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Sample records for impaired weight gain

  1. Antidepressants and Weight Gain

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Depression (major depressive disorder) Can antidepressants cause weight gain? Answers from Daniel K. Hall-Flavin, M.D. Weight gain is a possible side effect of nearly all antidepressants. ...

  2. Weight gain - unintentional

    MedlinePlus

    ... trying to do so can have many causes. Metabolism slows down as you age . This can cause weight gain if you eat too much, eat the wrong foods, or do not get enough exercise. Drugs that can cause weight gain include: Birth ...

  3. Preventing Weight Gain

    MedlinePlus

    ... body composition gradually shifts — the proportion of muscle decreases and the proportion of fat increases. This shift slows their metabolism, making it easier to gain weight. In addition, some people become less physically ...

  4. Caffeine prevents weight gain and cognitive impairment caused by a high-fat diet while elevating hippocampal BDNF.

    PubMed

    Moy, Gregory A; McNay, Ewan C

    2013-01-17

    Obesity, high-fat diets, and subsequent type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are associated with cognitive impairment. Moreover, T2DM increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and leads to abnormal elevation of brain beta-amyloid levels, one of the hallmarks of AD. The psychoactive alkaloid caffeine has been shown to have therapeutic potential in AD but the central impact of caffeine has not been well-studied in the context of a high-fat diet. Here we investigated the impact of caffeine administration on metabolism and cognitive performance, both in control rats and in rats placed on a high-fat diet. The effects of caffeine were significant: caffeine both (i) prevented the weight-gain associated with the high-fat diet and (ii) prevented cognitive impairment. Caffeine did not alter hippocampal metabolism or insulin signaling, likely because the high-fat-fed animals did not develop full-blown diabetes; however, caffeine did prevent or reverse a decrease in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) seen in high-fat-fed animals. These data confirm that caffeine may serve as a neuroprotective agent against cognitive impairment caused by obesity and/or a high-fat diet. Increased hippocampal BDNF following caffeine administration could explain, at least in part, the effects of caffeine on cognition and metabolism.

  5. Bipolar Medications and Weight Gain

    MedlinePlus

    Bipolar medications and weight gain Do all bipolar medications cause weight gain? Answers from Daniel K. Hall-Flavin, M. ... disorder can be treated with a number of medications. Some of these medications can increase your appetite ...

  6. Should I Gain Weight?

    MedlinePlus

    ... If you're having trouble with your body image, talk about how you feel with someone you like and trust who's been through it — maybe a parent, doctor, counselor, coach, or teacher. continue It's the Growth, Not the Gain No ...

  7. Physical and psychological consequences of weight gain.

    PubMed

    Kawachi, I

    1999-01-01

    Obesity and overweight are clearly associated with many serious conditions, including type II diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and coronary heart disease. Excess weight also increases the risk of death. Recent evidence suggests that weight gain itself, even if persons remain within the "normal" weight range, also increases the risk of medical illnesses and premature death. Persons who gain 5.0 to 7.9 kg (11 to 17.3 lb) as adults are 1.9 times more likely to develop type II diabetes mellitus and 1.25 times more likely to develop coronary heart disease than those who lose weight or maintain a stable weight after age 18 years. Gaining 11 to 20 kg (24.2 to 44 lb) or more in adulthood increases the risk of ischemic stroke 1.69 to 2.52 times. The relationship between weight gain and breast cancer has been difficult to study, primarily because postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy can mask the effect of weight gain on cancer risk. Accordingly, weight gain in adulthood has been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer only among women who have never used hormone replacement therapy. In addition to its adverse effects on disease outcomes, weight gain also impairs physical functioning, reduces quality of life, and is associated with poor mental health. These psychological and mental health consequences of weight gain can become an added burden for patients with schizophrenia and other mental disorders.

  8. Cyp8b1 ablation prevents western diet-induced weight gain and hepatic steatosis due to impaired fat absorption.

    PubMed

    Bertaggia, Enrico; Jensen, Kristian K; Castro-Perez, Jose; Xu, Yimeng; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Chan, Robin B; Wang, Liangsu; Haeusler, Rebecca A

    2017-04-04

    Bile acids (BAs) are cholesterol derivatives that regulate lipid metabolism, through their dual abilities to promote lipid absorption and activate BA receptors. However, different BA species have varying abilities to perform these functions. Eliminating 12α-hydroxy BAs in mice via Cyp8b1 knockout causes low body weight and improved glucose tolerance. The goal of this study was to determine mechanisms of low body weight in Cyp8b1(-/-) mice. We challenged Cyp8b1(-/-) mice with western type diet and assessed body weight and composition. We measured energy expenditure, fecal calories, lipid absorption and performed lipidomic studies on feces and intestine. We investigated the requirement for dietary fat in the phenotype using a fat-free diet. Cyp8b1(-/-) mice were resistant to western diet-induced body weight gain, hepatic steatosis, and insulin resistance. These changes were associated with increased fecal calories, due to malabsorption of hydrolyzed dietary triglycerides. This was reversed by treating the mice with taurocholic acid, the major 12α-hydroxylated BA species. The improvements in body weight and steatosis were normalized by feeding mice a fat-free diet. The effects of BA composition on intestinal lipid handling are important for whole-body energy homeostasis. Thus, modulating BA composition is a potential tool for obesity or diabetes therapy.

  9. Weight gain attitudes among pregnant adolescents.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Simon, C; Nakashima, I; Andrews, D

    1993-07-01

    Maternal weight gain is the most important, manageable determinant of infant birth weight among adolescents. Negative attitudes toward weight gain may adversely affect maternal weight gain. We hypothesized that (a) negative attitudes toward pregnancy weight gain are more common among younger pregnant adolescents, and (b) negative attitudes toward pregnancy weight gain adversely affect adolescent maternal weight gain. The study subjects, 99, radially diverse, pregnant 13 through 18 year olds, completed the 18-item, Likert-format, Pregnancy and Weight Gain Attitude Scale. Responses to the questionnaire indicated that most (83.8%) of the adolescents we interviewed had a positive attitude toward pregnancy weight gain when they entered prenatal care. Univariate analyses revealed that attitudes toward weight gain were unrelated to the respondents' ages but inversely related to their prepregnant weights (-0.16; p = 0.06) and the severity of their symptoms of depression (r = -0.26; p = 0.004). Attitudes toward weight gain were also directly related to their family support (r = 0.17; p = 0.06). Weight gain was significantly related to 4 of the 18 scale items but not to the total attitude scale score. We conclude that (a) the developmental task of formulating a positive body image does not foster more negative attitudes toward pregnancy weight gain among younger adolescents; (b) negative weight gain attitudes are most common among heavier adolescents, depressed adolescents, and adolescents who do not perceive their families as supportive; and (c) negative weight gain attitudes could adversely affect pregnancy weight gain.

  10. Is Weight Gain after Smoking Cessation Inevitable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talcott, Gerald W.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Studied weight gain after smoking cessation in a naturalistic setting where all smokers quit and risk factors for postcessation weight gain were modified. Results showed no significant weight changes for smokers who quit. Suggests that an intensive program featuring dietary guidelines and increased physical activity can attenuate weight gain. (RJM)

  11. Factors influencing weight gain after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C P; Gallagher-Lepak, S; Zhu, Y R; Porth, C; Kelber, S; Roza, A M; Adams, M B

    1993-10-01

    Weight gain following renal transplantation occurs frequently but has not been investigated quantitatively. A retrospective chart review of 115 adult renal transplant recipients was used to describe patterns of weight gain during the first 5 years after transplantation. Only 23 subjects (21%) were overweight before their transplant. Sixty-six subjects (57%) experienced a weight gain of greater than or equal to 10%, and 49 subjects (43%) were overweight according to Metropolitan relative weight criteria at 1 year after transplantation. There was an inverse correlation between advancing age and weight gain, with the youngest patients (18-29 years) having a 13.3% weight gain and the oldest patients (age greater than 50 years) having the lowest gain of 8.3% at 1 year (P = 0.047). Black recipients experienced a greater weight gain than whites during the first posttransplant year (14.6% vs. 9.0%; P = 0.043), and maintained or increased this difference over the 5-year period. Men and women experienced comparable weight gain during the first year (9.5% vs. 12.1%), but women continued to gain weight throughout the 5-year study (21.0% total weight gain). The men remained stable after the first year (10.8% total weight gain). Recipients who experienced at least a 10% weight gain also increased their serum cholesterol (mean 261 vs. 219) and triglyceride (mean 277 vs. 159) levels significantly, whereas those without weight gain did not. Weight gain did not correlate with cumulative steroid dose, donor source (living-related versus cadaver), rejection history, pre-existing obesity, the number of months on dialysis before transplantation, or posttransplant renal function. Posttransplant weight gain is related mainly to demographic factors, not to treatment factors associated with the transplant. The average weight gain during the first year after renal transplantation is approximately 10%. This increased weight, coupled with changes in lipid metabolism, may be significant in

  12. Gestational weight gain among Hispanic women.

    PubMed

    Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Lam, Kim; Raine, Susan P

    2014-01-01

    To describe gestational weight gain among Hispanic women and to examine psychological, social, and cultural contexts affecting weight gain. A total of 282 Hispanic women were surveyed post-partum before leaving the hospital. Women were queried about their prepregnancy weight and weight gained during pregnancy. Adequacy of gestational weight gain was based on guidelines set by the Institute of Medicine in 2009. Independent risk factors for excessive or insufficient weight gain were examined by logistic regression. Most women were unmarried (59 %), with a mean age of 28.4 ± 6.6 years and an average weight gain of 27.9 ± 13.3 lbs. Approximately 45 % of women had gained too much, 32 % too little, and only 24 % had an adequate amount of weight gain. The mean birth weight was 7.3, 7.9, and 6.8 lbs among the adequate, excessive, and insufficient weight gain groups. Among women who exercised before pregnancy, two-thirds continued to do so during pregnancy; the mean gestational weight gain of those who continued was lower than those who stopped (26.8 vs. 31.4 lbs, p = 0.04). Independent risk factors for excessive weight gain were being unmarried, U.S. born, higher prepregnancy body mass index, and having indifferent or negative views about weight gain. Independent risk factors for insufficient weight gain were low levels of support and late initiation of prenatal care. Depression, stress, and a woman's or her partner's happiness regarding pregnancy were unrelated to weight gain. The results of this study can be used by prenatal programs to identify Hispanic women at risk for excessive or insufficient gestational weight gain.

  13. Nicotine Replacement: Effects on Postcessation Weight Gain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Janet; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined nicotine replacement effects on postcessation weight gain in smoking cessation volunteers. Randomly assigned abstinent subjects to active nicotine or placebo gum conditions for 10 weeks. Analyses revealed strong evidence for gum effect on weight gain, with active gum users gaining mean total of 3.8 pounds compared with 7.8 pounds for…

  14. Gestational weight gain trajectories in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Piccinini-Vallis, Helena; Lee-Baggley, Dayna; Stewart, Moira; Ryan, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify gestational weight gain trajectories, stratified by prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), of women with singleton pregnancies who received prenatal care in a primary care setting, and to compare these trajectories with the 2009 Institute of Medicine gestational weight gain recommendations. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Halifax, NS. Participants Women who received prenatal care at the Dalhousie Family Medicine clinics in Halifax from 2009 to 2013. Main outcome measures For each prenatal visit, gestational age and weight measurements were obtained. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze the gestational weight gain trajectories. The upper limit of the guideline-recommended weekly gestational weight gain was compared with the 95% CI of the observed mean weekly gestational weight gain for each prepregnancy BMI category. Results A total of 280 women were included in the analyses. There was a significant interaction between prepregnancy BMI category and gestational weight gain over time (P < .001), with gestational weight gain being significantly lower among women with prepregnancy BMI of 30.0 kg/m2 or greater compared with those with BMI of 18.5 to less than 25.0 kg/m2 and 25.0 to less than 30.0 kg/m2. When comparing women’s weight gain with the recommendations, women with prepregnancy BMI of 25.0 to less than 30.0 kg/m2 had the most guideline discordance, deviating from the weight gain recommendations at 20 weeks’ gestation. Conclusion These results are relevant and of benefit to women and clinicians wishing to address excess gestational weight gain, and to researchers and policy makers developing interventions aimed at curbing gestational weight gain in primary care. Although our results showed women with prepregnancy BMI of 25.0 to less than 30.0 kg/m2 gained the most excess, guideline-discordant weight, interventions should target all women planning or experiencing a pregnancy.

  15. Deoxynivalenol Impairs Weight Gain and Affects Markers of Gut Health after Low-Dose, Short-Term Exposure of Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Arash; Braber, Saskia; Akbari, Peyman; Garssen, Johan; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of the major mycotoxins produced by Fusarium fungi, and exposure to this mycotoxin requires an assessment of the potential adverse effects, even at low toxin levels. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a short-term, low-dose DON exposure on various gut health parameters in pigs. Piglets received a commercial feed or the same feed contaminated with DON (0.9 mg/kg feed) for 10 days, and two hours after a DON bolus (0.28 mg/kg BW), weight gain was determined and samples of different segments of the intestine were collected. Even the selected low dose of DON in the diet negatively affected weight gain and induced histomorphological alterations in the duodenum and jejunum. The mRNA expression of different tight junction (TJ) proteins, especially occludin, of inflammatory markers, like interleukin-1 beta and interleukin-10 and the oxidative stress marker heme-oxigenase1, were affected along the intestine by low levels of DON in the diet. Taken together, our results indicate that even after low-level exposure to DON, which has been generally considered as acceptable in animal feeds, clinically-relevant changes are measurable in markers of gut health and integrity. PMID:26067367

  16. Can Beta Blockers Cause Weight Gain?

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions High blood pressure (hypertension) Can beta blockers cause weight gain? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, ... can occur as a side effect of some beta blockers, especially the older ones, such as atenolol (Tenormin) ...

  17. Intestinal Microbiota and Weight-Gain in Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Arboleya, Silvia; Martinez-Camblor, Pablo; Solís, Gonzalo; Suárez, Marta; Fernández, Nuria; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    The involvement of the gut microbiota on weight-gain and its relationship with childhood undernutrition and growth has been reported. Thus, the gut microbiota constitutes a potential therapeutic target for preventing growth impairment. However, our knowledge in this area is limited. In this study we aimed at evaluating the relationship among early microbiota, growth, and development in preterm infants. To this end we assessed the levels of specific microorganisms by qPCR, and those of short chain fatty acids by mean of gas-chromatography, in feces from 63 preterm newborns and determined their weight-gain during the first months. The statistical analyses performed indicate an influence of the intestinal microbiota in weight-gain, with the levels of some microorganisms showing a significant association with the weight-gain of the infant. The levels of specific microbial groups during the first days of life were found to affect weight gain by the age of 1 month. Moreover, clustering of the infants on the basis of the microbiota composition at 1 month of age rendered groups which showed differences in weight z-scores. Our results suggest an association between the gut microbiota composition and weight-gain in preterm infants at early life and point out potential microbial targets for favoring growth and maturation in these infants. PMID:28228752

  18. Intestinal Microbiota and Weight-Gain in Preterm Neonates.

    PubMed

    Arboleya, Silvia; Martinez-Camblor, Pablo; Solís, Gonzalo; Suárez, Marta; Fernández, Nuria; de Los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    The involvement of the gut microbiota on weight-gain and its relationship with childhood undernutrition and growth has been reported. Thus, the gut microbiota constitutes a potential therapeutic target for preventing growth impairment. However, our knowledge in this area is limited. In this study we aimed at evaluating the relationship among early microbiota, growth, and development in preterm infants. To this end we assessed the levels of specific microorganisms by qPCR, and those of short chain fatty acids by mean of gas-chromatography, in feces from 63 preterm newborns and determined their weight-gain during the first months. The statistical analyses performed indicate an influence of the intestinal microbiota in weight-gain, with the levels of some microorganisms showing a significant association with the weight-gain of the infant. The levels of specific microbial groups during the first days of life were found to affect weight gain by the age of 1 month. Moreover, clustering of the infants on the basis of the microbiota composition at 1 month of age rendered groups which showed differences in weight z-scores. Our results suggest an association between the gut microbiota composition and weight-gain in preterm infants at early life and point out potential microbial targets for favoring growth and maturation in these infants.

  19. Interventions to reduce weight gain in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Guy; Cohn, Tony; Remington, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Background Weight gain is common for people with schizophrenia and this has serious implications for health and well being. Objectives To determine the effects of both pharmacological (excluding medication switching) and non pharmacological strategies for reducing or preventing weight gain in people with schizophrenia. Search methods We searched key databases and the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group’s trials register (April 2006), reference sections within relevant papers, hand searched key journals, and contacted the first author of each relevant study and other experts to collect further information. Selection criteria We included all clinical randomised controlled trials comparing any pharmacological or non pharmacological intervention for weight gain (diet and exercise counselling) with standard care or other treatments for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like illnesses. Data collection and analysis We reliably selected, quality assessed and extracted data from studies. As weight is a continuous outcome measurement, weighted mean differences (WMD) of the change from baseline were calculated. The primary outcome measure was weight loss. Main results Twenty-three randomised controlled trials met the inclusion criteria for this review. Five trials assessed a cognitive/behavioural intervention and eighteen assessed a pharmacological adjunct. In terms of prevention, two cognitive/behavioural trials showed significant treatment effect (mean weight change) at end of treatment (n=104, 2 RCTs, WMD −3.38 kg CI −4.2 to −2.0). Pharmacological adjunct treatments were significant with a modest prevention of weight gain (n=274, 6 RCTs, WMD − 1.16 kg CI −1.9 to −0.4). In terms of treatments for weight loss, we found significantly greater weight reduction in the cognitive behavioural intervention group (n=129, 3 RCTs, WMD −1.69 kg CI −2.8 to −0.6) compared with standard care. Authors’ conclusions Modest weight loss can be achieved with selective

  20. [Atypical antipsychotic-induced weight gain].

    PubMed

    Godlewska, Beata R; Olajossy-Hilkesberger, Luiza; Marmurowska-Michałowska, Halina; Olajossy, Marcin; Landowski, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    Introduction of a new group of antipsychotic drugs, called atypical because of the proprieties differing them from classical neuroleptics, gave hope for the beginning of a new era in treatment of psychoses, including schizophrenia. Different mechanisms of action not only resulted in a broader spectrum of action and high efficacy but also in a relative lack of extrapiramidal symptoms. However, atypical neuroleptics are not totally free from adverse effects. Symptoms such as sedation, metabolic changes and weight gain, often very quick and severe - present also in the case of classical drugs, but put to the background by extrapiramidal symptoms--have become prominent. Weight gain is important both from the clinical and subjective point of view--as associated with serious somatic consequences and as a source of enormous mental distress. These problems are addressed in this review, with the focus on weight gain associated with the use of specific atypical neuroleptics.

  1. Body weight gain and deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Rieu, Isabelle; Derost, Philippe; Ulla, Miguel; Marques, Ana; Debilly, Bérangère; De Chazeron, Ingrid; Chéreau, Isabelle; Lemaire, Jean Jacques; Boirie, Yves; Llorca, Pierre Michel; Durif, Franck

    2011-11-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a neurosurgical technique that has now been available for some 25 years. It is used in the treatment of various motor disorders, e.g. Parkinson's disease (PD), essential tremor and dystonia, and neuropsychiatric illnesses, e.g. obsessive-compulsive disorder and Tourette syndrome. The surgical targets of DBS include the thalamic ventralis intermedius nucleus (Vim), the globus pallidus internus (GPi) and more recently the subthalamic nucleus (STN), currently considered as the reference target in the treatment of PD. In the last ten years, most studies in PD patients have described a rapid and marked weight gain in the months following DBS of the STN. This weight gain sometimes induces obesity and can have metabolic repercussions. The physiopathological mechanisms responsible for the weight gain are multifactorial (changes in energy metabolism and eating behaviour, reduction of motor complications, etc.). This review reports current knowledge concerning weight changes in patients treated by DBS with different surgical targets. It also describes the mechanisms responsible for weight gain and the health outcome for the patients.

  2. Association of gestational weight gain expectations with advice on actual weight gain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To examine pregnant women's gestational weight gain expectations/advice from various sources (i.e., self, family/friends, physician) and the impact of these sources of expectations/advice on actual measured gestational weight gain. Pregnant women (n=230, 87.4% Caucasian, second pregnancy) in a cohor...

  3. Management of Antipsychotic-Related Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Maayan, Lawrence; Correll, Christoph U.

    2012-01-01

    Despite variations across individuals and agents, antipsychotics are associated with clearly documented weight gain and adverse metabolic effects. Although increased appetite/caloric intake and various receptors, hormones and peptides have been implicated, biological mechanisms contributing to the increase in weight and glucose and lipid abnormalities with antipsychotics are largely unknown. This has hampered the creation of antipsychotics that are free of cardiometabolic effects, even in antipsychotic-naïve/early-phase patients, as well as the development of strategies that can prevent or drastically diminish the adverse cardiometabolic effects. In general, three strategies can reduce the cardiometabolic risk of antipsychotics: 1) switching to a less orexigenenic/metabolically adverse antipsychotic, 2) adjunctive behavioral treatments and 3) adjunctive pharmacologic interventions. However each of these strategies has only been modestly effective. Among different behavioral interventions (N=14, n=746), group and individual treatment, dietary counseling and cognitive-behavioral therapy seem to be similarly effective. Among 15 different pharmacologic strategies (N=35 , n=1,629), only metformin, fenfluramine, sibutramine, topiramate and reboxetine were more effective than placebo, with the most evidence being available for metformin, yet without any head-to-head trials comparing individual pharmacologic interventions. Even in the most successful trials, however, the risk reduction was modest. Weight was not decreased to a pre-treatment level, and despite superiority compared to placebo, weight gain still often occurred, particularly in antipsychotic-naïve patients and when interventions were “preventively” co-initiated with antipsychotics. Future research should focus on combining treatment modalities or agents and on exploring novel mechanism-based interventions. PMID:20586697

  4. Dieting: proxy or cause of future weight gain?

    PubMed

    Lowe, M R

    2015-02-01

    The relationship between dieting and body mass has a long and controversial history. This paper aims to help resolve this issue by making two key distinctions. The first is between dieting as a cause of weight gain/regain and as a proxy risk factor for identifying non-obese individuals prone to weight gain for reasons other than dieting. The second is between the body mass that is attained following one or more weight loss/regain cycles and the body mass that might have been reached had dieting never been undertaken. Evidence is reviewed on the relation between recent diet-induced weight loss and sustained weight loss (weight suppression), on the one hand, and weight regain, on the other hand. Furthermore, the reason that a history of dieting in non-obese individuals reflects a susceptibility to future weight gain is explained. It is concluded that (i) diet-induced weight loss hastens weight regain but a history of weight loss diets does not cause weight gain beyond that which would occur in the absence of dieting, and (ii) weight loss dieting in non-obese individuals does not cause future weight gain but is simply a proxy risk factor reflecting a personal vulnerability to weight gain and living in an obesogenic environment.

  5. Managing your weight gain during pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... basis for a healthy pregnancy. For most pregnant women, the right amount of calories is: 1,800 calories per ... are already overweight when they get pregnant. Other women gain ... on eating the right foods and staying active. If you do not ...

  6. Weight Gain Through Self-Control Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulanick, Nancy; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Underweight subjects were assigned to either a self-reinforcement condition, a self-punishment condition, or to a discussion/reflection control condition. The subjects received one treatment session per week over a five-week period. After treatment, the self-reinforcement groups gained significantly more pounds (kilograms) than either of the other…

  7. Impact of baseline weight on smoking cessation and weight gain in quitlines

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Terry M.; Levine, Michele D.; Magnusson, Brooke; Cheng, Yu; Chen, Xiaotian; Mahoney, Lisa; Miles, Lyndsay; Zbikowski, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Use and effectiveness of tobacco quitlines by weight is unknown. Purpose Determine if baseline weight is associated with treatment engagement, cessation or weight gain following quitline treatment. Methods Quitline participants (n=595) were surveyed at baseline, three and six months. Results Baseline weight was not associated with treatment engagement. In unadjusted analyses, overweight smokers reported higher quit rates and were more likely to gain weight after quitting than obese or normal weight smokers. At three months, 40% of overweight vs. 25% of normal weight or obese smokers quit smoking (p=0.01); 42% of overweight, 32% of normal weight, 33% of obese quitters gained weight (p=0.05). After adjusting for covariates, weight was not significantly related to cessation (approaching significance at six months, p=.06) or weight gain. Conclusions In the first quitline study of this kind, we found no consistent patterns of association between baseline weight and treatment engagement, cessation or weight gain. PMID:24048952

  8. Behavioral Treatment Approaches to Prevent Weight Gain Following Smoking Cessation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinstead, Olga A.

    Personality and physiological, cognitive, and environmental factors have all been suggested as critical variables in smoking cessation and relapse. Weight gain and the fear of weight gain after smoking cessation may also prevent many smokers from quitting. A sample of 45 adult smokers participated in a study in which three levels of preventive…

  9. Insulin therapy and type 2 diabetes: management of weight gain.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Samy I

    2009-10-01

    The potential for insulin-related weight gain in patients with type 2 diabetes presents a therapeutic dilemma and frequently leads to delays in the initiation of insulin therapy. It also poses considerable challenges when treatment is intensified. Addressing insulin-related weight gain is highly relevant to the prevention of metabolic and cardiovascular consequences in this high-risk population with type 2 diabetes. In addition to lifestyle changes (eg, diet and exercise) and available medical interventions to minimize the risk of weight gain with insulin treatment, familiarity with the weight gain patterns of different insulins may help deal with this problem. The use of basal insulin analogs may offer advantages over conventional human insulin preparations in terms of more physiologic time-action profiles, reduced risk of hypoglycemia, and reduced weight gain.

  10. Dieting and restrained eating as prospective predictors of weight gain.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Michael R; Doshi, Sapna D; Katterman, Shawn N; Feig, Emily H

    2013-09-02

    Research in normal weight individuals paradoxically suggests that measures of attempted eating restriction might represent robust predictors of weight gain. This review examined the extent to which measures of dieting (e.g., self-reported weight loss dieting in the past year) and dietary restraint (e.g., the Cognitive Restraint scale from the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire) have prospectively predicted weight change. We located and reviewed 25 prospective studies containing 40 relevant comparisons. Studies were limited to those in which participants were non-obese (with a mean BMI between 18.5 and 30) and averaged at least 12 years old. Neither measure predicted future weight loss. Fifteen of the 20 comparisons (75%) that examined measures of dieting significantly predicted future weight gain whereas only 1 of 20 (5%) that examined restrained eating measures did so. Two plausible explanations for these findings are that: (1) dieters and restrained eaters do not differ in terms of an underlying proneness toward weight gain, but restrained eating represents a more effective means of preventing it; and (2) normal weight individuals who diet do so because they are resisting a powerful predisposition toward weight gain which dieting ultimately fails to prevent. Recent dieting in non-obese individuals may be a valuable proxy of susceptibility to weight gain. This easily assessed characteristic could identify individuals for whom obesity prevention interventions would be particularly appropriate.

  11. Circadian Timing of Food Intake Contributes to Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Arble, Deanna M.; Bass, Joseph; Laposky, Aaron D.; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of body weight regulation have focused almost entirely on caloric intake and energy expenditure. However, a number of recent studies in animals linking energy regulation and the circadian clock at the molecular, physiological and behavioral levels raise the possibility that the timing of food intake itself may play a significant role in weight gain. The present study focused on the role of the circadian phase of food consumption in weight gain. We provide evidence that nocturnal mice fed a high fat diet only during the 12 hour light phase gain significantly more weight than mice fed only during the 12 hour dark phase. A better understanding of the role of the circadian system for weight gain could have important implications for developing new therapeutic strategies for combating the obesity epidemic facing the human population today. PMID:19730426

  12. Circadian timing of food intake contributes to weight gain.

    PubMed

    Arble, Deanna M; Bass, Joseph; Laposky, Aaron D; Vitaterna, Martha H; Turek, Fred W

    2009-11-01

    Studies of body weight regulation have focused almost entirely on caloric intake and energy expenditure. However, a number of recent studies in animals linking energy regulation and the circadian clock at the molecular, physiological, and behavioral levels raise the possibility that the timing of food intake itself may play a significant role in weight gain. The present study focused on the role of the circadian phase of food consumption in weight gain. We provide evidence that nocturnal mice fed a high-fat diet only during the 12-h light phase gain significantly more weight than mice fed only during the 12-h dark phase. A better understanding of the role of the circadian system for weight gain could have important implications for developing new therapeutic strategies for combating the obesity epidemic facing the human population today.

  13. Weight gain in smokers after quitting cigarettes: meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Amanda; Lycett, Deborah; Lahmek, Pierre; Aveyard, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe weight gain and its variation in smokers who achieve prolonged abstinence for up to 12 months and who quit without treatment or use drugs to assist cessation. Design Meta-analysis. Data sources We searched the Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and trials listed in Cochrane reviews of smoking cessation interventions (nicotine replacement therapy, nicotinic partial agonists, antidepressants, and exercise) for randomised trials of first line treatments (nicotine replacement therapy, bupropion, and varenicline) and exercise that reported weight change. We also searched CENTRAL for trials of interventions for weight gain after cessation. Review methods Trials were included if they recorded weight change from baseline to follow-up in abstinent smokers. We used a random effects inverse variance model to calculate the mean and 95% confidence intervals and the mean of the standard deviation for weight change from baseline to one, two, three, six, and 12 months after quitting. We explored subgroup differences using random effects meta-regression. Results 62 studies were included. In untreated quitters, mean weight gain was 1.12 kg (95% confidence interval 0.76 to 1.47), 2.26 kg (1.98 to 2.54), 2.85 kg (2.42 to 3.28), 4.23 kg (3.69 to 4.77), and 4.67 kg (3.96 to 5.38) at one, two, three, six, and 12 months after quitting, respectively. Using the means and weighted standard deviations, we calculated that at 12 months after cessation, 16%, 37%, 34%, and 13% of untreated quitters lost weight, and gained less than 5 kg, gained 5-10 kg, and gained more than 10 kg, respectively. Estimates of weight gain were similar for people using different pharmacotherapies to support cessation. Estimates were also similar between people especially concerned about weight gain and those not concerned. Conclusion Smoking cessation is associated with a mean increase of 4-5 kg in body weight after 12 months of abstinence, and most weight gain occurs within three

  14. Modifiable predictors associated with having a gestational weight gain goal.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Alison; Guthrie, Lauren B; Platek, Deborah; Stuebe, Alison; Herring, Sharon J; Oken, Emily

    2011-10-01

    The goal of this paper was to determine predictors of having a weight gain goal in early pregnancy. In 2008, we administered a 48-item survey to 249 pregnant women attending obstetric visits. We examined predictors of women having a goal concordant or discordant with 1990 Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines, vs. no goal, using binary and multinomial logistic regression. Of the 292 respondents, 116 (40%) had no gestational weight gain goal, 112 (39%) had a concordant goal and 61 (21%) had a goal discordant with IOM guidelines. Predictors of a guideline-concordant goal, vs. no goal, included sugar sweetened beverage consumption < vs. ≥ 1 serving per week (OR = 2.4, 95%CI: 1.1, 5.7), physical activity ≥ vs. <2.5 h per week (OR = 3.6, 95%CI: 1.7, 7.5), agreeing that 'I tried to keep weight down not to look pregnant' (OR = 14.3, 95%CI: 1.4, 140.5). Other predictors only of having a discordant goal (vs. no goal) included agreeing that 'as long as I am eating well, I don't care how much I gain' (OR = 0.3, 95%CI: 0.2, 0.8) and agreeing that 'if I gain too much weight one month, I try to keep from gaining the next' (OR = 4.1, 95%CI: 1.6, 10.4). Women whose doctors recommended weight gains consistent with IOM guidelines were more likely to have a concordant goal (vs. no goal) (OR = 5.3, 95%CI: 1.5, 18.6). Engaging in healthy behaviors and having health providers offer IOM weight gain recommendations may increase the likelihood of having a concordant gestational weight gain goal, which, in turn, is predictive of actual weight gains that fall within IOM guidelines.

  15. Menopause Weight Gain: Stop the Middle Age Spread

    MedlinePlus

    ... al. Diet and adipose tissue distributions: The multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis. Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases. 2016;26:185. Greenberg JA, et al. Chocolate-candy consumption and three-year weight gain among postmenopausal U.S. ...

  16. Compulsive eating and weight gain related to dopamine agonist use.

    PubMed

    Nirenberg, Melissa J; Waters, Cheryl

    2006-04-01

    Dopamine agonists have been implicated in causing compulsive behaviors in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). These have included gambling, hypersexuality, hobbyism, and other repetitive, purposeless behaviors ("punding"). In this report, we describe 7 patients in whom compulsive eating developed in the context of pramipexole use. All of the affected patients had significant, undesired weight gain; 4 had other comorbid compulsive behaviors. In the 5 patients who lowered the dose of pramipexole or discontinued dopamine agonist treatment, the behavior remitted and no further weight gain occurred. Physicians should be aware that compulsive eating resulting in significant weight gain may occur in PD as a side-effect of dopamine agonist medications such as pramipexole. Given the known risks of the associated weight gain and obesity, further investigation is warranted.

  17. Weight Gain in Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome After Acid Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Riff, Brian P.; Leiman, David A.; Bennett, Bonita; Fraker, Douglas L.; Metz, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome (ZES) is characterized by hypergastrinemia and gastric acid hypersecretion resulting in peptic ulcer disease, diarrhea and weight loss. Acid secretion can be controlled with medication and biochemical cure is possible with surgery. Data on how these interventions affect patients’ weight are lacking. We aimed to determine how medical and surgical acid control affects weight over time. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study on 60 ZES patients. Acid control was achieved with appropriate dose proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Surgery was performed for curative intent when appropriate. Weight change was assessed versus pre-acid control or immediate pre-operative weights and expressed as absolute and percent change from baseline at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Results A total of 30 PPI-controlled patients and 20 surgery-controlled patients were analyzed. Weight gain was noted at all-time points while on appropriate dose PPI therapy (p<0.005). Of patients who had surgery with curative intent, weight gain was noted at 12 months (7.9%, p=0.013) and 18 months (7.1%, p=0.007). There was a trend toward weight gain seen at all-time points in the patients who were surgically cured. Conclusion These data represent a novel description of weight gain after acid suppression in ZES. PMID:26164604

  18. Weight gain prevention and smoking cessation: cautionary findings.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, S M; Tunstall, C D; Vila, K L; Duffy, J

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Weight gain is a consistent sequela of smoking cessation. A successful intervention might attract smokers who fear weight gain. If the gain causes smoking relapse, such an intervention might reduce smoking relapse risk. METHODS. Using a sample of 158 smokers who completed a 2-week smoking treatment program, we compared an innovative weight gain prevention intervention with both a nonspecific treatment and standard treatment. Subjects were assessed on weight and smoking behavior and followed for 1 year. RESULTS. A disturbing, unexpected finding was that subjects in both the innovative and nonspecific conditions had a higher risk of smoking relapse than did standard treatment subjects. Some differences were observed between abstinent and smoking subjects in weight gain by treatment condition. CONCLUSIONS. Both active interventions may have been so complicated that they detracted from nonsmoking. Also, caloric restriction may increase the reinforcing value of nicotine, a psychoactive drug, thereby increasing smoking relapse risk. The magnitude of weight gain after smoking cessation may not merit interventions that increase smoking risk. Perhaps attitudinal modifications are the most appropriate. PMID:1585959

  19. Food groups and weight gain in Japanese men.

    PubMed

    Ibe, Y; Takahashi, Y; Sone, H

    2014-06-01

    Identifying subjects at high risk of weight gain according to consumption of food groups is important for individualizing nutritional education, but prospective studies of this issue have been few. We determined whether intake of specific food groups could predict future weight gain. We evaluated data from health checkups on 1236 Japanese men aged 28 to 87 years in 2005 and 2006. Dietary intake was assessed by a 24-h dietary recall at baseline. Weight change was measured after 1 year. Weight increased in 44.7% (n = 553) of participants. Multivariate regression analysis involving many food groups showed a significant association between sugar intake and weight gain after adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), total energy intake, alcohol, smoking and regular physical exercise (β = 0.22, P = 0.04). The effect of intake of 'fats and oils' was significant when adjusted for age and BMI, however, it became insignificant after adjustment for age, BMI and total energy intake. Intake of sugar, which was evaluated as a food group, was predictive of subsequent weight gain among Japanese men, even after adjustment for many confounders. This corroborates the evidence so far concerning the links between sugar intake and weight gain. Further long-term research is required to give robust recommendation to the public.

  20. Amantadine for weight gain associated with olanzapine treatment.

    PubMed

    Deberdt, Walter; Winokur, Andrew; Cavazzoni, Patrizia A; Trzaskoma, Quynh N; Carlson, Christopher D; Bymaster, Frank P; Wiener, Karen; Floris, Michel; Breier, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia (Sch), schizoaffective, schizophreniform, or bipolar (BP) I disorders [Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV)]; not manic or acutely psychotic [Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) total score < or =45]; treated with olanzapine for 1-24 months; and who had gained > or =5% of their initial body weight were examined to determine whether amantadine could attenuate weight gain or promote weight loss. Olanzapine (Olz; 5-20 mg/day) was co-administered with double-blind treatment of 100-300 mg/day amantadine (Olz+Amt, n=60) or placebo (Olz+Plc, n=65). Visit-wise analysis of weight showed that weight change from baseline [last-observation-carried-forward (LOCF)] in the Olz+Amt group was significantly different from the Olz+Plc group at weeks 8 (P=0.042), 12 (P=0.029), and 16 (primary endpoint, mean+/-S.D.: -0.19+/-4.58 versus 1.28+/-4.26 kg, P=0.045). Mean BPRS total score, positive subscale, and anxiety-depression scores improved comparably in both groups, and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score improved in the Olz+Amt group. Overall, amantadine was safe, was well tolerated, and attenuated weight gain or promoted weight loss in some patients who had gained weight during olanzapine therapy.

  1. Nutritional status and weight gain in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Sato, Ana Paula Sayuri; Fujimori, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This study described the nutritional status of 228 pregnant women and the influence of this on birth weight. This is a retrospective study, developed in a health center in the municipality of São Paulo, with data obtained from medical records. Linear regression analysis was carried out. An association was verified between the initial and final nutritional status (p<0.001). The mean of total weight gain in the pregnant women who began the pregnancy underweight was higher compared those who started overweight/obese (p=0.005). Weight gain was insufficient for 43.4% of the pregnant women with adequate initial weight and for 36.4% of all the pregnant women studied. However, 37.1% of those who began the pregnancy overweight/obese finished with excessive weight gain, a condition that ultimately affected almost a quarter of the pregnant women. Anemia and low birth weight were uncommon, however, in the linear regression analysis, birth weight was associated with weight gain (p<0.05). The study highlights the importance of nutritional care before and during pregnancy to promote maternal-infant health.

  2. Dynamic energy-balance model predicting gestational weight gain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gestational weight gains (GWGs) that exceed the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommended ranges increase risk of long-term postpartum weight retention; conversely, GWGs within the recommended ranges are more likely to result in positive maternal and fetal outcomes. Despite this evidence, recent epide...

  3. Weight gain in freshman college students and perceived health

    PubMed Central

    de Vos, Paul; Hanck, Christoph; Neisingh, Marjolein; Prak, Dennis; Groen, Henk; Faas, Marijke M.

    2015-01-01

    Background We determined body weight increase in first year Dutch college students. We had the objective to determine whether the awareness of the unhealthy lifestyle raised concerns and willingness to change habits. Methods Body weight, heartbeat, BMI, body fat percentages, and blood pressure values were collected from 1095 students. Comprehensive statistical analysis was performed on the data. Results The students had a mean weight gain of 1.1 kg and an average BMI gain of 0.35. Members of a student corps gained significantly more weight (1.6 ± 3.1 kg) than non-members (1.0 ± 2.5 kg), while students who are living independently gained an average of 0.5 kg more than students living with their parents (p < 0.05). Approximately 40% of the students changed their eating patterns and 30.7% of the students consumed more alcohol. Conclusions Students experienced hindrance in physical exercise and mental well-being. Students with a high BMI without irregular eating habits were willing to change their lifestyle. However, students who had irregular lifestyles exhibited the lowest willingness to change their eating behaviors and to lose weight. Our study provides insight into means by which adolescents at high risk for weight gain can be approached to improve experienced quality of life. PMID:26844076

  4. Gestational weight gain and medical outcomes of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Zachary M; Contador, Fernanda; Tawfiq, Afaf; Adamo, Kristi B

    2015-01-01

    This narrative review discusses gestational weight gain (GWG) and medical outcomes of pregnancy, including metabolic, cardiovascular, respiratory, musculoskeletal and psychiatric systems. Taken as a whole, the available evidence shows that excessive GWG increases the risk of all medical complications of pregnancy, and negatively impacts the long-term health and weight of both mothers and their offspring. Briefly, interventions to encourage appropriate GWG are discussed and readers are directed to resources to facilitate discussion of pregnancy weight. PMID:27512468

  5. Exercise during pregnancy and its association with gestational weight gain.

    PubMed

    Harris, Shericka T; Liu, Jihong; Wilcox, Sara; Moran, Robert; Gallagher, Alexa

    2015-03-01

    We examined the association between exercise during pregnancy and meeting gestational weight gain recommendations. Data came from the 2009 South Carolina Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (n = 856). Women reported their participation in exercise/sports activities before and during pregnancy, including the number of months and types of exercise. We developed an exercise index (EI), the product of the number of months spent in exercise and average metabolic equivalents for specific exercise. The 2009 Institute of Medicine's guideline was used to categorize gestational weight gain into three classes: inadequate, adequate, and excessive. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to adjust for confounders. Over 46 % of women exceeded the recommended weight gain during pregnancy. Nearly one third (31.9 %) of women reported exercising ≥3 times a week at any time during pregnancy. Compared to women who did not report this level of exercise during pregnancy, exercising women were more likely to meet gestational weight gain recommendations (32.7 vs. 18.7 %) and had a lower odds of excessive gestational weight gain [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 0.43, 95 % confidence interval 0.24-0.78]. Women with an EI above the median value of those women who exercised or women who exercised ≥3 times a week for 6-9 months during pregnancy had lower odds of excessive gestational weight gain (AOR for EI 0.20, 0.08-0.49; AOR for months 0.26, 0.12-0.56, respectively). Our findings support the need to promote or increase exercise during pregnancy to reduce the high proportion of women who are gaining excessive weight.

  6. Obesity and diabetes genetic variants associated with gestational weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Stuebe, Alison M.; Lyon, Helen; Herring, Amy; Ghosh, Joyee; Wise, Alison; North, Kari E.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether genetic variants associated with diabetes and obesity predict gestational weight gain. Study Design 960 participants in the Pregnancy, Infection and Nutrition cohorts were genotyped for 27 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with diabetes and obesity. Results Among white and black women (n=960), KCNQ1 risk allele carriage was directly associated with weight gain (p < 0.01). In Bayesian hierarchical models among white women (N=628), we found posterior odds ratios > 3 for inclusion of TCF2 and THADA SNPs in our models. Among black women (n=332), we found associations between risk allele carriage and weight gain for the THADA and INSIG2 SNPs. In Bayesian variable selection models, we found an interaction between the TSPAN8 risk allele and pre-gravid obesity, with lower weight gain among obese risk allele carriers. Conclusion We found evidence that diabetes and obesity risk alleles interact with maternal pre-gravid BMI to predict gestational weight gain. PMID:20816152

  7. Weight Gain following Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation: A PET Study.

    PubMed

    Sauleau, Paul; Drapier, Sophie; Duprez, Joan; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Dondaine, Thibaut; Haegelen, Claire; Drapier, Dominique; Jannin, Pierre; Robert, Gabriel; Le Jeune, Florence; Vérin, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms behind weight gain following deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery seem to be multifactorial and suspected depending on the target, either the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or the globus pallidus internus (GPi). Decreased energy expenditure following motor improvement and behavioral and/or metabolic changes are possible explanations. Focusing on GPi target, our objective was to analyze correlations between changes in brain metabolism (measured with PET) and weight gain following GPi-DBS in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Body mass index was calculated and brain activity prospectively measured using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose PET four months before and four months after the start of GPi-DBS in 19 PD patients. Dopaminergic medication was included in the analysis to control for its possible influence on brain metabolism. Body mass index increased significantly by 0.66 ± 1.3 kg/m2 (p = 0.040). There were correlations between weight gain and changes in brain metabolism in premotor areas, including the left and right superior gyri (Brodmann area, BA 6), left superior gyrus (BA 8), the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (right middle gyrus, BAs 9 and 46), and the left and right somatosensory association cortices (BA 7). However, we found no correlation between weight gain and metabolic changes in limbic and associative areas. Additionally, there was a trend toward a correlation between reduced dyskinesia and weight gain (r = 0.428, p = 0.067). These findings suggest that, unlike STN-DBS, motor improvement is the major contributing factor for weight gain following GPi-DBS PD, confirming the motor selectivity of this target.

  8. Weight Gain following Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation: A PET Study

    PubMed Central

    Sauleau, Paul; Drapier, Sophie; Duprez, Joan; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Dondaine, Thibaut; Haegelen, Claire; Drapier, Dominique; Jannin, Pierre; Robert, Gabriel; Le Jeune, Florence; Vérin, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms behind weight gain following deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery seem to be multifactorial and suspected depending on the target, either the subthalamic nucleus (STN) or the globus pallidus internus (GPi). Decreased energy expenditure following motor improvement and behavioral and/or metabolic changes are possible explanations. Focusing on GPi target, our objective was to analyze correlations between changes in brain metabolism (measured with PET) and weight gain following GPi-DBS in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Body mass index was calculated and brain activity prospectively measured using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose PET four months before and four months after the start of GPi-DBS in 19 PD patients. Dopaminergic medication was included in the analysis to control for its possible influence on brain metabolism. Body mass index increased significantly by 0.66 ± 1.3 kg/m2 (p = 0.040). There were correlations between weight gain and changes in brain metabolism in premotor areas, including the left and right superior gyri (Brodmann area, BA 6), left superior gyrus (BA 8), the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (right middle gyrus, BAs 9 and 46), and the left and right somatosensory association cortices (BA 7). However, we found no correlation between weight gain and metabolic changes in limbic and associative areas. Additionally, there was a trend toward a correlation between reduced dyskinesia and weight gain (r = 0.428, p = 0.067). These findings suggest that, unlike STN-DBS, motor improvement is the major contributing factor for weight gain following GPi-DBS PD, confirming the motor selectivity of this target. PMID:27070317

  9. Birth Weight, Early Weight Gain and Pubertal Maturation: a Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Dinse, Gregg E.; Rogan, Walter J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of birth weight and early weight gain on the timing of various measures of puberty in both girls and boys. Methods A total of 856 newborns enrolled in the North Carolina Infant Feeding Study were followed to age 5 years, with 600 children followed up at adolescence. Birth weight was obtained from medical records and children were weighed at study visits until age 5 years; gains in standardized weights were calculated over four early age intervals: 0–6 months, 6–12 months, 1–2 years, and 2–5 years. Age at menarche in girls and age at advanced Tanner stages in both girls and boys were reported by adolescents and their parents. Survival models were used to analyze the effects of birth weight and early weight gain on these outcomes. Results Girls with higher birth weight and greater weight gains during the four early age intervals were younger when they reached menarche and advanced Tanner stages; boys with greater early weight gains also were younger when they reached advanced Tanner stages, but few of these effects were statistically significant. Conclusions Higher birth weights and greater weight gains during infancy and early childhood can lead to earlier sexual maturation in girls. PMID:22434749

  10. Pseudotumor Cerebri and Implanon: Is Rapid Weight Gain the Trigger?

    PubMed Central

    Kassen, Nirusha; Wells, Cait-lynn; Moodley, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between pseudotumor cerebri and contraceptive drugs is controversial. Its association with Implanon, an implantable single-rod contraceptive containing etonogestrel (a progestogen) has not been reported but is the subject of many medico-legal cases. The authors present two case reports of patients using Implanon and who subsequently developed pseudotumor cerebri. Rapid weight gain rather than direct hormonal influence is probably the trigger. Headaches, visual obscurations, and rapid weight gain in patients using Implanon should alert one to the probable diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri. PMID:27928370

  11. Pseudotumor Cerebri and Implanon: Is Rapid Weight Gain the Trigger?

    PubMed

    Kassen, Nirusha; Wells, Cait-Lynn; Moodley, Anand

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between pseudotumor cerebri and contraceptive drugs is controversial. Its association with Implanon, an implantable single-rod contraceptive containing etonogestrel (a progestogen) has not been reported but is the subject of many medico-legal cases. The authors present two case reports of patients using Implanon and who subsequently developed pseudotumor cerebri. Rapid weight gain rather than direct hormonal influence is probably the trigger. Headaches, visual obscurations, and rapid weight gain in patients using Implanon should alert one to the probable diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri.

  12. Neural Vulnerability Factors that Increase Risk for Future Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Stice, Eric; Yokum, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Theorists have proposed several neural vulnerability factors that may increase overeating and consequent weight gain. Early cross-sectional imaging studies could not determine whether aberrant neural responsivity was a precursor or consequence of overeating. However, recent prospective imaging studies examining predictors of future weight gain and response to obesity treatment, and repeated-measures imaging studies before and after weight gain and loss have advanced knowledge of etiologic processes and neural plasticity resulting from weight change. The present article reviews evidence from prospective studies using imaging and behavioral measures reflecting neural function, as well as randomized experiments with humans and animals that are consistent or inconsistent with five neural vulnerability theories for excessive weight gain. Extant data provide strong support for the incentive sensitization theory of obesity and moderate support for the reward surfeit theory, inhibitory control deficit theory, and dynamic vulnerability model of obesity, which attempted to synthesize the former theories into a single etiologic model. However, existing data provide only minimal support for the reward deficit theory. Findings are synthesized into a new working etiologic model that is based on current scientific knowledge. Important directions for future studies, which have the potential to support or refute this working etiologic model, are delineated. PMID:26854866

  13. Sleep Is Increased By Weight Gain and Decreased By Weight Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Zhiwei; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Bixler, Edward O.; Fang, Jidong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether weight loss could reverse excessive sleep in high-fat diet-induced obesity. Design: Three groups of mice participated in the study. A weight gain/loss group was fed with high-fat food for 6 weeks (weight gain), and regular food again for 4 weeks (weight loss). A control group and a weight gain only group were fed with regular food and high-fat food, respectively, for 10 weeks after the baseline. Participants: Adult male C57BL/6 mice. Measurements: The amounts of wake, rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-REM sleep (NREMS) were determined at week 0 (baseline), week 6, and week 10. Results: The weight gain/loss group displayed a significant decrease in wakefulness and increases in NREMS and episodes of NREMS during 6 weeks of weight gain, which were reversed during subsequent 4 weeks of weight loss. The weight gain only group displayed significant decrease in wakefulness and increase of NREMS and REMS at both week 6 and week 10. The control group did not show significant sleep alterations during the experiment. Conclusion: These observations indicate that sleep alterations induced by weight gain are reversed by weight loss in obese animals. These data may shed light on the mechanisms underlying the well-established association between obesity and sleepiness in humans and may lead to new therapeutic strategies for these 2 increasingly prevalent problems in the modern societies. Citation: Guan Z; Vgontzas AN; Bixler EO; Fang J. Sleep is increased by weight gain and decreased by weight loss in mice. SLEEP 2008;31(5):627-633. PMID:18517033

  14. Predictors of weight variation and weight gain in peri- and post-menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Filipa; Maroco, João; Ramos, Catarina; Leal, Isabel

    2014-08-01

    This research encompasses a community sample of 497 women in peri- and post-menopause and uses structural equation modelling to investigate the structural models of weight variation and weight gain. Variables such as body shape concerns, depression, stress and life events are explored. Weight gain (from pre-menopause to current menopausal status) was observed in 69 per cent of participants. The predictors of weight gain were lower education level (β = -.146, p = .017), less or no physical exercise (β = -.111, p = .021), having a recent psychological problem (β = .191, p < .001), transition from peri- to post-menopause (β = .147, p = .013) and more frequent body shape concerns (β = .313, p < .001). Prevention of weight gain in pre-menopause is recommended; risk groups should be targeted considering the predictors of weight increase.

  15. Soft Drinks and Weight Gain: How Strong Is the Link?

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Emily; Dansinger, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    Context Soft drink consumption in the United States has tripled in recent decades, paralleling the dramatic increases in obesity prevalence. The purpose of this clinical review is to evaluate the extent to which current scientific evidence supports a causal link between sugar-sweetened soft drink consumption and weight gain. Evidence acquisition MEDLINE search of articles published in all languages between 1966 and December 2006 containing key words or medical subheadings, such as “soft drinks” and “weight.” Additional articles were obtained by reviewing references of retrieved articles, including a recent systematic review. All reports with cross-sectional, prospective cohort, or clinical trial data in humans were considered. Evidence synthesis Six of 15 cross-sectional and 6 of 10 prospective cohort studies identified statistically significant associations between soft drink consumption and increased body weight. There were 5 clinical trials; the two that involved adolescents indicated that efforts to reduce sugar-sweetened soft drinks slowed weight gain. In adults, 3 small experimental studies suggested that consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks caused weight gain; however, no trial in adults was longer than 10 weeks or included more than 41 participants. No trial reported the effects on lipids. Conclusions Although observational studies support the hypothesis that sugar-sweetened soft drinks cause weight gain, a paucity of hypothesis-confirming clinical trial data has left the issue open to debate. Given the magnitude of the public health concern, larger and longer intervention trials should be considered to clarify the specific effects of sugar-sweetened soft drinks on body weight and other cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:18924641

  16. Change in Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status and Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M.; Cooper-McCann, Rebecca; Ayers, Colby; Berrigan, David; Lian, Min; McClurkin, Michael; Barbash, Rachel Ballard; Das, Sandeep R.; Hoehner, Christine M.; Leonard, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite a proposed connection between neighborhood environment and obesity, few longitudinal studies have examined the relationship between change in neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation, as defined by moving between neighborhoods, and change in body weight. The purpose of this study is to examine the longitudinal relationship between moving to more socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods and weight gain as a cardiovascular risk factor. Methods Weight (kg) was measured in the Dallas Heart Study (DHS), a multiethnic cohort aged 18–65 years, at baseline (2000–2002) and 7-year follow-up (2007–2009, N=1,835). Data were analyzed in 2013–2014. Geocoded addresses were linked to Dallas County, TX census block groups. A block group-level neighborhood deprivation index (NDI) was created. Multilevel difference-in-difference models with random effects and a Heckman correction factor (HCF) determined weight change relative to NDI change. Results Forty-nine percent of the DHS population moved (263 to higher NDI, 586 to lower NDI, 47 within same NDI), with blacks more likely to move than whites or Hispanics (p<0.01), but similar baseline BMI and waist circumference were observed in movers vs. non-movers (p>0.05). Adjusting for HCF, sex, race, and time-varying covariates, those who moved to areas of higher NDI gained more weight compared to those remaining in the same or moving to a lower NDI (0.64 kg per 1-unit NDI increase, 95% CI=0.09, 1.19). Impact of NDI change on weight gain increased with time (p=0.03). Conclusions Moving to more–socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods was associated with weight gain among DHS participants. PMID:25960394

  17. A behavioral intervention to reduce excessive gestational weight gain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is a key modifiable risk factor for negative maternal and child health. We examined the efficacy of a behavioral intervention in preventing excessive GWG. 230 participants (87.8% Caucasian, mean age= 29.1 years; second parity) completed the 36 week gestational...

  18. [Antipsychotic-induced weight gain--pharmacogenetic studies].

    PubMed

    Olajossy-Hilkesberger, Luiza; Godlewska, Beata; Marmurowska-Michałowskal, Halina; Olajossy, Marcin; Landowski, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    Drug-naive patients with schizophrenia often present metabolic abnormalities and obesity. Weight gain may be the side effect of treatment with many antipsychotic drugs. Genetic effects, besides many other factors, are known to influence obesity in patients with schizophrenia treated with antipsychotics. Numerous studies of several genes' polymorphisms have been performed. -759C/T polymorphism of 5HT2C gene attracted most attention. In 5 independent studies of this polymorphism the association between T allele with the lower AP-induced weight gain was detected. No associations could be detected between weight gain and other polymorphisms of serotonergic system genes as well as histaminergic system genes. Studies of adrenergic and dopaminergic system have neither produced any unambiguous results. Analysis of the newest candidate genes (SAP-25, leptin gene) confirmed the role of genetic factors in AP-induced weight gain. It is worth emphasising, that the studies have been conducted in relatively small and heterogenic groups and that various treatment strategies were used.

  19. Maternal Behavior and Infant Weight Gain in the First Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worobey, John; Lopez, Maria Islas; Hoffman, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relative contributions of maternal characteristics and behaviors in predicting infant weight gain over the first year of postpartum life. Design: Longitudinal study of maternal feeding style throughout infancy. Setting: A Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children center. Participants:…

  20. Weight gain increases human aromatase expression in mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Zhao, Hong; Coon, John S; Ono, Masanori; Pearson, Elizabeth K; Bulun, Serdar E

    2012-05-15

    Adulthood weight gain predicts estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Because local estrogen excess in the breast likely contributes to cancer development, and aromatase is the key enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis, we investigated the role of local aromatase expression in weight gain-associated breast cancer risk in a humanized aromatase (Arom(hum)) mouse model containing the coding region and the 5'-regulatory region of the human aromatase gene. Compared with littermates on normal chow, female Arom(hum) mice on a high fat diet gained more weight, and had a larger mammary gland mass with elevated total human aromatase mRNA levels via promoters I.4 and II associated with increased levels of their regulators TNFα and C/EBPβ. There was no difference in total human aromatase mRNA levels in gonadal white adipose tissue. Our data suggest that diet-induced weight gain preferentially stimulates local aromatase expression in the breast, which may lead to local estrogen excess and breast cancer risk.

  1. Essential oils increase weight gain in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the effects of matrix encapsulated essential oils (Biomin® P.E.P. MGE) on weight gain, specific growth rate (SGR), feed conversion ratio (FCR), and survival of channel catfish. Five hundred catfish (32.4 ± 1.7 g/fish) were randomly assigned to two treatments with five replicate tanks/tre...

  2. Prospective associations of eating behaviors with weight gain in infants

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Desti N.; Chandler-Laney, Paula C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether maternal reports of infant eating behaviors are stable over time and whether eating behaviors are prospectively associated with weight gain. Methods In an ongoing study of infant growth, weight and length were measured at 2-weeks, 3-months, and 5-months of age. Food responsiveness (FR), satiety responsiveness (SR), enjoyment of feeding (EF), and slow eating (SE) were assessed with the Baby Eating Behavior Questionnaire. Repeated measures ANOVA were used to examine changes in eating behaviors from 2-weeks to 5-months. Simple Pearson correlations examined associations among eating behaviors across time, and associations of eating behaviors with subsequent change in weight-for-length z-scores. Results Among 31 infants studied from 2-weeks to 3-months, FR and SR remained consistent (P<0.05), and among 21 infants studied from 3- to 5-months, FR, EF, and SE were consistent (P<0.01). Infants ate more quickly (P<0.01), and tended to have greater SR with age (P=0.09). Only SE at 3-months was associated with subsequent gain in weight-for-length (P<0.05). Conclusions Consistent with previous research, SE was predictive of weight gain during infancy. Given that eating behaviors were largely consistent after 3-months of age, it may be important to encourage the development of healthy eating behaviors during early infancy. PMID:26242892

  3. Hygroscopic weight gain of pollen grains from Juniperus species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunderson, Landon D.; Levetin, Estelle

    2015-05-01

    Juniperus pollen is highly allergenic and is produced in large quantities across Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico. The pollen negatively affects human populations adjacent to the trees, and since it can be transported hundreds of kilometers by the wind, it also affects people who are far from the source. Predicting and tracking long-distance transport of pollen is difficult and complex. One parameter that has been understudied is the hygroscopic weight gain of pollen. It is believed that juniper pollen gains weight as humidity increases which could affect settling rate of pollen and thus affect pollen transport. This study was undertaken to examine how changes in relative humidity affect pollen weight, diameter, and settling rate. Juniperus ashei, Juniperus monosperma, and Juniperus pinchotii pollen were applied to greased microscope slides and placed in incubation chambers under a range of temperature and humidity levels. Pollen on slides were weighed using an analytical balance at 2- and 6-h intervals. The size of the pollen was also measured in order to calculate settling rate using Stokes' Law. All pollen types gained weight as humidity increased. The greatest settling rate increase was exhibited by J. pinchotii which increased by 24 %.

  4. Hygroscopic weight gain of pollen grains from Juniperus species.

    PubMed

    Bunderson, Landon D; Levetin, Estelle

    2015-05-01

    Juniperus pollen is highly allergenic and is produced in large quantities across Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico. The pollen negatively affects human populations adjacent to the trees, and since it can be transported hundreds of kilometers by the wind, it also affects people who are far from the source. Predicting and tracking long-distance transport of pollen is difficult and complex. One parameter that has been understudied is the hygroscopic weight gain of pollen. It is believed that juniper pollen gains weight as humidity increases which could affect settling rate of pollen and thus affect pollen transport. This study was undertaken to examine how changes in relative humidity affect pollen weight, diameter, and settling rate. Juniperus ashei, Juniperus monosperma, and Juniperus pinchotii pollen were applied to greased microscope slides and placed in incubation chambers under a range of temperature and humidity levels. Pollen on slides were weighed using an analytical balance at 2- and 6-h intervals. The size of the pollen was also measured in order to calculate settling rate using Stokes' Law. All pollen types gained weight as humidity increased. The greatest settling rate increase was exhibited by J. pinchotii which increased by 24 %.

  5. The Effect of Ranitidine on Olanzapine-Induced Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Fatemeh; Ghanepour, Alireza; Asadlo, Mahbob; Alizadeh, Amineh

    2013-01-01

    Induced weight gain is a disturbing side effect of Olanzapine that affects the quality of life in psychotic patients. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of Ranitidine in attenuating or preventing Olanzapine-induced weight gain. A parallel 2-arm clinical trial was done on 52 patients with schizophrenia, schizoaffective and schizophreniform disorders who received Olanzapine for the first time. All these were first-episode admitted patients. They were randomly allocated to receive either Ranitidine or placebo. The trend of body mass index (BMI) was compared between groups over 16-week course of treatment. Mean weight was 62.3 (SD: 9.6) kg at baseline. Thirty-three subjects (63.5%) had positive family history of obesity. The average BMI increment was 1.1 for Ranitidine group and 2.4 for the placebo group. The multivariate analysis showed this effect to be independent of sex, family history of obesity, and baseline BMI value. The longitudinal modeling after controlling for baseline values failed to show the whole trend slope to be different. Although the slight change in trend's slope puts forward a hypothesis that combined use of Ranitidine and Olanzapine may attenuate the weight gain long run, this needs to be retested in future larger scale long-term studies. This trial is registered with IRCT.ir 201009112181N5. PMID:23984393

  6. Increased adiposity and insulin correlates with the progressive suppression of pulsatile GH secretion during weight gain.

    PubMed

    Steyn, F J; Xie, T Y; Huang, L; Ngo, S T; Veldhuis, J D; Waters, M J; Chen, C

    2013-01-01

    Pathological changes associated with obesity are thought to contribute to GH deficiency. However, recent observations suggest that impaired GH secretion relative to excess calorie consumption contributes to progressive weight gain and thus may contribute to the development of obesity. To clarify this association between adiposity and GH secretion, we investigated the relationship between pulsatile GH secretion and body weight; epididymal fat mass; and circulating levels of leptin, insulin, non-esterified free fatty acids (NEFAs), and glucose. Data were obtained from male mice maintained on a standard or high-fat diet. We confirm the suppression of pulsatile GH secretion following dietary-induced weight gain. Correlation analyses reveal an inverse relationship between measures of pulsatile GH secretion, body weight, and epididymal fat mass. Moreover, we demonstrate an inverse relationship between measures of pulsatile GH secretion and circulating levels of leptin and insulin. The secretion of GH did not change relative to circulating levels of NEFAs or glucose. We conclude that impaired pulsatile GH secretion in the mouse occurs alongside progressive weight gain and thus precedes the development of obesity. Moreover, data illustrate key interactions between GH secretion and circulating levels of insulin and reflect the potential physiological role of GH in modulation of insulin-induced lipogenesis throughout positive energy balance.

  7. Impaired H-Reflex Gain during Postural Loaded Locomotion in Individuals Post-Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jing Nong; Brown, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Successful execution of upright locomotion requires coordinated interaction between controllers for locomotion and posture. Our earlier research supported this model in the non-impaired and found impaired interaction in the post-stroke nervous system during locomotion. In this study, we sought to examine the role of the Ia afferent spinal loop, via the H-reflex response, under postural influence during a locomotor task. We tested the hypothesis that the ability to increase stretch reflex gain in response to postural loads during locomotion would be reduced post-stroke. Methods Fifteen individuals with chronic post-stroke hemiparesis and 13 non-impaired controls pedaled on a motorized cycle ergometer with specialized backboard support system under (1) seated supported, and (2) non-seated postural-loaded conditions, generating matched pedal force outputs of two levels. H-reflexes were elicited at 90°crank angle. Results We observed increased H-reflex gain with postural influence in non-impaired individuals, but a lack of increase in individuals post-stroke. Furthermore, we observed decreased H-reflex gain at higher postural loads in the stroke-impaired group. Conclusion These findings suggest an impaired Ia afferent pathway potentially underlies the defects in the interaction between postural and locomotor control post-stroke and may explain reduced ability of paretic limb support during locomotor weight-bearing in individuals post-stroke. Significance These results support the judicious use of bodyweight support training when first helping individuals post-stroke to regain locomotor pattern generation and weight-bearing capability. PMID:26629996

  8. Control Systems Engineering for Optimizing a Prenatal Weight Gain Intervention to Regulate Infant Birth Weight

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Danielle Symons; Dong, Yuwen; Rivera, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We used dynamical systems modeling to describe how a prenatal behavioral intervention that adapts to the needs of each pregnant woman may help manage gestational weight gain and alter the obesogenic intrauterine environment to regulate infant birth weight. Methods. This approach relies on integrating mechanistic energy balance, theory of planned behavior, and self-regulation models to describe how internal processes can be impacted by intervention dosages, and reinforce positive outcomes (e.g., healthy eating and physical activity) to moderate gestational weight gain and affect birth weight. Results. A simulated hypothetical case study from MATLAB with Simulink showed how, in response to our adaptive intervention, self-regulation helps adjust perceived behavioral control. This, in turn, changes the woman’s intention and behavior with respect to healthy eating and physical activity during pregnancy, affecting gestational weight gain and infant birth weight. Conclusions. This article demonstrates the potential for real-world applications of an adaptive intervention to manage gestational weight gain and moderate infant birth weight. This model could be expanded to examine the long-term sustainable impacts of an intervention that varies according to the participant’s needs on maternal postpartum weight retention and child postnatal eating behavior. PMID:24832411

  9. Twin pregnancy: the distribution of maternal weight gain of non-smoking normal weight women.

    PubMed

    Fenton, T R; Thirsk, J E

    1994-01-01

    We documented the pattern and distribution of weight gain through twin pregnancies of healthy non-smoking women with good birth outcomes. The mean birthweight was 2621 g and the mean gestational age at delivery was 37.6 weeks. As few of the women were weighed after 34 weeks, the weight gain graph was drawn to this point. The sample was separated into subgroups based on birthweights and gender of the infants. Weight gains, parity, income, first measured weight, BMI and Apgars were not different between the subgroups. The only difference between those with infants that were small for gestational age (SGA), over 3 kg, or intermediate in weight was gestational age. For the groups divided by infant gender, the only differences were maternal age and infant birthweight. The mean, median and 80% confidence limits for weight gain at 34 weeks were 14.1, 13.6, and between 8.5 and 19.4 kg, respectively. There was a wide range of weight gained by these women carrying twin pregnancies.

