Science.gov

Sample records for impedance planimetric description

  1. Journal bearing impedance descriptions for rotordynamic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D.; Moes, H.; Van Leeuwen, H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper deals with the development of analytic descriptions for plain circumferentially-symmetric fluid journal bearings, which are suitable for use in rotor dynamic analysis. The bearing impedance vector is introduced, which defines the bearing reaction force components as a function of the bearing motion. Impedances are derived directly for the Ocvirk (short) and Sommerfeld (long) bearings, and the relationships between the impedance vector and the more familiar mobility vector are developed and used to derive analytic impedance for finite-length bearings. The static correctness of the finite-length cavitating impedance is verified. Analytic stiffness and damping coefficient definitions are derived in terms of an impedance vector for small motion around an equilibrium position and demonstrated for the finite-length cavitating impedance. Nonlinear transient rotordynamic simulations are presented for the short pi and 2-pi impedances and the finite-length cavitating impedance. It is shown that finite-length impedance yields more accurate results for substantially less computer time than the short-bearing numerical-pressure-integration approach.

  2. Planimetric Martian triangulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arthur, D.W.G.; McMacken, D.K.

    1977-01-01

    Narrow-angle photographs, which have severe drawbacks for stereophotogrammetry, have advantages for simple plane triangulations. Rectified narrow-angle pictures corrected for map projection effects can be combined in the map plane in relatively accurate planimetric triangulations. Provided the strict precepts of least squares are not followed, these triangulations can incorporate considerable overdetermination without increase in the labor of solving the equations. These plane triangulations have been used successfully in the cartography of Mars and are illustrated here by a triangulation of the environs of the prime Martian landing site.

  3. Kinetic Description of the Impedance Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberrath, Jens; Lapke, Martin; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Brinkmann, Ralf

    2011-10-01

    Active plasma resonance spectroscopy is a well known diagnostic method. Many concepts of this method are theoretically investigated and realized as a diagnostic tool, one of which is the impedance probe (IP). The application of such a probe in plasmas with pressures of a few Pa raises the question whether kinetic effects have to be taken into account or not. To address this question a kinetic model is necessary. A general kinetic model for an electrostatic concept of active plasma spectroscopy was presented by R.P. Brinkmann and can be used to describe the multipole resonance probe (MRP). In principle the IP is interpretable as a special case of the MRP in lower order. Thus, we are able to describe the IP by the kinetic model of the MRP. Based on this model we derive a solution to investigate the influence of kinetic effects to the resonance behavior of the IP. Active plasma resonance spectroscopy is a well known diagnostic method. Many concepts of this method are theoretically investigated and realized as a diagnostic tool, one of which is the impedance probe (IP). The application of such a probe in plasmas with pressures of a few Pa raises the question whether kinetic effects have to be taken into account or not. To address this question a kinetic model is necessary. A general kinetic model for an electrostatic concept of active plasma spectroscopy was presented by R.P. Brinkmann and can be used to describe the multipole resonance probe (MRP). In principle the IP is interpretable as a special case of the MRP in lower order. Thus, we are able to describe the IP by the kinetic model of the MRP. Based on this model we derive a solution to investigate the influence of kinetic effects to the resonance behavior of the IP. The authors acknowledge the support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) via the Ruhr University Research School and the Federal Ministry of Education and Research in frame of the PluTO project.

  4. Healing of excisional wound in alloxan induced diabetic sheep: A planimetric and histopathologic study.

    PubMed

    Kazemi-Darabadi, Siamak; Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei, Farshid; Farshid, Amir-Abbas; Baradar-Jalili, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Healing of skin wound is a multi-factorial and complex process. Proper treatment of diabetic wounds is still a major clinical challenge. Although diabetes mellitus can occur in ruminants, healing of wounds in diabetic ruminants has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate healing of ovine excisional diabetic wound model. Eight 4-month-old Iranian Makoui wethers were equally divided to diabetic and nondiabetic groups. Alloxan monohydrate (60 mg kg(-1), IV) was used for diabetes induction. In each wether, an excisional wound was created on the dorsum of the animal. Photographs were taken in distinct times for planimetric evaluation. Wound samples were taken on day 21 post-wounding for histopathologic evaluations of epidermal thickness, number of fibroblasts and number of new blood vessels. The planimetric study showed slightly delay in wound closure of diabetic animals, however, it was not significantly different from nondiabetic wounds (p ≥ 0.05). Furthermore, epidermal thickness, number of fibroblasts and number of blood vessels were significantly lower in diabetic group (p < 0.05). We concluded that healing of excisional diabetic wounds in sheep may be compromised, as seen in other species. However, contraction rate of these wounds may not be delayed due to metabolic features of ruminants and these animals might go under surgeries without any serious concern. However, healing quality of these wounds may be lower than normal wounds.

  5. Accuracy assessment of planimetric large-scale map data for decision-making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doskocz, Adam

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents decision-making risk estimation based on planimetric large-scale map data, which are data sets or databases which are useful for creating planimetric maps on scales of 1:5,000 or larger. The studies were conducted on four data sets of large-scale map data. Errors of map data were used for a risk assessment of decision-making about the localization of objects, e.g. for land-use planning in realization of investments. An analysis was performed for a large statistical sample set of shift vectors of control points, which were identified with the position errors of these points (errors of map data). In this paper, empirical cumulative distribution function models for decision-making risk assessment were established. The established models of the empirical cumulative distribution functions of shift vectors of control points involve polynomial equations. An evaluation of the compatibility degree of the polynomial with empirical data was stated by the convergence coefficient and by the indicator of the mean relative compatibility of model. The application of an empirical cumulative distribution function allows an estimation of the probability of the occurrence of position errors of points in a database. The estimated decision-making risk assessment is represented by the probability of the errors of points stored in the database.

  6. System Description and First Application of an FPGA-Based Simultaneous Multi-Frequency Electrical Impedance Tomography.

    PubMed

    Aguiar Santos, Susana; Robens, Anne; Boehm, Anna; Leonhardt, Steffen; Teichmann, Daniel

    2016-07-25

    A new prototype of a multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography system is presented. The system uses a field-programmable gate array as a main controller and is configured to measure at different frequencies simultaneously through a composite waveform. Both real and imaginary components of the data are computed for each frequency and sent to the personal computer over an ethernet connection, where both time-difference imaging and frequency-difference imaging are reconstructed and visualized. The system has been tested for both time-difference and frequency-difference imaging for diverse sets of frequency pairs in a resistive/capacitive test unit and in self-experiments. To our knowledge, this is the first work that shows preliminary frequency-difference images of in-vivo experiments. Results of time-difference imaging were compared with simulation results and shown that the new prototype performs well at all frequencies in the tested range of 60 kHz-960 kHz. For frequency-difference images, further development of algorithms and an improved normalization process is required to correctly reconstruct and interpreted the resulting images.

  7. System Description and First Application of an FPGA-Based Simultaneous Multi-Frequency Electrical Impedance Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar Santos, Susana; Robens, Anne; Boehm, Anna; Leonhardt, Steffen; Teichmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A new prototype of a multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography system is presented. The system uses a field-programmable gate array as a main controller and is configured to measure at different frequencies simultaneously through a composite waveform. Both real and imaginary components of the data are computed for each frequency and sent to the personal computer over an ethernet connection, where both time-difference imaging and frequency-difference imaging are reconstructed and visualized. The system has been tested for both time-difference and frequency-difference imaging for diverse sets of frequency pairs in a resistive/capacitive test unit and in self-experiments. To our knowledge, this is the first work that shows preliminary frequency-difference images of in-vivo experiments. Results of time-difference imaging were compared with simulation results and shown that the new prototype performs well at all frequencies in the tested range of 60 kHz–960 kHz. For frequency-difference images, further development of algorithms and an improved normalization process is required to correctly reconstruct and interpreted the resulting images. PMID:27463715

  8. System Description and First Application of an FPGA-Based Simultaneous Multi-Frequency Electrical Impedance Tomography.

    PubMed

    Aguiar Santos, Susana; Robens, Anne; Boehm, Anna; Leonhardt, Steffen; Teichmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A new prototype of a multi-frequency electrical impedance tomography system is presented. The system uses a field-programmable gate array as a main controller and is configured to measure at different frequencies simultaneously through a composite waveform. Both real and imaginary components of the data are computed for each frequency and sent to the personal computer over an ethernet connection, where both time-difference imaging and frequency-difference imaging are reconstructed and visualized. The system has been tested for both time-difference and frequency-difference imaging for diverse sets of frequency pairs in a resistive/capacitive test unit and in self-experiments. To our knowledge, this is the first work that shows preliminary frequency-difference images of in-vivo experiments. Results of time-difference imaging were compared with simulation results and shown that the new prototype performs well at all frequencies in the tested range of 60 kHz-960 kHz. For frequency-difference images, further development of algorithms and an improved normalization process is required to correctly reconstruct and interpreted the resulting images. PMID:27463715

  9. Manual planimetric measurement of carotid plaque volume using three-dimensional ultrasound imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Anthony; Ainsworth, Craig; Blake, Chris; Spence, J. David; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-04-15

    We investigated the utility of three manual planimetric methods to quantify carotid plaque volume. A single observer measured 15 individual plaques from 15 three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (3D US) images of patients ten times each using three different planimetric approaches. Individual plaque volumes were measured (range: 32.6-597.1 mm{sup 3}) using a standard planimetric approach (M1) whereby a plaque end was identified and sequential contours were measured. The same plaques were measured using a second approach (M2), whereby plaque ends were first identified and the 3D US image of the plaque was then subdivided into equal intervals. A third method (M3) was used to measure total plaque burden (range: 165.1-1080.0 mm{sup 3}) in a region ({+-}1.5 cm) relative to the carotid bifurcation. M1 systematically underestimated individual plaque volume compared to M2 (V{sub 2}=V{sub 1}+14.0 mm{sup 3}, r=0.99, p=0.006) due to a difference in the mean plaque length measured. Coefficients of variance (CV) for M1 and M2 decrease with increasing plaque volume, with M2 results less than M1. Root mean square difference between experimental and theoretical CV for M2 was 3.2%. The standard deviation in the identification of the transverse location of the carotid bifurcation was 0.56 mm. CVs for plaque burden measured using M3 ranged from 1.2% to 7.6% and were less than CVs determined for individual plaque volumes of the same volume. The utility of M3 was demonstrated by measuring carotid plaque burden and volume change over a period of 3 months in three patients. In conclusion, M2 was determined to be a more superior measurement technique than M1 to measure individual plaque volume. Furthermore, we demonstrated the utility of M3 to quantify regional plaque burden and to quantify change in plaque volume.

  10. Planimetric frontal area in the four swimming strokes: implications for drag, energetics and speed.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Giorgio; Cortesi, Matteo; Fantozzi, Silvia; Zamparo, Paola

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to use the planimetric method to determine frontal area (Ap) throughout the stroke cycle in the four swimming strokes as well as during "streamlined leg kicking". The minimum Ap values in all strokes are similar to those assessed during "streamlined leg kicking" (about 0.13m(2)). Active drag (Da=1/2ρ Cd Ap v(2)) was then calculated/estimated based on the average Ap values, as calculated for a full cycle in each condition. Da is the lowest in the "streamlined leg kicking" condition (Da=19.5v(2), e.g., similar to the values of passive drag reported in the literature), is similar in front crawl (Da=30.0v(2)), backstroke (Da=26.9v(2)) and butterfly (Da=28.5v(2)) and is the largest in the breaststroke (Da=37.5v(2)). Based on the C vs. v relationships reported in the literature for the four strokes it is then possible to estimate drag efficiency: for a speed of 1.5ms(-1), it ranges from 0.035-0.038 (breaststroke and backstroke, respectively) to 0.052-0.058 (butterfly and front crawl, respectively). This study is the first to establish Ap values throughout the swimming cycle for all swimming strokes and these findings have implications for active drag estimates, for the energetics of swimming and for swimming speed. PMID:25461432

  11. Planimetric frontal area in the four swimming strokes: implications for drag, energetics and speed.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Giorgio; Cortesi, Matteo; Fantozzi, Silvia; Zamparo, Paola

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to use the planimetric method to determine frontal area (Ap) throughout the stroke cycle in the four swimming strokes as well as during "streamlined leg kicking". The minimum Ap values in all strokes are similar to those assessed during "streamlined leg kicking" (about 0.13m(2)). Active drag (Da=1/2ρ Cd Ap v(2)) was then calculated/estimated based on the average Ap values, as calculated for a full cycle in each condition. Da is the lowest in the "streamlined leg kicking" condition (Da=19.5v(2), e.g., similar to the values of passive drag reported in the literature), is similar in front crawl (Da=30.0v(2)), backstroke (Da=26.9v(2)) and butterfly (Da=28.5v(2)) and is the largest in the breaststroke (Da=37.5v(2)). Based on the C vs. v relationships reported in the literature for the four strokes it is then possible to estimate drag efficiency: for a speed of 1.5ms(-1), it ranges from 0.035-0.038 (breaststroke and backstroke, respectively) to 0.052-0.058 (butterfly and front crawl, respectively). This study is the first to establish Ap values throughout the swimming cycle for all swimming strokes and these findings have implications for active drag estimates, for the energetics of swimming and for swimming speed.

  12. Electron Impedances

    SciTech Connect

    P Cameron

    2011-12-31

    It is only recently, and particularly with the quantum Hall effect and the development of nanoelectronics, that impedances on the scale of molecules, atoms and single electrons have gained attention. In what follows the possibility that characteristic impedances might be defined for the photon and the single free electron is explored is some detail, the premise being that the concepts of electrical and mechanical impedances are relevant to the elementary particle. The scale invariant quantum Hall impedance is pivotal in this exploration, as is the two body problem and Mach's principle.

  13. Impedance Scaling and Impedance Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, W.; Griffin, J.

    1997-05-01

    When a machine becomes really large, such as the Really Large Hadron Collider (RLHC),(G. W. Foster and E. Malamud, Fermilab-TM-1976 (June, 1996).) of which the circumference could reach the order of megameters, beam instability could be an essential bottleneck. This paper studies the scaling of the instability threshold vs. machine size when the coupling impedance scales in a ``normal'' way. It is shown that the beam would be intrinsically unstable for the RLHC. As a possible solution to this problem, it is proposed to introduce local impedance inserts for controlling the machine impedance. In the longitudinal plane, this could be done by using a heavily detuned rf cavity (e.g., a biconical structure), which could provide large imaginary impedance with the right sign (i.e., inductive or capacitive) while keeping the real part small. In the transverse direction, a carefully designed variation of the cross section of a beam pipe could generate negative impedance that would partially compensate the transverse impedance in one plane.

  14. Use of anisotropic modelling in electrical impedance tomography: description of method and preliminary assessment of utility in imaging brain function in the adult human head.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Juan-Felipe P J; Arridge, Simon R; Atkinson, David; Horesh, Raya; Fabrizi, Lorenzo; De Lucia, Marzia; Horesh, Lior; Bayford, Richard H; Holder, David S

    2008-11-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is an imaging method which enables a volume conductivity map of a subject to be produced from multiple impedance measurements. It has the potential to become a portable non-invasive imaging technique of particular use in imaging brain function. Accurate numerical forward models may be used to improve image reconstruction but, until now, have employed an assumption of isotropic tissue conductivity. This may be expected to introduce inaccuracy, as body tissues, especially those such as white matter and the skull in head imaging, are highly anisotropic. The purpose of this study was, for the first time, to develop a method for incorporating anisotropy in a forward numerical model for EIT of the head and assess the resulting improvement in image quality in the case of linear reconstruction of one example of the human head. A realistic Finite Element Model (FEM) of an adult human head with segments for the scalp, skull, CSF, and brain was produced from a structural MRI. Anisotropy of the brain was estimated from a diffusion tensor-MRI of the same subject and anisotropy of the skull was approximated from the structural information. A method for incorporation of anisotropy in the forward model and its use in image reconstruction was produced. The improvement in reconstructed image quality was assessed in computer simulation by producing forward data, and then linear reconstruction using a sensitivity matrix approach. The mean boundary data difference between anisotropic and isotropic forward models for a reference conductivity was 50%. Use of the correct anisotropic FEM in image reconstruction, as opposed to an isotropic one, corrected an error of 24 mm in imaging a 10% conductivity decrease located in the hippocampus, improved localisation for conductivity changes deep in the brain and due to epilepsy by 4-17 mm, and, overall, led to a substantial improvement on image quality. This suggests that incorporation of anisotropy in

  15. Planimetric and volumetric analysis of channel change in the post-hydraulic mining period (1906-2009) in the Central Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Subhajit

    Advances in remote sensing technologies can facilitate acquisition of topographical and planimetric information in fluvial environments and can produce spatial data with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Measuring planimetric and volumetric change in fluvial sediment budgets and geomorphic change detection was used for long-term monitoring of a fluvial system. Channel and floodplain changes caused by hydraulic gold mining sediment in this system are a major example of anthropogenic impacts on a fluvial system. This study uses remote sensing change-detection techniques to examine spatial and temporal patterns of HMS redistribution at a centennial time scale, and to measure and evaluate the magnitude and processes of a major channel and floodplain metamorphosis. Five reach-scale sites along the lower Yuba River and two sites on the Feather River were chosen for detailed analysis of planimetric and volumetric changes over a period of ~100 years. Volumetric changes were measured using DEM differencing and soft-copy photogrammetry methods, and planimetric changes were recorded from rectified maps and aerial photographs. This study indicates significant changes in channel morphology and sediment storage over the last 100 years. Large deposits of historical sediment remaining in the bed, banks and terraces of the lower Yuba River were remobilized by floods. The volumetric analysis shows the results of dredging of ditches, deposition in natural levees, and net erosion of high-water channels from 1906 or 1909 to 1999. Over the last century, channels incised up to ~13 m into mining sediment deposits. Systematic uncertainty analysis reveals vertical errors are mostly dependent on the topographical slopes and maximum errors are concentrated on the steep channel banks and scarps. The planimetric analysis shows significant reworking of sediment occurred throughout the 72-year period from 1937 to 2009. Substantial amounts of HMS remobilization occurred during major flood

  16. ADVANCES IN IMPEDANCE THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2009-06-05

    We review recent progress in the following areas of the impedance theory: calculation of impedance of tapers and small angle collimators; optical approximation and parabolic equation for the high-frequency impedance; impedance due to resistive inserts in a perfectly conducting pipe.

  17. A planimetric study of the mean epithelial thickness (MET) of the molluscan digestive gland over the tidal cycle and under environmental stress conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marigómez, J. A.; Sáez, V.; Cajaraville, M. P.; Angulo, E.

    1990-03-01

    Thinning of the digestive epithelium of marine molluscs may provide an index of environmental stress. Variability in epithelial thickness, as a consequence of the large variety of environmental and populational variables which could affect MET (Mean Epithelial Thickness), may counter the value of the index. Variation in MET of the intertidal gastropod Littorina littorea (L.) has been studied under experimental tidal conditions and, based on published data, under natural tidal conditions in the bivalves Mercenaria mercenaria (L.) and Mytilus edulis L. using a planimetric method. We found no significant variation in MET in all cases. The present results are discussed in relation to those obtained with L. littorea experimentally exposed to Cd and which show a significant reduction in MET after long sublethal exposure periods.

  18. Impedance Noise Identification for State-of-Health Prognostics

    SciTech Connect

    Jon P. Christophersen; Chester G. Motloch; John L. Morrison; Ian B. Donnellan; William H. Morrison

    2008-07-01

    Impedance Noise Identification is an in-situ method of measuring battery impedance as a function of frequency using a random small signal noise excitation source. Through a series of auto- and cross-correlations and Fast Fourier Transforms, the battery complex impedance as a function of frequency can be determined. The results are similar to those measured under a lab-scale electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement. The lab-scale measurements have been shown to correlate well with resistance and power data that are typically used to ascertain the remaining life of a battery. To this end, the Impedance Noise Identification system is designed to acquire the same type of data as an on-board tool. A prototype system is now under development, and results are being compared to standardized measurement techniques such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A brief description of the Impedance Noise Identification hardware system and representative test results are presented.

  19. Wakefields and coupling impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    1995-02-01

    After a short introduction of the wake potentials and coupling impedances, a few new results in impedance calculations are discussed. The first example is a new analytical method for calculating impedances of axisymmetric structures in the low frequency range, below the cutoff frequency of the vacuum chamber. The second example demonstrates that even very small discontinuities on a smooth waveguide can result in appearance of trapped modes, with frequencies slightly below the waveguide cutoff frequency. The high-frequency (above the cutoff) behavior of the coupling impedance of many small discontinuities is discussed in the third example.

  20. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  1. [Efficacy of application of radiofrequency scalpel and ozono-ultrasound method in dynamics of planimetric indices of the wound course process in the patients, suffering an acute purulent lactation mastitis].

    PubMed

    Ioffe, I V; Chernova, N V

    2013-02-01

    The results of planimetric investigation, conducted in 82 patients, suffering an acute purulent lactation mastitis (APLM), were analyzed. Of them 42 patients (the main group) were operated on, using radiofrequency scalpel, for the postoperative wounds processing the low-frequency ultrasound and ozonated isotonic solution of sodium chloride were used. In 40 patients (group of comparison) the conventional methods of treatment of APLM were applied.

  2. Impedance modelling of pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasy, M. Austin

    2016-03-01

    Impedance models of pipes can be used to estimate resonant frequencies of standing waves and model acoustic pressure of closed and open ended pipes. Modelling a pipe with impedance methods allows additional variations to the pipe to be included in the overall model as a system. Therefore an actuator can be attached and used to drive the system and the impedance model is able to include the dynamics of the actuator. Exciting the pipe system with a chirp signal allows resonant frequencies to be measured in both the time and frequency domain. The measurements in the time domain are beneficial for introducing undergraduates to resonances without needing an understanding of fast Fourier transforms. This paper also discusses resonant frequencies in open ended pipes and how numerous texts incorrectly approximate the resonant frequencies for this specific pipe system.

  3. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  4. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  5. Impedances of Tevatron separators

    SciTech Connect

    K. Y. Ng

    2003-05-28

    The impedances of the Tevatron separators are revisited and are found to be negligibly small in the few hundred MHz region, except for resonances at 22.5 MHz. The later are contributions from the power cables which may drive head-tail instabilities if the bunch is long enough.

  6. Longitudinal impedance of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Mernick, K.

    2015-05-03

    The longitudinal impedance of the two RHIC rings has been measured using the effect of potential well distortion on longitudinal Schottky measurements. For the blue RHIC ring Im(Z/n) = 1.5±0.2Ω. For the yellow ring Im(Z/n) = 5.4±1Ω.

  7. Implantable Impedance Plethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Theodor, Michael; Ruh, Dominic; Ocker, Martin; Spether, Dominik; Förster, Katharina; Heilmann, Claudia; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Manoli, Yiannos; Zappe, Hans; Seifert, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate by theory, as well as by ex vivo and in vivo measurements that impedance plethysmography, applied extravascularly directly on large arteries, is a viable method for monitoring various cardiovascular parameters, such as blood pressure, with high accuracy. The sensor is designed as an implant to monitor cardiac events and arteriosclerotic progression over the long term. PMID:25123467

  8. Recycler short kicker beam impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, Jim; Fellenz, Brian; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    Measured longitudinal and calculated transverse beam impedance is presented for the short kicker magnets being installed in the Fermilab Recycler. Fermi drawing number ME-457159. The longitudinal impedance was measured with a stretched wire and the Panofsky equation was used to estimate the transverse impedance. The impedance of 3319 meters (the Recycler circumference) of stainless vacuum pipe is provided for comparison. Although measurements where done to 3GHz, impedance was negligible above 30MHz. The beam power lost to the kicker impedance is shown for a range of bunch lengths. The measurements are for one kicker assuming a rotation frequency of 90KHz. Seven of these kickers are being installed.

  9. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  10. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus are presented for measuring the acoustic impedance of a surface in which the surface is used to enclose one end of the chamber of a Helmholz resonator. Acoustic waves are generated in the neck of the resonator by a piston driven by a variable speed motor through a cam assembly. The acoustic waves are measured in the chamber and the frequency of the generated acoustic waves is measured by an optical device. These measurements are used to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber and surface combined. The same procedure is followed with a calibration plate having infinite acoustic impedance enclosing the chamber of the resonator to compute the compliance and conductance of the chamber alone. Then by subtracting, the compliance and conductance for the surface is obtained.

  11. Superconducting active impedance converter

    SciTech Connect

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10--80 K temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  12. Impedance Measurement Box

    ScienceCinema

    Christophersen, Jon

    2016-07-12

    Energy storage devices, primarily batteries, are now more important to consumers, industries and the military. With increasing technical complexity and higher user expectations, there is also a demand for highly accurate state-of-health battery assessment techniques. IMB incorporates patented, proprietary, and tested capabilities using control software and hardware that can be part of an embedded monitoring system. IMB directly measures the wideband impedance spectrum in seconds during battery operation with no significant impact on service life. It also can be applied to batteries prior to installation, confirming health before entering active service, as well as during regular maintenance. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/impedance-measurement-box/

  13. Impedance Measurement Box

    SciTech Connect

    Christophersen, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Energy storage devices, primarily batteries, are now more important to consumers, industries and the military. With increasing technical complexity and higher user expectations, there is also a demand for highly accurate state-of-health battery assessment techniques. IMB incorporates patented, proprietary, and tested capabilities using control software and hardware that can be part of an embedded monitoring system. IMB directly measures the wideband impedance spectrum in seconds during battery operation with no significant impact on service life. It also can be applied to batteries prior to installation, confirming health before entering active service, as well as during regular maintenance. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/impedance-measurement-box/

  14. Impedance Measurement Box

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, William

    2014-11-20

    The IMB 50V software provides functionality for design of impedance measurement tests or sequences of tests, execution of these tests or sequences, processing measured responses and displaying and saving of the results. The software consists of a Graphical User Interface that allows configuration of measurement parameters and test sequencing, a core engine that controls test sequencing, execution of measurements, processing and storage of results and a hardware/software data acquisition interface with the IMB hardware system.

  15. Gynecologic electrical impedance tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korjenevsky, A.; Cherepenin, V.; Trokhanova, O.; Tuykin, T.

    2010-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography extends to the new and new areas of the medical diagnostics: lungs, breast, prostate, etc. The feedback from the doctors who use our breast EIT diagnostic system has induced us to develop the 3D electrical impedance imaging device for diagnostics of the cervix of the uterus - gynecologic impedance tomograph (GIT). The device uses the same measuring approach as the breast imaging system: 2D flat array of the electrodes arranged on the probe with handle is placed against the body. Each of the 32 electrodes of the array is connected in turn to the current source while the rest electrodes acquire the potentials on the surface. The current flows through the electrode of the array and returns through the remote electrode placed on the patient's limb. The voltages are measured relative to another remote electrode. The 3D backprojection along equipotential surfaces is used to reconstruct conductivity distribution up to approximately 1 cm in depth. Small number of electrodes enables us to implement real time imaging with a few frames per sec. rate. The device is under initial testing and evaluation of the imaging capabilities and suitability of usage.

  16. Acoustic ground impedance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    A compact, portable instrument was developed to measure the acoustic impedance of the ground, or other surfaces, by direct pressure-volume velocity measurement. A Helmholz resonator, constructed of heavy-walled stainless steel but open at the bottom, is positioned over the surface having the unknown impedance. The sound source, a cam-driven piston of known stroke and thus known volume velocity, is located in the neck of the resonator. The cam speed is a variable up to a maximum 3600 rpm. The sound pressure at the test surface is measured by means of a microphone flush-mounted in the wall of the chamber. An optical monitor of the piston displacement permits measurement of the phase angle between the volume velocity and the sound pressure, from which the real and imaginary parts of the impedance can be evaluated. Measurements using a 5-lobed cam can be made up to 300 Hz. Detailed design criteria and results on a soil sample are presented.

  17. Impedance group summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Dooling, J.; Dyachkov, M.; Fedotov, A.; Gluckstern, R.; Hahn, H.; Huang, H.; Kurennoy, S.; Linnecar, T.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Stupakov, G.; Toyama, T.; Wang, J. G.; Weng, W. T.; Zhang, S. Y.; Zotter, B.

    1999-12-01

    The impedance working group was charged to reply to the following 8 questions relevant to the design of high-intensity proton machines such as the SNS or the FNAL driver. These questions were first discussed one by one in the whole group, then each ne of them assigned to one member to summarize. On the lst morning these contributions were publicly read, re-discussed and re-written where required—hence they are not the opinion of a particular person, but rather the averaged opinion of all members of the working group. (AIP)

  18. Bioelectrical impedance modelling of gentamicin pharmacokinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Zarowitz, B J; Pilla, A M; Peterson, E L

    1989-10-01

    1. Bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to develop descriptive models of gentamicin pharmacokinetic parameters in 30 adult in-patients receiving therapy with gentamicin. 2. Serial blood samples obtained from each subject at steady state were analyzed and used to derive gentamicin pharmacokinetic parameters. 3. Multiple regression equations were developed for clearance, elimination rate constant and volume of distribution at steady state and were all statistically significant at P less than 0.05. 4. Clinical validation of this innovative technique is warranted before clinical use is recommended.

  19. Ionospheric effects to antenna impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bethke, K. H.

    1986-01-01

    The reciprocity between high power satellite antennas and the surrounding plasma are examined. The relevant plasma states for antenna impedance calculations are presented and plasma models, and hydrodynamic and kinetic theory, are discussed. A theory from which a variation in antenna impedance with regard to the radiated power can be calculated for a frequency range well above the plasma resonance frequency is give. The theory can include photo and secondary emission effects in antenna impedance calculations.

  20. Optically stimulated differential impedance spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, Lonnie C; Parks, II, James E; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A; Partridge, Jr., William P

    2014-02-18

    Methods and apparatuses for evaluating a material are described. Embodiments typically involve use of an impedance measurement sensor to measure the impedance of a sample of the material under at least two different states of illumination. The states of illumination may include (a) substantially no optical stimulation, (b) substantial optical stimulation, (c) optical stimulation at a first wavelength of light, (d) optical stimulation at a second wavelength of light, (e) a first level of light intensity, and (f) a second level of light intensity. Typically a difference in impedance between the impedance of the sample at the two states of illumination is measured to determine a characteristic of the material.

  1. IMPEDANCE OF FINITE LENGTH RESISTOR

    SciTech Connect

    KRINSKY, S.; PODOBEDOV, B.; GLUCKSTERN, R.L.

    2005-05-15

    We determine the impedance of a cylindrical metal tube (resistor) of radius a, length g, and conductivity {sigma}, attached at each end to perfect conductors of semi-infinite length. Our main interest is in the asymptotic behavior of the impedance at high frequency, k >> 1/a. In the equilibrium regime, , the impedance per unit length is accurately described by the well-known result for an infinite length tube with conductivity {sigma}. In the transient regime, ka{sup 2} >> g, we derive analytic expressions for the impedance and wakefield.

  2. Monolithically compatible impedance measurement

    DOEpatents

    Ericson, Milton Nance; Holcomb, David Eugene

    2002-01-01

    A monolithic sensor includes a reference channel and at least one sensing channel. Each sensing channel has an oscillator and a counter driven by the oscillator. The reference channel and the at least one sensing channel being formed integrally with a substrate and intimately nested with one another on the substrate. Thus, the oscillator and the counter have matched component values and temperature coefficients. A frequency determining component of the sensing oscillator is formed integrally with the substrate and has an impedance parameter which varies with an environmental parameter to be measured by the sensor. A gating control is responsive to an output signal generated by the reference channel, for terminating counting in the at least one sensing channel at an output count, whereby the output count is indicative of the environmental parameter, and successive ones of the output counts are indicative of changes in the environmental parameter.

  3. Impedance in School Screening Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robarts, John T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines the controversy over use of impedance screening in public schools to identify students with hearing problems, including otitis media, a common ear condition in infants and young children. It cites research that questions the value of pure tone screening as a single test and raises critics' objections to the use of impedance,…

  4. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1999-03-16

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks. 2 figs.

  5. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks.

  6. Impedance-estimation methods, modeling methods, articles of manufacture, impedance-modeling devices, and estimated-impedance monitoring systems

    DOEpatents

    Richardson, John G.

    2009-11-17

    An impedance estimation method includes measuring three or more impedances of an object having a periphery using three or more probes coupled to the periphery. The three or more impedance measurements are made at a first frequency. Three or more additional impedance measurements of the object are made using the three or more probes. The three or more additional impedance measurements are made at a second frequency different from the first frequency. An impedance of the object at a point within the periphery is estimated based on the impedance measurements and the additional impedance measurements.

  7. I/O impedance controller

    DOEpatents

    Ruesch, Rodney; Jenkins, Philip N.; Ma, Nan

    2004-03-09

    There is disclosed apparatus and apparatus for impedance control to provide for controlling the impedance of a communication circuit using an all-digital impedance control circuit wherein one or more control bits are used to tune the output impedance. In one example embodiment, the impedance control circuit is fabricated using circuit components found in a standard macro library of a computer aided design system. According to another example embodiment, there is provided a control for an output driver on an integrated circuit ("IC") device to provide for forming a resistor divider network with the output driver and a resistor off the IC device so that the divider network produces an output voltage, comparing the output voltage of the divider network with a reference voltage, and adjusting the output impedance of the output driver to attempt to match the output voltage of the divider network and the reference voltage. Also disclosed is over-sampling the divider network voltage, storing the results of the over sampling, repeating the over-sampling and storing, averaging the results of multiple over sampling operations, controlling the impedance with a plurality of bits forming a word, and updating the value of the word by only one least significant bit at a time.

  8. Damage Assessment of Aerospace Structural Components by Impedance Based Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Martin, Richard E.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses recent efforts at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field relating to the set-up and assessment of electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance based structural health monitoring. The overall aim is the application of the impedance based technique to aeronautic and space based structural components. As initial steps, a laboratory was created, software written, and experiments conducted on aluminum plates in undamaged and damaged states. A simulated crack, in the form of a narrow notch at various locations, was analyzed using piezoelectric-ceramic (PZT: lead, zirconate, titarate) patches as impedance measuring transducers. Descriptions of the impedance quantifying hardware and software are provided as well as experimental results. In summary, an impedance based health monitoring system was assembled and tested. The preliminary data showed that the impedance based technique was successful in recognizing the damage state of notched aluminum plates.

  9. Input impedance of microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. D.; Bailey, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Using Richmond's reaction integral equation, an expression is derived for the input impedance of microstrip patch antennas excited by either a microstrip line or a coaxial probe. The effects of the finite substrate thickness, a dielectric protective cover, and associated surface waves are properly included by the use of the exact dyadic Green's function. Using the present formulation the input impedance of a rectangular microstrip antenna is determined and compared with experimental and earlier calculated results.

  10. Drought description

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matalas, N.C.

    1991-01-01

    What constitutes a comprehensive description of drought, a description forming a basis for answering why a drought occurred is outlined. The description entails two aspects that are "naturally" coupled, named physical and economic, and treats the set of hydrologic measures of droughts in terms of their multivariate distribution, rather than in terms of a collection of the marginal distributions. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  11. IMPEDANCE ALARM SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Cowen, R.G.

    1959-09-29

    A description is given of electric protective systems and burglar alarm systems of the capacitance type in which the approach of an intruder at a place to be protected varies the capacitance in an electric circuit and the change is thereafter communicated to a remote point to actuate an alarm. According to the invention, an astable transitor multi-vibrator has the amplitude at its output voltage controlled by a change in the sensing capacitance. The sensing capacitance is effectively connected between collector and base of one stage of the multivibrator circuit through the detector-to-monitor line. The output of the detector is a small d-c voltage across the detector-to-monitor line. This d- c voltage is amplified and monitored at the other end of the line, where an appropriate alarm is actuated if a sudden change in the voltage occurs. The present system has a high degree of sensitivity and is very difficult to defeat by known techniques.

  12. Report of the SSC impedance workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1985-10-28

    This workshop focused attention on the transverse, single-bunch instability and the detailed analysis of the broadband impedance which would drive it. Issues discussed included: (1) single bunch stability -- impact of impedance frequency shape, coupled-mode vs. fast blowup regimes, possible stopband structure; (2) numerical estimates of transverse impedance of inner bellows and sliding contact shielded bellows; (3) analytic estimates of pickup and kicker impedance contributions; and (4) feasibility studies of wire and beam measurements of component impedance.

  13. Impedances of Laminated Vacuum Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-22

    First publications on impedance of laminated vacuum chambers are related to early 70s: those are of S. C. Snowdon [1] and of A. G. Ruggiero [2]; fifteen years later, a revision paper of R. Gluckstern appeared [3]. All the publications were presented as Fermilab preprints, and there is no surprise in that: the Fermilab Booster has its laminated magnets open to the beam. Being in a reasonable mutual agreement, these publications were all devoted to the longitudinal impedance of round vacuum chambers. The transverse impedance and the flat geometry case were addressed in more recent paper of K. Y. Ng [4]. The latest calculations of A. Macridin et al. [5] revealed some disagreement with Ref. [4]; this fact stimulated us to get our own results on that matter. Longitudinal and transverse impendances are derived for round and flat laminated vacuum chambers. Results of this paper agree with Ref. [5].

  14. Impedance of the amphibian lens.

    PubMed

    Duncan, G; Patmore, L; Pynsent, P B

    1981-03-01

    1. The electrical resistance of the perfused frog lens was measured using separate internal current passing and voltage measuring electrodes. 2. The resistance values obtained using voltage clamp and direct and alternating current techniques were in good agreement. 3. The voltage transients induced in response to current steps were multi-exponential in form. Increasing the external K concentration reduced both the amplitude of the voltage response and the rise time. 4. The impedance characteristics were investigated in more detail using alternating current analysis techniques. 5. In an equivalent-circuit modelling study it was assumed that there were two major pathways for current flow in the lens. The first through the surface membranes and the second through the inner fibre membranes via the narrow extracellular spaces. 6. The experimental impedance loci could not be adequately fitted by a simple two time constant model and a third time constant was introduced which may represent diffusion polarization effects in the extracellular spaces. 7. The three time constant model gave good and consistent fits to impedance data from a number of preparations. 8. The form of the impedance loci was also dependent on the external K concentration, but the only fitted parameter which changed consistently with external K was the surface membrane resistance (Rs).

  15. Characteristic impedance of microstrip lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Deshpande, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    The dyadic Green's function for a current embedded in a grounded dielectric slab is used to analyze microstrip lines at millimeter wave frequencies. The dyadic Green's function accounts accurately for fringing fields and dielectric cover over the microstrip line. Using Rumsey's reaction concept, an expression for the characteristic impedance is obtained. The numerical results are compared with other reported results.

  16. Impedance of the amphibian lens.

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, G; Patmore, L; Pynsent, P B

    1981-01-01

    1. The electrical resistance of the perfused frog lens was measured using separate internal current passing and voltage measuring electrodes. 2. The resistance values obtained using voltage clamp and direct and alternating current techniques were in good agreement. 3. The voltage transients induced in response to current steps were multi-exponential in form. Increasing the external K concentration reduced both the amplitude of the voltage response and the rise time. 4. The impedance characteristics were investigated in more detail using alternating current analysis techniques. 5. In an equivalent-circuit modelling study it was assumed that there were two major pathways for current flow in the lens. The first through the surface membranes and the second through the inner fibre membranes via the narrow extracellular spaces. 6. The experimental impedance loci could not be adequately fitted by a simple two time constant model and a third time constant was introduced which may represent diffusion polarization effects in the extracellular spaces. 7. The three time constant model gave good and consistent fits to impedance data from a number of preparations. 8. The form of the impedance loci was also dependent on the external K concentration, but the only fitted parameter which changed consistently with external K was the surface membrane resistance (Rs). PMID:6973626

  17. Calibration of electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W; Ramirez, A

    2000-05-01

    Over the past 10 years we have developed methods for imaging the electrical resistivity of soil and rock formations. These technologies have been called electrical resistance tomography of ERT (e.g. Daily and Owen, 1991). Recently we have been striving to extend this capability to include images of electric impedance--with a new nomenclature of electrical impedance tomography or EIT (Ramirez et al., 1999). Electrical impedance is simply a generalization of resistance. Whereas resistance is the zero frequency ratio of voltage and current, impedance includes both the magnitude and phase relationship between voltage and current at frequency. This phase and its frequency behavior is closely related to what in geophysics is called induced polarization or (Sumner, 1976). Why is this phase or IP important? IP is known to be related to many physical phenomena of importance so that image of IP will be maps of such things as mineralization and cation exchange IP (Marshall and Madden, 1959). Also, it is likely that IP, used in conjunction with resistivity, will yield information about the subsurface that can not be obtained by either piece of information separately. In order to define the accuracy of our technologies to image impedance we have constructed a physical model of known impedance that can be used as a calibration standard. It consists of 616 resistors, along with some capacitors to provide the reactive response, arranged in a three dimensional structure as in figure 1. Figure 2 shows the construction of the network and defines the coordinate system used to describe it. This network of components is a bounded and discrete version of the unbounded and continuous medium with which we normally work (the subsurface). The network has several desirable qualities: (1) The impedance values are known (to the accuracy of the component values). (2) The component values and their 3D distribution is easily controlled. (3) Error associated with electrode noise is eliminated. (4

  18. A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF BCS RF SURFACE IMPEDANCE WITH MAGNETIC FIELD USING THE XIAO CODE

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, Charles E.; Xiao, Binping

    2013-09-01

    A recent new analysis of field-dependent BCS rf surface impedance based on moving Cooper pairs has been presented.[1] Using this analysis coded in Mathematica TM, survey calculations have been completed which examine the sensitivities of this surface impedance to variation of the BCS material parameters and temperature. The results present a refined description of the "best theoretical" performance available to potential applications with corresponding materials.

  19. Analyses of Impedance Microstructure and Wave Propagation Characteristics in Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, M.; Mukerji, T.

    2002-12-01

    Seismic methods are our primary tools to image subsurface structures and to derive information about microstructural properties at subsurface that are pertinent to exploration. However, velocity - physical property transforms are mostly empirical or qualitative in nature, mainly because microstructural descriptions are qualitative. Although, sedimentary systems produce distinctive textures that influence physical properties and seismic signatures, these textures are not quantified in terms comparable to seismic. We present a method to quantify microsctructure in terms of acoustic impedance and show how these microstructural impedance maps can be used to analyze wave propagation characteristics in rocks. Using image analyses techniques, the texture of the calibrated scanned images is quantified by spatial autocorrelation functions and binary morphological operations. Parametric modeling of the empirical autocorrelation functions is used to estimate the textural anisotropy. We quantify microstructural impedance anisotropy and compare these textural maps to ultrasonic velocity anisotropy measurements. Inclusion based effective medium theory is used to upscale the impedances at the microstructural scale to the core plug scale. In the example of optically opaque kerogen-rich shales, we find that 1. Acoustic impedance in kerogen shales increases with shale maturity, 2. Impedance measured on a micrometer scale and centimeter scale match well, indicating that seismic wave propagation are controlled by the microtexture 3. With increasing maturity, there is a transition from kerogen supported to grain supported framework We thank the Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing (IZfP) for use of AM facilities, Walter Arnold (IZfP) for discussions about acoustic microscopy, ARCO and SRB Project for support. This work was performed under the auspices of National Science Foundation (Grant No. EAR 0074330) and Department of Energy (Award No. DE-FC26-01BC15354).

