income and education categories but appeared especially pronounced in lower education and higher income adequacy households. dmftDMFT were found to be disproportionately concentrated in lower-education households, though this did not vary by fluoridation status. The robust main effect of fluoridation on dmftDMFT and the beneficial effect across socio-economic groups support fluoridation as a beneficial and justifiable population health intervention. Fluoridation was equitable in the sense that its benefits were particularly apparent in those groups with the poorest oral health profiles, though the nature of the findings prompts consideration of the values underlying the judgement of health equity.

  19. Perceived oral health status, oral function and related behaviour among the patients of Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Miura, H; Isogai, E; Mizugai, H; Miura, K

    2000-01-01

    The majority of patients with Behçet's disease (BD) suffers from oral ulcers. The aim of the present study was to survey self-rated oral health status, oral function, and oral health behaviour of patients with BD in eastern Japan. Subjects were 33 BD patients and 101 healthy individuals ranging in age from 20 to 59 years. The survey was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire. The items of oral health in the questionnaire included subjective symptoms, self-rated dental problems and oral health behaviour. We found that compared to the healthy subjects, BD patients experienced more severe physical limitations, mainly involving difficulty in pronouncing words (p < 0.01) and the pain of oral mucosa and gingival tissue caused by oral ulcers (p < 0.01). Based on the results of oral health behaviour, BD patients did not behave positively with regard to maintaining oral health including regular tooth brushing despite relatively higher risk of dental diseases that they face. The present results suggest that oral ulcers due to BD induced dental disorder such as the pain of gingiva, oral mucosa, and difficulty in the pronouncing of words. In spite of this, their oral health behaviour is not positive compared to the healthy subjects. Thus, the need to develop a more active pragramme for oral health education for patients with BD is indicated.

  20. ICOHR: intelligent computer based oral health record.

    PubMed

    Peterson, L C; Cobb, D S; Reynolds, D C

    1995-01-01

    The majority of work on computer use in the dental field has focused on non-clinical practice management information needs. Very few computer-based dental information systems provide management support of the clinical care process, particularly with respect to quality management. Traditional quality assurance methods rely on the paper record and provide only retrospective analysis. Today, proactive quality management initiatives are on the rise. Computer-based dental information systems are being integrated into the care environment, actively providing decision support as patient care is being delivered. These new systems emphasize assessment and improvement of patient care at the time of treatment, thus building internal quality management into the caregiving process. The integration of real time quality management and patient care will be expedited by the introduction of an information system architecture that emulates the gathering and storage of clinical care data currently provided by the paper record. As a proposed solution to the problems associated with existing dental record systems, the computer-based patient record has emerged as a possible alternative to the paper dental record. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) recently conducted a study on improving the efficiency and accuracy of patient record keeping. As a result of this study, the IOM advocates the development and implementation of computer-based patient records as the standard for all patient care records. This project represents the ongoing efforts of The University of Iowa College of Dentistry's collaboration with the University of Uppsala Data Center, Uppsala, Sweden, on a computer-based patient dental record model. ICOHR (Intelligent Computer Based Oral Health Record) is an information system which brings together five important parts of the patient's dental record: medical and dental history; oral status; treatment planning; progress notes; and a Patient Care Database, generated from their

  1. Oral Health: A Window to Your Overall Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... that oral bacteria and the inflammation associated with periodontitis — a severe form of gum disease — might play ... that oral bacteria can cause. Pregnancy and birth. Periodontitis has been linked to premature birth and low ...

  2. School-Based Health Education Programmes, Health-Learning Capacity and Child Oral Health--related Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Ruth; Gibson, Barry; Humphris, Gerry; Leonard, Helen; Yuan, Siyang; Whelton, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To use a model of health learning to examine the role of health-learning capacity and the effect of a school-based oral health education intervention (Winning Smiles) on the health outcome, child oral health-related quality of life (COHRQoL). Setting: Primary schools, high social deprivation, Ireland/Northern Ireland. Design: Cluster…

  3. School-Based Health Education Programmes, Health-Learning Capacity and Child Oral Health--related Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Ruth; Gibson, Barry; Humphris, Gerry; Leonard, Helen; Yuan, Siyang; Whelton, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To use a model of health learning to examine the role of health-learning capacity and the effect of a school-based oral health education intervention (Winning Smiles) on the health outcome, child oral health-related quality of life (COHRQoL). Setting: Primary schools, high social deprivation, Ireland/Northern Ireland. Design: Cluster…

  4. Dental visiting by insurance and oral health impact.

    PubMed

    Brennan, D S; Anikeeva, O; Teusner, D N

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether oral health has an influence on the association between dental insurance and dental visiting. A random sample of adults aged 30-61 years living in Australia was drawn from the Australian Electoral Roll. Data were collected by mailed survey in 2009-2010, including age, gender, household income, dental insurance status, dental visiting and oral health impact. Responses were collected from n = 1096 persons (response rate = 39.1%). Dental insurance was positively associated with visiting a dentist in the last 12 months (prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.48; 95% CI: 1.31-1.67), while oral health impact was not associated with recent visiting PR = 1.01; 95% CI: 0.89-1.14). Visiting for the purpose of pain relief was less prevalent among insured participants (PR = 0.60; 95% CI: 0.44-0.81), but more prevalent among those with poor oral health (PR = 2.85; 95% CI: 2.15-3.76). It was found that oral health impact did not alter the relationship between dental insurance and visiting. Oral health impacts were not associated with recent dental visits, but were associated with visits for pain relief. Dental insurance was associated with a greater likelihood of recent visits and lower levels of relief of pain visits. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  5. Health and Oral Health Care Needs and Health Care-Seeking Behavior Among Homeless Injection Drug Users in San Francisco

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Lynn; Lorvick, Jennifer; Shiboski, Caroline; Kral, Alex H.

    2010-01-01

    Few existing studies have examined health and oral health needs and treatment-seeking behavior among the homeless and injection drug users (IDUs). This paper describes the prevalence and correlates of health and oral health care needs and treatment-seeking behaviors in homeless IDUs recruited in San Francisco, California, from 2003 to 2005 (N = 340). We examined sociodemographic characteristics, drug use patterns, HIV status via oral fluid testing, physical health using the Short Form 12 Physical Component Score, self-reported needs for physical and oral health care, and the self-reported frequency of seeking medical and oral health care. The sample had a lower health status as compared to the general population and reported a frequent need for physical and oral health care. In bivariate analysis, being in methadone treatment was associated with care-seeking behavior. In addition, being enrolled in Medi-Cal, California’s state Medicaid program, was associated with greater odds of seeking physical and oral health care. Methamphetamine use was not associated with higher odds of needing oral health care as compared to people who reported using other illicit drugs. Homeless IDUs in San Francisco have a large burden of unmet health and oral health needs. Recent cuts in Medi-Cal’s adult dental coverage may result in a greater burden of oral health care which will need to be provided by emergency departments and neighborhood dental clinics. PMID:20945108

  6. Dynamics of pregnant women's oral health status during preventive programme.

    PubMed

    Vasiliauskiene, Ingrida; Milciuviene, Simona; Bendoraitiene, Egle; Narbutaite, Julija; Slabsinskiene, Egle; Andruskeviciene, Vilija

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the efficiency of the applied preventive measures during pregnancy and to improve oral health status to pregnant women. Oral health status of 180 pregnant women was determined according to WHO criteria (WHO: Basic methods, 1997). Dental caries prevalence, DMF-T and DMF-S were evaluated. Gingival status was estimated according to Silness-Loe (GI) index. Women were asked about tooth brushing frequency; oral hygiene was evaluated according to Green-Vermilion (OHI-S) index. Participants were divided into test (89) and control (91) groups. During pregnancy, the following preventive measures were applied to the test group: fluoride varnish applications, mouthrinsing with 0.12% chlorhexine digluconate, professional oral hygiene. Oral health status was evaluated three times during pregnancy. Reduction in dental caries increment of the test group was 56.25% in comparison with the control group. The periodontal status has improved, oral hygiene index (OHI-S) has decreased from 1.48+/-0.05 to 0.94+/-0.06 in the test group, and from 1.49+/-0.06 to 1.9+/-0.06 in the control group. Results of the study showed that selected dental caries preventive measures were effective and significantly improved women's oral health during pregnancy.

  7. Oral Health Related Quality of Life in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Rokhsareh; Taleghani, Ferial; Farhadi, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Diabetic patients display an increased risk of oral disorders, and oral health related quality of life (OHRQL) might affect their management and treatment modalities. The aim of the present study was to determine OHRQL and associated parameters in patients with diabetes. Materials and methods. In this study two hundred patients were recruited from the diabetes clinic in Mustafa Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran. OHRQL was assessed using Oral Health Impact Profile Questionnaire (OHIP-20). Also, another questionnaire was designed which contained questions regarding participants’ knowledge about oral complications of diabetes and oral health behavior. OHRQL was categorized as low and good. Data were analyzed using logistic regression at P = 0.05. Results. Of the diabetic patients assessed, 77.5% were in good and 22.5% were in low categories of OHRQL. This quality was significantly associated with age (OR = 4.03, 95% CI = 1.63-11.29), knowledge about diabetes oral complications (OR = 18.17 95% CI = 4.42-158.6), educational level (OR = 26.31 95% CI = 4.2-1080.3), referred for dental visit by physician (OR = 3.16 95% CI = 1.48-6.69), frequency of brushing (OR = 10.29 95% CI = 3.96-31.2) and length of time diagnosed with diabetes (OR = 6.21 95% CI = 2.86-13.63). Conclusion. Oral health related quality of life was not negatively affected by diabetes mellitus in the assessed sample. PMID:25587385

  8. Concurrent and Construct Validity of Oral Language Measures with School-Age Children with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, LaVae M.; Loeb, Diane Frome; Brandel, Jayne; Gillam, Ronald B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the psychometric properties of 2 oral language measures that are commonly used for diagnostic purposes with school-age children who have language impairments. Method: Two hundred sixteen children with specific language impairment were assessed with the Test of Language Development--Primary, Third Edition (TOLD-P:3;…