  10. Ribose Accelerates Gut Motility and Suppresses Mouse Body Weight Gaining

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Li, Tong-Ruei R; Xu, Cong; Xu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity is closely related to excessive energy consumption. Clinical intervention of energy intake is an attractive strategy to fight obesity. However, the current FDA-approved weight-loss drugs all have significant side effects. Here we show that ribose upregulates gut motility and suppresses mice body weight gain. Ribokinase, which is encoded by Rbks gene, is the first enzyme for ribose metabolism in vivo. Rbks mutation resulted in ribose accumulation in the small intestine, which accelerated gut movement. Ribose oral treatment in wild type mice also enhanced bowel motility and rendered mice resistance to high fat diets. The suppressed weight gain was resulted from enhanced ingested food excretion. In addition, the effective dose of ribose didn't cause any known side effects (i.e. diarrhea and hypoglycemia). Overall, our results show that ribose can regulate gut motility and energy homeostasis in mice, and suggest that administration of ribose and its analogs could regulate gastrointestinal motility, providing a novel therapeutic approach for gastrointestinal dysfunction and weight control. PMID:27194947

  11. Small weight gains during obesity treatment: normative or cause for concern?

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Monika; Remmert, Jocelyn E.; Zhang, Fengqing; Forman, Evan M.; Butryn, Meghan L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives The objectives of the study are to characterize the frequency and size of small weight gains during behavioural weight loss treatment and to evaluate the relationship between small weight gains and weight loss outcomes. Methods Participants (n = 281) in a year‐long behavioural weight loss programme were weighed at treatment sessions, and between‐session weight gains were classified into several categories based on size. The occurrence of different gain magnitudes and their relation to weight loss were examined during both the active weight loss (months 1–6) and weight loss maintenance (months 7–12) phases of treatment. Results Weight gains were common during both phases of treatment, with smaller gains occurring more frequently than larger gains. Greater frequency of all gain magnitudes was associated with lesser weight loss during both phases. Additionally, participants who had just one or two weight gains of the smallest size examined (1.0–1.9 lb) lost less weight than those who had no gains. Conclusions Small gains appear to reflect true weight gain due to poor adherence to behavioural recommendations and are associated with worse weight loss outcomes, even when limited in number. Future research should examine how best to prevent small weight gains from occurring and how clinicians and participants should respond when a weight gain does occur to promote weight control success. PMID:28090341

  12. Metabolic impact of switching antipsychotic therapy to aripiprazole after weight gain: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun H; Ivanova, Oxana; Abbasi, Fahim A; Lamendola, Cindy A; Reaven, Gerald M; Glick, Ira D

    2007-08-01

    Switching antipsychotic regimen to agents with low weight gain potential has been suggested in patients who gain excessive weight on their antipsychotic therapy. In an open-label pilot study, we evaluated the metabolic and psychiatric efficacy of switching to aripiprazole in 15 (9 men, 6 women) outpatients with schizophrenia who had gained at least 10 kg on their previous antipsychotic regimen. Individuals had evaluation of glucose tolerance, insulin resistance (insulin suppression test), lipid concentrations, and psychiatric status before and after switching to aripiprazole for 4 months. A third of the individuals could not psychiatrically tolerate switching to aripiprazole. In the remaining individuals, psychiatric symptoms significantly improved with decline in Clinical Global Impression Scale (by 26%, P = 0.015) and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (by 22%, P = 0.023). Switching to aripiprazole did not alter weight or metabolic outcomes (fasting glucose, insulin resistance, and lipid concentrations) in the patients of whom 73% were insulin resistant and 47% had impaired or diabetic glucose tolerance at baseline. In conclusion, switching to aripiprazole alone does not ameliorate the highly prevalent metabolic abnormalities in the schizophrenia population who have gained weight on other second generation antipsychotic medications.

  13. Ramelteon attenuates age-associated hypertension and weight gain in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Oxenkrug, Gregory F; Summergrad, Paul

    2010-06-01

    The neuroendocrine theory of aging suggests the common mechanisms of developmental (prereproductive) and aging (postreproductive) processes and identified a cluster of conditions (hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, menopause, late onset depression, vascular cognitive impairment, impairment of immune defense, and some forms of cancer) as age-associated neuroendocrine disorders (AAND). Obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes were later described as metabolic syndrome (MetS). Because melatonin attenuated development of MetS is age-dependent, that is, in young and old, but not in middle-aged rats, we studied the effect of the selective melatonin agonist, Ramelteon, on the two core symptoms of MetS/AAND: hypertension and body weight gain in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto male rats (WKY). SHR rats developed hypertension at the time of maximal weight gain that coincided with the onset of reproductive activity (8-10 weeks old). Chronic (but not acute) administration of Ramelteon (in drinking water, 8 mg/kg/day, from 4 to 12 weeks of age) attenuated age-associated increase of systolic blood pressure (tail-cuff method) by 45%, and age-associated body weight gain by 30%. Acute and chronic Ramelteon did not affect blood pressure and body weight in normotensive WKY rats. Ramelteon-induced attenuation of age-associated hypertension and weight gain suggests that Ramelteon might attenuate the other symptoms of MetS/AAND and might be useful in the treatment of MetS/AAND during puberty, menopause, and old age.

  14. Impact of Pregestational Weight and Weight Gain during Pregnancy on Long-Term Risk for Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of maternal BMI at start of pregnancy and maternal weight gain during pregnancy on the risk of various diseases later in life. Methods In a population-based cohort from southern Sweden, women with at least one delivery registered in the Swedish Medical Birth Register ten or more years before answering a health questionnaire were identified (n = 13,608). Complete data were found in 3,539 women. Results Women with BMI >25 at start of pregnancy had increased risk of developing obesity (OR 21.9), diabetes (OR 6.4), cardiac disease (OR 2.7), endocrine diseases (OR 2.3), and other morbidity (OR 1.4), compared with women of normal weight. A high weight gain (>15 kg) during pregnancy was associated to later risk of overweight (OR 2.0) and obesity (OR 2.2), but not diabetes, cardiac disease, or endocrine diseases. A positive association was found between low weight gain and the risk of developing psychiatric disorders (OR 1.6). Conclusions A high BMI at start of pregnancy significantly increased the risk of several diseases later in life. However, a high weight gain during pregnancy was only significant for future overweight and obesity. These findings have implications for both pregestational intervention and post gestational follow up of obese and overweight women. PMID:28045917

  15. Npc1 haploinsufficiency promotes weight gain and metabolic features associated with insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Jelinek, David; Millward, Veronica; Birdi, Amandip; Trouard, Theodore P; Heidenreich, Randall A; Garver, William S

    2011-01-15

    A recent population-based genome-wide association study has revealed that the Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) gene is associated with early-onset and morbid adult obesity. Concurrently, our candidate gene-based mouse growth study performed using the BALB/cJ NPC1 mouse model (Npc1) with decreased Npc1 gene dosage independently supported these results by suggesting an Npc1 gene-diet interaction in relation to early-onset weight gain. To further investigate the Npc1 gene in relation to weight gain and metabolic features associated with insulin resistance, we interbred BALB/cJ Npc1(+/-) mice with wild-type C57BL/6J mice, the latter mouse strain commonly used to study aspects of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. This breeding produced a hybrid (BALB/cJ-C57BL/6J) Npc1(+/-) mouse model with increased susceptibility to weight gain and insulin resistance. The results from our study indicated that these Npc1(+/-) mice were susceptible to increased weight gain characterized by increased whole body and abdominal adiposity, adipocyte hypertrophy and hepatic steatosis in the absence of hyperphagia. Moreover, these Npc1(+/-) mice developed abnormal metabolic features characterized by impaired fasting glucose, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, hyperleptinemia and dyslipidemia marked by an increased concentration of cholesterol and triacylglycerol associated with low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein. The overall results are consistent with a unique Npc1 gene-diet interaction that promotes both weight gain and metabolic features associated with insulin resistance. Therefore, the NPC1 gene now represents a previously unrecognized gene involved in maintaining energy and metabolic homeostasis that will contribute to our understanding concerning the current global epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  16. Sociocultural influences on strategies to lose weight, gain weight, and increase muscles among ten cultural groups.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Marita P; Busija, Lucy; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew; Ricciardelli, Lina; Mellor, David; Mussap, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This study determined how sociocultural messages to change one's body are perceived by adolescents from different cultural groups. In total, 4904 adolescents, including Australian, Chilean, Chinese, Indo-Fijian, Indigenous Fijian, Greek, Malaysian, Chinese Malaysian, Tongans in New Zealand, and Tongans in Tonga, were surveyed about messages from family, peers, and the media to lose weight, gain weight, and increase muscles. Groups were best differentiated by family pressure to gain weight. Girls were more likely to receive the messages from multiple sociocultural sources whereas boys were more likely to receive the messages from the family. Some participants in a cultural group indicated higher, and others lower, levels of these sociocultural messages. These findings highlight the differences in sociocultural messages across cultural groups, but also that adolescents receive contrasting messages within a cultural group. These results demonstrate the difficulty in representing a particular message as being characteristic of each cultural group.

  17. Weight gain in pregnancy: is less truly more for mother and infant?

    PubMed Central

    Barbour, Linda A

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Although more than 50% of women gain weight above the Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines for weight gain in pregnancy and excessive weight gain is an independent risk factor for significant maternal and neonatal morbidity and offspring obesity, there is little consensus over the ideal weight gain during pregnancy. Surprisingly, the 2009 IOM guidelines varied minimally from the 1990 IOM guidelines, and many critics advocate lower weight gain recommendations. This review explores the energy costs of pregnancy, the relationship between gestational weight gain and birth weight, and considers what gestational weight gain minimizes both large-for-gestational age as well as small-for-gestational age infants. An extensive examination of the current data leads this author to question whether the current weight gain recommendations are too liberal, especially for obese pregnant women. PMID:27579137

  18. Gestational weight gain and offspring longitudinal growth in early life

    PubMed Central

    Diesel, Jill C.; Eckhardt, Cara L.; Day, Nancy L.; Brooks, Maria M.; Arslanian, Silva A.; Bodnar, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) increases the risk of childhood obesity, but little is known about its association with infant growth patterns. Aim To examine the GWG-infant growth association. Methods Pregnant women (n=743) self-reported GWG at delivery, which we classified as inadequate, adequate, or excessive based on current guidelines. Offspring weight-for-age z-scores (WAZ), length-for-age z-scores (LAZ (with height-for-age (HAZ) in place of length at 36 months)), and body mass index z-scores (BMIZ) were calculated at birth, 8, 18, and 36 months using the 2006 WHO growth standards. Linear mixed models estimated the change in z-scores from birth to 36 months by GWG. Results The mean (SD) WAZ was −0.22 (1.20) at birth. Overall, WAZ and BMIZ increased from birth to approximately 24 months and decreased from 24 to 36 months, while LAZ/HAZ decreased from birth through 36 months. Excessive GWG was associated with higher offspring WAZ and BMIZ at birth, 8, and 36 months, and higher HAZ at 36 months, compared with adequate GWG. Compared with the same referent, inadequate GWG was associated with smaller WAZ and BMIZ at birth and 8 months. Conclusion Excessive GWG may predispose infants to obesogenic growth patterns while inadequate GWG may not have a lasting impact on infant growth. PMID:26279171

  19. Gestational Weight Gain in Japanese Women With Favorable Perinatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shunji

    2017-01-01

    Background We examined the optimal gestational weight gain (GWG) in the healthy Japanese women with favorable perinatal outcomes of singleton pregnancy. Methods We calculated the average GWG in the women whose height was 150 - 164 cm with favorable perinatal outcomes set for this study. The women were categorized to underweight, normal, overweight and obese based on the pre-pregnancy body mass index categories according to the Institute of Medicine guideline. Results The average GWG in the normal-weight women with the favorable perinatal outcomes was 11.4 ± 3.7 kg. It was not significantly different from that in the underweight and overweight women (12.0 ± 3.4 and 10.0 ± 4.8 kg) by Student’s t-test. The average GWG in the obese women was significantly lower than that in the other three groups (3.2 ± 2.2 kg, P < 0.01). Conclusion Based on the current results, the optimal GWG for the Japanese women without obesity was found to be 10 - 12 kg. PMID:27924177

  20. Peer effects, fast food consumption and adolescent weight gain.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Bernard; Yazbeck, Myra

    2015-07-01

    This paper aims at opening the black box of peer effects in adolescent weight gain. Using Add Health data on secondary schools in the U.S., we investigate whether these effects partly flow through the eating habits channel. Adolescents are assumed to interact through a friendship social network. We propose a two-equation model. The first equation provides a social interaction model of fast food consumption. To estimate this equation we use a quasi maximum likelihood approach that allows us to control for common environment at the network level and to solve the simultaneity (reflection) problem. Our second equation is a panel dynamic weight production function relating an individual's Body Mass Index z-score (zBMI) to his fast food consumption and his lagged zBMI, and allowing for irregular intervals in the data. Results show that there are positive but small peer effects in fast food consumption among adolescents belonging to a same friendship school network. Based on our preferred specification, the estimated social multiplier is 1.15. Our results also suggest that, in the long run, an extra day of weekly fast food restaurant visits increases zBMI by 4.45% when ignoring peer effects and by 5.11%, when they are taken into account.

  1. Effects of pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on neonatal birth weight* #

    PubMed Central

    Du, Meng-kai; Ge, Li-ya; Zhou, Meng-lin; Ying, Jun; Qu, Fan; Dong, Min-yue; Chen, Dan-qing

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (pre-BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) on neonatal birth weight (NBW) in the population of Chinese healthy pregnant women, attempting to guide weight control in pregnancy. A retrospective cohort study of 3772 Chinese women was conducted. The population was stratified by maternal pre-BMI categories as underweight (<18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (18.5–23.9 kg/m2), overweight (24.0–27.9 kg/m2), and obesity (≥28.0 kg/m2). The NBW differences were tested among the four groups, and then deeper associations among maternal pre-BMI, GWG, and NBW were investigated by multivariate analysis. NBW increased significantly with the increase of maternal pre-BMI level (P<0.05), except overweight to obesity (P>0.05). The multivariate analysis showed that both pre-BMI and GWG were positively correlated with NBW (P<0.05). Compared with normal pre-BMI, underweight predicted an increased odds ratio of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) and decreased odds ratio for macrosomia and large-for-gestational-age (LGA), and the results were opposite for overweight. With the increase of GWG, the risk of SGA decreased and the risks of macrosomia and LGA increased. In addition, in different pre-BMI categories, the effects of weight gain in the first trimester on NBW were different (P<0.05). NBW is positively affected by both maternal pre-BMI and GWG, extreme pre-BMI and GWG are both associated with increased risks of abnormal birth weight, and maternal pre-BMI may modify the effect of weight gain in each trimester on NBW. A valid GWG guideline for Chinese women is an urgent requirement, whereas existing recommendations seem to be not very suitable for the Chinese. PMID:28271662

  2. Maternal weight gain, smoking and other factors in pregnancy as predictors of infant birth-weight in Sydney women.

    PubMed

    Ash, S; Fisher, C C; Truswell, A S; Allen, J R; Irwig, L

    1989-08-01

    Two hundred and four (204) women attending a Sydney maternity hospital and their babies were followed throughout pregnancy in a study, which aimed: 1) to describe the distribution of maternal weight gain in present day Australian women and 2) to determine the effect of weight gain and other factors on birth-weight. Maternal weights and skinfold thicknesses were measured serially to give an indication of weight gain. Mean weight gain from conception to term was 14.2kg and mean birth-weight was 3,442g. Maternal predictors of birth-weight such as maternal weight gain, parity, age, education, height, public or private booking status, smoking, prepregnancy weight, and sex of the infant and gestational age were explored using simple and multiple regression analysis. Weight gain was predictive of birth-weight, each kg increase in total weight gain resulting in about a 30g increase in birthweight. Other strong predictors were gestational age, maternal smoking, sex of the infant and maternal parity. Maternal height was less strongly predictive and age and prepregnant weight were not predictive. Smoking mothers had infants who were 268g lighter than those of nonsmoking mothers. However, smokers were also younger, shorter, had less education and were more likely to book as public patients than nonsmokers. After adjusting for all other predictors, the birth-weight of infants whose mothers smoked, was still 224g less than that for nonsmoking mothers.

  3. Pattern and Determinants of Gestational Weight Gain an Important Predictor of Infant Birth Weight in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Esimai, Olapeju Adefunke; Ojofeitimi, Ebenezer

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to determine correlates of gestational weight gain and infant birth weight of pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in public primary health care facilities in lfe Central and East Local Government Areas of Osun State, Nigeria. Over 1000 women were recruited during booking and antenatal clinic and followed up till delivery. Chi square was used in the bivariate analysis of association between gestational weight gain, pre pregnancy BMI and demographic characteristics. The correlates of gestational weight gain and infant birth weight were determined by linear regression analysis. Eight percent are underweight, 10.3% are overweight or obese, 78% had a weight gain less than 7kg and 0.5% had a weight gain above 11.5kg. Ninety seven percent gained less than recommended weight, only 3% of the women gained the recommended weight for their pre pregnant BMI mostly the obese women. Twenty eight percent of the women had infant weight within normal (2.5kg and above). The infant weight increases with the gestational age, maternal age and parity but decreases with gestational weight gain though not significant. Maternal age and parity were significant predictors of gestational weight gain and pre pregnancy BMI was a significant predictor of infant birth weight. The gestational weight gain and infant weight reduces as the pre pregnant BMI increases. Most of the women had low birth weight babies. There is a need to educate mothers on good weight before conception in order to improve birth outcome in view of other factors not looked into in the present study. PMID:24999149

  4. [Unexplained weight gain in a 41-year-old woman].

    PubMed

    Harsch, I A; Hahn, E G

    2010-03-01

    A 41-year-old female was admitted to our clinic due to weight gain and facial edema. The patient also reported hair loss, amenorrhea and the formation of striae. The laboratory diagnostics ensured the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome. Unfortunately, the patient was among the 5-10% of patients in whom neither laboratory testing nor imaging revealed the source of the cortisol excess. Due to the dramatic decrease of her general condition, and the appearance of hypertension and diabetes mellitus we chose to refer the patient to bilateral minimally invasive adrenalectomy. The advantage of this therapeutic approach is, that it is a definitive treatment that provides immediate control of hypercortisolism. As disadvantage, the resultant permanent hypoadrenalism requires a lifelong glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy. Furthermore, given that the problem was caused by occult pituitary microadenoma, Nelson's syndrome has to be considered. As only one adrenal could be excised due to technical reasons, the underlying pathology is thus not solved. In spite of this, the patient's general condition improved dramatically without need for replacement therapy. As the mortality of patients with persistent moderate hypercortisolism is increased 3,8- to 5 fold, mainly due to cardiovascular reasons, thorough surveillance for signs of recurrence is mandatory to be ready for quick intervention.

  5. Thirst distress and interdialytic weight gain: how do they relate?

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sheena; Locking-Cusolito, Heather

    2004-01-01

    Thirst is a frequent and stressful symptom experienced by hemodialysis patients. Several studies have noted a positive relationship between thirst and interdialytic weight gain (IDWG). These factors prompted us to consider ways that we could intervene to reduce thirst and IDWG through an educative, supportive nursing intervention. This paper presents the results of a pilot research project, the purpose of which was to: examine the relationship between thirst distress (the negative symptoms associated with thirst) and IDWG in a sample of our patients, describe patients' strategies for management of thirst, and establish the necessary sample size for the planned intervention study. The pilot research project results showed that in a small sample of 20, there was a mildly positive, though not statistically significant, correlation between thirst distress and IDWG (r = 0.117). Subjects shared a wide variety of thirst management strategies including: limiting salt intake, using ice chips, measuring daily allotment, performing mouth care, eating raw fruits and vegetables, sucking on hard candy and chewing gum. This pilot research project showed that given an alpha of 0.05 and a power of 80%, we will require a sample of 39 subjects to detect a 20% change in IDWG. We will employ these results to plan our intervention study, first by establishing the appropriate sample size and second by incorporating identified patient strategies into an educational pamphlet that will form the basis of our intervention.

  6. Consuming fire ants reduces northern bobwhite survival and weight gain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, P.E.; Allen, Craig R.; Birge, Hannah E.

    2014-01-01

    Northern bobwhite quail, Colinus virginianus (L.) (Galliformes: Odontophoridae), population declines are well documented, but pinpointing the reasons for these decreases has proven elusive. Bobwhite population declines are attributed primarily to loss of habitat and land use changes. This, however, does not entirely explain population declines in areas intensively managed for bobwhites. Although previous research demonstrates the negative impact of red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta Buren) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) on northern bobwhites, the mechanisms underlying this effect are largely unknown. To meet the protein demands of early growth and development, bobwhite chicks predominantly consume small insects, of which ants are a substantial proportion. Fire ants alter ant community dynamics by often reducing native ant diversity and abundance while concurrently increasing the abundance of individuals. Fire ants have negative effects on chicks, but they are also a large potential protein source, making it difficult to disentangle their net effect on bobwhite chicks. To help investigate these effects, we conducted a laboratory experiment to understand (1) whether or not bobwhites consume fire ants, and (2) how the benefits of this consumption compare to the deleterious impacts of bobwhite chick exposure to fire ants. Sixty bobwhite chicks were separated into two groups of 30; one group was provided with starter feed only and the second group was provided with feed and fire ants. Bobwhite chicks were observed feeding on fire ants. Chicks that fed on fire ants had reduced survival and weight gain. Our results show that, while fire ants increase potential food sources for northern bobwhite, their net effect on bobwhite chicks is deleterious. This information will help inform land managers and commercial bobwhite rearing operations.

  7. Almost All Antipsychotics Result in Weight Gain: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Maarten; Fransen, Annemarie; Janssen, Jouke; van Os, Jim; Drukker, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Antipsychotics (AP) induce weight gain. However, reviews and meta-analyses generally are restricted to second generation antipsychotics (SGA) and do not stratify for duration of AP use. It is hypothesised that patients gain more weight if duration of AP use is longer. Method A meta-analysis was conducted of clinical trials of AP that reported weight change. Outcome measures were body weight change, change in BMI and clinically relevant weight change (7% weight gain or loss). Duration of AP-use was stratified as follows: ≤6 weeks, 6–16 weeks, 16–38 weeks and >38 weeks. Forest plots stratified by AP as well as by duration of use were generated and results were summarised in figures. Results 307 articles met inclusion criteria. The majority were AP switch studies. Almost all AP showed a degree of weight gain after prolonged use, except for amisulpride, aripiprazole and ziprasidone, for which prolonged exposure resulted in negligible weight change. The level of weight gain per AP varied from discrete to severe. Contrary to expectations, switch of AP did not result in weight loss for amisulpride, aripiprazole or ziprasidone. In AP-naive patients, weight gain was much more pronounced for all AP. Conclusion Given prolonged exposure, virtually all AP are associated with weight gain. The rational of switching AP to achieve weight reduction may be overrated. In AP-naive patients, weight gain is more pronounced. PMID:24763306

  8. Chronic clozapine treatment in female rats does not induce weight gain or metabolic abnormalities but enhances adiposity: implications for animal models of antipsychotic-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Cooper, G D; Harrold, J A; Halford, J C G; Goudie, A J

    2008-02-15

    The ability of clozapine to induce weight gain in female rats was investigated in three studies with progressively lowered doses of clozapine. In an initial preliminary high dose study, clozapine at 6 and 12 mg/kg (i.p., b.i.d.) was found to induce weight loss. In a subsequent intermediate dose study, we obtained no evidence for clozapine-induced weight gain despite using identical procedures and doses of clozapine (1-4 mg/kg, i.p., b.i.d.) with which we have observed olanzapine-induced weight gain, hyperphagia, enhanced adiposity and metabolic changes [Cooper G, Pickavance L, Wilding J, Halford J, Goudie A (2005). A parametric analysis of olanzapine-induced weight gain in female rats. Psychopharmacology; 181: 80-89.]. Instead, clozapine induced weight loss without alteration in food intake and muscle mass or changes in levels of glucose, insulin, leptin and prolactin. However, these intermediate doses of clozapine enhanced visceral adiposity and elevated levels of adiponectin. In a final study, low doses of clozapine (0.25-0.5 mg/kg, i.p, b.i.d.) induced weight loss. These data demonstrate that clozapine-induced weight gain can be much more difficult to observe in female rats than olanzapine-induced weight gain. Moreover, these findings contrast with clinical findings with clozapine, which induces substantial weight gain in humans. Clozapine-induced enhanced adiposity appears to be easier to observe in rats than weight gain. These findings, along with other preclinical studies, suggest that enhanced adiposity can be observed in the absence of antipsychotic-induced weight gain and hyperphagia, possibly reflecting a direct drug effect on adipocyte function independent of drug-induced hyperphagia [e.g. Minet-Ringuet J, Even P, Valet P, Carpene C, Visentin V, Prevot D, Daviaud D, Quignard-Boulange A, Tome D, de Beaurepaire R (2007). Alterations of lipid metabolism and gene expression in rat adipocytes during chronic olanzapine treatment. Molecular Psychiatry; 12: 562

  9. Aspects of eating behaviors disinhibition and restraint are related to weight gain and BMI in women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: The causes of adult weight gain leading to obesity are uncertain. We examined the association of adult weight gain and obesity with subscales of eating behavior characteristics in older women. Research Methods and Procedures: Current height and weight, eating behavior subscales (Disinh...

  10. Dietary energy density but not glycemic load is associated with gestational weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Deierlein, Andrea L.; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Herring, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Background The majority of pregnant women are gaining outside of the recommended weight gain ranges. Excessive weight gains have been linked to pregnancy complications and long term maternal and child health outcomes. Objective To examine the impact of dietary glycemic load and energy density on total gestational weight gain and weight gain ratio (observed weight gain/expected weight gain). Design Data are from 1231 women with singleton pregnancies who participated in the Pregnancy, Infection, and Nutrition Cohort Study. Dietary information was collected at 26–29 weeks gestation using a semi-quantified food frequency questionnaire. Linear regression models were used to estimate the associations between glycemic load (in quartiles) and energy density (in quartiles) with total gestational weight gain and weight gain ratio. Results Dietary patterns of pregnant women significantly differed across many sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics, with the greatest contrasts seen for glycemic load. After adjustment for covariates, in comparison to women in the first quartile, consuming a mean dietary energy density of 0.77 kcal/g (reference), women in the second quartile, consuming a mean energy density of 0.95 kcal/g, gained an excess of 0.91 kg (95% CI: 0.02–1.79) and women in the third quartile, consuming a mean energy density of 1.09 kcal/g, gained an excess of 1.47 kg (95% CI: 0.58–2.36). All other comparisons of energy intakes were not statistically significant. Glycemic load was not associated with total gestational weight gain or weight gain ratio. Conclusions Dietary energy density is a modifiable factor that may assist pregnant women in managing gestational weight gains. PMID:18779285

  11. Pharmacological management of atypical antipsychotic-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Trino; ElFakih, Yamily; Uzcátegui, Euderruh; Sandia, Ignacio; Tálamo, Eduardo; Araujo de Baptista, Enma; Beaulieu, Serge

    2008-01-01

    Excessive bodyweight gain was reported during the 1950s as an adverse effect of typical antipsychotic drug treatment, but the magnitude of bodyweight gain was found to be higher with the atypical antipsychotic drugs that were introduced after 1990. Clozapine and olanzapine produce the greatest bodyweight gain, ziprasidone and aripiprazole have a neutral influence, and quetiapine and risperidone cause an intermediate effect. In the CATIE study, the percentage of patients with bodyweight gain of >7% compared with baseline differed significantly between the antipsychotic drugs, i.e. 30%, 16%, 14%, 12% and 7% for olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, perphenazine (a typical antipsychotic) and ziprasidone, respectively (p<0.001). Appetite stimulation is probably a key cause of bodyweight gain, but genetic polymorphisms modify the bodyweight response during treatment with atypical antipsychotics. In addition to nutritional advice, programmed physical activity, cognitive-behavioural training and atypical antipsychotic switching, pharmacological adjunctive treatments have been assessed to counteract excessive bodyweight gain. In some clinical trials, nizatidine, amantadine, reboxetine, topiramate, sibutramine and metformin proved effective in preventing or reversing atypical antipsychotic-induced bodyweight gain; however, the results are inconclusive since few randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials have been conducted. Indeed, most studies were short-term trials without adequate statistical power and, in the case of metformin, nizatidine and sibutramine, the results are contradictory. The tolerability profile of these agents is adequate. More studies are needed before formal recommendations on the use of these drugs can be made. Meanwhile, clinicians are advised to use any of these adjunctive treatments according to their individual pharmacological and tolerability profiles, and the patient's personal and family history of bodyweight gain and metabolic dysfunction.

  12. Weighted Genetic Risk Scores and Prediction of Weight Gain in Solid Organ Transplant Populations

    PubMed Central

    Saigi-Morgui, Núria; Quteineh, Lina; Bochud, Pierre-Yves; Crettol, Severine; Kutalik, Zoltán; Wojtowicz, Agnieszka; Bibert, Stéphanie; Beckmann, Sonja; Mueller, Nicolas J; Binet, Isabelle; van Delden, Christian; Steiger, Jürg; Mohacsi, Paul; Stirnimann, Guido; Soccal, Paola M.; Pascual, Manuel; Eap, Chin B

    2016-01-01

    Background Polygenic obesity in Solid Organ Transplant (SOT) populations is considered a risk factor for the development of metabolic abnormalities and graft survival. Few studies to date have studied the genetics of weight gain in SOT recipients. We aimed to determine whether weighted genetic risk scores (w-GRS) integrating genetic polymorphisms from GWAS studies (SNP group#1 and SNP group#2) and from Candidate Gene studies (SNP group#3) influence BMI in SOT populations and if they predict ≥10% weight gain (WG) one year after transplantation. To do so, two samples (nA = 995, nB = 156) were obtained from naturalistic studies and three w-GRS were constructed and tested for association with BMI over time. Prediction of 10% WG at one year after transplantation was assessed with models containing genetic and clinical factors. Results w-GRS were associated with BMI in sample A and B combined (BMI increased by 0.14 and 0.11 units per additional risk allele in SNP group#1 and #2, respectively, p-values<0.008). w-GRS of SNP group#3 showed an effect of 0.01 kg/m2 per additional risk allele when combining sample A and B (p-value 0.04). Models with genetic factors performed better than models without in predicting 10% WG at one year after transplantation. Conclusions This is the first study in SOT evaluating extensively the association of w-GRS with BMI and the influence of clinical and genetic factors on 10% of WG one year after transplantation, showing the importance of integrating genetic factors in the final model. Genetics of obesity among SOT recipients remains an important issue and can contribute to treatment personalization and prediction of WG after transplantation. PMID:27788139

  13. Weight gain after quitting smoking: What to do

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a habit. After you quit, you may crave high-calorie foods to replace cigarettes. What You ... at greater risk of putting on extra weight. Control your drinking. Alcohol, sugary sodas, and sweetened juices ...

  14. Investigating College Learning Gain: Exploring a Propensity Score Weighting Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ou Lydia; Liu, Huili; Roohr, Katrina Crotts; McCaffrey, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Learning outcomes assessment has been widely used by higher education institutions both nationally and internationally. One of its popular uses is to document learning gains of students. Prior studies have recognized the potential imbalance between freshmen and seniors in terms of their background characteristics and their prior academic…

  15. Sweetening yoghurt with glucose, but not with saccharin, promotes weight gain and increased fat pad mass in rats.

    PubMed

    Boakes, Robert A; Kendig, Michael D; Martire, Sarah I; Rooney, Kieron B

    2016-10-01

    The claim that non-nutritive sweeteners accelerate body weight gain by disrupting sweet-calorie associations was tested in two experiments using rats. The experiments were modelled on a key study from a series of experiments reporting greater body weight gain in rats fed yoghurt sweetened with saccharin than with glucose (Swithers & Davidson, 2008). Both of the current experiments likewise compared groups fed saccharin- or glucose-sweetened yoghurt in addition to chow and water, while Experiment 1 included a third group (Control) given unsweetened yoghurt. In Experiment 1, but not in Experiment 2, rats were initially exposed to both saccharin- and glucose-sweetened yoghurts to assess their relative palatability. We also tested whether the provision of an energy-dense sweet biscuit would augment any effects of saccharin on food intake and weight gain, as seemingly predicted by Swithers and Davidson (2008). In Experiment 1 there were no differences in body weight gain or fat pad mass between the Saccharin and Control group, whereas the Glucose group was the heaviest by the final 5 weeks and at cull had the largest fat pads. Greater acceptance of saccharin predicted more weight gain over the whole experiment. Consistent with past reports, fasting blood glucose and insulin measures did not differ between the Saccharin and Control groups, but suggested some impairment of insulin sensitivity in the Glucose group. Experiment 2 found similar effects of glucose on fat mass, but not on body weight gain. In summary, adding saccharin had no detectable effects on body-weight regulation, whereas the effects of glucose on fat pad mass were consistent with previous studies reporting more harmful effects of sugars compared to non-nutritive sweeteners.

  16. Gaining Efficiency via Weighted Estimators for Multivariate Failure Time Data*

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianqing; Zhou, Yong; Cai, Jianwen; Chen, Min

    2009-06-01

    Multivariate failure time data arise frequently in survival analysis. A commonly used technique is the working independence estimator for marginal hazard models. Two natural questions are how to improve the efficiency of the working independence estimator and how to identify the situations under which such an estimator has high statistical efficiency. In this paper, three weighted estimators are proposed based on three different optimal criteria in terms of the asymptotic covariance of weighted estimators. Simplified close-form solutions are found, which always outperform the working independence estimator. We also prove that the working independence estimator has high statistical efficiency, when asymptotic covariance of derivatives of partial log-likelihood functions is nearly exchangeable or diagonal. Simulations are conducted to compare the performance of the weighted estimator and working independence estimator. A data set from Busselton population health surveys is analyzed using the proposed estimators.

  17. Predictors of Gestational Weight Gain among White and Latina Women and Associations with Birth Weight

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Monica L.; Bodenlos, Jamie S.; Sankey, Heather Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined racial/ethnic differences in gestational weight gain (GWG) predictors and association of first-trimester GWG to overall GWG among 271 White women and 300 Latina women. Rates of within-guideline GWG were higher among Latinas than among Whites (28.7% versus 24.4%, p < 0.016). Adjusted odds of above-guideline GWG were higher among prepregnancy overweight (OR = 3.4, CI = 1.8–6.5) and obese (OR = 4.5, CI = 2.3–9.0) women than among healthy weight women and among women with above-guideline first-trimester GWG than among those with within-guideline first-trimester GWG (OR = 4.9, CI = 2.8–8.8). GWG was positively associated with neonate birth size (p < 0.001). Interventions targeting prepregnancy overweight or obese women and those with excessive first-trimester GWG are needed. PMID:27688913

  18. Improving gestational weight gain counseling through meaningful use of an electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Sara M; Anderson, Cynthie K

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of an intervention to improve the consistency and accuracy of antenatal gestational weight gain counseling through introduction of a "best practice alert" into an electronic medical record (EMR) system. A best practice alert was designed and implemented in the EMR. Based on each patient's pre-gravid body mass index (BMI), fetal number, and 2009 Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines, the alert provides an individualized total gestational weight gain goal, the weight gain goal per week of gestation, a template for scripted provider counseling and documentation, and a patient handout containing personalized gestational weight gain information. Retrospective chart reviews of 388 pre-intervention patients and 345 post-intervention patients were used to evaluate effectiveness. Introduction of a gestational weight gain best practice alert into the EMR improved the rate of antenatal gestational weight gain counseling that was consistent with current IOM guidelines (p < 0.001). Improvement in IOM-consistent gestational weight gain counseling was seen across all provider types, including obstetricians, family practice physicians, and certified nurse midwives. The intervention also resulted in significant improvement in documentation of pre-gravid weights and BMIs within the EMR. The EMR is an effective tool for improving the consistency and accuracy of antenatal gestational weight gain counseling in accord with 2009 IOM guidelines.

  19. Association of Second and Third Trimester Weight Gain in Pregnancy with Maternal and Fetal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Drehmer, Michele; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow; Kac, Gilberto; Schmidt, Maria Inês

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between weekly weight gain, during the second and third trimesters, classified according to the 2009 Institute of Medicine (IOM/NRC) recommendations, and maternal and fetal outcomes. Methods Gestational weight gain was evaluated in 2,244 pregnant women of the Brazilian Study of Gestational Diabetes (Estudo Brasileiro do Diabetes Gestacional – EBDG). Outcomes were cesarean delivery, preterm birth and small or large for gestational age birth (SGA, LGA). Associations between inadequate weight gain and outcomes were estimated using robust Poisson regression adjusting for pre-pregnancy body mass index, trimester-specific weight gain, age, height, skin color, parity, education, smoking, alcohol consumption, gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. Results In fully adjusted models, in the second trimester, insufficient weight gain was associated with SGA (relative risk [RR] 1.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.26–2.33), and excessive weight gain with LGA (RR 1.64, 95% CI 1.16–2.31); in third trimester, excessive weight gain with preterm birth (RR 1.70, 95% CI 1.08–2.70) and cesarean delivery (RR 1.21, 95% CI 1.03–1.44). Women with less than recommended gestational weight gain in the 2nd trimester had a lesser risk of cesarean deliveries (RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.71–0.96) than women with adequate gestational weight gain in this trimester. Conclusion Though insufficient weight gain in the 3rd trimester was not associated with adverse outcomes, other deviations from recommended weight gain during second and third trimester were associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. These findings support, in part, the 2009 IOM/NRC recommendations for nutritional monitoring during pregnancy. PMID:23382944

  20. Characteristics of women age 15-24 at risk for excess weight gain during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tammy; Moniz, Michelle H.; Plegue, Melissa A.; Richardson, Caroline R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Excess weight gain during pregnancy is a serious health concern among young pregnant women in the US. This study aimed to characterize young women at highest risk for gaining over the recommended amount of weight during pregnancy. Methods Using a database that is representative of births in large U.S. cities, The Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, we identified mothers of singleton term-infants age 15–24 years at the time of delivery. Institute of Medicine guidelines were used to categorize each mother’s weight gain as less than, within, or more than recommended during pregnancy. Multinomial logistic regression models for weight gain category were performed, controlling for age, race/ethnicity, federal poverty level (FPL), health status, and prepregnancy BMI. Results Among the weighted sample (n = 1,034, N = 181,375), the mean (SD) age was 21 (3) years, 32% were black, 39% were Hispanic, 44% reported income under the Federal Poverty Level, 45% were overweight or obese before pregnancy, and 55% gained more weight than recommended during pregnancy. Women who were overweight or obese before pregnancy were at increased risk for gaining more pregnancy weight than recommended, compared to normal-weight women (adjusted Relative Risk Ratio (RRR) = 3.82, p = 0.01; RRR = 3.27, p = 0.03, respectively). Hispanics were less likely than non-Hispanics to gain more weight than recommended (RRR = 0.39, p = 0.03). Conclusions The majority of mothers ages 15–24 gained excess weight during pregnancy, a strong risk factor for later obesity. Prepregnancy overweight or obesity and non-Hispanic ethnicity predicted excess pregnancy weight gain. Interventions and policies should target these high-risk young women to prevent excess weight gain. PMID:28291802

  1. Assessing Weight Gain by the 2009 Institute of Medicine Guidelines and Perinatal Outcomes in Twin Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Tulin; Bacak, Stephen J; Zozzaro-Smith, Paula; Li, Dongmei; Sagcan, Seyhan; Seligman, Neil; Glantz, Christopher J

    2016-07-23

    Objective The objective is to estimate the impact of maternal weight gain outside the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on perinatal outcomes in twin pregnancies. Study Design Twin pregnancies with two live births between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2014 delivered after 23 weeks Finger Lakes Region Perinatal Data System (FLRPDS) and Central New York Region Perinatal Data System were included. Women were classified into three groups using pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI). Perinatal outcomes in women with low or excessive weekly maternal weight gain were assessed using normal weekly weight gain as the referent in each BMI group. Results Low weight gain increased the risk of preterm delivery, birth weight less than the 10th percentile for one or both twins and decreased risk of macrosomia across all BMI groups. There was a decreased risk of hypertensive disorders in women with normal pre-pregnancy weight and an increased risk of gestational diabetes with low weight gain in obese women. Excessive weight gain increased the risk of hypertensive disorders and macrosomia across all BMI groups and decreased the risk of birth weight less than 10th percentile one twin in normal pre-pregnancy BMI group. Conclusion Among twin pregnancies, low weight gain is associated with low birth weight and preterm delivery in all BMI groups and increased risk of gestational diabetes in obese women. Our study did not reveal any benefit from excessive weekly weight gain with potential harm of an increase in risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Normal weight gain per 2009 IOM guidelines should be encouraged to improve pregnancy outcome in all pre-pregnancy BMI groups.

  2. The "Freshman 5": A Meta-Analysis of Weight Gain in the Freshman Year of College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vella-Zarb, Rachel A.; Elgar, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: (1) To use the available research to estimate the amount of weight gained by college freshman during their first year of college. (2) To identify potential predictors of freshman weight gain. Methods: A meta-analysis was conducted in November 2008. The analysis focused on articles published in English scientific journals between 1985…

  3. Hormonal Correlates of Clozapine-Induced Weight Gain in Psychotic Children: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sporn, Alexandra L.; Bobb, Aaron J.; Gogtay, Nitin; Stevens, Hanna; Greenstein, Deanna K.; Clasen, Liv S.; Tossell, Julia W.; Nugent, Thomas; Gochman, Peter A.; Sharp, Wendy S.; Mattai, Anand; Lenane, Marge C.; Yanovski, Jack A.; Rapoport, Judith L.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Weight gain is a serious side effect of atypical antipsychotics, especially in childhood. In this study, the authors examined six weight gain-related hormones in patients with childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS) after 6 weeks of clozapine treatment. Method: Fasting serum samples for 24 patients with COS and 21 matched healthy controls…

  4. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Inadequate Gestational Weight Gain Differ by Pre-pregnancy Weight

    PubMed Central

    Headen, Irene; Mujahid, Mahasin S.; Cohen, Alison K.; Rehkopf, David H.; Abrams, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) varies by race/ethnicity and modifies the association between gestational weight gain (GWG) and adverse pregnancy outcomes, which disproportionately affect racial/ethnic minorities. Yet studies investigating whether racial/ethnic disparities in GWG vary by pre-pregnancy BMI are inconsistent, and none studied nationally representative populations. Methods Using categorical measures of GWG adequacy based on Institute of Medicine recommendations, we investigated whether associations between race/ethnicity and GWG adequacy were modified by pre-pregnancy BMI [underweight (<18.5kg/m2), normal weight (18.5-24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25.0-29.9 kg/m2), or obese (≥30.0 kg/m2) ] among all births to Black, Hispanic, and White mothers in the 1979 USA National Longitudinal Survey of Youth cohort (n=6849 pregnancies; range=1-10). We used generalized estimating equations, adjusted for marital status, parity, smoking during pregnancy, gestational age, and multiple measures of socioeconomic position. Results Effect measure modification between race/ethnicity and pre-pregnancy BMI was significant for inadequate GWG (Wald test p-value=0.08). Normal weight Black (Risk Ratio (RR)=1.34, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18, 1.52) and Hispanic women (RR=1.33, 95%CI: 1.15, 1.54) and underweight Black women (RR=1.38; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.79) experienced an increased risk of inadequate GWG compared to Whites. Differences in risk of inadequate GWG between minority women, compared to White women, were not significant among overweight and obese women. Effect measure modification between race/ethnicity and pre-pregnancy BMI was not significant for excessive GWG. Conclusions The magnitude of racial/ethnic disparities in inadequate GWG appears to vary by pre-pregnancy weight class, which should be considered when designing interventions to close racial/ethnic gaps in healthy GWG. PMID:25652057

  5. Working conditions and major weight gain-a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Roos, Eira; Lallukka, Tea; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahelma, Eero; Laaksonen, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the associations of working conditions with major weight gain. Three different groups of work-related factors were examined: (i) work arrangements, (ii) physical working conditions, and (iii) psychosocial working conditions. The data are based on the Helsinki Health Study (HHS) questionnaire surveys. A baseline mail survey was made among middle-aged employees of the City of Helsinki in 2000-2002. A follow-up survey was made in 2007. Regression analyses with odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. During the 5- to 7-year follow-up, 26% of women and 24% of men gained in weight 5 kg or more. Working conditions were mostly unassociated with weight gain. However, nighttime shift work, physical threat at work, and hazardous exposures at work were moderately associated with weight gain. More attention should be devoted to the prevention of weight gain in general and among risk groups in particular.

  6. Substance Use, Disordered Eating, and Weight Gain: Describing the Prevention and Treatment Needs of Incarcerated Women.

    PubMed

    Drach, Linda L; Maher, Julie E; Braun, Margaret J F; Murray, Stefanie L; Sazie, Elizabeth

    2016-04-01

    Weight-related concerns are associated with women's substance use and treatment relapse. The prevalence of overweight, obesity, disordered eating behavior, and substance abuse history was assessed among female inmates incarcerated for 6 to 24 months at an Oregon state prison, using a self-administered survey and physical measurements. Average weight gain was 20 pounds, 87% of women were overweight (39%) or obese (48%), and 24% reported using one or more unhealthy strategies to lose weight in the past 6 months. Women who used tobacco and illicit substances before incarceration gained more weight. Integrating nutrition and weight gain issues into substance abuse treatment could benefit incarcerated women--both soon after entering prison to prevent weight gain and close to release to prevent relapse into substance use.

  7. Gestational Weight Gain: Results from the Delta Healthy Sprouts Comparative Impact Trial

    PubMed Central

    Olender, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Delta Healthy Sprouts trial was designed to test the comparative impact of two home visiting programs on weight status, dietary intake, and health behaviors of Southern African American women and their infants. Results pertaining to the primary outcome, gestational weight gain, are reported. Methods. Participants (n = 82), enrolled early in their second trimester of pregnancy, were randomly assigned to one of two treatment arms. Gestational weight gain, measured at six monthly home visits, was calculated by subtracting measured weight at each visit from self-reported prepregnancy weight. Weight gain was classified as under, within, or exceeding the Institute of Medicine recommendations based on prepregnancy body mass index. Chi-square tests and generalized linear mixed models were used to test for significant differences in percentages of participants within recommended weight gain ranges. Results. Differences in percentages of participants within the gestational weight gain guidelines were not significant between treatment arms across all visits. Conclusions. Enhancing the gestational nutrition and physical activity components of an existing home visiting program is feasible in a high risk population of primarily low income African American women. The impact of these enhancements on appropriate gestational weight gain is questionable given the more basic living needs of such women. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01746394, registered 4 December 2012. PMID:27595023

  8. Short-lived success: assessment of an intervention to improve pregnancy weight gain in Colorado.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Sue; Tolliver, Rickey; Schwalberg, Renee

    2014-05-01

    Inadequate weight gain in pregnancy is a major contributor to low birth weight in Colorado, where the low birth weight rate is among the highest in the nation. In 2004, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment implemented a population-based intervention in 9 counties, including provider training and a public media campaign, to encourage pregnant women to gain an adequate amount of weight in pregnancy as defined by the 1990 Institute of Medicine guidelines. Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System survey data were used to track weight gain in pregnancy in 1997 through 2004 (baseline), 2005 (post-intervention), and 2006 and 2007 (after the intervention had concluded). During the period immediately after the implementation of the intervention, the percentage of women delivering in the 9 study counties who gained an inadequate amount of weight during pregnancy dropped from 18.4 at baseline to 12.8 in 2005. However, this progress was reversed in 2006, when the percentage of women with inadequate weight gain rose to 19.7. Training providers to educate women about the importance of adequate weight gain in pregnancy, in conjunction with a social marketing campaign, appears to be a promising approach to addressing a major contributor to low birth weight. However, a time-limited intervention is likely to have temporary results.

  9. Is weight gain really a catalyst for broader recovery?: The impact of weight gain on psychological symptoms in the treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Accurso, Erin C; Ciao, Anna C; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Lock, James D; Le Grange, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The main aims of this study were to describe change in psychological outcomes for adolescents with anorexia nervosa across two treatments, and to explore predictors of change, including baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as weight gain over time. Participants were 121 adolescents with anorexia nervosa from a two-site (Chicago and Stanford) randomized controlled trial who received either family-based treatment or individual adolescent supportive psychotherapy. Psychological symptoms (i.e., eating disorder psychopathology, depressive symptoms, and self-esteem) were assessed at baseline, end of treatment, 6-month, and 12-month follow-up. Conditional multilevel growth models were used to test for predictors of slope for each outcome. Most psychological symptoms improved significantly from baseline to 12 month follow-up, regardless of treatment type. Depressive symptoms and dietary restraint were most improved, weight and shape concerns were least improved, and self-esteem was not at all improved. Weight gain emerged as a significant predictor of improved eating disorder pathology, with earlier weight gain having a greater impact on symptom improvement than later weight gain. Adolescents who presented with more severe, complex, and enduring clinical presentations (i.e., longer duration of illness, greater eating disorder pathology, binge-eating/purging subtype) also appeared to benefit more psychologically from treatment.

  10. Gaining weight after taking orlistat: A qualitative study of patients at 18-months follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hollywood, Amelia; Ogden, Jane

    2016-05-01

    Orlistat is currently the only prescribed form of pharmacological management for obesity and functions by reducing the amount of fat absorbed from food eaten. Although frequently prescribed, there is marked variability in outcomes. A total of 10 participants' experiences of gaining weight after taking orlistat were analysed using thematic analysis. Participants attributed their failed weight loss to mechanisms of the medication, emphasised a medical model of obesity with barriers to their weight loss and other weight-loss methods which had also failed. Overall, their weight gain was considered an inevitable part of their self-identity, reflecting their self-fulfilling prophecy of being a perpetual dieter.

  11. Weight status in the first 2 years of life and neurodevelopmental impairment in extremely low gestational age newborns

    PubMed Central

    Belfort, Mandy B.; Kuban, Karl C.K.; O'Shea, T. Michael; Allred, Elizabeth N.; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Engelke, Stephen C.; Leviton, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the extent to which weight gain and weight status in the first 2 years of life relate to the risk of neurodevelopmental impairment in extremely preterm infants. Study Design In a cohort of 1070 infants born between 23 and 27 weeks’ gestation, we examined weight gain from 7-28 days of life (in quartiles) and weight z-score at 12 and 24 months corrected age (in categories: <−2; ≥−2, <−1; ≥1, <1; ≥1) in relation to these adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes: Bayley-II mental development index <55, Bayley-II psychomotor development index <55, cerebral palsy, Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) ≥1 (cannot walk without assistance), microcephaly. We adjusted for confounders in logistic regression, stratified by sex, and performed separate analyses including the entire sample, and excluding children unable to walk without assistance (motor impairment). Results Weight gain in the lowest quartile from 7-28 days was not associated with higher risk of adverse outcomes. Children with a 12-month weight z-score <−2 were at increased risk for all adverse outcomes in girls, and for microcephaly and GMFCS ≥1 in boys. However, excluding children with motor impairment attenuated all associations except that of weight z-score <−2 with microcephaly in girls. Similarly, most associations of low weight z-score at 24 months with adverse outcomes were attenuated with exclusion of children with motor impairment. Conclusion Excluding children who have gross motor impairment appears to eliminate the association of low weight status with neurodevelopmental impairments at 2 years in extremely preterm infants. PMID:26470687

  12. Weight gain trajectories in hospital-based treatment of anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Makhzoumi, Saniha H; Coughlin, Janelle W; Schreyer, Colleen C; Redgrave, Graham W; Pitts, Steven C; Guarda, Angela S

    2017-02-10

    Weight gain is a primary treatment goal for anorexia nervosa (AN); however little is known about heterogeneity in weight gain pattern during treatment. Preliminary evidence suggests weight gain trajectory is associated with treatment outcome. This study grouped patients using mixture modeling into weight gain trajectories, and compared predictors and treatment outcomes between trajectory groups. Women diagnosed with AN or subthreshold AN (N = 211) completed self-report measures at admission and six-months after discharge from an integrated inpatient (IP)-partial hospitalization (PH) behavioral specialty eating disorders program. Gowned weights were measured daily. Three distinct trajectories emerged: negative quadratic (Optimal), negative quadratic with fast weight gain (Fast), and positive linear with slower weight gain (Slow). The majority of patients were assigned to the Optimal group. Trajectory groups differed on admission, discharge, and follow-up variables. The Fast group emerged as most distinct. Women in this group were more than twice as likely to binge and or vomit regularly compared with the other two groups and were most likely to achieve weight restoration by discharge and to have more positive weight outcomes at short-term follow-up. There were no group differences in eating disorder behavioral frequencies at follow-up when adjusting for behavioral severity at admission. Weight gain trajectory may serve as a personalized in-treatment marker of outcome and could inform research on moderators and mediators of treatment response. Randomized controlled treatment studies, utilizing weight gain trajectories to determine group membership, may help identify subgroups of patients with differential responses to treatment interventions.

  13. Metformin and berberine prevent olanzapine-induced weight gain in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yueshan; Young, Alan J; Ehli, Erik A; Nowotny, Dustin; Davies, Paige S; Droke, Elizabeth A; Soundy, Timothy J; Davies, Gareth E

    2014-01-01

    Olanzapine is a first line medication for the treatment of schizophrenia, but it is also one of the atypical antipsychotics carrying the highest risk of weight gain. Metformin was reported to produce significant attenuation of antipsychotic-induced weight gain in patients, while the study of preventing olanzapine-induced weight gain in an animal model is absent. Berberine, an herbal alkaloid, was shown in our previous studies to prevent fat accumulation in vitro and in vivo. Utilizing a well-replicated rat model of olanzapine-induced weight gain, here we demonstrated that two weeks of metformin or berberine treatment significantly prevented the olanzapine-induced weight gain and white fat accumulation. Neither metformin nor berberine treatment demonstrated a significant inhibition of olanzapine-increased food intake. But interestingly, a significant loss of brown adipose tissue caused by olanzapine treatment was prevented by the addition of metformin or berberine. Our gene expression analysis also demonstrated that the weight gain prevention efficacy of metformin or berberine treatment was associated with changes in the expression of multiple key genes controlling energy expenditure. This study not only demonstrates a significant preventive efficacy of metformin and berberine treatment on olanzapine-induced weight gain in rats, but also suggests a potential mechanism of action for preventing olanzapine-reduced energy expenditure.

  14. DRD2 promoter region variation predicts antipsychotic-induced weight gain in first episode schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lencz, Todd; Robinson, Delbert G; Napolitano, Barbara; Sevy, Serge; Kane, John M; Goldman, David; Malhotra, Anil K

    2010-09-01

    Many antipsychotic medications carry a substantial liability for weight gain, and one mechanism common to all antipsychotics is binding to the dopamine D2 receptor. We therefore examined the relationship between -141C Ins/Del (rs1799732), a functional promoter region polymorphism in DRD2, and antipsychotic-induced weight gain in 58 first episode schizophrenia patients enrolled in a randomized trial of risperidone versus olanzapine. Carriers of the deletion allele (n=29) were compared with Ins/Ins homozygotes (noncarriers, n=29) in a mixed model encompassing 10 weight measurements over 16 weeks. Deletion allele carriers showed significantly more weight gain after 6 weeks of treatment regardless of assigned medication. Although deletion carriers were prescribed higher doses of olanzapine (but not risperidone), dose did not seem to account for the genotype effects on weight gain. Given earlier evidence that deletion carriers show reduced symptom response to medication, additional study of appropriate treatment options for these patients seems warranted.

  15. Trimester-Specific Gestational Weight Gain and Infant Size for Gestational Age

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Sneha B.; Xu, Fei; Hedderson, Monique M.

    2016-01-01

    Gestational weight gain is known to influence fetal growth. However, it is unclear whether the associations between gestational weight gain and fetal growth vary by trimester. In a diverse cohort of 8,977 women who delivered a singleton between 2011 and 2013, we evaluated the associations between trimester-specific gestational weight gain and infant size for gestational age. Gestational weight gain was categorized per the 2009 Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations; meeting the recommendations was the referent. Large for gestational age and small for gestational age were defined as birthweight > 90th percentile or <10th percentile, respectively, based on a national reference standard birthweight distribution. Logistic regression models estimated the odds of having a large or small for gestational age versus an appropriate for gestational age infant. Only gestational weight gain exceeding the IOM recommendations in the 2nd and 3rd trimesters independently increased the odds of delivering a large for gestational age infant (Odds Ratio (95% Confidence Interval): 1st: 1.17 [0.94, 1.44], 2nd: 1.47 [1.13, 1.92], 3rd: 1.70 [1.30, 2.22]). Gestational weight gain below the IOM recommendations increased the likelihood of having a small for gestational age infant in the 2nd trimester only (1.76 [1.23, 2.52]). There was effect modification, and gestational weight gain below the IOM recommendations increased the likelihood of having a small for gestational age infant in the 2nd trimester and only among women with a pre-pregnancy body mass index from 18.5–24.9 kg/m2 (2.06 [1.35, 3.15]). These findings indicate that gestational weight gain during the 2nd and 3rd trimesters is more strongly associated with infant growth. Interventions to achieve appropriate gestational weight gain may optimize infant size at birth. PMID:27442137

  16. Differential activation of orexin neurons by antipsychotic drugs associated with weight gain.

    PubMed

    Fadel, Jim; Bubser, Michael; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2002-08-01

    Weight gain is one side effect of many antipsychotic drugs (APDs). A small number of lateral hypothalamic/perifornical area (LH/PFA) neurons express the orexins, peptides that are critically involved in body weight regulation and arousal. We examined the ability of APDs to activate orexin neurons, as reflected by induction of Fos. APDs with significant weight gain liability increased Fos expression in orexin neurons, but APDs with low or absent weight gain liability did not. The weight gain liability of APDs was correlated with the degree of Fos induction in orexin neurons of the lateral LH/PFA. In contrast, amphetamine, which causes weight loss, increased Fos expression in orexin neurons of the medial but not lateral LH/PFA. We compared the effects of amphetamine and clozapine, an APD with weight gain liability, on orexin neurons innervating the prefrontal cortex. Clozapine induced Fos in 75% of the orexin neurons that project to the cortex, but amphetamine induced Fos in less than a third of these cells. These data suggest that APD-induced weight gain is associated with activation of distinct orexin neurons and emphasize the presence of anatomically and functionally heterogeneous populations of orexin neurons.

  17. Antidepressant-induced undesirable weight gain: prevention with rimonabant without interference with behavioral effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Gobshtis, Nikolai; Ben-Shabat, Shimon; Fride, Ester

    2007-01-12

    Antidepressant pharmacotherapy has dramatically improved the quality of life for many patients. However, prolonged use may induce weight gain, resulting in enhanced risk for treatment noncompliance. Cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonists decrease food intake and body weight, but may also affect mood. We investigated in female Sabra mice first, whether acute treatment with the cannabinoid receptor antagonist rimonabant (5-(4-Chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide, SR141716, 5 mg/kg) interfered with the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine (15 mg/kg) or the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) in the Porsolt forced swimming test. Second, whether chronic treatment (3 months) with desipramine (5 mg/kg) enhanced weight gain and whether cotreatment with rimonabant (2 mg/kg), prevented the excessive weight gain, while retaining antidepressant effectiveness. Motor activity and anxiety-like behavior were also investigated. The acute studies indicated that rimonabant did not influence 'antidepressant' activity of desipramine or fluoxetine. In the chronic studies, desipramine enhanced weight gain, despite the observation that the injection procedure reduced weight gain. The enhanced weight gain continued at least 35 days after treatment ended. Rimonabant reduced weight gain to which no tolerance developed and which persisted at least 30 days beyond treatment. Mice cotreated with rimonabant and desipramine had body weights closer to controls or to those receiving rimonabant alone than to those treated with desipramine alone. The antidepressant effects of desipramine were maintained throughout treatment; this was not altered by the chronic rimonabant treatment at any time, although rimonabant together with desipramine transiently enhanced anxiety-like behavior. These observations suggest that combined treatment with antidepressants and cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist to prevent undesirable weight

  18. Body weight gain during adulthood and uterine myomas: Pró-Saúde Study

    PubMed Central

    Boclin, Karine de Lima Sírio; Torres, Fernanda Pelegrini; Faerstein, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study intended to investigate whether body weight gain during adulthood is associated with uterine myomas. 1,560 subjects were evaluated in a Pró-Saúde Study. Weight gain was evaluated in a continuous fashion and also in quintiles. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated through logistic regression models that were adjusted for education levels, color/race, body mass indices at age 20, age of menarche, parity, use of oral contraceptive methods, smoking, health insurance, and the Papanicolaou tests. No relevant differences were observed regarding the presence of uterine myomas among weight gain quintiles in that studied population. PMID:26558353

  19. Pregnant women's interest in a website or mobile application for healthy gestational weight gain.

    PubMed

    Waring, Molly E; Moore Simas, Tiffany A; Xiao, Rui S; Lombardini, Lisa M; Allison, Jeroan J; Rosal, Milagros C; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2014-12-01

    We examined pregnant women's interest in using a website or mobile application to help them gain a healthy amount of weight during pregnancy. Pregnant women (N = 64) completed a short questionnaire during routine prenatal care at hospital-based obstetric clinics in central Massachusetts during April-August 2012. Eighty-six percent reported interest in using a website or mobile application to help them gain a healthy amount of weight; interest ranged from 67% to 100% across demographics, clinical characteristics, and technology use. The Internet is a promising modality for delivering interventions to prevent excessive gestational weight gain and associated maternal and child health consequences.

  20. Risk Profiles for Weight Gain among Postmenopausal Women: A Classification and Regression Tree Analysis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Su Yon; Vitolins, Mara Z.; Fenton, Jenifer; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C.; Hursting, Stephen D.; Chang, Shine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Risk factors for obesity and weight gain are typically evaluated individually while “adjusting for” the influence of other confounding factors, and few studies, if any, have created risk profiles by clustering risk factors. We identified subgroups of postmenopausal women homogeneous in their clustered modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for gaining ≥ 3% weight. Methods This study included 612 postmenopausal women 50–79 years old, enrolled in an ancillary study of the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study between February 1995 and July 1998. Classification and regression tree and stepwise regression models were built and compared. Results Of 27 selected variables, the factors significantly related to ≥ 3% weight gain were weight change in the past 2 years, age at menopause, dietary fiber, fat, alcohol intake, and smoking. In women younger than 65 years, less than 4 kg weight change in the past 2 years sufficiently reduced risk of ≥ 3% weight gain. Different combinations of risk factors related to weight gain were reported for subgroups of women: women 65 years or older (essential factor: < 9.8 g/day dietary factor), African Americans (essential factor: currently smoking), and white women (essential factor: ≥ 5 kg weight change for the past 2 years). Conclusions Our findings suggest specific characteristics for particular subgroups of postmenopausal women that may be useful for identifying those at risk for weight gain. The study results may be useful for targeting efforts to promote strategies to reduce the risk of obesity and weight gain in subgroups of postmenopausal women and maximize the effect of weight control by decreasing obesity-relevant adverse health outcomes. PMID:25822239

  1. Appropriate maternal weight gain in singleton and twin pregnancies: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Leese, Brenda; Jomeen, Julie; Denton, Jane

    2012-12-01

    A review of the literature on maternal weight gain in singleton and twin pregnancies has identified two main messages. Firstly, that very little robust evidence exists on which to base advice to mothers about appropriate weight gain during pregnancy. Evidence that does exist has tended to be observational, or based on under-powered intervention studies and unable to provide definitive conclusions. Secondly, that although specific weight gains have been recommended by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in the USA, many women who gained weight outside these guidelines apparently achieved successful pregnancy and birth outcomes, in part because there were numerous confounders. Crucially, resources need to be invested to address women's concerns with weight management, so that they can receive the necessary support from midwives and others who care for them. Currently, women tend to receive little advice on weight gain during pregnancy and it is vital they are made aware of the increased risks associated with obesity, and that opportunities to minimise complications should be available and accessible prior to and during pregnancy. Overall, these findings highlight the difficulties in drawing up recommendations for individual women, whether expecting twins or singletons, on the basis of studies of populations, and the distinct difference between the USA and the UK in how weight gain is rationalised.

  2. Depressive and anxiety disorders: Associated with losing or gaining weight over 2 years?

    PubMed

    de Wit, Leonore M; van Straten, Annemieke; Lamers, Femke; Cuijpers, Pim; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2015-06-30

    This longitudinal study examines to what extent different depressive and anxiety disorders and clinical characteristics are associated with subsequent weight change, while controlling for baseline weight, sociodemographics, health status, psychotropic medication use and (un)healthy lifestyle factors. Data are from a sample of 2447 respondents aged 18-65 years of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). Baseline depressive disorders and anxiety disorders were determined with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Weight at baseline and after 2 years was measured and analyzed as continuous change score (mean change in weight 1kg) and in categories of significant weight loss (<1S.D. weight change equaling <4kg), weight maintenance and weight gain (>1S.D., >6kg). After full adjustment for covariates baseline comorbid anxiety and depressive disorder and baseline Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) were associated with significant 2-year weight gain. Both current and remitted MDD at baseline and a baseline dysthymia, but none of the anxiety disorders, were associated with significant weight loss. This longitudinal study confirms a U-curved link between depression and weight change over 2 years. Furthermore, a dose-response effect of depression severity on 2-year weight gain was found.

  3. Body weight gain rate in patients with Parkinson's disease and deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Barichella, Michela; Marczewska, Agnieszka M; Mariani, Claudio; Landi, Andrea; Vairo, Antonella; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2003-11-01

    We evaluated body weight changes in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) after electrode implantation for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in relation to clinical improvement. Thirty PD patients who received STN DBS were included (22 men, 8 women; mean age, 60.0 +/- 7.1 years; mean PD duration, 13.5 +/- 3.7 years; mean body mass index [BMI], 21.6 +/- 3.0 kg/m2). Body weight, physical activity, and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores were noted before and 3 and 12 months after the procedure. Significant weight gain occurred in 29 patients; the mean increase was 14.8 +/- 9.8% of initial body weight in 1 year. Of the patients, 46.5% reported weight gain in the first 3 months, 21.4% gradual weight gain in the first 6 months, and 32.1% a slow increase for 1 year. Mean BMI increased up to 24.7 +/- 3.7 kg/m2. After 1 year, mean UPDRS motor score improved significantly in off and in on; and therapy complications improved by 91.0 +/- 17.0%. BMI changes at 3 and 12 months were significantly correlated to dyskinesia score changes, and levodopa dosage was not. In PD, STN DBS produces not only symptom control, but also weight gain. DBS candidates should be given nutritional counseling before the intervention to prevent rapid and/or excessive weight gain.

  4. Neighborhood factors associated with physical activity and adequacy of weight gain during pregnancy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Healthy diet, physical activity, smoking, and adequate weight gain are all associated with maternal health and fetal growth during pregnancy. Neighborhood characteristics have been associated with poor maternal and child health outcomes, yet conceptualization of potential mechani...

  5. General and persistent effects of high-intensity sweeteners on body weight gain and caloric compensation in rats.

    PubMed

    Swithers, Susan E; Baker, Chelsea R; Davidson, T L

    2009-08-01

    In an earlier work (S. E. Swithers & T. L. Davidson, 2008), rats provided with a fixed amount of a yogurt diet mixed with saccharin gained more weight and showed impaired caloric compensation relative to rats given the same amount of yogurt mixed with glucose. The present 4 experiments examined the generality of these findings and demonstrated that increased body weight gain was also demonstrated when animals consumed a yogurt diet sweetened with an alternative high-intensity sweetener (acesulfame potassium; AceK) as well as in animals given a saccharin-sweetened base diet (refried beans) that was calorically similar but nutritionally distinct from low-fat yogurt. These studies also extended earlier findings by showing that body weight differences persist after saccharin-sweetened diets are discontinued and following a shift to a diet sweetened with glucose. In addition, rats first exposed to a diet sweetened with glucose still gain additional weight when subsequently exposed to a saccharin-sweetened diet. The results of these experiments add support to the hypothesis that exposure to weak or nonpredictive relationships between sweet tastes and caloric consequences may lead to positive energy balance.

  6. The Effect of Selenium Treatment on the Weight Gains of Lambs.

    PubMed

    Dale, D G; Lloyd, L E; Moxley, J E

    1962-05-01

    Two trials were conducted with lambs to evaluate the growth promoting effects of selenium administered orally at a level of 5 mg per month during the pasture season. No statistically significant effect on weight gains was found to be attributable to selenium administration in either the single lamb or the twin lamb experiment. In both trials there was a trend in the data that suggested a deleterious effect of selenium on weight gains.