  20. The quantum Hall impedance standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurr, J.; Kučera, J.; Pierz, K.; Kibble, B. P.

    2011-02-01

    Alternating current measurements of double-shielded quantum Hall devices have revealed a fascinating property of which only a quantum effect is capable: it can detect its own frequency dependence and convert it to a current dependence which can be used to eliminate both of them. According to an experimentally verified model, the residual frequency dependence is smaller than the measuring uncertainty of 1.3 × 10-9 kHz-1. In this way, a highly precise quantum standard of impedance can be established, without having to correct for any calculated frequency dependence and without the need for any artefact with a calculated frequency dependence. Nothing else like that is known to us and we hope that our results encourage other national metrology institutes to also apply it to impedance metrology and further explore its beautiful properties.

  1. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of...

  2. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of...

  3. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral...

  4. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral...

  5. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of...

  6. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance phlebograph. (a) Identification. An impedance phlebograph is a device used to provide a visual display of...

  7. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral...

  8. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770 Impedance plethysmograph. (a) Identification. An impedance plethysmograph is a device used to estimate peripheral...

  9. Impedance analysis of acupuncture points and pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplan, Michal; Kukučka, Marek; Ondrejkovičová, Alena

    2011-12-01

    Investigation of impedance characteristics of acupuncture points from acoustic to radio frequency range is addressed. Discernment and localization of acupuncture points in initial single subject study was unsuccessfully attempted by impedance map technique. Vector impedance analyses determined possible resonant zones in MHz region.

  10. [Research on Electrical Impedance Tomography Technology].

    PubMed

    Chang, Feiba; Zhang, Hehua; Yan, Lexian; Yin, Jun

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the principle of electrical impedance tomography imaging and measurement system; focuses on electrical impedance tomography imaging detection system of incentive mode and several typical image reconstruction algorithm of electrical impedance imaging; and objectively compares and effectively evaluates several image reconstruction algorithm.

  11. Constant current loop impedance measuring system that is immune to the effects of parasitic impedances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Karl F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A constant current loop measuring system is provided for measuring a characteristic of an environment. The system comprises a first impedance positionable in the environment, a second impedance coupled in series with said first impedance and a parasitic impedance electrically coupled to the first and second impedances. A current generating device, electrically coupled in series with the first and second impedances, provides a constant current through the first and second impedances to produce first and second voltages across the first and second impedances, respectively, and a parasitic voltage across the parasitic impedance. A high impedance voltage measuring device measures a voltage difference between the first and second voltages independent of the parasitic voltage to produce a characteristic voltage representative of the characteristic of the environment.

  12. Impedance spectroscopy of food mycotoxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilyy, Oleksandr I.; Yaremyk, Roman Ya.; Kotsyumbas, Ihor Ya.; Kotsyumbas, Halyna I.

    2012-01-01

    A new analytical method of high-selective detection of mycotoxins in food and feed are considered. A method is based on optical registration the changes of conduct of the electric polarized bacterial agents in solution at the action of the external gradient electric fields. Measuring are conducted in integrated electrode-optical cuvette of the special construction, which provides the photometric analysis of forward motion of the objects registration in liquid solution under act of the enclosed electric field and simultaneous registration of kinetics of change of electrical impedance parameters solution and electrode system.

  13. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba; Christopher J. Ziolkowski

    2004-06-30

    This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a simple sensor incorporated into the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD equipment. Imaging

  14. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba

    2003-10-01

    This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a simple sensor incorporated into the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD equipment. Imaging

  15. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba

    2003-04-01

    This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a thin film sensor conformal with the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is capacitively coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD

  16. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba

    2003-01-30

    This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a thin film sensor conformal with the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is capacitively coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD

  17. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba

    2002-08-30

    This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a thin film sensor conformal with the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is capacitively coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD

  18. DIFFERENTIAL SOIL IMPEDANCE OBSTACLE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Maximillian J. Kieba

    2002-11-27

    This project develops a new and unique obstacle detection sensor for horizontal directional drilling (HDD) equipment. The development of this new technology will greatly improve the reliability and safety of natural gas HDD construction practices. This sensor utilizes a differential soil impedance measurement technique that will be sensitive to the presence of plastic and ceramic, as well as metallic obstacles. The use of HDD equipment has risen significantly in the gas industry because HDD provides a much more cost-effective and less disruptive method for gas pipe installation than older, trenching methods. However, there have been isolated strikes of underground utilities by HDD equipment, which may have been avoided if methods were available to detect other underground obstacles when using HDD systems. GTI advisors from the gas industry have ranked the value of solving the obstacle detection problem as the most important research and development project for GTI to pursue using Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) funds available through its industry partner, GRI. GTI proposes to develop a prototype down-hole sensor system that is simple and compact. The sensor utilizes an impedance measurement technique that is sensitive to the presence of metallic or nonmetallic objects in the proximity of the HDD head. The system will use a thin film sensor conformal with the drill head. The impedance of the soil will be measured with a low frequency signal injected through the drill head itself. A pair of bridge type impedance sensors, mounted orthogonal to one another, is capacitively coupled to the soil. Inclusions in the soil will cause changes to the sensor balance distinguishable from homogeneous soil. The sensor will provide range and direction data for obstacles near the HDD head. The goal is to provide a simple, robust system that provides the information required to avoid obstacles. This must be done within the size and ruggedness constraints of the HDD

  19. Anaphoric Descriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beller, Charley

    2013-01-01

    The study of definite descriptions has been a central part of research in linguistics and philosophy of language since Russell's seminal work "On Denoting" (Russell 1905). In that work Russell quickly dispatches analyses of denoting expressions with forms like "no man," "some man," "a man," and "every…

  20. Spheromak Impedance and Current Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T K; Hua, D D; Stallard, B W

    2002-01-31

    It is shown that high current amplification can be achieved only by injecting helicity on the timescale for reconnection, {tau}{sub REC}, which determines the effective impedance of the spheromak. An approximate equation for current amplification is: dI{sub TOR}{sup 2}/dt {approx} I{sup 2}/{tau}{sub REC} - I{sub TOR}{sup 2}/{tau}{sub closed} where I is the gun current, I{sub TOR} is the spheromak toroidal current and {tau}{sub CLOSED} is the ohmic decay time of the spheromak. Achieving high current amplification, I{sub TOR} >> I, requires {tau}{sub REC} <<{tau}{sub CLOSED}. For resistive reconnection, this requires reconnection in a cold zone feeding helicity into a hot zone. Here we propose an impedance model based on these ideas in a form that can be implemented in the Corsica-based helicity transport code. The most important feature of the model is the possibility that {tau}{sub REC} actually increases as the spheromak temperature increases, perhaps accounting for the ''voltage sag'' observed in some experiments, and a tendency toward a constant ratio of field to current, B {proportional_to} I, or I{sub TOR} {approx} I. Program implications are discussed.

  1. TRANSVERSE IMPEDANCE MEASUREMENT AT THE RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,S.Y.; HUANG,H.; CAMERON,P.; DREES,A.; FLILLER,R.; SATOGATA,T.

    2002-06-02

    The RHIC transverse impedance was measured during the last operation run. Measurement of the imaginary part of the broadband impedance was the main goal. No large difference between the two rings was found nor in either plane. The measured tune shift is larger than the expected by a factor of 2.5 to 3. Several other issues such as the real part impedance measurement are also presented.

  2. Factors affecting bioelectrical impedance measurements in humans.

    PubMed

    Deurenberg, P; Weststrate, J A; Paymans, I; van der Kooy, K

    1988-12-01

    In several groups of young healthy subjects the effect of the ingestion of a meal, of drinking normal tea or beef tea, of exercise and of the menstrual cycle on body impedance was assessed. The day-to-day reproducibility of the method was also investigated under standardized conditions. Two to four hours after ingestion of a meal, body impedance had decreased by about 13-17 Ohms in comparison with body impedance in the fasting state. Drinking 200 ml of normal tea did not result in a change of body impedance, but drinking 200 ml beef tea lowered the body impedance significantly by 4 +/- 4 Ohms. Moderate exercise on a bicycle ergometer (90 min, 100 W) did not influence body impedance, but strenuous exercise (90 min, 175 W) resulted in a decrease of 9 +/- 11 Ohms in body impedance. In general, changes in body impedance during the menstrual cycle were small, and only the difference between measurements of body impedance 1 week before the onset of the menstruation and again 1 week after menstruation (8 +/- 9 Ohms) was statistically significant. Under standardized conditions (in the morning, in the fasting state after emptying the bladder) the within-person between-day variation was found to be 2.8 per cent (13 Ohms).

  3. Adaptive Impedance Control Of Redundant Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seraji, Homayoun; Colbaugh, Richard D.; Glass, Kristin L.

    1994-01-01

    Improved method of controlling mechanical impedance of end effector of redundant robotic manipulator based on adaptive-control theory. Consists of two subsystems: adaptive impedance controller generating force-control inputs in Cartesian space of end effector to provide desired end-effector-impedance characteristics, and subsystem implementing algorithm that maps force-control inputs into torques applied to joints of manipulator. Accurate control of end effector and effective utilization of redundancy achieved simultaneously by use of method. Potential use to improve performance of such typical impedance-control tasks as deburring edges and accommodating transitions between unconstrained and constrained motions of end effectors.

  4. Impedance Spectroscopy of Human Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, Francisco; Bernal, José J.; Sosa, Modesto A.; Villagómez, Julio C.; Palomares, Pascual

    2004-09-01

    The blood is one of the corporal fluids more used with analytical purposes. When the blood is extracted, immediately it is affected by agents that act on it, producing transformations in its elements. Among the effects of these transformations the hemolysis phenomenon stands out, which consists of the membrane rupture and possible death of the red blood cells. The main purpose of this investigation was the quantification of this phenomenon. A Solartron SI-1260 Impedance Spectrometer was used, which covers a frequency range of work from 1 μHz to 10 MHz, and its accuracy has been tested in the accomplishment of several applications. Measurements were performed on 3 mL human blood samples, from healthy donors. Reactive strips for sugar test of 2 μL, from Bayer, were used as electrodes, which allow gathering a portion of the sample, to be analyzed by the spectrometer. Preliminary results of these measurements are presented.

  5. Electrical Impedance Tomography of Electrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Arie; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this study is to explore the hypothesis that changes in pH during electrolysis can be detected with Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). The study has relevance to real time control of minimally invasive surgery with electrolytic ablation. To investigate the hypothesis, we compare EIT reconstructed images to optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar gel phantom treated with electrolysis. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E.Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of EIT to image pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E.coli model. The results are promising, and invite further experimental explorations. PMID:26039686

  6. Active impedance matching of complex structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on active impedance matching of complex structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: traveling wave model; dereverberated mobility model; computation of dereverberated mobility; control problem: optimal impedance matching; H2 optimal solution; statistical energy analysis (SEA) solution; experimental transfer functions; interferometer actuator and sensor locations; active strut configurations; power dual variables; dereverberation of complex structure; dereverberated transfer function; compensators; and relative power flow.

  7. 21 CFR 870.2750 - Impedance phlebograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Impedance phlebograph. 870.2750 Section 870.2750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2750 Impedance...

  8. Esophageal Impedance Monitoring: Clinical Pearls and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Karthik; Katzka, David A

    2016-09-01

    The development of intraluminal esophageal impedance monitoring has improved our ability to detect and measure gastroesophageal reflux without dependence on acid content. This ability to detect previously unrecognized weak or nonacid reflux episodes has had important clinical implications in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In addition, with the ability to assess bolus transit within the esophageal lumen, impedance monitoring has enhanced the recognition and characterization of esophageal motility disorders in patients with nonobstructive dysphagia. The assessment of the intraluminal movement of gas and liquid has also been proven to be of diagnostic value in conditions such as rumination syndrome and excessive belching. Further, alternative applications of impedance monitoring, such as the measurement of mucosal impedance, have provided novel insights into assessing esophageal mucosal integrity changes as a consequence of inflammatory change. Future applications for esophageal impedance monitoring also hold promise in esophageal conditions other than GERD. However, despite all of the clinical benefits afforded by esophageal impedance monitoring, important clinical and technical shortcomings limit its diagnostic value and must be considered when interpreting study results. Overinterpretation of studies or application of impedance monitoring in patients can have deleterious clinical implications. This review will highlight the clinical benefits and limitations of esophageal impedance monitoring and provide clinical pearls and pitfalls associated with this technology.

  9. Esophageal Impedance Monitoring: Clinical Pearls and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Karthik; Katzka, David A

    2016-09-01

    The development of intraluminal esophageal impedance monitoring has improved our ability to detect and measure gastroesophageal reflux without dependence on acid content. This ability to detect previously unrecognized weak or nonacid reflux episodes has had important clinical implications in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In addition, with the ability to assess bolus transit within the esophageal lumen, impedance monitoring has enhanced the recognition and characterization of esophageal motility disorders in patients with nonobstructive dysphagia. The assessment of the intraluminal movement of gas and liquid has also been proven to be of diagnostic value in conditions such as rumination syndrome and excessive belching. Further, alternative applications of impedance monitoring, such as the measurement of mucosal impedance, have provided novel insights into assessing esophageal mucosal integrity changes as a consequence of inflammatory change. Future applications for esophageal impedance monitoring also hold promise in esophageal conditions other than GERD. However, despite all of the clinical benefits afforded by esophageal impedance monitoring, important clinical and technical shortcomings limit its diagnostic value and must be considered when interpreting study results. Overinterpretation of studies or application of impedance monitoring in patients can have deleterious clinical implications. This review will highlight the clinical benefits and limitations of esophageal impedance monitoring and provide clinical pearls and pitfalls associated with this technology. PMID:27325223

  10. Possibilities of electrical impedance tomography in gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V, Trokhanova O.; A, Chijova Y.; B, Okhapkin M.; V, Korjenevsky A.; S, Tuykin T.

    2013-04-01

    The paper describes results of comprehensive EIT diagnostics of mammary glands and cervix. The data were obtained from examinations of 170 patients by EIT system MEM (multi-frequency electrical impedance mammograph) and EIT system GIT (gynecological impedance tomograph). Mutual dependence is discussed.

  11. Rotor damage detection by using piezoelectric impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Y.; Tao, Y.; Mao, Y. F.

    2016-04-01

    Rotor is a core component of rotary machinery. Once the rotor has the damage, it may lead to a major accident. Thus the quantitative rotor damage detection method based on piezoelectric impedance is studied in this paper. With the governing equation of piezoelectric transducer (PZT) in a cylindrical coordinate, the displacement along the radius direction is derived. The charge of PZT is calculated by the electric displacement. Then, by the use of the obtained displacement and charge, an analytic piezoelectric impedance model of the rotor is built. Given the circular boundary condition of a rotor, annular elements are used as the analyzed objects and spectral element method is used to set up the damage detection model. The Electro-Mechanical (E/M) coupled impedance expression of an undamaged rotor is deduced with the application of a low-cost impedance test circuit. A Taylor expansion method is used to obtain the approximate E/M coupled impedance expression for the damaged rotor. After obtaining the difference between the undamaged and damaged rotor impedance, a rotor damage detection method is proposed. This method can directly calculate the change of bending stiffness of the structural elements, it follows that the rotor damage can be effectively detected. Finally, a preset damage configuration is used for the numerical simulation. The result shows that the quantitative damage detection algorithm based on spectral element method and piezoelectric impedance proposed in this paper can identify the location and the severity of the damaged rotor accurately.

  12. Estimates of Acausal Joint Impedance Models

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of joint or limb impedance are commonly used in the study of how the nervous system controls posture and movement, and how that control is altered by injury to the neural or musculoskeletal systems. Impedance characterizes the dynamic relationship between an imposed perturbation of joint position and the torques generated in response. While there are many practical reasons for estimating impedance rather than its inverse, admittance, it is an acausal representation of the limb mechanics that can lead to difficulties in interpretation or use. The purpose of this study was to explore the acausal nature of nonparametric estimates of joint impedance representations to determine how they are influenced by common experimental and computational choices. This was accomplished by deriving discrete-time realizations of first-and second-order derivatives to illustrate two key difficulties in the physical interpretation of impedance impulse response functions. These illustrations were provided using both simulated and experimental data. It was found that the shape of the impedance impulse response depends critically on the selected sampling rate, and on the bandwidth and noise characteristics of the position perturbation used during the estimation process. These results provide important guidelines for designing experiments in which nonparametric estimates of impedance will be obtained, especially when those estimates are to be used in a multistep identification process. PMID:22907963

  13. Tracking of electrochemical impedance of batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piret, H.; Granjon, P.; Guillet, N.; Cattin, V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary battery impedance estimation method, which can be easily embedded in vehicles or nomad devices. The proposed method not only allows an accurate frequency impedance estimation, but also a tracking of its temporal evolution contrary to classical electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods. Taking into account constraints of cost and complexity, we propose to use the existing electronics of current control to perform a frequency evolutionary estimation of the electrochemical impedance. The developed method uses a simple wideband input signal, and relies on a recursive local average of Fourier transforms. The averaging is controlled by a single parameter, managing a trade-off between tracking and estimation performance. This normalized parameter allows to correctly adapt the behavior of the proposed estimator to the variations of the impedance. The advantage of the proposed method is twofold: the method is easy to embed into a simple electronic circuit, and the battery impedance estimator is evolutionary. The ability of the method to monitor the impedance over time is demonstrated on a simulator, and on a real Lithium ion battery, on which a repeatability study is carried out. The experiments reveal good tracking results, and estimation performance as accurate as the usual laboratory approaches.

  14. Summary of the impedance working group

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.

    1995-05-01

    The impedance working group concentrated on the LHC design during the workshop. They look at the impedance contributions of liner, beam position monitors, shielded bellows, experimental chambers, superconducting cavities, recombination chambers, space charge, kickers, and the resistive wall. The group concluded that the impedance budgeting and the conceptual designs of the vacuum chamber components looked basically sound. It also noted, not surprisingly, that a large amount of studies are to be carried out further, and it ventured to give a partial list of these studies.

  15. Linearly tapered slot antenna impedance characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents for the first time an experimental technique to de-embed the input impedance of a LTSA from the measured reflection coefficient. The results show that the input impedance is dependent on the semi-flare angle and the length of the LTSA. The Re(Z(sub in)) is large when the electrical length of the LTSA is small and is on the order of few thousand ohms. However for an electrically large LTSA the Re(Z(sub in)) is in the range of 55 to 130 ohms. These results have potential applications in the design of broad band impedance matching networks for LTSA.

  16. Universal impedance fluctuations in wave chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Hemmady, Sameer; Zheng, Xing; Ott, Edward; Antonsen, Thomas M; Anlage, Steven M

    2005-01-14

    We experimentally investigate theoretical predictions of universal impedance fluctuations in wave chaotic systems using a microwave analog of a quantum chaotic infinite square well potential. We emphasize the use of the radiation impedance to remove the nonuniversal effects of the particular coupling between the outside world and the scatterer. Specific predictions that we test include the probability density functions (PDFs) of the real and imaginary parts of the universal impedance, the equality of the variances of these PDFs, and the dependence of these PDFs on a single loss parameter.

  17. Descriptive thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, David; Huntsman, Steven

    2006-06-01

    Thermodynamics (in concert with its sister discipline, statistical physics) can be regarded as a data reduction scheme based on partitioning a total system into a subsystem and a bath that weakly interact with each other. Whereas conventionally, the systems investigated require this form of data reduction in order to facilitate prediction, a different problem also occurs, in the context of communication networks, markets, etc. Such “empirically accessible” systems typically overwhelm observers with the sort of information that in the case of (say) a gas is effectively unobtainable. What is required for such complex interacting systems is not prediction (this may be impossible when humans besides the observer are responsible for the interactions) but rather, description as a route to understanding. Still, the need for a thermodynamical data reduction scheme remains. In this paper, we show how an empirical temperature can be computed for finite, empirically accessible systems, and further outline how this construction allows the age-old science of thermodynamics to be fruitfully applied to them.

  18. Antenna pattern control using impedance surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Liu, Kefeng; Tirkas, Panayiotis A.

    1993-01-01

    During the period of this research project, a comprehensive study of pyramidal horn antennas was conducted. Full-wave analytical and numerical techniques were developed to analyze horn antennas with or without impedance surfaces. Based on these full-wave analytic techniques, research was conducted on the use of impedance surfaces on the walls of the horn antennas to control the antenna radiation patterns without a substantial loss of antenna gain. It was found that the use of impedance surfaces could modify the antenna radiation patterns. In addition to the analytical and numerical models, experimental models were also constructed and they were used to validate the predictions. Excellent agreement between theoretical predictions and the measured data was obtained for pyramidal horns with perfectly conducting surfaces. Very good comparisons between numerical and experimental models were also obtained for horns with impedance surfaces.

  19. Acoustic input impedance measurements on brass instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, Robert W., Jr.

    2002-11-01

    Measurement of the acoustic input impedance of a brass instrument can reveal something about the instrument's intonation, its reasonable playing range, its tone color, and perhaps whether the mouthpiece used for the impedance measurement is appropriate for the instrument. Such measurements are made at sound-presssure levels much lower than those encountered under playing conditions. Thus, impedance measurements may offer the only feasible way to infer something about the playing characteristics of instruments, typically museum specimens, that are too rare or too fragile to be played. In this paper the effects of some of the available choices of sound source and stimulus signal on measurement accuracy will be explored. Driver-transducer nonlinearity, source impedance, signal-to-noise ratio, and any necessary signal processing will be discussed.

  20. Increases in cerebrovascular impedance in older adults.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong-Sheng; Tseng, Benjamin Y; Shibata, Shigeki; Levine, Benjamin D; Zhang, Rong

    2011-08-01

    This study explored a novel method for measuring cerebrovascular impedance to quantify the relationship between pulsatile changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial pressure. Arterial pressure in the internal or common carotid artery (applanation tonometry), CBF velocity in the middle cerebral artery (transcranial Doppler), and end-tidal CO(2) (capnography) were measured in six young (28 ± 4 yr) and nine elderly subjects (70 ± 6 yr). Transfer function method was used to estimate cerebrovascular impedance. Under supine resting conditions, CBF velocity was reduced in the elderly despite the fact that they had higher arterial pressure than young subjects. As expected, cerebrovascular resistance index was increased in the elderly. In both young and elderly subjects, impedance modulus was reduced gradually in the frequency range of 0.78-8 Hz. Phase was negative in the range of 0.78-4.3 Hz and fluctuated at high frequencies. Compared with the young, impedance modulus increased by 38% in the elderly in the range of 0.78-2 Hz and by 39% in the range of 2-4 Hz (P < 0.05). Moreover, increases in impedance were correlated with reductions in CBF velocity. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the feasibility of assessing cerebrovascular impedance using the noninvasive method developed in this study. The estimated impedance modulus and phase are similar to those observed in the systemic circulation and other vascular beds. Moreover, increases in impedance in the elderly suggest that arterial stiffening, besides changes in cerebrovascular resistance, contributes to reduction in CBF with age.

  1. Inversion of elastic impedance for unconsolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2006-01-01

    Elastic properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are important for quantifying gas hydrate amounts as well as discriminating the gas hydrate effect on velocity from free gas or pore pressure. This paper presents an elastic inversion method for estimating elastic properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments from angle stacks using sequential inversion of P-wave impedance from the zero-offset stack and S-wave impedance from the far-offset stack without assuming velocity ratio.

  2. CSR Impedance for Non-Ultrarelativistic Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Rui; Tsai, Cheng Y.

    2015-09-01

    For the analysis of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR)-induced microbunching gain in the low energy regime, such as when a high-brightness electron beam is transported through a low-energy merger in an energy-recovery linac (ERL) design, it is necessary to extend the CSR impedance expression in the ultrarelativistic limit to the non-ultrarelativistic regime. This paper presents our analysis of CSR impedance for general beam energies.

  3. Modeling magnetically insulated devices using flow impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Rosenthal, S.E. )

    1995-04-01

    In modern pulsed power systems the electric field stresses at metal surfaces in vacuum transmission lines are so high that negative surfaces are space-charge-limited electron emitters. These electrons do not cause unacceptable losses because magnetic fields due to system currents result in net motion parallel to the electrodes. It has been known for several years that a parameter known as flow impedance is useful for describing these flows. Flow impedance is a measure of the separation between the anode and the mean position of the electron cloud, and it will be shown in this paper that in many situations flow impedance depends upon the geometry of the transmission line upstream of the point of interest. It can be remarkably independent of other considerations such as line currents and voltage. For this reason flow impedance is a valuable design parameter. Models of impedance transitions and voltage adders using flow impedance will be developed. Results of these models will be compared to two-dimensional, time-dependent, particle-in-cell simulations.

  4. A physical interpretation of impedance at conducting polymer/electrolyte junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Stavrinidou, Eleni; Sessolo, Michele; Sanaur, Sébastien; Malliaras, George G.; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn

    2014-01-15

    We monitor the process of dedoping in a planar junction between an electrolyte and a conducting polymer using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy performed during moving front measurements. The impedance spectra are consistent with an equivalent circuit of a time varying resistor in parallel with a capacitor. We show that the resistor corresponds to ion transport in the dedoped region of the film, and can be quantitatively described using ion density and drift mobility obtained from the moving front measurements. The capacitor, on the other hand, does not depend on time and is associated with charge separation at the moving front. This work offers a physical description of the impedance of conducting polymer/electrolyte interfaces based on materials parameters.

  5. Ambulatory impedance cardiography in hypertension: a validation study.

    PubMed

    McFetridge-Durdle, Judith A; Routledge, Faye S; Parry, Monica J E; Dean, C R T; Tucker, B

    2008-09-01

    The management of hypertension is improved by knowledge of the hemodynamics underlying blood pressure. Impedance Cardiography (ICG) provides data on a range of hemodynamic variables that affect blood pressure. However, ICG captures only fixed descriptions of hemodynamic characteristics. Improvements in ambulatory technology have led to the development of the Ambulatory Impedance Monitor (AIM) which records hemodynamic data during the activities of daily living. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of the AIM to detect hemodynamic changes associated with postural shift in persons with hypertension. Using a repeated measures cross-over design, sitting and standing hemodynamic measures were taken in seventeen persons with hypertension while wearing the AIM-BpTRU system designed for standard office use and the AIM-Spacelabs system designed for ambulatory monitoring. Both AIM-blood pressure monitoring systems detected significant changes from sitting to standing posture in heart rate (p=0.03), stroke volume (p=0.002), left ventricular ejection time (p<0.001), systemic vascular resistance (p=0.03) and diastolic blood pressure (p<0.001). Additionally, both systems generated measures of cardiac function that were positively correlated (p<0.001) and not significantly different (p>0.05). Our findings support previous work and demonstrate that the AIM provides valid and reliable estimates of cardiac function in persons with hypertension. PMID:18234557

  6. Effects of Liner Geometry on Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Tracy, Maureen B.; Watson, Willie R.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2002-01-01

    Current aircraft engine nacelles typically contain acoustic liners consisting of perforated sheets bonded onto honeycomb cavities. Numerous models have been developed to predict the acoustic impedance of these liners in the presence of grazing flow, and to use that information with aeroacoustic propagation codes to assess nacelle liner noise suppression. Recent efforts have provided advances in impedance education methodologies that offer more accurate determinations of acoustic liner properties in the presence of grazing flow. The current report provides the results of a parametric study, in which a finite element method was used to assess the effects of variations of the following geometric parameters on liner impedance, with and without the presence of grazing flow: percent open area, sheet thickness, sheet thickness-to-hole diameter ratio and cavity depth. Normal incidence acoustic impedances were determined for eight acoustic liners, consisting of punched aluminum facesheets bonded to hexcell honeycomb cavities. Similar liners were tested in the NASA Langley Research Center grazing incidence tube to determine their response in the presence of grazing flow. The resultant data provide a quantitative assessment of the effects of these perforate, single-layer liner parameters on the acoustic impedance of the liner.

  7. Vascular impedance analysis in human pulmonary circulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinlian; Gao, Jian; Huang, Wei; Yen, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Vascular impedance is determined by morphometry and mechanical properties of the vascular system, as well as the rheology of the blood. The interactions between all these factors are complicated and difficult to investigate solely by experiments. A mathematical model representing the entire system of human pulmonary circulation was constructed based on experimentally measured morphometric and elasticity data of the vessels. The model consisted of 16 orders of arteries and 15 orders of veins. The pulmonary arteries and veins were considered as elastic tubes and their impedance was calculated based on Womersley's theory. The flow in capillaries was described by the "sheet-flow" theory. The model yielded an impedance modulus spectrum that fell steeply from a high value at 0 Hz to a minimum around 1.5 Hz. At about 4 Hz, it reached a second high and then oscillated around a relatively small value at higher frequencies. Characteristic impedance was 27.9 dyn-sec/cm5. Influence of variations in vessel geometry and elasticity on impedance spectra was analyzed. Simulation results showed good agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:16817653

  8. Impedance of silver oxide-zinc cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H. A.; Long, W. L.; Uchiyama, A. A.

    1976-01-01

    Over 100 sealed AgO-Zn cells were subjected to prolonged periods of storage over a range of temperatures and storage modes including open circuit, trickle charge, and float charge. Impedances of these cells were monitored throughout, and at the end of the storage period their transient voltage characteristics were observed at the onset of discharge. Results revealed that the impedances of these cells tended to increase with storage time; the magnitude of the impedance rise was dependent primarily on temperature and to a lesser degree on storage mode. Typical values for 50 A-hr cells were usually less than 100 mohm immediately after activation and from 1 to 30 ohm after 6-10 months of storage. Transient voltages of these cells droped sharply during the first msec of discharge and then rose to a stablized value during the following few seconds. The magnitude of the initial drop and the stabilized voltage values were found to be related to impedance but not in a linear manner. The magnitude and duration of the low transient voltages may be unacceptable in some applications of these cells. The impedance variations are attributed to changes occurring at the positive electrode.

  9. Tunable microwave impedance matching to a high impedance source using a Josephson metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Altimiras, Carles Parlavecchio, Olivier; Joyez, Philippe; Vion, Denis; Roche, Patrice; Esteve, Daniel; Portier, Fabien

    2013-11-18

    We report the efficient coupling of a 50  Ω microwave circuit to a high impedance conductor. We use an impedance transformer consisting of a λ/4 co-planar resonator whose inner conductor contains an array of superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), providing it with a tunable lineic inductance L∼80 μ{sub 0}, resulting in a characteristic impedance Z{sub C}∼1 kΩ. The impedance matching efficiency is characterized by measuring the shot noise power emitted by a dc biased tunnel junction connected to the resonator. We demonstrate matching to impedances in the 15 to 35 kΩ range with bandwidths above 100 MHz around a resonant frequency tunable between 4 and 6 GHz.

  10. Effective impedance for predicting the existence of surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Meng; Huang, Xueqin; Fang, Anan; Chan, C. T.

    2016-03-01

    We build an effective impedance for two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals (PCs) comprising a rectangular lattice of dielectric cylinders with the incident electric field polarized along the axis of the cylinders. In particular, we discuss the feasibility of constructing an effective impedance for the case where the Bloch wave vector is far away from the center of Brillouin zone, where the optical response of the PC is necessarily anisotropic, and hence the effective description becomes inevitably angle dependent. We employ the scattering theory and treat the 2D system as a stack of 1D arrays. We consider only the zero-order interlayer diffraction, and all the higher order diffraction terms of interlayer scattering are ignored. This approximation works well when the higher order diffraction terms are all evanescent waves and the interlayer distance is far enough for them to decay out. Scattering theory enables the calculation of transmission and reflection coefficients of a finite-sized slab, and we extract the effective parameters such as the effective impedance (Ze) and the effective refractive index (ne) using a parameter retrieval method. We note that ne is uniquely defined only in a very limited region of the reciprocal space. (nek0a ≪1 , where k0 is the wave vector inside the vacuum and a is thickness of the slab for retrieval), but Ze is uniquely defined and has a well-defined meaning inside a much larger domain in the reciprocal space. For a lossless system, the effective impedance Ze is purely real for the pass band and purely imaginary in the band gaps. Using the sign of the imaginary part of Ze, we can classify the band gaps into two groups, and this classification explains why there is usually no surface state on the boundary of typical fully gapped PCs composed of a lattice of dielectric cylinders. This effective medium approach also allows us to predict the dispersion of surface states even when the surface wave vectors are well beyond the zone

  11. Ferrofluid Microwave Devices With Magnetically Controlled Impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fannin, P. C.; Stefu, N.; Marin, C. N.; Malaescu, I.; Totoreanu, R.

    2010-08-01

    Ferrofluid filled transmission lines are microwave electronic devices. The complex dielectric permittivity and the complex magnetic permeability of a kerosene based ferrofluid with magnetite nanoparticles, in the frequency range (0.5-6) GHz were measured, for several values of polarising field, H. Afterwards, the input impedance of a short-circuited transmission line filled with this ferrofluid was computed using the equation Z = Zc tanh(γl). Here Zc and l are the characteristic impedance and the length of the coaxial line and γ is the propagation constant, depending on the dielectric and magnetic parameters of the material within the line. It is demonstrated how the impedance displays a frequency and polarizing field dependence, which has application in the design of magnetically controlled microwave devices.

  12. Wavelet analysis of the impedance cardiogram waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podtaev, S.; Stepanov, R.; Dumler, A.; Chugainov, S.; Tziberkin, K.

    2012-12-01

    Impedance cardiography has been used for diagnosing atrial and ventricular dysfunctions, valve disorders, aortic stenosis, and vascular diseases. Almost all the applications of impedance cardiography require determination of some of the characteristic points of the ICG waveform. The ICG waveform has a set of characteristic points known as A, B, E ((dZ/dt)max) X, Y, O and Z. These points are related to distinct physiological events in the cardiac cycle. Objective of this work is an approbation of a new method of processing and interpretation of the impedance cardiogram waveforms using wavelet analysis. A method of computer thoracic tetrapolar polyrheocardiography is used for hemodynamic registrations. Use of original wavelet differentiation algorithm allows combining filtration and calculation of the derivatives of rheocardiogram. The proposed approach can be used in clinical practice for early diagnostics of cardiovascular system remodelling in the course of different pathologies.

  13. Propagation of waves along an impedance boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the scalar wave field due to a point source above a plane impedance boundary is presented. A surface wave is found to be an essential component of the total wave field. It is shown that, as a result of ducting of energy by the surface wave, the amplitude of the total wave near the boundary can be greater than it would be if the boundary were perfectly reflecting. Asymptotic results, valid near the boundary, are obtained both for the case of finite impedance (the soft-boundary case) and for the limiting case in which the impedance becomes infinite (the hard-boundary case). In the latter, the wave amplitude in the farfield decreases essentially inversely as the horizontal propagation distance; in the former (if the surface-wave term is neglected), it decreases inversely as the square of the horizontal propagation distance.

  14. Impedance properties of circular microstrip antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M. D.; Bailey, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    A moment method solution to the input impedance of a circular microstrip antenna excited by either a microstrip feed or a coaxial probe is presented. Using the exact dyadic Green's function and the Fourier transform the problem is formulated in terms of Richmond's reaction integral equation from which the unknown patch current can be solved for. The patch current is expanded in terms of regular surface patch modes and an attachment mode (for probe excited case) which insures continuity of the current at probe/patch junction, proper polarization and p-dependance of patch current in the vicinity of the probe. The input impedance of a circular microstrip antenna is computed and compared with earlier results. Effect of attachment mode on the input impedance is also discussed.

  15. Impedance Scaling for Small Angle Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Bane, Karl; Zagorodnov, I.; /DESY

    2010-10-27

    Based on the parabolic equation approach to Maxwell's equations we have derived scaling properties of the high frequency impedance/short bunch wakefields of structures. For the special case of small angle transitions we have shown the scaling properties are valid for all frequencies. Using these scaling properties one can greatly reduce the calculation time of the wakefield/impedance of long, small angle, beam pipe transitions, like one often finds in insertion regions of storage rings. We have tested the scaling with wakefield simulations of 2D and 3D models of such transitions, and found that the scaling works well. In modern ring-based light sources one often finds insertion devices having extremely small vertical apertures (on the order of millimeters) to allow for maximal undulator fields reaching the beam. Such insertion devices require that there be beam pipe transitions from these small apertures to the larger cross-sections (normally on the order of centimeters) found in the rest of the ring. The fact that there may be many such transitions, and that these transitions introduce beam pipe discontinuities very close to the beam path, means that their impedance will be large and, in fact, may dominate the impedance budget of the entire ring. To reduce their impact on impedance, the transitions are normally tapered gradually over a long distance. The accurate calculation of the impedance or wakefield of these long transitions, which are typically 3D objects (i.e. they do not have cylindrical symmetry), can be quite a challenging numerical task. In this report we present a method of obtaining the impedance of a long, small angle transition from the calculation of a scaled, shorter one. Normally, the actual calculation is obtained from a time domain simulation of the wakefield in the structure, where the impedance can be obtained by performing a Fourier transform. We shall see that the scaled calculation reduces the computer time and memory requirements

  16. Numerical modelling errors in electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Hamid; Soleimani, Manuchehr

    2007-07-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive technique that aims to reconstruct images of internal impedance values of a volume of interest, based on measurements taken on the external boundary. Since most reconstruction algorithms rely on model-based approximations, it is important to ensure numerical accuracy for the model being used. This work demonstrates and highlights the importance of accurate modelling in terms of model discretization (meshing) and shows that although the predicted boundary data from a forward model may be within an accepted error, the calculated internal field, which is often used for image reconstruction, may contain errors, based on the mesh quality that will result in image artefacts.

  17. Protein Aggregation Measurement through Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affanni, A.; Corazza, A.; Esposito, G.; Fogolari, F.; Polano, M.

    2013-09-01

    The paper presents a novel methodology to measure the fibril formation in protein solutions. We designed a bench consisting of a sensor having interdigitated electrodes, a PDMS hermetic reservoir and an impedance meter automatically driven by calculator. The impedance data are interpolated with a lumped elements model and their change over time can provide information on the aggregation process. Encouraging results have been obtained by testing the methodology on K-casein, a protein of milk, with and without the addition of a drug inhibiting the aggregation. The amount of sample needed to perform this measurement is by far lower than the amount needed by fluorescence analysis.

  18. Acoustic impedance of curved multilayered duct liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, W. E.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of curvature of annular duct liners on the liner acoustic impedance is examined. Exact equations are derived for the impedance of point reacting liners which are made from an arbitrary number of thin cylindrical layers of porous material separated by small radially oriented cells. Equations are given for liners with convex curvature and for liners with concave curvature. For ducts with small curvature, it is shown that these equations reduce to the equations for a flat liner. It is shown, by analytical and numerical examples, that the effect of liner curvature is significant in practical noise reduction problems.

  19. Electrical impedance tomography problem with inaccurately known boundary and contact impedances.

    PubMed

    Kolehmainen, Ville; Lassas, Matti; Ola, Petri

    2008-10-01

    In electrical impedance tomography (EIT) electric currents are injected into a body with unknown electromagnetic properties through a set of contact electrodes at the boundary of the body. The resulting voltages are measured on the same electrodes and the objective is to reconstruct the unknown conductivity function inside the body based on these data. All the traditional approaches to the reconstruction problem assume that the boundary of the body and the electrode-skin contact impedances are known a priori. However, in clinical experiments one usually lacks the exact knowledge of the boundary and contact impedances, and therefore, approximate model domain and contact impedances have to be used in the image reconstruction. However, it has been noticed that even small errors in the shape of the computation domain or contact impedances can cause large systematic artefacts in the reconstructed images, leading to loss of diagnostically relevant information. In a recent paper (Kolehmainen , 2006), we showed how in the 2-D case the errors induced by the inaccurately known boundary can be eliminated as part of the image reconstruction and introduced a novel method for finding a deformed image of the original isotropic conductivity using the theory of TeichmUller mappings. In this paper, the theory and reconstruction method are extended to include the estimation of unknown contact impedances. The method is implemented numerically and tested with experimental EIT data. The results show that the systematic errors caused by inaccurately known boundary and contact impedances can efficiently be eliminated by the reconstruction method.

  20. Impedance-matched drilling telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Normann, Randy A.; Mansure, Arthur J.

    2008-04-22

    A downhole telemetry system that uses inductance or capacitance as a mode through which signal is communicated across joints between assembled lengths of pipe wherein efficiency of signal propagation through a drill string, for example, over multiple successive pipe segments is enhanced through matching impedances associated with the various telemetry system components.

  1. Explicit expressions of impedances and wake functions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; Bane, K,; /SLAC

    2010-10-01

    Sections 3.2.4 and 3.2.5 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping are combined and updated. The new addition includes impedances and wakes for multi-layer beam pipe, optical model, diffraction model, and cross-sectional transition.

  2. Bioelectrical Impedance and Body Composition Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, Mike

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses field tests that can be used in physical education programs. The most common field tests are anthropometric measurements, which include body mass index (BMI), girth measurements, and skinfold testing. Another field test that is gaining popularity is bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Each method has particular strengths…

  3. 21 CFR 870.2770 - Impedance plethysmograph.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Impedance plethysmograph. 870.2770 Section 870.2770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2770...

  4. Impedance matching between ventricle and load.

    PubMed

    Piene, H

    1984-01-01

    Impedance matching in the cardiovascular system is discussed in light of two models of ventricle and load: a Thevenin equivalent consisting of a hydromotive pressure source and an internal, source resistance and compliance in parallel; and a time-varying compliance filled from a constant pressure source and ejecting into a load of three components, a central resistor, a compliance, and a peripheral resistance. According to the Thevenin analog, the energy source and the load are matched when the load resistance is T/t times the internal source resistance (T is total cycle length, t is systolic time interval). Both from this model and from the variable compliance model it appears that optimum matching between source and load depends on the compliance of the Windkessel, as low compliance shifts the matching load resistance to a low value. Animal experiments (isolated cat hearts) indicated that both left and right ventricles at normal loads work close to their maxima of output hydraulic power, and, according to experiments in the right ventricle, maximum power output is related to load resistance and compliance as predicted by the above models. From an experimentally determined relationship among instantaneous ventricular pressure and volume (right ventricle of isolated cat hearts), an optimum load impedance was calculated on the basis of the assumption that the ratio between stroke work and static, potential energy developed in the ventricular cavity is maximum. The optimum load impedance found by this procedure closely resembles the normal input impedance of the cat lung vessel bed. PMID:6507966

  5. Electrical Impedance Tomography Technology (EITT) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    Development of a portable, lightweight device providing two-dimensional tomographic imaging of the human body using impedance mapping. This technology can be developed to evaluate health risks and provide appropriate medical care on the ISS, during space travel and on the ground.