  9. Oral health evaluation in special needs individuals

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Danielle de Moraes; Fröhlich, Paula Cristina Gil Ritter; Rigo, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To identify the prevalence of the main oral problems present in special needs children and to relate the underlying conditions with the clinical and demographic variables. Methods The study was based on the physical examination of 47 students from the Associação de Pais e Amigos dos Excepcionais diagnosed as Down syndrome, cerebral palsy and intellectual deficit. For data collection, we used a self-administered questionnaire that included indices of dental caries and oral hygiene, Angle classification, malposition of dental groups and oral hygiene habits. Results The predominant age group was 12-25 years (46.8%) and most patients were male (55.3%). Regarding daily brushing, 63.8% reported brushing their teeth three times a day, and 85.1% did it by themselves. A total of 48.9% were rated as Angle class I, and 25.5% had no type of malocclusion. A high dental carries index (decayed, missing, filled >10) was observed in 44.7%, and 53.2% had inadequate oral hygiene (zero to 1.16). There was a statistically significant difference between cerebral palsy and the act of the participants brushing their teeth by themselves. Conclusion There was a high decayed-missing-filled teeth index and malocclusion class I, as well as inadequate oral hygiene. The type of underlying condition of the participants influenced the act of brushing teeth by themselves. PMID:28076597

  10. Oral hygiene behavior, smoking, and perceived oral health problems among university students

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Altaf Hussain; ElHaddad, Sally A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Behavioral aspects play a major role in the prevention of oral diseases. Moreover, not many people are aware of the relationship of smoking with potential oral diseases. Therefore, the aims of this study were to analyze oral hygiene behavior, smoking habits, and perceived oral health problems among a sample of university students in Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire about oral hygiene behavior, smoking, and perceived oral health problems was developed. The questionnaires were mainly distributed in Medical, Dental, and Pharmacy colleges of the university. Questionnaires completed at other colleges were included under the term “other colleges.” Results: Overall, 380 questionnaires were returned. Majority of the students (92.4%) reported cleaning their teeth. Most of the students reported cleaning teeth once daily (48.7%). Just over a half (55.8%) reported having a dental check-up in the last 6 months, and a significantly higher number of dental students reported having a dental check-up (P < 0.05). Regarding smoking, the majority (63.4%) reported to have never smoked while 17.3% reported that they were smoking frequently. About 17.6% perceived oral health problems, including a significant proportion of those who reported frequent smoking. Conclusions: Oral hygiene behavior exhibited by the university students sample was similar. Majority cleaned their teeth, although only once. Smoking habit was not exhibited by the vast majority of students. Frequent smokers perceived oral health problems more than other students. PMID:26312233

  11. Oral health and self-perceived oral treatment need of adults in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Lundegren, Nina

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this thesis was to study the oral health and the self-perceived oral treatment need of adults in Sweden. The first step was to analyse the self-perceived oral treatment need in a random national sample of young adults (20 to 25-year-olds). This study used one patient and one dentist questionnaire. The patient questionnaire was sent to 611 young adults and the response rate was 78%. After permission from 377 of these individuals, a questionnaire was sent to their dentists and answers were received from 85% (321 dentists). How the individuals perceived their oral treatment need was used as a dependent variable in a multivariate logistic regression model. Independent variables were self-assessed socio-economic situation, general health and dental attitudes together with information from the dentists on their patient's dental status. The results showed that having a high educational level, poorer oral health compared to one's peers, and being concerned about one's oral health significantly increased the odds for a high perceived oral treatment need. In this group of young adults, 33% perceived a high oral treatment need. In order to study if the oral treatment need was the same in all adult age groups and how the perceived oral health was in an adult Swedish population, a new questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 9 690 individuals, 20 to 89-year-olds, living in Skåne, Sweden. The response rate was 63%. The results showed that a majority of the adult population in Skåne had a positive perception of their oral health, in particular the individuals in the youngest age group. Most individuals had lost few teeth and removable dentures were uncommon. One third rated their dental treatment need as high. The highest proportion of individuals with a perceived high oral treatment need was found in the age group 70-79. In order to study the perceived oral treatment need in all adult age groups, the questionnaire was further analysed. The Andersen

  12. [Oral health status and nutritional deficit in noninstitutionalized older adults in Londrina, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Mesas, Arthur Eumann; Andrade, Selma Maffei de; Cabrera, Marcos Aparecido Sarria; Bueno, Vera Lúcia Ribeiro de Carvalho

    2010-09-01

    To examine the association between nutritional deficit and oral health problems in noninstitucionalized elderly adults in a Brazilian community. In this cross-sectional study, data were obtained from 267 elderly adults (160 women, 107 men) with ages between 60 and 74 years, identified through a census in the area covered by the Family Health Program in Londrina, Brazil. The Mini Nutritional Assessment score < 24 points was used to identify nutritional deficit. Oral evaluation consisted of an oral exam, measurement of stimulated salivary flow rate, and use of the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) for self-perception data. Multivariate analyses were adjusted by sociodemographic variables, depression, and drug consumption. Nutritional deficit was identified in 58 adults (21.7%). Among the dental conditions studied, absence of posterior occlusion (Odds Ratio, OR: 2.18; Confidence Interval, 95% CI: 1.06 - 4.45), stimulated salivary flow rate < 0.7 ml/minute (OR: 2.18, 95% CI: 1.06 - 4.50), advanced periodontal illness (OR: 6.54; 95% CI: 2.03 - 21.00), and negative self perception of oral health (OR: 3.41; 95% CI: 1.59 - 7.33) were associated with nutritional deficit regardless of sex, age, social class, education, smoking, depression, and drug consumption. Oral health impairment was associated with nutritional deficit and it requires a greater integration between dentistry and nutrition in the health promotion of older adults, especially in the prevention of tooth loss and in the posterior occlusal rehabilitation to avoid obstacles for an adequate diet.

  13. Oral Health Behaviors and Perceptions Among College Students.

    PubMed

    Crabtree, Rebecca; Kirk, Abigail; Moore, Moriah; Abraham, Sam

    Oral health is a simple and important part of college students' lives but might often be overlooked or undermined because of increased stress levels and unhealthy habits associated with the college setting. Despite the challenges, college days may be one of the best times to establish lifelong healthy habits, including oral health routines. The purpose of this study was to determine the current oral care behaviors and perceptions of students at a midwestern college. This study was nonexperimental in nature with a quantitative method and a cross-sectional design, which included 126 participants. The survey instrument included 2 Likert-type scales. The oral health-related quality-of-life model was used as the theoretical framework to guide the study.

  14. Role of Ayurveda in management of oral health

    PubMed Central

    Torwane, Nilesh Arjun; Hongal, Sudhir; Goel, Pankaj; Chandrashekar, B. R.

    2014-01-01

    Oral diseases continue to be a major health problem world-wide. Oral health is integral to general well-being and relates to the quality-of-life that extends beyond the functions of the craniofacial complex. The standard Western medicine has had only limited success in the prevention of periodontal disease and in the treatment of a variety of oral diseases. Hence, the search for alternative products continues and natural phytochemicals isolated from plants used in traditional medicine are considered to be good alternatives to synthetic chemicals. The botanicals in the Ayurvedic material medica have been proven to be safe and effective, through several hundred to several thousand years of use. The exploration of botanicals used in traditional medicine may lead to the development of novel preventive or therapeutic strategies for oral health. The present scientific evidence based review is focused on the possible role of Ayurveda in the management of various orofacial disorders. PMID:24600192

  15. Preventive strategies in oral health for special needs patients

    PubMed Central

    Vozza, Iole; Cavallè, Edoardo; Corridore, Denise; Ripari, Francesca; Spota, Andrea; Brugnoletti, Orlando; Guerra, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Summary As regards to the most common oral disease in pediatric patients, intellectual disability is not a risk factor for caries disease itself, but it rather reduces the individual capability to self-care and therefore to his own oral care. Children suffering of systemic pathologies and/or with different stages of disability are to be considered at high risk for dental caries development. According to recent guidelines for oral health prevention in childhood, individual additional strategies for a preventive care should be applied for these patients. All the health providers, family and caregivers should be involved with the aim of being aware, motivated and informed on oral health issues, and a better access system to the dental care structure, both logistic, professional and economical should be assured. PMID:26941896

  16. Oral Hygiene in Patients With Severe Mental Illness: A Pilot Study on the Collaboration Between Oral Hygienists and Mental Health Nurses.

    PubMed

    de Mey, Langha; Çömlekçi, Ceren; de Reuver, Fione; van Waard, Ineke; van Gool, Ronald; Scheerman, Janneke F M; van Meijel, Berno

    2016-07-01

    To test (a) the effects of an educational intervention about oral hygiene on the knowledge of mental health nurses, and (b) the effects of an oral care intervention on oral health in patients with severe mental illness (SMI). We applied a pretest/posttest design to test improvements in nurses' knowledge and the oral health of SMI patients. The nursing staff's knowledge increased significantly after the educational intervention. The oral health of the patients improved significantly after the oral health intervention. Oral health of SMI patients can improve significantly with basic oral health interventions carried out by collaborating oral hygienists and mental health nurses. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Ovarian hormones and oral health: pregnancy gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Zachariasen, R D

    1989-09-01

    The most common oral manifestation of increased levels of ovarian hormones is an increase in gingival inflammation with an accompanying increase in gingival exudate. Although plaque has been identified as the major etiologic agent of gingivitis, there are a number of known situations that exacerbate the condition. It is well-documented that pregnancy, puberty, menstrual cycle, and oral contraceptives all have been coupled with transient, self-limiting periods of gingivitis. A common feature these conditions share is an elevation in the plasma concentration of estrogens and progestins. This article will review the basic physiology of the estrogens and progestins and discuss the possible role these hormones play in the gingivitis occurring during pregnancy or oral contraceptive usage.

  18. Factors associated with parent capability on child's oral health care.

    PubMed

    Mitrakul, Kemthong; Laovoravit, Vorawee; Vanichanuwat, Vittawat; Charatchaiwanna, Attakorn; Charatchaiwanna, Attakrit; Bunpradit, Weerapol; Arunakul, Malee

    2012-01-01

    We investigated parental attitudes and behavior affecting their ability to care for their children's oral health among Thais who reside in or near Bangkok and to develop a Thai version of a factor analysis questionnaire in order to assess the risk of developing early childhood caries. There were 241 participants, 48.1% were aged 20-to-30 years, 86.3% were married and 48% had two children. Thirty-seven percent of subjects had a monthly income between 10,001 and 30,000 Baht. There were significant associations (p < 0.05) between parental education levels, monthly incomes and attitudes and behaviors. There were significant associations (p < 0.05) between parental education levels, careers and causes of stress that affected care of their child's oral health. Factors that affected their ability to care for their child's oral health were from most to least was lack of time, lack of knowledge about brushing, stress from work, not raising their child by themselves, economics problems and being a single parent. Parental attitudes and behavior in regard to their child's oral health were associated with their education levels and monthly income. Factors that affected their ability to care for their child's oral health were their education levels and their careers. These factors should be considered when giving oral hygiene education to improve their parenting capabilities.