  7. A Brief Motivational Intervention for Preventing Medication-Associated Weight Gain Among Youth with Bipolar Disorder: Treatment Development and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Mantz, Michael B.; Bailey, Bridget; Douaihy, Antoine

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Bipolar disorder (BP) in youth is an impairing psychiatric disorder associated with high rates of relapse and recurrence. High rates of psychiatric and medical co-morbidities account for additional illness burden in pediatric BP. The elevated risk of overweight and obesity in this population is of particular concern. One of the likely etiologies for weight gain in youth with BP is use of mood-stabilizing medications. Although these medications can be effective for mood stabilization, excessive weight gain is a common side effect. Obesity is associated with a host of medical problems and is also correlated with worse psychiatric outcomes in BP, rendering the prevention of weight gain in this population particularly clinically relevant. In this article, we describe the rationale and development of a brief motivational intervention for preventing weight gain among youth with BP initiating mood-stabilizing pharmacological treatment and then present a case example illustrating the principles of the intervention. PMID:21663430

  8. Can physical activity minimize weight gain in women after smoking cessation?

    PubMed Central

    Kawachi, I; Troisi, R J; Rotnitzky, A G; Coakley, E H; Colditz, G A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to examine prospectively whether exercise can modify weight gain after smoking cessation in women. METHODS. Data were analyzed from a 2-year follow-up period (1986-1988) in the Nurses' Health Study, an ongoing cohort of 121,700 US women aged 40 to 75 in 1986. RESULTS. The average weight gain over 2 years was 3.0 kg in the 1474 women who stopped smoking, and 0.6 kg among the 7832 women who continued smoking. Among women smoking 1 to 24 cigarettes per day, those who quit without changing their levels of exercise gained an average of 2.3 kg more (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9, 2.6) than women who continued smoking. Women who quit and increased exercise by between 8 to 16 MET-hours (the work metabolic rate divided by the resting metabolic rate) per week gained 1.8 kg (95% CI = 1.0, 2.5), and the excess weight gain was only 1.3 kg (95% CI = 0.7, 1.9) in women who increased exercise by more than 16 MET-hours per week. CONCLUSIONS. Smoking cessation is associated with a net excess weight gain of about 2.4 kg in middle-aged women. However, this weight gain is minimized if smoking cessation is accompanied by a moderate increase in the level of physical activity. PMID:8669525

  9. Reversible weight gain and prolactin levels--long-term follow-up in childhood.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, F; Salti, R; Stagi, S; La Cauza, F; Chiarelli, F

    2005-09-01

    In adult patients weight gain is a frequent complaint of hyperprolactinaemia and it has been associated with a high prevalence of obesity. Normalization of prolactin (PRL) levels result in weight loss. The nature of this link is poorly defined. In this report we describe a 14 year-old female with primary amenorrhea and persistent progressive weight gain. The patient's height, weight and BMI were 152 cm, 70 kg, and 30.3 kg/m2, respectively. Basal hormonal investigation showed normal free thyroxin, TSH, IGF-I, cortisol and ACTH values. Serum PRL level was very high (16,278 mIU/l; normal range 63-426 mIU/l). Magnetic resonance imaging scan showed the presence of a pituitary microadenoma. Treatment with the non-selective dopamine agonist pergolide caused a significant reduction of serum PRL concentration with a remarkable decrease of body weight. During follow-up, repeat MRI scan revealed disappearance of the microadenoma. The reduction of the daily dose of pergolide was associated with an increase of serum PRL with significant weight gain. A further reduction of body weight was subsequently observed with an increase of pergolide dosage. Serum PRL measurement may be useful as part of the endocrine work-up of obese children with a history of unexplained recent weight gain, especially if associated with pituitary-gonadal axis dysfunction. The relationship between PRL secretion and weight change needs to be examined in prospective larger studies.

  10. Efficiency of food utilization during body weight gain in dormice (Glis glis).

    PubMed

    Melnyk, R B; Boshes, M

    1980-06-01

    During spontaneous body weight gain in dormice, Glis glis, progressive increases in the efficiency of food utilization as defined by weight gain (g)/food intake (g), and parallel increases in mean daily food intake were observed. Towards the end of the weight gain period, there was an abrupt drop in feeding efficiency with no significant change in food intake even when the latter was expressed relative to an index of each animal's "metabolic mass" (body weightkg0.62). Animals whose body weight increases followed a return to ad lib feeding after prolonged food restriction showed marked decreases in feeding efficiency from initially high values which were independent of changes in food intake. These results are discussed in relation to the sliding set point concept of body weight regulation in hibernators.

  11. Changes in Energy Expenditure with Weight Gain and Weight Loss in Humans.

    PubMed

    Müller, Manfred J; Enderle, Janna; Bosy-Westphal, Anja

    2016-12-01

    Metabolic adaptation to weight changes relates to body weight control, obesity and malnutrition. Adaptive thermogenesis (AT) refers to changes in resting and non-resting energy expenditure (REE and nREE) which are independent from changes in fat-free mass (FFM) and FFM composition. AT differs in response to changes in energy balance. With negative energy balance, AT is directed towards energy sparing. It relates to a reset of biological defence of body weight and mainly refers to REE. After weight loss, AT of nREE adds to weight maintenance. During overfeeding, energy dissipation is explained by AT of the nREE component only. As to body weight regulation during weight loss, AT relates to two different set points with a settling between them. During early weight loss, the first set is related to depleted glycogen stores associated with the fall in insulin secretion where AT adds to meet brain's energy needs. During maintenance of reduced weight, the second set is related to low leptin levels keeping energy expenditure low to prevent triglyceride stores getting too low which is a risk for some basic biological functions (e.g., reproduction). Innovative topics of AT in humans are on its definition and assessment, its dynamics related to weight loss and its constitutional and neuro-endocrine determinants.

  12. Evaluating Provider Advice and Women's Beliefs on Total Weight Gain During Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Arinze, Nkiruka V; Karp, Sharon M; Gesell, Sabina B

    2016-02-01

    Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with complications for both mother and child. Minority women are at increased risk for excessive GWG, yet are underrepresented in published weight control interventions. To inform future interventions, we examined the prevalence and accuracy of provider advice and its association with personal beliefs about necessary maternal weight gain among predominantly Latina pregnant women. Secondary analysis examining baseline data (N = 123) from a healthy lifestyle randomized controlled trial conducted in and urban area of the South East. Only 23.6 % of women reported being told how much weight to gain during pregnancy; although 58.6 % received advice that met Institute of Medicine recommendations. Concordance of mothers' personal weight gain target with clinical recommendations varied by mothers' pre-pregnancy weight status [χ (4) (2)  = 9.781, p = 0.044]. Findings suggest the need for prenatal providers of low-income, minority women to engage patients in shaping healthy weight gain targets as a precursor to preventing excessive GWG and its complications.

  13. Nutrient Intake according to Weight Gain during Pregnancy, Job Status, and Household Income

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association of nutrient intake and pregnancy outcome mediated by weight gain during pregnancy, job status, and household income. Maternal age, educational level, self-reported pre-pregnancy weights, educational level, and household income were collected from the women at 2 months postpartum. For each offspring, weight at birth, length at birth, and gestational age were collected. Participants were asked to report the frequency of consumption of foods between 28–42 weeks into the pregnancy. Diet was assessed by using a validated 106-item semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire (SQFFQ) and women were asked portions and quantities based on pictures, food models, and measuring tools such as cups or teaspoons. Results showed that women who gained below the recommended weight gain during pregnancy, within, and over were 25.3%, 38.7%, 36.0%, respectively. In comparison to weight gain and the offspring's length and weight at birth, the offspring of mothers with a lower weight gain had a higher length. Energy, protein, vitamin B2, vitamin C, calcium, and potassium were significantly lower at employed group. We did not observe a significant difference between birth characteristics and maternal nutrient intake by income. Infants with a higher ponderal index at birth were born to women with a higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI). PMID:28168179

  14. The effect of massage with medium-chain triglyceride oil on weight gain in premature neonates.

    PubMed

    Saeadi, Reza; Ghorbani, Zahra; Shapouri Moghaddam, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Prematurity and poor weight gaining are important causes for neonatal hospitalization. The present study aimed to investigate the role of medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) oil via massage therapy as a supplementary nutritional method on the weight gain of Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU)-hospitalized neonates. This randomized clinical trial performed among 121 stable premature neonates hospitalized in the NICU of Qaem Educational Hospital, Mashhad, Iran. They were randomly divided into three groups: oil-massage, massage alone and control groups. These groups were compared on the basis of weight gain during a one-week interval. The three groups were matched for sex, mean gestational age, birth weight, head circumference, delivery, and feeding type (P>0.05). The mean weight gain on the 7th day in the oil massage group was 105±1.3gr and 52±0.1gr in the massage group; whereas 54±1.3gr weight loss was observed in the control group. Significant differences were observed between the oil-massage group and the other two groups, respectively (P=0.002 and P=0.000). The findings of this study suggest that transcutaneous feeding with MCT oil massage therapy in premature neonates can result in accelerated weight gain in this age group with no risk of NEC.

  15. Nutrient Intake according to Weight Gain during Pregnancy, Job Status, and Household Income.

    PubMed

    Jung, You-Mi; Choi, Mi-Ja

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association of nutrient intake and pregnancy outcome mediated by weight gain during pregnancy, job status, and household income. Maternal age, educational level, self-reported pre-pregnancy weights, educational level, and household income were collected from the women at 2 months postpartum. For each offspring, weight at birth, length at birth, and gestational age were collected. Participants were asked to report the frequency of consumption of foods between 28-42 weeks into the pregnancy. Diet was assessed by using a validated 106-item semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire (SQFFQ) and women were asked portions and quantities based on pictures, food models, and measuring tools such as cups or teaspoons. Results showed that women who gained below the recommended weight gain during pregnancy, within, and over were 25.3%, 38.7%, 36.0%, respectively. In comparison to weight gain and the offspring's length and weight at birth, the offspring of mothers with a lower weight gain had a higher length. Energy, protein, vitamin B2, vitamin C, calcium, and potassium were significantly lower at employed group. We did not observe a significant difference between birth characteristics and maternal nutrient intake by income. Infants with a higher ponderal index at birth were born to women with a higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI).

  16. Extremes of weight gain and weight loss with detailed assessments of energy balance: Illustrative case studies and clinical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Falck, Ryan S; Shook, Robin P; Hand, Gregory A; Lavie, Carl J; Blair, Steven N

    2015-04-01

    Extreme weight changes, or changes in weight greater than 10 kg within a 2-year period, can be caused by numerous factors that are much different than typical weight fluctuations. This paper uses two interesting cases of extreme weight change (a female who experienced extreme weight gain and a male who experienced extreme weight loss) from participants in the Energy Balance Study to illustrate the physiological and psychosocial variables associated with the weight change over a 15-month period, including rigorous assessments of energy intake, physical activity (PA) and energy expenditure, and body composition. In addition, we provide a brief review of the literature regarding the relationship between energy balance (EB) and weight change, as well as insight into proper weight management strategies. The case studies presented here are then placed in the context of the literature regarding EB and weight change. This report further supports previous research on the importance of regular doses of PA for weight maintenance, and that even higher volumes of PA are necessary for weight loss. Practitioners should emphasize the importance of PA to their patients and take steps to monitor their patients' involvement in PA.

  17. Effect of Weight Gain on Cardiac Autonomic Control During Wakefulness and Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Taro; Sert-Kuniyoshi, Fatima H.; Calvin, Andrew D.; Singh, Prachi; Romero-Corral, Abel; van der Walt, Christelle; Davison, Diane E.; Bukartyk, Jan; Konecny, Tomas; Pusalavidyasagar, Snigdha; Sierra-Johnson, Justo; Somers, Virend K.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased cardiac sympathetic activation during wakefulness, but the effect on sleep-related sympathetic modulation is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of fat gain on cardiac autonomic control during wakefulness and sleep in humans. We performed a randomized controlled study to assess the effects of fat gain on heart rate variability (HRV). We recruited 36 healthy volunteers, who were randomized to either a standardized diet to gain approximately 4 kg over 8 weeks followed by an 8 week weight loss period (n=20), or to serve as a weight-maintainer control (n=16). An overnight polysomnogram with power spectral analysis of HRV was performed at baseline, after weight gain, and after weight loss to determine the ratio of low frequency (LF) to high frequency (HF) power, and to examine the relationship between changes in HRV and changes in insulin, leptin and adiponectin levels. Mean weight gain was 3.9 kg in the fat gain group versus 0.1 kg in the maintainer group. LF/HF increased both during wakefulness and sleep after fat gain and returned to baseline after fat loss in the fat gain group, and did not change in the control group. Insulin, leptin and adiponectin also increased after fat gain and fell after fat loss, but no clear pattern of changes were seen that correlated consistently with changes in HRV. Short-term fat gain in healthy subjects is associated with increased cardiac sympathetic activation during wakefulness and sleep but the mechanisms remain unclear. PMID:21357280

  18. Gestational weight gain: results from the Delta Healthy Sprouts comparative impact trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. Delta Healthy Sprouts was designed to test the comparative impact of two home visiting programs on weight status, dietary intake, and health behaviors of Southern African American women and their infants. Results pertaining to the primary outcome, gestational weight gain, are reporte...

  19. Weight gain and behavior of Raramuri Criollo versus crossbred steers developed on Chihuahuan Desert rangeland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ranchers that raise Raramuri Criollo (RC) cattle must overcome the challenge of lack of markets for weaned calves. Growing and finishing RC or RC-crossbred steers on rangeland pastures is increasingly common; however, no data exist on their weight gains or grazing behavior. We tracked the weight a...

  20. Designing a Weight Gain Prevention Trial for Young Adults: The CHOICES Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, Leslie A.; Moe, Stacey G.; Nanney, M. Susie; Laska, Melissa N.; Linde, Jennifer A.; Petrich, Christine A.; Sevcik, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Young adults are at risk for weight gain. Little is known about how to design weight control programs to meet the needs of young adults and few theory-based interventions have been evaluated in a randomized control trial. The Choosing Healthy Options in College Environments and Settings (CHOICES) study was funded to create a…

  1. The role of environmental quality in gestational weight gain among U.S. pregnant women

    EPA Science Inventory

    From 2000-2009, 44% of United States (US) pregnant women had gestational weight gain (GWG) above and 20% had GWG below the recommended range of 15 to 40 pounds, which depends on starting weight. GWG outside the recommended range is associated with adverse outcomes including pre-e...

  2. Weight-Gain Velocity in Newborn Infants Managed with the Kangaroo Method and Associated Variables.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Raquel Guimarães; de Azevedo, Daniela Vasconcelos; de Almeida, Paulo César; de Almeida, Nádia Maria Girão Saraiva; Feitosa, Francisco Edson de Lucena

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The Kangaroo method helps promote maternal breastfeeding and adequate growth of low birthweight preterm infants. The objective of this study was to analyze the association between weight-gain velocity during use of the Kangaroo method and maternal and infant variables. Methods A nested cross-sectional study in a cohort of newborn infants managed using the Kangaroo method was carried out at a reference center for the method in Brazil. Data on low birthweight and preterm infants managed using the Kangaroo Method (n = 78) and on their respective mothers (n = 70) was collected between January and July 2014. Maternal and infant variables were associated and correlated with weight-gain velocity (g/kg/day) at each phase of the method (p < 0.05). Results Mean weight-gain velocity increased from 0.12 ± 11.11 g/kg/day in the first phase to 13.47 ± 4.84 g/kg/day in the third phase (p < 0.001), and percentage of adequate weight increased at phase 3 (p < 0.001). Birthweight was inversely correlated with weight-gain velocity at phases 1 and 2 of the Kangaroo method. Birthweight of under 1500 g was associated with a lower likelihood of inadequate weight-gain velocity of the newborn at phase 1 (OR = 0.1; 95 % CI 0.01-0.78; p = 0.012). In phase 3, maternal age was directly correlated with weight-gain velocity. Conclusions Weight-gain velocity was associated with maternal (age) and infant (gestational age at birth, birthweight, weight for gestational age at birth, length of hospital stay and five-minute Apgar score) variables. Knowledge of the factors influencing weight-gain velocity and its behavior at each phase of the method can help guide conduct toward potentializing factors that promote adequate weight-gain.

  3. Effects of smoking cessation on weight gain, metabolic rate, caloric consumption, and blood lipids.

    PubMed

    Stamford, B A; Matter, S; Fell, R D; Papanek, P

    1986-04-01

    Thirteen sedentary adult females successfully quit smoking cigarettes for 48 days. Mean daily caloric consumption increased 227 kcal and mean weight gain was 2.2 kg. There were no measurable acute effects of smoke inhalation and no chronic net effects of smoking cessation on resting metabolic rate, as determined by oxygen consumption and respiratory exchange ratio. After 1 yr, subjects who continued to abstain gained an average of 8.2 kg. HDL-cholesterol increased 7 mg/dl in 48 days; however, this effect was lost in those who returned to smoking. Increased caloric consumption accounted for 69% of weight gained immediately following smoking cessation. Factors other than changes in caloric consumption and metabolic rate may be responsible for a significant proportion (31%) of the weight gained in individuals who quit smoking.

  4. Management of atypical antipsychotic-induced weight gain in schizophrenic patients with topiramate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Hsiung; Liu, Chia-Yih; Hsiao, Mei-Chun

    2005-10-01

    Patients treated with atypical antipsychotic drugs commonly gain excess weight. Because obesity is associated with considerable morbidity and decreased life expectancy, treatment of weight gain in these patients is critical. Topiramate, a fairly new anticonvulsant, promotes bodyweight loss in healthy obese subjects, patients with bipolar disorder, and patients with eating disorder. However, there are very few reports about the efficacy of topiramate for weight management in schizophrenic patients. We present the cases of three Taiwanese patients with schizophrenia whose bodyweight increased as a result of atypical antipsychotics treatment, then was controlled by topiramate without aggravation of their psychotic symptoms.

  5. Cardiometabolic and fitness improvements in obese girls who either gained or lost weight during treatment

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Matthew G.; Bean, Melanie K.; Wickham, Edmond P.; Stern, Marilyn; Evans, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the quality of weight change (change in fat mass vs. fat-free mass [FFM]), changes in cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), and frequencies of metabolic risk factors in adolescent females with obesity that either lost weight or gained weight following lifestyle treatment. Study design Fifty-eight girls (mean age = 13.0 ± 1.6 yrs; 77% black; mean body mass index (BMI) = 36.5 ± 4.5 kg/m2) completed a 6-month lifestyle intervention combining dietary and behavioral counseling with aerobic and resistance exercise training. We examined baseline to 6-month differences in weight (kg), body composition, CRF, and frequencies of metabolic risk factors between weight loss and weight gain groups. Results In the weight loss group, body weight (-4.50 ± 3.53 kg, p < 0.001), fat mass (-4.50 ± 2.20 kg, p < 0.001), and body fat percentage ([BF%] -2.97% ± 1.45%, p < 0.001) decreased, and FFM was unchanged at 6 months. In the weight gain group, body weight (4.50 ± 2.20 kg, p < 0.001), fat mass (1.52 ± 3.16 kg, p < 0.024), and FFM (2.99 ± 2.45 kg, p < 0.001) increased, and BF% was unchanged. Both groups improved CRF (p < 0.05). Frequencies of metabolic risk factors were reduced across all participants after the 6-month treatment. Conclusion Participation in a weight management program might elicit health improvements in obese adolescent females who increase weight and fat mass, provided that FFM gains are sufficient to negate increases in body fat percentage. PMID:25890676

  6. Attitudes to body weight, weight gain and eating behavior in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Abraham, S; King, W; Llewellyn-Jones, D

    1994-12-01

    The eating behavior and attitudes to body weight of 100 healthy women were studied 3 days after the birth of their first child. During pregnancy women 'watch their weight' and use a range of methods of weight control which include cigarette smoking and inducing vomiting. During pregnancy 41 women reported weight control problems and 20 women considered their weight and eating problems to be greater than at any previous time. Picking was the most common unwanted behavior. Binge eating was experienced by 44 women, nine of whom reported it to be a 'severe' problem. Although women were ambivalent about being weighed at each antenatal visit, 81 recommended weighing once each month. The women held differing opinions on the effects of breastfeeding on body weight and on the need for nutritional supplements during pregnancy. Women reporting 'disordered eating' were more likely to have antenatal complications and give birth to low birthweight babies. The results suggest good obstetric care should include a history of the woman's eating behavior and body weight.

  7. Rhythmic leptin is required for weight gain from circadian desynchronized feeding in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Arble, Deanna Marie; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Turek, Fred W

    2011-01-01

    The neuroendocrine and metabolic effects of leptin have been extensively researched since the discovery, and the later identification, of the leptin gene mutated within the ob/ob mouse. Leptin is required for optimal health in a number of physiological systems (e.g. fertility, bone density, body weight regulation). Despite the extensive leptin literature and many observations of leptin's cyclical pattern over the 24-hour day, few studies have specifically examined how the circadian rhythm of leptin may be essential to leptin signaling and health. Here we present data indicating that a rhythmic leptin profile (e.g. 1 peak every 24 hours) leads to excessive weight gain during desynchronized feeding whereas non-rhythmic leptin provided in a continuous manner does not lead to excessive body weight gain under similar feeding conditions. This study suggests that feeding time can interact with leptin's endogenous rhythm to influence metabolic signals, specifically leading to excessive body weight gains during 'wrongly' timed feeding.

  8. Early Weight Gain Predicts Outcome in Two Treatments for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Le Grange, Daniel; Accurso, Erin C.; Lock, James; Agras, Stewart; Bryson, Susan W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Determine whether early weight gain predicts full remission at end-of-treatment (EOT) and follow-up in two different treatments for adolescent anorexia nervosa, and to track the rate of weight gain throughout treatment and follow-up. Method Participants were 121 adolescents with AN (mean age = 14.4 years, SD = 1.6), from a two-site (Chicago and Stanford) randomized controlled trial. Adolescents were randomly assigned to family-based treatment (FBT) (n=61) or individual adolescent supportive psychotherapy (AFT) (n=60). Treatment response was assessed using percent of expected body weight (EBW) and the global score on the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE). Full remission was defined as having achieved ≥95% EBW and within one standard deviation of the community norms of the EDE. Full remission was assessed at EOT as well as 12-month follow-up. Results Receiver operating characteristic analyses showed that the earliest predictor of remission at EOT was a gain of 5.8 pounds (2.65 kg) by session 3 in FBT (AUC = .670; p=.043), and a gain of 7.1 pounds (3.20 kg) by session 4 in AFT (AUC=0.754, p=.014). Early weight gain did not predict remission at follow-up for either treatment. A survival analysis showed that weight was marginally superior in FBT as opposed to AFT (Wald chi-square=3.692, df=1, p=.055). Conclusion Adolescents with AN who receive either FBT or AFT, and show early weight gain, are likely to remit at EOT. However, FBT is superior to AFT in terms of weight gain throughout treatment and follow-up. PMID:24190844

  9. Associations Between 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Weight Gain in Elderly Women

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Joanne H.; Pedula, Kathryn L.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Cauley, Jane; Hochberg, Marc; Hillier, Teresa A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background 25-Hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels are lower in obese individuals. Determining whether low vitamin D status can predispose weight gain requires a longitudinal study. Methods From a community-based multicenter U.S. prospective cohort of 9704 (Study of Osteoporotic Fractures [SOF]), 4659 women aged ≥65 with baseline 25(OH)D measurement were followed for 4.5 years. They were weighed at baseline and follow-up visits, and a subset (n=1054) had 25(OH)D levels remeasured at follow-up. Results Women with 25(OH)D levels ≥30 ng/mL had lower baseline weight (141.6 pounds) compared to women with 25(OH)D levels <30 ng/mL (148.6 pounds) (p<0.001). Overall, 25(OH)D status was not associated with weight change over 4.5 years, although there was a significant interaction between 25(OH)D status and weight change category (loss, gain, stable) (p<0.0001). In women who gained ≥5% weight, those with baseline 25(OH)D levels ≥30 ng/mL gained 16.4 pounds (12.2% of baseline weight) over 4.5 years compared to 18.5 pounds (13.9% of baseline weight) in women with levels <30 ng/mL (p=0.04). In women who lost ≥5% weight or remained stable (<5% weight change), there was no association between 25(OH)D status at baseline and weight change. Among women who gained weight and had 25(OH)D measured at both visits, having sustained or developing 25(OH)D levels ≥30 ng/mL was associated with less weight gain between visits (14.81 vs. 16.34 pounds, p=0.04). Conclusions Higher 25(OH)D levels are associated with lower weight gains, suggesting low vitamin D status may predispose to fat accumulation. PMID:22731629

  10. Excess Folic Acid Increases Lipid Storage, Weight Gain, and Adipose Tissue Inflammation in High Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Karen B.; Kennelly, John P.; Ordonez, Marta; Nelson, Randal; Leonard, Kelly; Stabler, Sally; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio; Field, Catherine J.; Jacobs, René L.

    2016-01-01

    Folic acid intake has increased to high levels in many countries, raising concerns about possible adverse effects, including disturbances to energy and lipid metabolism. Our aim was to investigate the effects of excess folic acid (EFA) intake compared to adequate folic acid (AFA) intake on metabolic health in a rodent model. We conducted these investigations in the setting of either a 15% energy low fat (LF) diet or 60% energy high fat (HF) diet. There was no difference in weight gain, fat mass, or glucose tolerance in EFA-fed rats compared to AFA-fed rats when they were fed a LF diet. However, rats fed EFA in combination with a HF diet had significantly greater weight gain and fat mass compared to rats fed AFA (p < 0.05). Gene expression analysis showed increased mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and some of its target genes in adipose tissue of high fat-excess folic acid (HF-EFA) fed rats. Inflammation was increased in HF-EFA fed rats, associated with impaired glucose tolerance compared to high fat-adequate folic acid (HF-AFA) fed rats (p < 0.05). In addition, folic acid induced PPARγ expression and triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells. Our results suggest that excess folic acid may exacerbate weight gain, fat accumulation, and inflammation caused by consumption of a HF diet. PMID:27669293

  11. Excess Folic Acid Increases Lipid Storage, Weight Gain, and Adipose Tissue Inflammation in High Fat Diet-Fed Rats.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Karen B; Kennelly, John P; Ordonez, Marta; Nelson, Randal; Leonard, Kelly; Stabler, Sally; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio; Field, Catherine J; Jacobs, René L

    2016-09-23

    Folic acid intake has increased to high levels in many countries, raising concerns about possible adverse effects, including disturbances to energy and lipid metabolism. Our aim was to investigate the effects of excess folic acid (EFA) intake compared to adequate folic acid (AFA) intake on metabolic health in a rodent model. We conducted these investigations in the setting of either a 15% energy low fat (LF) diet or 60% energy high fat (HF) diet. There was no difference in weight gain, fat mass, or glucose tolerance in EFA-fed rats compared to AFA-fed rats when they were fed a LF diet. However, rats fed EFA in combination with a HF diet had significantly greater weight gain and fat mass compared to rats fed AFA (p < 0.05). Gene expression analysis showed increased mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and some of its target genes in adipose tissue of high fat-excess folic acid (HF-EFA) fed rats. Inflammation was increased in HF-EFA fed rats, associated with impaired glucose tolerance compared to high fat-adequate folic acid (HF-AFA) fed rats (p < 0.05). In addition, folic acid induced PPARγ expression and triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells. Our results suggest that excess folic acid may exacerbate weight gain, fat accumulation, and inflammation caused by consumption of a HF diet.

  12. Placental cortisol and cord serum IGFBP-2 concentrations are important determinants of postnatal weight gain.

    PubMed

    Street, M E; Smerieri, A; Petraroli, A; Cesari, S; Viani, I; Garrubba, M; Rossi, M; Bernasconi, S

    2012-01-01

    There is a need to identify simple biochemical markers at birth that may predict subjects at risk of growth failure and metabolic complications in later life. Limited research to date has been performed on relationships of specific biochemical determinants at birth with postnatal weight gain and growth. We proposed to establish whether placental cortisol and IL-6 concentrations and cord serum IGF-II and IGFBP-2 concentrations influenced postnatal growth. We followed up from pregnancy 23 IUGR and 37 AGA subjects, and determined placental cortisol and IL-6 concentrations, and cord serum IGF-II, and IGFBP-2 concentrations at birth. We obtained height and weight measurements at 3, 6, 12, 24 months and 5 years of age in 20 IUGR and 15 AGA subjects of comparable gestational age. A multiple linear regression model was designed to establish the effect of the placental and cord serum peptides on postnatal linear growth and weight gain. All IUGR subjects had catch-up growth before 2 years of age. Placental cortisol concentration correlated positively with weight gain during the first 5 years of postnatal growth (P<0.05). Subjects with the highest placental cortisol concentrations were those who showed a greater increase in weight. Cord serum IGFBP-2 concentrations correlated positively with weight gain throughout the 5 year observation period (P:0.003). The subjects with the highest concentrations showed a greater weight gain. Placental cortisol and cord serum IGFBP-2 concentrations were related to postnatal weight gain, suggesting that the fetal environment has long-term effects on growth.

  13. Relationship between health services, socioeconomic variables and inadequate weight gain among Brazilian children.

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, A. C.; Peterson, K. E.; Cufino, E.; Gardner, J.; Craveiro, M. V.; Ascherio, A.

    1999-01-01

    This ecological analysis assessed the relative contribution of behavioural, health services and socioeconomic variables to inadequate weight gain in infants (0-11 months) and children (12-23 months) in 140 municipalities in the State of Ceara, north-east Brazil. To assess the total effect of selected variables, we fitted three unique sets of multivariate linear regression models to the prevalence of inadequate weight gain in infants and in children. The final predictive models included variables from the three sets. Findings showed that participation in growth monitoring and urbanization were inversely and significantly associated with the prevalence of inadequate weight gain in infants, accounting for 38.3% of the variation. Female illiteracy rate, participation in growth monitoring and degree of urbanization were all positively associated with prevalence of inadequate weight gain in children. Together, these factors explained 25.6% of the variation. Our results suggest that efforts to reduce the average municipality-specific female illiteracy rate, in combination with participation in growth monitoring, may be effective in reducing municipality-level prevalence of inadequate weight gain in infants and children in Ceara. PMID:10612885

  14. Weight gain following subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation: a PET study.

    PubMed

    Sauleau, Paul; Le Jeune, Florence; Drapier, Sophie; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Dondaine, Thibaut; Haegelen, Claire; Lalys, Florent; Robert, Gabriel; Drapier, Dominique; Vérin, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain weight gain after deep brain stimulation (DBS), but none provides a fully satisfactory account of this adverse effect. We analyzed the correlation between changes in brain metabolism (using positron emission tomography [PET] imaging) and weight gain after bilateral subthalamic nucleus DBS in patients with Parkinson's disease. Body mass index was calculated and brain activity prospectively measured using 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose 3 months before and 4 months after the start of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in 23 patients with Parkinson's disease. Motor complications (United Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS]-IV scores) and dopaminergic medication were included in the analysis to control for their possible influence on brain metabolism. Mean ± standard deviation (SD) body mass index increased significantly by 0.8 ± 1.5 kg/m(2) (P = 0.03). Correlations were found between weight gain and changes in brain metabolism in limbic and associative areas, including the orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann areas [BAs] 10 and 11), lateral and medial parts of the temporal lobe (BAs 20, 21, 22,39 and 42), anterior cingulate cortex (BA 32), and retrosplenial cortex (BA 30). However, we found no correlation between weight gain and metabolic changes in sensorimotor areas. These findings suggest that changes in associative and limbic processes contribute to weight gain after subthalamic nucleus DBS in Parkinson's disease.

  15. Olanzapine depot exposure in male rats: Dose-dependent lipogenic effects without concomitant weight gain.

    PubMed

    Fernø, J; Ersland, K M; Duus, I H; González-García, I; Fossan, K O; Berge, R K; Steen, V M; Skrede, S

    2015-06-01

    Treatment with second-generation antipsychotic agents such as olanzapine frequently results in metabolic adverse effects, e.g. hyperphagia, weight gain and dyslipidaemia in patients of both genders. The molecular mechanisms underlying metabolic adverse effects are still largely unknown, and studies in rodents represent an important approach in their exploration. However, the validity of the rodent model is hampered by the fact that antipsychotics induce weight gain in female, but not male, rats. When administered orally, the short half-life of olanzapine in rats prevents stable plasma concentrations of the drug. We recently showed that a single intramuscular injection of long-acting olanzapine formulation yields clinically relevant plasma concentrations accompanied by several dysmetabolic features in the female rat. In the current study, we show that depot injections of 100-250 mg/kg olanzapine yielded clinically relevant plasma olanzapine concentrations also in male rats. In spite of transient hyperphagia, however, olanzapine resulted in weight loss rather than weight gain. The resultant negative feed efficiency was accompanied by a slight elevation of thermogenesis markers in brown adipose tissue for the highest olanzapine dose, but the olanzapine-related reduction in weight gain remains to be explained. In spite of the absence of weight gain, an olanzapine dose of 200mg/kg or above induced significantly elevated plasma cholesterol levels and pronounced activation of lipogenic gene expression in the liver. These results confirm that olanzapine stimulates lipogenic effects, independent of weight gain, and raise the possibility that endocrine factors may influence gender specificity of metabolic effects of antipsychotics in the rat.

  16. Comparative Effectiveness of Group and Individual Prenatal Care on Gestational Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    STEINKA-FRY, Katarzyna T.; GESELL, Sabina B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study examined differences in gestational weight gain for women in CenteringPregnancy (CP) group prenatal care versus individually delivered prenatal care. METHODS We conducted a retrospective chart review and used propensity scores to form a matched sample of 393 women (76% African-American, 13% Latina, 11% White; average age 22 years) receiving prenatal care at a community health center in the South. Women were matched on a wide range of demographic and medical background characteristics RESULTS Compared to the matched group of women receiving standard individual prenatal care, CP participants were less likely to have excessive gestational weight gain, regardless of their pre-pregnancy weight (b = −.99, 95% CI [−1.92, −.06], RRR = .37). CP reduced the risk of excessive weight gain during pregnancy to 54% of what it would have been in the standard model of prenatal care (NNT = 5). The beneficial effect of CP was largest for women who were overweight or obese prior to their pregnancy. Effects did not vary by gestational age at delivery. Post-hoc analyses provided no evidence of adverse effects on newborn birth weight outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Group prenatal care had statistically and clinically significant beneficial effects on reducing excessive gestational weight gain relative to traditional individual prenatal care. PMID:24343309

  17. Comparative effectiveness of group and individual prenatal care on gestational weight gain.

    PubMed

    Tanner-Smith, Emily E; Steinka-Fry, Katarzyna T; Gesell, Sabina B

    2014-09-01

    This study examined differences in gestational weight gain for women in CenteringPregnancy (CP) group prenatal care versus individually delivered prenatal care. We conducted a retrospective chart review and used propensity scores to form a matched sample of 393 women (76 % African-American, 13 % Latina, 11 % White; average age 22 years) receiving prenatal care at a community health center in the South. Women were matched on a wide range of demographic and medical background characteristics. Compared to the matched group of women receiving standard individual prenatal care, CP participants were less likely to have excessive gestational weight gain, regardless of their pre-pregnancy weight (b = -.99, 95 % CI [-1.92, -.06], RRR = .37). CP reduced the risk of excessive weight gain during pregnancy to 54 % of what it would have been in the standard model of prenatal care (NNT = 5). The beneficial effect of CP was largest for women who were overweight or obese prior to their pregnancy. Effects did not vary by gestational age at delivery. Post-hoc analyses provided no evidence of adverse effects on newborn birth weight outcomes. Group prenatal care had statistically and clinically significant beneficial effects on reducing excessive gestational weight gain relative to traditional individual prenatal care.

  18. Food consumption and weight gain after cessation of chronic amphetamine administration.

    PubMed

    Orsini, Caitlin A; Ginton, Guy; Shimp, Kristy G; Avena, Nicole M; Gold, Mark S; Setlow, Barry

    2014-07-01

    Cessation of drug use often coincides with increased food consumption and weight gain in recovering addicts. However, it is not known whether this phenomenon (particularly the weight gain) is uniquely human, or whether it represents a consequence of drug cessation common across species. To address this issue, rats (n = 10/group) were given systemic injections of D-amphetamine (3 mg/kg) or an equal volume of saline vehicle for 9 consecutive days. Beginning 2 days after the final injection, rats were given free access to a highly palatable food mixture (consisting of sugar and butter) along with their standard chow diet, and food consumption and body weight were measured every 48 h for 30 days. Consistent with clinical observations, amphetamine-treated rats showed a greater increase in body weight over the course of the 30 days relative to vehicle-treated rats. Surprisingly, there was no difference in highly palatable food consumption between amphetamine- and vehicle-treated groups, but the amphetamine-treated group consumed significantly more standard chow than the control group. The finding that a history of chronic amphetamine exposure increases food consumption is consistent with previous work in humans showing that withdrawal from drugs of abuse is associated with overeating and weight gain. The current findings may reflect amphetamine-induced sensitization of mechanisms involved in reward motivation, suggesting that weight gain following drug cessation in humans could be due to similar mechanisms.

  19. Substantial weight gains are common prior to treatment-seeking in obese patients with binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Masheb, Robin M; White, Marney A; Grilo, Carlos M

    2013-10-01

    This study examined weight trajectories in obese patients with binge eating disorder (BED) during the year prior to treatment initiation and explored potential correlates of these weight changes. One hundred thirty (N=130) consecutive, treatment-seeking, obese patients with BED were assessed with structured interviews and self-report questionnaires. Eighty-three percent (83%; n=108) of treatment seeking obese BED patients gained weight, and 65% (n=84) gained a clinically significant amount of weight (greater than or equal to 5% body weight), in the year preceding treatment. Overall, participants reported a mean percent weight gain of 8% (16.6 pounds) during the 12months prior to treatment with a wide range of weight changes across participants (from a 52% weight gain to a 13% weight loss). A substantial proportion of patients (35%), categorized as High Weight Gainers (defined as gaining more than 10% of body weight during previous year), reported gaining an average of 16.7% of body weight. Low Weight Gainers (defined as gaining greater than 5%, but less than 10%) comprised 29% of the sample and were characterized by a mean gain of 6.9% of body weight. Weight Maintainers/Losers (defined as having maintained or lost weight during the 12months prior to treatment) comprised 17% of the sample and reported losing on average 2.8% of body weight. These three groups did not differ significantly in their current weight and eating behaviors or eating disorder psychopathology. The majority of treatment-seeking obese patients with BED reported having gained substantial amounts of weight during the previous year. These findings provide an important context for interpreting the modest weight losses typically reported in treatment studies of BED. Failure to produce weight loss in these studies may be reinterpreted as stabilization of weight and prevention of further weight gain.

  20. Weight gain after adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with early breast cancer in Istanbul Turkey.

    PubMed

    Basaran, Gul; Turhal, Nazım Serdar; Cabuk, Devrim; Yurt, Nevin; Yurtseven, Gul; Gumus, Mahmut; Teomete, Mehmet; Dane, Faysal; Yumuk, Perran Fulden

    2011-06-01

    Weight gain is a well-known and unwanted complication of adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer. We observed that the female Turkish cancer patients frequently gain weight with adjuvant treatment of breast cancer and planned to examine the magnitude of this problem in early breast cancer patients treated at our hospital. A total of 176 early breast cancer patients who received their adjuvant systemic therapy in Marmara University Hospital between 2003 and 2007 are included in the study. We recorded their weight before and after chemotherapy and also a year after chemotherapy to find out whether the change with weight is transitory. We have also recorded demographic information, including the educational level, menopausal status, the type of chemotherapy or hormonal treatment administered stage of disease, marital status, occupation and the underlying diseases to analyze the relationship between change in weight and these parameters. Median age of patients was 53 and 72% of patients were postmenopausal. Educational level was equally distributed for primary education (27%), high school (40%), and university (33%). The majority of the patients (76%) was married, had two children (69%) and was housewife (60%). Family history of any cancer was high (32%). Most of the patients had stage II cancer (56%), received anthracyclines+/- taxane based chemotherapy (98%) and had no underlying disease (68%). The majority also did not smoke (73%) or drink alcohol (93%). A total of 67% and 72% patients gained weight upon completion and one year after completion of chemotherapy. Mean weight before the chemotherapy, upon completion of chemotherapy and one year after completion of chemotherapy were 68.9 kg, 70.6 kg (P = 0.000) and 71.9 kg (P = 0.000) respectively. Mean body mass index was 27.1 at baseline, 27.8 upon completion of chemotherapy (P = 0.000) and 28.3 one year after completion of chemotherapy (P = 0.000). Age, menopausal status, multiparity and presence of comorbid diseases

  1. Childhood consequences of maternal obesity and excessive weight gain during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Romy; Felix, Janine F; Duijts, Liesbeth; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2014-11-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern. In western countries, the prevalence of obesity in pregnant women has strongly increased, with reported prevalence rates reaching 30%. Also, up to 40% of women gain an excessive amount of weight during pregnancy. Recent observational studies and meta-analyses strongly suggest long-term impact of maternal obesity and excessive weight gain during pregnancy on adiposity, cardiovascular and respiratory related health outcomes in their children. These observations suggest that maternal adiposity during pregnancy may program common health problems in the offspring. Currently, it remains unclear whether the observed associations are causal, or just reflect confounding by family-based sociodemographic or lifestyle-related factors. Parent-offspring studies, sibling comparison studies, Mendelian randomization studies and randomized trials can help to explore the causality and underlying mechanisms. Also, the potential for prevention of common diseases in future generations by reducing maternal obesity and excessive weight gain during pregnancy needs to be explored.

  2. Effect of body weight gain on insulin sensitivity after retirement from exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolkas, Constantine B.; Rodnick, Kenneth J.; Mondon, Carl E.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the body-weight gain after retirement from an exercise-training program on the retained increase in insulin sensitivity elicited by the training was investigated in exercise-trained (ET) rats. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by oral glucose tolerance and insulin suppression tests immediately after training and during retirement. Results show that, compared with sedentary controls, exercise training enhanced insulin-induced glucose uptake, but the enhanced sensitivity was gradually lost with the end of running activity until after seven days of retirement, when it became equal to that of controls. This loss of enhanced sensitivity to insulin was associated with an accelerated gain in body weight beginning one day after the start of retirement. However, those animals that gained weight only at rates similar to those of control rats, retained their enhanced sensitivity to insulin.

  3. The antipsychotic olanzapine interacts with the gut microbiome to cause weight gain in mouse.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Andrew P; Crowley, James J; Nonneman, Randal J; Quackenbush, Corey R; Miller, Cheryl N; Ryan, Allison K; Bogue, Molly A; Paredes, Sur Herrera; Yourstone, Scott; Carroll, Ian M; Kawula, Thomas H; Bower, Maureen A; Sartor, R Balfour; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2014-01-01

    The second-generation antipsychotic olanzapine is effective in reducing psychotic symptoms but can cause extreme weight gain in human patients. We investigated the role of the gut microbiota in this adverse drug effect using a mouse model. First, we used germ-free C57BL/6J mice to demonstrate that gut bacteria are necessary and sufficient for weight gain caused by oral delivery of olanzapine. Second, we surveyed fecal microbiota before, during, and after treatment and found that olanzapine potentiated a shift towards an "obesogenic" bacterial profile. Finally, we demonstrated that olanzapine has antimicrobial activity in vitro against resident enteric bacterial strains. These results collectively provide strong evidence for a mechanism underlying olanzapine-induced weight gain in mouse and a hypothesis for clinical translation in human patients.

  4. Weight gain and psychiatric treatment: Is there a role for green tea and conjugated linoleic acid?

    PubMed

    Katzman, Martin A; Jacobs, Leslie; Marcus, Madalyn; Vermani, Monica; Logan, Alan C

    2007-05-03

    Dietary supplement use is widespread in developed nations. In particular, patients who utilize mental health services also report frequent consumption of dietary supplements, often in relation to management of adverse events and specifically weight gain. Weight gain induced by psychotropic medications can further compound psychological distress and negatively influence compliance. Here we report on four cases of social anxiety disorder treated with the atypical antipsychotic quetiapine. Self-administration of conjugated linoleic acid and green tea extract may have influenced objective anthropomorphic measurements; each patient had an unexpected decrease in total body fat mass, a decrease in body fat percentage and an increase in lean body mass. Since weight gain is a common and undesirable side-effect with psychiatric medications, our observation strongly suggests the need for controlled clinical trials using these agents.

  5. Percentage of Body Fat and Weight Gain in Participants in the Tehran High School Wrestling Championship

    PubMed Central

    Kordi, Ramin; Nourian, Ruhollah; Rostami, Mohsen; Wallace, W. Angus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Weight loss in wrestling has been found to be an interesting issue for researchers. In this regard, complications of weight loss in wrestlers before the competitions and their weight gain in course of competitions have been debated in previous studies. The objective of this study was to investigate the extent of weight gain and to estimate the percentage of body fat in participants in the Tehran high school male wrestling championship. Methods This study was a cross sectional survey. Subjects were participants of the Tehran high school male wrestling championship (n = 365). Weight gain in course of competitions and body fat levels (based on skin fold measurements) of subjects were measured. Results Between the first weigh-in of the wrestlers which was done one day before the competitions and the second weigh-in which was conducted immediately before the first round of their first competition (20 hours), 69% of subjects gained on average 1.3±0.9 kg (range: 0.1 to 6.10 kg) or 2.2±1.7% of the wrestler’s weight (range: 0.1 to 9.3). Among the subjects, the mean of fat body percentage was found to be 15.2%. Conclusions Rapid weight loss for matches was prevalent among subjects. It was also found that Iranian wrestlers have a relatively higher body fat percentage in comparison to American wrestlers. Therefore, it can be concluded that weight loss behavior of these wrestlers should be changed from using dehydration methods to using gradual methods of weight loss such as fat reduction methods. PMID:22942998

  6. High-Protein Diet Improves Postoperative Weight Gain After Massive Small-Bowel Resection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Raphael C.; Choi, Pamela M.; Diaz-Miron, Jose; Sommovilla, Joshua; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a morbid clinical condition that results from massive small-bowel resection (SBR). After SBR, there is a dramatic weight loss in the acute postoperative period. Our aim was to determine the impact of a high-protein diet (HPD) on weight gain and body composition in mice after SBR. Methods C57BL/6 mice underwent 50 % proximal SBR. Postoperatively, mice were randomly selected to receive standard rodent liquid diet (LD) (n=6) or an isocaloric HPD (n=9) for 28 days. Mice weights were recorded daily. Body composition analyses were obtained weekly. Student's t test was used for statistical comparisons with p<0.05 considered significant. Results Mice that were fed HPD after SBR returned to baseline weight on average at postoperative day (POD) 8 versus mice that were fed LD that returned to baseline weight on average at POD 22. Total fat mass and lean mass were significantly greater by POD 14 within the HPD group. Both groups of mice demonstrated normal structural adaptation. Conclusion HPD results in greater weight gain and improved body composition in mice after SBR. This finding may be clinically important for patients with SBS since improved weight gain may reduce the time needed for parenteral nutrition. PMID:25519080

  7. Incarceration and adult weight gain in the National Survey of American Life (NSAL)

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Zinzi D.; Williams, David R.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Okechukwu, Cassandra A.

    2016-01-01

    The United States has the unenviable distinction of having both the highest obesity rate among Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) member countries and the highest incarceration rate in the world. Further, both are socially patterned by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic position. Incarceration involves various health behaviors that could influence adult weight trajectory. We evaluated the associations between history and duration of adult incarceration and weight gain using the National Survey of American Life (N=6,082 adults residing in the 48 contiguous states between February 2001 and March 2003). We propensity score-matched individuals to control for the probability of having a history of incarceration. To examine the relation between prior incarceration and adult weight gain, we fit gender-stratified generalized estimating equations controlling for propensity of incarceration history, age, education, income, race/ethnicity, and marital status. For males (N=563), incarceration was associated with about a 1.77 kg/m2 lower gain in body mass index (BMI) during adulthood, after adjusting for age, education, income, race/ethnicity, and marital status in addition to the propensity of having a history of incarceration (95% CI: −2.63, −0.92). For females (N=286), no significant overall relationship was found between a history of incarceration and adult weight gain. In subgroup analyses among those with an incarceration history, we found no overall association between duration of incarceration and adult weight gain in men or women. In sensitivity analyses, neither tobacco smoking nor parity changed the results. The results of this study indicate that incarceration is associated with a lower transition of weight gain in males, but not females. PMID:26456214

  8. Filling yet fattening: stereotypical beliefs about the weight gain potential and satiation of foods.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Michael E

    2006-03-01

    To what extent are stereotypes concerning the weight-gain potential and perceived hunger satisfaction of food names not congruent with views of the nutrient profiles of those same foods? Respondents rated the same 22 food names and descriptions in terms of weight-gain potential and hunger satisfaction. Half of the 22 snacks included foods from the lower two tiers of the USDA Food Guide Pyramid (fruits, vegetables, and grains: FV&G) and the other half from the upper two tiers (meats, dairy, fats, and sweets: MDF&S). FV&G and MDF&S snack names and descriptions were paired for data analyses based on energy content. Name and description ratings for weight-gain potential were not correlated, while these ratings for hunger satisfaction were strongly correlated. For weight-gain potential, fat and fiber content predicted snack-name ratings, while energy and sugar content predicted description ratings. For perceived hunger satisfaction, protein content predicted snack name ratings while energy and fat content predicted description ratings. The MDF&S snack named in each pair was always considered a greater weight gain promoter compared to its corresponding FV&G snack named. However, the description of the FV&G snack in each pair was often judged to promote greater weight-gain than the description of its corresponding MDF&S snack. Also, MDF&S names were generally judged as more filling than FV&G foods named with similar calorie content; however, a trend in the opposite direction was evident when rating the nutrient descriptions of these same foods. Apparently, food names have acquired reputation for promoting obesity and (to a lesser extent) hunger satisfaction that are not based on their nutrient profiles.

  9. Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Malik, Vasanti S; Schulze, Matthias B; Hu, Frank B

    2006-08-01

    Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), particularly carbonated soft drinks, may be a key contributor to the epidemic of overweight and obesity, by virtue of these beverages' high added sugar content, low satiety, and incomplete compensation for total energy. Whether an association exists between SSB intake and weight gain is unclear. We searched English-language MEDLINE publications from 1966 through May 2005 for cross-sectional, prospective cohort, and experimental studies of the relation between SSBs and the risk of weight gain (ie, overweight, obesity, or both). Thirty publications (15 cross-sectional, 10 prospective, and 5 experimental) were selected on the basis of relevance and quality of design and methods. Findings from large cross-sectional studies, in conjunction with those from well-powered prospective cohort studies with long periods of follow-up, show a positive association between greater intakes of SSBs and weight gain and obesity in both children and adults. Findings from short-term feeding trials in adults also support an induction of positive energy balance and weight gain by intake of sugar-sweetened sodas, but these trials are few. A school-based intervention found significantly less soft-drink consumption and prevalence of obese and overweight children in the intervention group than in control subjects after 12 mo, and a recent 25-week randomized controlled trial in adolescents found further evidence linking SSB intake to body weight. The weight of epidemiologic and experimental evidence indicates that a greater consumption of SSBs is associated with weight gain and obesity. Although more research is needed, sufficient evidence exists for public health strategies to discourage consumption of sugary drinks as part of a healthy lifestyle.

  10. Childhood maltreatment and the risk of pre-pregnancy obesity and excessive gestational weight gain.

    PubMed

    Diesel, Jill C; Bodnar, Lisa M; Day, Nancy L; Larkby, Cynthia A

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate whether maternal history of childhood maltreatment was associated with pre-pregnancy obesity or excessive gestational weight gain. Pregnant women (n = 472) reported pre-pregnancy weight and height and gestational weight gain and were followed up to 16 years post-partum when they reported maltreatment on the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). CTQ score ranged from no maltreatment (25) to severe maltreatment (125). Prenatal mental health modified the association between CTQ score and maternal weight (P < 0.15), and thus stratified models are presented. After adjusting for race, prenatal tobacco, marijuana and alcohol use, a one standard deviation (1 SD) increase in CTQ score was associated with a 45% increase in the risk of pre-pregnancy obesity among the 141 women with elevated anxiety (≥75th percentile on the State Trait Anxiety Inventory) [relative risk, RR (95% confidence interval, CI): 1.45 (1.12, 1.88)], but was not associated among less anxious (<75th percentile) women [RR (95% CI): 1.10 (0.81, 1.51)]. Risk of excessive gestational weight gain was higher [adjusted RR (95% CI): 1.21 (1.07, 1.37)] with every 1 SD increase in CTQ score for anxious women. No association was observed for less anxious women [adjusted RR (95% CI): 0.89 (0.78, 1.02)]. Prenatal depression similarly modified the association between maltreatment and weight gain. Factors such as psychological status and traumatic experiences in early childhood may contribute to pre-pregnancy obesity and excessive gestational weight gain.

  11. DRD2 Promoter Region Variation Predicts Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain in First Episode Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lencz, Todd; Robinson, Delbert G.; Napolitano, Barbara; Sevy, Serge; Kane, John M.; Goldman, David; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    Many antipsychotic medications carry a substantial liability for weight gain, and one mechanism common to all antipsychotics is binding to the dopamine D2 receptor. We therefore examined the relationship between −141C Ins/Del (rs1799732), a functional promoter region polymorphism in DRD2, and antipsychotic-induced weight gain in 58 first episode schizophrenia patients enrolled in a randomized trial of risperidone (RIS) vs. olanzapine (OLZ). Carriers of the deletion allele (n=29) were compared to Ins/Ins homozygotes (non-carriers, n=29) in a mixed model encompassing 10 weight measurements over 16 weeks. Deletion allele carriers demonstrated significantly more weight gain after 6 weeks of treatment regardless of assigned medication. While deletion carriers were prescribed higher doses of OLZ (but not RIS), dose did not appear to account for the genotype effects on weight gain. Given previous evidence that deletion carriers demonstrate reduced symptom response to medication, additional study of appropriate treatment options for these patients appears warranted. PMID:20664489

  12. Biological determinants linking infant weight gain and child obesity: current knowledge and future directions.

    PubMed

    Young, Bridget E; Johnson, Susan L; Krebs, Nancy F

    2012-09-01

    Childhood obesity rates have reached epidemic proportions. Excessive weight gain in infancy is associated with persistence of elevated weight status and later obesity. In this review, we make the case that weight gain in the first 6 mo is especially predictive of later obesity risk due to the metabolic programming that can occur early postpartum. The current state of knowledge regarding the biological determinants of excess infant weight gain is reviewed, with particular focus on infant feeding choice. Potential mechanisms by which different feeding approaches may program the metabolic profile of the infant, causing the link between early weight gain and later obesity are proposed. These mechanisms are likely highly complex and involve synergistic interactions between endocrine effects and factors that alter the inflammatory and oxidative stress status of the infant. Gaps in current knowledge are highlighted. These include a lack of data describing 1) what type of infant body fat distribution may impart risk and 2) how maternal metabolic dysfunction (obesity and/or diabetes) may affect milk composition and exert downstream effects on infant metabolism. Improved understanding and management of these early postnatal determinants of childhood obesity may have great impact on reducing its prevalence.

  13. The young hunter hypothesis: age-related weight gain--a tribute to the thrifty theories.

    PubMed

    Vardi, P; Pinhas-Hamiel, O

    2000-12-01

    A gradual and persistent physiologic increase in body weight of 3-5 kg per decade occurs between the third to the fifth decade. The thrifty genotype theory explains weight gain in large populations, the thrifty phenotype theory explains weight gain in subjects with intrauterine growth retardation. The young hunter theory explains the physiologic age-related weight gain. We believe this is nature's method of preservation by default. According to the young hunter theory, in the past food providers needed an appropriate muscular apparatus to cope with continual hunting expeditions to ensure maximal survival. At the end of the chronological 'hunting' age, there was a gradual redirection of metabolic processes toward energy conservation in anticipation of aging. According to our hypothesis, muscle loss allows for the full expression of hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance, which allows the fuel previously directed to the muscle to be deposited as adipose tissue. Thus, weight gain is an adaptive process engineered to compensate for adult muscle mass loss, guaranteeing survival and longevity beyond the age of hunting.

  14. Pregnant women's perceptions of weight gain, physical activity, and nutrition using Theory of Planned Behavior constructs.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Kara M; Wilcox, Sara; Liu, Jihong; Blair, Steven N; Pate, Russell R

    2016-02-01

    A better understanding of women's perceptions of weight gain and related behaviors during pregnancy is necessary to inform behavioral interventions. We used the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) to examine pregnant women's perceptions and intentions toward weight gain, physical activity (PA), and nutrition using a mixed methods study design. Women between 20 and 30 weeks gestation (n = 189) were recruited to complete an Internet-based survey. Salient beliefs toward weight gain, PA, and nutrition were captured through open-ended responses and content analyzed into themes. TPB constructs (attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, intentions) were examined using Pearson correlations and hierarchical linear regression models. Salient beliefs were consistent with the existing literature in non-pregnant populations, with the addition of many pregnancy-specific beliefs. TPB constructs accounted for 23-39 % of the variance in weight gain, PA, and nutrition intentions, and made varying contributions across outcomes. The TPB is a useful framework for examining women's weight-related intentions during pregnancy. Study implications for intervention development are discussed.

  15. Weight gain restriction during pregnancy is safe for both the mother and neonate.

    PubMed

    Claesson, Ing-Marie; Brynhildsen, Jan; Cedergren, Marie; Jeppsson, Annika; Sydsjö, Adam; Josefsson, Ann

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether pregnancy, delivery, and neonatal outcome among obese pregnant women who took part in an intervention study for weight restriction differed from a group of obese pregnant women attending regular antenatal care. The intervention group consisted of 155 obese pregnant women and 193 obese pregnant women who formed a control group. We found that a weight gain restriction of less than 7 kg during pregnancy is safe for both the mother and the neonate.

  16. Maternal body weight gain and fetus development of rats fed a moderately altered olive oil.

    PubMed

    López-Varela, S; Sánchez-Muniz, F J; Pérez-Granados, A M; Cuesta, C

    1998-03-01

    The present study examines whether the consumption of a moderately altered olive oil influenced body weight gain and food efficiency ratio of pregnant rats as well as placental and fetal development. Olive oil used for frying 15 times undergoes a relatively slight alteration involving a statistically significant increase in polar content (9.0+/-0.1 mg/100 mg oil vs 2.0+/-0.1 mg/100 mg oil; p < 0.001). The methyl ester content also increased (5.1+/-0.8 mg/100 mg oil vs 1.8+/-0.5 mg/100 mg oil; p < 0.02), while the linoleic acid and oleic acid contents decreased significantly (6.2+/-0.6% oil vs 7.2+/-0.2% oil and 75.8+/-0.6% vs 78.9+/-0.2%, respectively, both p < 0.05). Wistar rats were divided into four groups, two of which included pregnant rats (P1 and P2) and the other two, non-pregnant rats (NP1 and NP2). Groups NP1 and P1 received a diet containing 15% of fat as unused olive oil, while groups NP2 and P2 were fed a diet with a fat content of 15% as the olive oil used in 15 fryings. Pregnancy increased food intake, body weight, weight gain and food efficiency ratio (P1 vs NP1, and P2 vs NP1), while consumption of the used olive oil diet with respect to the unused oil diet did not alter food intake, body weight, weight gain and food efficiency ratio, placental weight, fetal weight and the number of fetuses in P2 rats with respect to P1 ones. These results suggest that in pregnant rats consumption of olive oil with a moderate level of alteration, as the only dietary fat source, exerts no detrimental effects on the mother weight gain or conceptus development.

  17. Perceived psychosocial stress and gestational weight gain among women with gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Ai; Ferrara, Assiamira; Brown, Susan D.; Ehrlich, Samantha F.; Tsai, Ai-Lin; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Crites, Yvonne; Hedderson, Monique M.

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence links perceived stress—a potentially modifiable psychosocial risk factor—with health behaviors and obesity. Yet little is known about the relationship between stress during pregnancy and gestational weight gain, particularly among women with pregnancy complications. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis to examine associations between psychosocial stress during pregnancy and gestational weight gain among women with gestational diabetes. We used baseline data from the Gestational Diabetes’s Effects on Moms (GEM) study: 1,353 women with gestational diabetes who delivered a term singleton within Kaiser Permanente Northern California were included. Perceived stress near the time of gestational diabetes diagnosis was measured using the validated Perceived Stress Scale (PSS10). Gestational weight gain was categorized according to the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations. Binomial regression analyses adjusted for gestational age and maternal age at the time of gestational diabetes diagnosis, and race/ethnicity and estimated rate ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence interval (CI). Among women with a normal pregravid Body Mass Index (BMI 18.5–24.9 kg/m2), there was a significant association between high (Q4) PSS score and risk of both exceeding and gaining below the Institute of Medicine recommendations compared to those with lower stress (Q1) [adjusted RR = 2.16 95% CI 1.45–3.21; RR = 1.39 95% CI 1.01–1.91, respectively.] Among women with pregravid overweight/obesity (BMI≥25 kg/m2), there was no association. Although the temporal relationship could not be established from this study, there may be a complex interplay between psychosocial stress and gestational weight gain among women with gestational diabetes. Further studies examining stress earlier in pregnancy, risk of developing gestational diabetes and excess/inadequate gestational weight gain are warranted to clarify these complex relationships. PMID:28350836

  18. Conjugated linoleic acid reduces body weight gain in ovariectomized female C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Noriko; Chen, Shiuan

    2010-10-01

    Estrogen is an important protective factor against obesity in females. Therefore, postmenopausal women have a higher rate of obesity than premenopausal women, which is associated with age-related loss of ovary function. It has been reported that a diet containing conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) reduced body weight and body fat mass in the animal model as well as in human trials. We hypothesized that ingestion of CLA would reduce body weight gain in ovariectomized (OVX) female C57BL/6J mice that is a model for postmenopausal women. We further hypothesized that body weight reduction may improve obesity-related complication. To test this hypothesis, the OVX mice were fed with a high-fat diet containing CLA for 3 months. Mice had significantly reduced body weight gain compared with OVX mice fed with a high-fat diet without CLA. Although CLA was effective in slowing down body weight gain of both sham and OVX mice, analysis of adipocyte size and number suggested different mechanisms for loss of fat tissue in these 2 groups of mice. Treatment with CLA did not increase liver weight and accumulation of fat in the livers of OVX mice. Furthermore, CLA intake did not change insulin resistance. Our results indicate that CLA is functional as an antiobesity supplement in the mouse model for postmenopausal women and that the antiobesity effect of CLA is not estrogen related.

  19. Conjugated linoleic acid reduces body weight gain in ovariectomized female C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Kanaya, Noriko; Chen, Shiuan

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen is an important protective factor against obesity in females. Therefore, postmenopausal women have a higher rate of obesity than premenopausal women, which is associated with age-related loss of ovary function. It has been reported that a diet containing conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) reduced body weight and body fat mass in the animal model as well as in human trials. We hypothesized that ingestion of CLA would reduce body weight gain in ovariectomized (OVX) female C57BL/6J mice which is a model for postmenopaual women. We further hypothesized that body weight reduction may improve obesity-related complication. To test this hypothesis, the OVX mice fed with a high fat diet containing CLA for 3 months. Mice had significantly reduced body weight gain compared to OVX mice fed with a high fat diet without CLA. While CLA was effective in slowing down of body weight gain of both Sham and OVX mice, analysis of adipocyte size and number suggested different mechanisms for loss of fat tissue in these two groups of mice. CLA treatment did not increase liver weight and accumulation of fat in the livers of OVX mice. Furthermore, CLA intake did not change insulin resistance. Our results indicate that CLA is functional as an anti-obesity supplement in the mouse model for postmenopausal women, and the anti-obesity effect of CLA is not estrogen-related. PMID:21056287

  20. Weight gain is associated with medial contact site of subthalamic stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Růžička, Filip; Jech, Robert; Nováková, Lucie; Urgošík, Dušan; Vymazal, Josef; Růžička, Evžen

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess changes in body-weight in relation to active electrode contact position in the subthalamic nucleus. Regular body weight measurements were done in 20 patients with advanced Parkinson's disease within a period of 18 months after implantation. T1-weighted (1.5T) magnetic resonance images were used to determine electrode position in the subthalamic nucleus and the Unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS-III) was used for motor assessment. The distance of the contacts from the wall of the third ventricle in the mediolateral direction inversely correlated with weight gain (r = -0.55, p<0.01) and with neurostimulation-related motor condition expressed as the contralateral hemi-body UPDRS-III (r = -0.42, p<0.01). Patients with at least one contact within 9.3 mm of the wall experienced significantly greater weight gain (9.4 ± (SD)4.4 kg, N = 11) than those with both contacts located laterally (3.9 ± 2.7 kg, N = 9) (p<0.001). The position of the active contact is critical not only for motor outcome but is also associated with weight gain, suggesting a regional effect of subthalamic stimulation on adjacent structures involved in the central regulation of energy balance, food intake or reward.

  1. Body composition and energy and protein nutritional requirements for weight gain in Santa Ines crossbred sheep.

    PubMed

    Cutrim, Darley Oliveira; Alves, Kaliandra Souza; dos Santos, Rozilda da Conceição; da Mata, Vanessa Jaqueline Veloso; Oliveira, Luis Rennan Sampaio; Gomes, Daiany Íris; Mezzomo, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the body composition and net energy and protein requirements for weight gain in Santa Ines crossbred sheep. Thirty woolless, 4-month-old, castrated male sheep with an initial body weight (BW) of 19.77 ± 1.99 kg were used. Six animals (reference group) were slaughtered after the adaptation period to estimate empty body weight (EBW) and initial body composition. The remaining 24 animals were randomly distributed among four treatments (experimental diets) and slaughtered when they reached 30.24 ± 0.78 kg BW. The body composition ranged from 162.88 to 160.4 g protein/kg EBW, from 59.49 to 164.23 g fat/kg EBW and from 1.54 to 2.46 Mcal energy/kg EBW for animals ranging between 20 and 30 kg BW. The net energy requirement for Santa Ines crossbred sheep linearly increased when BW increased from 20 to 30 kg. Within that same weight range, the net protein requirement for weight gain in sheep was constant, ranging from 12.61 to 12.42 g/day to 100 g daily weight gain.

  2. Chocolate-candy consumption and three-year weight gain among postmenopausal U.S. women

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, James A.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Buijsse, Brian; Wang, Lu; Allison, Matthew A.; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Tinker, Lesley; Waring, Molly E.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Martin, Lisa W.; Thomson, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To test the hypothesis that greater chocolate-candy intake is associated with more weight gain in postmenopausal women. DESIGN AND METHODS Prospective cohort study involving 107,243 post-menopausal American women aged 50–79 years (mean=60.7) at enrolment in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), with three-year follow up. Chocolate-candy consumption was assessed by food frequency questionnaire and body weight was measured. Linear mixed models, adjusted for demographic, socio-economic, anthropomorphic and behavioral variables, were used to test our main hypotheses. RESULTS Compared to women who ate a 1 oz (~28 g) serving of chocolate candy <1 per month, those who ate this amount 1 per month to <1 per week, 1 per week to < 3 per week and ≥3 per week showed greater three-year prospective weight gains (kg) of 0.76 (95% CI: 0.66, 0.85), 0.95 (0.84, 1.06) and 1.40 (1.27, 1.53), respectively, (p for linear trend<0.0001). Each additional 1 oz/day was associated with a greater three-year weight gain (kg) of 0.92 (0.80, 1.05). The weight gain in each chocolate-candy intake level increased as BMI increased above the normal range (18.5–25 kg/m2), and as age decreased. CONCLUSIONS Greater chocolate-candy intake was associated with greater prospective weight gain in this cohort of post-menopausal women. PMID:25644711

  3. Body mass index, gestational weight gain and fatty acid concentrations during pregnancy: the Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    Vidakovic, Aleksandra Jelena; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Gishti, Olta; Felix, Janine F; Williams, Michelle A; Hofman, Albert; Demmelmair, Hans; Koletzko, Berthold; Tiemeier, Henning; Gaillard, Romy

    2015-11-01

    Obesity during pregnancy may be correlated with an adverse nutritional status affecting pregnancy and offspring outcomes. We examined the associations of prepregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with plasma fatty acid concentrations in mid-pregnancy. This study was embedded in a population-based prospective cohort study among 5636 women. We obtained prepregnancy body mass index and maximum weight gain during pregnancy by questionnaires. We measured concentrations of saturated fatty acid (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6 PUFA) at a median gestational age of 20.5 (95% range 17.1-24.9) weeks. We used multivariate linear regression models. As compared to normal weight women, obese women had higher total SFA concentrations [difference: 0.10 standard deviation (SD) (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0, 0.19)] and lower total n-3 PUFA concentrations [difference: - 0.11 SD (95% CI - 0.20, - 0.02)]. As compared to women with sufficient gestational weight gain, those with excessive gestational weight gain had higher SFA concentrations [difference: 0.16 SD (95% CI 0.08, 0.25)], MUFA concentrations [difference: 0.16 SD (95% CI 0.08, 0.24)] and n-6 PUFA concentrations [difference: 0.12 SD (95% CI 0.04, 0.21)]. These results were not materially affected by adjustment for maternal characteristics. Our results suggest that obesity and excessive weight gain during pregnancy are associated with an adverse fatty acids profile. Further studies are needed to assess causality and direction of the observed associations.