  6. Explicit Expressions of Impedances and Wake Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; Bane, K,; /SLAC

    2012-06-11

    Sections 3.2.4 and 3.2.5 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping are combined and updated. The new addition includes impedances and wakes for multi-layer beam pipe, optical model, diffraction model, and cross-sectional transition.

  7. High Impedance Comparator for Monitoring Water Resistivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holewinski, Paul K.

    1984-01-01

    A high-impedance comparator suitable for monitoring the resistivity of a deionized or distilled water line supplying water in the 50 Kohm/cm-2 Mohm/cm range is described. Includes information on required circuits (with diagrams), sensor probe assembly, and calibration techniques. (JN)

  8. Aortic Input Impedance during Nitroprusside Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Pepine, Carl J.; Nichols, W. W.; Curry, R. C.; Conti, C. Richard

    1979-01-01

    Beneficial effects of nitroprusside infusion in heart failure are purportedly a result of decreased afterload through “impedance” reduction. To study the effect of nitroprusside on vascular factors that determine the total load opposing left ventricular ejection, the total aortic input impedance spectrum was examined in 12 patients with heart failure (cardiac index <2.0 liters/min per m2 and left ventricular end diastolic pressure >20 mm Hg). This input impedance spectrum expresses both mean flow (resistance) and pulsatile flow (compliance and wave reflections) components of vascular load. Aortic root blood flow velocity and pressure were recorded continuously with a catheter-tip electromagnetic velocity probe in addition to left ventricular pressure. Small doses of nitroprusside (9-19 μg/min) altered the total aortic input impedance spectrum as significant (P < 0.05) reductions in both mean and pulsatile components were observed within 60-90 s. With these acute changes in vascular load, left ventricular end diastolic pressure declined (44%) and stroke volume increased (20%, both P < 0.05). Larger nitroprusside doses (20-38 μg/min) caused additional alteration in the aortic input impedance spectrum with further reduction in left ventricular end diastolic pressure and increase in stroke volume but no additional changes in the impedance spectrum or stroke volume occurred with 39-77 μg/min. Improved ventricular function persisted when aortic pressure was restored to control values with simultaneous phenylephrine infusion in three patients. These data indicate that nitroprusside acutely alters both the mean and pulsatile components of vascular load to effect improvement in ventricular function in patients with heart failure. The evidence presented suggests that it may be possible to reduce vascular load and improve ventricular function independent of aortic pressure reduction. PMID:457874

  9. Dynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reconstructed from continuous impedance measurement of single frequency during charging/discharging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Li, Zhe; Zhang, Jianbo

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel implementation of dynamic electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (DEIS) is proposed. The method first measures the impedance continuously at a single frequency during one charging/discharging cycle, then repeats the measurement at a number of other selected frequencies. The impedance spectrum at a specific SOC is obtained by interpolating and collecting the impedance at all of the selected frequencies. The charge transfer resistance, Rct, from the DEIS is smaller than that from the steady EIS in a wide state-of-charge (SOC) range from 0.4 to 1.0, the Rct during charging is generally smaller than that during discharging for the battery chemistry used in this study.

  10. Tuning electrode impedance for the electrical recording of biopotentials.

    PubMed

    Fontes, M A; de Beeck, M; Van Hoof, C; Neves, H P

    2010-01-01

    Tuning the electrode impedance through the DC biasing of iridium oxide is presented. Impedance reduction of up to two orders of magnitude was reproducibly observed in 20 microm diameter microelectrodes at a biasing of 1V.

  11. Scattering by a groove in an impedance plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindiganavale, Sunil; Volakis, John L.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of two-dimensional scattering from a narrow groove in an impedance plane is presented. The groove is represented by a impedance surface and the problem reduces to that of scattering from an impedance strip in an otherwise uniform impedance plane. On the basis of this model, appropriate integral equations are constructed using a form of the impedance plane Green's functions involving rapidly convergent integrals. The integral equations are solved by introducing a single basis representation of the equivalent current on the narrow impedance insert. Both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations are treated. The resulting solution is validated by comparison with results from the standard boundary integral method (BIM) and a high frequency solution. It is found that the presented solution for narrow impedance inserts can be used in conjunction with the high frequency solution for the characterization of impedance inserts of any given width.

  12. Enhanced Method for Cavity Impedance Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Marhauser, Robert Rimmer, Kai Tian, Haipeng Wang

    2009-05-01

    With the proposal of medium to high average current accelerator facilities the demand for cavities with extremely low Higher Order Mode (HOM) impedances is increasing. Modern numerical tools are still under development to more thoroughly predict impedances that need to take into account complex absorbing boundaries and lossy materials. With the usually large problem size it is preferable to utilize massive parallel computing when applicable and available. Apart from such computational issues, we have developed methods using available computer resources to enhance the information that can be extracted from a cavities? wakefield computed in time domain. In particular this is helpful for a careful assessment of the extracted RF power and the mitigation of potential beam break-up or emittance diluting effects, a figure of merit for the cavity performance. The method is described as well as an example of its implementation.

  13. Stimuli dependent impedance of conductive magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Xuan, Shouhu; Dong, Bo; Xu, Feng; Gong, Xinglong

    2016-02-01

    The structure dependent impedance of conductive magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) under different loads and magnetic fields has been studied in this work. By increasing the weight fraction of iron particles, the conductivity of the MREs increased. Dynamic mechanical measurements and synchrotron radiation x-ray computed tomography (SR-CT) were used and they provided reasons for the electrical properties changing significantly under pressure and magnetic field stimulation. The high sensitivity of MREs to external stimuli renders them suitable for application in force or magnetic field sensors. The equivalent circuit model was proposed to analyze the impedance response of MREs and it fits the experimental results very well. Each circuit component reflected the change of the inner interface under different conditions, thus relative changes in the microstructure could be distinguished. This method could be used not only to detect the structural changes in the MRE but also to provide a great deal of valuable information for the further understanding of the MR mechanism.

  14. Automatic digital-analog impedance plethysmograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goy, C. B.; Mauro, K. A.; Yanicelli, L. M.; Parodi, N. F.; Gómez López, M. A.; Herrera, M. C.

    2016-04-01

    Venous occlusion plethysmography (VOP) is a traditional method widely used to assess limb blood circulation. One common mode to record VOP is by means of evaluating limb volume changes using impedance plethysmography (IP). In this paper the design and implementation of an automatic digital-analog impedance plethysmograph (ADAIP) for VOP is presented. The system is tested using precision resistances in order to calculate its repeatability. Then its global performance is assessed by means of VOP recordings on the upper and me lower limb of a healthy volunteer. The obtained repeatability was very high (95%), and the VOP recordings where the expected ones. It can be concluded that the whole system performs well and that it is suitable for automatic VOP recording.

  15. Nonlinear acoustic impedance of thermoacoustic stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Huan; Fan, Li; Xiao, Shu-yu; Tao, Sha; Qiu, Mei-chen; Zhang, Shu-yi; Zhang, Hui

    2012-09-01

    In order to optimize the performances of the thermoacoustic refrigerator working with the high sound pressure level, the nonlinear acoustic characteristics of the thermoacoustic stack in the resonant pipe are studied. The acoustic fluid impedance of the stack made of copper mesh and set up in a resonant pipe is measured in the acoustic fields with different intensities. It is found that when the sound pressure level in the pipe increases to a critical value, the resistance of the stack increases nonlinearly with the sound pressure, while the reactance of the stack keeps constant. Based on the experimental results, a theory model is set up to describe the acoustic characteristics of the stack, according to the rigid frame theory and Forchheimmer equation. Furthermore, the influences of the sound pressure level, operating frequency, volume porosity, and length of the stack on the nonlinear impedance of the stack are evaluated.

  16. Impedance issues in the CERN SPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnecar, T.

    1999-12-01

    The future use of the CERN SPS accelerator as injector for the Large Hadron Collider, LHC, and the possible use of the SPS as a neutrino source for the Gran Sasso experiment are pushing the maximum intensity requirements of the accelerator much higher than achieved up to now. At the same time the requirements on beam quality are becoming far more stringent. The SPS machine, built in the 70's, is not a "smooth" machine. It contains many discontinuities in vacuum chamber cross-section and many cavity-like objects, as well as the 5 separate RF systems at present installed. All these lead to a high impedance, seen by the beam, spread over a wide frequency range. As a result there is a constant fight against instabilities, both single and multi bunch, as the intensity increases. A program of studies is under way in the SPS to identify, reduce, and remove where possible the sources of these impedances.

  17. Impedance of a beam tube with antechamber

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, W.; Lambertson, G.R.; Voelker, F.

    1986-08-01

    A beam vacuum chamber was proposed to allow synchrotron light to radiate from a circulating electron beam into an antechamber containing photon targets, pumps, etc. To determine the impedance such a geometry would present to the beam, electromagnetic measurements were carried out on a section of chamber using for low frequencies a current-carrying wire and for up to 16 GHz, a resonance perturbation method. Because the response of such a chamber would depend on upstream and downstream restrictions of aperture yet to be determined, the resonance studies were analyzed in some generality. The favorable conclusion of these studies is that the antechamber makes practically no contribution to either the longitudinal or the transverse impedances.

  18. Impedance characteristics of terawatt ion diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendel, C. W., Jr.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Pointon, T. D.; Quintenz, J. P.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Seidel, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.

    Light ion fusion research has developed ion diodes that have unique properties when compared to other ion diodes. These diodes involve relativistic electrons, ion beam stagnation pressures that compress the magnetic field to the order of 10 Tesla, and large space charge and particle current effects throughout the accelerating region. These diodes have required new theories and models to account for effects that previously were unimportant. One of the most important effects of the magnetic field compression and large space charge has been impedance collapse. The impedance collapse can lead to poor energy transfer efficiency, beam debunching, and rapid change of the beam focus. The current understanding of these effects is discussed including some of the methods used to ameliorate them, and the future directions the theory and modeling will take.

  19. Signal conditioning circuit apparatus. [with constant input impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, V. B. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A signal conditioning circuit is described including operational amplifier, a variable source of offset potential, and four resistive impedance. The circuit has constant input impedance independent of gain and offset adjustments. Gain change is effected by varying one of the impedances in an amplifier feedback circuit; offset adjustment is effected through variation of the offset potential source.

  20. Impedance Matched Absorptive Thermal Blocking Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Chuss, D. T.; U-Yen, K.; Rostem, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized absorptive thermal blocking filters for cryogenic microwave applications. The transmission line filter's input characteristic impedance is designed to match 50 Omega and its response has been validated from 0-to-50GHz. The observed return loss in the 0-to-20GHz design band is greater than 20 dB and shows graceful degradation with frequency. Design considerations and equations are provided that enable this approach to be scaled and modified for use in other applications.

  1. Impedance Matched Absorptive Thermal Blocking Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Chuss, D. T.; Rostem, K.; U-Yen, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized absorptive thermal blocking filters for cryogenic microwave applications. The transmission line filter's input characteristic impedance is designed to match 50O and its response has been validated from 0-to-50GHz. The observed return loss in the 0-to-20GHz design band is greater than 20 dB and shows graceful degradation with frequency. Design considerations and equations are provided that enable this approach to be scaled and modified for use in other applications.

  2. Measurement of shear impedances of viscoelastic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, A.C.

    1996-12-31

    Shear-wave reflection coefficients from a solid/fluid interface are derived for non-Newtonian fluids that can be described by Maxwell, Voigt, and power-law fluid models. Based on model calculations, we have identified the measurable effects on the reflection coefficients due to fluid non-Newtonian behavior. The models are used to interpret the viscosity data obtained by a technique based on shear impedance measurement.

  3. Superconducting surface impedance under radiofrequency field

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Binping P.; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2013-04-26

    Based on BCS theory with moving Cooper pairs, the electron states distribution at 0K and the probability of electron occupation with finite temperature have been derived and applied to anomalous skin effect theory to obtain the surface impedance of a superconductor under radiofrequency (RF) field. We present the numerical results for Nb and compare these with representative RF field-dependent effective surface resistance measurements from a 1.5 GHz resonant structure.

  4. PEP-X IMPEDANCE AND INSTABILITY CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Lee, L.-Q.; Ng, C.; Stupakov, G.; au Wang, L.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    PEP-X, a next generation, ring-based light source is designed to run with beams of high current and low emittance. Important parameters are: energy 4.5 GeV, circumference 2.2 km, beam current 1.5 A, and horizontal and vertical emittances, 185 pm by 8 pm. In such a machine it is important that impedance driven instabilities not degrade the beam quality. In this report they study the strength of the impedance and its effects in PEP-X. For the present, lacking a detailed knowledge of the vacuum chamber shape, they create a straw man design comprising important vacuum chamber objects to be found in the ring, for which they then compute the wake functions. From the wake functions they generate an impedance budget and a pseudo-Green function wake representing the entire ring, which they, in turn, use for performing microwave instability calculations. In this report they, in addition, consider in PEP-X the transverse mode-coupling, multi-bunch transverse, and beam-ion instabilities.

  5. Interior impedance wedge diffraction with surface waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Griesser, Timothy

    1988-01-01

    The exact impedance wedge solution is evaluated asymptotically using the method of steepest descents for plane wave illumination at normal incidence. Uniform but different impedances on each face are considered for both soft and hard polarizations. The asymptotic solution isolates the incident, singly reflected, multiply reflected, diffracted, and surface wave fields. Multiply reflected fields of any order are permitted. The multiply reflected fields from the exact solution are written as ratios of auxiliary Maliuzhinets functions, whereas a geometrical analysis gives the reflected fields as products of reflection coefficients. These two representations are shown to be identical in magnitude, phase and the angular range over which they exist. The diffracted field includes four Fresnel transition functions as in the perfect conductor case, and the expressions for the appropriate discontinuities at the shadow boundaries are presented. The surface wave exists over a finite angular range and only for certain surface impedances. A surface wave transition field is included to retain continuity. Computations are presented for interior wedge diffractions although the formulation is valid for both exterior and interior wedges.

  6. Bioelectrical impedance analysis of bovine milk fat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiga, E. A.; Bertemes-Filho, P.

    2012-12-01

    Three samples of 250ml at home temperature of 20°C were obtained from whole, low fat and fat free bovine UHT milk. They were analysed by measuring both impedance spectra and dc conductivity in order to establish the relationship between samples related to fat content. An impedance measuring system was developed, which is based on digital oscilloscope, a current source and a FPGA. Data was measured by the oscilloscope in the frequency 1 kHz to 100 kHz. It was showed that there is approximately 7.9% difference in the conductivity between whole and low fat milk whereas 15.9% between low fat and free fat one. The change of fatness in the milk can be significantly sensed by both impedance spectra measurements and dc conductivity. This result might be useful for detecting fat content of milk in a very simple way and also may help the development of sensors for measuring milk quality, as for example the detection of mastitis.

  7. A vector impedance meter digitally controlled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caranti, Giorgio M.; Ré, Miguel A.

    1991-12-01

    As with most similar equipment, the method consists in applying a sinusoidal voltage to an unknown impedance and measuring the current through it. The advantage of the developed equipment is that it allows independent and simultaneous measurement of the resistive and reactive components of the current through the sample impedance, thus making possible the determination of impedances in magnitude and phase. The measurements can be controlled with a computer using a digital interface. The instrument may also be controlled with a computer using a digital interface. The instrument may also be controlled manually from a front panel. The apparatus was designed to operate in the audio range 1 Hz-100 kHz for currents even below 1 μA. The analog outputs may either be connected to an X-Y recorder or the data can be acquired with a computer through an analog-to-digital converter. The laboratory tests have shown a good performance according to the design specifications. These tests have been carried out using discrete circuits made of calibrated components.

  8. Application of impedance spectroscopy to SOFC research

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, G.; Mason, T.O.; Pederson, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    With the resurgence of interest in solid oxide fuel cells and other solid state electrochemical devices, techniques originally developed for characterizing aqueous systems are being adapted and applied to solid state systems. One of these techniques, three-electrode impedance spectroscopy, is particularly powerful as it allows characterization of subcomponent and interfacial properties. Obtaining accurate impedance spectra, however, is difficult as reference electrode impedance is usually non-negligible and solid electrolytes typically have much lower conductance than aqueous solutions. Faidi et al and Chechirlian et al have both identified problems associated with low conductivity media. Other sources of error are still being uncovered. Ford et al identified resistive contacts with large time constants as a possibility, while Me et al showed that the small contact capacitance of the reference electrode was at fault. Still others show that instrument limitations play a role. Using the voltage divider concept, a simplified model that demonstrates the interplay of these various factors, predicts the form of possible distortions, and offers means to minimize errors is presented.

  9. On the directional symmetry of the impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.A.

    1990-03-01

    The independence of the impedance on the beam direction is an important feature of an accelerator structure, in particular, for the electron-positron storage rings where bunches of opposite charges travel through the same vacuum chamber in opposite directions. Recently Gluckstern and Zotter considered a cylindrically symmetric but longitudinally asymmetric cavity with side pipes of equal radii. They were able to prove that for a relativistic particle the longitudinal impedance of the cavity with an arbitrary shape is independent of the direction in which the beam travels through it. Their result corroborates numerical observations of the independence of the wakefield obtained with the code TBCI. Bisognano gave an elegant proof of the same statement. His approach is based on a reciprocity relation applied to the tensor Green's function. I follow here his idea in a somewhat simpler way to obtain more general and physically transparent proof of this property for both longitudinal and transverse impedances. The result is valid for a cavity with no azimuthal symmetry and for arbitrary particle velocity, as soon as it may be considered constant. At the same time the limits of its validity are shown.

  10. Electrical impedance measurements of root canal length.

    PubMed

    Meredith, N; Gulabivala, K

    1997-06-01

    Electronic methods are now widely used during endodontic treatment for the assessment of root canal length. These commonly measure the electrical resistance or impedance between the root canal and the buccal mucosa. A number of studies have been undertaken to determine the accuracy of commercially available instruments. The aims of this investigation were to determine the electrical impedance characteristics of the root canal and periapical tissues in vivo, measure the changes relative to the distance of an endodontic instrument from the apical constriction and propose an equivalent circuit modelling the periapical tissues. The length of the root canals of 20 previously untreated teeth were determined using radiographic and electronic methods. Minimal canal preparation was carried out and measurements were made with a size 10 K-Flex file. A microprocessor-controlled LCR analyser was used to measure the electrical impedance characteristics of each root canal. The instrument measured the series and parallel resistive (RS, RP) and capacitance (CS, CP) component of the tissues at two test frequencies, 100 Hz and 1 kHz. Measurements were made for each root canal when the diagnostic file was placed at the apical constriction and repeated when the file was withdrawn to -0.5, -1.0, -1.5, -2.0 and -5.0 mm from the foramen. Readings were taken for each canal after the canal had been dried with paper points, and flooded first with deionised water and then with sodium hypochlorite. The root canals were then prepared, cleaned and obturated using standard endodontic procedures. The LCR analyser selected the series resistance component as the major measurement parameter. There was a clear increase in series resistance (RS) with increasing distance from the radiographic apex for dry canals and those containing deionised water and sodium hypochlorite. The mean resistance for dry canals was markedly higher than for those containing fluid, ranging from 22.19 k omega to 92.07 k omega

  11. Impedance adaptation for optimal robot-environment interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shuzhi Sam; Li, Yanan; Wang, Chen

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, impedance adaptation is investigated for robots interacting with unknown environments. Impedance control is employed for the physical interaction between robots and environments, subject to unknown and uncertain environments dynamics. The unknown environments are described as linear systems with unknown dynamics, based on which the desired impedance model is obtained. A cost function that measures the tracking error and interaction force is defined, and the critical impedance parameters are found to minimise it. Without requiring the information of the environments dynamics, the proposed impedance adaptation is feasible in a large number of applications where robots physically interact with unknown environments. The validity of the proposed method is verified through simulation studies.

  12. Label-Free Impedance Biosensors: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Jonathan S.; Pourmand, Nader

    2007-01-01

    Impedance biosensors are a class of electrical biosensors that show promise for point-of-care and other applications due to low cost, ease of miniaturization, and label-free operation. Unlabeled DNA and protein targets can be detected by monitoring changes in surface impedance when a target molecule binds to an immobilized probe. The affinity capture step leads to challenges shared by all label-free affinity biosensors; these challenges are discussed along with others unique to impedance readout. Various possible mechanisms for impedance change upon target binding are discussed. We critically summarize accomplishments of past label-free impedance biosensors and identify areas for future research. PMID:18176631

  13. Oblique impacts into low impedance layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stickle, A. M.; Schultz, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    Planetary impacts occur indiscriminately, in all locations and materials. Varied geologic settings can have significant effects on the impact process, including the coupling between the projectile and target, the final damage patterns and modes of deformation that occur. For example, marine impact craters are not identical to impacts directly into bedrock or into sedimentary materials, though many of the same fundamental processes occur. It is therefore important, especially when considering terrestrial impacts, to understand how a low impedance sedimentary layer over bedrock affects the deformation process during and after a hypervelocity impact. As a first step, detailed comparisons between impacts and hydrocode models were performed. Experiments performed at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range of oblique impacts into polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) targets with low impedance layers were performed and compared to experiments of targets without low impedance layers, as well as to hydrocode models under identical conditions. Impact velocities ranged from 5 km/s to 5.6 km/s, with trajectories from 30 degrees to 90 degrees above the horizontal. High-speed imaging provided documentation of the sequence and location of failure due to impact, which was compared to theoretical models. Plasticine and ice were used to construct the low impedance layers. The combination of experiments and models reveals the modes of failure due to a hypervelocity impact. How such failure is manifested at large scales can present a challenge for hydrocodes. CTH models tend to overestimate the amount of damage occurring within the targets and have difficulties perfectly reproducing morphologies; nevertheless, they provide significant and useful information about the failure modes and style within the material. CTH models corresponding to the experiments allow interpretation of the underlying processes involved as well as provide a benchmark for the experimental analysis. The transparency of PMMA

  14. Mechanism of the formation for thoracic impedance change.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ming-Xing; Xiao, Qiu-Jin; Cui, Chao-Ying; Kuang, Nan-Zhen; Hong, Wen-Qin; Hu, Ai-Rong

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the mechanism of the formation for thoracic impedance change. On the basis of Ohm's law and the electrical field distribution in the cylindrical volume conductor, the formula about the thoracic impedance change are deduced, and they are demonstrated with the model experiment. The results indicate that the thoracic impedance change caused by single blood vessel is directly proportional to the ratio of the impedance change to the basal impedance of the blood vessel itself, to the length of the blood vessel appearing between the current electrodes, and to the basal impedance between two detective electrodes on the chest surface, while it is inversely proportional to the distance between the blood vessel and the line joining two detective electrodes. The thoracic impedance change caused by multiple blood vessels together is equal to the algebraic addition of all thoracic impedance changes resulting from the individual blood vessels. That is, the impedance changes obey the principle of adding scalars in the measurement of the electrical impedance graph. The present study can offer the theoretical basis for the waveform reconstruction of Impedance cardiography (ICG).

  15. Bioelectrical Impedance Methods for Noninvasive Health Monitoring: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Tushar Kanti

    2014-01-01

    Under the alternating electrical excitation, biological tissues produce a complex electrical impedance which depends on tissue composition, structures, health status, and applied signal frequency, and hence the bioelectrical impedance methods can be utilized for noninvasive tissue characterization. As the impedance responses of these tissue parameters vary with frequencies of the applied signal, the impedance analysis conducted over a wide frequency band provides more information about the tissue interiors which help us to better understand the biological tissues anatomy, physiology, and pathology. Over past few decades, a number of impedance based noninvasive tissue characterization techniques such as bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrical impedance plethysmography (IPG), impedance cardiography (ICG), and electrical impedance tomography (EIT) have been proposed and a lot of research works have been conducted on these methods for noninvasive tissue characterization and disease diagnosis. In this paper BIA, EIS, IPG, ICG, and EIT techniques and their applications in different fields have been reviewed and technical perspective of these impedance methods has been presented. The working principles, applications, merits, and demerits of these methods has been discussed in detail along with their other technical issues followed by present status and future trends. PMID:27006932

  16. Superconducting fault current-limiter with variable shunt impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Llambes, Juan Carlos H; Xiong, Xuming

    2013-11-19

    A superconducting fault current-limiter is provided, including a superconducting element configured to resistively or inductively limit a fault current, and one or more variable-impedance shunts electrically coupled in parallel with the superconducting element. The variable-impedance shunt(s) is configured to present a first impedance during a superconducting state of the superconducting element and a second impedance during a normal resistive state of the superconducting element. The superconducting element transitions from the superconducting state to the normal resistive state responsive to the fault current, and responsive thereto, the variable-impedance shunt(s) transitions from the first to the second impedance. The second impedance of the variable-impedance shunt(s) is a lower impedance than the first impedance, which facilitates current flow through the variable-impedance shunt(s) during a recovery transition of the superconducting element from the normal resistive state to the superconducting state, and thus, facilitates recovery of the superconducting element under load.

  17. Characterization of protein-immobilized polystyrene nanoparticles using impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-In; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2014-10-01

    A novel approach for characterization of non-conductive protein-immobilized nanoparticles using AC impedance spectroscopy combined with conductive atomic force microscopy was examined. As AC impedance spectroscopy can provide information on diverse electrical properties such as capacitance and inductance, it is applicable to the characterization of non-conductive substances. Several non-conductive protein-immobilized polystyrene nanoparticles were analyzed using AC impedance spectroscopy, and their impedance spectra were used as markers for nanoparticle identification. Analyses of impedance signals using an electrical circuit model established that the capacitance and inductance of each nanoparticle changed with the adsorbed protein and that impedance spectral differences were characteristic properties of the proteins. From this study, AC impedance spectroscopy was shown to be a useful tool for characterization of non-conductive nanoparticles and is expected to be applicable to the development of sensors for nanomaterials. PMID:25942903

  18. Acquisition of teleological descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, David W.

    1992-03-01

    Teleology descriptions capture the purpose of an entity, mechanism, or activity with which they are associated. These descriptions can be used in explanation, diagnosis, and design reuse. We describe a technique for acquiring teleological descriptions expressed in the teleology language TeD. Acquisition occurs during design by observing design modifications and design verification. We demonstrate the acquisition technique in an electronic circuit design.

  19. Writing job descriptions.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, M

    1990-01-01

    The skill of writing job descriptions begins with an understanding of the advantages, as well as the basic elements, of a well written description. The end result should be approved and updated as needed. Having a better understanding of this process makes writing the job description a challenge rather than a chore.

  20. Impedance analysis of an enhanced piezoelectric biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gi-Ho

    This study investigated the usefulness and characteristics of a five-megahertz quartz crystal resonator oscillating in a thickness-shear mode as a sensor of biological pathogens such as Salmonella typhimurium . An impedance analyzer measured the impedance of the oscillating quartz crystal, which determined all mechanical properties of the oscillating quartz and its immediate environment. In this study, the impedance behavior of the bare crystal was characterized in air and in potassium phosphate buffer solution. The potassium phosphate buffer was a Newtonian liquid. The resonance frequency of the oscillating quartz shifted down about 900 Hz by contacting with the buffer. An immobilized-antibody layer on the quartz surface behaved like a rigid mass when immersed in the buffer solution. The quartz crystal with immobilized antibodies was characterized in various solutions containing antibody- coated paramagnetic microspheres and varying concentrations of Salmonella typhimurium (102 - 108 cells/ml). The Salmonella cells were captured by antibody- coated paramagnetic microspheres, and then these complexes were moved magnetically to the oscillating quartz and were captured by antibodies immobilized on the crystal surface. The response of the crystal was expressed in terms of equivalent circuit parameters. The motional inductance and the motional resistance increased as a function of the concentration of Salmonella. The viscous damping was the main contribution to the resistance and the inductance in a liquid environment. The load resistance was the most effective and sensitive circuit parameter. A magnetic force was a useful method to collect the complexes of Salmonella-microspheres on the crystal surface and enhance the response sensor. In this system, the detection limit, based on resistance monitoring, was about 103 cells/ml.

  1. Method for conducting nonlinear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Adler, Stuart B.; Wilson, Jamie R.; Huff, Shawn L.; Schwartz, Daniel T.

    2015-06-02

    A method for conducting nonlinear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The method includes quantifying the nonlinear response of an electrochemical system by measuring higher-order current or voltage harmonics generated by moderate-amplitude sinusoidal current or voltage perturbations. The method involves acquisition of the response signal followed by time apodization and fast Fourier transformation of the data into the frequency domain, where the magnitude and phase of each harmonic signal can be readily quantified. The method can be implemented on a computer as a software program.

  2. Adaptive techniques in electrical impedance tomography reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Li, Taoran; Isaacson, David; Newell, Jonathan C; Saulnier, Gary J

    2014-06-01

    We present an adaptive algorithm for solving the inverse problem in electrical impedance tomography. To strike a balance between the accuracy of the reconstructed images and the computational efficiency of the forward and inverse solvers, we propose to combine an adaptive mesh refinement technique with the adaptive Kaczmarz method. The iterative algorithm adaptively generates the optimal current patterns and a locally-refined mesh given the conductivity estimate and solves for the unknown conductivity distribution with the block Kaczmarz update step. Simulation and experimental results with numerical analysis demonstrate the accuracy and the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  3. Some boundary problems in electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Pidcock, M; Ciulli, S; Ispas, S

    1996-11-01

    Accurate mathematical modelling is important in the development of iterative image reconstruction algorithms for electrical impedance tomography (EIT). In such schemes the forward problem of calculating the electric potential from Neumann boundary data is solved many times. One aspect of this problem which has received some attention is the mathematical modelling of the electrodes used in the technique. In this paper we describe an integral equation formulation of a boundary value problem associated with this tissue and we indicate some of the ways in which this formulation can be used to obtain numerical and analytic results.

  4. Broadband Planar 5:1 Impedence Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehsan, Negar; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Moseley, Samuel H.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a broadband Guanella-type planar impedance transformer that transforms so 50 omega to 10 omega with a 10 dB bandwidth of 1-14GHz. The transformer is designed on a flexible 50 micrometer thick polyimide substrate in microstrip and parallel-plate transmission line topologies, and is Inspired by the traditional 4:1 Guanella transformer. Back-to-back transformers were designed and fabricated for characterization in a 50 omega system. Simulated and measured results are in excellent agreement.

  5. Fractional calculus model of electrical impedance applied to human skin.

    PubMed

    Vosika, Zoran B; Lazovic, Goran M; Misevic, Gradimir N; Simic-Krstic, Jovana B

    2013-01-01

    Fractional calculus is a mathematical approach dealing with derivatives and integrals of arbitrary and complex orders. Therefore, it adds a new dimension to understand and describe basic nature and behavior of complex systems in an improved way. Here we use the fractional calculus for modeling electrical properties of biological systems. We derived a new class of generalized models for electrical impedance and applied them to human skin by experimental data fitting. The primary model introduces new generalizations of: 1) Weyl fractional derivative operator, 2) Cole equation, and 3) Constant Phase Element (CPE). These generalizations were described by the novel equation which presented parameter [Formula: see text] related to remnant memory and corrected four essential parameters [Formula: see text] We further generalized single generalized element by introducing specific partial sum of Maclaurin series determined by parameters [Formula: see text] We defined individual primary model elements and their serial combination models by the appropriate equations and electrical schemes. Cole equation is a special case of our generalized class of models for[Formula: see text] Previous bioimpedance data analyses of living systems using basic Cole and serial Cole models show significant imprecisions. Our new class of models considerably improves the quality of fitting, evaluated by mean square errors, for bioimpedance data obtained from human skin. Our models with new parameters presented in specific partial sum of Maclaurin series also extend representation, understanding and description of complex systems electrical properties in terms of remnant memory effects. PMID:23577065

  6. Degree mixing in multilayer networks impedes the evolution of cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Lin; Perc, Matjaž

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, the evolution of cooperation has been studied on single, isolated networks. Yet a player, especially in human societies, will typically be a member of many different networks, and those networks will play different roles in the evolutionary process. Multilayer networks are therefore rapidly gaining on popularity as the more apt description of a networked society. With this motivation, we here consider two-layer scale-free networks with all possible combinations of degree mixing, wherein one network layer is used for the accumulation of payoffs and the other is used for strategy updating. We find that breaking the symmetry through assortative mixing in one layer and/or disassortative mixing in the other layer, as well as preserving the symmetry by means of assortative mixing in both layers, impedes the evolution of cooperation. We use degree-dependent distributions of strategies and cluster-size analysis to explain these results, which highlight the importance of hubs and the preservation of symmetry between multilayer networks for the successful resolution of social dilemmas.

  7. Degree mixing in multilayer networks impedes the evolution of cooperation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Lin; Perc, Matjaž

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, the evolution of cooperation has been studied on single, isolated networks. Yet a player, especially in human societies, will typically be a member of many different networks, and those networks will play different roles in the evolutionary process. Multilayer networks are therefore rapidly gaining on popularity as the more apt description of a networked society. With this motivation, we here consider two-layer scale-free networks with all possible combinations of degree mixing, wherein one network layer is used for the accumulation of payoffs and the other is used for strategy updating. We find that breaking the symmetry through assortative mixing in one layer and/or disassortative mixing in the other layer, as well as preserving the symmetry by means of assortative mixing in both layers, impedes the evolution of cooperation. We use degree-dependent distributions of strategies and cluster-size analysis to explain these results, which highlight the importance of hubs and the preservation of symmetry between multilayer networks for the successful resolution of social dilemmas.

  8. Method of Adjusting Acoustic Impedances for Impedance-Tunable Acoustic Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kennie H (Inventor); Nark, Douglas M. (Inventor); Jones, Michael G. (Inventor); Parrott, Tony L. (Inventor); Lodding, Kenneth N. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method is provided for making localized decisions and taking localized actions to achieve a global solution. In an embodiment of the present invention, acoustic impedances for impedance-tunable acoustic segments are adjusted. A first acoustic segment through an N-th acoustic segment are defined. To start the process, the first acoustic segment is designated as a leader and a noise-reducing impedance is determined therefor. This is accomplished using (i) one or more metrics associated with the acoustic wave at the leader, and (ii) the metric(s) associated with the acoustic wave at the N-th acoustic segment. The leader, the N-th acoustic segment, and each of the acoustic segments exclusive of the leader and the N-th acoustic segment, are tuned to the noise-reducing impedance. The current leader is then excluded from subsequent processing steps. The designation of leader is then given one of the remaining acoustic segments, and the process is repeated for each of the acoustic segments through an (N-1)-th one of the acoustic segments.

  9. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of Conductive Polymer Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; MacDowell, Louis G.

    1996-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to investigate the corrosion protection performance of twenty nine proprietary conductive polymer coatings for cold rolled steel under immersion in 3.55 percent NaCl. Corrosion potential as well as Bode plots of the data were obtained for each coating after one hour immersion, All coatings, with the exception of one, have a corrosion potential that is higher in the positive direction than the corrosion potential of bare steel under the same conditions. Group A consisted of twenty one coatings with Bode plots indicative of the capacitive behavior characteristic of barrier coatings. An equivalent circuit consisting of a capacitor in series with a resistor simulated the experimental EIS data for these coatings very well. Group B consisted of eight coatings that exhibited EIS spectra showing an inflection point which indicates that two time constants are present. This may be caused by an electrochemical process taking place which could be indicitive of coating failing. These coatings have a lower impedance that those in Group A.

  10. Impedance matching for broadband piezoelectric energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, F.; Leicht, J.; Sanchez, D.; Hehn, T.; Manoli, Y.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a system design for broadband piezoelectric energy harvesting by means of impedance matching. An inductive load impedance is emulated by controlling the output current of the piezoelectric harvester with a bipolar boost converter. The reference current is derived from the low pass filtered voltage measured at the harvester terminals. In order to maximize the harvested power especially for nonresonant frequencies the filter parameters are adjusted by a simple optimization algorithm. However the amount of harvested power is limited by the efficiency of the bipolar boost converter. Therefore an additional switch in the bipolar boost converter is proposed to reduce the capacitive switching losses. The proposed system is simulated using numerical parameters of available discrete components. Using the additional switch, the harvested power is increased by 20%. The proposed system constantly harvests 80% of the theoretically available power over frequency. The usable frequency range of ±4Hz around the resonance frequency of the piezoelectric harvester is mainly limited due to the boost converter topology. This comparison does not include the power dissipation of the control circuit.

  11. AC impedance analysis of polypyrrole thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Reginald M.; Martin, Charles R.

    1987-01-01

    The AC impedance spectra of thin polypyrrole films were obtained at open circuit potentials from -0.4 to 0.4 V vs SCE. Two limiting cases are discussed for which simplified equivalent circuits are applicable. At very positive potentials, the predominantly nonfaradaic AC impedance of polypyrrole is very similar to that observed previously for finite porous metallic films. Modeling of the data with the appropriate equivalent circuit permits effective pore diameter and pore number densities of the oxidized film to be estimated. At potentials from -0.4 to -0.3 V, the polypyrrole film is essentially nonelectronically conductive and diffusion of polymer oxidized sites with their associated counterions can be assumed to be linear from the film/substrate electrode interface. The equivalent circuit for the polypyrrole film at these potentials is that previously described for metal oxide, lithium intercalation thin films. Using this model, counterion diffusion coefficients are determined for both semi-infinite and finite diffusion domains. In addition, the limiting low frequency resistance and capacitance of the polypyrrole thin fims was determined and compared to that obtained previously for thicker films of the polymer. The origin of the observed potential dependence of these low frequency circuit components is discussed.

  12. Arts of electrical impedance tomographic sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mi; Wang, Qiang; Karki, Bishal

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews governing theorems in electrical impedance sensing for analysing the relationships of boundary voltages obtained from different sensing strategies. It reports that both the boundary voltage values and the associated sensitivity matrix of an alternative sensing strategy can be derived from a set of full independent measurements and sensitivity matrix obtained from other sensing strategy. A new sensing method for regional imaging with limited measurements is reported. It also proves that the sensitivity coefficient back-projection algorithm does not always work for all sensing strategies, unless the diagonal elements of the transformed matrix, ATA, have significant values and can be approximate to a diagonal matrix. Imaging capabilities of few sensing strategies were verified with static set-ups, which suggest the adjacent electrode pair sensing strategy displays better performance compared with the diametrically opposite protocol, with both the back-projection and multi-step image reconstruction methods. An application of electrical impedance tomography for sensing gas in water two-phase flows is demonstrated. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Supersensing through industrial process tomography’. PMID:27185968

  13. A high frequency electromagnetic impedance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex

    2003-01-15

    Non-invasive, high resolution geophysical mapping of the shallow subsurface is necessary for delineation of buried hazardous wastes, detecting unexploded ordinance, verifying and monitoring of containment or moisture contents, and other environmental applications. Electromagnetic (EM) techniques can be used for this purpose since electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity are representative of the subsurface media. Measurements in the EM frequency band between 1 and 100 MHz are very important for such applications, because the induction number of many targets is small and the ability to determine the subsurface distribution of both electrical properties is required. Earlier workers were successful in developing systems for detecting anomalous areas, but quantitative interpretation of the data was difficult. Accurate measurements are necessary, but difficult to achieve for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface. We are developing a broadband non-invasive method for accurately mapping the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the shallow subsurface using an EM impedance approach similar to the MT exploration technique. Electric and magnetic sensors were tested to ensure that stray EM scattering is minimized and the quality of the data collected with the high-frequency impedance (HFI) system is good enough to allow high-resolution, multi-dimensional imaging of hidden targets. Additional efforts are being made to modify and further develop existing sensors and transmitters to improve the imaging capability and data acquisition efficiency.

  14. Impedance analysis of the PEP-II vacuum chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, C.K.; Weiland, T.

    1995-05-01

    The PEP-II high energy ring (HER) vacuum chamber consists of a copper tube with periodically spaced pumping slots. The impedance of the vacuum chamber due to the slots is analyzed. Both narrow-band and broadband impedances are considered as well as longitudinal and transverse components thereof. It is found that although the broad-band impedance is tolerable, the narrow-band impedance may exceed the instability limit given by the natural damping with no feedback system on. Traveling wave modes in the chamber are the major source of this high value narrow-band impedance. We also study the dependences of the impedance on the slot length and the geometrical cross section.

  15. Breathing detection with a portable impedance measurement system: first measurements.

    PubMed

    Cordes, Axel; Foussier, Jerome; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    For monitoring the health status of individuals, detection of breathing and heart activity is important. From an electrical point of view, it is known that breathing and heart activity change the electrical impedance distribution in the human body over the time due to ventilation (high impedance) and blood shifts (low impedance). Thus, it is possible to detect both important vital parameters by measuring the impedance of the thorax or the region around lung and heart. For some measurement scenarios it is also essential to detect these parameters contactless. For instance, monitoring bus drivers health could help to limit accidents, but directly connected systems limit the drivers free moving space. One measurement technology for measuring the impedance changes in the chest without cables is the magnetic impedance tomography (MIT). This article describes a portable measurement system we developed for this scenario that allows to measure breathing contactless. Furthermore, first measurements with five volunteers were performed and analyzed.

  16. Transverse impedance measurement in RHIC and the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Biancacci, Nicolo; Blaskiewicz, M.; Dutheil, Y.; Liu, C.; Mernick, M.; Minty, M.; White, S. M.

    2014-05-12

    The RHIC luminosity upgrade program aims for an increase of the polarized proton luminosity by a factor 2. To achieve this goal a significant increase in the beam intensity is foreseen. The beam coupling impedance could therefore represent a source of detrimental effects for beam quality and stability at high bunch intensities. For this reason it is essential to quantify the accelerator impedance budget and the major impedance sources, and possibly cure them. In this MD note we summarize the results of the 2013 transverse impedance measurements in the AGS and RHIC. The studies have been performed measuring the tune shift as a function of bunch intensity and deriving the total accelerator machine transverse impedance. For RHIC, we could obtain first promising results of impedance localization measurements as well.

  17. Transverse beam coupling impedance of the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persichelli, S.; Migliorati, M.; Biancacci, N.; Gilardoni, S.; Metral, E.; Salvant, B.

    2016-04-01

    Beam coupling impedance is a fundamental parameter to characterize the electromagnetic interaction of a particle beam with the surrounding environment. Synchrotron machine performances are critically affected by instabilities and collective effects triggered by beam coupling impedance. In particular, transverse beam coupling impedance is expected to impact beam dynamics of the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS), since a significant increase in beam intensity is foreseen within the framework of the LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) project. In this paper we describe the study of the transverse beam coupling impedance of the PS, taking into account the main sources of geometrical impedance and the contribution of indirect space charge at different energies. The total machine impedance budget, determined from beam-based dedicated machine measurement sessions, is also discussed and compared with the theoretical model.

  18. Impedance Matched to Vacuum, Invisible Edge, Diffraction Suppressed Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John G. (Inventor); Roman, Patrick A. (Inventor); Shiri, Sharham (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Diffraction suppressed mirrors having an invisible edge are disclosed for incident light at both targeted wavelengths and broadband incident light. The mirrors have a first having at least one discontiguous portion having a plurality of nanostructured apertures. The discontiguous mirror portion impedance matches a relatively high impedance portion of the mirror to a relatively low impedance portion of the mirror, thereby reducing the diffraction edge effect otherwise present in a conventional mirror.