  19. Primary Oral Health Care in India: Vision or Dream?

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Kotumachagi S; Javanaiah, Nagarathna; Shantappa, Shruti; Srivastava, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    The contemporary approach to dental caries management in children focuses on prevention than treatment. Pediatricians, general dentists and pediatric dentists must be involved in a detailed preventive program, which includes prenatal counselling, treatment of expectant mothers at risk for dental caries, infant oral health care and the establishment of the dental home, so that dental disease can be prevented in infants, starting at a young age. Various health care system and organizations in India must join together to promote oral health care for all the children and specially focused toward children from disadvantaged background and children with special health care needs. How to cite this article Suresh KS, Kumar P, Javanaiah N, Shantappa S, Srivastava P. Primary Oral Health Care in India: Vision or Dream? Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(3):228-232. PMID:27843255

  20. Oral Health in Children with Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Vijay Prakash; Dhillon, Jatinder Kaur; Kalra, Gauri

    2012-01-01

    Leukemia is one of the most common malignancies affecting children in India. These children usually suffer from various oral complications, which may be due to the leukemia or due to the chemotherapeutic agents and/or radiotherapy. The complications may include some of the opportunistic infections like candidiasis, herpes simplex; hemorrhage, mucositis, taste alterations and increased incidence of dental caries etc. These complications can cause significant morbidity and mortality in the patients. The aim of this review is to summarize the various oral complications in these children and the methods of prevention and management. PMID:22837605

  1. Implications of HIV disease for oral health services.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P G

    2006-04-01

    This paper, by means of a quality framework, reviews health services research in relation to people with HIV infection. The relevance of oral health care services to people's needs is considered in terms of the goal of health services to reduce the burden of disease on the everyday life of the population. Dental services may therefore have a role in primary prevention in the HIV epidemic, passing on information about HIV and promoting health through the early diagnosis and treatment of oral disease. Effectiveness research of oral health care in HIV assesses the usefulness of oral diagnosis, whether care is safe, and whether treatment is clinically effective. Few data are available on the efficiency of services. People with HIV still have problems accessing dental care, due to the volume of care available in relation to their need and acceptability of care. Access problems in the US are compounded by social inequality. Health services research data are particularly sparse in resource-poor countries, and there is a need to translate the available information into treatment guidelines appropriate to these settings. The research community and funding agencies should place greater emphasis on the quality of oral health services for people with HIV.

  2. Oral health policy issues for women and children.

    PubMed

    Allukian, M

    1990-01-01

    A meaningful national oral health policy is essential to have an impact on the oral health of women and children in our country. The federal government must exert strong leadership to promote oral health as an integral component of total health. The public and private sectors of the dental and health professions must work together in developing, promoting, and supporting this policy on the local, state, and national level to make an impact on the oral health of the people of our nation. This policy must include incentives, resources, evaluation, and community participation, to assure that the purpose of the policy is achieved. Mark Twain once said: "Even if you are on the right track, you will get run over if you just sit still." A national policy by itself is not enough. This policy must also include an implementation strategy with constituency support and advocacy so that the policy is implemented in an effective manner through organized community efforts to improve the oral health of women, children, and our nation.

  3. Association Between Oral Health and Cognitive Status: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bei; Fillenbaum, Gerda G.; Plassman, Brenda L.; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We have carried out a systematic review of longitudinal studies examining the association between oral health and cognitive decline. DESIGN Studies, published 01/1993-03/2013, were identified by search of English language publications in PubMed/Medline using relevant MeSH terms and title/abstract keywords, and from CINAHL using relevant subject headings. After applying eligibility criteria, and adding four studies identified from article references, 56 of the 1412 articles identified remained: 40 were cross-sectional, and 16 longitudinal; 11 of the latter examined the impact of oral health on change in cognitive health or dementia incidence, five examined the reverse. SETTING Sources of information included administrative data, subject evaluations in parent studies, medical and dental records, self-reports, and in-person evaluations. MEASUREMENTS Most studies used subjects whose oral or cognitive status was known, adding the missing piece using standard measures. The oral health information most frequently studied included number of teeth, periodontal and caries problems, and denture use. Cognition was most frequently evaluated using the MMSE, or by determination of dementia. RESULTS Some studies found that oral health measures such as number of teeth and periodontal disease were associated with increased risk of cognitive decline or incident dementia, while others did not find the association. Similarly, cognitive decline was not consistently associated with greater loss of teeth or number of caries. Methodological limitations likely play a major role in explaining the inconsistent findings. CONCLUSION It is unclear how or whether oral health and cognitive status are related. Additional research is needed in which there is greater agreement on how oral health and cognitive states are assessed, in order to better examine the linkages between these two health outcomes. PMID:27037761

  4. [Health information on oral malodor in Japanese newspaper articles].

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Tomohito; Furukawa, Sayaka; Ueno, Masayuki; Shinada, Kayoko; Kawaguchi, Yoko

    2006-06-01

    Mass media is an important source for the general public to obtain health information. Newspapers especially have the advantages of providing a variety of information to a broad range of age groups, with wide regional coverage of both urban and rural areas. The purposes of this study were to review the oral malodor information in Japanese newspapers and to investigate peoples' knowledge on the causes of oral malodor. The Nikkei Database was used to select articles published in five major newspapers over a period of 12 years from 1993 to 2004. "Oral malodor" was used as a key search word. A total of 386 articles which contained oral malodor information were identified and used for the analysis. A questionnaire survey was conducted for the patients who visited a fresh breath clinic (n=295). The average number of articles per year was 32.2 +/- 7.3 and there was not a significant difference among years and months. There were only 25 articles (6.5%) with the central theme of oral malodor. More than half of the articles introduced anti-oral malodor products. The causes of oral malodor were described in 35% of the articles (n=134). Periodontal disease (n=57), tongue coating (n=35), otorhinolaryngological diseases (n=19), stomach problems (n=14) and psychological factors (n=21) were described as the causes of malodor. Only 35 articles (26%) described the treatment and prevention of halitosis. According to the questionnaire survey, 39% of the patients answered that they did not know the causes of malodor. Less than half knew that oral problems were related with malodor. It was revealed that the information about oral malodor in newspapers was not enough both quantitatively and qualitatively; people had little information about oral malodor. It is suggested that dental professionals should be aware of the importance of media advocacy to provide appropriate oral health information to the public.

  5. Oral health status of diabetes mellitus patients in Southwest Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Bissong, Mea; Azodo, C C; Agbor, M A; Nkuo-Akenji, T; Fon, P Nde

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually all tissues and organs the body including the hard and soft issues of the oral cavity, manifesting with several complications. To assess the prevalence of oral diseases in diabetics and non-diabetics and to correlate oral diseases with glycaemic control. This was an observational study involving 149 diabetic patients recruited from hospitals in Southwest Region of Cameroon and 102 non-diabetic controls drawn from the general population. The study participants were aged 18 years and above. Data were collected using questionnaires, oral examination and laboratory tests. Oral examination was conducted to assess dental plaque, calculus, dental caries, periodontitis, gingivitis and candidiasis. Glycemic status was assessed by measuring glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels using standardized methods. Thirty five out of 149 (23.5%) diabetic patients had gingivitis; 37 (24.8%) had periodontitis; 29 (19.5%) had dental caries and 32 (21.5%) had oral candidiasis. Gingivitis, periodontitis and oral candidiasis was significantly higher in diabetics than non-diabetics (P < 0.001). Also, more diabetic patients presented with poor oral hygiene than non-diabetics. Poorly controlled diabetics presented more with gingivitis and candidiasis than well-controlled diabetics and this relationship was statistically significant. The prevalence of oral disease was significantly higher in diabetics than in non-diabetic controls and hyperglycaemia seemed to be a major contributor to oral health in diabetic patients in the study area. Proper management of blood sugar levels might improve on the oral health of diabetes mellitus patients.

  6. Physicians’ knowledge of and adherence to improving oral health

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Integration of oral health promotion into general health care has been highly recommended by the World Health Organization. Primary-care physicians can as part of their general health care promote and contribute to improved oral health care. Our aim was to investigate primary-care physicians’ knowledge of oral health, their attitudes toward delivering oral health care (OHC), and their willingness to obtain more education in this field. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of all primary-care physicians working in the public health centers of Tehran city. An anonymous self-administered questionnaire queried their knowledge in pediatric- and general medicine-related areas of dentistry, providing knowledge scores to be calculated for three domains. The physicians’ attitudes toward OHC and willingness to pursue continuous education underwent evaluation with statements utilizing a 5-point Likert scale. Totally, 220 physicians took part in the survey (response rate: 92%). Chi-square test, linear and logistic regression, and t-test served for statistical analyses. Results The physicians’ knowledge score was significantly lower in the pediatric domain than in the dental and medical domains (p < 0.001). The number of physicians answering correctly to the pediatric questions was less than 40%. Almost all physicians (95%) reported it necessary for a physician to know about OHC and admitted (78%) that physicians’ general knowledge in this field is inadequate. Further, 77% of the physicians expressed a will to implement preventive oral health activities in their practice, and almost two-thirds (62%) of them showed a willingness to pursue further education about OHC. Those with higher knowledge scores had a greater willingness to deliver oral health care to their patients. Conclusions Physicians’ lack of knowledge of OHC and their generally positive attitudes toward it revealed a great need for planning of a continuous medical education program in

  7. Hepatic portal vein denervation impairs oral glucose tolerance but not exenatide's effect on glycemia.

    PubMed

    Ionut, Viorica; Castro, Ana Valeria B; Woolcott, Orison O; Stefanovski, Darko; Iyer, Malini S; Broussard, Josiane L; Burch, Miguel; Elazary, Ram; Kolka, Cathryn M; Mkrtchyan, Hasmik; Bediako, Isaac Asare; Bergman, Richard N

    2014-10-15

    The hepatoportal area is an important glucohomeostatic metabolic sensor, sensing hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, and hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). We have reported previously that activation of hepatoportal sensors by intraportal infusion of glucose and GLP-1 or by subcutaneous administration of GLP-1 receptor activator exenatide and of intraportal glucose improved glycemia independent of corresponding changes in pancreatic hormones. It is not clear whether this effect is mediated via the portal vein (PV) or by direct action on the liver itself. To test whether receptors in the PV mediate exenatide's beneficial effect on glucose tolerance, we performed 1) paired oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) with and without exenatide and 2) intravenous glucose tolerance tests before and after PV denervation in canines. Denervation of the portal vein affected oral glucose tolerance; post-denervation (POST-DEN) OGTT glucose and insulin AUC were 50% higher than before denervation (P = 0.01). However, portal denervation did not impair exenatide's effect to improve oral glucose tolerance (exenatide effect: 48 ± 12 mmol·l⁻¹·min before vs. 64 ± 26 mmol·l⁻¹·min after, P = 0.67). There were no changes in insulin sensitivity or secretion during IVGTTs. Portal vein sensing might play a role in controlling oral glucose tolerance during physiological conditions but not in pharmacological activation of GLP-1 receptors by exenatide.