  4. Prospect theory and body mass: characterizing psychological parameters for weight-related risk attitudes and weight-gain aversion

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seung-Lark; Bruce, Amanda S.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a novel decision-making paradigm that allows us to apply prospect theory in behavioral economics to body mass. 67 healthy young adults completed self-report measures and two decision-making tasks for weight-loss, as well as for monetary rewards. We estimated risk-related preference and loss aversion parameters for each individual, separately for weight-loss and monetary rewards choice data. Risk-seeking tendency for weight-loss was positively correlated with body mass index in individuals who desired to lose body weight, whereas the risk-seeking for momentary rewards was not. Risk-seeking for weight-loss was correlated to excessive body shape preoccupations, while aversion to weight-gain was correlated with self-reports of behavioral involvement for successful weight-loss. We demonstrated that prospect theory can be useful in explaining the decision-making process related to body mass. Applying prospect theory is expected to advance our understanding of decision-making mechanisms in obesity, which might prove helpful for improving healthy choices. PMID:25852628

  5. Prospect theory and body mass: characterizing psychological parameters for weight-related risk attitudes and weight-gain aversion.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seung-Lark; Bruce, Amanda S

    2015-01-01

    We developed a novel decision-making paradigm that allows us to apply prospect theory in behavioral economics to body mass. 67 healthy young adults completed self-report measures and two decision-making tasks for weight-loss, as well as for monetary rewards. We estimated risk-related preference and loss aversion parameters for each individual, separately for weight-loss and monetary rewards choice data. Risk-seeking tendency for weight-loss was positively correlated with body mass index in individuals who desired to lose body weight, whereas the risk-seeking for momentary rewards was not. Risk-seeking for weight-loss was correlated to excessive body shape preoccupations, while aversion to weight-gain was correlated with self-reports of behavioral involvement for successful weight-loss. We demonstrated that prospect theory can be useful in explaining the decision-making process related to body mass. Applying prospect theory is expected to advance our understanding of decision-making mechanisms in obesity, which might prove helpful for improving healthy choices.

  6. A systematic review and meta-analysis of gestational weight gain recommendations and related outcomes in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Ana Carolina; Nascimento, Simony Lira do; Surita, Fernanda Garanhani

    2015-11-01

    Worldwide, different guidelines are used to assess the adequacy of gestational weight gain. This study identified the recommendations for gestational weight gain in Brazilian women. We also determined the proportion of women with adequate weight gain in accordance with these recommendations and the associated perinatal outcomes. A systematic review was performed. A computerized search was conducted utilizing the following databases: PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, Embase, SciELO and Google Scholar. Observational studies of healthy, Brazilian, pregnant women were included. Studies were excluded if they did not provide pregestational weight and gestational weight gain or if they studied women with comorbid conditions. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the odds ratio of inadequate (insufficient or excessive) gestational weight gain. Seventeen studies were included in the systematic review and four studies were included in the meta-analysis. The most widely used recommendations were from the Institute of Medicine. Excessive gestational weight gain was associated with fetal macrosomia and high rates of cesarean delivery. Overweight women had a higher risk of excessive gestational weight gain than eutrophic women (OR=2.80, 95%CI=2.22-3.53). There are no standardized recommendations concerning gestational weight gain based on Brazilian population-based data. Many Brazilian women are overweight or obese at the beginning of pregnancy. Overweight pregnant women have a higher risk of excessive gestational weight gain. Excessive gestational weight gain was associated with cesarean delivery and fetal macrosomia.

  7. A systematic review and meta-analysis of gestational weight gain recommendations and related outcomes in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Ana Carolina; do Nascimento, Simony Lira; Surita, Fernanda Garanhani

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, different guidelines are used to assess the adequacy of gestational weight gain. This study identified the recommendations for gestational weight gain in Brazilian women. We also determined the proportion of women with adequate weight gain in accordance with these recommendations and the associated perinatal outcomes. A systematic review was performed. A computerized search was conducted utilizing the following databases: PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, Embase, SciELO and Google Scholar. Observational studies of healthy, Brazilian, pregnant women were included. Studies were excluded if they did not provide pregestational weight and gestational weight gain or if they studied women with comorbid conditions. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the odds ratio of inadequate (insufficient or excessive) gestational weight gain. Seventeen studies were included in the systematic review and four studies were included in the meta-analysis. The most widely used recommendations were from the Institute of Medicine. Excessive gestational weight gain was associated with fetal macrosomia and high rates of cesarean delivery. Overweight women had a higher risk of excessive gestational weight gain than eutrophic women (OR=2.80, 95%CI=2.22-3.53). There are no standardized recommendations concerning gestational weight gain based on Brazilian population-based data. Many Brazilian women are overweight or obese at the beginning of pregnancy. Overweight pregnant women have a higher risk of excessive gestational weight gain. Excessive gestational weight gain was associated with cesarean delivery and fetal macrosomia. PMID:26602524

  8. Preventing weight gain through exercise and physical activity in the elderly: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Stehr, Mareike D; von Lengerke, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    This review examines the role of exercise and physical activity for preventing weight gain in older people. A structured search using MeSH-vocabulary and Title/Abstract-searches was conducted in PubMed for January 2000 to June 2011, identifying weight gain and exercise or physical activity as study topics, and aged adults as target group. In study selection, all types of exercise and physical activity and any measure of weight change in aged adults (≥65 years) or postmenopausal women were considered. N=9 primary studies were identified. All were conducted in the US, with one study additionally including samples from Canada and the UK. Three studies focused on aged adults, while six concentrated specifically on postmenopausal women. Forms of exercise or physical activity comprised self-reported exercise history in four studies and low, moderate or high intensity exercise interventions in five studies. Four studies combined exercise with a hypocaloric diet and included comparison groups receiving either diet only, health education, stretching or a delayed intervention (one study each). Exercise was associated with weight loss (1.1-6 kg) in all intervention studies, all of which studied an overweight sample, and with weight maintenance in most observational studies, all of which studied a general population or otherwise overweight-unspecific sample. In sum, exercise and physical activity can effectively prevent weight gain in older adults and postmenopausal women either in terms of weight loss or maintenance. They can preserve lean body mass and thus are important for the balance between potentially positive and negative effects of weight reduction in later life. In addition, since all intervention studies were conducted with an overweight sample, it seems that primordial prevention (in terms of preventing the development of risk factors such as excess weight in the first place) might be a neglected issue in geriatric and postmenopausal prevention.

  9. Unaltered instrumental learning and attenuated body-weight gain in rats during non-rotating simulated shiftwork.

    PubMed

    Leenaars, C H C; Kalsbeek, A; Hanegraaf, M A J; Foppen, E; Joosten, R N J M A; Post, G; Dematteis, M; Feenstra, M G P; van Someren, E J W

    2012-04-01

    Exposure to shiftwork has been associated with multiple health disorders and cognitive impairments in humans. We tested if we could replicate metabolic and cognitive consequences of shiftwork, as reported in humans, in a rat model comparable to 5 wks of non-rotating night shifts. The following hypotheses were addressed: (i) shiftwork enhances body-weight gain, which would indicate metabolic effects; and (ii) shiftwork negatively affects learning of a simple goal-directed behavior, i.e., the association of lever pressing with food reward (instrumental learning), which would indicate cognitive effects. We used a novel method of forced locomotion to model work during the animals' normal resting period. We first show that Wistar rats, indeed, are active throughout a shiftwork protocol. In contrast with previous findings, the shiftwork protocol attenuated the normal weight gain to 76 ± 8 g in 5 wks as compared to 123 ± 15 g in the control group. The discrepancy with previous work may be explained by the concurrent observation that with our shiftwork protocol rats did not adjust their between-work circadian activity pattern. They maintained a normal level of activity during the "off-work" periods. In the control experiment, rats were kept active during the dark period, normally dominated by activity. This demonstrated that forced activity, per se, did not affect body-weight gain (mean ± SEM: 85 ± 11 g over 5 wks as compared to 84 ± 11 g in the control group). Rats were trained on an instrumental learning paradigm during the fifth week of the protocol. All groups showed equivalent increases in lever pressing from the first (3.8 ± .7) to the sixth (21.3 ± 2.4) session, and needed a similar amount of sessions (5.1 ± .3) to reach a learning criterion (≥ 27 out of 30 lever presses). These results suggest that while on prolonged non-rotating shiftwork, not fully reversing the circadian rhythm might actually be beneficial to prevent body-weight gain and cognitive

  10. The Parent-Child Relationship as Predictor of Eating Pathology and Weight Gain in Preadolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goossens, Lien; Braet, Caroline; Van Durme, Kim; Decaluwe, Veerle; Bosmans, Guy

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the role of attachment toward mother and father as a predictor of eating pathology and weight gain among preadolescent boys and girls. Self-report questionnaires and adjusted body mass index (BMI) were administered from a community sample of 601 preadolescents (8-11 years; 48% female) at baseline and once again 1 year…

  11. Effect of olive oil massage on weight gain in preterm infants: A randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Jabraeile, Mahnaz; Rasooly, Alehe Seyyed; Farshi, Mahni Rahkar; Malakouti, Jamileh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the fact that effect of massage with or without oil on the baby's weight gain is not clear, but recent studies have shown that massage with essential oils make lipid absorption through the skin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of olive oil massage on weight gain in preterm infants. Materials and Methods: This study was a single-blind, randomized controlled clinical trial. In this study, infants who met inclusion criteria for the study were divided into two groups by using random numbers table. Newborns in intervention group were under massage for 10 days and 3 times for 15 min daily; the mother of these newborns had been trained already using olive oil. Moreover, the infants of the control group were under massaging without oil same as the above-mentioned method. Researchers weighed babies daily during 10 days and recorded it at the checklist. Data from the study were reviewed and analyzed by descriptive statistics and repeated measure test using the statistical software SPSS/13. Results: This study showed that the neonatal weight gain in the infants with the oil massage was 21 g daily in average, whereas the increase in infant massage without oil was 7 g. This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Considering the positive effect of infant massage on weight gain in premature infants with olive oil, it is recommended that nurses use oil in infant massage in the neonatal units. PMID:27397955

  12. Body Mass Index, Gestational Weight Gain, and Obstetric Complications in Moroccan Population

    PubMed Central

    Mochhoury, Latifa; Razine, Rachid; Kasouati, Jalal; Kabiri, Mariam; Barkat, Amina

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the impact of the body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy and the weight gain during pregnancy, on the occurrence of maternal and neonatal morbidity in the Moroccan population, as well as to analyze the quality of the weight gain depending on the BMI. Methods. A study was carried out over a period of one year from October 1, 2010 to October 1, 2011, using data collected from a descriptive-transversal study. We recruited nondiabetic women without several HTAs, delivering singletons from 37 completed weeks up to 42 weeks gestation. Results. Total of 1408 were analyzed. The risks of moderate hypertension, macrosomia, dystocia, and resort to cesarean section were higher among overweight or obese women, as well as among women whose weight gain was >16 kg. The differences were significant <0.05. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that overweight women before pregnancy and weight gain during pregnancy are associated with higher risks of maternal and neonatal complications. These data provide ideas on prevention opportunities. PMID:23936654

  13. Recommendations for weight gain during pregnancy in the context of the obesity epidemic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council have issued new guidelines for gestational weight gain as well as recommendations for action and research that call for “a radical change in the care provided to women of childbearing age.” For the first time, these guidelines consider the ...

  14. Freshmen Women and the "Freshman 15": Perspectives on Prevalence and Causes of College Weight Gain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Jackson, TeriSue; Reel, Justine J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Freshman weight gain has been assessed using quantitative inquiry, but this qualitative study allowed for an in-depth exploration of freshmen women's experiences surrounding body image, nutrition, and exercise. The purpose of this study was to better understand the impact and explanations for the "Freshman 15." Participants: Freshmen…

  15. Risk profiles for weight gain among postmenopausal women: A classification and regression tree analysis approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Risk factors for obesity and weight gain are typically evaluated individually while "adjusting for" the influence of other confounding factors, and few studies, if any, have created risk profiles by clustering risk factors. We identified subgroups of postmenopausal women homogeneous in their cluster...

  16. Energy intake and energy expenditure for determining excess weight gain in pregnant women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To conduct a secondary analysis designed to test whether gestational weight gain is the result of increased energy intake or adaptive changes in energy expenditures. In this secondary analysis, energy intake and energy expenditure of 45 pregnant women (body mass index [BMI] 18.5-24.9 [n=33] and BMI ...

  17. Perceived Importance of Dietary Protein to Prevent Weight Gain: A National Survey among Midlife Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldrich, Noel D.; Perry, Courtney; Thomas, William; Raatz, Susan K.; Reicks, Marla

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate reported use of the practice of "eating more protein" to prevent weight gain among midlife women. Design: Cross-sectional national survey. Participants: One thousand eight hundred twenty-four midlife women (40-60 y) from the 9 United States geographic regions, primarily married (71%), white (76%), and well educated; half were…

  18. Antipsychotic-induced insulin resistance and postprandial hormonal dysregulation independent of weight gain or psychiatric disease.

    PubMed

    Teff, Karen L; Rickels, Michael R; Grudziak, Joanna; Fuller, Carissa; Nguyen, Huong-Lan; Rickels, Karl

    2013-09-01

    Atypical antipsychotic (AAP) medications that have revolutionized the treatment of mental illness have become stigmatized by metabolic side effects, including obesity and diabetes. It remains controversial whether the defects are treatment induced or disease related. Although the mechanisms underlying these metabolic defects are not understood, it is assumed that the initiating pathophysiology is weight gain, secondary to centrally mediated increases in appetite. To determine if the AAPs have detrimental metabolic effects independent of weight gain or psychiatric disease, we administered olanzapine, aripiprazole, or placebo for 9 days to healthy subjects (n = 10, each group) under controlled in-patient conditions while maintaining activity levels. Prior to and after the interventions, we conducted a meal challenge and a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp to evaluate insulin sensitivity and glucose disposal. We found that olanzapine, an AAP highly associated with weight gain, causes significant elevations in postprandial insulin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), and glucagon coincident with insulin resistance compared with placebo. Aripiprazole, an AAP considered metabolically sparing, induces insulin resistance but has no effect on postprandial hormones. Importantly, the metabolic changes occur in the absence of weight gain, increases in food intake and hunger, or psychiatric disease, suggesting that AAPs exert direct effects on tissues independent of mechanisms regulating eating behavior.

  19. Factors affecting weight gain and dietary intake in Latino males residing in Mississippi: A preliminary study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Research indicates that as Latinos become more acculturated to the United States, their diet changes and they experience weight gain. There is also a high incidence of depression in this population. The purpose of this preliminary study was to examine the correlations between sociodemographic factor...

  20. Antipsychotic-Induced Insulin Resistance and Postprandial Hormonal Dysregulation Independent of Weight Gain or Psychiatric Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teff, Karen L.; Rickels, Michael R.; Grudziak, Joanna; Fuller, Carissa; Nguyen, Huong-Lan; Rickels, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic (AAP) medications that have revolutionized the treatment of mental illness have become stigmatized by metabolic side effects, including obesity and diabetes. It remains controversial whether the defects are treatment induced or disease related. Although the mechanisms underlying these metabolic defects are not understood, it is assumed that the initiating pathophysiology is weight gain, secondary to centrally mediated increases in appetite. To determine if the AAPs have detrimental metabolic effects independent of weight gain or psychiatric disease, we administered olanzapine, aripiprazole, or placebo for 9 days to healthy subjects (n = 10, each group) under controlled in-patient conditions while maintaining activity levels. Prior to and after the interventions, we conducted a meal challenge and a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp to evaluate insulin sensitivity and glucose disposal. We found that olanzapine, an AAP highly associated with weight gain, causes significant elevations in postprandial insulin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), and glucagon coincident with insulin resistance compared with placebo. Aripiprazole, an AAP considered metabolically sparing, induces insulin resistance but has no effect on postprandial hormones. Importantly, the metabolic changes occur in the absence of weight gain, increases in food intake and hunger, or psychiatric disease, suggesting that AAPs exert direct effects on tissues independent of mechanisms regulating eating behavior. PMID:23835329

  1. Urinary F2-isoprostanes, obesity, and weight gain in the IRAS cohort.

    PubMed

    Il'yasova, Dora; Wang, Frances; Spasojevic, Ivan; Base, Karel; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Wagenknecht, Lynne E

    2012-09-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased F(2)-isoprostane (F(2)-IsoP) levels cross-sectionally. However, the prospective association may be inverse, based on our earlier finding that elevated urinary F(2)-IsoP levels predict lower risk of diabetes. This earlier finding led us to hypothesize that urinary F(2)-IsoPs reflect the intensity of oxidative metabolism and as such predict lower risk of both diabetes and weight gain. We examined cross-sectional relationships with obesity and prospective relationships with weight gain using the data from 299 participants of the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study (IRAS), all of whom were free of diabetes at baseline. Four urinary F(2)-IsoPs were assayed in stored baseline urine samples using liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry: iPF(2α)-III, 2,3-dinor-iPF(2α)-III, iPF(2α)-VI, and 8,12-iso-iPF(2α)-VI (F(2)-IsoP 1-4, respectively). Baseline F(2)-IsoPs were positively associated with baseline measures of obesity; the strongest associations were found with two F(2)-IsoPs: odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for overall and abdominal obesity were 1.74 (1.26-2.40) and 1.63 (1.18-2.24) for F(2)-IsoP2 and 1.47 (1.12-1.94) and 1.64 (1.22-2.20) for F(2)-IsoP4. F(2)-IsoP2 showed the strongest and significant inverse association with weight gain during the 5-year follow-up period: increase in F(2)-IsoP2 equal to 1 s.d. was associated with 0.90 kg lower weight gain (P = 0.02) and the odds ratios for relative (≥5%) and absolute (≥5 kg) weight gain were 0.67 (0.47-0.96) and 0.57 (0.37-0.87), respectively. The other three F(2)-IsoPs were consistently inversely associated with weight gain, although not significantly, suggesting that different F(2)-IsoPs vary in their ability to detect the association with weight gain.

  2. Effects of the pacifier activated lullaby on weight gain of premature infants.

    PubMed

    Cevasco, Andrea M; Grant, Roy E

    2005-01-01

    Within the past 5 years there has been an increase of premature infants surviving in the neonatal intensive care unit as well as an increasing cost for each day the infant is kept there. It is important for the premature infant to acquire the feeding skills necessary for weight gain, which lead to discharge from the hospital, and recent advancements have indicated the effectiveness in using contingent music to teach sucking skills to premature infants. The purpose of the first analysis in this study was to determine the effects of Pacifier Activated Lullaby (PAL) trials on weight gain of premature infants. During a 2-year time period, 62 infants from a sample of 188 met criteria for analysis. A one-way analysis of variance showed no significance in daily weight gain for the number of PAL trials completed. The mean weight gains for infants with 1 PAL trial = 13.85 grams, 2 trials = 26.67, 3 trials = 29.64, and 4 or more = 22.89. The Pearson product-moment correlation between the mean percent of music earned via nonnutritive sucking (NNS) and mean weight gain of all trials approached significance (p = .077, r = 0.18). In a second analysis, weight gained prior to use of PAL, during use of PAL, and post use of PAL was analyzed. Results indicated no significant difference between weight gain 1 day prior to use of PAL, the day of PAL trial, and 1 day post use of PAL. Mean weight gain for those infants who participated in 1 PAL trial was 8.49 grams for 1 day prior to use of PAL, 18.73 the day of PAL trial, and 24.81 for 1 day post use of PAL. Mean weight gain for 3 days prior to using the PAL was 10.78, 11.30 on the day of PAL trial, and 24.78 grams for 3 days post PAL use. The analyses show definite trends of greater weight gain with PAL use; however, individual variability within groups was greater than group differences leading to no significance in statistical analysis. In the third analysis the effect of proximity between premature infants' feeding schedule and PAL

  3. Designing a Weight Gain Prevention Trial for Young Adults: The CHOICES Study

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Leslie A.; Moe, Stacey G.; Nanney, M. Susie; Laska, Melissa N.; Linde, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Young adults are at risk for weight gain. Little is known about how to design weight control programs to meet the needs of young adults and few theory-based interventions have been evaluated in a randomized control trial. The Choosing Healthy Options in College Environments and Settings (CHOICES) study was funded to create a technology-based program for 2-year community college students to help prevent unhealthy weight gain. The purpose of this paper is to: 1) provide a brief background on weight-related interventions in young adults; 2) describe the study design for the CHOICES study, the conceptual model guiding the research and the CHOICES intervention; and 3) discuss implications of this research for health educators. Translation to Health Education Practice Our experiences from the CHOICES study will be useful in suggesting other theory-based models and intervention strategies that might be helpful in programs attempting to prevent unhealthy weight gain in young adults. In addition, this paper discusses important considerations for working with 2-year colleges on this type of health promotion work. PMID:24910855

  4. Open label study of the effect of amantadine on weight gain induced by olanzapine.

    PubMed

    Bahk, Won-Myong; Lee, Kyoung-Uk; Chae, Jeong-Ho; Pae, Chi-Un; Jun, Taeyoun; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to investigate the effects of the dopamine agonist amantadine in those patients with weight gain induced by olanzapine. An open trial was conducted in those patients who gained >3 kg in weight induced by olanzapine use. All subjects were evaluated by weight, body mass index (BMI), the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), and the Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale (ESRS) before and after the use of amantadine in addition to olanzapine. Twenty-five of 30 enrolled patients completed the present study. Mean bodyweight and BMI was increased by 6.44 +/- 4.42 kg and 5.04 +/- 3.47 kg/m2 significantly with olanzapine alone (P < 0.001). When amantadine and olanzapine were used together, the average weight and BMI decreased by 1.07 +/- 3.19 kg and 0.84 +/- 2.5 kg/m2, but did not have statistical significance. The average values of BPRS showed a significant decrease (P < 0.001). No significant changes were present in ESRS. Amantadine did not have an effect on weight gain induced by olanzapine. Randomized placebo-controlled prospective studies are needed.

  5. Subcutaneous administration of monosodium glutamate to pregnant mice reduces weight gain in pups during lactation.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Hun; Choi, Tae-Saeng

    2016-04-01

    Administering monosodium glutamate (MSG) to neonatal rodents induces obesity and type 2 diabetes. In addition, several studies have shown that MSG administered to pregnant animals can cross the placenta and reach the foetus. The present study was performed to investigate the effects of administering MSG to pregnant ICR mice on dam and neonatal growth. Pregnant mice were treated with 60 or 120 mg MSG once daily from day 5 of pregnancy to one day before parturition by subcutaneous injection. In addition, the body weights of the neonates were determined until nine weeks of age. The birth weights of neonates were not different between the control and MSG-treated groups. However, MSG treatment resulted in a lower body weight gain of neonates during lactation. In addition, this underweight of the MSG-treated group at weaning returned to normal compared with the control group at five weeks of age. Cross-fostering experiments indicated that the lower body weight gain of neonates in the MSG-treated group during lactation was due to its effects on the dam. Serum prolactin levels and mammary gland development of the mice were examined next to determine the reasons for this lactation problem. Although there were no differences in prolactin levels, morphological analyses of the mammary glands revealed apparent differences, including low numbers and altered phenotype of alveoli, between the control and MSG-treated groups. Taken together, our results show that treating pregnant mice with excess MSG induced lower neonate body weight gain during lactation.

  6. An adaptive response to uncertainty can lead to weight gain during dieting attempts

    PubMed Central

    Higginson, A. D.; McNamara, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Peoples’ attempts to lose weight by low calorie diets often result in weight gain because of over-compensatory overeating during lapses. Animals usually respond to a change in food availability by adjusting their foraging effort and altering how much energy reserves they store. But in many situations the long-term availability of food is uncertain, so animals may attempt to estimate it to decide the appropriate level of fat storage. Methodology: We report the results of a conceptual model of feeding in which the animal knows whether food is currently abundant or limited, but does not know the proportion of time, there will be an abundance in the long-term and has to learn it. Results: If the food supply is limited much of the time, such as during cycles of dieting attempts, the optimal response is to gain a lot of weight when food is abundant. Conclusions and implications: This implies that recurring attempts to diet, by signalling to the body that the food supply is often insufficient, will lead to a greater fat storage than if food was always abundant. Our results shed light on the widespread phenomenon of weight gain during weight cycling and indicate possible interventions that may reduce the incidence of obesity. PMID:27920041

  7. Elevated objectively measured but not self-reported energy intake predicts future weight gain in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Stice, Eric; Durant, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    Background Although obesity putatively occurs when individuals consume more calories than needed for metabolic needs, numerous risk factor studies have not observed significant positive relations between reported caloric intake and future weight gain, potentially because reported caloric intake is inaccurate. Objective The present study tested the hypothesis that objectively measured habitual energy intake, estimated with doubly labeled water, would show a stronger positive relation to future weight gain than self-reported caloric intake based on a widely used food frequency measure. Design 253 adolescents completed a doubly labeled water (DLW) assessment of energy intake (EI), a food frequency measure, and a resting metabolic rate (RMR) assessment at baseline, and had their body mass index (BMI) measured at baseline and at 1- and 2-year follow-ups. Results Controlling for baseline RMR, elevated objectively measured EI, but not self-reported habitual caloric intake, predicted increases in BMI over a 2-year follow-up. On average, participants under-reported caloric intake by 35%. Conclusions Results provide support for the thesis that self-reported caloric intake has not predicted future weight gain because it is less accurate than objectively measured habitual caloric intake, suggesting that food frequency measures can lead to misleading findings. However, even objectively measured caloric intake showed only a moderate relation to future weight gain, implying that habitual caloric intake fluctuates over time and that it may be necessary to conduct serial assessments of habitual intake to better reflect the time-varying effects of caloric intake on weight gain. PMID:24930597

  8. Ameliorating antipsychotic-induced weight gain by betahistine: Mechanisms and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jiamei; Huang, Xu-Feng; Pai, Nagesh; Deng, Chao

    2016-04-01

    Second generation antipsychotic drugs (SGAs) cause substantial body weight gain/obesity and other metabolic side-effects such as dyslipidaemia. Their antagonistic affinity to the histaminergic H1 receptor (H1R) has been identified as one of the main contributors to weight gain/obesity side-effects. The effects and mechanisms of betahistine (a histaminergic H1R agonist and H3 receptor antagonist) have been investigated for ameliorating SGA-induced weight gain/obesity in both animal models and clinical trials. It has been demonstrated that co-treatment with betahistine is effective in reducing weight gain, associated with olanzapine in drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia, as well as in the animal models of both drug-naïve rats and rats with chronic, repeated exposure to olanzapine. Betahistine co-treatment can reduce food intake and increase the effect of thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue by modulating hypothalamic H1R-NPY-AMPKα (NPY: neuropeptide Y; AMPKα: AMP-activated protein kinase α) pathways, and ameliorate olanzapine-induced dyslipidaemia through modulation of AMPKα-SREBP-1-PPARα-dependent pathways (SREBP-1: Sterol regulatory element binding protein 1; PPARα: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α) in the liver. Although reduced locomotor activity was observed from antipsychotic treatment in rats, betahistine did not affect locomotor activity. Importantly, betahistine co-treatment did not influence the effects of antipsychotics on serotonergic receptors in the key brain regions for antipsychotic therapeutic efficacy. However, betahistine co-treatment reverses the upregulated dopamine D2 binding caused by chronic olanzapine administration, which may be beneficial in reducing D2 supersensitivity often observed in chronic antipsychotic treatment. Therefore, these results provide solid evidence supporting further clinical trials in treating antipsychotics-induced weight gain using betahistine in patients with schizophrenia and other mental

  9. Quinine controls body weight gain without affecting food intake in male C57BL6 mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quinine is a natural molecule commonly used as a flavouring agent in tonic water. Diet supplementation with quinine leads to decreased body weight and food intake in rats. Quinine is an in vitro inhibitor of Trpm5, a cation channel expressed in taste bud cells, the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. The objective of this work is to determine the effect of diet supplementation with quinine on body weight and body composition in male mice, to investigate its mechanism of action, and whether the effect is mediated through Trpm5. Results Compared with mice consuming AIN, a regular balanced diet, mice consuming AIN diet supplemented with 0.1% quinine gained less weight (2.89 ± 0.30 g vs 5.39 ± 0.50 g) and less fat mass (2.22 ± 0.26 g vs 4.33 ± 0.43 g) after 13 weeks of diet, and had lower blood glucose and plasma triglycerides. There was no difference in food intake between the mice consuming quinine supplemented diet and those consuming control diet. Trpm5 knockout mice gained less fat mass than wild-type mice. There was a trend for a diet-genotype interaction for body weight and body weight gain, with the effect of quinine less pronounced in the Trpm5 KO than in the WT background. Faecal weight, energy and lipid contents were higher in quinine fed mice compared to regular AIN fed mice and in Trpm5 KO mice compared to wild type mice. Conclusion Quinine contributes to weight control in male C57BL6 mice without affecting food intake. A partial contribution of Trpm5 to quinine dependent body weight control is suggested. PMID:23394313

  10. Appetizer administration stimulates food consumption, weight gain and leptin levels in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Wadikar, D D; Premavalli, K S

    2011-08-01

    Appetizers based on different spices/herbs are highly acceptable but evaluation of their functionality needs more attention. The present study, investigated the effects of appetizers on food consumption, weight gain, and leptin levels in male Wistar rats. Three appetizers, namely ginger beverage, ajowan beverage, and karpurvalli beverage were administered to groups of rats. The fasting leptin levels ranged from 0.75 to 2.5 ng/ml, while weights were in the range of 147-201 g. Decreased (3.4-10.8%) leptin levels following the consumption of appetizers indicated their appetizing effect, with a greater reduction (p<0.05) for ginger beverage and karpurvalli beverage. Weight gain after 10 days was 7.68% in the control group whereas it was 11.20 and 13.26% in rats fed with ginger and karpurvalli beverages, respectively. However, food consumption was higher in all the appetizer groups than in the controls.

  11. Polyurethane foam pica in a patient with excessive interdialytic weight gain.

    PubMed

    Iyasere, Osasuyi; Allington, Ying; Cafferkey, Michele

    2010-08-31

    Maintaining fluid balance in haemodialysis patients is important because of the adverse effects of excessive interdialytic weight gain. This often requires fluid restriction that patients often struggle with. We report a case of a 31-year-old female diabetic patient on haemodialysis with repeated excessive interdialytic weight gains despite fluid restriction and dry weight adjustment. It was subsequently discovered that she devised an unusual, albeit unsuccessful, strategy of eating the polyurethane foam from her dialysis chair while increasing her fluid intake hoping that it would absorb excess water in the gut! This under-diagnosed phenomenon known as pica has been reported in renal patients with substances such as ice, clay and baking soda.

  12. Timing of Gestational Weight Gain on Fetal Growth and Infant Size at Birth in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Young, Melissa F.; Hong Nguyen, Phuong; Addo, O. Yaw; Pham, Hoa; Nguyen, Son; Martorell, Reynaldo; Ramakrishnan, Usha

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine the importance of timing of gestational weight gain during three time periods: 1: ≤ 20 weeks gestation), 2: 21–29 weeks) and 3: ≥ 30 weeks) on fetal growth and infant birth size. Methods Study uses secondary data from the PRECONCEPT randomized controlled trial in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam (n = 1436). Prospective data were collected on women starting pre-pregnancy through delivery. Maternal conditional weight gain (CWG) was defined as window-specific weight gains, uncorrelated with pre-pregnancy body mass index and all prior body weights. Fetal biometry, was assessed by ultrasound measurements of head and abdomen circumferences, biparietal diameter, and femoral length throughout pregnancy. Birth size outcomes included weight and length, and head, abdomen and mid upper arm circumferences as well as small for gestational age (SGA). Adjusted generalized linear and logistic models were used to examine associations. Results Overall, three-quarters of women gained below the Institute of Medicine guidelines, and these women were 2.5 times more likely to give birth to a SGA infant. Maternal CWG in the first window (≤ 20 weeks), followed by 21–29 weeks, had the greatest association on all parameters of fetal growth (except abdomen circumference) and infant size at birth. For birth weight, a 1 SD increase CWG in the first 20 weeks had 3 times the influence compared to later CWG (≥ 30 weeks) (111 g vs. 39 g) and was associated with a 43% reduction in SGA risk (OR (95% CI): 0.57 (0.46–0.70). Conclusion There is a need to target women before or early in pregnancy to ensure adequate nutrition to maximize impact on fetal growth and birth size. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01665378 PMID:28114316

  13. Rapid Infancy Weight Gain and 7- to 9-year Childhood Obesity Risk

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jing; Dang, Shaonong; Zeng, Lingxia; Gao, Wenlong; Wang, Duolao; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Wenhui; Pei, Leilei; Li, Chao; Yan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Obesity is increasing in developing countries. This study aimed to identify the association between rapid infancy weight gain and obesity risk among early school-age children. A total of 581 singletons (349 boys, 232 girls) whose mothers participated in an antenatal multiple micronutrient supplement trial in rural western China were followed from birth to between 7 and 9 years of age. Height and weight were measured at birth, 1.5 years, and between 7 and 9 years. At the 7- to 9-year time point, body composition was determined using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Multilevel mixed analysis was used to test the associations between rapid weight gain in infancy (from birth to age 1.5 years) and body size and composition or overweight/obesity among early school-age children. Overall, 31.2% (181 of 581) of the infants showed a weight-for-age Z score gain greater than 0.67 between birth and 1.5 years, indicating rapid weight gain. Approximately 5.7% (33 of 579) of the subjects were overweight (BMI-for-age Z scores [BAZ] >1 and ≤2) or obese (BAZ >2). Rapid infancy weight gain was associated with a higher BAZ (P < 0.001), mid-upper arm circumferences (P < 0.001), percentage body fat (P < 0.001), and fat mass index (P < 0.001) at 7 to 9 years of age after adjusting for biological and social economic factors, genetic factors, and perinatal and postnatal factors. These associations appeared to be independent of gender, economic status at early school age, and maternal nutritional status at enrollment. Rapid growers may have approximately 3 times the risk of being overweight/obese during the early school-age years (odds ratio = 2.94, 95% CI: 1.17–7.43, P = 0.022). Rapid infancy weight gain is a risk factor for being overweight/obesity among early school-age children in rural western China. We propose that social and biological determinants, such as economic status, physical activity, and feeding practice, should be targeted to prevent

  14. Computational Psychiatry of ADHD: Neural Gain Impairments across Marrian Levels of Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Tobias U.; Fiore, Vincenzo G.; Moutoussis, Michael; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), one of the most common psychiatric disorders, is characterised by unstable response patterns across multiple cognitive domains. However, the neural mechanisms that explain these characteristic features remain unclear. Using a computational multilevel approach, we propose that ADHD is caused by impaired gain modulation in systems that generate this phenotypic increased behavioural variability. Using Marr's three levels of analysis as a heuristic framework, we focus on this variable behaviour, detail how it can be explained algorithmically, and how it might be implemented at a neural level through catecholamine influences on corticostriatal loops. This computational, multilevel, approach to ADHD provides a framework for bridging gaps between descriptions of neuronal activity and behaviour, and provides testable predictions about impaired mechanisms. PMID:26787097

  15. Excess Weight Gain Prevention in Adolescents: Three-year Outcome following a Randomized-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Shomaker, Lauren B.; Wilfley, Denise E.; Young, Jami F.; Sbrocco, Tracy; Stephens, Mark; Brady, Sheila M.; Galescu, Ovidiu; Demidowich, Andrew; Olsen, Cara H.; Kozlosky, Merel; Reynolds, James C.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) prevents weight gain in adults with obesity and binge-eating-disorder, and is especially effective among those with increased psychosocial problems. However, IPT was not superior to health-education (HE) to prevent excess weight gain at 1-year follow-up in 113 adolescent girls at high-risk for excess weight gain because of loss-of-control (LOC)-eating and high BMI (kg/m2) (Tanofsky-Kraff et al., 2014). Method Participants from the original trial were re-contacted 3-years later for assessment. At baseline, adolescent- and parent-reported social-adjustment problems and trait-anxiety were evaluated. At baseline and follow-ups, BMIz and adiposity by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry were obtained. Results Nearly 60% were re-assessed at 3-years, with no group differences in participation (ps≥.70). Consistent with 1-year, there was no main effect of group on change in BMIz/adiposity (ps≥.18). In exploratory analyses, baseline social-adjustment problems and trait-anxiety moderated outcome (ps<.01). Among girls with high self-reported baseline social-adjustment problems or anxiety, IPT, compared to HE, was associated with the steepest declines in BMIz (p<.001). For adiposity, girls with high- or low-anxiety in HE, and girls with low-anxiety in IPT experienced gains (ps≤.03), while girls in IPT with high-anxiety stabilized. Parent-reports yielded complementary findings. Conclusion In obesity-prone adolescent girls, IPT was not superior to HE in preventing excess weight gain at 3-years. Consistent with theory, exploratory analyses suggested that IPT was associated with improvements in BMIz over 3-years among youth with high social-adjustment problems or trait-anxiety. Future studies should test the efficacy of IPT for obesity prevention among at-risk girls with social-adjustment problems and/or anxiety. PMID:27808536

  16. Rhythmic Leptin Is Required for Weight Gain from Circadian Desynchronized Feeding in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Arble, Deanna Marie; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Turek, Fred W.

    2011-01-01

    The neuroendocrine and metabolic effects of leptin have been extensively researched since the discovery, and the later identification, of the leptin gene mutated within the ob/ob mouse. Leptin is required for optimal health in a number of physiological systems (e.g. fertility, bone density, body weight regulation). Despite the extensive leptin literature and many observations of leptin’s cyclical pattern over the 24-hour day, few studies have specifically examined how the circadian rhythm of leptin may be essential to leptin signaling and health. Here we present data indicating that a rhythmic leptin profile (e.g. 1 peak every 24 hours) leads to excessive weight gain during desynchronized feeding whereas non-rhythmic leptin provided in a continuous manner does not lead to excessive body weight gain under similar feeding conditions. This study suggests that feeding time can interact with leptin’s endogenous rhythm to influence metabolic signals, specifically leading to excessive body weight gains during ‘wrongly’ timed feeding. PMID:21949859

  17. Overweight and Weight Gain Predict Psoriasis Development in a Population-based Cohort.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Kjersti; Wilsgaard, Tom; Olsen, Anne Olaug; Furberg, Anne-Sofie

    2017-03-10

    Overweight is a proposed risk factor for psoriasis. How-ever, evidence from prospective studies is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the association be-tween overweight, weight gain and risk of psoriasis, and potential synergism with smoking, within a population-based cohort including 8,752 individuals followed from 1994 up to 2008. There was a 32% increased odds of psoriasis from a body mass index (BMI) of 27 kg/m2, in multi-variable logistic regression analysis, further increasing to 43% at BMI 28 kg/m2, and to 71% at BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 in non-smokers. There was a dose-response association between weight gain from age 25 years, with up to 90% higher odds of psoriasis from middle age, independent of weight category. There was no indication of a synergism between overweight and smoking, and no interaction with sex. Overweight and weight gain represent modifiable risk factors that may be targets for primary prevention of psoriasis.

  18. Weight Gain, Schizophrenia and Antipsychotics: New Findings from Animal Model and Pharmacogenomic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Panariello, Fabio; De Luca, Vincenzo; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Excess body weight is one of the most common physical health problems among patients with schizophrenia that increases the risk for many medical problems, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, osteoarthritis, and hypertension, and accounts in part for 20% shorter life expectancy than in general population. Among patients with severe mental illness, obesity can be attributed to an unhealthy lifestyle, personal genetic profile, as well as the effects of psychotropic medications, above all antipsychotic drugs. Novel “atypical” antipsychotic drugs represent a substantial improvement on older “typical” drugs. However, clinical experience has shown that some, but not all, of these drugs can induce substantial weight gain. Animal models of antipsychotic-related weight gain and animal transgenic models of knockout or overexpressed genes of antipsychotic receptors have been largely evaluated by scientific community for changes in obesity-related gene expression or phenotypes. Moreover, pharmacogenomic approaches have allowed to detect more than 300 possible candidate genes for antipsychotics-induced body weight gain. In this paper, we summarize current thinking on: (1) the role of polymorphisms in several candidate genes, (2) the possible roles of various neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in this adverse drug reaction, and (3) the state of development of animal models in this matter. We also outline major areas for future research. PMID:22988505

  19. Metabolically normal obese people are protected from adverse effects following weight gain.

    PubMed

    Fabbrini, Elisa; Yoshino, Jun; Yoshino, Mihoko; Magkos, Faidon; Tiemann Luecking, Courtney; Samovski, Dmitri; Fraterrigo, Gemma; Okunade, Adewole L; Patterson, Bruce W; Klein, Samuel

    2015-02-01

    BACKGROUND. Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and increased intrahepatic triglyceride (IHTG) content, both of which are key risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, a subset of obese people does not develop these metabolic complications. Here, we tested the hypothesis that people defined by IHTG content and insulin sensitivity as "metabolically normal obese" (MNO), but not those defined as "metabolically abnormal obese" (MAO), are protected from the adverse metabolic effects of weight gain. METHODS. Body composition, multiorgan insulin sensitivity, VLDL apolipoprotein B100 (apoB100) kinetics, and global transcriptional profile in adipose tissue were evaluated before and after moderate (~6%) weight gain in MNO (n = 12) and MAO (n = 8) subjects with a mean BMI of 36 ± 4 kg/m2 who were matched for BMI and fat mass. RESULTS. Although the increase in body weight and fat mass was the same in both groups, hepatic, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity deteriorated, and VLDL apoB100 concentrations and secretion rates increased in MAO, but not MNO, subjects. Moreover, biological pathways and genes associated with adipose tissue lipogenesis increased in MNO, but not MAO, subjects. CONCLUSIONS. These data demonstrate that MNO people are resistant, whereas MAO people are predisposed, to the adverse metabolic effects of moderate weight gain and that increased adipose tissue capacity for lipogenesis might help protect MNO people from weight gain-induced metabolic dysfunction. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01184170. FUNDING. This work was supported by NIH grants UL1 RR024992 (Clinical Translational Science Award), DK 56341 (Nutrition and Obesity Research Center), DK 37948 and DK 20579 (Diabetes Center Grant), and UL1 TR000450 (KL2 Award); a Central Society for Clinical and Translational Research Early Career Development Award; and by grants from the Longer Life Foundation and the Kilo Foundation.

  20. Pregnancy as a window to future health: Excessive gestational weight gain and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Redman, Leanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic and behavioral changes that occur during pregnancy have well-known effects on maternal and fetal health during the immediate pregnancy and now are thought to be a catalyst for future health throughout later life. Recommendations for appropriate gestational weight gain (GWG) and lifestyle modifications during pregnancy have changed throughout history as more is known about this crucial time. Herein we discuss the current GWG recommendations and the impact of pregnancy and excess GWG gain on the current and future health of women and children including risk of obesity, gestational diabetes, type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome. PMID:26096078

  1. The effects of changing exercise levels on weight and age-relatedweight gain

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Paul T.; Wood, Peter D.

    2004-06-01

    To determine prospectively whether physical activity canprevent age-related weight gain and whether changing levels of activityaffect body weight. DESIGN/SUBJECTS: The study consisted of 8,080 maleand 4,871 female runners who completed two questionnaires an average(+/-standard deviation (s.d.)) of 3.20+/-2.30 and 2.59+/-2.17 yearsapart, respectively, as part of the National Runners' Health Study.RESULTS: Changes in running distance were inversely related to changes inmen's and women's body mass indices (BMIs) (slope+/-standard error(s.e.): -0.015+/-0.001 and -0.009+/-0.001 kg/m(2) per Deltakm/week,respectively), waist circumferences (-0.030+/-0.002 and -0.022+/-0.005 cmper Deltakm/week, respectively) and percent changes in body weight(-0.062+/-0.003 and -0.041+/-0.003 percent per Deltakm/week,respectively, all P<0.0001). The regression slopes were significantlysteeper (more negative) in men than women for DeltaBMI and Deltapercentbody weight (P<0.0001). A longer history of running diminishedthe impact of changing running distance on men's weights. When adjustedfor Deltakm/week, years of aging in men and years of aging in women wereassociated with increases of 0.066+/-0.005 and 0.056+/-0.006 kg/m(2) inBMI, respectively, increases of 0.294+/-0.019 and 0.279+/-0.028 percentin Delta percentbody weight, respectively, and increases of 0.203+/-0.016and 0.271+/-0.033 cm in waist circumference, respectively (allP<0.0001). These regression slopes suggest that vigorous exercise mayneed to increase 4.4 km/week annually in men and 6.2 km/week annually inwomen to compensate for the expected gain in weight associated with aging(2.7 and 3.9 km/week annually when correct for the attenuation due tomeasurement error). CONCLUSIONS: Age-related weight gain occurs evenamong the most active individuals when exercise is constant.Theoretically, vigorous exercise must increase significantly with age tocompensate for the expected gain in weight associated withaging.

  2. Effect of Nutrition Education by Paraprofessionals on Dietary Intake, Maternal Weight Gain, and Infant Birth Weight in Pregnant Native American and Caucasian Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Janice; Williams, Glenna; Hunt, Donna

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of nutrition instruction provided to 366 pregnant Native American and Caucasian teens by paraprofessionals determined that it effectively improved their dietary intake, maternal weight gain, and infant birth weight. Further modifications for Native Americans were suggested. (SK)

  3. Does the U.S. Food Stamp Program contribute to adult weight gain?

    PubMed

    Zagorsky, Jay L; Smith, Patricia K

    2009-07-01

    Obesity poses substantial costs both to the individual and society, mainly through its impact on health and labor productivity. Because obesity is more prevalent among the poor some have raised concerns that food assistance programs may encourage excess weight. This paper investigates whether the U.S. Food Stamp Program contributes to adult participants' weight as measured by body mass index (BMI). Results suggest that the typical female food stamp participant's BMI is indeed more than 1 unit higher than someone with the same socioeconomic characteristics who is not in the program. For the average American woman, who is 5 ft 4 in. (1.63 m) tall, this means an increase in weight of 5.8 pounds (2.6 kg). While this association does not prove that the Food Stamp Program causes weight gain, it does suggest that program changes to encourage the consumption of high-nutrient, low-calorie foods should be considered.

  4. Maternal Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain on Offspring Overweight in Early Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Liu, Enqing; Guo, Jia; Pan, Lei; Li, Baojuan; Wang, Ping; Liu, Jin; Wang, Yue; Liu, Gongshu; Hu, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) with anthropometry in the offspring from birth to 12 months old in Tianjin, China. Methods Between 2009 and 2011, health care records of 38,539 pregnant women had been collected, and their children had been measured body weight and length at birth, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of age. The independent and joint associations of pre-pregnancy BMI and GWG based on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines with anthropometry in the offspring were examined using General Linear Model and Logistic Regression. Results Prepregnancy BMI and maternal GWG were positively associated with Z-scores for birth weight-for-gestational age, birth length-for-gestational age, and birth weight-for-length. Infants born to mothers with excessive GWG had the greatest changes in Z-scores for weight-for-age from birth to Month 3, and from Month 6 to Month 12, and the greatest changes in Z-scores for length-for-age from birth to months 3 and 12 compared with infants born to mothers with adequate GWG. Excessive GWG was associated with an increased risk of offspring overweight or obesity at 12 months old in all BMI categories except underweight. Conclusions Maternal prepregnancy overweight/obesity and excessive GWG were associated with greater weight gain and length gain of offspring in early infancy. Excessive GWG was associated with increased infancy overweight and obesity risk. PMID:24204979

  5. Factors Associated With Excessive Gestational Weight Gain: Review of Current Literature

    PubMed Central

    Steer, Jonathan; Michelis, L. Daniela; Carroll, Lisa; Holland, Erica; Perkins, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Background: Excessive gestational weight gain (EGWG) places women at increased risk for complications during pregnancy and also increases the likelihood that they will remain overweight after pregnancy. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has recommended weight gain guidelines based on pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), but evidence-based strategies to achieve these goals are limited. Objective: This review discusses factors associated with EGWG with the goal of identifying targets for future intervention. Methods: A search was performed using the PubMed database to identify all English-language papers published between 1995 and 2014 related to excessive weight gain in pregnancy. Papers were grouped by theme: preconception BMI, sociodemographics, diet and exercise, psychosocial characteristics, and type of prenatal care. Results: Studies found that women who were overweight or obese at the time of conception were at higher risk of EGWG and that increased physical activity protected against EGWG. Studies on diet and sociodemographic characteristics were inconclusive. Psychological factors, specifically accurate perceptions of BMI, also appear to play a role in EGWG. Limited studies on methods of prenatal care delivery did not show improvement of weight parameters with group compared to one-on-one visits. Conclusion: Pre-pregnancy BMI is most strongly associated with EGWG, indicating that healthy weight habits throughout adult life may be especially important in periods of expected weight change, such as pregnancy. To decrease EGWG, providers should focus on improving pre-conception BMI through appropriate counseling on healthy eating and increased physical activity as well as encouraging pregnant women to continue moderate exercise during pregnancy when appropriate. PMID:26937318

  6. Honey promotes lower weight gain, adiposity, and triglycerides than sucrose in rats.

    PubMed

    Nemoseck, Tricia M; Carmody, Erin G; Furchner-Evanson, Allison; Gleason, Marsa; Li, Amy; Potter, Hayley; Rezende, Lauren M; Lane, Kelly J; Kern, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Various dietary carbohydrates have been linked to obesity and altered adipose metabolism; however, the influences of honey vs common sweeteners have not been fully explored. We hypothesized that in comparison with sucrose, a honey-based diet would promote lower weight gain, adiposity, and related biomarkers (leptin, insulin, and adiponectin) as well as a better blood lipid profile. Thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats (228.1 ± 12.5 g) were equally divided by weight into 2 groups (n = 18) and provided free access to 1 of 2 diets of equal energy densities differing only in a portion of the carbohydrate. Diets contained 20% carbohydrate (by weight of total diet) from either clover honey or sucrose. After 33 days, epididymal fat pads were excised and weighed, and blood was collected for analyses of serum concentrations of lipids, glucose, and markers of adiposity and inflammation. Body weight gain was 14.7% lower (P ≤ .05) for rats fed honey, corresponding to a 13.3% lower (P ≤ .05) consumption of food/energy, whereas food efficiency ratios were nearly identical. Epididymal fat weight was 20.1% lower (P ≤ .05) for rats fed honey. Serum concentrations of triglycerides and leptin were lower (P ≤ .05) by 29.6% and 21.6%, respectively, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was higher (P ≤ .05) by 16.8% for honey-fed rats. No significant differences in serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, adiponectin, C-reactive protein, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, glucose, or insulin were detected. These results suggest that in comparison with sucrose, honey may reduce weight gain and adiposity, presumably due to lower food intake, and promote lower serum triglycerides but higher non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations.

  7. Portion size effects on weight gain in a free living setting

    PubMed Central

    French, Simone A; Mitchell, Nathan R; Wolfson, Julian; Harnack, Lisa J; Jeffery, Robert W; Gerlach, Anne F; Blundell, John E; Pentel, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Objective Examine the effect of weekday exposure over six months to different lunch sizes on energy intake and body weight in a free-living sample of working adults. Design and Methods Adults (n=233) were randomly assigned to one of three lunch size groups (400 kcal; 800 kcal; 1600 kcal) or to a no-free lunch control group for six months. Weight and energy intake were measured at baseline, and months 1, 3, and 6. Results Lunch energy was significantly higher in the 800 and 1600 kcal groups compared to the 400 kcal group (p < 0.0001). Total energy was significantly higher for the 1600 kcal group compared to the 400 and 800 kcal groups (p = 0.02). Body weight change at six months did not significantly differ at the 5% level by experimental group (1600 kcal group: +1.1 kg (sd=0.44); 800 kcal group: −0.1 kg (sd=0.42); 400 kcal group: −0.1 kg (sd=0.43); control group: 1.1 (sd=0.42); p=.07). Weight gain over time was significant in the 1600 kcal box lunch group (p < 0.05). Conclusions Weekday exposure for six months to a 1600 kcal lunch caused significant increases in total energy intake and weight gain. PMID:24510841

  8. Food availability as a determinant of weight gain among renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Bloodworth, Robin F; Ward, Kenneth D; Relyea, George E; Cashion, Ann K

    2014-06-01

    Excessive weight gain is common after renal transplantation, but it is unknown whether environmental factors, such as food availability, contribute to this important clinical problem. We evaluated the effects of food availability (fast food restaurants, convenience stores, and grocery stores within 1, 2, and 3 mile buffers of transplant recipients' residences) on body mass index (BMI) change during the first year post-transplant. Participants (n = 299) resided in Memphis, Tennessee. BMI increased by 1.42 units (p < .001) corresponding to an average weight gain of 9.25 lbs (5.43%) during the first year post-transplant. The number of grocery stores within 1 mile of recipient's residence was associated with an increase in BMI (p < .05), but fast food restaurants and convenience stores were not significantly associated with BMI change.

  9. Food Availability as a Determinant of Weight Gain Among Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Bloodworth, Robin F.; Ward, Kenneth D.; Relyea, George E.; Cashion, Ann K.

    2014-01-01

    Excessive weight gain is common after renal transplantation, but it is unknown whether environmental factors, such as food availability, contribute to this important clinical problem. We evaluated the effects of food availability (fast food restaurants, convenience stores, and grocery stores within 1, 2, and 3 mile buffers of transplant recipients′ residences) on body mass index (BMI) change during the first year post-transplant. Participants (n = 299) resided in Memphis, Tennessee. BMI increased by 1.42 units (p<.001) corresponding to an average weight gain of 9.25 lbs (5.43%) during the first year post-transplant. The number of grocery stores within 1 mile of recipient's residence was associated with an increase in BMI (p<.05), but fast food restaurants and convenience stores were not significantly associated with BMI change. PMID:24805885

  10. The influence of photoperiod on body weight gain, body composition, nutrient intake and hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Tucker, H A; Petitclerc, D; Zinn, S A

    1984-12-01

    Increasing daily light exposure from 8 to 16 h increases average daily body weight gains of sheep and Holstein cattle but reduces gains of white-tailed doe fawns. Some of these effects on average daily gain in sheep are the result of increased gut fill and pelt weight. Increasing daily exposure to light increases feed intake when sheep or cattle are fed ad libitum. However, increased feed intake is not a prerequisite for the anabolic effects of long duration exposures to light because increased growth occurs in the animals given 16 h light:8 h dark (16L:8D) even when feed intake is restricted. The anabolic effects of increased duration photoperiods in sheep are independent of the gonads, whereas in cattle they are dependent on the gonads. Consistent increases in average daily gains of cattle in response to longer duration photoperiods have not always been achieved. The lack of consistency may be associated with sexual maturity or rate of fattening of the animal. For example, the stimulatory effects of 16L:8D photoperiods on live weight gain are not readily manifested in immature prepubertal heifers, but occur primarily during the peripubertal period. Short days are conducive to deposition of fat, which may account for the stimulatory effects of short days on live weight gain of white-tailed doe fawns and excessively fattened Holsteins. In contrast, long duration photoperiods stimulate protein accretion in cattle. The hormonal signals that mediate the anabolic effects of increasing exposure to light are not associated with change in insulin, thyroxine or growth hormone concentrations in the blood. Glucocorticoid concentrations in serum decrease with longer duration photoperiods which is consistent with an anabolic effect. Increasing daily light exposure to 16 h/d hastens the increase in concentrations of progesterone and testosterone in sera of peripubertal heifers and prepubertal bulls, respectively. Thus, change in secretion of reproductive hormones in the

  11. Gestational Weight Gain and Overweight in Children Aged 3–6 Years

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lianhong; Liu, Jufen; Ye, Rongwei; Liu, Jianmeng; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Ren, Aiguo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether gestational weight gain (GWG) was associated with increased odds of childhood overweight after accounting for pre-pregnancy BMI. Methods In a prospective cohort study based on a premarital and perinatal health care system in China, data of 100 612 mother-child pairs were obtained. The main exposure was GWG as both a continuous and categorical variable. The outcome measure was overweight, defined by age- and sex-specific cutoff values for body mass index (BMI) in children aged 3–6 years. Results A 1-kg increase in maternal GWG was associated with an increase of 0.009 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.007–0.010, P < 0.001) in children’s mean BMI; in the subgroup of pre-pregnancy overweight/obese mothers, the increase in children’s BMI was 0.028 (95% CI, 0.017–0.039, P < 0.001). Excessive GWG played an important role in childhood overweight when adequate GWG was used as the reference, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.21 (95% CI, 1.12–1.29). The risk was highest (OR 2.22; 95% CI, 1.79–2.76) in the children of mothers who were overweight/obese before pregnancy and gained excessive weight during pregnancy. Conclusions Greater maternal GWG was associated with greater offspring BMI, and the risk of overweight was doubled in children whose mothers were overweight/obese before pregnancy and gained excessive weight during pregnancy. As a result, maintenance of appropriate weight gain during pregnancy and prophylaxis of maternal overweight/obesity before pregnancy should be a strategy for preventing childhood overweight/obesity. PMID:26119288

  12. [Gestational weight gain and nutritional state of the newborn: a descriptive study].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Kelen Cristina Ramos; Muraro, Luana Oliveira; Witkowski, Maria Carolina; Breigeirond, Márcia Koja

    2014-03-01

    The objective was to characterize puerperal women in relation to gestational weight gain and their newborns in accordance with the nutritional state at birth. This is a descriptive, quantitative and retrospective study approved by the Ethics Committee at the institution responsible. The collection of data was from December 2012 to May 2013. The sample was composed of 24 puerperal women and their children. The participants presented an average age of 26.5 (DP=5.4) years, 79.2% white; 91.7% married; 58.3% multiparous; 75% with a level of education between secondary school and higher education; 58.3% with a low family income; 54.1% presented an altered pre-gestational nutritional state and 75% obtained an inadequate gestational weight gain. 79.2% of the newborns were classified as Adequate for Gestational Age (AIG). The newborns classified as Large for Gestational Age (GIG) were from pregnant women that had excessive weight gain or were overweight. It was concluded that health professionals should be attentive to nutritional deviations with the intention of avoiding complications for maternal/fetal health.

  13. Inactivation of β-catenin results in the reduction of postnatal body weight gain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Tao; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Xin; Li, Kui; Zu, Yong; Liu, Ji-wei; Liu, Yong-jie; Zhu, Zhi-chuan; Xiong, Zhi-Qi; Zheng, Jing; Hu, Ze-Lan

    2014-01-01

    Arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus (ARH) is the core component in the regulation circuits of food intake and energy homeostasis. ARH projections to other parts of the hypothalamus and to extrahypothalamic areas are established in the postnatal two weeks, which is a pivotal stage for individual development. β-Catenin, a cell adhesion protein and also the mediator of canonical Wnt signaling pathway, plays an important role in embryonic development and adult homeostasis. However, whether β-catenin plays any roles in the development of hypothalamus is not clear. Here, we report that perinatal conditional knockout of β-catenin by CamKIIα-Cre in forebrain reduces body weight gain from P8 and dramatically shortens life span. Quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization results showed the expression of NPY mRNA in the ARH of β-catenin CKO mice at P15 is obviously increased compared with that of littermate controls, whereas the expression of POMC mRNA is significantly decreased, which suggested the reduction of postnatal body weight gain might be due to the deficiency of food intake. Together, β-catenin might play an important role in the regulation of food intake and postnatal body weight gain probably through affecting the development of ARH circuits.

  14. Betahistine decreases olanzapine-induced weight gain and somnolence in humans.

    PubMed

    Barak, Nir; Beck, Yaffa; Albeck, Joseph H

    2016-03-01

    Olanzapine's efficacy in schizophrenia is attributed to antagonism of dopamine and serotonin receptors. Olanzapine is also a potent histamine-H1 antagonist that results in weight gain and somnolence. Betahistine is a centrally acting histamine-H1 agonist, and therefore may reduce olanzapine's effect on histamine receptors in the brain. Olanzapine's high affinity for the histamine-H1 receptor warrants the use of high doses of betahistine. Forty-eight healthy women were recruited and randomized to receive either betahistine 144 mg/day or matching placebo for 4 weeks. Due to the high dose of betahistine, olanzapine was started only on the second week and titrated up to 10 mg/day, and co-administration continued for an additional 2 weeks. Only nominal differences in adverse events were noted between the treatment groups. Betahistine caused a 37% reduction in mean weight gain (1.24 kg in the betahistine arm vs. 1.93 kg in the placebo arm; p=.049) and 60% reduction in the mean increase in daytime Epworth sleepiness scores (1.82 units in the betahistine group vs. 3.57 units in the placebo group; p=.042). The present study suggests that betahistine-olanzapine co-administration, in healthy female subjects, yields an acceptable safety profile with mitigation of weight gain and somnolence. This should be further tested in a patient cohort.

  15. Body weight gain in patients with bilateral deep brain stimulation for dystonia.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marc E; Capelle, Hans-Holger; Lütjens, Götz; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G; Krauss, Joachim K; Blahak, Christian

    2016-03-01

    In patients with Parkinson's disease, significant weight gain following chronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been reported. Recently, relevant weight gain could be demonstrated also following subthalamic nucleus DBS in patients with primary cervical dystonia. Prospective analyses of body weight changes following DBS in patients with dystonia, however, have not been published so far. We aimed to analyse the changes of body weight following DBS in patients with dystonia. The body mass index (BMI) of 17 consecutive patients with segmental or generalised dystonia (mean age 54.6 ± 16.1 years) treated with bilateral DBS of the globus pallidus internus (GPi) (n = 14) or the thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus (n = 3) was measured preoperatively (pre-OP) and at three follow-up (FU) time points post-DBS surgery (FU1 = 7 months, FU2 = 17 months, FU3 = 72 months). All patients benefited from marked improvement in their dystonia. The mean BMI pre-OP (SD) was 22.5 (±3.7) kg/m(2) and increased stepwise to 24.0 (±3.3) kg/m(2) at FU1, 24.4 (±3.7) kg/m(2) at FU2 and 24.9 (±3.7) kg/m(2) at FU3 (p < 0.05 at all three FUs compared to pre-OP). Relative BMI increase and improvement of dystonia were correlated (p = 0.025). Chronic bilateral GPi DBS in patients with dystonia is associated with significant body weight gain, in particular during the first 6 months post-OP. This probably is a result of improvement of dystonic motor symptoms and recovery of eating dysfunction rather than a target-specific phenomenon.

  16. Excessive Gestational Weight Gain in the First Trimester among Women with Normal Glucose Tolerance and Resulting Neonatal Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Josefson, Jami L.; Simons, Hannah; Zeiss, Dinah M.; Metzger, Boyd E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess whether weight gain above or below Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommended amounts in an ethnically diverse obstetric population with normal glucose tolerance is associated with differences in neonatal adiposity. Study Design In this prospective cohort study, healthy women with normal glucose tolerance based on the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups guidelines were enrolled. Gestational weight at multiple time points were collected. Neonatal adiposity was measured by air displacement plethysmography at 24-72 hours of life. Analyses included Fisher's exact test, ANOVA, and a trajectory analysis using a group-based weight gain trajectory model with a censored normal distribution. Result Overweight and obese women were more likely to exceed IOM weight gain guidelines. Regardless, there was no significant difference in %body fat of neonates born to mothers who either met or exceeded gestational weight gain guidelines. Gestational weight gain timing influenced neonatal anthropometrics: women who gained excessively by the first prenatal visit had neonates with significantly higher birth weight (3.91 kg vs. 3.45 kg, p<0.001), and %body fat (13.7% vs. 10.9%, p=0.0001) compared to women who had steady, moderate gestational weight gain. Conclusion Avoidance of excessive gestational weight gain in the first trimester may prevent high amounts of neonatal adiposity. PMID:27583397

  17. Lead Exposure Induces Weight Gain in Adult Rats, Accompanied by DNA Hypermethylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Li, Qin; Cang, Zhen; Chen, Chi; Lu, Meng; Cheng, Jing; Zhai, Hualing; Xia, Fangzhen; Ye, Lin; Lu, Yingli

    2017-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have revealed the association of lead (Pb) exposure with obesity. DNA methylation alteration has been suggested to be one of the regulatory mechanisms of obesity. We aimed to explore whether Pb exposure is related with weight gain and DNA methylation alteration. Methods Male adult 8 week Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups: the normal chow diet (NCD); the NCD+0.05%Pb; the NCD+0.15%Pb; the NCD+0.45%Pb and the high fat diet. Rats were exposed to different dosages of Pb through drinking water for 21 weeks. Body weight, fasted blood glucose level, fasted insulin level, homeostasis assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index and lipid profile were detected. Intra-peritoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) was constructed to evaluate the glucose tolerance. Lipid accumulation of liver was detected and liver DNA underwent whole genome bisulfite sequencing. Results The NCD+0.05%Pb group had significantly greater weight, HOMA-IR and triglycerides, and lower glucose intolerance than the NCD group (P <0.05). This group also showed hepatic lipid accumulation. These metabolic changes were not observed in the other two Pb dosage groups. Furthermore, DNA hypermethylation extended along pathways related to glucose and lipid metabolism in NCD+0.05%Pb group. Conclusion Pb exposure resulted in dose-specific weight gain in adult Wistar rats, accompanied by alteration of DNA methylation. PMID:28107465

  18. School year versus summer differences in child weight gain: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Tom; O'Connor, Teresia; Johnston, Craig; Hughes, Sheryl; Moreno, Jennette; Chen, Tzu-An; Meltzer, Lisa; Baranowski, Janice

    2014-02-01

    The causes of the current high prevalence of overweight and obesity among children are not clearly known. Schools have been implicated in the causal chain to high child obesity prevalence. Recent studies have compared school year versus summertime changes (herein called seasonal differences) in child adiposity or related phenomena. The most common seasonal pattern in six longitudinal descriptive studies was that overweight and obese children experienced accelerated gain in weight or some BMI indicator during the summer, whereas healthy weight children gained less or not at all. Four physical activity (PA) intervention studies demonstrated that school year fitness improvements were lost during the summer. One study showed that PA declined across the summer. Another study provided conflicting results of lower total energy expenditure in the summer, but no seasonal difference in total energy expenditure after adjusting for fat-free mass. This pattern of fairly rapid seasonal differences suggests that PA is the primary factor contributing to seasonal differences in weight or BMI, but the documented seasonal pattern in PA (i.e., higher in summer) does not support this relationship. Sleep duration has also been inversely related to child adiposity. Seasonal patterns in adiposity, PA, and sleep need to be clearly established separately for overweight and healthy weight children in further longitudinal research to provide a clear focus for national policy.

  19. Excess Gestational Weight Gain in Pregnancy and the Role of Lifestyle Intervention.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Rebecca; Teede, Helena; Thangaratinam, Shakila; Boyle, Jacqueline

    2016-03-01

    With increasingly adverse lifestyles, young women in many countries have rapid weight gain and rising obesity. In keeping with this, most pregnant women exceed recommended gestational weight gain (GWG) and then retain weight postpartum. The consequences of excess GWG include maternal risks during pregnancy, neonatal risks and maternal obesity and chronic disease longer term, presenting a significant public health and economic burden worldwide. This article discusses the adverse maternal and infant risks with excess GWG apparent from observational studies, summarizes the existing guidelines for optimal GWG and highlights the need for further research to identify optimal GWG recommendations across the different ethnicities and weight ranges.We also review the evidence for lifestyle interventions in pregnancy to prevent excess GWG and highlighting the work underway to integrate large scale meta-analyses of individual patient data from lifestyle intervention studies to inform clinical practice beyond current observational data. Finally, we address the need to implement lifestyle interventions into routine pregnancy care to improve short and long term maternal health outcomes.

  20. Gain weight by "going diet?" Artificial sweeteners and the neurobiology of sugar cravings: Neuroscience 2010.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing

    2010-06-01

    America's obesity epidemic has gathered much media attention recently. A rise in the percent of the population who are obese coincides with an increase in the widespread use of non-caloric artificial sweeteners, such as aspartame (e.g., Diet Coke) and sucralose (e.g., Pepsi One), in food products (Figure 1). Both forward and reverse causalities have been proposed. While people often choose "diet" or "light" products to lose weight, research studies suggest that artificial sweeteners may contribute to weight gain. In this mini-review, inspired by a discussion with Dr. Dana Small at Yale's Neuroscience 2010 conference in April, I first examine the development of artificial sweeteners in a historic context. I then summarize the epidemiological and experimental evidence concerning their effects on weight. Finally, I attempt to explain those effects in light of the neurobiology of food reward.

  1. Maternal pre-pregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, and infant birth weight: A within-family analysis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ji

    2015-07-01

    In the United States, the high prevalence of unhealthy preconception body weight and inappropriate gestational weight gain among pregnant women is an important public health concern. However, the relationship among pre-pregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, and newborn birth weight has not been well established. This study uses a very large dataset of sibling births and a within-family design to thoroughly address this issue. The baseline analysis controlling for mother fixed effects indicates maternal preconception overweight, preconception obesity, and excessive gestational weight gain significantly increase the risk of having a high birth weight baby, respectively, by 1.3, 3 and 3.9 percentage points, while underweight before pregnancy and inadequate gestational weight gain increase the low birth weight incidence by 1.4 and 2 percentage points. The benchmark results are robust in a variety of sensitivity checks. Since poor birth outcomes especially high birth weight and low birth weight have lasting adverse impacts on one's health, education, and socio-economic outcomes later in life, the findings of this research suggest promoting healthy weight among women before pregnancy and preventing inappropriate weight gain during pregnancy can generate significant intergenerational benefits.

