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  1. Cinnamaldehyde impairs high glucose-induced hypertrophy in renal interstitial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Louis Kuoping; Chang, W.-T.; Shih, Y.-W.; Huang, J.-S.

    2010-04-15

    Cinnamaldehyde is a major and a bioactive compound isolated from the leaves of Cinnamomum osmophloeum kaneh. To explore whether cinnamaldehyde was linked to altered high glucose (HG)-mediated renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in diabetic nephropathy (DN), the molecular mechanisms of cinnamaldehyde responsible for inhibition of HG-induced hypertrophy in renal interstitial fibroblasts were examined. We found that cinnamaldehyde caused inhibition of HG-induced cellular mitogenesis rather than cell death by either necrosis or apoptosis. There were no changes in caspase 3 activity, cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein expression, and mitochondrial cytochrome c release in HG or cinnamaldehyde treatments in these cells. HG-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (but not the Janus kinase 2/signal transducers and activators of transcription) activation was markedly blocked by cinnamaldehyde. The ability of cinnamaldehyde to inhibit HG-induced hypertrophy was verified by the observation that it significantly decreased cell size, cellular hypertrophy index, and protein levels of collagen IV, fibronectin, and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA). The results obtained in this study suggest that cinnamaldehyde treatment of renal interstitial fibroblasts that have been stimulated by HG reduces their ability to proliferate and hypertrophy through mechanisms that may be dependent on inactivation of the ERK/JNK/p38 MAPK pathway.

  2. Blockade of chronic high glucose-induced endothelial apoptosis by Sasa borealis bamboo extract.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yean-Jung; Lim, Hyeon-Sook; Choi, Jung-Suk; Shin, Seung-Yong; Bae, Ji-Young; Kang, Sang-Wook; Kang, Il-Jun; Kang, Young-Hee

    2008-05-01

    Hyperglycemia is a causal factor in the development of diabetic vascular complications including impaired vascular smooth muscle contractility and increased cell proliferation. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Sasa borealis water-extract (SBwE) on chronic hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC were cultured in 5.5 mM low glucose, 5.5 mM glucose plus 27.5 mM mannitol as an osmotic control, or 33 mM high glucose for 5 days in the absence and presence of 1-30 microg/ ml SBwE. Caspase-3 activation and Annexin V staining revealed chronic high glucose-induced endothelial apoptotic toxicity with a generation of oxidants detected by DCF-fluorescence, and these effects were reversed by SBwE at > or =1 microg/ml in a dose-dependent manner. Cytoprotective SBwE substantially reduced the sustained high glucose-induced expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and attenuated the formation of peroxynitrite radicals. The suppressive effects of SBwE were most likely mediated through blunting activation of PKC beta 2 and NADPH oxidase promoted by high glucose. In addition, this bamboo extract modulated the high glucose-triggered mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent upregulation of heat-shock proteins. Our results suggest that SBwE suppressed these detrimental effects caused by PKC-dependent peroxynitrite formation via activation of NADPH oxidase and induction of nitric oxide synthase and heat-shock protein family that may be essential mechanisms responsible for increased apoptotic oxidative stress in diabetic vascular complications. Moreover, the blockade of high glucose-elicited heat-shock protein induction appeared to be responsible for SBwE-alleviated endothelial apoptosis. Therefore, SBwE may be a therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of diabetic endothelial dysfunction and related complications. PMID:18375828

  3. Punicalagin exerts protective effect against high glucose-induced cellular stress and neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jianxiang; Reece, E Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-13

    Maternal diabetes-induced birth defects remain a significant health problem. Studying the effect of natural compounds with antioxidant properties and minimal toxicities on diabetic embryopathy may lead to the development of new and safe dietary supplements. Punicalagin is a primary polyphenol found in pomegranate juice, which possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic properties, suggesting a protective effect of punicalagin on diabetic embryopathy. Here, we examined whether punicalagin could reduce high glucose-induced neural tube defects (NTDs), and if this rescue occurs through blockage of cellular stress and caspase activation. Embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) mouse embryos were cultured for 24 or 36 h with normal (5 mM) glucose or high glucose (16.7 mM), in presence or absence of 10 or 20 μM punicalagin. 10 μM punicalagin slightly reduced NTD formation under high glucose conditions; however, 20 μM punicalagin significantly inhibited high glucose-induced NTD formation. Punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced lipid peroxidation marker 4-hydroxynonenal, nitrotyrosine-modified proteins, and lipid peroxides. Moreover, punicalagin abrogated endoplasmic reticulum stress by inhibiting phosphorylated protein kinase ribonucleic acid (RNA)-like ER kinase (p-PERK), phosphorylated inositol-requiring protein-1α (p-IRE1α), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing. Additionally, punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced caspase 3 and caspase 8 cleavage. Punicalagin reduces high glucose-induced NTD formation by blocking cellular stress and caspase activation. These observations suggest punicalagin supplements could mitigate the teratogenic effects of hyperglycemia in the developing embryo, and possibly prevent diabetes-induced NTDs.

  4. Resveratrol ameliorates high glucose-induced protein synthesis in glomerular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung-Ja; Feliers, Denis; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M; Li, Manli; Barnes, Jeffrey L; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S

    2010-01-01

    High glucose-induced protein synthesis in the glomerular epithelial cell (GEC) is partly dependent on reduction in phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). We evaluated the effect of resveratrol, a phytophenol known to stimulate AMPK, on protein synthesis. Resveratrol completely inhibited high glucose stimulation of protein synthesis and synthesis of fibronectin, an important matrix protein, at 3 days. Resveratrol dose-dependently increased AMPK phosphorylation and abolished high glucose-induced reduction in its phosphorylation. We examined the effect of resveratrol on critical steps in mRNA translation, a critical event in protein synthesis. Resveratrol inhibited high glucose-induced changes in association of eIF4E with eIF4G, phosphorylation of eIF4E, eEF2, eEF2 kinase and, p70S6 kinase, indicating that it affects important events in both initiation and elongation phases of mRNA translation. Upstream regulators of AMPK in high glucose-treated GEC were explored. High glucose augmented acetylation of LKB1, the upstream kinase for AMPK, and inhibited its activity. Resveratrol prevented acetylation of LKB1 and restored its activity in high glucose-treated cells; this action did not appear to depend on SIRT1, a class III histone deacetylase. Our data show that resveratrol ameliorates protein synthesis by regulating the LKB1-AMPK axis.

  5. Coenzyme Q10 prevents high glucose-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Sekizaki, Naoto; Suzuki, Takashi; Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Wada, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Tadashi; Kimura, Ikuko; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu

    2007-07-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of vascular complications in diabetes. Although some clinical evidences suggest the use of an antioxidant reagent coenzyme Q10 in diabetes with hypertension, the direct effect of coenzyme Q10 on the endothelial functions has not been examined. In the present study, we therefore investigated the protective effect of coenzyme Q10 against high glucose-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC exposed to high glucose (30 mM) exhibited abnormal properties, including the morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis, overproduction of reactive oxygen species, activation of protein kinase Cbeta2, and increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression. Treatment with coenzyme Q10 strongly inhibited these changes in HUVEC under high glucose condition. In addition, coenzyme Q10 inhibited high glucose-induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an endogenous caspase-3 substrate. These results suggest that coenzyme Q10 prevents reactive oxygen species-induced apoptosis through inhibition of the mitochondria-dependent caspase-3 pathway. Moreover, consistent with previous reports, high glucose caused upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in HUVEC, and promoted the adhesion of U937 monocytic cells. Coenzyme Q10 displayed potent inhibitory effects against these endothelial abnormalities. Thus, we provide the first evidence that coenzyme Q10 has a beneficial effect in protecting against the endothelial dysfunction by high glucose-induced oxidative stress in vitro.

  6. Effects of plant extracts on the reversal of glucose-induced impairment of stress-resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fitzenberger, Elena; Deusing, Dorothé Jenni; Wittkop, Anette; Kler, Adolf; Kriesl, Erwin; Bonnländer, Bernd; Wenzel, Uwe

    2014-03-01

    Enhanced blood glucose levels are a hallmark of diabetes and are associated with diabetic complications and a reduction of lifespan. In order to search for plant extracts that display preventive activities in such a scenario, we tested 16 extracts used in human nutrition for their survival enhancing activities in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Nematodes were exposed for 48 h to 10 mM glucose in the absence or presence of 0.1% extract. Thereafter, survival was measured at 37 °C. Extracts made from coffee, kola, rooibos and cinnamon, did not influence the glucose-induced reduction of survival. Those made from ginseng, camomile, lime blossom, paraguay tea, balm, rhodiola, black tea, or knotgrass all extended the lifespan of the glucose-treated nematodes significantly but did not rescue survival completely. Extracts from the leaves of blackberries, from hibiscus, elderberries, or jiaogulan completely countered the glucose-induced survival reduction. A potent activation of the proteasome was shown for the most preventive extracts suggesting a more efficient degradation of proteins impaired by glucose. In conclusion, we present a simple animal model to screen for plant extracts with potency to reverse glucose toxicity. Extracts from blackberry leaves, hibiscus, elderberries, and jiaogulan were identified as very potent in this regard whose exact mechanisms of action appear worthwile to investigate at the molecular level. PMID:24390728

  7. Myt3 suppression sensitizes islet cells to high glucose-induced cell death via Bim induction.

    PubMed

    Tennant, B R; Vanderkruk, B; Dhillon, J; Dai, D; Verchere, C B; Hoffman, B G

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that results from the body's inability to properly control circulating blood glucose levels. The loss of glucose homoeostasis can arise from a loss of β-cell mass because of immune-cell-mediated attack, as in type 1 diabetes, and/or from dysfunction of individual β-cells (in conjunction with target organ insulin resistance), as in type 2 diabetes. A better understanding of the transcriptional pathways regulating islet-cell survival is of great importance for the development of therapeutic strategies that target β-cells for diabetes. To this end, we previously identified the transcription factor Myt3 as a pro-survival factor in islets following acute suppression of Myt3 in vitro. To determine the effects of Myt3 suppression on islet-cell survival in vivo, we used an adenovirus to express an shRNA targeting Myt3 in syngeneic optimal and marginal mass islet transplants, and demonstrate that suppression of Myt3 impairs the function of marginal mass grafts. Analysis of grafts 5 weeks post-transplant revealed that grafts transduced with the shMyt3 adenovirus contained ~20% the number of transduced cells as grafts transduced with a control adenovirus. In fact, increased apoptosis and significant cell loss in the shMyt3-transduced grafts was evident after only 5 days, suggesting that Myt3 suppression sensitizes islet cells to stresses present in the early post-transplant period. Specifically, we find that Myt3 suppression sensitizes islet cells to high glucose-induced cell death via upregulation of the pro-apoptotic Bcl2 family member Bim. Taken together these data suggest that Myt3 may be an important link between glucotoxic and immune signalling pathways. PMID:27195679

  8. Oxidative stress plays a role in high glucose-induced activation of pancreatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Gyeong Ryul; Lee, Esder; Chun, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Song, Ki-Ho

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •High glucose increased production of reactive oxygen species in cultured pancreatic stellate cells. •High glucose facilitated the activation of these cells. •Antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced activation of these cells. -- Abstract: The activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) is thought to be a potential mechanism underlying islet fibrosis, which may contribute to progressive β-cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Recently, we demonstrated that antioxidants reduced islet fibrosis in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. However, there is no in vitro study demonstrating that high glucose itself can induce oxidative stress in PSCs. Thus, PSCs were isolated and cultured from Sprague Dawley rats, and treated with high glucose for 72 h. High glucose increased the production of reactive oxygen species. When treated with high glucose, freshly isolated PSCs exhibited myofibroblastic transformation. During early culture (passage 1), PSCs treated with high glucose contained an increased number of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells. During late culture (passages 2–5), PSCs treated with high glucose exhibited increases in cell proliferation, the expression of fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor, release of interleukin-6, transforming growth factor-β and collagen, and cell migration. Finally, the treatment of PSCs with high glucose and antioxidants attenuated these changes. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high glucose increased oxidative stress in primary rat PSCs, thereby facilitating the activation of these cells, while antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced PSC activation.

  9. Epigallocatechin gallate, a constituent of green tea, regulates high glucose-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang Joo; Yang, Eun Sun; Shin, Seoung Woo; Choi, Seong Hun; Park, Chan Ik; Yang, Chae Ha; Park, Jeen-Woo

    2008-01-01

    A high concentration of glucose has been implicated as a causal factor in initiation and progression of diabetic complications, and there is evidence to suggest that hyperglycemia increases the production of free radicals and oxidative stress. Therefore, compounds that scavenge reactive oxygen species may confer regulatory effects on high glucose-induced apoptosis. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenolic of green tea, is reported to have an antioxidant activity. We investigated the effect of EGCG on high glucose-induced apoptosis in U937 cells. Upon exposure to 35 mM glucose for 2 days, there was a distinct difference between untreated cells and cells pre-treated with 1 microM EGCG for 2 h in regard to cellular redox status and oxidative DNA damage to cells. EGCG pre-treated cells showed significant suppression of apoptotic features such as DNA fragmentation, damage to mitochondrial function, and modulation of apoptotic marker proteins upon exposure to high glucose. This study indicates that EGCG may play an important role in regulating the apoptosis induced by high glucose presumably through scavenging of reactive oxygen species.

  10. Proanthocyanidins Prevent High Glucose-Induced Eye Malformation by Restoring Pax6 Expression in Chick Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Rui-Rong; Zhang, Shi-Jie; Li, Yi-Fang; Tsoi, Bun; Huang, Wen-Shan; Yao, Nan; Hong, Mo; Zhai, Yu-Jia; Mao, Zhong-Fu; Tang, Lu-Ping; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Wang, Qi; He, Rong-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the leading causes of offspring malformations, in which eye malformation is an important disease. It has raised demand for therapy to improve fetal outcomes. In this study, we used chick embryo to establish a GDM model to study the protective effects of proanthocyanidins on eye development. Chick embryos were exposed to high glucose (0.2 mmol/egg) on embryo development day (EDD) 1. Proanthocyanidins (1 and 10 nmol/egg) were injected into the air sac on EDD 0. Results showed that both dosages of proanthocyanidins could prevent the eye malformation and rescue the high glucose-induced oxidative stress significantly, which the similar effects were showed in edaravone. However, proanthocyanidins could not decrease the glucose concentration of embryo eye. Moreover, the key genes regulating eye development, Pax6, was down-regulated by high glucose. Proanthocyanidins could restore the suppressed expression of Pax6. These results indicated proanthocyanidins might be a promising natural agent to prevent high glucose-induced eye malformation by restoring Pax6 expression. PMID:26262640

  11. Proanthocyanidins Prevent High Glucose-Induced Eye Malformation by Restoring Pax6 Expression in Chick Embryo.

    PubMed

    Tan, Rui-Rong; Zhang, Shi-Jie; Li, Yi-Fang; Tsoi, Bun; Huang, Wen-Shan; Yao, Nan; Hong, Mo; Zhai, Yu-Jia; Mao, Zhong-Fu; Tang, Lu-Ping; Kurihara, Hiroshi; Wang, Qi; He, Rong-Rong

    2015-08-07

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is one of the leading causes of offspring malformations, in which eye malformation is an important disease. It has raised demand for therapy to improve fetal outcomes. In this study, we used chick embryo to establish a GDM model to study the protective effects of proanthocyanidins on eye development. Chick embryos were exposed to high glucose (0.2 mmol/egg) on embryo development day (EDD) 1. Proanthocyanidins (1 and 10 nmol/egg) were injected into the air sac on EDD 0. Results showed that both dosages of proanthocyanidins could prevent the eye malformation and rescue the high glucose-induced oxidative stress significantly, which the similar effects were showed in edaravone. However, proanthocyanidins could not decrease the glucose concentration of embryo eye. Moreover, the key genes regulating eye development, Pax6, was down-regulated by high glucose. Proanthocyanidins could restore the suppressed expression of Pax6. These results indicated proanthocyanidins might be a promising natural agent to prevent high glucose-induced eye malformation by restoring Pax6 expression.

  12. Heme oxygenase-1-derived bilirubin protects endothelial cells against high glucose-induced damage.

    PubMed

    He, Meihua; Nitti, Mariapaola; Piras, Sabrina; Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Traverso, Nicola; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Mann, Giovanni E

    2015-12-01

    Hyperglycemia and diabetes are associated with endothelial cell dysfunction arising from enhanced oxidative injury, leading to the progression of diabetic vascular pathologies. The redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a master regulator of antioxidant genes, such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), involved in cellular defenses against oxidative stress. We have investigated the pathways involved in high glucose-induced activation of HO-1 in endothelial cells and examined the molecular mechanisms underlying cytoprotection. Elevated d-glucose increased intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and HO-1 expression in bovine aortic endothelial cells, with no changes in cell viability. Superoxide scavenging and inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) abrogated upregulation of HO-1 expression by elevated glucose. Inhibition of HO-1 increased the sensitivity of endothelial cells to high glucose-mediated damage, while addition of bilirubin restored cell viability. Our findings establish that exposure of endothelial cells to high glucose leads to activation of endogenous antioxidant defense genes via the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Upregulation of HO-1 provides cytoprotection against high glucose-induced oxidative stress through the antioxidant properties of bilirubin. Modulation of the Nrf2 pathway in the early stages of diabetes may thus protect against sustained damage by hyperglycemia during progression of the disease.

  13. Nanoceria Attenuated High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Damage in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shokrzadeh, Mohammad; Abdi, Hakimeh; Asadollah-Pour, Azin; Shaki, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia, a common metabolic disorder in diabetes, can lead to oxidative damage. The use of antioxidants can benefit the control and prevention of diabetes side effects. This study aims to evaluate the effect of nanoceria particles, as an antioxidant, on glucose induced cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and glutathione (GSH) content in a human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cell line. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we divided HepG2 cells into these groups: i. Cells treated with 5 mM D-glucose (control), ii. Cells treated with 45 mM D- mannitol+5 mM D-glucose (osmotic control), iii. Cells treated with 50 mM D-glucose (high glucose), and iv. Cells treated with 50 mM D-glucose+nanoceria. Cell viability, ROS formation, LPO and GSH were measured and analyzed statistically. Results High glucose (50 mM) treatment caused significant cell death and increased oxidative stress markers in HepG2 cells. Interestingly, nanoceria at a concentration of 50 mM significantly decreased the high glucose-induced cytotoxicity, ROS formation and LPO. This concentration of nanoceria increased the GSH content in HepG2 cells (P<0.05). Conclusion The antioxidant feature of nanoceria particles makes it an attractive candidate for attenuation of hyperglycemia oxidative damage in different organs. PMID:27054124

  14. High glucose induced nuclear factor kappa B mediated inhibition of endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hamuro, Masao; Polan, Jodie; Natarajan, Mohan; Mohan, Sumathy

    2002-06-01

    Delayed wound healing and accelerated atherosclerosis are common vascular complications of diabetes mellitus. Although elevated blood glucose level is the major contributing factor, mechanisms that mediate these complications are not clearly understood. In the present study, we have demonstrated that elevated glucose inhibits endothelial cell migration, thereby delaying wound healing. Our results clearly indicated that high glucose (10 or 30 mM) induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) inhibited endothelial cell migration (P<0.05). High glucose induced NF-kappaB DNA binding activity may mediate this inhibition of migration by regulating intracellular nitric oxide. In vitro wound healing model in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were used to evaluate cell migration under the influence of high glucose. The migration inhibited by high glucose was restored by NF-kappaB inhibitors (including E3-4-methylphenyl sulfonyl-2-propenenitrile, N-tosyl-Lys-chloromethylketone (TLCK), or over-expression of inhibitor subunit of kappaB) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (N-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA); and Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)). Furthermore, NF-kappaB inhibitors attenuated high glucose induced eNOS expression and intracellular nitric oxide (NO) production. Cytoskeletal immunofluorescence staining confirmed differences in actin distribution in HAEC incubated in high glucose in the presence or absence of NF-kappaB and NO inhibitors, explaining the differences observed in migration. In summary, our results for the first time suggest therapeutic strategies involving inhibition of NF-kappaB activation induced by high glucose, which may improve wound healing and help avoid some of the vascular complications of diabetes.

  15. Autophagy is involved in high glucose-induced heart tube malformation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guang; Huang, Wen-qing; Cui, Shu-dan; Li, Shuai; Wang, Xiao-yu; Li, Yan; Chuai, Manli; Cao, Liu; Li, Jiang-chao; Lu, Da-xiang; Yang, Xuesong

    2015-01-01

    Both pre-gestational and gestational diabetes have an adverse impact on heart development, but little is known about the influence on the early stage of heart tube formation. Using early gastrulating chick embryos, we investigated the influence of high glucose on the process of heart tube formation, specifically during the primary heart field phase. We demonstrated that high-glucose exposure resulted in 3 types of heart tube malformation: 1) ventricular hypertrophy, 2) ventricular hypertrophy with dextrocardia and 3) ventricular hypertrophy and dextrocardia with the fusion anomaly of a bilateral primary heart tube. Next, we found that these malformation phenotypes of heart tubes might mainly originate from the migratory anomaly of gastrulating precardiac mesoderm cells rather than cell proliferation in the developmental process of bilateral primary heart field primordia. The treatment of rapamycin (RAPA), an autophagy inducer, led to a similar heart tube malformation phenotype as high glucose. Additionally, high-glucose exposure promoted the expression of the key autophagy protein LC3B in early chick tissue. Atg7 is strongly expressed in the fusion site of bilateral primary heart tubes. All of these data imply that autophagy could be involved in the process of high-glucose-induced malformation of the heart tube. PMID:25738919

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Apoptosis Contributing to High Glucose-Induced Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Calcification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiang; Guo, Runmin; Liu, Chang; Fu, Duguan; Liu, Fuyuan; Hu, Jiefen; Jiang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a common feature in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder that is characterized by hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) in the context of insulin resistance and a relative lack of insulin. Recently, a few studies have indicated that a high concentration of glucose amplifies the osteogenesis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Some previous reports state that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis was activated in and contributed to VC. However, whether or not high glucose could induce ER stress-mediated apoptosis and then involve the pathogenesis of VC remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether high blood glucose-induced VC in diabetes mellitus is caused by the ER response and subsequent apoptosis. We examined the effects of high glucose on the ER stress response of VSMCs. High glucose treatment drastically increased the ER stress response in VSMCs. The high glucose-induced osteoblastic differentiation of VSMCs was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with 500 μM of 4-PBA (an ER stress inhibitor) prior to the exposure to high glucose, as evidenced by decreases in the expression of Runx2 and activity of alkaline phosphatase, as well as calcium nodules. These results suggest that high glucose induces the ER stress response and apoptosis, leading to high glucose-elicited VC.

  17. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Apoptosis Contributing to High Glucose-Induced Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Calcification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiang; Guo, Runmin; Liu, Chang; Fu, Duguan; Liu, Fuyuan; Hu, Jiefen; Jiang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a common feature in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder that is characterized by hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) in the context of insulin resistance and a relative lack of insulin. Recently, a few studies have indicated that a high concentration of glucose amplifies the osteogenesis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Some previous reports state that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis was activated in and contributed to VC. However, whether or not high glucose could induce ER stress-mediated apoptosis and then involve the pathogenesis of VC remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether high blood glucose-induced VC in diabetes mellitus is caused by the ER response and subsequent apoptosis. We examined the effects of high glucose on the ER stress response of VSMCs. High glucose treatment drastically increased the ER stress response in VSMCs. The high glucose-induced osteoblastic differentiation of VSMCs was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with 500 μM of 4-PBA (an ER stress inhibitor) prior to the exposure to high glucose, as evidenced by decreases in the expression of Runx2 and activity of alkaline phosphatase, as well as calcium nodules. These results suggest that high glucose induces the ER stress response and apoptosis, leading to high glucose-elicited VC. PMID:26890314

  18. High Glucose-induced Retinal Pericyte Apoptosis Depends on Association of GAPDH and Siah1.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Sandra; McCollum, Gary W; Jayagopal, Ashwath; Penn, John S

    2015-11-20

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of blindness worldwide, and its prevalence is growing. Current therapies for DR address only the later stages of the disease, are invasive, and have limited effectiveness. Retinal pericyte death is an early pathologic feature of DR. Although it has been observed in diabetic patients and in animal models of DR, the cause of pericyte death remains unknown. A novel pro-apoptotic pathway initiated by the interaction between glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and the E3 ubiquitin ligase, seven in absentia homolog 1 (Siah1), was recently identified in ocular tissues. In this article we examined the involvement of the GAPDH/Siah1 interaction in human retinal pericyte (hRP) apoptosis. HRP were cultured in 5 mm normal glucose, 25 mm l- or d-glucose for 48 h (osmotic control and high glucose treatments, respectively). Siah1 siRNA was used to down-regulate Siah1 expression. TAT-FLAG GAPDH and/or Siah1-directed peptides were used to block GAPDH and Siah1 interaction. Co-immunoprecipitation assays were conducted to analyze the effect of high glucose on the association of GAPDH and Siah1. Apoptosis was measured by Annexin V staining and caspase-3 enzymatic activity assay. High glucose increased Siah1 total protein levels, induced the association between GAPDH and Siah1, and led to GAPDH nuclear translocation. Our findings demonstrate that dissociation of the GAPDH/Siah1 pro-apoptotic complex can block high glucose-induced pericyte apoptosis, widely considered a hallmark feature of DR. Thus, the work presented in this article can provide a foundation to identify novel targets for early treatment of DR.

  19. Proteasome Dysfunction Mediates High Glucose-Induced Apoptosis in Rodent Beta Cells and Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Broca, Christophe; Varin, Elodie; Armanet, Mathieu; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Bosco, Domenico; Dalle, Stéphane; Wojtusciszyn, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS), a major cellular protein degradation machinery, plays key roles in the regulation of many cell functions. Glucotoxicity mediated by chronic hyperglycaemia is detrimental to the function and survival of pancreatic beta cells. The aim of our study was to determine whether proteasome dysfunction could be involved in beta cell apoptosis in glucotoxic conditions, and to evaluate whether such a dysfunction might be pharmacologically corrected. Therefore, UPS activity was measured in GK rats islets, INS-1E beta cells or human islets after high glucose and/or UPS inhibitor exposure. Immunoblotting was used to quantify polyubiquitinated proteins, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through CHOP expression, and apoptosis through the cleavage of PARP and caspase-3, whereas total cell death was detected through histone-associated DNA fragments measurement. In vitro, we found that chronic exposure of INS-1E cells to high glucose concentrations significantly decreases the three proteasome activities by 20% and leads to caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. We showed that pharmacological blockade of UPS activity by 20% leads to apoptosis in a same way. Indeed, ER stress was involved in both conditions. These results were confirmed in human islets, and proteasome activities were also decreased in hyperglycemic GK rats islets. Moreover, we observed that a high glucose treatment hypersensitized beta cells to the apoptotic effect of proteasome inhibitors. Noteworthily, the decreased proteasome activity can be corrected with Exendin-4, which also protected against glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings reveal an important role of proteasome activity in high glucose-induced beta cell apoptosis, potentially linking ER stress and glucotoxicity. These proteasome dysfunctions can be reversed by a GLP-1 analog. Thus, UPS may be a potent target to treat deleterious metabolic conditions leading to type 2 diabetes. PMID:24642635

  20. Protective effects of andrographolide derivative AL-1 on high glucose-induced oxidative stress in RIN-m cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Li, Yongmei; Yang, Yali; Zhang, Zaijun; Zhang, Gaoxiao; Sun, Yewei; Yu, Pei; Wang, Yuqiang; Xu, Lipeng

    2016-01-01

    AL-1 is a novel andrographolide derivative synthesized by conjugating andrographolide and alpha lipoic acid. AL-1 has been found to increase insulin secretion, decrease blood glucose level and protect β-cell mass and function in alloxan-induced diabetic mouse model. However, the protective mechanism of AL-1 on high glucose-induced pancreatic β-cell injury is still not clear. In the present study, we found that AL-1 reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) generation induced by high glucose in RIN-m cells, and which elevated the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). In addition, AL-1 increased the expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO- 1) proteins in RIN-m cells. These results suggest that AL-1 prevented RIN-m cells from high glucose-induced oxidative damage via upregulation of Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  1. Epigenetic regulation of high glucose-induced proinflammatory cytokine productionin monocytes by curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jung-Mi; Jialal, Ishwarlal; Devaraj, Sridevi

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes is a pro-inflammatory state. We have previously shown increased monocyte pro-inflammatory cytokines in patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. High glucose induces pro-inflammatory cytokines via epigenetic changes. Curcumin, a polyphenol responsible for the yellow color of the spice turmeric, is known to exert potent anti-inflammatory activity in vitro. Recent studies indicate that it may regulate chromatin remodeling by inhibiting histone acetylation. In this study, we aimed to test the effect of curcumin on histone acetylation and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion under high-glucose conditions in human monocytes. Human monocytic (THP-1) cells were cultured in presence of mannitol (osmolar control, mannitol) or normoglycemic (NG, 5.5 mmol/L glucose) or hyperglycemic (HG, 25 mmol/L glucose) conditions in absence or presence of curcumin (1.5-12.5μM) for 72 h. Cytokine level, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transactivation, histone deacetylases (HDACs) activity, histone acetylases (HATs) activity were measured by western blots, qRT-PCR, ELISA, Immunofluorescence (IF) staining. HG significantly induced histone acetylation, NF-κB activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-6, TNF-α and MCP-1) release from THP-1 cells. Curcumin suppressed NF-κB binding and cytokine release in THP-1 cells. Also, since p300 histone acetyltransferase is a coactivator of NF-κB, we examined its acetylation. Curcumin treatment also significantly reduced HAT activity, level of p300 and acetylated CBP/p300 gene expression, and induced histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) expression by curcumin. These results indicate that curcumin decreases HG-induced cytokine production in monocytes via epigenetic changes involving NF-κB. In conclusion, curcumin supplementation by reducing vascular inflammation may prevent diabetic complications. PMID:20655188

  2. NFAT2 mediates high glucose-induced glomerular podocyte apoptosis through increased Bax expression

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruizhao; Zhang, Li; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Bin; Liang, Xinling; Liu, Shuangxin; Wang, Wenjian

    2013-04-15

    Background: Hyperglycemia promotes podocyte apoptosis and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. However, the mechanisms that mediate hyperglycemia-induced podocyte apoptosis is still far from being fully understood. Recent studies reported that high glucose activate nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) in vascular smooth muscle or pancreatic β-cells. Here, we sought to determine if hyperglycemia activates NFAT2 in cultured podocyte and whether this leads to podocyte apoptosis. Meanwhile, we also further explore the mechanisms of NFAT2 activation and NFAT2 mediates high glucose-induced podocyte apoptosis. Methods: Immortalized mouse podocytes were cultured in media containing normal glucose (NG), or high glucose (HG) or HG plus cyclosporine A (a pharmacological inhibitor of calcinerin) or 11R-VIVIT (a special inhibitor of NFAT2). The activation of NFAT2 in podocytes was detected by western blotting and immunofluorescence assay. The role of NFAT2 in hyperglycemia-induced podocyte apoptosis was further evaluated by observing the inhibition of NFAT2 activation by 11R-VIVIT using flow cytometer. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} was monitored in HG-treated podcocytes using Fluo-3/AM. The mRNA and protein expression of apoptosis gene Bax were measured by real time-qPCR and western blotting. Results: HG stimulation activated NFAT2 in a time- and dose-dependent manner in cultured podocytes. Pretreatment with cyclosporine A (500 nM) or 11R-VIVIT (100 nM) completely blocked NFAT2 nuclear accumulation. Meanwhile, the apoptosis effects induced by HG were also abrogated by concomitant treatment with 11R-VIVIT in cultured podocytes. We further found that HG also increased [Ca{sup 2+}]i, leading to activation of calcineurin, and subsequent increased nuclear accumulation of NFAT2 and Bax expression in cultured podocytes. Conclusion: Our results identify a new finding that HG-induced podocyte apoptosis is mediated by calcineurin/NFAT2/Bax signaling pathway

  3. Spleen tyrosine kinase mediates high glucose-induced transforming growth factor-{beta}1 up-regulation in proximal tubular epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Won Seok; Chang, Jai Won; Han, Nam Jeong; Lee, Sang Koo; Park, Su-Kil

    2012-09-10

    The role of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) in high glucose-induced intracellular signal transduction has yet to be elucidated. We investigated whether Syk is implicated in high glucose-induced transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) up-regulation in cultured human proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2 cell). High glucose increased TGF-{beta}1 gene expression through Syk, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B. High glucose-induced AP-1 DNA binding activity was decreased by Syk inhibitors and U0126 (an ERK inhibitor). Syk inhibitors suppressed high glucose-induced ERK activation, whereas U0126 had no effect on Syk activation. High glucose-induced NF-{kappa}B DNA binding activity was also decreased by Syk inhibitors. High glucose increased nuclear translocation of p65 without serine phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and without degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, but with an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha} that may account for the activation of NF-{kappa}B. Both Syk inhibitors and Syk-siRNA attenuated high glucose-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} tyrosine phosphorylation and p65 nuclear translocation. Depletion of p21-activated kinase 2 (Pak2) by transfection of Pak2-siRNA abolished high glucose-induced Syk activation. In summary, high glucose-induced TGF-{beta}1 gene transcription occurred through Pak2, Syk and subsequent ERK/AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B pathways. This suggests that Syk might be implicated in the diabetic kidney disease.

  4. Coenzyme Q10 Attenuates High Glucose-Induced Endothelial Progenitor Cell Dysfunction through AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsiao-Ya; Lin, Chih-Pei; Huang, Po-Hsun; Li, Szu-Yuan; Chen, Jia-Shiong; Lin, Feng-Yen; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an antiapoptosis enzyme, is stored in the mitochondria of cells. We investigated whether CoQ10 can attenuate high glucose-induced endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) apoptosis and clarified its mechanism. EPCs were incubated with normal glucose (5 mM) or high glucose (25 mM) environment for 3 days, followed by treatment with CoQ10 (10 μM) for 24 hr. Cell proliferation, nitric oxide (NO) production, and JC-1 assay were examined. The specific signal pathways of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), eNOS/Akt, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were also assessed. High glucose reduced EPC functional activities, including proliferation and migration. Additionally, Akt/eNOS activity and NO production were downregulated in high glucose-stimulated EPCs. Administration of CoQ10 ameliorated high glucose-induced EPC apoptosis, including downregulation of caspase 3, upregulation of Bcl-2, and increase in mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, treatment with CoQ10 reduced reactive oxygen species, enhanced eNOS/Akt activity, and increased HO-1 expression in high glucose-treated EPCs. These effects were negated by administration of AMPK inhibitor. Transplantation of CoQ10-treated EPCs under high glucose conditions into ischemic hindlimbs improved blood flow recovery. CoQ10 reduced high glucose-induced EPC apoptosis and dysfunction through upregulation of eNOS, HO-1 through the AMPK pathway. Our findings provide a potential treatment strategy targeting dysfunctional EPC in diabetic patients.

  5. Neuroprotective Effects of Ginsenoside Rb1 on High Glucose-Induced Neurotoxicity in Primary Cultured Rat Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Di; Zhang, Hong; Gu, Wenjuan; Liu, Yuqin; Zhang, Mengren

    2013-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rb1 is one of the main active principles in traditional herb ginseng and has been reported to have a wide variety of neuroprotective effects. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, so the present study aimed to observe the effects of ginsenoside Rb1 on ER stress signaling pathways in high glucose-treated hippocampal neurons. The results from MTT, TUNEL labeling and Annexin V-FITC/PI/Hoechst assays showed that incubating neurons with 50 mM high glucose for 72h decreased cell viability and increased the number of apoptotic cells whereas treating neurons with 1 μM Rb1 for 72h protected the neurons against high glucose-induced cell damage. Further molecular mechanism study demonstrated that Rb1 suppressed the activation of ER stress-associated proteins including protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) and C/EBP homology protein (CHOP) and downregulation of Bcl-2 induced by high glucose. Moreover, Rb1 inhibited both the elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by high glucose. In addition, the high glucose-induced cell apoptosis, activation of ER stress, ROS accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction can also be attenuated by the inhibitor of ER stress 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) and anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine(NAC). In conclusion, these results suggest that Rb1 may protect neurons against high glucose-induced cell injury through inhibiting CHOP signaling pathway as well as oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:24223941

  6. Emodin attenuates high glucose-induced TGF-β1 and fibronectin expression in mesangial cells through inhibition of NF-κB pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jie; Zeng, Zhi; Wu, Teng; Yang, Zhicheng; Liu, Bing; Lan, Tian

    2013-12-10

    The activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the subsequent overexpression of its downstream targets transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and fibronectin (FN) are among the hallmarks for the progressive diabetic nephropathy. Our previous studies demonstrated that emodin ameliorated renal injury and inhibited extracellular matrix accumulation in kidney and mesangial cells under diabetic condition. However, the molecular mechanism has not been fully elucidated. Here, we showed that emodin significantly attenuated high glucose-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation in mesangial cells. Interestingly, emodin also inhibited the DNA-binding activity and transcriptional activity of NF-κB. Furthermore, NF-κB-mediated TGF-β1 and FN expression was significantly decreased by emodin. These results demonstrated that emodin suppressed TGF-β1 and FN overexpression through inhibition of NF-κB activation, suggesting that emodin-mediated inhibition of the NF-κB pathway could protect against diabetic nephropathy. - Highlights: • Emodin decreased high glucose-induced p65 phosphorylation in MCs. • Emodin decreased high glucose-induced IκB-α degradation in MCs. • Emodin decreased high glucose-induced p65 translocation in MCs. • Emodin blocked high glucose-induced NF-κB activity. • Emodin blocked high glucose-induced the expression of TGF-β1 and FN.

  7. ZLN005 protects cardiomyocytes against high glucose-induced cytotoxicity by promoting SIRT1 expression and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenju; Li, Xiaoli; Wang, Bin; Chen, Yan; Xiao, Aiping; Zeng, Di; Ou, Dongbo; Yan, Song; Li, Wei; Zheng, Qiangsun

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy increases the risk for the development of heart failure independent of coronary artery disease and hypertension. Either type 1 or type 2 diabetes is often accompanied by varying degrees of hyperglycemia, which has been proven to induce myocardial apoptosis in animal models. Recently, a novel small molecule, ZLN005, has been reported to show antidiabetic efficacy in a mouse model, possibly by induction of PGC-1α expression. In this study, we investigated whether ZLN005 protects cardiomyocytes against high glucose-induced cytotoxicity and the mechanisms involved. Neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes were incubated with media containing 5.5 or 33mM glucose for 24h in the presence or absence of ZLN005. ZLN005 treatment led to ameliorated cardiomyocyte oxidative injury, enhanced cell viability, and reduced apoptosis in the high glucose environment. Western blot analysis revealed that high glucose suppressed cardiomyocyte autophagy, whereas ZLN005 increased the expression of autophagy marker proteins ATG5, beclin1, and LC3 II/LC3 I; this increase was accompanied by increased expression of SIRT1. Furthermore, EX527, a SIRT1-specific inhibitor, weakened the protective effects of ZLN005 on cardiomyocytes subjected to high glucose. Taken together, these results suggest that ZLN005 suppresses high glucose-induced cardiomyocyte injury by promoting SIRT1 expression and autophagy. PMID:27208585

  8. Phytolacca americana inhibits the high glucose-induced mesangial proliferation via suppressing extracellular matrix accumulation and TGF-beta production.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Il; Kim, Kang Ju; Choo, Yong Kug; Keum, Kyung Soo; Choi, Bong Kyu; Jung, Kyu Yong

    2004-02-01

    This study describes a potential of Phytolaccaceae (Phytolacca americana var.) as an inhibitor of high glucose-stimulated production of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and TGF-beta in cultured glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Raising the ambient glucose concentration for 24 hrs caused a dose-dependent increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation of GMCs, and the maximal response was achieved at 20 mM. Phytolaccaceae extracts (2.5-20 microg/ml) inhibited the high glucose-induced [3H]thymidine incorporation in a dose-dependent manner, and the concentrations tested here did not affect to the cell viability. Exposure of the GMCs to 20 mM glucose caused both ECM (collagen and fibronectin) accumulation and TGF-beta secretion, and these changes were significantly diminished by treatment of GMCs with Phytolaccaceae (10 microg/ml). Taken together, these results indicate that Phytolaccaceae inhibits the high glucose-induced GMCs proliferation partially through suppressing accumulation of ECM components and TGF-beta production, suggesting that Phytolaccaceae may be a promising agent for treating the development and progression of diabetic glomerulopathy.

  9. Fyn Mediates High Glucose-Induced Actin Cytoskeleton Reorganization of Podocytes via Promoting ROCK Activation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhimei; Hu, Mengsi; Ren, Xiaoxu; Fan, Minghua; Zhen, Junhui; Chen, Liqun; Lin, Jiangong; Ding, Nannan; Wang, Qun; Wang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Fyn, a member of the Src family of tyrosine kinases, is a key regulator in cytoskeletal remodeling in a variety of cell types. Recent studies have demonstrated that Fyn is responsible for nephrin tyrosine phosphorylation, which will result in polymerization of actin filaments and podocyte damage. Thus detailed involvement of Fyn in podocytes is to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the potential role of Fyn/ROCK signaling and its interactions with paxillin. Our results presented that high glucose led to filamentous actin (F-actin) rearrangement in podocytes, accompanied by paxillin phosphorylation and increased cell motility, during which Fyn and ROCK were markedly activated. Gene knockdown of Fyn by siRNA showed a reversal effect on high glucose-induced podocyte damage and ROCK activation; however, inhibition of ROCK had no significant effects on Fyn phosphorylation. These observations demonstrate that in vitro Fyn mediates high glucose-induced actin cytoskeleton remodeling of podocytes via promoting ROCK activation and paxillin phosphorylation. PMID:26881253

  10. Tadalafil Integrates Nitric Oxide-Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling to Inhibit High Glucose-induced Matrix Protein Synthesis in Podocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hak Joo; Feliers, Denis; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M.; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh; Gorin, Yves; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes-induced kidney cell injury involves an increase in matrix protein expression that is only partly alleviated by current treatment, prompting a search for new modalities. We have previously shown that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) inhibits high glucose-induced protein synthesis in kidney podocytes. We tested whether tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor used to treat erectile dysfunction, ameliorates high glucose stimulation of matrix proteins by generating H2S in podocytes. Tadalafil abrogated high glucose stimulation of global protein synthesis and matrix protein laminin γ1. Tadalafil inhibited high glucose-induced activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 and laminin γ1 accumulation in an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent manner. Tadalafil increased AMPK phosphorylation by stimulating calcium-calmodulin kinase kinase β. Tadalafil rapidly increased the expression and activity of the H2S-generating enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) by promoting its translation. dl-Propargylglycine, a CSE inhibitor, and siRNA against CSE inhibited tadalafil-induced AMPK phosphorylation and abrogated the tadalafil effect on high glucose stimulation of laminin γ1. In tadalafil-treated podocytes, we examined the interaction between H2S and nitric oxide (NO). Nω-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]-quinoxalin-1-one, inhibitors of NO synthase (NOS) and soluble guanylyl cyclase, respectively, abolished tadalafil induction of H2S and AMPK phosphorylation. Tadalafil rapidly augmented inducible NOS (iNOS) expression by increasing its mRNA, and siRNA for iNOS and 1400W, an iNOS blocker, inhibited tadalafil stimulation of CSE expression and AMPK phosphorylation. We conclude that tadalafil amelioration of high glucose stimulation of synthesis of proteins including matrix proteins in podocytes requires integration of the NO-H2S-AMPK axis leading to the inhibition of high glucose-induced mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1

  11. High glucose induces suppression of insulin signalling and apoptosis via upregulation of endogenous IL-1beta and suppressor of cytokine signalling-1 in mouse pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Venieratos, Panagiotis D; Drossopoulou, Garyfalia I; Kapodistria, Katerina D; Tsilibary, Effie C; Kitsiou, Paraskevi V

    2010-05-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia and inflammatory cytokines disrupt and/or attenuate signal transduction pathways that promote normal beta-cell survival, leading to the destruction of endocrine pancreas in type 2 diabetes. There is convincing evidence that autocrine insulin signalling exerts protective anti-apoptotic effects on beta cells. Suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS) were induced by several cytokines and inhibit insulin-initiated signal transduction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether high glucose can influence endogenous interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and SOCS expression thus affecting insulin signalling and survival in insulin-producing mouse pancreatic beta cells (betaTC-6). Results showed that prolonged exposure of betaTC-6 cells to increased glucose concentrations resulted in significant inhibition of insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), and insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2) as well as PI3-kinase activation. These changes were accompanied by impaired activation of the anti-apoptotic signalling protein Akt and annulment of Akt-mediated suppression of the Forkhead family of transcription factors (FoxO) activation. Glucose-induced attenuation of IRS-2/Akt-mediated signalling was associated with increased IL-1beta expression. Enhanced endogenous IL-1beta specifically induced mRNA and protein expression of SOCS-1 in betaTC-6 cells. Inhibition of SOCS-1 expression by SOCS-1-specific small interfering RNA restored IRS-2/PI3K-mediated Akt phosphorylation suppressed by high glucose. The upregulation of endogenous cytokine signalling and FoxO activation were accompanied by enhanced caspase-3 activation and increased susceptibility of cells to apoptosis. These results indicated that glucose-induced endogenous IL-1beta expression increased betaTC-6 cells apoptosis by inhibiting, at least in part, IRS-2/Akt-mediated signalling through SOCS-1 upregulation.

  12. Sequential signaling cascade of IL-6 and PGC-1α is involved in high glucose-induced podocyte loss and growth arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong Il; Park, Soo Hyun

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •The pathophysiological role of IL-6 in high glucose-induced podocyte loss. •The novel role of PGC-1α in the development of diabetic nephropathy. •Signaling of IL-6 and PGC-1α in high glucose-induced dysfunction of podocyte. -- Abstract: Podocyte loss, which is mediated by podocyte apoptosis, is implicated in the onset of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we investigated the involvement of interleukin (IL)-6 in high glucose-induced apoptosis of rat podocytes. We also examined the pathophysiological role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) in this system. High glucose treatment induced not only podocyte apoptosis but also podocyte growth arrest. High glucose treatment also increased IL-6 secretion and activated IL-6 signaling. The high glucose-induced podocyte apoptosis was blocked by IL-6 neutralizing antibody. IL-6 treatment or overexpression induced podocyte apoptosis and growth arrest, and IL-6 siRNA transfection blocked high glucose-induced podocyte apoptosis and growth arrest. Furthermore, high glucose or IL-6 treatment increased PGC-1α expression, and PGC-1α overexpression also induced podocyte apoptosis and growth arrest. PGC-1α siRNA transfection blocked high glucose-induced podocyte apoptosis and growth arrest. Collectively, these findings showed that high glucose promoted apoptosis and cell growth arrest in podocytes via IL-6 signaling. In addition, PGC-1α is involved in podocyte apoptosis and cell growth arrest. Therefore, blocking IL-6 and its downstream mediators such as IL6Rα, gp130 and PGC-1α may attenuate the progression of diabetic nephropathy.

  13. Effects of astragalosides from Radix Astragali on high glucose-induced proliferation and extracellular matrix accumulation in glomerular mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, XIAO; WANG, DONG-DONG; WEI, TONG; HE, SU-MEI; ZHANG, GUAN-YING; WEI, QUN-LI

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) exhibits a deteriorating course that may lead to end-stage renal failure. Astragalosides have been clinically tested for the treatment of DN, but the mechanism is unclear at present. In this study, the effects of astragalosides were investigated on high glucose-induced proliferation and expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), type IV collagen (colIV) and fibronectin (FN) in glomerular mesangial cells (MCs). Cell proliferation was determined by 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine assay, and the expression of TGF-β1, CTGF, colIV and FN mRNA and proteins in MCs was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and ELISA assay, respectively. The results showed that high glucose clearly induced the proliferation of MCs and increased the expression of TGF-β1, CTGF, colIV and FN. Treatment with 50, 100, 200 µg/ml astragalosides inhibited cell proliferation and the expression of TGF-β1, CTGF, colIV and FN induced by high glucose. Thus, it is concluded that astragalosides inhibit the increased cell proliferation and expression of major extracellular matrix proteins that are induced by high glucose, indicating their value for the prophylaxis and therapy of DN. PMID:27313676

  14. Myricitrin Attenuates High Glucose-Induced Apoptosis through Activating Akt-Nrf2 Signaling in H9c2 Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Chen, Yaping; Shen, Qiang; Liu, Guiyan; Ye, Jingxue; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, as well as diabetes mellitus, has been shown to trigger cardiac cell apoptosis. We have previously demonstrated that myricitrin prevents endothelial cell apoptosis. However, whether myricitrin can attenuate H9c2 cell apoptosis remains unknown. In this study, we established an experiment model in H9c2 cells exposed to high glucose. We tested the hypothesis that myricitrin may inhibit high glucose (HG)-induced cardiac cell apoptosis as determined by TUNEL staining. Furthermore, myricitrin promoted antioxidative enzyme production, suppressed high glucose-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in H9c2 cells. This agent significantly inhibited apoptotic protein expression, activated Akt and facilitated the transcription of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated protein (heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) expression as determined by Western blotting. Significantly, an Akt inhibitor (LY294002) or HO-1 inhibitor (ZnPP) not only inhibited myricitrin-induced HO-1/NQO-1 upregulation but also alleviated its anti-apoptotic effects. In summary, these observations demonstrate that myricitrin activates Nrf2-mediated anti-oxidant signaling and attenuates H9c2 cell apoptosis induced by high glucose via activation of Akt signaling. PMID:27399653

  15. Protective Effects of Panax notoginseng Saponins against High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Injury in Rat Retinal Capillary Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yue; Qiao, Yuan; Huang, Jianmei; Tang, Minke

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of visual loss and blindness, is characterized by microvascular dysfunction. Hyperglycemia is considered the major pathogenic factor for diabetic retinopathy and is associated with increased oxidative stress in the retina. In this study, we investigated the potential protective effects of Panax notoginseng Saponins (PNS) in retinal capillary endothelial cells (RCECs) exposed to high glucose conditions. We found a pronounced increase in cell viability in rat RCECs incubated with both PNS and high glucose (30 mM) for 48 h or 72 h. The increased viability was accompanied by reduced intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2 (-)), decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lowered malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. PNS also increased the activities of total superoxide dismutase (SOD), MnSOD, catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX). The glutathione (GSH) content also increased after PNS treatment. Furthermore, PNS reduced NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression. These results indicate that PNS exerts a protective effect against high glucose-induced injury in RCECs, which may be partially attributed to its antioxidative function. PMID:27019662

  16. SIRT1 attenuates high glucose-induced insulin resistance via reducing mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao-Hao; Ma, Xiao-Jun; Wu, Li-Na; Zhao, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Peng-Yu; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Shao, Ming-Wei; Liu, Fei; Li, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is often characterized as the most critical factor contributing to the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sustained high glucose is an important extracellular environment that induces insulin resistance. Acquired insulin resistance is associated with reduced insulin-stimulated mitochondrial activity as a result of increased mitochondrial dysfunction. Silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) is one member of the SIRT2 (Sir2)-like family of proteins involved in glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion in mammals. Although SIRT1 has a therapeutic effect on metabolic deterioration in insulin resistance, it is still not clear how SIRT1 is involved in the development of insulin resistance. Here, we demonstrate that pcDNA3.1 vector-mediated overexpression of SIRT1 attenuates insulin resistance in the high glucose-induced insulin-resistant skeleton muscle cells. These beneficial effects were associated with ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction. Further studies have demonstrated that SIRT1 restores mitochondrial complex I activity leading to decreased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, SIRT1 significantly elevated the level of another SIRT which is named SIRT3, and SIRT3 siRNA-suppressed SIRT1-induced mitochondria complex activity increments. Taken together, these results showed that SIRT1 improves insulin sensitivity via the amelioration of mitochondrial dysfunction, and this is achieved through the SIRT1–SIRT3–mitochondrial complex I pathway. PMID:25710929

  17. Gallic Acid Decreases Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion Through Histone Acetyltransferase/Histone Deacetylase Regulation in High Glucose-Induced Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wooje; Lee, Sang Yeol; Son, Young-Jin; Yun, Jung-Mi

    2015-07-01

    Hyperglycemia contributes to diabetes and several diabetes-related complications. Gallic acid is a polyhydroxy phenolic compound found in various natural products. In this study, we investigated the effects and mechanism of gallic acid on proinflammatory cytokine secretion in high glucose-induced human monocytes (THP-1 cells). THP-1 cells were cultured under normoglycemic or hyperglycemic conditions, in the absence or presence of gallic acid. Hyperglycemic conditions significantly induced histone acetylation, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, and proinflammatory cytokine release from THP-1 cells, whereas gallic acid suppressed NF-κB activity and cytokine release. It also significantly reduced CREB-binding protein/p300 (CBP/p300, a NF-κB coactivator) gene expression, acetylation levels, and CBP/p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity. In addition, histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) expression was significantly induced. These results suggest that gallic acid inhibits hyperglycemic-induced cytokine production in monocytes through epigenetic changes involving NF-κB. Therefore, gallic acid may have potential for the treatment and prevention of diabetes and its complications.

  18. Effects of methanolic extracts of edible plants on RAGE in high-glucose-induced human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Okada, Mizue; Okada, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products' (AGEs) engagement of a cell-surface receptor for AGEs (RAGE) has been causally implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular complications in diabetic patients. Methanolic extracts from edible plants (MEEP) are naturally occurring phenolic compounds. The phenolic compounds have been reported to possess potent radical-scavenging properties. We investigated whether MEEP could inhibit high glucose-induced RAGE production through interference with reactive oxygen species generation in endothelial cells (ECs). ECs were incubated with 4.5 g/l of glucose in culture medium treated with 21 MEEP. Determination of RAGE production in the culture supernatants was performed by colorimetric ELISA. DNA damage was determined by using the 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine ELISA kit. Because peroxynitrite radicals with stronger toxicity were produced by nitric oxide radical (NO), the NO scavenging activity of MEEP was assessed as nitrite generation. Peroxynitrite radical-dependent oxidation inhibition by MEEP was estimated by the Crow method. The results showed that four extracts reduced RAGE production. The extract from onion peel showed the highest RAGE production inhibition activity, followed by that of onion rhizome, cow pea and burdock. The results showed that RAGE production is correlated with the above-mentioned indicators. This study supports the utilization of four extracts for improved treatment of diabetic complications. PMID:26407112

  19. High glucose induces inflammatory cytokine through protein kinase C-induced toll-like receptor 2 pathway in gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shao-Yun; Wei, Cong-Cong; Shang, Ting-Ting; Lian, Qi; Wu, Chen-Xuan; Deng, Jia-Yin

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High glucose significantly induced TLR2 expression in gingival fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High glucose increased NF-{kappa}B p65 nuclear activity, IL-1{beta} and TNF-{alpha} levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PKC-{alpha}/{delta}-TLR2 pathway is involved in periodontal inflammation under high glucose. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in innate immune response and inflammation, especially in periodontitis. Meanwhile, hyperglycemia can induce inflammation in diabetes complications. However, the activity of TLRs in periodontitis complicated with hyperglycemia is still unclear. In the present study, high glucose (25 mmol/l) significantly induced TLR2 expression in gingival fibroblasts (p < 0.05). Also, high glucose increased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) p65 nuclear activity, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-l{beta} (IL-1{beta}) levels. Protein kinase C (PKC)-{alpha} and {delta} knockdown with siRNA significantly decreased TLR2 and NF-{kappa}B p65 expression (p < 0.05), whereas inhibition of PKC-{beta} had no effect on TLR2 and NF-{kappa}B p65 under high glucose (p < 0.05). Additional studies revealed that TLR2 knockdown significantly abrogated high-glucose-induced NF-{kappa}B expression and inflammatory cytokine secretion. Collectively, these data suggest that high glucose stimulates TNF-{alpha} and IL-1{beta} secretion via inducing TLR2 through PKC-{alpha} and PKC-{delta} in human gingival fibroblasts.

  20. Protective Role of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Against High-Glucose-Induced Endothelial Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lixin; Qiao, Yue; Zhang, Lina; Pan, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the protective effect of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) against cell damage induced by high glucose. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were divided into control group (5.5 mmol/L) and high glucose groups (19, 33, or 47 mmol/L), which were cultured with different concentrations of glucose for 48 hours, respectively. Cell viability was measured with MTT assay. Levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were monitored by flow cytometry and apoptotic cell death was measured by staining with Annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide. Cultured cells were detected with intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), VCAM-1, and JNK on protein. Compared with the control group, cell viability was decreased by 20% and 37%, respectively, when cultured under 33 and 47 mM, while increased in different GLP-1-treated groups (0.01 L, 0.1, 1, and 10 nmol/L). The GLP-1 treatment significantly reduced the ROS level of high glucose treatment group but not impact on the control group. Meanwhile, the level of apoptosis was elevated in the high glucose treatment group. Early apoptosis was significantly reversed in the GLP-1-treated group (0.1, 1, and 10 nmol/L). Late apoptosis was uniquely decreased in the GLP-1 concentrations of 10 nmol/L. Furthermore, GLP-1 could also reduce the protein levels of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and phospho JNK in the endothelial cells with high glucose treatment. GLP-1 could inhibit cell apoptosis and reduce ROS generation and JNK-Bax signaling pathway activation, which were induced by high glucose treatment. PMID:26632709

  1. Serelaxin (recombinant human relaxin-2) prevents high glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction by ameliorating prostacyclin production in the mouse aorta.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hooi Hooi; Leo, Chen Huei; Parry, Laura J

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction is a critical initiating factor in the development of cardiovascular complications. Treatment with relaxin improves tumour necrosis factor α-induced endothelial dysfunction by enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and restoring superoxide dismutase 1 protein in rat aortic rings ex vivo. It is, therefore, possible that relaxin treatment could alleviate endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that serelaxin (recombinant human relaxin-2) prevents high glucose-induced vascular dysfunction in the mouse aorta. Abdominal aortae were isolated from C57BL/6 male mice and incubated in M199 media for 3days with either normal glucose (5.5mM) or high glucose (30mM), and co-incubated with placebo (20mM sodium acetate) or 10nM serelaxin at 37°C in 5% CO2. Vascular function was analysed using wire-myography. High glucose significantly reduced the sensitivity to the endothelium-dependent agonist, acetylcholine (ACh) (pEC50; normal glucose=7.66±0.10 vs high glucose=7.29±0.10, n=11-12, P<0.05) and the contraction induced by NOS inhibitor, L-NAME (200μM) (normal glucose=59.9±8.3% vs high glucose=38.7±4.3%, n=6, P<0.05), but had no effect on the endothelium-independent agonist, sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-mediated relaxation. Treatment with serelaxin restored endothelial function (pEC50; 7.83±0.11, n=11) but not NO availability. The presence of the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, indomethacin (1μM) (pEC50; control=7.29±0.10 vs indo=7.74±0.18, n=6-12, P<0.05) and a superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol (10μM) (pEC50; control=7.29±0.10 vs tempol=7.82±0.05, n=6-12, P<0.01) significantly improved sensitivity to ACh in high glucose treated aortae, but had no effect in serelaxin treated aortae. This suggests that high glucose incubation alters the superoxide and COX-sensitive pathway, which was normalized by co-incubation with serelaxin. Neither high glucose incubation nor serelaxin

  2. High glucose-induced proteome alterations in hepatocytes and its possible relevance to diabetic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Yi; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Chen, You-Hsuan; Chan, Hong-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Hyperglycemia can cause several abnormalities in liver cells, including diabetic liver disease. Previous research has shown that high blood glucose levels can damage liver cells through glycoxidation. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of high blood glucose on the development of diabetic liver disease have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we cultured a liver cell line (Chang liver cell) in mannitol-balanced 5.5 mM, 25 mM and 100 mM d-glucose media and evaluated protein expression and redox regulation. We identified 141 proteins that showed significant changes in protein expression and 29 proteins that showed significant changes in thiol reactivity, in response to high glucose concentration. Several proteins involved in transcription-control, signal transduction, redox regulation and cytoskeleton regulation showed significant changes in expression, whereas proteins involved in protein folding and gene regulation displayed changes in thiol reactivity. Further analyses of clinical plasma specimens confirmed that the proteins AKAP8L, galectin-3, PGK 1, syntenin-1, Abin 2, aldose reductase, CD63, GRP-78, GST-pi, RXR-gamma, TPI and vimentin showed type 2 diabetic liver disease-dependent alterations. In summary, in this study we used a comprehensive hepatocyte-based proteomic approach to identify changes in protein expression and to identify redox-associated diabetic liver disease markers induced by high glucose concentration. Some of the identified proteins were validated with clinical samples and are presented as potential targets for the prognosis and diagnosis of diabetic liver disease.

  3. Orientin inhibits high glucose-induced vascular inflammation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kwak, Soyoung; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2014-12-01

    Vascular inflammation plays a key role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, a major complication of diabetes mellitus. Orientin, a C-glycosyl flavonoid, is known to have anxiolytic and antioxidative activity. In this study, we assessed whether orientin can suppress vascular inflammation induced by high glucose (HG) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. Our data indicate that HG markedly increased vascular permeability, monocyte adhesion, the expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). Remarkably, the vascular inflammatory effects of HG were attenuated by pretreatment with orientin. Since vascular inflammation induced by HG is critical in the development of diabetic complications, our results suggest that orientin may have significant benefits in the treatment of diabetic complications and atherosclerosis.

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 enhances autophagy in podocytes as a protective mechanism against high glucose-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Chenglong; Zheng, Haining; Huang, Shanshan; You, Na; Xu, Jiarong; Ye, Xiaolong; Zhu, Qun; Feng, Yamin; You, Qiang; Miao, Heng; Ding, Dafa; Lu, Yibing

    2015-10-01

    Injury and loss of podocytes play vital roles in diabetic nephropathy progression. Emerging evidence suggests autophagy, which is induced by multiple stressors including hyperglycemia, plays a protective role. Meanwhile, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) possesses powerful anti-apoptotic properties. Therefore, we investigated the impact of autophagy on podocyte apoptosis under diabetic conditions and its association with HO-1. Mouse podocytes were cultured in vitro; apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Transmission electron microscopy and biochemical autophagic flux assays were used to measure the autophagy markers microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) and beclin-1. LC3-II and beclin-1 expression peaked 12–24 h after exposing podocytes to high glucose. Inhibition of autophagy with 3-methyladenine or Beclin-1 siRNAs or Atg 5 siRNAs sensitized cells to apoptosis, suggesting autophagy is a survival mechanism. HO-1 inactivation inhibited autophagy, which aggravated podocyte injury in vitro. Hemin-induced autophagy also protected podocytes from hyperglycemia in vitro and was abrogated by HO-1 siRNA. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase phosphorylation was higher in hemin-treated and lower in HO-1 siRNA-treated podocytes. Suppression of AMPK activity reversed HO-1-mediated Beclin-1 upregulation and autophagy, indicating HO-1-mediated autophagy is AMPK dependent. These findings suggest HO-1 induction and regulation of autophagy are potential therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy. - Highlights: • High glucose leads to increased autophagy in podocytes at an early stage. • The early autophagic response protects against high glucose-induced apoptosis. • Heme oxygenase-1 enhances autophagy and decreases high glucose -mediated apoptosis. • Heme oxygenase-1 induces autophagy through the activation of AMPK.

  5. Vicenin-2 and scolymoside inhibit high-glucose-induced vascular inflammation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sae-Kwang; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-03-01

    The vascular inflammatory process has been suggested to play a key role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, a major complication of diabetes mellitus. Thus, in this study, we attempted to determine whether 2 structurally related flavonoids found in Cyclopia subternata, vicenin-2 and scolymoside, can suppress high-glucose (HG)-induced vascular inflammatory processes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. The effects of vicenin-2 and scolymoside on HG-induced vascular inflammation were determined by measuring vascular permeability, leukocyte adhesion and migration, cell adhesion molecule (CAM) expression levels, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. In addition, the anti-inflammation mechanism was investigated using immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting. The data showed that HG markedly increased vascular permeability, monocyte adhesion, expression of CAMs, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Remarkably, pretreatment with vicenin-2 and scolymoside attenuated all of the above-mentioned vascular inflammatory effects of HG. HG-induced vascular inflammatory responses are critical events underlying the development of various diabetic complications; therefore, our results suggest that vicenin-2 and scolymoside have significant therapeutic benefits against diabetic complications and atherosclerosis.

  6. Cytoprotective mechanism of ferulic acid against high glucose-induced oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuan; Wen, Luona; Sun, Jianxia; Bai, Weibin; Jiao, Rui; Hu, Yunfeng; Peng, Xichun; He, Yong; Ou, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    Background Ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic acid, is a potential therapy for diabetes mellitus. FA has been shown to protect against hepatic and myocardial injury and oxidative stress in obese rats with late-stage diabetes, but the mechanism of the antioxidative activity of FA is still unclear. Objective The aim of this study was to elucidate whether FA can prevent damage to cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes caused by high glucose (HG)-induced oxidative stress and whether the protection effects of FA on these cells are related to the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE signaling pathways. Design Cells were divided into four groups: a control group (cultured with normal medium), an HG group (medium containing 80 mmol/L glucose), an FA+HG group (medium containing 80 mmol/L glucose and 1, 5, or 10 µg/mL FA), and a dimethylbiguanide (DMBG)+HG group (medium containing 80 mmol/L glucose and 50 µg/mL DMBG). Results FA treatment significantly increased cell viability and significantly decreased cell apoptosis compared with the HG-treated group. Moreover, FA down-regulated the expression of Keap1 protein and up-regulated the expression of Nrf2 protein and gene transcription of HO-1 and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion FA alleviated the HG-induced oxidative stress and decreased cell apoptosis in hepatocytes and cardiomyocytes. These effects were associated with the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway. PMID:26869273

  7. Poria cocos inhibits high glucose-induced proliferation of rat mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Joo; Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, So Min; Jin, Song Nan; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2013-01-01

    Mesangial cell proliferation is correlated with the progression of renal failure. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a water extract of Poria cocos Wolf (WPC), a well-known medicinal plant, regulates rat mesangial cell proliferation in the presence of high glucose (HG). HG significantly accelerated [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation, which was inhibited by WPC (1-50 μg/mL) in a dose-dependent manner. Cell migration and fibronectin mRNA expression data also supported the anti-proliferative effect of WPC. Western blot analysis revealed that pretreatment with WPC decreased the expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and promoted the expression of p21(waf1/cip1) and p27(kip1). WPC also suppressed HG-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) phosphorylation. Furthermore, WPC inhibited HG-induced production of dichlorofluorescein (DCF)-sensitive intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In conclusion, HG promoted mesangial cell proliferation, and WPC inhibited this activity, at least in part, via induction of cell cycle arrest and activation of anti-oxidant properties. Taken together, these results suggest that P. cocos may be a potent regulator of HG-induced proliferation.

  8. Aralia taibaiensis Protects Cardiac Myocytes against High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jialin; Wei, Guo; Guo, Chao; Cui, Jia; Yan, Jiajia; Yin, Ying; Guan, Yue; Weng, Yan; Zhu, Yanrong; Wu, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Yanhua; Xi, Miaomiao; Wen, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes have increased cardiovascular disease risk compared with those without diabetes. Hyperglycemia can induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which contributes to the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Our previous study has demonstrated that the total saponins of Aralia taibaiensis (sAT), a frequently-used antidiabetic medicine in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), can scavenge free radicals in vitro and have good anti-oxidant ability on lipid peroxidation of rat liver microsomes. This work was designed to investigate whether sAT could protect the heart while it was used in the treatment of diabetes. Oxidative stress was induced in H9c2 cells by high glucose (33 mM) and glucose oxidase (15 mU, G/GO) and the protective effects of sAT were evaluated. Treatment of H9c2 cells with G/GO resulted in an increase in cell death, intracellular ROS level and cell oxidative injury, which were markedly reduced by sAT treatment. Further study revealed that sAT induced the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and expression of its downstream targets. Moreover, Nrf2 siRNA markedly abolished the cytoprotective effects of sAT. sAT exerted cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress induced by hyperglycemia and the cardioprotective effects of sAT might be through the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Thus, sAT might be a promising candidate for the treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26446201

  9. Delphinidin prevents high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis by inhibition of NOX-1 and mitochondrial superoxide in mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Seung Eun; Jo, Hye Jun; Kim, Yong-Woon; Cho, Young-Je; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Park, So-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the effect of delphinidin on high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis in mesangial cells. Glucose dose-dependently (5.6-25 mM) increased cell proliferation and collagen I and IV mRNA levels, whereas pretreatment with delphinidin (50 μM) prevented cell proliferation and the increased collagen mRNA levels induced by high glucose (25 mM). High glucose increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and this was suppressed by pretreating delphinidin or the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine. NADPH oxidase (NOX) 1 was upregulated by high glucose, but pretreatment with delphinidin abrogated this upregulation. Increased mitochondrial superoxide by 25 mM glucose was also suppressed by delphinidin. The NOX inhibitor apocynin and mitochondria-targeted antioxidant Mito TEMPO inhibited ROS generation and cell proliferation induced by high glucose. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 was increased by high glucose, which was suppressed by delphinidin, apocynin or Mito TEMPO. Furthermore, PD98059 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) prevented the high glucose-induced cell proliferation and increased collagen mRNA levels. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β protein levels were elevated by high glucose, and pretreatment with delphinidin or PD98059 prevented this augmentation. These results suggest that delphinidin prevents high glucose-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis by inhibition of NOX-1 and mitochondrial superoxide in mesangial cells.

  10. Curcumin attenuates high glucose-induced podocyte apoptosis by regulating functional connections between caveolin-1 phosphorylation and ROS

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li-na; Liu, Xiang-chun; Chen, Xiang-jun; Guan, Guang-ju; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Caveolin-1 (cav-1) is a major multifunctional scaffolding protein of caveolae. Cav-1 is primarily expressed in mesangial cells, renal proximal tubule cells and podocytes in kidneys. Recent evidence shows that the functional connections between cav-1 and ROS play a key role in many diseases. In this study we investigated whether regulating the functional connections between cav-1 and ROS in kidneys contributed to the beneficial effects of curcumin in treating diabetic nephropathy in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Cultured mouse podocytes (mpc5) were incubated in a high glucose (HG, 30 mmol/L) medium for 24, 48 or 72 h. Male rats were injected with STZ (60 mg/kg, ip) to induce diabetes. ROS generation, SOD activity, MDA content and caspase-3 activity in the cultured cells and kidney cortex homogenate were determined. Apoptotic proteins and cav-1 phosphorylation were analyzed using Western blot analyses. Results: Incubation in HG-containing medium time-dependently increased ROS production, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and cav-1 phosphorylation in podocytes. Pretreatment with curcumin (1, 5, and 10 μmol/L) dose-dependently attenuated these abnormalities in HG-treated podocytes. Furthermore, in HG-containing medium, the podocytes transfected with a recombinant plasmid GFP-cav-1 Y14F (mutation at a cav-1 phosphorylation site) exhibited significantly decreased ROS production and apoptosis compared with the cells transfected with empty vector. In diabetic rats, administration of curcumin (100 or 200 mg/kg body weight per day, ig, for 8 weeks) not only significantly improved the renal function, but also suppressed ROS levels, oxidative stress, apoptosis and cav-1 phosphorylation in the kidneys. Conclusion: Curcumin attenuates high glucose-induced podocyte apoptosis in vitro and diabetic nephropathy in vivo partly through regulating the functional connections between cav-1 phosphorylation and ROS. PMID:26838071

  11. High glucose induces activation of NF-κB inflammatory signaling through IκBα sumoylation in rat mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wei; Xu, Ling; Zhou, Xueqin; Gao, Chenlin; Yang, Maojun; Chen, Guo; Zhu, Jianhua; Jiang, Lan; Gan, Huakui; Gou, Fang; Feng, Hong; Peng, Juan; Xu, Yong

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •The expression of SUMO1, SUMO2/3 under high glucose was obviously enhanced. •High glucose induced degradation of IκBα and activation of NF-κB pathway. •Sumoylation of IκBα in high glucose were significantly decreased. •The proteasome inhibitor MG132 could partially revert the degradation of IκBα. -- Abstract: The posttranslational modification of proteins by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) has emerged as an important regulatory mechanism for the alteration of protein activity, stability, and cellular localization. The latest research demonstrates that sumoylation is extensively involved in the regulation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway, which plays a critical role in the regulation of inflammation and contributes to fibrosis in diabetic nephropathy (DN). However, the role of sumoylation in the regulation of NF-κB signaling in DN is still unclear. In the present study, we cultured rat glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs) stimulated by high glucose and divided GMCs into six groups: normal glucose group (5.6 mmol/L), high glucose groups (10, 20, and 30 mmol/L), mannitol group (i.e., osmotic control group), and MG132 intervention group (30 mmol/L glucose with MG132, a proteasome inhibitor). The expression of SUMO1, SUMO2/3, IκBα, NF-κBp65, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) was measured by Western blot, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and indirect immunofluorescence laser scanning confocal microscopy. The interaction between SUMO1, SUMO2/3, and IκBα was observed by co-immunoprecipitation. The results showed that the expression of SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 was dose- and time-dependently enhanced by high glucose (p < 0.05). However, the expression of IκBα sumoylation in high glucose was significantly decreased compared with the normal glucose group (p < 0.05). The expression of IκBα was dose- and time-dependently decreased, and NF-κBp65 and MCP-1 were increased under high glucose conditions, which

  12. High glucose induces apoptosis and suppresses proliferation of adult rat neural stem cells following in vitro ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Post-stroke hyperglycemia appears to be associated with poor outcome from stroke, greater mortality, and reduced functional recovery. Focal cerebral ischemia data support that neural stem cells (NSCs) play an important role in post-ischemic repair. Here we sought to evaluate the negative effects of hyperglycemia on the cellular biology of NSCs following anoxia, and to test whether high glucose affects NSC recovery from ischemic injury. Results In this study, we used immortalized adult neural stem cells lines and we induced in vitro ischemia by 6 h oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in an anaerobic incubator. Reperfusion was performed by returning cells to normoxic conditions and the cells were then incubated in experimental medium with various concentrations of glucose (17.5, 27.75, 41.75, and 83.75 mM) for 24 h. We found that high glucose (≥27.75 mM) exposure induced apoptosis of NSCs in a dose-dependent manner after exposure to OGD, using an Annexin V/PI apoptosis detection kit. The cell viability and proliferative activity of NSCs following OGD in vitro, evaluated with both a Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and a 5-ethynyl-2’-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assay, were inhibited by high glucose exposure. Cell cycle analysis showed that high glucose exposure increased the percentage of cells in G0/G1-phase, and reduced the percentage of cells in S-phase. Furthermore, high glucose exposure was found to significantly induce the activation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and suppress extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that high glucose induces apoptosis and inhibits proliferation of NSCs following OGD in vitro, which may be associated with the activation of JNK/p38 MAPK pathways and the delay of G1-S transition in the cells. PMID:23452440

  13. Propolis, a Constituent of Honey, Inhibits the Development of Sugar Cataracts and High-Glucose-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species in Rat Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Teppei; Shibata, Shinsuke; Shibata, Naoko; Kiyokawa, Etsuko; Singh, Dhirendra P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study investigated the effects of oral propolis on the progression of galactose-induced sugar cataracts in rats and the in vitro effects of propolis on high-glucose-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death in cultured rat lens cells (RLECs). Methods. Galactose-fed rats and RLECs cultured in high glucose (55 mM) medium were treated with propolis or vehicle control. Relative lens opacity was assessed by densitometry and changes in lens morphology by histochemical analysis. Intracellular ROS levels and cell viability were measured. Results. Oral administration of propolis significantly inhibited the onset and progression of cataract in 15% and 25% of galactose-fed rats, respectively. RLECs cultured with high glucose showed a significant increase in ROS expression with reduced cell viability. Treatment of these RLECs with 5 and 50 μg/mL propolis cultured significantly reduced ROS levels and increased cell viability, indicating that the antioxidant activity of propolis protected cells against ROS-induced damage. Conclusion. Propolis significantly inhibited the onset and progression of sugar cataract in rats and mitigated high-glucose-induced ROS production and cell death. These effects may be associated with the ability of propolis to inhibit hyperglycemia-evoked oxidative or osmotic stress-induced cellular insults. PMID:27242920

  14. MicroRNA-21 Orchestrates High Glucose-induced Signals to TOR Complex 1, Resulting in Renal Cell Pathology in Diabetes*

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Nirmalya; Das, Falguni; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M.; Mandal, Chandi Charan; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S.; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh

    2011-01-01

    Hyperglycemia induces a wide array of signaling pathways in the kidney that lead to hypertrophy and matrix expansion, eventually culminating in progressive kidney failure. High glucose-induced reduction of the tumor suppressor protein phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted in chromosome 10 (PTEN) contributes to renal cell hypertrophy and matrix expansion. We identified microRNA-21 (miR-21) as the molecular link between high glucose and PTEN suppression. Renal cortices from OVE26 type 1 diabetic mice showed significantly elevated levels of miR-21 associated with reduced PTEN and increased fibronectin content. In renal mesangial cells, high glucose increased the expression of miR-21, which targeted the 3′-UTR of PTEN mRNA to inhibit PTEN protein expression. Overexpression of miR-21 mimicked the action of high glucose, which included a reduction in PTEN expression and a concomitant increase in Akt phosphorylation. In contrast, expression of miR-21 Sponge, to inhibit endogenous miR-21, prevented down-regulation of PTEN and phosphorylation of Akt induced by high glucose. Interestingly, high glucose-stimulated miR-21 inactivated PRAS40, a negative regulator of TORC1. Finally, miR-21 enhanced high glucose-induced TORC1 activity, resulting in renal cell hypertrophy and fibronectin expression. Thus, our results identify a previously unrecognized function of miR-21 that is the reciprocal regulation of PTEN levels and Akt/TORC1 activity that mediate critical pathologic features of diabetic kidney disease. PMID:21613227

  15. Biphasic Response to Luteolin in MG-63 Osteoblast-Like Cells under High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Naser; Khosravi, Afra; Aidy, Ali; Shafiei, Massoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical evidence indicates the diabetes-induced impairment of osteogenesis caused by a decrease in osteoblast activity. Flavonoids can increase the differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts in a high-glucose state. However, some flavonoids such as luteolin may have the potential to induce cytotoxicity in osteoblast-like cells. This study was performed to investigate whether a cytoprotective concentration range of luteolin could be separated from a cytotoxic concentration range in human MG-63 osteoblast-like cells in high-glucose condition. Methods: Cells were cultured in a normal- or high-glucose medium. Cell viability was determined with the MTT assay. The formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured using probe 2’,7’ -dichlorofluorescein diacetate, and osteogenic differentiation was evaluated with an alkaline phosphatase bioassay. Results: ROS generation, reduction in alkaline phosphatase activity, and cell death induced by high glucose were inhibited by lower concentrations of luteolin (EC50, 1.29±0.23 µM). Oxidative stress mediated by high glucose was also overcome by N-acetyl-L-cysteine. At high concentrations, luteolin caused osteoblast cell death in normal- and high-glucose states (IC50, 34±2.33 and 27±2.42 µM, respectively), as represented by increased ROS and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity. Conclusion: Our results indicated that the cytoprotective action of luteolin in glucotoxic condition was manifested in much lower concentrations, by a factor of approximately 26 and 20, than was its cytotoxic activity, which occurred under normal or glucotoxic condition, respectively. PMID:26989282

  16. High Glucose-Induced Repression of RAR/RXR In Cardiomyocytes is Mediated Through Oxidative Stress/JNK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amar Bahadur; Guleria, Rakeshwar S.; Nizamutdinova, Irina T.; Baker, Kenneth M.; Pan, Jing

    2011-01-01

    The biological actions of retinoids are mediated by nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid × receptors (RXRs). We have recently reported that decreased expression of RARα and RXRα has an important role in high glucose (HG)-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanisms of HG effects on RARα and RXRα remain unclear. Using neonatal cardiomyocytes, we found that ligand-induced promoter activity of RAR and RXR was significantly suppressed by HG. HG promoted protein destabilization and serine-phosphorylation of RARα and RXRα. Proteasome inhibitor MG132 blocked the inhibitory effect of HG on RARα and RXRα. Inhibition of intracellular reactive oxidative species (ROS) abolished the HG effect. In contrast, H2O2 stimulation suppressed the expression and ligand-induced promoter activity of RARα and RXRα. HG promoted phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK and p38 MAP kinases, which was abrogated by an ROS inhibitor. Inhibition of JNK, but not ERK and p38 activity, reversed HG effects on RARα and RXRα. Activation of JNK by over expressing MKK7 and MEKK1, resulted in significant downregulation of RARα and RXRα. Ligand-induced promoter activity of RARα and RXRα was also suppressed by overexpression of MEKK1. HG-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis was potentiated by activation of JNK, and prevented by ATRA and inhibition of JNK. Silencing the expression of RARα and RXRα activated the JNK pathway. In conclusion, HG-induced oxidative stress and activation of the JNK pathway negatively regulated expression/activation of RAR and RXR. The impaired RAR/RXR signaling and oxidative stress/JNK pathway forms a vicious circle, which significantly contributes to hyperglycemia induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. PMID:21882190

  17. High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress Mediates Apoptosis and Extracellular Matrix Metabolic Imbalances Possibly via p38 MAPK Activation in Rat Nucleus Pulposus Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Ni, Bin; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Ying; Zhao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate whether high glucose-induced oxidative stress is implicated in apoptosis of rat nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and abnormal expression of critical genes involved in the metabolic balance of extracellular matrix (ECM). Methods. NPCs were cultured with various concentrations of glucose to detect cell viability and apoptosis. Cells cultured with high glucose (25 mM) were untreated or pretreated with N-acetylcysteine or a p38 MAPK inhibitor SB 202190. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was evaluated. Activation of p38 MAPK was measured by Western blot. The expression of ECM metabolism-related genes, including type II collagen, aggrecan, SRY-related high-mobility-group box 9 (Sox-9), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), was analyzed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results. High glucose reduced viability of NPCs and induced apoptosis. High glucose resulted in increased ROS generation and p38 MAPK activation. In addition, it negatively regulated the expression of type II collagen, aggrecan, Sox-9, and TIMP-1 and positively regulated MMP-3 expression. These results were changed by pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine or SB 202190. Conclusions. High glucose might promote apoptosis of NPCs, trigger ECM catabolic pathways, and inhibit its anabolic activities, possibly through a p38 MAPK-dependent oxidative stress mechanism. PMID:27635402

  18. High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress Mediates Apoptosis and Extracellular Matrix Metabolic Imbalances Possibly via p38 MAPK Activation in Rat Nucleus Pulposus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Ni, Bin; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate whether high glucose-induced oxidative stress is implicated in apoptosis of rat nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and abnormal expression of critical genes involved in the metabolic balance of extracellular matrix (ECM). Methods. NPCs were cultured with various concentrations of glucose to detect cell viability and apoptosis. Cells cultured with high glucose (25 mM) were untreated or pretreated with N-acetylcysteine or a p38 MAPK inhibitor SB 202190. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was evaluated. Activation of p38 MAPK was measured by Western blot. The expression of ECM metabolism-related genes, including type II collagen, aggrecan, SRY-related high-mobility-group box 9 (Sox-9), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), was analyzed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results. High glucose reduced viability of NPCs and induced apoptosis. High glucose resulted in increased ROS generation and p38 MAPK activation. In addition, it negatively regulated the expression of type II collagen, aggrecan, Sox-9, and TIMP-1 and positively regulated MMP-3 expression. These results were changed by pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine or SB 202190. Conclusions. High glucose might promote apoptosis of NPCs, trigger ECM catabolic pathways, and inhibit its anabolic activities, possibly through a p38 MAPK-dependent oxidative stress mechanism.