  8. ORAL HEALTH OF DOWN SYNDROME CHILDREN IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

    PubMed Central

    Porovic, Selma; Zukanovic, Amila; Juric, Hrvoje; Dinarevic, Senka Mesihovic

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to determine the oral health condition Down syndrome (DS) children in Bosnia and Herzegovina, by analizing oral health of Down syndrome individuals in two largest regions, Sarajevo and Tuzla Canton. Patients and Methods: Caries and oral health status of Down syndrome children aged 6-18 years were examined and assessed according WHO 1997 criteria. DS individuals were divided in to four age groups: I (0-6 yrs); II (7-12 yrs); III (13-18 yrs). Results: The mean dmft/DMFT index for age group I is (6,40±6,05); II (2,05±2,04) and III (10,30±6,80). The analysis of oral hygiene of Down syndrome children by using the debris index, it was found that 43,9% have very good oral hygiene, 33,3% respondents have good oral hygiene, 15,8% were with poor oral hygiene, while the very poor hygiene had 7% subjects. By using Pearson’s correlation to the value of DMFT, debris index and age of examinees with Down syndrome, it is established a statistically significant positive correlation between analyzed variables. Values of CPI index according to age groups were as follows: I (0,1); II (0,17) and III group (0,4). PMID:27999487

  9. [Anthropology and oral health projects in developing countries].

    PubMed

    Grasveld, A E

    2016-01-01

    The mouth and teeth play an important role in social interactions around the world. The way people deal with their teeth and mouth, however, is determined culturally. When oral healthcare projects are being carried out in developing countries, differing cultural worldviews can cause misunderstandings between oral healthcare providers and their patients. The oral healthcare volunteer often has to try to understand the local assumptions about teeth and oral hygiene first, before he or she can bring about a change of behaviour, increase therapy compliance and make the oral healthcare project sustainable. Anthropology can be helpful in this respect. In 2014, in a pilot project commissioned by the Dutch Dental Care Foundation, in which oral healthcare was provided in combination with anthropological research, an oral healthcare project in Kwale (Kenia) was evaluated. The study identified 6 primary themes that indicate the most important factors influencing the oral health of school children in Kwale. Research into the local culture by oral healthcare providers would appear to be an important prerequisite to meaningful work in developing countries.

  10. Help Hints for the Management of Other Health Impaired Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Mary Lee; And Others

    The manual is designed to provide information to teachers, parents, and school administrators about health impaired children with medically diagnosed physical conditions. Definitions, common symptoms, incidence, age of onset, prognosis, most typical treatment, educational significance, educational adaptations, and symptoms to look out for are…

  11. Health-Related Fitness of Youths with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Lauren J.; Byrne, Heidi; Mattern, Craig O.; Watt, Celia A.; Fernandez-Vivo, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed the passing rates on five health-related fitness items on the Brockport Physical Fitness Test of youths aged 10-17 with visual impairments. It found that the youths had low passing rates on upper-body strength, cardiovascular endurance, and body composition. (Contains 2 tables.)

  12. Health-Related Fitness of Youths with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Lauren J.; Byrne, Heidi; Mattern, Craig O.; Watt, Celia A.; Fernandez-Vivo, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed the passing rates on five health-related fitness items on the Brockport Physical Fitness Test of youths aged 10-17 with visual impairments. It found that the youths had low passing rates on upper-body strength, cardiovascular endurance, and body composition. (Contains 2 tables.)

  13. Help Hints for the Management of Other Health Impaired Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Mary Lee; And Others

    The manual is designed to provide information to teachers, parents, and school administrators about health impaired children with medically diagnosed physical conditions. Definitions, common symptoms, incidence, age of onset, prognosis, most typical treatment, educational significance, educational adaptations, and symptoms to look out for are…

  14. The Ethical Imperative of Addressing Oral Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J.Y.; Divaris, K.

    2014-01-01

    Health disparities are preventable differences in the burden of disease or opportunities to achieve optimal health that are experienced by socially disadvantaged population groups. Reducing health disparities has been identified as an ethical imperative by the World Health Organization’s Commission on Social Determinants of Health and numerous other national and international bodies. Significant progress has been made over the past years in identifying vulnerable groups, and ‘distal’ factors including political, economic, social, and community characteristics are now considered pivotal. It is thus unsurprising that the remarkable advances in the science and practice of dentistry have not led to notable reductions in oral health disparities. In this review, we summarize recent work and emphasize the need for a solid theoretical framing to guide oral health disparities research. We provide a theoretical framework outlining pathways that operate across the continuum of oral health determinants during the lifecourse and highlight potential areas for intervention. Because oral health disparities emanate from the unequal distribution of social, political, economic, and environmental resources, tangible progress is likely to be realized only by a global movement and concerted efforts by all stakeholders, including policymakers, the civil society, and academic, professional, and scientific bodies. PMID:24189268

  15. Oral health technicians in Brazilian primary health care: potentials and constraints.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Dulce Maria Lucena de; Tomita, Nilce Emy; Machado, Maria de Fátima Antero Sousa; Martins, Cleide Lavieri; Frazão, Paulo

    2014-07-01

    Different perspectives on the role of mid-level workers in health care might represent a constraint to health policies. This study aimed to investigate how different agents view the participation of oral health technicians in direct activities of oral healthcare with the goal of understanding the related symbolic dispositions. Theoretical assumptions related to inter-professional collaboration and conflicts in the field of healthcare were used for this analysis. A researcher conducted 24 in-depth interviews with general dental practitioners, oral health technicians and local managers. The concepts of Pierre Bourdieu supported the data interpretation. The results indicated inter-professional relations marked by collaboration and conflict that reflect an action space related to different perspectives of primary care delivery. They also unveiled the symbolic devices related to the participation of oral health technicians that represent a constraint to the implementation of oral health policy, thus reducing the potential of primary health care in Brazil.

  16. Association of Parental Health Literacy with Oral Health of Navajo Nation Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brega, A. G.; Thomas, J. F.; Henderson, W. G.; Batliner, T. S.; Quissell, D. O.; Braun, P. A.; Wilson, A.; Bryant, L. L.; Nadeau, K. J.; Albino, J.

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy is "the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions". Although numerous studies show a link between health literacy and clinical outcomes, little research has examined the association of health literacy with oral health. No large-scale…

  17. Association of Parental Health Literacy with Oral Health of Navajo Nation Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brega, A. G.; Thomas, J. F.; Henderson, W. G.; Batliner, T. S.; Quissell, D. O.; Braun, P. A.; Wilson, A.; Bryant, L. L.; Nadeau, K. J.; Albino, J.

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy is "the capacity to obtain, process and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions". Although numerous studies show a link between health literacy and clinical outcomes, little research has examined the association of health literacy with oral health. No large-scale…

  18. Implementing a prenatal oral health program through interprofessional collaboration.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jeffrey T; Quinonez, Rocio B; Kerns, Amanda K; Chuang, Alice; Eidson, R Scott; Boggess, Kim A; Weintraub, Jane A

    2015-03-01

    Interprofessional collaboration has become a critical component of accreditation standards in dentistry and medicine. This article reports on implementation in an academic setting of a prenatal oral health program (pOHP) that addresses coordinated care, accreditation standards, and new clinical practice guidelines. The pOHP is an educational intervention for third-year medical students, residents, and faculty members to deliver preventive oral health information and referral to a dental home for pregnant women. At the same time, senior dental students and faculty members are introduced to prenatal oral health principles and delivery of comprehensive oral health care to pregnant women. A systems-based approach was used to guide the pOHP implementation during the 2012-13 academic year. Participants were 96 third-year medical students (50% of the total in an obstetrics and gynecology clerkship) and all 81 fourth-year dental students. During that academic year, 126 dental referrals were made to the School of Dentistry, and 55 women presented for care, resulting in 50% (n=40) of dental students participating in the clinical experience and delivery of simple to complex oral health procedures. The prenatal period is a frequently missed opportunity to address oral health care. The pOHP is an interprofessional collaboration model designed to educate dental and medical providers and provide a system of referral for comprehensive clinical care of pregnant patients, including educating women about their oral health and that of their children. Such programs can help meet interprofessional accreditation standards and encourage implementation of practice guidelines.

  19. Tennessee smiles: the UT grassroots oral health outreach initiative.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Maurice W; Wasson, Waletha; Scarbecz, Mark; Aubertin, Mary A; Woods, Marjorie; Himel, Van T

    2011-01-01

    Access to and awareness of oral healthcare in the United States have been highlighted in the mass media and discussed among diverse populations. The current surge to provide access to oral healthcare for citizens springs from this quagmire of oral healthcare issues which affects global to local (grassroots) communities. Publications by the World Health Organization's (WHO) Health for All and the United States' Healthy People have set into motion an agenda by which institutions, healthcare professionals and governments can develop action plans to foster and nurture grassroots organizations to address these issues. An initiative has been undertaken by members of the faculty, student doctors and staff of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, College of Dentistry (UTHSC CoD) and its partners. This cadre of volunteers has implemented grassroots efforts for the citizens of western Tennessee to date as the flagship of Tennessee Smiles: UT Grassroots Oral Health Outreach Initiative (Tennessee Smiles). By participation in health fairs, school programs and other cultural events, these volunteers have made a difference in the lives of thousands of Tennessee citizens who need exposure to information regarding their oral health care needs. The authors discuss the basis for the Tennessee Smiles organization, their successes and challenges. Future plans and the need for support of the organization are emphasized.

  20. Integrating oral health into primary health care--experiences in Bangladesh, Indonesia, Nepal and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    van Palenstein Helderman, W; Mikx, F; Begum, A; Adyatmaka, A; Bajracharya, M; Kikwilu, E; Rugarabamu, P

    1999-08-01

    When primary health care (PHC) was developed and implemented in developing countries, oral health was not included. The present consequences are marked disparities in the distribution of oral health care, since conventional dentistry can only serve relatively few people and at high costs. Oral health care is virtually non-existent in rural areas of most developing countries where more than 80 per cent of the population live. More recently, community based oral health programmes have been initiated in some countries to fill the gap. These programmes give more emphasis on oral health promotion and on the prevention of oral diseases than on treatment of its consequences, since history has shown that the latter is ineffective in preventing oral diseases. Unfortunately, most of these oral health programmes have been implemented next to the existing PHC system and hence they face enormous management, logistic and financial problems, which seriously threaten their sustainability. This paper presents a proposal to counteract the problems that many countries face in developing an adequate primary oral health care (POHC) service.