  2. Natural mixtures of POPs affected body weight gain and induced transcription of genes involved in weight regulation and insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lyche, Jan L; Nourizadeh-Lillabadi, Rasoul; Karlsson, Camilla; Stavik, Benedicte; Berg, Vidar; Skåre, Janneche Utne; Alestrøm, Peter; Ropstad, Erik

    2011-04-01

    Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions worldwide, and is associated with chronic illnesses such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and dyslipidemias (metabolic syndrome). Commonly held causes of obesity are overeating coupled with a sedentary lifestyle. However, it has also been postulated that exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may be related to the significant increase in the prevalence of obesity and associated diseases. In the present study, developmental and reproductive effects of lifelong exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of two natural mixtures of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were investigated using classical and molecular methods in a controlled zebrafish model. The mixtures used were extracted from burbot (Lota lota) liver originating from freshwater systems in Norway (Lake Mjøsa and Lake Losna). The concentration of POPs in the zebrafish ranged from levels detected in wild fish (Lake Mjøsa and Lake Losna), to concentrations reported in human and wildlife populations. Phenotypic effects observed in both exposure groups included (1) earlier onset of puberty, (2) elevated male/female sex ratio, and (3) increased body weight at 5 months of age. Interestingly, genome-wide transcription profiling identified functional networks of genes, in which key regulators of weight homeostasis (PPARs, glucocoricoids, CEBPs, estradiol), steroid hormone functions (glucocoricoids, estradiol, NCOA3) and insulin signaling (HNF4A, CEBPs, PPARG) occupied central positions. The increased weight and the regulation of genes associated with weight homeostasis and insulin signaling observed in the present study suggest that environmental pollution may affect the endocrine regulation of the metabolism, possibly leading to increased weight gain and obesity.

  3. Is acetazolamide similar to topiramate for reversal of antipsychotic-induced weight gain?

    PubMed

    Schneiderhan, Mark E; Marvin, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Acetazolamide (AZD), a sulfa-like moiety, is a potent, nonspecific inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzymes and has been demonstrated to decrease lipogenesis in adipose cells in in vitro cell culture studies. In contrast, topiramate (a sulfamate moiety) appears to inhibit specific (CA) enzymes II and V. Four placebo-controlled trials with topiramate have demonstrated positive results in weight loss. There is only anecdotal evidence that AZD may cause weight loss. The following case is of a 49-year-old African-American woman with a long history of schizoaffective disorder, hypertension, diabetes type II, stress incontinence, and obesity (body mass index, 45.5 kg/m2). Previous trials of topiramate demonstrated temporary but significant weight loss before AZD use. A 4 week washout period occurred before starting AZD, 250 mg twice daily. Significant weight loss of 11.5 lbs was seen over 4 weeks. During washout periods of either topiramate or AZD, her total mean weight was approximately 2 to 7 lbs higher than when she was treated with AZD. Although tolerance and side effects may limit the use of AZD as a safe and effective strategy for medication-related weight gain, the pharmacology may provide research insights into the causes and treatments of obesity.

  4. Mechanisms of body weight gain in patients with Parkinson's disease after subthalamic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Montaurier, C; Morio, B; Bannier, S; Derost, P; Arnaud, P; Brandolini-Bunlon, M; Giraudet, C; Boirie, Y; Durif, F

    2007-07-01

    Chronic bilateral subthalamic stimulation leads to a spectacular clinical improvement in patients with motor complications. However, the post-operative body weight gain involved may limit the benefits of surgery and induce critical metabolic disorders. Twenty-four Parkinsonians (61.1 +/- 1.4 years) were examined 1 month before (M - 1) and 3 months after (M + 3) surgery. Body composition and energy expenditure (EE) were measured (1) over 36 h in calorimetric chambers (CC) with rigorous control of food intakes and activities [sleep metabolic rate, resting activities, meals, 3 or 4 sessions of 20 min on a training bicycle at 13 km/h and daily EE] and (2) in resting conditions (basal metabolic rate) during an acute L-dopa challenge (M - 1) or according to acute 'off' and 'on' stimulation (M + 3). Before surgery, EE was compared between the Parkinsonian patients and healthy subjects matched for height and body composition (metabolic rate during sleep, daily EE) or matched to predicted values (basal metabolic rate). Before surgery, in Parkinsonian men but not women, (1) daily EE was higher while sleep metabolic rate was lower compared to healthy matched men (+9.2 +/- 3.9 and -8.2 +/- 2.3%, respectively, P < 0.05) and (2) basal metabolic rate (L-dopa 'on') was higher than predicted basal metabolic rate (+11.5 +/- 4.0%, P < 0.05) but was further increased without L-dopa (+8.4 +/- 3.2% vs L-dopa 'on', P < 0.05). EE during daily activities was higher during 'off' periods compared to 'on' periods for both men (+19.3 +/- 3.3%, P < 0.0001) and women (+16.1 +/- 4.7%, P < 0.01). After surgery, there was a 3.4 +/- 0.6 kg (P < 0.0001) body weight increase together with fat mass (P < 0.0001) and fat-free mass (P < 0.05) in Parkinsonian men and a 2.6 +/- 0.8 kg (P < 0.05) body weight increase together with fat mass (P < 0.05) in Parkinsonian women. Sleep metabolic rate increased in men (+7.5 +/- 2.0%, P < 0.01) to reach control values but remained unchanged in women. Daily EE

  5. Weight Gain Prevention: Identifying Theory-Based Targets for Health Behavior Change in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Kathryn A.; Parks, Serena L.; Anderson, Eileen; Winett, Richard; Davy, Brenda M.

    2008-01-01

    Young adults attending college are more vulnerable to weight gain than the general population. We sought to identify health behavior change targets related to weight management in college students. Based on the social cognitive theory model for health behavior change, we investigated the health-related lifestyle behaviors and physiological characteristics of this population. Forty-three college students (18.3±0.1 years) completed a series of quantitative assessments (body weight and composition, cardiorespiratory fitness, diet and activity habits) and structured qualitative assessments (structured interview or focus group). Participants were predominantly normal-weight (mean BMI=22.2±0.4 kg/m2) and fit (VO2max = 50.5±1.5 ml/kg/min). However, healthy eating and physical activity were not considered high priorities, despite having ample free time, high exercise self-efficacy, positive outcome expectations for exercise, and a desire to exercise more. Participants reported that regularly engaging in exercise was difficult. This may have been due to poor planning/time management, satisfaction with body image, lack of accountability and feelings of laziness. Dietary patterns generally met recommendations but were low in fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Social support for exercise and healthy dietary habits were important factors associated with health behaviors. Students reported a decline in exercise and dietary habits relative to high school, which may contribute to college weight gain. Our results suggest that this population may not have adequate self-regulatory skills, such as planning and self-monitoring, to maintain healthy behaviors in the college environment. Dietitians working with young adults attending college may use these findings to guide the behavioral therapy component of their weight management medical nutrition therapy goals and outcomes. PMID:18926139

  6. Psychological and hormonal features of smokers at risk to gain weight after smoking cessation--results of a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Koopmann, Anne; Dinter, Christina; Grosshans, Martin; von der Goltz, Christoph; Hentschel, Rahel; Dahmen, Norbert; Gallinat, Jürgen; Wagner, Michael; Gründer, Gerd; Thürauf, Norbert; Wienker, Thomas; Brinkmeyer, Jürgen; Mobascher, Arian; Spreckelmeyer, Katja N; Clepce, Marion; de Millas, Walter; Wiedemann, Klaus; Winterer, Georg; Kiefer, Falk

    2011-06-01

    Preclinical and clinical data suggest modulating effects of appetite-regulating hormones and stress perception on food intake. Nicotine intake also interferes with regulation of body weight. Especially following smoking cessation gaining weight is a common but only partially understood consequence. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction between smoking habits, the appetite regulating hormone leptin, negative affectivity, and stress vulnerability on eating behavior in a clinical case-control study under standardized conditions. In a large population-based study sample, we compared leptin and cortisol plasma concentrations (radioimmunoassay) between current tobacco smokers with high cognitive restraint and disinhibition in eating behavior and smokers scoring low in both categories as assessed with the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ; Stunkard & Messick, 1985). As a measure for smoking effects on the stress axis, the saliva cortisol concentrations were compared before and after nicotine smoking. Additionally, stress perception was assessed with the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), symptoms of depression and anxiety with the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). In smokers showing high cognitive restraint and disinhibition we found significantly higher leptin concentrations than in the group of smokers scoring low in both categories. Furthermore there was a significant group difference in saliva cortisol concentrations after nicotine intake. Smokers showing high cognitive restraint and disinhibition were also characterized by significantly higher scores in the STAI, the PSS and the BDI. Our results suggest that smokers with a pathological eating behavior show an impaired neuroendocrine regulation of appetite and are prone to experience higher levels of stress and negative affectivity. This interaction of behavioral and neuroendocrinological factors may constitute a high risk condition for gaining weight

  7. Effects of weight gain induced by controlled overfeeding on physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Bray, George A.; Smith, Steven R.; de Jonge, Lilian; Rood, Jennifer; Han, Hongmei; Redman, Leanne M.; Martin, Corby K.

    2014-01-01

    It is unclear whether physical activity changes following long-term overfeeding and in response to different dietary protein intakes. Twenty-five (16 males, 9 females) healthy adults (18–35 yr) with BMI ranging from 19 to 30 kg/m2 enrolled in this inpatient study. In a parallel group design, participants were fed 140% of energy needs, with 5, 15, or 25% of energy from protein, for 56 days. Participants wore an RT3 accelerometer for at least 59 days throughout baseline and during overfeeding and completed 24-h whole room metabolic chamber assessments at baseline and on days 1, 14, and 56 of overfeeding and on day 57, when the baseline energy intake was consumed, to measure percent of time active and spontaneous physical activity (SPA; kcal/day). Changes in activity were also assessed by doubly labeled water (DLW). From accelerometry, vector magnitude (VM), a weight-independent measure of activity, and activity energy expenditure (AEE) increased with weight gain during overfeeding. AEE remained increased after adjusting for changes in body composition. Activity-related energy expenditure (AREE) from DLW and percent activity and SPA in the metabolic chamber increased with overfeeding, but SPA was no longer significant after adjusting for change in body composition. Change in VM and AEE were positively correlated with weight gain; however, change in activity was not affected by protein intake. Overfeeding produces an increase in physical activity and in energy expended in physical activity after adjusting for changes in body composition, suggesting that increased activity in response to weight gain might be one mechanism to support adaptive thermogenesis. PMID:25294214

  8. Dehydration and acute weight gain in mixed martial arts fighters before competition.

    PubMed

    Jetton, Adam M; Lawrence, Marcus M; Meucci, Marco; Haines, Tracie L; Collier, Scott R; Morris, David M; Utter, Alan C

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the magnitude of acute weight gain (AWG) and dehydration in mixed martial arts (MMA) fighters before competition. Urinary measures of hydration status and body mass were determined approximately 24 hours before and then again approximately 2 hours before competition in 40 MMA fighters (mean ± SE, age: 25.2 ± 0.65 years, height: 1.77 ± 0.01 m, body mass: 75.8 ± 1.5 kg). The AWG was defined as the amount of body weight the fighters gained in the approximately 22-hour period between the official weigh-in and the actual competition. On average, the MMA fighters gained 3.40 ± 2.2 kg or 4.4% of their body weight in the approximately 22-hour period before competition. Urine specific gravity significantly decreased (p < 0.001) from 1.028 ± 0.001 to 1.020 ± 0.001 during the approximately 22-hour rehydration period. Results demonstrated that 39% of the MMA fighters presented with a Usg of >1.021 immediately before competition indicating significant or serious dehydration. The MMA fighters undergo significant dehydration and fluctuations in body mass (4.4% avg.) in the 24-hour period before competition. Urinary measures of hydration status indicate that a significant proportion of MMA fighters are not successfully rehydrating before competition and subsequently are competing in a dehydrated state. Weight management guidelines to prevent acute dehydration in MMA fighters are warranted to prevent unnecessary adverse health events secondary to dehydration.

  9. Why Research on the Pharmacogenetics of Atypical Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities Is Warranted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleister, Heidi M.; Valdovinos, Maria Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Weight gain is an often-observed side effect of atypical antipsychotics (AAPs) and is particularly significant in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). The majority of individuals treated with AAPs will gain at least 10% of their initial body weight over the course of therapy (Umbricht & Kane, 1996). One's genetic constitution is an…

  10. Predicting the "Freshman 15": Environmental and Psychological Predictors of Weight Gain in First-Year University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vella-Zarb, Rachel A.; Elgar, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To investigate weight gain in first-year university students; and (2) to examine whether environmental and psychological factors, specifically accommodation and stress, predict weight gain. Methods: Eighty-four first-year university students (77 per cent female) were weighed and completed the Perceived Stress Scale (Cohen, Kamarck…

  11. Weight Gain in Infancy and Overweight or Obesity in Childhood across the Gestational Spectrum: a Prospective Birth Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoying; Johnson, Sara; Gong, Yiwei; Polk, Sarah; Divall, Sara; Radovick, Sally; Moon, Margaret; Paige, David; Hong, Xiumei; Caruso, Deanna; Chen, Zhu; Mallow, Eric; Walker, Sheila O; Mao, Guangyun; Pearson, Colleen; Wang, Mei-Cheng; Zuckerman, Barry; Cheng, Tina L; Wang, Xiaobin

    2016-07-15

    This study aimed to investigate the optimal degree of weight gain across the gestational spectrum in 1971 children enrolled at birth and followed up to age 7 years. Weight gain in infancy was categorized into four groups based on weight gain z-scores: slow (<-0.67), on track (-0.67 to 0.67), rapid (0.67 to 1.28), and extremely rapid (>1.28). Underweight and overweight or obesity (OWO) were defined as a body mass index ≤5(th) and ≥85(th) percentile, respectively, for age and gender. In our population, OWO was far more common than underweight (39.7% vs. 3.6%). Weight gain tracked strongly from age 4 to 24 months, and was positively associated with OWO and an unfavorable pattern of metabolic biomarkers, although the degree of weight gain for the risk was different across gestational categories. Extremely rapid weight gain led to a particularly high risk of OWO among children born early term and late preterm: odds ratio: 3.3 (95% confidence interval: 1.9 to 5.5) and 3.7 (1.8 to 7.5), respectively, as compared to those with on track weight gain. Our findings suggest that monitoring and ensuring optimal weight gain across the entire gestational spectrum beginning from birth represents a first step towards primary prevention of childhood obesity.

  12. Weight Gain in Infancy and Overweight or Obesity in Childhood across the Gestational Spectrum: a Prospective Birth Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoying; Johnson, Sara; Gong, Yiwei; Polk, Sarah; Divall, Sara; Radovick, Sally; Moon, Margaret; Paige, David; Hong, Xiumei; Caruso, Deanna; Chen, Zhu; Mallow, Eric; Walker, Sheila O.; Mao, Guangyun; Pearson, Colleen; Wang, Mei-Cheng; Zuckerman, Barry; Cheng, Tina L.; Wang, Xiaobin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the optimal degree of weight gain across the gestational spectrum in 1971 children enrolled at birth and followed up to age 7 years. Weight gain in infancy was categorized into four groups based on weight gain z-scores: slow (<−0.67), on track (−0.67 to 0.67), rapid (0.67 to 1.28), and extremely rapid (>1.28). Underweight and overweight or obesity (OWO) were defined as a body mass index ≤5th and ≥85th percentile, respectively, for age and gender. In our population, OWO was far more common than underweight (39.7% vs. 3.6%). Weight gain tracked strongly from age 4 to 24 months, and was positively associated with OWO and an unfavorable pattern of metabolic biomarkers, although the degree of weight gain for the risk was different across gestational categories. Extremely rapid weight gain led to a particularly high risk of OWO among children born early term and late preterm: odds ratio: 3.3 (95% confidence interval: 1.9 to 5.5) and 3.7 (1.8 to 7.5), respectively, as compared to those with on track weight gain. Our findings suggest that monitoring and ensuring optimal weight gain across the entire gestational spectrum beginning from birth represents a first step towards primary prevention of childhood obesity. PMID:27417566

  13. Association of LEPR and ANKK1 Gene Polymorphisms with Weight Gain in Epilepsy Patients Receiving Valproic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongliang; Wang, Xueding; Zhou, Yafang; Ni, Guanzhong; Su, Qibiao; Chen, Ziyi; Chen, Zhuojia; Li, Jiali; Chen, Xinmeng; Hou, Xiangyu; Xie, Wen; Xin, Shuang; Zhou, Liemin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Weight gain is the most frequent adverse effect of valproic acid (VPA) treatment, resulting in poor compliance and many endocrine disturbances. Similarities in the weight change of monozygotic twins receiving VPA strongly suggests that genetic factors are involved in this effect. However, few studies have been conducted to identify the relevant genetic polymorphisms. Additionally, the causal relationship between the VPA concentration and weight gain has been controversial. Thus, we investigated the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in several appetite stimulation and energy homeostasis genes and the steady state plasma concentrations (Css) of VPA on the occurrence of weight gain in patients. Methods: A total of 212 epilepsy patients receiving VPA were enrolled. Nineteen SNPs in 11 genes were detected using the Sequenom MassArray iPlex platform, and VPA Css was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results: After 6 months of treatment, 20.28% of patients were found to gain a significant amount of weight (weight gained ≥7%). Three SNPs in the leptin receptor (LEPR), ankyrin repeat kinase domain containing 1 (ANKK1), and α catalytic subunit of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) showed significant associations with VPA-induced weight gain (p < 0.001, p = 0.017 and p = 0.020, respectively). After Bonferroni correction for multiple tests, the genotypic association of LEPR rs1137101, the allelic association of LEPR rs1137101, and ANKK1 rs1800497 with weight gain remained significant. However, the VPA Css in patents who gained weight were not significantly different from those who did not gain weight (p = 0.121). Conclusions: LEPR and ANKK1 genetic polymorphisms may have value in predicting VPA-induced weight gain. PMID:25740917

  14. Pregnant women's perceptions of gestational weight gain: a systematic review and meta-synthesis of qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Vanstone, Meredith; Kandasamy, Sujane; Giacomini, Mita; DeJean, Deirdre; McDonald, Sarah D

    2016-11-21

    Excess gestational weight gain has numerous negative health outcomes for women and children, including high blood pressure, diabetes, and cesarean section (maternal) and high birth weight, trauma at birth, and asphyxia (infants). Excess weight gain in pregnancy is associated with a higher risk of long-term obesity in both mothers and children. Despite a concerted public health effort, the proportion of pregnant women gaining weight in excess of national guidelines continues to increase. To understand this phenomenon and offer suggestions for improving interventions, we conducted a systematic review of qualitative research on pregnant women's perceptions and experiences of weight gain in pregnancy. We used the methodology of qualitative meta-synthesis to analyze 42 empirical qualitative research studies conducted in high-income countries and published between 2005 and 2015. With this synthesis, we provide an account of the underlying factors and circumstances (barriers, facilitators, and motivators) that pregnant women identify as important for appropriate weight gain. We also offer a description of the strategies identified by pregnant women as acceptable and appropriate ways to promote healthy weight gain. Through our integrative analysis, we identify women's common perception on the struggle to enact health behaviors and physical, social, and environmental factors outside of their control. Effective and sensitive interventions to encourage healthy weight gain in pregnancy must consider the social environment in which decisions about weight take place.

  15. Weight-Gain Misperceptions and the Third-Person Effect in Black and White College-bound Females: Potential Implications for Healthy Weight Management

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Jennifer B.; Butler-Ajibade, Phoebe; Robinson, Seronda A.; Lee, Shanique J.

    2013-01-01

    Elements of social norm theory and communication theory on the third-person effect may prove useful in efforts to prevent excessive weight gain among emerging adults entering college. The present study explored the associations of race/ethnicity and BMI status with these socio-cognitive factors that may affect first-year weight regulation in a sample of Black (N = 247) and White (N = 94) college-bound females. Participants completed an online survey assessing first-year weight-gain perceived norms along with weight-change expectations and concerns. Results provided evidence of the persistence of the myth of the “Freshman 15”, belief in the typicality of gaining weight during the first year of college, and significant concern about first-year weight gain. Initial findings further revealed a robust third-person effect whereby despite nearly 90% of the sample endorsing that first-year weight gain was common, only 12% expected they would experience weight gain. Main effects of race/ethnicity, BMI status, and their interaction further uncovered distinct patterns of findings. Preliminary results highlight the need for college health officials at both predominantly White as well as minority-serving institutions to adequately address the significant concern over first-year weight gain in conjunction with the desire to lose weight expressed by an appreciable number of incoming college females. Findings also advocate the utility of evaluating social norm theory and the third-person perceptual bias in the context of first-year weight gain to potentially enhance the design and effectiveness of healthy weight management initiatives among ethnically-diverse young women entering college. PMID:23910760

  16. Complications of fat grafts growth after weight gain: report of a severe diplopia.

    PubMed

    Duhoux, Alexandre; Chennoufi, Mehdi; Lantieri, Laurent; Hivelin, Mikael

    2013-07-01

    A 47 years old woman underwent autologous fat grafting to treat a 5×4 cm depression of the lower lid and the upper cheek secondary resection of squamous cell carcinoma and subsequent coverage by full thickness skin graft. 20 mL of autologous fat were harvested from lower abdomen, centrifuged and injected subcutaneously. The patient then gained a total of 15 kg over a period of 24 months. Eye dystopia developed while the grafted area became convex. MRI confirmed subcutaneous fat mass going to the orbital floor through the inferior septal defect. The fat excess was removed through a trans-conjonctival approach allowing for a progressive regression of diplopia after 2 months while the oedema reduced. The overall follow up from the resection-coverage and last examination was 5 years. In this case with a context of noticeable weight gain, the growth of a fat graft trapped between a sclerous plane and the eye, that penetrated the orbital cavity through a septal defect led have led to exophthalmos, ocular dystopia and diplopia. Systematic overcorrection in autologous fat grafting should be prevented, especially in functional areas and on low body mass index patient that might gain weight.

  17. Correlates of weight gain during long-term risperidone treatment in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Most clinical trials of antipsychotics in children are brief, failing to address their long-term safety, particularly when taken concurrently with other psychotropics. This hypothesis-generating analysis evaluates potential correlates of weight gain in children receiving extended risperidone treatment. Methods Medically healthy 7–17 year-old patients treated with risperidone for six months or more were enrolled. Anthropometric measurements were conducted. Developmental and medication history was obtained from the medical record. Information related to birth weight, dietary intake, physical activity, and parental weight was collected. Mixed regression analyses explored the contribution of various demographic and clinical factors to age- and sex-adjusted weight and body mass index (BMI) z scores over the treatment period. Results The sample consisted of 110 patients (89% males) with a mean age of 11.8 years (sd = 2.9) upon enrollment. The majority had an externalizing disorder and received 0.03 mg/kg/day (sd = 0.02) of risperidone, for 2.5 years (sd = 1.7), to primarily target irritability and aggression (81%). Polypharmacy was common with 71% receiving psychostimulants, 50% selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and 32% α2-agonists. Weight and BMI z score were positively correlated with baseline weight at the start of risperidone, treatment duration, and the weight-adjusted dose of risperidone but inversely associated with the weight-adjusted dose of psychostimulants and the concurrent use of SSRIs and α2-agonists. The effect of risperidone dose appeared to attenuate as treatment extended while that of psychostimulants became more significant. The rate of change in weight (or BMI) z score prior to and within the first 12 weeks of risperidone treatment did not independently predict future changes neither did birth weight, postnatal growth, dietary intake, physical activity, or parental weight. Conclusions This

  18. Unhealthy weight gain during treatment for alcohol and drug use in four residential programs for Latina and African American women.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Margaret H; Glovsky, Ellen; Amaro, Hortensia; Nieves, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Weight gain in women (n = 52) in four alcohol and drug user residential treatment programs in Boston, Massachusetts, was studied in 2004 through focus groups (n = 52) and weekly weights (n = 10). Focus group theme analyses revealed that weight gain was primarily attributed to availability of food and lack of exercise. Participants were very interested in improving nutrition, diet, and exercise in the programs. Weight gain (mean = 6.4 pounds) occurred in nine women (n = 10) in the first 12 weeks of treatment. The two-dimensional Food Model Chart and the Yale Physical Activity Survey were used. Limitations are noted and future research is suggested.

  19. 'Battling my biology': psychological effects of genetic testing for risk of weight gain.

    PubMed

    Meisel, S F; Wardle, J

    2014-04-01

    The availability of genetic tests for multifactorial conditions such as obesity raises concerns that higher-risk results could lead to fatalistic reactions or lower-risk results to complacency. No study has investigated the effects of genetic test feedback for the risk of obesity in non-clinical samples. The present study explored psychological and behavioral reactions to genetic test feedback for a weight related gene (FTO) in a volunteer sample (n = 18) using semi-structured interviews. Respondents perceived the gene test result as scientifically objective; removing some of the emotion attached to the issue of weight control. Those who were struggling with weight control reported relief of self-blame. There was no evidence for either complacency or fatalism; all respondents emphasized the importance of lifestyle choices in long-term weight management, although they recognized the role of both genes and environment. Regardless of the test result, respondents evaluated the testing positively and found it motivating and informative. Genetic test feedback for risk of weight gain may offer psychological benefits beyond its objectively limited clinical utility. As the role of genetic counselors is likely to expand, awareness of reasons for genetic testing for common, complex conditions and reactions to the test result is important.

  20. TOX and ADIPOQ Gene Polymorphisms Are Associated with Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shen; Xu, Chengai; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Xueshi; Jiang, Rui; Zhang, Miaomiao; Wang, Lili; Yang, Guifu; Gao, Ying; Song, Chenyu; He, Yukun; Zhang, Ying; Li, Jie; Li, Wei-Dong

    2017-01-01

    To find the genetic markers related to the antipsychotic-induced weight gain (AIWG), we analyzed associations among candidate gene single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and quantitative traits of weight changes and lipid profiles in a Chinese Han population. A total of 339 schizophrenic patients, including 86 first-episode patients (FEPs), meeting the entry criteria were collected. All patients received atypical antipsychotic drug monotherapy and hospitalization and were followed for 12 weeks. Forty-three SNPs in 23 candidate genes were calculated for quantitative genetic association with AIWG, performed by PLINK. The TOX gene SNP rs11777927 (P = 0.009) and the ADIPOQ gene SNP rs182052 (P = 0.019) were associated with AIWG (in body mass index, BMI). In addition, the BDNF SNP rs6265 (P = 0.002), BDAF SNP rs11030104 SNP (P = 0.001), and ADIPOQ SNPs rs822396 (P = 0.003) were significantly associated with the change of waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) induced by atypical antipsychotics. These results were still significant after age and gender adjustments. These findings provide preliminary evidence supporting the role of TOX, ADIPOQ and BDNF in weight and WHR gain induced by atypical antipsychotics. PMID:28327672

  1. Lower “Awake and Fed Thermogenesis” Predicts Future Weight Gain in Subjects With Abdominal Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Piaggi, Paolo; Krakoff, Jonathan; Bogardus, Clifton; Thearle, Marie S.

    2013-01-01

    Awake and fed thermogenesis (AFT) is the energy expenditure (EE) of the nonactive fed condition above the minimum metabolic requirement during sleep and is composed of the thermic effect of food and the cost of being awake. AFT was estimated from whole-room 24-h EE measures in 509 healthy subjects (368 Native Americans and 141 whites) while subjects consumed a eucaloric diet. Follow-up data were available for 290 Native Americans (median follow-up time: 6.6 years). AFT accounted for ∼10% of 24-h EE and explained a significant portion of deviations from expected energy requirements. Energy intake was the major determinant of AFT. AFT, normalized as a percentage of intake, was inversely related to age and fasting glucose concentration and showed a nonlinear relationship with waist circumference and BMI. Spline analysis demonstrated that AFT becomes inversely related to BMI at an inflection point of 29 kg/m2. The residual variance of AFT, after accounting for covariates, predicted future weight change only in subjects with a BMI >29 kg/m2. AFT may influence daily energy balance, is reduced in obese individuals, and predicts future weight gain in these subjects. Once central adiposity develops, a blunting of AFT may occur that then contributes to further weight gain. PMID:23974925

  2. Elevation of liver enzyme levels during psychopharmacological treatment is associated with weight gain.

    PubMed

    Himmerich, Hubertus; Kaufmann, Christian; Schuld, Andreas; Pollmächer, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Increased circulating levels of liver enzymes emerging during treatment with psychotropic drugs are frequently encountered and, in general, attributed to drug metabolism or toxic effects. Because obesity was shown to be associated with elevated liver enzyme levels in different non-psychiatric study samples, we hypothesized that drug-induced weight gain might be an additional causative factor. We tested this hypothesis in 67 inpatients who received psychopharmacological treatment across five weeks. Stepwise linear regression was used to predict changes in the serum levels of aspartate-amino transferase (ASAT) and alanine-amino transferase (ALAT) by changes in the body mass index (BMI), by changes in other biological parameters related to body weight (tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-alpha], soluble TNF receptors [sTNF-R], interleukin-6 [IL-6], leptin plasma levels) and by the respective liver enzyme baseline level. BMI changes from baseline to endpoint were significantly associated with the changes in ALAT and ASAT levels across five weeks of treatment and with ALAT and ASAT levels at the end point of the study. The baseline levels of ALAT and ASAT also had a significant impact on these liver enzyme level changes, whereas all other variables had not. These results suggest that weight gain-associated metabolic changes occurring during treatment with psychotropic drugs have consistent and clinically relevant effects on the liver.

  3. Food cue reactivity and craving predict eating and weight gain: a meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Rebecca G; Kober, Hedy

    2016-02-01

    According to learning-based models of behavior, food cue reactivity and craving are conditioned responses that lead to increased eating and subsequent weight gain. However, evidence supporting this relationship has been mixed. We conducted a quantitative meta-analysis to assess the predictive effects of food cue reactivity and craving on eating and weight-related outcomes. Across 69 reported statistics from 45 published reports representing 3,292 participants, we found an overall medium effect of food cue reactivity and craving on outcomes (r = 0.33, p < 0.001; approximately 11% of variance), suggesting that cue exposure and the experience of craving significantly influence and contribute to eating behavior and weight gain. Follow-up tests revealed a medium effect size for the effect of both tonic and cue-induced craving on eating behavior (r = 0.33). We did not find significant differences in effect sizes based on body mass index, age, or dietary restraint. However, we did find that visual food cues (e.g. pictures and videos) were associated with a similar effect size to real food exposure and a stronger effect size than olfactory cues. Overall, the present findings suggest that food cue reactivity, cue-induced craving and tonic craving systematically and prospectively predict food-related outcomes. These results have theoretical, methodological, public health and clinical implications.

  4. Treatment with FGFR2-IIIc monoclonal antibody suppresses weight gain and adiposity in KKAy mice

    PubMed Central

    Nonogaki, K; Kaji, T; Yamazaki, T; Murakami, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Expression of β-Kotho, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)-1c and 2c, which bind FGF21, is decreased in the white adipose tissue of obese mice. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of FGFR2c in the development of obesity and diabetes in KKAy mice. Treatment with mouse monoclonal FGFR2-IIIc antibody (0.5 mg kg−1) significantly suppressed body weight gain and epididymal white adipose tissue weight in individually housed KKAy mice while having no effect on daily food intake. In addition, treatment with FGFR2-IIIc antibody significantly increased plasma-free fatty acid levels while having no effect on blood glucose or plasma FGF21 levels. Moreover, treatment with FGFR2-IIIc antibody had no significant effect on the expression of uncoupling protein-1, uncoupling protein-2 or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α in the epididymal white adipose tissue. The treatment with FGFR2-IIIc antibody had no significant effects on daily food intake and body weight gain in individually housed KK mice. These findings suggest that FGFR2-IIIc upregulates the adiposity induced by social isolation in KKAy mice, and that decreased expression and/or function of FGFR2c might be a compensatory response to enhanced adiposity. Inhibition of FGFR2-IIIc function might be a novel therapeutic approach for obesity. PMID:27892934

  5. Effects of Proximate Foreclosed Properties on Individuals’ Weight Gain in Massachusetts, 1987–2008

    PubMed Central

    Glymour, M. Maria; Chakrabarti, Prabal; Christakis, Nicholas A.; Kawachi, Ichiro; Subramanian, S. V.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the extent to which living near foreclosed properties is associated with individuals’ subsequent weight gain. Methods. We linked health and address information on 2068 Framingham Offspring Cohort members (7830 assessments) across 5 waves (1987–2008) to records of all Massachusetts foreclosures during that period. We used counts of lender-owned foreclosed properties within 100 meters of participants’ homes to predict body mass index (BMI; defined as weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters) and the odds of being overweight (BMI ≥ 25), adjusted for individual and area-level covariates. Results. Mean BMI increased from 26.6 in 1987–1991 to 28.5 in 2005–2008; overweight prevalence increased from 59.0% to 71.3%. Foreclosures were within 100 meters of 159 (7.8%) participants’ homes on 187 occasions (1.8%), in 42 municipalities (21%). For each additional foreclosure, BMI increased by 0.20 units (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.03, 0.36), and the odds ratio for being overweight associated with proximity to a foreclosure was 1.77 (95% CI = 1.02, 3.05). Conclusions. We found a robust association between living near foreclosures and BMI, suggesting that neighbors’ foreclosures may spur weight gain. PMID:23865706

  6. The relationship between gestational weight gain and fetal growth: time to take stock?

    PubMed

    O'Higgins, Amy C; Doolan, Anne; Mullaney, Laura; Daly, Niamh; McCartney, Daniel; Turner, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this article is to review the current evidence on gestational weight gain (GWG). Maternal obesity has emerged as one of the great challenges in modern obstetrics as it is becoming increasingly common and is associated with increased maternal and fetal complications. There has been an upsurge of interest in GWG with an emphasis on the relationship between excessive GWG and increased fetal growth. Recent recommendations from the Institute of Medicine in the USA have revised downwards the weight gain recommendations in pregnancy for obese mothers. We believe that it is time to take stock again about the advice that pregnant women are given about GWG and their lifestyle before, during, and after pregnancy. The epidemiological links between excessive GWG and aberrant fetal growth are weak, particularly in obese women. There is little evidence that intervention studies decrease excessive GWG or improve intrauterine fetal growth. Indeed, there is a potential risk that inappropriate interventions during the course of pregnancy may lead to fetal malnutrition that may have adverse clinical consequences, both in the short- and long-term. It may be more appropriate to shift the focus of attention from monitoring maternal weight to increasing physical activity levels and improving nutritional intakes.

  7. Impact of demographic, genetic, and bioimpedance factors on gestational weight gain and birth weight in a Romanian population

    PubMed Central

    Mărginean, Claudiu; Mărginean, Cristina Oana; Bănescu, Claudia; Meliţ, Lorena; Tripon, Florin; Iancu, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study had 2 objectives, first, to investigate possible relationships between increased gestational weight gain and demographic, clinical, paraclinical, genetic, and bioimpedance (BIA) characteristics of Romanian mothers, and second, to identify the influence of predictors (maternal and newborns characteristics) on our outcome birth weight (BW). We performed a cross-sectional study on 309 mothers and 309 newborns from Romania, divided into 2 groups: Group I—141 mothers with high gestational weight gain (GWG) and Group II—168 mothers with normal GWG, that is, control group. The groups were evaluated regarding demographic, anthropometric (body mass index [BMI], middle upper arm circumference, tricipital skinfold thickness, weight, height [H]), clinical, paraclinical, genetic (interleukin 6 [IL-6]: IL-6 -174G>C and IL-6 -572C>G gene polymorphisms), and BIA parameters. We noticed that fat mass (FM), muscle mass (MM), bone mass (BM), total body water (TBW), basal metabolism rate (BMR) and metabolic age (P < 0.001), anthropometric parameters (middle upper arm circumference, tricipital skinfold thickness; P < 0.001/P = 0.001) and hypertension (odds ratio = 4.65, 95% confidence interval: 1.27–17.03) were higher in mothers with high GWG. BW was positively correlated with mothers’ FM (P < 0.001), TBW (P = 0.001), BMR (P = 0.02), while smoking was negatively correlated with BW (P = 0.04). Variant genotype (GG+GC) of the IL-6 -572C>G polymorphism was higher in the control group (P = 0.042). We observed that high GWG may be an important predictor factor for the afterward BW, being positively correlated with FM, TBW, BMR, metabolic age of the mothers, and negatively with the mother's smoking status. Variant genotype (GG+GC) of the IL-6 -572C>G gene polymorphism is a protector factor against obesity in mothers. All the variables considered explained 14.50% of the outcome variance. PMID:27399105

  8. Whey protein isolate and glycomacropeptide decrease weight gain and alter body composition in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Royle, Peter J; McIntosh, Graeme H; Clifton, Peter M

    2008-07-01

    The effect of feed protein type on body composition and growth has been examined. Evidence exists that whey protein concentrate is effective at limiting body fat expansion. The presence of caseinomacropeptide, a mixture of glycosylated and non-glycosylated carbohydrate residues, in particular glycomacropeptide (GMP) in whey protein concentrate may be important for this effect. The influence of whey protein isolate (WPI) and GMP on weight gain and body composition was examined by feeding Wistar rats ad libitum for 7 weeks with five semi-purified American Institute of Nutrition-based diets differing in protein type: (1) casein; (2) barbequed beef; (3) control WPI (no GMP); (4) WPI+GMP at 100 g/kg; (5) WPI+GMP at 200 g/kg. Body composition was assessed, and plasma samples were assayed for TAG, insulin and glucose. Body-weight gain was lower (- 21 %) on the control WPI diet relative to casein, with a non-significant influence associated with GMP inclusion (- 30 %), the effect being equivalent at both levels of GMP addition. Renal and carcass fat mass were reduced in the highest GMP diet when compared with WPI (P < 0.05). Plasma insulin was lowered by GMP at the highest addition compared with WPI alone (- 53 %; P < 0.01). Plasma TAG in the WPI+GMP (200 g/kg) group were lower (- 27 %; P < 0.05) than the casein and beef groups. In conclusion, GMP appears to have a significant additional influence when combined with WPI on fat accumulation. WPI alone appears to have the predominant influence accounting for 70 % of the overall effect on body-weight gain. Mechanisms for this effect have not been identified but food intake was not responsible.

  9. The effect of mothers’ empowerment program on premature infants’ weight gain and duration of hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Mohammaddoost, Fatemeh; Mosayebi, Ziba; Peyrovi, Hamid; Chehrzad, Minoo-Mitra; Mehran, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background: The readiness of mothers to take care for infants at discharge is a critical issue. Poor readiness of mothers in taking care of premature infants at the time of discharge is associated with potential adverse consequences. This study examined the effect of implementing mothers’ empowerment program on the weight gain and duration of hospitalization in premature infants. Materials and Methods: This study was a quasi-experimental before-after study with a control group, in which 80 mothers with premature infants who were hospitalized in NICU Level II of two hospitals were recruited in the study. Mothers’ empowerment program was implemented as a three-stage training program for the intervention group. Mothers’ readiness questionnaire was completed by the mothers before the intervention and at the discharge time. The changes in mean of mothers’ readiness scores were compared in both the groups. Results: The mean of daily weight gain in infants of the intervention group (3.95 g) was significantly higher than that of the infants in the control group (−0.9 g) (P = 0.003). The average duration of hospitalization for infants in the intervention and control groups was 15.45 days and 20.95 days, respectively, showing a statistically significant difference (P = 0.003). Conclusions: Providing training to the mothers regarding how to care for premature infants can be a useful and effective method in the process of weight gain of premature and low-birth newborns, and may shorten the duration of infants’ hospitalization. PMID:27563317

  10. Adoption of American Heart Association 2020 ideal healthy diet recommendations prevents weight gain in young adults.

    PubMed

    Forget, Geneviève; Doyon, Myriam; Lacerte, Guillaume; Labonté, Mélissa; Brown, Christine; Carpentier, André C; Langlois, Marie-France; Hivert, Marie-France

    2013-11-01

    In 2010, the American Heart Association established the concept of ideal cardiovascular health. Nationally representative data estimated that <1% of Americans meet the seven health metrics required for achieving ideal cardiovascular health, with the main challenge residing in meeting the criteria for an ideal Healthy Diet Score. In a cohort of young adults (N=196), we aimed to investigate the prevalence of ideal cardiovascular health and ideal Healthy Diet Score and its association to weight gain over a 4-year follow-up period. Anthropometric measures, blood pressure, and blood samples were taken according to standardized procedures. Dietary intake was measured by a 3-day food diary and verified by a registered dietitian. We observed that only 0.5% of our sample met the criteria for ideal cardiovascular health and only 4.1% met the criteria for an ideal Healthy Diet Score. The components of the Healthy Diet Score with the lowest observance were consumption of fruits and vegetables (9.7%) and whole grains (14.8%). Meeting zero or one out of five of the Healthy Diet Score components was associated with increased risk of weight gain over 4 years compared with meeting at least two components (P=0.03). With the exception of dietary criteria, prevalence was high for achieving ideal levels of the remaining six cardiovascular health metrics. In conclusion, in this sample of young adults, a very low prevalence of ideal overall cardiovascular health was observed, mainly driven by poor dietary habits, and a poor Healthy Diet Score was associated with increased weight gain.

  11. Betahistine ameliorates olanzapine-induced weight gain through modulation of histaminergic, NPY and AMPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jiamei; Huang, Xu-Feng; Pai, Nagesh; Deng, Chao

    2014-10-01

    Olanzapine is widely used to treat schizophrenia and other disorders, but causes adverse obesity and other metabolic side-effects. Both animal and clinical studies have shown that co-treatment with betahistine (a histaminergic H1 receptor agonist and H3 receptor antagonist) is effective for ameliorating olanzapine-induced weight gain/obesity. To reveal the mechanisms underlying these effects, this study investigated the effects of co-treatment of olanzapine and betahistine (O+B) on expressions of histaminergic H1 receptor (H1R), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in the hypothalamus associated with reducing olanzapine-induced weight gain. Olanzapine significantly upregulated the mRNA and protein expressions of H1R, while O+B co-treatment significantly downregulated the H1R levels, compared to the olanzapine-only treatment group. The NPY mRNA expression was significantly enhanced by olanzapine, but it was significantly reversed by O+B co-treatment. The hypothalamic H1R expression was positively correlated with total food intake, and NPY expression. Olanzapine also increased AMPKα activation measured by the AMPKα phosphorylation (pAMPKα)/AMPKα ratio compared with controls, whereas O+B co-treatment decreased the pAMPKα/AMPKα ratio, compared with olanzapine only treatment. The pAMPKα/AMPKα ratio was positively correlated with total food intake and H1R expression. Although olanzapine administration decreased the POMC mRNA level, this level was not affected by O+B co-treatment. Therefore, these results suggested that co-treatment with betahistine may reverse olanzapine-induced body weight gain via the H1R-NPY and H1R-pAMPKα pathways.

  12. Sucrose Exposure in Early Life Alters Adult Motivation and Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Cristianne R. M.; Mason, Peggy; Zhuang, Xiaoxi; Beeler, Jeff A.

    2008-01-01

    The cause of the current increase in obesity in westernized nations is poorly understood but is frequently attributed to a ‘thrifty genotype,’ an evolutionary predisposition to store calories in times of plenty to protect against future scarcity. In modern, industrialized environments that provide a ready, uninterrupted supply of energy-rich foods at low cost, this genetic predisposition is hypothesized to lead to obesity. Children are also exposed to this ‘obesogenic’ environment; however, whether such early dietary experience has developmental effects and contributes to adult vulnerability to obesity is unknown. Using mice, we tested the hypothesis that dietary experience during childhood and adolescence affects adult obesity risk. We gave mice unlimited or no access to sucrose for a short period post-weaning and measured sucrose-seeking, food consumption, and weight gain in adulthood. Unlimited access to sucrose early in life reduced sucrose-seeking when work was required to obtain it. When high-sugar/high-fat dietary options were made freely-available, however, the sucrose-exposed mice gained more weight than mice without early sucrose exposure. These results suggest that early, unlimited exposure to sucrose reduces motivation to acquire sucrose but promotes weight gain in adulthood when the cost of acquiring palatable, energy dense foods is low. This study demonstrates that early post-weaning experience can modify the expression of a ‘thrifty genotype’ and alter an adult animal's response to its environment, a finding consistent with evidence of pre- and peri-natal programming of adult obesity risk by maternal nutritional status. Our findings suggest the window for developmental effects of diet may extend into childhood, an observation with potentially important implications for both research and public policy in addressing the rising incidence of obesity. PMID:18797507

  13. Assessment of gastric sensorimotor function in paediatric patients with unexplained dyspeptic symptoms and poor weight gain.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, I; Vos, R; Tack, J

    2007-03-01

    Recent studies indicate that impaired meal accommodation or hypersensitivity to distention are highly prevalent in adult functional dyspepsia (FD). Our aim was to investigate whether similar abnormalities also occur in paediatric FD. Sixteen FD patients (15 girls, 10-16 years) were studied. The severity (0-3; 0, absent; 3, severe) of eight dyspeptic symptoms (epigastric pain, fullness, bloating, early satiety, nausea, vomiting, belching and epigastric burning) and the amount of weight loss were determined by questionnaire. All children underwent a gastric barostat study after an overnight fast to determine sensitivity to distention and meal-induced accommodation, which were compared with normal values in young adults (18-22 years). On a separate day, all patients underwent a gastric emptying breath test. A mean weight loss of 4.8 +/- 0.9 kg was present in 14 children. Compared with controls, patients had lower discomfort thresholds to gastric distention (8.8 +/- 1.0 mmHg vs 13.9 +/- 1.9 mmHg, P < 0.02) and gastric accommodation (87 +/- 25 mL vs 154 +/- 20 mL P < 0.04). Hypersensitivity to distention and impaired accommodation were present in respectively nine (56%) and 11 (69%) patients. No relationship was found between barostat and gastric emptying, which was delayed in only three patients. The majority of children with unexplained epigastric symptoms have abnormalities of gastric sensorimotor function.

  14. Weight gain in pregnancy and application of the 2009 IOM guidelines: toward a uniform approach

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, L. Anne; Redman, Leanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is an urgent need to adopt standardized nomenclature as it relates to GWG, a more uniform approach to calculate it, and hence quantifying adherence to the 2009 Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines. Results This perspective highlights the varying methods used to estimate GWG and discuss the advantages and limitations of each. While these calculations could be argued to have a minimal impact on data at the population level, on the patient level, incorrectly estimating weight at conception can result in misclassification of preconception body mass index (BMI) and assignment of the IOM guidelines which inherently affect the prospective management of weight gain (and potential outcomes) during the current pregnancy. Conclusions We recommend that preconception BMI and total GWG be determined objectively and total GWG be adjusted for length of gestation before assessing adherence to the IOM GWG guidelines. PMID:25521748

  15. Effects of flavangenol on autonomic nerve activities and dietary body weight gain in rats.

    PubMed

    Tanida, Mamoru; Tsuruoka, Nobuo; Shen, Jiao; Horii, Yuko; Beppu, Yoshinori; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Nagai, Katsuya

    2009-11-01

    In a previous report, evidence was presented that flavangenol supplementation has an anti-ischemic effects in rats. In the study presented here, we examined the autonomic effects of intraduodenal (ID) injection of flavangenol in urethane-anesthetized rats and found that it increased sympathetic nerve activity innervating brown adipose tissue (BAT-SNA) in a dose-dependent manner, while it suppressed gastric vagal nerve activity (GVNA). In addition, intra-oral (IO) injection of flavangenol elevated brown adipose tissue temperature (BAT-T). Furthermore, flavangenol drinking for 15 d reduced body weight gain in rats fed a high-fat diet. These results thus suggest that flavangenol supplementation exerts its reducing action on body weight through changes in autonomic neurotransmission.

  16. Parkinson's disease patients with bilateral subthalamic deep brain stimulation gain weight.

    PubMed

    Macia, Frédéric; Perlemoine, Caroline; Coman, Irène; Guehl, Dominique; Burbaud, Pierre; Cuny, Emmanuel; Gin, Henri; Rigalleau, Vincent; Tison, François

    2004-02-01

    Weight, body mass index (BMI) and energy expenditure/energy intake (EE/EI) was studied in 19 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients after subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) versus 14 nonoperated ones. Operated patients had a significant weight gain (WG, + 9.7 +/- 7 kg) and BMI increase (+ 4.7 kg/m2). The fat mass was higher after STN-DBS. Resting EE (REE; offdrug/ON stimulation) was significantly decreased in STN-DBS patients, while their daily energy expenditure (DEI) was not significantly different. A significant correlation was found among WG, BMI increase, and pre-operative levodopa-equivalent daily dose, their reduction after STN-DBS, and the differential REE related to stimulation and the REE in the offdrug/OFF stimulation condition. In conclusion, STN-DBS in PD induces a significant WG associated with a reduction in REE without DEI adjustment.

  17. Fat substitutes promote weight gain in rats consuming high-fat diets

    PubMed Central

    Swithers, Susan E.; Ogden, Sean B.; Davidson, Terry L.

    2011-01-01

    The use of food products designed to mimic the sensory properties of sweet and fat while providing fewer calories has been promoted as a method for reducing food intake and body weight. However, such products may interfere with one mechanism that animals use to regulate energy balance, a learned relationship between the sensory properites of food and the caloric consequences of consuming those foods. Consistent with this hypothesis, previous data have shown that providing rats with sweet tastes that are not associated with the delivery of calories using high-intensity sweeteners results in increased food intake, body weight and adiposity, but only if the diet on which they are maintained also tastes sweet. In the present experiment, we examined whether use of the fat substitute, olestra, would have similar consequences by comparing the effects of consuming high-fat, high-calorie potato chips to the effects of consuming potato chips that sometimes signalled high calories (using high-fat potato chips) and that sometimes signalled lower calories (using non-fat potato chips manufactured with the fat substitute olestra). The results demonstrated that food intake, body weight gain and adiposity were greater for rats that consumed both the high-calorie chips and the low-calorie chips with olestra compared to rats that consumed consuming only the high-calorie chips, but only if animals were also consuming a chow diet that was high in fat and calories. When animals were maintained on a low-fat chow diet, intake, weight gain, and adiposity did not differ significantly based on chip type. However, rats previously exposed to both the low-calorie chips with olestra and the high-calorie chips exhibited increased body weight gain, food intake and adiposity when they were provided with a high fat, high calorie chow diet, even though the potato chips were no longer available. This suggests that the experience with the chips containing olestra affected the ability to predict high

  18. Linseed Dietary Fibers Reduce Apparent Digestibility of Energy and Fat and Weight Gain in Growing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Mette; Bach Knudsen, Knud Erik; Jørgensen, Henry; Oomah, David; Bügel, Susanne; Toubro, Søren; Tetens, Inge; Astrup, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Dietary fibers (DF) may affect energy balance, an effect often ascribed to the viscous nature of some water soluble DF, which affect luminal viscosity and thus multiple physiological processes. We have tested the hypothesis that viscous linseed DF reduce apparent nutrient digestibility, and limit weight gain, in a randomized feeding trial where 60 male, growing, Wistar rats, with an initial weight of ~200 g, were fed different diets (n = 10 per group): low DF control (C), 5% DF from cellulose (5-CEL), CEL + 5% DF from whole (5-WL) or ground linseed (5-GL), CEL + 5% DF from linseed DF extract (5-LDF), and CEL + 10% DF from linseed DF extract (10-LDF). Diets were provided ad libitum for 21 days. Feed intake and faecal output were measured during days 17–21. Faecal fat excretion increased with increasing DF content and was highest in the 10-LDF group. Apparent fat digestibility was highest with the C diet (94.9% ± 0.8%) and lowest (74.3% ± 0.6%) with the 10-LDF diet, and decreased in a non-linear manner with increasing DF (p < 0.001). Apparent fat digestibility also decreased with increased accessibility of DF (5-WL vs. 5-GL) and when the proportion of viscous DF increased (5-GL vs. 5-LDF). The 10-LDF resulted in a lower final body weight (258 ± 6.2 g) compared to C (282 ± 5.9 g), 5-CEL (281 ± 5.9 g), and 5-WL (285 ± 5.9 g) (p < 0.05). The 10-LDF diet reduced body fat compared to 5-CEL (p < 0.01). In conclusion, DF extracted from linseed reduced apparent energy and fat digestibility and resulted in restriction of body weight gain in growing rats. PMID:23966109

  19. A neutral CB1 receptor antagonist reduces weight gain in rat.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Adam P; Vemuri, V Kiran; Peng, Yan; Wood, Jodianne T; Olszewska, Teresa; Pittman, Quentin J; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Sharkey, Keith A

    2007-12-01

    Cannabinoid (CB)1 receptor inverse agonists inhibit food intake in animals and humans but also potentiate emesis. It is not clear whether these effects result from inverse agonist properties or from the blockade of endogenous cannabinoid signaling. Here, we examine the effect of a neutral CB1 antagonist, AM4113, on food intake, weight gain, and emesis. Neutral antagonist and binding properties were confirmed in HEK-293 cells transfected with human CB1 or CB2 receptors. AM4113 had no effect on forskolin-stimulated cAMP production at concentrations up to 630 nM. The Ki value of AM4113 (0.80 +/- 0.44 nM) in competitive binding assays with the CB1/2 agonist [3H]CP55,940 was 100-fold more selective for CB1 over CB2 receptors. We determined that AM4113 antagonized CB1 receptors in brain by blocking hypothermia induced by CP55,940. AM4113 (0-20 mg/kg) significantly reduced food intake and weight gain in rat. Compared with AM251, higher doses of AM4113 were needed to produce similar effects on food intake and body weight. Unlike AM251 (5 mg/kg), a highly anorectic dose of AM4113 (10 mg/kg) did not significantly potentiate vomiting induced by the emetic morphine-6-glucoronide. We show that a centrally active neutral CB1 receptor antagonist shares the appetite suppressant and weight loss effects of inverse agonists. If these compounds display similar properties in humans, they could be developed into a new class of antiobesity agents.

  20. Hypothalamic deep brain stimulation reduces weight gain in an obesity-animal model.

    PubMed

    Melega, William P; Lacan, Goran; Gorgulho, Alessandra A; Behnke, Eric J; De Salles, Antonio A F

    2012-01-01

    Prior studies of appetite regulatory networks, primarily in rodents, have established that targeted electrical stimulation of ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) can alter food intake patterns and metabolic homeostasis. Consideration of this method for weight modulation in humans with severe overeating disorders and morbid obesity can be further advanced by modeling procedures and assessing endpoints that can provide preclinical data on efficacy and safety. In this study we adapted human deep brain stimulation (DBS) stereotactic methods and instrumentation to demonstrate in a large animal model the modulation of weight gain with VMH-DBS. Female Göttingen minipigs were used because of their dietary habits, physiologic characteristics, and brain structures that resemble those of primates. Further, these animals become obese on extra-feeding regimens. DBS electrodes were first bilaterally implanted into the VMH of the animals (n = 8) which were then maintained on a restricted food regimen for 1 mo following the surgery. The daily amount of food was then doubled for the next 2 mo in all animals to produce obesity associated with extra calorie intake, with half of the animals (n = 4) concurrently receiving continuous low frequency (50 Hz) VMH-DBS. Adverse motoric or behavioral effects were not observed subsequent to the surgical procedure or during the DBS period. Throughout this 2 mo DBS period, all animals consumed the doubled amount of daily food. However, the animals that had received VMH-DBS showed a cumulative weight gain (6.1±0.4 kg; mean ± SEM) that was lower than the nonstimulated VMH-DBS animals (9.4±1.3 kg; p<0.05), suggestive of a DBS-associated increase in metabolic rate. These results in a porcine obesity model demonstrate the efficacy and behavioral safety of a low frequency VMH-DBS application as a potential clinical strategy for modulation of body weight.

  1. Hypothalamic Deep Brain Stimulation Reduces Weight Gain in an Obesity-Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Melega, William P.; Lacan, Goran; Gorgulho, Alessandra A.; Behnke, Eric J.; De Salles, Antonio A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Prior studies of appetite regulatory networks, primarily in rodents, have established that targeted electrical stimulation of ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) can alter food intake patterns and metabolic homeostasis. Consideration of this method for weight modulation in humans with severe overeating disorders and morbid obesity can be further advanced by modeling procedures and assessing endpoints that can provide preclinical data on efficacy and safety. In this study we adapted human deep brain stimulation (DBS) stereotactic methods and instrumentation to demonstrate in a large animal model the modulation of weight gain with VMH-DBS. Female Göttingen minipigs were used because of their dietary habits, physiologic characteristics, and brain structures that resemble those of primates. Further, these animals become obese on extra-feeding regimens. DBS electrodes were first bilaterally implanted into the VMH of the animals (n = 8) which were then maintained on a restricted food regimen for 1 mo following the surgery. The daily amount of food was then doubled for the next 2 mo in all animals to produce obesity associated with extra calorie intake, with half of the animals (n = 4) concurrently receiving continuous low frequency (50 Hz) VMH-DBS. Adverse motoric or behavioral effects were not observed subsequent to the surgical procedure or during the DBS period. Throughout this 2 mo DBS period, all animals consumed the doubled amount of daily food. However, the animals that had received VMH-DBS showed a cumulative weight gain (6.1±0.4 kg; mean ± SEM) that was lower than the nonstimulated VMH-DBS animals (9.4±1.3 kg; p<0.05), suggestive of a DBS-associated increase in metabolic rate. These results in a porcine obesity model demonstrate the efficacy and behavioral safety of a low frequency VMH-DBS application as a potential clinical strategy for modulation of body weight. PMID:22295102

  2. Systematic Review of the Methodological Quality of Studies Aimed at Creating Gestational Weight Gain Charts12

    PubMed Central

    Ohadike, Corah O; Cheikh-Ismail, Leila; Ohuma, Eric O; Giuliani, Francesca; Bishop, Deborah; Kac, Gilberto; Puglia, Fabien; Maia-Schlüssel, Michael; Kennedy, Stephen H; Villar, José; Hirst, Jane E

    2016-01-01

    A range of adverse outcomes is associated with insufficient and excessive maternal weight gain in pregnancy, but there is no consensus regarding what constitutes optimal gestational weight gain (GWG). Differences in the methodological quality of GWG studies may explain the varying chart recommendations. The goal of this systematic review was to evaluate the methodological quality of studies that aimed to create GWG charts by scoring them against a set of predefined, independently agreed-upon criteria. These criteria were divided into 3 domains: study design (12 criteria), statistical methods (7 criteria), and reporting methods (4 criteria). The criteria were broken down further into items, and studies were assigned a quality score (QS) based on these criteria. For each item, studies were scored as either high (score = 0) or low (score = 1) risk of bias; a high QS correlated with a low risk of bias. The maximum possible QS was 34. The systematic search identified 12 eligible studies involving 2,268,556 women from 9 countries; their QSs ranged from 9 (26%) to 29 (85%) (median, 18; 53%). The most common sources for bias were found in study designs (i.e., not prospective); assessments of prepregnancy weight and gestational age; descriptions of weighing protocols; sample size calculations; and the multiple measurements taken at each visit. There is wide variation in the methodological quality of GWG studies constructing charts. High-quality studies are needed to guide future clinical recommendations. We recommend the following main requirements for future studies: prospective design, reliable evaluation of prepregnancy weight and gestational age, detailed description of measurement procedures and protocols, description of sample-size calculation, and the creation of smooth centile charts or z scores. PMID:26980814

  3. Weight gain in infancy and early childhood is associated with school age body mass index but not intelligence and blood pressure in very low birth weight children.

    PubMed

    Washburn, L; Nixon, P; Snively, B; Tennyson, A; O'Shea, T M

    2010-10-01

    Rates of weight gain in infancy and early childhood can influence later neurocognitive, metabolic and cardiovascular health. We studied the relationship of weight gain during infancy and early childhood to intelligence quotient (IQ), blood pressure (BP) and body mass index (BMI) at age 9 in children born with very low birth weight (VLBW). Sixty-five children born prematurely with VLBW were followed longitudinally and at 9 years IQ, BP and BMI were measured. The mean weight z-scores at birth, neonatal intensive care discharge, 1 year corrected for prematurity, 5 and 9 years were -0.17, -2.09, -1.3, -0.68 and 0.06, respectively. Weight gain during infancy (discharge to 1 year corrected for prematurity) and early childhood (1 year corrected age to 5 years) was expressed as rate of change in weight, rate of change in weight z-score and interval change in weight z-score. In multiple regression analyses that adjusted for race, gender, maternal education, antenatal steroids, birth weight z-score, major intracranial lesions on ultrasound and chronic lung disease, rates of weight gain in infancy and early childhood were predictive of BMI z-score at 9 years, regression coefficients (95% confidence intervals); 0.19 (0.02, 0.36) and 0.37 (0.11, 0.63), respectively, expressed as change in BMI z-score per 10 g/week weight increase. Rates of weight gain were not predictive of systolic BP z-score, Verbal IQ or Performance IQ. In VLBW infants, more rapid weight gain during infancy, and especially early childhood, is associated with higher BMI at school age.

  4. Extreme Rapid Weight Loss and Rapid Weight Gain Observed in UK Mixed Martial Arts Athletes Preparing for Competition.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Joseph John; Nicholas, Ceri

    2016-10-06

    There is a lack of research documenting the weight-making practices of mixed-martial-arts (MMA) competitors. The purpose of the investigation was to quantify the magnitude and identify the methods of rapid weight loss (RWL) and rapid weight gain (RWG) in MMA athletes preparing for competition. Seven athletes (mean ± SD, age 24.6 ± 3.5 yrs, body mass 69.9 ± 5.7 kg, competitive experience 3.1 ± 2.2 yrs) participated in a repeated-measures design. Measures of dietary intake, urinary hydration status, and body mass were recorded in the week preceding competition. Body mass decreased significantly (p<0.0005) from baseline by 5.6 ± 1.4 kg (8 ± 1.8%). During the RWG period (32 ± 1 hours) body mass increased significantly (p<0.001) by 7.4 ± 2.8 kg (11.7 ± 4.7%), exceeding RWL. Mean energy and carbohydrate intake were 3176 ± 482 kcal·day(-1) and 471 ± 124 g·day(-1), respectively. At the official weigh-in 57% of athletes were dehydrated (1033 ± 19 mOsmol·kg(-1)) and the remaining 43% were severely dehydrated (1267 ± 47 mOsmol·kg(-1)). Athletes reported using harmful dehydration-based RWL strategies, including sauna (43%) and training in plastic suits (43%). Results demonstrated RWG greater than RWL, this is a novel finding and may be attributable to the 32 hour duration from weigh-in till competition. The observed magnitude of RWL and strategies used are comparable to those which have previously resulted in fatalities. Rule changes which make RWL impractical should be implemented with immediate effect to ensure the health, safety and wellbeing of competitors.

  5. Weight gain as a consequence of living a modern lifestyle: a discussion of barriers to effective weight control and how to overcome them

    PubMed Central

    Seaman, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this commentary is to discuss modern lifestyle factors that promote weight gain and to suggest methods for clinicians to more effectively educate patients about weight management. Discussion Most adults in the United States are overweight or obese. Multiple factors related to the modern lifestyle appear to play causal roles. In general, the population maintains sedentary lives and overconsumes calorie-dense foods. In particular, refined carbohydrates negatively impact metabolism and stimulate neural addiction mechanisms, which facilitate weight gain. As adipose tissue mass accumulates, satiation centers in the hypothalamus become resistant to insulin and leptin, which leads to increased caloric consumption. Several behavior issues further augment weight gain, such as eating too quickly, a lack of sleep, high stress levels, and a lack of exercise. Finally, adipose tissue accumulation alters the body weight set point, which leads to metabolic changes that function to resist weight loss efforts. Each of these factors may work together to augment weight gain and promote obesity. Health care providers, such as chiropractic physicians, who educate patients on wellness, prevention, and lifestyle changes are well positioned to address these issues. Conclusion People need to be educated about the modern lifestyle factors that prevent effective weight management. Without this knowledge and the associated practical application of lifestyle choices that prevent weight gain, becoming overweight or obese appears to be an unavoidable consequence of living a modern lifestyle. PMID:25067929

  6. Adding Multiple Adipokines into the Model do not Improve Weight Gain Prediction by Leptin Levels in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Treviño-Garza, Consuelo; Estrada-Zúñiga, Cynthia M.; Mancillas-Adame, Leonardo; Villarreal-Martínez, Laura; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Z.; Rodríguez-Balderrama, Isaías; Montes-Tapia, Fernando F.; de la O. Cavazos, Manuel E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Most adipose tissue programming is realized in early life. Also, the postnatal three months, rather than the later phases of infancy, may be more relevant in the development of an adverse cardiometabolic risk profile. The adipokines phenotype, as a predictor of early-life weight gain, has been recently explored in cord blood. To determine whether in addition to leptin levels in cord samples, adiponectin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), resistin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels improve weight gain prediction during the first three months of life. Methods: Adiponectin, IL-6, MCP-1, leptin, resistin, PAI-1, and TNF-α were measured by multiplex immunoassay in a subsample of 86 healthy term newborns. Results: Leptin levels significantly predicted weight gain at 3 months of follow-up (r2=0.09, p=0.006). In the multivariate analysis, including additional adipokines in the model, stepwise or all at once, did not increase the prediction of weight gain after the first three months of life. Conclusion: Adding adiponectin, IL-6, MCP-1, resistin, PAI-1, and TNF-α to the prediction model of weight gain in healthy newborns did not prove to be useful. It is probable that their relative contribution to weight gain is not important. Only leptin was relevant as a predictor of weight gain at the 3-month endpoint. PMID:27087431

  7. Sweet taste of saccharin induces weight gain without increasing caloric intake, not related to insulin-resistance in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Foletto, Kelly Carraro; Melo Batista, Bruna Aparecida; Neves, Alice Magagnin; de Matos Feijó, Fernanda; Ballard, Cíntia Reis; Marques Ribeiro, Maria Flávia; Bertoluci, Marcello Casaccia

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, we showed that saccharin can induce weight gain when compared with sucrose in Wistar rats despite similar total caloric intake. We now question whether it could be due to the sweet taste of saccharin per se. We also aimed to address if this weight gain is associated with insulin-resistance and to increases in gut peptides such as leptin and PYY in the fasting state. In a 14 week experiment, 16 male Wistar rats received either saccharin-sweetened yogurt or non-sweetened yogurt daily in addition to chow and water ad lib. We measured daily food intake and weight gain weekly. At the end of the experiment, we evaluated fasting leptin, glucose, insulin, PYY and determined insulin resistance through HOMA-IR. Cumulative weight gain and food intake were evaluated through linear mixed models. Results showed that saccharin induced greater weight gain when compared with non-sweetened control (p = 0.027) despite a similar total caloric intake. There were no differences in HOMA-IR, fasting leptin or PYY levels between groups. We conclude that saccharin sweet taste can induce mild weight gain in Wistar rats without increasing total caloric intake. This weight gain was not related with insulin-resistance nor changes in fasting leptin or PYY in Wistar rats.

  8. Prepregnancy body mass and weight gain during pregnancy in India and sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Diane

    2015-03-17

    Despite being wealthier, Indian children are significantly shorter and smaller than African children. These differences begin very early in life, suggesting that they may in part reflect differences in maternal health. By applying reweighting estimation strategies to the Demographic and Health Surveys, this paper reports, to my knowledge, the first representative estimates of prepregnancy body mass index and weight gain during pregnancy for India and sub-Saharan Africa. I find that 42.2% of prepregnant women in India are underweight compared with 16.5% of prepregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa. Levels of prepregnancy underweight for India are almost seven percentage points higher than the average fraction underweight among women 15-49 y old. This difference in part reflects a previously unquantified relationship among age, fertility, and underweight; childbearing is concentrated in the narrow age range in which Indian women are most likely to be underweight. Further, because weight gain during pregnancy is low, averaging about 7 kg for a full-term pregnancy in both regions, the average woman in India ends pregnancy weighing less than the average woman in sub-Saharan Africa begins pregnancy. Poor maternal health among Indian women is of global significance because India is home to one fifth of the world's births.

  9. Dietary arginine requirement of juvenile red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) based on weight gain and feed efficiency.

    PubMed

    Barziza, D E; Buentello, J A; Gatlin, D M

    2000-07-01

    Increasing aquacultural production of red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) has prompted the determination of many of this species' nutritional requirements. However, limited information is available concerning its amino acid requirements, especially for arginine. Therefore, a feeding trial was conducted with juvenile red drum to determine their quantitative dietary requirement for arginine. Experimental diets contained 35 g crude protein/100 g from red drum muscle and crystalline amino acids. Incremental levels of arginine were added to the diets in place of a mixture of glycine and aspartic acid to maintain all diets isonitrogenous. All diets were fed in triplicate to juvenile red drum for 7 wk. Graded levels of arginine significantly (P < 0.05) affected weight gain, feed efficiency, protein efficiency ratio (PER) and plasma arginine levels of the fish. Based on least-squares regression of feed efficiency and PER data, the minimum requirement (+/- SEM) of red drum for arginine was estimated at 1.44 (+/- 0.15) and 1.48 (+/- 0.12) g/100 g diet (4.11 and 4.23 g/100 g dietary protein), respectively. The arginine requirements estimated from weight gain data were 1.75 (+/- 0.18) g/100 g diet or 5.0 g/100 g dietary protein. These values are similar to those reported for other carnivorous fish species.