  19. High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress Mediates Apoptosis and Extracellular Matrix Metabolic Imbalances Possibly via p38 MAPK Activation in Rat Nucleus Pulposus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Ni, Bin; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate whether high glucose-induced oxidative stress is implicated in apoptosis of rat nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and abnormal expression of critical genes involved in the metabolic balance of extracellular matrix (ECM). Methods. NPCs were cultured with various concentrations of glucose to detect cell viability and apoptosis. Cells cultured with high glucose (25 mM) were untreated or pretreated with N-acetylcysteine or a p38 MAPK inhibitor SB 202190. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was evaluated. Activation of p38 MAPK was measured by Western blot. The expression of ECM metabolism-related genes, including type II collagen, aggrecan, SRY-related high-mobility-group box 9 (Sox-9), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), was analyzed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results. High glucose reduced viability of NPCs and induced apoptosis. High glucose resulted in increased ROS generation and p38 MAPK activation. In addition, it negatively regulated the expression of type II collagen, aggrecan, Sox-9, and TIMP-1 and positively regulated MMP-3 expression. These results were changed by pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine or SB 202190. Conclusions. High glucose might promote apoptosis of NPCs, trigger ECM catabolic pathways, and inhibit its anabolic activities, possibly through a p38 MAPK-dependent oxidative stress mechanism. PMID:27635402

  20. Ginseng extracts restore high-glucose induced vascular dysfunctions by altering triglyceride metabolism and downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Gabriel Hoi-Huen; Law, Betty Yuen-Kwan; Chu, John Man-Tak; Yue, Kevin Kin-Man; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Lau, Chi-Wai; Huang, Yu; Chan, Shun-Wan; Ying-Kit Yue, Patrick; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun

    2013-01-01

    The king of herbs, Panax ginseng, has been used widely as a therapeutic agent vis-à-vis its active pharmacological and physiological effects. Based on Chinese pharmacopeia Ben Cao Gang Mu and various pieces of literature, Panax ginseng was believed to exert active vascular protective effects through its antiobesity and anti-inflammation properties. We investigated the vascular protective effects of ginseng by administrating ginseng extracts to rats after the induction of diabetes. We found that Panax ginseng can restore diabetes-induced impaired vasorelaxation and can reduce serum triglyceride but not cholesterol level in the diabetic rats. The ginseng extracts also suppressed the expression of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered the expression of lipid-related genes. The results provide evidence that Panax ginseng improves vascular dysfunction induced by diabetes and the protective effects may possibly be due to the downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered lipid metabolism, which help to restore normal endothelium functions.

  1. Effects of Danggui Buxue Tang, a traditional Chinese herbal decoction, on high glucose-induced proliferation and expression of extracellular matrix proteins in glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hao-Liang; Zhang, Ying-Wen; Zhou, Bi-Fa; Zhen, Rui-Tang

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage failure of the kidney, but the efficacy of currently available strategies for the prevention of DN remains unsatisfactory. In this study, we investigated the effects of Danggui Buxue Tang (DBT), a Chinese herbal decoction prepared from Radix Astragali (RA) and Radix Angelicae sinensis (RAS), on high glucose-induced proliferation and expression of laminin, type IV collagen (collagen IV) and fibronectin in glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). The cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay, and the expression of collagen IV, laminin and fibronectin in GMCs was detected by ELISA assay. It was shown that high glucose clearly induced the proliferation of GMCs and increased the release of collagen IV, laminin and fibronectin. Treatment with RA, RAS and DBT inhibited cell proliferation and the expression of collagen IV, laminin and fibronectin induced by high glucose, with DBT, especially at the highest concentration (DBT20), exhibiting a stronger effect than RA and RAS alone. Thus, it is concluded that DBT inhibits increased cell proliferation and the expression of major extracellular matrix proteins that are induced by high glucose, indicating its value for prophylaxis and therapy of DN at the early stages.

  2. CTRP9 induces mitochondrial biogenesis and protects high glucose-induced endothelial oxidative damage via AdipoR1 -SIRT1- PGC-1α activation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Li, Bin; Chen, Xu; Su, Jie; Wang, Hongbing; Yu, Shiqiang; Zheng, Qijun

    2016-09-01

    Vascular lesions caused by endothelial dysfunction are the most common and serious complication of diabetes. The vasoactive potency of CTRP9 has been reported in our previous study via nitric oxide (NO) production. However, the effect of CTRP9 on vascular endothelial cells remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the protection role of CTRP9 in the primary aortic vascular endothelial cells and HAECs under high-glucose condition. We found that the aortic vascular endothelial cells isolated from mice fed with a high fat diet generated more ROS production than normal cells, along with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis, which was also found in HAECs treated with high glucose. However, the treatment of CTPR9 significantly reduced ROS production and increased the activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, the expression of PGC-1α, NRF1, TFAM, ATP5A1 and SIRT1, and the activity of cytochrome c oxidase, indicating an induction of mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, silencing the expression of SIRT1 in HAECs impeded the effect of CTRP9 on mitochondrial biogenesis, while silencing the expression of AdipoR1 in HAECs reversed the expression of SIRT1 and PGC-1α. Based on these findings, this study showed that CTRP9 might induce mitochondrial biogenesis and protect high glucose-induced endothelial oxidative damage via AdipoR1-SIRT1-PGC-1α signaling pathway. PMID:27349872

  3. Reactive oxygen species and nuclear factor-kappa B pathway mediate high glucose-induced Pax-2 gene expression in mouse embryonic mesenchymal epithelial cells and kidney explants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-W; Liu, F; Tran, S; Zhu, Y; Hébert, M-J; Ingelfinger, J R; Zhang, S-L

    2006-11-01

    Diabetic mellitus confers a major risk of congenital malformations, and is associated with diabetic embryopathy, affecting multiple organs including the kidney. The DNA paired box-2 (Pax-2) gene is essential in nephrogenesis. We investigated whether high glucose alters Pax-2 gene expression and aimed to delineate its underlying mechanism(s) of action using both in vitro (mouse embryonic mesenchymal epithelial cells (MK4) and ex vivo (kidney explant from Hoxb7-green florescent protein (GFP) mice) approaches. Pax-2 gene expression was determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunofluorescent staining. A fusion gene containing the full-length 5'-flanking region of the human Pax-2 promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene, pGL-2/hPax-2, was transfected into MK4 cells with or without dominant negative IkappaBalpha (DN IkappaBalpha) cotransfection. Fusion gene expression level was quantified by cellular luciferase activity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was measured by lucigenin assay. Embryonic kidneys from Hoxb7-GFP mice were cultured ex vivo. High D(+) glucose (25 mM), compared to normal glucose (5 mM), specifically induced Pax-2 gene expression in MK4 cells and kidney explants. High glucose-induced Pax-2 gene expression is mediated, at least in part, via ROS generation and activation of the nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway, but not via protein kinase C, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and p44/42 MAPK signaling.

  4. High glucose induces cell death of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells through the formation of hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Peiró, Concepción; Lafuente, Nuria; Matesanz, Nuria; Cercas, Elena; Llergo, José L; Vallejo, Susana; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F

    2001-01-01

    Alterations of the vessel structure, which is mainly determined by smooth muscle cells through cell growth and/or cell death mechanisms, are characteristic of diabetes complications. We analysed the influence of high glucose (22 mM) on cultured human aortic smooth muscle cell growth and death, as hyperglycaemia is considered one of the main factors involved in diabetic vasculopathy. Growth curves were performed over 96 h in medium containing 0.5% foetal calf serum. Cell number increased by 2–4 fold over the culture period in the presence of 5.5 mM (low) glucose, while a 20% reduction in final cell number was observed with high glucose. Under serum-free conditions, cell number remained constant in low glucose cultures, but a 40% decrease was observed in high glucose cultures, suggesting that high glucose may induce increased cell death rather than reduced proliferation. Reduced final cell number induced by high glucose was also observed after stimulation with 5 or 10% foetal calf serum. The possible participation of oxidative stress was investigated by co-incubating high glucose with different reactive oxygen species scavengers. Only catalase reversed the effect of high glucose. Intracellular H2O2 content, visualized with 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein and quantified by flow cytometry, was increased after high glucose treatment. To investigate the cell death mechanism induced by high glucose, apoptosis and necrosis were quantified. No differences were observed regarding the apoptotic index between low and high glucose cultures, but lactate dehydrogenase activity was increased in high glucose cultures. In conclusion, high glucose promotes necrotic cell death through H2O2 formation, which may participate in the development of diabetic vasculopathy. PMID:11487505

  5. [Microdevice for the investigation of high-glucose induced lifespan and the protective effect of polydatin in C. elegans].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guoli; Yin, Fangchao; Wang, Li; Zhang, Min; Jiang, Lei; Qin, Jianhua

    2016-02-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has been widely used as a model organism for biomedical research due to its sufficient homology with human at molecular or genomic level. In this work, we describe a microfluidic device not only to investigate the response of C. elegans including lifespan and oxidative stress, but also to evaluate the protective effect of polydatin induced by high-glucose condition. It was found that the mean lifespan of worms was significantly reduced and the oxidative stress protein GST-4 was increased in worms that are subjected to high glucose. However, a certain dose of polydatin could weaken the increased oxidative stress induced by high-glucose and extend the lifespan, indicating the protective effect of polydatin against the toxic of high-glucose. The established approach is simple to operate, easy for realtime imaging and multiparatemer evaluations in parallel, providing a potential platform for drug evaluation/screening in a high throughput format at single animal resolution. PMID:27382717

  6. Experimental study on apoptosis of TNFR1 receptor pro-endothelial progenitor cells activated by high glucose induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Xei, Fei; Xu, Xiong-Fei; Zeng, Hong; He, Hu-Qiang; Zhang, Lei; Zheng, Ying-Qiang; He, Yan-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether high glucose in vitro activating TNFR1 and further promote rat marrow endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) apoptosis. Methods: Rat morrow endothelial progenitor cells were cultured and identified by Confocal Microscopy; then were treated with high glucose (5.5, 15, 30, 60 mmol/L), mannitol (15, 30, 60, 90 mmol/L), high glucose + Tempol and high glucose+ MAB430. Apoptosis rate of the above cells were detected by flow cytometry. ROS and MDA level and anti-O2- were detected by colorimetric technique; the expression level of TNFR1 induced signal pathway related proteins were detected by Western blotting. Results: High glucose can induce endothelial progenitor cells apoptosis, which is mostly in the later stage (72 h-96 h) instead of the earlier stage (24 h-48 h); high glucose can also induce oxidative stress reaction and the produces ROS and MDA increase significantly in the later stage (after 72 h), but anti-O2- decrease significantly. TNF apoptosis signal pathway related protein expression level not increase in the earlier stage (before 24 h) but increase significantly in the later stage (after 72 h). Tempol and MAB430 down-regulate TNF apoptosis signal pathway related protein expression and reduce EPCs apoptosis. Conclusion: High glucose activates the TNFR1 of TPCs through oxidative stress reaction and further induces cell apoptosis. PMID:26884909

  7. SIRT1 Is a Regulator in High Glucose-Induced Inflammatory Response in RAW264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weixia; Jia, Wenbin; Yang, Longlong; Dong, Maolong; Zhu, Xiongxiang; Su, Linlin; Hu, Dahai

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is defined as a systemic inflammatory response syndrome that disorders the functions of host immune system, including the imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses mediated by immune macrophages. Sepsis could also induce acute hyperglycemia. Studies have shown that the silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1), an NAD+-dependent deacetylase, mediates NF-κb deacetylation and inhibits its function. Therefore, SIRT1 is likely to play an important role in high glucose-mediated inflammatory signalings. Here we demonstrate that high glucose significantly downregulates both the mRNA and protein levels of SIRT1 and upregulates the mRNA level and the release of two pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and TNF-α, in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, the reduced level of SIRT1 by high glucose is remarkably upregulated by SIRT1 activator SRT1720, while the level and the release of IL-1β and TNF-α significantly decrease with the use of SRT1720. However, when the function of SIRT1 is inhibited by EX527 or its expression is suppressed by RNAi, the upregulated level and release of IL-1β and TNF-α by high glucose are further increased. Taken together, these findings collectively suggest that SIRT1 is an important regulator in many high glucose-related inflammatory diseases such as sepsis. PMID:25793995

  8. Agmatine Ameliorates High Glucose-Induced Neuronal Cell Senescence by Regulating the p21 and p53 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juhyun; Lee, Byeori; Kang, Somang; Oh, Yumi; Kim, Eosu; Kim, Chul-Hoon; Song, Ho-Taek

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal senescence caused by diabetic neuropathy is considered a common complication of diabetes mellitus. Neuronal senescence leads to the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the production of reactive oxygen species, and the alteration of cellular homeostasis. Agmatine, which is biosynthesized by arginine decarboxylation, has been reported in previous in vitro to exert a protective effect against various stresses. In present study, agmatine attenuated the cell death and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-alpha and CCL2 in high glucose in vitro conditions. Moreover, the senescence associated-β-galatosidase's activity in high glucose exposed neuronal cells was reduced by agmatine. Increased p21 and reduced p53 in high glucose conditioned cells were changed by agmatine. Ultimately, agmatine inhibits the neuronal cell senescence through the activation of p53 and the inhibition of p21. Here, we propose that agmatine may ameliorate neuronal cell senescence in hyperglycemia. PMID:26924930

  9. High glucose-induced oxidative stress represses sirtuin deacetylase expression and increases histone acetylation leading to neural tube defects.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Yang, Peixin

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant epigenetic modifications are implicated in maternal diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTDs). Because cellular stress plays a causal role in diabetic embryopathy, we investigated the possible role of the stress-resistant sirtuin (SIRT) family histone deacetylases. Among the seven sirtuins (SIRT1-7), pre-gestational maternal diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro significantly reduced the expression of SIRT 2 and SIRT6 in the embryo or neural stem cells, respectively. The down-regulation of SIRT2 and SIRT6 was reversed by superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) over-expression in the in vivo mouse model of diabetic embryopathy and the SOD mimetic, tempol and cell permeable SOD, PEGSOD in neural stem cell cultures. 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ), a superoxide generating agent, mimicked high glucose-suppressed SIRT2 and SIRT6 expression. The acetylation of histone 3 at lysine residues 56 (H3K56), H3K14, H3K9, and H3K27, putative substrates of SIRT2 and SIRT6, was increased by maternal diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro, and these increases were blocked by SOD1 over-expression or tempol treatment. SIRT2 or SIRT6 over-expression abrogated high glucose-suppressed SIRT2 or SIRT6 expression, and prevented the increase in acetylation of their histone substrates. The potent sirtuin activator (SRT1720) blocked high glucose-increased histone acetylation and NTD formation, whereas the combination of a pharmacological SIRT2 inhibitor and a pan SIRT inhibitor mimicked the effect of high glucose on increased histone acetylation and NTD induction. Thus, diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro suppresses SIRT2 and SIRT6 expression through oxidative stress, and sirtuin down-regulation-induced histone acetylation may be involved in diabetes-induced NTDs. The mechanism underlying pre-gestational diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTDs) is still elusive. Our study unravels a new epigenetic mechanism in which maternal diabetes-induced oxidative stress represses

  10. High glucose induces Smad activation via the transcriptional coregulator p300 and contributes to cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite advances in the treatment of heart failure, mortality remains high, particularly in individuals with diabetes. Activated transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) contributes to the pathogenesis of the fibrotic interstitium observed in diabetic cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that high glucose enhances the activity of the transcriptional co-activator p300, leading to the activation of TGF-β via acetylation of Smad2; and that by inhibiting p300, TGF-β activity will be reduced and heart failure prevented in a clinically relevant animal model of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Methods p300 activity was assessed in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts under normal glucose (5.6 mmol/L—NG) and high glucose (25 mmol/L—HG) conditions. 3H-proline incorporation in cardiac fibroblasts was also assessed as a marker of collagen synthesis. The role of p300 activity in modifying TGF-β activity was investigated with a known p300 inhibitor, curcumin or p300 siRNA in vitro, and the functional effects of p300 inhibition were assessed using curcumin in a hemodynamically validated model of diabetic cardiomyopathy – the diabetic TG m(Ren-2)27 rat. Results In vitro, H9c2 cells exposed to HG demonstrated increased p300 activity, Smad2 acetylation and increased TGF-β activity as assessed by Smad7 induction (all p < 0.05 c/w NG). Furthermore, HG induced 3H-proline incorporation as a marker of collagen synthesis (p < 0.05 c/w NG). p300 inhibition, using either siRNA or curcumin reduced p300 activity, Smad acetylation and TGF-β activity (all p < 0.05 c/w vehicle or scrambled siRNA). Furthermore, curcumin therapy reduced 3H-proline incorporation in HG and TGF-β stimulated fibroblasts (p < 0.05 c/w NG). To determine the functional significance of p300 inhibition, diabetic Ren-2 rats were randomized to receive curcumin or vehicle for 6 weeks. Curcumin treatment reduced cardiac hypertrophy, improved diastolic function and reduced extracellular matrix production, without

  11. Ghrelin inhibits high glucose-induced 16HBE cells apoptosis by regulating Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Dilong; Wu, Zhongjun; Li, Jing; Li, Jianqiang; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Tanzhen

    2016-09-01

    Ghrelin has a protective effect on diabetes and its complications. To expound its probable molecular mechanisms, we investigated the effects of ghrelin on high glucose (HG)-induced cell apoptosis and intracellular signaling pathways in cultured human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE). In this study, we firstly came to conclusion that HG-induced 16HBE apoptosis was significantly inhibited by co-treatment of ghrelin. The molecular mechanism of ghrelin-induced protective effects for lungs is still not understood. We reported here for the first time that ghrelin can not only eliminate apoptosis of 16HBE, but also regulate the disordered cell cycle caused by HG. We speculated here that ghrelin inhibits the apoptosis of 16HBE by regulating the abnormal cell cycle to some extent. The mechanism may be that ghrelin up-regulates the expression of cyclin D1 via regulating Wnt/β-catenin pathway, which has an intimate relationship with lung diseases. These results suggested the possible role of ghrelin in treating diabetic lung diseases, especially in view of its low toxicity in humans. PMID:27378423

  12. Aspalathin and Nothofagin from Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) inhibits high glucose-induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kwak, Soyoung; Kim, Yaesol; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2015-02-01

    Vascular inflammation plays a key role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, a major complication of diabetes mellitus. Aspalathin (Asp) and nothofagin (Not) are two major active dihydrochalcones found in green rooibos, which have been reported for their antioxidant activity. In this study, we assessed whether Asp or Not can suppress vascular inflammation induced by high glucose (HG) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and mice. We monitored the effects of Asp or Not on HG-induced vascular hyperpermeability, expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in vitro and in vivo. Our data indicate that HG markedly increased vascular permeability, monocyte adhesion, expression of CAMs, formation of ROS, and activation of NF-κB. Remarkably, treatment of Asp or Not inhibited HG-mediated vascular hyperpermeability, adhesion of monocytes toward HUVECs, and expression of CAMs. In addition, Asp or Not suppressed the formation of ROS and the activation of NF-κB. Since vascular inflammation induced by HG is critical in the development of diabetic complications, our results suggest that Asp or Not may have significant benefits in the treatment of diabetic complications.

  13. Role for high-glucose-induced protein O-GlcNAcylation in stimulating cardiac fibroblast collagen synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Hugo; Fricovsky, Eduardo; Ihm, Sang; Schimke, Magdalena; Maya-Ramos, Lisandro; Aroonsakool, Nakon; Ceballos, Guillermo; Dillmann, Wolfgang; Villarreal, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Excess enzyme-mediated protein O-GlcNAcylation is known to occur with diabetes mellitus. A characteristic of diabetic cardiomyopathy is the development of myocardial fibrosis. The role that enhanced protein O-GlcNAcylation plays in modulating the phenotype of cardiac fibroblasts (CF) is unknown. To address this issue, rat CF were cultured in normal glucose (NG; 5 mM glucose) or high-glucose (HG; 25 mM) media for 48 h. Results demonstrate that CF cultured in HG have higher levels (∼50%) of overall protein O-GlcNAcylation vs. NG cells. Key regulators of collagen synthesis such as transforming-growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), SMADs 2/3, and SMAD 7 protein levels, including those of arginase I and II, were altered, leading to increases in collagen levels. The nuclear transcription factor Sp1 and arginase II evidence excess O-GlcNAcylation in HG cells. Expression in CF of an adenovirus coding for the enzyme N-acetylglucosaminidase, which removes O-GlcNAc moieties from proteins, decreased Sp1 and arginase II O-GlcNAcylation and restored HG-induced perturbations in CF back to NG levels. These findings may have important pathophysiological implications for the development of diabetes-induced cardiac fibrosis. PMID:24553187

  14. MicroRNA-218 promotes high glucose-induced apoptosis in podocytes by targeting heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haibo; Wang, Qingjun; Li, Sutong

    2016-03-18

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs) play a mediatory role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we found that miR-218 was upregulated in high glucose (HG) treated podocytes, which are essential components of the glomerular filtration barrier and a major prognostic determinant in diabetic nephropathy. Additionally, up-regulation of miR-218 was accompanied by an increased rate of podocyte death and down-regulation in the level of nephrin, a key marker of podocytes. However, inhibition of miR-218 exerted the opposite effect. In addition, the dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that miR-218 directly targeted the 3'-untranslated region of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and further study confirmed an increase of HO-1 in HG-treated podocytes transfected with anti-miR-218. Knockdown of HO-1 blocked the anti-apoptotic effect of anti-miR-218. Furthermore, inhibition of miR-218 was associated with decreased expression of the known pro-apoptotic molecule p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) activation. Following preconditioning with SB203580, an inhibitor of p38-MAPK, the stimulatory effect of HG on podocyte apoptosis was strikingly ameliorated. These findings suggested that miR-218 accelerated HG-induced podocyte apoptosis through directly down-regulating HO-1 and facilitating p38-MAPK activation. PMID:26876575

  15. High Glucose-Induced PC12 Cell Death by Increasing Glutamate Production and Decreasing Methyl Group Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minjiang; Zheng, Hong; Wei, Tingting; Wang, Dan; Xia, Huanhuan; Zhao, Liangcai; Ji, Jiansong

    2016-01-01

    Objective. High glucose- (HG-) induced neuronal cell death is responsible for the development of diabetic neuropathy. However, the effect of HG on metabolism in neuronal cells is still unclear. Materials and Methods. The neural-crest derived PC12 cells were cultured for 72 h in the HG (75 mM) or control (25 mM) groups. We used NMR-based metabolomics to examine both intracellular and extracellular metabolic changes in HG-treated PC12 cells. Results. We found that the reduction in intracellular lactate may be due to excreting more lactate into the extracellular medium under HG condition. HG also induced the changes of other energy-related metabolites, such as an increased succinate and creatine phosphate. Our results also reveal that the synthesis of glutamate from the branched-chain amino acids (isoleucine and valine) may be enhanced under HG. Increased levels of intracellular alanine, phenylalanine, myoinositol, and choline were observed in HG-treated PC12 cells. In addition, HG-induced decreases in intracellular dimethylamine, dimethylglycine, and 3-methylhistidine may indicate a downregulation of methyl group metabolism. Conclusions. Our metabolomic results suggest that HG-induced neuronal cell death may be attributed to a series of metabolic changes, involving energy metabolism, amino acids metabolism, osmoregulation and membrane metabolism, and methyl group metabolism. PMID:27413747

  16. High Glucose-Induced PC12 Cell Death by Increasing Glutamate Production and Decreasing Methyl Group Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minjiang; Zheng, Hong; Wei, Tingting; Wang, Dan; Xia, Huanhuan; Zhao, Liangcai; Ji, Jiansong; Gao, Hongchang

    2016-01-01

    Objective. High glucose- (HG-) induced neuronal cell death is responsible for the development of diabetic neuropathy. However, the effect of HG on metabolism in neuronal cells is still unclear. Materials and Methods. The neural-crest derived PC12 cells were cultured for 72 h in the HG (75 mM) or control (25 mM) groups. We used NMR-based metabolomics to examine both intracellular and extracellular metabolic changes in HG-treated PC12 cells. Results. We found that the reduction in intracellular lactate may be due to excreting more lactate into the extracellular medium under HG condition. HG also induced the changes of other energy-related metabolites, such as an increased succinate and creatine phosphate. Our results also reveal that the synthesis of glutamate from the branched-chain amino acids (isoleucine and valine) may be enhanced under HG. Increased levels of intracellular alanine, phenylalanine, myoinositol, and choline were observed in HG-treated PC12 cells. In addition, HG-induced decreases in intracellular dimethylamine, dimethylglycine, and 3-methylhistidine may indicate a downregulation of methyl group metabolism. Conclusions. Our metabolomic results suggest that HG-induced neuronal cell death may be attributed to a series of metabolic changes, involving energy metabolism, amino acids metabolism, osmoregulation and membrane metabolism, and methyl group metabolism. PMID:27413747

  17. Oxidative Stress-Activated NHE1 Is Involved in High Glucose-Induced Apoptosis in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yiqing; Zhang, Min; Liu, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a prevalent chronic microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus involving disturbances in electrolytes and the acid-base balance caused by a disorder of glucose metabolism. NHE1 is a Na+/H+ exchanger responsible for keeping intracellular pH (pHi) balance and cell growth. Our study aimed to investigate roles of NHE1 in high glucose (HG)-induced apoptosis in renal tubular epithelial cells. Materials and Methods Renal epithelial tubular cell line HK-2 was cultured in medium containing 5 mM or 30 mM glucose. Then, cell apoptosis, oxidative stress, NHE1 expression, and pHi were evaluated. NHE1 siRNA and inhibitor were used to evaluate its role in cell apoptosis. Results HG significantly increased cell apoptosis and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 8-OHdG (p<0.05). Meanwhile, we found that HG induced the expression of NHE1 and increased the pHi from 7.0 to 7.6 after 48 h of incubation. However, inhibiting NHE1 using its specific siRNA or antagonist DMA markedly reduced cell apoptosis stimulated by HG. In addition, suppressing cellular oxidative stress using antioxidants, such as glutathione and N-acetyl cysteine, significantly reduced the production of ROS, accompanied by a decrease in NHE1. We also found that activated cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I (PKG) signaling promoted the production of ROS, which contributed to the regulation of NHE1 functions. Conclusion Our study indicated that HG activates PKG signaling and elevates the production of ROS, which was responsible for the induction of NHE1 expression and dysfunction, as well as subsequent cell apoptosis, in renal tubular epithelial cells. PMID:27401659

  18. Rutin Prevents High Glucose-Induced Renal Glomerular Endothelial Hyperpermeability by Inhibiting the ROS/Rhoa/ROCK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Xiaohong; Feng, Ting; Jin, Gang; Li, Zhenjiang

    2016-09-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a progressive kidney disease caused by damage to the capillaries in the glomeruli. Endothelial dysfunction is an early sign of diabetic cardiovascular disease and may contribute to progressive diabetic nephropathy. Hyperglycemia-induced endothelial hyperpermeability is crucial to diabetic nephropathy. Rutin has beneficial effects on diabetic nephropathy, but the exact mechanisms of its protective effect remain elusive. The aim of this study was to assess the role of pretreatment with rutin in an in vitro model of hyperglycemia-induced barrier dysfunction in human renal glomerular endothelial cells. Human renal glomerular endothelial cells were exposed to rutin and/or hyperglycemia for 24 h. Hyperglycemia increased permeability and decreased the junction protein occludin in the cell-cell junction area and the total expression in human renal glomerular endothelial cells, whereas rutin treatment significantly corrected these abnormalities. Furthermore, hyperglycemia-induced activation of RhoA/ROCK was reversed by treatment with rutin or the knockdown of ROCK2. Interestingly, rutin prevented hyperglycemia-induced hyperpermeability, and dysfunction of the tight junction, a high level of reactive oxygen species, and activation of RhoA/ROCK were significantly abolished with the knockdown of Nrf2. In conclusion, rutin significantly prevented hyperglycemia-disrupted renal endothelial barrier function by inhibiting the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway through decreasing reactive oxygen species, which was mediated by the activation of Nrf2. Our results may explain, at least in part, some beneficial effects of rutin that may be applicable to the treatment of vascular disorders in diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27552253

  19. Effects of the New Aldose Reductase Inhibitor Benzofuroxane Derivative BF-5m on High Glucose Induced Prolongation of Cardiac QT Interval and Increase of Coronary Perfusion Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Di Filippo, C.; Ferraro, B.; Maisto, R.; Trotta, M. C.; Di Carluccio, N.; Sartini, S.; La Motta, C.; Ferraraccio, F.; Rossi, F.; D'Amico, M.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the new aldose reductase inhibitor benzofuroxane derivative 5(6)-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-ylmethoxy)benzofuroxane (BF-5m) on the prolongation of cardiac QT interval and increase of coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) in isolated, high glucose (33.3 mM D-glucose) perfused rat hearts. BF-5m was dissolved in the Krebs solution at a final concentration of 0.01 μM, 0.05 μM, and 0.1 μM. 33.3 mM D-glucose caused a prolongation of the QT interval and increase of CPP up to values of 190 ± 12 ms and 110 ± 8 mmHg with respect to the values of hearts perfused with standard Krebs solution (11.1 mM D-glucose). The QT prolongation was reduced by 10%, 32%, and 41%, respectively, for the concentration of BF-5m 0.01 μM, 0.05 μM, and 0.1 μM. Similarly, the CPP was reduced by 20% for BF-5m 0.05 μM and by 32% for BF-5m 0.1 μM. BF-5m also increased the expression levels of sirtuin 1, MnSOD, eNOS, and FOXO-1, into the heart. The beneficial actions of BF-5m were partly abolished by the pretreatment of the rats with the inhibitor of the sirtuin 1 activity EX527 (10 mg/kg/day/7 days i.p.) prior to perfusion of the hearts with high glucose + BF-5m (0.1 μM). Therefore, BF-5m supplies cardioprotection from the high glucose induced QT prolongation and increase of CPP. PMID:26839893

  20. The Inhibitory Effect of Rhein on Proliferation of High Glucose-induced Mesangial Cell Through Cell Cycle Regulation and Induction of Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shouzhu; Lv, Yanying; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Junping; Wang, Guangjian; Wang, Siwang

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Increased mesangial cell proliferation and accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) are the major pathological features of early-stage diabetic nephropathy. This study was sought to investigate the inhibitory effects of rhein (RH) on high glucose (HG)-cultured mesangial cells. Specially, we focus on the analysis of proliferation rate, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and the expression of collagen IV and laminin. Materials and Methods: The established rat renal mesangial cell (RMC) line was cultured in medium with different concentrations of glucose (5.6 mM or 25 mM) and RH (40 μM, 20 μM, and 10 μM). Pro-treated cells were collected at 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h for cell proliferation analysis and after 24 h for the experiments of flow cytometry, transmission electron microscope, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting. Results: Our data shows HG can promote the proliferation of RMCs and RH has an inhibitory effect on HG-induced RMC proliferation and expression of ECM. Based on our data, we hypothesize this inhibitory effect might be a result of cell cycle regulation and the induction of cellular apoptosis. Conclusion: RH can inhibit cellular proliferation and downregulate the expression of ECM under the circumstance of HG. The mechanism of growth suppression may be due to cell cycle arrest at G1 phase, induction of cell apoptosis, and upregulation of apoptotic mediators bax and caspase-3. SUMMARY Rhein (RH) has an inhibitory effect on high glucose.induced rat mesangial cells proliferationRH has an inhibitory effect on the expression of extracellular matrixRH has a growth.suppression effectRH can upregulate the expression of apoptotic mediators bax and caspase-3All above shows RH is one of the main active ingredient in Shenkang injection. Abbreviations used: RH: Rhein, ECM: Extracellular matrix, DN: Diabetic nephropathy, RMC: Renal mesangial cell, SKI: Shenkang injection, MTT: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol–2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium

  1. High Glucose-Induced Mitochondrial Respiration and Reactive Oxygen Species in Mouse Cerebral Pericytes is Reversed by Pharmacological Inhibition of Mitochondrial Carbonic Anhydrases: Implications for Cerebral Microvascular Disease in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Gul N.; Morofuji, Yoichi; Banks, William A.; Price, Tulin O.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress leads to diabetes-associated damage to the microvasculature of the brain. Pericytes in close proximity to endothelial cells in the brain microvessels are vital to the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and are especially susceptible to oxidative stress. According to our recently published results, streptozotocin-diabetic mouse brain exhibits oxidative stress and loose pericytes by twelve weeks of diabetes, and cerebral pericytes cultured in high glucose media suffer intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis. Oxidative stress in diabetes is hypothesized to be caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during hyperglycemia-induced enhanced oxidative metabolism of glucose (respiration). To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of high glucose on respiration rate and ROS production in mouse cerebral pericytes. Previously, we showed that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases protects the brain from oxidative stress and pericyte loss. The high glucose-induced intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis of pericytes in culture were also reversed by inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases. Therefore, we extended our current study to determine the effect of these inhibitors on high glucose-induced increases in pericyte respiration and ROS. We now report that both the respiration and ROS are significantly increased in pericytes challenged with high glucose. Furthermore, inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases significantly slowed down both the rate of respiration and ROS production. These data provide new evidence that pharmacological inhibitors of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases, already in clinical use, may prove beneficial in protecting the brain from oxidative stress caused by ROS produced as a consequence of hyperglycemia-induced enhanced respiration. PMID:24076121

  2. High glucose-induced mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species in mouse cerebral pericytes is reversed by pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases: Implications for cerebral microvascular disease in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shah, Gul N; Morofuji, Yoichi; Banks, William A; Price, Tulin O

    2013-10-18

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress leads to diabetes-associated damage to the microvasculature of the brain. Pericytes in close proximity to endothelial cells in the brain microvessels are vital to the integrity of the blood-brain barrier and are especially susceptible to oxidative stress. According to our recently published results, streptozotocin-diabetic mouse brain exhibits oxidative stress and loose pericytes by twelve weeks of diabetes, and cerebral pericytes cultured in high glucose media suffer intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis. Oxidative stress in diabetes is hypothesized to be caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during hyperglycemia-induced enhanced oxidative metabolism of glucose (respiration). To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of high glucose on respiration rate and ROS production in mouse cerebral pericytes. Previously, we showed that pharmacological inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases protects the brain from oxidative stress and pericyte loss. The high glucose-induced intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis of pericytes in culture were also reversed by inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases. Therefore, we extended our current study to determine the effect of these inhibitors on high glucose-induced increases in pericyte respiration and ROS. We now report that both the respiration and ROS are significantly increased in pericytes challenged with high glucose. Furthermore, inhibition of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases significantly slowed down both the rate of respiration and ROS production. These data provide new evidence that pharmacological inhibitors of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases, already in clinical use, may prove beneficial in protecting the brain from oxidative stress caused by ROS produced as a consequence of hyperglycemia-induced enhanced respiration.

  3. The dual targeting of EGFR and ErbB2 with the inhibitor Lapatinib corrects high glucose-induced apoptosis and vascular dysfunction by opposing multiple diabetes-induced signaling changes.

    PubMed

    Benter, Ibrahim F; Sarkhou, Fatima; Al-Khaldi, Abeer T; Chandrasekhar, Bindu; Attur, Sreeja; Dhaunsi, Gursev S; Yousif, Mariam H M; Akhtar, Saghir

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptors, EGFR and EGFR2 (ErbB2), appear important mediators of diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction. We investigated whether targeted dual inhibition of EGFR and ErbB2 with Lapatinib would be effective in treating diabetes-induced vascular dysfunction in a rat model of type 1 diabetes. In streptozotocin-induced diabetes, chronic 4-week oral or acute, ex vivo, administration of Lapatinib prevented the development of vascular dysfunction as indicated by the attenuation of the hyper-reactivity of the diabetic mesenteric vascular bed (MVB) to norephinephrine without correcting hyperglycemia. Chronic in vivo or acute ex vivo Lapatinib treatment also significantly attenuated diabetes-induced increases in phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB2, ERK1/2, AKT, ROCK2 and IkB-alpha as well as normalized the reduced levels of phosphorylated FOXO3A, and eNOS (Ser1177) in the diabetic MVB. Similar results were observed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) cultured in high glucose (25 mM) treated with Lapatinib or small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the ErbB2 receptor. Lapatinib also prevented high glucose-induced apoptosis in VSMC. Thus, Lapatinib corrects hyperglycemia-induced apoptosis and vascular dysfunction with concomitant reversal of diabetes or high glucose-induced signaling changes in EGFR/ErbB2 and downstream signaling pathways implying that targeted dual inhibition of EGFR/ErbB2 might be an effective vasculoprotective treatment strategy in diabetic patients. PMID:26114862

  4. Glucose-Induced Acidification in Yeast Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Alan; Bourn, Julia; Pool, Brynne

    2005-01-01

    We present an investigation (for A-level biology students and equivalent) into the mechanism of glucose-induced extracellular acidification in unbuffered yeast suspensions. The investigation is designed to enhance understanding of aspects of the A-level curriculum that relate to the phenomenon (notably glucose catabolism) and to develop key skills…

  5. The protective effects of endogenous hydrogen sulfide modulator, S-propargyl-cysteine, on high glucose-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes: A novel mechanism mediated by the activation of Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hebei; Mao, Yicheng; Tan, Bo; Luo, Shanshan; Zhu, Yizhun

    2015-08-15

    S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC) is a novel synthetic molecule exerting antioxidant effects via elevating generation of endogenous H2S. Our study aimed to elucidate possible antioxidant mechanisms of SPRC in hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. H9C2 cells were treated with SPRC or NaHS at the indicated concentration before being treated with high glucose for 48h. Follow-up experiments were based on detailed description given in Section 2. SD rats were injected with Streptozocin (STZ) to induce diabetes as previously reported. Diabetic rats were administrated with SPRC, NaHS or solution respectively for one week before the rats were killed for follow-up experiments. Our work found that SPRC remarkably attenuated high glucose induced generation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis in H9C2 cells. SPRC increased stability and nuclear translocation of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), up-regulated expression of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) and interfered with the interaction between Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1) and Nrf2. SPRC activated Nrf2 via Cystathionase-γ-lyase (CSE) and Akt pathway. CSE inhibitor PAG and Akt inhibitor LY294002 could reverse the protective effects of SPRC. Knockdown of Nrf2 by shRNA also blocked SPRC up-regulated expression of CSE. Similar results of protein expression and hypoglycemic activity of SPRC were observed in STZ induced diabetic rats.

  6. Uncarboxylated osteocalcin inhibits high glucose-induced ROS production and stimulates osteoblastic differentiation by preventing the activation of PI3K/Akt in MC3T3-E1 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingli; Yang, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    Uncarboxylated osteocalcin, an osteoblast-derived protein, plays an important role in the regulation of glucose metabolism. It has previously been demonstrated that high glucose levels inhibit osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. However, the mechanisms through which uncarboxylated osteocalcin regulates osteoblast proliferation and differentiation under high glucose conditions remain unclear. Thus, in the present study, we aimed to examine the effects of uncarboxylated osteocalcin on the proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells under high glucose conditions. We demonstrated that high glucose levels induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in MC3T3-E1 cells, and this production was inhibited by treatment with uncarboxylated osteocalcin and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger. In addition, we found that uncarboxylated osteocalcin reduced high glucose‑induced oxidative stress and increased the mRNA expression of the osteogenic markers, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), osterix and osteocalcin, as well as the formation of mineralized nodules; it also inhibited adipogenic differentiation, as shown by a decrease in the mRNA expression of the adipogenic markers, peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor γ (PPARγ), adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (adipocyte protein 2; aP2) and fatty acid synthase (FAS), and reduced lipid drop accumulation. Furthermore, we found that uncarboxylated osteocalcin inhibited PI3K/Akt signaling which was induced by ROS and facilitated the osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells under high glucose conditions. Taken together and to the best of ou knowledge, our results demonstrate for the first time that uncarboxylated osteocalcin inhibits high glucose-induced ROS production and stimulates osteoblastic differentiation by inhibiting the activation of PI3K/Akt in MC3T3-E1 cells. Therefore, we suggest that uncarboxylated osteocalcin may be a potential therapeutic agent for diabetes

  7. The antioxidant edaravone prevents cardiac dysfunction by suppressing oxidative stress in type 1 diabetic rats and in high-glucose-induced injured H9c2 cardiomyoblasts.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lei; Liu, Yingying; Zhang, Ying; Chang, Wenguang; Gong, Junli; Wei, Shengnan; Li, Xudong; Qin, Ling

    2016-09-01

    Edaravone, a radical scavenger, has been recognized as a potential protective agent for cardiovascular diseases. However, little is known about the effect of edaravone in cardiac complications associated with diabetes. Here, we have demonstrated that edaravone prevents cardiac dysfunction and apoptosis in the streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rat heart. Mechanistic studies revealed that edaravone treatment improved cardiac function and restored superoxide dismutase levels. In addition, treatment of diabetic animals by edaravone increased protein expressions of sirtuin-1 (SIRT-1), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ coactivator α (PGC-1α), nuclear factor like-2 (NRF-2), and B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), and reduced protein expressions of Bax and Caspase-3 compared to the control group. High glucose incubation resulted in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death. Treatment of high-glucose-incubated H9c2 cells by edaravone reduced ROS production and cell death. In addition, the treatment of high-glucose-incubated H9c2 cells by edaravone increased the activity of antioxidative stress by increasing SIRT-1, PGC-1α, and NRF-2, and this treatment also reduced apoptosis by increasing Bcl-2 expression and reducing Bax and Caspase-3 expressions. Knockdown SIRT-1 with small interferer RNA abolished the effects of edaravone. Overall, our data demonstrated that edaravone may be an effective agent against the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:27376621

  8. Berberine attenuates high glucose-induced fibrosis by activating the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor TGR5 and repressing the S1P2/MAPK signaling pathway in glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiying; Li, Jie; Xiong, Fengxiao; Huang, Junying; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Peiqing; Huang, Heqing

    2016-08-15

    Berberine (BBR) exerts powerful renoprotective effects on diabetic nephropathy (DN), but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor TGR5 ameliorates diabetic nephropathy by inhibiting the activation of the sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2) signaling pathway. In this study, we explored the role of TGR5 in the BBR-induced downregulation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated fibrosis in glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Results showed that, BBR suppressed the expression of FN, ICAM-1, and TGF-β1 in high-glucose cultures of GMCs, and the phosphorylation level of c-Jun/c-Fos was downregulated. The high glucose lowered TGR5 expression in a time-dependent manner; this effect was reversed by BBR in a dose-dependent manner. The TGR5 agonist INT-777 decreased the high glucose-induced FN, ICAM-1, and TGF-β1 protein contents. In addition, TGR5 siRNA blocked S1P2 degradation by BBR. And MAPK signaling, which plays important regulatory roles in the pathological progression of DN, was activated by TGR5 siRNA. Apart from this, MAPK signaling as well as FN, ICAM-1, and TGF-β1 suppressed by BBR under high glucose conditions were limited by TGR5 depletion. Thus, BBR decreases FN, ICAM-1, and TGF-β1 levels under high glucose conditions in GMCs possibly by activating TGR5 and inhibiting S1P2/MAPK signaling. PMID:27292312

  9. Hydrogen sulfide releasing aspirin, ACS14, attenuates high glucose-induced increased methylglyoxal and oxidative stress in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qian; Sparatore, Anna; Del Soldato, Piero; Wu, Lingyun; Desai, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a gasotransmitter with vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Aspirin is an irreversible cyclooxygenase inhibitor anti-inflammatory drug. ACS14 is a novel synthetic hydrogen sulfide releasing aspirin which inhibits cyclooxygenase and has antioxidant effects. Methylglyoxal is a chemically active metabolite of glucose and fructose, and a major precursor of advanced glycation end products formation. Methylglyoxal is harmful when produced in excess. Plasma methylglyoxal levels are significantly elevated in diabetic patients. Our aim was to investigate the effects of ACS14 on methylglyoxal levels in cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. We used cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells for the study. Methylglyoxal was measured by HPLC after derivatization, and nitrite+nitrate with an assay kit. Western blotting was used to determine NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression. Dicholorofluorescein assay was used to measure oxidative stress. ACS14 significantly attenuated elevation of intracellular methylglyoxal levels caused by incubating cultured vascular smooth muscle cells with methylglyoxal (30 µM) and high glucose (25 mM). ACS14, but not aspirin, caused a significant attenuation of increase in nitrite+nitrate levels caused by methylglyoxal or high glucose. ACS14, aspirin, and sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS, a hydrogen sulfide donor), all attenuated the increase in oxidative stress caused by methylglyoxal and high glucose in cultured cells. ACS14 prevented the increase in NOX4 expression caused by incubating the cultured VSMCs with MG (30 µM). ACS14, aspirin and NaHS attenuated the increase in iNOS expression caused by high glucose (25 mM). In conclusion, ACS14 has the novel ability to attenuate an increase in methylglyoxal levels which in turn can reduce oxidative stress, decrease the formation of advanced glycation end products and prevent many of the known deleterious effects

  10. Fagopyrum tataricum (buckwheat) improved high-glucose-induced insulin resistance in mouse hepatocytes and diabetes in fructose-rich diet-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chia-Chen; Hsu, Wei-Hsuan; Shen, Siou-Ru; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Wu, She-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Fagopyrum tataricum (buckwheat) is used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Taiwan. This study was to evaluate the antihyperglycemic and anti-insulin resistance effects of 75% ethanol extracts of buckwheat (EEB) in FL83B hepatocytes by high-glucose (33 mM) induction and in C57BL/6 mice by fructose-rich diet (FRD; 60%) induction. The active compounds of EEB (100 μg/mL; 50 mg/kg bw), quercetin (6 μg/mL; 3 mg/kg bw), and rutin (23 μg/mL; 11.5 mg/kg bw) were also employed to treat FL83B hepatocytes and animal. Results indicated that EEB, rutin, and quercetin + rutin significantly improved 2-NBDG uptake via promoting Akt phosphorylation and preventing PPARγ degradation caused by high-glucose induction for 48 h in FL83B hepatocytes. We also found that EEB could elevate hepatic antioxidant enzymes activities to attenuate insulin resistance as well as its antioxidation caused by rutin and quercetin. Finally, EEB also inhibited increases in blood glucose and insulin levels of C57BL/6 mice induced by FRD.

  11. Resveratrol protects DAergic PC12 cells from high glucose-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis: effect on p53 and GRP75 localization.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Justine; Bournival, Julie; Zottig, Ximena; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol (RESV), a polyphenolic natural compound, has long been acknowledged to have cardioprotective and antiinflammatory actions. Evidence suggests that RESV has antioxidant properties that reduce the formation of reactive oxygen species leading to oxidative stress and apoptotic death of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent literature has recognized hyperglycemia as a cause of oxidative stress reported to be harmful for the nervous system. In this context, our study aimed (a) to evaluate the effect of RESV against high glucose (HG)-induced oxidative stress in DAergic neurons, (b) to study the antiapoptotic properties of RESV in HG condition, and c) to analyze RESV's ability to modulate p53 and GRP75, a p53 inactivator found to be under expressed in postmortem PD brains. Our results suggest that RESV protects DAergic neurons against HG-induced oxidative stress by diminishing cellular levels of superoxide anion. Moreover, RESV significantly reduces HG-induced apoptosis in DAergic cells by modulating DNA fragmentation and the expression of several genes implicated in the apoptotic cascade, such as Bax, Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved PARP-1. RESV also prevents the pro-apoptotic increase of p53 in the nucleus induced by HG. Such data strengthens the correlation between hyperglycemia and neurodegeneration, while providing new insight on the high occurrence of PD in patients with diabetes. This study enlightens potent neuroprotective roles for RESV that should be considered as a nutritional recommendation for preventive and/or complementary therapies in controlling neurodegenerative complications in diabetes. PMID:24218232

  12. DANGER is involved in high glucose-induced radioresistance through inhibiting DAPK-mediated anoikis in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, TaeWoo; Youn, HyeSook; Son, Beomseok; Kim, Daehoon; Seong, Ki Moon; Park, Sungkyun; Kim, Wanyeon; Youn, BuHyun

    2016-02-01

    18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake during FDG positron emission tomography seems to reflect increased radioresistance. However, the exact molecular mechanism underlying high glucose (HG)-induced radioresistance is unclear. In the current study, we showed that ionizing radiation-induced activation of the MEK-ERK-DAPK-p53 signaling axis is required for anoikis (anchorage-dependent apoptosis) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in normal glucose media. Phosphorylation of DAPK at Ser734 by ERK was essential for p53 transcriptional activity and radiosensitization. In HG media, overexpressed DANGER directly bound to the death domain of DAPK, thus inhibiting the catalytic activity of DAPK. In addition, inhibition of the DAPK-p53 signaling axis by DANGER promoted anoikis-resistance and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), resulting in radioresistance of HG-treated NSCLC cells. Notably, knockdown of DANGER enhanced anoikis, EMT inhibition, and radiosensitization in a mouse xenograft model of lung cancer. Taken together, our findings offered evidence that overexpression of DANGER and the subsequent inhibitory effect on DAPK kinase activity are critical responses that account for HG-induced radioresistance of NSCLC.

  13. Exogenous spermine ameliorates high glucose-induced cardiomyocytic apoptosis via decreasing reactive oxygen species accumulation through inhibiting p38/JNK and JAK2 pathways.

    PubMed

    He, Yuqin; Yang, Jinxia; Li, Hongzhu; Shao, Hongjiang; Wei, Can; Wang, Yuehong; Li, Meixiu; Xu, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation has been suggested to play a vital role in the initiation and progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy, a major complication of diabetes mellitus. Recent studies reveal that spermine possesses proliferative, antiaging and antioxidative properties. Thus, we hypothesized that spermine could decrease apoptosis via suppressing ROS accumulation induced by high glucose (HG) in cardiomyocytes. Cultured neonatal rat ventricle cardiomyocytes were treated with normal glucose (NG) (5 mM) or HG (25 mM) in the presence or absence of spermine for 48 h. The cell activity, apoptosis, ROS production, T-SOD and GSH activities, MDA content and GSSG level were assessed. The results showed that HG induced lipid peroxidation and the increase of intracellular ROS formation and apoptosis in primary cardiomyocytes. Spermine could obviously improve the above-mentioned changes. Western blot analysis revealed that spermine markedly inhibited HG-induced the phosphorylation of p38/JNK MAPKs and JAK2. Moreover, spermine had better antioxidative and anti-apoptotic effects than N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Taken together, the present data suggested that spermine could suppress ROS accumulation to decrease cardiomyocytes apoptosis in HG condition, which may be attributed to the inhibition of p38/JNK and JAK2 activation and its natural antioxidative property. Our findings may highlight a new therapeutic intervention for the prevention of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26884823

  14. Exogenous spermine ameliorates high glucose-induced cardiomyocytic apoptosis via decreasing reactive oxygen species accumulation through inhibiting p38/JNK and JAK2 pathways

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuqin; Yang, Jinxia; Li, Hongzhu; Shao, Hongjiang; Wei, Can; Wang, Yuehong; Li, Meixiu; Xu, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation has been suggested to play a vital role in the initiation and progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy, a major complication of diabetes mellitus. Recent studies reveal that spermine possesses proliferative, antiaging and antioxidative properties. Thus, we hypothesized that spermine could decrease apoptosis via suppressing ROS accumulation induced by high glucose (HG) in cardiomyocytes. Cultured neonatal rat ventricle cardiomyocytes were treated with normal glucose (NG) (5 mM) or HG (25 mM) in the presence or absence of spermine for 48 h. The cell activity, apoptosis, ROS production, T-SOD and GSH activities, MDA content and GSSG level were assessed. The results showed that HG induced lipid peroxidation and the increase of intracellular ROS formation and apoptosis in primary cardiomyocytes. Spermine could obviously improve the above-mentioned changes. Western blot analysis revealed that spermine markedly inhibited HG-induced the phosphorylation of p38/JNK MAPKs and JAK2. Moreover, spermine had better antioxidative and anti-apoptotic effects than N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Taken together, the present data suggested that spermine could suppress ROS accumulation to decrease cardiomyocytes apoptosis in HG condition, which may be attributed to the inhibition of p38/JNK and JAK2 activation and its natural antioxidative property. Our findings may highlight a new therapeutic intervention for the prevention of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26884823

  15. Investigating the protective effect of lithium against high glucose-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells: involvements of ROS, JNK and P38 MAPKs, and apoptotic mitochondria pathway.

    PubMed

    Aminzadeh, A; Dehpour, A R; Safa, M; Mirzamohammadi, S; Sharifi, A M

    2014-11-01

    Hyperglycemia that occurs under the diabetic condition is a major cause of diabetic complications such as diabetic neuropathy, one of the most common diabetes-related complications. It is well known that hyperglycemia could result in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Over production of ROS recommended as an important mediator for apoptotic signaling pathway as well as a key early event in the development of diabetic neuropathy. Recently, many studies have indicated that lithium has robust neuroprotective effect in relation to several neurodegenerative diseases. The present study aimed to examine effects of lithium on high glucose (HG)-induced neurotoxicity and to determine some of the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in this response in PC12 cells as a neuronal culture model for diabetic neuropathy. PC12 cells were pretreated with different concentrations of lithium for 7 days, exposed to HG for 24 h. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. ROS and lipid peroxidation levels as well as superoxide dismutase activity were measured. In order to examine the underlying molecular mechanisms, the expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3, total and phosphorylated JNK and P38 MAPK were also analyzed by Western blotting. The present results indicated that pretreatment with 1 mM lithium has protected PC12 cells against HG-induced apoptotic cell death. It could reduce ROS generation, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, Caspase-3 activation, and JNK and P38 MAPK phosphorylation. It may be concluded that in HG condition, lithium pretreatment could prevent mitochondrial apoptosis as well as JNK and P38 MAPK pathway in PC12 cells.

  16. Sinomenine alleviates high glucose-induced renal glomerular endothelial hyperpermeability by inhibiting the activation of RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qingqiao; Xia, Yuanyu; Wang, Guan

    2016-09-01

    As an early sign of diabetic cardiovascular disease, endothelial dysfunction may contribute to progressive diabetic nephropathy (DN). Endothelial hyperpermeability induced by hyperglycemia (HG) is a central pathogenesis for DN. Sinomenine (SIN) has strong anti-inflammatory and renal protective effects, following an unknown protective mechanism against HG-induced hyperpermeability. We herein explored the role of SIN in vitro in an HG-induced barrier dysfunction model in human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs). The cells were exposed to SIN and/or HG for 24 h, the permeability of which was significantly increased by HG. Moreover, junction protein occludin in the cell-cell junction area and its total expression in HRGECs were significantly decreased by HG. However, the dysfunction of tight junction and hyperpermeability of HRGECs were significantly reversed by SIN. Furthermore, SIN prevented HG-increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) by activating nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Interestingly, activation of RhoA/ROCK induced by HG was reversed by SIN or ROCK inhibitor. HG-induced hyperpermeability was prevented by SIN. High ROS level, tight junction dysfunction and RhoA/ROCK activation were significantly attenuated with knockdown of Nrf2. Mediated by activation of Nrf2, SIN managed to significantly prevent HG-disrupted renal endothelial barrier function by suppressing the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway through reducing ROS. We successfully identified a novel pathway via which SIN exerted antioxidative and renal protective functions, and provided a molecular basis for potential SIN applications in treating DN vascular disorders.

  17. Erianin inhibits high glucose-induced retinal angiogenesis via blocking ERK1/2-regulated HIF-1α-VEGF/VEGFR2 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zengyang; Zhang, Tianyu; Gong, Chenyuan; Sheng, Yuchen; Lu, Bin; Zhou, Lingyu; Ji, Lili; Wang, Zhengtao

    2016-01-01

    Erianin is a natural compound found in Dendrobium chrysotoxum Lindl. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a serious and common microvascular complication of diabetes. This study aims to investigate the inhibitory mechanism of erianin on retinal neoangiogenesis and its contribution to the amelioration of DR. Erianin blocked high glucose (HG)-induced tube formation and migration in choroid-retinal endothelial RF/6A cells. Erianin inhibited HG-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α) translocation into nucleus and ERK1/2 activation in RF/6A and microglia BV-2 cells. MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 blocked HG-induced HIF-1α and ERK1/2 activation in both above two cells. In addition, erianin abrogated VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, and also inhibited VEGF-induced activation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and its downstream cRaf-MEK1/2-ERK1/2 and PI3K-AKT signaling pathways in RF/6A cells. Furthermore, erianin reduced the increased retinal vessels, VEGF expression and microglia activation in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemic and oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mice. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that erianin inhibits retinal neoangiogenesis by abrogating HG-induced VEGF expression by blocking ERK1/2-mediated HIF-1α activation in retinal endothelial and microglial cells, and further suppressing VEGF-induced activation of VEGFR2 and its downstream signals in retinal endothelial cells. PMID:27678303

  18. Longevity is associated with increased vascular resistance to high glucose-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory gene expression in Peromyscus leucopus.

    PubMed

    Labinskyy, Nazar; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Toth, Janos; Szalai, Gabor; Veres, Monika; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Pinto, John T; Pacher, Pal; Ballabh, Praveen; Podlutsky, Andrej; Austad, Steven N; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2009-04-01

    Vascular aging is characterized by increased oxidative stress and proinflammatory phenotypic alterations. Metabolic stress, such as hyperglycemia in diabetes, is known to increase the production of ROS and promote inflammatory gene expression, accelerating vascular aging. The oxidative stress hypothesis of aging predicts that vascular cells of long-lived species exhibit lower steady-state production of ROS and/or superior resistance to the prooxidant effects of metabolic stress. We tested this hypothesis using two taxonomically related rodents, the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus) and the house mouse (Mus musculus), which show a more than twofold difference in maximum lifespan potential (8.2 and 3.5 yr, respectively). We compared interspecies differences in steady-state and high glucose (HG; 30 mmol/l)-induced production of O(2)(*-) and H(2)O(2), endothelial function, mitochondrial ROS generation, and inflammatory gene expression in cultured aortic segments. In P. leucopus aortas, steady-state endothelial O(2)(*-) and H(2)O(2) production and ROS generation by mitochondria were less than in M. musculus vessels. Furthermore, vessels of P. leucopus were more resistant to the prooxidant effects of HG. Primary fibroblasts from P. leucopus also exhibited less steady-state and HG-induced ROS production than M. musculus cells. In M. musculus arteries, HG elicited significant upregulation of inflammatory markers (TNF-alpha, IL-6, ICAM-1, VCAM, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1). In contrast, the proinflammatory effects of HG were blunted in P. leucopus vessels. Thus, increased life span potential in P. leucopus is associated with decreased cellular ROS generation and increased resistance to prooxidant and proinflammatory effects of metabolic stress, which accord with predictions of the oxidative stress hypothesis of aging.

  19. Sinomenine alleviates high glucose-induced renal glomerular endothelial hyperpermeability by inhibiting the activation of RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qingqiao; Xia, Yuanyu; Wang, Guan

    2016-09-01

    As an early sign of diabetic cardiovascular disease, endothelial dysfunction may contribute to progressive diabetic nephropathy (DN). Endothelial hyperpermeability induced by hyperglycemia (HG) is a central pathogenesis for DN. Sinomenine (SIN) has strong anti-inflammatory and renal protective effects, following an unknown protective mechanism against HG-induced hyperpermeability. We herein explored the role of SIN in vitro in an HG-induced barrier dysfunction model in human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs). The cells were exposed to SIN and/or HG for 24 h, the permeability of which was significantly increased by HG. Moreover, junction protein occludin in the cell-cell junction area and its total expression in HRGECs were significantly decreased by HG. However, the dysfunction of tight junction and hyperpermeability of HRGECs were significantly reversed by SIN. Furthermore, SIN prevented HG-increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) by activating nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Interestingly, activation of RhoA/ROCK induced by HG was reversed by SIN or ROCK inhibitor. HG-induced hyperpermeability was prevented by SIN. High ROS level, tight junction dysfunction and RhoA/ROCK activation were significantly attenuated with knockdown of Nrf2. Mediated by activation of Nrf2, SIN managed to significantly prevent HG-disrupted renal endothelial barrier function by suppressing the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway through reducing ROS. We successfully identified a novel pathway via which SIN exerted antioxidative and renal protective functions, and provided a molecular basis for potential SIN applications in treating DN vascular disorders. PMID:27378427

  20. CKIP-1 ameliorates high glucose-induced expression of fibronectin and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 by activating the Nrf2/ARE pathway in glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenyan; Chen, Cheng; Xiong, Fengxiao; Yang, Zhiying; Wang, Yu; Huang, Junying; Liu, Peiqing; Huang, Heqing

    2016-09-15

    Glucose and lipid metabolism disorders as well as oxidative stress (OSS) play important roles in diabetic nephropathy (DN). Glucose and lipid metabolic dysfunctions are the basic pathological changes of chronic microvascular complications of diabetes mellitus, such as DN. OSS can lead to the accumulation of extracellular matrix and inflammatory factors which will accelerate the progress of DN. Casein kinase 2 interacting protein-1 (CKIP-1) mediates adipogenesis, cell proliferation and inflammation under many circumstances. However, whether CKIP-1 is involved in the development of DN remains unknown. Here, we show that CKIP-1 is a novel regulator of resisting the development of DN and the underlying molecular mechanism is related to activating the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) antioxidative stress pathway. The following findings were obtained: (1) The treatment of glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs) with high glucose (HG) decreased CKIP-1 levels in a time-dependent manner; (2) CKIP-1 overexpression dramatically reduced fibronectin (FN) and intercellular adhesionmolecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression. Depletion of CKIP-1 further induced the production of FN and ICAM-1; (3) CKIP-1 promoted the nuclear accumulation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activity of Nrf2. Moreover, CKIP-1 upregulated the expression of Nrf2 downstream genes, heme oxygenase (HO-1) and superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1); and ultimately decreased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The molecular mechanisms clarify that the advantageous effect of CKIP-1 on DN are well connected with the activation of the Nrf2/ARE antioxidative stress pathway. PMID:27481061

  1. High Glucose-induced O-GlcNAcylated Carbohydrate Response Element-binding Protein (ChREBP) Mediates Mesangial Cell Lipogenesis and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min-Jung; Kim, Dong-Il; Lim, Seul-Ki; Choi, Joo-Hee; Han, Ho-Jae; Yoon, Kyung-Chul; Park, Soo-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) is a transcription factor responsible for carbohydrate metabolism in the liver. However, the role of ChREBP in diabetic nephropathy has not been elucidated. Thus, we investigated the role of ChREBP in mesangial cells in diabetic nephropathy. Treatment with 25 mm glucose (high glucose; HG) increased cellular O-GlcNAc and O-GlcNAcylated ChREBP in mesangial cells compared with normal 5.5 mm glucose. O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranosylidene) amino N-phenylcarbamate (PUGNAc), a drug that increases O-GlcNAc, augmented the expression of ChREBP targets, whereas DON, a drug that decreases O-GlcNAc and O-GlcNAcase overexpression, mitigated the increase with HG. O-GlcNAc augmented the protein stability, transcriptional activity, and nuclear translocation of ChREBP. HG treatment also stimulated lipid accumulation and the contents of triglyceride and cholesterol in mesangial cells. In addition, HG triggered expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and extracellular matrix components related to nephrosclerosis. The ChREBP mutant, W130A, did not exhibit HG-induced lipid accumulation and fibrotic proteins, suggesting that the Trp-130 residue in the MCR3 domain is important in the development of glomerulosclerosis. O-GlcNAcylated ChREBP was elevated in mesangium cells of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In conclusion, HG increased the O-GlcNAcylated ChREBP level, which resulted in lipid accumulation and up-regulation of fibrotic proteins in mesangial cells. These effects may lead mesangial cells to an ultimately pathological state. PMID:24616092

  2. Glucose-induced serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase activation in oncofetal fibronectin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Zia A.; Barbin, Yousef P.; Farhangkhoee, Hana; Beier, Norbert; Scholz, Wolfgang; Chakrabarti, Subrata . E-mail: subrata.chakrabarti@fmd.uwo.ca

    2005-04-01

    Preferential expression of oncofetal extra domain-B fibronectin (EDB{sup +} FN), a proposed angiogenic marker, has been shown in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. High levels of glucose also increase EDB{sup +} FN expression in endothelial cells (ECs) via transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and endothelin-1 (ET-1). The present study was aimed at elucidating the role of serum- and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK-1) in glucose-induced EDB{sup +} FN expression. Using human macro- and microvascular ECs, we show that high levels of glucose, TGF-{beta}1, and ET-1 increase the EDB{sup +} FN expression via SGK-1 alteration at the mRNA, protein, and activity levels. Inhibition of TGF-{beta}1 and ET-1 prevented glucose-induced SGK-1 activation and the EDB{sup +} FN expression. Furthermore, using siRNA-mediated SGK-1 gene silencing, we show that glucose-induced EDB{sup +} FN expression can be completely prevented. These findings provide first evidence of glucose-induced SGK-1 activation in altered EDB{sup +} FN expression and provide novel avenues for therapeutic modalities.

  3. High-Density Lipoproteins Rescue Diabetes-Impaired Angiogenesis via Scavenger Receptor Class B Type I.

    PubMed

    Tan, Joanne T M; Prosser, Hamish C G; Dunn, Louise L; Vanags, Laura Z; Ridiandries, Anisyah; Tsatralis, Tania; Leece, Laura; Clayton, Zoë E; Yuen, Sui Ching G; Robertson, Stacy; Lam, Yuen Ting; Celermajer, David S; Ng, Martin K C; Bursill, Christina A

    2016-10-01

    Disordered neovascularization and impaired wound healing are important contributors to diabetic vascular complications. We recently showed that high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) enhance ischemia-mediated neovascularization, and mounting evidence suggests HDL have antidiabetic properties. We therefore hypothesized that HDL rescue diabetes-impaired neovascularization. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice had reduced blood flow recovery and neovessel formation in a hindlimb ischemia model compared with nondiabetic mice. Reconstituted HDL (rHDL) infusions in diabetic mice restored blood flow recovery and capillary density to nondiabetic levels. Topical rHDL application rescued diabetes-impaired wound closure, wound angiogenesis, and capillary density. In vitro, rHDL increased key mediators involved in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) stabilization, including the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway, Siah1, and Siah2, and suppressed the prolyl hydroxylases (PHD) 2 and PHD3. rHDL rescued high glucose-induced impairment of tubulogenesis and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A protein production, a finding associated with enhanced phosphorylation of proangiogenic mediators VEGF receptor 2 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Siah1/2 small interfering RNA knockdown confirmed the importance of HIF-1α stability in mediating rHDL action. Lentiviral short hairpin RNA knockdown of scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in vitro and SR-BI(-/-) diabetic mice in vivo attenuated rHDL rescue of diabetes-impaired angiogenesis, indicating a key role for SR-BI. These findings provide a greater understanding of the vascular biological effects of HDL, with potential therapeutic implications for diabetic vascular complications. PMID:27284113

  4. Cognitive impairments at high altitudes and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaodan

    2014-06-01

    High altitude hypoxia has been shown to have significant impact on cognitive performance. This article reviews the aspects in which, and the conditions under which, decreased cognitive performance has been observed at high altitudes. Neural changes related to high altitude hypoxia are also reviewed with respect to their possible contributions to cognitive impairments. In addition, potential adaptation mechanisms are reviewed among indigenous high altitude residents and long-term immigrant residents, with discussions about methodological concerns related to these studies.