  1. The influence of epigenetics in relation to oral health.

    PubMed

    Lod, S; Johansson, T; Abrahamsson, K H; Larsson, L

    2014-02-01

    The immune response is influenced by genetic and epigenetic factors, as well as disease and environmental factors. The term 'epigenetics' describes changes in the genome that influence the gene expression without altering the DNA sequence. In contrast to genetic changes in the DNA, epigenetic changes are reversible and are influenced by environmental factors. The aim of this study is to review the literature on epigenetic modifications with respect to oral health and inflammatory conditions in the oral cavity and to discuss the potential use of this new research field for the dental hygienists' and/or dentists' clinical work. Relevant publications were identified using the PubMed database without limits. The searches were conducted during January to March 2012 and resulted in articles published between 1912 and 2012. Key factors such as environment, diet, smoking, bacteria and inflammation were identified to be relevant to oral health. The result of this review article shows that there is a void in the research on epigenetics in relation to oral health. Identification of epigenetic modifications correlating with oral health may not only present a link between the influence of genetics and that of the environment on oral diseases but also provide new treatment models and tools for the dental professionals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Oral health and risk of pneumonia in asthmatic pacients with inhaled treatment.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Francesc; Duran, Analía; Muñoz, Zulema; Palomera, Elisabet; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Boixeda, Ramón; Vicente, Vanesa; Almirall, Jordi

    2017-09-22

    Asthma is a chronic disease requiring inhaled treatment and in addition it is a risk factor (RF) of pneumonia. In the oropharyngeal cavity there are numerous species of bacteria that could be dragged to the bronco-alveolar level. to decide whether oral health is a community acquired pneumonia (CAP) RF in asthmatic patients who are taking inhaled treatment, and determining whether the frequency of use of inhalation devices and the type of inhaled drug are CAP RF. Case-control study in asthmatic population with inhaled treatment. We recruited 126 asthmatic patients diagnosed with pneumonia by clinical and radiological criteria (cases) and 252 asthmatics not diagnosed with pneumonia during the last year (controls), matched by age. The main factor of study was the General Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) score. Bivariated analysis showed a statistically significant association of CAP with a GOHAI score≤57 points (poor oral health) (OR 1.69), anticholinergic treatment (OR 2.41), 6 or more inhalations (3.23), chamber use (OR 1.62), FEV1 (OR 0.98), altered functionality (OR 2.08) and psychiatric disorders or depression (OR 0.41). The multivariated analysis shows an independent association of performing 6 or more inhalations per day (OR 2.74) and functional impairment (OR 1.67). The results suggest that poor oral health may be a CAP RF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Oral health evaluation in special needs individuals.

    PubMed

    Pini, Danielle de Moraes; Fröhlich, Paula Cristina Gil Ritter; Rigo, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    To identify the prevalence of the main oral problems present in special needs children and to relate the underlying conditions with the clinical and demographic variables. The study was based on the physical examination of 47 students from the Associação de Pais e Amigos dos Excepcionais diagnosed as Down syndrome, cerebral palsy and intellectual deficit. For data collection, we used a self-administered questionnaire that included indices of dental caries and oral hygiene, Angle classification, malposition of dental groups and oral hygiene habits. The predominant age group was 12-25 years (46.8%) and most patients were male (55.3%). Regarding daily brushing, 63.8% reported brushing their teeth three times a day, and 85.1% did it by themselves. A total of 48.9% were rated as Angle class I, and 25.5% had no type of malocclusion. A high dental carries index (decayed, missing, filled >10) was observed in 44.7%, and 53.2% had inadequate oral hygiene (zero to 1.16). There was a statistically significant difference between cerebral palsy and the act of the participants brushing their teeth by themselves. There was a high decayed-missing-filled teeth index and malocclusion class I, as well as inadequate oral hygiene. The type of underlying condition of the participants influenced the act of brushing teeth by themselves. Conhecer a prevalência dos principais problemas bucais em crianças com necessidades especiais, e relacionar as doenças de base com variáveis clínicas e demográficas. O estudo foi realizado a partir de exame clínico em 47 alunos da Associação de Pais e Amigos dos Excepcionais com diagnóstico médico de síndrome de Down, paralisia cerebral e deficit intelectual. Para a coleta de dados, foi utilizado um questionário autoaplicativo com índices de cárie dentária e higiene oral, classificação de Angle, malposição de grupos dentários e hábitos de higiene oral. A faixa etária predominante foi de 12 a 25 anos (46,8%) e a maioria era do sexo

  4. Factors associated with self-assessed oral health in the Japanese independent elderly.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Chisato; Hakuta, Chiyoko; Ueno, Masayuki; Shinada, Kayoko; Wright, Fredrick A C; Kawaguchi, Yoko

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to analyse the relationship between oral health status, oral motor function, daily life situations and self-assessed oral health. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 190 independent elderly volunteers aged 62-99 years from senior citizen centres in Tokyo, Japan. A questionnaire survey and oral examination were conducted on each participant. For the descriptive analyses, Independent t-test and the chi-squared test were used. Following that, using four latent variables, (oral health, oral function, daily life situations and chronic health condition), a structural equation modelling analysis (SEMA) was undertaken. In the descriptive analyses, there were no significant differences between self-assessed oral health and oral health status. However, there were significant differences between self-assessed oral health and oral function and daily life situations. Findings from SEMA revealed that daily life situations and oral function have independent effects on self-assessed oral health and that the relationship between self-assessed oral health and oral health status was weak. Many factors affect self-assessed oral health status. Dental clinicians and researchers should attempt to understand these factors and incorporate them into effective personal and population-based oral health education and oral health promotion programmes.

  5. Framing Young Childrens Oral Health: A Participatory Action Research Project

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Chimere C.; Villa-Torres, Laura; Sams, Lattice D.; Zeldin, Leslie P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Despite the widespread acknowledgement of the importance of childhood oral health, little progress has been made in preventing early childhood caries. Limited information exists regarding specific daily-life and community-related factors that impede optimal oral hygiene, diet, care, and ultimately oral health for children. We sought to understand what parents of young children consider important and potentially modifiable factors and resources influencing their children’s oral health, within the contexts of the family and the community. Methods This qualitative study employed Photovoice among 10 English-speaking parents of infants and toddlers who were clients of an urban WIC clinic in North Carolina. The primary research question was: “What do you consider as important behaviors, as well as family and community resources to prevent cavities among young children?” Five group sessions were conducted and they were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative research methodology. Inductive analyses were based on analytical summaries, double-coding, and summary matrices and were done using Atlas.ti.7.5.9 software. Findings Good oral health was associated with avoidance of problems or restorations for the participants. Financial constraints affected healthy food and beverage choices, as well as access to oral health care. Time constraints and occasional frustration related to children’s oral hygiene emerged as additional barriers. Establishment of rules/routines and commitment to them was a successful strategy to promote their children’s oral health, as well as modeling of older siblings, cooperation among caregivers and peer support. Community programs and organizations, social hubs including playgrounds, grocery stores and social media emerged as promising avenues for gaining support and sharing resources. Conclusions Low-income parents of young children are faced with daily life struggles that interfere with oral

  6. [Oral health and pregnancy: promotion of oral health during the pre-natal training in the Latina province].

    PubMed

    Capasso, F; La Penna, C; Carcione, P; Vestri, A; Polimeni, A; Ottolenghi, L

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study, conducted in the Province of Latina, was to verify knowledge, attitudes, and lifestyles in relation to oral health in a sample of pregnant women, assessing their subjective perception of oral health, and highlight prenatal dental prevention need specialist in the area and provide adequate information on the importance of good oral hygiene in order to achieve a better health level both of the mother and the child. The study was conducted on a sample of pregnant women between the 26th and 39th gestational week, in the period from June to October 2009, during the childbirth training courses in the Province of Latina. Each patient was administered a questionnaire for the assessment of oral habits during pregnancy and for the definition of specific knowledge on and perception of themselves and their own oral condition. The survey shows that more than one third of the sample reported visiting a dentist only in case of pain, over half (56.9%) did not undergo any dental visit during the gestational period, only 24 subjects (33.3%) having applied to a dental hygienist for professional oral hygiene and that only 7 out of 72 women had been prescribed a dental checkup by a gynecologist. The study showed that knowledge about dental problems that may arise during pregnancy is insufficient to guarantee a good threshold to oral health care for the mother hence the need to promote information programs, oral health and pregnancy prevention and training in the territory mainly directed to health-care specialists (gynecologists and obstetricians) and to pregnant women.

  7. Campaigning for children's oral health: a case study.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Arguably, the ultimate application of evidenced-based communications is translating the research recommendations into a full-fledged media campaign. This article explains the development and implementation of Watch Your Mouth, a campaign based on FrameWorks Institute's research on children's oral health. To date, this innovative campaign has been implemented in four states, with impressive results. Combining paid and earned media activity with community organizing and policy advocacy helped each state change the public perception of children's oral health as a largely cosmetic concern to a legitimate children's health issue.

  8. Improving oral health in Pakistan using dental hygienists.

    PubMed

    Shah, M A; Darby, M L; Bauman, D B

    2011-02-01

    This paper reviews the healthcare system, available dental care, and oral health status of people in Pakistan. Considering the enormous unmet oral health needs, the insufficient supply of dental professionals and the current unstructured dental hygiene curriculum in Pakistan, a mission, vision, and goals for professional dental hygiene in Pakistan is recommended. The authors offer recommendations for competency-based dental hygiene education and practice, professional credentialing, a practice act, and a dental hygiene scope of practice to promote the health, welfare, and quality of life of the Pakistani people. Specifically, the authors recommend increasing the number of quality dental hygiene programs, establishing the dental hygienist as a primary care provider of oral health services, enhancing current dental hygiene curriculum, and establishing a dental hygiene council with responsibility for educational requirements and regulation of dental hygienists in Pakistan.

  9. Addressing Oral Health Disparities Via Educational Foci on Cultural Competence

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Rueben C.; Dodd, Virginia J.; Catalanotto, Frank A.