  19. Application of alternating current impedance to fuel cell modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, T.E.

    1999-05-02

    AC impedance has provided a useful diagnostic tool in the Los Alamos polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) program. The author reviews the techniques he has used in ac impedance modeling. These techniques include equation implementation, model simplification and verification, least squares fitting, application of two-dimensional Laplace equation solvers handling complex interfacial boundary conditions, and interpretation of impedance features. The separate features of the complete electrode model are explained by analytic examples.

  20. Multimedia content description framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Lawrence David (Inventor); Kim, Michelle Yoonk Yung (Inventor); Li, Chung-Sheng (Inventor); Mohan, Rakesh (Inventor); Smith, John Richard (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A framework is provided for describing multimedia content and a system in which a plurality of multimedia storage devices employing the content description methods of the present invention can interoperate. In accordance with one form of the present invention, the content description framework is a description scheme (DS) for describing streams or aggregations of multimedia objects, which may comprise audio, images, video, text, time series, and various other modalities. This description scheme can accommodate an essentially limitless number of descriptors in terms of features, semantics or metadata, and facilitate content-based search, index, and retrieval, among other capabilities, for both streamed or aggregated multimedia objects.

  1. Validation of an Impedance Education Method in Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports results of a research effort to validate a method for educing the normal incidence impedance of a locally reacting liner, located in a grazing incidence, nonprogressive acoustic wave environment with flow. The results presented in this paper test the ability of the method to reproduce the measured normal incidence impedance of a solid steel plate and two soft test liners in a uniform flow. The test liners are known to be locally react- ing and exhibit no measurable amplitude-dependent impedance nonlinearities or flow effects. Baseline impedance spectra for these liners were therefore established from measurements in a conventional normal incidence impedance tube. A key feature of the method is the expansion of the unknown impedance function as a piecewise continuous polynomial with undetermined coefficients. Stewart's adaptation of the Davidon-Fletcher-Powell optimization algorithm is used to educe the normal incidence impedance at each Mach number by optimizing an objective function. The method is shown to reproduce the measured normal incidence impedance spectrum for each of the test liners, thus validating its usefulness for determining the normal incidence impedance of test liners for a broad range of source frequencies and flow Mach numbers. Nomenclature

  2. [Cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Seki, S; Mizuguchi, A; Tsuchida, H; Watanabe, H; Namiki, A

    1990-04-01

    The cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography, NCCOM3, was evaluated in adult patients (n = 12) who were subjected to coronary artery bypass grafting. Values of cardiac output measured by impedance cardiography were compared to those by the thermodilution method. Changes of base impedance level used as an index of thoracic fluid volume were also investigated before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Correlation coefficient (r) of the values obtained by thermodilution with impedance cardiography was 0.79 and the mean difference was 1.29 +/- 16.9 (SD)% during induction of anesthesia. During the operation, r was 0.83 and the mean difference was -14.6 +/- 18.7%. The measurement by impedance cardiography could be carried out through the operation except when electro-cautery was used. Base impedance level before CPB was significantly lower as compared with that after CPB. There was a negative correlation between the base impedance level and central venous pressure (CVP). No patients showed any signs suggesting lung edema and all the values of CVP, pulmonary artery pressure and blood gas analysis were within normal ranges. From the result of this study, it was concluded that cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography was useful in cardiac surgery, but further detailed examinations will be necessary on the relationship between the numerical values of base impedance and the clinical state of the patients. PMID:2362347

  3. In vivo impedance spectroscopy of deep brain stimulation electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempka, Scott F.; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Johnson, Matthew D.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2009-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents a powerful clinical technology, but a systematic characterization of the electrical interactions between the electrode and the brain is lacking. The goal of this study was to examine the in vivo changes in the DBS electrode impedance that occur after implantation and during clinically relevant stimulation. Clinical DBS devices typically apply high-frequency voltage-controlled stimulation, and as a result, the injected current is directly regulated by the impedance of the electrode-tissue interface. We monitored the impedance of scaled-down clinical DBS electrodes implanted in the thalamus and subthalamic nucleus of a rhesus macaque using electrode impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements ranging from 0.5 Hz to 10 kHz. To further characterize our measurements, equivalent circuit models of the electrode-tissue interface were used to quantify the role of various interface components in producing the observed electrode impedance. Following implantation, the DBS electrode impedance increased and a semicircular arc was observed in the high-frequency range of the EIS measurements, commonly referred to as the tissue component of the impedance. Clinically relevant stimulation produced a rapid decrease in electrode impedance with extensive changes in the tissue component. These post-operative and stimulation-induced changes in impedance could play an important role in the observed functional effects of voltage-controlled DBS and should be considered during clinical stimulation parameter selection and chronic animal research studies.

  4. Multi-gap high impedance plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mason, R.J.

    1996-10-22

    A high impedance plasma opening switch having an anode and a cathode and at least one additional electrode placed between the anode and cathode is disclosed. The presence of the additional electrodes leads to the creation of additional plasma gaps which are in series, increasing the net impedance of the switch. An equivalent effect can be obtained by using two or more conventional plasma switches with their plasma gaps wired in series. Higher impedance switches can provide high current and voltage to higher impedance loads such as plasma radiation sources. 12 figs.

  5. Multi-gap high impedance plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mason, Rodney J.

    1996-01-01

    A high impedance plasma opening switch having an anode and a cathode and at least one additional electrode placed between the anode and cathode. The presence of the additional electrodes leads to the creation of additional plasma gaps which are in series, increasing the net impedance of the switch. An equivalent effect can be obtained by using two or more conventional plasma switches with their plasma gaps wired in series. Higher impedance switches can provide high current and voltage to higher impedance loads such as plasma radiation sources.

  6. Time-Domain Impedance Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Auriault, Laurent

    1996-01-01

    It is an accepted practice in aeroacoustics to characterize the properties of an acoustically treated surface by a quantity known as impedance. Impedance is a complex quantity. As such, it is designed primarily for frequency-domain analysis. Time-domain boundary conditions that are the equivalent of the frequency-domain impedance boundary condition are proposed. Both single frequency and model broadband time-domain impedance boundary conditions are provided. It is shown that the proposed boundary conditions, together with the linearized Euler equations, form well-posed initial boundary value problems. Unlike ill-posed problems, they are free from spurious instabilities that would render time-marching computational solutions impossible.

  7. Impedance generalization for plasmonic waveguides beyond the lumped circuit model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Thomas; Hasan, Shakeeb Bin; Paul, Thomas; Pertsch, Thomas; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2013-07-01

    We analytically derive a rigorous expression for the relative impedance ratio between two photonic structures based on their electromagnetic interaction. Our approach generalizes the physical meaning of the impedance to a measure for the reciprocity-based overlap of eigenmodes. The consistency with known cases in the radio-frequency and optical domain is shown. The analysis reveals where the applicability of simple circuit parameters ends and how the impedance can be interpreted beyond this point. We illustrate our approach by successfully describing a Bragg reflector that terminates an insulator-metal-insulator plasmonic waveguide in the near infrared by our impedance concept.

  8. Impedance measurements for detecting pathogens attached to antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S.; Fuller, Christopher K.

    2004-12-28

    The use of impedance measurements to detect the presence of pathogens attached to antibody-coated beads. In a fluidic device antibodies are immobilized on a surface of a patterned interdigitated electrode. Pathogens in a sample fluid streaming past the electrode attach to the immobilized antibodies, which produces a change in impedance between two adjacent electrodes, which impedance change is measured and used to detect the presence of a pathogen. To amplify the signal, beads coated with antibodies are introduced and the beads would stick to the pathogen causing a greater change in impedance between the two adjacent electrodes.

  9. Proceedings of the impedance and bunch instability workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    This report discusses the following topics: impedance and bunch lengthening; single bunch stability in the ESRF; a longitudinal mode-coupling instability model for bunch lengthening; high-frequency behavior of longitudinal coupling impedance; beam-induced energy spreads at beam-pipe transitions; on the calculation of wake functions using MAFIA-T3 code; preliminary measurements of the bunch length and the impedance of LEP; measurements and simulations of collective effects in the CERN SPS; bunch lengthening in the SLC damping rings; and status of impedance measurements for the spring-8 storage ring.

  10. Electrode-side impedance nonlinearity in polycarbazole bioelectrodes quantifiable by a quaternion formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovadia, M.; Zavitz, D. H.; Kayinamura, Y. P.; Rubinson, J. F.

    2008-03-01

    Nonlinear response to sinusoidal electrification is a phenomenon rarely observed for conductive interfaces. We report nonlinear response as an electrode phenomenon in a conjugated polymer electrode polycarbazole. While other semiconductors manifest an impedance quantifiable in the complex field (e.g. Warburg where complex Z = ZW∞ and resistive with Z = ZHl [Hl-Halbleiter]) the polycarbazole manifests no definable impedance due to essential nonlinearity. There is no description available for this form of pseudoconductivity. We introduce a quaternion formalism ZT=a+bi+cj+dk [where a,b,c,d are real and i^2=j^2=k^2=-1 and jk=i] that successfully describes all conductivity (c=d=0) and pseudoconductivity presently known as a normed ring, and reduces to the complex field for conductivity. In this formalism, the normalized impedance of a capacitor is Z=i, the experimentally determined polycarbazole pseudoimpedance ZT=k, that of a resistance is Z=1 and that of the ZW∞=i=i^.5ex1 -.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 . The non-Abelian character of ZT implies that the Onsager relation fails for some interfaces. Remarkably, certain Kramers-Kronig relations (Hilbert transformation in not only the complex but also the [j,k] plane) still hold for certain experimental setups. Computation of the energy integral D^.Edt reveals that charge transport is lossless, similar to conduction in an ordinary capacitance.

  11. Algorithmic Error Correction of Impedance Measuring Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Starostenko, Oleg; Alarcon-Aquino, Vicente; Hernandez, Wilmar; Sergiyenko, Oleg; Tyrsa, Vira

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes novel design concepts and some advanced techniques proposed for increasing the accuracy of low cost impedance measuring devices without reduction of operational speed. The proposed structural method for algorithmic error correction and iterating correction method provide linearization of transfer functions of the measuring sensor and signal conditioning converter, which contribute the principal additive and relative measurement errors. Some measuring systems have been implemented in order to estimate in practice the performance of the proposed methods. Particularly, a measuring system for analysis of C-V, G-V characteristics has been designed and constructed. It has been tested during technological process control of charge-coupled device CCD manufacturing. The obtained results are discussed in order to define a reasonable range of applied methods, their utility, and performance. PMID:22303177

  12. Quartz tuning fork based microwave impedance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yong-Tao; Ma, Eric Yue; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2016-06-01

    Microwave impedance microscopy (MIM), a near-field microwave scanning probe technique, has become a powerful tool to characterize local electrical responses in solid state samples. We present the design of a new type of MIM sensor based on quartz tuning fork and electrochemically etched thin metal wires. Due to a higher aspect ratio tip and integration with tuning fork, such design achieves comparable MIM performance and enables easy self-sensing topography feedback in situations where the conventional optical feedback mechanism is not available, thus is complementary to microfabricated shielded stripline-type probes. The new design also enables stable differential mode MIM detection and multiple-frequency MIM measurements with a single sensor.

  13. Corrosion Study Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farooq, Muhammad Umar

    2003-01-01

    Corrosion is a common phenomenon. It is the destructive result of chemical reaction between a metal or metal alloy and its environment. Stainless steel tubing is used at Kennedy Space Center for various supply lines which service the orbiter. The launch pads are also made of stainless steel. The environment at the launch site has very high chloride content due to the proximity to the Atlantic Ocean. Also, during a launch, the exhaust products in the solid rocket boosters include concentrated hydrogen chloride. The purpose of this project was to study various alloys by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy in corrosive environments similar to the launch sites. This report includes data and analysis of the measurements for 304L, 254SMO and AL-6XN in primarily neutral 3.55% NaCl. One set of data for 304L in neutral 3.55%NaCl + 0.1N HCl is also included.

  14. Bioelectrical impedance analysis. What does it measure?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeller, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) has been proposed for measuring fat-free mass, total body water, percent fat, body cell mass, intracellular water, and extracellular water: a veritable laboratory in a box. Although it is unlikely that BIA is quite this versatile, correlations have been demonstrated between BIA and all of these body compartments. At the same time, it is known that all of the compartments are correlated among themselves. Because of this, it is difficult to determine whether BIA is specific for any or all of these compartments. To investigate this question, we induced acute changes in total body water and its compartments over a 3-h period. Using this approach, we demonstrated that multifrequency BIA, using the Cole-Cole model to calculate the zero frequency and infinite frequency resistance, measures extracellular and intracellular water.

  15. Wave guide impedance matching method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for modifying the end portion of a wave guide, whether hollow or solid, carrying electromagnetic, acoustic or optical energy, to produce a gradual impedance change over the length of the end portion, comprising the cutting of longitudinal, V-shaped grooves that increase in width and depth from beginning of the end portion of the wave guide to the end of the guide so that, at the end of the guide, no guide material remains and no surfaces of the guide as modified are perpendicular to the direction of energy flow. For hollow guides, the grooves are cut beginning on the interior surface; for solid guides, the grooves are cut beginning on the exterior surface. One or more resistive, partially conductive or nonconductive sleeves can be placed over the exterior of the guide and through which the grooves are cut to smooth the transition to free space.

  16. Sensing Estrogen with Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Kim, Byung Kun; Im, Ji-Eun; Choi, Han Nim; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Cho, Seong In

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates the application feasibility of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in measuring estrogen (17β-estradiol) in gas phase. The present biosensor gives a linear response (R2 = 0.999) for 17β-estradiol vapor concentration from 3.7 ng/L to 3.7 × 10−4 ng/L with a limit of detection (3.7 × 10−4 ng/L). The results show that the fabricated biosensor demonstrates better detection limit of 17β-estradiol in gas phase than the previous report with GC-MS method. This estrogen biosensor has many potential applications for on-site detection of a variety of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in the gas phase. PMID:27803838

  17. Impedance matched thin metamaterials make metals absorbing

    PubMed Central

    Mattiucci, N.; Bloemer, M. J.; Aközbek, N.; D'Aguanno, G.

    2013-01-01

    Metals are generally considered good reflectors over the entire electromagnetic spectrum up to their plasma frequency. Here we demonstrate an approach to tailor their absorbing characteristics based on the effective metamaterial properties of thin, periodic metallo-dielectric multilayers by exploiting a broadband, inherently non-resonant, surface impedance matching mechanism. Based on this mechanism, we design, fabricate and test omnidirectional, thin (<1 micron), polarization independent, extremely efficient absorbers (in principle being capable to reach A > 99%) over a frequency range spanning from the UV to the IR. Our approach opens new venues to design cost effective materials for many applications such as thermo-photovoltaic energy conversion devices, light harvesting for solar cells, flat panel display, infrared detectors, stray light reduction, stealth and others. PMID:24220284

  18. Impedance matched thin metamaterials make metals absorbing.

    PubMed

    Mattiucci, N; Bloemer, M J; Aközbek, N; D'Aguanno, G

    2013-01-01

    Metals are generally considered good reflectors over the entire electromagnetic spectrum up to their plasma frequency. Here we demonstrate an approach to tailor their absorbing characteristics based on the effective metamaterial properties of thin, periodic metallo-dielectric multilayers by exploiting a broadband, inherently non-resonant, surface impedance matching mechanism. Based on this mechanism, we design, fabricate and test omnidirectional, thin (<1 micron), polarization independent, extremely efficient absorbers (in principle being capable to reach A > 99%) over a frequency range spanning from the UV to the IR. Our approach opens new venues to design cost effective materials for many applications such as thermo-photovoltaic energy conversion devices, light harvesting for solar cells, flat panel display, infrared detectors, stray light reduction, stealth and others. PMID:24220284

  19. Impedance matched thin metamaterials make metals absorbing.

    PubMed

    Mattiucci, N; Bloemer, M J; Aközbek, N; D'Aguanno, G

    2013-11-13

    Metals are generally considered good reflectors over the entire electromagnetic spectrum up to their plasma frequency. Here we demonstrate an approach to tailor their absorbing characteristics based on the effective metamaterial properties of thin, periodic metallo-dielectric multilayers by exploiting a broadband, inherently non-resonant, surface impedance matching mechanism. Based on this mechanism, we design, fabricate and test omnidirectional, thin (<1 micron), polarization independent, extremely efficient absorbers (in principle being capable to reach A > 99%) over a frequency range spanning from the UV to the IR. Our approach opens new venues to design cost effective materials for many applications such as thermo-photovoltaic energy conversion devices, light harvesting for solar cells, flat panel display, infrared detectors, stray light reduction, stealth and others.

  20. Scheme for rapid adjustment of network impedance

    DOEpatents

    Vithayathil, John J.

    1991-01-01

    A static controlled reactance device is inserted in series with an AC electric power transmission line to adjust its transfer impedance. An inductor (reactor) is serially connected with two back-to-back connected thyristors which control the conduction period and hence the effective reactance of the inductor. Additional reactive elements are provided in parallel with the thyristor controlled reactor to filter harmonics and to obtain required range of variable reactance. Alternatively, the static controlled reactance device discussed above may be connected to the secondary winding of a series transformer having its primary winding connected in series to the transmission line. In a three phase transmission system, the controlled reactance device may be connected in delta configuration on the secondary side of the series transformer to eliminate triplen harmonics.

  1. Provocative Opinion: Descriptive Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Henry A.; Bent, Brian E.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses many of the distinctions that chemists draw between theoretical chemistry and descriptive chemistry, along with the tendency for chemical educators to adopt the type of chemistry they feel is most important to teach. Uses examples to argue that theoretical chemistry and descriptive chemistry are, at the bottom line, the same. (TW)

  2. A Descriptive Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Josef

    1979-01-01

    In this experiment in description, students in a high school honors English class were asked to select a surrealistic painting and capture it in writing. Their compositions were given to art students who tried to reproduce the paintings from the written descriptions. (SJL)

  3. Physics 3204. Course Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newfoundland and Labrador Dept. of Education.

    A description of the physics 3204 course in Newfoundland and Labrador is provided. The description includes: (1) statement of purpose, including general objectives of science education; (2) a list of six course objectives; (3) course content for units on sound, light, optical instruments, electrostatics, current electricity, Michael Faraday and…

  4. Job descriptions made easy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Larry

    2014-01-01

    The act of writing a job description can be a daunting and difficult task for many managers. This article focuses on the key concepts of What, How, and Measureable Results as they relate to an employee's job duties. When the answers to these three elements are articulated, they define the core responsibilities of any job that form the basis for an effective job description.

  5. Sources and effects of electrode impedance during deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Butson, Christopher R.; Maks, Christopher B.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Clinical impedance measurements for deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes in human patients are normally in the range 500–1500 Ω. DBS devices utilize voltage-controlled stimulation; therefore, the current delivered to the tissue is inversely proportional to the impedance. The goals of this study were to evaluate the effects of various electrical properties of the tissue medium and electrode-tissue interface on the impedance and to determine the impact of clinically relevant impedance variability on the volume of tissue activated (VTA) during DBS. Methods Axisymmetric finite-element models (FEM) of the DBS system were constructed with explicit representation of encapsulation layers around the electrode and implanted pulse generator. Impedance was calculated by dividing the stimulation voltage by the integrated current density along the active electrode contact. The models utilized a Fourier FEM solver that accounted for the capacitive components of the electrode-tissue interface during voltage-controlled stimulation. The resulting time- and space-dependent voltage waveforms generated in the tissue medium were superimposed onto cable model axons to calculate the VTA. Results The primary determinants of electrode impedance were the thickness and conductivity of the encapsulation layer around the electrode contact and the conductivity of the bulk tissue medium. The difference in the VTA between our low (790 Ω) and high (1244 Ω) impedance models with typical DBS settings (−3 V, 90 μs, 130 Hz pulse train) was 121 mm3, representing a 52% volume reduction. Conclusions Electrode impedance has a substantial effect on the VTA and accurate representation of electrode impedance should be an explicit component of computational models of voltage-controlled DBS. Significance Impedance is often used to identify broken leads (for values >2000 Ω) or short circuits in the hardware (for values <50 Ω); however, clinical impedance values also represent an important

  6. Preliminary Results on Different Impedance Contrast Agents for Pulmonary Perfusion Imaging with Electrical Impedance Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, D. T.; Kosobrodov, R.; Barry, M. A.; Chik, W.; Pouliopoulos, J.; Oh, T. I.; Thiagalingam, A.; McEwan, A.

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies in animal models suggest that the use of small volume boluses of NaCl as an impedance contrast agent can significantly improve pulmonary perfusion imaging by Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). However, these studies used highly concentrated NaCl solution (20%) which may have adverse effects on the patients. In a pilot experiment, we address this problem by comparing a number of different Impedance Contrast Boluses (ICBs). Conductivity changes in the lungs of a sheep after the injection of four different ICBs were compared, including three NaCl-based ICBs and one glucose-based ICB. The following procedure was followed for each ICB. Firstly, ventilation was turned off to provide an apneic window of approximately 40s to image the conductivity changes due to the ICB. Each ICB was then injected through a pig-tail catheter directly into the right atrium. EIT images were acquired throughout the apnea to capture the conductivity change. For each ICB, the experiment was repeated three times. The three NaCl-based ICB exhibited similar behaviour in which following the injection of each of these ICBs, the conductivity of each lung predictably increased. The effect of the ICB of 5% glucose solution was inconclusive. A small decrease in conductivity in the left lung was observed in two out of three cases and none was discernible in the right lung.

  7. Transthoracic defibrillation: effect of sternotomy on chest impedance.

    PubMed

    Kerber, R E; Vance, S; Schomer, S J; Mariano, D J; Charbonnier, F

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of sternotomy on transthoracic impedance, a major determinant of current flow and defibrillation success. Transthoracic impedance was determined by using a validated test-pulse technique that does not require actual shocks. Seventeen patients undergoing median sternotomy were studied prospectively. Transthoracic impedance was determined before operation, 3 to 5 days after operation and (in eight patients) greater than or equal to 1 month after operation. When measured using paddle electrodes placed in the standard apex-right parasternal defibrillating position, transthoracic impedance declined after sternotomy in all patients, from 77 +/- 18 to 59 +/- 17 omega (p less than 0.01); smaller declines were demonstrated by using other electrode positions. Transthoracic impedance remained below the preoperative level in the eight patients who underwent a second set of measurements at least 1 month after operation. Six normal subjects not undergoing sternotomy underwent serial transthoracic impedance measurements at least 5 days apart; mean transthoracic impedance did not change. It is concluded that transthoracic impedance declines after sternotomy. At any operator-selected energy level a higher current flow will result after sternotomy; this may facilitate postoperative defibrillation.

  8. The Impedance Response of Semiconductors: An Electrochemical Engineering Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orazem, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    Shows that the principles learned in the study of mass transport, thermodynamics, and kinetics associated with electrochemical systems can be applied to the transport and reaction processes taking place within a semiconductor. Describes impedance techniques and provides several graphs illustrating impedance data for diverse circuit systems. (YP)

  9. An Inexpensive, Very High Impedance Digital Voltmeter for Selective Electrodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caceci, Marco S.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a compact, digital voltmeter which exceeds, both in accuracy and input impedance, most commercial pH meters and potentiometers. The instrument consists of two parts: a very high impedance hybrid operational amplifier used as a voltage follower (ICH8500/A, Intersil) and a four and one-half digits LED display panel meter (RP-4500,…

  10. Induced optical metric in the non-impedance-matched media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. A.; Roknizadeh, R.; Sahebdivan, S.

    2016-11-01

    In non-magnetic anisotropic media, the behavior of electromagnetic waves depends on the polarization and direction of the incident light. Therefore, to tame the unwanted wave responses such as polarization dependent reflections, the artificial impedance-matched media are suggested to be used in optical devices like invisibility cloak or super lenses. Nevertheless, developing the impedance-matched media is far from trivial in practice. In this paper, we are comparing the samples of both impedance-matched and non-impedance-matched (non-magnetic) media regarding their electromagnetic response in constructing a well-defined optical metric. In the case of similar anisotropic patterns, we show that the optical metric in an impedance-matched medium for unpolarized light is the same as the optical metric of an electrical birefringent medium when the extraordinary mode is concerned. By comparing the eikonal equation in an empty curved space-time and its counterparts in the medium, we have shown that a non-impedance-matched medium can resemble an optical metric for a particular polarization. As an example of non-impedance-matched materials, we are studying a medium with varying optical axis profile. We show that such a medium can be an alternative to impedance-matched materials in various optical devices.

  11. An Alternative to Impedance Screening: Unoccluded Frontal Bone Conduction Screening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Square, Regina; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A bone conduction hearing screening test using frontal bone oscillator placement was compared with pure-tone air-conduction screening and impedance audiometry with 114 preschoolers. Unoccluded frontal bone conduction testing produced screening results not significantly different from results obtained by impedance audiometry. (CL)!

  12. Impedance Matching of Tapered Slot Antenna using a Dielectric Transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, R. N.; Lee, R. Q.

    1998-01-01

    A new impedance matching technique for tapered slot antennas using a dielectric transformer is presented. The technique is demonstrated by measuring the input impedance, Voltage Standing Wave Ratio (VSWR) and the gain of a Vivaldi antenna (VA). Measured results at Ka-Band frequencies are presented and discussed.

  13. Modifying the acoustic impedance of polyurea-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantasetphong, Wiroj; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Jia, Zhanzhan; Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    2013-04-01

    Acoustic impedance is a material property that depends on mass density and acoustic wave speed. An impedance mismatch between two media leads to the partial reflection of an acoustic wave sent from one medium to another. Active sonar is one example of a useful application of this phenomenon, where reflected and scattered acoustic waves enable the detection of objects. If the impedance of an object is matched to that of the surrounding medium, however, the object may be hidden from observation (at least directly) by sonar. In this study, polyurea composites are developed to facilitate such impedance matching. Polyurea is used due to its excellent blast-mitigating properties, easy casting, corrosion protection, abrasion resistance, and various uses in current military technology. Since pure polyurea has impedance higher than that of water (the current medium of interest), low mass density phenolic microballoon particles are added to create composite materials with reduced effective impedances. The volume fraction of particles is varied to study the effect of filler quantity on the acoustic impedance of the resulting composite. The composites are experimentally characterized via ultrasonic measurements. Computational models based on the method of dilute-randomly-distributed inclusions are developed and compared with the experimental results. These experiments and models will facilitate the design of new elastomeric composites with desirable acoustic impedances.

  14. Flip-Chip Carrier Would Match Microwave FET Impedances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed field-effect transistor consists of three cells which make up one complete FET pellet. Pellet is flip-chip mounted on carrier with source grounded gate and drain posts connected directly to impedance-matching transmission-line segments. Impedance transformers are part of mounting and contact strips.

  15. Development of impedance matching technologies for ICRF antenna arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.

    1998-03-01

    All high power ICRF heating systems include devices for matching the input impedance of the antenna array to the generator output impedance. For most types of antennas used, the input impedance is strongly time-dependent on timescales as rapid as 10-4 s, while the rf generators used are capable of producing full power only into a stationary load impedance. Hence, the dynamic response of the matching method is of great practical importance. In this paper, world-wide developments in this field over the past decade are reviewed. These techniques may be divided into several classes. The edge plasma parameters that determine the antenna array`s input impedance may be controlled to maintain a fixed load impedance. The frequency of the rf source can be feedback controlled to compensate for changes in the edge plasma conditions, or fast variable tuning elements in the transmission line between the generator output and the antenna input connections can provide the necessary time-varying impedance transformation. In lossy passive schemes, reflected power due to the time-varying impedance of the antenna array is diverted to a dummy load. Each of these techniques can be applied to a pre-existing antenna system. If a new antenna is to be designed, recent advances allow the antenna array to have the intrinsic property of presenting a constant load to the feeding transmission lines despite the varying load seen by each antenna in the array.

  16. Equivalent Circuits For AC-Impedance Analysis Of Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents investigation of equivalent circuits for ac-impedance analysis of corrosion. Impedance between specimen and electrolyte measured as function of frequency. Data used to characterize corrosion electrochemical system in terms of equivalent circuit. Eleven resistor/capacitor equivalent-circuit models were analyzed.

  17. Equivalent circuit models for ac impedance data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    A least-squares fitting routine has been developed for the analysis of ac impedance data. It has been determined that the checking of the derived equations for a particular circuit with a commercially available electronics circuit program is essential. As a result of the investigation described, three equivalent circuit models were selected for use in the analysis of ac impedance data.

  18. 21 CFR 874.1090 - Auditory impedance tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1090 Auditory impedance tester. (a) Identification. An auditory impedance tester is a device that is intended to change the air pressure in the... evaluate the functional condition of the middle ear. The device is used to determine abnormalities in...

  19. 21 CFR 874.1090 - Auditory impedance tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1090 Auditory impedance tester. (a) Identification. An auditory impedance tester is a device that is intended to change the air pressure in the... evaluate the functional condition of the middle ear. The device is used to determine abnormalities in...

  20. Development of a field-portable small-size impedance analyzer for structural health monitoring using the electromechanical impedance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Xu, Buli

    2004-07-01

    Electromechanical (E/M) impedance method is emerging as an effective and powerful technique for structural health monitoring. The E/M impedance method utilizes as its main apparatus an impedance analyzer that reads the in-situ E/M impedance of piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) attached to the monitored structure. Laboratory-type impedance analyzers (e.g. HP4194) are bulky, heavy, and expensive. They cannot be easily carried into the field for on-site structural health monitoring. To address this issue, means of to reduce the size of the impedance analyzer making the impedance analyzer more compact and field-portable are explored. In this paper, we present a systematic approach to the development of a field-portable small-size impedance analyzer for structural health monitoring using the electromechanical impedance technique. Our approach consists of several developmental stages. First, we perform a simulation of the E/M Impedance technique and develop the software tools for analyzing the signal in a fast and efficient way while maintaining the desired accuracy. The objective of this signal processing part is to obtain the complex impedance, ZR+iZI)=|Z| angle arg Z, at a number of frequencies in a predetermined range. Several signal processing methods were explored such as: (a) integration method; (b) correlation method; (c) Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) method. Second, we discuss the hardware issues associated with the implementation of this approach. The hardware system architecture consists of several blocks: (a) reference signal generation; (b) voltage and current measurements; and (c) digital signal acquisition and processing. Practical results obtained during proof-of-concept experiments are presented and comparatively examined.

  1. Development on electromagnetic impedance function modeling and its estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Sutarno, D.

    2015-09-30

    Today the Electromagnetic methods such as magnetotellurics (MT) and controlled sources audio MT (CSAMT) is used in a broad variety of applications. Its usefulness in poor seismic areas and its negligible environmental impact are integral parts of effective exploration at minimum cost. As exploration was forced into more difficult areas, the importance of MT and CSAMT, in conjunction with other techniques, has tended to grow continuously. However, there are obviously important and difficult problems remaining to be solved concerning our ability to collect process and interpret MT as well as CSAMT in complex 3D structural environments. This talk aim at reviewing and discussing the recent development on MT as well as CSAMT impedance functions modeling, and also some improvements on estimation procedures for the corresponding impedance functions. In MT impedance modeling, research efforts focus on developing numerical method for computing the impedance functions of three dimensionally (3-D) earth resistivity models. On that reason, 3-D finite elements numerical modeling for the impedances is developed based on edge element method. Whereas, in the CSAMT case, the efforts were focused to accomplish the non-plane wave problem in the corresponding impedance functions. Concerning estimation of MT and CSAMT impedance functions, researches were focused on improving quality of the estimates. On that objective, non-linear regression approach based on the robust M-estimators and the Hilbert transform operating on the causal transfer functions, were used to dealing with outliers (abnormal data) which are frequently superimposed on a normal ambient MT as well as CSAMT noise fields. As validated, the proposed MT impedance modeling method gives acceptable results for standard three dimensional resistivity models. Whilst, the full solution based modeling that accommodate the non-plane wave effect for CSAMT impedances is applied for all measurement zones, including near-, transition

  2. Development on electromagnetic impedance function modeling and its estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutarno, D.

    2015-09-01

    Today the Electromagnetic methods such as magnetotellurics (MT) and controlled sources audio MT (CSAMT) is used in a broad variety of applications. Its usefulness in poor seismic areas and its negligible environmental impact are integral parts of effective exploration at minimum cost. As exploration was forced into more difficult areas, the importance of MT and CSAMT, in conjunction with other techniques, has tended to grow continuously. However, there are obviously important and difficult problems remaining to be solved concerning our ability to collect process and interpret MT as well as CSAMT in complex 3D structural environments. This talk aim at reviewing and discussing the recent development on MT as well as CSAMT impedance functions modeling, and also some improvements on estimation procedures for the corresponding impedance functions. In MT impedance modeling, research efforts focus on developing numerical method for computing the impedance functions of three dimensionally (3-D) earth resistivity models. On that reason, 3-D finite elements numerical modeling for the impedances is developed based on edge element method. Whereas, in the CSAMT case, the efforts were focused to accomplish the non-plane wave problem in the corresponding impedance functions. Concerning estimation of MT and CSAMT impedance functions, researches were focused on improving quality of the estimates. On that objective, non-linear regression approach based on the robust M-estimators and the Hilbert transform operating on the causal transfer functions, were used to dealing with outliers (abnormal data) which are frequently superimposed on a normal ambient MT as well as CSAMT noise fields. As validated, the proposed MT impedance modeling method gives acceptable results for standard three dimensional resistivity models. Whilst, the full solution based modeling that accommodate the non-plane wave effect for CSAMT impedances is applied for all measurement zones, including near-, transition

  3. Plasmonic-Based Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy: Application to Molecular Binding

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin; Wang, Wei; Wang, Shaopeng; Shan, Xiaonan; Li, Jinghong; Tao, Nongjian

    2012-01-01

    Plasmonic-based electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (P-EIS) is developed to investigate molecular binding on surfaces. Its basic principle relies on the sensitive dependence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) signal on surface charge density, which is modulated by applying an AC potential to a SPR chip surface. The AC component of the SPR response gives the electrochemical impedance, and the DC component provides the conventional SPR detection. The plasmonic-based impedance measured over a range of frequency is in quantitative agreement with the conventional electrochemical impedance. Compared to the conventional SPR detection, P-EIS is sensitive to molecular binding taking place on the chip surface, and less sensitive to bulk refractive index changes or non-specific binding. Moreover, this new approach allows for simultaneous SPR and surface impedance analysis of molecular binding processes. PMID:22122514

  4. [Effects of different electrodes on bioelectrical impedance values].

    PubMed

    Nakadomo, F; Tanaka, K; Yokoyama, T; Maeda, K

    1990-01-01

    Effects of different electrodes on bioelectrical impedance values measured by the Selco bioelectrical impedance plethysmograph (SIF-881, Japan) were investigated using 8 adult females (age: 35.3 +/- 7.6 yr, Ht: 156.9 +/- 3.8 cm, Wt: 57.1 +/- 9.9 kg, and hydrodensitometrically determined body fat: 29.4 +/- 6.0%). The Lectec MP3000 electrode (Liberty Carton, USA) and the Bipolar electrode (Sanwa, Japan) produced significantly higher impedance values when compared to the Disposable electrode (Adovance, Japan) and the ECG electrode (Nihon Kohden, Japan). The coefficient of variation was significantly lower for the Disposable electrode (0.8%) and the ECG electrode (0.2%) than that for the Lectec MP3000 electrode (2.3%) and the Bipolar electrode (4.9%). In conclusion, the ECG electrode provides higher bioelectrical impedance values with the highest reproducibility in the assessment of human body composition by the bioelectrical impedance plethysmography.

  5. Twelve years evolution of skin as seen by electrical impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicander, Ingrid; Emtestam, Lennart; Åberg, Peter; Ollmar, Stig

    2010-04-01

    Twelve years ago we reported an electrical impedance baseline study related to age, sex and body locations. The results showed significant differences between different anatomical locations and ages. In this study, the same participants were recalled to explore how the skin had evolved at the individual level over time. A total of 50 subjects, divided into an older and a younger group, were recalled for measurements of electrical impedance at eight anatomical locations. Readings were taken with an electrical impedance spectrometer. Information was extracted from the impedance spectra using indices based on magnitude and phase at two frequencies as in the earlier study. All included body sites had undergone alterations over time, and the size of the changes varied at different locations. The results also showed that changes in the younger group were different over time compared with the older group. In conclusion: Electrical impedance can be used to monitor skin evolution over time and baseline characteristics differ between various locations.

  6. AC impedance study of degradation of porous nickel battery electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenhart, Stephen J.; Macdonald, D. D.; Pound, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    AC impedance spectra of porous nickel battery electrodes were recorded periodically during charge/discharge cycling in concentrated KOH solution at various temperatures. A transmission line model (TLM) was adopted to represent the impedance of the porous electrodes, and various model parameters were adjusted in a curve fitting routine to reproduce the experimental impedances. Degradation processes were deduced from changes in model parameters with electrode cycling time. In developing the TLM, impedance spectra of planar (nonporous) electrodes were used to represent the pore wall and backing plate interfacial impedances. These data were measured over a range of potentials and temperatures, and an equivalent circuit model was adopted to represent the planar electrode data. Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the characteristics of the oxygen evolution reaction on planar nickel electrodes during charging, since oxygen evolution can affect battery electrode charging efficiency and ultimately electrode cycle life if the overpotential for oxygen evolution is sufficiently low.

  7. Method of estimating pulse response using an impedance spectrum

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, John L; Morrison, William H; Christophersen, Jon P; Motloch, Chester G

    2014-10-21

    Electrochemical Impedance Spectrum data are used to predict pulse performance of an energy storage device. The impedance spectrum may be obtained in-situ. A simulation waveform includes a pulse wave with a period greater than or equal to the lowest frequency used in the impedance measurement. Fourier series coefficients of the pulse train can be obtained. The number of harmonic constituents in the Fourier series are selected so as to appropriately resolve the response, but the maximum frequency should be less than or equal to the highest frequency used in the impedance measurement. Using a current pulse as an example, the Fourier coefficients of the pulse are multiplied by the impedance spectrum at corresponding frequencies to obtain Fourier coefficients of the voltage response to the desired pulse. The Fourier coefficients of the response are then summed and reassembled to obtain the overall time domain estimate of the voltage using the Fourier series analysis.

  8. Impedances of Nickel Electrodes Cycled in Various KOH Concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Margaret A.; Loyselle, Patricia L.

    1991-01-01

    Impedances were measured of electrodes from boiler-plate cells cycled i n KOH concentrations from 21% to 36%. These cells under accelerated conditions at 80% DOD to failure, defined discharge voltage. Cell life ranged from about 1,000 t o 40 impedances were measured at five voltages corresponding to charge. The results were analyzed using a standard circuit model including a Warburg impedance term. The kinetic resistances and Warburg slopes were greater for those electrodes which had failed earliest. Other circuit models have also been examined. The results are considered indicative but not conclusive, since the cells had been stored after failure for varying lengths of time which is known to affect the impedance. In order to minimize the effects of storage, the electrodes were cycled 10 times before the impedance measurements were taken.

  9. Quality factor concept in piezoceramic transformer performance description.

    PubMed

    Mezheritsky, Alex V

    2006-02-01

    A new general approach based on the quality factor concept to piezoceramic transformer (PT) performance description is proposed. The system's quality factor, material elastic anisotropy, and coupling factors of the input and output sections of an electrically excited and electrically loaded PT fully characterize its resonance and near-resonance behavior. The PT efficiency, transformation ratio, and input and output power were analytically analyzed and simulated as functions of the load and frequency for the simplest classical Langevin-type and Rosen-type PT designs. A new formulation of the electrical input impedance allows one to separate the power consumed by PT from the power transferred into the load. The system's PT quality factor takes into account losses in each PT "input-output-load" functional components. The loading process is changing PT input electrical impedance on the way that under loading the minimum series impedance is increasing and the maximum parallel impedance is decreasing coincidentally. The quality-factors ratio, between the states of fully loaded and nonloaded PT, is one of the best measures of PTs dynamic performance--practically, the lower the ratio is, the better PT efficiency. A simple and effective method for the loaded PT quality factor determination is proposed. As was found, a piezoceramic with low piezoelectric anisotropy is required to provide maximum PT efficiency and higher corresponding voltage gain. Limitations on the PT output voltage and power, caused by nonlinear effects in piezoceramics, were established.

  10. Development of CSAMT impedance modeling and its estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutarno, D.

    2015-04-01

    Accurate modeling and estimation of impedance functions is essential for the correct interpretation of Controlled Source Audio Magnetotelluric (CSAMT) measurements. Non plane wave effect of CSAMT source and noises are inevitably encountered when CSAMT observations are conducted and, consequently, impedance estimates are usually based on least-squares (LS) approximation, and the resulting estimates need to be corrected for the non plane wave field fraction. However, estimation procedure based on LS would not be statistically optimal, as outliers (abnormal data) are frequently superimposed on a normal ambient CSAMT noise field. In this situation, the estimation can be seriously misleading, while plane wave correction has also limited application, as the non plane wave field fraction is reasonably strong. This paper briefly discus the recent development of alternative methods for the CSAMT impedance modeling and its estimation, those are efficient in nature. The means for accomplishing the non plane wave problem is based on full solution numerical modeling of CSAMT impedance function that accommodates the non plane wave effect in the function. Whilst, one appealing approach to dealing with outliers is to make the estimation procedure robust. This is based on the M-estimation and the Hilbert transform operating on the causal CSAMT impedance functions. As demonstrated, the full solution based modeling for CSAMT impedance function is applied for all measurement zones, including near-, transition- as well as the far-field zones, and suitably, the plane wave correction is no longer needed for the impedance function. In the resulting impedance estimates, outlier contamination is removed and the self consistency between the real and imaginary parts of the impedance estimates is guaranteed. Using synthetic data, it is shown that the proposed methods can produce usable CSAMT impedance functions for all measurement zones, even under condition of severe noise contamination.

  11. Hardware description languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Jerry H.

    1994-01-01

    Hardware description languages are special purpose programming languages. They are primarily used to specify the behavior of digital systems and are rapidly replacing traditional digital system design techniques. This is because they allow the designer to concentrate on how the system should operate rather than on implementation details. Hardware description languages allow a digital system to be described with a wide range of abstraction, and they support top down design techniques. A key feature of any hardware description language environment is its ability to simulate the modeled system. The two most important hardware description languages are Verilog and VHDL. Verilog has been the dominant language for the design of application specific integrated circuits (ASIC's). However, VHDL is rapidly gaining in popularity.