  5. Cardioprotective role of Syzygium cumini against glucose-induced oxidative stress in H9C2 cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Atale, Neha; Chakraborty, Mainak; Mohanty, Sujata; Bhattacharya, Susinjan; Nigam, Darshika; Sharma, Manish; Rani, Vibha

    2013-09-01

    Diabetic patients are known to have an independent risk of cardiomyopathy. Hyperglycemia leads to upregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may contribute to diabetic cardiomyopathy. Thus, agents that suppress glucose-induced intracellular ROS levels can have therapeutic potential against diabetic cardiomyopathy. Syzygium cumini is well known for its anti-diabetic potential, but its cardioprotective properties have not been evaluated yet. The aim of the present study is to analyze cardioprotective properties of methanolic seed extract (MSE) of S. cumini in diabetic in vitro conditions. ROS scavenging activity of MSE was studied in glucose-stressed H9C2 cardiac myoblasts after optimizing the safe dose of glucose and MSE by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide. 2',7'-dichlorfluorescein diacetate staining and Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis confirmed the suppression of ROS production by MSE in glucose-induced cells. The intracellular NO and H2O2 radical-scavenging activity of MSE was found to be significantly high in glucose-induced cells. Exposure of glucose-stressed H9C2 cells to MSE showed decline in the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase enzymes and collagen content. 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, propidium iodide and 10-N-nonyl-3,6-bis (dimethylamino) acridine staining revealed that MSE protects myocardial cells from glucose-induced stress. Taken together, our findings revealed that the well-known anti-diabetic S. cumini can also protect the cardiac cells from glucose-induced stress. PMID:23512199

  6. Impaired beta-cell functions induced by chronic exposure of cultured human pancreatic islets to high glucose.

    PubMed

    Marshak, S; Leibowitz, G; Bertuzzi, F; Socci, C; Kaiser, N; Gross, D J; Cerasi, E; Melloul, D

    1999-06-01

    In type 2 diabetes, chronic hyperglycemia has been suggested to be detrimental to beta-cell function, causing reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and disproportionately elevated proinsulin. In the present study, we investigated the effect on several beta-cell functions of prolonged in vitro exposure of human pancreatic islet cultures to high glucose concentrations. Islets exposed to high glucose levels (33 mmol/l) for 4 and 9 days showed dramatic decreases in glucose-induced insulin release and in islet insulin content, with increased proportion of proinsulin-like peptides relative to insulin. The depletion in insulin stores correlated with the reduction in insulin mRNA levels and human insulin promoter transcriptional activity. We also demonstrated that high glucose dramatically lowered the binding activity of pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (the glucose-sensitive transcription factor), whereas the transcription factor rat insulin promoter element 3b1 activator was less influenced and insulin enhancer factor 1 remained unaffected. Most of these beta-cell impairments were partially reversible when islets first incubated for 6 days in high glucose were transferred to normal glucose (5.5 mmol/l) concentrations for 3 days. We conclude that cultured human islets are sensitive to the deleterious effect of high glucose concentrations at multiple functional levels, and that such mechanisms may play an important role in the decreased insulin production and secretion of type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:10342809

  7. Bradykinin receptors and EphB2/EphrinB2 pathway in response to high glucose-induced osteoblast dysfunction and hyperglycemia-induced bone deterioration in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Ai, Wenting; Chen, Lin; Zhao, Sihai; Liu, Enqi

    2016-03-01

    This study was carried out in order to investigate bone dysfunction and the involvement of bradykinin receptors and the Eph/Ephrin signaling pathway in osteoblasts and in mice with diabetes-related osteoporosis in response to exposure to high glucose. Osteogenic transdifferentiation was inhibited when the osteoblasts were exposed to high glucose, and the expression levels of bone formation-related genes [Runx2 and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)] were decreased, while those of bone resorption-related genes [matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)9 and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII)] were increased. Moreover, the mRNA and protein expression levels of bradykinin receptor B1 (BK1R)/bradykinin receptor B2 (BK2R) and EphB2/EphrinB2 were significantly decreased in the osteoblasts following exposure to high glucose. Intriguingly, the interaction between BK2R and EphB2/EphrinB2 was confirmed, and BK2R loss-of-function significantly decreased the mRNA and protein expression levels of EphB2/EphrinB4. In vivo, hyperglycemia induced the disequilibrium of calcium homeostasis through the inhibition of bone formation and the acceleration of bone resorption, which was manifested by the reduction of trabecular bone mass of the primary and secondary spongiosa, as well as by the increase in the number of mature osteoclasts throughout the proximal tibial metaphysis in mice with diabetes-related osteoporosis. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression levels of BK1R/BK2R and EphB2/EphrinB2 in the tibias of the mice with diabetes-related osteoporosis were significantly decreased. These results demonstrate that bradykinin receptors and the EphB4/EphrinB2 pathway mediate the development of complications in mice with diabetes-related osteoporosis and suggest that the inactivation of bradykinin receptors and the EphB4/EphrinB2 pathway enhance the severity of complications in mice with diabetes-related osteoporosis. PMID:26782642

  8. Bradykinin receptors and EphB2/EphrinB2 pathway in response to high glucose-induced osteoblast dysfunction and hyperglycemia-induced bone deterioration in mice

    PubMed Central

    WU, MIN; AI, WENTING; CHEN, LIN; ZHAO, SIHAI; LIU, ENQI

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to investigate bone dysfunction and the involvement of bradykinin receptors and the Eph/Ephrin signaling pathway in osteoblasts and in mice with diabetes-related osteoporosis in response to exposure to high glucose. Osteogenic transdifferentiation was inhibited when the osteoblasts were exposed to high glucose, and the expression levels of bone formation-related genes [Runx2 and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)] were decreased, while those of bone resorption-related genes [matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)9 and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII)] were increased. Moreover, the mRNA and protein expression levels of bradykinin receptor B1 (BK1R)/bradykinin receptor B2 (BK2R) and EphB2/EphrinB2 were significantly decreased in the osteoblasts following exposure to high glucose. Intriguingly, the interaction between BK2R and EphB2/EphrinB2 was confirmed, and BK2R loss-of-function significantly decreased the mRNA and protein expression levels of EphB2/EphrinB4. In vivo, hyperglycemia induced the disequilibrium of calcium homeostasis through the inhibition of bone formation and the acceleration of bone resorption, which was manifested by the reduction of trabecular bone mass of the primary and secondary spongiosa, as well as by the increase in the number of mature osteoclasts throughout the proximal tibial metaphysis in mice with diabetes-related osteoporosis. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression levels of BK1R/BK2R and EphB2/EphrinB2 in the tibias of the mice with diabetes-related osteoporosis were significantly decreased. These results demonstrate that bradykinin receptors and the EphB4/EphrinB2 pathway mediate the development of complications in mice with diabetes-related osteoporosis and suggest that the inactivation of bradykinin receptors and the EphB4/EphrinB2 pathway enhance the severity of complications in mice with diabetes-related osteoporosis. PMID:26782642

  9. L-cysteine reversibly inhibits glucose-induced biphasic insulin secretion and ATP production by inactivating PKM2.

    PubMed

    Nakatsu, Daiki; Horiuchi, Yuta; Kano, Fumi; Noguchi, Yoshiyuki; Sugawara, Taichi; Takamoto, Iseki; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Murata, Masayuki

    2015-03-10

    Increase in the concentration of plasma L-cysteine is closely associated with defective insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, which results in type 2 diabetes (T2D). In this study, we investigated the effects of prolonged L-cysteine treatment on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from mouse insulinoma 6 (MIN6) cells and from mouse pancreatic islets, and found that the treatment reversibly inhibited glucose-induced ATP production and resulting GSIS without affecting proinsulin and insulin synthesis. Comprehensive metabolic analyses using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed that prolonged L-cysteine treatment decreased the levels of pyruvate and its downstream metabolites. In addition, methyl pyruvate, a membrane-permeable form of pyruvate, rescued L-cysteine-induced inhibition of GSIS. Based on these results, we found that both in vitro and in MIN6 cells, L-cysteine specifically inhibited the activity of pyruvate kinase muscle isoform 2 (PKM2), an isoform of pyruvate kinases that catalyze the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. L-cysteine also induced PKM2 subunit dissociation (tetramers to dimers/monomers) in cells, which resulted in impaired glucose-induced ATP production for GSIS. DASA-10 (NCGC00181061, a substituted N,N'-diarylsulfonamide), a specific activator for PKM2, restored the tetramer formation and the activity of PKM2, glucose-induced ATP production, and biphasic insulin secretion in L-cysteine-treated cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that impaired insulin secretion due to exposure to L-cysteine resulted from its direct binding and inactivation of PKM2 and suggest that PKM2 is a potential therapeutic target for T2D.

  10. l-cysteine reversibly inhibits glucose-induced biphasic insulin secretion and ATP production by inactivating PKM2

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsu, Daiki; Horiuchi, Yuta; Kano, Fumi; Noguchi, Yoshiyuki; Sugawara, Taichi; Takamoto, Iseki; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Murata, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Increase in the concentration of plasma l-cysteine is closely associated with defective insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells, which results in type 2 diabetes (T2D). In this study, we investigated the effects of prolonged l-cysteine treatment on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from mouse insulinoma 6 (MIN6) cells and from mouse pancreatic islets, and found that the treatment reversibly inhibited glucose-induced ATP production and resulting GSIS without affecting proinsulin and insulin synthesis. Comprehensive metabolic analyses using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed that prolonged l-cysteine treatment decreased the levels of pyruvate and its downstream metabolites. In addition, methyl pyruvate, a membrane-permeable form of pyruvate, rescued l-cysteine–induced inhibition of GSIS. Based on these results, we found that both in vitro and in MIN6 cells, l-cysteine specifically inhibited the activity of pyruvate kinase muscle isoform 2 (PKM2), an isoform of pyruvate kinases that catalyze the conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate. l-cysteine also induced PKM2 subunit dissociation (tetramers to dimers/monomers) in cells, which resulted in impaired glucose-induced ATP production for GSIS. DASA-10 (NCGC00181061, a substituted N,N′-diarylsulfonamide), a specific activator for PKM2, restored the tetramer formation and the activity of PKM2, glucose-induced ATP production, and biphasic insulin secretion in l-cysteine–treated cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that impaired insulin secretion due to exposure to l-cysteine resulted from its direct binding and inactivation of PKM2 and suggest that PKM2 is a potential therapeutic target for T2D. PMID:25713368

  11. Prevalence of Hearing Impairment in High Risk Infants.

    PubMed

    Vashistha, Ishika; Aseri, Yogesh; Singh, B K; Verma, P C

    2016-06-01

    Hearing impairment is prevalent in the general population, early intervention facilitates proper development. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of hearing impairment in high-risk infants born between 2013 and 2014. 100 newborns were evaluated using evoked otoacoustic emissions and distortion produce and auditory behavior. Tests were reported if the results were altered. If altered results persisted, the child was referred for impedance testing and when necessary for medical evaluation. Infants referred for BOA and OAE undergone Brainstem auditory evoked potential testing. Of 100 children, 85 children have hearing within normal limits. Hearing impairment was found in 15 out of which 7 had unilateral hearing loss and 8 had bilateral hearing loss. The high prevalence of hearing impairment in this population underlines the importance of early audiological testing.

  12. Prevalence of Hearing Impairment in High Risk Infants.

    PubMed

    Vashistha, Ishika; Aseri, Yogesh; Singh, B K; Verma, P C

    2016-06-01

    Hearing impairment is prevalent in the general population, early intervention facilitates proper development. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of hearing impairment in high-risk infants born between 2013 and 2014. 100 newborns were evaluated using evoked otoacoustic emissions and distortion produce and auditory behavior. Tests were reported if the results were altered. If altered results persisted, the child was referred for impedance testing and when necessary for medical evaluation. Infants referred for BOA and OAE undergone Brainstem auditory evoked potential testing. Of 100 children, 85 children have hearing within normal limits. Hearing impairment was found in 15 out of which 7 had unilateral hearing loss and 8 had bilateral hearing loss. The high prevalence of hearing impairment in this population underlines the importance of early audiological testing. PMID:27340640

  13. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits glucose-induced membrane cholesterol crystalline domain formation through a potent antioxidant mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F

    2015-02-01

    Lipid oxidation leads to endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and foam cell formation during atherogenesis. Glucose also contributes to lipid oxidation and promotes pathologic changes in membrane structural organization, including the development of cholesterol crystalline domains. In this study, we tested the comparative effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), an omega-3 fatty acid indicated for the treatment of very high triglyceride (TG) levels, and other TG-lowering agents (fenofibrate, niacin, and gemfibrozil) on lipid oxidation in human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as well as membrane lipid vesicles prepared in the presence of glucose (200 mg/dL). We also examined the antioxidant effects of EPA in combination with atorvastatin o-hydroxy (active) metabolite (ATM). Glucose-induced changes in membrane structural organization were measured using small angle x-ray scattering approaches and correlated with changes in lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) levels. EPA was found to inhibit LDL oxidation in a dose-dependent manner (1.0-10.0 µM) and was distinguished from the other TG-lowering agents, which had no significant effect as compared to vehicle treatment alone. Similar effects were observed in membrane lipid vesicles exposed to hyperglycemic conditions. The antioxidant activity of EPA, as observed in glucose-treated vesicles, was significantly enhanced in combination with ATM. Glucose treatment produced highly-ordered, membrane-restricted, cholesterol crystalline domains, which correlated with increased LOOH levels. Of the agents tested in this study, only EPA inhibited glucose-induced cholesterol domain formation. These data demonstrate that EPA, at pharmacologic levels, inhibits hyperglycemia-induced changes in membrane lipid structural organization through a potent antioxidant mechanism associated with its distinct, physicochemical interactions with the membrane bilayer. PMID:25449996

  14. Cysteine analogues potentiate glucose-induced insulin release in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ammon, H.P.; Hehl, K.H.; Enz, G.; Setiadi-Ranti, A.; Verspohl, E.J.

    1986-12-01

    In rat pancreatic islets, cysteine analogues, including glutathione, acetylcysteine, cysteamine, D-penicillamine, L-cysteine ethyl ester, and cysteine-potentiated glucose (11.1 mM) induced insulin secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. Their maximal effects were similar and occurred at approximately 0.05, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.0 mM, respectively. At substimulatory glucose levels (2.8 mM), insulin release was not affected by these compounds. In contrast, thiol compounds, structurally different from cysteine and its analogues, such as mesna, tiopronin, meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), dimercaprol (BAL), beta-thio-D-glucose, as well as those cysteine analogues that lack a free-thiol group, including L-cystine, cystamine, D-penicillamine disulfide, S-carbocysteine, and S-carbamoyl-L-cysteine, did not enhance insulin release at stimulatory glucose levels (11.1 mM); cystine (5 mM) was inhibitory. These in vitro data indicate that among the thiols tested here, only cysteine and its analogues potentiate glucose-induced insulin secretion, whereas thiols that are structurally not related to cysteine do not. This suggests that a cysteine moiety in the molecule is necessary for the insulinotropic effect. For their synergistic action to glucose, the availability of a sulfhydryl group is also a prerequisite. The maximal synergistic action is similar for all cysteine analogues tested, whereas the potency of action is different, suggesting similarity in the mechanism of action but differences in the affinity to the secretory system.

  15. High-frequency audibility: benefits for hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Hogan, C A; Turner, C W

    1998-07-01

    The present study was a systematic investigation of the benefit of providing hearing-impaired listeners with audible high-frequency speech information. Five normal-hearing and nine high-frequency hearing-impaired listeners identified nonsense syllables that were low-pass filtered at a number of cutoff frequencies. As a means of quantifying audibility for each condition, Articulation Index (AI) was calculated for each condition for each listener. Most hearing-impaired listeners demonstrated an improvement in speech recognition as additional audible high-frequency information was provided. In some cases for more severely impaired listeners, increasing the audibility of high-frequency speech information resulted in no further improvement in speech recognition, or even decreases in speech recognition. A new measure of how well hearing-impaired listeners used information within specific frequency bands called "efficiency" was devised. This measure compared the benefit of providing a given increase in speech audibility to a hearing-impaired listener to the benefit observed in normal-hearing listeners for the same increase in speech audibility. Efficiencies were calculated using the old AI method and the new AI method (which takes into account the effects of high speech presentation levels). There was a clear pattern in the results suggesting that as the degree of hearing loss at a given frequency increased beyond 55 dB HL, the efficacy of providing additional audibility to that frequency region was diminished, especially when this degree of hearing loss was present at frequencies of 4000 Hz and above. A comparison of analyses from the "old" and "new" AI procedures suggests that some, but not all, of the deficiencies of speech recognition in these listeners was due to high presentation levels.

  16. The protective effects of beta-casomorphin-7 against glucose -induced renal oxidative stress in vivo and vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Miao, Jinfeng; Wang, Shanshan; Zhang, Yuanshu

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of β-casomorphin-7 (BCM7) on the oxidative stress occurring in kidney tissue in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats and proximal tubular epithelial cells (NRK-52E) exposure to high glucose (HG) by using biochemical methods. There is a significant decrease in plasma insulin and a significant increase in plasma glucagon in the rats of diabetic group. Oral administration of BCM7 for 30 days to rats with STZ-induced diabetes resulted in a significant increase in serum level of insulin, and a decrease in the level of glucagon. Moreover, rats with STZ-induced diabetes had lower levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC), higher levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the kidney than that in the control rats. The administration of BCM7 altered the changes of SOD, GPx, T-AOC, MDA and H2O2 in the kidney of diabetic rats. Furthermore, BCM7 alleviated high glucose-induced decreasement in SOD and GPx activity, increasement in MDA contents in the NRK-52E cells. BCM7 ameliorated the changes of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and ACE2 levels in the kidney of diabetic rats and BCM7 lowered the levels of angiotensin (Ang)II in the kidney of diabetic rats and culture medium for cells. Moreover losartan (antagonist of angiotensin II type I receptor) lowered the high glucose-induced oxidative stress in the NRK-52E cells. Our results suggest that administration of BCM7 would alleviate high glucose-induced renal oxidative stress in vivo and in vitro, which may be associated with down regulation of the concentration of Ang II partly. PMID:23658831

  17. Executive Function Impairments in High IQ Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Thomas E.; Reichel, Philipp C.; Quinlan, Donald M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To demonstrate that high IQ adults diagnosed with ADHD suffer from executive function (EF) impairments that: a) can be identified with a combination of standardized measures and self-report data; and b) occur more commonly in this group than in the general population. Method: 157 ADHD adults with IQ greater than or equal to 120 were…

  18. Green tea polysaccharide-conjugates protect human umbilical vein endothelial cells against impairments triggered by high glucose.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Yuefei; Wu, Yalin; Han, Baoyu; Zhu, Yuejin; Tang, Xiaolin; Sun, Qinglei

    2011-07-01

    Hot-water extracts of low-grade green tea were precipitated with ethanol, deproteinized with trichloroacetic acid, neutralized with NaOH and fractionated by DEAE-cellulose DE-52 column chromatography to yield three (3) of unexplored polysaccharide-conjugate fractions termed gTPC1, gTPC2 and gTPC3. Monosaccharide and amino acid composition, contents of total neutral sugars, proteins and moistures, HPGPC distribution and Zeta potentials of gTPC1-3 were investigated. Exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE) cells to high glucose (33 mM) for 12h significantly decreased cell viability relative to normal glucose control (p<0.001). As compared with cell injury group, gTPC1-3 at all of three dose levels (50, 150 and 300 μg/mL) were found to possess remarkably protective effects on HUVE cells against impairments induced by high glucose in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05, p<0.001). To contribute toward our understanding of the cell-based protection mechanism of gTPC1-3, the latter were subjected to self-oxidation of 1,2,3-phentriol assay, and their scavenging effects were observed as 55.1%, 47.6% and 47.9% at the concentration of 300 μg/mL, respectively. On the basis of the fact that high glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction involves in the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and contributes to the vascular complications in patients with diabetes, inhibitory effects of gTPC1-3 on high glucose-mediated HUVE cell loss are, at least in part, correlated with their potential scavenging potency of ROS. Taken together, gTPC1-3 could be developed as non-cytotoxic candidates of therapeutic agent for diabetic vascular complications. PMID:21439996

  19. Green tea polysaccharide-conjugates protect human umbilical vein endothelial cells against impairments triggered by high glucose.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Yuefei; Wu, Yalin; Han, Baoyu; Zhu, Yuejin; Tang, Xiaolin; Sun, Qinglei

    2011-07-01

    Hot-water extracts of low-grade green tea were precipitated with ethanol, deproteinized with trichloroacetic acid, neutralized with NaOH and fractionated by DEAE-cellulose DE-52 column chromatography to yield three (3) of unexplored polysaccharide-conjugate fractions termed gTPC1, gTPC2 and gTPC3. Monosaccharide and amino acid composition, contents of total neutral sugars, proteins and moistures, HPGPC distribution and Zeta potentials of gTPC1-3 were investigated. Exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE) cells to high glucose (33 mM) for 12h significantly decreased cell viability relative to normal glucose control (p<0.001). As compared with cell injury group, gTPC1-3 at all of three dose levels (50, 150 and 300 μg/mL) were found to possess remarkably protective effects on HUVE cells against impairments induced by high glucose in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05, p<0.001). To contribute toward our understanding of the cell-based protection mechanism of gTPC1-3, the latter were subjected to self-oxidation of 1,2,3-phentriol assay, and their scavenging effects were observed as 55.1%, 47.6% and 47.9% at the concentration of 300 μg/mL, respectively. On the basis of the fact that high glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction involves in the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and contributes to the vascular complications in patients with diabetes, inhibitory effects of gTPC1-3 on high glucose-mediated HUVE cell loss are, at least in part, correlated with their potential scavenging potency of ROS. Taken together, gTPC1-3 could be developed as non-cytotoxic candidates of therapeutic agent for diabetic vascular complications.

  20. The protective effect of magnesium lithospermate B against glucose-induced intracellular oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jian; Ren, Xian; Hou, Rui-ying; Dai, Xing-ping; Zhao, Ying-chun; Xu, Xiao-jing; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Gan; Zhou, Hong-hao; Liu, Zhao-qian

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} LAB reduced the ROS production in HEK293T cells cultured under oxidative stress. High dose of glucose enhanced the expression of HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein in a time-dependent manner. {yields} LAB enhanced the expression of HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein in a dose-dependent manner treated with high dose of glucose. {yields} LAB plays an important role against glucose-induced intracellular oxidative damage. {yields} The enhanced expression of HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein caused by LAB is regulated via Nrf2 signal pathway. -- Abstract: Objectives: To investigate the effects of magnesium lithospermate B (LAB) on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by high dose of glucose or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, we explored the influences of LAB on the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) in HEK293T cells after treatment with high dose of glucose. Materials and methods: The total nuclear proteins in HEK293T cells were extracted with Cytoplasmic Protein Extraction Kit. The ROS level was determined by flow cytometry. The mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 and Nrf2 were determined by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot. Results: LAB reduced the ROS production in HEK293T cells cultured under oxidative stress. High dose of glucose enhanced the expression of HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein in a time-dependent manner. LAB enhanced the expression of HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein in a dose-dependent manner treated with high dose of glucose. The amount of Nrf2 translocation was enhanced after cells were pretreated with 50 {mu}mol/L or 100 {mu}mol/L LAB. Silencing of Nrf2 gene eliminated the enhanced expression of HO-1 protein induced by high dose of glucose plus LAB. Conclusions: LAB plays an important role against glucose-induced intracellular oxidative damage. The enhanced expression of HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein caused by LAB is regulated via Nrf2 signal pathway.

  1. High passage MIN6 cells have impaired insulin secretion with impaired glucose and lipid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kim; Delghingaro-Augusto, Viviane; Nolan, Christopher J; Turner, Nigel; Hallahan, Nicole; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Gunton, Jenny E

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by the inability of beta-cells to secrete enough insulin to maintain glucose homeostasis. MIN6 cells secrete insulin in response to glucose and other secretagogues, but high passage (HP) MIN6 cells lose their ability to secrete insulin in response to glucose. We hypothesized that metabolism of glucose and lipids were defective in HP MIN6 cells causing impaired glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). HP MIN6 cells had no first phase and impaired second phase GSIS indicative of global functional impairment. This was coupled with a markedly reduced ATP content at basal and glucose stimulated states. Glucose uptake and oxidation were higher at basal glucose but ATP content failed to increase with glucose. HP MIN6 cells had decreased basal lipid oxidation. This was accompanied by reduced expressions of Glut1, Gck, Pfk, Srebp1c, Ucp2, Sirt3, Nampt. MIN6 cells represent an important model of beta cells which, as passage numbers increased lost first phase but retained partial second phase GSIS, similar to patients early in type 2 diabetes onset. We believe a number of gene expression changes occurred to produce this defect, with emphasis on Sirt3 and Nampt, two genes that have been implicated in maintenance of glucose homeostasis.

  2. Ethanol extract of Moringa oliefera prevents in vitro glucose induced cataract on isolated goat eye lens

    PubMed Central

    Kurmi, Raghvendra; Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Bansal, Divya; Agnihotri, Abhishek; Dubey, Nazneen

    2014-01-01

    Aim of Study: The aim of current work was to evaluate in vitro anticataract potential of Moringa oliefera extract. Materials and Methods: Goat eye lenses were divided into 4 groups; Group served as control, Group II as toxic control, Group III and Group IV were incubated in extract (250 μg/ml and 500 μg/ml of extract of M. oliefera) Group II, III and IV were incubated in 55 mM glucose in artificial aqueous humor to induce lens opacification. Estimation of total, water soluble protein, catalase, glutathione and malondialdehyde along with photographic evaluation of lens was done. Results: Group II (toxic control) lenses showed high amount of MDA (Malondialdehyde), soluble, insoluble protein, decreased catalase and glutathione levels, while lenses treated with Moringa oliefera extract (Group III and Group IV) showed significant (* P < 0.05) reduction in MDA and increased level of catalase, glutathione, total and soluble protein. Conclusion: Results of present findings suggest protective effect of Moringa oliefera in prevention of in vitro glucose induced cataract. PMID:24008789

  3. Impairment of glucose-induced insulin secretion in human pancreatic islets transplanted to diabetic nude mice.

    PubMed

    Jansson, L; Eizirik, D L; Pipeleers, D G; Borg, L A; Hellerström, C; Andersson, A

    1995-08-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced beta-cell dysfunction may be an important component in the pathogenesis of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. However, most available data in this field were obtained from rodent islets. To investigate the relevance of this hypothesis for human beta-cells in vivo, human pancreatic islets were transplanted under the renal capsule of nude mice. Experimental groups were chosen so that grafted islets were exposed to either hyper- or normoglycemia or combinations of these for 4 or 6 wk. Grafts of normoglycemic recipients responded with an increased insulin release to a glucose stimulus during perfusion, whereas grafts of hyperglycemic recipients failed to respond to glucose. The insulin content of the grafts in the latter groups was only 10% of those observed in controls. Recipients initially hyperglycemic (4 wk), followed by 2 wk of normoglycemia regained a normal graft insulin content, but a decreased insulin response to glucose remained. No ultrastructural signs of beta-cell damage were observed, with the exception of increased glycogen deposits in animals hyperglycemic at the time of killing. It is concluded that prolonged exposure to a diabetic environment induces a long-term secretory defect in human beta-cells, which is not dependent on the size of the islet insulin stores.

  4. High altitude impairs in vivo immunity in humans.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Samuel J; Macdonald, Jamie H; Harper Smith, Adam D; Lawley, Justin S; Gallagher, Carla A; Di Felice, Umberto; Walsh, Neil P

    2013-06-01

    The aim was to assess the effect of high altitude on the development of new immune memory (induction) using a contact sensitization model of in vivo immunity. We hypothesized that high-altitude exposure would impair induction of the in vivo immune response to a novel antigen, diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP). DPCP was applied (sensitization) to the lower back of 27 rested controls at sea level and to ten rested mountaineers 28 hours after passive ascent to 3777 m. After sensitization, mountaineers avoided strenuous exercise for a further 24 hours, after which they completed alpine activities for 11-18 days. Exactly 4 weeks after sensitization, the strength of immune memory induction was quantified in rested mountaineers and controls at sea level, by measuring the response to a low, dose-series DPCP challenge, read at 48 hours as skin measures of edema (skinfold thickness) and redness (erythema). Compared with control responses, skinfold thickness and erythema were reduced in the mountaineers (skinfold thickness,-52%, p=0.01, d=0.86; erythema, -36%, p=0.02, d=0.77). These changes in skinfold thickness and erythema were related to arterial oxygen saturation (r=0.7, p=0.04), but not cortisol (r<0.1, p>0.79), at sensitization. In conclusion, this is the first study to show, using a contact sensitization model of in vivo immunity, that high altitude exposure impairs the development of new immunity in humans.

  5. Snf1-Dependent Transcription Confers Glucose-Induced Decay upon the mRNA Product

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Katherine A.; Dombek, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the switch from respiratory metabolism to fermentation causes rapid decay of transcripts encoding proteins uniquely required for aerobic metabolism. Snf1, the yeast ortholog of AMP-activated protein kinase, has been implicated in this process because inhibiting Snf1 mimics the addition of glucose. In this study, we show that the SNF1-dependent ADH2 promoter, or just the major transcription factor binding site, is sufficient to confer glucose-induced mRNA decay upon heterologous transcripts. SNF1-independent expression from the ADH2 promoter prevented glucose-induced mRNA decay without altering the start site of transcription. SNF1-dependent transcripts are enriched for the binding motif of the RNA binding protein Vts1, an important mediator of mRNA decay and mRNA repression whose expression is correlated with decreased abundance of SNF1-dependent transcripts during the yeast metabolic cycle. However, deletion of VTS1 did not slow the rate of glucose-induced mRNA decay. ADH2 mRNA rapidly dissociated from polysomes after glucose repletion, and sequences bound by RNA binding proteins were enriched in the transcripts from repressed cells. Inhibiting the protein kinase A pathway did not affect glucose-induced decay of ADH2 mRNA. Our results suggest that Snf1 may influence mRNA stability by altering the recruitment activity of the transcription factor Adr1. PMID:26667037

  6. High Glucose-Mediated Oxidative Stress Impairs Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, Marcelo L.; Almeida, Maíra E. S.; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Horwitz, Alan F.; Santos, Marinilce F.

    2011-01-01

    Deficient wound healing in diabetic patients is very frequent, but the cellular and molecular causes are poorly defined. In this study, we evaluate the hypothesis that high glucose concentrations inhibit cell migration. Using CHO.K1 cells, NIH-3T3 fibroblasts, mouse embryonic fibroblasts and primary skin fibroblasts from control and diabetic rats cultured in 5 mM D-glucose (low glucose, LG), 25 mM D-glucose (high glucose, HG) or 25 mM L-glucose medium (osmotic control - OC), we analyzed the migration speed, protrusion stability, cell polarity, adhesion maturation and the activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1. We also analyzed the effects of reactive oxygen species by incubating cells with the antioxidant N-Acetyl-Cysteine (NAC). We observed that HG conditions inhibited cell migration when compared to LG or OC. This inhibition resulted from impaired cell polarity, protrusion destabilization and inhibition of adhesion maturation. Conversely, Rac1 activity, which promotes protrusion and blocks adhesion maturation, was increased in HG conditions, thus providing a mechanistic basis for the HG phenotype. Most of the HG effects were partially or completely rescued by treatment with NAC. These findings demonstrate that HG impairs cell migration due to an increase in oxidative stress that causes polarity loss, deficient adhesion and protrusion. These alterations arise, in large part, from increased Rac1 activity and may contribute to the poor wound healing observed in diabetic patients. PMID:21826213

  7. Acrolein impairs the cholesterol transport functions of high density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Alexandra C; Holme, Rebecca L; Chen, Yiliang; Thomas, Michael J; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Silverstein, Roy L; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Sahoo, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are considered athero-protective, primarily due to their role in reverse cholesterol transport, where they transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. The current study was designed to determine the impact of HDL modification by acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde found in high abundance in cigarette smoke, on the cholesterol transport functions of HDL. HDL was chemically-modified with acrolein and immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed apolipoprotein crosslinking, as well as acrolein adducts on apolipoproteins A-I and A-II. The ability of acrolein-modified HDL (acro-HDL) to serve as an acceptor of free cholesterol (FC) from COS-7 cells transiently expressing SR-BI was significantly decreased. Further, in contrast to native HDL, acro-HDL promotes higher neutral lipid accumulation in murine macrophages as judged by Oil Red O staining. The ability of acro-HDL to mediate efficient selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters (CE) into SR-BI-expressing cells was reduced compared to native HDL. Together, the findings from our studies suggest that acrolein modification of HDL produces a dysfunctional particle that may ultimately promote atherogenesis by impairing functions that are critical in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway.

  8. Impairment of memorization by high doses of pyridoxine in man.

    PubMed

    Molimard, R; Marillaud, A; Paille, A; Le Devehat, C; Lemoine, A; Dougny, M

    1980-05-01

    Two controlled trials were performed successively to evaluate the effect of high doses of oral pyridoxine on brain performance in man. In trial I, medical students volunteered to take 100 mg, 500 mg of pyridoxine a day or placebo for 10 days. A digit coding test was performed before, and at the end of the treatment period and a third 15 days later. The improvement of performance from the first to the third test (learning effect) was significantly better in the placebo group than in the B6 treated groups. This could be attributed to memorization of skills. Trial II was performed in obese patients starting a low calorie diet in whom vitamins are routinely prescribed. Performance in a work recognition test and in a visual retention test was lower for the group receiving 1 g of pyridoxine a day. Thus, high doses of oral pyridoxine are likely to impair memorization in man. Disturbances of neuro-transmitter metabolism such as increase of GABA production might explain the effect. As the benefit of high doses of pyridoxine has not been well-documented and as the study has suggested that undesired effects may indeed exist, the widespread use of such doses is questionable.

  9. In vivo and in vitro glucose-induced biphasic insulin secretion in the mouse: pattern and role of cytoplasmic Ca2+ and amplification signals in beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Henquin, Jean-Claude; Nenquin, Myriam; Stiernet, Patrick; Ahren, Bo

    2006-02-01

    The mechanisms underlying biphasic insulin secretion have not been completely elucidated. We compared the pattern of plasma insulin changes during hyperglycemic clamps in mice to that of glucose-induced insulin secretion and cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) changes in perifused mouse islets. Anesthetized mice were infused with glucose to clamp blood glucose at 8.5 (baseline), 11.1, 16.7, or 30 mmol/l. A first-phase insulin response consistently peaked at 1 min, and a slowly ascending second phase occurred at 16.7 and 30 mmol/l glucose. Glucose-induced insulin secretion in vivo is thus biphasic, with a similarly increasing second phase in the mouse as in humans. In vitro, square-wave stimulation from a baseline of 3 mmol/l glucose induced similar biphasic insulin secretion and [Ca(2+)](c) increases, with sustained and flat second phases. The glucose dependency (3-30 mmol/l) of both changes was sigmoidal with, however, a shift to the right of the relation for insulin secretion compared with that for [Ca(2+)](c). The maximum [Ca(2+)](c) increase was achieved by glucose concentrations, causing half-maximum insulin secretion. Because this was true for both phases, we propose that contrary to current concepts, amplifying signals are also implicated in first-phase glucose-induced insulin secretion. To mimic in vivo conditions, islets were stimulated with high glucose after being initially perifused with 8.5 instead of 3.0 mmol/l glucose. First-phase insulin secretion induced by glucose at 11.1, 16.7, and 30 mmol/l was decreased by approximately 50%, an inhibition that could not be explained by commensurate decreases in [Ca(2+)](c) or in the pool of readily releasable granules. Also unexpected was the gradually ascending pattern of the second phase, now similar to that in vivo. These observations indicated that variations in prestimulatory glucose can secondarily affect the magnitude and pattern of subsequent glucose-induced insulin secretion.

  10. Reduced AMPKα2 protein expression restores glucose-induced insulin secretion in islets from calorie-restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Maria Esméria C; Ribeiro, Rosane A; Vanzela, Emerielle C; Barbosa-Sampaio, Helena C

    2016-02-01

    In a state of caloric restriction (CR), improved insulin action was associated with the activation of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK). Here, we verified whether AMPK was involved in impaired β-cell function in islets from rats subjected to CR for 21 days. Eight-week-old male rats were distributed into a control (CTL) group that was fed an isocaloric diet ad libitum or a CR group that received 60% of the food consumed by the CTL group. From days 18-21, CTL and CR rats were treated with sense (CTLS and CRS) or antisense (CTLAS and CRAS) AMPKα2 oligonucleotides. Caloric restriction was associated with decreased body weight, perigonadal fat pads and insulinaemia, while higher glucose tolerance was observed in CRS rats. Antisense treatment normalized insulinaemia and glucose tolerance in CRAS rats and increased cholesterolaemia in CRAS and CTLAS groups. These effects were associated with reduced pAMPK/AMPK protein expression in the liver of rats treated with antisense oligonucleotides. Additionally, CRS islets showed higher pAMPK/AMPK content and lower glucose-induced insulin release. As expected, antisense oligonucleotides against AMPKα2 efficiently reduced pAMPK/AMPK protein in CRAS and CTLAS islets. The lower AMPK content in CRAS islets normalized the insulin secretion in islets exposed to 16.7 mM glucose. In addition, CTLAS islets presented higher insulin secretion at 2.8 and 16.7 mM glucose. These findings support the hypothesis that higher AMPK protein expression is involved in impaired β-cell function in islets from rats subjected to CR for 21 days. PMID:27102713

  11. Low glucose-induced ghrelin secretion is mediated by an ATP-sensitive potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Oya, Manami; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Harada, Kazuki; Numano, Rika; Sato, Takahiro; Kojima, Masayasu; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Ghrelin is synthesized in X/A-like cells of the gastric mucosa, which plays an important role in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Although ghrelin secretion is known to be induced by neurotransmitters or hormones or by nutrient sensing in the ghrelin-secreting cells themselves, the mechanism of ghrelin secretion is not clearly understood. In the present study, we found that changing the extracellular glucose concentration from elevated (25  mM) to optimal (10 mM) caused an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in ghrelin-secreting mouse ghrelinoma 3-1 (MGN3-1) cells (n=32, P<0.01), whereas changing the glucose concentration from elevated to lowered (5 or 1 mM) had little effect on [Ca2+]i increase. Overexpression of a closed form of an ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel mutant suppressed the 10  mM glucose-induced [Ca2+]i increase (n=8, P<0.01) and exocytotic events (n=6, P<0.01). We also found that a low concentration of a KATP channel opener, diazoxide, with 25  mM glucose induced [Ca2+]i increase (n=23, P<0.01) and ghrelin secretion (n≥3, P<0.05). In contrast, the application of a low concentration of a KATP channel blocker, tolbutamide, significantly induced [Ca2+]i increase (n=15, P<0.01) and ghrelin secretion (n≥3, P<0.05) under 5 mM glucose. Furthermore, the application of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel inhibitors suppressed the 10 mM glucose-induced [Ca2+]i increase (n≥26, P<0.01) and ghrelin secretion (n≥5, P<0.05). These findings suggest that KATP and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels are involved in glucose-dependent ghrelin secretion in MGN3-1 cells.

  12. Transcriptional coactivator p300 regulates glucose-induced gene expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shali; Feng, Biao; George, Biju; Chakrabarti, Rana; Chen, Megan; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2010-01-01

    Sustained hyperglycemia in diabetes causes alteration of a large number of transcription factors and mRNA transcripts, leading to tissue damage. We investigated whether p300, a transcriptional coactivator with histone acetyl transferase activity, regulates glucose-induced activation of transcription factors and subsequent upregulation of vasoactive factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were incubated in varied glucose concentrations and were studied after p300 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection, p300 overexpression, or incubation with the p300 inhibitor curcumin. Histone H2AX phosphorylation and lysine acetylation were examined for oxidative DNA damage and p300 activation. Screening for transcription factors was performed with the Luminex system. Alterations of selected transcription factors were validated. mRNA expression of p300, endothelin-1 (ET-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and fibronectin (FN) and its splice variant EDB(+)FN and FN protein production were analyzed. HUVECs in 25 mmol/l glucose showed increased p300 production accompanied by increased binding of p300 to ET-1 and FN promoters, augmented histone acetylation, H2AX phosphorylation, activation of multiple transcription factors, and increased mRNA expression of vasoactive factors and ECM proteins. p300 overexpression showed a glucose-like effect on the mRNA expression of ET-1, VEGF, and FN. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated p300 blockade or chemical inhibitor of p300 prevented such glucose-induced changes. Similar mRNA upregulation was also seen in the organ culture of vascular tissues, which was prevented by p300 siRNA transfection. Data from these studies suggest that glucose-induced p300 upregulation is an important upstream epigenetic mechanism regulating gene expression of vasoactive factors and ECM proteins in endothelial cells and is a potential therapeutic target for diabetic complications.

  13. Glucose-induced toxicity in insulin-producing pituitary cells that coexpress GLUT2 and glucokinase. Implications for metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Faradji, R N; Havari, E; Chen, Q; Gray, J; Tornheim, K; Corkey, B E; Mulligan, R C; Lipes, M A

    2001-09-28

    We have shown that intermediate lobe (IL) pituitary cells can be engineered to produce sufficient amounts of insulin (ins) to cure diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice but, unlike transplanted islets, ILins cells evade immune attack. To confer glucose-sensing capabilities into these cells, they were further modified with recombinant adenoviruses to express high levels of GLUT2 and the beta-cell isoform of glucokinase (GK). Although expression of GLUT2 alone had negligible effects on glucose usage and lactate production, expression of GK alone resulted in approximately 2-fold increase in glycolytic flux within the physiological (3-20 mm) glucose range. GLUT2/GK coexpression further increased glycolytic flux at 20 mm glucose but disproportionately increased flux at 3 mm glucose. Despite enhanced glycolytic fluxes, GLUT2/GK-coexpressing cells showed glucose dose-dependent accumulation of hexose phosphates, depletion of intracellular ATP, and severe apoptotic cell death. These studies demonstrate that glucose-sensing properties can be introduced into non-islet cells by the single expression of GK and that glucose responsiveness can be augmented by the coexpression of GLUT2. However, in the metabolic engineering of surrogate beta cells, it is critical that the levels of the components be closely optimized to ensure their physiological function and to avoid the deleterious consequences of glucose-induced toxicity.

  14. Effects of calcium buffering on glucose-induced insulin release in mouse pancreatic islets: an approximation to the calcium sensor

    PubMed Central

    Pertusa, José A G; Sanchez-Andrés, Juan V; Martín, Franz; Soria, Bernat

    1999-01-01

    The properties of the calcium sensor for glucose-induced insulin secretion have been studied using cell-permeant Ca2+ buffers with distinct kinetics and affinities. In addition, submembrane cytosolic Ca2+ distribution has been modelled after trains of glucose-induced action potential-like depolarizations. Slow Ca2+ buffers (around 1 mmol l−1 intracellular concentration) with different affinities (EGTA and Calcium Orange-5N) did not significantly affect glucose-induced insulin release. Modelling showed no effect on cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations at the outermost shell (0.05 μm), their effects being observed in the innermost shells dependent on Ca2+ affinity. In contrast, fast Ca2+ buffers (around 1 mmol l−1 intracellular concentration) with different affinities (BAPTA and Calcium Green-5N) caused a 50% inhibition of early insulin response and completely blocked the late phase of glucose-induced insulin response, their simulations showing a decrease of [Ca2+]i at both the inner and outermost shells. These data are consistent with the existence in pancreatic β-cells of a higher affinity Ca2+ sensor than that proposed for neurons. Moreover, these data are consistent with the proposed existence of two distinct pools of granules: (i) ‘primed’ vesicles, colocalized with Ca2+ channels and responsible of the first phase of insulin release; and (ii) ‘reserved pool’ vesicles, not colocalized and responsible for the second phase. PMID:10523416

  15. GLUCOSE-INDUCED INTESTINAL VASODILATION VIA ADENOSINE A1 RECEPTORS REQUIRES NITRIC OXIDE BUT NOT K+ATP CHANNELS

    PubMed Central

    Matheson, Paul J.; Li, Na; Harris, Patrick D.; Zakaria, El Rasheid; Garrison, R. Neal

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Both nitric oxide (NO) and adenosine A1 receptor activation mediate microvascular vasodilation during intestinal glucose absorption. Our overall hypothesis is that ATP utilization during glucose absorption would increase adenosine metabolite release, which acts on adenosine A1 receptors to alter endothelial production of NO and/or activate ATP-dependent potassium channels (K+ATP) to dilate intestinal microvessels. METHODS Intravital videomicroscopy of the rat jejunum was used to record the vascular responses of inflow (termed 1A) arterioles and proximal (p3A) and distal (d3A) premucosal arterioles during exposure to isotonic glucose or mannitol solutions alone or in the presence of the selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (L-NMMA), an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX)), or a K+ATP channel inhibitor (glibenclamide). RESULTS As expected, glucose exposure caused rapid dilation of both p3A and d3A arterioles, while mannitol exposure had no effect on microvascular diameters. Adenosine A1 receptor blockade completely prevented glucose-induced dilation of the premucosal arterioles. NOS inhibition significantly blunted the glucose-induced vasodilation of the premucosal arterioles, but had little effect in the mannitol group. Simultaneous application of both the NOS inhibitor and the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist gave the same reduction in glucose-induced dilation of the premucosal arterioles as the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist alone. Blockade of K+ATP channels with glibenclamide did not attenuate glucose-induced vasodilation of the premucosal arterioles. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that glucose-induced vasodilation of premucosal jejunal arterioles is mediated through adenosine A1 receptors, and NO at least partially mediates the adenosine A1 receptor-induced vasodilation. In addition, K+ATP channels are not involved in premucosal arteriolar vasodilation during intestinal glucose exposure. PMID

  16. Long-term exposure of proximal tubular epithelial cells to glucose induces transforming growth factor-beta 1 synthesis via an autocrine PDGF loop.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Donald; Brunskill, Nigel; Ito, Takafumi; Phillips, Aled

    2003-12-01

    We have recently reported increased transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 gene transcription in proximal tubular cells within 12 hours of exposure to 25 mmol/L D-glucose, with a requirement for a second stimulus such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to increase its translation in short-term experiments. In the current study we investigated the effect on TGF-beta 1 production of prolonged exposure of proximal tubular cells to high glucose concentrations. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of cell culture supernatant showed significant increase in latent TGF-beta 1 only after 7 days exposure to high glucose. Radiolabeling of glucose-stimulated cells with (3)H amino acids and subsequent immunoprecipitation of TGF-beta 1 demonstrated de novo synthesis from day 5 of high glucose exposure onwards. Similarly, polysome analysis showed enhanced translation of TGF-beta mRNA after 4 or more days of high glucose exposure. TGF-beta 1 synthesis, following addition of glucose, was inhibited by blockade of the PDGF-alpha receptor subunit. Glucose did not alter PDGF expression, nor expression of PDGF alpha-receptors. Activation of the receptor following addition of 25 mm D-glucose could be demonstrated suggesting increased sensitivity to endogenous PDGF. Exposure to glucose activated p38MAP kinase, and inhibition of this activation abrogated both glucose induced TGF-beta 1 transcriptional activation and TGF-beta 1 synthesis. Inhibition of p38MAP kinase did not influence the effect of exogenous PDGF when cells were stimulated sequentially by glucose and PDGF. We postulate that glucose induces an early increase in TGF-beta 1 transcription via activation of p38MAP kinase. In addition, glucose causes a late increase in PDGF-dependent TGF-beta 1 translation by enhancing cellular sensitivity to PDGF. This provides a potential explanation for the clinical observation that prolonged poor glycemic control may contribute to progression of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:14633628

  17. MicroRNAs involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades pathway during glucose-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Shen, E; Diao, Xuehong; Wang, Xiaoxia; Chen, Ruizhen; Hu, Bing

    2011-08-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a key structural feature of diabetic cardiomyopathy in the late stage of diabetes. Recent studies show that microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy in diabetic mice, but more novel miRNAs remain to be investigated. In this study, diabetic cardiomyopathy, characterized by hypertrophy, was induced in mice by streptozotocin injection. Using microarray analysis of myocardial tissue, we were able to identify changes in expression in 19 miRNA, of which 16 miRNAs were further validated by real-time PCR and a total of 3212 targets mRNA were predicted. Further analysis showed that 31 GO functions and 16 KEGG pathways were enriched in the diabetic heart. Of these, MAPK signaling pathway was prominent. In vivo and in vitro studies have confirmed that three major subgroups of MAPK including ERK1/2, JNK, and p38, are specifically upregulated in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy during hyperglycemia. To further explore the potential involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of glucose-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to high glucose and transfected with miR-373 mimic. Overexpression of miR-373 decreased the cell size, and also reduced the level of its target gene MEF2C, and miR-373 expression was regulated by p38. Our data highlight an important role of miRNAs in diabetic cardiomyopathy, and implicate the reliability of bioinformatics analysis in shedding light on the mechanisms underlying diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  18. Measuring ADHD and ODD Symptoms and Impairment Using High School Teachers' Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Steven W.; Brady, Christine E.; Harrison, Judith R.; Bunford, Nora; Kern, Lee; State, Talida; Andrews, Christiana

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed the results of high school teachers' ratings of symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder, as well as school-related impairment of 875 adolescents. One hundred forty-three teachers at 19 high schools across 4 states each rated 6 students from their first-period classes according…

  19. Glucose induces intestinal human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 to prevent neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, Naoya; Fujie, Yoshiko; Itoh, Tomoo; Tukey, Robert H; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2014-01-01

    Inadequate calorie intake or starvation has been suggested as a cause of neonatal jaundice, which can further cause permanent brain damage, kernicterus. This study experimentally investigated whether additional glucose treatments induce the bilirubin-metabolizing enzyme--UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1--to prevent the onset of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Neonatal humanized UGT1 (hUGT1) mice physiologically develop jaundice. In this study, UGT1A1 expression levels were determined in the liver and small intestine of neonatal hUGT1 mice that were orally treated with glucose. In the hUGT1 mice, glucose induced UGT1A1 in the small intestine, while it did not affect the expression of UGT1A1 in the liver. UGT1A1 was also induced in the human intestinal Caco-2 cells when the cells were cultured in the presence of glucose. Luciferase assays demonstrated that not only the proximal region (-1300/-7) of the UGT1A1 promoter, but also distal region (-6500/-4050) were responsible for the induction of UGT1A1 in the intestinal cells. Adequate calorie intake would lead to the sufficient expression of UGT1A1 in the small intestine to reduce serum bilirubin levels. Supplemental treatment of newborns with glucose solution can be a convenient and efficient method to treat neonatal jaundice while allowing continuous breastfeeding. PMID:25209391

  20. HIGH GLUCOSE INDUCES TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN HUMAN MONOCYTES: MECHANISM OF ACTIVATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Hyperglycemia induced inflammation is central in diabetes complications and monocytes are important in orchestrating these effects. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in innate immune responses as well as inflammation. However, there is a paucity of data examining the expression a...

  1. A catechin-enriched green tea extract prevents glucose-induced survival reduction in Caenorhabditis elegans through sir-2.1 and uba-1 dependent hormesis.

    PubMed

    Deusing, Dorothé Jenni; Winter, Sarah; Kler, Adolf; Kriesl, Erwin; Bonnländer, Bernd; Wenzel, Uwe; Fitzenberger, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is a hallmark of diabetes mellitus which leads to the onset of complications in the long term. Green tea through its high content of polyphenolic catechins, on the other hand, is suggested to prevent or at least delay such detrimental complications. In the present study we fed the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans on a liquid medium supplemented with 10mM glucose in the absence or presence of a catechin-enriched green tea extract (CEGTE). After exposure of young adults for 48h survival was subsequently measured under heat stress at 37°C. Whereas CEGTE at 0.01% did not affect the survival of wild type nematodes, it completely reversed the glucose-induced survival reduction. Those effects were not achieved through the monomeric catechins included in CEGTE. RNA interference (RNAi) for sir-2.1 not only prevented the survival extension by CEGTE under simultaneous glucose exposure but also caused a further reduction of survival. Likewise, the knockdown of uba-1, encoding the only E1-ubiquitin-activating enzyme in C. elegans, proved that UBA-1 is essential for the survival extension by CEGTE and that its loss of function changes CEGTE from a survival extending into a survival reducing extract. Stimulation of the proteasome by CEGTE was finally proven through measurements of the proteolytic cleavage of a fluorogenic peptide substrate. To conclude, our studies provide evidence that CEGTE reverses glucose-induced damage in C. elegans through activation of adaptive responses mediated by SIR-2.1 and proteasomal degradation. The hormetic mode of action is revealed by a reduction of survival once the adaptive processes were blocked.

  2. A catechin-enriched green tea extract prevents glucose-induced survival reduction in Caenorhabditis elegans through sir-2.1 and uba-1 dependent hormesis.

    PubMed

    Deusing, Dorothé Jenni; Winter, Sarah; Kler, Adolf; Kriesl, Erwin; Bonnländer, Bernd; Wenzel, Uwe; Fitzenberger, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is a hallmark of diabetes mellitus which leads to the onset of complications in the long term. Green tea through its high content of polyphenolic catechins, on the other hand, is suggested to prevent or at least delay such detrimental complications. In the present study we fed the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans on a liquid medium supplemented with 10mM glucose in the absence or presence of a catechin-enriched green tea extract (CEGTE). After exposure of young adults for 48h survival was subsequently measured under heat stress at 37°C. Whereas CEGTE at 0.01% did not affect the survival of wild type nematodes, it completely reversed the glucose-induced survival reduction. Those effects were not achieved through the monomeric catechins included in CEGTE. RNA interference (RNAi) for sir-2.1 not only prevented the survival extension by CEGTE under simultaneous glucose exposure but also caused a further reduction of survival. Likewise, the knockdown of uba-1, encoding the only E1-ubiquitin-activating enzyme in C. elegans, proved that UBA-1 is essential for the survival extension by CEGTE and that its loss of function changes CEGTE from a survival extending into a survival reducing extract. Stimulation of the proteasome by CEGTE was finally proven through measurements of the proteolytic cleavage of a fluorogenic peptide substrate. To conclude, our studies provide evidence that CEGTE reverses glucose-induced damage in C. elegans through activation of adaptive responses mediated by SIR-2.1 and proteasomal degradation. The hormetic mode of action is revealed by a reduction of survival once the adaptive processes were blocked. PMID:25771124

  3. Brief Report: Biochemical Correlates of Clinical Impairment in High Functioning Autism and Asperger's Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinhans, Natalia M.; Richards, Todd; Weaver, Kurt E.; Liang, Olivia; Dawson, Geraldine; Aylward, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Amygdala dysfunction has been proposed as a critical contributor to social impairment in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The current study investigated biochemical abnormalities in the amygdala in 20 high functioning adults with autistic disorder or Asperger's disorder and 19 typically developing adults matched on age and IQ. Magnetic resonance…

  4. Social Studies: A Resource Guide for Hearing-Impaired High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaggers, Robert A.; Jaggers, Barbara A.

    The guide was written to give secondary level hearing impaired students exposure to real life problems from a social studies perspective. Units are outlined for the three levels of the high school years and provide an overview, information on vocabulary, target competencies, suggested activities, sources, and a list of objectives. The units are…

  5. Neonatal insulin action impairs hypothalamic neurocircuit formation in response to maternal high fat feeding

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Merly C.; Paeger, Lars; Hess, Simon; Steculorum, Sophie M.; Awazawa, Motoharu; Hampel, Brigitte; Neupert, Susanne; Nicholls, Hayley T.; Mauer, Jan; Hausen, A. Christine; Predel, Reinhard; Kloppenburg, Peter; Horvath, Tamas L.; Brüning, Jens C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Maternal metabolic homeostasis exerts long-term effects on the offspring's health outcomes. Here, we demonstrate that maternal high fat diet (HFD)-feeding during lactation predisposes the offspring for obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis in mice, which is associated with an impairment of the hypothalamic melanocortin circuitry. Whereas the number and neuropeptide expression of anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin-(POMC) and orexigenic agoui-related peptide (AgRP)-neurons, electrophysiological properties of POMC-neurons and posttranslational processing of POMC remain unaffected in response to maternal HFD-feeding during lactation, the formation of POMC- and AgRP-projections to hypothalamic target sites is severely impaired. Abrogating insulin action in POMC-neurons of the offspring prevents altered POMC-projections to the preautonomic paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH), pancreatic parasympathetic innervation and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin-secretion in response to maternal overnutrition. These experiments reveal a critical timing, when altered maternal metabolism disrupts metabolic homeostasis in the offspring via impairing neuronal projections and that abnormal insulin signaling contributes to this effect. PMID:24462248

  6. An examination of the Clinical Impairment Assessment among women at high risk for eating disorder onset

    PubMed Central

    Vannucci, Anna; Kass, Andrea E.; Sinton, Meghan M.; Aspen, Vandana; Weisman, Hannah; Bailey, Jakki O.; Wilfley, Denise E.; Taylor, C. Barr

    2013-01-01

    Identifying measures that reliably and validly assess clinical impairment has important implications for eating disorder (ED) diagnosis and treatment. The current study examined the psychometric properties of the Clinical Impairment Assessment (CIA) in women at high risk for ED onset. Participants were 543 women (20.6 ± 2.0 years) who were classified into one of three ED categories: clinical ED, high risk for ED onset, and low risk control. Among high risk women, the CIA demonstrated high internal consistency (α = 0.93) and good convergent validity with disordered eating attitudes (rs = 0.27–0.68, ps < 0.001). Examination of the CIA’s discriminant validity revealed that CIA global scores were highest among women with a clinical ED (17.7 ± 10.7) followed by high risk women (10.6 ± 8.5) and low risk controls (3.0 ± 3.3), respectively (p < 0.001). High risk women reporting behavioral indices of ED psychopathology (objective and/or subjective binge episodes, purging behaviors, driven exercise, and ED treatment history) had higher CIA global scores than those without such indices (ps < 0.05), suggesting good criterion validity. These data establish the first norms for the CIA in a United States sample. The CIA is psychometrically sound among high risk women, and heightened levels of impairment among these individuals as compared to low risk women verify the relevance of early intervention efforts. PMID:22516320

  7. Protective effect of lycopene on high-fat diet-induced cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Fan, Jin; Wang, Jian; Li, Yuxia; Xiao, Li; Duan, Dan; Wang, Qingsong

    2016-08-01

    A Western diet, high in saturated fats, has been linked to the development of cognitive impairment. Lycopene has recently received considerable attention for its potent protective properties demonstrated in several models of nervous system dysfunction. However, it remains unclear whether lycopene exerts protective effects on cognition. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of lycopene on learning and memory impairment and the potential underlying mechanism in rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD). One-month-old male rats were fed different diets for 16 weeks (n=12 per group), including a standard chow diet (CD), a HFD, or a HFD plus lycopene (4mg/kg, oral gavage in the last three weeks). Behavioral testing, including the Morris water maze (MWM), object recognition task (ORT), and anxiety-like behavior in an open field (OF), were assessed at week 16. The dendritic spine density and neuronal density in the hippocampal CA1 subfield were subsequently measured. The results indicate that HFD consumption for 16 weeks significantly impaired spatial memory (P<0.001), working memory (P<0.01), and object recognition memory (P<0.01), decreased the dendritic spine density (P<0.001), damaged pyramidal neurons in the CA1 subfield (P<0.001) compared with the CD group. However, lycopene significantly attenuated learning and memory impairments and prevented the reduction in dendritic spine density (P<0.001). Thus, this study indicated that lycopene helps to protect HFD induced cognitive dysfunction. PMID:27177726

  8. Barcroft's bold assertion: All dwellers at high altitudes are persons of impaired physical and mental powers.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2016-03-01

    Barcroft's bold assertion that everyone at high altitude has physical and mental impairment compared with sea level was very provocative. It was a result of the expedition that he led to Cerro de Pasco in Peru, altitude 4300 m. Although it is clear that newcomers to high altitude have reduced physical powers, some people believe that this does not apply to permanent residents who have been at high altitude for generations. The best evidence supports Barcroft's contention, although permanent residents often perform better than acclimatized lowlanders. Turning to neuropsychological function, newcomers to high altitude certainly have some impairment, and there is evidence that the same applies to highlanders. However the notion that permanent residents are impaired is anathema to many people. For example the eminent Peruvian physician Carlos Monge took great exception to Barcroft's remark and even attributed it to the fact that Barcroft was suffering from acute mountain sickness when he made it! Monge referred to 'climatic aggression', by which he meant the negative consequences of the inevitable hypoxia of high altitude. Recent technological advances such as oxygen enrichment of room air can overcome this 'aggression'. This might be useful in some settings at high altitude such as a nursery where newborn babies are cared for, and possibly operating rooms where the surgeon's dexterity may be enhanced. Other situations might be dormitories, conference rooms, and perhaps some school rooms. These constitute possible ways by which the effects of Barcroft's assertion might be countered. PMID:25962370

  9. Barcroft's bold assertion: All dwellers at high altitudes are persons of impaired physical and mental powers.

    PubMed

    West, John B

    2016-03-01

    Barcroft's bold assertion that everyone at high altitude has physical and mental impairment compared with sea level was very provocative. It was a result of the expedition that he led to Cerro de Pasco in Peru, altitude 4300 m. Although it is clear that newcomers to high altitude have reduced physical powers, some people believe that this does not apply to permanent residents who have been at high altitude for generations. The best evidence supports Barcroft's contention, although permanent residents often perform better than acclimatized lowlanders. Turning to neuropsychological function, newcomers to high altitude certainly have some impairment, and there is evidence that the same applies to highlanders. However the notion that permanent residents are impaired is anathema to many people. For example the eminent Peruvian physician Carlos Monge took great exception to Barcroft's remark and even attributed it to the fact that Barcroft was suffering from acute mountain sickness when he made it! Monge referred to 'climatic aggression', by which he meant the negative consequences of the inevitable hypoxia of high altitude. Recent technological advances such as oxygen enrichment of room air can overcome this 'aggression'. This might be useful in some settings at high altitude such as a nursery where newborn babies are cared for, and possibly operating rooms where the surgeon's dexterity may be enhanced. Other situations might be dormitories, conference rooms, and perhaps some school rooms. These constitute possible ways by which the effects of Barcroft's assertion might be countered.

  10. Interpreting the Meaning of the Terms "Certified" and "Highly Qualified" for Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pogrund, Rona L.; Wibbenmeyer, Kristina A.

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the value of the term "highly qualified" as it relates to teachers of students with visual impairments. Routes to certification of teachers of students with visual impairments in the United States are not uniform and may not always reflect high-quality teacher preparation. A rationale for more stringent national standards…

  11. On the mechanism of impaired insulin secretion in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Fadda, G Z; Hajjar, S M; Perna, A F; Zhou, X J; Lipson, L G; Massry, S G

    1991-01-01

    It has been suggested that a sustained rise in resting levels of cytosolic calcium [Ca2+]i of pancreatic islets is responsible for impaired insulin secretion in chronic renal failure (CRF). Evidence for such an event is lacking and the mechanisms through which it may affect insulin secretion are not known. Studies were conducted in normal, CRF, and normocalcemic, parathyroidectomized (PTX) CRF rats to answer these questions. Resting levels of [Ca2+]i of islets from CRF rats were higher (P less than 0.01) than in control of CRF-PTX rats. [3H]2-deoxyglucose uptake and cAMP production by islets were not different in the three groups. Insulin content of, and glucose-induced insulin secretion by islets from CRF rats was lower (P less than 0.01) than in control and CRF-PTX rats. In contrast, glyceraldehyde-induced insulin release by CRF islets was normal. Basal ATP content, both glucose-stimulated ATP content and ATP/ADP ratio, net lactic acid output, Vmax of phosphofructokinase-1, and Ca2+ ATPase of islets from CRF rats were lower (P less than 0.02-less than 0.01) than in normal or CRF-PTX animals. Data show that: (a) Glucose but not glyceraldehyde-induced insulin secretion is impaired in CRF; (b) the impairment in glucose-induced insulin release in CRF is due to a defect in the metabolism of glucose; (c) this latter defect is due to reduced ATP content induced partly by high [Ca2+]i of islets; and (d) the high [Ca2+]i in islets of CRF rats is due to augmented PTH-induced calcium entry into cells and decreased calcium extrusion from the islets secondary to reduced activity of the Ca2+ ATPase. Images PMID:1985099

  12. SERCA2 Deficiency Impairs Pancreatic β-Cell Function in Response to Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Kono, Tatsuyoshi; Anderson-Baucum, Emily K; Yamamoto, Wataru; Gilon, Patrick; Lebeche, Djamel; Day, Richard N; Shull, Gary E; Evans-Molina, Carmella

    2016-10-01

    The sarcoendoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) ATPase 2 (SERCA2) pump is a P-type ATPase tasked with the maintenance of ER Ca(2+) stores. Whereas β-cell SERCA2 expression is reduced in diabetes, the role of SERCA2 in the regulation of whole-body glucose homeostasis has remained uncharacterized. To this end, SERCA2 heterozygous mice (S2HET) were challenged with a high-fat diet (HFD) containing 45% of kilocalories from fat. After 16 weeks of the HFD, S2HET mice were hyperglycemic and glucose intolerant, but adiposity and insulin sensitivity were not different between HFD-fed S2HET mice and HFD-fed wild-type controls. Consistent with a defect in β-cell function, insulin secretion, glucose-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) mobilization, and the onset of steady-state glucose-induced Ca(2+) oscillations were impaired in HFD-fed S2HET islets. Moreover, HFD-fed S2HET mice exhibited reduced β-cell mass and proliferation, altered insulin production and proinsulin processing, and increased islet ER stress and death. In contrast, SERCA2 activation with a small molecule allosteric activator increased ER Ca(2+) storage and rescued tunicamycin-induced β-cell death. In aggregate, these data suggest a critical role for SERCA2 and the regulation of ER Ca(2+) homeostasis in the β-cell compensatory response to diet-induced obesity.

  13. SERCA2 Deficiency Impairs Pancreatic β-Cell Function in Response to Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Kono, Tatsuyoshi; Anderson-Baucum, Emily K; Yamamoto, Wataru; Gilon, Patrick; Lebeche, Djamel; Day, Richard N; Shull, Gary E; Evans-Molina, Carmella

    2016-10-01

    The sarcoendoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) ATPase 2 (SERCA2) pump is a P-type ATPase tasked with the maintenance of ER Ca(2+) stores. Whereas β-cell SERCA2 expression is reduced in diabetes, the role of SERCA2 in the regulation of whole-body glucose homeostasis has remained uncharacterized. To this end, SERCA2 heterozygous mice (S2HET) were challenged with a high-fat diet (HFD) containing 45% of kilocalories from fat. After 16 weeks of the HFD, S2HET mice were hyperglycemic and glucose intolerant, but adiposity and insulin sensitivity were not different between HFD-fed S2HET mice and HFD-fed wild-type controls. Consistent with a defect in β-cell function, insulin secretion, glucose-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) mobilization, and the onset of steady-state glucose-induced Ca(2+) oscillations were impaired in HFD-fed S2HET islets. Moreover, HFD-fed S2HET mice exhibited reduced β-cell mass and proliferation, altered insulin production and proinsulin processing, and increased islet ER stress and death. In contrast, SERCA2 activation with a small molecule allosteric activator increased ER Ca(2+) storage and rescued tunicamycin-induced β-cell death. In aggregate, these data suggest a critical role for SERCA2 and the regulation of ER Ca(2+) homeostasis in the β-cell compensatory response to diet-induced obesity. PMID:27489309

  14. Self-awareness of functional impairment in individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Olvet, Doreen M.; Carrión, Ricardo E.; Auther, Andrea M.; Cornblatt, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims A major public health concern associated with schizophrenia is the long-term disability that involves an inability to function independently in the community. An individual’s self-awareness of functional impairment may be a significant factor contributing to long-term disability. In fact, subjective interpretation of one’s illness impacts treatment participation and adherence, and is linked to poor outcomes. However, it remains unclear how illness-related functional impairment is perceived by individuals prior to the onset of psychosis. This study aims to examine the relationship between clinician-based and self-report assessments of functioning, as well as the contribution of clinical symptoms to this relationship in individuals at clinical high-risk for psychosis. Methods The Sheehan Disability Scale, a self-rated instrument, was used to measure disruption in daily functioning in social and role functioning due to symptoms in a sample of 73 treatment-seeking patients at clinical high-risk for psychosis and 50 healthy controls. Results Relative to healthy controls, clinical high-risk patients self-reported significant disruptions in social and role functioning. In addition, a specific relationship emerged in that clinician-rated measures of functioning and depression were related to disability scores. Conclusions These findings suggest that clinical high-risk patients are significantly disturbed by their illness. Self-reported disruption of daily functioning was associated with clinician-rated functioning and depressive symptoms, further highlighting the impact of functional impairments on the level of distress experienced by patients in the early phases of the illness. Intervention strategies that repair functional impairment before the onset of psychosis may prevent long-term disability. PMID:23968457

  15. Rosuvastatin Treatment Affects Both Basal and Glucose-Induced Insulin Secretion in INS-1 832/13 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Salunkhe, Vishal A.; Elvstam, Olof; Eliasson, Lena; Wendt, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Rosuvastatin is a member of the statin family. Like the other statins it is prescribed to lower cholesterol levels and thereby reduce the risk of cardiovascular events. Rosuvastatin lowers the cholesterol levels by inhibiting the key enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) in the cholesterol producing mevalonate pathway. It has been recognized that apart from their beneficial lipid lowering effects, statins also exhibit diabetogenic properties. The molecular mechanisms behind these remain unresolved. To investigate the effects of rosuvastatin on insulin secretion, we treated INS-1 832/13 cells with varying doses (20 nM to 20 μM) of rosuvastatin for 48 h. At concentrations of 2 μM and above basal insulin secretion was significantly increased. Using diazoxide we could determine that rosuvastatin did not increase basal insulin secretion by corrupting the KATP channels. Glucose-induced insulin secretion on the other hand seemed to be affected differently at different rosuvastatin concentrations. Rosuvastatin treatment (20 μM) for 24–48 h inhibited voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which lead to reduced depolarization-induced exocytosis of insulin-containing granules. At lower concentrations of rosuvastatin (≤ 2 μM) the stimulus-secretion coupling pathway was intact downstream of the KATP channels as assessed by the patch clamp technique. However, a reduction in glucose-induced insulin secretion could be observed with rosuvastatin concentrations as low as 200 nM. The inhibitory effects of rosuvastatin on glucose-induced insulin secretion could be reversed with mevalonate, but not squalene, indicating that rosuvastatin affects insulin secretion through its effects on the mevalonate pathway, but not through the reduction of cholesterol biosynthesis. Taken together, these data suggest that rosuvastatin has the potential to increase basal insulin secretion and reduce glucose-induced insulin secretion. The latter is possibly an unavoidable

  16. Rosuvastatin Treatment Affects Both Basal and Glucose-Induced Insulin Secretion in INS-1 832/13 Cells.

    PubMed

    Salunkhe, Vishal A; Elvstam, Olof; Eliasson, Lena; Wendt, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Rosuvastatin is a member of the statin family. Like the other statins it is prescribed to lower cholesterol levels and thereby reduce the risk of cardiovascular events. Rosuvastatin lowers the cholesterol levels by inhibiting the key enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase) in the cholesterol producing mevalonate pathway. It has been recognized that apart from their beneficial lipid lowering effects, statins also exhibit diabetogenic properties. The molecular mechanisms behind these remain unresolved. To investigate the effects of rosuvastatin on insulin secretion, we treated INS-1 832/13 cells with varying doses (20 nM to 20 μM) of rosuvastatin for 48 h. At concentrations of 2 μM and above basal insulin secretion was significantly increased. Using diazoxide we could determine that rosuvastatin did not increase basal insulin secretion by corrupting the KATP channels. Glucose-induced insulin secretion on the other hand seemed to be affected differently at different rosuvastatin concentrations. Rosuvastatin treatment (20 μM) for 24-48 h inhibited voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, which lead to reduced depolarization-induced exocytosis of insulin-containing granules. At lower concentrations of rosuvastatin (≤ 2 μM) the stimulus-secretion coupling pathway was intact downstream of the KATP channels as assessed by the patch clamp technique. However, a reduction in glucose-induced insulin secretion could be observed with rosuvastatin concentrations as low as 200 nM. The inhibitory effects of rosuvastatin on glucose-induced insulin secretion could be reversed with mevalonate, but not squalene, indicating that rosuvastatin affects insulin secretion through its effects on the mevalonate pathway, but not through the reduction of cholesterol biosynthesis. Taken together, these data suggest that rosuvastatin has the potential to increase basal insulin secretion and reduce glucose-induced insulin secretion. The latter is possibly an unavoidable

  17. Effect of blueberries and insulin on glucose induced neurotoxicity in brain cells in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction Literature had shown that disruption in glucose metabolism seen in metabolic syndrome maybe responsible for neuronal cell-death. Oxidative stress (OS) and inflammation (INF) triggered by the impaired metabolic process are considered to be the primary factors for the toxic neuronal atmos...

  18. Pressor recovery after acute stress is impaired in high fructose-fed Lean Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jennifer A; D'Angelo, Gerard; Mintz, James D; Fulton, David J; Stepp, David W

    2016-06-01

    Insulin resistance is a powerful predictor of cardiovascular disease; however, the mechanistic link remains unclear. This study aims to determine if early cardiovascular changes associated with short-term fructose feeding in the absence of obesity manifest as abnormal blood pressure control. Metabolic dysfunction was induced in Lean Zucker rats by short-term high-fructose feeding. Rats were implanted with telemetry devices for the measurement of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and subjected to air jet stress at 5 and 8 weeks after feeding. Additional animals were catheterized under anesthesia for the determination of MAP and blood flow responses in the hind limb and mesenteric vascular beds to intravenous injection of isoproterenol (0.001-0.5 μm), a β-adrenergic agonist. Metabolic dysfunction in high-fructose rats was not accompanied by changes in 24-h MAP Yet, animals fed a high-fructose diet for 8 weeks exhibited a marked impairment in blood pressure recovery after air-jet stress. Dose-dependent decreases in MAP and peripheral blood flow in response to isoproterenol treatment were significantly attenuated in high-fructose rats. These data suggest that impaired blood pressure recovery to acute mental stress precedes the onset of hypertension in the early stages of insulin resistance. Further, blunted responses to isoproterenol implicate β2-adrenergic sensitivity as a possible mechanism responsible for altered blood pressure control after short-term high-fructose feeding.

  19. Does hypoxia impair ovarian function in Bolivian women indigenous to high altitude?

    PubMed

    Vitzthum, V J; Ellison, P T; Sukalich, S; Caceres, E; Spielvogel, H

    2000-01-01

    Fertility appears to be reduced in at least some high altitude populations relative to their counterparts at lower elevations. Inferring from the difficulties with reproduction of newcomers to high altitude and from animal experiments, it has been hypothesized that this apparent reduction is the result of hypoxia acting to reduce fecundity and/or increase fetal loss. In humans, however, several behavioral as well as biological factors may affect fertility levels. These many factors have been organized by demographers into a framework of seven proximate determinants that includes fecundability (the monthly probability of conception) of which successful ovulation is one component. To test whether ovarian function is impaired in women indigenous to high altitude, we measured salivary progesterone (P) in a sample (n = 20) of Quechua women (aged 19-42 years) residing at 3,100 m. It was found that mean luteal P = 179 pmol/L and mean midluteal P = 243 pmol/L, levels that fall about midway in the range of known values for several populations and are higher than some lower altitude populations. These findings suggest that hypoxia does not appear to significantly impair ovarian function in those with lifelong residence at high altitude. There are, however, several factors common to many high altitude populations that may act to reduce fecundability and fertility including intercourse patterns (affected by marriage and migration practices), prolonged lactation, dietary insufficiency, and hard labor.

  20. Methylphenidate prevents high-fat diet (HFD)-induced learning/memory impairment in juvenile mice.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Melissa M; Machaj, Agnieszka S; Chiu, Gabriel S; Lawson, Marcus A; Gainey, Stephen J; York, Jason M; Meling, Daryl D; Martin, Stephen A; Kwakwa, Kristin A; Newman, Andrew F; Woods, Jeffrey A; Kelley, Keith W; Wang, Yanyan; Miller, Michael J; Freund, Gregory G

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity has risen dramatically and coincident with this upsurge is a growth in adverse childhood psychological conditions including impulsivity, depression, anxiety and attention deficit/hyperactive disorder (ADHD). Due to confounds that exist when determining causality of childhood behavioral perturbations, controversy remains as to whether overnutrition and/or childhood obesity is important. Therefore, we examined juvenile mice to determine if biobehaviors were impacted by a short-term feeding (1-3wks) of a high-fat diet (HFD). After 1wk of a HFD feeding, mouse burrowing and spontaneous wheel running were increased while mouse exploration of the open quadrants of a zero maze, perfect alternations in a Y-maze and recognition of a novel object were impaired. Examination of mouse cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus for dopamine and its metabolites demonstrated increased homovanillic acid (HVA) concentrations in the hippocampus and cortex that were associated with decreased cortical BDNF gene expression. In contrast, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcripts and serum IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 were unaffected by the short-term HFD feeding. Administration to mice of the psychostimulant methylphenidate prevented HFD-dependent impairment of learning/memory. HFD learning/memory impairment was not inhibited by the anti-depressants desipramine or reboxetine nor was it blocked in IDO or IL-1R1 knockout mice. In sum, a HFD rapidly impacts dopamine metabolism in the brain appearing to trigger anxiety-like behaviors and learning/memory impairments prior to the onset of weight gain and/or pre-diabetes. Thus, overnutrition due to fats may be central to childhood psychological perturbations such as anxiety and ADHD.

  1. Methylphenidate prevents high-fat diet (HFD)-induced learning/memory impairment in juvenile mice.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarczyk, Melissa M; Machaj, Agnieszka S; Chiu, Gabriel S; Lawson, Marcus A; Gainey, Stephen J; York, Jason M; Meling, Daryl D; Martin, Stephen A; Kwakwa, Kristin A; Newman, Andrew F; Woods, Jeffrey A; Kelley, Keith W; Wang, Yanyan; Miller, Michael J; Freund, Gregory G

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity has risen dramatically and coincident with this upsurge is a growth in adverse childhood psychological conditions including impulsivity, depression, anxiety and attention deficit/hyperactive disorder (ADHD). Due to confounds that exist when determining causality of childhood behavioral perturbations, controversy remains as to whether overnutrition and/or childhood obesity is important. Therefore, we examined juvenile mice to determine if biobehaviors were impacted by a short-term feeding (1-3wks) of a high-fat diet (HFD). After 1wk of a HFD feeding, mouse burrowing and spontaneous wheel running were increased while mouse exploration of the open quadrants of a zero maze, perfect alternations in a Y-maze and recognition of a novel object were impaired. Examination of mouse cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus for dopamine and its metabolites demonstrated increased homovanillic acid (HVA) concentrations in the hippocampus and cortex that were associated with decreased cortical BDNF gene expression. In contrast, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcripts and serum IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 were unaffected by the short-term HFD feeding. Administration to mice of the psychostimulant methylphenidate prevented HFD-dependent impairment of learning/memory. HFD learning/memory impairment was not inhibited by the anti-depressants desipramine or reboxetine nor was it blocked in IDO or IL-1R1 knockout mice. In sum, a HFD rapidly impacts dopamine metabolism in the brain appearing to trigger anxiety-like behaviors and learning/memory impairments prior to the onset of weight gain and/or pre-diabetes. Thus, overnutrition due to fats may be central to childhood psychological perturbations such as anxiety and ADHD. PMID:23411461

  2. Methylphenidate prevents high-fat diet (HFD)-induced learning/memory impairment in juvenile mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarczyk, Melissa M.; Machaj, Agnieszka S.; Chiu, Gabriel S.; Lawson, Marcus A.; Gainey, Stephen J.; York, Jason M.; Meling, Daryl D.; Martin, Stephen A.; Kwakwa, Kristen A.; Newman, Andrew F.; Woods, Jeffrey A.; Kelley, Keith W.; Wang, Yanyan; Miller, Michael J.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity has risen dramatically and coincident with this upsurge is a growth in adverse childhood psychological conditions including impulsivity, depression, anxiety and attention deficit/hyperactive disorder (ADHD). Due to confounds that exist when determining causality of childhood behavioral perturbations, controversy remains as to whether overnutrition and/or childhood obesity is important. Therefore, we examined juvenile mice to determine if biobehaviors were impacted by a short-term feeding (1–3 wks) of a high-fat diet (HFD). After 1 wk of a HFD feeding, mouse burrowing and spontaneous wheel running were increased while mouse exploration of the open quadrants of a zero maze, perfect alternations in a Y-maze and recognition of a novel object were impaired. Examination of mouse cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus for dopamine and its metabolites demonstrated increased homovanillic acid (HVA) concentrations in the hippocampus and cortex that were associated with decreased cortical BDNF gene expression. In contrast, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene transcripts and serum IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 were unaffected by the short-term HFD feeding. Administration to mice of the psychostimulant methylphenidate prevented HFD-dependent impairment of learning/memory. HFD learning/memory impairment was not inhibited by the anti-depressants desipramine or reboxetine nor was it blocked in IDO or IL-1R1 knockout mice. In sum, a HFD rapidly impacts dopamine metabolism in the brain appearing to trigger anxiety-like behaviors and learning/memory impairments prior to the onset of weight gain and/or pre-diabetes. Thus, overnutrition due to fats may be central to childhood psychological perturbations such as anxiety and ADHD. PMID:23411461

  3. Optimization of extraction and purification of arctiin from Fructus arctii and its protection against glucose-induced rat aortic endothelial cell injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lai-chun; Zhang, Rong; Song, Ming-bao; Zhou, Shi-wen; Qian, Gui-sheng

    2014-05-01

    To develop an efficient method for extracting and purifying the active ingredient, arctiin, from Fructus arctii and to investigate the protective effect of arctiin against glucose-induced rat aortic endothelial cell (RAEC) injury was investigated. Using a L9 (34) orthogonal array and two-step column chromatography (with AB-8 macroporous resin) arctiin extraction was optimized using a reflux method with 70% ethanol. The RAECs were then treated with different concentrations of arctiin (1, 10, or 100 μg/ml). The effects of arctiin on cell viability in a high glucose medium, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and lactate dehydrogenase were measured using commercially available assays. After extraction, the purity of arctiin reached 95.7%. In rats, arctiin was shown to stimulate the proliferation of RAECs in a high glucose medium in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure of RAECs to high glucose resulted in a significant increase in MDA and release of lactate dehydrogenase. This was accompanied by significant increase in nitric oxide release and expression of antiendothelial nitric oxide synthase. This technique resulted in relatively pure arctiin extraction. Furthermore, the results from this study suggest that arctiin could potentially function as a protector against vascular endothelial cell injury and further investigation is warranted. PMID:24163109

  4. Evidence for inositol triphosphate as a second messenger for glucose-induced calcium signalling in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Tisi, Renata; Belotti, Fiorella; Wera, Stefaan; Winderickx, Joris; Thevelein, Johan M; Martegani, Enzo

    2004-02-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae phospholipase C Plc1 is involved in cytosolic transient glucose-induced calcium increase, which also requires the Gpr1/Gpa2 receptor/G protein complex and glucose hexokinases. Differing from mammalian cells, this increase in cytosolic calcium concentration is mainly due to an influx from the external medium. No inositol triphosphate receptor homologue has been identified in the S. cerevisiae genome; and, therefore, the transduction mechanism from Plc1 activation to calcium flux generation still has to be identified. Inositol triphosphate (IP(3)) in yeast is rapidly transformed into IP(4) and IP(5) by a dual kinase, Arg82. Then another kinase, Ipk1, phosphorylates the IP(5) into IP(6). In mutant cells that do not express either of these kinases, the glucose-induced calcium signal was not only detectable but was even wider than in the wild-type strain. IP(3) accumulation upon glucose addition was completely absent in the plc1Delta strain and was amplified both by deletion of either ARG82 or IPK1 genes and by overexpression of PLC1. These results taken together suggest that Plc1p activation by glucose, leading to cleavage of PIP(2) and generation of IP(3), seems to be sufficient for raising the calcium level in the cytosol. This is the first indication for a physiological role of IP(3) signalling in S. cerevisiae. Many aspects about the signal transduction mechanism and the final effectors require further study.