  10. Laminin α4 Deficient Mice Exhibit Decreased Capacity for Adipose Tissue Expansion and Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Movérare-Skrtic, Sofia; Kortesmaa, Jarkko; Soininen, Raija; Bergström, Göran; Ohlsson, Claes; Chong, Li Yen; Rozell, Björn; Emont, Margo; Cohen, Ronald N.; Brey, Eric M.; Tryggvason, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic that contributes to the increasing medical burdens related to type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. A better understanding of the mechanisms regulating adipose tissue expansion could lead to therapeutics that eliminate or reduce obesity-associated morbidity and mortality. The extracellular matrix (ECM) has been shown to regulate the development and function of numerous tissues and organs. However, there is little understanding of its function in adipose tissue. In this manuscript we describe the role of laminin α4, a specialized ECM protein surrounding adipocytes, on weight gain and adipose tissue function. Adipose tissue accumulation, lipogenesis, and structure were examined in mice with a null mutation of the laminin α4 gene (Lama4−/−) and compared to wild-type (Lama4+/+) control animals. Lama4−/− mice exhibited reduced weight gain in response to both age and high fat diet. Interestingly, the mice had decreased adipose tissue mass and altered lipogenesis in a depot-specific manner. In particular, epididymal adipose tissue mass was specifically decreased in knock-out mice, and there was also a defect in lipogenesis in this depot as well. In contrast, no such differences were observed in subcutaneous adipose tissue at 14 weeks. The results suggest that laminin α4 influences adipose tissue structure and function in a depot-specific manner. Alterations in laminin composition offers insight into the roll the ECM potentially plays in modulating cellular behavior in adipose tissue expansion. PMID:25310607

  11. Estrogenic Plant Extracts Reverse Weight Gain and Fat Accumulation without Causing Mammary Gland or Uterine Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Saunier, Elise F.; Vivar, Omar I.; Rubenstein, Andrea; Zhao, Xiaoyue; Olshansky, Moshe; Baggett, Scott; Staub, Richard E.; Tagliaferri, Mary; Cohen, Isaac; Speed, Terence P.; Baxter, John D.; Leitman, Dale C.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term estrogen deficiency increases the risk of obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. Menopausal hormone therapy containing estrogens might prevent these conditions, but its prolonged use increases the risk of breast cancer, as wells as endometrial cancer if used without progestins. Animal studies indicate that beneficial effects of estrogens in adipose tissue and adverse effects on mammary gland and uterus are mediated by estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). One strategy to improve the safety of estrogens to prevent/treat obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome is to develop estrogens that act as agonists in adipose tissue, but not in mammary gland and uterus. We considered plant extracts, which have been the source of many pharmaceuticals, as a source of tissue selective estrogens. Extracts from two plants, Glycyrrhiza uralensis (RG) and Pueraria montana var. lobata (RP) bound to ERα, activated ERα responsive reporters, and reversed weight gain and fat accumulation comparable to estradiol in ovariectomized obese mice maintained on a high fat diet. Unlike estradiol, RG and RP did not induce proliferative effects on mammary gland and uterus. Gene expression profiling demonstrated that RG and RP induced estradiol-like regulation of genes in abdominal fat, but not in mammary gland and uterus. The compounds in extracts from RG and RP might constitute a new class of tissue selective estrogens to reverse weight gain, fat accumulation and metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. PMID:22163294

  12. Comparison of weight gain and energy intake after subthalamic versus pallidal stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sauleau, Paul; Leray, Emmanuelle; Rouaud, Tiphaine; Drapier, Sophie; Drapier, Dominique; Blanchard, Sophie; Drillet, Gwenolla; Péron, Julie; Vérin, Marc

    2009-10-30

    To compare body mass index (BMI) and daily energy intake (DEI) after subthalamic versus pallidal deep brain stimulation (DBS). Weight gain following DBS in Parkinson's disease patients remains largely unexplained and no comparison of subthalamic and pallidal (GPi) stimulation has yet been performed. BMI and DEI, dopaminergic drug administration and motor scores were recorded in 46 patients with PD before STN (n = 32) or GPi (n = 14) DBS and 3 and 6 months after. At M6, BMI had increased by an average of 8.4% in the STN group and 3.2% in the GPi group. BMI increased in 28 STN and 9 GPi patients. This increase was significantly higher in the STN group (P < 0.048) and the difference remained significant after adjustment for reduced dopaminergic medication; 28.6% of GPi patients were overweight at 6 months (14.3% preoperatively) versus 37.5% of STN patients (21.9% preoperatively). Changes in BMI were negatively correlated with changes in dyskinesia in the GPi-DBS group. Food intake did not change in the two groups, either quantitatively or qualitatively. Frequent weight gain, inadequately explained by motor improvement or reduced dopaminergic drug dosage, occurred in subthalamic DBS patients. The difference between groups suggests additional factors in the STN group, such as homeostatic control center involvement.

  13. n-3 Essential fatty acids decrease weight gain in genetically obese mice.

    PubMed

    Cunnane, S C; McAdoo, K R; Horrobin, D F

    1986-07-01

    1. Lean (ln/ln) and obese (ob/ob) mice were given diets containing a fat source of 100 g evening primrose (Oenothera biennis) oil (fatty acids 18:2n-6, 18:3n-6; EPO) or 100 g cod liver oil (20:5n-3, 22:6n-3; CLO)/kg diet. 2. Weight gain was lower in the ob/ob mice fed on CLO, an effect unrelated to food intake. 3. In the ob/ob mice fed on CLO, thromboxane synthesis by clotting platelets was reduced compared with that in ob/ob mice fed on EPO. 4. The ob/ob CLO-fed mice had lower arachidonic acid but higher levels of n-3 fatty acids in liver, brown adipose tissue and white adipose tissue. 5. The n-3 fatty acids in CLO therefore replaced the n-6 fatty acids in tissue lipids and reduced synthesis of '2 series' prostaglandins in addition to causing lower weight gain in the CLO-fed ob/ob mice.

  14. Littermate presence enhances motor development, weight gain and competitive ability in newborn and juvenile domestic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Nicolás, Leticia; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Hudson, Robyn; Bautista, Amando

    2011-01-01

    Interest has been growing in the influence siblings may have on individual development. While mammalian research has tended to emphasize competition among siblings for essential but often limited resources such as the mother's milk, there is also evidence of mutual benefits to be had from sibling presence, most notably for altricial young in enhanced thermoregulatory efficiency. In the present study we asked whether littermates of an altricial mammal, the domestic rabbit, might gain other developmental benefits from sibling presence. From postnatal days 1 to 25 we raised rabbit pups either together with their littermates or alone except for the brief, once daily nursing characteristic of this species, while controlling for litter size and ambient nest box temperature. At weaning on Day 25 the young were then transferred to individual cages. Before weaning, we found that pups raised separately from their littermates obtained less milk, and showed lower weight gain and slower development of the ability to maintain body equilibrium than their litter-raised sibs. This was the case even though the two groups did not differ in birth weight or in the ratio of converting milk into body mass in their temperature-controlled nest boxes. Postweaning, the isolation-raised animals were also less successful in competing for food and water when tested after deprivation than their litter-raised sibs. The present study adds to the growing evidence of the influence, in this case positive, that sibs (or half sibs) may have in shaping one another's development.

  15. Risk Factors for Excessive Gestational Weight Gain in a Healthy, Nulliparous Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Rennae S.; Thompson, John M. D.; Flower, Deralie; Dekker, Gustaaf A.; Kenny, Louise C.; Poston, Lucilla; McCowan, Lesley M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with adverse maternal and child outcomes and contributes to obesity in women. Our aim was to identify early pregnancy factors associated with excessive GWG, in a contemporary nulliparous cohort. Methods. Participants in the SCOPE study were classified into GWG categories (“not excessive” versus “excessive”) based on pregravid body mass index (BMI) using 2009 Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines. Maternal characteristics and pregnancy risk factors at 14–16 weeks were compared between categories and multivariable analysis controlled for confounding factors. Results. Of 1950 women, 17% gained weight within the recommended range, 74% had excessive and 9% inadequate GWG. Women with excessive GWG were more likely to be overweight (adjOR 2.9 (95% CI 2.2–3.8)) or obese (adjOR 2.5 (95% CI 1.8–3.5)) before pregnancy compared to women with a normal BMI. Other factors independently associated with excessive GWG included recruitment in Ireland, younger maternal age, increasing maternal birthweight, cessation of smoking by 14–16 weeks, increased nightly sleep duration, high seafood diet, recent immigrant, limiting behaviour, and decreasing exercise by 14–16 weeks. Fertility treatment was protective. Conclusions. Identification of potentially modifiable risk factors for excessive GWG provides opportunities for intervention studies to improve pregnancy outcome and prevent maternal obesity. PMID:24995130

  16. Outrunning major weight gain: a prospective study of 8,340consistent runners during 7 years of follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Paul T.

    2006-01-06

    Background: Body weight increases with aging. Short-term,longitudinal exercise training studies suggest that increasing exerciseproduces acute weight loss, but it is not clear if the maintenance oflong-term, vigorous exercise attenuates age-related weight gain inproportion to the exercise dose. Methods: Prospective study of 6,119 maleand 2,221 female runners whose running distance changed less than 5 km/wkbetween their baseline and follow-up survey 7 years later. Results: Onaverage, men who ran modest (0-24 km/wk), intermediate (24-48 km/wk) orprolonged distances (>_48 km/wk) all gained weight throughage 64,however, those who ran ?48 km/wk had one-half the average annual weightgain of those who ran<24 km/wk. Age-related weight gain, and itsreduction by running, were both greater in younger than older men. Incontrast, men s gain in waist circumference with age, and its reductionby running, were the same in older and younger men. Women increased theirbody weight and waist and hip circumferences over time, regardless ofage, which was also reduced in proportion to running distance. In bothsexes, running did not attenuate weight gain uniformly, but ratherdisproportionately prevented more extreme increases. Conclusion: Men andwomen who remain vigorously active gain less weight as they age and thereduction is in proportion to the exercise dose.

  17. Sugar Sweetened Beverages and Weight Gain over 4 Years in a Thai National Cohort – A Prospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Lynette; Banwell, Cathy; Bain, Chris; Banks, Emily; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Kelly, Matthew; Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara; Sleigh, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs) are implicated in the rising prevalence of obesity and diet-related chronic diseases worldwide. However, little is known about their contribution to weight gain in Asian populations. This study aimed to investigate weight change associated with SSB consumption between 2005 and 2009 in a large national cohort of Thai university students. Methods Questionnaire data were collected from a large Thai cohort (the Thai Health-Risk Transition: a National Cohort Study). The analysis was based on responses from 59 283 of the 60 569 (98%) cohort members who had valid SSB consumption and weight variables in 2005 and 2009. The relationship between SSB consumption in 2005 and self-reported weight change was analysed using multiple linear regression models controlled for socio-demographic, activity and (non-validated) dietary factors shown to influence weight. Results Higher frequency of SSB consumption in 2005 was significantly associated with greater weight gain between 2005 and 2009 in all age groups and in both sexes (p<0.0001); persons who consumed SSBs at least once a day in 2005 gained 0.5 kg more than those who consumed SSBs less than once a month. The estimated weight gain for the average person in the sample was 1.9 kg (95% C I 1.95–1.96). The difference in weight gain between those who increased their consumption frequency ( once per day) between 2005 and 2009 compared to those who maintained it was 0.3 kgs, while persons who reduced their consumption frequency (once a day to > once a month) gained 0.2 kgs less than those whose consumption remained unchanged. Conclusion SSB consumption is independently associated with weight gain in the Thai population. Research and health promotion in Thailand and other economically transitioning countries should focus on reducing their contribution to population weight gain and to diet-related chronic diseases. PMID:24805125

  18. Weight gain, body mass index, hormone replacement therapy, and postmenopausal breast cancer in a large prospective study.

    PubMed

    Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Jonas, Carolyn R; Teras, Lauren R; Thun, Michael J; Calle, Eugenia E

    2004-02-01

    Excess adiposity and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are important contributors to postmenopausal breast cancer risk. HRT has been shown to modify the association between body weight and breast cancer risk, although few studies are sufficiently large to examine the risk of breast cancer associated with body mass index (BMI) and weight gain separately among current HRT users and nonusers. This study includes 1,934 incident breast cancer cases occurring among 62,756 postmenopausal women in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort. Age-adjusted incidence rates were calculated, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association of BMI and adult weight gain (since age 18 years) with breast cancer risk stratified by HRT use. Total adult weight gain strongly predicted breast cancer risk among former and never HRT users (P for trend < 0.0001). Weight gain of 21-30 pounds was associated with a rate ratio of 1.4 (95% confidence interval 1.1-1.8); rates doubled among women gaining >70 pounds compared with women who maintained their weight within 5 pounds of their weight at age 18. After accounting for weight gain, neither recent BMI nor BMI at age 18 were independent predictors of risk. Among current HRT users, no association was seen between breast cancer and either BMI or weight gain. Adult weight gain is strongly associated with postmenopausal breast cancer only among non-HRT users in this study. These data illustrate the importance of examining breast cancer risk factors separately by HRT use; the effects of other risk factors may be attenuated or obscured among women taking HRT.

  19. Initiating and Continuing Behaviour Change within a Weight Gain Prevention Trial: A Qualitative Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Kozica, Samantha; Lombard, Catherine; Teede, Helena; Ilic, Dragan; Murphy, Kerry; Harrison, Cheryce

    2015-01-01

    Background Preventing obesity is an international health priority. In Australia, young women who live in rural communities are at high risk of unhealthy weight gain. Interventions which engage young women and support sustainable behaviour change are needed and comprehensive evaluation of such interventions generates knowledge for population scale-up. This qualitative sub-study aims to identify enablers and barriers to behaviour change initiation and continuation within a community weight gain prevention program. Methods In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with program participants 6 months after baseline. All interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analysed independently by two investigators via thematic analysis. Participants A total of 28 women with a mean age of 39.9±6.2years and a BMI of 28.6±5.2kg/m2 were purposively recruited from the larger cohort (n = 649) that participated in the prevention trial. Results Four behaviour change groups emerged were identified from participant interviews: (i) no change, (ii) relapse, (iii) intermittent and (iv) continued change. Factors influencing behaviour change initiation and continuation included realistic program expectations and the participant’s ability to apply the core program elements including: setting small, achievable behaviour change goals, problem solving and using self-management techniques. Personal knowledge, skills, motivation, self-efficacy, accountability and perceived social and environmental barriers also affected behaviour change. Satisfaction with personal program progress and the perceived amount of program supports required to achieve ongoing behaviour change varied amongst participants. Women who relapsed expressed a desire for more intensive and regular support from health professionals, identified more barriers unrelated to the program, anticipated significant weight loss and had lower satisfaction with their progress. Conclusion Initiating and

  20. Maternal Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain on Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Liu, Enqing; Guo, Jia; Pan, Lei; Li, Baojuan; Wang, Ping; Liu, Jin; Wang, Yue; Liu, Gongshu; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Hou, Lifang; Hu, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the single and joint associations of maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) with pregnancy outcomes in Tianjin, China. Methods Between June 2009 and May 2011, health care records of 33,973 pregnant women were collected and their children were measured for birth weight and birth length. The independent and joint associations of prepregnancy BMI and GWG based on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines with the risks of pregnancy and neonatal outcomes were examined by using Logistic Regression. Results After adjustment for all confounding factors, maternal prepregnancy BMI was positively associated with risks of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, preterm delivery, large-for-gestational age infant (LGA), and macrosomia, and inversely associated with risks of small-for-gestational age infant (SGA) and low birth weight. Maternal excessive GWG was associated with increased risks of pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, LGA, and macrosomia, and decreased risks of preterm delivery, SGA, and low birth weight. Maternal inadequate GWG was associated with increased risks of preterm delivery and SGA, and decreased risks of LGA and macrosomia, compared with maternal adequate GWG. Women with both prepregnancy obesity and excessive GWG had 2.2–5.9 folds higher risks of GDM, pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, LGA, and macrosomia compared with women with normal prepregnancy BMI and adequate GWG. Conclusions Maternal prepregnancy obesity and excessive GWG were associated with greater risks of pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, and greater infant size at birth. Health care providers should inform women to start the pregnancy with a BMI in the normal weight category and limit their GWG to the range specified for their prepregnancy BMI. PMID:24376527

  1. Racial differences in gestational weight gain and pregnancy-related hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jihong; Gallagher, Alexa E; Carta, Courtney M.; Torres, Myriam E.; Moran, Robert; Wilcox, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine racial differences in gestational weight gain (GWG) and pregnancy-related hypertension. Methods Logistic regression models tested racial differences in adequacy of GWG and pregnancy-induced hypertension in all singleton live births from the South Carolina 2004-2006 birth certificates. Results Compared to white women, black and Hispanic women had 16%-46% lower odds of gaining weight above the recommendations. However, the odds of inadequate GWG was ~50% higher in black and Hispanic women with a pregnancy body mass index (BMI) <25kg/m2. Furthermore, compared to women with adequate GWG, women with excessive GWG had higher odds of pregnancy-related hypertension (underweight: 2.35, 95% CI(1.66, 3.32); normal: 2.05, 95% CI(1.84, 2.27); overweight: 1.93, 95% CI(1.64, 2.27); obese: 1.46, 95% CI(1.30, 1.63)). Among women with a BMI <25 kg/m2, black women had higher odds of pregnancy-related hypertension than white women (underweight: 1.64, 95% CI(1.14, 2.36); normal weight: 1.28, 95% CI(1.15, 1.42)), while among women with a BMI ≥25 kg/m2, Hispanic women had 40% lower odds. Conclusion Programs are needed to curb excessive GWG in all racial groups and to help some sub-groups ensure adequate GWG. Maternal obesity and GWG are two factors that should be used in combination to reduce racial differences in pregnancy-related hypertension. PMID:24685832

  2. Dairy protein attenuates weight gain in obese rats better than whey or casein alone.

    PubMed

    Eller, Lindsay K; Reimer, Raylene A

    2010-04-01

    Evidence suggests that dietary calcium (Ca) and particularly dairy foods may attenuate weight gain and improve symptoms of the metabolic syndrome. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different Ca-enriched dairy protein sources on the prevention of weight gain in Sprague-Dawley diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Twelve week-old DIO rats were assigned to one of eight ad libitum diets that varied in protein source (casein, whey, or complete dairy), Ca content (0.67 or 2.4%) and energy level (high fat/high sucrose (HFHS); or normal calorie density (NC)). Body composition and response to a meal tolerance test (MTT) were measured. Average daily caloric intake did not differ within normal or high energy density groups. At the end of 8 weeks, the dairy/HFHS/0.67% and 2.4% groups had significantly lower body weight than all other HFHS groups. The dairy/HFHS/0.67% and 2.4% groups also had lower body fat and greater lean mass expressed as a percent (P < 0.05). Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA(IR)) was lowest for dairy/HFHS/0.67% and significantly different from whey/HFHS/0.67% and 2.4%. Independent of protein source, high Ca decreased plasma insulin at 30 min in the MTT more so than low Ca (P < 0.05). Hepatic sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP1c) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) mRNA was downregulated by dairy and whey compared to casein in the HFHS/0.67% diets. Overall, these data suggest that complete dairy improves body composition and insulin sensitivity to a greater extent than whey or casein alone.

  3. Captopril intake decreases body weight gain via angiotensin-(1-7).

    PubMed

    Oh, Young-Bin; Kim, Jong Hun; Park, Byung Mun; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Suhn Hee

    2012-09-01

    Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] plays a beneficial role in cardiovascular physiology by providing a counterbalance to the function of angiotensin II (Ang II). Although Ang II has been shown to be an adipokine secreted by adipocyte and affect lipid metabolism, the role of Ang-(1-7) in adipose tissue remains to be clarified. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether Ang-(1-7) affects lipid metabolism in adipose tissue. Ang-(1-7) increased glycerol release from primary adipocytes in a dose-dependent manner. A lipolytic effect of Ang-(1-7) was attenuated by pretreatment with A-779, a Mas receptor blocker and with an inhibitor of phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), or eNOS. However, losartan and PD123319 did not cause any change in Ang-(1-7)-induced lipolysis. Ang-(1-7)-induced lipolysis had an addictive effect with isoproterenol. In normal rats, chronic intake of captopril for 4 wks decreased body weight gain and the amount of adipose tissue and increased plasma Ang-(1-7) level. These effects were attenuated by administration of A-779. The levels of Mas receptor and phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (p-HSL) were significantly increased by treatment with captopril and these captopril-mediated effects were attenuated by the administration of A-779. There was no difference in diameter of adipocytes among sham, captopril- and captopril+A-779-treated groups. The similar effects of captopril on body weight, expression of Mas receptor, and p-HSL were observed in Ang-(1-7)-treated rats. These results suggest that captopril intake decreased body weight gain partly through Ang-(1-7)/Mas receptor/PI3K pathway.

  4. Saccharin and aspartame, compared with sucrose, induce greater weight gain in adult Wistar rats, at similar total caloric intake levels.

    PubMed

    Feijó, Fernanda de Matos; Ballard, Cíntia Reis; Foletto, Kelly Carraro; Batista, Bruna Aparecida Melo; Neves, Alice Magagnin; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia Marques; Bertoluci, Marcello Casaccia

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the use of nonnutritive sweeteners (NNSs) can lead to weight gain, but evidence regarding their real effect in body weight and satiety is still inconclusive. Using a rat model, the present study compares the effect of saccharin and aspartame to sucrose in body weight gain and in caloric intake. Twenty-nine male Wistar rats received plain yogurt sweetened with 20% sucrose, 0.3% sodium saccharin or 0.4% aspartame, in addition to chow and water ad libitum, while physical activity was restrained. Measurements of cumulative body weight gain, total caloric intake, caloric intake of chow and caloric intake of sweetened yogurt were performed weekly for 12 weeks. Results showed that addition of either saccharin or aspartame to yogurt resulted in increased weight gain compared to addition of sucrose, however total caloric intake was similar among groups. In conclusion, greater weight gain was promoted by the use of saccharin or aspartame, compared with sucrose, and this weight gain was unrelated to caloric intake. We speculate that a decrease in energy expenditure or increase in fluid retention might be involved.

  5. Factors influencing individual variability in high fat diet-induced weight gain in out-bred MF1 mice.

    PubMed

    Vaanholt, L M; Sinclair, R E; Mitchell, S E; Speakman, J R

    2015-05-15

    Easy access to high-energy palatable foods has been suggested to have contributed to the world-wide obesity epidemic. However, within these 'obesogenic' environments many people manage to remain lean. Mice also show variability in their weight gain responses to high-fat diet (HFD) feeding and their weight loss responses to calorically restricted (CR) feeding. In this study we investigated which factors contribute to determining susceptibility to HFD-induced obesity in mice, and whether the responses in weight gain on HFD are correlated with the responses to CR. One-hundred twenty four mice were exposed to 30% CR for 28days followed by a 14day recovery period, and subsequent exposure to 60% HFD for 28days. Responses in various metabolic factors were measured before and after each exposure (body mass; BM, body composition, food intake; FI, resting metabolic rate; RMR, physical activity, body temperature and glucose tolerance; GT). Weight changes on HFD ranged from -1 to 26%, equivalent to -0.2g to 10.5g in absolute mass. Multiple regression models showed that fat free mass (FFM) of the mice before exposure to HFD predicted 12% of the variability in weight gain on HFD (p<0.001). Also, FI during the first week of HFD feeding predicted 20% of the variability in BM and fat mass (FM) gain 4weeks later. These data may point to a role for the reward system in driving individual differences in FI and weight gain. Weight gain on the HFD was significantly negatively correlated to weight loss on CR, indicating that animals that are poor at defending against weight gain on HFD, were also poor at defending against CR-induced weight loss. Changes in FM and FFM in response to HFD or CR were not correlated however.

  6. Rate and pattern of weight gain in Indian women from the upper income group during pregnancy and its effect on pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Raje, L; Ghugre, P

    2012-10-01

    Maternal weight gain and pattern of weight gain during pregnancy influence the ultimate outcome of pregnancy. Pregravid body mass index (BMI), maternal dietary intake, maternal height and age all determine the weight gain during pregnancy. The study was taken up with an objective to observe maternal weight gain and its pattern in pregnancy in women from an upper income group and to find out their association with pregnancy outcome. 180 normal primiparous pregnant Indian women (20-35 years) from an upper income group were recruited between the 10th and 14th weeks of pregnancy and were followed up throughout their pregnancy to record total and trimester-wise weight gain. Neonatal birth weights were recorded. The results showed that mothers with high pregravid BMI gained more weight during pregnancy than the recommended weight gain; in addition, weight gain in the first trimester was significantly correlated with birth weight of the neonates (P = 0.019). Significant correlation was found between weight gain in the third trimester and birth weight of the neonate irrespective of maternal BMI. The rate of weight gain was significantly correlated with neonatal birth weights irrespective of maternal pregravid BMI (P = 0.022) and as per its categories (P = 0.027). Thus, overall it can be concluded that adequate maternal nutrition before and during pregnancy is important for adequate weight gain by the mother and can result in better outcome of pregnancy. The rate of weight gain is also an important contributing factor.

  7. Radiographic and computed tomographic demonstration of pseudotumor cerebri due to rapid weight gain in a child with pelvic rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Berdon, W.E.; Barker, D.H.; Barash, F.S.

    1982-06-01

    Rapid weight gain in a malnourished child can be associated with suture diastasis in the pattern of pseudotumor cerebri; this has been previously reported in deprivational dwarfism and cystic fibrosis. In a child with pelvic rhabdomyosarcoma, skull radiographs and cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans were available prior to a period of rapid weight gain induced by hyperalimentation. Suture diastasis developed and repeat CT scans showed this to be accompanied by smaller ventricles.

  8. Impact of Restricted Maternal Weight Gain on Fetal Growth and Perinatal Morbidity in Obese Women With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ásbjörnsdóttir, Björg; Rasmussen, Signe S.; Kelstrup, Louise; Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Since January 2008, obese women with type 2 diabetes were advised to gain 0–5 kg during pregnancy. The aim with this study was to evaluate fetal growth and perinatal morbidity in relation to gestational weight gain in these women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A retrospective cohort comprised the records of 58 singleton pregnancies in obese women (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) with type 2 diabetes giving birth between 2008 and 2011. Birth weight was evaluated by SD z score to adjust for gestational age and sex. RESULTS Seventeen women (29%) gained ≤5 kg, and the remaining 41 gained >5 kg. The median (range) gestational weight gains were 3.7 kg (−4.7 to 5 kg) and 12.1 kg (5.5–25.5 kg), respectively. Prepregnancy BMI was 33.5 kg/m2 (30–53 kg/m2) vs. 36.8 kg/m2 (30–48 kg/m2), P = 0.037, and median HbA1c was 6.7% at first visit in both groups and decreased to 5.7 and 6.0%, P = 0.620, in late pregnancy, respectively. Gestational weight gain ≤5 kg was associated with lower birth weight z score (P = 0.008), lower rates of large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants (12 vs. 39%, P = 0.041), delivery closer to term (268 vs. 262 days, P = 0.039), and less perinatal morbidity (35 vs. 71%, P = 0.024) compared with pregnancies with maternal weight gain >5 kg. CONCLUSIONS In this pilot study in obese women with type 2 diabetes, maternal gestational weight gain ≤5 kg was associated with a more proportionate birth weight and less perinatal morbidity. PMID:23248191

  9. The Effect of Medicated Feed on the Nasal Microflora and Weight Gain of Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Woods, G. T.; Jensen, A. H.; Gossling, Jennifer; Rhoades, H. E.; Nickelson, W. F.

    1972-01-01

    Antimicrobial agents were added to the feed of swine for three weeks to determine the interrelationships of potentially pathogenic agents in the nasal tract, turbinate atrophy and weight gains. Bordetella bronchiseptica was not isolated from the groups fed the combination of chlortetracycline, penicillin and sulfamethazine. B. bronchiseptica was found in some pigs after the feeding trail, but this organism was not significantly associated with turbinate atrophy at the time of slaughter. Mycoplasma hyorhinis was not found in the nasal passages of the pigs that received feed containing high concentration chlortetracycline but was found in pigs that received other diets. Hemophilus suis was not significantly reduced by any of the treatments used. The organisms studied in the pigs were not isolated from the personnel handling the pigs. PMID:4258545

  10. Amyloid precursor protein modulates macrophage phenotype and diet-dependent weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Kendra L.; Brose, Stephen A.; Zhou, Xudong; Sens, Mary A.; Combs, Gerald F.; Jensen, Michael D.; Golovko, Mikhail Y.; Combs, Colin K.

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that mutations in the gene coding for amyloid precursor protein are responsible for autosomal dominant forms of Alzheimer’s disease. Proteolytic processing of the protein leads to a number of metabolites including the amyloid beta peptide. Although brain amyloid precursor protein expression and amyloid beta production are associated with the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease, it is clear that amyloid precursor protein is expressed in numerous cell types and tissues. Here we demonstrate that amyloid precursor protein is involved in regulating the phenotype of both adipocytes and peripheral macrophages and is required for high fat diet-dependent weight gain in mice. These data suggest that functions of this protein include modulation of the peripheral immune system and lipid metabolism. This biology may have relevance not only to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease but also diet-associated obesity. PMID:28262782

  11. Gestational diabetes: Linking epidemiology, excessive gestational weight gain, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and future metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Durnwald, Celeste

    2015-06-01

    Gestational diabetes (GDM) affects up to 200,000 deliveries in the United States each year. With the growing obesity epidemic, delayed childbearing, and multiple gestations, the diagnosis of GDM is expected to continue to rise. GDM unmasks a beta-cell defect that persists after pregnancy and typically worsens over time imparting the increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus after the index pregnancy. In addition, coexisting obesity and progressive weight gain are additive factors for progression to type 2 DM. Obstetricians play an integral role in informing GDM women about their lifelong risk of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and can help bridge the care to primary care physicians, as it relates to recommended screening and long-term follow-up.

  12. Increased epigenetic alterations at the promoters of transcriptional regulators following inadequate maternal gestational weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Tomoko; Yamada, Takahiro; Abe, Kosei; Okamura, Kohji; Kamura, Hiromi; Akaishi, Rina; Minakami, Hisanori; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Hata, Kenichiro

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications are thought to serve as a memory of exposure to in utero environments. However, few human studies have investigated the associations between maternal nutritional conditions during pregnancy and epigenetic alterations in offspring. In this study, we report genome-wide methylation profiles for 33 postpartum placentas from pregnancies of normal and foetal growth restriction with various extents of maternal gestational weight gain. Epigenetic alterations accumulate in the placenta under adverse in utero environments, as shown by application of Smirnov-Grubbs’ outlier test. Moreover, hypermethylation occurs frequently at the promoter regions of transcriptional regulator genes, including polycomb targets and zinc-finger genes, as shown by annotations of the genomic and functional features of loci with altered DNA methylation. Aberrant epigenetic modifications at such developmental regulator loci, if occurring in foetuses as well, will elevate the risk of developing various diseases, including metabolic and mental disorders, later in life. PMID:26415774

  13. Overexpression of Jazf1 reduces body weight gain and regulates lipid metabolism in high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Jang, Woo Young; Bae, Ki Beom; Kim, Sung Hyun; Yu, Dong Hun; Kim, Hei Jung; Ji, Young Rae; Park, Seo Jin; Park, Si Jun; Kang, Min-Cheol; Jeong, Ja In; Park, Sang-Joon; Lee, Sang Gyu; Lee, Inkyu; Kim, Myoung Ok; Yoon, Duhak; Ryoo, Zae Young

    2014-02-14

    Jazf1 is a 27 kDa nuclear protein containing three putative zinc finger motifs that is associated with diabetes mellitus and prostate cancer; however, little is known about the role that this gene plays in regulation of metabolism. Recent evidence indicates that Jazf1 transcription factors bind to the nuclear orphan receptor TR4. This receptor regulates PEPCK, the key enzyme involved in gluconeogenesis. To elucidate Jazf1's role in metabolism, we fed a 60% fat diet for up to 15 weeks. In Jazf1 overexpression mice, weight gain was found to be significantly decreased. The expression of Jazf1 in the liver also suppressed lipid accumulation and decreased droplet size. These results suggest that Jazf1 plays a critical role in the regulation of lipid homeostasis. Finally, Jazf1 may provide a new therapeutic target in the management of obesity and diabetes.

  14. Public and health professionals’ misconceptions about the dynamics of body weight gain/loss

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Hamid, Tarek; Ankel, Felix; Battle-Fisher, Michele; Gibson, Bryan; Gonzalez-Parra, Gilberto; Jalali, Mohammad; Kaipainen, Kirsikka; Kalupahana, Nishan; Karanfil, Ozge; Marathe, Achla; Martinson, Brian; McKelvey, Karma; Sarbadhikari, Suptendra Nath; Pintauro, Stephen; Poucheret, Patrick; Pronk, Nicolaas; Qian, Ying; Sazonov, Edward; Van Oorschot, Kim; Venkitasubramanian, Akshay; Murphy, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Human body energy storage operates as a stock-and-flow system with inflow (food intake) and outflow (energy expenditure). In spite of the ubiquity of stock-and-flow structures, evidence suggests that human beings fail to understand stock accumulation and rates of change, a difficulty called the stock–flow failure. This study examines the influence of health care training and cultural background in overcoming stock–flow failure. A standardized protocol assessed lay people’s and health care professionals’ ability to apply stock-and-flow reasoning to infer the dynamics of weight gain/loss during the holiday season (621 subjects from seven countries). Our results indicate that both types of subjects exhibited systematic errors indicative of use of erroneous heuristics. Stock–flow failure was found across cultures and was not improved by professional health training. The problem of stock–flow failure as a transcultural global issue with education and policy implications is discussed. PMID:25620843

  15. Determinants of Weight Gain Prevention in Young Adult and Midlife Women: Study Design and Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment of overweight and obesity through body weight reduction has been monumentally ineffective as few individuals are able to sustain weight loss. Rather than treating weight gain once it has become problematic, prevention of weight gain over time may be more effective. Objective The aim of this research is to preclude the burden of adult obesity in women by identifying the determinants of weight gain prevention. The objective of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to compare a weight gain prevention intervention delivered by the registered dietitian versus counselor. Methods This is a 12-month parallel-arm weight gain prevention RCT designed to increase self-efficacy, self-regulation, outcome expectations and family and social support through the use of a nutrition education intervention in women, aged 18-45 years, from the Urbana-Champaign (Illinois, USA) area. Women have been randomized to registered dietitian, counselor or wait-list control groups (August 2014) and are undergoing weekly nutrition education sessions for four months, followed by monthly sessions for eight months (through August 2015). Outcome measures, including: (1) dietary intake, (2) physical activity, (3) anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, (4) biochemical markers of health, (5) eating behaviors and health perceptions, and (6) mediators of behavior change, were collected before the intervention began (baseline) and will be collected at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of the study. Results In total, 87 women have been randomized to intervention groups, and 81 women have completed first week of the study. Results are expected in early 2016. Conclusions This RCT is one of the first to examine weight gain prevention in women across normal, overweight, and obese body mass index categories. Results of this research are expected to have application to evidence-based practice in weight gain prevention for women and possibly have implication for policy regarding decreasing the

  16. Association between adult weight gain and colorectal cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Wang, Jing; Yang, Jinghui; Jin, Zhichao; Shi, Wentao; Qin, Yingyi; Yu, Feifei; He, Jia

    2015-06-15

    This study investigated the association between adult weight gain and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Using terms related to weight gain and CRC, we searched PubMed, Embase and Web of Science for relevant studies published before June 2014. Two evaluators independently selected studies according to the selection criteria, and eight studies were included (three case-control and five cohort studies). Summary estimates were obtained using fixed- or random-effects models. The relative risk (RR) of the association between adult weight gain and CRC was 1.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.43); the RR was 1.30 (95% CI, 1.14-1.49) for colon cancer (CC) and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.02-1.58) for rectal cancer (RC) for the highest versus lowest category. For every 5-kg increase in adult weight, the risk increased by 5% (RR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02-1.09) for CRC, 6% (RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02-1.11) for CC and 6% (RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.03-1.08) for RC. The subgroup analyses showed a positive association between adult weight gain and risk of CRC only in men, and the RR was 1.65 (95% CI, 1.42-1.92) for the highest versus lowest category of adult weight gain and 1.10 (95% CI, 1.06-1.15) for a 5-kg increase in adult weight. In conclusion, there is evidence that adult weight gain is associated with an increased risk of CRC. However, the positive association between adult weight gain and risk of CRC is stronger among men than among women.

  17. Ostα−/− mice are not protected from western diet‐induced weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Christine L.; Wheeler, Sadie G.; Ballatori, Nazzareno; Hinkle, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Organic solute transporterα‐OSTβ is a bile acid transporter important for bile acid recycling in the enterohepatic circulation. In comparison to wild‐type mice, Ostα−/− mice have a lower bile acid pool and increased fecal lipids and they are relatively resistant to age‐related weight gain and insulin resistance. These studies tested whether Ostα−/− mice are also protected from weight gain, lipid changes, and insulin resistance which are normally observed with a western‐style diet high in both fat and cholesterol (WD). Wild‐type and Ostα−/− mice were fed a WD, a control defined low‐fat diet (LF) or standard laboratory chow (CH). Surprisingly, although the Ostα−/− mice remained lighter on LF and CH diets, they weighed the same as wild‐type mice after 12 weeks on the WD even though bile acid pool levels remained low and fecal lipid excretion remained elevated. Mice of both genotypes excreted relatively less lipid when switched from CH to LF or WD. WD caused slightly greater changes in expression of genes involved in lipid transport in the small intestines of Ostα−/− mice than wild‐type, but the largest differences were between CH and defined diets. After WD feeding, Ostα−/− mice had lower serum cholesterol and hepatic lipids, but Ostα−/− and wild‐type mice had equivalent levels of muscle lipids and similar responses in glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Taken together, the results show that Ostα−/− mice are able to adapt to a western‐style diet despite low bile acid levels. PMID:25626867

  18. Lifestyle Risk Factors for Weight Gain in Children with and without Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Megan E.; Gibson, Peter G.; Collins, Clare E.; Hilton, Jodi M.; Wood, Lisa G.

    2017-01-01

    A higher proportion of children with asthma are overweight and obese compared to children without asthma; however, it is unknown whether asthmatic children are at increased risk of weight gain due to modifiable lifestyle factors. Thus, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare weight-gain risk factors (sleep, appetite, diet, activity) in an opportunistic sample of children with and without asthma. Non-obese children with (n = 17; age 10.7 (2.4) years) and without asthma (n = 17; age 10.8 (2.3) years), referred for overnight polysomnography, underwent measurement of lung function, plasma appetite hormones, dietary intake and food cravings, activity, and daytime sleepiness. Sleep latency (56.6 (25.5) vs. 40.9 (16.9) min, p = 0.042) and plasma triglycerides (1.0 (0.8, 1.2) vs. 0.7 (0.7, 0.8) mmol/L, p = 0.013) were significantly greater in asthmatic versus non-asthmatic children. No group difference was observed in appetite hormones, dietary intake, or activity levels (p > 0.05). Sleep duration paralleled overall diet quality (r = 0.36, p = 0.04), whilst daytime sleepiness paralleled plasma lipids (r = 0.61, p =0.001) and sedentary time (r = 0.39, p = 0.02). Disturbances in sleep quality and plasma triglycerides were evident in non-obese asthmatic children referred for polysomnography, versus non-asthmatic children. Observed associations between diet quality, sedentary behavior, and metabolic and sleep-related outcomes warrant further investigation, particularly the long-term health implications. PMID:28245609

  19. Behavioral intervention to promote smoking cessation and prevent weight gain: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bonnie; Howe, Dorothea; Berendsen, Mark; McFadden, H. Gene; Hitchcock, Kristin; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Hitsman, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Aims The prospect of weight gain discourages many cigarette smokers from quitting. Practice guidelines offer varied advice about managing weight gain after quitting smoking, but no systematic review and meta-analysis have been available. We reviewed evidence to determine whether behavioral weight control intervention compromises smoking cessation attempts, and if it offers an effective way to reduce post-cessation weight gain. Methods We identified randomized controlled trials that compared combined smoking treatment and behavioral weight control to smoking treatment alone for adult smokers. English-language studies were identified through searches of PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Of 779 articles identified and 35 potentially relevant RCTs screened, 10 met criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Results Patients who received both smoking treatment and weight treatment showed increased abstinence (OR=1.29, 95% CI=1.01,1.64) and reduced weight gain (g = -0.30, 95% CI=-0.63, -0.04) in the short term (<3 months) compared with patients who received smoking treatment alone. Differences in abstinence (OR=1.23, 95% CI=0.85, 1.79) and weight control (g= -0.17, 95% CI=-0.42, 0.07) were no longer significant in the long term (>6 months). Conclusions Findings provide no evidence that combining smoking treatment and behavioral weight control produces any harm and significant evidence of short-term benefit for both abstinence and weight control. However, the absence of long-term enhancement of either smoking cessation or weight control by the time-limited interventions studied to date provides insufficient basis to recommend societal expenditures on weight gain prevention treatment for patients who are quitting smoking. PMID:19549058

  20. Synthetic maternal pheromone stimulates feeding behavior and weight gain in weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    McGlone, J J; Anderson, D L

    2002-12-01

    One hundred and forty-four pigs were used to determine the effects of a putative synthetic maternal pheromone on behavior and performance of weanling pigs. Each pen of weaned pigs contained three pigs that were given free access to water and feed. Pigs were videotaped in time lapse for 48 h after weaning and weekly body weights and feed disappearances were recorded for 4 wk. Treatments included: a) control (vehicle applied), b) 30 mL of synthetic pheromone applied to the feeder, or c) 10 mL of synthetic pheromone applied to each of three pigs' snouts. Pigs exposed to the synthetic pheromone spent more (P < 0.05) time with their heads in the feeder and less (P < 0.05) time drinking, lying down, or engaged in agonistic behaviors than control pigs. Pigs exposed to the synthetic pheromone were more (P < 0.05) active during the 48-h period of video taping than control pigs. Pigs exposed to the synthetic pheromone (either on the feeder or their snout) had increased (P < 0.01) average daily gain (ADG) and better (P < 0.01) feed:gain ratio than control pigs over the 28-d postweaning period. In conclusion, the putative synthetic pheromone, applied once at weaning, stimulated apparent feeding behaviors, and reduced fighting and apparent drinking behaviors during the first 48 h after weaning. ADG and feed:gain ratio were improved by application of the putative synthetic pheromone either directly on the feeder or when painted on the pigs' snouts. Olfactory signals can modulate adaptation to the postweaning environment in ways that may improve pig performance and welfare.

  1. 48 CFR 31.205-16 - Gains and losses on disposition or impairment of depreciable property or other capital assets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gains and losses on disposition or impairment of depreciable property or other capital assets. 31.205-16 Section 31.205-16 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES...

  2. A Technology-Mediated Behavioral Weight Gain Prevention Intervention for College Students: Controlled, Quasi-Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Courtney M; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Sundstrom, Beth; Larsen, Chelsea; Magradey, Karen; Wilcox, Sara; Brandt, Heather M

    2016-01-01

    Background Both men and women are vulnerable to weight gain during the college years, and this phenomenon is linked to an increased risk of several chronic diseases and mortality. Technology represents an attractive medium for the delivery of weight control interventions focused on college students, given its reach and appeal among this population. However, few technology-mediated weight gain prevention interventions have been evaluated for college students. Objective This study examined a new technology-based, social media-facilitated weight gain prevention intervention for college students. Methods Undergraduates (n =58) in two sections of a public university course were allocated to either a behavioral weight gain prevention intervention (Healthy Weight, HW; N=29) or a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination awareness intervention (control; N=29). All students were enrolled, regardless of initial body weight or expressed interest in weight management. The interventions delivered 8 lessons via electronic newsletters and Facebook postings over 9 weeks, which were designed to foster social support and introduce relevant educational content. The HW intervention targeted behavioral strategies to prevent weight gain and provided participants with a Wi-Fi-enabled scale and an electronic physical activity tracker to facilitate weight regulation. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted to examine within- and between-group differences in measures of self-reported weight control practices and objectively measured weight. Use of each intervention medium and device was objectively tracked, and intervention satisfaction measures were obtained. Results Students remained weight stable (HW: −0.48+1.9 kg; control: −0.45+1.4 kg), with no significant difference between groups over 9 weeks (P =.94). However, HW students reported a significantly greater increase in the number of appropriate weight control strategies than did controls (2.1+4.5 vs −1

  3. Psychological factors and trimester-specific gestational weight gain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Mufiza Zia; Gaston, Anca; Van Blyderveen, Sherry; Schmidt, Louis; Beyene, Joseph; McDonald, Helen; McDonald, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Excess gestational weight gain (GWG), which has reached epidemic proportions, is associated with numerous adverse pregnancy outcomes. Early pregnancy provides a unique opportunity for counseling pregnant women since many women are motivated to engage in healthy behaviors. A systematic review was conducted to summarize the relation between psychological factors and trimester-specific GWG, i.e. GWG measured at the end of each trimester. Eight databases were searched for affect, cognition and personality factors. The guidelines on meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology were followed. The methodological quality of each study was assessed using a modified Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Of 3620 non-duplicate titles and abstracts, 74 articles underwent full-text review. Two cohort studies met the inclusion criteria. Distress was negatively associated with first trimester GWG among both adolescents and non-adolescents. Body image dissatisfaction was associated with second trimester GWG only among non-adolescents. No association emerged between perceived stress, state and trait anxiety and body image dissatisfaction among adolescents and trimester-specific GWG. The relation between trimester-specific GWG and a number of weight-related and dietary-related cognitions, affective states and personality traits remain unexplored. Given the limited number of studies, further high-quality evidence is required to examine the association between psychological factors and trimester-specific GWG, especially for cognitive and personality factors.

  4. Anthelmintic resistance impact on tropical beef cattle productivity: effect on weight gain of weaned calves.

    PubMed

    Borges, Fernando A; Almeida, Gabriel D; Heckler, Rafael P; Lemes, Raul T; Onizuka, Marcel K V; Borges, Dyego G L

    2013-03-01

    The performance of grazing cattle in tropical areas is deeply influenced by parasitism, and the increasing reports of resistance are a threat to effective nematode control. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of avermectins on the performance of weaned calves naturally infected by ivermectin-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes. The effect of four commercial endectocides (ivermectin 2.25 % + abamectin 1.25 %, ivermectin 3.15 %, doramectin 3.15 %, and doramectin 1 %) on parasitism and performance of a hundred weaned Nellore calves were evaluated during 112 days. The most effective anthelmintic showed efficacy of 84 % and resulted in an increase (P < 0.05) of live weight gain of 11.85 kg, compared to untreated group, 9.05 and 9.41 kg compared to those treated with more ineffective avermectins which showed efficacy of 0 and 48.2 %, respectively. A significant (P < 0.05) and weak negative correlation (r = -0.22) between the eggs per gram (EPG) and body weight was observed, indicating that even the low mean EPG (175 ± 150) observed at day 0 in the control group, with predominance of Haemonchus sp., was responsible for production losses. These results indicate that control of nematode parasites in beef cattle in the weaning phase may not result in increased productivity when carried out without technical criteria.

  5. Effect of Dietary Protein Content on Weight Gain, Energy Expenditure, and Body Composition During Overeating

    PubMed Central

    Bray, George A.; Smith, Steven R.; de Jonge, Lilian; Xie, Hui; Rood, Jennifer; Martin, Corby K.; Most, Marlene; Brock, Courtney; Mancuso, Susan; Redman, Leanne M.

    2013-01-01

    Context The role of diet composition in response to overeating and energy dissipation in humans is unclear. Objective To evaluate the effects of overconsumption of low, normal, and high protein diets on weight gain, energy expenditure, and body composition. Design, Setting, and Participants A single-blind, randomized controlled trial of 25 US healthy, weight-stable male and female volunteers, aged 18 to 35 years with a body mass index between 19 and 30. The first participant was admitted to the inpatient metabolic unit in June 2005 and the last in October 2007. Intervention After consuming a weight-stabilizing diet for 13 to 25 days, participants were randomized to diets containing 5% of energy from protein (low protein), 15% (normal protein), or 25% (high protein), which they were overfed during the last 8 weeks of their 10- to 12-week stay in the inpatient metabolic unit. Compared with energy intake during the weight stabilization period, the protein diets provided approximately 40% more energy intake, which corresponds to 954 kcal/d (95% CI, 884–1022 kcal/d). Main Outcome Measures Body composition was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry biweekly, resting energy expenditure was measured weekly by ventilated hood, and total energy expenditure by doubly labeled water prior to the overeating and weight stabilization periods and at weeks 7 to 8. Results Overeating produced significantly less weight gain in the low protein diet group (3.16 kg; 95% CI, 1.88–4.44 kg) compared with the normal protein diet group (6.05 kg; 95% CI, 4.84–7.26 kg) or the high protein diet group (6.51 kg; 95% CI, 5.23–7.79 kg) (P=.002). Body fat increased similarly in all 3 protein diet groups and represented 50% to more than 90% of the excess stored calories. Resting energy expenditure, total energy expenditure, and body protein did not increase during overfeeding with the low protein diet. In contrast, resting energy expenditure (normal protein diet: 160 kcal/d [95% CI, 102

  6. Psychological responses to genetic testing for weight gain: a vignette study.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Susanne F; Walker, Catherine; Wardle, Jane

    2012-03-01

    Genetic testing for obesity risk is increasingly available to the public but few studies have examined motivational or affective reactions. Here we report findings from a "vignette" study investigating reactions to "higher-risk" and "average-risk" results for the obesity-related FTO gene in two groups: a panel sample of individuals with weight concerns, for whom testing may have treatment implications (n = 306, mean age = 45 years, mean BMI = 35) and a student sample (n = 395, mean age = 25 years, mean BMI = 23), for whom testing would have implications for obesity prevention. Participants were given FTO gene information that described higher-risk alleles as linked with modest weight gain and slightly higher risk of obesity. They responded to both higher- and average-risk vignettes, with order randomized. Interest in genetic testing was high overall, and higher in panel respondents than students (93% vs. 78% would "probably" or "definitely" have the test; P < 0.001). In students, a higher-risk result generated higher motivation to change (d = 0.15; P < 0.001), but also slightly higher negative affect (d = 0.03, P < 0.001) and fatalism (d = 0.05, P < 0.001) than an average-risk result. Panel respondents also had higher motivation to change (d = 0.17, P < 0.001) as well as relief about having an explanation for their body weight (d = 0.02, P = 0.013) in the higher-risk condition, but no increase in fatalism or depression. These results suggest that at the level of anticipated responses to FTO gene feedback, higher-risk results had positive motivational effects with minimal changes in negative affect or fatalism. Genetic testing has the potential to be a useful clinical or preventive tool when combined with appropriate information.

  7. Efficacy Trial of a Selective Prevention Program Targeting Both Eating Disorder Symptoms and Unhealthy Weight Gain among Female College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul; Shaw, Heather; Marti, C. Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate a selective prevention program targeting both eating disorder symptoms and unhealthy weight gain in young women. Method: Female college students at high-risk for these outcomes by virtue of body image concerns (N = 398; M age = 18.4 years, SD = 0.6) were randomized to the Healthy Weight group-based 4-hr prevention program,…

  8. An exploratory examination of patient and parental self-efficacy as predictors of weight gain in adolescents with anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Catherine E.; Accurso, Erin C.; Arnow, Katherine D.; Lock, James; Le Grange, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether increases in adolescent or parental self-efficacy predicted subsequent weight gain in two different therapies for adolescent anorexia nervosa (AN). Method Participants were 121 adolescents with AN (M = 14.4 years, SD = 1.6), from a two-site randomized clinical trial for family-based treatment (FBT) and individual adolescent focused therapy (AFT). Both adolescent and parental self-efficacy were assessed at baseline and sessions 2, 4, 6, and 8. Adolescent self-efficacy was assessed using a generic measure of self-efficacy, while parental self-efficacy was assessed using a measure specific to the recovery of an eating disorder. Weight was assessed at baseline, sessions 1 through 8, and end of treatment. Mixed-effects models were used to evaluate the relation between patient and parent self-efficacy and subsequent weight gain, controlling for weight at the previous time point. Results For families who received FBT, greater within-treatment increases in parental self-efficacy predicted greater subsequent adolescent weight gain compared to those who received FBT with lesser change in parental self-efficacy and those who received AFT. Interestingly, adolescent self-efficacy did not significantly predict subsequent weight gain. Discussion Greater increases in parental self-efficacy predicted significantly greater subsequent weight gain for adolescents who received FBT, but the same was not true for adolescents who received AFT. Neither overall level nor change in adolescent self-efficacy significantly predicted subsequent weight gain in either treatment group. These findings emphasize the importance of increasing parental self-efficacy in FBT in order to impact adolescent weight outcomes. PMID:25808269

  9. Low-dose Naltrexone Augmentation of Nicotine Replacement for Smoking Cessation with Reduced Weight Gain: A Randomized Trial*

    PubMed Central

    Toll, Benjamin A.; White, Marney; Wu, Ran; Meandzija, Boris; Jatlow, Peter; Makuch, Robert; O’Malley, Stephanie S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Fear of weight gain is a significant obstacle to smoking cessation, preventing some smokers from attempting to quit. Several previous studies of naltrexone yielded promising results for minimization of post-quit weight gain. Given these encouraging findings, we endeavored to test whether minimization of weight gain might translate to better quit outcomes for a population that is particularly concerned about gaining weight upon quitting. Methods Smokers (N = 172) in this investigation were prospectively randomized to receive either 25 mg naltrexone or placebo for 27 weeks (1 week pre-, 26 weeks post-quit) for minimization of post-quit weight gain and smoking cessation. All participants received open label therapy with the nicotine patch for the first 8 weeks post-quit and behavioral counseling over the 27 week treatment. The 2 pre-specified primary outcomes were change in weight for continuously abstinent participants and biologically verified end-of-treatment 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 26 weeks after the quit date. Results The difference in weight at 26 weeks post-quit between the naltrexone and placebo groups (naltrexone: 6.8 lbs ± 8.94 vs placebo: 9.7 lbs ± 9.19, p = .45) was not statistically different. Seven-day point prevalence smoking abstinence rates at 26 weeks post-quit was not significantly different between the 2 groups (naltrexone: 22% vs placebo: 27%, p = .43). Conclusions For smokers high in weight concern, the relatively small reduction in weight gain with low dose naltrexone is not worth the potential for somewhat lower rates of smoking abstinence. PMID:20542391

  10. The weight gain response to stress during adulthood is conditioned by both sex and prenatal stress exposure.

    PubMed

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Diz-Chaves, Yolanda; Lagunas, Natalia; Calmarza-Font, Isabel; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Frago, Laura M; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2010-04-01

    Food intake and weight gain are known to be affected by stress. However, the type and duration of the stress may have variable effects, with males and females responding differently. We report the short-term and long-term effects of prenatal and adult immobilization stress, as well as the combination of these two stresses, on weight gain and food intake in male and female rats and the role of post-pubertal gonadal hormones in this process. No long-term effect of prenatal stress on food intake or weight gain was found in either sex. However, during the period of adult stress [at postnatal day (P) 90; 10 days duration] stressed male rats gained significantly less weight than controls and previous exposure to prenatal stress attenuated this effect (control: 31.2+/-2.1g; prenatal stress: 24.6+/-3.8g; adult stress: 8.1+/-3.4g; prenatal and adult stress: 18.2+/-3.3g; p<0.0001). There was no change in food intake in response to either prenatal or adult stress. Adult stress increased circulating corticosterone levels during the initial part of the stress period, in both male and female rats with this rise being greater in male rats. No effect on corticosterone levels was observed on the last day of stress in either sex. No effect on weight gain or food intake was observed in female rats. Following adult stress, male rats increased their weight gain, with no change in food intake, such that 1 month later they reached control levels. At the time of sacrifice (P180), there were no differences in weight or circulating metabolic hormone levels between any of the male groups. Although castration alone modulated body weight in both male and female rats, it did not affect their weight gain response to adult stress. These results indicate that the weight gain response to adult stress is sexually dimorphic and that this is not dependent on post-pubertal gonadal steroids. Furthermore, the outcome of this response closely depends on the time at which the change in weight is analyzed

  11. Reducing olanzapine-induced weight gain side effect by using betahistine: a study in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chao; Lian, Jiamei; Pai, Nagesh; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2012-09-01

    Olanzapine is effective at treating multiple domains of schizophrenia symptoms. However, it induces serious metabolic side effects. Antipsychotic drug's antagonistic affinity to histamine H₁ receptors has been identified as a main contributor for weight gain/obesity side effects. This study therefore investigated whether a combined treatment of betahistine (a H₁ receptor agonist and H₃ receptor antagonist) could reduce the body weight/obesity induced by olanzapine. Female Sprague Dawley rats were treated orally with olanzapine (1 mg/kg, t.i.d.) and/or betahistine (2.67 mg/kg, t.i.d.), or vehicle for two weeks. Rats treated with olanzapine exhibited significant body weight gain and increased food intake. Co-treatment of olanzapine with betahistine significantly prevented (-45%) weight gain and reduced feeding efficiency compared to sole olanzapine treatment. Betahistine treatment alone had no effect on weight gain and food intake. Olanzapine reduced locomotor activity, but not betahistine. These findings demonstrate that olanzapine-induced body weight gain can partially be reduced by co-treatment with betahistine. Betahistine has H₃ receptor antagonistic effects to increase histamine release, which may augment its direct agonistic effects on H₁ receptors. These findings have important implications for clinical trials using betahistine to control antipsychotic-induced obesity side effects.

  12. [Educational status and patterns of weight gain in adulthood in Brazil: Estudo Pró-Saúde].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Maria de Jesus Mendes da; França, Rosana de Figueiredo; Faerstein, Eduardo; Werneck, Guilherme Loureiro; Chor, Dóra

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between participant and parental educational status (considered as an indicator of socioeconomic status) and participant pattern of weight gain in adulthood. We analyzed data from 2 582 baseline participants (1999) of Estudo Pró-Saúde (Pro-Health Study), a longitudinal investigation of civil servants from a public university in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Self-administered questionnaires were used to identify patterns of weight gain in adulthood. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated for the association between parental and participant educational status and steady weight gain or weight cycling, with stable weight as a reference, using multinomial logistic regression models. For males, lower paternal educational level entailed a chance about 55% lower of weight cycling as compared to stable weight (OR = 0.45; IC95% = 0.26-0.78), whereas lower maternal schooling was related to increased risk of weight cycling, although without reaching statistical significance (OR = 1.68; IC95% = 0.94-3.00). The association between participant educational status and weight history was not statistically significant among men. In women, lower educational status entailed a chance 94% higher of self-reported weight cycling (OR = 1.94; 95% CI = 1.17-3.23), and there was no association between parental educational level and history of weight gain. In this study, changes in weight throughout life, both steady and cyclic, were associated with parental and participant educational status, with major differences between genders.

  13. Memantine rescues transient cognitive impairment caused by high-molecular-weight aβ oligomers but not the persistent impairment induced by low-molecular-weight oligomers.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Cláudia P; Clarke, Julia R; Ledo, José Henrique; Ribeiro, Felipe C; Costa, Carine V; Melo, Helen M; Mota-Sales, Axa P; Saraiva, Leonardo M; Klein, William L; Sebollela, Adriano; De Felice, Fernanda G; Ferreira, Sergio T

    2013-06-05

    Brain accumulation of soluble amyloid-β oligomers (AβOs) has been implicated in synapse failure and cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, whether and how oligomers of different sizes induce synapse dysfunction is a matter of controversy. Here, we report that low-molecular-weight (LMW) and high-molecular-weight (HMW) Aβ oligomers differentially impact synapses and memory. A single intracerebroventricular injection of LMW AβOs (10 pmol) induced rapid and persistent cognitive impairment in mice. On the other hand, memory deficit induced by HMW AβOs (10 pmol) was found to be reversible. While memory impairment in LMW oligomer-injected mice was associated with decreased hippocampal synaptophysin and GluN2B immunoreactivities, synaptic pathology was not detected in the hippocampi of HMW oligomer-injected mice. On the other hand, HMW oligomers, but not LMW oligomers, induced oxidative stress in hippocampal neurons. Memantine rescued both neuronal oxidative stress and the transient memory impairment caused by HMW oligomers, but did not prevent the persistent cognitive deficit induced by LMW oligomers. Results establish that different Aβ oligomer assemblies act in an orchestrated manner, inducing different pathologies and leading to synapse dysfunction. Furthermore, results suggest a mechanistic explanation for the limited efficacy of memantine in preventing memory loss in AD.

  14. [Factors associated with excessive gestational weight gain among patients in prenatal care at a public hospital in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Andreto, Luciana Marques; de Souza, Ariani Impieri; Figueiroa, José Natal; Cabral-Filho, José Eulálio

    2006-11-01

    This study assessed excessive weight gain in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy and the influence of biological, socio-demographic, behavioral, and reproductive factors and co-morbidity. The cross-sectional sample included 240 pregnant women at low risk of obstetric complications, followed from May 2000 to July 2001. There were 347 patient records in the original database, but 107 were excluded because of age (42 patients were younger than 18 years) or lack of data on weight (65 women). Excessive weight gain was common in all categories of baseline nutritional status, but was more frequent in the second trimester among women who were already overweight or obese upon entering pregnancy. In the third trimester, variables associated with excessive weekly weight gain were schooling and marital status.

  15. Association of physical violence by an intimate partner around the time of pregnancy with inadequate gestational weight gain in Oklahoma

    PubMed Central

    Beydoun, Hind A.; Tamim, Hala; Lincoln, Alicia M.; Dooley, Suzanna D.; Beydoun, May A.

    2012-01-01

    Intimate partner violence has been previously examined in relation to numerous pregnancy, labor and delivery outcomes. We evaluated whether women who experienced physical violence by their intimate partners around the time of pregnancy were less likely to achieve weight gain according to Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the 2000–2006 Oklahoma Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring Survey (PRAMS) data for post-partum women, 20 years and older. Physical violence perpetrated by an intimate partner before and/or during pregnancy was prevalent in nearly 6.5% of women. Weight gain was adequate in 38.8%, deficient in 28.4% and excessive in 32.8% of these women, respectively. After adjusting for maternal age, marital status, education, pregnancy intention, stressful life events, third-trimester use of tobacco and alcohol and gestational age at delivery, physical violence by an intimate partner around the time of pregnancy was positively but non-significantly associated with excessive (but not deficient) gestational weight gain. After stratifying by age group, positive and significant associations between physical violence by an intimate partner around the time of pregnancy and inadequate gestational weight gain were observed only among women 35 years and older. With the exception of mothers ≥ 35 years of age, deficient and excessive gestational weight gains were not significantly related to experiences with physical violence by an intimate partner prior to delivery. Prospective cohort studies are needed to establish whether other forms of violence, including emotional and sexual abuse, can affect gestational weight gain and whether gestational weight gain can mediate the effect of physical, sexual and emotional abuse on pregnancy, labor and delivery outcomes. PMID:21324411

  16. Liver fatty acid binding protein gene-ablation exacerbates weight gain in high-fat fed female mice.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Avery L; Atshaves, Barbara P; Landrock, Danilo; Landrock, Kerstin K; Martin, Gregory G; Storey, Stephen M; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-05-01

    Loss of liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) decreases long chain fatty acid uptake and oxidation in primary hepatocytes and in vivo. On this basis, L-FABP gene ablation would potentiate high-fat diet-induced weight gain and weight gain/energy intake. While this was indeed the case when L-FABP null (-/-) mice on the C57BL/6NCr background were pair-fed a high-fat diet, whether this would also be observed under high-fat diet fed ad libitum was not known. Therefore, this possibility was examined in female L-FABP (-/-) mice on the same background. L-FABP (-/-) mice consumed equal amounts of defined high-fat or isocaloric control diets fed ad libitum. However, on the ad libitum-fed high-fat diet the L-FABP (-/-) mice exhibited: (1) decreased hepatic long chain fatty acid (LCFA) β-oxidation as indicated by lower serum β-hydroxybutyrate level; (2) decreased hepatic protein levels of key enzymes mitochondrial (rate limiting carnitine palmitoyl acyltransferase A1, CPT1A; HMG-CoA synthase) and peroxisomal (acyl CoA oxidase 1, ACOX1) LCFA β-oxidation; (3) increased fat tissue mass (FTM) and FTM/energy intake to the greatest extent; and (4) exacerbated body weight gain, weight gain/energy intake, liver weight, and liver weight/body weight to the greatest extent. Taken together, these findings showed that L-FABP gene-ablation exacerbated diet-induced weight gain and fat tissue mass gain in mice fed high-fat diet ad libitum--consistent with the known biochemistry and cell biology of L-FABP.

  17. Association between Maternal Fish Consumption and Gestational Weight Gain: Influence of Molecular Genetic Predisposition to Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Sofus C.; Ängquist, Lars; Laurin, Charles; Morgen, Camilla S.; Jakobsen, Marianne U.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Smith, George Davey; Olsen, Sjurdur F.; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Nohr, Ellen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that fish consumption can restrict weight gain. However, little is known about how fish consumption affects gestational weight gain (GWG), and whether this relationship depends on genetic makeup. Objective To examine the association between fish consumption and GWG, and whether this relationship is dependent on molecular genetic predisposition to obesity. Design A nested case-cohort study based on the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) sampling the most obese women (n = 990) and a random sample of the remaining participants (n = 1,128). Replication of statistically significant findings was attempted in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) (n = 4,841). We included 32 body mass index (BMI) associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 5 SNPs found associated with GWG. BMI associated SNPs were combined in a genetic risk score (GRS). Associations between consumption of fish, GRS or individual variants and GWG were analysed, and interactions between fish and the GRS or individual variants were examined. Results In the DNBC, each portion/week (150 g) of fatty fish was associated with a higher GWG of 0.58 kg (95% CI: 0.16, 0.99, P<0.01). For total fish and lean fish, similar patterns were observed, but these associations were not statistically significant. We found no association between GRS and GWG, and no interactions between GRS and dietary fish on GWG. However, we found an interaction between the PPARG Pro12Ala variant and dietary fish. Each additional Pro12Ala G-allele was associated with a GWG of -0.83 kg (95% CI: -1.29, -0.37, P<0.01) per portion/week of dietary fish, with the same pattern for both lean and fatty fish. In ALSPAC, we were unable to replicate these findings. Conclusion We found no consistent evidence of association between fish consumption and GWG, and our results indicate that the association between dietary fish and GWG has little or no dependency on GRS or individual SNPs. PMID:26930408

  18. A2BP1 gene polymorphisms association with olanzapine-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Dong, Licai; Yan, Hao; Huang, Xuebing; Hu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Yongfeng; Ma, Cuicui; Du, Bo; Lu, Tianlan; Jin, Chao; Wang, Lifang; Yu, Hao; Dong, Zheng; Li, Wenqiang; Ruan, Yanyan; Zhang, Hongyan; Zhang, Hongxing; Mi, Weifeng; Ma, Wenbin; Li, Keqing; Lv, Luxian; Zhang, Dai; Yue, Weihua

    2015-09-01

    The ataxin-2 binding protein 1 (A2BP1) gene is reported to be one of the susceptibility genes in schizophrenia, autism, and obesity. The aim of this study was to explore the association of A2BP1 gene polymorphisms with antipsychotic induced weight gain (AIWG) in Chinese Han population. Three hundred and twenty-eight patients with schizophrenia were followed-up for an 8-week period of treatment with olanzapine. The fasting weights of 328 patients were measured before and after the 8-week course of treatment. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs: rs8048076, rs1478697, rs10500331, and rs4786847) of the A2BP1 gene were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We analyzed putative association of A2BP1 polymorphisms with AIWG of olanzapine using linear regression analysis and found that SNP rs1478697 was significantly associated with AIWG caused by olanzapine (p=0.0012; Bonferroni corrected p=0.0048). The association was replicated in another independent sample including 208 first-episode and drug-naïve patients presenting with schizophrenia after a 4-week treatment with olanzapine (p=0.0092; Bonferroni corrected p=0.0368; meta p=5.33×10(-5)). To explore the biological plausibility of A2BP1 in the pathogenesis of AIWG, we made expression analyses and eQTL analyses; these analyses showed that A2BP1 was highly expressed in whole brain tissues using the HBT database, and that rs1478697 has an expression quantitative trait locus effect in human cerebellar cortex tissues using the BRAINEAC database (p=2.50E-04). In conclusion, the rs1478697 in A2BP1 may be associated with AIWG induced by 8-week treatment with olanzapine.