  12. Impedance spectroscopy of reduced monoclinic zirconia.

    PubMed

    Eder, Dominik; Kramer, Reinhard

    2006-10-14

    Zirconia doped with low-valent cations (e.g. Y3+ or Ca2+) exhibits an exceptionally high ionic conductivity, making them ideal candidates for various electrochemical applications including solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and oxygen sensors. It is nevertheless important to study the undoped, monoclinic ZrO2 as a model system to construct a comprehensive picture of the electrical behaviour. In pure zirconia a residual number of anion vacancies remains because of contaminants in the material as well as the thermodynamic disorder equilibrium, but electronic conduction may also contribute to the observed conductivity. Reduction of zirconia in hydrogen leads to the adsorption of hydrogen and to the formation of oxygen vacancies, with their concentration affected by various parameters (e.g. reduction temperature and time, surface area, and water vapour pressure). However, there is still little known about the reactivities of defect species and their effect on the ionic and electronic conduction. Thus, we applied electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to investigate the electric performance of pure monoclinic zirconia with different surface areas in both oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. A novel equivalent circuit model including parallel ionic and electronic conduction has previously been developed for titania and is used herein to decouple the conduction processes. The concentration of defects and their formation energies were measured using volumetric oxygen titration and temperature programmed oxidation/desorption.

  13. Modified sparse regularization for electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenru; Wang, Huaxiang; Xue, Qian; Cui, Ziqiang; Sun, Benyuan; Wang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) aims to estimate the electrical properties at the interior of an object from current-voltage measurements on its boundary. It has been widely investigated due to its advantages of low cost, non-radiation, non-invasiveness, and high speed. Image reconstruction of EIT is a nonlinear and ill-posed inverse problem. Therefore, regularization techniques like Tikhonov regularization are used to solve the inverse problem. A sparse regularization based on L1 norm exhibits superiority in preserving boundary information at sharp changes or discontinuous areas in the image. However, the limitation of sparse regularization lies in the time consumption for solving the problem. In order to further improve the calculation speed of sparse regularization, a modified method based on separable approximation algorithm is proposed by using adaptive step-size and preconditioning technique. Both simulation and experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method in improving the image quality and real-time performance in the presence of different noise intensities and conductivity contrasts. PMID:27036798

  14. Modified sparse regularization for electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wenru; Wang, Huaxiang; Xue, Qian; Cui, Ziqiang; Sun, Benyuan; Wang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) aims to estimate the electrical properties at the interior of an object from current-voltage measurements on its boundary. It has been widely investigated due to its advantages of low cost, non-radiation, non-invasiveness, and high speed. Image reconstruction of EIT is a nonlinear and ill-posed inverse problem. Therefore, regularization techniques like Tikhonov regularization are used to solve the inverse problem. A sparse regularization based on L1 norm exhibits superiority in preserving boundary information at sharp changes or discontinuous areas in the image. However, the limitation of sparse regularization lies in the time consumption for solving the problem. In order to further improve the calculation speed of sparse regularization, a modified method based on separable approximation algorithm is proposed by using adaptive step-size and preconditioning technique. Both simulation and experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method in improving the image quality and real-time performance in the presence of different noise intensities and conductivity contrasts.

  15. Journal and Wave Bearing Impedance Calculation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanford, Amanda; Campbell, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The wave bearing software suite is a MALTA application that computes bearing properties for user-specified wave bearing conditions, as well as plain journal bearings. Wave bearings are fluid film journal bearings with multi-lobed wave patterns around the circumference of the bearing surface. In this software suite, the dynamic coefficients are outputted in a way for easy implementation in a finite element model used in rotor dynamics analysis. The software has a graphical user interface (GUI) for inputting bearing geometry parameters, and uses MATLAB s structure interface for ease of interpreting data. This innovation was developed to provide the stiffness and damping components of wave bearing impedances. The computational method for computing bearing coefficients was originally designed for plain journal bearings and tilting pad bearings. Modifications to include a wave bearing profile consisted of changing the film thickness profile given by an equation, and writing an algorithm to locate the integration limits for each fluid region. Careful consideration was needed to implement the correct integration limits while computing the dynamic coefficients, depending on the form of the input/output variables specified in the algorithm.

  16. Calculating the impedance of a grounding system

    SciTech Connect

    Nekhoul, B.; Labie, P.; Zgainski, F.X.; Meunier, G.; Morillon, F.; Bourg, S.

    1996-05-01

    Following up previous research, concerning low frequency electromagnetic emission from a grounding system, the authors suggest methodology which allows a complete electromagnetic study by Finite Element Method (FEM) of a grounding system in the significant frequential spectrum of a stroke of lightning or a short circuit (f{le}1MHz). In this study, as well as calculating the electromagnetic field at any point in space (ground and air), the authors shall pay particular attention to variation with frequency of the impedance of a grounding system. Suggested modelling will take into account eddy currents in buried conductors and ground and nonlinear phenomena (ionization of the ground) around the buried conductors when high currents flow via the earth. It will also deal with displacement currents when their effect becomes noticeable in the earth for high frequency. The interest of this work lies in providing data needed to implement an optimal grounding system in nonhomogeneous medium. All the results of calculations will be compared with measurements made by the French Electricity Board (E.D.F., France).

  17. Electrical Impedance Tomography During Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Brian K; Smallwood, Craig D

    2016-10-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a noninvasive, non-radiologic imaging modality that may be useful for the quantification of lung disorders and titration of mechanical ventilation. The principle of operation is based on changes in electrical conductivity that occur as a function of changes in lung volume during ventilation. EIT offers potentially important benefits over standard imaging modalities because the system is portable and non-radiologic and can be applied to patients for long periods of time. Rather than providing a technical dissection of the methods utilized to gather, compile, reconstruct, and display EIT images, the present article seeks to provide an overview of the clinical application of this technology as it relates to monitoring mechanical ventilation and providing decision support at the bedside. EIT has been shown to be useful in the detection of pneumothoraces, quantification of pulmonary edema and comparison of distribution of ventilation between different modes of ventilation and may offer superior individual titration of PEEP and other ventilator parameters compared with existing approaches. Although application of EIT is still primarily done within a research context, it may prove to be a useful bedside tool in the future. However, head-to-head comparisons with existing methods of mechanical ventilation titration in humans need to be conducted before its application in general ICUs can be recommended. PMID:27682815

  18. Low impedance printed circuit radiating element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahm, James K. (Inventor); Frankievich, Robert H. (Inventor); Martinko, John D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A printed circuit radiating element comprises a geometrically symmetric planar area of a conducting material separated from a ground plane by a dielectric medium. The driving point of the radiating element is at the base of a notch in one side thereof so that the driving impedance is reduced from that obtained when the element is driven at its edge. Symmetrically disposed on opposite sides of an axis of symmetry of the element along which the driving point lies are two notches which restore the electrical symmetry of the radiating element thereby to suppress higher order modes. The suppression of these higher order modes results in a radiation pattern with minimal cross-polarized energy in the principal planes and high port-to-port isolation which could not be achieved with an asymmetrical element. Two driving points may be employed with the radiating element to produce a dual linearly polarized antenna and a reactive combiner or hybrid may be employed to obtain circularly-polarized radiations. The shape of the radiating element may be square, rectangular or circular, for example, in accordance with the desired characteristics. A plurality of radiating elements may be interconnected via appropriate transmission paths to form an antenna array.

  19. A Batteryless Sensor ASIC for Implantable Bio-Impedance Applications.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Saul; Ollmar, Stig; Waqar, Muhammad; Rusu, Ana

    2016-06-01

    The measurement of the biological tissue's electrical impedance is an active research field that has attracted a lot of attention during the last decades. Bio-impedances are closely related to a large variety of physiological conditions; therefore, they are useful for diagnosis and monitoring in many medical applications. Measuring living tissues, however, is a challenging task that poses countless technical and practical problems, in particular if the tissues need to be measured under the skin. This paper presents a bio-impedance sensor ASIC targeting a battery-free, miniature size, implantable device, which performs accurate 4-point complex impedance extraction in the frequency range from 2 kHz to 2 MHz. The ASIC is fabricated in 150 nm CMOS, has a size of 1.22 mm × 1.22 mm and consumes 165 μA from a 1.8 V power supply. The ASIC is embedded in a prototype which communicates with, and is powered by an external reader device through inductive coupling. The prototype is validated by measuring the impedances of different combinations of discrete components, measuring the electrochemical impedance of physiological solution, and performing ex vivo measurements on animal organs. The proposed ASIC is able to extract complex impedances with around 1 Ω resolution; therefore enabling accurate wireless tissue measurements. PMID:26372646

  20. Analysis of left ventricular impedance in comparison with ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong Wook; Park, Sung Min

    2012-05-01

    Cardiac monitoring of ventricular assist devices (VADs) is important for detecting heart failure risks, such as critical arrhythmia and ventricular fibrillation, and for supplying data that are useful for hemodynamic control. Specifically, impedance cardiograms (ICGs) are especially beneficial because they have no effect on the tissue or organs and can monitor various parameters simultaneously, including the heart rate and heart contractions. In this article, we measured impedance changes in porcine left ventricles using electrodes placed around the inlet and outlet cannulae of the VAD. The measured left ventricular impedance (LVI) waveform changes are caused by heart movements, such as cardiac muscle contraction and changes in blood volume as a result of heart filling and emptying. In contrast to other impedance measurements, LVI is less affected by the movement of other organs. Using a porcine model, LVIs were measured and compared with blood flow data measured with an ultrasound blood flowmeter. The ICG showed the same frequency as the animal's heart rate, and their amplitudes were closely related to cardiac output (CO). However, the waveform differed from other vital signs, such as CO, electrocardiogram, and blood pressure. Ultrasound images were used to explain the impedance waveform. In the ultrasound images, we obtained the shape and size of the animal's heart and calculated the predicted impedance data. We then compared these to the actual measured data. These results show that the impedance signal contains detailed information on heart rate and CO; these results were unaffected by the cannulae or VAD perfusion. PMID:22188560

  1. Frequency dependent elastic impedance inversion for interstratified dispersive elastic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Zhaoyun; Yin, Xingyao; Wu, Guochen

    2016-08-01

    The elastic impedance equation is extended to frequency dependent elastic impedance equation by taking partial derivative to frequency. With this equation as the forward solver, a practical frequency dependent elastic impedance inversion approach is presented to implement the estimation of the interstratified dispersive elastic parameters which makes full use of the frequency information of elastic impedances. Three main steps are included in this approach. Firstly, the elastic Bayesian inversion is implemented for the estimation of elastic impedances from different incident angle. Secondly, with those estimated elastic impedances, their variations are used to estimate P-wave velocity and S-wave velocity. Finally, with the prior elastic impedance and P-wave and S-wave velocity information, the frequency dependent elastic variation with incident angle inversion is presented for the estimation of the interstratified elastic parameters. With this approach, the interstratified elastic parameters rather than the interface information can be estimated, making easier the interpretation of frequency dependent seismic attributes. The model examples illustrate the feasibility and stability of the proposed method in P-wave velocity dispersion and S-wave velocity dispersion estimation. The field data example validates the possibility and efficiency in hydrocarbon indication of the estimated P-wave velocity dispersion and S-wave velocity dispersion.

  2. Summary of Human Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Walking

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2016-01-01

    The human ankle joint plays a critical role during walking and understanding the biomechanical factors that govern ankle behavior and provides fundamental insight into normal and pathologically altered gait. Previous researchers have comprehensively studied ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during many biomechanical tasks, including locomotion; however, only recently have researchers been able to quantify how the mechanical impedance of the ankle varies during walking. The mechanical impedance describes the dynamic relationship between the joint position and the joint torque during perturbation, and is often represented in terms of stiffness, damping, and inertia. The purpose of this short communication is to unify the results of the first two studies measuring ankle mechanical impedance in the sagittal plane during walking, where each study investigated differing regions of the gait cycle. Rouse et al. measured ankle impedance from late loading response to terminal stance, where Lee et al. quantified ankle impedance from pre-swing to early loading response. While stiffness component of impedance increases significantly as the stance phase of walking progressed, the change in damping during the gait cycle is much less than the changes observed in stiffness. In addition, both stiffness and damping remained low during the swing phase of walking. Future work will focus on quantifying impedance during the “push off” region of stance phase, as well as measurement of these properties in the coronal plane. PMID:27766187

  3. Impedance spectroscopy for the detection and identification of unknown toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggs, B. C.; Plopper, G. E.; Paluh, J. L.; Phamduy, T. B.; Corr, D. T.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2012-06-01

    Advancements in biological and chemical warfare has allowed for the creation of novel toxins necessitating a universal, real-time sensor. We have used a function-based biosensor employing impedance spectroscopy using a low current density AC signal over a range of frequencies (62.5 Hz-64 kHz) to measure the electrical impedance of a confluent epithelial cell monolayer at 120 sec intervals. Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells were grown to confluence on thin film interdigitated gold electrodes. A stable impedance measurement of 2200 Ω was found after 24 hrs of growth. After exposure to cytotoxins anthrax lethal toxin and etoposide, the impedance decreased in a linear fashion resulting in a 50% drop in impedance over 50hrs showing significant difference from the control sample (~20% decrease). Immunofluorescent imaging showed that apoptosis was induced through the addition of toxins. Similarities of the impedance signal shows that the mechanism of cellular death was the same between ALT and etoposide. A revised equivalent circuit model was employed in order to quantify morphological changes in the cell monolayer such as tight junction integrity and cell surface area coverage. This model showed a faster response to cytotoxin (2 hrs) compared to raw measurements (20 hrs). We demonstrate that herein that impedance spectroscopy of epithelial monolayers serves as a real-time non-destructive sensor for unknown pathogens.

  4. Measurement and simulation of the RHIC abort kicker longitudinal impedence

    SciTech Connect

    Abreu,N.P.; Hahn,H.; Choi, E.

    2009-09-01

    In face of the new upgrades for RHIC the longitudinal impedance of the machine plays an important role in setting the threshold for instabilities and the efficacy of some systems. In this paper we describe the measurement of the longitudinal impedance of the abort kicker for RHIC as well as computer simulations of the structure. The impedance measurement was done by the S{sub 21} wire method covering the frequency range from 9 kHz to 2.5 GHz. We observed a sharp resonance peak around 10 MHz and a broader peak around 20 MHz in both, the real and imaginary part, of the Z/n. These two peaks account for a maximum imaginary longitudinal impedance of j15 {Omega}, a value an order of magnitude larger than the estimated value of j0.2 {Omega}, which indicates that the kicker is one of the main sources of longitudinal impedance in the machine. A computer model was constructed for simulations in the CST MWS program. Results for the magnet input and the also the beam impedance are compared to the measurements. A more detail study of the system properties and possible changes to reduce the coupling impedance are presented.

  5. Very long period magnetotellurics at Tucson Observatory: Estimation of impedances

    SciTech Connect

    Egbert, G.D.; Booker, J.R.; Schultz, A.

    1992-10-10

    Eleven years (1932-1942) of electric potential and magnetic measurements at the Tucson observatory represent a unique very long period magnetotelluric (MT) data set. The authors report on a careful reanalysis of this data using modern processing techniques. They have developed and used novel methods for separating out the quasi-periodic daily variation fields and for cleaning up outliers and filling in missing data in the time domain. MT impedance tensors, estimated using the cleaned and filled data and using robust frequency domain methods, are well determined and smoothly varying for periods between 4 hours and 10 days. At longer periods the electric field data are swamped by large-amplitude incoherent noise, particularly after the third year of the experiment. Although they find no evidence for contamination of any field components by oceanic motional induction at tidal periods, the MT impedance estimates do show evidence of small systematic biases due to finite spatial scale geomagnetic sources at harmonics of the daily variation period. These periods are thus removed from the time series and not used in further analysis. They show that the resulting impedance tensor is well modeled by a real, frequency-independent distortion of a scalar impedance, which is consistent with non-inductive distortion of the electric fields by local surface geology. To estimate the undetermined static shift of the MT impedance, the authors compare the long-period MT results to equivalent MT impedances determined from 46 years of geomagnetic data. Combining the geomagnetic and undistorted MT impedances results in scalar impedance estimates for periods 0.17 < T < 91 days of unprecedented precision. However, for periods less than one day, the phase and amplitude of this impedance, while individually consistent, are not mutually consistent with any one-dimensional conductivity distribution. 51 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Note: electrode polarization of Galinstan electrodes for liquid impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Brett L; Kellis, Nathan A; Mazzeo, Brian A

    2011-04-01

    Electrode polarization is a significant obstacle in the impedance measurements of ionic liquids. An atomically smooth electrode surface could potentially reduce unwanted impedance contributions from electrode polarization. Liquid metal electrodes were formed by adhering Galinstan to acrylic plates in a parallel-plate capacitor arrangement. Electrode polarization was compared to a similar cell with stainless steel electrodes. The impedance of salt and protein solutions (β-lactoglobulin) was measured from 40 Hz to 110 MHz. Because of oxide layer formation, the performance of the Galinstan electrode is significantly different than the theoretical ideal.

  7. (abstract) Scaling Nominal Solar Cell Impedances for Array Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert L; Wallace, Matthew T.; Iles, Peter

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses a task the objective of which is to characterize solar cell array AC impedance and develop scaling rules for impedance characterization of large arrays by testing single solar cells and small arrays. This effort is aimed at formulating a methodology for estimating the AC impedance of the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) cruise and lander solar arrays based upon testing single cells and small solar cell arrays and to create a basis for design of a single shunt limiter for MPF power control of flight solar arrays having very different inpedances.

  8. Low Impedance Bellows for High-current Beam Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, G; Nassiri, A; Waldschmidt, G J; Yang, Y; Feingold, J J; Mammosser, J D; Rimmer, R A; Wang, H; Jang, J; Kim, S H

    2012-07-01

    In particle accelerators, bellows are commonly used to connect beamline components. Such bellows are traditionally shielded to lower the beam impedance. Excessive beam impedance can cause overheating in the bellows, especially in high beam current operation. For an SRF-based accelerator, the bellows must also be particulate free. Many designs of shielded bellows incorporate rf slides or fingers that prevent convolutions from being exposed to wakefields. Unfortunately these mechanical structures tend to generate particulates that, if left in the SRF accelerator, can migrate into superconducting cavities, the accelerator's critical components. In this paper, we describe a prototype unshielded bellows that has low beam impedance and no risk of particulate generation.

  9. Propagation of quasiplane waves along an impedance boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcaninch, G. L.; Myers, M. K.

    1988-01-01

    The parabolic approximation for the acoustic equations of motion is applied to the study of the sound field generated by a time harmonic plane wave at grazing incidence to a finite impedance boundary. The resulting equations possess a solution which may be expressed in terms of the complementary error function. Asymptotic expansion of this solution for field points near the boundary provides results compatible with those for a point source on the boundary for both the soft boundary (finite impedance) and hard boundary (the limit in which the impedance becomes infinite) cases. The presence of a surface wave in the solution is also established.

  10. Note: Electrode polarization of Galinstan electrodes for liquid impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellor, Brett L.; Kellis, Nathan A.; Mazzeo, Brian A.

    2011-04-01

    Electrode polarization is a significant obstacle in the impedance measurements of ionic liquids. An atomically smooth electrode surface could potentially reduce unwanted impedance contributions from electrode polarization. Liquid metal electrodes were formed by adhering Galinstan to acrylic plates in a parallel-plate capacitor arrangement. Electrode polarization was compared to a similar cell with stainless steel electrodes. The impedance of salt and protein solutions (β-lactoglobulin) was measured from 40 Hz to 110 MHz. Because of oxide layer formation, the performance of the Galinstan electrode is significantly different than the theoretical ideal.

  11. Childbearing impeded education more than education impeded childbearing among Norwegian women.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel E; Kravdal, Øystein; Keilman, Nico

    2011-07-19

    In most societies, women at age 39 with higher levels of education have fewer children. To understand this association, we investigated the effects of childbearing on educational attainment and the effects of education on fertility in the 1964 birth cohort of Norwegian women. Using detailed annual data from ages 17 to 39, we estimated the probabilities of an additional birth, a change in educational level, and enrollment in the coming year, conditional on fertility history, educational level, and enrollment history at the beginning of each year. A simple model reproduced a declining gradient of children ever born with increasing educational level at age 39. When a counterfactual simulation assumed no effects of childbearing on educational progression or enrollment (without changing the estimated effects of education on childbearing), the simulated number of children ever born decreased very little with increasing completed educational level, contrary to data. However, when another counterfactual simulation assumed no effects of current educational level and enrollment on childbearing (without changing the estimated effects of childbearing on education), the simulated number of children ever born decreased with increasing completed educational level nearly as much as the decrease in the data. In summary, in these Norwegian data, childbearing impeded education much more than education impeded childbearing. These results suggest that women with advanced degrees have lower completed fertility on the average principally because women who have one or more children early are more likely to leave or not enter long educational tracks and never attain a high educational level.

  12. Impedance and Otoscopy Screening of Multiply Handicapped Children in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruns, Janet M.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    In order to examine the effectiveness of impedance and otoscopic screening in the determination of middle ear abnormalities, 79 physically handicapped, mentally retarded school children (mean age 8 years) were examined. (Author/PHR)

  13. Motion discrimination of throwing a baseball using forearm electrical impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takao; Kusuhara, Toshimasa; Yamamoto, Yoshitake

    2013-04-01

    The extroversion or hyperextension of elbow joint cause disorders of elbow joint in throwing a baseball. A method, which is easy handling and to measure motion objectively, can be useful for evaluation of throwing motion. We investigated a possibility of motion discrimination of throwing a baseball using electrical impedance method. The parameters of frequency characteristics (Cole-Cole arc) of forearm electrical impedance were measured during four types of throwing a baseball. Multiple discriminant analysis was used and the independent variables were change ratios of 11 parameters of forearm electrical impedance. As results of 120 data with four types of throwing motion in three subjects, hitting ratio was very high and 95.8%. We can expect to discriminate throwing a baseball using multiple discriminant analysis of impedance parameters.

  14. Bioelectrical impedance analysis for bovine milk: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertemes-Filho, P.; Valicheski, R.; Pereira, R. M.; Paterno, A. S.

    2010-04-01

    This work reports the investigation and analysis of bovine milk quality by using biological impedance measurements using electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The samples were distinguished by a first chemical analysis using Fourier transform midinfrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and flow citometry. A set of milk samples (100ml each) obtained from 17 different cows in lactation with and without mastitis were analyzed with the proposed technique using EIS. The samples were adulterated by adding distilled water and hydrogen peroxide in a controlled manner. FTIR spectroscopy and flow cytometry were performed, and impedance measurements were made in a frequency range from 500Hz up to 1MHz with an implemented EIS system. The system's phase shift was compensated by measuring saline solutions. It was possible to show that the results obtained with the Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) technique may detect changes in the milk caused by mastitis and the presence of water and hydrogen peroxide in the bovine milk.

  15. Statistical Properties of Antenna Impedance in an Electrically Large Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    WARNE,LARRY K.; LEE,KELVIN S.H.; HUDSON,H. GERALD; JOHNSON,WILLIAM A.; JORGENSON,ROY E.; STRONACH,STEPHEN L.

    2000-12-13

    This paper presents models and measurements of antenna input impedance in resonant cavities at high frequencies.The behavior of input impedance is useful in determining the transmission and reception characteristics of an antenna (as well as the transmission characteristics of certain apertures). Results are presented for both the case where the cavity is undermoded (modes with separate and discrete spectra) as well as the over moded case (modes with overlapping spectra). A modal series is constructed and analyzed to determine the impedance statistical distribution. Both electrically small as well as electrically longer resonant and wall mounted antennas are analyzed. Measurements in a large mode stirred chamber cavity are compared with calculations. Finally a method based on power arguments is given, yielding simple formulas for the impedance distribution.

  16. Manipulating acoustic wavefront by inhomogeneous impedance and steerable extraordinary reflection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiajun; Li, Baowen; Chen, Zhining; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    We unveil the connection between the acoustic impedance along a flat surface and the reflected acoustic wavefront, in order to empower a wide wariety of novel applications in acoustic community. Our designed flat surface can generate double reflections: the ordinary reflection and the extraordinary one whose wavefront is manipulated by the proposed impedance-governed generalized Snell's law of reflection (IGSL). IGSL is based on Green's function and integral equation, instead of Fermat's principle for optical wavefront manipulation. Remarkably, via the adjustment of the designed specific acoustic impedance, extraordinary reflection can be steered for unprecedented acoustic wavefront while that ordinary reflection can be surprisingly switched on or off. The realization of the complex discontinuity of the impedance surface has been proposed using Helmholtz resonators. PMID:23985717

  17. Manipulating Acoustic Wavefront by Inhomogeneous Impedance and Steerable Extraordinary Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiajun; Li, Baowen; Chen, Zhining; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-08-01

    We unveil the connection between the acoustic impedance along a flat surface and the reflected acoustic wavefront, in order to empower a wide wariety of novel applications in acoustic community. Our designed flat surface can generate double reflections: the ordinary reflection and the extraordinary one whose wavefront is manipulated by the proposed impedance-governed generalized Snell's law of reflection (IGSL). IGSL is based on Green's function and integral equation, instead of Fermat's principle for optical wavefront manipulation. Remarkably, via the adjustment of the designed specific acoustic impedance, extraordinary reflection can be steered for unprecedented acoustic wavefront while that ordinary reflection can be surprisingly switched on or off. The realization of the complex discontinuity of the impedance surface has been proposed using Helmholtz resonators.

  18. The effects of pulmonary circulation pulsatility on the impedance cardiogram.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Goto, T; Terasaki, H; Hayashida, Y; Morioka, T

    1983-11-01

    To study the effects of pulmonary blood flow on the impedance cardiogram, the pattern of pulmonary blood flow was alternated from pulsatile to non pulsatile, or the reverse, using our extracorporeal bypass-method on anaesthetized dogs. The thoracic impedance cardiogram was recorded from band electrodes placed around the neck and upper abdomen. During nonpulsatile pulmonary blood flow, the height of the diastolic phase of the delta Z wave was lower than that during pulsatile pulmonary blood flow. The area under the impedance curve decreased during nonpulsatile pulmonary blood flow. This appeared to be more obvious as the pulmonary arterial flow was reduced. The results suggest that the pulmonary blood flow might have substantial effects on the impedance cardiogram.

  19. Impedance Calculations for the NSLS-II Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Blednykh,A.; Ferreira, M.; Krinsky, S.

    2009-05-04

    Impedance of two vacuum chamber components, Bellows and BPM, is considered in some detail. In order to avoid generation of Higher-Order Modes (HOM's) in the NSLS-II bellows, we designed a new low-impedance RF shielding consisting of 6 wide and 2 narrow metal plates without opening slots between them. The short-range wakepotential has been optimized taking into account vertical offset of RF fingers from their nominal position. The results were compared with data of bellows designed at other laboratories. Narrow-band impedance of the BPM Button has been studied. TE-modes in the BPM button were suppressed by a factor of 8 by modification of existing housings. Two new types of housings are shown. The total impedance of the NSLS-II storage ring is discussed in terms of the loss factor and the vertical kick factor for a 3mm-Gaussian bunch.

  20. Impedance Biosensors: Applications to Sustainability and Remaining Technical Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Due to their all-electrical nature, impedance biosensors have significant potential for use as simple and portable sensors for environmental studies and environmental monitoring. Detection of two endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC), norfluoxetine and BDE-47, is reported here by impedance biosensing, with a detection limit of 8.5 and 1.3 ng/mL for norfluoxetine and BDE-47, respectively. Although impedance biosensors have been widely studied in the academic literature, commercial applications have been hindered by several technical limitations, including possible limitations to small analytes, the complexity of impedance detection, susceptibility to nonspecific adsorption, and stability of biomolecule immobilization. Recent research into methods to overcome these obstacles is briefly reviewed. New results demonstrating antibody regeneration atop degenerate (highly doped) Si are also reported. Using 0.2 M KSCN and 10 mM HF for antibody regeneration, peanut protein Ara h 1 is detected daily during a 30 day trial. PMID:25068095

  1. Beam coupling impedances of fast transmission-line kickers.

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S.

    2002-01-01

    Fast transmission-line kickers contain no ferrite and consist of two long metallic parallel plates supported by insulators inside a beam pipe. A beam is deflected by both the electric and magnetic fields of a TEM wave created by a pulse propagating along the strips in the direction opposite to the beam. Computations of the beam coupling impedances for such structures are difficult because of their length. In the paper, the beam coupling impedances of transmission-line kickers are calculated by combining analytical and numerical methods: the wake potentials computed in short models are extended analytically to obtain the wakes for the long kickers, and then the corresponding beam impedances are derived. At very low frequencies the results are compared with simple analytical expressions for the coupling impedances of striplines in beam position monitors.

  2. New impedance and electrochemical image techniques for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, N. J.

    2010-03-01

    A method to image local surface impedance and electrochemical current optically is developed for biological applications. The principle of the impedance imaging is based on sensitive dependence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on local surface charge density. The technique can image local surface impedance and charge while providing simultaneously a conventional surface plasmon resonance (SPR) image. By applying a potential modulation to a sensor surface, it is possible to obtain an image of the DC component, and the amplitude and phase images of the AC component. The DC image provides local molecular binding, as found in the conventional SPR imaging technique. The AC images are directly related to the local impedance of the surface. This imaging capability may be used as a new detection platform for DNA and protein microarrays, a new method for analyzing local molecular binding and interfacial processes and a new tool for imaging cells and tissues.

  3. Smart mug to measure hand's geometrical mechanical impedance.

    PubMed

    Hondori, Hossein Mousavi; Tech, Ang Wei

    2011-01-01

    A novel device, which looks like a mug, has been proposed for measuring the impedance of human hand. The device is designed to have convenient size and light weight similar to an ordinary coffee mug. It contains a 2-axis inertia sensor to monitor vibration and a small motor to carry an eccentric mass (m=100 gr, r=2 cm, rpm=600). The centrifugal force due to the rotating mass applies a dynamic force to the hand that holds the mug. Correlation of the acceleration signals with the perturbing force gives the geometrical mechanical impedance. Experimental results on a healthy subject shows that impedance is posture dependant while it changes with the direction of the applied perturbing force. For nine postures the geometrical impedance is obtained all of which have elliptical shapes. The method can be used for assessment of spasticity and monitoring stability in patients with stroke or similar problems. PMID:22255230

  4. Manipulating Acoustic Wavefront by Inhomogeneous Impedance and Steerable Extraordinary Reflection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiajun; Li, Baowen; Chen, Zhining; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-01-01

    We unveil the connection between the acoustic impedance along a flat surface and the reflected acoustic wavefront, in order to empower a wide wariety of novel applications in acoustic community. Our designed flat surface can generate double reflections: the ordinary reflection and the extraordinary one whose wavefront is manipulated by the proposed impedance-governed generalized Snell's law of reflection (IGSL). IGSL is based on Green's function and integral equation, instead of Fermat's principle for optical wavefront manipulation. Remarkably, via the adjustment of the designed specific acoustic impedance, extraordinary reflection can be steered for unprecedented acoustic wavefront while that ordinary reflection can be surprisingly switched on or off. The realization of the complex discontinuity of the impedance surface has been proposed using Helmholtz resonators. PMID:23985717

  5. A quantitative skin impedance test to diagnose spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ugur, Mukden; Arslan, Yunus Ziya; Palamar, Deniz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a quantitative skin impedance test that could be used to diagnose spinal cord injury (SCI) if any, especially in unconscious and/or non-cooperative SCI patients. To achieve this goal, initially skin impedance of the sensory key points of the dermatomes (between C3 and S1 bilaterally) was measured in 15 traumatic SCI patients (13 paraplegics and 2 tetraplegics) and 15 control subjects. In order to classify impedance values and to observe whether there would be a significant difference between patient and subject impedances, an artificial neural network (ANN) with back-propagation algorithm was employed. Validation results of the ANN showed promising performance. It could classify traumatic SCI patients with a success rate of 73%. By assessing the experimental protocols and the validation results, the proposed method seemed to be a simple, objective, quantitative, non-invasive and non-expensive way of assessing SCI in such patients. PMID:19301045

  6. CRAC2 model description

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, L.T.; Alpert, D.J.; Burke, R.P.; Johnson, J.D.; Ostmeyer, R.M.; Aldrich, D.C.; Blond, R.M.

    1984-03-01

    The CRAC2 computer code is a revised version of CRAC (Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences) which was developed for the Reactor Safety Study. This document provides an overview of the CRAC2 code and a description of each of the models used. Significant improvements incorporated into CRAC2 include an improved weather sequence sampling technique, a new evacuation model, and new output capabilities. In addition, refinements have been made to the atmospheric transport and deposition model. Details of the modeling differences between CRAC2 and CRAC are emphasized in the model descriptions.

  7. Comparison of Two Acoustic Waveguide Methods for Determining Liner Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.; Tracy, Maureen B.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2001-01-01

    Acoustic measurements taken in a flow impedance tube are used to assess the relative accuracy of two waveguide methods for impedance eduction in the presence of grazing flow. The aeroacoustic environment is assumed to contain forward and backward-traveling acoustic waves, consisting of multiple modes, and uniform mean flow. Both methods require a measurement of the complex acoustic pressure profile over the length of the test liner. The Single Mode Method assumes that the sound pressure level and phase decay-rates of a single progressive mode can be extracted from this measured complex acoustic pressure profile. No a priori assumptions are made in the Finite Element. Method regarding the modal or reflection content in the measured acoustic pressure profile. The integrity of each method is initially demonstrated by how well their no-flow impedances match those acquired in a normal incidence impedance tube. These tests were conducted using ceramic tubular and conventional perforate liners. Ceramic tubular liners were included because of their impedance insensitivity to mean flow effects. Conversely, the conventional perforate liner was included because its impedance is known to be sensitive to mean flow velocity effects. Excellent comparisons between impedance values educed with the two waveguide methods in the absence of mean flow and the corresponding values educed with the normal incident impedance tube were observed. The two methods are then compared for mean flow Mach numbers up to 0.5, and are shown to give consistent results for both types of test liners. The quality of the results indicates that the Single Mode Method should be used when the measured acoustic pressure profile is clearly dominated by a single progressive mode, and the Finite Element Method should be used for all other cases.

  8. Input impedance and mutual coupling of rectangular microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozar, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A moment method solution to the problem of input impedance and mutual coupling of rectangular microstrip antenna elements is presented. The formulation uses the grounded dielectric slab Green's function to account rigorously for the presence of the substrate and surface waves. Both entire basis (EB) and piecewise sinusoidal (PWS) expansion modes are used, and their relative advantages are noted. Calculations of input impedance and mutual coupling are compared with measured data and other calculations.

  9. PRELIMINARY IMPEDANCE BUDGET FOR NSLS-II STORAGE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    BLEDNYKH,A.; KRINSKY, S.

    2007-06-25

    The wakefield and impedance produced by the components of the NSLS-II storage ring have been computed for an electron bunch length of 3mm rms. The results are summarized in a table giving for each component, the loss factor ({kappa}{sub {parallel}}), the imaginary part of the longitudinal impedance at low frequency divided by the revolution harmonic (ImZ{sub {parallel}}/n), and the transverse kick factors ({kappa}{sub x}, {kappa}{sub y}).

  10. Measurement of steel corrosion in concrete by impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholomew, Paul; Sumsion, Eric; Guthrie, Spencer; Mazzeo, Brian

    2010-10-01

    Steel corrosion is a major problem for aging bridge structures. The steel corrodes as chloride ions migrate to the buried steel. The properties of the corroded steel-concrete interface change due to the corrosion and can be measured by impedance spectroscopy. A new spectrometer was built to measure concrete slabs. A fitting function to the impedance spectra was used to determine relevant parameters correlated with corrosion. Data from the laboratory and the field demonstrate the utility of this technique.

  11. Beam coupling impedances of obstacles protruding into a beam pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    1997-03-01

    The beam coupling impedances of small obstacles protruding inside the vacuum chamber of an accelerator are calculated at frequencies for which the wavelength is large compared to a typical size of the obstacle. Formulas for a few important particular cases including both essentially three-dimensional objects like a post or a mask and axisymmetric irises, are presented. These results allow simple practical estimates of the broadband impedance contributions from such discontinuities.

  12. Quantitative rotor damage detection based on piezoelectric impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yi; Tao, Yi; Mao, Yongfang; Tang, Baoping

    2015-12-01

    To realize the quantitative damage detection of a rotor, firstly an impedance analytic model is built. Then the change of bending stiffness is introduced as the damage index. Given the circular boundary condition of a rotor, annular elements are used as the analyzed objects and spectral element method is used. The electro-mechanical (E/M) coupled impedance expression of an undamaged rotor is derived with the application of a low-cost impedance test circuit. A Taylor expansion method is used to obtain the approximate E/M coupled impedance expression for the damaged rotor. After obtaining the difference between the undamaged and damaged rotor impedance, a rotor damage detection algorithm is proposed. In this paper, a preset damage configuration is used for the numerical simulation and experiment validation. The detection results have shown that the quantitative damage detection algorithm based on spectral element method and piezoelectric impedance proposed in this paper can identify the location and the severity of the damaged rotor accurately.

  13. Positive impedance humidity sensors via single-component materials.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jingwen; Peng, Zhijian; Shen, Zhenguang; Zhao, Zengying; Zhang, Guoliang; Fu, Xiuli

    2016-05-06

    Resistivity-type humidity sensors have been investigated with great interest due to the increasing demands in industry, agriculture and daily life. To date, most of the available humidity sensors have been fabricated based on negative humidity impedance, in which the electrical resistance decreases as the humidity increases, and only several carbon composites have been reported to present positive humidity impedance. However, here we fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors only via single-component WO3-x crystals. The resistance of WO3-x crystal sensors in response to relative humidity could be tuned from a negative to positive one by increasing the compositional x. And it was revealed that the positive humidity impedance was driven by the defects of oxygen vacancy. This result will extend the application field of humidity sensors, because the positive humidity impedance sensors would be more energy-efficient, easier to be miniaturized and electrically safer than their negative counterparts for their lower operation voltages. And we believe that constructing vacancies in semiconducting materials is a universal way to fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors.

  14. Feasibility of Bioelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy Measurement before and after Thoracentesis

    PubMed Central

    Weyer, Sören; Pauly, Karolin; Napp, Andreas; Dreher, Michael; Leonhardt, Steffen; Marx, Nikolaus; Schauerte, Patrick; Mischke, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background. Bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy is applied to measure changes in tissue composition. The aim of this study was to evaluate its feasibility in measuring the fluid shift after thoracentesis in patients with pleural effusion. Methods. 45 participants (21 with pleural effusion and 24 healthy subjects) were included. Bioelectrical impedance was analyzed for “Transthoracic,” “Foot to Foot,” “Foot to Hand,” and “Hand to Hand” vectors in low and high frequency domain before and after thoracentesis. Healthy subjects were measured at a single time point. Results. The mean volume of removed pleural effusion was 1169 ± 513 mL. The “Foot to Foot,” “Hand to Hand,” and “Foot to Hand” vector indicated a trend for increased bioelectrical impedance after thoracentesis. Values for the low frequency domain in the “Transthoracic” vector increased significantly (P < 0.001). A moderate correlation was observed between the amount of removed fluid and impedance change in the low frequency domain using the “Foot to Hand” vector (r = −0.7). Conclusion. Bioelectrical impedance changes in correlation with the thoracic fluid level. It was feasible to monitor significant fluid shifts and loss after thoracentesis in the “Transthoracic” vector by means of bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy. The trial is registered with Registration Numbers IRB EK206/11 and NCT01778270. PMID:25861647

  15. Computer simulations of the impedance response of lithium rechargeable batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, M.; Meyers, J.P.; Newman, J.

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to simulate the impedance response of a wide range of lithium rechargeable battery systems. The mathematical model is a macroscopic model of a full-cell sandwich utilizing porous electrode theory to treat the electrode region and concentrated solution theory for transport processes in solution. Insertion processes are described with charge-transfer kinetic expressions and solid-phase diffusion of lithium into the active electrode material. The impedance model assumes steady-state conditions and a linear response with the perturbation applied about the open-circuit condition for the battery. The simulated impedance response of a specific system, the lithium-polymer cell Li{vert{underscore}bar}PEO{sub 18}LiCF{sub 3}So{sub 3}{vert{underscore}bar}LiTiS{sub 2}, is analyzed in more detail to illustrate several features of the impedance behavior. Particular attention is paid to the measurement of solid-phase lithium-ion diffusion coefficients in the insertion electrodes using impedance techniques. A number of complications that can lead to errors in diffusion-coefficient measurements based on impedance techniques are discussed.

  16. Positive impedance humidity sensors via single-component materials

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jingwen; Peng, Zhijian; Shen, Zhenguang; Zhao, Zengying; Zhang, Guoliang; Fu, Xiuli

    2016-01-01

    Resistivity-type humidity sensors have been investigated with great interest due to the increasing demands in industry, agriculture and daily life. To date, most of the available humidity sensors have been fabricated based on negative humidity impedance, in which the electrical resistance decreases as the humidity increases, and only several carbon composites have been reported to present positive humidity impedance. However, here we fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors only via single-component WO3−x crystals. The resistance of WO3−x crystal sensors in response to relative humidity could be tuned from a negative to positive one by increasing the compositional x. And it was revealed that the positive humidity impedance was driven by the defects of oxygen vacancy. This result will extend the application field of humidity sensors, because the positive humidity impedance sensors would be more energy-efficient, easier to be miniaturized and electrically safer than their negative counterparts for their lower operation voltages. And we believe that constructing vacancies in semiconducting materials is a universal way to fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors. PMID:27150936

  17. Validation of an Acoustic Impedance Prediction Model for Skewed Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2009-01-01

    An impedance prediction model was validated experimentally to determine the composite impedance of a series of high-aspect ratio slot resonators incorporating channel skew and sharp bends. Such structures are useful for packaging acoustic liners into constrained spaces for turbofan noise control applications. A formulation of the Zwikker-Kosten Transmission Line (ZKTL) model, incorporating the Richards correction for rectangular channels, is used to calculate the composite normalized impedance of a series of six multi-slot resonator arrays with constant channel length. Experimentally, acoustic data was acquired in the NASA Langley Normal Incidence Tube over the frequency range of 500 to 3500 Hz at 120 and 140 dB OASPL. Normalized impedance was reduced using the Two-Microphone Method for the various combinations of channel skew and sharp 90o and 180o bends. Results show that the presence of skew and/or sharp bends does not significantly alter the impedance of a slot resonator as compared to a straight resonator of the same total channel length. ZKTL predicts the impedance of such resonators very well over the frequency range of interest. The model can be used to design arrays of slot resonators that can be packaged into complex geometries heretofore unsuitable for effective acoustic treatment.

  18. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  19. Optimization and Control of Acoustic Liner Impedance with Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Houston; Follet, Jesse

    2000-01-01

    Because communities are impacted by steady increases in aircraft traffic, aircraft noise continues to be a growing problem for the growth of commercial aviation. Research has focused on improving the design of specific high noise source areas of aircraft and on noise control measures to alleviate noise radiated from aircraft to the surrounding environment. Engine duct liners have long been a principal means of attenuating engine noise. The ability to control in-situ the acoustic impedance of a liner would provide a valuable tool to improve the performance of liners. The acoustic impedance of a liner is directly related to the sound absorption qualities of that liner. Increased attenuation rates, the ability to change liner acoustic impedance to match various operating conditions, or the ability to tune a liner to more precisely match design impedance represent some ways that in-situ impedance control could be useful. With this in mind, the research to be investigated will focus on improvements in the ability to control liner impedance using a mean flow through the liner which is referred to as bias flow.