  5. Nitric oxide-mediated endothlium-dependent vasodilation is impaired with borderline high-LDL cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Kyle J; Stauffer, Brian L; Greiner, Jared J; Weil, Brian R; DeSouza, Christopher A

    2012-02-01

    The experimental aims of this study were to determine: (1) whether nitric oxide-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation is blunted in adult humans with borderline high plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol compared with adults with optimal/near optimal LDL-cholesterol levels; and, if so: (2) whether the magnitude of impairment in adults with borderline high LDL-cholesterol is similar to adults with high LDL-cholesterol. Forearm blood flow responses to intraarterial infusions of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were measured in 50 middle-aged (43-64 year) adults: 20 in the optimal/near optimal LDL-cholesterol range (<130 mg/dL); 20 with borderline high LDL-cholesterol (130-159 mg/dL); and 10 with high LDL-cholesterol ($160 mg/dL). In addition, blood flow responses to acetylcholine were determined in the absence and presence of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G) -monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Vasodilation to acetylcholine was ~20% lower (p < 0.05) in the borderline high (from 4.3 ± 0.2 to 12.3 ± 0.8 mL/100 mL tissue/min) and high (from 4.3 ± 0.3 to 12.0 ± 0.5 mL/100 mL tissue/min) LDL-cholesterol groups compared with the optimal/near optimal (from 4.4 ± 0.2 to 14.5 ± 0.5 mL/100 mL tissue/min) LDL-cholesterol group. L-NMMA significantly reduced (~30%) the vasodilator response to acetylcholine in the optimal/near optimal LDL-cholesterol group but not the borderline high or high LDL-cholesterol groups. Borderline high LDL-cholesterol is associated with impaired nitric oxide-mediated endothelium-dependent vasodilation.

  6. Impaired glucose tolerance in rats fed low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets.

    PubMed

    Bielohuby, Maximilian; Sisley, Stephanie; Sandoval, Darleen; Herbach, Nadja; Zengin, Ayse; Fischereder, Michael; Menhofer, Dominik; Stoehr, Barbara J M; Stemmer, Kerstin; Wanke, Rüdiger; Tschöp, Matthias H; Seeley, Randy J; Bidlingmaier, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Moderate low-carbohydrate/high-fat (LC-HF) diets are widely used to induce weight loss in overweight subjects, whereas extreme ketogenic LC-HF diets are used to treat neurological disorders like pediatric epilepsy. Usage of LC-HF diets for improvement of glucose metabolism is highly controversial; some studies suggest that LC-HF diets ameliorate glucose tolerance, whereas other investigations could not identify positive effects of these diets or reported impaired insulin sensitivity. Here, we investigate the effects of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism in a well-characterized animal model. Male rats were fed isoenergetic or hypocaloric amounts of standard control diet, a high-protein "Atkins-style" LC-HF diet, or a low-protein, ketogenic, LC-HF diet. Both LC-HF diets induced lower fasting glucose and insulin levels associated with lower pancreatic β-cell volumes. However, dynamic challenge tests (oral and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests, insulin-tolerance tests, and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps) revealed that LC-HF pair-fed rats exhibited impaired glucose tolerance and impaired hepatic and peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity, the latter potentially being mediated by elevated intramyocellular lipids. Adjusting visceral fat mass in LC-HF groups to that of controls by reducing the intake of LC-HF diets to 80% of the pair-fed groups did not prevent glucose intolerance. Taken together, these data show that lack of dietary carbohydrates leads to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in rats despite causing a reduction in fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Our results argue against a beneficial effect of LC-HF diets on glucose and insulin metabolism, at least under physiological conditions. Therefore, use of LC-HF diets for weight loss or other therapeutic purposes should be balanced against potentially harmful metabolic side effects.

  7. Partial genetic deficiency in tissue kallikrein impairs adaptation to high potassium intake in humans.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Joana S; Blanchard, Anne; Curis, Emmanuel; Chambrey, Régine; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Azizi, Michel

    2013-12-01

    Inactivation of the tissue kallikrein gene in mice impairs renal handling of potassium due to enhanced H, K-ATPase activity, and induces hyperkalemia. We investigated whether the R53H loss-of-function polymorphism of the human tissue kallikrein gene affects renal potassium handling. In a crossover study, 30 R53R homozygous and 10 R53H heterozygous healthy males were randomly assigned to a low-sodium/high-potassium or a high-sodium/low-potassium diet to modulate tissue kallikrein synthesis. On the seventh day of each diet, participants were studied before and during a 2-h infusion of furosemide to stimulate distal potassium secretion. Urinary kallikrein activity was significantly lower in R53H than in R53R subjects on the low-sodium/high-potassium diet and was similarly reduced in both genotypes on high-sodium/low-potassium. Plasma potassium and renal potassium reabsorption were similar in both genotypes on an ad libitum sodium/potassium diet or after 7 days of a high-sodium/low-potassium diet. However, the median plasma potassium was significantly higher after 7 days of low-sodium/high-potassium diet in R53H than in R53R individuals. Urine potassium excretion and plasma aldosterone concentrations were similar. On the low-sodium/high-potassium diet, furosemide-induced decrease in plasma potassium was significantly larger in R53H than in R53R subjects. Thus, impaired tissue kallikrein stimulation by a low-sodium/high-potassium diet in R53H subjects with partial tissue kallikrein deficiency highlights an inappropriate renal adaptation to potassium load, consistent with experimental data in mice.

  8. Vowel formant discrimination in high-fidelity speech by hearing-impaired listeners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kewley-Port, Diane; Liu, Chang; Burkle, T. Zachary

    2003-10-01

    The ability to discriminate differences in vowel formant frequency under a more ordinary listening condition has been reported recently by Kewley-Port and Zheng (1999) for synthetic speech and Liu and Kewley-Port (2003) for high-fidelity speech. Results for normal-hearing (YNH) listeners showed that a longer phonetic context (sentences versus words) degraded formant discrimination while adding a sentence identification task did not. The present study used the same high-fidelity stimuli but employed listeners with moderate hearing impairment (YHI). Experimental factors manipulated included phonetic context (isolated vowels, words and sentences), level [70-dB SPL (partially audible) and 95-dB SPL (fully audible)], and task (discrimination with and without the sentence identification task). Thresholds for F1 and F2 of the vowels /I, ɛ, æ invv/ were estimated using adaptive tracking for 71% correct discrimination. The anticipated degrading effects of higher formant frequency and longer phonetic context were obtained. Unexpectedly formant thresholds for high-fidelity vowels at the higher (95-dB SPL) were slightly elevated compared to the 70-dB SPL level, the opposite of results for synthetic vowels. No effect of the added sentence task was seen, similar to the YNH listeners. Details of the differences in vowel processing attributable to moderate hearing impairment will be discussed. [Research supported by NIH-NIDCD.

  9. High CO2 Levels Impair Alveolar Epithelial Function Independently of pH

    PubMed Central

    Briva, Arturo; Vadász, István; Lecuona, Emilia; Welch, Lynn C.; Chen, Jiwang; Dada, Laura A.; Trejo, Humberto E.; Dumasius, Vidas; Azzam, Zaher S.; Myrianthefs, Pavlos M.; Batlle, Daniel; Gruenbaum, Yosef; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2007-01-01

    Background In patients with acute respiratory failure, gas exchange is impaired due to the accumulation of fluid in the lung airspaces. This life-threatening syndrome is treated with mechanical ventilation, which is adjusted to maintain gas exchange, but can be associated with the accumulation of carbon dioxide in the lung. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a by-product of cellular energy utilization and its elimination is affected via alveolar epithelial cells. Signaling pathways sensitive to changes in CO2 levels were described in plants and neuronal mammalian cells. However, it has not been fully elucidated whether non-neuronal cells sense and respond to CO2. The Na,K-ATPase consumes ∼40% of the cellular metabolism to maintain cell homeostasis. Our study examines the effects of increased pCO2 on the epithelial Na,K-ATPase a major contributor to alveolar fluid reabsorption which is a marker of alveolar epithelial function. Principal Findings We found that short-term increases in pCO2 impaired alveolar fluid reabsorption in rats. Also, we provide evidence that non-excitable, alveolar epithelial cells sense and respond to high levels of CO2, independently of extracellular and intracellular pH, by inhibiting Na,K-ATPase function, via activation of PKCζ which phosphorylates the Na,K-ATPase, causing it to endocytose from the plasma membrane into intracellular pools. Conclusions Our data suggest that alveolar epithelial cells, through which CO2 is eliminated in mammals, are highly sensitive to hypercapnia. Elevated CO2 levels impair alveolar epithelial function, independently of pH, which is relevant in patients with lung diseases and altered alveolar gas exchange. PMID:18043745

  10. Impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation at extreme high altitude even after acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Ken-ichi; Zhang, Rong; Zuckerman, Julie H; Ogawa, Yojiro; Hansen, Lærke H; Levine, Benjamin David

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) increases and dynamic cerebral autoregulation is impaired by acute hypoxia. We hypothesized that progressive hypocapnia with restoration of arterial oxygen content after altitude acclimatization would normalize CBF and dynamic cerebral autoregulation. To test this hypothesis, dynamic cerebral autoregulation was examined by spectral and transfer function analyses between arterial pressure and CBF velocity variabilities in 11 healthy members of the Danish High-Altitude Research Expedition during normoxia and acute hypoxia (10.5% O(2)) at sea level, and after acclimatization (for over 1 month at 5,260 m at Chacaltaya, Bolivia). Arterial pressure and CBF velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), were recorded on a beat-by-beat basis. Steady-state CBF velocity increased during acute hypoxia, but normalized after acclimatization with partial restoration of SaO(2) (acute, 78% ± 2%; chronic, 89% ± 1%) and progression of hypocapnia (end-tidal carbon dioxide: acute, 34 ± 2 mm Hg; chronic, 21 ± 1 mm Hg). Coherence (0.40 ± 0.05 Units at normoxia) and transfer function gain (0.77 ± 0.13 cm/s per mm Hg at normoxia) increased, and phase (0.86 ± 0.15 radians at normoxia) decreased significantly in the very-low-frequency range during acute hypoxia (gain, 141% ± 24%; coherence, 136% ± 29%; phase, -25% ± 22%), which persisted after acclimatization (gain, 136% ± 36%; coherence, 131% ± 50%; phase, -42% ± 13%), together indicating impaired dynamic cerebral autoregulation in this frequency range. The similarity between both acute and chronic conditions suggests that dynamic cerebral autoregulation is impaired by hypoxia even after successful acclimatization to an extreme high altitude.

  11. Experimental studies of high-accuracy RFID localization with channel impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauls, Eric; Zhang, Yimin D.

    2015-05-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) systems present an incredibly cost-effective and easy-to-implement solution to close-range localization. One of the important applications of a passive RFID system is to determine the reader position through multilateration based on the estimated distances between the reader and multiple distributed reference tags obtained from, e.g., the received signal strength indicator (RSSI) readings. In practice, the achievable accuracy of passive RFID reader localization suffers from many factors, such as the distorted RSSI reading due to channel impairments in terms of the susceptibility to reader antenna patterns and multipath propagation. Previous studies have shown that the accuracy of passive RFID localization can be significantly improved by properly modeling and compensating for such channel impairments. The objective of this paper is to report experimental study results that validate the effectiveness of such approaches for high-accuracy RFID localization. We also examine a number of practical issues arising in the underlying problem that limit the accuracy of reader-tag distance measurements and, therefore, the estimated reader localization. These issues include the variations in tag radiation characteristics for similar tags, effects of tag orientations, and reader RSS quantization and measurement errors. As such, this paper reveals valuable insights of the issues and solutions toward achieving high-accuracy passive RFID localization.

  12. Can ultrasound and computed tomography replace high-dose urography in patients with impaired renal function?

    PubMed

    Webb, J A; Reznek, R H; White, F E; Cattell, W R; Fry, I K; Baker, L R

    1984-01-01

    Ninety-one patients with unexplained impaired renal function were investigated by high-dose urography, ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) without contrast. The aim was to evaluate the role of ultrasound and CT in renal failure, in particular their ability to define renal length and to show collecting system dilatation. In the majority of patients, renal length could be measured accurately by ultrasound. Measurements were less that those at urography because of the absence of magnification. Renal measurement by CT was not a sufficiently accurate indicator of renal length to be of clinical use. Both ultrasound and CT were sensitive detectors of collecting system dilatation: neither technique missed any case diagnosed by urography. However, in the presence of staghorn calculi or multiple cysts, neither ultrasound nor CT could exclude collecting system dilatation. CT was the only technique which demonstrated retroperitoneal nodes or fibrosis causing obstruction. It is proposed that the first investigation when renal function is impaired should be ultrasound, with plain films and renal tomograms to show calculi. CT should be reserved for those patients in whom ultrasound is not diagnostic or in whom ultrasound shows collecting system dilatation but does not demonstrate the cause. Using this scheme, ultrasound, plain radiography and CT would have demonstrated collecting system dilatation and, where appropriate, shown the cause of obstruction in 84 per cent of patients in this series. Only 16 per cent of patients would have required either high-dose urography or retrograde ureterograms.

  13. Impaired High-Density Lipoprotein Anti-Oxidant Function Predicts Poor Outcome in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schrutka, Lore; Goliasch, Georg; Meyer, Brigitte; Wurm, Raphael; Koller, Lorenz; Kriechbaumer, Lukas; Heinz, Gottfried; Pacher, Richard; Lang, Irene M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oxidative stress affects clinical outcome in critically ill patients. Although high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles generally possess anti-oxidant capacities, deleterious properties of HDL have been described in acutely ill patients. The impact of anti-oxidant HDL capacities on clinical outcome in critically ill patients is unknown. We therefore analyzed the predictive value of anti-oxidant HDL function on mortality in an unselected cohort of critically ill patients. Method We prospectively enrolled 270 consecutive patients admitted to a university-affiliated intensive care unit (ICU) and determined anti-oxidant HDL function using the HDL oxidant index (HOI). Based on their HOI, the study population was stratified into patients with impaired anti-oxidant HDL function and the residual study population. Results During a median follow-up time of 9.8 years (IQR: 9.2 to 10.0), 69% of patients died. Cox regression analysis revealed a significant and independent association between impaired anti-oxidant HDL function and short-term mortality with an adjusted HR of 1.65 (95% CI 1.22–2.24; p = 0.001) as well as 10-year mortality with an adj. HR of 1.19 (95% CI 1.02–1.40; p = 0.032) when compared to the residual study population. Anti-oxidant HDL function correlated with the amount of oxidative stress as determined by Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (r = 0.38; p<0.001). Conclusion Impaired anti-oxidant HDL function represents a strong and independent predictor of 30-day mortality as well as long-term mortality in critically ill patients. PMID:26978526

  14. An investigation of the career development of high school adolescents with hearing impairments in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Furlonger, B

    1998-07-01

    Although the need for better-skilled workers has been signaled by the marketplace, people with hearing impairments generally are employed in unskilled or semiskilled jobs. They are, therefore, at heightened risk of unemployment and underemployment. Compounding this risk are the levels of vocational preparation and job awareness of adolescents with hearing impairments, which are generally considered inadequate. With a view to improving prevocational programs for hearing impaired adolescents, the researcher collected information on career awareness and vocational maturity. Significant differences were identified between hearing impaired and hearing adolescents on a range of career measures. In particular, adolescents with hearing impairments were identified as having less career awareness. PMID:9680734

  15. The mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter MCU is essential for glucose-induced ATP increases in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Andrei I; Semplici, Francesca; Ravier, Magalie A; Bellomo, Elisa A; Pullen, Timothy J; Gilon, Patrick; Sekler, Israel; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rutter, Guy A

    2012-01-01

    Glucose induces insulin release from pancreatic β-cells by stimulating ATP synthesis, membrane depolarisation and Ca(2+) influx. As well as activating ATP-consuming processes, cytosolic Ca(2+) increases may also potentiate mitochondrial ATP synthesis. Until recently, the ability to study the role of mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion has been hindered by the absence of suitable approaches either to suppress Ca(2+) uptake into these organelles, or to examine the impact on β-cell excitability. Here, we have combined patch-clamp electrophysiology with simultaneous real-time imaging of compartmentalised changes in Ca(2+) and ATP/ADP ratio in single primary mouse β-cells, using recombinant targeted (Pericam or Perceval, respectively) as well as entrapped intracellular (Fura-Red), probes. Through shRNA-mediated silencing we show that the recently-identified mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter, MCU, is required for depolarisation-induced mitochondrial Ca(2+) increases, and for a sustained increase in cytosolic ATP/ADP ratio. By contrast, silencing of the mitochondrial Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger NCLX affected the kinetics of glucose-induced changes in, but not steady state values of, cytosolic ATP/ADP. Exposure to gluco-lipotoxic conditions delayed both mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and cytosolic ATP/ADP ratio increases without affecting the expression of either gene. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) accumulation, mediated by MCU and modulated by NCLX, is thus required for normal glucose sensing by pancreatic β-cells, and becomes defective in conditions mimicking the diabetic milieu.

  16. Genome-wide association analysis demonstrates the highly polygenic character of age-related hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    Fransen, Erik; Bonneux, Sarah; Corneveaux, Jason J; Schrauwen, Isabelle; Di Berardino, Federica; White, Cory H; Ohmen, Jeffrey D; Van de Heyning, Paul; Ambrosetti, Umberto; Huentelman, Matthew J; Van Camp, Guy; Friedman, Rick A

    2015-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify the genes responsible for age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), the most common form of hearing impairment in the elderly. Analysis of common variants, with and without adjustment for stratification and environmental covariates, rare variants and interactions, as well as gene-set enrichment analysis, showed no variants with genome-wide significance. No evidence for replication of any previously reported genes was found. A study of the genetic architecture indicates for the first time that ARHI is highly polygenic in nature, with probably no major genes involved. The phenotype depends on the aggregated effect of a large number of SNPs, of which the individual effects are undetectable in a modestly powered GWAS. We estimated that 22% of the variance in our data set can be explained by the collective effect of all genotyped SNPs. A score analysis showed a modest enrichment in causative SNPs among the SNPs with a P-value below 0.01. PMID:24939585

  17. High Current Anxiety Symptoms, But Not a Past Anxiety Disorder Diagnosis, are Associated with Impaired Fear Extinction

    PubMed Central

    Duits, Puck; Cath, Danielle C.; Heitland, Ivo; Baas, Johanna M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Although impaired fear extinction has repeatedly been demonstrated in patients with anxiety disorders, little is known about whether these impairments persist after treatment. The current comparative exploratory study investigated fear extinction in 26 patients treated for their anxiety disorder in the years preceding the study as compared to 17 healthy control subjects. Fear-potentiated startle and subjective fear were measured in a cue and context fear conditioning paradigm within a virtual reality environment. Results indicated no differences in fear extinction between treated anxiety patients and control subjects. However, scores on the Beck Anxiety Inventory across all participants revealed impaired extinction of fear potentiated startle in subjects with high compared to low anxiety symptoms over the past week. Taken together, this exploratory study found no support for impaired fear extinction in treated anxiety patients, and implies that current anxiety symptoms rather than previous patient status determine the success of extinction. PMID:26955364

  18. Psilocybin impairs high-level but not low-level motion perception.

    PubMed

    Carter, Olivia L; Pettigrew, John D; Burr, David C; Alais, David; Hasler, Felix; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2004-08-26

    The hallucinogenic serotonin(1A&2A) agonist psilocybin is known for its ability to induce illusions of motion in otherwise stationary objects or textured surfaces. This study investigated the effect of psilocybin on local and global motion processing in nine human volunteers. Using a forced choice direction of motion discrimination task we show that psilocybin selectively impairs coherence sensitivity for random dot patterns, likely mediated by high-level global motion detectors, but not contrast sensitivity for drifting gratings, believed to be mediated by low-level detectors. These results are in line with those observed within schizophrenic populations and are discussed in respect to the proposition that psilocybin may provide a model to investigate clinical psychosis and the pharmacological underpinnings of visual perception in normal populations.

  19. Glucose-induced production of recombinant proteins in Hansenula polymorpha mutants deficient in catabolite repression.

    PubMed

    Krasovska, Olena S; Stasyk, Olena G; Nahorny, Viktor O; Stasyk, Oleh V; Granovski, Nikolai; Kordium, Vitaliy A; Vozianov, Oleksandr F; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2007-07-01

    The most commonly used expression platform for production of recombinant proteins in the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha relies on the strong and strictly regulated promoter from the gene encoding peroxisomal enzyme alcohol (or methanol) oxidase (P(MOX)). Expression from P(MOX) is induced by methanol and is partially derepressed in glycerol or xylose medium, whereas in the presence of hexoses, disaccharides or ethanol, it is repressed. The need for methanol for maximal induction of gene expression in large-scale fermentation is a significant drawback, as this compound is toxic, flammable, supports a slow growth rate and requires extensive aeration. We isolated H. polymorpha mutants deficient in glucose repression of P(MOX) due to an impaired HpGCR1 gene, and other yet unidentified secondary mutations. The mutants exhibited pronounced defects in P(MOX) regulation only by hexoses and xylose, but not by disaccharides or ethanol. With one of these mutant strains as hosts, we developed a modified two-carbon source mode expression platform that utilizes convenient sugar substrates for growth (sucrose) and induction of recombinant protein expression (glucose or xylose). We demonstrate efficient regulatable by sugar carbon sources expression of three recombinant proteins: a secreted glucose oxidase from the fungus Aspergillus niger, a secreted mini pro-insulin, and an intracellular hepatitis B virus surface antigen in these mutant hosts. The modified expression platform preserves the favorable regulatable nature of P(MOX) without methanol, making a convenient alternative to the traditional system. PMID:17163508

  20. High intensity running results in an impaired neuromuscular response in ACL reconstructed individuals.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kostas; Ziogas, Giorgos; Ristanis, Stavros; Tsepis, Elias; Stergiou, Nicholas; Georgoulis, Anastasios D

    2009-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction reestablishes electromyographic activity during moderate activities such as walking but is unclear if this is also the case in sports activities such as high intensity running that results in accumulation of metabolic fatigue. Nine bone-patella tendon-bone ACL reconstructed athletes were evaluated 19.2 (5.7) months post-operatively using a telemetric electromyographic system. The neuromuscular response of vastus lateralis and biceps femoris muscles was tested bilaterally on separate occasions during 10 min running at moderate intensity (20% below the lactate threshold) and 10 min running at high intensity (40% above the lactate threshold). During moderate intensity running, electromyographic activity did not change for either leg. During high intensity running, electromyographic activity did not change for the vastus lateralis of the ACL reconstructed leg [267.8 (142.8)-263.8 (128.9) microV, P > 0.05] while it increased significantly [294.2 (120.6)-317.1 (140.5) microV, P = 0.03] for the vastus lateralis of the intact leg. High intensity exercise that is associated with accumulation of metabolic fatigue, results in an impaired neuromuscular response for the vastus lateralis muscle of the ACL reconstructed leg.

  1. High-fat diet induces hepatic insulin resistance and impairment of synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhigang; Patil, Ishan Y; Jiang, Tianyi; Sancheti, Harsh; Walsh, John P; Stiles, Bangyan L; Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity is associated with insulin resistance, which may affect brain synaptic plasticity through impairment of insulin-sensitive processes underlying neuronal survival, learning, and memory. The experimental model consisted of 3 month-old C57BL/6J mice fed either a normal chow diet (control group) or a HFD (60% of calorie from fat; HFD group) for 12 weeks. This model was characterized as a function of time in terms of body weight, fasting blood glucose and insulin levels, HOMA-IR values, and plasma triglycerides. IRS-1/Akt pathway was assessed in primary hepatocytes and brain homogenates. The effect of HFD in brain was assessed by electrophysiology, input/output responses and long-term potentiation. HFD-fed mice exhibited a significant increase in body weight, higher fasting glucose- and insulin levels in plasma, lower glucose tolerance, and higher HOMA-IR values. In liver, HFD elicited (a) a significant decrease of insulin receptor substrate (IRS-1) phosphorylation on Tyr608 and increase of Ser307 phosphorylation, indicative of IRS-1 inactivation; (b) these changes were accompanied by inflammatory responses in terms of increases in the expression of NFκB and iNOS and activation of the MAP kinases p38 and JNK; (c) primary hepatocytes from mice fed a HFD showed decreased cellular oxygen consumption rates (indicative of mitochondrial functional impairment); this can be ascribed partly to a decreased expression of PGC1α and mitochondrial biogenesis. In brain, HFD feeding elicited (a) an inactivation of the IRS-1 and, consequentially, (b) a decreased expression and plasma membrane localization of the insulin-sensitive neuronal glucose transporters GLUT3/GLUT4; (c) a suppression of the ERK/CREB pathway, and (d) a substantial decrease in long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of hippocampus (indicative of impaired synaptic plasticity). It may be surmised that 12 weeks fed with HFD induce a systemic insulin resistance that impacts

  2. Carnitine protects the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans from glucose-induced reduction of survival depending on the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12

    SciTech Connect

    Deusing, Dorothé Jenni Beyrer, Melanie Fitzenberger, Elena Wenzel, Uwe

    2015-05-08

    Besides its function in transport of fatty acids into mitochondria in order to provide substrates for β-oxidation, carnitine has been shown to affect also glucose metabolism and to inhibit several mechanisms associated with diabetic complications. In the present study we used the mev-1 mutant of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans fed on a high glucose concentration in liquid media as a diabetes model and tested the effects of carnitine supplementation on their survival under heat-stress. Carnitine at 100 μM completely prevented the survival reduction that was caused by the application of 10 mM glucose. RNA-interference for sir-2.1, a candidate genes mediating the effects of carnitine revealed no contribution of the sirtuin for the rescue of survival. Under daf-12 RNAi rescue of survival by carnitine was abolished. RNA-interference for γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase 2, encoding the key enzyme for carnitine biosynthesis did neither increase glucose toxicity nor prevent the rescue of survival by carnitine, suggesting that the effects of carnitine supplementation on carnitine levels were significant. Finally, it was demonstrated that neither the amount of lysosomes nor the proteasomal activity were increased by carnitine, excluding that protein degradation pathways, such as autophagy or proteasomal degradation, are involved in the protective carnitine effects. In conclusion, carnitine supplementation prevents the reduction of survival caused by glucose in C. elegans in dependence on a nuclear hormone receptor which displays high homologies to the vertebrate peroxisomal proliferator activated receptors. - Highlights: • Carnitine protects from glucose-induced reduction of stress-resistance. • Carnitine acts via the PPAR homolog DAF-12 on glucose toxicity. • Carnitine protects from glucose toxicity independent of protein degradation.

  3. High-Content Imaging Assays for Identifying Compounds that Generate Superoxide and Impair Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Adherent Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Billis, Puja; Will, Yvonne; Nadanaciva, Sashi

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly produced in cells as a result of aerobic metabolism. When there is an excessive production of ROS and the cell's antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, oxidative stress occurs. The superoxide anion is a type of ROS that is produced primarily in mitochondria but is also generated in other regions of the cell including peroxisomes, endoplasmic reticulum, plasma membrane, and cytosol. Here, a high-content imaging assay using the dye dihydroethidium is described for identifying compounds that generate superoxide in eukaryotic cells. A high-content imaging assay using the fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester is also described to identify compounds that impair mitochondrial membrane potential in eukaryotic cells. The purpose of performing both assays is to identify compounds that (1) generate superoxide at lower concentrations than they impair mitochondrial membrane potential, (2) impair mitochondrial membrane potential at lower concentrations than they generate superoxide, (3) generate superoxide and impair mitochondrial function at similar concentrations, and (4) do not generate superoxide or impair mitochondrial membrane potential during the duration of the assays.

  4. Impaired Global, and Compensatory Local, Biological Motion Processing in People with High Levels of Autistic Traits

    PubMed Central

    van Boxtel, Jeroen J. A.; Lu, Hongjing

    2013-01-01

    People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are hypothesized to have poor high-level processing but superior low-level processing, causing impaired social recognition, and a focus on non-social stimulus contingencies. Biological motion perception provides an ideal domain to investigate exactly how ASD modulates the interaction between low and high-level processing, because it involves multiple processing stages, and carries many important social cues. We investigated individual differences among typically developing observers in biological motion processing, and whether such individual differences associate with the number of autistic traits. In Experiment 1, we found that individuals with fewer autistic traits were automatically and involuntarily attracted to global biological motion information, whereas individuals with more autistic traits did not show this pre-attentional distraction. We employed an action adaptation paradigm in the second study to show that individuals with more autistic traits were able to compensate for deficits in global processing with an increased involvement in local processing. Our findings can be interpreted within a predictive coding framework, which characterizes the functional relationship between local and global processing stages, and explains how these stages contribute to the perceptual difficulties associated with ASD. PMID:23630514

  5. Selective impairment of cognitive empathy for moral judgment in adults with high functioning autism.

    PubMed

    Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Torralva, Teresa; Rattazzi, Alexia; Marenco, Victoria; Roca, María; Manes, Facundo

    2013-10-01

    Faced with a moral dilemma, conflict arises between a cognitive controlled response aimed at maximizing welfare, i.e. the utilitarian judgment, and an emotional aversion to harm, i.e. the deontological judgment. In the present study, we investigated moral judgment in adult individuals with high functioning autism/Asperger syndrome (HFA/AS), a clinical population characterized by impairments in prosocial emotions and social cognition. In Experiment 1, we compared the response patterns of HFA/AS participants and neurotypical controls to moral dilemmas with low and high emotional saliency. We found that HFA/AS participants more frequently delivered the utilitarian judgment. Their perception of appropriateness of moral transgression was similar to that of controls, but HFA/AS participants reported decreased levels of emotional reaction to the dilemma. In Experiment 2, we explored the way in which demographic, clinical and social cognition variables including emotional and cognitive aspects of empathy and theory of mind influenced moral judgment. We found that utilitarian HFA/AS participants showed a decreased ability to infer other people's thoughts and to understand their intentions, as measured both by performance on neuropsychological tests and through dispositional measures. We conclude that greater prevalence of utilitarianism in HFA/AS is associated with difficulties in specific aspects of social cognition. PMID:22689217

  6. Impaired protection against diabetes and coronary heart disease by high-density lipoproteins in Turks.

    PubMed

    Onat, Altan; Can, Günay; Ayhan, Erkan; Kaya, Zekeriya; Hergenç, Gülay

    2009-10-01

    The issue of whether or not incident type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease (CHD) can be predicted by high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in both sexes needs investigation. A representative sample of 3035 middle-aged Turkish adults free of CHD at baseline was studied with this purpose prospectively over a mean of 7.8 years. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were found to be correlated in women positively with plasma fibrinogen and weakly with waist girth and C-reactive protein, and to be not correlated with fasting insulin. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol protected men against future CHD risk (for a 12-mg/dL increment: relative risk = 0.80 [95% confidence interval, 0.69-0.95]) after multivariable adjustment in logistic regression analyses for age, smoking status, physical activity grade, hypertension, abdominal obesity, diabetes, and lipid-lowering drugs. However, men were not protected against risk of diabetes. In women, HDL cholesterol was not associated with risk for CHD, whereas intermediate (40-60 mg/dL) compared with lower HDL cholesterol levels proved protective against risk of diabetes (relative risk = 0.57 [95% confidence interval, 0.36-0.90]) after adjustments that included apolipoprotein A-I tertiles. Yet higher serum concentrations failed to yield protection against diabetes. It was concluded that HDL particles confer partially lacking protection against cardiometabolic risk among Turks, and this impairment is modulated by sex. This highly important observation may result from a setting of prevailing chronic subclinical inflammation.

  7. Effect of Betula pendula Leaf Extract on α-Glucosidase and Glutathione Level in Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bljajić, Kristina; Šoštarić, Nina; Petlevski, Roberta; Vujić, Lovorka; Brajković, Andrea; Fumić, Barbara; de Carvalho, Isabel Saraiva

    2016-01-01

    B. pendula leaf is a common ingredient in traditional herbal combinations for treatment of diabetes in southeastern Europe. Present study investigated B. pendula ethanolic and aqueous extract as inhibitors of carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes, as well as their ability to restore glutathione concentration in Hep G2 cells subjected to glucose-induced oxidative stress. Phytochemical analysis revealed presence of rutin and other quercetin derivatives, as well as chlorogenic acid. In general, ethanolic extract was richer in phenolic substances than the aqueous extract. Furthermore, a comprehensive analysis of antioxidant activity of two extracts (determined by DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activity, total antioxidant activity, and chelating activity as well as ferric-reducing antioxidant power) has shown that ethanolic extract was better radical scavenger and metal ion reductant. In addition, ethanolic extract effectively increased cellular glutathione levels caused by hyperglycemia and inhibited α-glucosidase with the activity comparable to that of acarbose. Therefore, in vitro research using B. pendula plant extracts has confirmed their antidiabetic properties.

  8. Effect of Betula pendula Leaf Extract on α-Glucosidase and Glutathione Level in Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bljajić, Kristina; Šoštarić, Nina; Petlevski, Roberta; Vujić, Lovorka; Brajković, Andrea; Fumić, Barbara; de Carvalho, Isabel Saraiva

    2016-01-01

    B. pendula leaf is a common ingredient in traditional herbal combinations for treatment of diabetes in southeastern Europe. Present study investigated B. pendula ethanolic and aqueous extract as inhibitors of carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes, as well as their ability to restore glutathione concentration in Hep G2 cells subjected to glucose-induced oxidative stress. Phytochemical analysis revealed presence of rutin and other quercetin derivatives, as well as chlorogenic acid. In general, ethanolic extract was richer in phenolic substances than the aqueous extract. Furthermore, a comprehensive analysis of antioxidant activity of two extracts (determined by DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activity, total antioxidant activity, and chelating activity as well as ferric-reducing antioxidant power) has shown that ethanolic extract was better radical scavenger and metal ion reductant. In addition, ethanolic extract effectively increased cellular glutathione levels caused by hyperglycemia and inhibited α-glucosidase with the activity comparable to that of acarbose. Therefore, in vitro research using B. pendula plant extracts has confirmed their antidiabetic properties. PMID:27668005

  9. Effect of Betula pendula Leaf Extract on α-Glucosidase and Glutathione Level in Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Bljajić, Kristina; Šoštarić, Nina; Petlevski, Roberta; Vujić, Lovorka; Brajković, Andrea; Fumić, Barbara; de Carvalho, Isabel Saraiva; Končić, Marijana Zovko

    2016-01-01

    B. pendula leaf is a common ingredient in traditional herbal combinations for treatment of diabetes in southeastern Europe. Present study investigated B. pendula ethanolic and aqueous extract as inhibitors of carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes, as well as their ability to restore glutathione concentration in Hep G2 cells subjected to glucose-induced oxidative stress. Phytochemical analysis revealed presence of rutin and other quercetin derivatives, as well as chlorogenic acid. In general, ethanolic extract was richer in phenolic substances than the aqueous extract. Furthermore, a comprehensive analysis of antioxidant activity of two extracts (determined by DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activity, total antioxidant activity, and chelating activity as well as ferric-reducing antioxidant power) has shown that ethanolic extract was better radical scavenger and metal ion reductant. In addition, ethanolic extract effectively increased cellular glutathione levels caused by hyperglycemia and inhibited α-glucosidase with the activity comparable to that of acarbose. Therefore, in vitro research using B. pendula plant extracts has confirmed their antidiabetic properties. PMID:27668005

  10. Effect of Betula pendula Leaf Extract on α-Glucosidase and Glutathione Level in Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Bljajić, Kristina; Šoštarić, Nina; Petlevski, Roberta; Vujić, Lovorka; Brajković, Andrea; Fumić, Barbara; de Carvalho, Isabel Saraiva; Končić, Marijana Zovko

    2016-01-01

    B. pendula leaf is a common ingredient in traditional herbal combinations for treatment of diabetes in southeastern Europe. Present study investigated B. pendula ethanolic and aqueous extract as inhibitors of carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes, as well as their ability to restore glutathione concentration in Hep G2 cells subjected to glucose-induced oxidative stress. Phytochemical analysis revealed presence of rutin and other quercetin derivatives, as well as chlorogenic acid. In general, ethanolic extract was richer in phenolic substances than the aqueous extract. Furthermore, a comprehensive analysis of antioxidant activity of two extracts (determined by DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activity, total antioxidant activity, and chelating activity as well as ferric-reducing antioxidant power) has shown that ethanolic extract was better radical scavenger and metal ion reductant. In addition, ethanolic extract effectively increased cellular glutathione levels caused by hyperglycemia and inhibited α-glucosidase with the activity comparable to that of acarbose. Therefore, in vitro research using B. pendula plant extracts has confirmed their antidiabetic properties.

  11. The Use of Assistive Technology by High School Students with Visual Impairments: A Second Look at the Current Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Stacy M.

    2011-01-01

    Even though a wide variety of assistive technology tools and devices are available in the marketplace, many students with visual impairments (that is, those who are blind or have low vision) have not yet benefitted from using this specialized technology. This article presents a study that assessed the use of assistive technology by high school…

  12. High School Teachers' Perspectives on Supporting Students with Visual Impairments toward Higher Education: Access, Barriers, and Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Maureen; Curtis, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study presented here was to understand the experiences of teachers in assisting students with visual impairments in making the transition to higher education. The teachers reported barriers in high school that affect students' access to and success in higher education. Furthermore, institutions of higher education provided…

  13. Bats aggregate to improve prey search but might be impaired when their density becomes too high.

    PubMed

    Cvikel, Noam; Egert Berg, Katya; Levin, Eran; Hurme, Edward; Borissov, Ivailo; Boonman, Arjan; Amichai, Eran; Yovel, Yossi

    2015-01-19

    Social foraging is a very common yet extremely complex behavior. Numerous studies attempted to model it with little supporting evidence. Studying it in the wild is difficult because it requires monitoring the animal's movement, its foraging success, and its interactions with conspecifics. We present a novel system that enables full night ultrasonic recording of freely foraging bats, in addition to GPS tracking. As they rely on echolocation, audio recordings of bats allow tapping into their sensory acquisition of the world. Rapid changes in echolocation allowed us to reveal the bats' dynamic reactions in response to prey or conspecifics—two key behaviors that are extremely difficult to assess in most animals. We found that bats actively aggregate and forage as a group. However, we also found that when the group became too dense, bats were forced to devote sensory attention to conspecifics that frequently entered their biosonar "field of view," impairing the bats' prey detection performance. Why then did bats fly in such high densities? By emitting echolocation calls, bats constantly provide public information about their detection of prey. Bats could therefore benefit from intentionally flying at a distance that enables eavesdropping on conspecifics. Group foraging, therefore, probably allowed bats to effectively operate as an array of sensors, increasing their searching efficiency. We suggest that two opposing forces are at play in determining the efficient foraging density: on the one hand, higher densities improve prey detection, but on the other hand, they increase conspecific interference.

  14. Acute Thermotherapy Prevents Impairments in Cutaneous Microvascular Function Induced by a High Fat Meal

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Jennifer C.; Roseguini, Bruno T.; Goerger, Benjamin M.; Fallon, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a high fat meal (HFM) would impair cutaneous vasodilation, while thermotherapy (TT) would reverse the detrimental effects. Eight participants were instrumented with skin heaters and laser-Doppler (LD) probes and tested in three trials: control, HFM, and HFM + TT. Participants wore a water-perfused suit perfused with 33°C (control and HFM) or 50°C (HFM + TT) water. Participants consumed 1 g fat/kg body weight. Blood samples were taken at baseline and two hours post-HFM. Blood pressure was measured every 5–10 minutes. Microvascular function was assessed via skin local heating from 33°C to 39°C two hours after HFM. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated and normalized to maximal vasodilation (%CVCmax). HFM had no effect on initial peak (48 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (49 ± 4 %CVCmax) but attenuated the plateau (51 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (63 ± 4 %CVCmax, P < 0.001). Initial peak was augmented in HFM + TT (66 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control and HFM (P < 0.05), while plateau (73 ± 3 % CVCmax) was augmented only compared to the HFM trial (P < 0.001). These data suggest that HFM negatively affects cutaneous vasodilation but can be minimized by TT. PMID:27595112

  15. Acute Thermotherapy Prevents Impairments in Cutaneous Microvascular Function Induced by a High Fat Meal.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Jennifer C; Roseguini, Bruno T; Goerger, Benjamin M; Fallon, Elizabeth A; Wong, Brett J

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a high fat meal (HFM) would impair cutaneous vasodilation, while thermotherapy (TT) would reverse the detrimental effects. Eight participants were instrumented with skin heaters and laser-Doppler (LD) probes and tested in three trials: control, HFM, and HFM + TT. Participants wore a water-perfused suit perfused with 33°C (control and HFM) or 50°C (HFM + TT) water. Participants consumed 1 g fat/kg body weight. Blood samples were taken at baseline and two hours post-HFM. Blood pressure was measured every 5-10 minutes. Microvascular function was assessed via skin local heating from 33°C to 39°C two hours after HFM. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated and normalized to maximal vasodilation (%CVCmax). HFM had no effect on initial peak (48 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (49 ± 4 %CVCmax) but attenuated the plateau (51 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (63 ± 4 %CVCmax, P < 0.001). Initial peak was augmented in HFM + TT (66 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control and HFM (P < 0.05), while plateau (73 ± 3 % CVCmax) was augmented only compared to the HFM trial (P < 0.001). These data suggest that HFM negatively affects cutaneous vasodilation but can be minimized by TT. PMID:27595112

  16. Acute Thermotherapy Prevents Impairments in Cutaneous Microvascular Function Induced by a High Fat Meal

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Jennifer C.; Roseguini, Bruno T.; Goerger, Benjamin M.; Fallon, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a high fat meal (HFM) would impair cutaneous vasodilation, while thermotherapy (TT) would reverse the detrimental effects. Eight participants were instrumented with skin heaters and laser-Doppler (LD) probes and tested in three trials: control, HFM, and HFM + TT. Participants wore a water-perfused suit perfused with 33°C (control and HFM) or 50°C (HFM + TT) water. Participants consumed 1 g fat/kg body weight. Blood samples were taken at baseline and two hours post-HFM. Blood pressure was measured every 5–10 minutes. Microvascular function was assessed via skin local heating from 33°C to 39°C two hours after HFM. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated and normalized to maximal vasodilation (%CVCmax). HFM had no effect on initial peak (48 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (49 ± 4 %CVCmax) but attenuated the plateau (51 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control (63 ± 4 %CVCmax, P < 0.001). Initial peak was augmented in HFM + TT (66 ± 4 %CVCmax) compared to control and HFM (P < 0.05), while plateau (73 ± 3 % CVCmax) was augmented only compared to the HFM trial (P < 0.001). These data suggest that HFM negatively affects cutaneous vasodilation but can be minimized by TT.

  17. Unfinished tasks foster rumination and impair sleeping - particularly if leaders have high performance expectations.

    PubMed

    Syrek, Christine J; Antoni, Conny H

    2014-10-01

    This study examines the relationship between time pressure and unfinished tasks as work stressors on employee well-being. Relatively little is known about the effect of unfinished tasks on well-being. Specifically, excluding the impact of time pressure, we examined whether the feeling of not having finished the week's tasks fosters perseverative cognitions and impairs sleep. Additionally, we proposed that leader performance expectations moderate these relationships. In more detail, we expected the detrimental effect of unfinished tasks on both rumination and sleep would be enhanced if leader expectations were perceived to be high. In total, 89 employees filled out online diary surveys both before and after the weekend over a 5-week period. Multilevel growth modeling revealed that time pressure and unfinished tasks impacted rumination and sleep on the weekend. Further, our results supported our hypothesis that unfinished tasks explain unique variance in the dependent variables above and beyond the influence of time pressure. Moreover, we found the relationship between unfinished tasks and both rumination and sleep was moderated by leader performance expectations. Our results emphasize the importance of unfinished tasks as a stressor and highlight that leadership, specifically in the form of performance expectations, contributes significantly to the strength of this relationship.

  18. Glucose induced activation of canonical Wnt signaling pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma is regulated by DKK4

    PubMed Central

    Chouhan, Surbhi; Singh, Snahlata; Athavale, Dipti; Ramteke, Pranay; Pandey, Vimal; Joseph, Jomon; Mohan, Rajashekar; Shetty, Praveen Kumar; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Elevated glycemic index, an important feature of diabetes is implicated in an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of this association are relatively less explored. Present study investigates the effect of hyperglycemia over HCC proliferation. We observed that high glucose culture condition (HG) specifically activates canonical Wnt signaling in HCC cells, which is mediated by suppression of DKK4 (a Wnt antagonist) expression and enhanced β-catenin level. Functional assays demonstrated that a normoglycemic culture condition (NG) maintains constitutive expression of DKK4, which controls HCC proliferation rate by suppressing canonical Wnt signaling pathway. HG diminishes DKK4 expression leading to loss of check at G0/G1/S phases of the cell cycle thereby enhancing HCC proliferation, in a β-catenin dependent manner. Interestingly, in NOD/SCID mice supplemented with high glucose, HepG2 xenografted tumors grew rapidly in which elevated levels of β-catenin, c-Myc and decreased levels of DKK4 were detected. Knockdown of DKK4 by shRNA promotes proliferation of HCC cells in NG, which is suppressed by treating cells exogenously with recombinant DKK4 protein. Our in vitro and in vivo results indicate an important functional role of DKK4 in glucose facilitated HCC proliferation. PMID:27272409

  19. Glucose induced activation of canonical Wnt signaling pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma is regulated by DKK4.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Surbhi; Singh, Snahlata; Athavale, Dipti; Ramteke, Pranay; Pandey, Vimal; Joseph, Jomon; Mohan, Rajashekar; Shetty, Praveen Kumar; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2016-06-08

    Elevated glycemic index, an important feature of diabetes is implicated in an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of this association are relatively less explored. Present study investigates the effect of hyperglycemia over HCC proliferation. We observed that high glucose culture condition (HG) specifically activates canonical Wnt signaling in HCC cells, which is mediated by suppression of DKK4 (a Wnt antagonist) expression and enhanced β-catenin level. Functional assays demonstrated that a normoglycemic culture condition (NG) maintains constitutive expression of DKK4, which controls HCC proliferation rate by suppressing canonical Wnt signaling pathway. HG diminishes DKK4 expression leading to loss of check at G0/G1/S phases of the cell cycle thereby enhancing HCC proliferation, in a β-catenin dependent manner. Interestingly, in NOD/SCID mice supplemented with high glucose, HepG2 xenografted tumors grew rapidly in which elevated levels of β-catenin, c-Myc and decreased levels of DKK4 were detected. Knockdown of DKK4 by shRNA promotes proliferation of HCC cells in NG, which is suppressed by treating cells exogenously with recombinant DKK4 protein. Our in vitro and in vivo results indicate an important functional role of DKK4 in glucose facilitated HCC proliferation.

  20. Glucose-induced β-catenin acetylation enhances Wnt signaling in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chocarro-Calvo, Ana; García-Martínez, Jose Manuel; Ardila-González, Soraya; De la Vieja, Antonio; García-Jiménez, Custodia

    2013-02-01

    Nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, a widely recognized marker of poor cancer prognosis, drives cancer cell proliferation and senescence bypass and regulates incretins, critical regulators of fat and glucose metabolism. Diabetes, characterized by elevated blood glucose levels, is associated with increased cancer risk, partly because of increased insulin growth factor 1 signaling, but whether elevated glucose directly impacts cancer-associated signal-transduction pathways is unknown. Here, we show that high glucose is essential for nuclear localization of β-catenin in response to Wnt signaling. Glucose-dependent β-catenin nuclear retention requires lysine 354 and is mediated by alteration of the balance between p300 and sirtuins that trigger β-catenin acetylation. Consequently β-catenin accumulates in the nucleus and activates target promoters under combined glucose and Wnt stimulation, but not with either stimulus alone. Our results reveal a mechanism by which high glucose enhances signaling through the cancer-associated Wnt/β-catenin pathway and may explain the increased frequency of cancer associated with obesity and diabetes.

  1. Ethylene acts as a negative regulator of glucose induced lateral root emergence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjul; Gupta, Aditi; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Plants, being sessile organisms, are more exposed to the hazards of constantly changing environmental conditions globally. During the lifetime of a plant, the root system encounters various challenges such as obstacles, pathogens, high salinity, water logging, nutrient scarcity etc. The developmental plasticity of the root system provides brilliant adaptability to plants to counter the changes exerted by both external as well as internal cues and achieve an optimized growth status. Phytohormones are one of the major intrinsic factors regulating all aspects of plant growth and development both independently as well as through complex signal integrations at multiple levels. We have previously shown that glucose (Glc) and brassinosteroid (BR) signalings interact extensively to regulate lateral root (LR) development in Arabidopsis. (1) Auxin efflux as well as influx and downstream signaling components are also involved in Glc-BR regulation of LR emergence. Here, we provide evidence for involvement of ethylene signaling machinery downstream to Glc and BR in regulation of LR emergence. PMID:26236960

  2. Insulin granule trafficking in beta-cells: mathematical model of glucose-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Bertuzzi, Alessandro; Salinari, Serenella; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2007-07-01

    A mathematical model that represents the dynamics of intracellular insulin granules in beta-cells is proposed. Granule translocation and exocytosis are controlled by signals assumed to be essentially related to ATP-to-ADP ratio and cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. The model provides an interpretation of the roles of the triggering and amplifying pathways of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Values of most of the model parameters were inferred from available experimental data. The numerical simulations represent a variety of experimental conditions, such as the stimulation by high K(+) and by different time courses of extracellular glucose, and the predicted responses agree with published experimental data. Model capacity to represent data measured in a hyperglycemic clamp was also tested. Model parameter changes that may reflect alterations of beta-cell function present in type 2 diabetes are investigated, and the action of pharmacological agents that bind to sulfonylurea receptors is simulated.

  3. Rapamycin impairs metabolism-secretion coupling in rat pancreatic islets by suppressing carbohydrate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shimodahira, Makiko; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Mukai, Eri; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Nishi, Yuichi; Sasaki, Mayumi; Sato, Yuichi; Sato, Hiroki; Hosokawa, Masaya; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Seino, Yutaka; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2010-01-01

    Rapamycin, an immunosuppressant used in human transplantation, impairs beta-cell function, but the mechanism is unclear. Chronic (24 h) exposure to rapamycin concentration dependently suppressed 16.7 mM glucose-induced insulin release from islets (1.65+/-0.06, 30 nM rapamycin versus 2.35+/-0.11 ng/islet per 30 min, control, n=30, P<0.01) without affecting insulin and DNA contents. Rapamycin also decreased alpha-ketoisocaproate-induced insulin release, suggesting reduced mitochondrial carbohydrate metabolism. ATP content in the presence of 16.7 mM glucose was significantly reduced in rapamycin-treated islets (13.42+/-0.47, rapamycin versus 16.04+/-0.46 pmol/islet, control, n=30, P<0.01). Glucose oxidation, which indicates the velocity of metabolism in the Krebs cycle, was decreased by rapamycin in the presence of 16.7 mM glucose (30.1+/-2.7, rapamycin versus 42.2+/-3.3 pmol/islet per 90 min, control, n=9, P<0.01). Immunoblotting revealed that the expression of complex I, III, IV, and V was not affected by rapamycin. Mitochondrial ATP production indicated that the respiratory chain downstream of complex II was not affected, but that carbohydrate metabolism in the Krebs cycle was reduced by rapamycin. Analysis of enzymes in the Krebs cycle revealed that activity of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDH), which catalyzes one of the slowest reactions in the Krebs cycle, was reduced by rapamycin (10.08+/-0.82, rapamycin versus 13.82+/-0.84 nmol/mg mitochondrial protein per min, control, n=5, P<0.01). Considered together, these findings indicate that rapamycin suppresses high glucose-induced insulin secretion from pancreatic islets by reducing mitochondrial ATP production through suppression of carbohydrate metabolism in the Krebs cycle, together with reduced KGDH activity. PMID:19812126

  4. Functionally-detected cognitive impairment in high school football players without clinically-diagnosed concussion.

    PubMed

    Talavage, Thomas M; Nauman, Eric A; Breedlove, Evan L; Yoruk, Umit; Dye, Anne E; Morigaki, Katherine E; Feuer, Henry; Leverenz, Larry J

    2014-02-15

    Head trauma and concussion in football players have recently received considerable media attention. Postmortem evidence suggests that accrual of damage to the brain may occur with repeated blows to the head, even when the individual blows fail to produce clinical symptoms. There is an urgent need for improved detection and characterization of head trauma to reduce future injury risk and promote development of new therapies. In this study we examined neurological performance and health in the presence of head collision events in high school football players, using longitudinal measures of collision events (the HIT(™) System), neurocognitive testing (ImPACT(™)), and functional magnetic resonance imaging MRI (fMRI). Longitudinal assessment (including baseline) was conducted in 11 young men (ages 15-19 years) participating on the varsity and junior varsity football teams at a single high school. We expected and observed subjects in two previously described categories: (1) no clinically-diagnosed concussion and no changes in neurological behavior, and (2) clinically-diagnosed concussion with changes in neurological behavior. Additionally, we observed players in a previously undiscovered third category, who exhibited no clinically-observed symptoms associated with concussion, but who demonstrated measurable neurocognitive (primarily visual working memory) and neurophysiological (altered activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex [DLPFC]) impairments. This new category was associated with significantly higher numbers of head collision events to the top-front of the head, directly above the DLPFC. The discovery of this new category suggests that more players are suffering neurological injury than are currently being detected using traditional concussion-assessment tools. These individuals are unlikely to undergo clinical evaluation, and thus may continue to participate in football-related activities, even when changes in brain physiology (and potential brain

  5. Functionally-Detected Cognitive Impairment in High School Football Players without Clinically-Diagnosed Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Nauman, Eric A.; Breedlove, Evan L.; Yoruk, Umit; Dye, Anne E.; Morigaki, Katherine E.; Feuer, Henry; Leverenz, Larry J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Head trauma and concussion in football players have recently received considerable media attention. Postmortem evidence suggests that accrual of damage to the brain may occur with repeated blows to the head, even when the individual blows fail to produce clinical symptoms. There is an urgent need for improved detection and characterization of head trauma to reduce future injury risk and promote development of new therapies. In this study we examined neurological performance and health in the presence of head collision events in high school football players, using longitudinal measures of collision events (the HIT™ System), neurocognitive testing (ImPACT™), and functional magnetic resonance imaging MRI (fMRI). Longitudinal assessment (including baseline) was conducted in 11 young men (ages 15–19 years) participating on the varsity and junior varsity football teams at a single high school. We expected and observed subjects in two previously described categories: (1) no clinically-diagnosed concussion and no changes in neurological behavior, and (2) clinically-diagnosed concussion with changes in neurological behavior. Additionally, we observed players in a previously undiscovered third category, who exhibited no clinically-observed symptoms associated with concussion, but who demonstrated measurable neurocognitive (primarily visual working memory) and neurophysiological (altered activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex [DLPFC]) impairments. This new category was associated with significantly higher numbers of head collision events to the top-front of the head, directly above the DLPFC. The discovery of this new category suggests that more players are suffering neurological injury than are currently being detected using traditional concussion-assessment tools. These individuals are unlikely to undergo clinical evaluation, and thus may continue to participate in football-related activities, even when changes in brain physiology (and potential

  6. Effect of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate on glucose-induced human serum albumin glycation.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Hagerman, A E

    2015-01-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in plant-based foods and beverages such as green tea. Although EGCg can eliminate carbonyl species produced by glucose autoxidation and thus can inhibit protein glycation, it is also reported to be a pro-oxidant that stimulates protein glycation in vitro. To better understand the balance between antioxidant and pro-oxidant features of EGCg, we evaluated EGCg-mediated bioactivities in a human serum albumin (HSA)/glucose model by varying three different parameters (glucose level, EGCg concentration, and time of exposure to EGCg). Measurements of glycation-induced fluorescence, protein carbonyls, and electrophoretic mobility showed that the level of HSA glycation was positively related to the glucose level over the range 10-100 mM during a 21-day incubation at 37°C and pH: 7.4. Under mild glycemic pressure (10 mM), long exposure to EGCg enhanced HSA glycation, while brief exposure to low concentrations of EGCg did not. Under high glycemic pressure (100 mM glucose), long exposure to EGCg inhibited glycation. For the first time we showed that brief exposure to EGCg reversed glycation-induced fluorescence, indicating a restorative effect. In conclusion, our research identified glucose level, EGCg concentration, and time of exposure as critical factors dictating EGCg bioactivities in HSA glycation. EGCg did not affect HSA glycation under normal physiological conditions but had a potential therapeutic effect on HSA severely damaged by glycation.

  7. Chronic ingestion of 2-deoxy-D-glucose induces cardiac vacuolization and increases mortality in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, Robin K.; Smith, Daniel L.; Sossong, Alex M.; Kaushik, Susmita; Poosala, Suresh; Spangler, Edward L.; Roth, George S.; Lane, Mark; Allison, David B.; Cabo, Rafael de; Ingram, Donald K.; Mattison, Julie A.

    2010-03-15

    Calorie restriction (CR), the purposeful reduction of energy intake with maintenance of adequate micronutrient intake, is well known to extend the lifespan of laboratory animals. Compounds like 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) that can recapitulate the metabolic effects of CR are of great interest for their potential to extend lifespan. 2DG treatment has been shown to have potential therapeutic benefits for treating cancer and seizures. 2DG has also recapitulated some hallmarks of the CR phenotype including reduced body temperature and circulating insulin in short-term rodent trials, but one chronic feeding study in rats found toxic effects. The present studies were performed to further explore the long-term effects of 2DG in vivo. First we demonstrate that 2DG increases mortality of male Fischer-344 rats. Increased incidence of pheochromocytoma in the adrenal medulla was also noted in the 2DG treated rats. We reconfirm the cardiotoxicity of 2DG in a 6-week follow-up study evaluating male Brown Norway rats and a natural form of 2DG in addition to again examining effects in Fischer-344 rats and the original synthetic 2DG. High levels of both 2DG sources reduced weight gain secondary to reduced food intake in both strains. Histopathological analysis of the hearts revealed increasing vacuolarization of cardiac myocytes with dose, and tissue staining revealed the vacuoles were free of both glycogen and lipid. We did, however, observe higher expression of both cathepsin D and LC3 in the hearts of 2DG-treated rats which indicates an increase in autophagic flux. Although a remarkable CR-like phenotype can be reproduced with 2DG treatment, the ultimate toxicity of 2DG seriously challenges 2DG as a potential CR mimetic in mammals and also raises concerns about other therapeutic applications of the compound.

  8. Chronic ingestion of 2-deoxy-D-glucose induces cardiac vacuolization and increases mortality in rats

    PubMed Central

    Minor, Robin K.; Smith, Daniel L.; Sossong, Alex M.; Kaushik, Susmita; Poosala, Suresh; Spangler, Edward L.; Roth, George S.; Lane, Mark; Allison, David B.; de Cabo, Rafael; Ingram, Donald K.; Mattison, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR), the purposeful reduction of energy intake with maintenance of adequate micronutrient intake, is well known to extend the lifespan of laboratory animals. Compounds like 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) that can recapitulate the metabolic effects of CR are of great interest for their potential to extend lifespan. 2DG treatment has been shown to have potential therapeutic benefits for treating cancer and seizures. 2DG has also recapitulated some hallmarks of the CR phenotype including reduced body temperature and circulating insulin in short-term rodent trials, but one chronic feeding study in rats found toxic effects. The present studies were performed to further explore the long-term effects of 2DG in vivo. First we demonstrate that 2DG increases mortality of male Fischer-344 rats. Increased incidence of pheochromocytoma in the adrenal medulla was also noted in the 2DG treated rats. We reconfirm the cardiotoxicity of 2DG in a 6-week follow-up study evaluating male Brown Norway rats and a natural form of 2DG in addition to again examining effects in Fischer-344 rats and the original synthetic 2DG. High levels of both 2DG sources reduced weight gain secondary to reduced food intake in both strains. Histopathological analysis of the hearts revealed increasing vacuolarization of cardiac myocytes with dose, and tissue staining revealed the vacuoles were free of both glycogen and lipid. We did, however, observe higher expression of both cathepsin D and LC3 in the hearts of 2DG-treated rats which indicates an increase in autophagic flux. Although a remarkable CR-like phenotype can be reproduced with 2DG treatment, the ultimate toxicity of 2DG seriously challenges 2DG as a potential CR mimetic in mammals and also raises concerns about other therapeutic applications of the compound. PMID:20026095

  9. Impaired Lipid and Glucose Homeostasis in Hexabromocyclododecane-Exposed Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Eiko; Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Yamamoto, Megumi; Takano, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is an additive flame retardant used in the textile industry and in polystyrene foam manufacturing. Because of its lipophilicity and persistency, HBCD accumulates in adipose tissue and thus has the potential of causing metabolic disorders through disruption of lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the association between HBCD and obesity remains unclear. Objectives: We investigated whether exposure to HBCD contributes to initiation and progression of obesity and related metabolic dysfunction in mice fed a normal diet (ND) or a high-fat diet (HFD). Methods: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a HFD (62.2 kcal% fat) or a ND and treated orally with HBCD (0, 1.75, 35, or 700 μg/kg body weight) weekly from 6 to 20 weeks of age. We examined body weight, liver weight, blood biochemistry, histopathological changes, and gene expression profiles in the liver and adipose tissue. Results: In HFD-fed mice, body and liver weight were markedly increased in mice treated with the high (700 μg/kg) and medium (35 μg/kg) doses of HBCD compared with vehicle. This effect was more prominent in the high-dose group. These increases were paralleled by increases in random blood glucose and insulin levels and enhancement of microvesicular steatosis and macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue. HBCD-treated HFD-fed mice also had increased mRNA levels of Pparg (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ) in the liver and decreased mRNA levels of Glut4 (glucose transporter 4) in adipose tissue compared with vehicle-treated HFD-fed mice. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that HBCD may contribute to enhancement of diet-induced body weight gain and metabolic dysfunction through disruption of lipid and glucose homeostasis, resulting in accelerated progression of obesity. Citation: Yanagisawa R, Koike E, Win-Shwe TT, Yamamoto M, Takano H. 2014. Impaired lipid and glucose homeostasis in hexabromocyclododecane-exposed mice fed a high-fat diet. Environ Health

  10. A High-Fat Diet Causes Impairment in Hippocampal Memory and Sex-Dependent Alterations in Peripheral Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Erica L.; Thompson, Lucien T.

    2016-01-01

    While high-fat diets are associated with rising incidence of obesity/type-2 diabetes and can induce metabolic and cognitive deficits, sex-dependent comparisons are rarely systematically made. Effects of exclusive consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) on systemic metabolism and on behavioral measures of hippocampal-dependent memory were compared in young male and female LE rats. Littermates were fed from weaning either a HFD or a control diet (CD) for 12 wk prior to testing. Sex-different effects of the HFD were observed in classic metabolic signs associated with type-2 diabetes. Males fed the HFD became obese, and had elevated fasted blood glucose levels, elevated corticosterone, and impaired glucose-tolerance, while females on the HFD exhibited only elevated corticosterone. Regardless of peripheral metabolism alteration, rats of both sexes fed the HFD were equally impaired in a spatial object recognition memory task associated with impaired hippocampal function. While the metabolic changes reported here have been characterized previously in males, the set of diet-induced effects observed here in females are novel. Impaired memory can have significant cognitive consequences, over the short-term and over the lifespan. A significant need exists for comparative research into sex-dependent differences underlying obesity and metabolic syndromes relating systemic, cognitive, and neural plasticity mechanisms. PMID:26819773

  11. Transcriptional Consequence and Impaired Gametogenesis with High-Grade Aneuploidy in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Chen, I-Ju; Liu, Yu-Chen; Chung, Mei-Chu; Lo, Wan-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Aneuploidy features a numerical chromosome variant that the number of chromosomes in the nucleus of a cell is not an exact multiple of the haploid number, which may have an impact on morphology and gene expression. Here we report a tertiary trisomy uncovered by characterizing a T-DNA insertion mutant (aur2-1/+) in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AURORA2 locus. Whole-genome analysis with DNA tiling arrays revealed a chromosomal translocation linked to the aur2-1 allele, which collectively accounted for a tertiary trisomy 2. Morphologic, cytogenetic and genetic analyses of aur2-1 progeny showed impaired male and female gametogenesis to various degrees and a tight association of the aur2-1 allele with the tertiary trisomy that was preferentially inherited. Transcriptome analysis showed overlapping and distinct gene expression profiles between primary and tertiary trisomy 2 plants, particularly genes involved in response to stress and various types of external and internal stimuli. Additionally, transcriptome and gene ontology analyses revealed an overrepresentation of nuclear-encoded organelle-related genes functionally involved in plastids, mitochondria and peroxisomes that were differentially expressed in at least three if not all Arabidopsis trisomics. These observations support a previous hypothesis that aneuploid cells have higher energy requirement to overcome the detrimental effects of an unbalanced genome. Moreover, our findings extend the knowledge of the complex nature of the T-DNA insertion event influencing plant genomic integrity by creating high-grade trisomy. Finally, gene expression profiling results provide useful information for future research to compare primary and tertiary trisomics for the effects of aneuploidy on plant cell physiology. PMID:25514186

  12. Impaired Presynaptic High-Affinity Choline Transporter Causes a Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome with Episodic Apnea.

    PubMed

    Bauché, Stéphanie; O'Regan, Seana; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Laffargue, Fanny; McMacken, Grace; Sternberg, Damien; Brochier, Guy; Buon, Céline; Bouzidi, Nassima; Topf, Ana; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Remerand, Ganaelle; Beaufrere, Anne-Marie; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Thevenon, Julien; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Faivre, Laurence; Duffourd, Yannis; Ricci, Federica; Mongini, Tiziana; Fiorillo, Chiara; Astrea, Guja; Burloiu, Carmen Magdalena; Butoianu, Niculina; Sandu, Carmen; Servais, Laurent; Bonne, Gisèle; Nelson, Isabelle; Desguerre, Isabelle; Nougues, Marie-Christine; Bœuf, Benoit; Romero, Norma; Laporte, Jocelyn; Boland, Anne; Lechner, Doris; Deleuze, Jean-François; Fontaine, Bertrand; Strochlic, Laure; Lochmuller, Hanns; Eymard, Bruno; Mayer, Michèle; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is one of the best-studied cholinergic synapses. Inherited defects of peripheral neurotransmission result in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases with fluctuating fatigable muscle weakness as the clinical hallmark. Whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in six unrelated families identified compound heterozygous and homozygous mutations in SLC5A7 encoding the presynaptic sodium-dependent high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT), which is known to be mutated in one dominant form of distal motor neuronopathy (DHMN7A). We identified 11 recessive mutations in SLC5A7 that were associated with a spectrum of severe muscle weakness ranging from a lethal antenatal form of arthrogryposis and severe hypotonia to a neonatal form of CMS with episodic apnea and a favorable prognosis when well managed at the clinical level. As expected given the critical role of CHT for multisystemic cholinergic neurotransmission, autonomic dysfunctions were reported in the antenatal form and cognitive impairment was noticed in half of the persons with the neonatal form. The missense mutations induced a near complete loss of function of CHT activity in cell models. At the human NMJ, a delay in synaptic maturation and an altered maintenance were observed in the antenatal and neonatal forms, respectively. Increased synaptic expression of butyrylcholinesterase was also observed, exposing the dysfunction of cholinergic metabolism when CHT is deficient in vivo. This work broadens the clinical spectrum of human diseases resulting from reduced CHT activity and highlights the complexity of cholinergic metabolism at the synapse. PMID:27569547

  13. High Glucose Impairs Insulin Signaling in the Glomerulus: An In Vitro and Ex Vivo Approach

    PubMed Central

    Katsoulieris, Elias N.; Drossopoulou, Garyfalia I.; Kotsopoulou, Eleni S.; Vlahakos, Dimitrios V.; Lianos, Elias A.; Tsilibary, Effie C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chronic hyperglycaemia, as seen in type II diabetes, results in both morphological and functional impairments of podocytes in the kidney. We investigated the effects of high glucose (HG) on the insulin signaling pathway, focusing on cell survival and apoptotic markers, in immortalized human glomerular cells (HGEC; podocytes) and isolated glomeruli from healthy rats. Methods and Findings HGEC and isolated glomeruli were cultured for various time intervals under HG concentrations in the presence or absence of insulin. Our findings indicated that exposure of HGEC to HG led to downregulation of all insulin signaling markers tested (IR, p-IR, IRS-1, p-Akt, p-Fox01,03), as well as to increased sensitivity to apoptosis (as seen by increased PARP cleavage, Casp3 activation and DNA fragmentation). Short insulin pulse caused upregulation of insulin signaling markers (IR, p-IR, p-Akt, p-Fox01,03) in a greater extent in normoglycaemic cells compared to hyperglycaemic cells and for the case of p-Akt, in a PI3K-dependent manner. IRS-1 phosphorylation of HG-treated podocytes was negatively regulated, favoring serine versus tyrosine residues. Prolonged insulin treatment caused a significant decrease of IR levels, while alterations in glucose concentrations for various time intervals demonstrated changes of IR, p-IR and p-Akt levels, suggesting that the IR signaling pathway is regulated by glucose levels. Finally, HG exerted similar effects in isolated glomeruli. Conclusions These results suggest that HG compromises the insulin signaling pathway in the glomerulus, promoting a proapoptotic environment, with a possible critical step for this malfunction lying at the level of IRS-1 phosphorylation; thus we herein demonstrate glomerular insulin signaling as another target for investigation for the prevention and/ or treatment of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27434075

  14. Impaired Presynaptic High-Affinity Choline Transporter Causes a Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome with Episodic Apnea.

    PubMed

    Bauché, Stéphanie; O'Regan, Seana; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Laffargue, Fanny; McMacken, Grace; Sternberg, Damien; Brochier, Guy; Buon, Céline; Bouzidi, Nassima; Topf, Ana; Lacène, Emmanuelle; Remerand, Ganaelle; Beaufrere, Anne-Marie; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Thevenon, Julien; El Chehadeh-Djebbar, Salima; Faivre, Laurence; Duffourd, Yannis; Ricci, Federica; Mongini, Tiziana; Fiorillo, Chiara; Astrea, Guja; Burloiu, Carmen Magdalena; Butoianu, Niculina; Sandu, Carmen; Servais, Laurent; Bonne, Gisèle; Nelson, Isabelle; Desguerre, Isabelle; Nougues, Marie-Christine; Bœuf, Benoit; Romero, Norma; Laporte, Jocelyn; Boland, Anne; Lechner, Doris; Deleuze, Jean-François; Fontaine, Bertrand; Strochlic, Laure; Lochmuller, Hanns; Eymard, Bruno; Mayer, Michèle; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    The neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is one of the best-studied cholinergic synapses. Inherited defects of peripheral neurotransmission result in congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases with fluctuating fatigable muscle weakness as the clinical hallmark. Whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in six unrelated families identified compound heterozygous and homozygous mutations in SLC5A7 encoding the presynaptic sodium-dependent high-affinity choline transporter 1 (CHT), which is known to be mutated in one dominant form of distal motor neuronopathy (DHMN7A). We identified 11 recessive mutations in SLC5A7 that were associated with a spectrum of severe muscle weakness ranging from a lethal antenatal form of arthrogryposis and severe hypotonia to a neonatal form of CMS with episodic apnea and a favorable prognosis when well managed at the clinical level. As expected given the critical role of CHT for multisystemic cholinergic neurotransmission, autonomic dysfunctions were reported in the antenatal form and cognitive impairment was noticed in half of the persons with the neonatal form. The missense mutations induced a near complete loss of function of CHT activity in cell models. At the human NMJ, a delay in synaptic maturation and an altered maintenance were observed in the antenatal and neonatal forms, respectively. Increased synaptic expression of butyrylcholinesterase was also observed, exposing the dysfunction of cholinergic metabolism when CHT is deficient in vivo. This work broadens the clinical spectrum of human diseases resulting from reduced CHT activity and highlights the complexity of cholinergic metabolism at the synapse.

  15. Glucose-induced insulin secretion in uremia: role of 1 alpha,25(HO)2-vitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Allegra, V; Luisetto, G; Mengozzi, G; Martimbianco, L; Vasile, A

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the role and mechanism of action of calcitriol on glucose-induced insulin secretion in uremia, 17 patients with severe chronic renal failure were studied. Glucose metabolism was investigated by the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) before and after treatment for 21 days with 0.5 microgram/day of calcitriol and 500 mg/day of calcium (C+Ca) (6 cases) or 0.5 microgram/day of calcitriol alone (C) (11 cases). After these evaluations the patients on C+Ca were shifted to C and 6 patients on C were shifted to C+Ca, and IVGTT was repeated 21 days after the shift. For each test plasma glucose (G), immunoreactive insulin (IRI) and C-peptide (C-p) were measured at -30, 0, 2, 5, 15, 30, 45, 60 min, and baseline plasma values of 1 alpha,25(HO)2-vitamin D3, C-terminal parathyroid hormone (PTH-C), intact parathyroid hormone (PTH-I), calcitonin, and serum values of total and ionized calcium were dosed. Also, glucose constant decay (K-G), insulin response (IRI area), C-p production (C-p area), insulinogenic index (IGI) and insulin resistance index (RI) were calculated. A historical group of 21 healthy volunteers formed the normal controls. 1 alpha,25(HO)2-vitamin D3 plasma levels in uremic patients before treatment were significantly lower than normal range. As compared to controls, uremic patients showed significantly lower K-G, IRI area and IGI values and significantly higher RI values. After treatment with C or C+Ca, the insulin response improved significantly at 2 and 5 min and G decrement was more marked at 30, 45 and 60 min.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Comparison of seven water quality assessment methods for the characterization and management of highly impaired river systems.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaoliang; Dahlgren, Randy A; Zhang, Minghua

    2016-01-01

    In the context of water resource management and pollution control, the characterization of water quality impairments and identification of dominant pollutants are of critical importance. In this study, water quality impairment was assessed on the basis of 7 hydrochemical variables that were monitored bimonthly at 17 sites in 2010 along the rural-suburban-urban portion of the Wen-Rui Tang River in eastern China. Seven methods were used to assess water quality in the river system. These methods included single-factor assessment, water quality grading, comprehensive pollution index, the Nemerow pollution index, principle component analysis, fuzzy comprehensive evaluation, and comprehensive water quality identification index. Our analysis showed that the comprehensive water quality identification index was the best method for assessing water quality in the Wen-Rui Tang River due to its ability to effectively characterize highly polluted waters with multiple impairments. Furthermore, a guideline for the applications of these methods was presented based on their characteristics and efficacy. Results indicated that the dominant pollutant impairing water quality was total nitrogen comprised mainly of ammonium. The temporal variation of water quality was closely related to precipitation as a result of dilution. The spatial variation of water quality was associated with anthropogenic influences (urban, industrial, and agriculture activities) and water flow direction (downstream segments experiencing cumulative effects of upstream inputs). These findings provide valuable information and guidance for water pollution control and water resource management in highly polluted surface waters with multiple water quality impairments in areas with rapid industrial growth and urbanization. PMID:26643812

  17. High-affinity α4β2 nicotinic receptors mediate the impairing effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Holliday, Erica; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Previously, studies from our lab have shown that while acute nicotine administered prior to training and testing enhances contextual fear conditioning, acute nicotine injections prior to extinction sessions impair extinction of contextual fear. Although there is also strong evidence showing that the acute nicotine's enhancing effects on contextual fear conditioning require high-affinity α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), it is unknown which nAChR subtypes are involved in the acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute nicotine administration on contextual fear extinction in knock-out (KO) mice lacking α4, β2 or α7 subtypes of nAChRs and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Both KO and WT mice were first trained and tested for contextual fear conditioning and received a daily contextual extinction session for 4 days. Subjects received intraperitoneal injections of nicotine (0.18 mg/kg) or saline 2-4 min prior to each extinction session. Our results showed that the mice that lack α4 and β2 subtypes of nAChRs showed normal contextual fear extinction but not the acute nicotine-induced impairment while the mice that lack the α7 subtype showed both normal contextual extinction and nicotine-induced impairment of contextual extinction. In addition, control experiments showed that acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction persisted when nicotine administration was ceased and repeated acute nicotine administrations alone did not induce freezing behavior in the absence of context-shock learning. These results clearly demonstrate that high-affinity α4β2 nAChRs are necessary for the effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction.