    2017-01-01

    An ever-present challenge for the oral health profession is to reduce the extent of oral disease among racial and ethnic minority populations. Adding to this complex dilemma is the linkage between oral health and systemic health. We describe enhanced cultural competency, in the context of individual cultural beliefs, values, language, practice, and health behaviors, among dental professionals, as one approach to meeting the dental care needs of the underserved. An overview and examples of teaching methods used by University of Florida dental educators to enhance student cultural competency is provided. Evidence-based evaluation results provide evidence of methodology efficacy. We conclude by describing actions that can be implemented by academic dental institutions to facilitate development of culturally competent practitioners. PMID:28661820

  10. Oral health in the context of primary care in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Antonio C; Moysés, Simone T; Werneck, Renata I; Moysés, Samuel J

    2013-10-01

    This article presents an integrative literature review that analyses the advances and challenges in oral health care of the Brazilian primary health care system, based on a political agenda that envisages re-organising the unified health system (SistemaÚnico de Saúde - SUS). It is presumed that the actions suggested by the Alma-Ata Conference of 1978 are still up-to-date and relevant when adapted to the situation in Brazil. Several studies and policies are reviewed, including works demonstrating the importance of primary care as an organising platform in an integrated health-care network, Brazil's strategy for reorganising the primary care network known as the Family Health Strategy, and the National Oral Health Policy. This review discusses results obtained over the last twenty years, with special attention paid to changes in oral health-care practices, as well as the funding of action programmes and assistance cover. The conclusion is that oral healthcare in the Brazilian primary health care system has advanced over the past decades; however, serious obstacles have been experienced, especially with regard to the guarantee of universal access to services and funding. The continuous efforts of public managers and society should focus on the goal of achieving universal coverage for all Brazilians. © 2013 FDI World Dental Federation.

  11. The Impact of Medicaid Expansion on Oral Health Equity for Older Adults: A Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Sara S.; Birenz, Shirley S.; Kunzel, Carol; Wang, Hua; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Marshall, Stephen E.; Northridge, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses a collaborative, interdisciplinary systems science inquiry to explore implications of Medicaid expansion on achieving oral health equity for older adults. Through an iterative modeling process oriented toward the experiences of both patients and oral health care providers, complex feedback mechanisms for promoting oral health equity are articulated that acknowledge the potential for stigma as well as disparities in oral health care accessibility. Multiple factors mediate the impact of Medicaid expansion on oral health equity. PMID:26457047

  12. Mainstreaming Preschoolers: Children with Health Impairments. A Guide for Teachers, Parents, and Others Who Work with Health Impaired Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Alfred; And Others

    This guide to mainstreaming health impaired preschoolers is one of a series of eight manuals on mainstreaming preschoolers developed by Project Head Start. The guide is addressed to parents, teachers and other professionals and paraprofessionals. Chapter I presents information on the meaning, benefits and implementation of mainstreaming. The role…

  13. Mainstreaming Preschoolers: Children with Health Impairments. A Guide for Teachers, Parents, and Others Who Work with Health Impaired Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Alfred; And Others

    This guide to mainstreaming health impaired preschoolers is one of a series of eight manuals on mainstreaming preschoolers developed by Project Head Start. The guide is addressed to parents, teachers and other professionals and paraprofessionals. Chapter I presents information on the meaning, benefits and implementation of mainstreaming. The role…

  14. Preventive oral health practices of school pupils in Southern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the goals of the World Health Organisation goal is to ensure increased uptake of preventive oral self-care by 2020. This would require the design public health programmes that will ensure children place premium on preventive oral health care uptake. One effort in that direction is the need for countries to define baseline measures on use of preventive oral self-care measures by their population as well as identify factors that impact on its use. This study aims to determine the prevalence and the impact of age and sex on the use of recommended oral self-care measures by pupils in Southern Nigeria. Methods Pupils age 8 to 16 years (N = 2,676) in two urban sites in Southern Nigeria completed a questionnaire about recommended oral self-care (use of fluoridated toothpaste, flossing, regularity of consuming sugary snacks between main meals), time of the last dental check-up and cigarette smoking habit. Chi square was used to test association between age (8-10years, 11–16 years), sex, and use of recommended oral self-care. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of use of recommended oral self-care. Results Only 7.8% of the study population practiced the recommended oral self-care. Older adolescents had an 8.0% increased odds (OR: 1.08; CI:0.81–1.43; p = 0.61) and males had a 20.0% decreased odds (OR: 0.80; CI:0.60-1.06; p = 0.12) of practicing recommended oral self-care though observed differences were not statistically significant. Very few respondents (12.7%) had visited the dental clinic for a check-up in the last one year. Majority of the respondents (92.2%) were non-smokers. Conclusions The use of a combination of oral self-care approaches was very low for this study population. Age and sex were predictive factors for the use of components of the oral self-care measures but not significant predictors of use of recommended oral self-care. Future studies would be required to understand ‘why’ and

  15. Oral health of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Chau, Yvonne C Y; Lai, Kelly Y C; McGrath, Colman P J; Yiu, Cynthia K Y

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed and compared oral health and oral-health behaviours among children with and without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The study included 31 children, 12-18 yr of age, with ADHD and 31 age- and gender-matched children without ADHD. Clinical data were recorded by a trained and calibrated examiner for caries, traumatic dental injuries, periodontal health, tooth wear, and salivary function. A questionnaire was also given to parents or caregivers about the oral health habits and behaviours of these children. Data were compared using Mann-Whitney U-tests and chi-square tests. No significant differences were found between children, with or without ADHD, in caries extent or prevalence, dental trauma prevalence, prevalence of periodontal disease or plaque, tooth wear, or unstimulated salivary flow. Children with ADHD had a significantly higher percentage of sites with gingival bleeding, as well as a higher frequency of parent-reported dislike of dentists, bruxism, history of assisted toothbrushing, and toothbrushing duration <1 min. They also had higher attendance at government dental clinics. The findings indicate that children with ADHD have poorer oral hygiene and more adverse oral-health attitudes and behaviours than do children without ADHD.

  16. Autism spectrum disorders: an update on oral health management.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Roopa P; Klein, Ulrich

    2014-06-01

    Dental professionals caring for patients with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) will need to provide oral health care based on a family-centered approach that involves a comprehensive understanding of parental concerns and preferences, as well as the unique medical management, behaviors, and needs of the individual patient. With the rising prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), oral health providers will find themselves increasingly likely to care for these patients in their daily practice. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive update on the medical and oral health management of patients with autism spectrum disorders. The authors conducted a literature review by searching for relevant articles written in English in the PubMed database pertaining to the medical and oral health management of autism, including caries status, preventive, behavioral, trauma, and restorative considerations. A detailed family centered approach based on parental preferences and concerns, the patient's challenging behaviors, and related comorbidities can serve to improve the treatment planning and oral health management of dental patients with ASD. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  17. Unmet oral health needs among persons with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Bojan B; Peric, Tamara O; Markovic, Dejan L J; Bajkin, Branislav B; Petrovic, Djorde; Blagojevic, Duska B; Vujkov, Sanja

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the factors affecting oral health status among intellectually disabled individuals in Serbia. The sample population was categorized according to age, sex, living arrangements, general health and the level of intellectual disability (ID). The diagnosis of dental caries was performed using the DMFT/dmft criteria. The oral hygiene and gingival health were assessed with the plaque index (Silness&Löe) and gingival index (Löe&Silness), respectively. Descriptive analysis, step-wise and logistic regression were performed to analyze related influential factors for caries presence, number of extracted teeth, teeth restored, the oral hygiene level and the extent of gingival inflammation. Odds ratios for caries were significantly higher among adult persons with ID, in persons with co-occurring developmental disorders (DDS) and increased with the level of ID. Group with DDS was associated with a 1.6 times greater odds of untreated decay, while the institutionalization was associated with 2.4 times greater odds of untreated decay. Institutionalization and co-occurring disabilities have been found to be significantly associated with a higher probability of developing gingivitis. Targeting oral health services to individuals with ID are encouraged and may help to reduce overall negative effect on oral and general health associated with delayed treatments, chronic dental pain, emergency dental care, tooth loss and advanced periodontal disease.

  18. The burden of oral ill health for children

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, J H

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to draw attention to the common oral and dental diseases and conditions in childhood in the context of aetiological factors and to highlight how many of the risk factors for oral and dental ill health are common to other areas of chronic diseases among this age group: diet, hygiene, trauma, stress, and in older children and adolescents, smoking, alcohol use, and use of illegal substances. Suggestions as to how to address these common risk factors are proposed. PMID:16492889

  19. Population groups at high risk for poor oral self care: the basis for oral health promotion.

    PubMed

    Artnik, Barbara; Premik, Marjan; Zaletel-Kragelj, Lijana

    2008-01-01

    Identification of population groups at high risk for poor oral self-care in adults was needed in order to enable more focused planning of oral health promotion actions in Slovenia. The study was based on the national health behaviour database in adults aged 25-64. Data collected in 2001 were used. The sample size was 15,379. The overall response rate was 64%, and 8,392 questionnaires were eligible for oral self-care assessment. A complex indicator based on oral hygiene, frequency of visiting a dentist, and nutritional habits was derived. The outcome of interest was poor oral self-care. Logistic regression was used to test multivariate associations between several factors (gender, age, educational level, social class, etc.) and poor oral self-care. The overall prevalence of poor oral self-care was 6.9%. The odds for this outcome were higher for men (OR(males vs. females) = 7.49, p < 0.001), (or participants with the lowest educational levels (OR(uncompleted primary vs. university) = 5.95, p < 0.001; OR(primary vs. university) = 4.95, p < 0.001), and for participants from the lowest social classes (OR(lower vs. upper-middle) = 6.20, p < 0.001; OR(labour vs. upper-middle) = 4.05, p = 0.001). Special attention should be paid to oral health promotion for men, for those with low educational level, and for those belonging to the lowest social classes.