  20. Optical approximation in the theory of geometric impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupakov, G.; Bane, K. L. F.; Zagorodnov, I.

    2007-05-01

    In this paper we introduce an optical approximation into the theory of impedance calculation, one valid in the limit of high frequencies. This approximation neglects diffraction effects in the radiation process, and is conceptually equivalent to the approximation of geometric optics in electromagnetic theory. Using this approximation, we derive equations for the longitudinal impedance for arbitrary offsets, with respect to a reference orbit, of source and test particles. With the help of the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem, we also obtain expressions for the transverse impedance (also for arbitrary offsets). We further simplify these expressions for the case of the small offsets that are typical for practical applications. Our final expressions for the impedance, in the general case, involve two-dimensional integrals over various cross sections of the transition. We further demonstrate, for several known axisymmetric examples, how our method is applied to the calculation of impedances. Finally, we discuss the accuracy of the optical approximation and its relation to the diffraction regime in the theory of impedance.

  1. Positive impedance humidity sensors via single-component materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Jingwen; Peng, Zhijian; Shen, Zhenguang; Zhao, Zengying; Zhang, Guoliang; Fu, Xiuli

    2016-05-01

    Resistivity-type humidity sensors have been investigated with great interest due to the increasing demands in industry, agriculture and daily life. To date, most of the available humidity sensors have been fabricated based on negative humidity impedance, in which the electrical resistance decreases as the humidity increases, and only several carbon composites have been reported to present positive humidity impedance. However, here we fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors only via single-component WO3‑x crystals. The resistance of WO3‑x crystal sensors in response to relative humidity could be tuned from a negative to positive one by increasing the compositional x. And it was revealed that the positive humidity impedance was driven by the defects of oxygen vacancy. This result will extend the application field of humidity sensors, because the positive humidity impedance sensors would be more energy-efficient, easier to be miniaturized and electrically safer than their negative counterparts for their lower operation voltages. And we believe that constructing vacancies in semiconducting materials is a universal way to fabricate positive impedance humidity sensors.

  2. Implementation and Validation of an Impedance Eduction Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.; Gerhold, Carl H.

    2011-01-01

    Implementation of a pressure gradient method of impedance eduction in two NASA Langley flow ducts is described. The Grazing Flow Impedance Tube only supports plane-wave sources, while the Curved Duct Test Rig supports sources that contain higher-order modes. Multiple exercises are used to validate this new impedance eduction method. First, synthesized data for a hard wall insert and a conventional liner mounted in the Grazing Flow Impedance Tube are used as input to the two impedance eduction methods, the pressure gradient method and a previously validated wall pressure method. Comparisons between the two results are excellent. Next, data measured in the Grazing Flow Impedance Tube are used as input to both methods. Results from the two methods compare quite favorably for sufficiently low Mach numbers but this comparison degrades at Mach 0.5, especially when the hard wall insert is used. Finally, data measured with a hard wall insert mounted in the Curved Duct Test Rig are used as input to the pressure gradient method. Significant deviation from the known solution is observed, which is believed to be largely due to 3-D effects in this flow duct. Potential solutions to this issue are currently being explored.

  3. Skin impedance comparisons of electrodes for electro-oculography.

    PubMed

    Lee, J B; Reinecke, R D

    1991-01-01

    In an effort to define the most comfortable electrode needing the simplest skin preparation with low and stable skin impedance, we compared the impedance between skin electrodes and Stat-Trace II St-102 EKG electrodes (Niko Med USA, New Brunswick, NJ)--the latter being renamed "dry electrodes" because they are used without electrolyte paste--on 12 normal subjects with two different skin preparations, with and without alcohol. The dry electrodes were found to have lower impedance than the skin electrodes. With each skin preparation the alcohol scored better, 7.2 kOhm vs 16.5 kOhm, respectively, and "no preparation" worse, 13.8 kOhm vs 22.7 kOhm, respectively, (but still acceptable when the dry electrode was used). The dry electrode's impedance was quite stable from the moment of application while the skin electrode's impedance drifted dramatically for 30 minutes. If the dry electrode was halved in area of skin contact, as often is necessary with the nasal electrode in children, the impedance rose proportionally but remained acceptable. We conclude that the new dry electrodes give us improved electro-oculography records and suggest their use, particularly for infants and young children where ease of application and simple skin preparation are particularly important.

  4. Clinical implementation of electrical impedance tomography with hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, M J; Ryan, T P; Paulsen, K D; Mitchell, S E

    1995-01-01

    We describe the use of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) for non-invasive thermal imaging in conjunction with a clinical treatment of a superficial scalp lesion utilizing a spiral microstrip antenna. This is our first reported use of EIT with a clinical hyperthermia treatment and perhaps the first world-wide. The thermal measurements recorded during treatment compare favourably with the images reconstructed from impedance data gathered during heating. A linear relation, measured in phantom material, between the change in temperature with the change in reconstructed impedance was assumed. The average discrepancy between the measured temperature changes with the temperatures reconstructed from the impedance changes was 1.4 degrees C, with the maximum being 8.9 degrees C. These preliminary data suggest that impedance changes can be measured during hyperthermia delivery and temperature estimates based on these observed changes are possible in the clinical setting. These findings also point to the complex, yet critical nature of the impedance versus temperature relationship for tissue in vivo. The reconstructed thermal images may provide complementary information about the overall thermal damage imposed during heating. Based on this initial clinical experience we feel that EIT has great potential as a viable clinical aid in imaging the temperature changes imposed during hyperthermia. PMID:7790730

  5. Teaching Descriptive Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brashers, H. C.

    1968-01-01

    As the inexperienced writer becomes aware of the issues involved in the composition of effective descriptive prose, he also develops a consistent control over his materials. The persona he chooses, if coherently thought out, can function as an index of many choices, helping him to manipulate the tone, intent, and mood of this style; to regulate…

  6. The Cooperate Assistive Teamwork Environment for Software Description Languages.

    PubMed

    Groenda, Henning; Seifermann, Stephan; Müller, Karin; Jaworek, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Versatile description languages such as the Unified Modeling Language (UML) are commonly used in software engineering across different application domains in theory and practice. They often use graphical notations and leverage visual memory for expressing complex relations. Those notations are hard to access for people with visual impairment and impede their smooth inclusion in an engineering team. Existing approaches provide textual notations but require manual synchronization between the notations. This paper presents requirements for an accessible and language-aware team work environment as well as our plan for the assistive implementation of Cooperate. An industrial software engineering team consisting of people with and without visual impairment will evaluate the implementation. PMID:26294461

  7. Analysis and design of triple-band high-impedance surface absorber with periodic diversified impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui Zhang, Guo; Heng Zhou, Pei; Bin Zhang, Hui; Bo Zhang, Lin; Liang Xie, Jian; Jiang Deng, Long

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, a triple-band planar absorber with high-impedance surface (HIS) is designed and fabricated. The absorber structure is composed of polyurethane foam sandwiched between a lossy sheet of frequency selective surfaces (FSS) and a perfect electric conductor. The lossy FSS possesses different resistances in a periodic composite unit as compared with typical HIS absorber. Losses in the FSS are introduced by printing the periodic composite square ring pattern on blank stickers using various resistive inks. Physical mechanism of the HIS absorbers is analyzed by equivalent circuit model and electric field distribution studies. The proposed absorber with periodic composite units offers superimposed triple-band absorption as compared with that of the single units having single- or dual-band absorption characteristics. The reflection loss measurements show that the 90% absorption bandwidth of the HIS absorber is increased by 42% by the proposed composite periodic units.

  8. Spectral properties of plasmon resonances in a random impedance network model of binary nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olekhno, N. A.; Beltukov, Y. M.; Parshin, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    One of the methods for the description of plasmon resonances in disordered metal-dielectric nanocomposites represents an initial composite as an electric network in the form of a lattice whose bonds are randomly arranged complex impedances. In this work, a general method is used to describe resonances in binary networks consisting of two types of impedances, which are arbitrary functions of the frequency [Th. Jonckheere and J.M. Luck, J. Phys. A 31, 3687 (1998)]. The generalization of the low-frequency L- C model where metal and dielectric regions in the lattice are replaced by inductive bonds L and capacitive bonds C d, respectively, has been considered. To analyze the spectrum of resonances in the entire optical region, a more accurate model involves the replacement of the metal regions by bonds in the form of parallel LC circuits with the resonant frequency equal to the plasma frequency of the metal ωp. The spectral properties of this model, as well as the model of a nanocomposite consisting of two metals with different plasma frequencies, have been considered. Analytical relations between the spectra of all such systems and the spectra of the initial L- C model have been established in the matrix representation. General expressions describing the dependence of the resonance spectrum of composites with arbitrary geometry on the permittivity of the matrix have been obtained.

  9. Correcting electrode impedance effects in broadband SIP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Johan Alexander; Zimmermann, Egon; Esser, Odilia; Haegel, Franz-Hubert; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Broadband spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements of the complex electrical resistivity can be affected by the contact impedance of the potential electrodes above 100 Hz. In this study, we present a correction procedure to remove electrode impedance effects from SIP measurements. The first step in this correction procedure is to estimate the electrode impedance using a measurement with reversed current and potential electrodes. In a second step, this estimated electrode impedance is used to correct SIP measurements based on a simplified electrical model of the SIP measurement system. We evaluated this new correction procedure using SIP measurements on water because of the well-defined dielectric properties. It was found that the difference between the corrected and expected phase of the complex electrical resistivity of water was below 0.1 mrad at 1 kHz for a wide range of electrode impedances. In addition, SIP measurements on a saturated unconsolidated sediment sample with two types of potential electrodes showed that the measured phase of the electrical resistivity was very similar (difference <0.2 mrad) up to a frequency of 10 kHz after the effect of the different electrode impedances was removed. Finally, SIP measurements on variably saturated unconsolidated sand were made. Here, the plausibility of the phase of the electrical resistivity was improved for frequencies up to 1 kHz, but errors remained for higher frequencies due to the approximate nature of the electrode impedance estimates and some remaining unknown parasitic capacitances that led to current leakage. It was concluded that the proposed correction procedure for SIP measurements improved the accuracy of the phase measurements by an order of magnitude in the kHz frequency range. Further improvement of this accuracy requires a method to accurately estimate parasitic capacitances in situ.

  10. [Experimental study on electrical impedance properties of human hepatoma cells].

    PubMed

    Fang, Yun; Tang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Xin; Ma, Qing

    2014-10-01

    The AC impedance of human hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells were measured in our laboratory by Agilent 4294A impedance analyzer in the frequency range of 0.01-100 MHz. And then the effect of hematocrit on electrical impedance characteristics of hepatoma cells was observed by electrical impedance spectroscopy, Bode diagram, Nyquist diagram and Nichols diagram. The results showed that firstly, there is a frequency dependence, i.e., the increment of real part and the imaginary part of complex electrical impedance (δZ', δZ"), the increment of the amplitude modulus of complex electrical impedance (δ[Z *]) and phase angle (δθ) were all changed with the increasing frequency. Secondly, it showed cell volume fraction (CVF) dependence, i. e. , the increment of low-frequency limit (δZ'0, δ[Z*] 0), peak (δZ"(p), δθ(p)), area and radius (Nyquist diagram, Nichols diagram) were all increased along with the electric field frequency. Thirdly, there was the presence of two characteristic frequencies: the first characteristic frequency (f(c1)) and the second characteristic frequency (f(c2)), which were originated respectively in the polarization effects of two interfaces that the cell membrane and extracellular fluid, cell membrane and cytoplasm. A conclusion can be drawn that the electrical impedance spectroscopy is able to be used to observe the electrical characteristics of human hepatoma cells, and therefore this method can be used to investigate the electrophysiological mechanisms of liver cancer cells, and provide research tools and observation parameters, and it also has important theoretical value and potential applications for screening anticancer drugs. PMID:25764724

  11. [The design of a new respiratory detecting system using impedance method].

    PubMed

    Liu, Baohua

    2003-09-01

    A coupling principle of reflecting impedance based on resonance is designed to achieve impedance detection with high sensitivity. It is characterized by small impelled current, high sensitivity and simple circuit. The principle can be used not only in detecting human respiratory impedance, but also in detecting the bio-impedance of other human organs. It may find wide application in this aspect.

  12. Relaxation oscillations of the synchrotron motion caused by narrow-band impedances.

    PubMed

    Limborg, C; Sebek, J

    1999-10-01

    Although the linearized theory of small amplitude synchrotron oscillations and the instability thresholds derived from it have long been understood, there is no satisfactory description of the large amplitude highly nonlinear synchrotron motion of a bunched beam. With an appropriate tuning of the RF cavity impedance, large amplitude, low frequency, self-sustained relaxation oscillations of this synchrotron motion are generated. This paper presents detailed experimental data on such behavior, tracking code results that reproduce the important characteristics, and a simple analytical model that explains the key features of the relaxation oscillation: growth of the instability, saturation of the oscillation, breakup of the bunch, and subsequent damping of the system back to the beginning of the next cycle of the relaxation oscillation. PMID:11970347

  13. Spacelab J experiment descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, T.Y.

    1993-08-01

    Brief descriptions of the experiment investigations for the Spacelab J Mission which was launched from the Kennedy Space Center aboard the Endeavour in Sept. 1992 are presented. Experiments cover the following: semiconductor crystals; single crystals; superconducting composite materials; crystal growth; bubble behavior in weightlessness; microgravity environment; health monitoring of Payload Specialists; cultured plant cells; effect of low gravity on calcium metabolism and bone formation; and circadian rhythm. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this report.

  14. Spacelab J experiment descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Teresa Y. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    Brief descriptions of the experiment investigations for the Spacelab J Mission which was launched from the Kennedy Space Center aboard the Endeavour in Sept. 1992 are presented. Experiments cover the following: semiconductor crystals; single crystals; superconducting composite materials; crystal growth; bubble behavior in weightlessness; microgravity environment; health monitoring of Payload Specialists; cultured plant cells; effect of low gravity on calcium metabolism and bone formation; and circadian rhythm.

  15. Management control system description

    SciTech Connect

    Bence, P. J.

    1990-10-01

    This Management Control System (MCS) description describes the processes used to manage the cost and schedule of work performed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) for the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), Richland, Washington. Westinghouse Hanford will maintain and use formal cost and schedule management control systems, as presented in this document, in performing work for the DOE-RL. This MCS description is a controlled document and will be modified or updated as required. This document must be approved by the DOE-RL; thereafter, any significant change will require DOE-RL concurrence. Westinghouse Hanford is the DOE-RL operations and engineering contractor at the Hanford Site. Activities associated with this contract (DE-AC06-87RL10930) include operating existing plant facilities, managing defined projects and programs, and planning future enhancements. This document is designed to comply with Section I-13 of the contract by providing a description of Westinghouse Hanford's cost and schedule control systems used in managing the above activities. 5 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Data analysis in multiple-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis.

    PubMed

    Cornish, B H; Ward, L C

    1998-05-01

    The performance of three analytical methods for multiple-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (MFBIA) data was assessed. The methods were the established method of Cole and Cole, the newly proposed method of Siconolfi and co-workers and a modification of this procedure. Method performance was assessed from the adequacy of the curve fitting techniques, as judged by the correlation coefficient and standard error of the estimate, and the accuracy of the different methods in determining the theoretical values of impedance parameters describing a set of model electrical circuits. The experimental data were well fitted by all curve-fitting procedures (r = 0.9 with SEE 0.3 to 3.5% or better for most circuit-procedure combinations). Cole-Cole modelling provided the most accurate estimates of circuit impedance values, generally within 1-2% of the theoretical values, followed by the Siconolfi procedure using a sixth-order polynomial regression (1-6% variation). None of the methods, however, accurately estimated circuit parameters when the measured impedances were low (< 20 omega) reflecting the electronic limits of the impedance meter used. These data suggest that Cole-Cole modelling remains the preferred method for the analysis of MFBIA data.

  17. Do changes in transcardiac impedance modulation correlate with haemodynamic status?

    PubMed

    Weiss, S M; Einstein, R; Matthews, R J; Leer, T W; Cincunegui, J L; McCulloch, R

    1992-06-01

    Implantable cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators have the ability to revert a variety of arrhythmias to normal sinus rhythm. For correct operation, such devices require accurate arrhythmia classification. Arrhythmia classification by these devices could be improved with the addition of a suitable haemodynamic sensor. This study investigated the use of transcardiac impedance for haemodynamic sensing. Ventricular fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, electro-mechanical dissociation and five rates of ventricular pacing, each having a different associated level of haemodynamic compromise, were induced in each of seven mongrel dogs. The amplitude responses of the modulations of transcardiac impedance were compared with those of arterial pulse pressure (an established measure of haemodynamic status), and changes in cycle length. The correlation coefficient for changes in transcardiac impedance modulation amplitude and arterial pulse pressure was found to be 0.89. For transcardiac impedance modulation amplitude and cycle length, the correlation coefficient was 0.77, and for arterial pulse pressure and cycle length, the correlation coefficient was 0.85. In the acute anaesthetised dog, changes in the amplitude of transcardiac impedance modulations were shown to reflect different levels of haemodynamic status. PMID:1642572

  18. Reconstruction of relaxation time distribution from linear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanxiang; Chen, Yu; Yan, Mufu; Chen, Fanglin

    2015-06-01

    Linear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and in particular its representation of distribution of relaxation time (DRT), enables the identification of the number of processes and their nature involved in electrochemical cells. With the advantage of high frequency resolution, DRT has recently drawn increasing attention for applications in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). However, the method of DRT reconstruction is not yet presented clearly in terms of what mathematical treatments and theoretical assumptions have been made. Here we present unambiguously a method to reconstruct DRT function of impedance based on Tikhonov regularization. By using the synthetic impedances and analytic DRT functions of RQ element, generalized finite length Warburg element, and Gerischer element with physical quantities representative to those of SOFC processes, we show that the quality of DRT reconstruction is sensitive to the sampling points per decade (ppd) of frequency from the impedance measurement. The robustness of the DRT reconstruction to resist noise imbedded in impedance data and numerical calculations can be accomplished by optimizing the weighting factor λ according to well defined criterion.

  19. Effects of Flow Profile on Educed Acoustic Liner Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie r.; Nark, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results of an investigation of the effects of shear flow profile on impedance eduction processes employed at NASA Langley. Uniform and 1-D shear-flow propagation models are used to educe the acoustic impedance of three test liners based on aeroacoustic data acquired in the Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube, at source levels of 130, 140 and 150 dB, and at centerline Mach numbers of 0.0, 0.3 and 0.5. A ceramic tubular, calibration liner is used to evaluate the propagation models, as this liner is expected to be insensitive to SPL, grazing flow Mach number, and flow profile effects. The propagation models are then used to investigate the effects of shear flow profile on acoustic impedances educed for two conventional perforate-over-honeycomb liners. Results achieved with the uniform-flow models follow expected trends, but those educed with the 1-D shear-flow model do not, even for the calibration liner. However, when the flow profile used with the shear-flow model is varied to increase the Mach number gradient near the wall, results computed with the shear-flow model are well matched to those achieved with the uniform-flow model. This indicates the effects of flow profile on educed acoustic liner impedance are small, but more detailed investigations of the flow field throughout the duct are needed to better understand these effects.

  20. Piezogenerator impedance matching using Mason equivalent circuit for harvester identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Richard, Claude

    2014-04-01

    Any piezoelectric generator structure can be modeled close to its resonance by an equivalent circuit derived from the well known Mason equivalent circuit. This equivalent circuit can therefore be used in order to optimize the harvested power using usual electrical impedance matching. The objective of this paper is to illustrate the full process leading to the definition of the proper passive load allowing the optimization of the harvested energy of any harvesting device. First, the electric equivalent circuit of the generator is derived from the Mason equivalent circuit of a seismic harvester. Theoretical ideal impedance matching and optimal load analyze is then given emphasizing the fact that for a given acceleration a constant optimal output power is achievable for any frequency as long as the optimal load is feasible. Identification of the equivalent circuit of an experimental seismic harvester is then derived and matched impedance is defined both theoretically and experimentally. Results demonstrate that an optimal load can always be obtained and that the corresponding output power is constant. However, it is very sensitive to this impedance, and that even if impedance matching is a longtime well known technique, it is not really experimentally and practically achievable.

  1. Temperature dependence of acoustic impedance for specific fluorocarbon liquids.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Jon N; Hall, Christopher S; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2002-12-01

    Recent studies by our group have demonstrated the efficacy of perfluorocarbon liquid nanoparticles for enhancing the reflectivity of tissuelike surfaces to which they are bound. The magnitude of this enhancement depends in large part on the difference in impedances of the perfluorocarbon, the bound substrate, and the propagating medium. The impedance varies directly with temperature because both the speed of sound and the mass density of perfluorocarbon liquids are highly temperature dependent. However, there are relatively little data in the literature pertaining to the temperature dependence of the acoustic impedance of these compounds. In this study, the speed of sound and density of seven different fluorocarbon liquids were measured at specific temperatures between 20 degrees C and 45 degrees C. All of the samples demonstrated negative, linear dependencies on temperature for both speed of sound and density and, consequently, for the acoustic impedance. The slope of sound speed was greatest for perfluorohexane (-278 +/- 1.5 cm/s-degrees C) and lowest for perfluorodichlorooctane (-222 +/- 0.9 cm/s-degrees C). Of the compounds measured, perfluorohexane exhibited the lowest acoustic impedance at all temperatures, and perfluorodecalin the highest at all temperatures. Computations from a simple transmission-line model used to predict reflectivity enhancement from surface-bound nanoparticles are discussed in light of these results.

  2. Microfluidic impedance cytometry of tumour cells in blood.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Daniel; Hollis, Veronica; Morgan, Hywel

    2014-11-01

    The dielectric properties of tumour cells are known to differ from normal blood cells, and this difference can be exploited for label-free separation of cells. Conventional measurement techniques are slow and cannot identify rare circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in a realistic timeframe. We use high throughput single cell microfluidic impedance cytometry to measure the dielectric properties of the MCF7 tumour cell line (representative of CTCs), both as pure populations and mixed with whole blood. The data show that the MCF7 cells have a large membrane capacitance and size, enabling clear discrimination from all other leukocytes. Impedance analysis is used to follow changes in cell viability when cells are kept in suspension, a process which can be understood from modelling time-dependent changes in the dielectric properties (predominantly membrane conductivity) of the cells. Impedance cytometry is used to enumerate low numbers of MCF7 cells spiked into whole blood. Chemical lysis is commonly used to remove the abundant erythrocytes, and it is shown that this process does not alter the MCF7 cell count or change their dielectric properties. Combining impedance cytometry with magnetic bead based antibody enrichment enables MCF7 cells to be detected down to 100 MCF7 cells in 1 ml whole blood, a log 3.5 enrichment and a mean recovery of 92%. Microfluidic impedance cytometry could be easily integrated within complex cell separation systems for identification and enumeration of specific cell types, providing a fast in-line single cell characterisation method.

  3. A systematic uncertainty analysis for liner impedance eduction technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lin; Bodén, Hans

    2015-11-01

    The so-called impedance eduction technology is widely used for obtaining acoustic properties of liners used in aircraft engines. The measurement uncertainties for this technology are still not well understood though it is essential for data quality assessment and model validation. A systematic framework based on multivariate analysis is presented in this paper to provide 95 percent confidence interval uncertainty estimates in the process of impedance eduction. The analysis is made using a single mode straightforward method based on transmission coefficients involving the classic Ingard-Myers boundary condition. The multivariate technique makes it possible to obtain an uncertainty analysis for the possibly correlated real and imaginary parts of the complex quantities. The results show that the errors in impedance results at low frequency mainly depend on the variability of transmission coefficients, while the mean Mach number accuracy is the most important source of error at high frequencies. The effect of Mach numbers used in the wave dispersion equation and in the Ingard-Myers boundary condition has been separated for comparison of the outcome of impedance eduction. A local Mach number based on friction velocity is suggested as a way to reduce the inconsistencies found when estimating impedance using upstream and downstream acoustic excitation.

  4. Uncertainty Analysis of the Grazing Flow Impedance Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Martha C.; Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines a methodology to identify the measurement uncertainty of NASA Langley s Grazing Flow Impedance Tube (GFIT) over its operating range, and to identify the parameters that most significantly contribute to the acoustic impedance prediction. Two acoustic liners are used for this study. The first is a single-layer, perforate-over-honeycomb liner that is nonlinear with respect to sound pressure level. The second consists of a wire-mesh facesheet and a honeycomb core, and is linear with respect to sound pressure level. These liners allow for evaluation of the effects of measurement uncertainty on impedances educed with linear and nonlinear liners. In general, the measurement uncertainty is observed to be larger for the nonlinear liners, with the largest uncertainty occurring near anti-resonance. A sensitivity analysis of the aerodynamic parameters (Mach number, static temperature, and static pressure) used in the impedance eduction process is also conducted using a Monte-Carlo approach. This sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the impedance eduction process is virtually insensitive to each of these parameters.

  5. Electro-mechanical analogies for modeling the structural impedance response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrai, Andrei

    2007-04-01

    Electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance is a powerful structural identification and health monitoring (SHM) technique that allows for inferring high-frequency structural dynamic characteristics directly by interrogating a network of embedded piezoelectric active sensors. In recent years, there has been a considerable interest in expanding range of applications of the electromechanical impedance technique, its synergistic integration into complementary SHM methodologies, and miniaturizing the associated impedance measurement circuitry. The present work is aimed at developing an E/M impedance modeling approach that explores analogies between electrical and mechanical systems and permits representation of the mechanical system elements in terms of equivalent electrical circuits. The advantage of such a representation is that analytical modeling is substantially simplified by considering a network of electrical elements, mechanical quantities are incorporated directly into the electrical model of a measurement unit, and modern circuit design, simulation and analysis software tools can be employed to improve the method performance. The electro-mechanical model of a piezoelectric impedance sensor is discussed and development of the electrical circuit representation of the sensor-structure interaction is presented. The proposed electrical and existing mechanical models are compared showing a good agreement. Applicability of the developed modeling approach is discussed and examples of numerical calculations are provided. It is suggested that describing a sensor-structure electro-mechanical system in terms of electro-mechanical analogies could simplify analytical modeling and improve instrumentation design.

  6. Wideband impedance spectrum analyzer for process automation applications.

    PubMed

    Doerner, Steffen; Schneider, Thomas; Hauptmann, Peter R

    2007-10-01

    For decades impedance spectroscopy is used in technical laboratories and research departments to investigate effects or material characteristics that affect the impedance spectrum of the sensor. Establishing this analytical approach for process automation and stand-alone applications will deliver additional and valuable information beside traditional measurement techniques such as the measurement of temperature, flow rate, and conductivity, among others. As yet, most of the current impedance analysis methods are suited for laboratory applications only since they involve stand-alone network analyzers that are slow, expensive, large, or immobile. Furthermore, those systems offer a large range of functionality that is not being used in process control and other fields of application. We developed a sensor interface based on high speed direct digital signal processing offering wideband impedance spectrum analysis with high resolution for frequency adjustment, excellent noise rejection, very high measurement rate, and convenient data exchange to common interfaces. The electronics has been implemented on two small circuit boards and it is well suited for process control applications such as monitoring phase transitions, characterization of fluidal systems, and control of biological processes. The impedance spectrum analyzer can be customized easily for different measurement applications by adapting the appropriate sensor module. It has been tested for industrial applications, e.g., dielectric spectroscopy and high temperature gas analysis.

  7. Development of a wearable multi-frequency impedance cardiography device.

    PubMed

    Weyer, Sören; Menden, Tobias; Leicht, Lennart; Leonhardt, Steffen; Wartzek, Tobias

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases as well as pulmonary oedema can be early diagnosed using vital signs and thoracic bio-impedance. By recording the electrocardiogram (ECG) and the impedance cardiogram (ICG), vital parameters are captured continuously. The aim of this study is the continuous monitoring of ECG and multi-frequency ICG by a mobile system. A mobile measuring system, based on 'low-power' ECG, ICG and an included radio transmission is described. Due to the high component integration, a board size of only 6.5 cm×5 cm could be realized. The measured data can be transmitted via Bluetooth and visualized on a portable monitor. By using energy-efficient hardware, the system can operate for up to 18 hs with a 3 V battery, continuously sending data via Bluetooth. Longer operating times can be realized by decreased transfer rates. The relative error of the impedance measurement was less than 1%. The ECG and ICG measurements allow an approximate calculation of the heart stroke volume. The ECG and the measured impedance showed a high correlation to commercial devices (r=0.83, p<0.05). In addition to commercial devices, the developed system allows a multi-frequency measurement of the thoracic impedance between 5-150 kHz.

  8. Coupling impedances of small discontinuities: Dependence on beam velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    2006-05-01

    The beam coupling impedances of small discontinuities of an accelerator vacuum chamber have been calculated [e.g., Kurennoy, Gluckstern, and Stupakov, Phys. Rev. E 52, 4354 (1995)PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.52.4354] for ultrarelativistic beams using the Bethe diffraction theory. Here we extend the results to an arbitrary beam velocity. The vacuum chamber is assumed to have an arbitrary, but uniform along the beam path, cross section. The longitudinal and transverse coupling impedances are derived in terms of series over cross-section eigenfunctions, while the discontinuity shape enters via its polarizabilities. Simple explicit formulas for two important particular cases—circular and rectangular chamber cross sections—are presented. The impedance dependence on the beam velocity exhibits some unusual features: for example, the reactive impedance, which dominates in the ultrarelativistic limit, can vanish at a certain beam velocity, or its magnitude can exceed the ultrarelativistic value many times. In addition, we demonstrate that the same technique, the field expansion into a series of cross-section eigenfunctions, is convenient for calculating the space-charge impedance of uniform beam pipes with arbitrary cross section.

  9. Diagnostic criteria for mass lesions differentiating in electrical impedance mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A, Karpov; M, Korotkova

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the diagnostic criteria for differentiating volumetric lesions in the mammary gland in electrical impedance mammography. The research was carried out utilizing the electrical impedance computer mammograph llMEIK v.5.6gg®, which enables to acquire images of 3-D conductivity distribution layers within mamma's tissues up to 5 cm depth. The weighted reciprocal projection method was employed to reconstruct the 3-D electric conductivity distribution of the examined organ. The results of 3,710 electrical impedance examinations were analyzed. The analysis of a volumetric lesion included assessment of its shape, contour, internal electrical structure and changes of the surrounding tissues. Moreover, mammary gland status was evaluated with the help of comparative and age-related electrical conductivity curves. The diagnostic chart is provided. Each criterion is measured in points. Using the numerical score for evaluation of mass and non-volumetric lesions within the mammary gland in electrical impedance mammography allowed comparing this information to BI-RADS categories developed by American College of Radiology experts. The article is illustrated with electrical impedance mammograms and tables.

  10. High-precision impedance spectroscopy: a strategy demonstrated on PZT.

    PubMed

    Boukamp, Bernard A; Blank, Dave H A

    2011-12-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) has been recognized as a very powerful tool for studying charge and mass transport and transfer in a wide variety of electrically or electrochemically active systems. Sophisticated modeling programs make it possible to extract parameters from the impedance data, thus contributing to a better understanding of the system or material properties. For an accurate analysis, a correct modeling function is needed; this is often in the form of an equivalent circuit. It is not always possible to define the modeling function from visual inspection of the impedance dispersion. Small contributions to the overall dispersion can be masked, and hence overlooked. In this publication, a strategy is presented for high-precision impedance data analysis. A Kramers-Kronig test is used for the essential data validation. An iterative process of partial analysis and subtraction assists in deconvoluting the impedance spectrum, yielding both a vi- able model function and a set of necessary starting values for the full complex nonlinear least squares (CNLS) modeling. The advantage and possibilities of this strategy are demonstrated with an analysis of the ionic and electronic conductivity of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) as functions of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. PMID:23443688

  11. Determination of soil ionic concentration using impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Gunjan; Kumar, Ratnesh; Weber, Robert J.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to estimate the soil ionic concentration by way of multi-frequency impedance measurements and using the quasi-static dielectric mixing models to infer the various ionic concentrations. In our approach, the permittivity of the soil dielectric mixture is measured using impedance spectroscopy and the results are used as input parameters to dielectric mixing models, combined with the debye-type dielectric relaxation models. We observe that the dielectric mixing models work well for low RF (radio-frequency) range and help in determining the individual ionic concentration in a multi-component soil mixture. Using the fact that the permittivity of a dielectric mixture is proportional to its impedance, we validated our approach by making multi-frequency impedance measurements of a soil mixture at different concentrations of various components. The method provides a good estimate of individual components such as air, water and ions like nitrates. While the paper is written with the perspective of soil constituent concentration determination, the underlying principle of determining individual component concentration using multi-frequency impedance measurement is applicable more generally in areas such as characterizing biological systems like pathogens, quality control of pharmaceuticals etc.

  12. Materials analyses and electrochemical impedance of implantable metal electrodes.

    PubMed

    Howlader, Matiar M R; Ul Alam, Arif; Sharma, Rahul P; Deen, M Jamal

    2015-04-21

    Implantable electrodes with high flexibility, high mechanical fixation and low electrochemical impedance are desirable for neuromuscular activation because they provide safe, effective and stable stimulation. In this paper, we report on detailed materials and electrical analyses of three metal implantable electrodes - gold (Au), platinum (Pt) and titanium (Ti) - using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning acoustic microscopy, drop shape analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. We investigated the cause of changes in electrochemical impedance of long-term immersed Au, Pt and Ti electrodes on liquid crystal polymers (LCPs) in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). We analyzed the surface wettability, surface and interface defects and the elemental depth profile of the electrode-adhesion layers on the LCP. The impedance of the electrodes decreased at lower frequencies, but increased at higher frequencies compared with that of the short-term immersion. The increase of impedances was influenced by the oxidation of the electrode/adhesion-layers that affected the double layer capacitance behavior of the electrode/PBS. The oxidation of the adhesion layer for all the electrodes was confirmed by XPS. Alkali ions (sodium) were adsorbed on the Au and Pt surfaces, but diffused into the Ti electrode and LCPs. The Pt electrode showed a higher sensitivity to surface and interface defects than that of Ti and Au electrodes. These findings may be useful when designing electrodes for long-term implantable devices.

  13. Impedance simulation for LEReC booster cavity transformed from ERL gun cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chuyu

    2015-11-24

    Wake impedance induced energy spread is a concern for the low energy cooling electron beam. The impedance simulation of the booster cavity for the LEReC projection is presented in this report. The simulation is done for both non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic cases. The space charge impedance in the first case is discussed. For impedance budget consideration of the electron machine, only simulation of the geometrical impedance in the latter case is necessary since space charge is considered separately.

  14. Design and Evaluation of Modifications to the NASA Langley Flow Impedance Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.; Parrott, Tony L.; Smith, Charles D.

    2004-01-01

    The need to minimize fan noise radiation from commercial aircraft engine nacelles continues to provide an impetus for developing new acoustic liner concepts. If the full value of such concepts is to be attained, an understanding of grazing flow effects is crucial. Because of this need for improved understanding of grazing flow effects, the NASA Langley Research Center Liner Physics Group has invested a large effort over the past decade into the development of a 2-D finite element method that characterizes wave propagation through a lined duct. The original test section in the Langley Grazing IncidenceTube was used to acquire data needed for implementation of this finite element method. This test section employed a stepper motor-driven axial-traversing bar, embedded in the wall opposite the test liner, to position a flush-mounted microphone at pre-selected locations. Complex acoustic pressure data acquired with this traversing microphone were used to educe the acoustic impedance of test liners using this 2-D finite element method and a local optimization technique. Results acquired in this facility have been extensively reported, and were compared with corresponding results from various U.S. aeroacoustics laboratories in the late 1990 s. Impedance data comparisons acquired from this multi-laboratory study suggested that it would be valuable to incorporate more realistic 3-D aeroacoustic effects into the impedance eduction methodology. This paper provides a description of modifications that have been implemented to facilitate studies of 3-D effects. The two key features of the modified test section are (1) the replacement of the traversing bar and its flush-mounted microphone with an array of 95 fixed-location microphones that are flush-mounted in all four walls of the duct, and (2) the inclusion of a suction device to modify the boundary layer upstream of the lined portion of the duct. The initial results achieved with the modified test section are provided in this

  15. Experimental verification of depolarization effects in bioelectrical impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Lv, Xinqiang; Du, Meng

    2014-01-01

    The electrode polarization effects on bioelectrical impedance measurement at low-frequency cannot be ignored. In this paper, the bioelectrical data of mice livers are measured to specify the polarization effects on the bio-impedance measurement data. We firstly introduce the measurement system and methodology. Using the depolarization method, the corrected results are obtained. Besides, the specific effects of electrode polarization on bio-impedance measurement results are investigated using comparative analysis of the previous and posterior correction results from dielectric spectroscopy, Cole-Cole plot, conductivity and spectroscopy of dissipation tangent. Experimental results show that electrode polarization has a significant influence on the characteristic parameters of mouse liver tissues. To be specific, we see a low-frequency limit resistance R0 increase by 19.29%, a reactance peak XP increase by 8.50%, a low-frequency limit conductivity Kl decrease by 17.65% and a dissipation peak tangent decrease by 160%.

  16. Primary Multi-frequency Data Analyze in Electrical Impedance Scanning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruigang; Dong, Xiuzhen; Fu, Feng; Shi, Xuetao; You, Fusheng; Ji, Zhenyu

    2005-01-01

    This paper deduced the Cole-Cole arc equation in form of admittance by the traditional Cole-Cole equation in form of impedance. Comparing to the latter, the former is more adaptive to the electrical impedance scanning which using lower frequency region. When using our own electrical impedance scanning device at 50-5000Hz, the measurement data separated on the arc of the former, while collected near the direct current resistor on the arc of the latter. The four parameters of the former can be evaluated by the least square method. The frequency of the imaginary part of admittance reaching maximum can be calculated by the Cole-Cole parameters. In conclusion, the Cole-Cole arc in form of admittance is more effective to multi-frequency data analyze at lower frequency region, like EIS.

  17. Impedance characteristics of nanoparticle-LiCoO2+PVDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjaitan, Elman; Kartini, Evvy; Honggowiranto, Wagiyo

    2016-02-01

    The impendance of np-LiCoO2+xPVDF, as a cathode material candidate for lithium-ion battery (LIB), has been characterized using impedance spectroscopy for x = 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 volume percentage (%v/v) and for frequencies in the 42 Hz to 5 MHz range. Both real and imaginary components of the impedance were found to be frequency dependent, and both tend to increase for increasing PVDF (polyvinyilidene fluoride) concentration, except that for 10% PVDF both real and imaginary components of impedance are smaller than for 5%. The mechanism for relaxation time for each addition of PVDF was analyzed using Cole-Cole plots. The analysis showed that the relaxation times of the nanostructured LiCoO2 with PVDF additive is relatively constant. Further, PVDF addition increases the bulk resistance and decreases the bulk capacitance of the nanostructured LiCoO2.

  18. Changes in impedance of Ni electrodes upon standing and cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Margaret A.

    1989-01-01

    Impedances of Ni electrodes vary with many factors including voltage, cycling, and manufacturer. However, results from Ni/H2 cells being tested for Space Station Freedom show that consistent results are obtained within a group of cells from the same manufacturer if the cells are cycled and stored in the same manner. Impedance changes with storage and cycling are being investigated. Impedances are low in the fully charged state but rise abruptly by several orders of magnitude at a voltage corresponding to a very low state-of-charge. After standing for several months, this increase occurred at a higher voltage, consistent with an increase in structural order during storage which hinders diffusion of protons and reduces high rate capacity. Early measurements on the effects of cycling on Ni/H2 cells being tested for Space Station Freedom show differences between cells from different manufacturers.

  19. A Wireless Multi-Sensor Dielectric Impedance Spectroscopy Platform

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Seyed Alireza; Caron, William-O.; Loubier, Mathilde; Rioux, Maxime; Viens, Jeff; Gosselin, Benoit; Messaddeq, Younes

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a low-cost, miniaturized, multiplexed, and connected platform for dielectric impedance spectroscopy (DIS), designed for in situ measurements and adapted to wireless network architectures. The platform has been tested and used as a DIS sensor node on ZigBee mesh and was able to interface up to three DIS sensors at the same time and relay the information through the network for data analysis and storage. The system is built from low-cost commercial microelectronics components, performs dielectric spectroscopy ranging from 5 kHz to 100 kHz, and benefits from an on-the-fly calibration system that makes sensor calibration easy. The paper describes the microelectronics design, the Nyquist impedance response, the measurement sensitivity and accuracy, and the testing of the platform for in situ dielectric impedance spectroscopy applications pertaining to fertilizer sensing, water quality sensing, and touch sensing. PMID:26393587

  20. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying; Mei, Jun; Aljahdali, Rasha

    We design a type of acoustic metasurface, which is composed of carefully designed slits in a rigid thin plate. The effective refractive indices of different slits are different but the impedances are kept the same as that of the host medium. Numerical simulations show that such a metasurface can redirect or reflect a normally incident wave at different frequencies, even though it is impedance matched to the host medium. We show that the underlying mechanisms can be understood by using the generalized Snell's law, and a unified analytic model based on mode-coupling theory. We demonstrate some simple realization of such acoustic metasurface with real materials. The principle is also extended to the design of planar acoustic lens which can focus acoustic waves. Manipulate acoustic waves by impedance matched acoustic metasurfaces.

  1. Impedance characteristics of coaxial and planar magnetoplasma capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harker, K. J.; Crawford, F. W.

    1977-01-01

    A theory has been developed for the impedance of a homogeneous magnetoplasma enclosed between two specular reflecting coaxial electrodes, with a static magnetic field parallel to the electrode axes. The parallel-plate magnetoplasma capacitor is treated as a sub-case. Starting with the Vlasov equation, an integral equation is derived for the electric field. Solving this equation, and integrating to obtain the voltage, gives the capacitor impedance. This includes a capacitive component, and a resistive component expressing the Landau damping associated with the open orbits of electrons reflected at the electrodes. A direct numerical solution of the field integral equation has been carried out for a range of values of magnetic field, plasma density, and signal frequency. The values of impedance so obtained are compared with the predictions of macroscopic theory, and of an approximate microscopic theory in which open orbits are ignored and solutions are obtained using finite Fourier transform methods. The mathematical relations between these theories are demonstrated.

  2. The Mutual Impedance Probe (RPC-MIP) onboard ROSETTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Pierre; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Béghin, Christian; Décréau, Pierrette; Grard, Réjean; Hamelin, Michel; Mazelle, Christian; Randriamboarison, Orélien; Schmidt, Walter; Winterhalter, Daniel; Aouad, Youcef; Lagoutte, Dominique; Vallières, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    The ROSETTA mission will reach the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in August 2014 and enable, for the first time, the in situ survey of a comet activity during along orbit. On board the ROSETTA orbiter, the Mutual Impedance Probe (MIP) is one of the instruments of the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC) that aims at monitoring the cometary plasma environment. MIP is a quadrupolar probe that measures the frequency response of the coupling impedance between two emitting and two receiving dipoles. The electron density and temperature are derived from the resonance peak and the interference pattern of the mutual impedance spectrum. We will describe this instrument and discuss the preliminary results obtained during the third ROSETTA Earth flyby to show its expected capabilities. The RPC switch ON for the post-hibernation recommissioning is planned at the end of March. The health status of the instrument will be discussed.