  18. High-affinity α4β2 nicotinic receptors mediate the impairing effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Holliday, Erica; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Previously, studies from our lab have shown that while acute nicotine administered prior to training and testing enhances contextual fear conditioning, acute nicotine injections prior to extinction sessions impair extinction of contextual fear. Although there is also strong evidence showing that the acute nicotine's enhancing effects on contextual fear conditioning require high-affinity α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), it is unknown which nAChR subtypes are involved in the acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute nicotine administration on contextual fear extinction in knock-out (KO) mice lacking α4, β2 or α7 subtypes of nAChRs and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Both KO and WT mice were first trained and tested for contextual fear conditioning and received a daily contextual extinction session for 4 days. Subjects received intraperitoneal injections of nicotine (0.18 mg/kg) or saline 2-4 min prior to each extinction session. Our results showed that the mice that lack α4 and β2 subtypes of nAChRs showed normal contextual fear extinction but not the acute nicotine-induced impairment while the mice that lack the α7 subtype showed both normal contextual extinction and nicotine-induced impairment of contextual extinction. In addition, control experiments showed that acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction persisted when nicotine administration was ceased and repeated acute nicotine administrations alone did not induce freezing behavior in the absence of context-shock learning. These results clearly demonstrate that high-affinity α4β2 nAChRs are necessary for the effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction. PMID:26688111

  19. Impaired Timing and Frequency Discrimination in High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatara, Anjali; Babikian, Talin; Laugeson, Elizabeth; Tachdjian, Raffi; Sininger, Yvonne S.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) frequently demonstrate preserved or enhanced frequency perception but impaired timing perception. The present study investigated the processing of spectral and temporal information in 12 adolescents with ASD and 15 age-matched controls. Participants completed two psychoacoustic tasks: one determined…

  20. Factors Predicting Post-High School Employment for Young Adults with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnall, Michele Capella

    2010-01-01

    Although low levels of employment among transition-age youth with visual impairments (VI) have long been a concern, empirical research in this area is very limited. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that predict future employment for this population and to compare these factors to the factors that predict employment for the general…

  1. Phlorotannins from Brown Algae: inhibition of advanced glycation end products formation in high glucose induced Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Shakambari, Ganeshan; Ashokkumar, Balasubramaniem; Varalakshmi, Perumal

    2015-06-01

    Advanced Glycation End products (AGE) generated in a non enzymatic protein glycation process are frequently associated with diabetes, aging and other chronic diseases. Here, we explored the protective effect of phlorotannins from brown algae Padina pavonica, Sargassum polycystum and Turbinaria ornata against AGEs formation. Phlorotannins were extracted from brown algae with methanol and its purity was analyzed by TLC and RP-HPLC-DAD. Twenty five grams of P. pavonica, S. polycystum, T. ornata yielded 27.6 ± 0.8 μg/ml, 37.7 μg/ml and 37.1 ± 0.74 μg/ml of phloroglucinol equivalent of phlorotannins, respectively. Antioxidant potentials were examined through DPPH assay and their IC50 values were P. pavonica (30.12 ± 0.99 μg), S. polycystum (40.9 ± 1.2 μg) and T. ornata (22.9 ± 1.3 μg), which was comparatively lesser than the control ascorbic acid (46 ± 0.2 μg). Further, anti-AGE activity was examined in vitro by BSA-glucose assay with the extracted phlorotannins of brown algae (P. pavonica, 15.16 ± 0.26 μg/ml; S. polycystum, 35.245 ± 2.3 μg/ml; T. ornata, 22.7 ± 0.3 μg/ml), which revealed the required concentration to inhibit 50% of albumin glycation (IC50) were lower for extracts than controls (phloroglucinol, 222.33 ± 4.9 μg/ml; thiamine, 263 μg/ml). Furthermore, brown algal extracts containing phlorotannins (100 μl) exhibited protective effects against AGE formation in vivo in C. elegans with induced hyperglycemia. PMID:26155677

  2. Progression of impairment in adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder through the transition out of high school: Contributions of parent involvement and college attendance.

    PubMed

    Howard, Andrea L; Strickland, Noelle J; Murray, Desiree W; Tamm, Leanne; Swanson, James M; Hinshaw, Stephen P; Arnold, L Eugene; Molina, Brooke S G

    2016-02-01

    Long-term, prospective follow-up studies of children diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) show that symptoms tend to decline with age, but impairments in daily life functioning often persist into adulthood. We examined the developmental progression of impairments before and after the transition out of high school in relation to parent involvement during adolescence, parent support during adulthood, and college attendance, using 8 waves of data from the prospective 16-year follow-up of the Multimodal Treatment of ADHD (MTA) study. Participants were 548 proband children diagnosed with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) ADHD Combined Type and 258 age- and sex-matched comparison children (Local Normative Comparison Group; LNCG) randomly sampled from probands' schools. Impairment was assessed consistently by parent report from childhood through adulthood. Results showed that impairment worsens over time both before and after the transition to adulthood for those with ADHD histories, in contrast to non-ADHD peers, whose impairments remained stably low over time. However, impairment stabilized after leaving high school for young adults with ADHD histories who attended college. Involved parenting in adolescence was associated with less impairment overall. Attending college was associated with a stable post-high school trajectory of impairment regardless of parents' involvement during adolescence, but young adults with histories of involved parenting and who attended college were the least impaired overall. PMID:26854508

  3. Protein deficiency during pregnancy and lactation impairs glucose-induced insulin secretion but increases the sensitivity to insulin in weaned rats.

    PubMed

    Latorraca, M Q; Carneiro, E M; Boschero, A C; Mello, M A

    1998-09-01

    We studied glucose homeostasis in rat pups from dams fed on a normal-protein (170 g/kg) (NP) diet or a diet containing 60 g protein/kg (LP) during fetal life and the suckling period. At birth, total serum protein, serum albumin and serum insulin levels were similar in both groups. However, body weight and serum glucose levels in LP rats were lower than those in NP rats. At the end of the suckling period (28 d of age), total serum protein, serum albumin and serum insulin were significantly lower and the liver glycogen and serum free fatty acid levels were significantly higher in LP rats compared with NP rats. Although the fasting serum glucose level was similar in both groups, the area under the blood glucose concentration curve after a glucose load was higher for NP rats (859 (SEM 58) mmol/l per 120 min for NP rats v. 607 (SEM 52) mmol/l per 120 min for LP rats; P < 0.005). The mean post-glucose increase in insulin was higher for NP rats (30 (SEM 4.7) nmol/l per 120 min for NP rats v. 17 (SEM 3.9) nmol/l per 120 min for LP rats; P < 0.05). The glucose disappearance rate for NP rats (0.7 (SEM 0.1) %/min) was lower than that for LP rats (1.6 (SEM 0.2) %/min; P < 0.001). Insulin secretion from isolated islets (1 h incubation) in response to 16.7 mmol glucose/l was augmented 14-fold in NP rats but only 2.6-fold in LP rats compared with the respective basal secretion (2.8 mmol/l; P < 0.001). These results indicate that in vivo as well as in vitro insulin secretion in pups from dams maintained on a LP diet is reduced. This defect may be counteracted by an increase in the sensitivity of target tissues to insulin. PMID:9875069

  4. Deletion of GPR40 Impairs Glucose-Induced Insulin Secretion In Vivo in Mice Without Affecting Intracellular Fuel Metabolism in Islets

    SciTech Connect

    Alquier, Thierry; Peyot, Marie-Line; Latour, M. G.; Kebede, Melkam; Sorensen, Christina M.; Gesta, Stephane; Kahn, C. R.; Smith, Richard D.; Jetton, Thomas L.; Metz, Thomas O.; Prentki, Marc; Poitout, Vincent J.

    2009-11-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor GPR40 mediates fatty-acid potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, but its contribution to insulin secretion in vivo and mechanisms of action remain uncertain. This study was aimed to ascertain whether GPR40 controls insulin secretion in vivo and modulates intracellular fuel metabolism in islets. We observed that glucose- and arginine-stimulated insulin secretion, assessed by hyperglycemic clamps, was decreased by approximately 60% in GPR40 knock-out (KO) fasted and fed mice, without changes in insulin sensitivity assessed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps. Glucose and palmitate metabolism were not affected by GPR40 deletion. Lipid profiling revealed a similar increase in triglyceride and decrease in lysophosphatidylethanolamine species in WT and KO islets in response to palmitate. These results demonstrate that GPR40 regulates insulin secretion in vivo not only in response to fatty acids but also to glucose and arginine, without altering intracellular fuel metabolism.

  5. Impaired timing and frequency discrimination in high-functioning autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Bhatara, Anjali; Babikian, Talin; Laugeson, Elizabeth; Tachdjian, Raffi; Sininger, Yvonne S

    2013-10-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) frequently demonstrate preserved or enhanced frequency perception but impaired timing perception. The present study investigated the processing of spectral and temporal information in 12 adolescents with ASD and 15 age-matched controls. Participants completed two psychoacoustic tasks: one determined frequency difference limens, and the other determined gap detection thresholds. Results showed impaired frequency discrimination at the highest standard frequency in the ASD group but no overall difference between groups. However, when groups were defined by auditory hyper-sensitivity, a group difference arose. For the gap detection task, the ASD group demonstrated elevated thresholds. This supports previous research demonstrating a deficit in ASD in temporal perception and suggests a connection between hyper-sensitivity and frequency discrimination abilities.

  6. Glucose-induced inhibition of the appetitive brain response to visual food cues in polycystic ovary syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Van Vugt, Dean A; Krzemien, Alicja; Alsaadi, Hanin; Frank, Tamar C; Reid, Robert L

    2014-04-16

    We postulate that insulin regulation of food intake is compromised when insulin resistance is present. In order to investigate the effect of insulin sensitivity on appetitive brain responses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in a group of women diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in which insulin sensitivity ranged from normal to resistant. Subjects (n=19) were imaged while viewing pictures of high calorie (HC) foods and low calorie (LC) foods after ingesting either 75 g glucose or an equivalent volume of water. The insulin sensitive group showed reduced blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in response to food pictures following glucose ingestion in numerous corticolimbic brain regions, whereas the insulin resistant group did not. There was a significant interaction between insulin sensitivity (sensitive vs resistant) and condition (water vs glucose). The largest clusters identified included the left insula, bilateral limbic/parahippocampal gyrus/culmen/midbrain, bilateral limbic lobe/precuneus, and left superior/mid temporal gyrus/parietal for HC and LC stimuli combined, the left parahippocampal gyrus/fusiform/pulvinar/midbrain for HC pictures, and the left superior/mid temporal gyrus/parietal and middle/inferior frontal gyrus/orbitofrontal cortex for LC pictures. Furthermore, BOLD signal in the anterior cingulate, medial frontal gyrus, posterior cingulate/precuneus, and parietal cortex during a glucose challenge correlated negatively with insulin sensitivity. We conclude the PCOS women with insulin resistance have an impaired brain response to a glucose challenge. The inability of postprandial hyperinsulinemia to inhibit brain responsiveness to food cues in insulin resistant subjects may lead to greater non-homeostatic eating. PMID:24583185

  7. Highly Conserved Testicular Localization of Claudin-11 in Normal and Impaired Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Stammler, Angelika; Lüftner, Benjamin Udo; Kliesch, Sabine; Weidner, Wolfgang; Bergmann, Martin; Middendorff, Ralf; Konrad, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    In this study we tested expression of tight junction proteins in human, mouse and rat and analyzed the localization of claudin-11 in testis of patients with normal and impaired spermatogenesis. Recent concepts generated in mice suggest that the stage-specifically expressed claudin-3 acts as a basal barrier, sealing the seminiferous epithelium during migration of spermatocytes. Corresponding mechanisms have never been demonstrated in humans. Testicular biopsies (n = 103) from five distinct groups were analyzed: normal spermatogenesis (NSP, n = 28), hypospermatogenesis (Hyp, n = 24), maturation arrest at the level of primary spermatocytes (MA, n = 24), Sertoli cell only syndrome (SCO, n = 19), and spermatogonial arrest (SGA, n = 8). Protein expression of claudin-3, -11 and occludin was analyzed. Human, mice and rat testis robustly express claudin-11 protein. Occludin was detected in mouse and rat and claudin-3 was found only in mice. Thus, we selected claudin-11 for further analysis of localization. In NSP, claudin-11 is located at Sertoli-Sertoli junctions and in Sertoli cell contacts towards spermatogonia. Typically, claudin-11 patches do not reach the basal membrane, unless flanked by the Sertoli cell body or patches between two Sertoli cell bodies. The amount of basal claudin-11 patches was found to be increased in impaired spermatogenesis. Only claudin-11 is expressed in all three species examined. The claudin-11 pattern is robust in man with impaired spermatogenesis, but the proportion of localization is altered in SCO and MA. We conclude that claudin-11 might represent the essential component of the BTB in human. PMID:27486954

  8. Mitigation of starch and glucose-induced postprandial glycemic excursion in rats by antioxidant-rich green-leafy vegetables’ juice

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Ashok Kumar; Jyothi, Atmakuri Lakshmana; Tejeswini, Vasantharao Brahma; Madhusudana, Kuncha; Kumar, Domati Anand; Zehra, Amtul; Agawane, Sachin Bharat

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Consumption of green-leafy vegetables is being advocated beneficial for type 2 diabetes mellitus individuals possibly because they are cost effective source of potent biological antioxidants. This research analyzed various phytochemicals, free radicals scavenging antioxidant potentials and starch digesting enzymes inhibitory activities in fresh juice of nine green-leafy vegetables. Furthermore, this study also investigated influence of these vegetables juice on starch and glucose induced postprandial glycemic load. Materials and Methods: Phytochemical constituents, in vitro free radicals scavenging antioxidant and enzymes inhibitory activities were evaluated applying various reported methods. Post-prandial glycemic excursion was induced in rats pretreated with vegetables juice by oral administration of starch and glucose. Results: All the leafy vegetables juice displayed potent free radicals scavenging activities. Juice of amaranthus, rumex, palak and raphanus displayed potential anti-oxidative property by reducing H2O2 induced hemolysis in rats red blood cells RBCs. Ajwain and rumex juice showed pancreatic α-amylase inhibitory activity. Alternanthera, ajwain, methi, amaranthus and sowa leaves juice displayed intestinal α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Juice of raphanus, ajwain and sowa significantly mitigated starch-induced postprandial glycemic load. Amaranthus leaves juice potently mitigated glucose-induced postprandial glycemic load and also reduced hemoglobin glycation induced by glucose in vitro. Conclusions: This investigation finds that juice of leafy vegetables is potent source of biological antioxidants. In addition, juice of raphanus, ajwain and sowa leaves possess capacity to mitigate starch induced postprandial glycemic burden and amaranthus leaves’ juice can reduce glucose induced postprandial glycemic excursion. PMID:24143048

  9. Glucose-induced hyperaccumulation of cyclic AMP and defective glucose repression in yeast strains with reduced activity of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Mbonyi, K; van Aelst, L; Argüelles, J C; Jans, A W; Thevelein, J M

    1990-09-01

    Addition of glucose or related fermentable sugars to derepressed cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae triggers a RAS-mediated cyclic AMP (cAMP) signal that induces a protein phosphorylation cascade. In yeast mutants (tpk1w1, tpk2w1, and tpk3w1) containing reduced activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, fermentable sugars, as opposed to nonfermentable carbon sources, induced a permanent hyperaccumulation of cAMP. This finding confirms previous conclusions that fermentable sugars are specific stimulators of cAMP synthesis in yeast cells. Despite the huge cAMP levels present in these mutants, deletion of the gene (BCY1) coding for the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase severely reduced hyperaccumulation of cAMP. Glucose-induced hyperaccumulation of cAMP was also observed in exponential-phase glucose-grown cells of the tpklw1 and tpk2w1 strains but not the tpk3w1 strain even though addition of glucose to glucose-repressed wild-type cells did not induce a cAMP signal. Investigation of mitochondrial respiration by in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed the tpk1w1 and tpk2w1 strains, to be defective in glucose repression. These results are consistent with the idea that the signal transmission pathway from glucose to adenyl cyclase contains a glucose-repressible protein. They also show that a certain level of cAMP-dependent protein phosphorylation is required for glucose repression. Investigation of the glucose-induced cAMP signal and glucose-induced activation of trehalase in derepressed cells of strains containing only one of the wild-type TPK genes indicates that the transient nature of the cAMP signal is due to feedback inhibition by cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  10. Toll-like receptor 2 mediates high-fat diet-induced impairment of vasodilator actions of insulin

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Hae-Suk; Hwang, Daniel H.; Quon, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by a chronic proinflammatory state that leads to endothelial dysfunction. Saturated fatty acids (SFA) stimulate Toll-like receptors (TLR) that promote metabolic insulin resistance. However, it is not known whether TLR2 mediates impairment of vascular actions of insulin in response to high-fat diet (HFD) to cause endothelial dysfunction. siRNA knockdown of TLR2 in primary endothelial cells opposed palmitate-stimulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines and splicing of X box protein 1 (XBP-1). Inhibition of unfolding protein response (UPR) reduced SFA-stimulated expression of TNFα. Thus, SFA stimulates UPR and proinflammatory response through activation of TLR2 in endothelial cells. Knockdown of TLR2 also opposed impairment of insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of eNOS and subsequent production of NO. Importantly, insulin-stimulated vasorelaxation of mesenteric arteries from TLR2 knockout mice was preserved even on HFD (in contrast with results from arteries examined in wild-type mice on HFD). We conclude that TLR2 in vascular endothelium mediates HFD-stimulated proinflammatory responses and UPR that accompany impairment of vasodilator actions of insulin, leading to endothelial dysfunction. These results are relevant to understanding the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular complications of diabetes and obesity. PMID:23531618

  11. ACL reconstructed patients with a BPTB graft present an impaired vastus lateralis neuromuscular response during high intensity running.

    PubMed

    Patras, Kostas; Ziogas, Giorgos; Ristanis, Stavros; Tsepis, Elias; Stergiou, Nicholas; Georgoulis, Anastasios D

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the electromyographic response of the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructed leg is similar to that of the intact contralateral leg and healthy controls, during moderate and high intensity running. Fourteen bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) ACL reconstructed amateur soccer players and fourteen healthy control amateur soccer players volunteered to participate in the study. Electromyographic (EMG) traces from the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle were collected bilaterally, as athletes ran on a treadmill for 10 min on separate occasions, at moderate and high intensity. The dependent variable examined was the EMG amplitude during stance. During the moderate intensity running, EMG amplitude of the VL did not increase with time for any of the tested legs. During the high intensity running, the EMG amplitude of the VL increased significantly with time for the intact (F=6.747, p=0.001) and the control leg (F=4.258, p=0.008), but remained unchanged for the ACL reconstructed leg. During moderate intensity running, there was no difference in the neuromuscular response of the VL in the reconstructed leg compared to the intact and control leg. High intensity running resulted in an impaired neuromuscular response of the VL in the reconstructed leg compared to the intact and control leg. It seems that potential impairments of the neuromuscular response after ACL reconstruction should be tested under high rather than moderate intensity efforts.

  12. Social Communication Disorder outside Autism? A Diagnostic Classification Approach to Delineating Pragmatic Language Impairment, High Functioning Autism and Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Jenny; Adams, Catherine; Lockton, Elaine; Green, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Developmental disorders of language and communication present considerable diagnostic challenges due to overlapping of symptomatology and uncertain aetiology. We aimed to further elucidate the behavioural and linguistic profile associated with impairments of social communication occurring outside of an autism diagnosis. Methods: Six to…

  13. AltitudeOmics: Decreased reaction time after high altitude cognitive testing is a sensitive metric of hypoxic impairment.

    PubMed

    Roach, Emma B; Bleiberg, Joseph; Lathan, Corinna E; Wolpert, Lawrence; Tsao, Jack W; Roach, Robert C

    2014-04-01

    Humans experiencing hypoxic conditions exhibit multiple signs of cognitive impairment, and high altitude expeditions may be undermined by abrupt degradation in mental performance. Therefore, the development of psychometric tools to quickly and accurately assess cognitive impairment is of great importance in aiding medical decision-making in the field, particularly in situations where symptoms may not be readily recognized. The present study used the Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment (DANA), a ruggedized and portable neurocognitive assessment tool, to examine cognitive function in healthy human volunteers at sea level, immediately after ascending to an elevation over 5000 m, and following 16 days of acclimatization to this high altitude. The DANA battery begins with a simple reaction time test (SRT1) which is followed by a 20-min series of complex cognitive tests and ends with a second test of simple reaction time (SRT2). Tabulating the performance scores from these two tests allows the calculation of an SRT change score (dSRT=SRT1 - SRT2) that reflects the potential effect of mental effort spent during the 20-min testing session. We found that dSRT, but not direct SRT in comparison to sea-level baseline performance, is highly sensitive to acute altitude-related performance deficits and the remission of impairment following successful acclimatization. Our results suggest that dSRT is a potentially useful analytical method to enhance the sensitivity of neurocognitive assessment.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution- Non Commercial License, where it is permissible to download, share and reproduce the work in any medium, provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be used commercially. PMID:24722229

  14. High Tech Aids Low Vision: A Review of Image Processing for the Visually Impaired

    PubMed Central

    Moshtael, Howard; Aslam, Tariq; Underwood, Ian; Dhillon, Baljean

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in digital image processing provide promising methods for maximizing the residual vision of the visually impaired. This paper seeks to introduce this field to the readership and describe its current state as found in the literature. A systematic search revealed 37 studies that measure the value of image processing techniques for subjects with low vision. The techniques used are categorized according to their effect and the principal findings are summarized. The majority of participants preferred enhanced images over the original for a wide range of enhancement types. Adapting the contrast and spatial frequency content often improved performance at object recognition and reading speed, as did techniques that attenuate the image background and a technique that induced jitter. A lack of consistency in preference and performance measures was found, as well as a lack of independent studies. Nevertheless, the promising results should encourage further research in order to allow their widespread use in low-vision aids. PMID:26290777

  15. Are the High Hip Fracture Rates Among Norwegian Women Explained by Impaired Bone Material Properties?

    PubMed

    Duarte Sosa, Daysi; Vilaplana, Laila; Güerri, Roberto; Nogués, Xavier; Wang-Fagerland, Morten; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; F Eriksen, Erik

    2015-10-01

    Hip fracture rates in Norway rank among the highest in the world, more than double that of Spanish women. Previous studies were unable to demonstrate significant differences between the two populations with respect to bone mass or calcium metabolism. In order to test whether the difference in fracture propensity between both populations could be explained by differences in bone material quality we assessed bone material strength using microindentation in 42 Norwegian and 46 Spanish women with normal BMD values, without clinical or morphometric vertebral fractures, no clinical or laboratory signs of secondary osteoporosis, and without use of drugs with known influence on bone metabolism. Bone material properties were assessed by microindentation of the thick cortex of the mid tibia following local anesthesia of the area using the Osteoprobe device (Active Life Scientific, Santa Barbara, CA, USA). Indentation distance was standardized against a calibration phantom of methylmethacrylate and results, as percentage of this reference value, expressed as bone material strength index units (BMSi). We found that the bone material properties reflected in the BMSi value of Norwegian women was significantly inferior when compared to Spanish women (77 ± 7.1 versus 80.7 ± 7.8, p < 0.001). Total hip BMD was significantly higher in Norwegian women (1.218 g/cm(2) versus 0.938 g/cm(2) , p < 0.001) but regression analysis revealed that indentation values did not vary with BMD r(2)  = 0.03 or age r(2)  = 0.04. In conclusion Norwegian women show impaired bone material properties, higher bone mass, and were taller than Spanish women. The increased height will increase the impact on bone after falls, and impaired bone material properties may further enhance the risk fracture after such falls. These ethnic differences in bone material properties may partly explain the higher propensity for fracture in Norwegian women.

  16. The development of multisensory integration in high-functioning autism: high-density electrical mapping and psychophysical measures reveal impairments in the processing of audiovisual inputs.

    PubMed

    Brandwein, Alice B; Foxe, John J; Butler, John S; Russo, Natalie N; Altschuler, Ted S; Gomes, Hilary; Molholm, Sophie

    2013-06-01

    Successful integration of auditory and visual inputs is crucial for both basic perceptual functions and for higher-order processes related to social cognition. Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by impairments in social cognition and are associated with abnormalities in sensory and perceptual processes. Several groups have reported that individuals with ASD are impaired in their ability to integrate socially relevant audiovisual (AV) information, and it has been suggested that this contributes to the higher-order social and cognitive deficits observed in ASD. However, successful integration of auditory and visual inputs also influences detection and perception of nonsocial stimuli, and integration deficits may impair earlier stages of information processing, with cascading downstream effects. To assess the integrity of basic AV integration, we recorded high-density electrophysiology from a cohort of high-functioning children with ASD (7-16 years) while they performed a simple AV reaction time task. Children with ASD showed considerably less behavioral facilitation to multisensory inputs, deficits that were paralleled by less effective neural integration. Evidence for processing differences relative to typically developing children was seen as early as 100 ms poststimulation, and topographic analysis suggested that children with ASD relied on different cortical networks during this early multisensory processing stage. PMID:22628458

  17. Restoration of autophagy alleviates hepatic ER stress and impaired insulin signalling transduction in high fructose-fed male mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Sun, Ruo-Qiong; Zeng, Xiao-Yi; Zhou, Xiu; Li, Songpei; Jo, Eunjung; Molero, Juan C; Ye, Ji-Ming

    2015-01-01

    High-carbohydrate (mainly fructose) consumption is a major dietary factor for hepatic insulin resistance, involving endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and lipid accumulation. Because autophagy has been implicated in ER stress, the present study investigated the role of autophagy in high-fructose (HFru) diet-induced hepatic ER stress and insulin resistance in male C57BL/6J mice. The results show that chronic HFru feeding induced glucose intolerance and impaired insulin signaling transduction in the liver, associated with ER stress and the accumulation of lipids. Intriguingly, hepatic autophagy was suppressed as a result of activation of mammalian target of rapamycin. The suppressed autophagy was detected within 6 hours after HFru feeding along with activation of both inositol-requiring enzyme 1 and protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase pathways. These events occurred prior to lipid accumulation or lipogenesis and were sufficient to blunt insulin signaling transduction with activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase/inhibitory-κB kinase and serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1. The stimulation of autophagy attenuated ER stress- and c-Jun N-terminal kinase/inhibitory-κB kinase-associated impairment in insulin signaling transduction in a mammalian target of rapamycin -independent manner. Taken together, our data suggest that restoration of autophagy functions disrupted by fructose is able to alleviate ER stress and improve insulin signaling transduction.

  18. Development of a novel, highly quantitative in vivo model for the study of biofilm-impaired cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Gurjala, Anandev N; Geringer, Matthew R; Seth, Akhil K; Hong, Seok J; Smeltzer, Mark S; Galiano, Robert D; Leung, Kai P; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that in addition to hypoxia, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and intrinsic host factors, bacterial biofilms represent a fourth major pillar in chronic wound pathogenesis. Given that most studies to date rely on in vitro or observational clinical data, our aim was to develop a novel, quantitative animal model enabling further investigation of the biofilm hypothesis in vivo. Dermal punch wounds were created in New Zealand rabbit ears, and used as uninfected controls, or inoculated with green fluorescent protein-labeled Staphylococcus aureus to form wounds with bacteria predominantly in the planktonic or biofilm phase. Epifluorescence and scanning electron microscopy revealed that S. aureus rapidly forms mature biofilm in wounds within 24 hours of inoculation, with persistence of biofilm viability over time seen through serial bacterial count measurement and laser scanning confocal imaging at different time points postwounding and inoculation. Inflammatory markers confirmed that the biofilm phenotype creates a characteristic, sustained, low-grade inflammatory response, and that over time biofilm impairs epithelial migration and granulation tissue in-growth, as shown histologically. We have established and validated a highly quantitative, reproducible in vivo biofilm model, while providing evidence that the biofilm phenotype specifically contributes to profound cutaneous wound healing impairment. Our model highlights the importance of bacterial biofilms in chronic wound pathogenesis, providing an in vivo platform for further inquiry into the basic biology of bacterial biofilm-host interaction and high-throughput testing of antibiofilm therapeutics.

  19. High prevalence of vaterite in sagittal otoliths causes hearing impairment in farmed fish

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, T.; Dempster, T.; Warren-Myers, F.; Jensen, A. J.; Swearer, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid growth of aquaculture raises questions about the welfare status of mass-produced species. Sagittal otoliths are primary hearing structures in the inner ear of all teleost (bony) fishes and are normally composed of aragonite, though abnormal vaterite replacement is sometimes seen in the wild. We provide the first widespread evaluation of the prevalence of vaterite in otoliths, showing that farmed fish have levels of vaterite replacement over 10 times higher than wild fish, regardless of species. We confirm this observation with extensive sampling of wild and farmed Atlantic salmon in Norway, the world’s largest producer, and verify that vateritic otoliths are common in farmed salmon worldwide. Using a mechanistic model of otolith oscillation in response to sound, we demonstrate that average levels of vaterite replacement result in a 28–50% loss of otolith functionality across most of a salmonid’s known hearing range and throughout its life cycle. The underlying cause(s) of vaterite formation remain unknown, but the prevalence of hearing impairment in farmed fish has important implications for animal welfare, the survival of escapees and their effects on wild populations, and the efficacy of restocking programs based on captive-bred fish. PMID:27121086

  20. High fidelity simian immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase mutants have impaired replication in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Sarah B; Lichtfuss, Marit; Amarasena, Thakshila H; Alcantara, Sheilajen; De Rose, Robert; Tachedjian, Gilda; Alinejad-Rokny, Hamid; Venturi, Vanessa; Davenport, Miles P; Winnall, Wendy R; Kent, Stephen J

    2016-05-01

    The low fidelity of HIV replication facilitates immune and drug escape. Some reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor drug-resistance mutations increase RT fidelity in biochemical assays but their effect during viral replication is unclear. We investigated the effect of RT mutations K65R, Q151N and V148I on SIV replication and fidelity in vitro, along with SIV replication in pigtailed macaques. SIVmac239-K65R and SIVmac239-V148I viruses had reduced replication capacity compared to wild-type SIVmac239. Direct virus competition assays demonstrated a rank order of wild-type>K65R>V148I mutants in terms of viral fitness. In single round in vitro-replication assays, SIVmac239-K65R demonstrated significantly higher fidelity than wild-type, and rapidly reverted to wild-type following infection of macaques. In contrast, SIVmac239-Q151N was replication incompetent in vitro and in pigtailed macaques. Thus, we showed that RT mutants, and specifically the common K65R drug-resistance mutation, had impaired replication capacity and higher fidelity. These results have implications for the pathogenesis of drug-resistant HIV. PMID:26896929

  1. High prevalence of vaterite in sagittal otoliths causes hearing impairment in farmed fish.

    PubMed

    Reimer, T; Dempster, T; Warren-Myers, F; Jensen, A J; Swearer, S E

    2016-01-01

    The rapid growth of aquaculture raises questions about the welfare status of mass-produced species. Sagittal otoliths are primary hearing structures in the inner ear of all teleost (bony) fishes and are normally composed of aragonite, though abnormal vaterite replacement is sometimes seen in the wild. We provide the first widespread evaluation of the prevalence of vaterite in otoliths, showing that farmed fish have levels of vaterite replacement over 10 times higher than wild fish, regardless of species. We confirm this observation with extensive sampling of wild and farmed Atlantic salmon in Norway, the world's largest producer, and verify that vateritic otoliths are common in farmed salmon worldwide. Using a mechanistic model of otolith oscillation in response to sound, we demonstrate that average levels of vaterite replacement result in a 28-50% loss of otolith functionality across most of a salmonid's known hearing range and throughout its life cycle. The underlying cause(s) of vaterite formation remain unknown, but the prevalence of hearing impairment in farmed fish has important implications for animal welfare, the survival of escapees and their effects on wild populations, and the efficacy of restocking programs based on captive-bred fish. PMID:27121086

  2. High prevalence of vaterite in sagittal otoliths causes hearing impairment in farmed fish.

    PubMed

    Reimer, T; Dempster, T; Warren-Myers, F; Jensen, A J; Swearer, S E

    2016-01-01

    The rapid growth of aquaculture raises questions about the welfare status of mass-produced species. Sagittal otoliths are primary hearing structures in the inner ear of all teleost (bony) fishes and are normally composed of aragonite, though abnormal vaterite replacement is sometimes seen in the wild. We provide the first widespread evaluation of the prevalence of vaterite in otoliths, showing that farmed fish have levels of vaterite replacement over 10 times higher than wild fish, regardless of species. We confirm this observation with extensive sampling of wild and farmed Atlantic salmon in Norway, the world's largest producer, and verify that vateritic otoliths are common in farmed salmon worldwide. Using a mechanistic model of otolith oscillation in response to sound, we demonstrate that average levels of vaterite replacement result in a 28-50% loss of otolith functionality across most of a salmonid's known hearing range and throughout its life cycle. The underlying cause(s) of vaterite formation remain unknown, but the prevalence of hearing impairment in farmed fish has important implications for animal welfare, the survival of escapees and their effects on wild populations, and the efficacy of restocking programs based on captive-bred fish.

  3. High daytime and nighttime ambulatory pulse pressure predict poor cognitive function and mild cognitive impairment in hypertensive individuals.

    PubMed

    Riba-Llena, Iolanda; Nafría, Cristina; Filomena, Josefina; Tovar, José L; Vinyoles, Ernest; Mundet, Xavier; Jarca, Carmen I; Vilar-Bergua, Andrea; Montaner, Joan; Delgado, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure accelerates normal aging stiffness process. Arterial stiffness (AS) has been previously associated with impaired cognitive function and dementia. Our aims are to study how cognitive function and status (mild cognitive impairment, MCI and normal cognitive aging, NCA) relate to AS in a community-based population of hypertensive participants assessed with office and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurements. Six hundred ninety-nine participants were studied, 71 had MCI and the rest had NCA. Office pulse pressure (PP), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and 24-hour ambulatory PP monitoring were collected. Also, participants underwent a brain magnetic resonance to study cerebral small-vessel disease (cSVD) lesions. Multivariate analysis-related cognitive function and cognitive status to AS measurements after adjusting for demographic, vascular risk factors, and cSVD. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and PP at different periods were inversely correlated with several cognitive domains, but only awake PP measurements were associated with attention after correcting for confounders (beta = -0.22, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.41, -0.03). All ambulatory PP measurements were related to MCI, which was independently associated with nocturnal PP (odds ratio (OR) = 2.552, 95% CI 1.137, 5.728) and also related to the presence of deep white matter hyperintensities (OR = 1.903, 1.096, 3.306). Therefore, higher day and night ambulatory PP measurements are associated with poor cognitive outcomes.

  4. Pairing high-frequency data with a link-node model to manage dissolved oxygen impairment in a dredged estuary.

    PubMed

    Camarillo, Mary Kay; Weissmann, Gregory A; Gulati, Shelly; Herr, Joel; Sheeder, Scott; Stringfellow, William T

    2016-08-01

    High-frequency data and a link-node model were used to investigate the relative importance of mass loads of oxygen-demanding substances and channel geometry on recurrent low dissolved oxygen (DO) in the San Joaquin River Estuary in California. The model was calibrated using 6 years of data. The calibrated model was then used to determine the significance of the following factors on low DO: excavation of the river to allow navigation of large vessels, non-point source pollution from the agricultural watershed, effluent from a wastewater treatment plant, and non-point source pollution from an urban area. An alternative metric for low DO, excess net oxygen demand (ENOD), was applied to better characterize DO impairment. Model results indicate that the dredged ship channel had the most significant effect on DO (62 % fewer predicted hourly DO violations), followed by mass load inputs from the watershed (52 % fewer predicted hourly DO violations). Model results suggest that elimination of any one factor will not completely resolve DO impairment and that continued use of supplemental aeration is warranted. Calculation of ENOD proved more informative than the sole use of DO. Application of the simple model allowed for interpretation of the extensive data collected. The current monitoring program could be enhanced by additional monitoring stations that would provide better volumetric estimates of low DO. PMID:27393195

  5. Pairing high-frequency data with a link-node model to manage dissolved oxygen impairment in a dredged estuary.

    PubMed

    Camarillo, Mary Kay; Weissmann, Gregory A; Gulati, Shelly; Herr, Joel; Sheeder, Scott; Stringfellow, William T

    2016-08-01

    High-frequency data and a link-node model were used to investigate the relative importance of mass loads of oxygen-demanding substances and channel geometry on recurrent low dissolved oxygen (DO) in the San Joaquin River Estuary in California. The model was calibrated using 6 years of data. The calibrated model was then used to determine the significance of the following factors on low DO: excavation of the river to allow navigation of large vessels, non-point source pollution from the agricultural watershed, effluent from a wastewater treatment plant, and non-point source pollution from an urban area. An alternative metric for low DO, excess net oxygen demand (ENOD), was applied to better characterize DO impairment. Model results indicate that the dredged ship channel had the most significant effect on DO (62 % fewer predicted hourly DO violations), followed by mass load inputs from the watershed (52 % fewer predicted hourly DO violations). Model results suggest that elimination of any one factor will not completely resolve DO impairment and that continued use of supplemental aeration is warranted. Calculation of ENOD proved more informative than the sole use of DO. Application of the simple model allowed for interpretation of the extensive data collected. The current monitoring program could be enhanced by additional monitoring stations that would provide better volumetric estimates of low DO.

  6. Maternal high-fat diet during lactation impairs thermogenic function of brown adipose tissue in offspring mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xingwei; Yang, Qiyuan; Zhang, Lupei; Maricelli, Joseph W; Rodgers, Buel D.; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Du, Min

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity and high-fat diet (HFD) predisposes offspring to obesity and metabolic diseases. Due to uncoupling, brown adipose tissue (BAT) dissipates energy via heat generation, mitigating obesity and diabetes. The lactation stage is a manageable period for improving the health of offspring of obese mothers, but the impact of maternal HFD during lactation on offspring BAT function is unknown. To determine, female mice were fed either a control or HFD during lactation. At weaning, HFD offspring gained more body weight and had greater body fat mass compared to the control, and these differences maintained into adulthood, which correlated with glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in HFD offspring. Adaptive thermogenesis of BAT was impaired in HFD offspring at weaning. In adulthood, HFD offspring BAT had lower Ucp1 expression and thermogenic activity. Mechanistically, maternal HFD feeding during lactation elevated peripheral serotonin, which decreased the sensitivity of BAT to sympathetic β3-adrenergic signaling. Importantly, early postnatal metformin administration decreased serotonin concentration and ameliorated the impairment of offspring BAT due to maternal HFD. Our data suggest that attenuation of BAT thermogenic function may be a key mechanism linking maternal HFD during lactation to persisted metabolic disorder in the offspring. PMID:27686741

  7. High Fat Diet Inhibits Dendritic Cell and T Cell Response to Allergens but Does Not Impair Inhalational Respiratory Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pizzolla, Angela; Oh, Ding Yuan; Luong, Suzanne; Prickett, Sara R; Henstridge, Darren C; Febbraio, Mark A; O'Hehir, Robyn E; Rolland, Jennifer M; Hardy, Charles L

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obesity has risen to epidemic proportions in recent decades, most commonly attributed to an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, and a 'western' diet high in fat and low in fibre. Although non-allergic asthma is a well-established co-morbidity of obesity, the influence of obesity on allergic asthma is still under debate. Allergic asthma is thought to result from impaired tolerance to airborne antigens, so-called respiratory tolerance. We sought to investigate whether a diet high in fats affects the development of respiratory tolerance. Mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks showed weight gain, metabolic disease, and alteration in gut microbiota, metabolites and glucose metabolism compared to age-matched mice fed normal chow diet (ND). Respiratory tolerance was induced by repeated intranasal (i.n.) administration of ovalbumin (OVA), prior to induction of allergic airway inflammation (AAI) by sensitization with OVA in alum i.p. and subsequent i.n. OVA challenge. Surprisingly, respiratory tolerance was induced equally well in HFD and ND mice, as evidenced by decreased lung eosinophilia and serum OVA-specific IgE production. However, in a pilot study, HFD mice showed a tendency for impaired activation of airway dendritic cells and regulatory T cells compared with ND mice after induction of respiratory tolerance. Moreover, the capacity of lymph node cells to produce IL-5 and IL-13 after AAI was drastically diminished in HFD mice compared to ND mice. These results indicate that HFD does not affect the inflammatory or B cell response to an allergen, but inhibits priming of Th2 cells and possibly dendritic cell and regulatory T cell activation. PMID:27483441

  8. High Fat Diet Inhibits Dendritic Cell and T Cell Response to Allergens but Does Not Impair Inhalational Respiratory Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Pizzolla, Angela; Oh, Ding Yuan; Luong, Suzanne; Prickett, Sara R.; Henstridge, Darren C.; Febbraio, Mark A.; O’Hehir, Robyn E.; Rolland, Jennifer M.; Hardy, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obesity has risen to epidemic proportions in recent decades, most commonly attributed to an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, and a ‘western’ diet high in fat and low in fibre. Although non-allergic asthma is a well-established co-morbidity of obesity, the influence of obesity on allergic asthma is still under debate. Allergic asthma is thought to result from impaired tolerance to airborne antigens, so-called respiratory tolerance. We sought to investigate whether a diet high in fats affects the development of respiratory tolerance. Mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks showed weight gain, metabolic disease, and alteration in gut microbiota, metabolites and glucose metabolism compared to age-matched mice fed normal chow diet (ND). Respiratory tolerance was induced by repeated intranasal (i.n.) administration of ovalbumin (OVA), prior to induction of allergic airway inflammation (AAI) by sensitization with OVA in alum i.p. and subsequent i.n. OVA challenge. Surprisingly, respiratory tolerance was induced equally well in HFD and ND mice, as evidenced by decreased lung eosinophilia and serum OVA-specific IgE production. However, in a pilot study, HFD mice showed a tendency for impaired activation of airway dendritic cells and regulatory T cells compared with ND mice after induction of respiratory tolerance. Moreover, the capacity of lymph node cells to produce IL-5 and IL-13 after AAI was drastically diminished in HFD mice compared to ND mice. These results indicate that HFD does not affect the inflammatory or B cell response to an allergen, but inhibits priming of Th2 cells and possibly dendritic cell and regulatory T cell activation. PMID:27483441

  9. Treadmill exercise alleviates impairment of cognitive function by enhancing hippocampal neuroplasticity in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Choi, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise is one of the most effective methods for managing obesity, and exercise exerts positive effects on various brain functions. Excessive weight gain is known to be related to the impairment of cognitive function. High-fat diet-induced obesity impairs hippocampal neuroplasticity, which impedes cognitive function, such as learning ability and memory function. In this study, we investigated the effect of treadmill exercise on impairment of cognitive function in relation with hippocampal neuroplasticity using high-fat diet-induced obese mice. After obesity was induced by a 20-week high-fat (60%) diet, treadmill exercise was performed for 12 weeks. In the present results, cognitive function was impaired in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosin kinase B (TrkB) expression and cell proliferation were decreased in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Treadmill exercise improved cognitive function through enhancing neuroplasticity, including increased expression of BDNF and TrkB and enhanced cell proliferation. The present results suggest that treadmill exercise enhances hippocampal neuroplasticity, and then potentially plays a protective role against obesity-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:27419109

  10. Treadmill exercise alleviates impairment of cognitive function by enhancing hippocampal neuroplasticity in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Choi, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2016-06-01

    Physical exercise is one of the most effective methods for managing obesity, and exercise exerts positive effects on various brain functions. Excessive weight gain is known to be related to the impairment of cognitive function. High-fat diet-induced obesity impairs hippocampal neuroplasticity, which impedes cognitive function, such as learning ability and memory function. In this study, we investigated the effect of treadmill exercise on impairment of cognitive function in relation with hippocampal neuroplasticity using high-fat diet-induced obese mice. After obesity was induced by a 20-week high-fat (60%) diet, treadmill exercise was performed for 12 weeks. In the present results, cognitive function was impaired in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosin kinase B (TrkB) expression and cell proliferation were decreased in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Treadmill exercise improved cognitive function through enhancing neuroplasticity, including increased expression of BDNF and TrkB and enhanced cell proliferation. The present results suggest that treadmill exercise enhances hippocampal neuroplasticity, and then potentially plays a protective role against obesity-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:27419109

  11. Treadmill exercise alleviates impairment of cognitive function by enhancing hippocampal neuroplasticity in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Choi, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2016-06-01

    Physical exercise is one of the most effective methods for managing obesity, and exercise exerts positive effects on various brain functions. Excessive weight gain is known to be related to the impairment of cognitive function. High-fat diet-induced obesity impairs hippocampal neuroplasticity, which impedes cognitive function, such as learning ability and memory function. In this study, we investigated the effect of treadmill exercise on impairment of cognitive function in relation with hippocampal neuroplasticity using high-fat diet-induced obese mice. After obesity was induced by a 20-week high-fat (60%) diet, treadmill exercise was performed for 12 weeks. In the present results, cognitive function was impaired in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosin kinase B (TrkB) expression and cell proliferation were decreased in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Treadmill exercise improved cognitive function through enhancing neuroplasticity, including increased expression of BDNF and TrkB and enhanced cell proliferation. The present results suggest that treadmill exercise enhances hippocampal neuroplasticity, and then potentially plays a protective role against obesity-induced cognitive impairment.

  12. Field trial on glucose-induced insulin and metabolite responses in Estonian Holstein and Estonian Red dairy cows in two herds

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Insulin secretion and tissue sensitivity to insulin is considered to be one of the factors controlling lipid metabolism post partum. The objective of this study was to compare glucose-induced blood insulin and metabolite responses in Estonian Holstein (EH, n = 14) and Estonian Red (ER, n = 14) cows. Methods The study was carried out using the glucose tolerance test (GTT) performed at 31 ± 1.9 days post partum during negative energy balance. Blood samples were obtained at -15, -5, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 min relative to infusion of 0.15 g/kg BW glucose and analysed for glucose, insulin, triglycerides (TG), non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), cholesterol and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). Applying the MIXED Procedure with the SAS System the basal concentration of cholesterol, and basal concentration and concentrations at post-infusion time points for other metabolites, area under the curve (AUC) for glucose and insulin, clearance rate (CR) for glucose, and maximum increase from basal concentration for glucose and insulin were compared between breeds. Results There was a breed effect on blood NEFA (P < 0.05) and a time effect on all metabolites concentration (P < 0.01). The following differences were observed in EH compared to ER: lower blood insulin concentration 5 min after glucose infusion (P < 0.05), higher glucose concentration 20 (P < 0.01) and 30 min (P < 0.05) after infusion, and higher NEFA concentration before (P < 0.01) and 5 min after infusion (P < 0.05). Blood TG concentration in ER remained stable, while in EH there was a decrease from the basal level to the 40th min nadir (P < 0.01), followed by an increase to the 60th min postinfusion (P < 0.01). Conclusion Our results imply that glucose-induced changes in insulin concentration and metabolite responses to insulin differ between EH and ER dairy cows. PMID:20089161

  13. Elevation of D-glucose impairs coronary artery autoregulation after slight reduction of coronary flow.

    PubMed

    Wascher, T C; Bachernegg, M; Kickenweiz, E; Stark, G; Stark, U; Toplak, H; Graier, W F; Krejs, G J

    1995-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is thought to increase the susceptibility of tissue to hypoxic injury through D-glucose-induced alterations of intracellular metabolism. Therefore the effects of hyperglycaemia on coronary artery autoregulation under slight reduction of coronary flow were investigated in isolated perfused guinea-pig hearts. Under normal (10 mM) D-glucose concentrations coronary autoregulation was intact in response to a slight reduction of coronary flow (from 6 to 4.5 mL min-1) when L-arginine as a precursor of the endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF/NO) was available and formation of prostaglandines was intact. Under high (44 mM) D-glucose concentrations on the other hand, a sustained vasodilatation dependent on the availability of L-arginine was observed, when formation of prostaglandins was blocked. This effect was partially reduced in the presence of prostaglandin synthesis. Furthermore, the effect of L-arginine under both conditions could be antagonized by the L-arginine-analogue NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl-ester (100 microM). Our results suggest that hyperglycaemia impairs coronary artery autoregulation by reducing the threshold for hypoxic vasodilatation in an EDRF/NO-dependent manner. Concomitantly a shift from the formation of vasodilatatory to vasoconstrictive prostaglandines was observed. These results might be of particular interest in patients with diabetes mellitus and ischaemic heart disease.

  14. Performance of Students with Visual Impairments on High-Stakes Tests: A Pennsylvania Report Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Lynn A.

    2012-01-01

    Students with disabilities participate in high-stakes assessments to meet NCLB's newer proficiency standards. This study explored performance in reading and math on the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA), Pennsylvania's grade-level assessment, to provide a foundational baseline on performance and accommodations used by…

  15. A high-fat diet impairs learning that is dependent on the dorsal hippocampus but spares other forms of learning.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Eric M; Warninger, Elizabeth E; Michener, Paige N

    2015-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of a high-fat diet (HFD) on two tasks that were either dependent on the dorsal hippocampus (DH) or independent of the DH. A total of 80 adult male Sprague Dawley rats were administered either a lard-based HFD (60% of calories from fat) or a control diet (10% of calories from fat) for 8 weeks, and then were trained and tested on either the latent cue preference (LCP) task or the conditioned cue preference (CCP) task in a 3-compartment box apparatus (2 end-compartments and 1 middle-compartment). The end compartments of the box apparatus contained either a single environmental cue (DH-independent) or multiple environmental cues (DH-dependent). During training trials for the LCP and CCP tasks, on alternating days, rats were given access to water in 1 of the 2 end compartments and no water in the opposite end compartment. Rats were water-replete during LCP training and were water-deprived during CCP training. During testing for both tasks, all rats were water-deprived and given free access to all compartments while the amounts of time spent in each compartment were recorded. Results showed that rats given the HFD demonstrated no compartment preferences during both LCP and CCP testing when the compartments contained multiple cues, while rats fed the control diet demonstrated normal compartment preference behavior. However, when the compartments contained a single environmental cue, rats given either the HFD and control diet demonstrated normal LCP and CCP learning. These results demonstrate that consumption of a HFD disrupted both LCP and CCP learning in a multiple-cue (DH-dependent) environment, but did not impair either type of learning in a single-cue (DH-independent) environment. This may be due to selective impairment of the DH caused by increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and/or disrupted neurotransmission produced by consumption of the HFD.

  16. Interpersonal sensitivity and functioning impairment in youth at ultra-high risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Masillo, A; Valmaggia, L R; Saba, R; Brandizzi, M; Lindau, J F; Solfanelli, A; Curto, M; Narilli, F; Telesforo, L; Kotzalidis, G D; Di Pietro, D; D'Alema, M; Girardi, P; Fiori Nastro, P

    2016-01-01

    A personality trait that often elicits poor and uneasy interpersonal relationships is interpersonal sensitivity. The aim of the present study was to explore the relationship between interpersonal sensitivity and psychosocial functioning in individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis as compared to help-seeking individuals who screened negative for an ultra-high risk of psychosis. A total sample of 147 adolescents and young adult who were help seeking for emerging mental health problems participated in the study. The sample was divided into two groups: 39 individuals who met criteria for an ultra-high-risk mental state (UHR), and 108 (NS). The whole sample completed the Interpersonal Sensitivity Measure (IPSM) and the Global Functioning: Social and Role Scale (GF:SS; GF:RS). Mediation analysis was used to explore whether attenuated negative symptoms mediated the relationship between interpersonal sensitivity and social functioning. Individuals with UHR state showed higher IPSM scores and lower GF:SS and GF:RS scores than NS participants. A statistically negative significant correlation between two IPSM subscales (Interpersonal Awareness and Timidity) and GF:SS was found in both groups. Our results also suggest that the relationship between the aforementioned aspects of interpersonal sensitivity and social functioning was not mediated by negative prodromal symptoms. This study suggests that some aspects of interpersonal sensitivity were associated with low level of social functioning. Assessing and treating interpersonal sensitivity may be a promising therapeutic target to improve social functioning in young help-seeking individuals.

  17. High-Dose Fluoride Impairs the Properties of Human Embryonic Stem Cells via JNK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xin; Xie, Fang-Nan; Dong, Ping; Li, Qiu-Chen; Yu, Guang-Yan; Xiao, Ran

    2016-01-01

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous natural substance that is often used in dental products to prevent dental caries. The biphasic actions of fluoride imply that excessive systemic exposure to fluoride can cause harmful effects on embryonic development in both animal models and humans. However, insufficient information is available on the effects of fluoride on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which is a novel in vitro humanized model for analyzing the embryotoxicities of chemical compounds. Therefore, we investigated the effects of sodium fluoride (NaF) on the proliferation, differentiation and viability of H9 hESCs. For the first time, we showed that 1 mM NaF did not significantly affect the proliferation of hESCs but did disturb the gene expression patterns of hESCs during embryoid body (EB) differentiation. Higher doses of NaF (2 mM and above) markedly decreased the viability and proliferation of hESCs. The mode and underlying mechanism of high-dose NaF-induced cell death were further investigated by assessing the sub-cellular morphology, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), caspase activities, cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). High-dose NaF caused the death of hESCs via apoptosis in a caspase-mediated but ROS-independent pathway, coupled with an increase in the phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) levels. Pretreatment with a p-JNK-specific inhibitor (SP600125) could effectively protect hESCs from NaF-induced cell death in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. These findings suggest that NaF might interfere with early human embryogenesis by disturbing the specification of the three germ layers as well as osteogenic lineage commitment and that high-dose NaF could cause apoptosis through a JNK-dependent pathway in hESCs. PMID:26859149

  18. Limitations on High Data Rate Optical Fiber Transmission Systems Due to Transmission Impairment

    SciTech Connect

    Menyuk, Curtis R.

    2002-03-15

    This project supplemented our regular DOE grant from the Basic Energy Sciences organization with the goal of fostering industrial partnerships and student internships. During the project period, we have interacted with between 15 and 20 companies in the optical fiber telecommunications equipment industry, and our students have participated in a number of highly visible projects with companies such as Ciena, Science Applications International Corporation, KDD, ATT, Virtual Photonics, Inc., Phaethon Telecommunications, PhotonEx, and others. The project led to many successful interactions and numerous job offers for our students.

  19. Atropine, an anticholinergic drug, impairs memory retrieval of a high consolidated avoidance response in mice.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Mariano M; Blake, Mariano G; Acosta, Gabriela B; Baratti, Carlos M

    2003-07-17

    Immediate post-training intraperitoneal administration of the centrally acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (70.0, or 150.0 microg/kg) enhanced retention of male CF-1 mice tested 48 h after training in a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task (0.8 mA, 50 Hz, 1 s footshock). The effect was observed in mice that received saline 30 min before the retention test; on the contrary, the pre-test administration of the centrally active muscarinic cholinergic antagonist, atropine (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), but not methylatropine (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), instead of saline, prevents the enhancement of retention induced by both doses of the anticholinesterase when given immediately after training. The high retention performance caused by post-training physostigmine was recovered following a second administration of the same doses of the drug, 10 min after the pre-test injections of atropine. Since, physostigmine do not influence memory retrieval when given prior to the retention test, and its post-training effects are not due to the induction of state-dependency, the recover of the high retention performance was probably due to a classical interaction between a muscarinic competitive antagonist and an indirect cholinergic agonist. Further, atropine probably does not modify the memory trace by erasing it, but by producing a poor retrieval. PMID:12821180

  20. Atropine, an anticholinergic drug, impairs memory retrieval of a high consolidated avoidance response in mice.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Mariano M; Blake, Mariano G; Acosta, Gabriela B; Baratti, Carlos M

    2003-07-17

    Immediate post-training intraperitoneal administration of the centrally acting anticholinesterase physostigmine (70.0, or 150.0 microg/kg) enhanced retention of male CF-1 mice tested 48 h after training in a one-trial step-through inhibitory avoidance task (0.8 mA, 50 Hz, 1 s footshock). The effect was observed in mice that received saline 30 min before the retention test; on the contrary, the pre-test administration of the centrally active muscarinic cholinergic antagonist, atropine (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), but not methylatropine (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), instead of saline, prevents the enhancement of retention induced by both doses of the anticholinesterase when given immediately after training. The high retention performance caused by post-training physostigmine was recovered following a second administration of the same doses of the drug, 10 min after the pre-test injections of atropine. Since, physostigmine do not influence memory retrieval when given prior to the retention test, and its post-training effects are not due to the induction of state-dependency, the recover of the high retention performance was probably due to a classical interaction between a muscarinic competitive antagonist and an indirect cholinergic agonist. Further, atropine probably does not modify the memory trace by erasing it, but by producing a poor retrieval.

  1. Maternal high-fat diet is associated with impaired fetal lung development.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Reina S; Finch, Katelyn E; Zehr, Jordan; Morselli, Eugenia; Neinast, Michael D; Frank, Aaron P; Hahner, Lisa D; Wang, Jason; Rakheja, Dinesh; Palmer, Biff F; Rosenfeld, Charles R; Savani, Rashmin C; Clegg, Deborah J

    2015-08-15

    Maternal nutrition has a profound long-term impact on infant health. Poor maternal nutrition influences placental development and fetal growth, resulting in low birth weight, which is strongly associated with the risk of developing chronic diseases, including heart disease, hypertension, asthma, and type 2 diabetes, later in life. Few studies have delineated the mechanisms by which maternal nutrition affects fetal lung development. Here, we report that maternal exposure to a diet high in fat (HFD) causes placental inflammation, resulting in placental insufficiency, fetal growth restriction (FGR), and inhibition of fetal lung development. Notably, pre- and postnatal exposure to maternal HFD also results in persistent alveolar simplification in the postnatal period. Our novel findings provide a strong association between maternal diet and fetal lung development.

  2. Impaired high-intensity cycling performance time at low levels of dehydration.

    PubMed

    Walsh, R M; Noakes, T D; Hawley, J A; Dennis, S C

    1994-10-01

    On two separate occasions six trained subjects (peak oxygen consumption [VO2peak] 4.41/min) rode for 60 min at 70% of VO2peak and then to exhaustion at 90% of VO2peak to determine the effects of mild dehydration on high-intensity cycling performance time in the heat (32 degrees C, 60% relative humidity, wind speed 3 km/h). In one trial (F) subjects ingested a 400 ml bolus of 20 mmol/l NaCl immediately before, and then as repetitive 120 ml feedings every 10 min during the first 50 min of exercise. In the other trial they did not ingest fluid (NF) either before or during exercise. The order of testing was in a counter-balanced random sequence. For the first 60 min of exercise mean (+/- SD) VO2 (2.90 +/- 0.39 vs 2.93 +/- 0.38 l/min) and respiratory exchange ratio (RER; 0.95 +/- 0.03 vs 0.94 +/- 0.04) values were similar between F and NF trials. However, weight loss was significantly reduced during F compared to NF (0.16 +/- 0.39 vs 1.30 +/- 0.22 kg; p < 0.005) and high-intensity cycling time to exhaustion was significantly increased (9.8 +/- 3.9 vs 6.8 +/- 3.0 min; p < 0.005). Increased cycling times to exhaustion in the F trial were not associated with any measurable differences in heart rate (HR), body temperature, respiratory gas exchange, leg muscle power over 5 sec, or the degree to which fluid ingestion reduced the level of dehydration within the group. Only the ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and plasma anti diuretic hormone (ADH) concentrations were significantly increased in the NF trial compared to the F trial.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Hearing Impairment and High Blood Pressure among Bus Drivers in Puducherry

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Rajeshwar; John, Nitin Ashok; Venkatappa, Umadevi Sajja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL), a major heath concern due to constant exposure to loud noise is on the rising trend in today’s world. The bus drivers are more vulnerable to the auditory and non-auditory ill effects of noise pollution. Aim The aim of this study was to assess and compare the hearing level, blood pressure and peak expiratory flow rate of bus drivers and individuals employed in office jobs. Materials and Methods Fifty male bus drivers aged 30-50 years and fifty males of the same group employed in office jobs were recruited as the test and control groups respectively. The hearing level of the individuals in both the groups was assessed using the Hearing Deterioration Index (HDI). The lung function and cardiovascular status of the study participants were assessed by measuring their Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) and Blood Pressure (BP) respectively. The mean HDI, PEFR and BP values of both the groups were compared using the unpaired t-test and the extent of correlation between HDI, service years, exposure level, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was determined using Pearson correlation coefficient test. Results HDI, SBP and DBP were significantly higher among the bus drivers when compared to the controls. However, there was no significant difference in the PEFR values between the test and the control groups. There was a highly significant positive correlation between HDI and service years and exposure level. Similarly, there was a significant positive correlation between exposure level and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Conclusion Prolonged exposure to high intensity of sound results in deterioration of hearing capacity and increase in blood pressure among the bus drivers. PMID:27042452

  4. High-NaCl diet impairs dynamic renal blood flow autoregulation in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Aso; DiBona, Gerald F; Grimberg, Elisabeth; Nguy, Lisa; Mikkelsen, Minne Line Nedergaard; Marcussen, Niels; Guron, Gregor

    2014-03-15

    This study examined the effects of 2 wk of high-NaCl diet on kidney function and dynamic renal blood flow autoregulation (RBFA) in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure (ACRF). Male Sprague-Dawley rats received either chow containing adenine or were pair-fed an identical diet without adenine (controls). After 10 wk, rats were randomized to either remain on the same diet (0.6% NaCl) or to be switched to high 4% NaCl chow. Two weeks after randomization, renal clearance experiments were performed under isoflurane anesthesia and dynamic RBFA, baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), systolic arterial pressure variability (SAPV), and heart rate variability were assessed by spectral analytical techniques. Rats with ACRF showed marked reductions in glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow (RBF), whereas mean arterial pressure and SAPV were significantly elevated. In addition, spontaneous BRS was reduced by ∼50% in ACRF animals. High-NaCl diet significantly increased transfer function fractional gain values between arterial pressure and RBF in the frequency range of the myogenic response (0.06-0.09 Hz) only in ACRF animals (0.3 ± 4.0 vs. -4.4 ± 3.8 dB; P < 0.05). Similarly, a high-NaCl diet significantly increased SAPV in the low-frequency range only in ACRF animals. To conclude, a 2-wk period of a high-NaCl diet in ACRF rats significantly impaired dynamic RBFA in the frequency range of the myogenic response and increased SAPV in the low-frequency range. These abnormalities may increase the susceptibility to hypertensive end-organ injury and progressive renal failure by facilitating pressure transmission to the microvasculature.

  5. Impaired respiratory function in MELAS-induced pluripotent stem cells with high heteroplasmy levels.

    PubMed

    Kodaira, Masaki; Hatakeyama, Hideyuki; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Tohyama, Shugo; Kuroda, Yusuke; Tanaka, Atsushi; Okata, Shinichiro; Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Suzuki, Tomoyuki; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Saito, Yuki; Goto, Yu-Ichi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are heterogeneous disorders, caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondria are not regulated solely by nuclear genomic DNA but by mitochondrial DNA. It is difficult to develop effective therapies for mitochondrial disease because of the lack of mitochondrial disease models. Mitochondrial myopathy, encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is one of the major mitochondrial diseases. The aim of this study was to generate MELAS-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and to demonstrate that MELAS-iPSCs can be models for mitochondrial disease. We successfully established iPSCs from the primary MELAS-fibroblasts carrying 77.7% of m.3243A>G heteroplasmy. MELAS-iPSC lines ranged from 3.6% to 99.4% of m.3243A>G heteroplasmy levels. The enzymatic activities of mitochondrial respiratory complexes indicated that MELAS-iPSC-derived fibroblasts with high heteroplasmy levels showed a deficiency of complex I activity but MELAS-iPSC-derived fibroblasts with low heteroplasmy levels showed normal complex I activity. Our data indicate that MELAS-iPSCs can be models for MELAS but we should carefully select MELAS-iPSCs with appropriate heteroplasmy levels and respiratory functions for mitochondrial disease modeling.

  6. Biomechanical correlates of symptomatic and asymptomatic neurophysiological impairment in high school football.

    PubMed

    Breedlove, Evan L; Robinson, Meghan; Talavage, Thomas M; Morigaki, Katherine E; Yoruk, Umit; O'Keefe, Kyle; King, Jeff; Leverenz, Larry J; Gilger, Jeffrey W; Nauman, Eric A

    2012-04-30

    Concussion is a growing public health issue in the United States, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is the chief long-term concern linked to repeated concussions. Recently, attention has shifted toward subconcussive blows and the role they may play in the development of CTE. We recruited a cohort of high school football players for two seasons of observation. Acceleration sensors were placed in the helmets, and all contact activity was monitored. Pre-season computer-based neuropsychological tests and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) tests were also obtained in order to assess cognitive and neurophysiological health. In-season follow-up scans were then obtained both from individuals who had sustained a clinically-diagnosed concussion and those who had not. These changes were then related through stepwise regression to history of blows recorded throughout the football season up to the date of the scan. In addition to those subjects who had sustained a concussion, a substantial portion of our cohort who did not sustain concussions showed significant neurophysiological changes. Stepwise regression indicated significant relationships between the number of blows sustained by a subject and the ensuing neurophysiological change. Our findings reinforce the hypothesis that the effects of repetitive blows to the head are cumulative and that repeated exposure to subconcussive blows is connected to pathologically altered neurophysiology.

  7. Impaired memory and reduced sensitivity to the circadian period lengthening effects of methamphetamine in mice selected for high methamphetamine consumption.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Reid H J; Allen, Charles N; Derkach, Victor A; Phillips, Tamara J; Belknap, John K; Raber, Jacob

    2013-11-01

    Drug abuse runs in families suggesting the involvement of genetic risk factors. Differences in addiction-related neurobiological systems, including learning and memory and circadian rhythms, may exist prior to developing addiction. We characterized the cognitive phenotypes and the free-running circadian period of mouse lines selectively bred for high methamphetamine (MA) drinking (MA high drinking or MAHDR) and low MA drinking (MA low drinking or MALDR). MA-naïve MALDR mice showed spatial memory retention while MAHDR mice did not. MA-naïve MAHDR mice had elevated hippocampal levels of the AMPA receptor subunits GluA2 (old terminology: GluR2), but not GluA1 (old terminology: GluR1). There were no line differences in the free running period (τ) when only water was available. During a 25 mg/L MA solution access period (vs water), there was an increase in τ in MALDR but not MAHDR mice, although MAHDR mice consumed significantly more MA. During a 50 mg/L MA solution access period (vs water), both lines showed an increased τ. There was a positive correlation between MA consumption and τ from baseline in MALDR, but not MAHDR, mice. Thus, a heritable proclivity for elevated MA self-administration may be associated with impairments in hippocampus-dependent memory and reduced sensitivity to effects of MA on lengthening of the circadian period.

  8. DNA Demethylation Rescues the Impaired Osteogenic Differentiation Ability of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells in High Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Chen, Tian; Sun, Wenhua; Yuan, Zongyi; Yu, Mei; Chen, Guoqing; Guo, Weihua; Xiao, Jingang; Tian, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, characterized by abnormally high blood glucose levels, gives rise to impaired bone remodeling. In response to high glucose (HG), the attenuated osteogenic differentiation capacity of human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) is associated with the loss of alveolar bone. Recently, DNA methylation was reported to affect osteogenic differentiation of stem cells in pathological states. However, the intrinsic mechanism linking DNA methylation to osteogenic differentiation ability in the presence of HG is still unclear. In this study, we found that diabetic rats with increased DNA methylation levels in periodontal ligaments exhibited reduced bone mass and density. In vitro application of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC), a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, to decrease DNA methylation levels in hPDLSCs, rescued the osteogenic differentiation capacity of hPDLSCs under HG conditions. Moreover, we demonstrated that the canonical Wnt signaling pathway was activated during this process and, under HG circumstances, the 5-aza-dC-rescued osteogenic differentiation capacity was blocked by Dickkopf-1, an effective antagonist of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that suppression of DNA methylation is able to facilitate the osteogenic differentiation capacity of hPDLSCs exposed to HG, through activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:27273319

  9. Kras activation in p53-deficient myoblasts results in high-grade sarcoma formation with impaired myogenic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Timothy; Venier, Rosemarie; Dickson, Brendan C.; Kabaroff, Leah; Alkema, Manon; Chen, Li; Shern, Jack F.; Yohe, Marielle E.; Khan, Javed; Gladdy, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    While genomic studies have improved our ability to classify sarcomas, the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation and progression of many sarcoma subtypes are unknown. To better understand developmental origins and genetic drivers involved in rhabdomyosarcomagenesis, we describe a novel sarcoma model system employing primary murine p53-deficient myoblasts that were isolated and lentivirally transduced with KrasG12D. Myoblast cell lines were characterized and subjected to proliferation, anchorage-independent growth and differentiation assays to assess the effects of transgenic KrasG12D expression. KrasG12D overexpression transformed p53−/− myoblasts as demonstrated by an increased anchorage-independent growth. Induction of differentiation in parental myoblasts resulted in activation of key myogenic regulators. In contrast, Kras-transduced myoblasts had impaired terminal differentiation. p53−/− myoblasts transformed by KrasG12D overexpression resulted in rapid, reproducible tumor formation following orthotopic injection into syngeneic host hindlimbs. Pathological analysis revealed high-grade sarcomas with myogenic differentiation based on the expression of muscle-specific markers, such as Myod1 and Myog. Gene expression patterns of murine sarcomas shared biological pathways with RMS gene sets as determined by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and were 61% similar to human RMS as determined by metagene analysis. Thus, our novel model system is an effective means to model high-grade sarcomas along the RMS spectrum. PMID:25992772

  10. Reduced phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate synthesis impairs inner ear Ca2+ signaling and high-frequency hearing acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Laura; Simeonato, Elena; Scimemi, Pietro; Anselmi, Fabio; Calì, Bianca; Crispino, Giulia; Ciubotaru, Catalin D.; Bortolozzi, Mario; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Majumder, Paromita; Arslan, Edoardo; De Camilli, Pietro; Pozzan, Tullio; Mammano, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase type 1γ (PIPKIγ) is a key enzyme in the generation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and is expressed at high levels in the nervous system. Homozygous knockout mice lacking this enzyme die postnatally within 24 h, whereas PIPKIγ+/− siblings breed normally and have no reported phenotype. Here we show that adult PIPKIγ+/− mice have dramatically elevated hearing thresholds for high-frequency sounds. During the first postnatal week we observed a reduction of ATP-dependent Ca2+ signaling activity in cochlear nonsensory cells. Because Ca2+ signaling under these conditions depends on inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate generation from phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent hydrolysis of PI(4,5)P2, we conclude that (i) PIPKIγ is primarily responsible for the synthesis of the receptor-regulated PLC-sensitive PI(4,5)P2 pool in the cell syncytia that supports auditory hair cells; (ii) spatially graded impairment of this signaling pathway in cochlear nonsensory cells causes a selective alteration in the acquisition of hearing in PIPKIγ+/− mice. This mouse model also suggests that PIPKIγ may determine the level of gap junction contribution to cochlear development. PMID:22891314

  11. High-Iron Consumption Impairs Growth and Causes Copper-Deficiency Anemia in Weanling Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jung-Heun; Doguer, Caglar; Wang, Xiaoyu; Flores, Shireen R; Collins, James F

    2016-01-01

    Iron-copper interactions were described decades ago; however, molecular mechanisms linking the two essential minerals remain largely undefined. Investigations in humans and other mammals noted that copper levels increase in the intestinal mucosa, liver and blood during iron deficiency, tissues all important for iron homeostasis. The current study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that dietary copper influences iron homeostasis during iron deficiency and iron overload. We thus fed weanling, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6-11/group) AIN-93G-based diets containing high (~8800 ppm), adequate (~80) or low (~11) iron in combination with high (~183), adequate (~8) or low (~0.9) copper for 5 weeks. Subsequently, the iron- and copper-related phenotype of the rats was assessed. Rats fed the low-iron diets grew slower than controls, with changes in dietary copper not further influencing growth. Unexpectedly, however, high-iron (HFe) feeding also impaired growth. Furthermore, consumption of the HFe diet caused cardiac hypertrophy, anemia, low serum and tissue copper levels and decreased circulating ceruloplasmin activity. Intriguingly, these physiologic perturbations were prevented by adding extra copper to the HFe diet. Furthermore, higher copper levels in the HFe diet increased serum nonheme iron concentration and transferrin saturation, exacerbated hepatic nonheme iron loading and attenuated splenic nonheme iron accumulation. Moreover, serum erythropoietin levels, and splenic erythroferrone and hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels were altered by the dietary treatments in unanticipated ways, providing insight into how iron and copper influence expression of these hormones. We conclude that high-iron feeding of weanling rats causes systemic copper deficiency, and further, that copper influences the iron-overload phenotype. PMID:27537180

  12. High-Iron Consumption Impairs Growth and Causes Copper-Deficiency Anemia in Weanling Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung-Heun; Doguer, Caglar; Wang, Xiaoyu; Flores, Shireen R.; Collins, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Iron-copper interactions were described decades ago; however, molecular mechanisms linking the two essential minerals remain largely undefined. Investigations in humans and other mammals noted that copper levels increase in the intestinal mucosa, liver and blood during iron deficiency, tissues all important for iron homeostasis. The current study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that dietary copper influences iron homeostasis during iron deficiency and iron overload. We thus fed weanling, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6-11/group) AIN-93G-based diets containing high (~8800 ppm), adequate (~80) or low (~11) iron in combination with high (~183), adequate (~8) or low (~0.9) copper for 5 weeks. Subsequently, the iron- and copper-related phenotype of the rats was assessed. Rats fed the low-iron diets grew slower than controls, with changes in dietary copper not further influencing growth. Unexpectedly, however, high-iron (HFe) feeding also impaired growth. Furthermore, consumption of the HFe diet caused cardiac hypertrophy, anemia, low serum and tissue copper levels and decreased circulating ceruloplasmin activity. Intriguingly, these physiologic perturbations were prevented by adding extra copper to the HFe diet. Furthermore, higher copper levels in the HFe diet increased serum nonheme iron concentration and transferrin saturation, exacerbated hepatic nonheme iron loading and attenuated splenic nonheme iron accumulation. Moreover, serum erythropoietin levels, and splenic erythroferrone and hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels were altered by the dietary treatments in unanticipated ways, providing insight into how iron and copper influence expression of these hormones. We conclude that high-iron feeding of weanling rats causes systemic copper deficiency, and further, that copper influences the iron-overload phenotype. PMID:27537180

  13. Triglycerides to High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio Can Predict Impaired Glucose Tolerance in Young Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Song, Do Kyeong; Lee, Hyejin; Sung, Yeon-Ah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The triglycerides to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio could be related to insulin resistance (IR). We previously reported that Korean women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) had a high prevalence of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). We aimed to determine the cutoff value of the TG/HDL-C ratio for predicting IR and to examine whether the TG/HDL-C ratio is useful for identifying individuals at risk of IGT in young Korean women with PCOS. Materials and Methods We recruited 450 women with PCOS (24±5 yrs) and performed a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). IR was assessed by a homeostasis model assessment index over that of the 95th percentile of regular-cycling women who served as the controls (n=450, 24±4 yrs). Results The cutoff value of the TG/HDL-C ratio for predicting IR was 2.5 in women with PCOS. Among the women with PCOS who had normal fasting glucose (NFG), the prevalence of IGT was significantly higher in the women with PCOS who had a high TG/HDL-C ratio compared with those with a low TG/HDL-C ratio (15.6% vs. 5.6%, p<0.05). Conclusion The cutoff value of the TG/HDL-C ratio for predicting IR was 2.5 in young Korean women with PCOS, and women with NFG and a high TG/HDL-C ratio had a higher prevalence of IGT. Therefore, Korean women with PCOS with a TG/HDL-C ratio >2.5 are recommended to be administered an OGTT to detect IGT even if they have NFG. PMID:27593868

  14. Experience with the high-intensity sweetener saccharin impairs glucose homeostasis and GLP-1 release in rats.

    PubMed

    Swithers, Susan E; Laboy, Alycia F; Clark, Kiely; Cooper, Stephanie; Davidson, T L

    2012-07-15

    Previous work from our lab has demonstrated that experience with high-intensity sweeteners in rats leads to increased food intake, body weight gain and adiposity, along with diminished caloric compensation and decreased thermic effect of food. These changes may occur as a result of interfering with learned relations between the sweet taste of food and the caloric or nutritive consequences of consuming those foods. The present experiments determined whether experience with the high-intensity sweetener saccharin versus the caloric sweetener glucose affected blood glucose homeostasis. The results demonstrated that during oral glucose tolerance tests, blood glucose levels were more elevated in animals that had previously consumed the saccharin-sweetened supplements. In contrast, during glucose tolerance tests when a glucose solution was delivered directly into the stomach, no differences in blood glucose levels between the groups were observed. Differences in oral glucose tolerance responses were not accompanied by differences in insulin release; insulin release was similar in animals previously exposed to saccharin and those previously exposed to glucose. However, release of GLP-1 in response to an oral glucose tolerance test, but not to glucose tolerance tests delivered by gavage, was significantly lower in saccharin-exposed animals compared to glucose-exposed animals. Differences in both blood glucose and GLP-1 release in saccharin animals were rapid and transient, and suggest that one mechanism by which exposure to high-intensity sweeteners that interfere with a predictive relation between sweet tastes and calories may impair energy balance is by suppressing GLP-1 release, which could alter glucose homeostasis and reduce satiety.