  20. Self-reported Oral Health, Oral Hygiene, and Oral HPV Infection in At-Risk Women in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Tran, Ly Thi-Hai; Markham, Christine M.; Huynh, Thuy Thi-Thu; Tran, Loi Thi; Pham, Vy Thi-Tuong; Tran, Quan Minh; Hoang, Ngoc Hieu; Hwang, Lu-Yu; Sturgis, Erich Madison

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to examine the relationship between self-reported oral health, oral hygiene practices, and oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among women at risk for sexually transmitted infections in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Study design Convenience and referral sampling methods were used in a clinic-based setting to recruit 126 women aged 18–45 years between August–October 2013. Behavioral factors were self-reported. Oral-rinse samples were tested for HPV DNA of two low-risk and 13 high-risk genotypes. Results A higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with poorer self-rated overall oral health (p=.001), reporting oral lesions/problems in the past year (p=.001), and reporting a tooth loss not because of injury (p=.001). Higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was also associated with two measures of oral hygiene: lower frequencies of toothbrush per day (p=.047) and gargling without toothbrush (p=.037). After adjusting for other factors in multivariable logistic regression models, poorer self-rated overall oral health remained statistically associated with oral HPV infection (p=.042); yet, the frequency of toothbrush per day did not (p=.704). Conclusion Results corroborate the association between self-reported poor oral health and oral HPV infection. The effect of oral hygiene on oral HPV infection remains inconclusive. PMID:26093681

  1. [Impairment of oral cavity acid-base balance in patients with concomitant somatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Rumiantsev, V A; Esaian, L K; Ziuz'kova, E D; Leonova, S O; Namestnikova, I V

    2013-01-01

    Acid-basic balance (ABB) is the important element that supports local homeostasis in oral cavity (OC). However dentists usually do not take into account ABB in OC thus reducing the efficiency of dental care and treatment of mucous membrane disorders in these patients. The purpose of the research was to estimate the ABB values in OC in patients having chronic general somatic diseases. The ABB in OC in 80 healthy persons and in 289 persons with ulcer disease, chronic kidneys insufficiency or insulin-dependent diabetes aged 35-44 years was assessed. The speed of no stimulus salivation, рН of oral and gingival liquids as well as amplitude tests (saccharose and carbamide) curves рН were evaluated. Patients with a somatic pathology have an impairment of OC ABB regulation system associated with changes of acid- and ammonia-producing microflora activity, topographical redistribution of functional acidosis and alkalosis zones. Correction of the revealed impairments is necessary to increase the efficiency of dental care and preventive treatment in these groups of patients.

  2. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling of psychomotor impairment induced by oral clonazepam in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Fábio Monteiro; Gonçalves, José Carlos Saraiva; Caminha, Ricardo; da Silveira, Gabriel Estolano; Neves, Claúdia Silvana de Miranda; Gram, Karla Regina da Silva; Ferreira, Carla Teixeira; Jacqmin, Philippe; Noël, François

    2009-10-01

    This study was undertaken to model the relationship between clonazepam plasma concentrations and a central nervous system adverse effect (impairment of the psychomotor performance) following the oral administration of immediate-release tablets of clonazepam in healthy volunteers. Such a (P)pharmacokinetic/(P)pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) study is important to interpret properly the consequences of determined levels of plasma concentrations of psychoactive therapeutic drugs reported to be involved in road-traffic accidents. Twenty-three male subjects received a single oral dose of 4 mg clonazepam. Plasma concentration, determined by on-line solid phase extraction coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, and psychomotor performance, quantified through the Digit Symbol Substitution Test, were monitored for 72 hours. A 2-compartment open model with first order absorption and lag-time better fitted the plasma clonazepam concentrations. Clonazepam decreased the psychomotor performance by 72 +/- 3.7% (observed maximum effect), 1.5 to 4 hours (25th-75th percentile) after drug administration. A simultaneous population PK/PD model based on a sigmoid Emax model with time-dependent tolerance described well the time course of effect. Such acute tolerance could minimize the risk of accident as a result of impairment of motor skill after a single dose of clonazepam. However, an individual analysis of the data revealed a great interindividual variation in the relationship between clonazepam effect and plasma concentration, indicating that the phenomenon of acute tolerance can be predicted at a population, but not individual, level.

  3. Equity, social determinants and public health programmes--the case of oral health.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Kwan, Stella

    2011-12-01

    The WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health issued the 2008 report 'Closing the gap within a generation - health equity through action on the social determinants of health' in response to the widening gaps, within and between countries, in income levels, opportunities, life expectancy, health status, and access to health care. Most individuals and societies, irrespective of their philosophical and ideological stance, have limits as to how much unfairness is acceptable. In 2010, WHO published another important report on 'Equity, Social Determinants and Public Health Programmes', with the aim of translating knowledge into concrete, workable actions. Poor oral health was flagged as a severe public health problem. Oral disease and illness remain global problems and widening inequities in oral health status exist among different social groupings between and within countries. The good news is that means are available for breaking poverty and reduce if not eliminate social inequalities in oral health. Whether public health actions are initiated simply depends on the political will. The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion (1986) and subsequent charters have emphasized the importance of policy for health, healthy environments, healthy lifestyles, and the need for orientation of health services towards health promotion and disease prevention. This report advocates that oral health for all can be promoted effectively by applying this philosophy and some major public health actions are outlined. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Outlining a preventive oral health care system for China.

    PubMed

    Saekel, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The most recent Chinese health care reform, scheduled to run until 2020, has been underway for a number of years. Oral health care has not been explicitly mentioned in the context of this reform. However, oral health is an integral part of general health and the under-servicing of the Chinese population in the area of dental care is particularly high. The article describes how this problem could be addressed. Based on present scientific knowledge,specifically on evidence-based strategies and long-term empirical experience from Western industrialised countries, as well as findings from Chinese pilot studies, the author outlines a preventive oral health care system tailored specifically to the conditions prevailing in China. He describes the background and rationale for a clearly structured, preventive system and summarises the scientific cornerstones on which this concept is founded. The single steps of this model, that are adapted specifically to China, are presented so as to facilitate a critical discussion on the pros and cons of the approach. The author concludes that, by implementing preventive oral care, China could gradually reduce the under-servicing of great parts of the population with dental care that largely avoids dental disease and preserves teeth at a price that is affordable to both public health and patients. This approach would minimise the danger of starting a cycle of re-restorations, owing to outdated treatment methods. The proposal would both fit in well with and add to the current blueprint for Chinese health care reform.

  5. [Oral health: social representations among pregnant mothers. Medellin, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Escobar-Paucar, Gloria; Sosa-Palacio, Catalina; Sánchez-Mejía, Angela

    2011-11-01

    Based on the theory of social representations, a qualitative investigation was conducted in order to assess social representations in oral heath in pregnant mothers living in an urban environment. Twenty-eight pregnant adult women attending a prenatal program at a health institution in the city of Medellín, Colombia, were interviewed. The interviews were recorded and transcribed; analysis was performed through open, axial and selective coding, in line with grounded theory. Findings revealed that although pregnant mothers are not greatly concerned about oral health after birth and in early childhood, it increases in importance during growth and development of the child when, besides chewing and feeding aspects, it acquires a socially important role. Analysis revealed how social representations anchored in tradition, with new elements from health professional discourses as well as mass media influences coexist in mothers in an urban environment. These include the close relationship between oral health and teeth, health linked to healthy practices as well as recourse to health services and oral health as a social advantage, related to esthetic aspects.

  6. A sociodental approach to assessing children's oral health needs: integrating an oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) measure into oral health service planning.

    PubMed Central

    Gherunpong, Sudaduang; Sheiham, Aubrey; Tsakos, Georgios

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We adopted a sociodental approach to assess the real dental needs of Thai primary school children, and integrated an oral health-related quality of life measure (OHRQoL) into oral health service planning. We then compared the results of this sociodental assessment with standard estimates of a child's oral health needs. METHODS: We developed a new model of sociodental needs assessment and used it to assess the level of impact that various oral health conditions have on the everyday lives of school children. We then carried out a cross-sectional study of all grade-6 children (11-12 years old) in Suphan-buri Province, Thailand. We examined the sample (n = 1034) to assess the children's oral health and then we interviewed each child individually to assess what impact any dental conditions he or she may have on their quality of life. This assessment was done using an OHRQoL indicator, the Child Oral Impacts on Daily Performances index (child-OIDP). We integrated the results obtained using this indicator with those estimates obtained using more traditional, standard clinical methods, in order to generate a clearer picture of exactly which non-progressive dental conditions really needed treatment. These results take into account the impact those conditions have on the overall well-being of children and their ability to function normally and unimpeded. We were then able to prioritize their dental needs according to the severity of disruption caused in their daily lives. FINDINGS: Using standard or "normative" estimates of dental health care needs, the children's need was 98.8%. This level of need decreased signifi cantly to 39.5% when adopting the sociodental approach (P <0.001). Overall, per 100 children with a standard or normative need for dental treatment, only 40 had a sociodental need for treatment when taking into account the impact their condition has on their everyday lives. Children thus identifi ed as requiring treatment were further categorized

  7. Assessing Health Literacy and Oral Health: Preliminary Results of a Multi-Site Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Macek, Mark D.; Atchison, Kathryn A.; Watson, Maria Rosa; Holtzman, Jennifer; Wells, William; Braun, Bonnie; Aldoory, Linda; Messadi, Diana; Gironda, Melanie; Haynes, Don; Parker, Ruth M.; Chen, Haiyan; Coller, Susan; Richards, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To introduce a multi-site assessment of oral health literacy and to describe preliminary analyses of the relationships between health literacy and selected oral health outcomes within the context of a comprehensive conceptual model. Methods Data for this analysis came from the Multi-Site Oral Health Literacy Research Study (MOHLRS), a federally-funded investigation of health literacy and oral health. MOHLRS consisted of a broad survey, including several health literacy assessments, and measures of attitudes, knowledge, and other factors. The survey was administered to 922 initial care-seeking adult patients presenting to university-based dental clinics in California and Maryland. For this descriptive analysis, confidence filling out forms, word recognition, and reading comprehension comprised the health literacy assessments. Dental visits, oral health functioning, and dental self-efficacy were the outcomes. Results Overall, up to 21% of participants reported having difficulties with practical health literacy tasks. After controlling for sociodemographic confounders, no health literacy assessment was associated with dental visits or dental caries self-efficacy. However, confidence filling out forms and word recognition were each associated with oral health functioning and periodontal disease self-efficacy. Conclusions Our analysis showed that dental school patients exhibit a range of health literacy abilities. It also revealed that the relationship between health literacy and oral health is not straightforward, depending on patient characteristics and the unique circumstances of the encounter. We anticipate future analyses of MOHLRS data will answer questions about the role that health literacy and various mediating factors play in explaining oral health disparities. PMID:27126734

  8. Oral health activities of U.S. children: results of a national health interview survey.

    PubMed

    Gift, H C; Newman, J F

    1992-10-01

    Data from the 1989 National Health Interview Survey show oral health activities for U.S. children aged 2-17. Key population subgroups neither received optimal preventive care nor visited a dentist regularly.