  3. Active Control of Liner Impedance by Varying Perforate Orifice Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuji, K. K.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The present work explored the feasibility of controlling the acoustic impedance of a resonant type acoustic liner. This was accomplished by translating one perforate over another of the same porosity creating a totally new perforate that had an intermediate porosity. This type of adjustable perforate created a variable orifice perforate whose orifices were non-circular. The key objective of the present study was to quantify, the degree of attenuation control that can be achieved by applying such a concept to the buried septum in a two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) acoustic liner. An additional objective was to examine the adequacy of the existing impedance models to explain the behavior of the unique orifice shapes that result from the proposed silding perforate concept. Different orifice shapes with equivalent area were also examined to determine if highly non-circular orifices had a significant impact on the impedance.

  4. Investigation of an Anomaly Observed in Impedance Eduction Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.; Jones, M. G.; Parrott, T. L.

    2008-01-01

    An intensive investigation into the cause of anomalous behavior commonly observed in impedance eduction techniques is performed. The investigation consists of grid refinement studies, detailed evaluation of results at and near anti-resonance frequencies, comparisons of different model results with synthesized and measured data, assessment or optimization techniques, and evaluation or boundary condition effects. Results show that the root cause of the anomalous behavior is the sensitivity of the educed impedance to small errors in the measured termination resistance at frequencies near anti-resonance or cut-on of a higher-order mode. Evidence is presented to show that the common usage of an anechoic, plane wave termination boundary condition in ducts where the "true" termination is reflective may act as a trigger for these anomalies. Replacing the exit impedance boundary condition by an exit pressure condition is shown to reduce the anomalous results.

  5. Active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase tuning

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bo O.; Zhao, Junming; Feng, Yijun

    2013-01-01

    Impedance metasurface is composed of electrical small scatters in two dimensional plane, of which the surface impedance can be designed to produce desired reflection phase. Tunable reflection phase can be achieved by incorporating active element into the scatters, but the tuning range of the reflection phase is limited. In this paper, an active impedance metasurface with full 360° reflection phase control is presented to remove the phase tuning deficiency in conventional approach. The unit cell of the metasurface is a multiple resonance structure with two resonance poles and one resonance zero, capable of providing 360° reflection phase variation and active tuning within a finite frequency band. Linear reflection phase tuning can also be obtained. Theoretical analysis and simulation are presented and validated by experiment at microwave frequency. The proposed approach can be applied to many cases where fine and full phase tuning is needed, such as beam steering in reflectarray antennas. PMID:24162366

  6. Monitoring variations of biological impedances using microwave Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Thansandote, A; Stuchly, S S; Smith, A M

    1983-08-01

    A microwave Doppler radar for continuously monitoring time-varying biological impedances is described. The radar compares the phase of the signal scattered from a region of biological tissue with that of the transmitted signal. The phase changes of the scattered signal are an indication of the net impedance changes within the test region due to various physiological processes, for example, the displacements of blood vessels during the cardiac cycle. A Doppler radar, equipped with a matched antenna, was tested with a simulation model and its detection characteristic was found to be a sinusoidal function of the antenna-object spacing. Tests with healthy human subjects were also performed at 3 GHz and 10.5 GHz. It was found that the 3 GHz Doppler radar has significantly greater penetration in tissues but is less sensitive to changes of the biological impedance than the 10.5 GHz system.

  7. Bayesian identification of acoustic impedance in treated ducts.

    PubMed

    Buot de l'Épine, Y; Chazot, J-D; Ville, J-M

    2015-07-01

    The noise reduction of a liner placed in the nacelle of a turbofan engine is still difficult to predict due to the lack of knowledge of its acoustic impedance that depends on grazing flow profile, mode order, and sound pressure level. An eduction method, based on a Bayesian approach, is presented here to adjust an impedance model of the liner from sound pressures measured in a rectangular treated duct under multimodal propagation and flow. The cost function is regularized with prior information provided by Guess's [J. Sound Vib. 40, 119-137 (1975)] impedance of a perforated plate. The multi-parameter optimization is achieved with an Evolutionary-Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo algorithm. PMID:26233052

  8. On cochlear impedances and the miscomputation of power gain.

    PubMed

    Shera, Christopher A; Olson, Elizabeth S; Guinan, John J

    2011-12-01

    In their article, "Measurement of cochlear power gain in the sensitive gerbil ear," Ren et al. (Nat Commun 2:216, 2011) claim to provide "the first direct experimental evidence of power amplification in the sensitive living cochlea." While we recognize the technical challenges of the experiments and appreciate the beauty of the data, the authors' analysis and interpretation of the measurements are invalid. We review the concept of impedance (i.e., the ratio of pressure to velocity) as it applies to cochlear mechanics and show that Ren et al. mistakenly equate the impedances near the basilar membrane and stapes with the impedance characteristic of an infinite, uniform tube of fluid. As a consequence of this error, Ren et al.'s measurements and analysis provide no evidence for power amplification in the cochlea. Compelling evidence for power amplification has, however, been previously provided by others. PMID:21947765

  9. A Wireless Multi-Sensor Dielectric Impedance Spectroscopy Platform.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Seyed Alireza; Caron, William-O; Loubier, Mathilde; Rioux, Maxime; Viens, Jeff; Gosselin, Benoit; Messaddeq, Younes

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a low-cost, miniaturized, multiplexed, and connected platform for dielectric impedance spectroscopy (DIS), designed for in situ measurements and adapted to wireless network architectures. The platform has been tested and used as a DIS sensor node on ZigBee mesh and was able to interface up to three DIS sensors at the same time and relay the information through the network for data analysis and storage. The system is built from low-cost commercial microelectronics components, performs dielectric spectroscopy ranging from 5 kHz to 100 kHz, and benefits from an on-the-fly calibration system that makes sensor calibration easy. The paper describes the microelectronics design, the Nyquist impedance response, the measurement sensitivity and accuracy, and the testing of the platform for in situ dielectric impedance spectroscopy applications pertaining to fertilizer sensing, water quality sensing, and touch sensing. PMID:26393587

  10. 50 omega characteristic impedance low-pass metal powder filters.

    PubMed

    Milliken, F P; Rozen, J R; Keefe, G A; Koch, R H

    2007-02-01

    We have fabricated several 50 omega characteristic impedance low-pass metal powder filters. The filters are made with bronze or copper metal powder with varying amounts of metal powder in a metal powder/epoxy mixture. Our goal is to make a filter with a characteristic impedance Z = 50 omega at frequencies up to 10 GHz. Using a 78% bronze powder/epoxy mixture in a suitable geometry, we achieved an impedance Z = 54 omega at 4.2 K, with a cutoff frequency fc approximately/= 0.3 GHz and an attenuation A = Vout/Vin=0.0001 (-80 dB) at 10 GHz. We also made several non-50 omega low-pass bronze powder filters with fc = 1 MHz and A = 0.0001 at 10 MHz. Fabrication details and performance data will be presented for both types of filter.

  11. REDUCING BEAM COUPLING IMPEDANCES IN SNS RING EXTRACTION KICKERS.

    SciTech Connect

    KURENNOY,S.S.; DAVINO,D.; LEE,Y.Y.

    2001-06-18

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Accumulator ring extraction kickers [1] consists of 14 modules of windowframe ferrite pulsing magnets with the rise time of about 200 ns. Their contribution to the beam coupling impedances is a serious concern. The kicker impedances, as well as its deflecting magnetic field versus time, are studied using detailed 3-D MAFIA modeling. Various design options, external circuit resistances, and a range of ferrite permeabilities are explored. A kicker module with wide conductor windings around the ferrite behind the kicker current sheet suggests a significant reduction of the kicker transverse and longitudinal coupling impedances. This design provides a good extraction field performance, as demonstrated by electromagnetic simulations. Results of measurements for a small model are also presented.

  12. Gas breakdown and plasma impedance in split-ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskinson, Alan R.; Parsons, Stephen; Hopwood, Jeffrey

    2016-02-01

    The appearance of resonant structures in metamaterials coupled to plasmas motivates the systematic investigation of gas breakdown and plasma impedance in split-ring resonators over a frequency range of 0.5-9 GHz. In co-planar electrode gaps of 100 μm, the breakdown voltage amplitude decreases from 280 V to 225 V over this frequency range in atmospheric argon. At the highest frequency, a microplasma can be sustained using only 2 mW of power. At 20 mW, we measure a central electron density of 2 × 1020 m-3. The plasma-electrode overlap plays a key role in the microplasma impedance and causes the sheath impedance to dominate the plasma resistance at very low power levels. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Recent Breakthroughs in Microplasma Science and Technology", edited by Kurt Becker, Jose Lopez, David Staack, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Wei Dong Zhu.

  13. Electrical impedance tomography of the 1995 OGI gasoline release

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.

    1996-10-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) was used to image the plume resulting from a release of 378 liters (100 gallons) of gasoline into a sandy acquifer. Images were made in 5 planes before and 5 times during the release, to generate a detailed picture of the spatial as well as the temporal development of the plume as it spread at the water table. Information of the electrical impedance (both in phase and out of phase voltages) was used or several different frequencies to produce images. We observed little dispersion in the images either before or after the gasoline entered the acquifer. Likewise, despite some laboratory measurements of impedances, there was no evidence of a change in the reactance in the soil because of the gasoline.

  14. Space-charge impedance calculations in long-wavelength approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    1999-12-01

    Space-charge impedance calculations for smooth vacuum chambers with an arbitrary cross-section and perfectly conducting walls are considered in the long-wavelength approximation, when ωb/(βγc)≪1, where b is a typical transverse size. For the SNS beam energies βγ⩽1.8, and the wavelengths are long when λ≫b. Within the long-wavelength approximation, the fields can be found by solving a 2-D electrostatic problem. Two examples are presented: the space-charge impedance of screening wires (RF-cage) and of a ceramic chamber with inner metal stripes. In addition, we explore the transverse space-charge impedance of a circular pipe with account of betatron oscillations in a wide frequency range.

  15. Validation of a New Procedure for Impedance Eduction in Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.; Jones, M. G.

    2010-01-01

    A new impedance eduction procedure is validated by comparing the educed impedance spectrum to that of an older but well-tested eduction procedure. The older procedure requires the installation of a microphone array in the liner test section but the new procedure removes this requirement. A 12.7-mm stainless steel plate and a conventional liner consisting of a perforated plate bonded to a honeycomb core are tested. Test data is acquired from a grazing flow, impedance tube facility for a range of source frequencies and mean flow Mach numbers for which only plane waves are cut on. For the stainless steel plate, the educed admittance spectrum using the new procedure shows an improvement over that of the old procedure. This improvement shows up primarily in the educed conductance spectrum. Both eduction procedures show discrepancies in educed admittance in the mid-frequency range. Indications are that this discrepancy is triggered by an inconsistency between the measured eduction data (that contains boundary layer effects) and the two eduction models (for which the boundary layer is neglected). For the conventional liner, both eduction procedures are in very good agreement with each other. Small discrepancies occur for one or two frequencies in the mid-frequency range and for frequencies beyond the cut on frequency of higher-order duct modes. This discrepancy in the midfrequency range occurs because an automated optimizer is used to educe the impedance and the objective function used by the optimizer is extremely flat and therefore sensitive to initial starting values. The discrepancies at frequencies beyond the cut on frequency of higher order duct modes are due to the assumption of only plane waves in the impedance eduction model, although higher order modes are propagating in the impedance tube facility.

  16. Validity of estimating limb muscle volume by bioelectrical impedance.

    PubMed

    Miyatani, M; Kanehisa, H; Masuo, Y; Ito, M; Fukunaga, T

    2001-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the validity of estimating muscle volume by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Bioelectrical impedance and series cross-sectional images of the forearm, upper arm, lower leg, and thigh on the right side were determined in 22 healthy young adult men using a specially designed bioelectrical impedance acquisition system and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method, respectively. The impedance index (L(2)/Z) for every segment, calculated as the ratio of segment length squared to the impedance, was significantly correlated to the muscle volume measured by MRI, with r = 0.902-0.976 (P < 0.05). In these relationships, the SE of estimation was 38.4 cm(3) for the forearm, 40.9 cm(3) for the upper arm, 107.2 cm(3) for the lower leg, and 362.3 cm(3) for the thigh. Moreover, isometric torque developed in elbow flexion or extension and knee flexion or extension was significantly correlated to the L(2)/Z values of the upper arm and thigh, respectively, with correlation coefficients of 0.770-0.937 (P < 0.05), which differed insignificantly from those (0.799-0.958; P < 0.05) in the corresponding relationships with the muscle volume measured by MRI of elbow flexors or extensors and knee flexors or extensors. Thus the present study indicates that bioelectrical impedance analysis may be useful to predict the muscle volume and to investigate possible relations between muscle size and strength capability in a limited segment of the upper and lower limbs.

  17. Electrical-Impedance-Based Ice-Thickness Gauges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard

    2003-01-01

    Langley Research Center has developed electrical-impedance-based ice-thickness gauges and is seeking partners and collaborators to commercialize them. When used as parts of active monitoring and diagnostic systems, these gauges make it possible to begin deicing or to take other protective measures before ice accretes to dangerous levels. These gauges are inexpensive, small, and simple to produce. They can be adapted to use on a variety of stationary and moving structures that are subject to accumulation of ice. Examples of such structures include aircraft, cars, trucks, ships, buildings, towers, power lines (see figure), power-generating equipment, water pipes, freezer compartments, and cooling coils. A gauge of this type includes a temperature sensor and two or more pairs of electrically insulated conductors embedded in a surface on which ice could accumulate. The electrical impedances of the pairs of conductors vary with the thickness of any ice that may be present. Somewhat more specifically, when the pairs of conductors are spaced appropriately, the ratio between their impedances is indicative of the thickness of the ice. Therefore, the gauge includes embedded electronic circuits that measure the electrical impedances, plus circuits that process the combination of temperature and impedance measurements to determine whether ice is present and, if so, how thick it is. Of course, in the processing of the impedance measurements, the temperature measurements help the circuitry to distinguish between liquid water and ice. The basic design of a gauge of this type can be adapted to local conditions. For example, if there is a need to monitor ice over a wide range of thickness, then the gauge can include more than two sets of conductors having various spacings.

  18. Electrical impedance imaging of water distribution in the root zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newill, P.; Karadaglić, D.; Podd, F.; Grieve, B. D.; York, T. A.

    2014-05-01

    The paper describes a technique that is proposed for imaging water transport in and around the root zone of plants using distributed measurements of electrical impedance. The technique has the potential to analyse sub-surface phenotypes, for instance drought tolerance traits in crop breeding programmes. The technical aim is to implement an automated, low cost, instrument for high-throughput screening. Ultimately the technique is targeted at in-field, on-line, measurements. For demonstration purposes the present work considers measurements on laboratory scale rhizotrons housing growing maize plants. Each rhizotron is fitted with 60 electrodes in a rectangular array. To reduce electrochemical effects the capacitively coupled contactless conductivity (C4D) electrodes have an insulating layer on the surface and the resistance of the bulk material is deduced from spectroscopic considerations. Electrical impedance is measured between pairs of electrodes to build up a two-dimensional map. A modified electrical model of such electrodes is proposed which includes the resistive and reactive components of both the insulating layer and the bulk material. Measurements taken on a parallel-plate test cell containing water confirm that the C4D technique is able to measure electrical impedance. The test cell has been used to explore the effects of water content, compaction and temperature on measurements in soil. Results confirm that electrical impedance measurements are very sensitive to moisture content. Impedance fraction changes up to 20% are observed due to compaction up to a pressure of 0.21 kg cm-2 and a temperature fraction sensitivity of about 2%/°C. The effects of compaction and temperature are most significant under dry conditions. Measurements on growing maize reveal the changes in impedance across the rhizotron over a period of several weeks. Results are compared to a control vessel housing only soil.

  19. Impedance control complements incomplete internal models under complex external dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tomi, Naoki; Gouko, Manabu; Ito, Koji

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate motor adaptation of human arm movements to external dynamics. In an experiment, we tried to determine whether humans can learn an internal model of a mixed force field (V+P) that was the sum of a velocity-dependent force field (V) and a position-dependent force field (P). The experimental results show that the subjects did not learn the internal model of V+P accurately and they compensated for the loads by using impedance control. Our results suggest that humans use impedance control when internal models become inaccurate because of the complexity of the external dynamics.

  20. 3D printed impedance elements by micro-dispensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles Dominguez, Ubaldo

    Micro-dispensing allows electric circuits to be "3D printed," which can be used to give 3D printed systems electronic and electromagnetic functionality. The focus of this thesis is using micro-dispensing to fabricate capacitors and inductors. 3D printed impedance elements are capable of being more easily embedded, can be used to create structural electronics, and will have extensive applications in antennas, metamaterials, frequency selective surfaces, and more. This is the first known effort to print and measure impedance elements by micro-dispensing which holds great potential for manufacturing multi-material devices.

  1. IMPEDANCE BUDGET FOR CRAB CAVITY IN MEIC ELECTRON RING

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, B. Yunn, G. Krafft

    2012-07-01

    The Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab has been envisioned as a first stage high energy particle accelerator beyond the 12 GeV upgrade of CEBAF. The estimate of impedance budget is important from the view point of beam stability and matching with other accelerator components driving currents. The detailed study of impedance budget for electron ring has been performed by considering the current design parameters of the e-ring. A comprehensive picture of the calculations involved in this study has been illustrated in the paper.

  2. Characterization of active metamaterials based on negative impedance converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, K. Z.; Fan, Y. F.; Hao, Y.

    2012-11-01

    Negative impedance converters (NICs) are used to create impedance loads that can effectively cancel the inductive properties of magnetic dipoles, resulting in active metamaterials with increased bandwidth and reduced loss for μ-near-zero (MNZ) and negative-Re(μ) (MNG) media. We demonstrate techniques for analyzing the stability and characterizing the magnetic properties of effective media loaded with NICs. Specifically, we apply the Nyquist criterion to validate the stability of sample active metamaterials. It is shown that the practical NIC-loaded metamaterial may maintain stability and reduce dispersion, albeit with reduced performance as compared to the ideal NIC load.

  3. An impedance analysis of double-stream interaction in semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, P. W.; Durney, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    The electromagnetic waves propagating through a drifting semiconductor plasma are studied from a macroscopic point of view in terms of double-stream interaction. The possible existing waves (helicon waves, longitudinal waves, ordinary waves, and pseudolongitudinal waves) which depend upon the orientation of the dc external magnetic field are derived. A powerful impedance concept is introduced to investigate the wave behavior of longitudinal (space charge) waves or pseudolongitudinal waves in a semiconductor plasma. The impedances due to one- and two-carrier stream interactions were calculated theoretically.

  4. Acoustic characteristics of the medium with gradient change of impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Yang, Desen; Sun, Yu; Shi, Jie; Shi, Shengguo; Zhang, Haoyang

    2015-10-01

    The medium with gradient change of acoustic impedance is a new acoustic structure which developed from multiple layer structures. In this paper, the inclusion is introduced and a new set of equations is developed. It can obtain better acoustic properties based on the medium with gradient change of acoustic impedance. Theoretical formulation has been systematically addressed which demonstrates how the idea of utilizing this method. The sound reflection and absorption coefficients were obtained. At last, the validity and the correctness of this method are assessed by simulations. The results show that appropriate design of parameters of the medium can improve underwater acoustic properties.

  5. Analytical solutions with Generalized Impedance Boundary Conditions (GIBC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, H. H.; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Rigorous uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) diffraction coefficients are presented for a coated convex cylinder simulated with generalized impedance boundary conditions. In particular, ray solutions are obtained which remain valid in the transition region and reduce uniformly to those in the deep lit and shadow regions. These involve new transition functions in place of the usual Fock-type integrals, characteristics to the impedance cylinder. A uniform asymptotic solution is also presented for observations in the close vicinity of the cylinder. The diffraction coefficients for the convex cylinder are obtained via a generalization of the corresponding ones for the circular cylinder.

  6. Electrochemical Impedance Of Inorganic-Zinc-Coated Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, Louis G.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes preliminary experiments to evaluate both direct-current and alternating-current electrochemical impedance measurements as candidate techniques for use in accelerated corrosion testing of mild-steel panels coated with inorganic zinc-rich primers and exposed to seaside air. Basic idea behind experiments to compare electrochemical impedance measurements with anticorrosion performances of coating materials to determine whether measurements can be used to predict performances. Part of continuing program to identify anticorrosion coating materials protecting steel panels adequately for as long as 5 years and beyond.

  7. Anisotropic bioelectrical impedance determination of subcutaneous fat thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Becerra, P. A. I.; Delgadillo-Holtfort, I.; Balleza-Ordaz, M.; Huerta-Franco, M. R.; Vargas-Luna, M.

    2014-11-01

    Preliminary results have shown that bioelectrical impedance measurements performed on different parts of the human body strongly depend upon the subcutaneous fat of the considered region. In this work, a method for the determination of subcutaneous fat thickness is explored. Within this method the measurement of the bioelectrical impedance response of the fat-muscle system, both along the direction defined by the muscle fibers and along the corresponding perpendicular direction, are performed. Measurements have been carried out on human female and male subjects of ages around 25 years old at the region of the biceps. Correlation has been performed with skinfold caliper measurements.

  8. THE COUPLING IMPEDANCE OF THE RHIC INJECTION KICKER SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    HAHN,H.

    1999-06-28

    IN THIS PAPER, RESULTS FROM IMPEDANCE MEASUREMENTS ON THE RHIC INJECTION KICKERS ARE REPORTED. THE KICKER IS CONFIGURED AS A ''C'' CROSS SECTION MAGNET WITH INTERLEAVED FERRITE AND HIGH-PERMITTIVITY DIELECTRIC SECTIONS TO ACHIEVE A TRAVELLING WAVE STRUCTURE. THE IMPEDANCE WAS MEASURED USING THE WIRE METHOD, AND ACCURATE RESULTS ARE OBTAINED BY INTERPRETING THE FORWARD SCATTERING COEFFICIENT VIA THE LONG-FORMULA. THE FOUR KICKERS WITH THEIR CERAMIC BEAM TUBES CONTRIBUE AT Z/N-0.22 OMEGA/RING IN THE INTERESTING FREQUENCY RANGE FROM 0.1 TO 1 BHZ, AND LESS ABOVE.

  9. Electrochemical impedance analysis for lithium ion intercalation into graphitized carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Sohn, H.J.

    2000-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was employed to study electrochemical behaviors during intercalation of Li{sup +} into graphitized carbon anode. Analysis was carried out on three regions of frequencies mainly below 0.3 V. The first depressed semicircle in the high-frequency region had two-dimensional characteristics and did not vary over the entire potential range. The second semicircle in the mid-frequency region had a potential dependency above 0.3 V. Impedance spectra at the lower frequency region were attributed to the finite diffusion of Li{sup +}, and the order of the chemical diffusion coefficient was approximately 10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2}/s.

  10. Bunch Length and Impedance Measurements at SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, W.J.; Cheng, W.X.; Fisher, A.S.; Huang, X.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    Streak camera measurements were made at SPEAR3 to characterize longitudinal coupling impedance. For the nominal optics, data was taken at three rf voltages and a single-bunch current range of 0-20mA. Both bunchcentroid phase shift and bunch lengthening were recorded to extract values for resistive and reactive impedance. An (R+L) and a Q=1 model were then back-substituted into the Haissinski equation and compared with raw profile data. In the short bunch (low-{alpha}) mode, distribution 'bursting' was observed.

  11. Electrical impedance along connective tissue planes associated with acupuncture meridians

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Andrew C; Wu, Junru; Badger, Gary J; Hammerschlag, Richard; Langevin, Helene M

    2005-01-01

    Background Acupuncture points and meridians are commonly believed to possess unique electrical properties. The experimental support for this claim is limited given the technical and methodological shortcomings of prior studies. Recent studies indicate a correspondence between acupuncture meridians and connective tissue planes. We hypothesized that segments of acupuncture meridians that are associated with loose connective tissue planes (between muscles or between muscle and bone) visible by ultrasound have greater electrical conductance (less electrical impedance) than non-meridian, parallel control segments. Methods We used a four-electrode method to measure the electrical impedance along segments of the Pericardium and Spleen meridians and corresponding parallel control segments in 23 human subjects. Meridian segments were determined by palpation and proportional measurements. Connective tissue planes underlying those segments were imaged with an ultrasound scanner. Along each meridian segment, four gold-plated needles were inserted along a straight line and used as electrodes. A parallel series of four control needles were placed 0.8 cm medial to the meridian needles. For each set of four needles, a 3.3 kHz alternating (AC) constant amplitude current was introduced at three different amplitudes (20, 40, and 80 μAmps) to the outer two needles, while the voltage was measured between the inner two needles. Tissue impedance between the two inner needles was calculated based on Ohm's law (ratio of voltage to current intensity). Results At the Pericardium location, mean tissue impedance was significantly lower at meridian segments (70.4 ± 5.7 Ω) compared with control segments (75.0 ± 5.9 Ω) (p = 0.0003). At the Spleen location, mean impedance for meridian (67.8 ± 6.8 Ω) and control segments (68.5 ± 7.5 Ω) were not significantly different (p = 0.70). Conclusion Tissue impedance was on average lower along the Pericardium meridian, but not along the Spleen

  12. Beam Coupling Impedances of Obstacles Protruding into Beam Pipe.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    1997-05-01

    The beam coupling impedances of small obstacles protruding inside the vacuum chamber of an accelerator are calculated analytically at frequencies for which the wavelength is large compared to a typical size of the obstacle. Simple formulas for a few important particular cases including both essentially three-dimensional objects like a post or a mask and axisymmetric irises, are presented. The analytical results are compared and agree with three-dimensional computer simulations. These results allow simple practical estimates of the broad-band impedance contributions from such discontinuities.

  13. Coupling impedances of small discontinuities: A general approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.; Gluckstern, Robert L.; Stupakov, Gennady V.

    1995-10-01

    A general theory of the beam interaction with small discontinuities of the vacuum chamber of an accelerator is developed taking into account the reaction of radiated waves back on the discontinuity. The reactive impedance calculated earlier is reproduced as the first order and the resistive one as the second order of a perturbation theory based on this general approach. The theory also gives, in an easy and natural way, the analytical results for the frequencies and coupling impedances of the trapped modes due to small discontinuities on the vacuum chamber of a general cross section. Formulas for two important particular cases-a circular and a rectangular chamber-are presented.

  14. Transverse resistive wall impedance for multi-layer round chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Alexy Burov and Valeri Lebedev

    2002-06-11

    The resistive wall impedance is usually calculated assuming the skin depth being much smaller than the chamber thickness. This approximation is not always correct. In particular, it is not valid when the revolution frequency is very low (as in VLHC [1]), or the surface is coated by a thin conductive layer (as for extraction kickers [2]), or for the coherent effects in the closed orbit motion [3]. A method of analytical calculation of the transverse impedance is developed here for multi-layer vacuum chambers and applied to an arbitrary two-layer structure.

  15. Amplifier input impedance in dry electrode ECG recording.

    PubMed

    Assambo, Cedric; Burke, Martin J

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for designing the front-end of instrumentation amplifiers for use in dry electrode recording of the human electrocardiogram (ECG). The method relies on information provided by the characterization of the skin-electrode interface and the analysis of low frequency ECG criteria defined by international standards. Marginal measurements of capacitive elements of the skin-electrode interface as small as 0.01 microF, suggest values of input impedance in the order of 1.3 GOmega. However, results in 99% of the data analyzed indicate that a recording amplifier providing an input impedance of 500 MOmega should ensure clear signal sensing without distortion.

  16. Monitoring the evolution of boron doped porous diamond electrode on flexible retinal implant by OCT and in vivo impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Clément; Cottance, Myline; Degardin, Julie; Scorsone, Emmanuel; Rousseau, Lionel; Lissorgues, Gaelle; Bergonzo, Philippe; Picaud, Serge

    2016-12-01

    Nanocrystalline Boron doped Diamond proved to be a very attractive material for neural interfacing, especially with the retina, where reduce glia growth is observed with respect to other materials, thus facilitating neuro-stimulation over long terms. In the present study, we integrated diamond microelectrodes on a polyimide substrate and investigated their performances for the development of neural prosthesis. A full description of the microfabrication of the implants is provided and their functionalities are assessed using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A porous structure of the electrode surface was thus revealed and showed promising properties for neural recording or stimulation. Using the flexible implant, we showed that is possible to follow in vivo the evolution of the electric contact between the diamond electrodes and the retina over 4months by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The position of the implant was also monitored by optical coherence tomography to corroborate the information given by the impedance measurements. The results suggest that diamond microelectrodes are very good candidates for retinal prosthesis. PMID:27612691

  17. The Case for Descriptive Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauck, Marian K.

    An approach to teaching descriptive writing and its values are discussed. Benefits derived from a descriptive writing unit are said to be the following: (1) Descriptive writing is fun; (2) It enables the instructor to demonstrate that the first word that pops into the writer's mind is often not the best one; (3) There is no easier way in which to…

  18. Three Approaches to Descriptive Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Lennart

    This report compares three approaches to descriptive research, focusing on the kinds of descriptions developed and on the methods used to develop the descriptions. The main emphasis in all three approaches is on verbal data. In these approaches the importance of interpretation and its intuitive nature are emphasized. The three approaches, however,…

  19. Transition metal oxide as anode interface buffer for impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Tang, Chao; Wang, Xu-Liang; Zhai, Wen-Juan; Liu, Rui-Lan; Rong, Zhou; Pang, Zong-Qiang; Jiang, Bing; Fan, Qu-Li; Huang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Impedance spectroscopy is a strong method in electric measurement, which also shows powerful function in research of carrier dynamics in organic semiconductors when suitable mathematical physical models are used. Apart from this, another requirement is that the contact interface between the electrode and materials should at least be quasi-ohmic contact. So in this report, three different transitional metal oxides, V2O5, MoO3 and WO3 were used as hole injection buffer for interface of ITO/NPB. Through the impedance spectroscopy and PSO algorithm, the carrier mobilities and I-V characteristics of the NPB in different devices were measured. Then the data curves were compared with the single layer device without the interface layer in order to investigate the influence of transitional metal oxides on the carrier mobility. The careful research showed that when the work function (WF) of the buffer material was just between the work function of anode and the HOMO of the organic material, such interface material could work as a good bridge for carrier injection. Under such condition, the carrier mobility measured through impedance spectroscopy should be close to the intrinsic value. Considering that the HOMO (or LUMO) of most organic semiconductors did not match with the work function of the electrode, this report also provides a method for wide application of impedance spectroscopy to the research of carrier dynamics.

  20. Organic electrochemical transistors for cell-based impedance sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivnay, Jonathan; Ramuz, Marc; Leleux, Pierre; Hama, Adel; Huerta, Miriam; Owens, Roisin M.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical impedance sensing of biological systems, especially cultured epithelial cell layers, is now a common technique to monitor cell motion, morphology, and cell layer/tissue integrity for high throughput toxicology screening. Existing methods to measure electrical impedance most often rely on a two electrode configuration, where low frequency signals are challenging to obtain for small devices and for tissues with high resistance, due to low current. Organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) are conducting polymer-based devices, which have been shown to efficiently transduce and amplify low-level ionic fluxes in biological systems into electronic output signals. In this work, we combine OECT-based drain current measurements with simultaneous measurement of more traditional impedance sensing using the gate current to produce complex impedance traces, which show low error at both low and high frequencies. We apply this technique in vitro to a model epithelial tissue layer and show that the data can be fit to an equivalent circuit model yielding trans-epithelial resistance and cell layer capacitance values in agreement with literature. Importantly, the combined measurement allows for low biases across the cell layer, while still maintaining good broadband signal.

  1. Tunable nanogap devices for ultra-sensitive electrochemical impedance biosensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong; Guo, Zheng; Song, Jing-Jing; Huang, Qin-An; Zhu, Si-Wei; Huang, Xing-Jiu; Wei, Yan

    2016-01-28

    A wealth of research has been available discussing nanogap devices for detecting very small quantities of biomolecules by observing their electrical behavior generally performed in dry conditions. We report that a gold nanogapped electrode with tunable gap length for ultra-sensitive detection of streptavidin based on electrochemical impedance technique. The gold nanogap is fabricated using simple monolayer film deposition and in-situ growth of gold nanoparticles in a traditional interdigitated array (IDA) microelectrode. The electrochemical impedance biosensor with a 25-nm nanogap is found to be ultra-sensitive to the specific binding of streptavidin to biotin. The binding of the streptavidin hinder the electron transfer between two electrodes, resulting in a large increase in electron-transfer resistance (Ret) for operating the impedance. A linear relation between the relative Ret and the logarithmic value of streptavidin concentration is observed in the concentration range from 1 pM (picomolar) to 100 nM (nanomolar). The lowest detectable concentration actually measured reaches 1 pM. We believe that such an electrochemical impedance nanogap biosensor provides a useful approach towards biomolecular detection that could be extended to a number of other systems.

  2. Characterization of antimicrobial peptide activity by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, William K.; Wimley, William C.; Searson, Peter C.; Hristova, Kalina; Merzlyakov, Mikhail

    2008-01-01

    Summary Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy performed on surface-supported bilayer membranes allows for the monitoring of changes in membrane properties, such as thickness, ion permeability, and homogeneity, after exposure to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). We show that two model cationic peptides, very similar in sequence but different in activity, induce dramatically different changes in membrane properties as probed by impedance spectroscopy. Moreover, the impedance results excluded the “barrel-stave” and the “toroidal pore” models of AMP mode of action, and are more consistent with the “carpet” and the “detergent” models. The impedance data provide important new insights about the kinetics and the scale of the peptide action which currently are not addressed by the “carpet” and the “detergent” models. The method presented not only provides additional information about the mode of action of a particular AMP, but offers a means of characterizing AMP activity in reproducible, well-defined quantitative terms. PMID:18657512

  3. Sensorless battery temperature measurements based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raijmakers, L. H. J.; Danilov, D. L.; van Lammeren, J. P. M.; Lammers, M. J. G.; Notten, P. H. L.

    2014-02-01

    A new method is proposed to measure the internal temperature of (Li-ion) batteries. Based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, an intercept frequency (f0) can be determined which is exclusively related to the internal battery temperature. The intercept frequency is defined as the frequency at which the imaginary part of the impedance is zero (Zim = 0), i.e. where the phase shift between the battery current and voltage is absent. The advantage of the proposed method is twofold: (i) no hardware temperature sensors are required anymore to monitor the battery temperature and (ii) the method does not suffer from heat transfer delays. Mathematical analysis of the equivalent electrical-circuit, representing the battery performance, confirms that the intercept frequency decreases with rising temperatures. Impedance measurements on rechargeable Li-ion cells of various chemistries were conducted to verify the proposed method. These experiments reveal that the intercept frequency is clearly dependent on the temperature and does not depend on State-of-Charge (SoC) and aging. These impedance-based sensorless temperature measurements are therefore simple and convenient for application in a wide range of stationary, mobile and high-power devices, such as hybrid- and full electric vehicles.

  4. Impedance sensing of flaws in non-homogenous materials

    DOEpatents

    Novak, James L.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for sensing impedances of materials placed in contact therewith. The invention comprises a plurality of drive electrodes and one or more sense electrodes. Both rotating electric fields and differently shaped electric fields are provided for, as are analysis of structure and composition at different orientations and depths.

  5. Impedance Screening by the School Speech-Language Pathologist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucker, Jay R.; Samsky, Jay G.

    1979-01-01

    Questions regarding the use of minimally trained speech-language pathologists in conducting an impedance screening program, obtaining the cooperation of the children during testing, and dealing with problems related to referral procedures are discussed, and an account of a pilot otoadmittance screening program is presented. (Author/DLS)

  6. Impedance sensing of flaws in non-homogeneous materials

    DOEpatents

    Novak, J.L.

    1997-02-11

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for sensing impedances of materials placed in contact therewith. The invention comprises a plurality of drive electrodes and one or more sense electrodes. Both rotating electric fields and differently shaped electric fields are provided for, as are analysis of structure and composition at different orientations and depths. 10 figs.

  7. Determination of Complex Microcalorimeter Parameters with Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saab, T.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Finkbeiner, F.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lindeman, M. A.; Porter, F. S.; Sadleir, J.

    2005-01-01

    The proper understanding and modeling of a microcalorimeter s response requires the accurate knowledge of a handful of parameters, such as C, G, alpha, . . . . While a few of these, such 8s the normal state resistance and the total thermal conductance to the heat bath (G) are directly determined from the DC IV characteristics, some others, notoriously the heat capacity (C) and alpha, appear in degenerate combinations in most measurable quantities. The case of a complex microcalorimeter, i.e. one in which the absorber s heat capacity is connected by a finite thermal impedance to the sensor, and subsequently by another thermal impedance to the heat bath, results in an added ambiguity in the determination of the individual C's and G's. In general, the dependence of the microcalorimeter s complex impedance on these parameters varies with frequency. This variation allows us to determine the individual parameters by fitting the prediction of the microcalorimeter model to the impedance data. We describe in this paper our efforts at characterizing the Goddard X-ray microcalorimeters. Using the parameters determined with this method we them compare the pulse shape and noise spectra predicted by the microcalorimeter model to data taken with the same devices.

  8. Contactless impedance sensors and their application to flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Opekar, František; Tůma, Petr; Stulík, Karel

    2013-02-27

    The paper provides a critical discussion of the present state of the theory of high-frequency impedance sensors (now mostly called contactless impedance or conductivity sensors), the principal approaches employed in designing impedance flow-through cells and their operational parameters. In addition to characterization of traditional types of impedance sensors, the article is concerned with the use of less common sensors, such as cells with wire electrodes or planar cells. There is a detailed discussion of the effect of the individual operational parameters (width and shape of the electrodes, detection gap, frequency and amplitude of the input signal) on the response of the detector. The most important problems to be resolved in coupling these devices with flow-through measurements in the liquid phase are also discussed. Examples are given of cell designs for continuous flow and flow-injection analyses and of detection systems for miniaturized liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. New directions for the use of these sensors in molecular biology and chemical reactors and some directions for future development are outlined.

  9. Monitoring early zeolite formation via in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brabants, G; Lieben, S; Breynaert, E; Reichel, E K; Taulelle, F; Martens, J A; Jakoby, B; Kirschhock, C E A

    2016-04-01

    Hitherto zeolite formation has not been fully understood. Although electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has proven to be a versatile tool for characterizing ionic solutions, it was never used for monitoring zeolite growth. We show here that EIS can quantitatively monitor zeolite formation, especially during crucial early steps where other methods fall short. PMID:27020096

  10. Adaptive mesh refinement techniques for electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Molinari, M; Cox, S J; Blott, B H; Daniell, G J

    2001-02-01

    Adaptive mesh refinement techniques can be applied to increase the efficiency of electrical impedance tomography reconstruction algorithms by reducing computational and storage cost as well as providing problem-dependent solution structures. A self-adaptive refinement algorithm based on an a posteriori error estimate has been developed and its results are shown in comparison with uniform mesh refinement for a simple head model.

  11. Tunable nanogap devices for ultra-sensitive electrochemical impedance biosensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong; Guo, Zheng; Song, Jing-Jing; Huang, Qin-An; Zhu, Si-Wei; Huang, Xing-Jiu; Wei, Yan

    2016-01-28

    A wealth of research has been available discussing nanogap devices for detecting very small quantities of biomolecules by observing their electrical behavior generally performed in dry conditions. We report that a gold nanogapped electrode with tunable gap length for ultra-sensitive detection of streptavidin based on electrochemical impedance technique. The gold nanogap is fabricated using simple monolayer film deposition and in-situ growth of gold nanoparticles in a traditional interdigitated array (IDA) microelectrode. The electrochemical impedance biosensor with a 25-nm nanogap is found to be ultra-sensitive to the specific binding of streptavidin to biotin. The binding of the streptavidin hinder the electron transfer between two electrodes, resulting in a large increase in electron-transfer resistance (Ret) for operating the impedance. A linear relation between the relative Ret and the logarithmic value of streptavidin concentration is observed in the concentration range from 1 pM (picomolar) to 100 nM (nanomolar). The lowest detectable concentration actually measured reaches 1 pM. We believe that such an electrochemical impedance nanogap biosensor provides a useful approach towards biomolecular detection that could be extended to a number of other systems. PMID:26755137

  12. On-chip electrical impedance tomography for imaging biological cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Tsuda, Soichiro; Zauner, Klaus-Peter; Morgan, Hywel

    2010-01-15

    Electrical impedance tomography is an imaging technology that spatially characterizes the electrical properties of an object. We present a miniaturized electrical impedance tomography system that can image the electrical conductivity distribution within a two-dimensional cell culture. A chip containing a circular 16-electrode array was fabricated using printed circuit board developing technology and used to inject current and to measure spatial voltage across the object. The signal stimulation and voltage data acquisition were performed using an impedance analyzer, operating in four-electrode mode. An open source software, EIDORS was used for image reconstruction. Finite element modelling was used to simulate the image reconstruction process by imaging two ellipsoidal phantoms in the circular 16-electrode array. The effect of the regularization parameter in the reconstruction algorithm and the influence from noise on the fidelity of the images has been numerically analyzed. Experimentally, we show reconstructed images of a multi-nuclear single cellular organism, Physarum Polycephalum, demonstrating the first step towards impedance imaging of single cells in culture. Our system provides a non-invasive lab-on-a-chip technology for spatially mapping the electrical properties of single cells, which would be significant and useful for diagnostic and clinical applications.

  13. An experimental technique for determining middle ear impedance.

    PubMed

    Blayney, A W; McAvoy, G J; Rice, H J; Williams, K R

    1996-03-01

    A two-microphone technique was used to determine the middle ear impedance of a live subject. The procedure involved the application of standing wave tube theory and the assumption that the ear canal behaves like an homogeneous cylinder with plane acoustic wave propagation up to a certain frequency--2 kHz for the current analysis. During experimentation the subject lay on a bench with his head braced against a wooden fixture. Acoustic pressures were recorded from the ear canal by the use of a spectrum analyser and probe microphones with flexible tips. Resultant impedance curves show middle ear natural frequencies at 831 Hz and 1,970 Hz with high levels of damping. The reactive impedance curves show the influence of stiffness and ossicular mass on middle ear sound transmission. An advantage of the approach is that using features of the recorded data it is possible to calculate the effective probe tip to eardrum distance required for the calculation of the middle ear impedance. The two-microphone technique appears to be a promising tool for assessing healthy and diseased middle ear function. PMID:8725514

  14. Tests Of Shear-Flow Model For Acoustic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrot, Tony L.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    1992-01-01

    Tests described in report conducted to validate two-dimensional shear-flow analytical model for determination of acoustic impedance of acoustic liner in grazing-incidence, grazing-flow environment by use of infinite-waveguide method. Tests successful for both upstream and downstream propagations. Work has potential for utility in testing of engine ducts in commercial aircraft.