  15. Similar Comparative Low and High Doses of Deltamethrin and Acetamiprid Differently Impair the Retrieval of the Proboscis Extension Reflex in the Forager Honey Bee (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Thany, Steeve H; Bourdin, Céline M; Graton, Jérôme; Laurent, Adèle D; Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Lebreton, Jacques; Questel, Jean-Yves le

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of low (10 ng/bee) and high (100 ng/bee) doses of acetamiprid and deltamethrin insecticides on multi-trial learning and retrieval were evaluated in the honey bee Apis mellifera. After oral application, acetamiprid and deltamethrin at the concentrations used were not able to impair learning sessions. When the retention tests were performed 1 h, 6 h, and 24 h after learning, we found a significant difference between bees after learning sessions when drugs were applied 24 h before learning. Deltamethrin-treated bees were found to be more sensitive at 10 ng/bee and 100 ng/bee doses compared to acetamiprid-treated bees, only with amounts of 100 ng/bee and at 6 h and 24 h delays. When insecticides were applied during learning sessions, none of the tested insecticides was able to impair learning performance at 10 ng/bee or 100 ng/bee but retention performance was altered 24 h after learning sessions. Acetamiprid was the only one to impair retrieval at 10 ng/bee, whereas at 100 ng/bee an impairment of retrieval was found with both insecticides. The present results therefore suggest that acetamiprid and deltamethrin are able to impair retrieval performance in the honey bee Apis mellifera. PMID:26466901

  16. Similar Comparative Low and High Doses of Deltamethrin and Acetamiprid Differently Impair the Retrieval of the Proboscis Extension Reflex in the Forager Honey Bee (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Thany, Steeve H.; Bourdin, Céline M.; Graton, Jérôme; Laurent, Adèle D.; Mathé-Allainmat, Monique; Lebreton, Jacques; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of low (10 ng/bee) and high (100 ng/bee) doses of acetamiprid and deltamethrin insecticides on multi-trial learning and retrieval were evaluated in the honey bee Apis mellifera. After oral application, acetamiprid and deltamethrin at the concentrations used were not able to impair learning sessions. When the retention tests were performed 1 h, 6 h, and 24 h after learning, we found a significant difference between bees after learning sessions when drugs were applied 24 h before learning. Deltamethrin-treated bees were found to be more sensitive at 10 ng/bee and 100 ng/bee doses compared to acetamiprid-treated bees, only with amounts of 100 ng/bee and at 6 h and 24 h delays. When insecticides were applied during learning sessions, none of the tested insecticides was able to impair learning performance at 10 ng/bee or 100 ng/bee but retention performance was altered 24 h after learning sessions. Acetamiprid was the only one to impair retrieval at 10 ng/bee, whereas at 100 ng/bee an impairment of retrieval was found with both insecticides. The present results therefore suggest that acetamiprid and deltamethrin are able to impair retrieval performance in the honey bee Apis mellifera. PMID:26466901

  17. Grape powder supplementation prevents oxidative stress-induced anxiety-like behavior, memory impairment, and high blood pressure in rats.

    PubMed

    Allam, Farida; Dao, An T; Chugh, Gaurav; Bohat, Ritu; Jafri, Faizan; Patki, Gaurav; Mowrey, Christopher; Asghar, Mohammad; Alkadhi, Karim A; Salim, Samina

    2013-06-01

    We examined whether or not grape powder treatment ameliorates oxidative stress-induced anxiety-like behavior, memory impairment, and hypertension in rats. Oxidative stress in Sprague-Dawley rats was produced by using L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO). Four groups of rats were used: 1) control (C; injected with vehicle and provided with tap water), 2) grape powder-treated (GP; injected with vehicle and provided for 3 wk with 15 g/L grape powder dissolved in tap water), 3) BSO-treated [injected with BSO (300 mg/kg body weight), i.p. for 7 d and provided with tap water], and 4) BSO plus grape powder-treated (GP+BSO; injected with BSO and provided with grape powder-treated tap water). Anxiety-like behavior was significantly greater in BSO rats compared with C or GP rats (P < 0.05). Grape powder attenuated BSO-induced anxiety-like behavior in GP+BSO rats. BSO rats made significantly more errors in both short- and long-term memory tests compared with C or GP rats (P < 0.05), which was prevented in GP+BSO rats. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure was significantly greater in BSO rats compared with C or GP rats (P < 0.05), whereas grape powder prevented high blood pressure in GP+BSO rats. Furthermore, brain extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK-1/2) was activated (P < 0.05), whereas levels of glyoxalase-1 (GLO-1), glutathione reductase-1 (GSR-1), calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type IV (CAMK-IV), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were significantly less (P < 0.05) in BSO but not in GP+BSO rats compared with C or GP rats. We suggest that by regulating brain ERK-1/2, GLO-1, GSR-1, CAMK-IV, CREB, and BDNF levels, grape powder prevents oxidative stress-induced anxiety, memory impairment, and hypertension in rats. PMID:23596160

  18. The Influence of Neurocognitive Impairment on HIV Risk Behaviors and Intervention Outcomes among High-Risk Substance Users: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Roman; Copenhaver, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neurocognitive impairment (NCI) among high-risk substance users poses a substantial barrier to reducing risk behaviors in this population. Previous work suggests that NCI is intertwined in a close, reciprocal relationship with risk behaviors. Not only does substance use worsen cognitive impairment but cognitive impairment may also reduce the efficacy of interventions aimed at reducing risk and improving medication adherence. In this systematic review, we examine the potential impact of substance abuse and cognitive functioning in the context of HIV risk behaviors and risk-reduction intervention outcomes. The findings thus far suggest that, in order to be effective, risk-reduction interventions must take into account the impact of NCI on learning, memory, and behavior. PMID:26904535

  19. Taste - impaired

    MedlinePlus

    ... longer. Causes of impaired taste include: Bell's palsy Common cold Flu and other viral infections Nasal infection, nasal ... your diet. For taste problems due to the common cold or flu, normal taste should return when the ...

  20. Involvement of the CDC25 gene product in the signal transmission pathway of the glucose-induced RAS-mediated cAMP signal in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    van Aelst, L; Jans, A W; Thevelein, J M

    1991-02-01

    Addition of glucose or related fermentable sugars to derepressed cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae triggers a RAS-protein-mediated cAMP signal, which induces a protein phosphorylation cascade. Yeast strains without a functional CDC25 gene were deficient in basal cAMP synthesis and in the glucose-induced cAMP signal. Addition of dinitrophenol, which in wild-type strains strongly stimulates in vivo cAMP synthesis by lowering intracellular pH, did not enhance the cAMP level. cdc25 disruption mutants, in which the basal cAMP level was restored by the RAS2val19 oncogene or by disruption of the gene (PDE2) coding for the high-affinity phosphodiesterase, were still deficient in the glucose- and acidification-induced cAMP responses. These results indicate that the CDC25 gene product is required not only for basal cAMP synthesis in yeast but also for specific activation of cAMP synthesis by the signal transmission pathway leading from glucose to adenyl cyclase. They also show that intracellular acidification stimulates the pathway at or upstream of the CDC25 protein. When shifted to the restrictive temperature, cells with the temperature sensitive cdc25-5 mutation lost their cAMP content within a few minutes. After prolonged incubation at the restrictive temperature, cells with this mutation, and also those with the temperature sensitive cdc25-1 mutation, arrested at the 'start' point (in G1) of the cell cycle, and subsequently accumulated in the resting state G0. In contrast with cdc25-5 cells, however, the cAMP level did not decrease and normal glucose- and acidification-induced cAMP responses were observed when cdc25-1 cells were shifted to the restrictive temperature.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. [Deformations of the vertebral column in the visually impaired schoolchildren presenting with complicated high myopia and the possibilities for its correction].

    PubMed

    Egorova, T S; Smirnova, T S; Romashin, O V; Egorova, I V

    2016-01-01

    Complicated high myopia is one of the leading causes responsible for the disablement in the children associated with visual impairment especially when it is combined with other pathological conditions and abnormalities among which are disorders of the musculoskeletal system. In the present study, we for the first time examined visually impaired schoolchildren (n=44) who suffered from high myopia complications making use of the computed optical topographer for the evaluation of the state of their vertebral column. The control group consisted of 60 children attending a secondary school. The study revealed various deformations of the musculoskeletal system including scoliosis, misalignment of the pelvis, kyphosis, hyperlordosis, torsion, platypodia, deformation of the lower extremities and the chest. These deformations were more pronounced in the visually impaired schoolchildren in comparison with the children of the same age comprising the control group (p<0,05). It is concluded that the assessment of the state of the vertebral column with the use of the apparatus yields an important information for the elaboration and application of a series of measures for the timely provision of medical assistance needed for the comprehensive rehabilitation of the visually impaired schoolchildren presenting with high myopia complications.

  2. [Deformations of the vertebral column in the visually impaired schoolchildren presenting with complicated high myopia and the possibilities for its correction].

    PubMed

    Egorova, T S; Smirnova, T S; Romashin, O V; Egorova, I V

    2016-01-01

    Complicated high myopia is one of the leading causes responsible for the disablement in the children associated with visual impairment especially when it is combined with other pathological conditions and abnormalities among which are disorders of the musculoskeletal system. In the present study, we for the first time examined visually impaired schoolchildren (n=44) who suffered from high myopia complications making use of the computed optical topographer for the evaluation of the state of their vertebral column. The control group consisted of 60 children attending a secondary school. The study revealed various deformations of the musculoskeletal system including scoliosis, misalignment of the pelvis, kyphosis, hyperlordosis, torsion, platypodia, deformation of the lower extremities and the chest. These deformations were more pronounced in the visually impaired schoolchildren in comparison with the children of the same age comprising the control group (p<0,05). It is concluded that the assessment of the state of the vertebral column with the use of the apparatus yields an important information for the elaboration and application of a series of measures for the timely provision of medical assistance needed for the comprehensive rehabilitation of the visually impaired schoolchildren presenting with high myopia complications. PMID:27213945

  3. Self-selecting fluid intake while maintaining high carbohydrate availability does not impair half-marathon performance.

    PubMed

    Lee, M J C; Hammond, K M; Vasdev, A; Poole, K L; Impey, S G; Close, G L; Morton, J P

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to test the hypothesis that self-selecting fluid intake but maintaining high exogenous CHO availability (60 g/h) does not compromise half-marathon performance. 15 participants completed 3 half-marathons while drinking a 6% CHO solution to guidelines (DRINK) or a non-caloric solution in self-selected volumes when consuming 3×glucose (20 g) gels (G-GEL) or glucose-fructose (13 g glucose+7 g fructose) gels (GF-GEL) per hour. Fluid intake (DRINK: 1 557±182, G-GEL: 473±234, GF-GEL: 404±144 ml) and percent body mass loss (DRINK: - 0.8±0.9, G-GEL: - 2.0±0.6, GF-GEL: -2.3±1.1) were different (P<0.05) between conditions, though race time did not differ (DRINK: 110.6±14.4, G-GEL: 110.3±14.6, GF-GEL: 113.7±12.8 min). In G-GEL, there was a positive correlation (P<0.05) between body mass loss and race time. Plasma glucose was lower (P<0.05) in GF-GEL compared with other conditions, and total CHO oxidation (DRINK: 3.2±0.5, G-GEL: 3.0±0.4, GF-GEL: 2.6±0.4 g/min) was lower (P=0.06) in this trial. Self-selecting fluid intake but maintaining high CHO availability does not impair half-marathon performance. Additionally, consuming glucose-fructose mixtures in sub-optimal amounts reduces plasma glucose and total rates of CHO oxidation.

  4. High-fat diet-mediated lipotoxicity and insulin resistance is related to impaired lipase expression in mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Badin, Pierre-Marie; Vila, Isabelle K; Louche, Katie; Mairal, Aline; Marques, Marie-Adeline; Bourlier, Virginie; Tavernier, Geneviève; Langin, Dominique; Moro, Cedric

    2013-04-01

    Elevated expression/activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and/or reduced activity of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in skeletal muscle are causally linked to insulin resistance in vitro. We investigated here the effect of high-fat feeding on skeletal muscle lipolytic proteins, lipotoxicity, and insulin signaling in vivo. Five-week-old C3H mice were fed normal chow diet (NCD) or 45% kcal high-fat diet (HFD) for 4 weeks. Wild-type and HSL knockout mice fed NCD were also studied. Whole-body and muscle insulin sensitivity, as well as lipolytic protein expression, lipid levels, and insulin signaling in skeletal muscle, were measured. HFD induced whole-body insulin resistance and glucose intolerance and reduced skeletal muscle glucose uptake compared with NCD. HFD increased skeletal muscle total diacylglycerol (DAG) content, protein kinase Cθ and protein kinase Cε membrane translocation, and impaired insulin signaling as reflected by a robust increase of basal Ser1101 insulin receptor substrate 1 phosphorylation (2.8-fold, P < .05) and a decrease of insulin-stimulated v-Akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog Ser473 (-37%, P < .05) and AS160 Thr642 (-47%, P <.01) phosphorylation. We next showed that HFD strongly reduced HSL phosphorylation at Ser660. HFD significantly up-regulated the muscle protein content of the ATGL coactivator comparative gene identification 58 and triacylglycerol hydrolase activity, despite a lower ATGL protein content. We further show a defective skeletal muscle insulin signaling and DAG accumulation in HSL knockout compared with wild-type mice. Together, these data suggest a pathophysiological link between altered skeletal muscle lipase expression and DAG-mediated insulin resistance in mice. PMID:23471217

  5. MicroRNA-134 Contributes to Glucose-Induced Endothelial Cell Dysfunction and This Effect Can Be Reversed by Far-Infrared Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yen-Li; Chang, Shih-Ting; Liao, Ko-Hsun; Lo, Hung-Hao; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Hsieh, Tsung-Han; Huang, Tse-Shun; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Cheng, Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease that is increasing worldwide. Furthermore, it is associated with the deregulation of vascular-related functions, which can develop into major complications among DM patients. Endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) have the potential to bring about medical repairs because of their post-natal angiogenic activities; however, such activities are impaired by high glucose- (HG) and the DM-associated conditions. Far-infrared radiation (FIR) transfers energy as heat that is perceived by the thermoreceptors in human skin. Several studies have revealed that FIR improves vascular endothelial functioning and boost angiogenesis. FIR has been used as anti-inflammatory therapy and as a clinical treatment for peripheral circulation improvement. In addition to vascular repair, there is increasing evidence to show that FIR can be applied to a variety of diseases, including cardiovascular disorders, hypertension and arthritis. Yet mechanism of action of FIR and the biomarkers that indicate FIR effects remain unclear. MicroRNA-134 (miR-134-5p) was identified by small RNA sequencing as being increased in high glucose (HG) treated dfECFCs (HG-dfECFCs). Highly expressed miR-134 was also validated in dmECFCs by RT-qPCR and it is associated with impaired angiogenic activities of ECFCs. The functioning of ECFCs is improved by FIR treatment and this occurs via a reduction in the level of miR-134 and an increase in the NRIP1 transcript, a direct target of miR-134. Using a mouse ischemic hindlimb model, the recovery of impaired blood flow in the presence of HG-dfECFCs was improved by FIR pretreatment and this enhanced functionality was decreased when there was miR-134 overexpression in the FIR pretreated HG-dfECFCs. In conclusion, our results reveal that the deregulation of miR-134 is involved in angiogenic defects found in DM patients. FIR treatment improves the angiogenic activity of HG-dfECFCs and dmECFCs and FIR has potential as a treatment

  6. MicroRNA-134 Contributes to Glucose-Induced Endothelial Cell Dysfunction and This Effect Can Be Reversed by Far-Infrared Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsei-Wei; Su, Shu-Han; Wang, Yen-Li; Chang, Shih-Ting; Liao, Ko-Hsun; Lo, Hung-Hao; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Hsieh, Tsung-Han; Huang, Tse-Shun; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Cheng, Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease that is increasing worldwide. Furthermore, it is associated with the deregulation of vascular-related functions, which can develop into major complications among DM patients. Endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) have the potential to bring about medical repairs because of their post-natal angiogenic activities; however, such activities are impaired by high glucose- (HG) and the DM-associated conditions. Far-infrared radiation (FIR) transfers energy as heat that is perceived by the thermoreceptors in human skin. Several studies have revealed that FIR improves vascular endothelial functioning and boost angiogenesis. FIR has been used as anti-inflammatory therapy and as a clinical treatment for peripheral circulation improvement. In addition to vascular repair, there is increasing evidence to show that FIR can be applied to a variety of diseases, including cardiovascular disorders, hypertension and arthritis. Yet mechanism of action of FIR and the biomarkers that indicate FIR effects remain unclear. MicroRNA-134 (miR-134-5p) was identified by small RNA sequencing as being increased in high glucose (HG) treated dfECFCs (HG-dfECFCs). Highly expressed miR-134 was also validated in dmECFCs by RT-qPCR and it is associated with impaired angiogenic activities of ECFCs. The functioning of ECFCs is improved by FIR treatment and this occurs via a reduction in the level of miR-134 and an increase in the NRIP1 transcript, a direct target of miR-134. Using a mouse ischemic hindlimb model, the recovery of impaired blood flow in the presence of HG-dfECFCs was improved by FIR pretreatment and this enhanced functionality was decreased when there was miR-134 overexpression in the FIR pretreated HG-dfECFCs. In conclusion, our results reveal that the deregulation of miR-134 is involved in angiogenic defects found in DM patients. FIR treatment improves the angiogenic activity of HG-dfECFCs and dmECFCs and FIR has potential as a treatment

  7. Repression of the glucose-inducible outer-membrane protein OprB during utilization of aromatic compounds and organic acids in Pseudomonas putida CSV86.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Rahul; Basu, Bhakti; Godbole, Ashwini; Mathew, M K; Apte, Shree K; Phale, Prashant S

    2011-05-01

    Pseudomonas putida CSV86 shows preferential utilization of aromatic compounds over glucose. Protein analysis and [¹⁴C]glucose-binding studies of the outer membrane fraction of cells grown on different carbon sources revealed a 40 kDa protein that was transcriptionally induced by glucose and repressed by aromatics and succinate. Based on 2D gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, the 40 kDa protein closely resembled the porin B of P. putida KT2440 and carbohydrate-selective porin OprB of various Pseudomonas strains. The purified native protein (i) was estimated to be a homotrimer of 125 kDa with a subunit molecular mass of 40 kDa, (ii) displayed heat modifiability of electrophoretic mobility, (iii) showed channel conductance of 166 pS in 1 M KCl, (iv) permeated various sugars (mono-, di- and tri-saccharides), organic acids, amino acids and aromatic compounds, and (v) harboured a glucose-specific and saturable binding site with a dissociation constant of 1.3 µM. These results identify the glucose-inducible outer-membrane protein of P. putida CSV86 as a carbohydrate-selective protein OprB. Besides modulation of intracellular glucose-metabolizing enzymes and specific glucose-binding periplasmic space protein, the repression of OprB by aromatics and organic acids, even in the presence of glucose, also contributes significantly to the strain's ability to utilize aromatics and organic acids over glucose.

  8. Redox Signal-mediated Enhancement of the Temperature Sensitivity of Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) Elevates Glucose-induced Insulin Secretion from Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Kashio, Makiko; Tominaga, Makoto

    2015-05-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a thermosensitive Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel expressed by pancreatic β cells where channel function is constantly affected by body temperature. We focused on the physiological functions of redox signal-mediated TRPM2 activity at body temperature. H2O2, an important molecule in redox signaling, reduced the temperature threshold for TRPM2 activation in pancreatic β cells of WT mice but not in TRPM2KO cells. TRPM2-mediated [Ca(2+)]i increases were likely caused by Ca(2+) influx through the plasma membrane because the responses were abolished in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). In addition, TRPM2 activation downstream from the redox signal plus glucose stimulation enhanced glucose-induced insulin secretion. H2O2 application at 37 °C induced [Ca(2+)]i increases not only in WT but also in TRPM2KO β cells. This was likely due to the effect of H2O2 on KATP channel activity. However, the N-acetylcysteine-sensitive fraction of insulin secretion by WT islets was increased by temperature elevation, and this temperature-dependent enhancement was diminished significantly in TRPM2KO islets. These data suggest that endogenous redox signals in pancreatic β cells elevate insulin secretion via TRPM2 sensitization and activity at body temperature. The results in this study could provide new therapeutic approaches for the regulation of diabetic conditions by focusing on the physiological function of TRPM2 and redox signals.

  9. Oxidized High-Density Lipoprotein Impairs Endothelial Progenitor Cells' Function by Activation of CD36-MAPK-TSP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianxiang; He, Zhiqing; Gao, Xiang; Wu, Feng; Ding, Ru; Ren, Yusheng; Jiang, Qijun; Fan, Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: High-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels inversely correlate with cardiovascular events due to the protective effects on vascular wall and stem cells, which are susceptible to oxidative modifications and then lead to potential pro-atherosclerotic effects. We proposed that oxidized HDL (ox-HDL) might lead to endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) dysfunction and investigated underlying mechanisms. Results: ox-HDL was shown to increase apoptosis and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels, but to reduce migration, angiogenesis, and cholesterol efflux of EPCs in a dose-dependent manner. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB were activated after ox-HDL stimulation, which also upregulated thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) expression without affecting vascular endothelial growth factor. Effects caused by ox-HDL could be significantly attenuated by pretreatment with short hairpin RNA-mediated CD36 knockdown or probucol. Data of in vivo experiments and the inverse correlation of ox-HDL and circulating EPC numbers among patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) or CAD and type 2 diabetes also supported it. Meanwhile, HDL separated from such patients could significantly increase cultured EPC's caspase 3 activity, further supporting our proposal. Innovation: This is the most complete study to date of how ox-HDL would impair EPCs function, which was involved with activation of CD36-p38 MAPK-TSP-1 pathways and proved by not only the inverse relationship between ox-HDL and circulating EPCs in clinic but also pro-apoptotic effects of HDL separated from patients' serum. Conclusion: Activation of CD36-p38 MAPK-TSP-1 pathways contributes to the pathological effects of ox-HDL on EPCs' dysfunction, which might be one of the potential etiological factors responsible for the disturbed neovascularization in chronic ischemic disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 308–324. PMID:25313537

  10. Predictors of impaired renal function among HIV infected patients commencing highly active antiretroviral therapy in Jos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Agbaji, Oche O.; Onu, Adamu; Agaba, Patricia E.; Muazu, Muhammad A.; Falang, Kakjing D.; Idoko, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Kidney disease is a common complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection even in the era of antiretroviral therapy, with kidney function being abnormal in up to 30% of HIV-infected patients. We determined the predictors of impaired renal function in HIV-infected adults initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study among HIV-1 infected patients attending the antiretroviral clinic at the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH), between November 2005 and November 2007. Data were analysed for age, gender, weight, WHO clinical stage, CD4 count, HIV-1 RNA viral load, HBsAg and anti-HCV antibody status. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the Cockcroft-Gault equation. Statistical analysis was done using Epi Info 3.5.1. Results: Data for 491 (294 females and 197 males) eligible patients were abstracted. The mean age of this population was 38.8±8.87 years. One hundred and seventeen patients (23.8%; 95% CI, 20.2-27.9%) had a reduced eGFR (defined as <60 mL/min), with more females than males (28.6% vs. 16.8%; P=0.02) having reduced eGFR. Age and female sex were found to have significant associations with reduced eGFR. Adjusted odds ratios were 1.07 (95% CI, 1.04, 1.10) and 1.96 (95% CI, 1.23, 3.12) for age and female sex, respectively. Conclusions: Older age and female sex are independently associated with a higher likelihood of having lower eGFRs at initiation of HAART among our study population. We recommend assessment of renal function of HIV-infected patients prior to initiation of HAART to guide the choice and dosing of antiretroviral drugs. PMID:22083208

  11. High prevalence of NIDDM and impaired glucose tolerance in Indian, Creole, and Chinese Mauritians. Mauritius Noncommunicable Disease Study Group.

    PubMed

    Dowse, G K; Gareeboo, H; Zimmet, P Z; Alberti, K G; Tuomilehto, J; Fareed, D; Brissonnette, L G; Finch, C F

    1990-03-01

    Mauritius, a multiethnic island nation in the southwestern Indian Ocean, has one of the world's highest diabetes mortality rates. The prevalence of both impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) was investigated in 5080 Muslim and Hindu Indian, Creole (mixed African, European, and Indian origin), and Chinese Mauritian adults aged 25-74 yr who were selected by random cluster sampling. Based on a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test and World Health Organization criteria, the age-standardized prevalence of IGT was significantly greater in women (19.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 18.1-21.2) than in men (11.7%, CI 10.5-12.8). By contrast, the prevalence of NIDDM was similar in men (12.1%, CI 10.9-13.4) and women (11.7%, CI 10.5-12.8) for all ethnic groups combined. The sex difference in IGT prevalence was seen in all ethnic groups, but for NIDDM, the sex difference was not consistent across ethnic groups. However, age- and sex-standardized prevalence of IGT and NIDDM was remarkably similar across ethnic groups (16.2 and 12.4% in Hindu Indians, 15.3 and 13.3% in Muslim Indians, 17.5 and 10.4% in Creoles, and 16.6 and 11.9% in Chinese, respectively). Three new cases of diabetes were diagnosed for every two known cases. The high prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance in Indian subjects is consistent with studies of other migrant Indian communities, but the findings in Creole and, in particular, Chinese subjects are unexpected. Potent environmental factors shared between ethnic groups in Mauritius may be responsible for the epidemic of glucose intolerance.

  12. Highly Significant Linkage to the SLI1 Locus in an Expanded Sample of Individuals Affected by Specific Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Specific language impairment (SLI) is defined as an unexplained failure to acquire normal language skills despite adequate intelligence and opportunity. We have reported elsewhere a full-genome scan in 98 nuclear families affected by this disorder, with the use of three quantitative traits of language ability (the expressive and receptive tests of the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals and a test of nonsense word repetition). This screen implicated two quantitative trait loci, one on chromosome 16q (SLI1) and a second on chromosome 19q (SLI2). However, a second independent genome screen performed by another group, with the use of parametric linkage analyses in extended pedigrees, found little evidence for the involvement of either of these regions in SLI. To investigate these loci further, we have collected a second sample, consisting of 86 families (367 individuals, 174 independent sib pairs), all with probands whose language skills are ⩾1.5 SD below the mean for their age. Haseman-Elston linkage analysis resulted in a maximum LOD score (MLS) of 2.84 on chromosome 16 and an MLS of 2.31 on chromosome 19, both of which represent significant linkage at the 2% level. Amalgamation of the wave 2 sample with the cohort used for the genome screen generated a total of 184 families (840 individuals, 393 independent sib pairs). Analysis of linkage within this pooled group strengthened the evidence for linkage at SLI1 and yielded a highly significant LOD score (MLS = 7.46, interval empirical P<.0004). Furthermore, linkage at the same locus was also demonstrated to three reading-related measures (basic reading [MLS = 1.49], spelling [MLS = 2.67], and reading comprehension [MLS = 1.99] subtests of the Wechsler Objectives Reading Dimensions). PMID:15133743

  13. Dynamics of glucose-induced membrane recruitment of protein kinase C beta II in living pancreatic islet beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Paolo; Tsuboi, Takashi; Ainscow, Edward K; Pozzan, Tullio; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-10-01

    The mechanisms by which glucose may affect protein kinase C (PKC) activity in the pancreatic islet beta-cell are presently unclear. By developing adenovirally expressed chimeras encoding fusion proteins between green fluorescent protein and conventional (betaII), novel (delta), or atypical (zeta) PKCs, we show that glucose selectively alters the subcellular localization of these enzymes dynamically in primary islet and MIN6 beta-cells. Examined by laser scanning confocal or total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, elevated glucose concentrations induced oscillatory translocations of PKCbetaII to spatially confined regions of the plasma membrane. Suggesting that increases in free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](c)) were primarily responsible, prevention of [Ca(2+)](c) increases with EGTA or diazoxide completely eliminated membrane recruitment, whereas elevation of cytosolic [Ca(2+)](c) with KCl or tolbutamide was highly effective in redistributing PKCbetaII both to the plasma membrane and to the surface of dense core secretory vesicles. By contrast, the distribution of PKCdelta.EGFP, which binds diacylglycerol but not Ca(2+), was unaffected by glucose. Measurement of [Ca(2+)](c) immediately beneath the plasma membrane with a ratiometric "pericam," fused to synaptic vesicle-associated protein-25, revealed that depolarization induced significantly larger increases in [Ca(2+)](c) in this domain. These data demonstrate that nutrient stimulation of beta-cells causes spatially and temporally complex changes in the subcellular localization of PKCbetaII, possibly resulting from the generation of Ca(2+) microdomains. Localized changes in PKCbetaII activity may thus have a role in the spatial control of insulin exocytosis.

  14. High signal intensity in dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1‐weighted MR images in three patients with impaired renal function and vascular calcification

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Sebastiano; Schroeder, Christophe; Froehlich, Johannes M.; Pasch, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium‐based contrast agents (primarily those with linear chelates) are associated with a dose‐dependent signal hyperintensity in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus on unenhanced T1‐weighted MRI following administration to selected patients with normal renal function. The accumulation of gadolinium has also been reported in the skin, heart, liver, lung, and kidney of patients with impaired renal function suffering from nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Here we report on three patients with impaired renal function and vascular calcification (two with confirmed NSF) whose unenhanced T1‐weighted MRIs showed conspicuous high signal intensity in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus after they had been exposed to relatively low doses of linear gadolinium‐based contrast agents (0.27, 0.45, and 0.68 mmol/kg). Signal ratios between dentate nucleus and pons and between globus pallidus and thalamus were comparable with previously reported measurements in subjects without renal impairment. Of note, all three analysed patients suffered from transient signs of neurological disorders of undetermined cause. In conclusion, the exposure to 0.27‐0.68 mmol/kg of linear gadolinium‐based contrast agent was associated with probable gadolinium accumulation in the brain of three patients suffering from impaired renal function and vascular calcification. © 2016 The Authors. Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26929131

  15. High signal intensity in dentate nucleus and globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted MR images in three patients with impaired renal function and vascular calcification.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Sebastiano; Schroeder, Christophe; Froehlich, Johannes M; Pasch, Andreas; Thoeny, Harriet C

    2016-05-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (primarily those with linear chelates) are associated with a dose-dependent signal hyperintensity in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus on unenhanced T1-weighted MRI following administration to selected patients with normal renal function. The accumulation of gadolinium has also been reported in the skin, heart, liver, lung, and kidney of patients with impaired renal function suffering from nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Here we report on three patients with impaired renal function and vascular calcification (two with confirmed NSF) whose unenhanced T1-weighted MRIs showed conspicuous high signal intensity in the dentate nucleus and the globus pallidus after they had been exposed to relatively low doses of linear gadolinium-based contrast agents (0.27, 0.45, and 0.68 mmol/kg). Signal ratios between dentate nucleus and pons and between globus pallidus and thalamus were comparable with previously reported measurements in subjects without renal impairment. Of note, all three analysed patients suffered from transient signs of neurological disorders of undetermined cause. In conclusion, the exposure to 0.27-0.68 mmol/kg of linear gadolinium-based contrast agent was associated with probable gadolinium accumulation in the brain of three patients suffering from impaired renal function and vascular calcification. © 2016 The Authors. Contrast Media & Molecular Imaging published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26929131

  16. High-Level Psychophysical Tuning Curves: Forward Masking in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, David A.

    1991-01-01

    Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves were obtained at multiple probe levels from 26 normal-hearing listeners and 24 ears of 21 hearing-impaired listeners with cochlear hearing loss. Results indicated that some cochlear hearing losses influence the sharp tuning capabilities usually associated with outer hair cell function. (Author/JDD)

  17. The Experience of High School Students with Emotional and Behavioral Impairments: A Critical Look Back upon Alternative Educational Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackermann, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Young people with emotional and behavioral impairments--known as emotionally disturbed (ED) in the United States public K-12 educational system--are generally not allowed a voice on their own behalf. Instead, they become "the focus of 'assessment,' 'management,' and 'intervention'" (White, 2000, p. 16). Because they are young, and because they…

  18. Enhanced glucose-induced intracellular signaling promotes insulin hypersecretion: pancreatic beta-cell functional adaptations in a model of genetic obesity and prediabetes.

    PubMed

    Irles, Esperanza; Ñeco, Patricia; Lluesma, Mónica; Villar-Pazos, Sabrina; Santos-Silva, Junia Carolina; Vettorazzi, Jean F; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Carneiro, Everardo M; Boschero, Antonio C; Nadal, Ángel; Quesada, Ivan

    2015-03-15

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance and is known to be a risk factor for type-2 diabetes. In obese individuals, pancreatic beta-cells try to compensate for the increased insulin demand in order to maintain euglycemia. Most studies have reported that this adaptation is due to morphological changes. However, the involvement of beta-cell functional adaptations in this process needs to be clarified. For this purpose, we evaluated different key steps in the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in intact islets from female ob/ob obese mice and lean controls. Obese mice showed increased body weight, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance and fed hyperglycemia. Islets from ob/ob mice exhibited increased glucose-induced mitochondrial activity, reflected by enhanced NAD(P)H production and mitochondrial membrane potential hyperpolarization. Perforated patch-clamp examination of beta-cells within intact islets revealed several alterations in the electrical activity such as increased firing frequency and higher sensitivity to low glucose concentrations. A higher intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in response to glucose was also found in ob/ob islets. Additionally, they displayed a change in the oscillatory pattern and Ca(2+) signals at low glucose levels. Capacitance experiments in intact islets revealed increased exocytosis in individual ob/ob beta-cells. All these up-regulated processes led to increased GSIS. In contrast, we found a lack of beta-cell Ca(2+) signal coupling, which could be a manifestation of early defects that lead to beta-cell malfunction in the progression to diabetes. These findings indicate that beta-cell functional adaptations are an important process in the compensatory response to obesity.

  19. Sex-Related Differences in Self-Reported Neurocognitive Impairment among High-Risk Cocaine Users in Methadone Maintenance Treatment Program

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Roman; Huedo-Medina, Tania B; Copenhaver, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Previous research has suggested possible sex-related differences in executive functioning among cocaine users; however, no studies specifically explain sex-related differences in neurocognitive impairment (NCI) among cocaine users receiving clinical care. Knowledge about this association can aid in the development of targeted prevention strategies to reduce adverse health outcomes. This study was designed to examine the sex-related differences in NCI among high-risk cocaine users receiving substance-abuse treatment. METHODS The Neuropsychological Impairment Scale (NIS) was administered to 199 cocaine users (98 men; 101 women), receiving methadone maintainance treatment, to assess self-reported NCI by identifying the patients’ awareness of neuropsychological symptoms. We used T-test comparison to find differences in NCI between men and women and multiple regression analysis to explore the relative contribution of sex to NCI. RESULTS Consistent with prior work, high NCI was evident within this sample, as indicated by high scores on most of the NIS subscales. Women reported greater impairment than men, as evidenced by significantly higher scores on several NIS subscales, after controlling for demographic and other confounding variables. Interestingly, cocaine craving significantly predicted NCI among men but not among women, as suggested by the significant association between cocaine craving and all except one of the NIS subscales. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that cocaine users enter into treatment with a range of NCI – with women having significantly more neurocognitive deficits than men – that may contribute to differential treatment outcomes. This highlights the need to include additional services such as neuropsychological screening and sex-specific treatment programs to optimally reduce adverse health outcomes in these high-risk, cognitively impaired patients. PMID:25861219

  20. Influence of high carbohydrate versus high fat diet in ozone induced pulmonary injury and systemic metabolic impairment in a Brown Norway (BN) rat model of healthy aging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Air pollution has been recently linked to the increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome. It has been postulated that dietary risk factors might exacerbate air pollution-induced metabolic impairment. We have recently reported that ozone exposure induces acute systemic ...

  1. Short-Term High-Fat Diet (HFD) Induced Anxiety-Like Behaviors and Cognitive Impairment Are Improved with Treatment by Glyburide.

    PubMed

    Gainey, Stephen J; Kwakwa, Kristin A; Bray, Julie K; Pillote, Melissa M; Tir, Vincent L; Towers, Albert E; Freund, Gregory G

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-associated comorbidities such as cognitive impairment and anxiety are increasing public health burdens that have gained prevalence in children. To better understand the impact of childhood obesity on brain function, mice were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD) from weaning for 1, 3 or 6 weeks. When compared to low-fat diet (LFD)-fed mice (LFD-mice), HFD-fed mice (HFD-mice) had impaired novel object recognition (NOR) after 1 week. After 3 weeks, HFD-mice had impaired NOR and object location recognition (OLR). Additionally, these mice displayed anxiety-like behavior by measure of both the open-field and elevated zero maze (EZM) testing. At 6 weeks, HFD-mice were comparable to LFD-mice in NOR, open-field and EZM performance but they remained impaired during OLR testing. Glyburide, a second-generation sulfonylurea for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, was chosen as a countermeasure based on previous data exhibiting its potential as an anxiolytic. Interestingly, a single dose of glyburide corrected deficiencies in NOR and mitigated anxiety-like behaviors in mice fed with HFD-diet for 3-weeks. Taken together these results indicate that a HFD negatively impacts a subset of hippocampal-independent behaviors relatively rapidly, but such behaviors normalize with age. In contrast, impairment of hippocampal-sensitive memory takes longer to develop but persists. Since single-dose glyburide restores brain function in 3-week-old HFD-mice, drugs that block ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channels may be of clinical relevance in the treatment of obesity-associated childhood cognitive issues and psychopathologies.

  2. Short-Term High-Fat Diet (HFD) Induced Anxiety-Like Behaviors and Cognitive Impairment Are Improved with Treatment by Glyburide

    PubMed Central

    Gainey, Stephen J.; Kwakwa, Kristin A.; Bray, Julie K.; Pillote, Melissa M.; Tir, Vincent L.; Towers, Albert E.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-associated comorbidities such as cognitive impairment and anxiety are increasing public health burdens that have gained prevalence in children. To better understand the impact of childhood obesity on brain function, mice were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD) from weaning for 1, 3 or 6 weeks. When compared to low-fat diet (LFD)-fed mice (LFD-mice), HFD-fed mice (HFD-mice) had impaired novel object recognition (NOR) after 1 week. After 3 weeks, HFD-mice had impaired NOR and object location recognition (OLR). Additionally, these mice displayed anxiety-like behavior by measure of both the open-field and elevated zero maze (EZM) testing. At 6 weeks, HFD-mice were comparable to LFD-mice in NOR, open-field and EZM performance but they remained impaired during OLR testing. Glyburide, a second-generation sulfonylurea for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, was chosen as a countermeasure based on previous data exhibiting its potential as an anxiolytic. Interestingly, a single dose of glyburide corrected deficiencies in NOR and mitigated anxiety-like behaviors in mice fed with HFD-diet for 3-weeks. Taken together these results indicate that a HFD negatively impacts a subset of hippocampal-independent behaviors relatively rapidly, but such behaviors normalize with age. In contrast, impairment of hippocampal-sensitive memory takes longer to develop but persists. Since single-dose glyburide restores brain function in 3-week-old HFD-mice, drugs that block ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels may be of clinical relevance in the treatment of obesity-associated childhood cognitive issues and psychopathologies. PMID:27563288

  3. Spatial navigation impairments among intellectually high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorder: exploring relations with theory of mind, episodic memory, and episodic future thinking.

    PubMed

    Lind, Sophie E; Williams, David M; Raber, Jacob; Peel, Anna; Bowler, Dermot M

    2013-11-01

    Research suggests that spatial navigation relies on the same neural network as episodic memory, episodic future thinking, and theory of mind (ToM). Such findings have stimulated theories (e.g., the scene construction and self-projection hypotheses) concerning possible common underlying cognitive capacities. Consistent with such theories, autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by concurrent impairments in episodic memory, episodic future thinking, and ToM. However, it is currently unclear whether spatial navigation is also impaired. Hence, ASD provides a test case for the scene construction and self-projection theories. The study of spatial navigation in ASD also provides a test of the extreme male brain theory of ASD, which predicts intact or superior navigation (purportedly a systemizing skill) performance among individuals with ASD. Thus, the aim of the current study was to establish whether spatial navigation in ASD is impaired, intact, or superior. Twenty-seven intellectually high-functioning adults with ASD and 28 sex-, age-, and IQ-matched neurotypical comparison adults completed the memory island virtual navigation task. Tests of episodic memory, episodic future thinking, and ToM were also completed. Participants with ASD showed significantly diminished performance on the memory island task, and performance was positively related to ToM and episodic memory, but not episodic future thinking. These results suggest that (contra the extreme male brain theory) individuals with ASD have impaired survey-based navigation skills--that is, difficulties generating cognitive maps of the environment--and adds weight to the idea that scene construction/self-projection are impaired in ASD. The theoretical and clinical implications of these results are discussed.

  4. Short-Term High-Fat Diet (HFD) Induced Anxiety-Like Behaviors and Cognitive Impairment Are Improved with Treatment by Glyburide.

    PubMed

    Gainey, Stephen J; Kwakwa, Kristin A; Bray, Julie K; Pillote, Melissa M; Tir, Vincent L; Towers, Albert E; Freund, Gregory G

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-associated comorbidities such as cognitive impairment and anxiety are increasing public health burdens that have gained prevalence in children. To better understand the impact of childhood obesity on brain function, mice were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD) from weaning for 1, 3 or 6 weeks. When compared to low-fat diet (LFD)-fed mice (LFD-mice), HFD-fed mice (HFD-mice) had impaired novel object recognition (NOR) after 1 week. After 3 weeks, HFD-mice had impaired NOR and object location recognition (OLR). Additionally, these mice displayed anxiety-like behavior by measure of both the open-field and elevated zero maze (EZM) testing. At 6 weeks, HFD-mice were comparable to LFD-mice in NOR, open-field and EZM performance but they remained impaired during OLR testing. Glyburide, a second-generation sulfonylurea for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, was chosen as a countermeasure based on previous data exhibiting its potential as an anxiolytic. Interestingly, a single dose of glyburide corrected deficiencies in NOR and mitigated anxiety-like behaviors in mice fed with HFD-diet for 3-weeks. Taken together these results indicate that a HFD negatively impacts a subset of hippocampal-independent behaviors relatively rapidly, but such behaviors normalize with age. In contrast, impairment of hippocampal-sensitive memory takes longer to develop but persists. Since single-dose glyburide restores brain function in 3-week-old HFD-mice, drugs that block ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channels may be of clinical relevance in the treatment of obesity-associated childhood cognitive issues and psychopathologies. PMID:27563288

  5. A high-throughput chemical screen with FDA approved drugs reveals that the antihypertensive drug Spironolactone impairs cancer cell survival by inhibiting homology directed repair

    PubMed Central

    Shahar, Or David; Kalousi, Alkmini; Eini, Lital; Fisher, Benoit; Weiss, Amelie; Darr, Jonatan; Mazina, Olga; Bramson, Shay; Kupiec, Martin; Eden, Amir; Meshorer, Eran; Mazin, Alexander V.; Brino, Laurent; Goldberg, Michal; Soutoglou, Evi

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most severe type of DNA damage. DSBs are repaired by non-homologous end-joining or homology directed repair (HDR). Identifying novel small molecules that affect HDR is of great importance both for research use and therapy. Molecules that elevate HDR may improve gene targeting whereas inhibiting molecules can be used for chemotherapy, since some of the cancers are more sensitive to repair impairment. Here, we performed a high-throughput chemical screen for FDA approved drugs, which affect HDR in cancer cells. We found that HDR frequencies are increased by retinoic acid and Idoxuridine and reduced by the antihypertensive drug Spironolactone. We further revealed that Spironolactone impairs Rad51 foci formation, sensitizes cancer cells to DNA damaging agents, to Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and cross-linking agents and inhibits tumor growth in xenografts, in mice. This study suggests Spironolactone as a new candidate for chemotherapy. PMID:24682826

  6. A high-throughput chemical screen with FDA approved drugs reveals that the antihypertensive drug Spironolactone impairs cancer cell survival by inhibiting homology directed repair.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Or David; Kalousi, Alkmini; Eini, Lital; Fisher, Benoit; Weiss, Amelie; Darr, Jonatan; Mazina, Olga; Bramson, Shay; Kupiec, Martin; Eden, Amir; Meshorer, Eran; Mazin, Alexander V; Brino, Laurent; Goldberg, Michal; Soutoglou, Evi

    2014-05-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most severe type of DNA damage. DSBs are repaired by non-homologous end-joining or homology directed repair (HDR). Identifying novel small molecules that affect HDR is of great importance both for research use and therapy. Molecules that elevate HDR may improve gene targeting whereas inhibiting molecules can be used for chemotherapy, since some of the cancers are more sensitive to repair impairment. Here, we performed a high-throughput chemical screen for FDA approved drugs, which affect HDR in cancer cells. We found that HDR frequencies are increased by retinoic acid and Idoxuridine and reduced by the antihypertensive drug Spironolactone. We further revealed that Spironolactone impairs Rad51 foci formation, sensitizes cancer cells to DNA damaging agents, to Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and cross-linking agents and inhibits tumor growth in xenografts, in mice. This study suggests Spironolactone as a new candidate for chemotherapy.

  7. High calcium enhances calcium oxalate crystal binding capacity of renal tubular cells via increased surface annexin A1 but impairs their proliferation and healing.

    PubMed

    Chutipongtanate, Somchai; Fong-ngern, Kedsarin; Peerapen, Paleerath; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2012-07-01

    Hypercalciuria is associated with kidney stone formation and impaired renal function. However, responses of renal tubular cells upon exposure to high-calcium environment remain largely unknown. We thus performed a proteomic analysis of altered proteins in renal tubular cells induced by high-calcium and evaluated functional significance of these changes. MDCK cells were maintained with or without 20 mM CaCl(2) for 72 h. Cellular proteins were then analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) (n = 5 gels derived from 5 independent culture flasks per group). Spot matching and quantitative intensity analysis revealed 20 protein spots (from a total of 700) that were differentially expressed between the two groups. These altered proteins were then identified by Q-TOF-MS and MS/MS analyses, including those involved in calcium binding, protein synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, cell proliferation, mitosis regulation, apoptosis, cell migration, oxidative stress, and ion transport. Protein network analysis and functional validation revealed that high-calcium-exposed cells had 36.5% increase in calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal-binding capacity. This functional change was consistent to the expression data in which annexin A1 (ANXA1), a membrane-associated calcium-binding protein, was markedly increased on the apical surface of high-calcium-exposed cells. Pretreatment with anti-ANXA1 antibody could neutralize this increasing crystal-binding capacity. Moreover, high-calcium exposure caused defects in cell proliferation and wound healing. These expression and functional data demonstrate the enhanced crystal-binding capacity but impaired cell proliferation and wound healing in renal tubular cells induced by high-calcium. Taken together, these phenomena may contribute, at least in part, to the pathogenic mechanisms of hypercalciuria-induced nephrolithiasis and impaired renal function. Our in vitro study offers several candidates for further

  8. [Multilingualism and specific language impairment].

    PubMed

    Arkkila, Eva; Smolander, Sini; Laasonen, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Specific language impairment is one of the most common developmental disturbances in childhood. With the increase of the foreign language population group an increasing number of children assimilating several languages and causing concern in language development attend clinical examinations. Knowledge of factors underlying the specific language impairment and the specific impairment in general, special features of language development of those learning several languages, as well as the assessment and support of the linguistic skills of a multilingual child is essential. The risk of long-term problems and marginalization is high for children having specific language impairment.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of acyclovir and its metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid and systemic circulation after administration of high-dose valacyclovir in subjects with normal and impaired renal function.

    PubMed

    Smith, James P; Weller, Stephen; Johnson, Benjamin; Nicotera, Janet; Luther, James M; Haas, David W

    2010-03-01

    Valacyclovir, the L-valyl ester prodrug of acyclovir (ACV), is widely prescribed to treat infections caused by varicella-zoster virus or herpes simplex virus. Rarely, treatment is complicated by reversible neuropsychiatric symptoms. By mechanisms not fully understood, this occurs more frequently in the setting of renal impairment. We characterized the steady-state pharmacokinetics of ACV and its metabolites 9-[(carboxymethoxy)methyl]guanine (CMMG) and 8-hydroxy-acyclovir (8-OH-ACV) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the systemic circulation. We administered multiple doses of high-dose valacyclovir to 6 subjects with normal renal function and 3 subjects with chronic renal impairment (creatinine clearance [CrCl], approximately 15 to 30 ml/min). Dosages were 2,000 mg every 6 h and 1,500 mg every 12 h, respectively. Indwelling intrathecal catheters allowed serial CSF sampling throughout the dosing interval. The average steady-state concentrations of acyclovir, CMMG, and 8-OH-ACV were greater in both the systemic circulation and the CSF among subjects with impaired renal function than among subjects with normal renal function. However, the CSF penetration of each analyte, reflected by the CSF-to-plasma area under the concentration-time curve over the 6- or 12-h dosing interval (AUC(tau)) ratio, did not differ based on renal function. Renal impairment does not alter the propensity for ACV or its metabolites to distribute to the CSF, but the higher concentrations in the systemic circulation, as a result of reduced elimination, are associated with proportionally higher concentrations in CSF.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Acyclovir and Its Metabolites in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Systemic Circulation after Administration of High-Dose Valacyclovir in Subjects with Normal and Impaired Renal Function▿

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James P.; Weller, Stephen; Johnson, Benjamin; Nicotera, Janet; Luther, James M.; Haas, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Valacyclovir, the l-valyl ester prodrug of acyclovir (ACV), is widely prescribed to treat infections caused by varicella-zoster virus or herpes simplex virus. Rarely, treatment is complicated by reversible neuropsychiatric symptoms. By mechanisms not fully understood, this occurs more frequently in the setting of renal impairment. We characterized the steady-state pharmacokinetics of ACV and its metabolites 9-[(carboxymethoxy)methyl]guanine (CMMG) and 8-hydroxy-acyclovir (8-OH-ACV) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the systemic circulation. We administered multiple doses of high-dose valacyclovir to 6 subjects with normal renal function and 3 subjects with chronic renal impairment (creatinine clearance [CrCl], ∼15 to 30 ml/min). Dosages were 2,000 mg every 6 h and 1,500 mg every 12 h, respectively. Indwelling intrathecal catheters allowed serial CSF sampling throughout the dosing interval. The average steady-state concentrations of acyclovir, CMMG, and 8-OH-ACV were greater in both the systemic circulation and the CSF among subjects with impaired renal function than among subjects with normal renal function. However, the CSF penetration of each analyte, reflected by the CSF-to-plasma area under the concentration-time curve over the 6- or 12-h dosing interval (AUCτ) ratio, did not differ based on renal function. Renal impairment does not alter the propensity for ACV or its metabolites to distribute to the CSF, but the higher concentrations in the systemic circulation, as a result of reduced elimination, are associated with proportionally higher concentrations in CSF. PMID:20038622

  11. High-fat, low-carbohydrate diet alters myocardial oxidative stress and impairs recovery of cardiac function after ischemia and reperfusion in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Lloyd, Steven G

    2013-04-01

    Obesity is associated with elevated risk of heart disease. A solid understanding of the safety and potential adverse effects of high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet (HFLCD) similar to that used by humans for weight loss on the heart is crucial. High fat intake is known to promote increases in reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial damage. We hypothesized that there would be adverse effects of HFLCD on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury through enhancing oxidative stress injury and impairing mitochondrial biogenesis in a nongenetic, diet-induced rat model of obesity. To test the hypothesis, 250-g male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed an obesity-promoting diet for 7 weeks to induce obesity, then switched to HFLCD or a low-fat control diet for 2 weeks. Isolated hearts underwent global low flow ischemia for 60 minutes and reperfusion for 60 minutes. High-fat, low-carbohydrate diet resulted in greater weight gain and lower myocardial glycogen, plasma adiponectin, and insulin. Myocardial antioxidant gene transcript and protein expression of superoxide dismutase and catalase were reduced in HFLCD, along with increased oxidative gene NADPH oxidase-4 transcript and xanthine oxidase activity, and a 37% increase in nitrated protein (nitrotyrosine) in HFLCD hearts. The cardiac expression of key mitochondrial regulatory factors such as nuclear respiratory factor-1 and transcription factor A-mitochondrial were inhibited and myocardial mitochondrial DNA copy number decreased. The cardiac expression of adiponectin and its receptors was down-regulated in HFLCD. High-fat, low-carbohydrate diet impaired recovery of left ventricular rate-pressure product after ischemia/reperfusion and led to 3.5-fold increased injury as measured by lactate dehydrogenase release. In conclusion, HFLCD leads to increased ischemic myocardial injury and impaired recovery of function after reperfusion and was associated with attenuation of mitochondrial biogenesis and enhanced oxidative stress in obese rats

  12. High antigen levels induce an exhausted phenotype in a chronic infection without impairing T cell expansion and survival.

    PubMed

    Utzschneider, Daniel T; Alfei, Francesca; Roelli, Patrick; Barras, David; Chennupati, Vijaykumar; Darbre, Stephanie; Delorenzi, Mauro; Pinschewer, Daniel D; Zehn, Dietmar

    2016-08-22

    Chronic infections induce T cells showing impaired cytokine secretion and up-regulated expression of inhibitory receptors such as PD-1. What determines the acquisition of this chronic phenotype and how it impacts T cell function remain vaguely understood. Using newly generated recombinant antigen variant-expressing chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) strains, we uncovered that T cell differentiation and acquisition of a chronic or exhausted phenotype depend critically on the frequency of T cell receptor (TCR) engagement and less significantly on the strength of TCR stimulation. In fact, we noted that low-level antigen exposure promotes the formation of T cells with an acute phenotype in chronic infections. Unexpectedly, we found that T cell populations with an acute or chronic phenotype are maintained equally well in chronic infections and undergo comparable primary and secondary expansion. Thus, our observations contrast with the view that T cells with a typical chronic infection phenotype are severely functionally impaired and rapidly transition into a terminal stage of differentiation. Instead, our data unravel that T cells primarily undergo a form of phenotypic and functional differentiation in the early phase of a chronic LCMV infection without inheriting a net survival or expansion deficit, and we demonstrate that the acquired chronic phenotype transitions into the memory T cell compartment. PMID:27455951

  13. Impaired Early Attentional Processes in Parkinson’s Disease: A High-Resolution Event-Related Potentials Study

    PubMed Central

    Bocquillon, Perrine; Bourriez, Jean-Louis; Palmero-Soler, Ernesto; Defebvre, Luc; Derambure, Philippe; Dujardin, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The selection of task-relevant information requires both the focalization of attention on the task and resistance to interference from irrelevant stimuli. A previous study using the P3 component of the event-related potentials suggested that a reduced ability to resist interference could be responsible for attention disorders at early stages of Parkinson’s disease (PD), with a possible role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Methods Our objective was to better determine the origin of this impairment, by studying an earlier ERP component, the N2, and its subcomponents, as they reflect early inhibition processes and as they are known to have sources in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), which is involved together with the DLPFC in inhibition processes. Fifteen early-stage PD patients and 15 healthy controls (HCs) performed a three-stimulus visual oddball paradigm, consisting in detecting target inputs amongst standard stimuli, while resisting interference from distracter ones. A 128-channel electroencephalogram was recorded during this task and the generators of the N2 subcomponents were identified using standardized weighted low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (swLORETA). Results PD patients displayed fewer N2 generators than HCs in both the DLPFC and the ACC, for all types of stimuli. In contrast to controls, PD patients did not show any differences between their generators for different N2 subcomponents. Conclusion Our data suggest that impaired inhibition in PD results from dysfunction of the DLPFC and the ACC during the early stages of attentional processes. PMID:26135906

  14. Women with elevated food addiction symptoms show accelerated reactions, but no impaired inhibitory control, in response to pictures of high-calorie food-cues.

    PubMed

    Meule, Adrian; Lutz, Annika; Vögele, Claus; Kübler, Andrea

    2012-12-01

    Addictive behaviors are accompanied by a lack of inhibitory control, specifically when individuals are confronted with substance-related cues. Thus, we expected women with symptoms of food addiction to be impaired in inhibitory control, when confronted with palatable, high-calorie food-cues. Female college students (N=50) were divided in low and high food addiction groups based on the symptom count of the Yale Food Addiction Scale. Participants performed a Go/No-go-task with high-calorie food-cues or neutral pictures presented behind the targets. Self-reported impulsivity was also assessed. The high food addiction group had faster reaction times in response to food-cues as compared to neutral cues and reported higher attentional impulsivity than the low food addiction group. Commission and omission errors did not differ between groups or picture types. Hence, women with food addiction symptoms reported higher attentional impulsivity and reacted faster in response to food-cues, although neither increased self-reported motor impulsivity nor impaired behavioral inhibition was found. Food addiction symptoms seem to be related to attentional aspects of impulsivity but not other facets of impulsivity.

  15. Proinflammatory Stimulation of Toll-Like Receptor 9 with High Dose CpG ODN 1826 Impairs Endothelial Regeneration and Promotes Atherosclerosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Martin; Asdonk, Tobias; Lahrmann, Catharina; Lütjohann, Dieter; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptors (TLR) of the innate immune system have been closely linked with the development of atherosclerotic lesions. TLR9 is activated by unmethylated CpG motifs within ssDNA, but also by CpG motifs in nucleic acids released during vascular apoptosis and necrosis. The role of TLR9 in vascular disease remains controversial and we sought to investigate the effects of a proinflammatory TLR9 stimulation in mice. Methods and Findings TLR9-stimulation with high dose CpG ODN at concentrations between 6.25nM to 30nM induced a significant proinflammatory cytokine response in mice. This was associated with impaired reendothelialization upon acute denudation of the carotid and increased numbers of circulating endothelial microparticles, as a marker for amplified endothelial damage. Chronic TLR9 agonism in apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice fed a cholesterol-rich diet increased aortic production of reactive oxygen species, the number of circulating endothelial microparticles, circulating sca-1/flk-1 positive cells, and most importantly augmented atherosclerotic plaque formation when compared to vehicle treated animals. Importantly, high concentrations of CpG ODN are required for these proatherogenic effects. Conclusions Systemic stimulation of TLR9 with high dose CpG ODN impaired reendothelialization upon acute vascular injury and increased atherosclerotic plaque development in ApoE-/- mice. Further studies are necessary to fully decipher the contradictory finding of TLR9 agonism in vascular biology. PMID:26751387

  16. “8 Plate”: An Alternative Device to Fix Highly Recurrent Traumatic Anterior Gleno-Humeral Instability in Patients with Severe Impairment of the Anterior Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Tudisco, C; Bisicchia, S; Savarese, E; Ippolito, E

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is still debate about the best treatment option for highly recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation in patients with severe impairment of the anterior capsule and/or recurrence after either arthroscopic or open capsulorrhaphy. Materials and Methods: The clinical and radiological findings of 7 patients treated with an open capsulorrhaphy stabilized with an “8 plate” for a highly recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation with severe impairment of the anterior capsule and a large Bankart lesion were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up evaluation included VAS for pain, Constant-Murley, Simple Shoulder Test, ASES, UCLA, Quick DASH, Rowe, Walsch-Duplay scores, as well as X-rays of the operated shoulder. Results: At follow-up none of the patients reported subsequent dislocations. Range of motion of the shoulder was complete in all cases, but one. Results of the functional scoring systems were satisfactory. X-rays showed no osteolysis and good position of the plate. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature about an open capsular tensioning and Bankart lesion repair performed with an “8 plate”. We believe that this is a reliable and effective procedure to address traumatic anterior re-dislocation of the gleno-humeral joint when the capsule is extensively torn and frayed or in revision cases. Moreover the “8 plate” is ideal to be applied in such a narrow space on the slant surface of the scapular neck close to the glenoid rim. PMID:25621080

  17. Analysis of renal impairment in MM-003, a phase III study of pomalidomide + low - dose dexamethasone versus high - dose dexamethasone in refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Weisel, Katja C.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Moreau, Philippe; Lacy, Martha Q.; Song, Kevin W.; Delforge, Michel; Karlin, Lionel; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Banos, Anne; Oriol, Albert; Alegre, Adrian; Chen, Christine; Cavo, Michele; Garderet, Laurent; Ivanova, Valentina; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Knop, Stefan; Yu, Xin; Hong, Kevin; Sternas, Lars; Jacques, Christian; Zaki, Mohamed H.; Miguel, Jesus San

    2016-01-01

    Pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone is effective and well tolerated for refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma after bortezomib and lenalidomide failure. The phase III trial MM-003 compared pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone with high-dose dexamethasone. This subanalysis grouped patients by baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 30 − < 60 mL/min (n=93, pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone; n=56, high-dose dexamethasone) or ≥ 60 mL/min (n=205, pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone; n=93, high-dose dexamethasone). Median progression-free survival was similar for both subgroups and favored pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone versus high-dose dexamethasone: 4.0 versus 1.9 months in the group with baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 30 − < 60 mL/min (P<0.001) and 4.0 versus 2.0 months in the group with baseline creatinine clearance ≥ 60 mL/min (P<0.001). Median overall survival for pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone versus high-dose dexamethasone was 10.4 versus 4.9 months (P=0.030) and 15.5 versus 9.2 months (P=0.133), respectively. Improved renal function, defined as an increase in creatinine clearance from < 60 to ≥ 60 mL/min, was similar in pomalidomide + low-dose dexamethasone and high-dose dexamethasone patients (42% and 47%, respectively). Improvement in progression-free and overall survival in these patients was comparable with that in patients without renal impairment. There was no increase in discontinuations of therapy, dose modifications, and adverse events in patients with moderate renal impairment. Pomalidomide at a starting dose of 4 mg + low-dose dexamethasone is well tolerated in patients with refractory or relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma, and of comparable efficacy if moderate renal impairment is present. This trial was registered with clinicaltrials.gov identifier 01311687 and EudraCT identifier 2010-019820-30. PMID:27081177

  18. Grape Powder Intake Prevents Ovariectomy-Induced Anxiety-Like Behavior, Memory Impairment and High Blood Pressure in Female Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Patki, Gaurav; Allam, Farida H.; Atrooz, Fatin; Dao, An T.; Solanki, Naimesh; Chugh, Gaurav; Asghar, Mohammad; Jafri, Faizan; Bohat, Ritu; Alkadhi, Karim A.; Salim, Samina

    2013-01-01

    Diminished estrogen influence at menopause is reported to be associated with cognitive decline, heightened anxiety and hypertension. While estrogen therapy is often prescribed to overcome these behavioral and physiological deficits, antioxidants which have been shown beneficial are gaining nutritional intervention and popularity. Therefore, in the present study, utilizing the antioxidant properties of grapes, we have examined effect of 3 weeks of grape powder (GP; 15 g/L dissolved in tap water) treatment on anxiety-like behavior, learning-memory impairment and high blood pressure in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Four groups of female Wistar rats were used; sham control, sham-GP treated, OVX and OVX+GP treated. We observed a significant increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure in OVX rats as compared to sham-controls. Furthermore, ovariectomy increased anxiety-like behavior and caused learning and memory impairment in rats as compared to sham-controls. Interestingly, providing grape powder treated water to OVX rats restored both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, decreased anxiety-like behavior and improved memory function. Moreover, OVX rats exhibited an impaired long term potentiation which was restored with grape powder treatment. Furthermore, ovariectomy increased oxidative stress in the brain, serum and urine, selectively decreasing antioxidant enzyme, glyoxalase-1 protein expression in the hippocampus but not in the cortex and amygdala of OVX rats, while grape powder treatment reversed these effects. Other antioxidant enzyme levels, including manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Cu/Zn SOD remained unchanged. We suggest that grape powder by regulating oxidative stress mechanisms exerts its protective effect on blood pressure, learning-memory and anxiety-like behavior. Our study is the first to examine behavioral, biochemical, physiological and electrophysiological outcome of estrogen depletion in rats and to test protective role of grape powder

  19. In utero exposure to prepregnancy maternal obesity and postweaning high-fat diet impair regulators of mitochondrial dynamics in rat placenta and offspring

    PubMed Central

    Borengasser, Sarah J.; Faske, Jennifer; Kang, Ping; Blackburn, Michael L.; Badger, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of pregnant women who are obese at conception continues to rise. Compelling evidence suggests the intrauterine environment is an important determinant of offspring health. Maternal obesity and unhealthy diets are shown to promote metabolic programming in the offspring. Mitochondria are maternally inherited, and we have previously shown impaired mitochondrial function in rat offspring exposed to maternal obesity in utero. Mitochondrial health is maintained by mitochondrial dynamics, or the processes of fusion and fission, which serve to repair damaged mitochondria, remove irreparable mitochondria, and maintain mitochondrial morphology. An imbalance between fusion and fission has been associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and reproduction complications. In the present study, we examined the influence of maternal obesity and postweaning high-fat diet (HFD) on key regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission in rat offspring at important developmental milestones which included postnatal day (PND)35 (2 wk HFD) and PND130 (∼16 wk HFD). Our results indicate HFD-fed offspring had reduced mRNA expression of presenilin-associated rhomboid-like (PARL), optic atrophy (OPA)1, mitofusin (Mfn)1, Mfn2, fission (Fis)1, and nuclear respiratory factor (Nrf)1 at PND35, while OPA1 and Mfn2 remained decreased at PND130. Putative transcriptional regulators of mitochondrial dynamics were reduced in rat placenta and offspring liver and skeletal muscle [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC1)α, PGC1β, and estrogen-related receptor (ERR)α], consistent with indirect calorimetry findings revealing reduced energy expenditure and impaired fat utilization. Overall, maternal obesity detrimentally alters mitochondrial targets that may contribute to impaired mitochondrial health and increased obesity susceptibility in later life. PMID:25336449

  20. Cognitive MMN and P300 in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease: A high density EEG-3D vector field tomography approach.

    PubMed

    Papadaniil, Chrysa D; Kosmidou, Vasiliki E; Tsolaki, Anthoula; Tsolaki, Magda; Kompatsiaris, Ioannis Yiannis; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J

    2016-10-01

    Precise preclinical detection of dementia for effective treatment and stage monitoring is of great importance. Miscellaneous types of biomarkers, e.g., biochemical, genetic, neuroimaging, and physiological, have been proposed to diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD), the usual suspect behind manifested cognitive decline, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a neuropathology prior to AD that does not affect cognitive functions. Event related potential (ERP) methods constitute a non-invasive, inexpensive means of analysis and have been proposed as sensitive biomarkers of cognitive impairment; besides, various ERP components are strongly linked with working memory, attention, sensory processing and motor responses. In this study, an auditory oddball task is employed, to acquire high density electroencephalograhy recordings from healthy elderly controls, MCI and AD patients. The mismatch negativity (MMN) and P300 ERP components are then extracted and their relationship with neurodegeneration is examined. Then, the neural activation at these components is reconstructed using the 3D vector field tomography (3D-VFT) inverse solution. The results reveal a decline of both ERPs amplitude, and a statistically significant prolongation of their latency as cognitive impairment advances. For the MMN, higher brain activation is usually localized in the inferior frontal and superior temporal gyri in the controls. However, in AD, parietal sites exhibit strong activity. Stronger P300 generators are mostly found in the frontal lobe for the controls, but in AD they often shift to the temporal lobe. Reduction in inferior frontal source strength and the switch of the maximum intensity area to parietal and superior temporal sites suggest that these areas, especially the former, are of particular significance when neurodegenerative disorders are investigated. The modulation of MMN and P300 can serve to produce biomarkers of dementia and its progression, and brain imaging can further contribute

  1. Long-term ambient air pollution and lung function impairment in Chinese children from a high air pollution range area: The Seven Northeastern Cities (SNEC) study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiao-Wen; Vivian, Elaina; Mohammed, Kahee A.; Jakhar, Shailja; Vaughn, Michael; Huang, Jin; Zelicoff, Alan; Xaverius, Pamela; Bai, Zhipeng; Lin, Shao; Hao, Yuan-Tao; Paul, Gunther; Morawska, Lidia; Wang, Si-Quan; Qian, Zhengmin; Dong, Guang-Hui

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent and inconclusive associations between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and lung function in children from Europe and America, where air pollution levels were typically low. The aim of the present study is to examine the relationship between air pollutants and lung function in children selected from heavily industrialized and polluted cities in northeastern China. During 2012, 6740 boys and girls aged 7-14 years were recruited in 24 districts of seven northeastern cities. Portable electronic spirometers were used to measure lung function. Four-year average concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤10 μm (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3) were measured at monitoring stations in the 24 districts. Two-staged regression models were used in the data analysis, controlling for covariates. Overall, for all subjects, the increased odds of lung function impairment associated with exposure to air pollutants, ranged from 5% (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01, 1.10) for FVC < 85% predicted per 46.3 μg/m3 for O3 to 81% (aOR = 1.81; 95%CI = 1.44, 2.28) for FEV1 < 85% predicted per 30.6 μg/m3 for PM10. The linear regression models consistently showed a negative relationship between all air pollutants and lung function measures across subjects. There were significant interaction terms indicating gender differences for lung function impairment and pulmonary function from exposure to some pollutants (P < 0.10). In conclusion, long term exposure to high concentrations of ambient air pollution is associated with decreased pulmonary function and lung function impairment, and females appear to be more susceptible than males.

  2. Episodic Memory and Episodic Future Thinking Impairments in High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: An Underlying Difficulty With Scene Construction or Self-Projection?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective: There appears to be a common network of brain regions that underlie the ability to recall past personal experiences (episodic memory) and the ability to imagine possible future personal experiences (episodic future thinking). At the cognitive level, these abilities are thought to rely on “scene construction” (the ability to bind together multimodal elements of a scene in mind—dependent on hippocampal functioning) and temporal “self-projection” (the ability to mentally project oneself through time—dependent on prefrontal cortex functioning). Although autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by diminished episodic memory, it is unclear whether episodic future thinking is correspondingly impaired. Moreover, the underlying basis of such impairments (difficulties with scene construction, self-projection, or both) is yet to be established. The current study therefore aimed to elucidate these issues. Method: Twenty-seven intellectually high-functioning adults with ASD and 29 age- and IQ-matched neurotypical comparison adults were asked to describe (a) imagined atemporal, non-self-relevant fictitious scenes (assessing scene construction), (b) imagined plausible self-relevant future episodes (assessing episodic future thinking), and (c) recalled personally experienced past episodes (assessing episodic memory). Tests of narrative ability and theory of mind were also completed. Results: Performances of participants with ASD were significantly and equally diminished in each condition and, crucially, this diminution was independent of general narrative ability. Conclusions: Given that participants with ASD were impaired in the fictitious scene condition, which does not involve self-projection, we suggest the underlying difficulty with episodic memory/future thinking is one of scene construction. PMID:24015827

  3. P2X7R-Panx1 Complex Impairs Bone Mechanosignaling under High Glucose Levels Associated with Type-1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Seref-Ferlengez, Zeynep; Maung, Stephanie; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Spray, David C; Suadicani, Sylvia O; Thi, Mia M

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) causes a range of skeletal problems, including reduced bone density and increased risk for bone fractures. However, mechanisms underlying skeletal complications in diabetes are still not well understood. We hypothesize that high glucose levels in T1D alters expression and function of purinergic receptors (P2Rs) and pannexin 1 (Panx1) channels, and thereby impairs ATP signaling that is essential for proper bone response to mechanical loading and maintenance of skeletal integrity. We first established a key role for P2X7 receptor-Panx1 in osteocyte mechanosignaling by showing that these proteins are co-expressed to provide a major pathway for flow-induced ATP release. To simulate in vitro the glucose levels to which bone cells are exposed in healthy vs. diabetic bones, we cultured osteoblast and osteocyte cell lines for 10 days in medium containing 5.5 or 25 mM glucose. High glucose effects on expression and function of P2Rs and Panx1 channels were determined by Western Blot analysis, quantification of Ca2+ responses to P2R agonists and oscillatory fluid shear stress (± 10 dyne/cm2), and measurement of flow-induced ATP release. Diabetic C57BL/6J-Ins2Akita mice were used to evaluate in vivo effects of high glucose on P2R and Panx1. Western blotting indicated altered P2X7R, P2Y2R and P2Y4R expression in high glucose exposed bone cells, and in diabetic bone tissue. Moreover, high glucose blunted normal P2R- and flow-induced Ca2+ signaling and ATP release from osteocytes. These findings indicate that T1D impairs load-induced ATP signaling in osteocytes and affects osteoblast function, which are essential for maintaining bone health. PMID:27159053

  4. P2X7R-Panx1 Complex Impairs Bone Mechanosignaling under High Glucose Levels Associated with Type-1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Maung, Stephanie; Schaffler, Mitchell B.; Spray, David C.; Suadicani, Sylvia O.; Thi, Mia M.

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) causes a range of skeletal problems, including reduced bone density and increased risk for bone fractures. However, mechanisms underlying skeletal complications in diabetes are still not well understood. We hypothesize that high glucose levels in T1D alters expression and function of purinergic receptors (P2Rs) and pannexin 1 (Panx1) channels, and thereby impairs ATP signaling that is essential for proper bone response to mechanical loading and maintenance of skeletal integrity. We first established a key role for P2X7 receptor-Panx1 in osteocyte mechanosignaling by showing that these proteins are co-expressed to provide a major pathway for flow-induced ATP release. To simulate in vitro the glucose levels to which bone cells are exposed in healthy vs. diabetic bones, we cultured osteoblast and osteocyte cell lines for 10 days in medium containing 5.5 or 25 mM glucose. High glucose effects on expression and function of P2Rs and Panx1 channels were determined by Western Blot analysis, quantification of Ca2+ responses to P2R agonists and oscillatory fluid shear stress (± 10 dyne/cm2), and measurement of flow-induced ATP release. Diabetic C57BL/6J-Ins2Akita mice were used to evaluate in vivo effects of high glucose on P2R and Panx1. Western blotting indicated altered P2X7R, P2Y2R and P2Y4R expression in high glucose exposed bone cells, and in diabetic bone tissue. Moreover, high glucose blunted normal P2R- and flow-induced Ca2+ signaling and ATP release from osteocytes. These findings indicate that T1D impairs load-induced ATP signaling in osteocytes and affects osteoblast function, which are essential for maintaining bone health. PMID:27159053

  5. High ethanol and acetaldehyde impair spatial memory in mouse models: opposite effects of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and apolipoprotein E on memory.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Mostofa; Ameno, Kiyoshi; Miki, Takanori; Tanaka, Naoko; Ono, Junichiro; Shirakami, Gotaro; Sultana, Ruby; Yu, Nakamura; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-05-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 deficiency may directly contribute to excess acetaldehyde (AcH) accumulation after ethanol (EtOH) drinking and AcH mediates some of the behavioral effects of EtOH. Apolipoprotein E has been suggested to be involved in the alteration of attention and memory. We have chosen Aldh2-knockout (Aldh2-KO), ApoE-KO, and their wild-type (WT) control mice to examine the effects of EtOH and AcH on spatial memory and to compare the possible relationship between genetic deficiency and memory using two behavioral assessments. Mice were trained for 4 days, with EtOH (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 g/kg) being given intraperitoneally on day 4. A probe trial was given on day 5 in the non-EtOH state in the Morris water maze (MWM). The results showed that 2.0 g/kg EtOH increased errors, indicating memory impairment on the eight-arm radial maze (RAM) for all the mice studied. One gram per kilogram EtOH impaired the performance of Aldh2-KO and ApoE-KO mice, but not WT mice. We found similar effects of EtOH on the MWM performance, with 2.0 g/kg EtOH increasing the latencies. One gram per kilogram EtOH increased the latencies of Aldh2-KO and WT mice, but not ApoE-KO mice. The 2.0 g/kg EtOH-induced memory impairment in Aldh2-KO mice was greater, suggesting an AcH effect. Furthermore, time spent on the probe trial was shorter in mice that had previously received 2.0 g/kg EtOH. ApoE-KO mice learned more slowly, while Aldh2-KO mice learned more quickly. Both the RAM and MWM results suggest that high EtOH and AcH impair spatial memory in mice, while lower doses do not have consistent memory effects. In addition, we conclude that genetic differences might underlie some of EtOH's effects on memory.