  9. Poor oral health affects survival in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, Douglas R; Divaris, Kimon; Mazul, Angela L; Weissler, Mark C; Zevallos, Jose P; Olshan, Andrew F

    2017-10-01

    Poor oral health has emerged as a risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) but its impact on survival has not been examined. We sought to estimate the impact of oral health indicators on survival in a population-based HNSCC cohort. Cases (n=1381) and age-, sex- and race-matched controls (n=1396) were participants in the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiologic Study (CHANCE). Vital status was determined via linkage with the National Death Index. Survival was considered at 5years post-diagnosis or study-enrollment for controls. Oral health was assessed using self-reported indicators including frequency of routine dental exams and tooth brushing. We used Kaplan-Meyer analyses and Cox regression to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Routine dental visits during the preceding 10years were associated with decreased mortality risk (>10 visits: HR=0.6, 95% CI=0.4-0.8) after adjusting for confounders. This effect was most pronounced for oral cavity cancer-(e.g., >10 visits: HR=0.4, 95% CI=0.2-0.9). Dental visits were also positively associated with survival among controls. No other routine health screening (e.g., eye exams) was associated with survival. We found significant associations between markers of oral health and survival among both HNSCC cases and controls. This association was most pronounced for sites closer to the dentition. Oral health may have a direct effect on tumor biology due to the associated immune or inflammatory response. It may also represent a proxy for wellness or unmeasured social determinants of health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Oral health in groups of refugees in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, M

    1993-01-01

    In recent years the impact of ever-increasing numbers of refugees on the resources of the host countries has become a global concern. Health personnel face unanticipated demands complicated by different cultural, ethnic and religious factors and an unfamiliar disease panorama. Sweden today has around 1 million immigrants, 15% of the population. The aim of this thesis was to describe oral status with respect to caries and periodontal conditions, to analyse the need for dental treatment, to evaluate the effect of a preventive dental health programme, to study attitudes and knowledge of preventive dentistry and to describe and analyse utilization of dental services by different groups of adult refugees in Sweden. Three different methods were used: a descriptive clinical survey of a random sample of 193 Chilean and 92 Polish refugees, an experimental survey of a random sample of 159 Chilean refugees and a register survey, using national health statistics, consisting of a random sample of 2,489 refugees arriving in Sweden 1975-1985. The Chilean and Polish refugees had markedly poorer oral status than corresponding Swedish population groups. No association could be found between oral health or estimated treatment need and the length of time in Sweden. The simplified preventive program in the form of group discussion had a lasting effect on improved periodontal conditions and also improved knowledge of dental health care in the group of Chilean refugees. The register survey showed a generally low utilization of dental services but a high dental consumption among adult refugees in Sweden. The total treatment time for a course of treatment showed no marked decrease with subsequent courses of treatment. Immigration may have a profound effect on oral health care needs in a given population by introducing undetermined accumulated needs for oral care, and by stimulating changes in attitudes to and preferences in oral health and care.

  11. The Interplay between socioeconomic inequalities and clinical oral health.

    PubMed

    Steele, J; Shen, J; Tsakos, G; Fuller, E; Morris, S; Watt, R; Guarnizo-Herreño, C; Wildman, J

    2015-01-01

    Oral health inequalities associated with socioeconomic status are widely observed but may depend on the way that both oral health and socioeconomic status are measured. Our aim was to investigate inequalities using diverse indicators of oral health and 4 socioeconomic determinants, in the context of age and cohort. Multiple linear or logistic regressions were estimated for 7 oral health measures representing very different outcomes (2 caries prevalence measures, decayed/missing/filled teeth, 6-mm pockets, number of teeth, anterior spaces, and excellent oral health) against 4 socioeconomic measures (income, education, Index of Multiple Deprivation, and occupational social class) for adults aged ≥21 y in the 2009 UK Adult Dental Health Survey data set. Confounders were adjusted and marginal effects calculated. The results showed highly variable relationships for the different combinations of variables and that age group was critical, with different relationships at different ages. There were significant income inequalities in caries prevalence in the youngest age group, marginal effects of 0.10 to 0.18, representing a 10- to 18-percentage point increase in the probability of caries between the wealthiest and every other quintile, but there was not a clear gradient across the quintiles. With number of teeth as an outcome, there were significant income gradients after adjustment in older groups, up to 4.5 teeth (95% confidence interval, 2.2-6.8) between richest and poorest but none for the younger groups. For periodontal disease, income inequalities were mediated by other socioeconomic variables and smoking, while for anterior spaces, the relationships were age dependent and complex. In conclusion, oral health inequalities manifest in different ways in different age groups, representing age and cohort effects. Income sometimes has an independent relationship, but education and area of residence are also contributory. Appropriate choices of measures in relation to age

  12. Integration of Oral Health into Primary Health Care System: Views of Primary Health Care Workers in Lagos State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogunbodede, Eyitope; Adeniyi, Abiola

    2014-01-01

    The limited access to oral health care in developing countries can be greatly improved by integrating oral health into the Primary Health Care (PHC) system. This study was designed to assess the views of PHC workers on integrating oral health care into the PHC system. A self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted in two selected local government areas of Lagos State. The instrument contained three sections assessing sociodemographic features, knowledge of common oral diseases and views on integration of oral health into PHC respectively. The mean knowledge score was 7.75 (SD=±1.81), while 60.4% of the respondents had average knowledge scores. Educational status (P=0.018) and designation (P=0.033) were significantly related to the mean knowledge scores. There was no significant difference in the oral health knowledge of the various cadres (P=0.393). Majority (85.4%) of the respondents were willing to include oral health education in their job schedule and 82% believed they needed more training on oral health. The knowledge of the respondents on the causes of the common oral diseases was deficient. Oral health education should be included in the future curriculum of these personnel. PMID:28299117

  13. Evidence-Based Health Promotion in Nursing Homes: A Pilot Intervention to Improve Oral Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadet, Tamara J.; Berrett-Abebe, Julie; Burke, Shanna L.; Bakk, Louanne; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Maramaldi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nursing home residents over the age of 65 years are at high risk for poor oral health and related complications such as pneumonia and adverse diabetes outcomes. A preliminary study found that Massachusetts' nursing homes generally lack the training and resources needed to provide adequate oral health care to residents. In this study, an…

  14. Evidence-Based Health Promotion in Nursing Homes: A Pilot Intervention to Improve Oral Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadet, Tamara J.; Berrett-Abebe, Julie; Burke, Shanna L.; Bakk, Louanne; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Maramaldi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Nursing home residents over the age of 65 years are at high risk for poor oral health and related complications such as pneumonia and adverse diabetes outcomes. A preliminary study found that Massachusetts' nursing homes generally lack the training and resources needed to provide adequate oral health care to residents. In this study, an…

  15. Fluoride availability from natural resources in The Gambia--implications for oral health care.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Rainer A; Markovic, Ljubisa; Gaengler, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Changing food patterns in combination with ineffective oral hygiene measures and insufficient bioavailability of fluoride from drinking water and other sources seem to impair the dental health status in developing countries, especially in the younger population. Therefore, preventive programmes in controlling dental caries progression should be based on local conditions. For mapping the drinking water fluoride content throughout The Gambia, samples of water from rural community wells, public water taps, commercial mineral water, and from the Gambia-River were measured. Additionally, fluoride concentrations of locally extracted table salt and green tea were determined. Showed the need for supplementary fluoride intake, because natural dietary fluoride availability is very low. Age-related recommendations for oral health care and for additional fluoride bioavailability are given, taking into account local socio-economic conditions in the Republic of The Gambia and similar developing countries.

  16. Oral health status of homeless people in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yan; McGrath, Colman

    2006-01-01

    The authors report on an oral health survey among Hong Kong Chinese homeless people. A total of 140 homeless men underwent clinical examination and were interviewed with a structured questionnaire. More than 90% had evidence of caries experience; most (75%) were related to untreated caries. The mean DMFT score was 9.0 (DT = 3.2, MT = 5.2, FT = 0.6). Periodontal disease was highly prevalent, with 96% having periodontal pockets. The dental problems most frequently reported by the homeless were: bleeding gums or drifting teeth (62%), dental pain (52%) and tooth trauma (38%). More than 70% of the study's participants perceived a need for dental care. The population surveyed had poorer oral health compared to the general population. High levels of dental needs, both normative and perceived, were found. There is a need to provide more accessible and affordable oral health services to this group of people.

  17. Leadership training for oral health professionals: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Taichman, Russell S; Parkinson, Joseph W; Nelson, Bonnie A; Nordquist, Barbara; Ferguson-Young, Daphne C; Thompson, Joseph F

    2012-02-01

    With dramatic changes in the scope and mode of delivering oral health care on the horizon, a strategic approach to addressing the emerging opportunities and challenges is required. Such an approach will demand new and sustained initiatives to develop leaders with the skills, knowledge, and passion to guide oral health care into the future. The purpose of this position paper is to define the need for leadership training programs for dental and dental hygiene students to become future leaders. Whether these oral health professionals become leaders within a solo or group practice or at the local or national level of their profession, they must be given the mindset and tools to lead. This position paper will describe goals for leadership training and give examples of some programs that currently exist in dental education and other professional settings as the background for a call to action for dental education to provide leadership training opportunities for its students.

  18. Part 2: Oral health care for the housebound patient.

    PubMed

    Critchlow, Diana

    2017-01-02

    Oral disease can have a significant impact on the health and wellbeing of the housebound patient. The aetiology of oral conditions such as dental caries and periodontal disease have been well investigated and there is a solid evidence base in how to best prevent their progress. The Department of Health document Delivering better oral health: an evidence-based toolkit for prevention is a valuable resource that outlines the current best preventative evidence in the form of practical advice for clinicians and patients. This article aims to distil and present this advice for the benefit of community nurses. It will identify areas of particular importance for people with additional needs, particularly the elderly and infirm. Outlining how to best tailor preventative advice and treatment for this patient group.

  19. Assessment of oral health related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Allen, P Finbarr

    2003-01-01

    In Dentistry, as in other branches of Medicine, it has been recognised that objective measures of disease provide little insight into the impact of oral disorders on daily living and quality of life. A significant body of development work has been undertaken to provide health status measures for use as outcome measures in dentistry. In descriptive population studies, poor oral health related quality of life is associated with tooth loss. There is a less extensive literature of longitudinal clinical trials, and measurement of change and interpretation of change scores continues to pose a challenge. This paper reviews the literature regarding the development and use of these oral health related QoL measures and includes an appraisal of future research needs in this area. PMID:14514355

  20. Perceptions of Oral Health, Preventive Care, and Care-Seeking Behaviors among Rural Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Virginia J.; Logan, Henrietta; Brown, Cameron D.; Calderon, Angela; Catalanotto, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background: An asymmetrical oral disease burden is endured by certain population subgroups, particularly children and ad