  19. Moderate and Vigorous Intensity Exercise during Pregnancy and Gestational Weight Gain in Women with Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Samantha F.; Sternfeld, Barbara; Krefman, Amy E.; Hedderson, Monique M.; Brown, Susan D.; Mevi, Ashley; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Ferrara, Assiamira

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the associations of moderate and vigorous intensity exercise during pregnancy with the rate of gestational weight gain (GWG) from gestational diabetes (GDM) diagnosis to delivery, overall and stratified by prepregnancy overweight/obesity. Methods Prospective cohort study with physical activity reported shortly after the GDM diagnosis and prepregnancy weight and post-diagnosis GWG obtained from electronic medical records (n= 1,055). Multinomial logistic regression models in the full cohort and stratified by prepregnancy overweight/obesity estimated associations of moderate and vigorous intensity exercise with GWG below and above the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) prepregnancy BMI-specific recommended ranges for weekly rate of GWG in the second and third trimesters. Results In the full cohort, any participation in vigorous intensity exercise was associated with decreased odds of GWG above recommended ranges as compared to no participation [Odds Ratio (95% Confidence Interval): 0.63 (0.40, 0.99)], with a significant trend for decreasing odds of excess GWG with increasing level of vigorous intensity exercise. Upon stratification by prepregnancy overweight/obesity, significant associations were only observed for BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m2: any vigorous intensity exercise, as compared to none, was associated with 54% decreased odds of excess GWG [0.46 (0.27, 0.79)] and significant trends were detected for decreasing odds of GWG both below and above the IOM’s recommended ranges with increasing level of vigorous exercise (both P ≤ 0.03). No associations were observed for moderate intensity exercise. Conclusions In women with GDM, particularly overweight and obese women, vigorous intensity exercise during pregnancy may reduce the odds of excess GWG. PMID:26955997

  20. Diet, Pre-pregnancy BMI, and Gestational Weight Gain in Puerto Rican Women

    PubMed Central

    Guilloty, Natacha I.; Soto, Roxana; Anzalota, Liza; Rosario, Zaira; Cordero, José F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To describe the dietary patterns in pregnant woman and determine the association between diet factors, pre-pregnancy Body Mass Index (BMI) and socio-demographic characteristics with gestational weight gain (GWG). Methods This is a secondary analysis of a longitudinal cohort study of pregnant women exploring the risk factors for preterm birth, the Puerto Rico Testsite for Exploring Contamination Threats program. Recruitment was conducted during 2011–2014. Data was collected from multiple sources. GWG was calculated using maternal weight recorded in the medical records at the first and last prenatal visits and classified according to the Institute of Medicine guidelines. Sociodemographic characteristics were obtained at baseline using an interviewed-based questionnaire. Participants completed a self-administered food frequency questionnaire at 20–28 weeks to assess dietary patterns. Analysis of associations between variables was conducted using Chi Square tests. Results A total of 160 women with term pregnancies were included in this analysis. Mean pre-pregnancy BMI was 25.4 ± 5.48 kg/m2, with 44.4 % classified as overweight/obese. Excessive GWG was observed in 24.4 % of the participants. Socio-demographic characteristics were not associated with GWG. Being overweight/obese at the start of pregnancy was significantly associated with excessive GWG (p < 0.05). In addition, women consuming one or more fruit drinks per day were more likely to have an excessive GWG while those consuming less than one fruit drink per day were more likely to have an adequate GWG (p < 0.05). Conclusions for Practice Being obese before pregnancy and frequently consuming fruit drinks were important determinants of excessive GWG in this group. PMID:26100133

  1. High dietary fat exacerbates weight gain and obesity in female liver fatty acid binding protein gene-ablated mice.

    PubMed

    Atshaves, Barbara P; McIntosh, Avery L; Storey, Stephen M; Landrock, Kerstin K; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2010-02-01

    Since liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) facilitates uptake/oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in cultured transfected cells and primary hepatocytes, loss of L-FABP was expected to exacerbate weight gain and/or obesity in response to high dietary fat. Male and female wild-type (WT) and L-FABP gene-ablated mice, pair-fed a defined isocaloric control or high fat diet for 12 weeks, consumed equal amounts of food by weight and kcal. Male WT mice gained weight faster than their female WT counterparts regardless of diet. L-FABP gene ablation enhanced weight gain more in female than male mice-an effect exacerbated by high fat diet. Dual emission X-ray absorptiometry revealed high-fat fed male and female WT mice gained mostly fat tissue mass (FTM). L-FABP gene ablation increased FTM in female, but not male, mice-an effect also exacerbated by high fat diet. Concomitantly, L-FABP gene ablation decreased serum beta-hydroxybutyrate in male and female mice fed the control diet and, even more so, on the high-fat diet. Thus, L-FABP gene ablation decreased fat oxidation and sensitized all mice to weight gain as whole body FTM and LTM-with the most gain observed in FTM of control vs high-fat fed female L-FABP null mice. Taken together, these results indicate loss of L-FABP exacerbates weight gain and/or obesity in response to high dietary fat.

  2. Influence of canola hulls on gain in weight of larvae of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor L.

    PubMed

    Davis, G R; Campbell, S J; McGregor, D I

    1983-12-01

    Larvae of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor L., Gembloux strain, race F, were reared on diets in which the protein component was supplied by defatted ground seed, defatted ground dehulled fraction, or defatted ground hulls of Brassica napus L. cv. Tower or Brassica campestris L. cv. Candle, obtained from autoclaved seed. They were also fed casein diets to which defatted ground hulls of Tower or Candle seed were added. Gain in weight was equally good for all diets containing Candle seed fractions and for diets containing Tower ground seed. However, it was lower for diets containing the ground dehulled fraction or the ground hulls of Tower. Addition of Candle hulls or of a mixture of equal proportions (w/w) of Candle and Tower hulls to diets containing dehulled Tower did not improve the gain in weight of larvae, compared with that of larvae fed diets containing the dehulled fraction, alone. Similar additions of Tower hulls or of the mixture to diets containing the dehulled fraction of Candle had no adverse effect on larval gain in weight, compared to that registered by larvae fed the dehulled fraction of Candle. Significant improvement in weight gain in comparison with that recorded for larvae fed the unsupplemented casein diet could not be demonstrated when ground hulls of Tower or Candle were added to this diet. Considered collectively, weight gains of larvae of T. molitor were consistently greater when Candle products were fed than when Tower products provided the protein fraction of the diet.

  3. Excess gestational weight gain in low-income overweight and obese women: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cynthie K.; Walch, Tanis J.; Lindberg, Sara M.; Smith, Aubrey M.; Lindheim, Steven R.; Whigham, Leah D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Examine factors implicated in gestational weight gain (GWG) in low-income overweight and obese women. Design Qualitative study. Setting Community-based perinatal center. Participants 8 focus groups with women (Black=48%, White non-Hispanic=41%, Hispanic=10%) in the first half of (n=12) and last half of pregnancy (n=10), or post-partum (n=7); 2 with obstetrician-gynecologists (OB-GYNs) (n=9). Phenomenon of Interest Barriers and facilitators to healthy eating and GWG within different levels of the Social Ecological Model (SEM), e.g. intrapersonal, interpersonal, organizational, etc. Analysis Coding guide was based on the SEM. Transcripts were coded by 3 researchers for common themes. Thematic saturation was reached. Results At an intrapersonal level, knowledge/skills and cravings were the most common barriers. At an interpersonal level, family and friends were most influential. At an organizational level, the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program and clinics were influential. At the community level, lack of transportation was most frequently discussed. At a policy level, complex policies and social stigma surrounding WIC were barriers. There was consensus that ideal intervention approaches would include peer-facilitated support groups with information from experts. OB-GYNs felt uncomfortable counseling patients about GWG due to time constraints, other priorities, and lack of training. Conclusions and Implications There are multi-level public health opportunities to promote healthy GWG. Better communication between nutrition specialists and OB-GYNs is needed. PMID:26187348

  4. Overexpression of Jazf1 reduces body weight gain and regulates lipid metabolism in high fat diet

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Woo Young; Bae, Ki Beom; Kim, Sung Hyun; Yu, Dong Hun; Kim, Hei Jung; Ji, Young Rae; Park, Seo Jin; Park, Si Jun; Kang, Min-Cheol; Jeong, Ja In; Park, Sang-Joon; Lee, Sang Gyu; Lee, Inkyu; Kim, Myoung Ok; Yoon, Duhak; Ryoo, Zae Young

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • The expression of Jazf1 in the liver suppressed lipid accumulation. • Jazf1 significantly increases transcription of fatty acid synthase. • Jazf1 plays a critical role in the regulation of energy and lipid homeostasis. • Jazf1 associates the development of metabolic disorder. • Jazf1 may provide a new therapeutic target in the management of metabolic disorder. - Abstract: Jazf1 is a 27 kDa nuclear protein containing three putative zinc finger motifs that is associated with diabetes mellitus and prostate cancer; however, little is known about the role that this gene plays in regulation of metabolism. Recent evidence indicates that Jazf1 transcription factors bind to the nuclear orphan receptor TR4. This receptor regulates PEPCK, the key enzyme involved in gluconeogenesis. To elucidate Jazf1’s role in metabolism, we fed a 60% fat diet for up to 15 weeks. In Jazf1 overexpression mice, weight gain was found to be significantly decreased. The expression of Jazf1 in the liver also suppressed lipid accumulation and decreased droplet size. These results suggest that Jazf1 plays a critical role in the regulation of lipid homeostasis. Finally, Jazf1 may provide a new therapeutic target in the management of obesity and diabetes.

  5. Historic Variations in Winter Indoor Domestic Temperatures and Potential Implications for Body Weight Gain.

    PubMed

    Mavrogianni, A; Johnson, F; Ucci, M; Marmot, A; Wardle, J; Oreszczyn, T; Summerfield, A

    2013-04-01

    It has been argued that the amount of time spent by humans in thermoneutral environments has increased in recent decades. This paper examines evidence of historic changes in winter domestic temperatures in industrialised countries. Future trajectories for indoor thermal comfort are also explored. Whilst methodological differences across studies make it difficult to compare data and accurately estimate the absolute size of historic changes in indoor domestic temperatures, data analysis does suggest an upward trend, particularly in bedrooms. The variations in indoor winter residential temperatures might have been further exacerbated in some countries by a temporary drop in demand temperatures due to the 1970s energy crisis, as well as by recent changes in the building stock. In the United Kingdom, for example, spot measurement data indicate that an increase of up to 1.3°C per decade in mean dwelling winter indoor temperatures may have occurred from 1978 to 1996. The findings of this review paper are also discussed in the context of their significance for human health and well-being. In particular, historic indoor domestic temperature trends are discussed in conjunction with evidence on the links between low ambient temperatures, body energy expenditure and weight gain.

  6. Maternal and Neonatal Levels of Perfluoroalkyl Substances in Relation to Gestational Weight Gain.

    PubMed

    Ashley-Martin, Jillian; Dodds, Linda; Arbuckle, Tye E; Morisset, Anne-Sophie; Fisher, Mandy; Bouchard, Maryse F; Shapiro, Gabriel D; Ettinger, Adrienne S; Monnier, Patricia; Dallaire, Renee; Taback, Shayne; Fraser, William

    2016-01-20

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are ubiquitous, persistent pollutants widely used in the production of common household and consumer goods. There is a limited body of literature suggesting that these chemicals may alter metabolic pathways and growth trajectories. The relationship between prenatal exposures to these chemicals and gestational weight gain (GWG) has received limited attention. One objective was to analyze the associations among maternal plasma levels of three common perfluoroalkyl substances (perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), perfluorohexanesulfanoate (PFHxS)) and GWG. Additionally, we explored whether GWG was associated with cord blood PFAS levels. This study utilized data collected in the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) Study, a trans-Canada cohort study of 2001 pregnant women. Our analysis quantified associations between (1) maternal PFAS concentrations and GWG and (2) GWG and cord blood PFAS concentrations. Maternal PFOS concentrations were positively associated with GWG (β = 0.39 95% CI: 0.02, 0.75). Interquartile increases in GWG were significantly associated with elevated cord blood PFOA (OR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.13 to 1.56) and PFOS (OR = 1.20; 95% CI: 1.03 to 1.40) concentrations. No statistically significant associations were observed between GWG and either measure of PFHxS. These findings warrant elucidation of the potential underlying mechanisms.

  7. Maternal and Neonatal Levels of Perfluoroalkyl Substances in Relation to Gestational Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Ashley-Martin, Jillian; Dodds, Linda; Arbuckle, Tye E.; Morisset, Anne-Sophie; Fisher, Mandy; Bouchard, Maryse F.; Shapiro, Gabriel D.; Ettinger, Adrienne S.; Monnier, Patricia; Dallaire, Renee; Taback, Shayne; Fraser, William

    2016-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are ubiquitous, persistent pollutants widely used in the production of common household and consumer goods. There is a limited body of literature suggesting that these chemicals may alter metabolic pathways and growth trajectories. The relationship between prenatal exposures to these chemicals and gestational weight gain (GWG) has received limited attention. One objective was to analyze the associations among maternal plasma levels of three common perfluoroalkyl substances (perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), perfluorohexanesulfanoate (PFHxS)) and GWG. Additionally, we explored whether GWG was associated with cord blood PFAS levels. This study utilized data collected in the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) Study, a trans-Canada cohort study of 2001 pregnant women. Our analysis quantified associations between (1) maternal PFAS concentrations and GWG and (2) GWG and cord blood PFAS concentrations. Maternal PFOS concentrations were positively associated with GWG (β = 0.39 95% CI: 0.02, 0.75). Interquartile increases in GWG were significantly associated with elevated cord blood PFOA (OR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.13 to 1.56) and PFOS (OR = 1.20; 95% CI: 1.03 to 1.40) concentrations. No statistically significant associations were observed between GWG and either measure of PFHxS. These findings warrant elucidation of the potential underlying mechanisms. PMID:26805861

  8. Historic Variations in Winter Indoor Domestic Temperatures and Potential Implications for Body Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, F.; Ucci, M.; Marmot, A.; Wardle, J.; Oreszczyn, T.; Summerfield, A.

    2013-01-01

    It has been argued that the amount of time spent by humans in thermoneutral environments has increased in recent decades. This paper examines evidence of historic changes in winter domestic temperatures in industrialised countries. Future trajectories for indoor thermal comfort are also explored. Whilst methodological differences across studies make it difficult to compare data and accurately estimate the absolute size of historic changes in indoor domestic temperatures, data analysis does suggest an upward trend, particularly in bedrooms. The variations in indoor winter residential temperatures might have been further exacerbated in some countries by a temporary drop in demand temperatures due to the 1970s energy crisis, as well as by recent changes in the building stock. In the United Kingdom, for example, spot measurement data indicate that an increase of up to 1.3°C per decade in mean dwelling winter indoor temperatures may have occurred from 1978 to 1996. The findings of this review paper are also discussed in the context of their significance for human health and well-being. In particular, historic indoor domestic temperature trends are discussed in conjunction with evidence on the links between low ambient temperatures, body energy expenditure and weight gain. PMID:26321874

  9. Applying weight gain in Pomacea lineata (SPIX 1824) (Mollusca: Prosobranchia) as a measure of herbicide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Coler, R A; Coler, R R; Felizardo, E K G; Watanabe, T

    2005-11-01

    Pomacea lineata, an extremely ubiquitous snail and pest to rice farmers throughout Asia, holds promise as a valuable resource for monitoring water quality in northeast Brazil. In this paper, we present data demonstrating the rate of weight gain in P. lineata neonates as a consistent measure of the stress imposed by sublethal concentrations of the herbicides Paraquat and Round-up. Our secondary agenda is to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating bioassay into the standard municipal and state procedure of monitoring water quality. Growth data to assess chronic toxicity were generated in experiments of four and four, eight, twelve and sixteen days for Paraquat and Round-up, respectively. We estimated a 96 h no observed effect concentration (NOEC) and lowest observed effect concentration (LOEC) for Paraquat of 0.12 and 0.25 mg/L. The 96 h Round-up data yielded NOEC and LOEC values, respectively, of 0.25 and 0.5 mg/L. All concentrations of Round-up tested for the 192 h exposure yielded significantly lower growth than the control. Consequently, no NOEC could be derived. The LOEC was < 0.12 mg/L. Furthermore, there was no mortality during the test. At the lowest concentrations of Paraquat tested (0.005 mg/L) there was a significant increase in growth compared with the controls, suggesting a hormetic effect.

  10. The preterm placental microbiome varies in association with excess maternal gestational weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Kathleen M.; Ma, Jun; Mitchell, Kristen B.; Racusin, Diana A.; Versalovic, James; Aagaard, Kjersti

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although a higher maternal body mass index is associated with preterm birth, it is unclear whether excess gestational weight gain (GWG) or obesity drives increased risk. We and others have shown that the placenta harbors microbiota, which is significantly different among preterm births. Our aim in this study was to investigate whether the preterm placental microbiome varies by virtue of obesity or alternately by excess GWG. STUDY DESIGN Placentas (n = 320) were collected from term and preterm pregnancies. Genomic DNA was extracted and subjected to metagenomic sequencing. Data were analyzed by clinical covariates that included the 2009 Institute of Medicine’s GWG guideline and obesity. RESULTS Analysis of 16S recombinant RNA–based metagenomics revealed no clustering of the microbiome by virtue of obesity (P = .161). Among women who spontaneously delivered preterm, there was again no clustering by obesity (P = .480), but there was significant clustering by excess GWG (P = .022). Moreover, among pretermbirths, detailed analysis identified microbial genera (family and genus level) and bacterial metabolic gene pathways that varied among pregnancies with excess GWG. Notably, excess GWG was associated with decreased microbial folate biosynthesis pathways and decreased butanoate metabolism (linear discriminate analysis, >3.0-fold). CONCLUSION Although there were no significant alterations in the microbiome by virtue of obesity per se, excess GWG was associated with an altered microbiome and its metabolic profile among those women who experienced a preterm birth. PMID:25557210

  11. Genome-wide association study on antipsychotic-induced weight gain in the CATIE sample.

    PubMed

    Brandl, E J; Tiwari, A K; Zai, C C; Nurmi, E L; Chowdhury, N I; Arenovich, T; Sanches, M; Goncalves, V F; Shen, J J; Lieberman, J A; Meltzer, H Y; Kennedy, J L; Müller, D J

    2016-08-01

    Antipsychotic-induced weight gain (AIWG) is a common side effect with a high genetic contribution. We reanalyzed genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) selecting a refined subset of patients most suitable for AIWG studies. The final GWAS was conducted in N=189 individuals. The top polymorphisms were analyzed in a second cohort of N=86 patients. None of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms was significant at the genome-wide threshold of 5x10(-8). We observed interesting trends for rs9346455 (P=6.49x10(-6)) upstream of OGFRL1, the intergenic variants rs7336345 (P=1.31 × 10(-5)) and rs1012650 (P=1.47 × 10(-5)), and rs1059778 (P=1.49x10(-5)) in IBA57. In the second cohort, rs9346455 showed significant association with AIWG (P=0.005). The combined meta-analysis P-value for rs9346455 was 1.09 × 10(-7). Our reanalysis of the CATIE GWAS data revealed interesting new variants associated with AIWG. As the functional relevance of these polymorphisms is yet to be determined, further studies are needed.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 1 September 2015; doi:10.1038/tpj.2015.59.

  12. Stimulation of food intake and weight gain in mature female rats by bovine prolactin and bovine growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Byatt, J C; Staten, N R; Salsgiver, W J; Kostelc, J G; Collier, R J

    1993-06-01

    Recombinant bovine prolactin (rbPRL) or bovine growth hormone (rbGH) was administered to mature female rats (10/treatment group) by daily subcutaneous injection for 10 days. Doses ranged from 7 to 5,000 micrograms/day (0.03-24 mg/kg body wt). Both rbPRL and rbGH increased body weight gain and food intake, but these parameters were increased at lower doses of rbPRL (7-63 micrograms/day) than rbGH (> 190 micrograms/day). Weight gain and food intake were maximally stimulated by 190 micrograms/day rbPRL, whereas maximal increased weight gain was obtained with the highest dose of rbGH (5,000 micrograms/day). Total carcass protein was increased by both hormones; however, protein as a percentage of body weight was unchanged. Similarly, neither rbPRL nor rbGH changed the percentage of carcass moisture. Percentage of body fat was increased by rbPRL but was decreased by rbGH. Weight of the gastrointestinal tract and kidneys was increased by both hormones, but increases were in proportion to body weight gain. These data confirm that ungulate prolactin is a hyperphagic agent in the female rat. In addition, they suggest that, while prolactin stimulates growth in mature female rats, this growth is probably not via a somatogenic mechanism.

  13. Weight Loss Predicts Progression of Mild Cognitive Impairment to Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cova, Ilaria; Rossi, Annalia; Cucumo, Valentina; Ghiretti, Roberta; Maggiore, Laura; Pomati, Simone; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Mariani, Claudio; Caracciolo, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background Weight loss is common in people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and it could be a marker of impending AD in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and improve prognostic accuracy, if accelerated progression to AD would be shown. Aims To assess weight loss as a predictor of dementia and AD in MCI. Methods One hundred twenty-five subjects with MCI (age 73.8 ± 7.1 years) were followed for an average of 4 years. Two weight measurements were carried out at a minimum time interval of one year. Dementia was defined according to DSM-IV criteria and AD according to NINCDS-ADRDA criteria. Weight loss was defined as a ≥4% decrease in baseline weight. Results Fifty-three (42.4%) MCI progressed to dementia, which was of the AD-type in half of the cases. Weight loss was associated with a 3.4-fold increased risk of dementia (95% CI = 1.5–6.9) and a 3.2-fold increased risk of AD (95% CI = 1.4–8.3). In terms of years lived without disease, weight loss was associated to a 2.3 and 2.5 years earlier onset of dementia and AD. Conclusions Accelerated progression towards dementia and AD is expected when weight loss is observed in MCI patients. Weight should be closely monitored in elderly with mild cognitive impairment. PMID:26990757

  14. Body weight gain and risk of colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, S; Lieb, W; Koch, M; Fedirko, V; Dahm, C C; Pischon, T; Nöthlings, U; Boeing, H; Aleksandrova, K

    2015-07-01

    While the relationship between body mass index as an indicator of excess body weight and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) is well established, the association between body weight gain in adulthood and risk of CRC remains unresolved. We quantified this association in a meta-analysis of 12 observational studies published until November 2014 with a total of 16,151 incident CRC cases. Random effect models were used to obtain summary relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Between-study heterogeneity was assessed using I(2) statistics. Overall, the summary RR (95% CI) was 1.22 (1.14-1.30) for high body weight gain (midpoint: 15.2 kg) compared with stable weight (P for heterogeneity = 0.182; I(2) = 21.2%). In a dose-response analysis, each 5 kg weight gain was associated with a 4% (95% CI: 2%-5%) higher risk of CRC. The association persisted after adjustment for body weight at younger age and was present for both men and women, as well as for colon and rectal cancer. Differences by sex were detected for colon cancer (P for interaction = 0.003, with higher risk for men than women), but not for rectal cancer (P for interaction = 0.613). In conclusion, these data underscore the importance of body weight management from early adulthood onwards for the prevention of CRC development.

  15. Body Satisfaction, Weight Gain, and Binge Eating Among Overweight Adolescent Girls

    PubMed Central

    Sonneville, Kendrin R.; Calzo, Jerel P.; Horton, Nicholas J.; Haines, Jess; Austin, S. Bryn; Field, Alison E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine if body satisfaction is associated with body mass index (BMI) change and whether it protects against the development of frequent binge eating among overweight and obese adolescent girls. Methods We used prospective data from 9 waves of an ongoing cohort study of adolescents, the Growing Up Today Study. At enrollment in 1996, participants were 9 to 14 years old. Questionnaires were mailed to participants annually until 2001, then biennially through 2007. Girls who were overweight or obese in 1996 were included in the analysis (n=1 559). Our outcomes were annual change in BMI and incident frequent binge eating, defined as binge eating at least weekly and no use of compensatory behaviors. Results At baseline, 57.2% of the overweight and obese girls were at least somewhat satisfied with their bodies. During 11 years of follow-up, 9.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) [7.8, 10.8]) of the girls started to binge eat frequently. Controlling for BMI and other confounders, overweight and obese girls who reported being at least somewhat satisfied with their bodies made smaller BMI gains (β=−0.10 kg/m2, 95% CI [−0.19, −0.02]) and had 61% lower odds of starting to binge eat frequently (odds ratio (OR)=0.39, 95% CI [0.24, 0.64]) than their less satisfied peers. Compared to girls who were the least satisfied with their bodies, girls who were the most satisfied had 85% lower odds of starting to binge eat frequently (OR=0.15, 95% CI [0.06, 0.37]). The association between body satisfaction and starting to binge eat frequently was stronger for younger adolescents than older adolescents. Conclusions While body dissatisfaction is common among overweight and obese girls, body satisfaction may protect against excessive weight gain and binge eating. Prevention of body dissatisfaction must begin early and should be considered as a component of both obesity and eating disorder prevention programs. PMID:22565419

  16. Frequent self-weighing with electronic graphic feedback to prevent age-related weight gain in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Bertz, Fredrik; Pacanowski, Carly R.; Levitsky, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Young adults display substantial weight gain. Preventing this age-related weight gain would reduce overweight and obesity. Objective We evaluated an internet based intervention using Internet-connected scales and graphic email feedback; the Caloric Titration Method (CTM), to reduce age-related weight gain over the course of 1 y among first-year college students. Design First-year college students (n=167) were randomized to (CTM) or control (C) group. Both groups were provided Internet-connected scales. CTM group was instructed to weigh daily, view a weight graph emailed to them after weighing, and try to maintain their weight as indicated in the graph. The C group could weigh at any time, but did not receive feedback. At six months and 1 year the C group were notified to provide weights. Intention to treat analysis, using a mixed model adjusted for baseline weight, BMI and gender was used to analyze the effect of the intervention. Results Baseline Body Mass Index was 22.9 ± 3.0 kg/m2. Frequency of self-weighing (median) was 5 times/week in the CTM group, compared to 1 time/week in C (p<0.001). Ninety-five percent of the CTM participants weighed ≥3 times/week, compared to 15% in C group (p<0.001). After 1 year the C group had gained 1.1 ± 4.4 kg whereas the CTM group lost 0.5 ± 3.7 kg, yielding a significant overall time*group interaction (F=3.39, p=0.035). The difference in weight change between the two groups at 1 year was significant (p=0.004). Weight change of the CTM group was not different from zero whereas weight gain in C group was significant. Retention was 81%. Conclusions The internet based frequent self-weighing CTM system was effective in preventing age-related weight gain in young adults over one year and thus offers promise to reduce overweight and obesity. PMID:26414563

  17. Study the live weight and live weight gain of black bengal and jamunapari goat breeds by fitting the linear regression under semi-intensive conditions.

    PubMed

    Khan, M K I; Naznin, M

    2013-10-01

    The present study was conducted to know the live weight gain of goats under semi-intensive conditions of Chittagong district of Bangladesh during the period of July, 2012 to January, 2013. Data were collected from 72 black Bengal and 32 Jamunapari goats and the kids birth weight and their subsequent live weight at weekly intervals up to age and weight of weaning at sexual maturity was recorded. The weight gains from birth to sexual maturity of two different breeds under 2 different farms were studied. Average birth weight of male and female black Bengal goats kids were 1.22 +/- 0.15, 1.01 +/- 0.14, 1.42 +/- 0.10 and 1.12 +/- 0.27 kg, respectively for farm 1 and 2. For Jamunapari goat's kid birth weight were 1.51 +/- 0.07 and 1.42 +/- 0.09 kg, for male and females, respectively in the farm 2. The average weaning age was 4 months and the average weaning weight of male and female black Bengal goats were 5.19 +/- 0.358, 5.05 +/- 0.28, 5.63 +/- 0.61 and 5.54 +/- 0.41 kg, in the farm 1 and 2, respectively. However, the average weaning weight of male and female Jamunapari was 6.59 +/- 0.69 and 6.79 +/- 0.31 kg, respectively in farm 2 which was higher than black Bengal. The average age at sexual maturity of black Bengal goat was 8 months. The average weight at sexual maturity of male and female black Bengal goats were 9.82 +/- 0.75 and 9.52 +/- 0.62 kg, respectively in farm 1 and 9.65 +/- 0.75 and 9.138 +/- 0.70 kg, respectively in farm 2. The average age at sexual maturity was 9 months for Jamunapari goat. The average weight at sexual maturity of male and female Jamunapari goats was 13.2 +/- 0.75 and 14.1 +/- 0.82 kg, respectively. The average daily body weight gain from birth to weaning for male and female black Bengal goat was 33.70, 35.11 g day(-1) and was 35.67 and 45.94 g day(-1), respectively in farm 1 and 2 and for Jamunapari goat was 42.97 and 45.47 g day(-1), respectively. The males were grew faster than the females. The predicted live weight gains for both

  18. Motor Responses and Weight Gaining in Neonates through Use of Two Methods of Earmuff and Receiving Silence in NICU

    PubMed Central

    Abdeyazdan, Z.; Ghasemi, S.; Marofi, M.; Berjis, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims. With technological advances in NICUs the survival rate of preterm infants has been increased. Because NICU environment is a potent source of stress for infants, its modification is an essential measure to decrease infants' morbidity. The purposes of this study were to compare the effects of wearing earmuff and provision silence for infants on their motor responses and gaining weight. Methods. In a randomized clinical trial 96 preterm infants were enrolled. Their motor responses were evaluated for two consecutive days in the morning and afternoon shifts, in the groups of earmuff and silence, and at similar time points in the control group. Also their weight was measured at days 1 and 10. Results. In the two intervention groups, means of motor responses in infants were significantly less than in the control group, and weight gain of infants was more than the control group. However weight gain was more pronounced in the earmuff group. Conclusion. Both interventions led to decreasing number of motor responses and improvement of weight gain pattern, but these effects were more pronounced in earmuff group; thus because implementation of silence in NICUs has many barriers, it is suggested to use earmuff for preterm infants in these units. This trial obtained IRCT registration number IRCT2012092010812N2. PMID:25614898

  19. Effects of Chitosan on Body Weight Gain, Growth Hormone and Intestinal Morphology in Weaned Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanqing; Shi, Binlin; Yan, Sumei; Li, Tiyu; Guo, Yiwei; Li, Junliang

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effects of chitosan on the concentrations of GH and IGF-I in serum and small intestinal morphological structure of piglets, in order to evaluate the regulating action of chitosan on weaned pig growth through endocrine and intestinal morphological approaches. A total of 180 weaned pigs (35 d of age; 11.56±1.61 kg of body weight) were selected and assigned randomly to 5 dietary treatments, including 1 basal diet (control) and 4 diets with chitosan supplementation (100, 500, 1,000 and 2,000 mg/kg, respectively). Each treatment contained six replicate pens with six pigs per pen. The experiment lasted for 28 d. The results showed that the average body weight gain (BWG) of pigs was improved quadratically by dietary chitosan during the former 14 d and the later 14 d after weaned (p<0.05). Furthermore, dietary supplementation of chitosan tended to quadratically increase the concentration of serum GH on d 14 (p = 0.082) and 28 (p = 0.087). Diets supplemented with increasing levels of chitosan increased quadratically the villus height of jejunum and ileum on d 14 (p = 0.089, p<0.01) and 28 (p = 0.074, p<0.01), meanwhile, chitosan increased quadratically the ratio of villus height to crypt depth in duodenum, jejunum and ileum on d 14 (p<0.05, p = 0.055, p<0.01) and 28 (p<0.01, p<0.01, p<0.01), however, it decreased quadratically crypt depth in ileum on d 14 (p<0.05) and that in duodenum, jejunum and ileum on d 28 (p<0.01, p<0.05, p<0.05). In conclusion, these results indicated that chitosan could quadratically improve growth in weaned pigs, and the underlying mechanism may due to the increase of the serum GH concentration and improvement of the small intestines morphological structure. PMID:25049731

  20. Effects of chitosan on body weight gain, growth hormone and intestinal morphology in weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanqing; Shi, Binlin; Yan, Sumei; Li, Tiyu; Guo, Yiwei; Li, Junliang

    2013-10-01

    The study was conducted to determine the effects of chitosan on the concentrations of GH and IGF-I in serum and small intestinal morphological structure of piglets, in order to evaluate the regulating action of chitosan on weaned pig growth through endocrine and intestinal morphological approaches. A total of 180 weaned pigs (35 d of age; 11.56±1.61 kg of body weight) were selected and assigned randomly to 5 dietary treatments, including 1 basal diet (control) and 4 diets with chitosan supplementation (100, 500, 1,000 and 2,000 mg/kg, respectively). Each treatment contained six replicate pens with six pigs per pen. The experiment lasted for 28 d. The results showed that the average body weight gain (BWG) of pigs was improved quadratically by dietary chitosan during the former 14 d and the later 14 d after weaned (p<0.05). Furthermore, dietary supplementation of chitosan tended to quadratically increase the concentration of serum GH on d 14 (p = 0.082) and 28 (p = 0.087). Diets supplemented with increasing levels of chitosan increased quadratically the villus height of jejunum and ileum on d 14 (p = 0.089, p<0.01) and 28 (p = 0.074, p<0.01), meanwhile, chitosan increased quadratically the ratio of villus height to crypt depth in duodenum, jejunum and ileum on d 14 (p<0.05, p = 0.055, p<0.01) and 28 (p<0.01, p<0.01, p<0.01), however, it decreased quadratically crypt depth in ileum on d 14 (p<0.05) and that in duodenum, jejunum and ileum on d 28 (p<0.01, p<0.05, p<0.05). In conclusion, these results indicated that chitosan could quadratically improve growth in weaned pigs, and the underlying mechanism may due to the increase of the serum GH concentration and improvement of the small intestines morphological structure.

  1. Reduced sympathetic nervous activity. A potential mechanism predisposing to body weight gain.

    PubMed Central

    Spraul, M; Ravussin, E; Fontvieille, A M; Rising, R; Larson, D E; Anderson, E A

    1993-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system is recognized to play a role in the etiology of animal and possibly human obesity through its impact on energy expenditure and/or food intake. We, therefore, measured fasting muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in the peroneal nerve and its relationship with energy expenditure and body composition in 25 relatively lean Pima Indian males (means +/- SD; 26 +/- 6 yr, 82 +/- 19 kg, 28 +/- 10% body fat) and 19 Caucasian males (29 +/- 5 yr, 81 +/- 13 kg, 24 +/- 9% body fat). 24-h energy expenditure, sleeping metabolic rate, and resting metabolic rate were measured in a respiratory chamber, whereas body composition was estimated by hydrodensitometry. Pima Indians had lower MSNA than Caucasians (23 +/- 6 vs 33 +/- 10 bursts/min, P = 0.0007). MSNA was significantly related to percent body fat in Caucasians (r = 0.55, P = 0.01) but not in Pimas. MSNA also correlated with energy expenditure adjusted for fat-free mass, fat mass, and age in Caucasians (r = 0.51, P = 0.03; r = 0.54, P = 0.02; and r = 0.53, P = 0.02 for adjusted 24-h energy expenditure, sleeping metabolic rate, and resting metabolic rate, respectively) but not in Pima Indians. In conclusion, the activity of the sympathetic nervous system is a determinant of energy expenditure in Caucasians. Individuals with low resting MSNA may be at risk for body weight gain resulting from a lower metabolic rate. A low resting MSNA and the lack of impact of MSNA on metabolic rate might play a role in the etiology of obesity in Pima Indians. PMID:8408625

  2. Influence of Maternal Obesity and Gestational Weight Gain on Maternal and Foetal Lipid Profile

    PubMed Central

    Cinelli, Giulia; Fabrizi, Marta; Ravà, Lucilla; Ciofi degli Atti, Marta; Vernocchi, Pamela; Vallone, Cristina; Pietrantoni, Emanuela; Lanciotti, Rosalba; Signore, Fabrizio; Manco, Melania

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) are fundamental for a foetus’s growth, serving as an energy source, structural constituents of cellular membranes and precursors of bioactive molecules, as well as being essential for cell signalling. Long-chain polyunsaturated FAs (LC-PUFAs) are pivotal in brain and visual development. It is of interest to investigate whether and how specific pregnancy conditions, which alter fatty acid metabolism (excessive pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) or gestational weight gain (GWG)), affect lipid supply to the foetus. For this purpose, we evaluated the erythrocyte FAs of mothers and offspring (cord-blood) at birth, in relation to pre-pregnancy BMI and GWG. A total of 435 mothers and their offspring (237 males, 51%) were included in the study. Distribution of linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (ALA), and their metabolites, arachidonic acid, dihomogamma linoleic (DGLA) and ecosapentanoic acid, was significantly different in maternal and foetal erythrocytes. Pre-pregnancy BMI was significantly associated with maternal percentage of MUFAs (Coeff: −0.112; p = 0.021), LA (Coeff: −0.033; p = 0.044) and DHA (Coeff. = 0.055; p = 0.0016); inadequate GWG with DPA (Coeff: 0.637; p = 0.001); excessive GWG with docosaexahenoic acid (DHA) (Coeff. = −0.714; p = 0.004). Moreover, pre-pregnancy BMI was associated with foetus percentage of PUFAs (Coeff: −0.172; p = 0.009), omega 6 (Coeff: −0.098; p = 0.015) and DHA (Coeff: −0.0285; p = 0.036), even after adjusting for maternal lipids. Our findings show that maternal GWG affects maternal but not foetal lipid profile, differently from pre-pregnancy BMI, which influences both. PMID:27314385

  3. Preventing excessive weight gain during pregnancy and promoting postpartum weight loss: A pilot lifestyle intervention for overweight and obese African American women

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jihong; Wilcox, Sara; Whitaker, Kara; Blake, Christine; Addy, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To test the feasibility and acceptability of a theory-based lifestyle intervention designed to prevent excessive weight gain during pregnancy and promote weight loss in the early postpartum period in overweight and obese African American women. Methods Sixteen pregnant women (≤18 weeks gestation) were recruited from prenatal clinics in Columbia, South Carolina in 2011 and assigned to a lifestyle intervention program. The intervention, guided by formative research, consisted of an individual counseling session followed by 8 group sessions alternated with telephone counseling contacts that continued through 36 weeks of gestation. At 6–8 weeks postpartum, participants received a home visit and up to three counseling calls through week 12. Medical charts were reviewed for 38 contemporary controls who met the same inclusion criteria and attended the same prenatal clinics. Results Compared to controls, study participants gained less total weight, had a smaller weekly rate of weight gain across the 2nd and 3rd trimesters (0.89 vs. 0.96 lbs), and were less likely to exceed weight gain recommendations (56.3 vs. 65.8%). At 12 weeks postpartum, study participants retained 2.6 lbs from their prepregnancy weight, half of study participants were at their prepregnancy weight or lower, and only 35% retained ≥5 lbs. The intervention also demonstrated success in promoting physical activity and reducing caloric intake, and was well-received by participants. Conclusions The initial results were promising. The lessons learned can help inform future studies. The efficacy of our intervention will be tested in a large randomized controlled trial. PMID:25051907

  4. Replacing sugary drinks with milk is inversely associated with weight gain among young obesity-predisposed children.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Miaobing; Rangan, Anna; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret; Rohde, Jeanett Friis; Olsen, Nanna Julie; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2015-11-14

    The aim of the present study was to examine the associations of sugary drink consumption and its substitution with alternative beverages with body weight gain among young children predisposed to future weight gain. Secondary analysis of the Healthy Start Study, a 1·5-year randomised controlled trial designed to prevent overweight among Danish children aged 2-6 years (n 366), was carried out. Multivariate linear regression models were used to investigate the associations of beverage consumption with change in body weightweight) or BMI(ΔBMI) z-score. Substitution models were used to extrapolate the influence of replacing sugary drinks with alternative beverages (water, milk and diet drinks) on Δweight or ΔBMI z-score. Sugary drink intake at baseline and substitution of sugary drinks with milk were associated with both Δweight and ΔBMI z-score. Every 100 g/d increase in sugary drink intake was associated with 0·10 kg and 0·06 unit increases in body weight (P=0·048) and BMI z-score (P=0·04), respectively. Substitution of 100 g/d sugary drinks with 100 g/d milk was inversely associated with Δweight (β=-0·16 kg; P=0·045) and ΔBMI z-score (β=-0·07 units; P=0·04). The results of this study suggest that sugary drink consumption was associated with body weight gain among young children with high predisposition for future overweight. In line with the current recommendations, sugary drinks, whether high in added or natural sugar, should be discouraged to help prevent childhood obesity. Milk may be a good alternative to sugary drinks with regard to weight management among young obesity-predisposed children.

  5. The Effect of Education and Implementation of Evidence-Based Nursing Guidelines on Infants’ Weight Gaining in NICU

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Zahra; Nouri, Jamileh Mokhtari; Khademolhoseyni, Seyyed Mohammad; Ebadi, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Educating evidence-based guidelines influences increased quality of nursing cares effectively. Infant’s weight gaining is one of the most important indicators for measuring quality of nursing care in NICU. The research is conducted with the aim of surveying the effect of education and implementation of educating evidence-based guidelines on infants’ weight gaining in NICU. Methods: This two-group clinical trial study was conducted in 2013 on one hundred infants in Baqiyatallah (AJ) hospital of Tehran. It was performed by using non-probable and convenient sampling. Data collection tools included; infants’ demographic questionnaire and a researcher-made checklist to record infants’ weight by using a weighing scale. Infants’ weight was recorded before intervention and two months after implementation of the guidelines, then data were analyzed by using SPSS19 statistical software. Findings: Mean weight of the infants in the control group on admission and on discharge was respectively; 1771(41.71) and 1712(42.68), and mean weight of the infants in intervention group on admission and on discharge was respectively; 1697(37.63) and 1793(40.71). After two months, infants’ weight gaining in intervention group was more than control group and it was statistically significant (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Results of the present study showed that implementation of evidence-based instruction an effective and economical method regarding infants’ weight gaining. Therefore it is recommended to the authorities and managers of the hospitals and educational centers of the healthcare services to put education and implementation of educating evidence-based instruction the priority of their work plans. PMID:25716388

  6. Weight Gain Prevention among Midlife Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial to Address Needs Related to the Physical and Social Environment

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Courtney D.; Degeneffe, Dennis; Davey, Cynthia; Kollannoor-Samuel, Grace; Reicks, Marla

    2016-01-01

    Women tend to gain weight at midlife (40–60 years) increasing risk of obesity-related chronic diseases. Within specific eating occasions, needs related to the physical and social environment may result in less healthy eating behavior, which can lead to weight gain over time. The purpose of this study was to determine if a dietitian-delivered nutrition counseling intervention tailored to eating occasion needs could improve diet and prevent weight gain among midlife women over two years. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with healthy midlife women (n = 354) in one U.S. metropolitan area. The intervention group (n = 185) received ten hours of individual nutrition counseling from dietitians over six months, while women in a control group (n = 169) received no counseling. Measured height, weight and waist circumference, and dietary intakes were collected at baseline and every six months over two years. Mixed linear models were used to test for intervention effect on change in outcome variables over time. Dietary intakes of fruit, reduced/low-fat dairy foods and refined grains were significantly improved over time in the intervention compared to control group. However, the intervention had no effect on weight over time (p = 0.48). Nutrition counseling tailored to address eating occasion needs improved self-reported diet but did not significantly affect weight change. PMID:27231927

  7. Cognitive and motor function of neurologically impaired extremely low birth weight children

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Janine; Friedman, Harriet; Minich, Nori; Taylor, H Gerry; Wilson-Costello, Deanne; Hack, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rates of neurological impairment among extremely low birth weight children (ELBW [<1 kg]) have decreased since 2000; however, their functioning is unexamined. OBJECTIVE: To compare motor and cognitive functioning of ELBW children with neurological impairment, including cerebral palsy and severe hypotonia/hypertonia, between two periods: 1990 to 1999 (n=83) and 2000 to 2005 (n=34). METHODS: Measures of function at 20 months corrected age included the Mental and Psychomotor Developmental Indexes of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development and the Gross Motor Functional Classification System as primary outcomes and individual motor function items as secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Analysis failed to reveal significant differences for the primary outcomes, although during 2000 to 2005, sitting significantly improved in children with neurological impairment (P=0.003). CONCLUSION: Decreases in rates of neurological impairment among ELBW children have been accompanied by a suggestion of improved motor function, although cognitive function has not changed. PMID:26435676

  8. NEU-P11, a novel melatonin agonist, inhibits weight gain and improves insulin sensitivity in high-fat/high-sucrose-fed rats.

    PubMed

    She, Meihua; Deng, Xiaojian; Guo, Zhenyu; Laudon, Moshe; Hu, Zhuowei; Liao, Duanfang; Hu, Xiaobo; Luo, Yi; Shen, Qingyun; Su, Zehong; Yin, Weidong

    2009-04-01

    Evidences indicate that a complex relationship exists among sleep disorders, obesity and insulin resistance. NEU-P11 is a novel melatonin agonist used in treatment of psychophysiological insomnia, and in animal studies NEU-P11 showed sleep-promoting effect. In this study, we applied NEU-P11 on obese rats to assess its potential melatoninergic effects in vivo. Obese models were established using high-fat/high-sucrose-fed for 5 months. NEU-P11 (10mg/kg)/melatonin (4mg/kg)/vehicle were administered by a daily intraperitoneal injection respectively for 8 weeks. Our results showed that NEU-P11 or melatonin inhibited both body weight gain and deposit of abdominal fat with no influence on food intake. The impaired insulin sensitivity and antioxidative potency were improved and the levels of plasma glucose, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG) decreased with an increased in HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) after NEU-P11 or melatonin administration. These data suggest that NEU-P11, like melatonin, decreased body weight gain and improved insulin sensitivity and metabolic profiles in obese rats. We conclude that NEU-P11 has a melatoninergic effect on regulating body weight in obese rats and also improving metabolic profiles and efficiently enhancing insulin sensitivity.

  9. Excess pregnancy weight gain leads to early indications of metabolic syndrome in a swine model of fetal programming.

    PubMed

    Arentson-Lantz, Emily J; Buhman, Kimberly K; Ajuwon, Kolapo; Donkin, Shawn S

    2014-03-01

    Few data exist on the impact of maternal weight gain on offspring despite evidence demonstrating that early-life environment precipitates risks for metabolic syndrome. We hypothesized that excessive weight gain during pregnancy results in programming that predisposes offspring to obesity and metabolic syndrome. We further hypothesized that early postweaning nutrition alters the effects of maternal weight gain on indications of metabolic syndrome in offspring. Pregnant sows and their offspring were used for these experiments due to similarities with human digestive physiology, metabolism, and neonatal development. First parity sows fed a high-energy (maternal nutrition high energy [MatHE]) diet gained 12.4 kg (42%) more weight during pregnancy than sows fed a normal energy (maternal nutrition normal energy) diet. Birth weight and litter characteristics did not differ, but offspring MatHE gilts weighed more (P < .05) at age of 3 weeks (4.35 vs 5.24 ± 0.35 kg). At age of 12 weeks, offspring from MatHE mothers that were weaned onto a high-energy diet had elevated (P < .05) blood glucose (102 vs 64 mg/dL, confidence interval [CI]: 67-91), insulin (0.21 vs 0.10 ng/mL, CI: 0.011-0.019), and lower nonesterified fatty acid (0.31 vs 0.62 mmol/L, CI: 0.34-0.56) than offspring from the same MatHE sows weaned to the normal energy diet. These effects were not observed for offspring from sows fed a normal energy diet during pregnancy. These data indicate that excessive gestational weight gain during pregnancy in a pig model promotes early indications of metabolic syndrome in offspring that are further promoted by a high-energy postweaning diet.

  10. Distribution of energy intake throughout the day and weight gain: a population-based cohort study in Spain.

    PubMed

    Hermengildo, Ygor; López-García, Esther; García-Esquinas, Esther; Pérez-Tasigchana, Raúl F; Rodríguez-Artalejo, Fernando; Guallar-Castillón, Pilar

    2016-06-01

    Experimental research suggests that food timing is associated with weight regulation. However, the association between the distribution of energy intake (EI) throughout the day and weight gain in the population is uncertain. A cohort of 4243 individuals (49·9 % men, 50·1 % women) aged ≥18 years was selected in 2008-2010 and followed-up through 2012. At baseline, food consumption for a typical week in the previous year was collected with a validated dietary history, and EI was assessed at six eating occasions: breakfast, mid-morning meal, lunch, mid-afternoon meal, dinner and snacking (at any other moment). Individuals were classified into sex-specific quartiles of %EI for each eating occasion. The cut-off points for increasing quartiles of %EI at lunch were 34·4, 40·8 and 47·7 % in men and 33·2, 39·4 and 46·1 % in women. Weight was self-reported at baseline and at the end of follow-up. During a 3·5-year follow-up, 16·3 % of study participants gained >3 kg. Compared with those in the lowest quartile of %EI at lunch, the multivariate OR of gaining >3 kg was 0·79 (95 % CI 0·63, 0·99) in the second quartile, 0·82 (95 % CI 0·64, 1·04) in the third quartile and 0·62 (95 % CI 0·47, 0·80) in the highest quartile (P trend: 0·001). The association was stronger among women and those with overweight or obesity. No association was found between the %EI at the rest of the eating occasions and weight gain. In conclusion, a higher %EI at lunch was associated with a lower risk of weight gain; this may help weight control through the appropriate distribution of daily EI.

  11. Preventing olanzapine-induced weight gain using betahistine: a study in a rat model with chronic olanzapine treatment.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jiamei; Huang, Xu-Feng; Pai, Nagesh; Deng, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Olanzapine is the one of first line antipsychotic drug for schizophrenia and other serious mental illness. However, it is associated with troublesome metabolic side-effects, particularly body weight gain and obesity. The antagonistic affinity to histamine H1 receptors (H1R) of antipsychotic drugs has been identified as one of the main contributors to weight gain/obesity side-effects. Our previous study showed that a short term (2 weeks) combination treatment of betahistine (an H1R agonist and H3R antagonist) and olanzapine (O+B) reduced (-45%) body weight gain induced by olanzapine in drug-naïve rats. A key issue is that clinical patients suffering with schizophrenia, bipolar disease and other mental disorders often face chronic, even life-time, antipsychotic treatment, in which they have often had previous antipsychotic exposure. Therefore, we investigated the effects of chronic O+B co-treatment in controlling body weight in female rats with chronic and repeated exposure of olanzapine. The results showed that co-administration of olanzapine (3 mg/kg, t.i.d.) and betahistine (9.6 mg/kg, t.i.d.) significantly reduced (-51.4%) weight gain induced by olanzapine. Co-treatment of O+B also led to a decrease in feeding efficiency, liver and fat mass. Consistently, the olanzapine-only treatment increased hypothalamic H1R protein levels, as well as hypothalamic pAMPKα, AMPKα and NPY protein levels, while reducing the hypothalamic POMC, and UCP1 and PGC-1α protein levels in brown adipose tissue (BAT). The olanzapine induced changes in hypothalamic H1R, pAMPKα, BAT UCP1 and PGC-1α could be reversed by co-treatment of O+B. These results supported further clinical trials to test the effectiveness of co-treatment of O+B for controlling weight gain/obesity side-effects in schizophrenia with chronic antipsychotic treatment.

  12. The effect of dietary fish oil on weight gain and insulin sensitivity is dependent on APOE genotype in humanized targeted replacement mice

    PubMed Central

    Slim, Kenna E.; Vauzour, David; Tejera, Noemi; Voshol, Peter J.; Cassidy, Aedin; Minihane, Anne Marie

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the independent and interactive impact of the common APOE genotype and marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on the development of obesity and associated cardiometabolic dysfunction in a murine model. Human APOE3 and APOE4 targeted replacement mice were fed either a control high-fat diet (HFD) or an HFD supplemented with 3% n-3 PUFAs from fish oil (HFD + FO) for 8 wk. We established the impact of intervention on food intake, body weight, and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) mass; plasma, lipids (cholesterol and triglycerides), liver enzymes, and adipokines; glucose and insulin during an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test; and Glut4 and ApoE expression in VAT. HFD feeding induced more weight gain and higher plasma lipids in APOE3 compared to APOE4 mice (P < 0.05), along with a 2-fold higher insulin and impaired glucose tolerance. Supplementing APOE3, but not APOE4, animals with dietary n-3 PUFAs decreased body-weight gain, plasma lipids, and insulin (P < 0.05) and improved glucose tolerance, which was associated with increased VAT Glut4 mRNA levels (P < 0.05). Our findings demonstrate that an APOE3 genotype predisposes mice to develop obesity and its metabolic complications, which was attenuated by n-3 PUFA supplementation.—Slim, K. E., Vauzour, D., Tejera, N., Voshol, P. J., Cassidy, A., Minihane, A. M. The effect of dietary fish oil on weight gain and insulin sensitivity is dependent on APOE genotype in humanized targeted replacement mice. PMID:27895108

  13. Effects of Arm Weight Support Training to Promote Recovery of Upper Limb Function for Subacute Patients after Stroke with Different Levels of Arm Impairments.

    PubMed

    Chan, Irene H L; Fong, Kenneth N K; Chan, Dora Y L; Wang, Apple Q L; Cheng, Eddy K N; Chau, Pinky H Y; Chow, Kathy K Y; Cheung, Hobby K Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of arm weight support training using the ArmeoSpring for subacute patients after stroke with different levels of hemiplegic arm impairments. Methods. 48 inpatients with subacute stroke, stratified into 3 groups from mild to severe upper extremity impairment, were engaged in ArmeoSpring training for 45 minutes daily, 5 days per week for 3 weeks, in addition to conventional rehabilitation. Evaluations were conducted at three measurement occasions: immediately before training (T1); immediately after training (T2); and at a 3-week follow-up (T3) by a blind rater. Results. Shoulder flexion active range of motion, Upper Extremity Scores in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), and Vertical Catch had the greatest differences in gain scores for patients between severe and moderate impairments, whereas FMA Hand Scores had significant differences in gain scores between moderate and mild impairments. There was no significant change in muscle tone or hand-path ratios between T1, T2, and T3 within the groups. Conclusion. Arm weight support training is beneficial for subacute stroke patients with moderate to severe arm impairments, especially to improve vertical control such as shoulder flexion, and there were no adverse effects in muscle tone.

  14. Effects of Arm Weight Support Training to Promote Recovery of Upper Limb Function for Subacute Patients after Stroke with Different Levels of Arm Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Irene H. L.; Chan, Dora Y. L.; Wang, Apple Q. L.; Cheng, Eddy K. N.; Chau, Pinky H. Y.; Chow, Kathy K. Y.; Cheung, Hobby K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of arm weight support training using the ArmeoSpring for subacute patients after stroke with different levels of hemiplegic arm impairments. Methods. 48 inpatients with subacute stroke, stratified into 3 groups from mild to severe upper extremity impairment, were engaged in ArmeoSpring training for 45 minutes daily, 5 days per week for 3 weeks, in addition to conventional rehabilitation. Evaluations were conducted at three measurement occasions: immediately before training (T1); immediately after training (T2); and at a 3-week follow-up (T3) by a blind rater. Results. Shoulder flexion active range of motion, Upper Extremity Scores in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), and Vertical Catch had the greatest differences in gain scores for patients between severe and moderate impairments, whereas FMA Hand Scores had significant differences in gain scores between moderate and mild impairments. There was no significant change in muscle tone or hand-path ratios between T1, T2, and T3 within the groups. Conclusion. Arm weight support training is beneficial for subacute stroke patients with moderate to severe arm impairments, especially to improve vertical control such as shoulder flexion, and there were no adverse effects in muscle tone. PMID:27517053

  15. Facilitating Smoking Cessation and Preventing Relapse in Primary Care: Minimizing Weight Gain by Reducing Alcohol Consumption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    breastfeeding ; health conditions that contraindicate cessation medication; used weight loss medication within past 6 mos.; at base temporarily; recent or...Exclusion criteria: Pregnant, trying to become pregnant, breastfeeding ; health conditions that contraindicate cessation medication; used weight loss

  16. Predicted implications of using percentage weight gain as single discharge criterion in management of acute malnutrition in rural southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Forsén, Emmanuel; Tadesse, Elazar; Berhane, Yemane; Ekström, Eva-Charlotte

    2015-10-01

    Mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) is increasingly used in identifying and admitting children with acute malnutrition for treatment. It is easy to use because it does not involve height assessment, but its use calls for alternative discharge criteria. This study examined how use of percentage weight gain as discharge criterion would affect the nutritional status of children admitted into a community-based management programme for acute malnutrition in rural southern Ethiopia. Non-oedematous children (n = 631) aged 6-59 months and having a MUAC of <125 mm were studied. By simulation, 10%, 15% and 20% weight was added to admission weight and their nutritional status by weight-for-height z-score (WHZ) was determined at each target. Moderate and severe wasting according to World Health Organization WHZ definitions was used as outcome. Applying the most commonly recommended target of 15% weight gain resulted in 9% of children with admission MUAC <115 mm still being moderately or severely wasted at theoretical discharge. In children with admission MUAC 115-124 mm, 10% of weight gain was sufficient to generate a similar result. Children failing to recover were the ones with the poorest nutritional status at admission. Increasing the percentage weight gain targets in the two groups to 20% and 15%, respectively, would largely resolve wasting but likely lead to increased programme costs by keeping already recovered children in the programme. Further research is needed on appropriate discharge procedures in programmes using MUAC for screening and admission.

  17. Weight gain in college females is not prevented by isoflavone-rich soy protein: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Berger, Paige K; Principe, Jessica L; Laing, Emma M; Henley, E C; Pollock, Norman K; Taylor, Ruth G; Blair, Robert M; Baile, Clifton A; Hall, Daniel B; Lewis, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Human clinical trials targeted at preventing gains in body weight using soy protein and isoflavones are limited to adults and yield conflicting results. We hypothesized that daily intake of soy protein/isoflavones would attenuate gains in body weight to a greater extent than a casein-based control in 18 to 19 year-old females. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial over 16 weeks to examine the effects of a soy protein/isoflavone-based meal replacement (experimental group) versus a casein-based meal replacement (control group) on body weight and body composition variables in female college freshmen (N = 120). Fat mass (FM), fat-free soft tissue mass (FFST), and percent body fat (%BF) were measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA; Delphi A). Repeated measures mixed models were used to determine the effects of treatment on anthropometric and body composition variables (body weight, waist circumference, FM, FFST, and %BF). No significant group×time interactions were observed, even when body mass index was controlled for in the analysis. Over 16 weeks, body weight, FM, FFST, and %BF significantly increased in both groups (P < .05). Our findings show that female college freshmen gained a significant amount of weight over the course of the 16-week study. Gains in body weight and FM were similar among participants assigned to the soy protein/isoflavone- and the casein-based meal replacements. Future research is warranted to determine the effects of soy protein/isoflavone- and casein-based meal replacements versus a non-intervention (i.e., non-protein based) control.

  18. Associations between sleep characteristics and weight gain in an older population: results of the Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study

    PubMed Central

    Kowall, B; Lehnich, A-T; Erbel, R; Moebus, S; Jöckel, K-H; Stang, A

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Sleep duration influences weight change in children and young adults, but there is less evidence in middle-aged, and, in particular, older adults. We assessed associations between sleep duration, daytime napping and sleep disturbances, respectively, with change of weight and waist circumference in older subjects. Contrary to previous studies, we also used two points in time to assess sleep characteristics. Methods: We used data from the population-based Heinz Nixdorf Recall study, a cohort study in Germany with a baseline and two follow-up visits (age 45–74 years, median follow-up 5.1 years for first, 5.2 years for second follow-up visit). In adjusted linear regression models (N=3751), we estimated weight change between baseline and first follow-up visit in relation to various self-reported sleep characteristics measured at baseline. Furthermore, we estimated change of weight and waist circumference, respectively, between first and second follow-up visit in relation to patterns of sleep characteristics measured at baseline and at the first follow-up visit (N=2837). Results: In all analyses, short and long sleep duration, sleep disturbances, and regular daytime napping were associated with <1 kg of weight gain and <1 cm of gain in waist circumference over 5 years compared with the respective reference categories. For example, compared with 7–<8 h night sleep, short night sleep (⩽5 h at baseline) was associated with 0.5 kg of weight gain (95% confidence interval: −0.1; 1.1 kg). Conclusions: Our study gave no evidence that sleep characteristics were associated with clinically relevant weight gain in the older population. PMID:27525820

  19. Teaching Goal-Setting for Weight-Gain Prevention in a College Population: Insights from the CHOICES Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Jolynn; Kjolhaug, Jerri; Linde, Jennifer A.; Sevcik, Sarah; Lytle, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes the effectiveness of goal setting instruction in the CHOICES (Choosing Healthy Options in College Environments and Settings) study, an intervention evaluating the effectiveness of weight gain prevention strategies for 2-year college students. Methods: Four hundred and forty-one participants from three community…

  20. Personal history of dieting and family history of obesity are unrelated: implications for understanding weight gain proneness.

    PubMed

    Lowe, M R; Shank, L M; Mikorski, R; Butryn, M L

    2015-04-01

    Identifying predictors of future weight gain is important in obesity prevention efforts. Both family history of obesity and personal dieting history have been established as predictors of future weight gain; however, it is unknown if they are independent or overlapping predictors. The purpose of this study was to examine the degree of overlap between these two predictors using cross-sectional data. Baseline data from four studies were examined separately and in combination for a total of 561 female participants, and analyses were conducted to examine parent anthropometric variables by dieting status within and across studies. All participants were female university students between the ages of 17 and 30. For each study, as well as for the entire sample combined, parent anthropometric variables were examined by dieting status using factorial ANOVAs. No meaningful pattern was found when examining parent anthropometric variables by dieting status, which suggests that the two risk factors are largely independent. This suggests that the processes associated with the development of future weight gain by each variable are different; therefore, future research should use a longitudinal study to test the hypothesis that using both variables to predict future weight gain would account for more variance than using either variable alone.

  1. Steps Ahead: Adaptation of physical activity and dietary guidelines for reducing unhealthy weight gain in the Lower Misissippi Delta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of our study was to test the effectiveness of adapting the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2010) (DG), with and without a physical activity (PA) component, in reducing weight gain in the Lower Mississippi Delta region (LMD) of the United States. A sample of 121 White and African-Americ...

  2. Tert-butylhydroquinone reduces lipid accumulation in C57BL/6 mice with lower body weight gain.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kung-Woo; Kim, Yong Hyun; Kwon, Hyun Jung; Rhee, Sang-Ki; Kim, Wan-Jong; Han, Man-Deuk

    2013-07-01

    tert-Butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) is a commonly used antioxidant additive that is approved for human use by both the Food and Agriculture Organization and the World Health Organization (FAO/WHO). In this study, we examined the effect of tBHQ on body weight gain and found that food supplementation with 0.001 % (w/w) tBHQ inhibited 61.4 % (P < 0.01) of body weight gain in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced C57BL/6 mice, and the oral administration of tBHQ (1.5 mg/kg) reduced 47.5 % (P < 0.05) of body weight gain in normal diet fed db/db mice. The HFD increased lipid deposit in adipocytes, but these were reduced significantly by tBHQ treatment in C57BL/6 mice. tBHQ supplementation significantly lowered the plasma triglyceride and total cholesterol, with reduced size of accumulated fat mass. The rate limiting enzyme of beta-oxidation (ACOX1) was significantly over-expressed in the liver with tBHQ treatment. These results indicate that tBHQ suppresses body weight gain in mice, possibly at least related to the up-regulation of ACOX1 gene expression.

  3. Process Evaluation of a School-Based Weight Gain Prevention Program: The Dutch Obesity Intervention in Teenagers (DOiT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, A. S.; Chinapaw, M. J. M.; Brug, J.; van Mechelen, W.

    2009-01-01

    Health promotion programs benefit from an accompanying process evaluation since it can provide more insight in the strengths and weaknesses of a program. A process evaluation was conducted to assess the reach, implementation, satisfaction and maintenance of a school-based program aimed at the prevention of excessive weight gain among Dutch…

  4. Effects of perceptual body image distortion and early weight gain on long-term outcome of adolescent anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Ilka; Finke, Beatrice; Tam, Friederike I; Fittig, Eike; Scholz, Michael; Gantchev, Krassimir; Roessner, Veit; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a severe mental disorder with an onset during adolescence, has been found to be difficult to treat. Identifying variables that predict long-term outcome may help to develop better treatment strategies. Since body image distortion and weight gain are central elements of diagnosis and treatment of AN, the current study investigated perceptual body image distortion, defined as the accuracy of evaluating one's own perceived body size in relation to the actual body size, as well as total and early weight gain during inpatient treatment as predictors for long-term outcome in a sample of 76 female adolescent AN patients. Long-term outcome was defined by physical, psychological and psychosocial adjustment using the Morgan-Russell outcome assessment schedule as well as by the mere physical outcome consisting of menses and/or BMI approximately 3 years after treatment. Perceptual body image distortion and early weight gain predicted long-term outcome (explained variance 13.3 %), but not the physical outcome alone. This study provides first evidence for an association of perceptual body image distortion with long-term outcome of adolescent anorexia nervosa and underlines the importance of sufficient early weight gain.

  5. "The Rolling Store" An economical and environmental approach to the prevention of weight gain in African American women.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to test the feasibility of the "Rolling Store," an innovative food delivery medium to provide healthy food choices (fruits and vegetables) to prevent weight gain in African American women. A randomized trial design was used in the study. Eligible participants from the community wer...

  6. Risperidone-induced weight gain is mediated through shifts in the gut microbiome and suppression of energy expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Bahr, Sarah M.; Weidemann, Benjamin J.; Castro, Ana N.; Walsh, John W.; deLeon, Orlando; Burnett, Colin M.L.; Pearson, Nicole A.; Murry, Daryl J.; Grobe, Justin L.; Kirby, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Risperidone is a second-generation antipsychotic that causes weight gain. We hypothesized that risperidone-induced shifts in the gut microbiome are mechanistically involved in its metabolic consequences. Wild-type female C57BL/6J mice treated with risperidone (80 μg/day) exhibited significant excess weight gain, due to reduced energy expenditure, which correlated with an altered gut microbiome. Fecal transplant from risperidone-treated mice caused a 16% reduction in total resting metabolic rate in naïve recipients, attributable to suppression of non-aerobic metabolism. Risperidone inhibited growth of cultured fecal bacteria grown anaerobically more than those grown aerobically. Finally, transplant of the fecal phage fraction from risperidone-treated mice was sufficient to cause excess weight gain in naïve recipients, again through reduced energy expenditure. Collectively, these data highlight a major role for the gut microbiome in weight gain following chronic use of risperidone, and specifically implicates the modulation of non-aerobic resting metabolism in this mechanism. PMID:26870798

  7. Pregnancy in Sickle Cell-Haemoglobin C (SC) Disease, A Retrospective Study of Birth Size and Maternal Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Thame, Minerva M.; Singh-Minott, Indira; Osmond, Clive; Melbourne-Chambers, Roxanne H.; Serjeant, Graham R

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess pregnancy and fetal outcomes in Jamaican subjects with sickle cell-haemoglobin C (SC) disease. Study Design A retrospective chart review over 21 years (1992-2012) of all pregnancies in SC disease and a comparison group matched by gender and date of delivery in mothers with a normal haemoglobin (AA) phenotype at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica. There were 118 pregnancies in 81 patients with SC disease and 110 pregnancies in 110 in the normal comparison group. Corrections were made for repeat pregnancies from the same mother. Outcome measures included maternal weight at 20, 25, 30, 35 and 38 weeks gestation, maternal pregnancy complications, birth weight, head circumference and crown heel length and were used to analyse possible predictors of birth weight. Results First antenatal visits occurred later in women with SC disease, who also had lower haemoglobin level and lower systolic blood pressure. The prevalence of pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia, ante-partum or postpartum haemorrhage did not differ between genotypes. Maternal weight gain was significantly lower in SC disease and there was a significantly lower birth weight, head circumference, and gestational age. Conclusions Pregnancy in SC disease is generally benign but mothers had lower weight gain and lower birth weight babies, the difference persisting after correction for gestational age. PMID:27235631

  8. Attentional bias toward high-calorie food-cues and trait motor impulsivity interactively predict weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Meule, Adrian; Platte, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Strong bottom-up impulses and weak top-down control may interactively lead to overeating and, consequently, weight gain. In the present study, female university freshmen were tested at the start of the first semester and again at the start of the second semester. Attentional bias toward high- or low-calorie food-cues was assessed using a dot-probe paradigm and participants completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. Attentional bias and motor impulsivity interactively predicted change in body mass index: motor impulsivity positively predicted weight gain only when participants showed an attentional bias toward high-calorie food-cues. Attentional and non-planning impulsivity were unrelated to weight change. Results support findings showing that weight gain is prospectively predicted by a combination of weak top-down control (i.e. high impulsivity) and strong bottom-up impulses (i.e. high automatic motivational drive toward high-calorie food stimuli). They also highlight the fact that only specific aspects of impulsivity are relevant in eating and weight regulation. PMID:28070402

  9. Basolateral amygdala response to food cues in the absence of hunger is associated with weight gain susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue; Kroemer, Nils B; Veldhuizen, Maria G; Babbs, Amanda E; de Araujo, Ivan E; Gitelman, Darren R; Sherwin, Robert S; Sinha, Rajita; Small, Dana M

    2015-05-20

    In rodents, food-predictive cues elicit eating in the absence of hunger (Weingarten, 1983). This behavior is disrupted by the disconnection of amygdala pathways to the lateral hypothalamus (Petrovich et al., 2002). Whether this circuit contributes to long-term weight gain is unknown. Using fMRI in 32 healthy individuals, we demonstrate here that the amygdala response to the taste of a milkshake when sated but not hungry positively predicts weight change. This effect is independent of sex, initial BMI, and total circulating ghrelin levels, but it is only present in individuals who do not carry a copy of the A1 allele of the Taq1A polymorphism. In contrast, A1 allele carriers, who have decreased D2 receptor density (Blum et al., 1996), show a positive association between caudate response and weight change. Regardless of genotype, however, dynamic causal modeling supports unidirectional gustatory input from basolateral amygdala (BLA) to hypothalamus in sated subjects. This finding suggests that, as in rodents, external cues gain access to the homeostatic control circuits of the human hypothalamus via the amygdala. In contrast, during hunger, gustatory inputs enter the hypothalamus and drive bidirectional connectivity with the amygdala. These findings implicate the BLA-hypothalamic circuit in long-term weight change related to nonhomeostatic eating and provide compelling evidence that distinct brain mechanisms confer susceptibility to weight gain depending upon individual differences in dopamine signaling.