  6. High-Fat Feeding Impairs Nutrient Sensing and Gut Brain Integration in the Caudomedial Nucleus of the Solitary Tract in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, Althea R.; Schwartz, Gary J.; Blouet, Clémence

    2015-01-01

    Hyperphagic obesity is characterized in part by a specific increase in meal size that contributes to increased daily energy intake, but the mechanisms underlying impaired activity of meal size regulatory circuits, particularly those converging at the caudomedial nucleus of the solitary tract in the hindbrain (cmNTS), remain poorly understood. In this paper, we assessed the consequences of high-fat (HF) feeding and diet-induced obesity (DIO) on cmNTS nutrient sensing and metabolic integration in the control of meal size. Mice maintained on a standard chow diet, low-fat (LF) diet or HF diet for 2 weeks or 6 months were implanted with a bilateral brain cannula targeting the cmNTS. Feeding behavior was assessed using behavioral chambers and meal-pattern analysis following cmNTS L-leucine injections alone or together with ip CCK. Molecular mechanisms implicated in the feeding responses were assessed using western blot, immunofluorescence and pharmacological inhibition of the amino acid sensing mTORC1 pathway (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1). We found that HF feeding blunts the anorectic consequences of cmNTS L-leucine administration. Increased baseline activity of the L-leucine sensor P70 S6 kinase 1 and impaired L-leucine-induced activation of this pathway in the cmNTS of HF-fed mice indicate that HF feeding is associated with an impairment in cmNTS mTOR nutritional and hormonal sensing. Interestingly, the acute orexigenic effect of the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin was preserved in HF-fed mice, supporting the assertion that HF-induced increase in baseline cmNTS mTORC1 activity underlies the defect in L-leucine sensing. Last, the synergistic feeding-suppressive effect of CCK and cmNTS L-leucine was abrogated in DIO mice. These results indicate that HF feeding leads to an impairment in cmNTS nutrient sensing and metabolic integration in the regulation of meal size. PMID:25774780

  7. High prevalence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in liver cancer patients: A hospital based study of 4610 patients with benign tumors or specific cancers

    PubMed Central

    Roujun, Chen; Yanhua, Yi; Bixun, Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) were hypothesised to be different among different tumor patients. This study aimed to study the association between the prevalence of DM, IGT and IFG and liver cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, cervical cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer and benign tumor. Methods:  A hospital based retrospective study was conducted on 4610 patients admitted to the Internal Medical Department of the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, China. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between gender, age group, ethnicity , cancer types or benign tumors and prevalence of DM, IFG, IGT. Results: Among 4610 patients, there were 1000 liver cancer patients, 373 breast cancer patients, 415 nasopharyngeal cancer patients, 230 cervical cancer patients, 405 colorectal cancer patients, and 2187 benign tumor patients. The prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancer patients was 14.7% and 22.1%, respectively. The prevalence of DM and IGT was 13.8% and 20%, respectively, in colorectal cancer patients, significantly higher than that of benign cancers. After adjusting for gender, age group, and ethnicity, the prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancers patients was 1.29 times (CI :1.12-1.66) and 1.49 times (CI :1.20-1.86) higher than that of benign tumors, respectively. Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancer patients.

  8. High prevalence of diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance in liver cancer patients: A hospital based study of 4610 patients with benign tumors or specific cancers

    PubMed Central

    Roujun, Chen; Yanhua, Yi; Bixun, Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) were hypothesised to be different among different tumor patients. This study aimed to study the association between the prevalence of DM, IGT and IFG and liver cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, cervical cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer and benign tumor. Methods:  A hospital based retrospective study was conducted on 4610 patients admitted to the Internal Medical Department of the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, China. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between gender, age group, ethnicity , cancer types or benign tumors and prevalence of DM, IFG, IGT. Results: Among 4610 patients, there were 1000 liver cancer patients, 373 breast cancer patients, 415 nasopharyngeal cancer patients, 230 cervical cancer patients, 405 colorectal cancer patients, and 2187 benign tumor patients. The prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancer patients was 14.7% and 22.1%, respectively. The prevalence of DM and IGT was 13.8% and 20%, respectively, in colorectal cancer patients, significantly higher than that of benign cancers. After adjusting for gender, age group, and ethnicity, the prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancers patients was 1.29 times (CI :1.12-1.66) and 1.49 times (CI :1.20-1.86) higher than that of benign tumors, respectively. Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of DM and IGT in liver cancer patients. PMID:27610222

  9. Impaired drug absorption due to high stomach pH: a review of strategies for mitigation of such effect to enable pharmaceutical product development.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Amitava; Kesisoglou, Filippos

    2013-11-01

    Published reports have clearly shown that weakly basic drugs which have low solubility at high pH could have impaired absorption in patients with high gastric pH thus leading to reduced and variable bioavailability. Since such reduction in exposure can lead to significant loss of efficacy, it is imperative to (1) understand the behavior of the compound as a function of stomach pH to inform of any risk of bioavailability loss in clinical studies and (2) develop a robust formulation which can provide adequate exposure in achlorhydric patients. In this review paper, we provide an overview of the factors that can cause high gastric pH in human, discuss clinical and preclinical pharmacokinetic data for weak bases under conditions of normal and high gastric pH, and give examples of formulation strategies to minimize or mitigate the reduced absorption of weakly basic drugs under high gastric pH conditions. It should be noted that the ability to overcome pH sensitivity issues is highly compound dependent and there are no obvious and general solutions to overcome such effect. Further, we discuss, along with several examples, the use of biopharmaceutical tools such as in vitro dissolution, absorption modeling, and gastric pH modified animal models to assess absorption risk of weak bases in high gastric pH and also the use of these tools to enable development of formulations to mitigate such effects.

  10. Long-Term Feeding of Chitosan Ameliorates Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in a High-Fructose-Diet-Impaired Rat Model of Glucose Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Cai, Fang-Ying; Chiang, Meng-Tsan

    2015-12-10

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of long-term feeding of chitosan on plasma glucose and lipids in rats fed a high-fructose (HF) diet (63.1%). Male Sprague-Dawley rats aged seven weeks were used as experimental animals. Rats were divided into three groups: (1) normal group (normal); (2) HF group; (3) chitosan + HF group (HF + C). The rats were fed the experimental diets and drinking water ad libitum for 21 weeks. The results showed that chitosan (average molecular weight was about 3.8 × 10⁵ Dalton and degree of deacetylation was about 89.8%) significantly decreased body weight, paraepididymal fat mass, and retroperitoneal fat mass weight, but elevated the lipolysis rate in retroperitoneal fats of HF diet-fed rats. Supplementation of chitosan causes a decrease in plasma insulin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, Interleukin (IL)-6, and leptin, and an increase in plasma adiponectin. The HF diet increased hepatic lipids. However, intake of chitosan reduced the accumulation of hepatic lipids, including total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) contents. In addition, chitosan elevated the excretion of fecal lipids in HF diet-fed rats. Furthermore, chitosan significantly decreased plasma TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C), the TC/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio, and increased the HDL-C/(LDL-C + VLDL-C) ratio, but elevated the plasma TG and free fatty acids concentrations in HF diet-fed rats. Plasma angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4) protein expression was not affected by the HF diet, but it was significantly increased in chitosan-supplemented, HF-diet-fed rats. The high-fructose diet induced an increase in plasma glucose and impaired glucose tolerance, but chitosan supplementation decreased plasma glucose and improved impairment of glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance. Taken together, these results indicate that supplementation with chitosan can improve the impairment of

  11. Unimpaired Perception of Social and Physical Causality, but Impaired Perception of Animacy in High Functioning Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congiu, Sara; Schlottmann, Anne; Ray, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    We investigated perception of social and physical causality and animacy in simple motion events, for high-functioning children with autism (CA = 13, VMA = 9.6). Children matched 14 different animations to pictures showing physical, social or non-causality. In contrast to previous work, children with autism performed at a high level similar to…

  12. Evidence for Impairments in Using Static Line Drawings of Eye Gaze Cues to Orient Visual-Spatial Attention in Children with High Functioning Autism

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Melissa C.; Mostow, Allison J.; Vecera, Shaun P.; Larson, Jennifer C. Gidley; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Mahone, E. Mark; Denckla, Martha B.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the ability to use static line drawings of eye gaze cues to orient visual-spatial attention in children with high functioning autism (HFA) compared to typically developing children (TD). The task was organized such that on valid trials, gaze cues were directed toward the same spatial location as the appearance of an upcoming target, while on invalid trials gaze cues were directed to an opposite location. Unlike TD children, children with HFA showed no advantage in reaction time (RT) on valid trials compared to invalid trials (i.e., no significant validity effect). The two stimulus onset asynchronies (200 ms, 700 ms) did not differentially affect these findings. The results suggest that children with HFA show impairments in utilizing static line drawings of gaze cues to orient visual-spatial attention. PMID:18074212

  13. The Contribution of Childhood Parental Rejection and Early Androgen Exposure to Impairments in Socio-Cognitive Skills in Intimate Partner Violence Perpetrators with High Alcohol Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Martínez, Ángel; Lila, Marisol; Catalá-Miñana, Alba; Williams, Ryan K.; Moya-Albiol, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol consumption, a larger history of childhood parental rejection, and high prenatal androgen exposure have been linked with facilitation and high risk of recidivism in intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators. Participants were distributed into two groups according to their alcohol consumption scores as high (HA) and low (LA). HA presented a higher history of childhood parental rejection, prenatal masculinization (smaller 2D:4D ratio), and violence-related scores than LA IPV perpetrators. Nonetheless, the former showed poor socio-cognitive skills performance (cognitive flexibility, emotional recognition and cognitive empathy). Particularly in HA IPV perpetrators, the history of childhood parental rejection was associated with high hostile sexism and low cognitive empathy. Moreover, a masculinized 2D:4D ratio was associated with high anger expression and low cognitive empathy. Parental rejection during childhood and early androgen exposure are relevant factors for the development of violence and the lack of adequate empathy in adulthood. Furthermore, alcohol abuse plays a key role in the development of socio-cognitive impairments and in the proneness to violence and its recidivism. These findings contribute to new coadjutant violence intervention programs, focused on the rehabilitation of basic executive functions and emotional decoding processes and on the treatment of alcohol dependence. PMID:23965927

  14. The contribution of childhood parental rejection and early androgen exposure to impairments in socio-cognitive skills in intimate partner violence perpetrators with high alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Romero-Martínez, Ángel; Lila, Marisol; Catalá-Miñana, Alba; Williams, Ryan K; Moya-Albiol, Luis

    2013-08-01

    Alcohol consumption, a larger history of childhood parental rejection, and high prenatal androgen exposure have been linked with facilitation and high risk of recidivism in intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators. Participants were distributed into two groups according to their alcohol consumption scores as high (HA) and low (LA). HA presented a higher history of childhood parental rejection, prenatal masculinization (smaller 2D:4D ratio), and violence-related scores than LA IPV perpetrators. Nonetheless, the former showed poor socio-cognitive skills performance (cognitive flexibility, emotional recognition and cognitive empathy). Particularly in HA IPV perpetrators, the history of childhood parental rejection was associated with high hostile sexism and low cognitive empathy. Moreover, a masculinized 2D:4D ratio was associated with high anger expression and low cognitive empathy. Parental rejection during childhood and early androgen exposure are relevant factors for the development of violence and the lack of adequate empathy in adulthood. Furthermore, alcohol abuse plays a key role in the development of socio-cognitive impairments and in the proneness to violence and its recidivism. These findings contribute to new coadjutant violence intervention programs, focused on the rehabilitation of basic executive functions and emotional decoding processes and on the treatment of alcohol dependence. PMID:23965927

  15. Magnolia bioactive constituent 4-O-methylhonokiol prevents the impairment of cardiac insulin signaling and the cardiac pathogenesis in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Jing; Zhou, Shanshan; Wang, Shudong; Cai, Xiaohong; Conklin, Daniel J; Kim, Ki-Soo; Kim, Ki Ho; Tan, Yi; Zheng, Yang; Kim, Young Heui; Cai, Lu

    2015-01-01

    In obesity, cardiac insulin resistance is a putative cause of cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. In our previous study, we observed that Magnolia extract BL153 attenuated high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced cardiac pathogenic changes. In this study, we further investigated the protective effects of the BL153 bioactive constituent, 4-O-methylhonokiol (MH), against HFD-induced cardiac pathogenesis and its possible mechanisms. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal diet or a HFD with gavage administration of vehicle, BL153, or MH (low or high dose) daily for 24 weeks. Treatment with MH attenuated HFD-induced obesity, as evidenced by body weight gain, and cardiac pathogenesis, as assessed by the heart weight and echocardiography. Mechanistically, MH treatment significantly reduced HFD-induced impairment of cardiac insulin signaling by preferentially augmenting Akt2 signaling. MH also inhibited cardiac expression of the inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor-α and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and increased the phosphorylation of nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) as well as the expression of a Nrf2 downstream target gene heme oxygenase-1. The increased Nrf2 signaling was associated with decreased oxidative stress and damage, as reflected by lowered malondialdehyde and 3-nitrotyrosine levels. Furthermore, MH reduced HFD-induced cardiac lipid accumulation along with lowering expression of cardiac fatty acid translocase/CD36 protein. These results suggest that MH, a bioactive constituent of Magnolia, prevents HFD-induced cardiac pathogenesis by attenuating the impairment of cardiac insulin signaling, perhaps via activation of Nrf2 and Akt2 signaling to attenuate CD36-mediated lipid accumulation and lipotoxicity. PMID:26157343

  16. AC1MMYR2 impairs high dose paclitaxel-induced tumor metastasis by targeting miR-21/CDK5 axis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yu; Zhou, Xuan; Yang, Juan-Juan; Liu, Xia; Zhao, Xiao-hui; Wang, Qi-xue; Han, Lei; Song, Xin; Zhu, Zhi-yan; Tian, Wei-ping; Zhang, Lun; Mei, Mei; Kang, Chun-sheng

    2015-07-01

    Paclitaxel (taxol) is a widely used chemo-drug for many solid tumors, while continual taxol treatment is revealed to stimulate tumor dissemination. We previously found that a small molecule inhibitor of miR-21, termed AC1MMYR2, had the potential to impair tumorigenesis and metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether combining AC1MMYR2 with taxol could be explored as a means to limit tumor metastasis. Here we showed that abnormal activation of miR-21/CDK5 axis was associated with breast cancer lymph node metastasis, which was also contribute to high dose taxol-induced invasion and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in both breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and glioblastoma cell line U87VIII. AC1MMYR2 attenuated CDK5 activity by functional targeting CDK5RAP1, CDK5 activator p39 and target p-FAK(ser732). A series of in vitro assays indicated that treatment of AC1MMYR2 combined with taxol suppressed tumor migration and invasion ability in both MDA-MB-231 and U87VIII cell. More importantly, combination therapy impaired high-dose taxol induced invadopodia, and EMT markers including β-catenin, E-cadherin and vimentin. Strikingly, a significant reduction of lung metastasis in mice was observed in the AC1MMYR2 plus taxol treatment. Taken together, our work demonstrated that AC1MMYR2 appeared to be a promising strategy in combating taxol induced cancer metastasis by targeting miR-21/CDK5 axis, which highlighted the potential for development of therapeutic modalities for better clinic taxol application.

  17. AC1MMYR2 impairs high dose paclitaxel-induced tumor metastasis by targeting miR-21/CDK5 axis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yu; Zhou, Xuan; Yang, Juan-Juan; Liu, Xia; Zhao, Xiao-hui; Wang, Qi-xue; Han, Lei; Song, Xin; Zhu, Zhi-yan; Tian, Wei-ping; Zhang, Lun; Mei, Mei; Kang, Chun-sheng

    2015-07-01

    Paclitaxel (taxol) is a widely used chemo-drug for many solid tumors, while continual taxol treatment is revealed to stimulate tumor dissemination. We previously found that a small molecule inhibitor of miR-21, termed AC1MMYR2, had the potential to impair tumorigenesis and metastasis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether combining AC1MMYR2 with taxol could be explored as a means to limit tumor metastasis. Here we showed that abnormal activation of miR-21/CDK5 axis was associated with breast cancer lymph node metastasis, which was also contribute to high dose taxol-induced invasion and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) in both breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and glioblastoma cell line U87VIII. AC1MMYR2 attenuated CDK5 activity by functional targeting CDK5RAP1, CDK5 activator p39 and target p-FAK(ser732). A series of in vitro assays indicated that treatment of AC1MMYR2 combined with taxol suppressed tumor migration and invasion ability in both MDA-MB-231 and U87VIII cell. More importantly, combination therapy impaired high-dose taxol induced invadopodia, and EMT markers including β-catenin, E-cadherin and vimentin. Strikingly, a significant reduction of lung metastasis in mice was observed in the AC1MMYR2 plus taxol treatment. Taken together, our work demonstrated that AC1MMYR2 appeared to be a promising strategy in combating taxol induced cancer metastasis by targeting miR-21/CDK5 axis, which highlighted the potential for development of therapeutic modalities for better clinic taxol application. PMID:25827073

  18. High avidity cytotoxic T lymphocytes can be selected into the memory pool but they are exquisitely sensitive to functional impairment.

    PubMed

    Brentville, Victoria A; Metheringham, Rachael L; Gunn, Barbara; Durrant, Lindy G

    2012-01-01

    High avidity cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are important in viral clearance and anti-tumor immunity, however, mechanisms for their optimal generation and maintenance in vivo remain unclear. Immunizing mice with an antibody-DNA vaccine encoding a single CTL epitope, induces a 100 fold higher avidity response than peptide vaccination with the identical epitope. The high avidity response is retained into memory and can be efficiently reactivated with an antibody-DNA boost. In contrast, reactivation of high avidity CTL with peptide, stimulated responses with a significant drop in avidity, suggesting loss or conversion of the high avidity CTL to lower avidity. Similarly, high avidity T cells maintained ex vivo were exquisitely sensitive to signaling with low doses of peptide (1 ng/ml) giving optimal TCR stimulation and resulting in retained avidity, proliferation and ability to kill specific targets. In contrast, high avidity T cells maintained ex vivo with supraoptimal TCR stimulation (10 µg/ml peptide) resulted in reduced avidity and failure to kill tumor cells. They also failed to proliferate, showed a significant increase in apoptosis and expressed high levels of the exhaustion marker programmed death-1 (PD-1) and low levels of the lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG-3). This suggests high avidity T cells are recruited to the memory pool but can be lost by supraoptimal stimulation in vitro and in vivo. This is characterized by loss of function and an increase in cell death. The remaining CTL, exhibit low functional avidity that is reflected in reduced anti-tumor activity. This could contribute to failure of the immune system to control the growth of tumors and has implications for vaccination strategies and adoptive transfer of T cells. PMID:22829916

  19. Hearing Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) . Personal music players are among the chief culprits of NIHL ... exposure to high noise levels (such as loud music) over time can cause permanent damage to the ...

  20. Titanium Implant Impairment and Surrounding Muscle Cell Death Following High-Salt Diet: An In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Lecocq, Mathieu; Felix, Marie-Solenne; Linares, Jean-Marc; Chaves-Jacob, Julien; Decherchi, Patrick; Dousset, Erick

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study High-salt consumption has been widely described as a risk factor for cardiovascular, renal and bone functions. In the present study, the extent to which high-salt diet could influence Ti6Al4V implant surface characteristic, its adhesion to rat tibial crest, and could modify muscle cell viability of two surrounding muscles, was investigated in vivo. These parameters have also been assessed following a NMES (neuro-myoelectrostimulation) program similar to that currently used in human care following arthroplasty. Results After a three-week diet, a harmful effect on titanium implant surface and muscle cell viability was noted. This is probably due to salt corrosive effect on metal and then release of toxic substance around biologic tissue. Moreover, if the use of NMES with high-salt diet induced muscles damages, the latter were higher when implant was added. Unexpectedly, higher implant-to-bone adhesion was found for implanted animals receiving salt supplementation. Conclusion Our in vivo study highlights the potential dangerous effect of high-salt diet in arthroplasty based on titanium prosthesis. This effect appears to be more important when high-salt diet is combined with NMES. PMID:26761710

  1. Exercise prevents high-fat diet-induced impairment of flexible memory expression in the water maze and modulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Klein, C; Jonas, W; Iggena, D; Empl, L; Rivalan, M; Wiedmer, P; Spranger, J; Hellweg, R; Winter, Y; Steiner, B

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is currently one of the most serious threats to human health in the western civilization. A growing body of evidence suggests that obesity is associated with cognitive dysfunction. Physical exercise not only improves fitness but it has also been shown in human and animal studies to increase hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and physical exercise both modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis has been demonstrated to play a role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory, particularly flexible memory expression. Here, we investigated the effects of twelve weeks of HFD vs. control diet (CD) and voluntary physical activity (wheel running; -R) vs. inactivity (sedentary; -S) on hippocampal neurogenesis and spatial learning and flexible memory function in female C57Bl/6 mice assessed in the Morris water maze. HFD was initiated either in adolescent mice combined with long-term concurrent exercise (preventive approach) or in young adult mice with 14days of subsequent exercise (therapeutic approach). HFD resulted in impaired flexible memory expression only when initiated in adolescent (HFD-S) but not in young adult mice, which was successfully prevented by concurrent exercise (HFD-R). Histological analysis revealed a reduction of immature neurons in the hippocampus of the memory-impaired HFD-S mice of the preventive approach. Long-term physical exercise also led to accelerated spatial learning during the acquisition period, which was accompanied by increased numbers of newborn mature neurons (HFD-R and CD-R). Short-term exercise of 14days in the therapeutic group was not effective in improving spatial learning or memory. We show that (1) alterations in learning and flexible memory expression are accompanied by changes in the number of neuronal cells at different maturation stages; (2) these neuronal cells are in turn differently affected by HFD; (3) adolescent mice are specifically susceptible to the

  2. Exercise prevents high-fat diet-induced impairment of flexible memory expression in the water maze and modulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Klein, C; Jonas, W; Iggena, D; Empl, L; Rivalan, M; Wiedmer, P; Spranger, J; Hellweg, R; Winter, Y; Steiner, B

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is currently one of the most serious threats to human health in the western civilization. A growing body of evidence suggests that obesity is associated with cognitive dysfunction. Physical exercise not only improves fitness but it has also been shown in human and animal studies to increase hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and physical exercise both modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis has been demonstrated to play a role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory, particularly flexible memory expression. Here, we investigated the effects of twelve weeks of HFD vs. control diet (CD) and voluntary physical activity (wheel running; -R) vs. inactivity (sedentary; -S) on hippocampal neurogenesis and spatial learning and flexible memory function in female C57Bl/6 mice assessed in the Morris water maze. HFD was initiated either in adolescent mice combined with long-term concurrent exercise (preventive approach) or in young adult mice with 14days of subsequent exercise (therapeutic approach). HFD resulted in impaired flexible memory expression only when initiated in adolescent (HFD-S) but not in young adult mice, which was successfully prevented by concurrent exercise (HFD-R). Histological analysis revealed a reduction of immature neurons in the hippocampus of the memory-impaired HFD-S mice of the preventive approach. Long-term physical exercise also led to accelerated spatial learning during the acquisition period, which was accompanied by increased numbers of newborn mature neurons (HFD-R and CD-R). Short-term exercise of 14days in the therapeutic group was not effective in improving spatial learning or memory. We show that (1) alterations in learning and flexible memory expression are accompanied by changes in the number of neuronal cells at different maturation stages; (2) these neuronal cells are in turn differently affected by HFD; (3) adolescent mice are specifically susceptible to the

  3. Relationships among Testing Medium, Test Performance, and Testing Time of High School Students Who Are Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erin, Jane N.; Hong, Sunggye; Schoch, Christina; Kuo, YaJu

    2006-01-01

    This study compared the test scores and time required by high school students who are blind, sighted, or have low vision to complete tests administered in written and oral formats. The quantitative results showed that the blind students performed better on multiple-choice tests in braille and needed more time while taking tests in braille. The…

  4. The Inhibition of the Highly Expressed Mir-221 and Mir-222 Impairs the Growth of Prostate Carcinoma Xenografts in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mercatelli, Neri; Coppola, Valeria; Bonci, Desirée; Miele, Francesca; Costantini, Arianna; Guadagnoli, Marco; Bonanno, Elena; Muto, Giovanni; Frajese, Giovanni Vanni; De Maria, Ruggero; Spagnoli, Luigi Giusto; Farace, Maria Giulia; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna

    2008-01-01

    Background MiR-221 and miR-222 are two highly homologous microRNAs whose upregulation has been recently described in several types of human tumors, for some of which their oncogenic role was explained by the discovery of their target p27, a key cell cycle regulator. We previously showed this regulatory relationship in prostate carcinoma cell lines in vitro, underlying the role of miR-221/222 as inducers of proliferation and tumorigenicity. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a number of in vivo approaches confirming our previous data. The ectopic overexpression of miR-221 is able, per se, to confer a high growth advantage to LNCaP-derived tumors in SCID mice. Consistently, the anti-miR-221/222 antagomir treatment of established subcutaneous tumors derived from the highly aggressive PC3 cell line, naturally expressing high levels of miR-221/222, reduces tumor growth by increasing intratumoral p27 amount; this effect is long lasting, as it is detectable as long as 25 days after the treatment. Furthermore, we provide evidence in favour of a clinical relevance of the role of miR-221/222 in prostate carcinoma, by showing their general upregulation in patient-derived primary cell lines, where we find a significant inverse correlation with p27 expression. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that modulating miR-221/222 levels may have a therapeutic potential in prostate carcinoma. PMID:19107213

  5. Long-term Treatment of Teicoplanin for Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Sternal Osteomyelitis with Renal Impairment: A Case of High Teicoplanin Trough Levels Maintained by Therapeutic Drug Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Shiohira, Hideo; Nakamatsu, Masashi; Kise, Yuya; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Hokama, Nobuo; Kuniyoshi, Yukio; Ueda, Shinichiro; Nakamura, Katsunori; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Teicoplanin, a glycopeptide antibiotic for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, is recommended for therapeutic drug monitoring during treatment. Maintaining a high trough range of teicoplanin is also recommended for severe infectious disease. However, the optimal dose and interval of treatment for severe renal impairment is unknown. We report a 79-year-old man who received long-term teicoplanin treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia due to postoperative sternal osteomyelitis with renal impairment. Plasma teicoplanin trough levels were maintained at a high range (20-30 μg/mL). Although the patient required long-term teicoplanin treatment, a further decline in renal function was not observed, and blood culture remained negative after the start of treatment. Teicoplanin treatment that is maintained at a high trough level by therapeutic drug monitoring might be beneficial for severe methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection accompanied by renal impairment. PMID:27592834

  6. Knockdown of neuropeptide Y in the dorsomedial hypothalamus reverses high-fat diet-induced obesity and impaired glucose tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonwook J; Bi, Sheng

    2016-01-15

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) plays an important role in the regulation of energy balance. While DMH NPY overexpression causes hyperphagia and obesity in rats, knockdown of NPY in the DMH via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated RNAi (AAVshNPY) ameliorates these alterations. Whether this knockdown has a therapeutic effect on obesity and glycemic disorder has yet to be determined. The present study sought to test this potential using a rat model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and insulin resistance, mimicking human obesity with impaired glucose homeostasis. Rats had ad libitum access to rodent regular chow (RC) or HFD. Six weeks later, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed for verifying HFD-induced glucose intolerance. After verification, obese rats received bilateral DMH injections of AAVshNPY or the control vector AAVshCTL, and OGTT and insulin tolerance test (ITT) were performed at 16 and 18 wk after viral injection (23 and 25 wk on HFD), respectively. Rats were killed at 26 wk on HFD. We found that AAVshCTL rats on HFD remained hyperphagic, obese, glucose intolerant, and insulin resistant relative to lean control RC-fed rats receiving DMH injection of AAVshCTL, whereas these alterations were reversed in NPY knockdown rats fed a HFD. NPY knockdown rats exhibited normal food intake, body weight, glucose tolerance, and insulin sensitivity, as seen in lean control rats. Together, these results demonstrate a therapeutic action of DMH NPY knockdown against obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis in rats, providing a potential target for the treatment of obesity and diabetes.

  7. In vitro TNF-α- and noradrenaline-stimulated lipolysis is impaired in adipocytes from growing rats fed a low-protein, high-carbohydrate diet.

    PubMed

    Feres, Daniel D S; Dos Santos, Maísa P; Buzelle, Samyra L; Pereira, Mayara P; de França, Suélem A; Garófalo, Maria A R; Andrade, Cláudia M B; Froelich, Mendalli; de Almeida, Fhelipe J S; Frasson, Danúbia; Chaves, Valéria E; Kawashita, Nair H

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)- and noradrenaline (NE)-stimulated lipolysis in retroperitoneal (RWAT) and epididymal (EAT) white adipose tissue as a means of understanding how low-protein, high-carbohydrate (LPHC) diet-fed rats maintain their lipid storage in a catabolic environment (marked by increases in serum TNF-α and corticosterone and sympathetic flux to RWAT and EAT), as previously observed. Adipocytes or tissues from the RWAT and EAT of rats fed an LPHC diet and rats fed a control (C) diet for 15 days were used in the experiments. The adipocytes from both tissues of the LPHC rats exhibited lower TNF-α- stimulated lipolysis compared to adipocytes from the C rats. The intracellular lipolytic agents IBMX, DBcAMPc and FSK increased lipolysis in both tissues from rats fed the C and LPHC diets compared to basal lipolysis; however, the effect was approximately 2.5-fold lower in adipocytes from LPHC rats. The LPHC diet induced a marked reduction in the β3 and α2-AR, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) content in RWAT and EAT. The LPHC diet did not affect TNF-α receptor 1 content but did induce a reduction in ERK p44/42 in both tissues. The present work indicates that RWAT and EAT from LPHC rats have an impairment in the lipolysis signaling pathway activated by NE and TNF-α, and this impairment explains the reduced response to these lipolytic stimuli, which may be fundamental to the maintenance of lipid storage in LPHC rats.

  8. Impaired Cholesterol Efflux Capacity of High-Density Lipoprotein Isolated From Interstitial Fluid in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus—Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Tietge, Uwe J.F.; Dikkers, Arne; Parini, Paolo; Angelin, Bo; Rudling, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Objective— Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, the mechanism of which is incompletely understood. Their high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles in plasma have been reported to have impaired cholesterol efflux capacity. However, the efflux capacity of HDL from interstitial fluid (IF), the starting point for reverse cholesterol transport, has not been studied. We here investigated the cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL from IF and plasma from T2D patients and healthy controls. Approach and Results— HDL was isolated from IF and peripheral plasma from 35 T2D patients and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Cholesterol efflux to HDL was determined in vitro, normalized for HDL cholesterol, using cholesterol-loaded macrophages. Efflux capacity of plasma HDL was 10% lower in T2D patients than in healthy controls, in line with previous observations. This difference was much more pronounced for HDL from IF, where efflux capacity was reduced by 28% in T2D. Somewhat surprisingly, the efflux capacity of HDL from IF was lower than that of plasma HDL, by 15% and 32% in controls and T2D patients, respectively. Conclusion— These data demonstrate that (1) HDL from IF has a lower cholesterol efflux capacity than plasma HDL and (2) the efflux capacity of HDL from IF is severely impaired in T2D when compared with controls. Because IF comprises the compartment where reverse cholesterol transport is initiated, the marked reduction in cholesterol efflux capacity of IF-HDL from T2D patients may play an important role for their increased risk to develop atherosclerosis. PMID:27034474

  9. High Working Memory Load Impairs Language Processing during a Simulated Piloting Task: An ERP and Pupillometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Causse, Mickaël; Peysakhovich, Vsevolod; Fabre, Eve F.

    2016-01-01

    Given the important amount of visual and auditory linguistic information that pilots have to process, operating an aircraft generates a high working-memory load (WML). In this context, the ability to focus attention on relevant information and to remain responsive to concurrent stimuli might be altered. Consequently, understanding the effects of WML on the processing of both linguistic targets and distractors is of particular interest in the study of pilot performance. In the present work, participants performed a simplified piloting task in which they had to follow one of three colored aircraft, according to specific written instructions (i.e., the written word for the color corresponding to the color of one of the aircraft) and to ignore either congruent or incongruent concurrent auditory distractors (i.e., a spoken name of color). The WML was manipulated with an n-back sub-task. Participants were instructed to apply the current written instruction in the low WML condition, and the 2-back written instruction in the high WML condition. Electrophysiological results revealed a major effect of WML at behavioral (i.e., decline of piloting performance), electrophysiological, and autonomic levels (i.e., greater pupil diameter). Increased WML consumed resources that could not be allocated to the processing of the linguistic stimuli, as indexed by lower P300/P600 amplitudes. Also, significantly, lower P600 responses were measured in incongruent vs. congruent trials in the low WML condition, showing a higher difficulty reorienting attention toward the written instruction, but this effect was canceled in the high WML condition. This suppression of interference in the high load condition is in line with the engagement/distraction trade-off model. We propose that P300/P600 components could be reliable indicators of WML and that they allow an estimation of its impact on the processing of linguistic stimuli. PMID:27252639

  10. High Working Memory Load Impairs Language Processing during a Simulated Piloting Task: An ERP and Pupillometry Study.

    PubMed

    Causse, Mickaël; Peysakhovich, Vsevolod; Fabre, Eve F

    2016-01-01

    Given the important amount of visual and auditory linguistic information that pilots have to process, operating an aircraft generates a high working-memory load (WML). In this context, the ability to focus attention on relevant information and to remain responsive to concurrent stimuli might be altered. Consequently, understanding the effects of WML on the processing of both linguistic targets and distractors is of particular interest in the study of pilot performance. In the present work, participants performed a simplified piloting task in which they had to follow one of three colored aircraft, according to specific written instructions (i.e., the written word for the color corresponding to the color of one of the aircraft) and to ignore either congruent or incongruent concurrent auditory distractors (i.e., a spoken name of color). The WML was manipulated with an n-back sub-task. Participants were instructed to apply the current written instruction in the low WML condition, and the 2-back written instruction in the high WML condition. Electrophysiological results revealed a major effect of WML at behavioral (i.e., decline of piloting performance), electrophysiological, and autonomic levels (i.e., greater pupil diameter). Increased WML consumed resources that could not be allocated to the processing of the linguistic stimuli, as indexed by lower P300/P600 amplitudes. Also, significantly, lower P600 responses were measured in incongruent vs. congruent trials in the low WML condition, showing a higher difficulty reorienting attention toward the written instruction, but this effect was canceled in the high WML condition. This suppression of interference in the high load condition is in line with the engagement/distraction trade-off model. We propose that P300/P600 components could be reliable indicators of WML and that they allow an estimation of its impact on the processing of linguistic stimuli. PMID:27252639

  11. High Hemoglobin Levels Maintained by an Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent Improve Renal Survival in Patients with Severe Renal Impairment.

    PubMed

    Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Akizawa, Tadao; Iwasaki, Manabu; Shimazaki, Ryutaro

    2015-10-01

    Our goal was to investigate the effect modification of maintaining a high Hb target range through erythropoiesis-stimulating agent therapy on the renal outcome with respect to chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage and concurrent diabetes condition in patients with CKD. We used data from a previously reported randomized controlled trial involving 321 CKD patients not on dialysis, with Hb levels of <10 g/dL, and serum creatinine (Cr) of 2.0 to 6.0 mg/dL, and in which maintaining Hb levels at 11.0-13.0 g/dL with darbepoetin-α (High Hb group) resulted in a greater renal protective effect than maintaining Hb levels at 9.0-11.0 g/dL with epoetin-α (Low Hb group). We conducted a post-hoc analysis of the effects of baseline CKD stage and concurrent diabetic condition on the renal composite endpoint, consisting of death, initiation of renal replacement therapy, and doubling of the serum Cr level. Both groups with stage 4 CKD had a 3-year cumulative renal survival rate of 53.8%, whereas in patients with stage 5 CKD, the rate in the High Hb group (31.0%) was significantly (P = 0.012) higher than that in the Low Hb group (19.1%). The observations made in patients with stage 5 CKD were maintained on further analysis of non-diabetic patients, but were not seen in those with diabetes or stage 4 CKD. These results suggest that in patients with stage 5 CKD, especially those without diabetes, achieving a higher target Hb level with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents is associated with a greater renoprotective effect. PMID:25944732

  12. High levels of plasma cortisol and impaired hypoosmoregulation in a mutant medaka deficient in P450c17I.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideya; Sato, Tadashi; Ikeuchi, Toshitaka; Saito, Kazuhiro; Sakaizumi, Mitsuru; Sakamoto, Tatsuya

    2016-07-15

    scl is a spontaneous medaka mutant deficient in P450c17I, which is required for production of sex steroids, but not of cortisol, the major role of which is osmoregulation in teleost fish. The scl mutant provides a new model to study the functions of these hormones. We first found that fish homozygous for this mutation have plasma cortisol constitutively at a high physiological level (1000 nM). Since we previously showed that this level reversed the seawater-type differentiation of the medaka gastrointestinal tract, hypoosmoregulation of the scl mutant was analyzed. Muscle water contents in freshwater were normal in scl homozygotes, but the contents were lower than those of the wild type (WT) after seawater transfer. There were no differences in gill mRNA levels of corticosteroid receptors or ion transporters between scl homozygotes and WT. In the intestine, expression of glucocorticoid receptors and Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter were induced in WT during seawater acclimation, but not in scl homozygotes. The high plasma cortisol may prevent hypoosmoregulation by inhibition of increased intestinal water absorption, essentially by the Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter, in seawater. PMID:27107936

  13. A high-fat diet impairs cooling-evoked brown adipose tissue activation via a vagal afferent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Madden, Christopher J; Morrison, Shaun F

    2016-08-01

    In dramatic contrast to rats on a control diet, rats maintained on a high-fat diet (HFD) failed to activate brown adipose tissue (BAT) during cooling despite robust increases in their BAT activity following direct activation of their BAT sympathetic premotor neurons in the raphe pallidus. Cervical vagotomy or blockade of glutamate receptors in the nucleus of the tractus solitarii (NTS) reversed the HFD-induced inhibition of cold-evoked BAT activity. Thus, a HFD does not prevent rats from mounting a robust, centrally driven BAT thermogenesis; however, a HFD does alter a vagal afferent input to NTS neurons, thereby preventing the normal activation of BAT thermogenesis to cooling. These results, paralleling the absence of cooling-evoked glucose uptake in the BAT of obese humans, reveal a neural mechanism through which consumption of a HFD contributes to reduced energy expenditure and thus to weight gain. PMID:27354235

  14. High heterogeneity and low reliability in the diagnosis of major depression will impair the development of new drugs

    PubMed Central

    Castle, David J.; Pantelis, Christos; Hopwood, Malcolm; Young, Allan Hunter; Everall, Ian P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Major depressive disorder is a common diagnosis associated with a high burden of disease that has proven to be highly heterogeneous and unreliable. Treatments currently available demonstrate limited efficacy and effectiveness. New drug development is urgently required but is likely to be hindered by diagnostic limitations. Declarations of interest D.J.C. has received grants and personal fees from Eli Lilly, Janssen-Cilag, Roche, Allergen, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Pfizer, Lundbeck, AstraZeneca, Hospira, Organon, Sanofi-Aventis, and Wyeth during the writing of this review. C.P. has received grant support from Janssen-Cilag, Eli Lilly, Hospira (Mayne), AstraZeneca, and received honoraria for consultancy to Janssen-Cilag, Eli Lilly, Hospira (Mayne), AstraZeneca, Pfizer, Schering Plough, and Lundbeck. Over the past 2 years he has participated on advisory boards for Janssen-Cilag and Lundbeck, and received honoraria for talks presented at educational meetings organised by AstraZeneca, Janssen-Cilag and Lundbeck. M.H. has received personal fees or grants from Lundbeck, AstraZeneca and Servier during the writing of this review. A.H.Y. reports personal fees from Lundbeck, Sunovion, AstraZeneca and Janssen outside the submitted work. I.P.E. has received personal fees or grants from Lundbeck, AstraZeneca, and Abbvie during the writing of this review. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703745

  15. Impaired Transcriptional Response of the Murine Heart to Cigarette Smoke in the Setting of High Fat Diet and Obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Mikheev, Vladimir B.; Lee, K. M.; Corley, Richard A.; Pounds, Joel G.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2013-07-01

    Smoking and obesity are each well-established risk factors for cardiovascular heart disease, which together impose earlier onset and greater severity of disease. To identify early signaling events in the response of the heart to cigarette smoke exposure within the setting of obesity, we exposed normal weight and high fat diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6 mice to repeated inhaled doses of mainstream (MS) or sidestream (SS) cigarette smoke administered over a two week period, monitoring effects on both cardiac and pulmonary transcriptomes. MS smoke (250 μg wet total particulate matter (WTPM)/L, 5 h/day) exposures elicited robust cellular and molecular inflammatory responses in the lung with 1466 differentially expressed pulmonary genes (p < 0.01) in normal weight animals and a much-attenuated response (463 genes) in the hearts of the same animals. In contrast, exposures to SS smoke (85 μg WTPM/L) with a CO concentration equivalent to that of MS smoke (250 CO ppm) induced a weak pulmonary response (328 genes) but an extensive cardiac response (1590 genes). SS smoke and to a lesser extent MS smoke preferentially elicited hypoxia- and stress-responsive genes as well as genes predicting early changes of vascular smooth muscle and endothelium, precursors of cardiovascular disease. The most sensitive smoke-induced cardiac transcriptional changes of normal weight mice were largely absent in DIO mice after smoke exposure, while genes involved in fatty acid utilization were unaffected. At the same time, smoke exposure suppressed multiple proteome maintenance genes induced in the hearts of DIO mice. Together, these results underscore the sensitivity of the heart to SS smoke and reveal adaptive responses in healthy individuals that are absent in the setting of high fat diet and obesity.

  16. Rats with metabolic syndrome resist the protective effects of N-acetyl l-cystein against impaired spermatogenesis induced by high-phosphorus/zinc-free diet.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuka; Ichihara, Gaku; Sahabudeen, Sheik Mohideen; Kato, Ai; Yamaguchi, Takanori; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Yamada, Yoshiji; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2013-11-01

    Consumption of relatively high amounts of processed food can result in abnormal nutritional status, such as zinc deficiency or phosphorus excess. Moreover, hyperphosphatemia and hypozincemia are found in some patients with diabetic nephropathy and metabolic syndrome. The present study investigated the effects of high-phosphorus/zinc-free diet on the reproductive function of spontaneously hypertensive rats/NDmcr-cp (SHR/cp), a model of the metabolic syndrome. We also investigated the effects of antioxidant, N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), on testicular dysfunction under such conditions. Male SHR/cp and control rats (Wistar Kyoto rats, WKY) were divided into three groups; rats fed control diet (P 0.3%, w/w; Zn 0.2%, w/w), high-phosphorus and zinc-deficient diet (P 1.2%, w/w; Zn 0.0%, w/w) with vehicle, or high-phosphorus and zinc-deficient diet with NAC (1.5mg/g/day) for 12 weeks (n=6 or 8 rats/group). The weights of testis and epididymis were significantly reduced by high-phosphate/zinc-free diet in both SHR/cp and WKY. The same diet significantly reduced caudal epididymal sperm count and motility and induced histopathological changes in the testis in both strains. Treatment with NAC provided significant protection against the toxic effects of the diet on testicular function in WKY, but not in SHR/cp. The lack of the protective effects of NAC on impaired spermatogenesis in SHR/cp could be due to the more pronounced state of oxidative stress observed in these rats compared with WKY.

  17. Differentiation of the ILO boundary chest roentgenograph (0/1 to 1/0) in asbestosis by high-resolution computed tomography scan, alveolitis, and respiratory impairment.

    PubMed

    Harkin, T J; McGuinness, G; Goldring, R; Cohen, H; Parker, J E; Crane, M; Naidich, D P; Rom, W N

    1996-01-01

    High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans have been advocated as providing greater sensitivity in detecting parenchymal opacities in asbestos-exposed individuals, especially in the presence of pleural fibrosis, and having excellent inter- and intraobserver reader interpretation. We compared the 1980 International Labor Organization (ILO) International Classification of the Radiographs of the Pneumoconioses for asbestosis with the high-resolution CT scan using a grid scoring system to better differentiate normal versus abnormal in the ILO boundary 0/1 to 1/0 chest roentgenograph. We studied 37 asbestos-exposed individuals using the ILO classification, HRCT grid scores, respiratory symptom questionnaires, pulmonary function tests, and bronchoalveolar lavage. We used Pearson correlation coefficients to evaluate the linear relationship between outcome variables and each roentgenographic method. The normal HRCT scan proved to be an excellent predictor of "normality," with pulmonary function values close to 100% for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), total lung capacity (TLC), and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO) and no increase in BAL inflammatory cells. Concordant HRCT/ILO abnormalities were associated with reduced FEV1/FVC ratio, reduced diffusing capacity, and alveolitis consistent with a definition of asbestosis. In our study, the ILO classification and HRCT grid scores were both excellent modalities for the assessment of asbestosis and its association with impaired physiology and alveolitis, with their combined use providing statistical associations with alveolitis and reduced diffusing capacity.

  18. Prion-Protein-interacting Amyloid-β Oligomers of High Molecular Weight Are Tightly Correlated with Memory Impairment in Multiple Alzheimer Mouse Models*

    PubMed Central

    Kostylev, Mikhail A.; Kaufman, Adam C.; Nygaard, Haakon B.; Patel, Pujan; Haas, Laura T.; Gunther, Erik C.; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by amyloid-β accumulation, with soluble oligomers (Aβo) being the most synaptotoxic. However, the multivalent and unstable nature of Aβo limits molecular characterization and hinders research reproducibility. Here, we characterized multiple Aβo forms throughout the life span of various AD mice and in post-mortem human brain. Aβo exists in several populations, where prion protein (PrPC)-interacting Aβo is a high molecular weight Aβ assembly present in multiple mice and humans with AD. Levels of PrPC-interacting Aβo match closely with mouse memory and are equal or superior to other Aβ measures in predicting behavioral impairment. However, Aβo metrics vary considerably between mouse strains. Deleting PrPC expression in mice with relatively low PrPC-interacting Aβo (Tg2576) results in partial rescue of cognitive performance as opposed to complete recovery in animals with a high percentage of PrPC-interacting Aβo (APP/PSEN1). These findings highlight the relative contributions and interplay of Aβo forms in AD. PMID:26018073

  19. Osteocalcin attenuates high fat diet-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation through Akt/eNOS-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies have demonstrated a protective effect of osteocalcin (OCN) on glucose homeostasis and metabolic syndrome. However, its role in vascular function remains unknown. This study investigated the contribution of OCN to the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction in the thoracic aorta of apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-KO) mice. Methods Eight-week-old ApoE–KO mice were given chow or high fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks with or without daily intraperitoneal injection of OCN. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT), insulin tolerance test (ITT),measurement of serum lipid profiles and blood pressure were carried out. Endothelium-dependent relaxation (EDR) was measured by wire myography. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to study the role of OCN on eNOS levels in vitro. PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) and Akt inhibitor V were used ex-vivo to determine whether PI3K/Akt/eNOS contributes to the beneficial effect of OCN for the vascular or not. Results Daily injections of OCN can significantly improve lipid metabolism, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in ApoE-KO mice. In ApoE-KO mice fed with HFD, the OCN-treated mice displayed an improved acetylcholine-stimulated EDR compared to the vehicle-treated group. In addition, compared to vehicle-treated HUVECs, OCN-treated HUVECs displayed increased activation of the Akt-eNOS signaling pathway, as evidenced by significantly higher levels of phosphorylated Akt and eNOS. Furthermore, a similar beneficial effect of OCN on thoracic aorta was observed using ex vivo organ culture of isolated mouse aortic segment. However, this effect was attenuated upon co-incubation with PI3K inhibitor or Akt inhibitor V. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that OCN has an endothelial-protective effect in atherosclerosis through mediating the PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling pathway. PMID:24708830

  20. High-mobility group box 1 impairs airway epithelial barrier function through the activation of the RAGE/ERK pathway

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, WUFENG; ZHAO, HAIJIN; DONG, HANGMING; WU, YUE; YAO, LIHONG; ZOU, FEI; CAI, SHAOXI

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma. However, whether the activation of the HMGB1/RAGE axis mediates airway epithelial barrier dysfunction remains unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of HMGB1 and its synergistic action with interleukin (IL)-1β on airway epithelial barrier properties. We evaluated the effects of recombinant human HMGB1 alone or in combination with IL-1β on ionic and macromolecular barrier permeability, by culturing air-liquid interface 16HBE cells with HMGB1 to mimic the differentiated epithelium. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining were utilized to examine the level and structure of major junction proteins, namely E-cadherin, β-catenin, occludin and claudin-1. Furthermore, we examined the effects of RAGE neutralizing antibodies and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors on epithelial barrier properties in order to elucidate the mechanisms involved. HMGB1 increased FITC-dextran permeability, but suppressed epithelial resistance in a dose-and time-dependent manner. HMGB1-mediated barrier hyperpermeability was accompanied by a disruption of cell-cell contacts, the selective downregulation of occludin and claudin-1, and the redistribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin. HMGB1 in synergy with IL-1β induced a similar, but greater barrier hyperpermeability and induced the disruption of junction proteins. Furthermore, HMGB1 elicited the activation of the RAGE/extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)1/2 signaling pathway, which correlated with barrier dysfunction in the 16HBE cells. Anti-RAGE antibody and the ERK1/2 inhibitor, U0126, attenuated the HMGB1-mediated changes in barrier permeability, restored the expression levels of occludin and claudin-1 and pevented the redistribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin. Taken together, the findings of our study

  1. Targeted mutations in a highly conserved motif of the nsp1β protein impair the interferon antagonizing activity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhua; Zhu, Longchao; Lawson, Steven R; Fang, Ying

    2013-09-01

    Non-structural protein 1β (nsp1β) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) contains a papain-like cysteine protease (PLPβ) domain and has been identified as the main viral protein antagonizing the host innate immune response. In this study, nsp1β was determined to suppress the expression of reporter genes as well as to suppress 'self-expression' in transfected cells, and this activity appeared to be associated with its interferon (IFN) antagonist function. To knock down the effect of nsp1β on IFN activity, a panel of site-specific mutations in nsp1β was analysed. Double mutations K130A/R134A (type 1 PRRSV) or K124A/R128A (type 2 PRRSV) targeting a highly conserved motif of nsp1β, GKYLQRRLQ (in bold), impaired the ability of nsp1β to suppress IFN-β and reporter gene expression, as well as to suppress 'self-expression' in vitro. Subsequently, viable recombinant viruses vSD01-08-K130A/R134A and vSD95-21-K124A/R128A, containing double mutations in the GKYLQRRLQ motif were generated using reverse genetics. In comparison with WT viruses, these nsp1β mutants showed impaired growth ability in infected cells, but the PLPβ cleavage function was not directly affected. The expression of selected innate immune genes was determined in vSD95-21-K124A/R128A mutant-infected cells. The results consistently showed that gene expression levels of IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-stimulated gene 15 were upregulated in cells that were infected with the vSD95-21-K124A/R128A compared with that of WT virus. These data suggest that PRRSV nsp1β may selectively suppress cellular gene expression, including expression of genes involved in the host innate immune function. Modifying the key residues in the highly conserved GKYLQRRLQ motif could attenuate virus growth and improve the cellular innate immune responses. PMID:23761406

  2. Speech impairment (adult)

    MedlinePlus

    Language impairment; Impairment of speech; Inability to speak; Aphasia; Dysarthria; Slurred speech; Dysphonia voice disorders ... environment and keep external stimuli to a minimum. Speak in a normal tone of voice (this condition ...

  3. Moderately Low Magnesium Intake Impairs Growth of Lean Body Mass in Obese-Prone and Obese-Resistant Rats Fed a High-Energy Diet

    PubMed Central

    Bertinato, Jesse; Lavergne, Christopher; Rahimi, Sophia; Rachid, Hiba; Vu, Nina A.; Plouffe, Louise J.; Swist, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    The physical and biochemical changes resulting from moderately low magnesium (Mg) intake are not fully understood. Obesity and associated co-morbidities affect Mg metabolism and may exacerbate Mg deficiency and physiological effects. Male rats selectively bred for diet-induced obesity (OP, obese-prone) or resistance (OR, obese-resistant) were fed a high-fat, high-energy diet containing moderately low (LMg, 0.116 ± 0.001 g/kg) or normal (NMg, 0.516 ± 0.007 g/kg) Mg for 13 weeks. The growth, body composition, mineral homeostasis, bone development, and glucose metabolism of the rats were examined. OP and OR rats showed differences (p < 0.05) in many physical and biochemical measures regardless of diet. OP and OR rats fed the LMg diet had decreased body weight, lean body mass, decreased femoral size (width, weight, and volume), and serum Mg and potassium concentrations compared to rats fed the NMg diet. The LMg diet increased serum calcium (Ca) concentration in both rat strains with a concomitant decrease in serum parathyroid hormone concentration only in the OR strain. In the femur, Mg concentration was reduced, whereas concentrations of Ca and sodium were increased in both strains fed the LMg diet. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in an oral glucose tolerance test were similar in rats fed the LMg or NMg diets. These results show that a moderately low Mg diet impairs the growth of lean body mass and alters femoral geometry and mineral metabolism in OP and OR rats fed a high-energy diet. PMID:27136580

  4. Moderately Low Magnesium Intake Impairs Growth of Lean Body Mass in Obese-Prone and Obese-Resistant Rats Fed a High-Energy Diet.

    PubMed

    Bertinato, Jesse; Lavergne, Christopher; Rahimi, Sophia; Rachid, Hiba; Vu, Nina A; Plouffe, Louise J; Swist, Eleonora

    2016-04-28

    The physical and biochemical changes resulting from moderately low magnesium (Mg) intake are not fully understood. Obesity and associated co-morbidities affect Mg metabolism and may exacerbate Mg deficiency and physiological effects. Male rats selectively bred for diet-induced obesity (OP, obese-prone) or resistance (OR, obese-resistant) were fed a high-fat, high-energy diet containing moderately low (LMg, 0.116 ± 0.001 g/kg) or normal (NMg, 0.516 ± 0.007 g/kg) Mg for 13 weeks. The growth, body composition, mineral homeostasis, bone development, and glucose metabolism of the rats were examined. OP and OR rats showed differences (p < 0.05) in many physical and biochemical measures regardless of diet. OP and OR rats fed the LMg diet had decreased body weight, lean body mass, decreased femoral size (width, weight, and volume), and serum Mg and potassium concentrations compared to rats fed the NMg diet. The LMg diet increased serum calcium (Ca) concentration in both rat strains with a concomitant decrease in serum parathyroid hormone concentration only in the OR strain. In the femur, Mg concentration was reduced, whereas concentrations of Ca and sodium were increased in both strains fed the LMg diet. Plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in an oral glucose tolerance test were similar in rats fed the LMg or NMg diets. These results show that a moderately low Mg diet impairs the growth of lean body mass and alters femoral geometry and mineral metabolism in OP and OR rats fed a high-energy diet.

  5. Impaired phagocytosis among patients infected by the human immunodeficiency virus: implication for a role of highly active anti-retroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Michailidis, C; Giannopoulos, G; Vigklis, V; Armenis, K; Tsakris, A; Gargalianos, P

    2012-03-01

    In patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, neutrophil and monocyte functions, including phagocytosis, are impaired. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes of phagocytic function and respiratory burst occurring over the course of patients infected by the HIV-1 virus. Treatment-naive patients (group B), patients receiving highly active anti-retroviral treatment (HAART) (group C) and patients in which HAART has failed (group D) were studied and compared with healthy volunteers (group A). Phagocytosis and oxidative burst were evaluated using commercially available kits. Results clearly denote a significant decrease of the phagocytic function of both cell types of groups B and C compared with group A. Among group C patients, those in the upper quartile of CD4 increase had higher oxidative burst compared with patients of the other quartiles. In addition, comparisons clearly showed a lower degree of phagocytic function and of oxidative burst of both monocytes and neutrophils of group D compared with group B. Finally, it was found that monocyte and neutrophil function was correlated inversely to the change in viral load, i.e. the greater the decrease of viral load, the better the phagocytic and oxidative activity. Innate immunity defects appear to be present in HIV-positive patients, regarding phagocytic activity and oxidative burst of monocytes and neutrophils. These defects are greatly influenced by the level of treatment efficacy, with emphasis on CD4 cell counts and viral load. PMID:22288593

  6. Heterozygous Hfe gene deletion leads to impaired glucose homeostasis, but not liver injury in mice fed a high-calorie diet.

    PubMed

    Britton, Laurence; Jaskowski, Lesley; Bridle, Kim; Santrampurwala, Nishreen; Reiling, Janske; Musgrave, Nick; Subramaniam, V Nathan; Crawford, Darrell

    2016-06-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the Hfe gene have been proposed as cofactors in the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Homozygous Hfe deletion previously has been shown to lead to dysregulated hepatic lipid metabolism and accentuated liver injury in a dietary mouse model of NAFLD We sought to establish whether heterozygous deletion of Hfe is sufficient to promote liver injury when mice are exposed to a high-calorie diet (HCD). Eight-week-old wild-type and Hfe(+/-) mice received 8 weeks of a control diet or HCD Liver histology and pathways of lipid and iron metabolism were analyzed. Liver histology demonstrated that mice fed a HCD had increased NAFLD activity score (NAS), steatosis, and hepatocyte ballooning. However, liver injury was unaffected by Hfe genotype. Hepatic iron concentration (HIC) was increased in Hfe(+/-) mice of both dietary groups. HCD resulted in a hepcidin-independent reduction in HIC Hfe(+/-) mice demonstrated raised fasting serum glucose concentrations and HOMA-IR score, despite unaltered serum adiponectin concentrations. Downstream regulators of hepatic de novo lipogenesis (pAKT, SREBP-1, Fas, Scd1) and fatty acid oxidation (AdipoR2, Pparα, Cpt1) were largely unaffected by genotype. In summary, heterozygous Hfe gene deletion is associated with impaired iron and glucose metabolism. However, unlike homozygous Hfe deletion, heterozygous gene deletion did not affect lipid metabolism pathways or liver injury in this model.

  7. Secretin receptor-knockout mice are resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity and exhibit impaired intestinal lipid absorption.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Revathi; Chow, Billy K C

    2014-08-01

    Secretin, a classical gastrointestinal hormone released from S cells in response to acid and dietary lipid, regulates pleiotropic physiological functions, such as exocrine pancreatic secretion and gastric motility. Subsequent to recently proposed revisit on secretin's metabolic effects, we have confirmed lipolytic actions of secretin during starvation and discovered a hormone-sensitive lipase-mediated mechanistic pathway behind. In this study, a 12 wk high-fat diet (HFD) feeding to secretin receptor-knockout (SCTR(-/-)) mice and their wild-type (SCTR(+/+)) littermates revealed that, despite similar food intake, SCTR(-/-) mice gained significantly less weight (SCTR(+/+): 49.6±0.9 g; SCTR(-/-): 44.7±1.4 g; P<0.05) and exhibited lower body fat content. These SCTR(-/-) mice have corresponding alleviated HFD-associated hyperleptinemia and improved glucose/insulin tolerance. Further analyses indicate that SCTR(-/-) have impaired intestinal fatty acid absorption while having similar energy expenditure and locomotor activity. Reduced fat absorption in the intestine is further supported by lowered postprandial triglyceride concentrations in circulation in SCTR(-/-) mice. In jejunal cells, transcript and protein levels of a key fat absorption regulator, cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36), was reduced in knockout mice, while transcript of Cd36 and fatty-acid uptake in isolated enterocytes was stimulated by secretin. Based on our findings, a novel positive feedback pathway involving secretin and CD36 to enhance intestinal lipid absorption is being proposed.

  8. Polydatin Restores Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation in Rat Aorta Rings Impaired by High Glucose: A Novel Insight into the PPARβ-NO Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Xue, Lai; Du, Weimin; Huang, Bo; Tang, Cuiping; Liu, Changqing; Qiu, Hongmei; Jiang, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    Polydatin, a natural component from Polygonum Cuspidatum, has important therapeutic effects on metabolic syndrome. A novel therapeutic strategy using polydatin to improve vascular function has recently been proposed to treat diabetes-related cardiovascular complications. However, the biological role and molecular basis of polydatin's action on vascular endothelial cells (VECs)-mediated vasodilatation under diabetes-related hyperglycemia condition remain elusive. The present study aimed to assess the contribution of polydatin in restoring endothelium-dependent relaxation and to determine the details of its underlying mechanism. By measuring endothelium-dependent relaxation, we found that acetylcholine-induced vasodilation was impaired by elevated glucose (55 mmol/L); however, polydatin (1, 3, 10 μmol/L) could restore the relaxation in a dose-dependent manner. Polydatin could also improve the histological damage to endothelial cells in the thoracic aorta. Polydatin's effects were mediated via promoting the expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), enhancing eNOS activity and decreasing the inducible NOS (iNOS) level, finally resulting in a beneficial increase in NO release, which probably, at least in part, through activation of the PPARβ signaling pathway. The results provided a novel insight into polydatin action, via PPARβ-NO signaling pathways, in restoring endothelial function in high glucose conditions. The results also indicated the potential utility of polydatin to treat diabetes related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25941823

  9. Impaired phagocytosis among patients infected by the human immunodeficiency virus: implication for a role of highly active anti-retroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Michailidis, C; Giannopoulos, G; Vigklis, V; Armenis, K; Tsakris, A; Gargalianos, P

    2012-01-01

    In patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, neutrophil and monocyte functions, including phagocytosis, are impaired. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes of phagocytic function and respiratory burst occurring over the course of patients infected by the HIV-1 virus. Treatment-naive patients (group B), patients receiving highly active anti-retroviral treatment (HAART) (group C) and patients in which HAART has failed (group D) were studied and compared with healthy volunteers (group A). Phagocytosis and oxidative burst were evaluated using commercially available kits. Results clearly denote a significant decrease of the phagocytic function of both cell types of groups B and C compared with group A. Among group C patients, those in the upper quartile of CD4 increase had higher oxidative burst compared with patients of the other quartiles. In addition, comparisons clearly showed a lower degree of phagocytic function and of oxidative burst of both monocytes and neutrophils of group D compared with group B. Finally, it was found that monocyte and neutrophil function was correlated inversely to the change in viral load, i.e. the greater the decrease of viral load, the better the phagocytic and oxidative activity. Innate immunity defects appear to be present in HIV-positive patients, regarding phagocytic activity and oxidative burst of monocytes and neutrophils. These defects are greatly influenced by the level of treatment efficacy, with emphasis on CD4 cell counts and viral load. PMID:22288593

  10. Heterozygous Hfe gene deletion leads to impaired glucose homeostasis, but not liver injury in mice fed a high-calorie diet.

    PubMed

    Britton, Laurence; Jaskowski, Lesley; Bridle, Kim; Santrampurwala, Nishreen; Reiling, Janske; Musgrave, Nick; Subramaniam, V Nathan; Crawford, Darrell

    2016-06-01

    Heterozygous mutations of the Hfe gene have been proposed as cofactors in the development and progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Homozygous Hfe deletion previously has been shown to lead to dysregulated hepatic lipid metabolism and accentuated liver injury in a dietary mouse model of NAFLD We sought to establish whether heterozygous deletion of Hfe is sufficient to promote liver injury when mice are exposed to a high-calorie diet (HCD). Eight-week-old wild-type and Hfe(+/-) mice received 8 weeks of a control diet or HCD Liver histology and pathways of lipid and iron metabolism were analyzed. Liver histology demonstrated that mice fed a HCD had increased NAFLD activity score (NAS), steatosis, and hepatocyte ballooning. However, liver injury was unaffected by Hfe genotype. Hepatic iron concentration (HIC) was increased in Hfe(+/-) mice of both dietary groups. HCD resulted in a hepcidin-independent reduction in HIC Hfe(+/-) mice demonstrated raised fasting serum glucose concentrations and HOMA-IR score, despite unaltered serum adiponectin concentrations. Downstream regulators of hepatic de novo lipogenesis (pAKT, SREBP-1, Fas, Scd1) and fatty acid oxidation (AdipoR2, Pparα, Cpt1) were largely unaffected by genotype. In summary, heterozygous Hfe gene deletion is associated with impaired iron and glucose metabolism. However, unlike homozygous Hfe deletion, heterozygous gene deletion did not affect lipid metabolism pathways or liver injury in this model. PMID:27354540

  11. Decreased Osteoclastogenesis and High Bone Mass in Mice with Impaired Insulin Clearance Due to Liver-Specific Inactivation to CEACAM1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, S.; Kaw, M.; Harris, M.T.; Ebraheim, N.; McInerney, M.F.; Najjar, S.M.; Lecka-Czernik, B.

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with normal-to-higher bone mineral density (BMD) and increased rate of fracture. Hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia may affect bone mass and quality in the diabetic skeleton. In order to dissect the effect of hyperinsulinemia from the hyperglycemic impact on bone homeostasis, we have analyzed L-SACC1 mice, a murine model of impaired insulin clearance in liver causing hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance without fasting hyperglycemia. Adult L-SACC1 mice exhibit significantly higher trabecular and cortical bone mass, attenuated bone formation as measured by dynamic histomorphometry, and reduced number of osteoclasts. Serum levels of bone formation (BALP) and bone resorption markers (TRAP5b and CTX) are decreased by approximately 50%. The L-SACC1 mutation in the liver affects myeloid cell lineage allocation in the bone marrow: the (CD3−CD11b−CD45R−) population of osteoclast progenitors is decreased by 40% and the number of (CD3−CD11b−CD45R+) B-cell progenitors is increased by 60%. L-SACC1 osteoclasts express lower levels of c-fos and RANK and their differentiation is impaired. In vitro analysis corroborated a negative effect of insulin on osteoclast recruitment, maturation and the expression levels of c-fos and RANK transcripts. Although bone formation is decreased in L-SACC1 mice, the differentiation potential and expression of the osteoblast-specific gene markers in L-SACC1-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) remain unchanged as compared to the WT. Interestingly, however MSC from L-SACC1 mice exhibit increased PPARγ2 and decreased IGF-1 transcript levels. These data suggest that high bone mass in L-SACC1 animals results, at least in part, from a negative regulatory effect of insulin on bone resorption and formation, which leads to decreased bone turnover. Because low bone turnover contributes to decreased bone quality and an increased incidence of fractures, studies on L-SACC1 mice may advance our understanding of altered

  12. High glucose suppresses embryonic stem cell differentiation into neural lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Penghua; Shen, Wei-bin; Reece, E Albert; Chen, Xi; Yang, Peixin

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal neurogenesis occurs during embryonic development in human diabetic pregnancies and in animal models of diabetic embryopathy. Our previous studies in a mouse model of diabetic embryopathy have implicated that high glucose of maternal diabetes delays neurogenesis in the developing neuroepithelium leading to neural tube defects. However, the underlying process in high glucose-impaired neurogenesis is uncharacterized. Neurogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells provides a valuable model for understanding the abnormal neural lineage development under high glucose conditions. ES cells are commonly generated and maintained in high glucose (approximately 25 mM glucose). Here, the mouse ES cell line, E14, was gradually adapted to and maintained in low glucose (5 mM), and became a glucose responsive E14 (GR-E14) line. High glucose induced the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker, CHOP, in GR-E14 cells. Under low glucose conditions, the GR-E14 cells retained their pluripotency and capability to differentiate into neural lineage cells. GR-E14 cell differentiation into neural stem cells (Sox1 and nestin positive cells) was inhibited by high glucose. Neuron (Tuj1 positive cells) and glia (GFAP positive cells) differentiation from GR-E14 cells was also suppressed by high glucose. In addition, high glucose delayed GR-E14 differentiation into neural crest cells by decreasing neural crest markers, paired box 3 (Pax3) and paired box 7 (Pax7). Thus, high glucose impairs ES cell differentiation into neural lineage cells. The low glucose adapted and high glucose responsive GR-E14 cell line is a useful in vitro model for assessing the adverse effect of high glucose on the development of the central nervous system. PMID:26940741

  13. High glucose suppresses embryonic stem cell differentiation into neural lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Penghua; Shen, Wei-bin; Reece, E Albert; Chen, Xi; Yang, Peixin

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal neurogenesis occurs during embryonic development in human diabetic pregnancies and in animal models of diabetic embryopathy. Our previous studies in a mouse model of diabetic embryopathy have implicated that high glucose of maternal diabetes delays neurogenesis in the developing neuroepithelium leading to neural tube defects. However, the underlying process in high glucose-impaired neurogenesis is uncharacterized. Neurogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells provides a valuable model for understanding the abnormal neural lineage development under high glucose conditions. ES cells are commonly generated and maintained in high glucose (approximately 25 mM glucose). Here, the mouse ES cell line, E14, was gradually adapted to and maintained in low glucose (5 mM), and became a glucose responsive E14 (GR-E14) line. High glucose induced the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker, CHOP, in GR-E14 cells. Under low glucose conditions, the GR-E14 cells retained their pluripotency and capability to differentiate into neural lineage cells. GR-E14 cell differentiation into neural stem cells (Sox1 and nestin positive cells) was inhibited by high glucose. Neuron (Tuj1 positive cells) and glia (GFAP positive cells) differentiation from GR-E14 cells was also suppressed by high glucose. In addition, high glucose delayed GR-E14 differentiation into neural crest cells by decreasing neural crest markers, paired box 3 (Pax3) and paired box 7 (Pax7). Thus, high glucose impairs ES cell differentiation into neural lineage cells. The low glucose adapted and high glucose responsive GR-E14 cell line is a useful in vitro model for assessing the adverse effect of high glucose on the development of the central nervous system.

  14. Early adaptive response of the retina to a pro-diabetogenic diet: Impairment of cone response and gene expression changes in high-fructose fed rats.

    PubMed

    Thierry, Magalie; Pasquis, Bruno; Buteau, Bénédicte; Fourgeux, Cynthia; Dembele, Doulaye; Leclere, Laurent; Gambert-Nicot, Ségolène; Acar, Niyazi; Bron, Alain M; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine P; Bretillon, Lionel

    2015-06-01

    The lack of plasticity of neurons to respond to dietary changes, such as high fat and high fructose diets, by modulating gene and protein expression has been associated with functional and behavioral impairments that can have detrimental consequences. The inhibition of high fat-induced rewiring of hypothalamic neurons induced obesity. Feeding rodents with high fructose is a recognized and widely used model to trigger obesity and metabolic syndrome. However the adaptive response of the retina to short term feeding with high fructose is poorly documented. We therefore aimed to characterize both the functional and gene expression changes in the neurosensory retina of Brown Norway rats fed during 3 and 8 days with a 60%-rich fructose diet (n = 16 per diet and per time point). Glucose, insulin, leptin, triacylglycerols, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and fructosamine were quantified in plasma (n = 8 in each group). Functionality of the inner retina was studied using scotopic single flash electroretinography (n = 8 in each group) and the individual response of rod and cone photoreceptors was determined using 8.02 Hz Flicker electroretinography (n = 8 in each group). Analysis of gene expression in the neurosensory retina was performed by Affymetrix genechips, and confirmed by RT-qPCR (n = 6 in each group). Elevated glycemia (+13%), insulinemia (+83%), and leptinemia (+172%) was observed after 8 days of fructose feeding. The cone photoreceptor response was altered at day 8 in high fructose fed rats (Δ = 0.5 log unit of light stimulus intensity). Affymetrix analysis of gene expression highlighted significant modulation of the pathways of eIF2 signaling and endoplasmic reticulum stress, regulation of eIF4 and p70S6K signaling, as well as mTOR signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction. RT-qPCR analysis confirmed the down regulation of Crystallins, Npy, Nid1 and Optc genes after 3 days of fructose feeding, and up regulation of End2. Meanwhile, a trend

  15. An index of reservoir habitat impairment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, L.E.; Hunt, K.M.

    2011-01-01

    Fish habitat impairment resulting from natural and anthropogenic watershed and in-lake processes has in many cases reduced the ability of reservoirs to sustain native fish assemblages and fisheries quality. Rehabilitation of impaired reservoirs is hindered by the lack of a method suitable for scoring impairment status. To address this limitation, an index of reservoir habitat impairment (IRHI) was developed by merging 14 metrics descriptive of common impairment sources, with each metric scored from 0 (no impairment) to 5 (high impairment) by fisheries scientists with local knowledge. With a plausible range of 5 to 25, distribution of the IRHI scores ranged from 5 to 23 over 482 randomly selected reservoirs dispersed throughout the USA. The IRHI reflected five impairment factors including siltation, structural habitat, eutrophication, water regime, and aquatic plants. The factors were weakly related to key reservoir characteristics including reservoir area, depth, age, and usetype, suggesting that common reservoir descriptors are poor predictors of fish habitat impairment. The IRHI is rapid and inexpensive to calculate, provides an easily understood measure of the overall habitat impairment, allows comparison of reservoirs and therefore prioritization of restoration activities, and may be used to track restoration progress. The major limitation of the IRHI is its reliance on unstandardized professional judgment rather than standardized empirical measurements. ?? 2010 US Government.

  16. Hexokinase 1 is required for glucose-induced repression of bZIP63, At5g22920, and BT2 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Sabine; Gardeström, Per; Pesquet, Edouard; Kleczkowski, Leszek A.

    2015-01-01

    Simple sugars, like glucose (Glc) and sucrose (Suc), act as signals to modulate the expression of hundreds of genes in plants. Frequently, however, it remains unclear whether this regulation is induced by the sugars themselves or by their derivatives generated in the course of carbohydrate (CH) metabolism. In the present study, we tested the relevance of different CH metabolism and allocation pathways affecting expression patterns of five selected sugar-responsive genes (bZIP63, At5g22920, BT2, MGD2, and TPS9) in Arabidopsis thaliana. In general, the expression followed diurnal changes in the overall sugar availability. However, under steady growth conditions, this response was hardly impaired in the mutants for CH metabolizing/ transporting proteins (adg1, sex1, sus1-4, sus5/6, and tpt2), including also hexokinase1 (HXK1) loss- and gain-of-function plants—gin2.1 and oe3.2, respectively. In addition, transgenic plants carrying pbZIP63::GUS showed no changes in reporter-gene-expression when grown on sugar under steady-state conditions. In contrast, short-term treatments of agar-grown seedlings with 1% Glc or Suc induced pbZIP63::GUS repression, which became even more apparent in seedlings grown in liquid media. Subsequent analyses of liquid-grown gin2.1 and oe3.2 seedlings revealed that Glc -dependent regulation of the five selected genes was not affected in gin2.1, whereas it was enhanced in oe3.2 plants for bZIP63, At5g22920, and BT2. The sugar treatments had no effect on ATP/ADP ratio, suggesting that changes in gene expression were not linked to cellular energy status. Overall, the data suggest that HXK1 does not act as Glc sensor controlling bZIP63, At5g22920, and BT2 expression, but it is nevertheless required for the production of a downstream metabolic signal regulating their expression. PMID:26236323

  17. Specific language impairment.

    PubMed

    Kamhi, Alan G; Clark, Mary Kristen

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of language is one of the most important achievements in young children, in part because most children appear to acquire language with little effort. Some children are not so fortunate, however. There is a large group of children who also have difficulty learning language, but do not have obvious neurological, cognitive, sensory, emotional, or environmental deficits. Clinicians often refer to these children as language disordered or language impaired. Researchers tend to refer to these children as specific language impaired (SLI). Children with SLI have intrigued researchers for many years because there is no obvious reason for their language learning difficulties. SLI has been found to be an enduring condition that begins in early childhood and often persists into adolescence and adulthood. The language problems of children with SLI are not limited to spoken language; they also affect reading and writing and thus much of academic learning. Knowledge of the characteristics of SLI should aid physicians, pediatricians, and early childhood specialists to identify these children during the preschool years and ensure that they receive appropriate services. With high-quality language intervention and literacy instruction, most children with SLI should be able to perform and function adequately in school and beyond. PMID:23622167

  18. Memory Impairment in Children with Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Gillian; Dworzynski, Katharina; Slonims, Vicky; Simonoff, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to assess whether any memory impairment co-occurring with language impairment is global, affecting both verbal and visual domains, or domain specific. Method: Visual and verbal memory, learning, and processing speed were assessed in children aged 6 years to 16 years 11 months (mean 9y 9m, SD 2y 6mo) with current,…

  19. IMPAIRED NATURAL KILLER CELL LYSIS IN BREAST CANCER PATIENTS WITH HIGH LEVELS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL STRESS IS ASSOCIATED WITH ALTERED EXPRESSION OF KILLER IMMUNOGLOBULIN-LIKE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Varker, Kimberly A.; Terrell, Catherine E.; Welt, Marilyn; Suleiman, Samer; Thornton, Lisa; Andersen, Barbara L.; Carson, William E.

    2007-01-01

    expression was significantly lower in Group I after incubation with IL-2. Conclusions In this study of a small subset of breast cancer patients chosen from a previous clinical trial of psychosocial intervention for breast cancer, impaired NK lysis in breast cancer patients with high levels of psychological stress was associated with alterations in surface expression of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors. However, immune effectors retained the ability to lyse antibody-coated targets and to initiate lymphokine-activated killer activity, irrespective of stress levels or baseline NK50. PMID:17292412

  20. Impaired natriuretic response to high-NaCl diet plus aldosterone infusion in mice overexpressing human CD39, an ectonucleotidase (NTPDase1)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Robson, Simon C.; Morris, Kaiya L.; Heiney, Kristina M.; Dwyer, Karen M.; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides acting through P2 receptors facilitate natriuresis. To define how purinergic mechanisms are involved in sodium homeostasis, we used transgenic (TG) mice that globally overexpress human CD39 (hCD39, NTPDase1), an ectonucleotidase that hydrolyzes extracellular ATP/ADP to AMP, resulting in an altered extracellular purine profile. On a high-sodium diet (HSD, 3.5% Na+), urine volume and serum sodium were significantly higher in TG mice but sodium excretion was unaltered. Furthermore, TG mice showed an attenuated fall in urine aldosterone with HSD. Western blot analysis revealed significantly lower densities (∼40%) of the β-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in medulla, and the major band (85-kDa) of γ-ENaC in TG mice cortex. To evaluate aldosterone-independent differences, in a second experiment, aldosterone was clamped by osmotic minipump at 20 μg/day, and mice were fed either an HSD or a low-sodium diet (LSD, 0.03% Na+). Here, no differences in urine volume or osmolality, or serum aldosterone were found, but TG mice showed a modest, yet significant impairment in late natriuresis (days 3 and 4). Several major sodium transporters or channel subunits were differentially expressed between the genotypes. HSD caused a downregulation of Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) in both genotypes; and had higher cortical levels of NCC, Na-K-ATPase (α-1 subunit), and α- and γ-ENaC. The Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) was downregulated by HSD in wild-type mice, but it increased in TG mice. In summary, our data support the concept that extracellular nucleotides facilitate natriuresis; they also reveal an aldosterone-independent downregulation of major renal sodium transporters and channel subunits by purinergic signaling. PMID:25877509

  1. Shooting history and presence of high-frequency hearing impairment in swedish hunters: A cross-sectional internet-based observational study.