  10. Attentional bias toward high-calorie food-cues and trait motor impulsivity interactively predict weight gain.

    PubMed

    Meule, Adrian; Platte, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Strong bottom-up impulses and weak top-down control may interactively lead to overeating and, consequently, weight gain. In the present study, female university freshmen were tested at the start of the first semester and again at the start of the second semester. Attentional bias toward high- or low-calorie food-cues was assessed using a dot-probe paradigm and participants completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. Attentional bias and motor impulsivity interactively predicted change in body mass index: motor impulsivity positively predicted weight gain only when participants showed an attentional bias toward high-calorie food-cues. Attentional and non-planning impulsivity were unrelated to weight change. Results support findings showing that weight gain is prospectively predicted by a combination of weak top-down control (i.e. high impulsivity) and strong bottom-up impulses (i.e. high automatic motivational drive toward high-calorie food stimuli). They also highlight the fact that only specific aspects of impulsivity are relevant in eating and weight regulation.

  11. Personalized health planning with integrative health coaching to reduce obesity risk among women gaining excess weight during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nancy Y; Wroth, Shelley; Parham, Catherine; Strait, Melva; Simmons, Leigh Ann

    2013-07-01

    Health coaching is an emerging behavioral intervention to improve outcomes in chronic disease management and prevention; however, no studies have investigated its utility in postpartum women who have gained excess weight during pregnancy. A 32-year-old primigravida woman who was overweight at conception and gained 23 lbs more than Institute of Medicine recommendations for her pre-pregnancy body mass index participated in a 6-month personalized health planning with integrative health coaching (PHPIHC) intervention. The intervention included a baseline health risk assessment review with a healthcare provider and eight biweekly, 30-minute telephonic health coaching sessions. The participant demonstrated improvement in physical activity, energy expenditure, knowledge, and confidence to engage in healthpromoting behaviors. Although the participant did not reach the target weight by completion of the health coaching sessions, follow up 8 months later indicated she achieved the target goal (within 5% of prepregnancy weight). This case report suggests that PHP-IHC can support postpartum women in returning to pre-pregnancy weight after gaining excess gestational weight. Future research and clinical trials are needed to determine the best timing, length, and medium (online, in-person, telephonic) of PHP-IHC for postpartum women.

  12. Basolateral Amygdala Response to Food Cues in the Absence of Hunger Is Associated with Weight Gain Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, Nils B.; Veldhuizen, Maria G.; Babbs, Amanda E.; de Araujo, Ivan E.; Gitelman, Darren R.; Sherwin, Robert S.; Sinha, Rajita

    2015-01-01

    In rodents, food-predictive cues elicit eating in the absence of hunger (Weingarten, 1983). This behavior is disrupted by the disconnection of amygdala pathways to the lateral hypothalamus (Petrovich et al., 2002). Whether this circuit contributes to long-term weight gain is unknown. Using fMRI in 32 healthy individuals, we demonstrate here that the amygdala response to the taste of a milkshake when sated but not hungry positively predicts weight change. This effect is independent of sex, initial BMI, and total circulating ghrelin levels, but it is only present in individuals who do not carry a copy of the A1 allele of the Taq1A polymorphism. In contrast, A1 allele carriers, who have decreased D2 receptor density (Blum et al., 1996), show a positive association between caudate response and weight change. Regardless of genotype, however, dynamic causal modeling supports unidirectional gustatory input from basolateral amygdala (BLA) to hypothalamus in sated subjects. This finding suggests that, as in rodents, external cues gain access to the homeostatic control circuits of the human hypothalamus via the amygdala. In contrast, during hunger, gustatory inputs enter the hypothalamus and drive bidirectional connectivity with the amygdala. These findings implicate the BLA–hypothalamic circuit in long-term weight change related to nonhomeostatic eating and provide compelling evidence that distinct brain mechanisms confer susceptibility to weight gain depending upon individual differences in dopamine signaling. PMID:25995480

  13. Obstetric outcomes in normal weight and obese women in relation to gestational weight gain: comparison between Institute of Medicine guidelines and Cedergren criteria.

    PubMed

    Potti, Sushma; Sliwinski, Christopher S; Jain, Neetu J; Dandolu, Vani

    2010-05-01

    We compared obstetric outcomes based on gestational weight gain in normal-weight and obese women using traditional Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines and newly recommended Cedergren criteria. Using the New Jersey Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) database and electronic birth records, perinatal outcomes were analyzed to estimate the independent effects of prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain by IOM versus Cedergren criteria. Of 9125 subjects in PRAMS database from 2002 to 2006, 53.7% had normal BMI, 12.3% were overweight, 18.2% were obese, and the rest were underweight. Among normal-weight mothers, when compared with the IOM guidelines, macrosomia (6.45% versus 4.27%) and cesarean delivery rates (30.42% versus 29.83%) were lower using Cedergren criteria but the rates of preterm delivery (5.06% versus 9.44%), low birth weight (0.38% versus 2.42%), and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admissions (7.02% versus 10.86%) were higher with the Cedergren criteria. Similarly, among obese patients, when compared with IOM guidelines, macrosomia (10.79% versus 5.47%) and cesarean delivery rates (43.95% versus 40.71%) were lower using Cedergren criteria but the rates of preterm delivery (6.83% versus 8.32%), low birth weight (0.87% versus 1.88%), and NICU admissions (8.92% versus 13.78%) were higher with the Cedergren criteria. Based on our results, ideal gestational weight gain is presumably somewhere between the IOM and Cedergren's guidelines.

  14. Feeding intervention in cleft lip and palate babies: a practical approach to feeding efficiency and weight gain.

    PubMed

    Ize-Iyamu, I N; Saheeb, B D

    2011-09-01

    Using a disposable syringe to feed 1-14-week-old babies with cleft lip and palate (CLP) was studied. 57 CLP babies were randomly divided into: syringe-fed (intervention) and cup-and-spoon-fed groups and compared with 55 normal breast- or bottle-fed babies. Differences in weight gained from birth to 6, 10 and 14 weeks were compared. Syringe-fed CLP babies fed breast milk had a significant difference in weight gain (0.7 and 0.8 kg) compared with cup-and-spoon-fed babies (0.4 kg), at 10 and 14 weeks, respectively. Normal breast-fed babies gained 0.6 and 0.7 kg. Cup-and-spoon-fed CLP babies fed artificial and breast milk gained 0.5 and 0.6 kg; syringe-fed CLP babies gained 0.6 and 1.2 kg. Normal babies gained 1.0 and 1.7 kg for the same age and food. Average feeding times were 10 ml/1.25 min for syringe-fed and 10 ml/2.08 min for cup-and-spoon-fed CLP babies at 6 weeks. 19 (100%) cup-and-spoon-fed babies exhibited spill and regurgitation at 6 weeks compared with 30 (79%) CLP syringe-fed babies (P<0.05). In both groups spill and regurgitation decreased with age. CLP babies fed with the modified method had a faster feeding time, less spill and regurgitation and gained the same weight as normal babies at 10 and 14 weeks.

  15. The Association between Weight Gain/Restoration and Bone Mineral Density in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    El Ghoch, Marwan; Gatti, Davide; Calugi, Simona; Viapiana, Ombretta; Bazzani, Paola Vittoria; Dalle Grave, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reduced bone mineral density (BMD) is one of the most frequent medical complications of anorexia nervosa (AN). The purpose of this paper was to conduct a systematic review of the association between weight gain/restoration and BMD in adolescents with AN. Methods: Literature searches, study selection, method, and quality appraisal were performed independently by two authors, and data were collated using a narrative approach. Results: Of the 1156 articles retrieved, 19 studies met the inclusion criteria, and their analysis revealed four main findings. First, six studies reported that weight gain and restoration are associated with BMD stabilization after one year of follow-up from baseline. Second, seven studies with longer follow-up periods (≈16 months) reported significant improvements in BMD measures. Third, one study showed that normalization of BMD can be achieved after ≈30-month follow-up of normal-weight maintenance. Fourth, another study showed that male adolescents with AN who achieve weight gain but remain underweight may experience further BMD loss, unlike their weight-restored counterparts (BMI ≥ 19 kg/m2), who show a significant increase in BMD and bone mineral accrual rates that double those of healthy male adolescents. The first two findings can be considered robust, as they are supported by strong evidence. The third and fourth findings, however, derive from single studies and therefore require further confirmation. Conclusion: The literature supports weight gain as an effective strategy for promoting BMD increase in adolescents with AN. However, this process is slow, and improvements do not become detectable until ≈16-month follow-up. PMID:27916839

  16. Association of diarrhoea and upper respiratory infections with weight and height gains in Bangladeshi children aged 5 to 11 years.

    PubMed Central

    Torres, A. M.; Peterson, K. E.; de Souza, A. C.; Orav, E. J.; Hughes, M.; Chen, L. C.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The association between infection and growth delay is not well documented in school-age children in developing countries. We conducted a prospective cohort study to examine the association between infectious disease and weight and height gains among Bangladeshi children. METHODS: A one-year follow-up study was performed to elucidate the determinants and consequences of physical growth of children under five years of age. The study included 135 households randomly selected from four villages in the Matlab area. RESULTS: The most frequent infections were upper respiratory infections (mean = 4 episodes or 27 days per year) followed by non-dysenteric diarrhoea (mean = 2.3 episodes or 15 days per year) and dysentery (mean = 0.2 episodes or 2 days per year). The number of episodes and their duration decreased significantly with age. Over a 12-month period the mean weight gain was 1.3 kg and the mean increase in height was 2.9 cm. The total number of days when diarrhoea occurred was negatively associated with annual weight gain (regression coefficient beta = -7 g per day, P = 0.02), with adjustment for age, sex, energy and protein intake, and household land ownership. The incidence of diarrhoeal disease was significantly associated with weight gain in intermediate models but only marginally associated with it in the final multivariate model (P = 0.08). Neither the incidence nor the duration of upper respiratory infections was associated with weight gain. Height gain was not significantly associated with the duration or incidence of either category of illness. Diarrhoea was a significant correlate of retarded weight gain among children above preschool age, whereas upper respiratory infections were not. DISCUSSION: Diarrhoeal morbidity slowed growth in children well beyond the weaning age, suggesting that increased attention should be given to the study of the continuous impact of diarrhoea in children aged over 5 years. An understanding of the determinants of

  17. Effect of the INSIGHT Responsive Parenting Intervention on Rapid Infant Weight Gain and Overweight Status at Age 1 Year

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Jennifer S.; Birch, Leann L.; Marini, Michele; Anzman-Frasca, Stephanie; Paul, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Rapid infant weight gain is associated with later obesity, but interventions to prevent rapid infant growth and reduce risk for overweight status in infancy are lacking. OBJECTIVE To examine the effect of a responsive parenting (RP) intervention on infant weight gain between birth and 28 weeks and overweight status at age 1 year. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS The Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories (INSIGHT) study is an ongoing randomized clinical trial comparing an RP intervention designed to prevent childhood obesity with a safety control. The study includes primiparous mother-newborn dyads (n = 291) and was conducted at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, in addition to home visits. Enrollment was initiated in January 2012, and evaluable population analyses for this study were conducted between April 2015 and November 2015. INTERVENTIONS At 2 weeks post partum, initial intervention materials appropriate to the assigned treatment group were mailed to the participant’s home. Research nurses conducted home visits at 3 weeks, 16 weeks, 28 weeks, and 40 weeks, and a research center visit occurred at 1 year. The Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories curriculum included messages about infant feeding, sleep hygiene, active social play, emotion regulation, and growth record education. The control group received a developmentally appropriate home safety intervention also delivered by nurse home visitors. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Conditional weight gain from birth to 28 weeks was calculated. General linear models examined intervention effect on conditional weight gain. The intervention’s effect on infant weight-for-length percentiles was tested using analysis of variance. Logistic regression compared the odds of overweight status (weight for length ≥95th percentile) at 1 year as a function of conditional weight gain. RESULTS Of the mothers included in the

  18. Rapid Infancy Weight Gain and 7- to 9-year Childhood Obesity Risk: A Prospective Cohort Study in Rural Western China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Dang, Shaonong; Zeng, Lingxia; Gao, Wenlong; Wang, Duolao; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Wenhui; Pei, Leilei; Li, Chao; Yan, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is increasing in developing countries. This study aimed to identify the association between rapid infancy weight gain and obesity risk among early school-age children. A total of 581 singletons (349 boys, 232 girls) whose mothers participated in an antenatal multiple micronutrient supplement trial in rural western China were followed from birth to between 7 and 9 years of age. Height and weight were measured at birth, 1.5 years, and between 7 and 9 years. At the 7- to 9-year time point, body composition was determined using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Multilevel mixed analysis was used to test the associations between rapid weight gain in infancy (from birth to age 1.5 years) and body size and composition or overweight/obesity among early school-age children. Overall, 31.2% (181 of 581) of the infants showed a weight-for-age Z score gain greater than 0.67 between birth and 1.5 years, indicating rapid weight gain. Approximately 5.7% (33 of 579) of the subjects were overweight (BMI-for-age Z scores [BAZ] >1 and ≤2) or obese (BAZ >2). Rapid infancy weight gain was associated with a higher BAZ (P < 0.001), mid-upper arm circumferences (P < 0.001), percentage body fat (P < 0.001), and fat mass index (P < 0.001) at 7 to 9 years of age after adjusting for biological and social economic factors, genetic factors, and perinatal and postnatal factors. These associations appeared to be independent of gender, economic status at early school age, and maternal nutritional status at enrollment. Rapid growers may have approximately 3 times the risk of being overweight/obese during the early school-age years (odds ratio = 2.94, 95% CI: 1.17-7.43, P = 0.022). Rapid infancy weight gain is a risk factor for being overweight/obesity among early school-age children in rural western China. We propose that social and biological determinants, such as economic status, physical activity, and feeding practice, should be targeted to prevent obesity.

  19. Antagonism of T-type calcium channels inhibits high-fat diet-induced weight gain in mice.

    PubMed

    Uebele, Victor N; Gotter, Anthony L; Nuss, Cindy E; Kraus, Richard L; Doran, Scott M; Garson, Susan L; Reiss, Duane R; Li, Yuxing; Barrow, James C; Reger, Thomas S; Yang, Zhi-Qiang; Ballard, Jeanine E; Tang, Cuyue; Metzger, Joseph M; Wang, Sheng-Ping; Koblan, Kenneth S; Renger, John J

    2009-06-01

    The epidemics of obesity and metabolic disorders have well-recognized health and economic burdens. Pharmacologic treatments for these diseases remain unsatisfactory with respect to both efficacy and side-effect profiles. Here, we have identified a potential central role for T-type calcium channels in regulating body weight maintenance and sleep. Previously, it was shown that mice lacking CaV3.1 T-type calcium channels have altered sleep/wake activity. We found that these mice were also resistant to high-fat diet-induced weight gain, without changes in food intake or sensitivity to high-fat diet-induced disruptions of diurnal rhythm. Administration of a potent and selective antagonist of T-type calcium channels, TTA-A2, to normal-weight animals prior to the inactive phase acutely increased sleep, decreased body core temperature, and prevented high-fat diet-induced weight gain. Administration of TTA-A2 to obese rodents reduced body weight and fat mass while concurrently increasing lean muscle mass. These effects likely result from better alignment of diurnal feeding patterns with daily changes in circadian physiology and potentially an increased metabolic rate during the active phase. Together, these studies reveal what we believe to be a previously unknown role for T-type calcium channels in the regulation of sleep and weight maintenance and suggest the potential for a novel therapeutic approach to treating obesity.

  20. Weight cycling promotes fat gain and altered clock gene expression in adipose tissue in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Dankel, S N; Degerud, E M; Borkowski, K; Fjære, E; Midtbø, L K; Haugen, C; Solsvik, M H; Lavigne, A M; Liaset, B; Sagen, J V; Kristiansen, K; Mellgren, G; Madsen, L

    2014-01-15

    Repeated attempts to lose weight by temporary dieting may result in weight cycling, eventually further gain of body fat, and possible metabolic adaptation. We tested this with a controlled experiment in C57BL/6J mice subjected to four weight cycles (WC), continuous hypercaloric feeding (HF), or low-fat feeding (LF). To search for genes involved in an adaptive mechanism to former weight cycling and avoid acute effects of the last cycle, the last hypercaloric feeding period was prolonged by an additional 2 wk before euthanization. Total energy intake was identical in WC and HF. However, compared with HF, the WC mice gained significantly more total body mass and fat mass and showed increased levels of circulating leptin and lipids in liver. Both the HF and WC groups showed increased adipocyte size and insulin resistance. Despite these effects, we also observed an interesting maintenance of circulating adiponectin and free fatty acid levels after WC, whereas changes in these parameters were observed in HF mice. Global gene expression was analyzed by microarrays. Weight-cycled mice were characterized by a downregulation of several clock genes (Dbp, Tef, Per1, Per2, Per3, and Nr1d2) in adipose tissues, which was confirmed by quantitative PCR. In 3T3-L1 cells, we found reduced expression of Dbp and Tef early in adipogenic differentiation, which was mediated via cAMP-dependent signaling. Our data suggest that clock genes in adipose tissue may play a role in metabolic adaptation to weight cycling.

  1. Recruiting and retaining young adults in a weight gain prevention trial: Lessons learned from the CHOICES study

    PubMed Central

    Moe, Stacey G; Lytle, Leslie A; Nanney, Marilyn S; Linde, Jennifer A; Laska, Melissa N

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Young adults are at risk for weight gain but little is known about designing effective weight control trials for young adults or how to recruit and retain participants in these programs. The Choosing Healthy Options in College Environments and Settings (CHOICES) study evaluated the effectiveness of a weight gain prevention intervention for 2-year college students. We describe the methods used to recruit and retain the colleges and their students, describe the sample and discuss recommendations for future studies. Methods Students were recruited into a 24-month trial of a weight control intervention with assessment periods at baseline, 4-, 12- and 24-months follow-up. Results We successfully recruited 441 students through partnerships with three 2-year colleges through a variety of campus-based methods. Ultimately, 83.4% of the randomized cohort participated in the 24-month assessment period. Those retained more often were white (p=0.03), compared to those who dropped out or were lost to follow-up; no other socio-demographic factor (e.g., gender, ethnicity, education), BMI, body fat, waist circumference or weight status was observed to differ between randomly assigned groups. Conclusions Two-year colleges and their students are interested in participating in weight-related trials and partnering with universities for research. Researchers must work closely with administrators to identify benefits to their institutions and to resolve student-level barriers to recruitment and retention. Our experiences from the CHOICES study should be useful in identifying effective recruitment and retention methods for weight gain prevention trials among young adults. PMID:26378096

  2. Trypsin inhibitor from tamarindus indica L. seeds reduces weight gain and food consumption and increases plasmatic cholecystokinin levels

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento Campos Ribeiro, Joycellane Alline; Serquiz, Alexandre Coellho; dos Santos Silva, Priscila Fabíola; Barbosa, Patrícia Batista Barra Medeiros; Sampaio, Tarcísio Bruno Montenegro; de Araújo, Raimundo Fernandes; de Oliveira, Adeliana Silva; Machado, Richele Janaina Araújo; Maciel, Bruna Leal Lima; Uchôa, Adriana Ferreira; dos Santos, Elizeu Antunes; de Araújo Morais, Ana Heloneida

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Seeds are excellent sources of proteinase inhibitors, some of which may have satietogenic and slimming actions. We evaluated the effect of a trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus indica L. seeds on weight gain, food consumption and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. METHODS: A trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus was isolated using ammonium sulfate (30–60%) following precipitation with acetone and was further isolated with Trypsin-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Analyses were conducted to assess the in vivo digestibility, food intake, body weight evolution and cholecystokinin levels in Wistar rats. Histological analyses of organs and biochemical analyses of sera were performed. RESULTS: The trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus reduced food consumption, thereby reducing weight gain. The in vivo true digestibility was not significantly different between the control and Tamarindus trypsin inhibitor-treated groups. The trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus did not cause alterations in biochemical parameters or liver, stomach, intestine or pancreas histology. Rats treated with the trypsin inhibitor showed significantly elevated cholecystokinin levels compared with animals receiving casein or water. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that the isolated trypsin inhibitor from Tamarindus reduces weight gain by reducing food consumption, an effect that may be mediated by increased cholecystokinin. Thus, the potential use of this trypsin inhibitor in obesity prevention and/or treatment should be evaluated. PMID:25789523

  3. Transgenic rescue of adipocyte glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor expression restores high fat diet-induced body weight gain.

    PubMed

    Ugleholdt, Randi; Pedersen, Jens; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Jørgensen, Signe Marie; Kissow, Hanne-Louise; Nytofte, Nikolaj; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie; Seino, Yutaka; Thams, Peter; Holst, Peter Johannes; Holst, Jens Juul

    2011-12-30

    The glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor (GIPr) has been implicated in high fat diet-induced obesity and is proposed as an anti-obesity target despite an uncertainty regarding the mechanism of action. To independently investigate the contribution of the insulinotropic effects and the direct effects on adipose tissue, we generated transgenic mice with targeted expression of the human GIPr to white adipose tissue or beta-cells, respectively. These mice were then cross-bred with the GIPr knock-out strain. The central findings of the study are that mice with GIPr expression targeted to adipose tissue have a similar high fat diet -induced body weight gain as control mice, significantly greater than the weight gain in mice with a general ablation of the receptor. Surprisingly, this difference was due to an increase in total lean body mass rather than a gain in total fat mass that was similar between the groups. In contrast, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide-mediated insulin secretion does not seem to be important for regulation of body weight after high fat feeding. The study supports a role of the adipocyte GIPr in nutrient-dependent regulation of body weight and lean mass, but it does not support a direct and independent role for the adipocyte or beta-cell GIPr in promoting adipogenesis.

  4. EFFECT OF DIETARY PROTEIN AND CARBOHYDRATE LEVELS ON WEIGHT GAIN AND GONAD PRODUCTION IN THE SEA URCHIN LYTECHINUS VARIEGATUS.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Laura E; Gibbs, Victoria K; Powell, Mickie L; Makowsky, Robert; Lawrence, John M; Lawrence, Addison L; Watts, Stephen A

    2012-08-15

    Adult Lytechinus variegatus were fed eight formulated diets with different protein (ranging from 12 to 36%) and carbohydrate (ranging from 21 to 39 %) levels. Each sea urchin (n = 8 per treatment) was fed a daily sub-satiation ration of 1.5% of average body weight for 9 weeks. Akaike information criterion analysis was used to compare six different hypothesized dietary composition models across eight growth measurements. Dietary protein level and protein: energy ratio were the best models for prediction of total weight gain. Diets with the highest (> 68.6 mg P kcal(--1)) protein: energy ratios produced the most wet weight gain after 9 weeks. Dietary carbohydrate level was a poor predictor for most growth parameters examined in this study. However, the model containing a protein × carbohydrate interaction effect was the best model for protein efficiency ratio (PER). PER decreased with increasing dietary protein level, more so at higher carbohydrate levels. Food conversion ratio (FCR) was best modeled by total dietary energy levels: Higher energy diets produced lower FCRs. Dietary protein level was the best model of gonad wet weight gain. These data suggest that variations in dietary nutrients and energy differentially affect organismal growth and growth of body components.

  5. Observed infant food cue responsivity: Associations with maternal report of infant eating behavior, breastfeeding, and infant weight gain.

    PubMed

    Buvinger, Elizabeth; Rosenblum, Katherine; Miller, Alison L; Kaciroti, Niko A; Lumeng, Julie C

    2017-05-01

    Infant obesity and the rate of weight gain during infancy are significant public health concerns, but few studies have examined eating behaviors in infancy. Food cue responsivity has been described as a key contributor to obesity risk in school age children and adults, but has been rarely examined during infancy. The purpose of the current study was to test among 30 infants aged 6-12 months the hypotheses that infants would show greater interest in food versus non-food stimuli, and that greater birth weight, greater rate of weight gain during infancy, greater mother-reported food responsiveness, being formula versus breastmilk fed, and higher maternal body mass index, would each be associated with greater interest in the food versus non-food stimulus. Results showed that overall infants showed a preference for the food versus non-food stimulus. Preference for the food versus non-food stimulus was predicted by greater infant rate of weight gain since birth, greater maternal-reported infant food responsiveness, and having been exclusively formula-fed, but not by any other factor tested. Results are discussed with regard to theoretical implications for the study of infant obesity and applied prevention implications.

  6. A Longitudinal Study of Childhood Depression and Anxiety in Relation to Weight Gain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rofey, Dana L.; Kolko, Rachel P.; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Silk, Jennifer S.; Bost, James E.; Feng, Wentao; Szigethy, Eva M.; Noll, Robert B.; Ryan, Neal D.; Dahl, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Adult mood disturbances are highly correlated with obesity, although little is known about the developmental relationship between mood disorders and weight. This study investigated the relationship between childhood psychopathology and weight over the course of 3 years. Body Mass Index (BMI) percentiles and demographic data of children (ages 8-18)…

  7. Effect of FTO, SH2B1, LEP, and LEPR polymorphisms on weight gain associated with antipsychotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Mata, Ignacio; Amado, Jose Antonio; Berja, Ana; Garcia-Unzueta, Maria Teresa; Martínez García, Obdulia; Arranz, Maria Jesús; Vazquez-Barquero, Jose Luis; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto

    2010-12-01

    Weight gain is one of the major adverse effects of antipsychotics. Although mechanisms remain unclear, genetic susceptibility has become increasingly attractive as a potential mechanism that could explain a significant part of interindividual variability. Most investigations have explored genes related with the mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs. An alternative approach to investigate the role that genetic factors play in weight gain secondary to antipsychotic treatment is to study those genetic variants that have been found associated with obesity. The aim of this study was to determine whether the fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) rs9939609 variant, the single nucleotide polymorphism that has shown the strongest association with common obesity in different populations, influences weight gain during the first year of antipsychotic treatment. We investigated also the genetic variants in other 3 strong candidates genes involved in the leptin-signaling pathway including leptin, leptin receptor, and Src homology 2. We carried out a prospective study on 239 patients with first-episode psychosis. Two hundred five patients completed the follow-up at 1 year (85.8%). Before antipsychotic treatment, the homozygous subjects for the risk allele A of the FTOrs9939609 variant had a higher body mass index at baseline (24.2 T 3.8 kg/m²) than the AT/TT group (22.82 T 3.3 kg/m2; F = 5.744; P = 0.018). After 1 year, the magnitude of weight increase was similar in the 3 genotypes defined by the rs9939609 variant. These results suggest that the pharmacological intervention accompanied by changes in energy intake and expenditure could suppress the genetic susceptibility conferred by the FTO genotype. None of the other single nucleotide polymorphisms evaluated were associated with weight gain during the first 12 months of antipsychotic therapy.

  8. The effect of betahistine, a histamine H1 receptor agonist/H3 antagonist, on olanzapine-induced weight gain in first-episode schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Poyurovsky, Michael; Pashinian, Artashes; Levi, Aya; Weizman, Ronit; Weizman, Abraham

    2005-03-01

    Histamine antagonism has been implicated in antipsychotic drug-induced weight gain. Betahistine, a histamine enhancer with H1 agonistic/H3 antagonistic properties (48 mg t.i.d.), was coadministered with olanzapine (10 mg/day) in three first-episode schizophrenia patients for 6 weeks. Body weight was measured at baseline and weekly thereafter. Clinical rating scales were completed at baseline and at week 6. All participants gained weight (mean weight gain 3.1+/-0.9 kg) and a similar pattern of weight gain was observed: an increase during the first 2 weeks and no additional weight gain (two patients) or minor weight loss (one patient) from weeks 3 to 6. None gained 7% of baseline weight, which is the cut-off for clinically significant weight gain. Betahistine was safe and well tolerated and did not interfere with the antipsychotic effect of olanzapine. Our findings justify a placebo-controlled evaluation of the putative weight-attenuating effect of betahistine in olanzapine-induced weight gain.

  9. Use of low-molecular-weight heparins and new anticoagulants in elderly patients with renal impairment.

    PubMed

    Samama, Meyer Michel

    2011-03-01

    Elderly people with renal impairment are at high risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and acute coronary syndromes (ACS); however, they are also at increased risk for bleeding complications. Evidence-based data for the management of anticoagulation in elderly patients with severe renal impairment, in particular, are limited. These patients are frequently excluded from randomized clinical trials evaluating anticoagulants, confounding clinical decision making. Low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs), such as enoxaparin sodium and dalteparin sodium, provide a predictable anticoagulant effect across almost all patient populations; however, because they are primarily eliminated through the kidneys, elderly patients with moderate or severe renal impairment are potentially at risk for LMWH accumulation. Clinical evidence suggests that treatment with full-dose enoxaparin sodium could increase the risk for bleeding in elderly patients with severe renal impairment; however, this risk is ameliorated with approved dose adjustments. Dalteparin sodium has been evaluated in small studies within this population but no strategy for reduced dosing has been developed. There are limited clinical data on the use of fondaparinux sodium and, in particular, the new anticoagulants, such as dabigatran etexilate and rivaroxaban, in elderly patients with renal impairment. Evidence suggests that the clearance of fondaparinux sodium is mildly reduced in elderly patients, and more substantially reduced in patients with severe renal impairment; a dose reduction has recently been approved in Europe. Age and renal function appear to affect the exposure of dabigatran etexilate. A dose reduction is recommended in the elderly and in those with moderate renal function, but dabigatran etexilate is contraindicated in severe renal impairment. Rivaroxaban has been associated with increased exposure and pharmacodynamic effects in the elderly and those with renal impairment; at present there is no facility

  10. Effects of Thiabendazole Treatment on Weight Gains by Nebraska Range Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, D. L.; Twiehaus, M. J.; Reynolds, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    The results of these studies indicate that a high percentage of Nebraska range cattle are infected with gastrointestinal parasites, but at a subclinical level of infection. However, significant differences were not observed in average daily gain between thiabendazole-treated range cattle and unmedicated controls in three of four field trials. In the three trials the average improvement in daily gain in animals receiving thiabendazole once averaged .01 lb greater than untreated controls. During a 120 day grazing period this improvement would not be sufficient to pay for the wormer or cost of additional labor. PMID:4251782

  11. Genetic parameters related to environmental variability of weight traits in a selection experiment for weight gain in mice; signs of correlated canalised response

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Escriche, Noelia; Moreno, Almudena; Nieto, Blanca; Piqueras, Pepa; Salgado, Concepción; Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo

    2008-01-01

    Data from an experimental mice population selected from 18 generations to increase weight gain were used to estimate the genetic parameters associated with environmental variability. The analysis involved three traits: weight at 21 days, weight at 42 days and weight gain between 21 and 42 days. A dataset of 5273 records for males was studied. Data were analysed using Bayesian procedures by comparing the Deviance Information Criterion (DIC) value of two different models: one assuming homogeneous environmental variances and another assuming them as heterogeneous. The model assuming heterogeneity was better in all cases and also showed higher additive genetic variances and lower common environmental variances. The heterogeneity of residual variance was associated with systematic and additive genetic effects thus making reduction by selection possible. Genetic correlations between the additive genetic effects on mean and environmental variance of the traits analysed were always negative, ranging from -0.19 to -0.38. An increase in the heritability of the traits was found when considering the genetic determination of the environmental variability. A suggested correlated canalised response was found in terms of coefficient of variation but it could be insufficient to compensate for the scale effect associated with an increase of the mean. PMID:18400150

  12. Moderation of antipsychotic-induced weight gain by energy balance gene variants in the RUPP autism network risperidone studies

    PubMed Central

    Nurmi, E L; Spilman, S L; Whelan, F; Scahill, L L; Aman, M G; McDougle, C J; Arnold, L E; Handen, B; Johnson, C; Sukhodolsky, D G; Posey, D J; Lecavalier, L; Stigler, K A; Ritz, L; Tierney, E; Vitiello, B; McCracken, J T

    2013-01-01

    Second-generation antipsychotic exposure, in both children and adults, carries significant risk for excessive weight gain that varies widely across individuals. We queried common variation in key energy balance genes (FTO, MC4R, LEP, CNR1, FAAH) for their association with weight gain during the initial 8 weeks in the two NIMH Research Units on Pediatric Psychopharmacology Autism Network trials (N=225) of risperidone for treatment of irritability in children/adolescents aged 4–17 years with autism spectrum disorders. Variants in the cannabinoid receptor (CNR)-1 promoter (P=1.0 × 10−6), CNR1 (P=9.6 × 10−5) and the leptin (LEP) promoter (P=1.4 × 10−4) conferred robust-independent risks for weight gain. A model combining these three variants was highly significant (P=1.3 × 10−9) with a 0.85 effect size between lowest and highest risk groups. All results survived correction for multiple testing and were not dependent on dose, plasma level or ethnicity. We found no evidence for association with a reported functional variant in the endocannabinoid metabolic enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase, whereas body mass index-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms in FTO and MC4R showed only trend associations. These data suggest a substantial genetic contribution of common variants in energy balance regulatory genes to individual antipsychotic-associated weight gain in children and adolescents, which supersedes findings from prior adult studies. The effects are robust enough to be detected after only 8 weeks and are more prominent in this largely treatment naive population. This study highlights compelling directions for further exploration of the pharmacogenetic basis of this concerning multifactorial adverse event. PMID:23799528

  13. Pioglitazone-induced body weight gain is prevented by combined administration with the lipoprotein lipase activator NO-1886.

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, Masataka; Tsutsumi, Kazuhiko; Sato, Daisuke; Nakamura, Aki; Habu, Satoshi; Mori, Yuichi; Morishita, Munehiko; Yonemoto, Takayuki; Miyata, Tetsuro; Nakaya, Yutaka; Nakamura, Takao

    2011-10-15

    Pioglitazone improves insulin resistance in diabetics but often causes body weight gain. The lipoprotein lipase activator NO-1886 has been shown to exert both anti-obesity and anti-insulin-resistance effects. In this study, we investigated the effect of the combined administration of pioglitazone with NO-1886 (pioglitazone+NO-1886) in preventing body weight gain in insulin-resistant, high-fat fed rats. The rats were fed a standard or high-fat diet for 16 weeks. The high-fat fed rats were randomized at week 9 into 4 groups (i.e., control, pioglitazone (30 mg/kg/day), NO-1886 (100mg/kg/day), and pioglitazone+NO-1886 (30 and 100mg/kg/day, respectively)). The high-fat fed control rats developed obesity and insulin resistance. After 7 weeks of drug treatment, pioglitazone+NO-1886 was found to prevent the body weight gain caused by pioglitazone alone (pioglitazone+NO-1886: Δ76.0 ± 16.8 g vs. pioglitazone: Δ127.8 ± 39.5 g, P<0.05) and to increase glucose infusion rate during insulin clamp, compared with the results in the high-fat fed control group. No differences in plasma nonesterified fatty acid, leptin, adiponectin, glucose, or insulin levels were observed between the pioglitazone+NO-1886 and the pioglitazone-alone groups. However, plasma total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol levels were significantly increased and plasma triglyceride levels were slightly decreased in the pioglitazone+NO-1886 group, compared with the values in the pioglitazone-alone group. In summary, the combined administration of pioglitazone and NO-1886 prevented the pioglitazone-induced body weight gains and ameliorated insulin resistance observed in high-fat fed rats. These results indicate that combined therapy with pioglitazone and NO-1886 may be beneficial for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  14. High Adherence to CPAP Treatment Does Not Prevent the Continuation of Weight Gain among Severely Obese OSAS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Myllylä, Minna; Kurki, Samu; Anttalainen, Ulla; Saaresranta, Tarja; Laitinen, Tarja

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients benefit from continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment in a dose-response manner. We determined adherence and weight control, as well as their predictors, among long-term CPAP users. Methods: Cohort of 1,023 OSAS patients had used CPAP on average of 6.6 ± 1.2 years. BMI was determined at baseline and at follow-up visits. There were 7.4 ± 1.7 BMI and 6.5 ± 1.8 CPAP usage measurements per patient on average. Using the Bayesian hierarchical model, we determined the patients' individual trends of BMI and adherence development. Patients with significantly increasing or decreasing trends were identified at the posterior probability level of > 90%. Results: The mean age in the cohort was 55.6 ± 9.8 years, BMI 33.5 ± 6.4 kg/m2, apnea-hypopnea index 33.7 ± 23.1, and CPAP usage 6.0 ± 1.8 h/day. The majority of patients had no significant change in BMI (mean annual weight gain 0.04 ± 0.29 kg/m2) or CPAP adherence (mean annual increase 11.4 ± 7.0 min/day). However, at the individual level, 10% of the patients showed significant annual weight gain (0.63 ± 0.35 kg/m2) during the 5-year follow-up period. At baseline these patients were already more severely obese (mean BMI 40.0 ± 5.9 kg/m2) despite being younger (mean 50.9 ± 9.5 years) than the rest of the cohort. Conclusions: In the majority of CPAP-treated OSAS patients, weight did not significantly change but gained slightly slower than in age-matched population in general. However, in 10% of patients, high adherence to CPAP treatment did not prevent the continuation of weight gain. These patients present a high-risk group for OSAS-related multimorbidity later in life. Citation: Myllylä M, Kurki S, Anttalainen U, Saaresranta T, Laitinen T. High adherence to CPAP treatment does not prevent the continuation of weight gain among severely obese OSAS patients. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(4):519–528. PMID:26888588

  15. Adult weight gain, fat distribution and mammographic density in Spanish pre- and post-menopausal women (DDM-Spain).

    PubMed

    Pollán, Marina; Lope, Virginia; Miranda-García, Josefa; García, Milagros; Casanova, Francisco; Sánchez-Contador, Carmen; Santamariña, Carmen; Moreo, Pilar; Vidal, Carmen; Peris, Mercé; Moreno, María Pilar; Vázquez-Carrete, José Antonio; Collado, Francisca; Pedraz-Pingarrón, Carmen; Ascunce, Nieves; Salas-Trejo, Dolores; Aragonés, Nuria; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Ruiz-Perales, Francisco

    2012-07-01

    High mammographic density (MD) is a phenotype risk marker for breast cancer. Body mass index (BMI) is inversely associated with MD, with the breast being a fat storage site. We investigated the influence of abdominal fat distribution and adult weight gain on MD, taking age, BMI and other confounders into account. Because visceral adiposity and BMI are associated with breast cancer only after menopause, differences in pre- and post-menopausal women were also explored. We recruited 3,584 women aged 45-68 years within the Spanish breast cancer screening network. Demographic, reproductive, family and personal history data were collected by purpose-trained staff, who measured current weight, height, waist and hip circumferences under the same protocol and with the same tools. MD was assessed in the left craniocaudal view using Boyd's Semiquantitative Scale. Association between waist-to-hip ratio, adult weight gain (difference between current weight and self-reported weight at 18 years) and MD was quantified by ordinal logistic regression, with random center-specific intercepts. Models were adjusted for age, BMI, breast size, time since menopause, parity, family history of breast cancer and hormonal replacement therapy use. Natural splines were used to describe the shape of the relationship between these two variables and MD. Waist-to-hip ratio was inversely associated with MD, and the effect was more pronounced in pre-menopausal (OR = 0.53 per 0.1 units; 95 % CI = 0.42-0.66) than in post-menopausal women (OR = 0.73; 95 % CI = 0.65-0.82) (P of heterogeneity = 0.010). In contrast, adult weight gain displayed a positive association with MD, which was similar in both groups (OR = 1.17 per 6 kg; 95 % CI = 1.11-1.23). Women who had gained more than 24 kg displayed higher MD (OR = 2.05; 95 % CI = 1.53-2.73). MD was also evaluated using Wolfe's and Tabár's classifications, with similar results being obtained. Once BMI, fat distribution and other confounders were considered

  16. Preventing Olanzapine-Induced Weight Gain Using Betahistine: A Study in a Rat Model with Chronic Olanzapine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Jiamei; Huang, Xu-Feng; Pai, Nagesh; Deng, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Olanzapine is the one of first line antipsychotic drug for schizophrenia and other serious mental illness. However, it is associated with troublesome metabolic side-effects, particularly body weight gain and obesity. The antagonistic affinity to histamine H1 receptors (H1R) of antipsychotic drugs has been identified as one of the main contributors to weight gain/obesity side-effects. Our previous study showed that a short term (2 weeks) combination treatment of betahistine (an H1R agonist and H3R antagonist) and olanzapine (O+B) reduced (−45%) body weight gain induced by olanzapine in drug-naïve rats. A key issue is that clinical patients suffering with schizophrenia, bipolar disease and other mental disorders often face chronic, even life-time, antipsychotic treatment, in which they have often had previous antipsychotic exposure. Therefore, we investigated the effects of chronic O+B co-treatment in controlling body weight in female rats with chronic and repeated exposure of olanzapine. The results showed that co-administration of olanzapine (3 mg/kg, t.i.d.) and betahistine (9.6 mg/kg, t.i.d.) significantly reduced (−51.4%) weight gain induced by olanzapine. Co-treatment of O+B also led to a decrease in feeding efficiency, liver and fat mass. Consistently, the olanzapine-only treatment increased hypothalamic H1R protein levels, as well as hypothalamic pAMPKα, AMPKα and NPY protein levels, while reducing the hypothalamic POMC, and UCP1 and PGC-1α protein levels in brown adipose tissue (BAT). The olanzapine induced changes in hypothalamic H1R, pAMPKα, BAT UCP1 and PGC-1α could be reversed by co-treatment of O+B. These results supported further clinical trials to test the effectiveness of co-treatment of O+B for controlling weight gain/obesity side-effects in schizophrenia with chronic antipsychotic treatment. PMID:25084453

  17. Reflections from a systematic review of dietary energy density and weight gain: is the inclusion of drinks valid?

    PubMed

    Johnson, L; Wilks, D C; Lindroos, A K; Jebb, S A

    2009-11-01

    The association between dietary energy density, increased energy intake and weight gain is supported by experimental evidence, but confirmation of an effect in free-living humans is limited. Experimental evidence supports a role of energy density in obesity through changes in food composition, not drinks consumption. The inclusion of drinks in the calculation creates a variable of questionable validity and has a substantive impact on the estimated energy density of the diet. We posit, based on the experimental evidence, that calculating the energy density of diets by excluding drinks and including calories from drinks as a covariate in the analysis is the most valid and reliable method of testing the relationship between energy density and weight gain in free-living humans. We demonstrate, by systematically reviewing existing observational studies of dietary energy density and weight gain in free-living humans, how current variation in the method for calculating energy density hampers the interpretation of these data. Reaching an a priori decision on the appropriate methodology will reduce the error caused by multiple comparisons and facilitate meaningful interpretation of epidemiological evidence to inform the development of effective obesity prevention strategies.

  18. Protein Kinase C β: a New Target Therapy to Prevent the Long-Term Atypical Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain.

    PubMed

    Rimessi, Alessandro; Pavan, Chiara; Ioannidi, Elli; Nigro, Federica; Morganti, Claudia; Brugnoli, Alberto; Longo, Francesco; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Morari, Michele; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Zavan, Barbara; Pinton, Paolo

    2017-02-15

    Antipsychotic drugs are currently used in clinical practice for a variety of mental disorders. Among them, clozapine is the most effective medication for treatment-resistant schizophrenia and is most helpful in controlling aggression and the suicidal behavior in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. Although clozapine is associated with a low likelihood of extrapyramidal symptoms and other neurological side effects, it is well known for the weight gain and metabolic side effects, which expose the patient to a greater risk of cardiovascular disorders and premature death, as well as psychosocial issues, leading to non-adherence to therapy. The mechanisms underlying these iatrogenic metabolic disorders are still controversial. We have therefore investigated the in vivo effects of the selective PKCβ inhibitor, ruboxistaurin (LY-333531), in a preclinical model of long-term clozapine-induced weight gain. Cell biology, biochemistry, and behavioral tests have been performed in wild-type and PKCβ knockout mice to investigate the contribution of endogenous PKCβ and its pharmacological inhibition to the psychomotor effects of clozapine. Finally, we also shed light on a novel aspect of the mechanism underlying the clozapine-induced weight gain, demonstrating that the clozapine-dependent PKCβ activation promotes the inhibition of the lipid droplet-selective autophagy process. This paves the way to new therapeutic approaches to this serious complication of clozapine therapy.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 15 February 2017; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.20.

  19. Association study of olanzapine-induced weight gain and therapeutic response with SERT gene polymorphisms in female schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Bozina, Nada; Medved, Vesna; Kuzman, Martina Rojnic; Sain, Ivica; Sertic, Jadranka

    2007-09-01

    We investigated the relationships between L/S promoter (SERTPR) and l/s intron2 (SERTin2) genetic variants of serotonin transporter (SERT) polymorphisms with olanzapine-induced weight gain and treatment response in 94 female schizophrenic patients treated with olanzapine for up to 3 months. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated for each patient prior to olanzapine administration and 3 months afterwards. To assess and evaluate improvement of clinical psychotic symptoms and therapeutic response to the antipsychotic, all patients were rated using the Positive and Negative Syndrome ScaLe (PANSS). Overall, the presence of S SERTPR allelic variant and SS genotype was associated with significantly higher weight gain in subjects who were non-obese at the time of admission. The presence of L SERTPR variant was associated with significantly better treatment response measured with total PANSS and general PANSS subscale, while the presence of l SERTin2 variant determined better treatment response only in several items. No evidence of linkage disequilibrium between the two loci was found in the sample. These findings identify genetic factors associated with oLanzapine-induced weight gain and treatment response in femaLe schizophrenic patients.

  20. Improving glucose tolerance by reducing weight gain in a polygenic obese mouse model: use of a high protein diet.

    PubMed

    Blair, A R; Strube, M L; Proietto, J; Andrikopoulos, S

    2015-03-01

    Diets to decrease body weight have limited success in achieving and importantly maintaining this weight loss long-term. It has recently been suggested that energy intake can be regulated by the amount of protein ingested, termed the protein leverage hypothesis. In this study, we determined whether a high protein diet would be effective in achieving and maintaining weight loss in a genetically obese model, the New Zealand Obese (NZO) mouse. NZO and C57BL/6J (C57) control mice were fed a high protein or chow diet for 5 weeks from weaning (3 weeks of age). Body weight and food intake were determined. Mice on the same diet were bred to produce offspring that were fed either a chow or high protein diet. Body weight, food intake, and glucose tolerance were determined. Feeding NZO and C57 mice a high protein diet for 5 weeks resulted in reduced food intake and consequently energy intake and body weight gain compared with mice on a chow diet. NZO mice fed a high protein diet showed a significant improvement in glucose tolerance compared with their chow-fed counterparts, while no difference was seen in C57 mice fed chow or protein diet. The offspring of NZO mice that were fed a high protein diet during gestation and weaning were also lighter and displayed improved glucose tolerance compared with chow fed animals. We conclude that a high protein diet is a reasonable strategy to reduce body weight gain and improve glucose tolerance in the NZO mouse, a polygenic model of obesity.

  1. Appetite and weight gain suppression effects of alcohol depend on the route and pattern of administration in Long Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nnamdi G; Suhaidi, Faten A; DeAngelis, Ross S; Liang, Nu-Chu

    Ethanol can be a food source but its effects on energy balance and contribution to obesity remain inconclusive. In this study, we hypothesized that the effects of ethanol on energy intake and body weight would depend on the administration dose, pattern and the blood ethanol concentration (BEC) time-course. Experiment 1 examined changes in food intake, diet preference, and body weight after saline or ethanol (1 and 3g/kg) injection (IP). Experiment 2 compared the effects in rats that received either 3g/kg/day ethanol administered all at once (EtOH_S) or 2 1.5g/kg injections spaced by 3h (EtOH_D). Experiment 3 examined the effects of 7.5h/day, Mon through Fri for 8weeks, voluntary ethanol drinking (5% and 10% ethanol) on food intake and body weight. Results of Experiments 1 and 2 indicate that acute ethanol administrations dose-dependently reduced energy intake, high fat diet preference and weight gain. Acute 3g/kg ethanol injection in the EtOH_S group decreased energy intake, weight gain and visceral fat to a greater extent than in the EtOH_D group. Results of Experiment 3 show that male and female rats voluntarily drank 1.65-2.31g/kg ethanol within 3.5h with reduced chow intake but unchanged total energy intake and weight gain. Furthermore, 3g/kg ethanol injection resulted in BEC that remained at intoxicating levels e.g. >120mg/dL for several hours post-administration and was higher in the EtOH_S than in the EtOH_D group. In contrast, BEC in voluntarily drinking was ~67mg/dL and decreased to below 10mg/dL 5h after termination of ethanol access. Taken together, these data suggest that 3g/kg ethanol injection robustly suppresses appetite and weight gain due to the higher BECs attained. Furthermore, BEC attained and maintained is a determining factor for how ethanol administration affects appetite and long-term energy balance.

  2. Metabolic requirements of red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus, for protein and energy based on weight gain and body composition.

    PubMed

    McGoogan, B B; Gatlin, D M

    1998-01-01

    Precise formulation of diets that meet but do not greatly exceed nutritional requirements should assist in lowering feed costs for commercial aquaculture of red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus. In this study, protein and energy requirements of red drum for maintenance and maximum gain were determined by feeding a diet containing digestible protein (DP) at 36.5% and 14.2 kJ digestible energy (DE) per gram at various rates for 8 wk in two separate experiments. Changes in weight and whole-body energy and protein were measured and regressed against protein or energy fed using a nonlinear procedure. In the first experiment, juvenile fish [ approximately 3. 4 g initial body weight (BW)] were either starved or fed at one of the following g/(100 g BW.d): 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, or 8. The second experiment utilized larger red drum (approximately 5.5 g initial weight), fed 0.75, 1.5, 3, 5, 5.5, 6, 6.5 or 7 g/(100 g BW.d) to confirm and refine results from the first experiment. Based on maintenance of body weight in both experiments, red drum had a protein maintenance requirement of 1.5 and 2.5 g DP/(kg BW.d) whereas estimates based on maintenance of whole-body protein were 0.5 and 2.2 g DP/(kg BW.d). Energy requirements for maintenance of weight and body energy ranged from 58 to 93 and 92 to 97 kJ DE/(kg BW.d), respectively. Protein requirements for maximum weight gain and change in body protein ranged from 20 to 25 g DP/(kg BW.d), whereas energy requirements for maximum weight gain and whole-body deposition ranged from 776 to 958 and 914 to 985 kJ DE/(kg BW.d), respectively. These requirements for maintenance and maximum gain of red drum should assist in formulation of diets for a variety of desired feeding strategies.

  3. Sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain in children and adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis123

    PubMed Central

    Pan, An; Willett, Walter C; Hu, Frank B

    2013-01-01

    Background: The relation between sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and body weight remains controversial. Objective: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize the evidence in children and adults. Design: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases through March 2013 for prospective cohort studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the SSB-weight relation. Separate meta-analyses were conducted in children and adults and for cohorts and RCTs by using random- and fixed-effects models. Results: Thirty-two original articles were included in our meta-analyses: 20 in children (15 cohort studies, n = 25,745; 5 trials, n = 2772) and 12 in adults (7 cohort studies, n = 174,252; 5 trials, n = 292). In cohort studies, one daily serving increment of SSBs was associated with a 0.06 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.10) and 0.05 (95% CI: 0.03, 0.07)-unit increase in BMI in children and 0.22 kg (95% CI: 0.09, 0.34 kg) and 0.12 kg (95% CI: 0.10, 0.14 kg) weight gain in adults over 1 y in random- and fixed-effects models, respectively. RCTs in children showed reductions in BMI gain when SSBs were reduced [random and fixed effects: −0.17 (95% CI: −0.39, 0.05) and −0.12 (95% CI: −0.22, −0.2)], whereas RCTs in adults showed increases in body weight when SSBs were added (random and fixed effects: 0.85 kg; 95% CI: 0.50, 1.20 kg). Sensitivity analyses of RCTs in children showed more pronounced benefits in preventing weight gain in SSB substitution trials (compared with school-based educational programs) and among overweight children (compared with normal-weight children). Conclusion: Our systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies and RCTs provides evidence that SSB consumption promotes weight gain in children and adults. PMID:23966427

  4. Fermented Barley Supplementation Modulates the Expression of Hypothalamic Genes and Reduces Energy Intake and Weight Gain in Rats.

    PubMed

    Pichiah, P B Tirupathi; Cho, Suk-Ho; Han, Seong-Kyu; Cha, Youn-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Dietary fiber and proteins are individually known to decrease feeding, but could result greater weight management benefit when both are combined. We hypothesized that supplementing the diet with fermented barley, being rich in both dietary fiber and proteins, could lower energy intake by modulating the mRNA expression level of hypothalamic genes associated with the regulation of feeding behavior and satiety; thereby decreasing body weight gain. To test our hypothesis, four groups of Sprague Dawley rats were arranged in a 2 × 2 factorial design (n = 6), low-fat diet with either guar gum (LFD-G) or fermented barley (LFD-FB) and high-fat diet with either guar gum (HFD-G) or fermented barley (HFD-FB). Using oral gavage, fermented barley was given at a dosage of 1500 mg/kg body weight and guar gum was supplemented in an equivalent quantity to that of the fiber in the fermented barley. After 19 weeks, the fermented barley-supplemented groups showed a significant reduction in energy intake, triglyceride, body weight gain, and serum leptin, compared to the guar gum-supplemented groups in both the low- and high-fat diet groups. Likewise, the anorexigenic gene proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) mRNA level were significantly higher in the fermented barley-supplemented groups compared to the guar gum-supplemented groups in rats fed on both high- and low-fat diets. In conclusion, fermented barley supplementation upregulated hypothalamic POMC/CART, decreased energy intake in both low- and high-fat diet groups, and prevented excessive weight gain in rats.

  5. Effects of agave nectar versus sucrose on weight gain, adiposity, blood glucose, insulin, and lipid responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Hooshmand, Shirin; Holloway, Brittany; Nemoseck, Tricia; Cole, Sarah; Petrisko, Yumi; Hong, Mee Young; Kern, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Agave nectar is a fructose-rich liquid sweetener derived from a plant, and is often promoted as a low glycemic alternative to refined sugar. However, little scientific research has been conducted in animals or humans to determine its metabolic and/or health effects. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of agave nectar versus sucrose on weight gain, adiposity, fasting plasma blood glucose, insulin, and lipid levels. Eighteen (n=18) male ICR mice (33.8±1.6 g) were divided into two groups (n=6 for agave nectar and n=12 for sucrose) and provided free access to one of two diets of equal energy densities differing only in a portion of the carbohydrate provided. Diets contained 20% carbohydrate (by weight of total diet) from either raw agave nectar or sucrose. Epididymal fat pads were excised, and blood was collected after 34 days. Weight gain (4.3±2.2 vs. 8.4±3.4 g), fat pad weights (0.95±0.54 vs. 1.75±0.66 g), plasma glucose (77.8±12.2 vs. 111.0±27.9 mg/dL), and insulin (0.61±0.29 vs. 1.46±0.81 ng/mL) were significantly lower (P≤.05) for agave nectar-fed mice compared to sucrose-fed mice respectively. No statistically significant differences in total cholesterol or triglycerides were detected. These results suggest that in comparison to sucrose, agave nectar may have a positive influence on weight gain and glucose control. However, more research with a larger sample of animals and/or with human subjects is warranted.

  6. Exercise Training and Weight Gain in Obese Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial (ETIP Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Garnæs, Kirsti Krohn; Mørkved, Siv; Salvesen, Øyvind; Moholdt, Trine

    2016-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of exercise training for preventing excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is still uncertain. As maternal obesity is associated with both GWG and GDM, there is a special need to assess whether prenatal exercise training programs provided to obese women reduce the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Our primary aim was to assess whether regular supervised exercise training in pregnancy could reduce GWG in women with prepregnancy overweight/obesity. Secondary aims were to examine the effects of exercise in pregnancy on 30 outcomes including GDM incidence, blood pressure, blood measurements, skinfold thickness, and body composition. Methods and Findings This was a single-center study where we randomized (1:1) 91 pregnant women with a prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) ≥ 28 kg/m2 to exercise training (n = 46) or control (standard maternity care) (n = 45). Assessments were done at baseline (pregnancy week 12–18) and in late pregnancy (week 34–37), as well as at delivery. The exercise group was offered thrice weekly supervised sessions of 35 min of moderate intensity endurance exercise and 25 min of strength training. Seventeen women were lost to follow-up (eight in the exercise group and nine in the control group). Our primary endpoint was GWG from baseline testing to delivery. The principal analyses were done as intention-to-treat analyses, with supplementary per protocol analyses where we assessed outcomes in the women who adhered to the exercise program (n = 19) compared to the control group. Mean GWG from baseline to delivery was 10.5 kg in the exercise group and 9.2 kg in the control group, with a mean difference of 0.92 kg (95% CI −1.35, 3.18; p = 0.43). Among the 30 secondary outcomes in late pregnancy, an apparent reduction was recorded in the incidence of GDM (2009 WHO definition) in the exercise group (2 cases; 6.1%) compared to the control group (9 cases; 27.3%), with an odds ratio

  7. Impaired prefrontal synaptic gain in people with psychosis and their relatives during the mismatch negativity

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rick A.; Díez, Álvaro; Constante, Miguel; Dutt, Anirban; Hall, Mei‐Hua; Maestro Carbayo, Amparo; McDonald, Colm; Petrella, Sabrina; Schulze, Katja; Shaikh, Madiha; Walshe, Muriel; Friston, Karl; Pinotsis, Dimitris; Bramon, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The mismatch negativity (MMN) evoked potential, a preattentive brain response to a discriminable change in auditory stimulation, is significantly reduced in psychosis. Glutamatergic theories of psychosis propose that hypofunction of NMDA receptors (on pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons) causes a loss of synaptic gain control. We measured changes in neuronal effective connectivity underlying the MMN using dynamic causal modeling (DCM), where the gain (excitability) of superficial pyramidal cells is explicitly parameterised. EEG data were obtained during a MMN task—for 24 patients with psychosis, 25 of their first‐degree unaffected relatives, and 35 controls—and DCM was used to estimate the excitability (modeled as self‐inhibition) of (source‐specific) superficial pyramidal populations. The MMN sources, based on previous research, included primary and secondary auditory cortices, and the right inferior frontal gyrus. Both patients with psychosis and unaffected relatives (to a lesser degree) showed increased excitability in right inferior frontal gyrus across task conditions, compared to controls. Furthermore, in the same region, both patients and their relatives showed a reversal of the normal response to deviant stimuli; that is, a decrease in excitability in comparison to standard conditions. Our results suggest that psychosis and genetic risk for the illness are associated with both context‐dependent (condition‐specific) and context‐independent abnormalities of the excitability of superficial pyramidal cell populations in the MMN paradigm. These abnormalities could relate to NMDA receptor hypofunction on both pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons, and appear to be linked to the genetic aetiology of the illness, thereby constituting potential endophenotypes for psychosis. Hum Brain Mapp 37:351–365, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26503033

  8. Impaired visually guided weight-shifting ability in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Ballaz, Laurent; Robert, Maxime; Parent, Audrey; Prince, François; Lemay, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The ability to control voluntary weight shifting is crucial in many functional tasks. To our knowledge, weight shifting ability in response to a visual stimulus has never been evaluated in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The aim of the study was (1) to propose a new method to assess visually guided medio-lateral (M/L) weight shifting ability and (2) to compare weight-shifting ability in children with CP and typically developing (TD) children. Ten children with spastic diplegic CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System level I and II; age 7-12 years) and 10 TD age-matched children were tested. Participants played with the skiing game on the Wii Fit game console. Center of pressure (COP) displacements, trunk and lower-limb movements were recorded during the last virtual slalom. Maximal isometric lower limb strength and postural control during quiet standing were also assessed. Lower-limb muscle strength was reduced in children with CP compared to TD children and postural control during quiet standing was impaired in children with CP. As expected, the skiing game mainly resulted in M/L COP displacements. Children with CP showed lower M/L COP range and velocity as compared to TD children but larger trunk movements. Trunk and lower extremity movements were less in phase in children with CP compared to TD children. Commercially available active video games can be used to assess visually guided weight shifting ability. Children with spastic diplegic CP showed impaired visually guided weight shifting which can be explained by non-optimal coordination of postural movement and reduced muscular strength.

  9. Breastfeeding duration and its relation to weight gain, eating behaviours and positive maternal feeding practices in infancy.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Samantha L; Blissett, Jackie

    2017-01-01

    Research examining the relationship between breastfeeding and infant weight has generated conflicting results. Few studies account for significant covariates and many suffer methodological problems such as retrospective self-report. The current study aimed to investigate relationships between breastfeeding duration, infant weight and eating and positive maternal mealtime behaviours, whilst overcoming many of the limitations of previous research. Eighty-one women on low-risk maternity units gave informed consent and were visited at home at 1-week, 1-, 6- and 12-months postpartum. Infants included 45 males and 36 females (mean birth-weight 3.52 kg [SD 0.39]). Mothers and infants were weighed and measured and feeding information was recorded at each visit. Infant weight was converted to a standard deviation score (SDS), accounting for age and sex. Mothers reported infant eating behaviours at 12-months using the Children's Eating Behaviour Questionnaire and were observed feeding their infants solid food at home at 6- and 12-months. Partial correlations (covariates: maternal age, education, BMI, smoking during pregnancy, household income, infant birth weight SDS and age introduced to solid foods) revealed negative associations between breastfeeding duration and 1- to 6- and 1- to 12-month weight gain, and 6- and 12-month weight. Breastfeeding duration was also associated with a slower rate of infant eating and greater observed maternal vocalisations, appropriateness and sensitivity. Results support a dose-response relationship between breastfeeding and infant weight and suggest that breastfeeding may encourage the development of obesity-protective eating behaviours through learning to attend to internal hunger and satiety signals. Future research should investigate whether relationships between slowness in eating and weight extend to satiety responsiveness after infancy.

  10. Sociocultural and Individual Influences on Muscle Gain and Weight Loss Strategies among Adolescent Boys and Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricciardelli, Lina A.; McCabe, Marita P.

    2003-01-01

    The study examined the role of body dissatisfaction, body image importance, sociocultural influences (media and parent and peer encouragement), self-esteem and negative affect on body change strategies to decrease weight and increase muscles in adolescent boys and girls. Surveys were administered to 587 boys and 598 girls aged between 11 and 15…

  11. Astrovirus, reovirus and rotavirus concomitant infection causes decreased weight gain in broad-breasted white poults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Turkey astrovirus type-2 (TAstV-2), turkey rotavirus (TRotV) and turkey reovirus (TReoV) were evaluated for pathogenesis in 3 day-old turkey poults in all possible combinations of one, two or three viruses. Body-weights were recorded at 2, 4, 7, 10 and 14 days post inoculation (PI) and were decreas...

  12. Effect of chronic coffee consumption on weight gain and glycaemia in a mouse model of obesity and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rustenbeck, I; Lier-Glaubitz, V; Willenborg, M; Eggert, F; Engelhardt, U; Jörns, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Epidemiological evidence shows that chronic coffee consumption in humans is correlated with a lower incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For the experimental exploration of the underlying mechanisms, this effect needs to be replicated in an animal model of type 2 diabetes with a short lifespan. Design: Male C57BL/6 mice consumed regular coffee or water ad libitum and the development of obesity and diabetes caused by high-fat diet (55% lipids, HFD) was observed from week 10 on for 35 weeks in comparison with mice feeding on a defined normal diet (9% lipids, ND). Results: The massive weight gain in HFD mice was dose-dependently retarded (P=0.034), the moderate weight gain in ND mice was abolished (P<0.001) by coffee consumption, probably because of a lower feeding efficiency. The consumption of fluid (water or coffee) was significantly diminished by HFD (P<0.001), resulting in a higher coffee exposure of ND mice. On week 21 intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT) showed a dose-dependent faster decline of elevated glucose levels in coffee-consuming HFD mice (P=0.016), but not in ND mice. Remarkably, a spontaneous decrease in non-fasting glycaemia occurred after week 21 in all treatment groups (P<0.001). On week 39 the IPGTT showed diminished peak of glucose levels in coffee-consuming HFD mice (P<0.05). HFD mice were hyperinsulinaemic and had significantly (P<0.001) enlarged islets. Coffee consumption did not affect islet size or parameters of beta-cell apoptosis, proliferation and insulin granule content. Conclusion: Coffee consumption retarded weight gain and improved glucose tolerance in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes and corresponding controls. This gives rise to the expectation that further insight into the mechanism of the diabetes-preventive effect of coffee consumption in humans may be gained by this approach. PMID:24979152

  13. Preventing large birth size in women with preexisting diabetes mellitus: The benefit of appropriate gestational weight gain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin Y.; Sharma, Andrea J.; Sappenfield, William; Salihu, Hamisu M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the percentage of infants with large birth size attributable to excess gestational weight gain (GWG), independent of prepregnancy body mass index, among mothers with preexisting diabetes mellitus (PDM). Study design We analyzed 2004–2008 Florida linked birth certificate and maternal hospital discharge data of live, term (37–41 weeks) singleton deliveries (N = 641,857). We calculated prevalence of large-for-gestational age (LGA) (birth weight-for-gestational age ≥ 90th percentile) and macrosomia (birth weight > 4500 g) by GWG categories (inadequate, appropriate, or excess). We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate the relative risk (RR) of large birth size associated with excess compared to appropriate GWG among mothers with PDM. We then estimated the population attributable fraction (PAF) of large birth size due to excess GWG among mothers with PDM (n = 4427). Results Regardless of diabetes status, half of mothers (51.2%) gained weight in excess of recommendations. Large birth size was higher in infants of mothers with PDM than in infants of mothers without diabetes (28.8% versus 9.4% for LGA, 5.8% versus 0.9% for macrosomia). Among women with PDM, the adjusted RR of having an LGA infant was 1.7 (95% CI 1.5, 1.9) for women with excess GWG compared to those with appropriate gain; the PAF was 27.7% (95% CI 22.0, 33.3). For macrosomia, the adjusted RR associated with excess GWG was 2.1 (95% CI 1.5, 2.9) and the PAF was 38.6% (95% CI 24.9, 52.4). Conclusion Preventing excess GWG may avert over one-third of macrosomic term infants of mothers with PDM. Effective strategies to prevent excess GWG are needed. PMID:27539071

  14. The Theory, Development, and Implementation of an e-Intervention to Prevent Excessive Gestational Weight Gain: e-Moms Roc

    PubMed Central

    Uesugi, Keriann H.; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Gay, Geri K.; Olson, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Gaining more weight during pregnancy than is recommended by the Institute of Medicine is prevalent and contributes to the development of obesity in women. This article describes the development and use of e-Moms of Rochester (e-Moms Roc), an electronic intervention (e-intervention), to address this health issue in a socioeconomically diverse sample of pregnant women. Materials and Methods: Formative research in the form of intercept interviews, in-depth interviews, and focus groups was conducted to inform the design of the e-intervention. The Web site continuously tracked each participant's use of e-intervention features. Results: An e-intervention, including Web site and mobile phone components, was developed and implemented in a randomized control trial. Formative research informed the design. Participants in all arms accessed blogs, local resources, articles, frequently asked questions, and events. Participants in the intervention arms also accessed the weight gain tracker and diet and physical activity goal-setting tools. Overall, 80% of women logged into the Web site and used a tool or feature at least twice. Among those in the intervention arm, 70% used the weight gain tracker, but only 40% used the diet and physical activity goal-setting tools. Conclusions: To maximize and sustain potential usage of e-Moms Roc over time, the e-intervention included customized reminders, tailored content, and community features such as blogs and resources. Usage was comparable to those in other weight