    PubMed

    Honeth, Louise; Ström, Peter; Ploner, Alexander; Bagger-Sjöbäck, Dan; Rosenhall, Ulf; Nyrén, Olof

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study among Swedish hunters was to examine the association between shooting history and presence of high-frequency hearing impairment (HFHI). All hunters registered with an e-mail address in the membership roster of the Swedish Hunters' Association were invited via e-mail to a secure website with a questionnaire and an Internet-based audiometry test. Associations, expressed as prevalence ratio (PR), were multivariately modelled using Poisson regression. The questionnaire was answered by 1771 hunters (age 11-91 years), and 202 of them also completed the audiometry test. Subjective severe hearing loss was reported by 195/1771 (11%), while 23/202 (11%) exhibited HFHI upon testing with Internet-based audiometry. As many as 328/1771 (19%) had never used hearing protection during hunting. In the preceding 5 years, 785/1771 (45%), had fired >6 unprotected gunshots with hunting rifle calibers. The adjusted PR of HFHI when reporting 1-6 such shots, relative to 0, was 1.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.1; P = 0.02]. We could not verify any excessive HFHI prevalence among 89 hunters reporting unprotected exposure to such gunshot noise >6 times. Nor did the total number of reported rifle shots seem to matter. These findings support the notion of a wide variation in individual susceptibility to impulse noise; that significant sound energy, corresponding to unprotected noise from hunting rifle calibers, seems to be required; that susceptible individuals may sustain irreversible damage to the inner ear from just one or a few shots; and that use of hearing protection should be encouraged from the first shot with such weapons.

  2. Vibrotactile Presentation of Musical Notes to the Glabrous Skin for Adults with Normal Hearing or a Hearing Impairment: Thresholds, Dynamic Range and High-Frequency Perception.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Carl; Maté-Cid, Saúl; Fulford, Robert; Seiffert, Gary; Ginsborg, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Presentation of music as vibration to the skin has the potential to facilitate interaction between musicians with hearing impairments and other musicians during group performance. Vibrotactile thresholds have been determined to assess the potential for vibrotactile presentation of music to the glabrous skin of the fingertip, forefoot and heel. No significant differences were found between the thresholds for sinusoids representing notes between C1 and C6 when presented to the fingertip of participants with normal hearing and with a severe or profound hearing loss. For participants with normal hearing, thresholds for notes between C1 and C6 showed the characteristic U-shape curve for the fingertip, but not for the forefoot and heel. Compared to the fingertip, the forefoot had lower thresholds between C1 and C3, and the heel had lower thresholds between C1 and G2; this is attributed to spatial summation from the Pacinian receptors over the larger contactor area used for the forefoot and heel. Participants with normal hearing assessed the perception of high-frequency vibration using 1s sinusoids presented to the fingertip and were found to be more aware of transient vibration at the beginning and/or end of notes between G4 and C6 when stimuli were presented 10dB above threshold, rather than at threshold. An average of 94% of these participants reported feeling continuous vibration between G4 and G5 with stimuli presented 10dB above threshold. Based on the experimental findings and consideration of health effects relating to vibration exposure, a suitable range of notes for vibrotactile presentation of music is identified as being from C1 to G5. This is more limited than for human hearing but the fundamental frequencies of the human voice, and the notes played by many instruments, lie within it. However, the dynamic range might require compression to avoid the negative effects of amplitude on pitch perception. PMID:27191400

  3. A novel closed-body model of spinal cord injury caused by high-pressure air blasts produces extensive axonal injury and motor impairments.

    PubMed

    del Mar, Nobel; von Buttlar, Xinyu; Yu, Angela S; Guley, Natalie H; Reiner, Anton; Honig, Marcia G

    2015-09-01

    Diffuse axonal injury is thought to be the basis of the functional impairments stemming from mild traumatic brain injury. To examine how axons are damaged by traumatic events, such as motor vehicle accidents, falls, sports activities, or explosive blasts, we have taken advantage of the spinal cord with its extensive white matter tracts. We developed a closed-body model of spinal cord injury in mice whereby high-pressure air blasts targeted to lower thoracic vertebral levels produce tensile, compressive, and shear forces within the parenchyma of the spinal cord and thereby cause extensive axonal injury. Markers of cytoskeletal integrity showed that spinal cord axons exhibited three distinct pathologies: microtubule breakage, neurofilament compaction, and calpain-mediated spectrin breakdown. The dorsally situated axons of the corticospinal tract primarily exhibited microtubule breakage, whereas all three pathologies were common in the lateral and ventral white matter. Individual axons typically demonstrated only one of the three pathologies during the first 24h after blast injury, suggesting that the different perturbations are initiated independently of one another. For the first few days after blast, neurofilament compaction was frequently accompanied by autophagy, and subsequent to that, by the fragmentation of degenerating axons. TuJ1 immunolabeling and mice with YFP-reporter labeling each revealed more extensive microtubule breakage than did βAPP immunolabeling, raising doubts about the sensitivity of this standard approach for assessing axonal injury. Although motor deficits were mild and largely transient, some aspects of motor function gradually worsened over several weeks, suggesting that a low level of axonal degeneration continued past the initial wave. Our model can help provide further insight into how to intervene in the processes by which initial axonal damage culminates in axonal degeneration, to improve outcomes after traumatic injury. Importantly

  4. Shooting history and presence of high-frequency hearing impairment in swedish hunters: A cross-sectional internet-based observational study.

    PubMed

    Honeth, Louise; Ström, Peter; Ploner, Alexander; Bagger-Sjöbäck, Dan; Rosenhall, Ulf; Nyrén, Olof

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study among Swedish hunters was to examine the association between shooting history and presence of high-frequency hearing impairment (HFHI). All hunters registered with an e-mail address in the membership roster of the Swedish Hunters' Association were invited via e-mail to a secure website with a questionnaire and an Internet-based audiometry test. Associations, expressed as prevalence ratio (PR), were multivariately modelled using Poisson regression. The questionnaire was answered by 1771 hunters (age 11-91 years), and 202 of them also completed the audiometry test. Subjective severe hearing loss was reported by 195/1771 (11%), while 23/202 (11%) exhibited HFHI upon testing with Internet-based audiometry. As many as 328/1771 (19%) had never used hearing protection during hunting. In the preceding 5 years, 785/1771 (45%), had fired >6 unprotected gunshots with hunting rifle calibers. The adjusted PR of HFHI when reporting 1-6 such shots, relative to 0, was 1.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.1; P = 0.02]. We could not verify any excessive HFHI prevalence among 89 hunters reporting unprotected exposure to such gunshot noise >6 times. Nor did the total number of reported rifle shots seem to matter. These findings support the notion of a wide variation in individual susceptibility to impulse noise; that significant sound energy, corresponding to unprotected noise from hunting rifle calibers, seems to be required; that susceptible individuals may sustain irreversible damage to the inner ear from just one or a few shots; and that use of hearing protection should be encouraged from the first shot with such weapons. PMID:26356369

  5. A novel closed-body model of spinal cord injury caused by high-pressure air blasts produces extensive axonal injury and motor impairments

    PubMed Central

    del Mar, Nobel; von Buttlar, Xinyu; Yu, Angela S.; Guley, Natalie H.; Reiner, Anton; Honig, Marcia G.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse axonal injury is thought to be the basis of the functional impairments stemming from mild traumatic brain injury. To examine how axons are damaged by traumatic events, such as motor vehicle accidents, falls, sports activities, or explosive blasts, we have taken advantage of the spinal cord with its extensive white matter tracts. We developed a closed-body model of spinal cord injury in mice whereby high-pressure air blasts targeted to lower thoracic vertebral levels produce tensile, compressive, and shear forces within the parenchyma of the spinal cord and thereby cause extensive axonal injury. Markers of cytoskeletal integrity showed that spinal cord axons exhibited three distinct pathologies: microtubule breakage, neurofilament compaction, and calpain-mediated spectrin breakdown. The dorsally situated axons of the corticospinal tract primarily exhibited microtubule breakage, whereas all three pathologies were common in the lateral and ventral white matter. Individual axons typically demonstrated only one of the three pathologies during the first 24 h after blast injury, suggesting that the different perturbations are initiated independently of one another. For the first few days after blast, neurofilament compaction was frequently accompanied by autophagy, and subsequent to that, by the fragmentation of degenerating axons. TuJ1 immunolabeling and mice with YFP-reporter labeling each revealed more extensive microtubule breakage than did βAPP immunolabeling, raising doubts about the sensitivity of this standard approach for assessing axonal injury. Although motor deficits were mild and largely transient, some aspects of motor function gradually worsened over several weeks, suggesting that a low level of axonal degeneration continued past the initial wave. Our model can help provide further insight into how to intervene in the processes by which initial axonal damage culminates in axonal degeneration, to improve outcomes after traumatic injury. Importantly

  6. Vibrotactile Presentation of Musical Notes to the Glabrous Skin for Adults with Normal Hearing or a Hearing Impairment: Thresholds, Dynamic Range and High-Frequency Perception

    PubMed Central

    Maté-Cid, Saúl; Fulford, Robert; Seiffert, Gary; Ginsborg, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Presentation of music as vibration to the skin has the potential to facilitate interaction between musicians with hearing impairments and other musicians during group performance. Vibrotactile thresholds have been determined to assess the potential for vibrotactile presentation of music to the glabrous skin of the fingertip, forefoot and heel. No significant differences were found between the thresholds for sinusoids representing notes between C1 and C6 when presented to the fingertip of participants with normal hearing and with a severe or profound hearing loss. For participants with normal hearing, thresholds for notes between C1 and C6 showed the characteristic U-shape curve for the fingertip, but not for the forefoot and heel. Compared to the fingertip, the forefoot had lower thresholds between C1 and C3, and the heel had lower thresholds between C1 and G2; this is attributed to spatial summation from the Pacinian receptors over the larger contactor area used for the forefoot and heel. Participants with normal hearing assessed the perception of high-frequency vibration using 1s sinusoids presented to the fingertip and were found to be more aware of transient vibration at the beginning and/or end of notes between G4 and C6 when stimuli were presented 10dB above threshold, rather than at threshold. An average of 94% of these participants reported feeling continuous vibration between G4 and G5 with stimuli presented 10dB above threshold. Based on the experimental findings and consideration of health effects relating to vibration exposure, a suitable range of notes for vibrotactile presentation of music is identified as being from C1 to G5. This is more limited than for human hearing but the fundamental frequencies of the human voice, and the notes played by many instruments, lie within it. However, the dynamic range might require compression to avoid the negative effects of amplitude on pitch perception. PMID:27191400

  7. Shooting history and presence of high-frequency hearing impairment in Swedish hunters: A cross-sectional internet-based observational study

    PubMed Central

    Honeth, Louise; Ström, Peter; Ploner, Alexander; Bagger-Sjöbäck, Dan; Rosenhall, Ulf; Nyrén, Olof

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study among Swedish hunters was to examine the association between shooting history and presence of high-frequency hearing impairment (HFHI). All hunters registered with an e-mail address in the membership roster of the Swedish Hunters’ Association were invited via e-mail to a secure website with a questionnaire and an Internet-based audiometry test. Associations, expressed as prevalence ratio (PR), were multivariately modelled using Poisson regression. The questionnaire was answered by 1771 hunters (age 11-91 years), and 202 of them also completed the audiometry test. Subjective severe hearing loss was reported by 195/1771 (11%), while 23/202 (11%) exhibited HFHI upon testing with Internet-based audiometry. As many as 328/1771 (19%) had never used hearing protection during hunting. In the preceding 5 years, 785/1771 (45%), had fired >6 unprotected gunshots with hunting rifle calibers. The adjusted PR of HFHI when reporting 1-6 such shots, relative to 0, was 1.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.1; P = 0.02]. We could not verify any excessive HFHI prevalence among 89 hunters reporting unprotected exposure to such gunshot noise >6 times. Nor did the total number of reported rifle shots seem to matter. These findings support the notion of a wide variation in individual susceptibility to impulse noise; that significant sound energy, corresponding to unprotected noise from hunting rifle calibers, seems to be required; that susceptible individuals may sustain irreversible damage to the inner ear from just one or a few shots; and that use of hearing protection should be encouraged from the first shot with such weapons. PMID:26356369

  8. Identification of Adults with Developmental Language Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Lesley J.; Plante, Elena; Vance, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of a wide range of language measures (phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics) for the identification of adults with developmental language impairment. Method: Measures were administered to 3 groups of adults, each representing a population expected to demonstrate high levels of language impairment, and to…

  9. Ascorbate Reverses High Glucose- and RAGE-induced Leak of the Endothelial Permeability Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, M. Elizabeth; Qu, Zhi-chao; May, James M.

    2014-01-01

    High glucose concentrations due to diabetes increase leakage of plasma constituents across the endothelial permeability barrier. We sought to determine whether vitamin C, or ascorbic acid (ascorbate), could reverse such high glucose-induced increases in endothelial barrier permeability. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells and two brain endothelial cell lines cultured at 25 mM glucose showed increases in endothelial barrier permeability to radiolabeled inulin compared to cells cultured at 5 mM glucose. Acute loading of the cells for 30–60 min with ascorbate before the permeability assay prevented the high glucose-induced increase in permeability and decreased basal permeability at 5 mM glucose. High glucose-induced barrier leakage was mediated largely by activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), since it was prevented by RAGE blockade and mimicked by RAGE ligands. Intracellular ascorbate completely prevented RAGE ligand-induced increases in barrier permeability. The high glucose-induced increase in endothelial barrier permeability was also acutely decreased by several cell-penetrant antioxidants, suggesting that at least part of the ascorbate effect could be due to its ability to act as an antioxidant. PMID:24472555

  10. High-Bandwidth AFM-Based Rheology Reveals that Cartilage is Most Sensitive to High Loading Rates at Early Stages of Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Bozchalooi, Iman S.; Li, Yang; Han, Lin; Hung, Han-Hwa; Frank, Eliot; Youcef-Toumi, Kamal; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing a newly developed atomic-force-microscopy-based wide-frequency rheology system, we measured the dynamic nanomechanical behavior of normal and glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-depleted cartilage, the latter representing matrix degradation that occurs at the earliest stages of osteoarthritis. We observed unique variations in the frequency-dependent stiffness and hydraulic permeability of cartilage in the 1 Hz-to-10 kHz range, a frequency range that is relevant to joint motions from normal ambulation to high-frequency impact loading. Measurement in this frequency range is well beyond the capabilities of typical commercial atomic force microscopes. We showed that the dynamic modulus of cartilage undergoes a dramatic alteration after GAG loss, even with the collagen network still intact: whereas the magnitude of the dynamic modulus decreased two- to threefold at higher frequencies, the peak frequency of the phase angle of the modulus (representing fluid-solid frictional dissipation) increased 15-fold from 55 Hz in normal cartilage to 800 Hz after GAG depletion. These results, based on a fibril-reinforced poroelastic finite-element model, demonstrated that GAG loss caused a dramatic increase in cartilage hydraulic permeability (up to 25-fold), suggesting that early osteoarthritic cartilage is more vulnerable to higher loading rates than to the conventionally studied “loading magnitude”. Thus, over the wide frequency range of joint motion during daily activities, hydraulic permeability appears the most sensitive marker of early tissue degradation. PMID:23561529

  11. Analysis of Arabidopsis glucose insensitive growth Mutants Reveals the Involvement of the Plastidial Copper Transporter PAA1 in Glucose-Induced Intracellular Signaling1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shin Ae; Yoon, Eun Kyung; Heo, Jung-Ok; Lee, Mi-Hyun; Hwang, Indeok; Cheong, Hyeonsook; Lee, Woo Sung; Hwang, Yong-sic; Lim, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Sugars play important roles in many aspects of plant growth and development, acting as both energy sources and signaling molecules. With the successful use of genetic approaches, the molecular components involved in sugar signaling have been identified and their regulatory roles in the pathways have been elucidated. Here, we describe novel mutants of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), named glucose insensitive growth (gig), identified by their insensitivity to high-glucose (Glc)-induced growth inhibition. The gig mutant displayed retarded growth under normal growth conditions and also showed alterations in the expression of Glc-responsive genes under high-Glc conditions. Our molecular identification reveals that GIG encodes the plastidial copper (Cu) transporter PAA1 (for P1B-type ATPase 1). Interestingly, double mutant analysis indicated that in high Glc, gig is epistatic to both hexokinase1 (hxk1) and aba insensitive4 (abi4), major regulators in sugar and retrograde signaling. Under high-Glc conditions, the addition of Cu had no effect on the recovery of gig/paa1 to the wild type, whereas exogenous Cu feeding could suppress its phenotype under normal growth conditions. The expression of GIG/PAA1 was also altered by mutations in the nuclear factors HXK1, ABI3, and ABI4 in high Glc. Furthermore, a transient expression assay revealed the interaction between ABI4 and the GIG/PAA1 promoter, suggesting that ABI4 actively regulates the transcription of GIG/PAA1, likely binding to the CCAC/ACGT core element of the GIG/PAA1 promoter. Our findings indicate that the plastidial Cu transporter PAA1, which is essential for plastid function and/or activity, plays an important role in bidirectional communication between the plastid and the nucleus in high Glc. PMID:22582133

  12. Depression in Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Laurel D.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Marano, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Depression and cognitive disorders, including dementia and mild cognitive impairment, are common in the elderly. Depression is also a common feature of cognitive impairment although the symptoms of depression in cognitive impairment differ from depression without cognitive impairment. Pre-morbid depression approximately doubles the risk of subsequent dementia. There are two predominant, though not mutually exclusive, constructs linking pre-morbid depression to subsequent cognitive impairment: Alzheimer’s pathology and the vascular depression hypothesis. When evaluating a patient with depression and cognitive impairment, it is important to obtain caregiver input and to evaluate for alternative etiologies for depressive symptoms such as delirium. We recommend a sequential approach to the treatment of depression in dementia patients: (1) a period of watchful waiting for milder symptoms, (2) psychosocial treatment program, (3) a medication trial for more severe symptoms or failure of psychosocial interventions, and (4) possible ECT for refractory symptoms. PMID:23933974

  13. Using Early Standardized Language Measures to Predict Later Language and Early Reading Outcomes in Children at High Risk for Language-Learning Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flax, Judy F.; Realpe-Bonilla, Teresa; Roesler, Cynthia; Choudhury, Naseem; Benasich, April

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the profiles of children with a family history (FH+) of language-learning impairments (LLI) and a control group of children with no reported family history of LLI (FH-) and identify which language constructs (receptive or expressive) and which ages (2 or 3 years) are related to expressive and receptive language…

  14. Are fetal growth impairment and preterm birth causally related to child attention problems and ADHD? Evidence from a comparison between high-income and middle-income cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Elizabeth; Pearson, Rebecca; Fernandes, Michelle; Santos, Iná S; Barros, Fernando C; Victora, Cesar G; Stein, Alan; Matijasevich, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Background Cross-cohort comparison is an established method for improving causal inference. This study compared 2 cohorts, 1 from a high-income country and another from a middle-income country, to (1) establish whether birth exposures may play a causal role in the development of childhood attention problems; and (2) identify whether confounding structures play a different role in parent-reported attention difficulties compared with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnoses. Methods Birth exposures included low birth weight (LBW), small-for-gestational age (SGA), small head circumference (HC) and preterm birth (PTB)). Outcomes of interest were attention difficulties (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, SDQ) and ADHD (Development and Well-Being Assessment, DAWBA). Associations between exposures and outcomes were compared between 7-year-old children from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) in the UK (N=6849) and the 2004 Pelotas cohort in Brazil (N=3509). Results For attention difficulties (SDQ), the pattern of association with birth exposures was similar between cohorts: following adjustment, attention difficulties were associated with SGA (OR=1.59, 95% CI 1.20 to 2.19) and small HC (OR=1.64, 95% CI 1.11 to 2.41) in ALSPAC and SGA (OR=1.35, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.75) in Pelotas. For ADHD, however, the pattern of association following adjustment differed markedly between cohorts. In ALSPAC, ADHD was associated with LBW (OR=2.29, 95% CI 1.09 to 4.80) and PTB (OR=2.33, 95% CI 1.23 to 4.42). In the Pelotas cohort, however, ADHD was associated with SGA (OR=1.69, 95% CI 1.02 to 2.82). Conclusions The findings suggest that fetal growth impairment may play a causal role in the development of attention difficulties in childhood, as similar associations were identified across both cohorts. Confounding structures, however, appear to play a greater role in determining whether a child meets the full diagnostic criteria for ADHD. PMID

  15. Infection with a Mouse-Adapted Strain of the 2009 Pandemic Virus Causes a Highly Severe Disease Associated with an Impaired T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Isabelle; Morisseau, Olivier; Garneau, Émilie; Marois, Isabelle; Cloutier, Alexandre; Richter, Martin V.

    2015-01-01

    Despite a relatively low fatality rate, the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus differed from other seasonal viruses in that it caused mortality and severe pneumonia in the young and middle-aged population (18–59 years old). The mechanisms underlying this increased disease severity are still poorly understood. In this study, a human isolate of the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus was adapted to the mouse (MAp2009). The pathogenicity of the MAp2009 virus and the host immune responses were evaluated in the mouse model and compared to the laboratory H1N1 strain A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8). The MAp2009 virus reached consistently higher titers in the lungs over 14 days compared to the PR8 virus, and caused severe disease associated with high morbidity and 85% mortality rate, contrasting with the 0% death rate in the PR8 group. During the early phase of infection, both viruses induced similar pathology in the lungs. However, MAp2009-induced lung inflammation was sustained until the end of the study (day 14), while there was no sign of inflammation in the PR8-infected group by day 10. Furthermore, at day 3 post-infection, MAp2009 induced up to 10- to 40-fold more cytokine and chemokine gene expression, respectively. More importantly, the numbers of CD4+ T cells and virus-specific CD8+ T cells were significantly lower in the lungs of MAp2009-infected mice compared to PR8-infected mice. Interestingly, there was no difference in the number of dendritic cells in the lung and in the draining lymph node. Moreover, mice infected with PR8 or MAp2009 had similar numbers of CCR5 and CXCR3-expressing T cells, suggesting that the impaired T cell response was not due to a lack of chemokine responsiveness or priming of T cells. This study demonstrates that a mouse-adapted virus from an isolate of the 2009 pandemic virus interferes with the adaptive immune response leading to a more severe disease. PMID:26381265

  16. Cooperation between HMGA1, PDX-1, and MafA is Essential for Glucose-Induced Insulin Transcription in Pancreatic Beta Cells.

    PubMed

    Arcidiacono, Biagio; Iiritano, Stefania; Chiefari, Eusebio; Brunetti, Francesco S; Gu, Guoqiang; Foti, Daniela Patrizia; Brunetti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The high-mobility group AT-hook 1 (HMGA1) protein is a nuclear architectural factor that can organize chromatin structures. It regulates gene expression by controlling the formation of stereospecific multiprotein complexes called "enhanceosomes" on the AT-rich regions of target gene promoters. Previously, we reported that defects in HMGA1 caused decreased insulin receptor expression and increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans and mice. Interestingly, mice with disrupted HMGA1 gene had significantly smaller islets and decreased insulin content in their pancreata, suggesting that HMGA1 may have a direct role in insulin transcription and secretion. Herein, we investigate the regulatory roles of HMGA1 in insulin transcription. We provide evidence that HMGA1 physically interacts with PDX-1 and MafA, two critical transcription factors for insulin gene expression and beta-cell function, both in vitro and in vivo. We then show that the overexpression of HMGA1 significantly improves the transactivating activity of PDX-1 and MafA on human and mouse insulin promoters, while HMGA1 knockdown considerably decreased this transactivating activity. Lastly, we demonstrate that high glucose stimulus significantly increases the binding of HMGA1 to the insulin (INS) gene promoter, suggesting that HMGA1 may act as a glucose-sensitive element controlling the transcription of the INS gene. Together, our findings provide evidence that HMGA1, by regulating PDX-1- and MafA-induced transactivation of the INS gene promoter, plays a critical role in pancreatic beta-cell function and insulin production.

  17. Osteocalcin protects pancreatic beta cell function and survival under high glucose conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kover, Karen; Yan, Yun; Tong, Pei Ying; Watkins, Dara; Li, Xiaoyu; Tasch, James; Hager, Melissa; Clements, Mark; Moore, Wayne V.

    2015-06-19

    Diabetes is characterized by progressive beta cell dysfunction and loss due in part to oxidative stress that occurs from gluco/lipotoxicity. Treatments that directly protect beta cell function and survival in the diabetic milieu are of particular interest. A growing body of evidence suggests that osteocalcin, an abundant non-collagenous protein of bone, supports beta cell function and proliferation. Based on previous gene expression data by microarray, we hypothesized that osteocalcin protects beta cells from glucose-induced oxidative stress. To test our hypothesis we cultured isolated rat islets and INS-1E cells in the presence of normal, high, or high glucose ± osteocalcin for up to 72 h. Oxidative stress and viability/mitochondrial function were measured by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} assay and Alamar Blue assay, respectively. Caspase 3/7 activity was also measured as a marker of apoptosis. A functional test, glucose stimulated insulin release, was conducted and expression of genes/protein was measured by qRT-PCR/western blot/ELISA. Osteocalcin treatment significantly reduced high glucose-induced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} levels while maintaining viability/mitochondrial function. Osteocalcin also significantly improved glucose stimulated insulin secretion and insulin content in rat islets after 48 h of high glucose exposure compared to untreated islets. As expected sustained high glucose down-regulated gene/protein expression of INS1 and BCL2 while increasing TXNIP expression. Interestingly, osteocalcin treatment reversed the effects of high glucose on gene/protein expression. We conclude that osteocalcin can protect beta cells from the negative effects of glucose-induced oxidative stress, in part, by reducing TXNIP expression, thereby preserving beta cell function and survival. - Highlights: • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced oxidative stress in beta cells. • Osteocalcin preserves beta cell function and survival under stress conditions. • Osteocalcin reduces glucose-induced

  18. Mechanistic evaluation of the glucose-induced reduction in initial burst release of octreotide acetate from poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Barbara M; Schwendeman, Steven P

    2004-05-01

    One major obstacle for development of injectable biodegradable microspheres for controlled peptide and protein delivery is the high initial burst of drug release occurring over the first day of incubation. We describe here the significant reduction in initial burst release of a highly water-soluble model peptide, octreotide acetate, from poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres by the co-encapsulation of a small amount of glucose (e.g., 0.2%w/w), i.e., from 30+/-20% burst - glucose to 8+/-3% + glucose (mean+/-SD, n=4). This reduction is unexpected since hydrophilic additives are known to increase porosity of microspheres, causing an increase in permeability to mass transport and a higher burst. Using the double emulsion-solvent evaporation method of encapsulation, the effect of glucose on initial burst in an acetate buffer pH 4 was found to depend on polymer concentration, discontinuous phase/continuous phase ratio, and glucose content. Extensive characterization studies were performed on two microsphere batches, +/-0.2% glucose, to elucidate the mechanism of this effect. However, no significant difference was observed with respect to specific surface area, porosity, internal and external morphology and drug distribution. Continuous monitoring of the first 24-h release of octreotide acetate from these two batches disclosed that even though their starting release rates were close, the microspheres + glucose exhibited a much lower release rate between 0.2 and 24h compared to those - glucose. The microspheres + glucose showed a denser periphery and a reduced water uptake at the end of 24-h release, indicating decreased permeability. However, this effect at times was offset as glucose content was further increased to 1%, causing an increase in surface area and porosity. In summary, we conclude that the effect of glucose on initial burst are determined by two factors: (1) increased initial burst due to increased osmotic pressure during encapsulation and drug release

  19. Education for the Hearing Impaired (Auditorily Impaired).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Federation of the Deaf, Rome (Italy).

    Education for the hearing impaired is discussed in nine conference papers. J. N. Howarth describes "The Education of Deaf Children in Schools for Hearing Pupils in the United Kingdom" and A.I.Dyachkov of the U.S.S.R. outlines Didactical Principles of Educating the Deaf in the Light of their Rehabilitation Goal." Seven papers from Poland are also…

  20. Development or Impairment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakansson, Gisela

    2010-01-01

    Joanne Paradis' Keynote Article on bilingualism and specific language impairment (SLI) is an impressive overview of research in language acquisition and language impairment. Studying different populations is crucial both for theorizing about language acquisition mechanisms, and for practical purposes of diagnosing and supporting children with…

  1. Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress Reduces Proliferation in Embryonic Stem Cells via FOXO3A/β-Catenin-Dependent Transcription of p21(cip1).

    PubMed

    McClelland Descalzo, Darcie L; Satoorian, Tiffany S; Walker, Lauren M; Sparks, Nicole R L; Pulyanina, Polina Y; Zur Nieden, Nicole I

    2016-07-12

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), which are derived from a peri-implantation embryo, are routinely cultured in medium containing diabetic glucose (Glc) concentrations. While pregnancy in women with pre-existing diabetes may result in small embryos, whether such high Glc levels affect ESC growth remains uncovered. We show here that long-term exposure of ESCs to diabetic Glc inhibits their proliferation, thereby mimicking in vivo findings. Molecularly, Glc exposure increased oxidative stress and activated Forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a), promoting increased expression and activity of the ROS-removal enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase and the cell-cycle inhibitors p21(cip1) and p27(kip1). Diabetic Glc also promoted β-catenin nuclear localization and the formation of a complex with FOXO3a that localized to the promoters of Sod2, p21(cip1), and potentially p27(kip1). Our results demonstrate an adaptive response to increases in oxidative stress induced by diabetic Glc conditions that promote ROS removal, but also result in a decrease in proliferation.

  2. Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress Reduces Proliferation in Embryonic Stem Cells via FOXO3A/β-Catenin-Dependent Transcription of p21(cip1).

    PubMed

    McClelland Descalzo, Darcie L; Satoorian, Tiffany S; Walker, Lauren M; Sparks, Nicole R L; Pulyanina, Polina Y; Zur Nieden, Nicole I

    2016-07-12

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), which are derived from a peri-implantation embryo, are routinely cultured in medium containing diabetic glucose (Glc) concentrations. While pregnancy in women with pre-existing diabetes may result in small embryos, whether such high Glc levels affect ESC growth remains uncovered. We show here that long-term exposure of ESCs to diabetic Glc inhibits their proliferation, thereby mimicking in vivo findings. Molecularly, Glc exposure increased oxidative stress and activated Forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a), promoting increased expression and activity of the ROS-removal enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase and the cell-cycle inhibitors p21(cip1) and p27(kip1). Diabetic Glc also promoted β-catenin nuclear localization and the formation of a complex with FOXO3a that localized to the promoters of Sod2, p21(cip1), and potentially p27(kip1). Our results demonstrate an adaptive response to increases in oxidative stress induced by diabetic Glc conditions that promote ROS removal, but also result in a decrease in proliferation. PMID:27411103

  3. Absence of Shb impairs insulin secretion by elevated FAK activity in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Alenkvist, Ida; Dyachok, Oleg; Tian, Geng; Li, Jia; Mehrabanfar, Saba; Jin, Yang; Birnir, Bryndis; Tengholm, Anders; Welsh, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The Src homology-2 domain containing protein B (SHB) has previously been shown to function as a pleiotropic adapter protein, conveying signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to intracellular signaling intermediates. The overexpression of Shb in β-cells promotes β-cell proliferation by increased insulin receptor substrate (IRS) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity, whereas Shb deficiency causes moderate glucose intolerance and impaired first-peak insulin secretion. Using an array of techniques, including live-cell imaging, patch-clamping, immunoblotting, and semi-quantitative PCR, we presently investigated the causes of the abnormal insulin secretory characteristics in Shb-knockout mice. Shb-knockout islets displayed an abnormal signaling signature with increased activities of FAK, IRS, and AKT. β-catenin protein expression was elevated and it showed increased nuclear localization. However, there were no major alterations in the gene expression of various proteins involved in the β-cell secretory machinery. Nor was Shb deficiency associated with changes in glucose-induced ATP generation or cytoplasmic Ca(2+) handling. In contrast, the glucose-induced rise in cAMP, known to be important for the insulin secretory response, was delayed in the Shb-knockout compared with WT control. Inhibition of FAK increased the submembrane cAMP concentration, implicating FAK activity in the regulation of insulin exocytosis. In conclusion, Shb deficiency causes a chronic increase in β-cell FAK activity that perturbs the normal insulin secretory characteristics of β-cells, suggesting multi-faceted effects of FAK on insulin secretion depending on the mechanism of FAK activation.

  4. High Frequency of Diabetes and Impaired Fasting Glucose in Patients with Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency in the Western Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Marli S.; Monteiro, Wuelton M.; Costa, Mônica R. F.; Sampaio, Vanderson S.; Brito, Marcelo A. M.; Lacerda, Marcus V. G.; Alecrim, Maria G. C.

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common human genetic abnormalities, and it has a significant prevalence in the male population (X chromosome linked). The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency of impaired fasting glucose and diabetes among G6PD-deficient persons in Manaus, Brazil, an area in the Western Brazilian Amazon to which malaria is endemic. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase–deficient males had more impaired fasting glucose and diabetes. This feature could be used as a screening tool for G6PD-deficient persons who are unable to use primaquine for the radical cure of Plasmodium vivax malaria. PMID:24865682

  5. High-fat diet-induced memory impairment in triple-transgenic Alzheimer's disease (3xTgAD) mice is independent of changes in amyloid and tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Knight, Elysse M; Martins, Isaura V A; Gümüsgöz, Sarah; Allan, Stuart M; Lawrence, Catherine B

    2014-08-01

    Obesity and consumption of a high-fat diet are known to increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Diets high in fat also increase disease neuropathology and/or cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. However, the effect of a high-fat diet on both the neuropathology and memory impairments in the triple-transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTgAD) is unknown. Therefore, groups of 2-month-old male 3xTgAD and control (non-Tg) mice were maintained on a high-fat or control diet and memory was assessed at the age of 3-4, 7-8, 11-12, and 15-16 months using a series of behavioral tests. A comparable increase in body weight was observed in non-Tg and 3xTgAD mice after high-fat feeding at all ages tested but a significantly greater increase in epididymal adipose tissue was observed in 3xTgAD mice at the age of 7-8, 11-12, and 15-16 months. A high-fat diet caused memory impairments in non-Tg control mice as early as the age of 3-4 months. In 3xTgAD mice, high-fat consumption led to a reduction in the age of onset and an increase in the extent of memory impairments. Some of these effects of high-fat diet on cognition in non-Tg and 3xTgAD mice were transient, and the age at which cognitive impairment was detected depended on the behavioral test. The effect of high-fat diet on memory in the 3xTgAD mice was independent of changes in AD neuropathology as no significant differences in (plaques, oligomers) or tau neuropathology were observed. An acute increase in microglial activation was seen in high-fat fed 3xTgAD mice at the age of 3-4 months but in non-Tg control mice microglial activation was not observed until the age of 15-16 months. These data indicate therefore that a high-fat diet has rapid and long-lasting negative effects on memory in both control and AD mice that are associated with neuroinflammation, but independent of changes in beta amyloid and tau neuropathology in the AD mice.

  6. The Impact of Visual Impairment on Perceived School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schade, Benjamin; Larwin, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    The current investigation examines whether visual impairment has an impact on a student's perception of the school climate. Using a large national sample of high school students, perceptions were examined for students with vision impairment relative to students with no visual impairments. Three factors were examined: self-reported level of…

  7. Actin dynamics regulated by the balance of neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) and cofilin activities determines the biphasic response of glucose-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Uenishi, Eita; Shibasaki, Tadao; Takahashi, Harumi; Seki, Chihiro; Hamaguchi, Hitomi; Yasuda, Takao; Tatebe, Masao; Oiso, Yutaka; Takenawa, Tadaomi; Seino, Susumu

    2013-09-01

    Actin dynamics in pancreatic β-cells is involved in insulin secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms of the regulation of actin dynamics by intracellular signals in pancreatic β-cells and its role in phasic insulin secretion are largely unknown. In this study, we elucidate the regulation of actin dynamics by neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) and cofilin in pancreatic β-cells and demonstrate its role in glucose-induced insulin secretion (GIIS). N-WASP, which promotes actin polymerization through activation of the actin nucleation factor Arp2/3 complex, was found to be activated by glucose stimulation in insulin-secreting clonal pancreatic β-cells (MIN6-K8 β-cells). Introduction of a dominant-negative mutant of N-WASP, which lacks G-actin and Arp2/3 complex-binding region VCA, into MIN6-K8 β-cells or knockdown of N-WASP suppressed GIIS, especially the second phase. We also found that cofilin, which severs F-actin in its dephosphorylated (active) form, is converted to the phosphorylated (inactive) form by glucose stimulation in MIN6-K8 β-cells, thereby promoting F-actin remodeling. In addition, the dominant-negative mutant of cofilin, which inhibits activation of endogenous cofilin, or knockdown of cofilin reduced the second phase of GIIS. However, the first phase of GIIS occurs in the G-actin predominant state, in which cofilin activity predominates over N-WASP activity. Thus, actin dynamics regulated by the balance of N-WASP and cofilin activities determines the biphasic response of GIIS.

  8. Impairment in Non-Word Repetition: A Marker for Language Impairment or Reading Impairment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Gillian; Slonims, Vicky; Simonoff, Emily; Dworzynski, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    Aim: A deficit in non-word repetition (NWR), a measure of short-term phonological memory proposed as a marker for language impairment, is found not only in language impairment but also in reading impairment. We evaluated the strength of association between language impairment and reading impairment in children with current, past, and no language…

  9. Hearing or speech impairment - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - hearing or speech impairment ... The following organizations are good resources for information on hearing impairment or speech impairment: Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing -- www.agbell. ...

  10. Impairments to Vision

    MedlinePlus

    ... an external Non-Government web site. Impairments to Vision Normal Vision Diabetic Retinopathy Age-related Macular Degeneration In this ... pictures, fixate on the nose to simulate the vision loss. In diabetic retinopathy, the blood vessels in ...

  11. Kids' Quest: Vision Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... important job. Â Return to Steps World-Wide Web Search Kids Health: What is Vision Impairment What ... for the Blind (AFB) created the Braille Bug web site to teach sighted children about braille, and ...

  12. Literacy and visual impairment.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Karen A; Hatton, Deborah

    2007-02-01

    Research supporting specific instructional approaches for young children with visual impairments and blindness is limited. There is, however, a growing body of evidence to support the belief that the critical components of emergent and early conventional literacy for children with visual impairments do not differ markedly from those of their sighted peers. Specifically, infants and toddlers with visual impairments and blindness require interactions that support their oral language development, awareness of print or braille, and opportunities to explore writing. Although these very young children are often delayed in developing emergent literacy understandings, the path of their development is consistent with emergent literacy development of sighted children. The research regarding older children with visual impairments and blindness suggests that they too benefit from instruction that emphasizes the critical elements of early literacy instruction for all children. Research also suggests that specific strategies, such as repeated readings, direct instruction in phonics, and big word decoding that emphasizes morphemes, can benefit school-aged children with visual impairments and blindness. Further research is needed if we are to understand fully the most effective approaches to emergent and early literacy instruction for children with visual impairments and blindness, but there is a solid base from which we can begin. PMID:17340383

  13. [Cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a common finding in Parkinson's disease (PD), even in the early stages. The concept of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in PD was recently formalized with diagnosis being reached after impairments in neuropsychological tasks become significant in at least one domain. The brain profile of cognitive deficits involves executive functions (e. g., planning, set shifting, set maintenance, problem solving), attention and memory function. Memory deficits are characterized by impairments in delayed recall, temporal ordering and conditional associate learning. PD patients demonstrate relatively preserved recognition. Visuospatial dysfunctions have also been reported, while language is largely preserved. The existence of two distinct mild cognitive syndromes has also been suggested. One of these affects mainly the frontostriatal executive deficits that are modulated by dopaminergic medications and by a genetically determined level of prefrontal cortex dopamine release. The other affects the more-posterior cortical abilities, such as visuospatial and memory functions, and is suggested to be associated with an increased risk for conversion to dementia. Cross-sectional studies have commonly reported dementia in 20-30% of PD patients, although the 8-year cumulative incidence of dementia may be as high as 78%. Factors associated with dementia in PD are age at onset, age at the time of examination, akinetic-rigid form PD, depression, hallucination, rapid eye movement sleep behavioral disorder and severe olfactory deficits. Clinical features generally involve the same type of deficits as those found in MCI patients, which are more severe and more extensive. The phenomenology of the dementia syndrome is similar to that seen in dementia with Lewy bodies, and clinicopathological correlation studies have revealed varying results with regard to neurochemical deficits and the pathological substrate underlying cognitive impairment and dementia. Early cognitive

  14. Trainable Mentally Impaired/Severely Multiply Impaired/Autistic Impaired/Severely Mentally Impaired. Product Evaluation Report 1989-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claus, Richard N.; And Others

    The evaluation report describes special education services provided to trainable mentally impaired (TMI), autistic impaired (AI), severely multiply impaired (SXI), and severely mentally impaired (SMI) students at and through the Melvin G. Millet Learning Center (Bridgeport, Michigan). The eight program components are described individually and…

  15. Mandatory notification of impaired doctors.

    PubMed

    Beran, R G

    2014-12-01

    Mandatory reporting of impaired doctors is compulsory in Australasia. Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency guidelines for notification claim high benchmark though the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and the Royal Australasian College of Physicians suggest they still obstruct doctors seeking help. Western Australia excludes mandatory reporting of practitioner-patients. This study examines reporting, consequences and international experiences with notification. Depressed doctors avoid diagnosis and treatment, fearing consequences, yet are more prone to marital problems, substance dependence and needing psychotherapy. South African research confirms isolation of impaired doctors and delayed seeking help with definable characteristics of those at risk. New Zealand data acknowledge: errors occur; questionable contribution from mandatory reporting; issues concerning competence assessment; favouring reporting to senior colleagues or self-intervention to compliance with mandatory reporting. UK found an anaesthetist guilty of professional misconduct for not reporting and sanctioned doctors regarding Harold Shipman. Australians are reluctant to report, fearing legalistic intrusion into care. Australian research confirmed definable characteristics for doctors with psychiatric illness or alcohol abuse. Exposure to legal medicine evokes personal disenchantment for doctors involved. Medicine poses barriers for impaired doctors. Spanish and UK doctors do not use general practitioners and may have suboptimal care. US and European doctors self-medicate using samples. US drug-dependent doctors also prescribe for spouses. Junior doctors are losing empathy with the profession. UK doctors favour private care, avoiding public scrutiny. NZ and Brazil created specific services for doctors, which appear effective. Mandatory reporting may be counterproductive requiring reappraisal.

  16. Cognitive impairment and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dash, Sandip K

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to provide a brief review of the link between diabetes mellitus with cognitive impairment, the possible pathophysiology linking the two, and some possible therapeutic interventions for the treatment of this condition. The prevalence of diabetes increases with age, so also dementia increases in later life. As the population ages, type 2 diabetes and AD are increasing. Both diseases are chronic and are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Recent studies showed that older people with type 2 diabetes have a higher risk of cognitive decline. The precise mechanism linking the two remains to be found out. Several hypothetical mechanisms have been postulated. Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for AD and vascular dementia. The association between diabetes and AD is particularly strong among carriers of the APOE ε4. Several studies have linked dementia to diabetes. Impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance have also been associated with poor cognitive performance and at risk of developing cognitive impairment. Studies have suggested that metabolic syndrome may be linked to vascular dementia, while contrasting findings showed the role of metabolic syndrome to AD. In this review, how diabetes and cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease are mutually linked, possible mechanism linking the two and some possible therapeutic interventions with some patents that seem to be good therapeutic targets in future are discussed.

  17. Endoglin Deficiency Impairs Stroke Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Fanxia; Vincent, Degos; Chu, Pei-Lun; Han, Zhenying; Westbroek, Erick M.; Choi, Eun-Jung; Marchuk, Douglas; Kim, Helen; Lawton, Michael T.; Maze, Mervyn; Young, William L.; Su, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Endoglin (ENG) deficiency causes hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia-1 (HHT1) and impairs myocardial repair. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (AVM) in HHT1 patients are associated with a high incidence of paradoxical embolism in the cerebral circulation and ischemic brain injury. We hypothesized that ENG deficiency impairs stroke recovery. Methods Eng heterozygous (Eng+/−) and wild-type (WT) mice underwent permanent distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). Pial collateral vessels were quantified before pMCAO. Infarct/atrophic volume, vascular density and macrophages were quantified in various days after pMCAO; and behavioral function was assessed using corner and adhesive removal tests on days 3, 15, 30 and 60 after pMCAO. The association between ENG 207G>A polymorphism and brain AVM rupture and surgery outcome was analyzed using logistic regression analysis in 256 ruptured and 157 unruptured patients. Results After pMCAO, Eng+/− mice showed larger infarct/atrophic volumes at all time points (P<0.05), and worse behavior performance (p<0.05) at 15, 30 and 60 days compared to WT mice. Eng+/− mice had fewer macrophages on day 3 (P=0.009) and more macrophages on day 60 (P=0.02) in the peri-infarct region. Although Eng+/− and WT mice had similar numbers of pial collateral vessels before pMCAO, Eng+/− mice had lower vascular density in the peri-infarct region (p=0.05) on day 60 after pMCAO. In humans, ENG 207A allele has been associated with worse outcomes after AVM rupture or surgery of unruptured AVM patients. Conclusions ENG deficiency impairs brain injury recovery. Reduced angiogenesis, impaired macrophage homing, and delayed inflammation resolution could be the underlying mechanism. PMID:24876084

  18. Black Adzuki Bean (Vigna angularis) Extract Protects Pancreatic β Cells and Improves Glucose Tolerance in C57BL/6J Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mina; Kim, Dae Keun; Cha, Youn-Soo

    2016-05-01

    Adzuki beans have long been cultivated as a food and folk medicine in East Asia. In this study, we investigated the effect of black adzuki bean (BAB) extract on pancreatic cells and determined their mechanism of action in impaired glucose tolerance in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. In addition, we performed functional gene annotation analysis to identify genes related to the regulation of glucose metabolism and insulin response. Treatment of pancreatic β cells with BAB extract (0.2 mg/mL) led to tolerance of the high glucose-induced glucotoxicity, resulting in a similar viability as cells maintained in normal glucose media. In addition, dietary supplementation with BAB extract significantly (P < .05) improved hyperglycemia and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) in high-fat diet-induced glucose-intolerant obese C57BL/6J mice. Our results suggest that BAB extract ameliorates hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance, and lowers HOMA-IR by regulating insulin secretion and response, and by maintaining the integrity of pancreatic β cells exposed to hyperglycemic conditions. PMID:27070495

  19. Impaired mobility and impaired working capacity among foreign born people and native born Swedes

    PubMed Central

    Pudaric, S.; Sundquist, J.; Johansson, S. E.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to analyse the influence of country of birth and attained level of education, on impaired mobility and impaired working capacity adjusted for age, sex, and other background variables. SETTING: Sweden. DESIGN: A random sample of 5798 men and 6072 women ages 55-74 years were interviewed face to face by Statistics Sweden 1986-1993. Dependent variable: impaired mobility and impaired working capacity. Independent variables: sex, age, country of birth (Swedes, Finns, Western countries, south Europeans, and all others), attained level of education, marital status, form of tenure, and social network. This study was designed as a cross sectional study. The data were analysed with unconditional logistic regression in main effect models. The results are shown as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: In general, poor health, defined as impaired working capacity or impaired mobility, proved to be more frequent among foreign born people and in all socially disadvantaged groups such as those with a low educational status, people renting a dwelling or with a poor social network. Impaired working capacity and impaired mobility were more frequent among female "all others". The impaired mobility among men and women born in south Europe was high with OR = 2.65 (CI = 1.34, 5.25) and OR = 3.17 (CI = 1.44, 7.00) in the full model. Men and women from Finland and all other countries had high risks for impaired mobility when adjusted for all background variables. Finnish men and south European women had the highest odds ratios for impaired working capacity. There was a clear gradient between educational status and impaired working capacity, with the highest odds ratios for men and women, 2.39 and 1.92, with a low attained level of education, when adjusting for the independent variables. CONCLUSION: Country of birth and educational status are two important independent factors with influence on poor health defined as impaired

  20. "They Think They Know What's Best for Me": An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of the Experience of Inclusion and Support in High School for Vision-Impaired Students with Albinism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurston, Mhairi

    2014-01-01

    The challenges of social inclusion and access to the curriculum facing students with visual impairment in schools are well documented. The refreshed UK Vision Strategy (2013) seeks to improve education for students with vision impairment. In order to do this, it is important to understand how students with visual impairment experience education.…

  1. Specific Language Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to distinguish between children who are struggling to learn a new language and children with true language impairments. After studying a large group of Hispanic children who speak English as a second language, NIDCD-funded researchers have developed a dual ...

  2. Hearing Impaired: Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    The curriculum guide is intended to assist families, school administrators, and teachers providing educational services to hearing impaired (HI) children in regular and special classes in Alberta, Canada. Explained in the introduction are such curriculum aspects as goals and purpose, population to be served, eligibility criteria, three…

  3. Frailty and the risk of cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Searle, Samuel D; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Aging occurs as a series of small steps, first causing cellular damage and then affecting tissues and organs. This is also true in the brain. Frailty, a state of increased risk due to accelerated deficit accumulation, is robustly a risk factor for cognitive impairment. Community-based autopsy studies show that frail individuals have brains that show multiple deficits without necessarily demonstrating cognitive impairment. These facts cast a new light on the growing number of risk factors for cognitive impairment, suggesting that, on a population basis, most health deficits can be associated with late-life cognitive impairment. The systems mechanism by which things that are bad for the body are likely to be bad for the brain can be understood like this: the burden of health deficits anywhere indicates impaired ability to withstand or repair endogenous and environmental damage. This in turn makes additional damage more likely. If true, this suggests that a life course approach to preventing cognitive impairment is desirable. Furthermore, conducting studies in highly selected, younger, healthier individuals to provide 'proof of concept' information is now common. This strategy might exclude the very circumstances that are required for disease expression in the people in whom dementia chiefly occurs (that is, older adults who are often in poor health). PMID:26240611

  4. Induction of insulin resistance by high-sucrose feeding does not raise mean arterial blood pressure but impairs haemodynamic responses to insulin in rats.

    PubMed

    Santuré, Marta; Pitre, Maryse; Marette, André; Deshaies, Yves; Lemieux, Christian; Larivière, Richard; Nadeau, André; Bachelard, Hélène

    2002-09-01

    1. This study was undertaken to further investigate the effects of a sucrose-enriched diet on vascular function and insulin sensitivity in rats. 2. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive a sucrose- or regular rat chow-diet for 4 weeks. A first group of sucrose- and chow-fed rats was instrumented with pulsed Doppler flow probes and intravascular catheters to determine blood pressure, heart rate, regional blood flows and insulin sensitivity in conscious rats. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique. Glucose transport activity was examined in isolated muscles by using the glucose analogue [(3)H]-2-deoxy-D-glucose. A second group of sucrose- and chow-fed rats was used to obtain information regarding nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isozymes protein expression in muscles, and determine endothelin content in vascular tissues isolated from both dietary groups. 3. Sucrose feeding was found to induce insulin resistance, but had no effect on resting blood pressure, heart rate, or regional haemodynamics. This insulin resistance was accompanied by alteration in the vascular responses to insulin. Insulin-mediated skeletal muscle vasodilation was impaired, whereas the mesenteric vasoconstrictor response was potentiated in sucrose-fed rats. A reduction in eNOS protein content in muscle and an increase in vascular endothelin peptide were noted in these animals. Moreover, a reduction in insulin-simulated glucose transport activity was also noted in muscles isolated from sucrose-fed rats. 4. Together these data suggest that a cluster of metabolic and haemodynamic abnormalities occur in response to the intake of simple sugars in rats.

  5. Induction of insulin resistance by high-sucrose feeding does not raise mean arterial blood pressure but impairs haemodynamic responses to insulin in rats

    PubMed Central

    Santuré, Marta; Pitre, Maryse; Marette, André; Deshaies, Yves; Lemieux, Christian; Lariviére, Richard; Nadeau, André; Bachelard, Hélène

    2002-01-01

    This study was undertaken to further investigate the effects of a sucrose-enriched diet on vascular function and insulin sensitivity in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive a sucrose- or regular rat chow-diet for 4 weeks. A first group of sucrose- and chow-fed rats was instrumented with pulsed Doppler flow probes and intravascular catheters to determine blood pressure, heart rate, regional blood flows and insulin sensitivity in conscious rats. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique. Glucose transport activity was examined in isolated muscles by using the glucose analogue [3H]-2-deoxy-D-glucose. A second group of sucrose- and chow-fed rats was used to obtain information regarding nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isozymes protein expression in muscles, and determine endothelin content in vascular tissues isolated from both dietary groups. Sucrose feeding was found to induce insulin resistance, but had no effect on resting blood pressure, heart rate, or regional haemodynamics. This insulin resistance was accompanied by alteration in the vascular responses to insulin. Insulin-mediated skeletal muscle vasodilation was impaired, whereas the mesenteric vasoconstrictor response was potentiated in sucrose-fed rats. A reduction in eNOS protein content in muscle and an increase in vascular endothelin peptide were noted in these animals. Moreover, a reduction in insulin-simulated glucose transport activity was also noted in muscles isolated from sucrose-fed rats. Together these data suggest that a cluster of metabolic and haemodynamic abnormalities occur in response to the intake of simple sugars in rats. PMID:12208775

  6. Antioxidant effects of JM-20 on rat brain mitochondria and synaptosomes: mitoprotection against Ca²⁺-induced mitochondrial impairment.

    PubMed

    Nuñez-Figueredo, Yanier; Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L; Ramírez-Sánchez, Jeney; Delgado-Hernández, René; Ochoa-Rodríguez, Estael; Verdecia-Reyes, Yamila; Naal, Zeki; Muller, Alexandre Pastoris; Portela, Luis Valmor; Souza, Diogo O

    2014-10-01

    Because mitochondrial oxidative stress and impairment are important mediators of neuronal damage in neurodegenerative diseases and in brain ischemia/reperfusion, in the present study, we evaluated the antioxidant and mitoprotective effect of a new promising neuroprotective molecule, JM-20, in mitochondria and synaptosomes isolated from rat brains. JM-20 inhibited succinate-mediated H₂O₂ generation in both mitochondria and synaptosomes incubated in depolarized (high K(+)) medium at extremely low micromolar concentration and with identical IC₅₀ values of 0.91 μM. JM-20 also repressed glucose-induced H₂O₂ generation stimulated by rotenone or by antimycin A in synaptosomes incubated in high sodium-polarized medium at extremely low IC₅₀ values of 0.395 μM and 2.452 μM, respectively. JM-20 was unable to react directly with H₂O₂ or with superoxide anion radicals but displayed a cathodic reduction peak at -0.71V, which is close to that of oxygen (-0.8V), indicating high electron affinity. JM-20 also inhibited uncoupled respiration in mitochondria or synaptosomes and was a more effective inhibitor in the presence of the respiratory substrates glutamate/malate than in the presence of succinate. JM-20 also prevented Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, membrane potential dissipation and cytochrome c release, which are key pathogenic events during stroke. This molecule also prevented Ca(2+) influx into synaptosomes and mitochondria; the former effect was a consequence of the latter because JM-20 inhibition followed the patterns of carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone (FCCP), which is a classic mitochondrial uncoupler. Because the mitochondrion is considered an important source and target of neuronal cell death signaling after an ischemic insult, the antioxidant and protective effects of JM-20 against the deleterious effects of Ca(2+) observed at the mitochondrial level in this study may endow this molecule

  7. Antioxidant effects of JM-20 on rat brain mitochondria and synaptosomes: mitoprotection against Ca²⁺-induced mitochondrial impairment.

    PubMed

    Nuñez-Figueredo, Yanier; Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L; Ramírez-Sánchez, Jeney; Delgado-Hernández, René; Ochoa-Rodríguez, Estael; Verdecia-Reyes, Yamila; Naal, Zeki; Muller, Alexandre Pastoris; Portela, Luis Valmor; Souza, Diogo O

    2014-10-01

    Because mitochondrial oxidative stress and impairment are important mediators of neuronal damage in neurodegenerative diseases and in brain ischemia/reperfusion, in the present study, we evaluated the antioxidant and mitoprotective effect of a new promising neuroprotective molecule, JM-20, in mitochondria and synaptosomes isolated from rat brains. JM-20 inhibited succinate-mediated H₂O₂ generation in both mitochondria and synaptosomes incubated in depolarized (high K(+)) medium at extremely low micromolar concentration and with identical IC₅₀ values of 0.91 μM. JM-20 also repressed glucose-induced H₂O₂ generation stimulated by rotenone or by antimycin A in synaptosomes incubated in high sodium-polarized medium at extremely low IC₅₀ values of 0.395 μM and 2.452 μM, respectively. JM-20 was unable to react directly with H₂O₂ or with superoxide anion radicals but displayed a cathodic reduction peak at -0.71V, which is close to that of oxygen (-0.8V), indicating high electron affinity. JM-20 also inhibited uncoupled respiration in mitochondria or synaptosomes and was a more effective inhibitor in the presence of the respiratory substrates glutamate/malate than in the presence of succinate. JM-20 also prevented Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, membrane potential dissipation and cytochrome c release, which are key pathogenic events during stroke. This molecule also prevented Ca(2+) influx into synaptosomes and mitochondria; the former effect was a consequence of the latter because JM-20 inhibition followed the patterns of carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl hydrazone (FCCP), which is a classic mitochondrial uncoupler. Because the mitochondrion is considered an important source and target of neuronal cell death signaling after an ischemic insult, the antioxidant and protective effects of JM-20 against the deleterious effects of Ca(2+) observed at the mitochondrial level in this study may endow this molecule

  8. Chemistry for the Visually Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Judy L.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses modifications to general education or introductory chemistry courses that allow visually impaired students to participate productively. Describes a strategy for teaching about elements and density, and the construction of a conductivity tester for visually impaired students. (JRH)

  9. Impaired consciousness in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Hal

    2012-09-01

    Consciousness is essential to normal human life. In epileptic seizures consciousness is often transiently lost, which makes it impossible for the individual to experience or respond. These effects have huge consequences for safety, productivity, emotional health, and quality of life. To prevent impaired consciousness in epilepsy, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms that lead to brain dysfunction during seizures. Normally the consciousness system-a specialised set of cortical-subcortical structures-maintains alertness, attention, and awareness. Advances in neuroimaging, electrophysiology, and prospective behavioural testing have shed light on how epileptic seizures disrupt the consciousness system. Diverse seizure types, including absence, generalised tonic-clonic, and complex partial seizures, converge on the same set of anatomical structures through different mechanisms to disrupt consciousness. Understanding of these mechanisms could lead to improved treatment strategies to prevent impairment of consciousness and improve the quality of life of people with epilepsy.

  10. Impairment, disability, and handicap.

    PubMed

    Mooney, V

    1987-08-01

    It seems clear that the orthopedic surgeon cannot separate impairment from disability. The measurement of impairment is clouded by the inability to measure dynamic function. A range of motion demonstrated by a patient in the doctor's office does not fully describe the functional potential of either the extremity or the spine. Moreover, the rules by which disability is defined are interpreted with a natural sympathy of the physician's care for the patient. The physician may have less sympathy if the individual being reviewed is a client of an insurance company or of an attorney, compared to being a "private" patient. In the future, the orthopedic surgeon would focus on the musculoskeletal handicap rather than disability, or function rather than impairment. Function must be measured in a dynamic manner. The guidelines for definition of function or dysfunction should be similar to those used in sports medicine regarding the decision as to when the athlete can resume sports. What was the capacity before injury? How close to the normal capacity has medical care restored function? This includes measurements of passage of time and consideration of the desire to return to previous activity. The goal is the development of methods that will accurately measure dynamic musculoskeletal function. Visceral organ systems have biochemical standards of measurement; comparable standards must be devised for the musculoskeletal system.

  11. Impairment, disability, and handicap.

    PubMed

    Mooney, V

    1987-08-01

    It seems clear that the orthopedic surgeon cannot separate impairment from disability. The measurement of impairment is clouded by the inability to measure dynamic function. A range of motion demonstrated by a patient in the doctor's office does not fully describe the functional potential of either the extremity or the spine. Moreover, the rules by which disability is defined are interpreted with a natural sympathy of the physician's care for the patient. The physician may have less sympathy if the individual being reviewed is a client of an insurance company or of an attorney, compared to being a "private" patient. In the future, the orthopedic surgeon would focus on the musculoskeletal handicap rather than disability, or function rather than impairment. Function must be measured in a dynamic manner. The guidelines for definition of function or dysfunction should be similar to those used in sports medicine regarding the decision as to when the athlete can resume sports. What was the capacity before injury? How close to the normal capacity has medical care restored function? This includes measurements of passage of time and consideration of the desire to return to previous activity. The goal is the development of methods that will accurately measure dynamic musculoskeletal function. Visceral organ systems have biochemical standards of measurement; comparable standards must be devised for the musculoskeletal system. PMID:2955986

  12. Diabetes and Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Zilliox, Lindsay A; Chadrasekaran, Krish; Kwan, Justin Y; Russell, James W

    2016-09-01

    Both type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have been associated with reduced performance on multiple domains of cognitive function and with evidence of abnormal structural and functional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cognitive deficits may occur at the very earliest stages of diabetes and are further exacerbated by the metabolic syndrome. The duration of diabetes and glycemic control may have an impact on the type and severity of cognitive impairment, but as yet we cannot predict who is at greatest risk of developing cognitive impairment. The pathophysiology of cognitive impairment is multifactorial, although dysfunction in each interconnecting pathway ultimately leads to discordance in metabolic signaling. The pathophysiology includes defects in insulin signaling, autonomic function, neuroinflammatory pathways, mitochondrial (Mt) metabolism, the sirtuin-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator 1α (SIRT-PGC-1α) axis, and Tau signaling. Several promising therapies have been identified in pre-clinical studies, but remain to be validated in clinical trials. PMID:27491830

  13. Sleep, Torpor and Memory Impairment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchykova, S.; Tobler, I.

    It is now well known that daily torpor induces a sleep deficit. Djungarian hamsters emerging from this hypometabolic state spend most of the time in sleep. This sleep is characterized by high initial values of EEG slow-wave activity (SWA) that monotonically decline during recovery sleep. These features resemble the changes seen in numerous species during recovery after prolonged wakefulness or sleep deprivation (SD). When hamsters are totally or partially sleep deprived immediately after emerging from torpor, an additional increase in SWA can be induced. It has been therefore postulated, that these slow- waves are homeostatically regulated, as predicted by the two-process model of sleep regulation, and that during daily torpor a sleep deficit is accumulated as it is during prolonged waking. The predominance of SWA in the frontal EEG observed both after SD and daily torpor provides further evidence for the similarity of these conditions. It has been shown in several animal and human studies that sleep can enhance memory consolidation, and that SD leads to memory impairment. Preliminary data obtained in the Djungarian hamster showed that both SD and daily torpor result in object recognition deficits. Thus, animals subjected to SD immediately after learning, or if they underwent an episode of daily torpor between learning and retention, displayed impaired recognition memory for complex object scenes. The investigation of daily torpor can reveal mechanisms that could have important implications for hypometabolic state induction in other mammalian species, including humans.

  14. Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33 secreted from impaired vessels in the skin compared to fractionated irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Yoo, Hyun; Kwak, Woori; Choi, Won Hoon; Cho, Seoae; Choi, Yu Jeong; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-08-14

    We have revealed in a porcine skin injury model that eosinophil recruitment was dose-dependently enhanced by a single high-dose irradiation. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of eosinophil-associated skin fibrosis and the effect of high-dose-per-fraction radiation. The dorsal skin of a mini-pig was divided into two sections containing 4-cm{sup 2} fields that were irradiated with 30 Gy in a single fraction or 5 fractions and biopsied regularly over 14 weeks. Eosinophil-related Th2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and C–C motif chemokine-11 (CCL11/eotaxin) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. RNA-sequencing using 30 Gy-irradiated mouse skin and functional assays in a co-culture system of THP-1 and irradiated-human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed to investigate the mechanism of eosinophil-mediated radiation fibrosis. Single high-dose-per-fraction irradiation caused pronounced eosinophil accumulation, increased profibrotic factors collagen and transforming growth factor-β, enhanced production of eosinophil-related cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, CCL11, IL-13, and IL-33, and reduced vessels compared with 5-fraction irradiation. IL-33 notably increased in pig and mouse skin vessels after single high-dose irradiation of 30 Gy, as well as in irradiated HUVECs following 12 Gy. Blocking IL-33 suppressed the migration ability of THP-1 cells and cytokine secretion in a co-culture system of THP-1 cells and irradiated HUVECs. Hence, high-dose-per-fraction irradiation appears to enhance eosinophil-mediated fibrotic responses, and IL-33 may be a key molecule operating in eosinophil-mediated fibrosis in high-dose-per fraction irradiated skin. - Highlights: • Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33. • Vascular endothelial cells damaged by high-dose radiation secrete IL-33. • Blocking IL-33 suppressed migration of inflammatory cells and cytokine secretion. • IL

  15. High serum Cu and Cu/Zn ratios correlate with impairments in bone density, physical performance and overall health in a population of elderly men with frailty characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Gaier, Eric D; Kleppinger, Alison; Ralle, Martina; Mains, Richard E; Kenny, Anne M; Eipper, Betty A

    2014-01-01

    Serum Cu levels rise with age and high Cu/Zn ratios are linked with multiple-cause mortality in the elderly. The relationships of these parameters to measures of musculoskeletal health and frailty have not yet been analyzed. We used inductively coupled mass spectrometry to assess serum levels of Cu and Zn and probed for relationships between serum Cu levels and the Cu/Zn ratio with specific measures of bone, physical and overall health in a cohort of 144 frail elderly men. Subjects were divided into quintiles based on serum metal levels and comparisons for functional measures were made between the reference (middle) group and the low and high groups. Subjects’ serum metal values were normally distributed. We found significant correlations between high Cu/Zn ratios and deficits in femoral bone mineral density, measures of speed and strength, muscle mass and hematocrit. High Cu/Zn ratios were also correlated with decreased triglycerides and increased reliance on ADL assistance. This study identifies specific deficits associated with high Cu/Zn ratios that span multiple organ systems and supports earlier studies indicating that serum Cu levels and the Cu/Zn ratio may serve as useful predictive biomarkers for poor health in the elderly. PMID:22484083

  16. Cognitive Impairment in CKD: Keep Vascular Disease in Mind

    PubMed Central

    Drew, David A; Weiner, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is a major cause of morbidity in people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with lower quality of life, more difficulty adhering to medications, and worse survival. Prior data suggest a relationship between vascular disease and cognitive impairment in individuals with CKD, although overall risk factors remain poorly understood. Critically, clinicians should be aware of the high rates of cognitive impairment that occur in all stages of CKD, which, although sometimes subtle, may impact comprehension and decision making in these individuals and may herald future, more debilitating impairment. PMID:24583984

  17. 20 CFR 220.104 - Multiple impairments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... physical or mental impairment or impairments are of a sufficient medical severity that such impairment or impairments could be the basis of eligiblity under the law, the combined effect of all of the...

  18. 20 CFR 220.104 - Multiple impairments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... physical or mental impairment or impairments are of a sufficient medical severity that such impairment or impairments could be the basis of eligiblity under the law, the combined effect of all of the...

  19. 20 CFR 220.104 - Multiple impairments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... physical or mental impairment or impairments are of a sufficient medical severity that such impairment or impairments could be the basis of eligiblity under the law, the combined effect of all of the...

  20. 20 CFR 416.923 - Multiple impairments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... determining whether your physical or mental impairment or impairments are of a sufficient medical severity... the combined effect of all of your impairments without regard to whether any such impairment,...

  1. Language Learning Impairment in Sequential Bilingual Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, Kerry Danahy; Kohnert, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    We review and synthesize empirical evidence at the intersection of two populations: children with language learning impairment (LLI) and children from immigrant families who learn a single language from birth and a second language beginning in early childhood. LLI is a high incidence disorder that, in recent years, has been referred to by…

  2. Subclinical Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection and Hearing Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahle, Arthur J.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    When the hearing sensitivity of children with subclinical congenital cytomegalovirus infection was evaluated and compared with that of a group of matched control subjects, nine of the 18 infected subjects were found to have some hearing loss, ranging from slight high-frequency impairments to a severe-to-profound unilateral loss. (MYS)

  3. Cognitive impairment and stroke in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Lo Coco, Daniele; Lopez, Gianluca; Corrao, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed current knowledge about the interaction between stroke and vascular risk factors and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Stroke is increasingly recognized as an important cause of cognitive problems and has been implicated in the development of both Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. The prevalence of cognitive impairment after stroke is high, and their combined effects significantly increase the cost of care and health resource utilization, with reflections on hospital readmissions and increased mortality rates. There is also substantial evidence that vascular risk factors (such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and tobacco smoking) are independently associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Thus, a successful management of these factors, as well as optimal acute stroke management, might have a great impact on the development of cognitive impairment. Notwithstanding, the pathological link between cognitive impairment, stroke, and vascular risk factors is complex and still partially unclear so that further studies are needed to better elucidate the boundaries of this relationship. Many specific pharmacological treatments, including anticholinergic drugs and antihypertensive medications, and nonpharmacological approaches, such as diet, cognitive rehabilitation, and physical activity, have been studied for patients with vascular cognitive impairment, but the optimal care is still far away. Meanwhile, according to the most recent knowledge, optimal stroke care should also include cognitive assessment in the short and long term, and great efforts should be oriented toward a multidisciplinary approach, including quality-of-life assessment and support of caregivers. PMID:27069366

  4. Cognitive impairment and stroke in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Lo Coco, Daniele; Lopez, Gianluca; Corrao, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed current knowledge about the interaction between stroke and vascular risk factors and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Stroke is increasingly recognized as an important cause of cognitive problems and has been implicated in the development of both Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. The prevalence of cognitive impairment after stroke is high, and their combined effects significantly increase the cost of care and health resource utilization, with reflections on hospital readmissions and increased mortality rates. There is also substantial evidence that vascular risk factors (such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and tobacco smoking) are independently associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Thus, a successful management of these factors, as well as optimal acute stroke management, might have a great impact on the development of cognitive impairment. Notwithstanding, the pathological link between cognitive impairment, stroke, and vascular risk factors is complex and still partially unclear so that further studies are needed to better elucidate the boundaries of this relationship. Many specific pharmacological treatments, including anticholinergic drugs and antihypertensive medications, and nonpharmacological approaches, such as diet, cognitive rehabilitation, and physical activity, have been studied for patients with vascular cognitive impairment, but the optimal care is still far away. Meanwhile, according to the most recent knowledge, optimal stroke care should also include cognitive assessment in the short and long term, and great efforts should be oriented toward a multidisciplinary approach, including quality-of-life assessment and support of caregivers.

  5. Cognitive impairment and stroke in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Lo Coco, Daniele; Lopez, Gianluca; Corrao, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed current knowledge about the interaction between stroke and vascular risk factors and the development of cognitive impairment and dementia. Stroke is increasingly recognized as an important cause of cognitive problems and has been implicated in the development of both Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. The prevalence of cognitive impairment after stroke is high, and their combined effects significantly increase the cost of care and health resource utilization, with reflections on hospital readmissions and increased mortality rates. There is also substantial evidence that vascular risk factors (such as hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and tobacco smoking) are independently associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Thus, a successful management of these factors, as well as optimal acute stroke management, might have a great impact on the development of cognitive impairment. Notwithstanding, the pathological link between cognitive impairment, stroke, and vascular risk factors is complex and still partially unclear so that further studies are needed to better elucidate the boundaries of this relationship. Many specific pharmacological treatments, including anticholinergic drugs and antihypertensive medications, and nonpharmacological approaches, such as diet, cognitive rehabilitation, and physical activity, have been studied for patients with vascular cognitive impairment, but the optimal care is still far away. Meanwhile, according to the most recent knowledge, optimal stroke care should also include cognitive assessment in the short and long term, and great efforts should be oriented toward a multidisciplinary approach, including quality-of-life assessment and support of caregivers. PMID:27069366

  6. Design and baseline characteristics of the PODOSA (Prevention of Diabetes & Obesity in South Asians) trial: a cluster, randomised lifestyle intervention in Indian and Pakistani adults with impaired glycaemia at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Anne; Bhopal, Raj S; Bhopal, Ruby; Forbes, John F; Gill, Jason M R; McKnight, John; Murray, Gordon; Sattar, Naveed; Sharma, Anu; Wallia, Sunita; Wild, Sarah; Sheikh, Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the design and baseline population characteristics of an adapted lifestyle intervention trial aimed at reducing weight and increasing physical activity in people of Indian and Pakistani origin at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Design Cluster, randomised controlled trial. Setting Community-based in Edinburgh and Glasgow, Scotland, UK. Participants 156 families, comprising 171 people with impaired glycaemia, and waist sizes ≥90 cm (men) and ≥80 cm (women), plus 124 family volunteers. Interventions Families were randomised into either an intensive intervention of 15 dietitian visits providing lifestyle advice, or a light (control) intervention of four visits, over a period of 3 years. Outcome measures The primary outcome is a change in mean weight between baseline and 3 years. Secondary outcomes are changes in waist, hip, body mass index, plasma blood glucose and physical activity. The cost of the intervention will be measured. Qualitative work will seek to understand factors that motivated participation and retention in the trial and families’ experience of adhering to the interventions. Results Between July 2007 and October 2009, 171 people with impaired glycaemia, along with 124 family volunteers, were randomised. In total, 95% (171/196) of eligible participants agreed to proceed to the 3-year trial. Only 13 of the 156 families contained more than one recruit with impaired glycaemia. We have recruited sufficient participants to undertake an adequately powered trial to detect a mean difference in weight of 2.5 kg between the intensive and light intervention groups at the 5% significance level. Over half the families include family volunteers. The main participants have a mean age of 52 years and 64% are women. Conclusions Prevention of Diabetes & Obesity in South Asians (PODOSA) is one of the first community-based, randomised lifestyle intervention trials in a UK South Asian population. The main trial results will

  7. Face Scanning Distinguishes Social from Communication Impairments in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falck-Ytter, Terje; Fernell, Elisabeth; Gillberg, Christopher; Von Hofsten, Claes

    2010-01-01

    How closely related are the social and communicative impairments in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)? Recent findings in typically developing children suggest that both types of impairment are highly heritable but have only moderate behavioural and genetic overlap. So far, their respective roles in social perception are poorly understood. Here we…

  8. Early Language Impairment and Young Adult Delinquent and Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownlie, E.B.; Beitchman, Joseph H.; Escobar, Michael; Young, Arlene; Atkinson, Leslie; Johnson, Carla; Wilson, Beth; Douglas, Lori

    2004-01-01

    Clinic and forensic studies have reported high rates of language impairments in conduct- disordered and incarcerated youth. In community samples followed to early adolescence, speech and language impairments have been linked to attention deficits and internalizing problems, rather than conduct problems, delinquency, or aggression. This study…

  9. Adults with Intellectual Impairment Who Stammer: A Clinical Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Jois; Collier, Ruth; King, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Adults with intellectual impairments have a high prevalence of stammering. Characteristic speech and associated behaviours are also different in quality and more variable between individuals than those of the typical adult population. This paper describes a speech and language therapy group with two adults with intellectual impairments and…

  10. Prospective memory impairment in mild cognitive impairment: an analytical review.

    PubMed

    Costa, Alberto; Caltagirone, Carlo; Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto

    2011-12-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by the presence in an otherwise healthy elderly individual of cognitive deficits involving specific domains in the absence of significant functional impairments. Reports indicate that prospective memory (PM), that is, the ability to remember to execute delayed intentions, is impaired in individuals with MCI. The present review discusses the current debate in the literature on PM functioning in MCI by focusing on the relationship between prospective retrieval and retrospective memory functioning. Analysis of the reported evidence revealed that both the prospective component and the retrospective component of PM can be impaired in MCI. Declarative memory dysfunction may account for the retrospective memory impairment, while either reduced executive abilities or a deficit of reflexive mechanisms could explain the prospective component impairment.

  11. Impaired sensory conduction in a mixed nerve induced by high frequency stimulation of the muscle fibres. An experimental study in cats.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, A; Matsuda, H; Shimazu, A; Nakata, N; Seki, M

    1993-12-01

    To see if symptoms such as sensory disturbance or numbness worsen during exercise as is thought to occur in entrapment neuropathy, we studied the interaction between sensory and muscle nerve fibres in a mixed nerve in cats. Stimulation electrodes were placed on both the deep (muscle) and superficial (sensory) branch of the radial nerve at the elbow. High frequency stimulation at 100 Hz was applied to one branch for five minutes and the nerve action potential of the other branch was recorded at the axilla where the radial nerve is mixed. The stimulation decreased the amplitude of the nerve action potential and prolonged its latency. Recovery from these changes was gradual, and changes were the same whichever branch was stimulated. When a cat's leg was made ischaemic, the changes were more pronounced. The changes in the nerve action potential may have arisen from ischaemia in the nerve, possibly caused by high frequency stimulation. PMID:8159937

  12. High-resolution fMRI detects neuromodulation of individual brainstem nuclei by electrical tongue stimulation in balance-impaired individuals

    PubMed Central

    Wildenberg, Joseph C.; Tyler, Mitchell E.; Danilov, Yuri P.; Kaczmarek, Kurt A.; Meyerand, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be used to precisely identify blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activation of small structures within the brainstem not accessible with standard fMRI. A previous study identified a region within the pons exhibiting sustained neuromodulation due to electrical tongue stimulation, but was unable to precisely identify the neuronal structure involved. For this study, high-resolution images of neural activity induced by optic flow were acquired in nine healthy controls and nine individuals with balance dysfunction before and after information-free tongue stimulation. Subjects viewed optic flow videos to activate the structures of interest. Sub-millimeter in-plane voxels of structures within the posterior fossa were acquired using a restricted field of view. Whole-brain functional imaging verified that global activation patterns due to optic flow were consistent with previous studies. Optic flow activated t