  15. BIOELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE VECTOR ANALYSIS IDENTIFIES SARCOPENIA IN NURSING HOME RESIDENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Loss of muscle mass and water shifts between body compartments are contributing factors to frailty in the elderly. The body composition changes are especially pronounced in institutionalized elderly. We investigated the ability of single-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) to identify b...

  16. Multi-Electrode Impedance Method for Detection of Regional Ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Norio; Sakamoto, Katsuyuki

    2013-04-01

    By means of computer simulation and experiment, we investigated the feasibility of simultaneously measuring the transfer impedance changes in the right apex, left apex, right base and left base of the lungs using the multi-electrode impedance method. To obtain the transfer impedance in each region, while suppressing the effects of other regions, changing the amplitude and polarity of the applied current must localize the high sensitivity areas in the interest region. Twelve current and eight voltage electrodes were equidistantly arranged on the anterior and posterior chest walls. The amplitudes and polarities of the currents that were simultaneously applied to the current electrodes, and which provided the appropriate sensitivity distribution, were theoretically obtained. The effects of the localized sensitivity distribution were verified by comparing the simulation results of the investigated method with the results of the conventional four-electrode method. From the results of the computer simulation, we developed a multi-electrode impedance pneumography and applied it to healthy adult volunteers who were both in sitting position and in left decubitus. We found that the measurement results were physiologically reasonable.

  17. Temperature dependence of liquid crystals electrical response by impedance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. C.; Gaona, N.; Pérez, I.; Urruchi, V.; Pena, J. M. S.

    2007-05-01

    Liquid crystals are a growing technology bringing solutions for a number of applications in high performance displays featuring video-rate, color and high resolution images, and in prototypes of photonic devices. Electrooptic response of antiferroelectric liquid crystals (AFLC) might be superior to nematic liquid crystals that are been customarily employed nowadays. AFLC show reduced time response being promising candidates for portable multimedia devices, optical routing applications, among others. In this work, temperature and frequency dependence of impedance measurements, in passive devices of commercial antiferroelectric liquid crystals, has been studied. Measurements of the temperature dependence of optical transmission have been obtained. 1Hz triangular waveforms with different amplitude have been applied to the devices to carry out such characterization. Simultaneous measurements of optical transmission and electrical impedance have been performed. Specific addressing schemes have been tested in order to obtain the optimum electrooptical performance. Display blanking takes place when a saturation pulse is applied. Results achieved show that increasing temperature shifts the dynamic range of the analogue grayscale towards lower voltages. Impedance analysis of these devices upon switching has been performed as well. Temperature and frequency dependence of the impedance measurements have been characterized. Negative phase responses show there is a combined capacitive and resistive behavior. As the frequency increases the capacitive effect grows. Magnitude shows a linear decrease on a log-log frequency scale. As temperature increases, phase profile becomes slight more complex. New capacitive effects are suggested in a model of the electric response of AFLC cells at low frequencies.

  18. Challenges of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in protein biosensing.

    PubMed

    Bogomolova, A; Komarova, E; Reber, K; Gerasimov, T; Yavuz, O; Bhatt, S; Aldissi, M

    2009-05-15

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement, performed in the presence of a redox agent, is a convenient method to measure molecular interactions of electrochemically inactive compounds taking place on the electrode surface. High sensitivity of the method, being highly advantageous, can be also associated with nonspecific impedance changes that could be easily mistaken for specific interactions. Therefore, it is necessary to be aware of all possible causes and perform parallel control experiments to rule them out. We present the results obtained during the early stages of aptamer-based sensor development, utilizing a model system of human alpha thrombin interacting with a thiolated DNA aptamer, immobilized on gold electrodes. EIS measurements took place in the presence of iron ferrocyanides. In addition to known method limitations, that is, inability to discriminate between specific and nonspecific binding (both causing impedance increase), we have found other factors leading to nonspecific impedance changes, such as: (i) initial electrode contamination; (ii) repetitive measurements; (iii) additional cyclic voltammetry (CV) or differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) measurements; and (iv) additional incubations in the buffer between measurements, which have never been discussed before. We suggest ways to overcome the method limitations.

  19. Domain identification in impedance computed tomography by spline collocation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Fumio

    1990-01-01

    A method for estimating an unknown domain in elliptic boundary value problems is considered. The problem is formulated as an inverse problem of integral equations of the second kind. A computational method is developed using a splice collocation scheme. The results can be applied to the inverse problem of impedance computed tomography (ICT) for image reconstruction.

  20. 21 CFR 874.1090 - Auditory impedance tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1090 Auditory impedance tester. (a... evaluate the functional condition of the middle ear. The device is used to determine abnormalities in the mobility of the tympanic membrane due to stiffness, flaccidity, or the presence of fluid in the middle...

  1. 21 CFR 874.1090 - Auditory impedance tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1090 Auditory impedance tester. (a... evaluate the functional condition of the middle ear. The device is used to determine abnormalities in the mobility of the tympanic membrane due to stiffness, flaccidity, or the presence of fluid in the middle...

  2. 21 CFR 874.1090 - Auditory impedance tester.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1090 Auditory impedance tester. (a... evaluate the functional condition of the middle ear. The device is used to determine abnormalities in the mobility of the tympanic membrane due to stiffness, flaccidity, or the presence of fluid in the middle...

  3. Organic electrochemical transistors for cell-based impedance sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Rivnay, Jonathan E-mail: owens@emse.fr; Ramuz, Marc; Hama, Adel; Huerta, Miriam; Owens, Roisin M. E-mail: owens@emse.fr; Leleux, Pierre

    2015-01-26

    Electrical impedance sensing of biological systems, especially cultured epithelial cell layers, is now a common technique to monitor cell motion, morphology, and cell layer/tissue integrity for high throughput toxicology screening. Existing methods to measure electrical impedance most often rely on a two electrode configuration, where low frequency signals are challenging to obtain for small devices and for tissues with high resistance, due to low current. Organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) are conducting polymer-based devices, which have been shown to efficiently transduce and amplify low-level ionic fluxes in biological systems into electronic output signals. In this work, we combine OECT-based drain current measurements with simultaneous measurement of more traditional impedance sensing using the gate current to produce complex impedance traces, which show low error at both low and high frequencies. We apply this technique in vitro to a model epithelial tissue layer and show that the data can be fit to an equivalent circuit model yielding trans-epithelial resistance and cell layer capacitance values in agreement with literature. Importantly, the combined measurement allows for low biases across the cell layer, while still maintaining good broadband signal.

  4. Shunt impedance measurement of the APS BBC injector.

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.-E.; Lewellen, J. W.

    2006-01-01

    The injector test stand (ITS) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) presently incorporates a ballistic bunch compression (BBC) gun, and it is used as a beam source for a number of experiments, including THz generation, beam position monitor testing for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), novel cathode testing, and radiation therapy source development. The BBC gun uses three independently powered and phased rf cavities, one cathode cell, and two full cells to provide beam energies from 2 to 10 MeV with variable energy spread, energy chirp, and, to an extent, bunch duration. The shunt impedance of an rf accelerator determines how effectively the accelerator can convert supplied rf power to accelerating gradient. The calculation of the shunt impedance can be complicated if the beam energy changes substantially during its transit through a cavity, such as in a cathode cell. We present the results of direct measurements of the shunt impedance of the APS BBC gun on an individual cavity basis, including the cathode cell, and report on achieved gradients. We also present a comparison of the measured shunt impedance with theoretical values calculated from the rf models of the cavities.

  5. Scattering from impedance gratings and surface wave formation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenhao; Stinson, Michael R; Daigle, Gilles A

    2002-05-01

    The scattering problem of acoustic plane waves from comb-like impedance gratings on a rigid surface has been investigated in this paper. A rigorous analytic approach for homogeneous plane-wave incidence is presented based on the periodicity of the grating structure, in which the problem was solved as a mixed boundary value problem and the scattered field was represented by the tangent velocity difference across a partition wall of the grating. A singular integral equation has been derived for the tangent velocity difference, which can directly be solved with the Gauss-Chebyshev procedure. The resulting solution consists of a series of Bloch-Floquet waves (plane bulk wave and surface wave modes) with explicit expressions for the expansion coefficients. When the grating period is much less than the incident wavelength (ka < 1), the grating structure is equivalent to a plane impedance surface and no surface waves can be excited with homogeneous plane-wave incidence. When the grating period is comparable to the incident wavelength, resonance phenomena are predicted under certain conditions and surface waves can form, even with homogeneous plane-wave incidence. The dispersion relation for surface waves has also been examined. The impedance effects of the grating on the reflection and diffraction waves as well as on the dispersion and formation of surface waves have been studied, with the acoustically hard grating being the special case of the general impedance grating.

  6. Combined electromechanical impedance and fiber optic diagnosis of aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlavin, Jon; Zagrai, Andrei; Clemens, Rebecca; Black, Richard J.; Costa, Joey; Moslehi, Behzad; Patel, Ronak; Sotoudeh, Vahid; Faridian, Fereydoun

    2014-03-01

    Electromechanical impedance is a popular diagnostic method for assessing structural conditions at high frequencies. It has been utilized, and shown utility, in aeronautic, space, naval, civil, mechanical, and other types of structures. By contrast, fiber optic sensing initially found its niche in static strain measurement and low frequency structural dynamic testing. Any low frequency limitations of the fiber optic sensing, however, are mainly governed by its hardware elements. As hardware improves, so does the bandwidth (frequency range * number of sensors) provided by the appropriate enabling fiber optic sensor interrogation system. In this contribution we demonstrate simultaneous high frequency measurements using fiber optic and electromechanical impedance structural health monitoring technologies. A laboratory specimen imitating an aircraft wing structure, incorporating surfaces with adjustable boundary conditions, was instrumented with piezoelectric and fiber optic sensors. Experiments were conducted at different structural boundary conditions associated with deterioration of structural health. High frequency dynamic responses were collected at multiple locations on a laboratory wing specimen and conclusions were drawn about correspondence between structural damage and dynamic signatures as well as correlation between electromechanical impedance and fiber optic sensors spectra. Theoretical investigation of the effect of boundary conditions on electromechanical impedance spectra is presented and connection to low frequency structural dynamics is suggested. It is envisioned that acquisition of high frequency structural dynamic responses with multiple fiber optic sensors may open new diagnostic capabilities for fiber optic sensing technologies.

  7. Frequency-dependent shear impedance of the tectorial membrane.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jianwen Wendy; Hemmert, Werner; Freeman, Dennis M; Aranyosi, A J

    2008-09-01

    Microscale mechanical probes were designed and bulk-fabricated for applying shearing forces to biological tissues. These probes were used to measure shear impedance of the tectorial membrane (TM) in two dimensions. Forces were applied in the radial and longitudinal directions at frequencies ranging from 0.01-9 kHz and amplitudes from 0.02-4 microN. The force applied was determined by measuring the deflection of the probes' cantilever arms. TM impedance in the radial direction had a magnitude of 63 +/- 28 mN x s/m at 10 Hz and fell with frequency by 16 +/- 0.4 dB/decade, with a constant phase of -72 +/- 6 degrees . In the longitudinal direction, impedance was 36 +/- 9 mN x s/m at 10 Hz and fell by 19 +/- 0.4 dB/decade, with a constant phase of -78 +/- 4 degrees . Impedance was nearly constant as a function of force except at the highest forces, for which it fell slightly. These results show that the viscoelastic properties of the TM extend over a significant range of audio frequencies, consistent with a poroelastic interpretation of TM mechanics. The shear modulus G' determined from these measurements was 17-50 kPa, which is larger than in species with a lower auditory frequency range. This value suggests that hair bundles cannot globally shear the TM, but most likely cause bulk TM motion. PMID:18515382

  8. Monitoring early zeolite formation via in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brabants, G; Lieben, S; Breynaert, E; Reichel, E K; Taulelle, F; Martens, J A; Jakoby, B; Kirschhock, C E A

    2016-04-01

    Hitherto zeolite formation has not been fully understood. Although electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has proven to be a versatile tool for characterizing ionic solutions, it was never used for monitoring zeolite growth. We show here that EIS can quantitatively monitor zeolite formation, especially during crucial early steps where other methods fall short.

  9. Instantaneous Respiratory Estimation from Thoracic Impedance by Empirical Mode Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu-Tai; Chan, Hsiao-Lung; Wang, Chun-Li; Jian, Hung-Ming; Lin, Sheng-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Impedance plethysmography provides a way to measure respiratory activity by sensing the change of thoracic impedance caused by inspiration and expiration. This measurement imposes little pressure on the body and uses the human body as the sensor, thereby reducing the need for adjustments as body position changes and making it suitable for long-term or ambulatory monitoring. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD) can decompose a signal into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) that disclose nonstationary components as well as stationary components and, similarly, capture respiratory episodes from thoracic impedance. However, upper-body movements usually produce motion artifacts that are not easily removed by digital filtering. Moreover, large motion artifacts disable the EMD to decompose respiratory components. In this paper, motion artifacts are detected and replaced by the data mirrored from the prior and the posterior before EMD processing. A novel intrinsic respiratory reconstruction index that considers both global and local properties of IMFs is proposed to define respiration-related IMFs for respiration reconstruction and instantaneous respiratory estimation. Based on the experiments performing a series of static and dynamic physical activates, our results showed the proposed method had higher cross correlations between respiratory frequencies estimated from thoracic impedance and those from oronasal airflow based on small window size compared to the Fourier transform-based method. PMID:26198231

  10. Brush Seal Would Impede Flow Of Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Paul F.; Easter, Barry P.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed brush seal helps prevent recirculating flow of hot combustion gases from reaching bellows seal located deep in gap in wall of combustion chamber. More durable, more tolerant of irregularities, and easier to install. Seals also helpful in impeding deleterious flows of hot gases in other combustion chambers such as those of furnaces and turbomachines.

  11. Contactless Impedance Sensors and Their Application to Flow Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Opekar, František; Tůma, Petr; Štulík, Karel

    2013-01-01

    The paper provides a critical discussion of the present state of the theory of high-frequency impedance sensors (now mostly called contactless impedance or conductivity sensors), the principal approaches employed in designing impedance flow-through cells and their operational parameters. In addition to characterization of traditional types of impedance sensors, the article is concerned with the use of less common sensors, such as cells with wire electrodes or planar cells. There is a detailed discussion of the effect of the individual operational parameters (width and shape of the electrodes, detection gap, frequency and amplitude of the input signal) on the response of the detector. The most important problems to be resolved in coupling these devices with flow-through measurements in the liquid phase are also discussed. Examples are given of cell designs for continuous flow and flow-injection analyses and of detection systems for miniaturized liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. New directions for the use of these sensors in molecular biology and chemical reactors and some directions for future development are outlined. PMID:23447011

  12. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Active Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance in two coupled degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) was quantified when muscles were active. Measurements were performed at five different target activation levels of tibialis anterior and soleus, from 10% to 30% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with increments of 5% MVC. Interestingly, several ankle behaviors characterized in our previous study of the relaxed ankle were observed with muscles active: ankle mechanical impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness; stiffness was greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane at all activation conditions for all subjects; and the coupling between dorsiflexion–plantarflexion and inversion–eversion was small—the two DOF measurements were well explained by a strictly diagonal impedance matrix. In general, ankle stiffness increased linearly with muscle activation in all directions in the 2-D space formed by the sagittal and frontal planes, but more in the sagittal than in the frontal plane, resulting in an accentuated “peanut shape.” This characterization of young healthy subjects’ ankle mechanical impedance with active muscles will serve as a baseline to investigate pathophysiological ankle behaviors of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. PMID:25203497

  13. Some practical biological phantoms for calibrating multifrequency electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Holder, D S; Hanquan, Y; Rao, A

    1996-11-01

    Three groups of materials have been assessed with a Hewlett-Packard 4284A impedance analyser and Sheffield Mark 1 electrical impedance tomography (EIT) system for suitability for calibration of multifrequency EIT systems. They were required to be easy to use, stable over several hours, and have complex impedance similar to biological tissue. The groups were: (i) inorganic materials including barium titanate, polystyrene microspheres and fumed silica, all in aqueous suspension; these had phase angles below 1 degrees and so were unsuitable. (ii) Cucumber in KCl solution. Cucumber cortex had a phase angle of 40 degrees at a centre frequency of 50 kHz. Contrast between the cucumber and bathing solution could be selected by varying the KCl concentration. (iii) Polyurethane sponge immersed in packed red cells. The phase angle of packed cells was about 25 degrees at 1 MHz. Sponge resistivities and permittivities when immersed in packed cells were 5-20% higher than the bathing solution itself, for densities of 2-6.2% w/v. Both the biological materials appear suitable for the intended purpose; system (iii) is inherently more stable, and has capacitance in both bathing medium and test object. If an initial accuracy of greater than about +/- 15% is required, direct measurement with an impedance analyser is recommended prior to imaging studies.

  14. Prevalence of child malnutrition at a university hospital using the World Health Organization criteria and bioelectrical impedance data

    PubMed Central

    Pileggi, V.N.; Monteiro, J.P.; Margutti, A.V.B.; Camelo, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition constitutes a major public health concern worldwide and serves as an indicator of hospitalized patients’ prognosis. Although various methods with which to conduct nutritional assessments exist, large hospitals seldom employ them to diagnose malnutrition. The aim of this study was to understand the prevalence of child malnutrition at the University Hospital of the Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São, Brazil. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted to compare the nutritional status of 292 hospitalized children with that of a healthy control group (n=234). Information regarding patients’ weight, height, and bioelectrical impedance (i.e., bioelectrical impedance vector analysis) was obtained, and the phase angle was calculated. Using the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, 35.27% of the patients presented with malnutrition; specifically, 16.10% had undernutrition and 19.17% were overweight. Classification according to the bioelectrical impedance results of nutritional status was more sensitive than the WHO criteria: of the 55.45% of patients with malnutrition, 51.25% exhibited undernutrition and 4.20% were overweight. After applying the WHO criteria in the unpaired control group (n=234), we observed that 100.00% of the subjects were eutrophic; however, 23.34% of the controls were malnourished according to impedance analysis. The phase angle was significantly lower in the hospitalized group than in the control group (P<0.05). Therefore, this study suggests that a protocol to obtain patients’ weight and height must be followed, and bioimpedance data must be examined upon hospital admission of all children. PMID:26840712

  15. Shock Hugoniot Behavior of Mixed Phases with Widely Varying Shock Impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reaugh, John; Lee, Edward

    1997-07-01

    The shock velocity dependence on shock pressure in composite explosive materials containing polymeric materials is known to exhibit marked non-linear behavior in the Us - up plane at low pressures. This is in addition to the non-linear behavior noted in pure polymeric materials. The precise description of this behavior is important in analyzing the response of energetic materials to impact shocks. We will show that the mismatch of the shock impedances in such materials as rocket propellants composed of polymer binder, aluminum, and ammonium perchlorate can be expected to exhibit a very large initial slope of the shock velocity, Us, dependence on the particle velocity, up. This slope is simply a result of the equilibration of Hugoniot pressure amongst the phases. With accurate descriptions for the equations of state of the individual components, we successfully predict the extreme slope at low compression. The effect is primarily due to the very large compression of the polymeric phase at relatively low volumetric compression of the whole mixture. Examples are shown and compared with available experimental results.

  16. Microfluidic Impedance Flow Cytometry Enabling High-Throughput Single-Cell Electrical Property Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Xue, Chengcheng; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Deyong; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Junbo

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for high-throughput electrical property characterization of single cells. Four major perspectives of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell characterization are included in this review: (1) early developments of microfluidic impedance flow cytometry for single-cell electrical property characterization; (2) microfluidic impedance flow cytometry with enhanced sensitivity; (3) microfluidic impedance and optical flow cytometry for single-cell analysis and (4) integrated point of care system based on microfluidic impedance flow cytometry. We examine the advantages and limitations of each technique and discuss future research opportunities from the perspectives of both technical innovation and clinical applications. PMID:25938973

  17. Direction and Description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Menahem, Yemima

    This paper deals with the dependence of directionality in the course of events-or our claims concerning such directionality-on the modes of description we use in speaking of the events in question. I argue that criteria of similarity and individuation play a crucial role in assessments of directionality. This is an extension of Davidson's claim regarding the difference between causal and explanatory contexts. The argument is based on a characterisation of notions of necessity and contingency that differ from their modal logic counterparts on the one hand, and from causality and chance on the other. I show that some types of directionality are perfectly compatible with both determinism and indeterminism at the microscopic level, and that there is no likelihood of, or advantage to, reducing such directionality to other laws or causal processes.

  18. Symmetrical gait descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunajewski, Adam; Dusza, Jacek J.; Rosado Muñoz, Alfredo

    2014-11-01

    The article presents a proposal for the description of human gait as a periodic and symmetric process. Firstly, the data for researches was obtained in the Laboratory of Group SATI in the School of Engineering of University of Valencia. Then, the periodical model - Mean Double Step (MDS) was made. Finally, on the basis of MDS, the symmetrical models - Left Mean Double Step and Right Mean Double Step (LMDS and RMDS) could be created. The method of various functional extensions was used. Symmetrical gait models can be used to calculate the coefficients of asymmetry at any time or phase of the gait. In this way it is possible to create asymmetry, function which better describes human gait dysfunction. The paper also describes an algorithm for calculating symmetric models, and shows exemplary results based on the experimental data.

  19. Task Description Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Reid; Apfelbaum, David

    2005-01-01

    Task Description Language (TDL) is an extension of the C++ programming language that enables programmers to quickly and easily write complex, concurrent computer programs for controlling real-time autonomous systems, including robots and spacecraft. TDL is based on earlier work (circa 1984 through 1989) on the Task Control Architecture (TCA). TDL provides syntactic support for hierarchical task-level control functions, including task decomposition, synchronization, execution monitoring, and exception handling. A Java-language-based compiler transforms TDL programs into pure C++ code that includes calls to a platform-independent task-control-management (TCM) library. TDL has been used to control and coordinate multiple heterogeneous robots in projects sponsored by NASA and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). It has also been used in Brazil to control an autonomous airship and in Canada to control a robotic manipulator.

  20. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  1. An investigation of the diffraction of an acoustic plane wave by a curved surface of finite impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, James Andrew

    1990-08-01

    The diffraction effects which would occur near the tops of hills and ridges was analyzed. The diffraction of a high frequency plane wave due to its grazing of a two-dimensional curved surface of finite impedance was studied. Laboratory scale models were constructed and measurements were made of the field on, above, and behind either of two curved surfaces possessing distinctly different impedances; that is, one was soft while the other was hard. The experimental technique consisted of simultaneously measuring the pressure at a reference point and at a field point due to a transient pulse generated by an electric spark. The pressure waveforms were digitized and processed. The ratio of the discrete Fourier transforms of the two waveforms provided an estimate of the insertion loss between them. The results of the measurements were compared with the predictions of theory which was derived by Pierce using the method of matched asymptotic expansions (MAE). The predictions relied upon the experimental evaluation of the impedance of each surface at grazing angles of incidence. This evaluation was achieved by a fairly standard technique involving empirical models of various generic types of surfaces. An example was shown of the important role that the structural intricacies of a surface play in the determination of an appropriate model. The comparison between the measurements and predictions clearly indicated that the theory gives an excellent description of the field anywhere near a curved surface. The theory was also shown to give nearly as good of a description of the field surrounding a curved surface even at distances far behind the surface yet near the line of sight.

  2. A Investigation of the Diffraction of AN Acoustic Plane Wave by a Curved Surface of Finite Impedance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, James Andrew

    Phenomena associated with long range propagation of sound over irregular topography motivated the research work which was described in this thesis. Specifically,the goal of the work was to analyze the diffraction effects which would occur near the tops of hills and ridges. From this particular goal, the research work evolved into a study of the diffraction of a high frequency plane wave due to its grazing of a two-dimensional curved surface of finite impedance. Laboratory scale models were constructed and measurements were made of the field on, above, and behind either of two curved surfaces possessing distinctly different impedances; that is, one was soft while the other was hard. The experimental technique consisted of simultaneously measuring the pressure at a reference point and at a field point due to a transient pulse generated by an electric spark. The pressure waveforms were digitized and processed. As described in the thesis, the ratio of the discrete Fourier transforms of the two waveforms provided an estimate of the insertion loss between them. The results of the measurements were compared with the predictions of a theory which was derived by Pierce using the method of Matched Asymptotic Expansions (MAE). The predictions relied upon the experimental evaluation of the impedance of each surface at grazing angles of incidence. This evaluation was achieved by a fairly standard technique involving empirical models of various generic types of surfaces. An example was shown of the important role that the structural intricacies of a surface play in the determination of an appropriate model. The comparison between the measurements and predictions clearly indicated that the theory gives an excellent description of the field anywhere near a curved surface. Further, with a simple modification, the theory was also shown to give nearly as good of a description of the field surrounding a curved surface even at distances far behind the surface yet near the line of sight.

  3. An investigation of the diffraction of an acoustic plane wave by a curved surface of finite impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, James A.

    1989-12-01

    Phenomena associated with long range propagation of sound over irregular topography motivated this work, which was to analyze the diffraction effects which would occur near the tops of hills and ridges. The diffraction of a high frequency plane wave due to its grazing of a two-dimensional curved surface of finite impedance was also studied. Laboratory scale models were constructed and measurements were made of the field on, above, and behind either of two curved surfaces possessing distinctly different impedances; that is, one was soft while the other was hard. The experimental technique consisted of simultaneously measuring the pressure at a reference point and at a field point due to a transient pulse generated by an electric spark. The pressure waveforms were digitized and processed. The ratio of the discrete Fourier transforms of the two waveforms provided an estimate of the insertion loss between them. The results of the measurements were compared with the predictions of a theory which was derived by Pierce using the method of Matched Asymptotic Expansions (MAE). The predictions relied upon the experimental evaluation of the impedance of each surface at grazing angles of incidence. This evaluation was achieved by a fairly standard technique involving empirical models of various generic types of surfaces. An example was shown of the important role that the structural intricacies of a surface play in the determination of an appropriate model. The comparison between the measurements and predictions indicated that the theory gives an excellent description of the field anywhere near a curved surface. Further, with a simple modification, the theory was also shown to give nearly as good of a description of the field surrounding a curved surface even at distances far behind the surface yet near the line of sight.

  4. Time-Varying Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Human Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Hogan, Neville

    2015-09-01

    In human locomotion, we continuously modulate joint mechanical impedance of the lower limb (hip, knee, and ankle) either voluntarily or reflexively to accommodate environmental changes and maintain stable interaction. Ankle mechanical impedance plays a pivotal role at the interface between the neuro-mechanical system and the physical world. This paper reports, for the first time, a characterization of human ankle mechanical impedance in two degrees-of-freedom simultaneously as it varies with time during walking. Ensemble-based linear time-varying system identification methods implemented with a wearable ankle robot, Anklebot, enabled reliable estimation of ankle mechanical impedance from the pre-swing phase through the entire swing phase to the early-stance phase. This included heel-strike and toe-off, key events in the transition from the swing to stance phase or vice versa. Time-varying ankle mechanical impedance was accurately approximated by a second order model consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness in both inversion-eversion and dorsiflexion-plantarflexion directions, as observed in our previous steady-state dynamic studies. We found that viscosity and stiffness of the ankle significantly decreased at the end of the stance phase before toe-off, remained relatively constant across the swing phase, and increased around heel-strike. Closer investigation around heel-strike revealed that viscosity and stiffness in both planes increased before heel-strike occurred. This finding is important evidence of "pretuning" by the central nervous system. In addition, viscosity and stiffness were greater in the sagittal plane than in the frontal plane across all subgait phases, except the early stance phase. Comparison with previous studies and implications for clinical study of neurologically impaired patients are provided.

  5. Study of Influence of Electrode Geometry on Impedance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Riaz; Reifsnider, Kenneth L

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is a powerful and proven tool for analyzing AC impedance response. A conventional three electrode EIS method was used to perform the investigation in the present study. Saturated potassium chloride solution was used as the electrolyte and three different material rods were used as working electrodes. Different configurations of electrode area were exposed to the electrolyte as an active area to investigate electrode geometry effects. Counter to working electrode distance was also altered while keeping the working electrode effective area constant to explore the AC response dependence on the variation of ion travel distance. Some controlled experiments were done to validate the experimental setup and to provide a control condition for comparison with experimental results. A frequency range of 100 mHz to 1 MHz was used for all experiments. In our analysis, we have found a noteworthy influence of electrode geometry on AC impedance response. For all electrodes, impedance decreases with the increase of effective area of the electrolyte. High frequency impedance is not as dependent on geometry as low frequency response. The observed phase shift angle drops in the high frequency region with increased working electrode area, whereas at low frequency the reverse is true. Resistance and capacitive reactance both decrease with an increase of area, but resistance response is more pronounce than reactance. For lower frequencies, small changes in working area produce very distinctive EIS variations. Electrode material as well as geometry was systematically varied in the present study. From these and other studies, we hope to develop a fundamental foundation for understanding specific changes in local geometry in fuel cell (and other) electrodes as a method of designing local morphology for specific performance.

  6. A mathematical model for electrical impedance spectroscopy of zwitterionic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Feicht, Sarah E; Khair, Aditya S

    2016-08-17

    We report a mathematical model for ion transport and electrical impedance in zwitterionic hydrogels, which possess acidic and basic functional groups that carry a net charge at a pH not equal to the isoelectric point. Such hydrogels can act as an electro-mechanical interface between a relatively hard biosensor and soft tissue in the body. For this application, the electrical impedance of the hydrogel must be characterized to ensure that ion transport to the biosensor is not significantly hindered. The electrical impedance is the ratio of the applied voltage to the measured current. We consider a simple model system, wherein an oscillating voltage is applied across a hydrogel immersed in electrolyte and sandwiched between parallel, blocking electrodes. We employ the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations coupled with acid-base dissociation reactions for the charge on the hydrogel backbone to model the ionic transport across the hydrogel. The electrical impedance is calculated from the numerical solution to the PNP equations and subsequently analyzed via an equivalent circuit model to extract the hydrogel capacitance, resistance, and the capacitance of electrical double layers at the electrode-hydrogel interface. For example, we predict that an increase in pH from the isoelectric point, pH = 6.4 for a model PCBMA hydrogel, to pH = 8 reduces the resistance of the hydrogel by ∼40% and increases the double layer capacitance by ∼250% at an electrolyte concentration of 0.1 mM. The significant impact of charged hydrogel functional groups to the impedance is damped at higher electrolyte concentration.

  7. Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance with relaxed muscles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2014-11-01

    Neurological or biomechanical disorders may distort ankle mechanical impedance and thereby impair locomotor function. This paper presents a quantitative characterization of multivariable ankle mechanical impedance of young healthy subjects when their muscles were relaxed, to serve as a baseline to compare with pathophysiological ankle properties of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. Measurements using a highly backdrivable wearable ankle robot combined with multi-input multi-output stochastic system identification methods enabled reliable characterization of ankle mechanical impedance in two degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) simultaneously, the sagittal and frontal planes. The characterization included important ankle properties unavailable from single DOF studies: coupling between DOFs and anisotropy as a function of frequency. Ankle impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness in both seated (knee flexed) and standing (knee straightened) postures. Stiffness in the sagittal plane was greater than in the frontal plane and furthermore, was greater when standing than when seated, most likely due to the stretch of bi-articular muscles (medial and lateral gastrocnemius). Very low off-diagonal partial coherences implied negligible coupling between dorsiflexion-plantarflexion and inversion-eversion. The directions of principal axes were tilted slightly counterclockwise from the original joint coordinates. The directional variation (anisotropy) of ankle impedance in the 2-D space formed by rotations in the sagittal and frontal planes exhibited a characteristic "peanut" shape, weak in inversion-eversion over a wide range of frequencies from the stiffness dominated region up to the inertia dominated region. Implications for the assessment of neurological and biomechanical impairments are discussed.

  8. A mathematical model for electrical impedance spectroscopy of zwitterionic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Feicht, Sarah E; Khair, Aditya S

    2016-08-17

    We report a mathematical model for ion transport and electrical impedance in zwitterionic hydrogels, which possess acidic and basic functional groups that carry a net charge at a pH not equal to the isoelectric point. Such hydrogels can act as an electro-mechanical interface between a relatively hard biosensor and soft tissue in the body. For this application, the electrical impedance of the hydrogel must be characterized to ensure that ion transport to the biosensor is not significantly hindered. The electrical impedance is the ratio of the applied voltage to the measured current. We consider a simple model system, wherein an oscillating voltage is applied across a hydrogel immersed in electrolyte and sandwiched between parallel, blocking electrodes. We employ the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations coupled with acid-base dissociation reactions for the charge on the hydrogel backbone to model the ionic transport across the hydrogel. The electrical impedance is calculated from the numerical solution to the PNP equations and subsequently analyzed via an equivalent circuit model to extract the hydrogel capacitance, resistance, and the capacitance of electrical double layers at the electrode-hydrogel interface. For example, we predict that an increase in pH from the isoelectric point, pH = 6.4 for a model PCBMA hydrogel, to pH = 8 reduces the resistance of the hydrogel by ∼40% and increases the double layer capacitance by ∼250% at an electrolyte concentration of 0.1 mM. The significant impact of charged hydrogel functional groups to the impedance is damped at higher electrolyte concentration. PMID:27464763

  9. YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Simmons

    2004-04-16

    The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

  10. Local impedance measurement of an electrode/single-pentacene-grain interface by frequency-modulation scanning impedance microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Tomoharu; Kobayashi, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2015-08-01

    The device performances of organic thin film transistors are often limited by the metal-organic interface because of the disordered molecular layers at the interface and the energy barriers against the carrier injection. It is important to study the local impedance at the interface without being affected by the interface morphology. We combined frequency modulation atomic force microscopy with scanning impedance microscopy (SIM) to sensitively measure the ac responses of the interface to an ac voltage applied across the interface and the dc potential drop at the interface. By using the frequency-modulation SIM (FM-SIM) technique, we characterized the interface impedance of a Pt electrode and a single pentacene grain as a parallel circuit of a contact resistance and a capacitance. We found that the reduction of the contact resistance was caused by the reduction of the energy level mismatch at the interface by the FM-SIM measurements, demonstrating the usefulness of the FM-SIM technique for investigation of the local interface impedance without being affected by its morphology.

  11. Local impedance measurement of an electrode/single-pentacene-grain interface by frequency-modulation scanning impedance microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Tomoharu; Yamada, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Kei

    2015-08-07

    The device performances of organic thin film transistors are often limited by the metal–organic interface because of the disordered molecular layers at the interface and the energy barriers against the carrier injection. It is important to study the local impedance at the interface without being affected by the interface morphology. We combined frequency modulation atomic force microscopy with scanning impedance microscopy (SIM) to sensitively measure the ac responses of the interface to an ac voltage applied across the interface and the dc potential drop at the interface. By using the frequency-modulation SIM (FM-SIM) technique, we characterized the interface impedance of a Pt electrode and a single pentacene grain as a parallel circuit of a contact resistance and a capacitance. We found that the reduction of the contact resistance was caused by the reduction of the energy level mismatch at the interface by the FM-SIM measurements, demonstrating the usefulness of the FM-SIM technique for investigation of the local interface impedance without being affected by its morphology.

  12. PREFACE: XV International Conference on Electrical Bio-Impedance (ICEBI) & XIV Conference on Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pliquett, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Over recent years advanced measurement methods have facilitated outstanding achievements not only in medical instrumentation but also in biotechnology. Impedance measurement is a simple and innocuous way to characterize materials. For more than 40 years biological materials, most of them based on cells, have been characterized by means of electrical impedance for quality control of agricultural products, monitoring of biotechnological or food processes or in health care. Although the list of possible applications is long, very few applications successfully entered the market before the turn of the century. This was, on the one hand, due to the low specificity of electrical impedance with respect to other material properties because it is influenced by multiple factors. On the other hand, equipment and methods for many potential applications were not available. With the appearance of microcontrollers that could be easily integrated in applications at the beginning of the 1980s, impedance measurement advanced as a valuable tool in process optimization and lab automation. However, established methods and data processing were mostly used in a new environment. This has changed significantly during the last 10 years with a dramatic growth of the market for medical instrumentation and also for biotechnological applications. Today, advanced process monitoring and control require fast and highly parallel electrical characterization which in turn yields incredible data volumes that must be handled in real time. Many newer developments require miniaturized but precise sensing methods which is one of the main parts of Lab-on-Chip technology. Moreover, biosensors increasingly use impedometric transducers, which are not compatible with the large expensive measurement devices that are common in the laboratory environment. Following the achievements in the field of bioimpedance measurement, we will now witness a dramatic development of new electrode structures and electronics

  13. Multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance: a comparison between the Cole-Cole modelling and Hanai equations with the classical impedance index approach.

    PubMed

    Deurenberg, P; Andreoli, A; de Lorenzo, A

    1996-01-01

    Total body water and extracellular water were measured by deuterium oxide and bromide dilution respectively in 23 healthy males and 25 healthy females. In addition, total body impedance was measured at 17 frequencies, ranging from 1 kHz to 1350 kHz. Modelling programs were used to extrapolate impedance values to frequency zero (extracellular resistance) and frequency infinity (total body water resistance). Impedance indexes (height2/Zf) were computed at all 17 frequencies. The estimation errors of extracellular resistance and total body water resistance were 1% and 3%, respectively. Impedance and impedance index at low frequency were correlated with extracellular water, independent of the amount of total body water. Total body water showed the greatest correlation with impedance and impedance index at high frequencies. Extrapolated impedance values did not show a higher correlation compared to measured values. Prediction formulas from the literature applied to fixed frequencies showed the best mean and individual predictions for both extracellular water and total body water. It is concluded that, at least in healthy individuals with normal body water distribution, modelling impedance data has no advantage over impedance values measured at fixed frequencies, probably due to estimation errors in the modelled data.

  14. Measurement uncertainty in pulmonary vascular input impedance and characteristic impedance estimated from pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound and pressure: clinical studies on 57 pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Hunter, Kendall S; Kirby, K Scott; Ivy, D Dunbar; Shandas, Robin

    2010-06-01

    Pulmonary vascular input impedance better characterizes right ventricular (RV) afterload and disease outcomes in pulmonary hypertension compared to the standard clinical diagnostic, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Early efforts to measure impedance were not routine, involving open-chest measurement. Recently, the use of pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler-measured velocity to non-invasively estimate instantaneous flow has made impedance measurement more practical. One critical concern remains with clinical use: the measurement uncertainty, especially since previous studies only incorporated random error. This study utilized data from a large pediatric patient population to comprehensively examine the systematic and random error contributions to the total impedance uncertainty and determined the least error prone methodology to compute impedance from among four different methods. We found that the systematic error contributes greatly to the total uncertainty and that one of the four methods had significantly smaller propagated uncertainty; however, even when this best method is used, the uncertainty can be large for input impedance at high harmonics and for the characteristic impedance modulus. Finally, we found that uncertainty in impedance between normotensive and hypertensive patient groups displays no significant difference. It is concluded that clinical impedance measurement would be most improved by advancements in instrumentation, and the best computation method is proposed for future clinical use of the input impedance.

  15. Micro-Horn Arrays for Ultrasonic Impedance Matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Shanti; Palmer, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Thin-layered structures containing arrays of micromachined horns, denoted solid micro-horn arrays (SMIHAs), have been conceived as improved means of matching acoustic impedances between ultrasonic transducers and the media with which the transducers are required to exchange acoustic energy. Typically, ultrasonic transducers (e.g., those used in medical imaging) are piezoelectric or similar devices, which produce small displacements at large stresses. However, larger displacements at smaller stresses are required in the target media (e.g., human tissues) with which acoustic energy is to be exchanged. Heretofore, efficiencies in transmission of acoustic energy between ultrasonic transducers and target media have been severely limited because substantial mismatches of acoustic impedances have remained, even when coupling material layers have been interposed between the transducers and the target media. In contrast, SMIHAs can, in principle, be designed to effect more nearly complete acoustic impedance matching, leading to power transmission efficiencies of 90 percent or even greater. The SMIHA concept is based on extension, into the higher-frequency/ lower-wavelength ultrasonic range, of the use of horns to match acoustic impedances in the audible and lower-frequency ultrasonic ranges. In matching acoustic impedance in transmission from a higher-impedance acoustic source (e.g., a piezoelectric transducer) and a lowerimpedance target medium (e.g., air or human tissue), a horn acts as a mechanical amplifier. The shape and size of the horn can be optimized for matching acoustic impedance in a specified frequency range. A typical SMIHA would consist of a base plate, a face plate, and an array of horns that would constitute pillars that connect the two plates (see figure). In use, the base plate would be connected to an ultrasonic transducer and the face plate would be placed in contact with the target medium. As at lower frequencies, the sizes and shapes of the pillars

  16. Body Fat Measurement: Weighing the Pros and Cons of Electrical Impedance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Heyward L.

    1985-01-01

    Research technologists have developed electrical impedance units in response to demand for a convenient and reliable method of measuring body fat. Accuracy of impedance measures versus calipers and underwater weighing are discussed. (MT)

  17. 12 CFR 615.5136 - Emergencies impeding normal access of Farm Credit banks to capital markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Investment Management § 615.5136 Emergencies impeding normal access of Farm Credit banks to capital markets... defense crisis could impede the normal access of Farm Credit banks to the capital markets. Whenever...

  18. 12 CFR 615.5136 - Emergencies impeding normal access of Farm Credit banks to capital markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Investment Management § 615.5136 Emergencies impeding normal access of Farm Credit banks to capital markets... defense crisis could impede the normal access of Farm Credit banks to the capital markets. Whenever...

  19. 12 CFR 615.5136 - Emergencies impeding normal access of Farm Credit banks to capital markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... defense crisis could impede the normal access of Farm Credit banks to the capital markets. Whenever the... financial, economic, agricultural, national defense, or other crisis could impede the normal access of...

  20. Wave impedances of drill strings and other periodic media.

    PubMed

    Drumheller, Douglas S

    2002-12-01

    It is commonly known that wave reflections are caused by abrupt spatial variations in the physical parameter called wave impedance. When a material contains a spatially periodic distribution of wave impedances some very interesting and complex wave propagation phenomena will occur. Two examples of such periodic structures immediately come to mind: the first is a sandwiched structure of two types of plates, say for example, identical layers of thin steel plates interspersed with identical thick aluminum plates; and the second is a large number of identical long thin pipes that are connected from end to end with identical short heavy threaded couplings. The pipe assembly is our primary concern here because it represents the drill string, used worldwide to drill for natural energy resources. We want to understand how waves propagate through drill strings because we want to use them as a means of communication. But while the second structure is our primary concern, it is the study of the first structure, composed of layers, that is the truly historical problem and the source of much of our understanding of this rich set of wave physics. Traditionally, wave propagation in periodic media has been studied as an eigenvalue problem. The eigenvalues themselves yield information about phase velocities, group velocities, passbands, and stopbands. Most often the analysis has stopped there and the eigenvectors have been ignored. Here we turn our attention to the eigenvectors, using them to evaluate the impedance of the periodic structure with particular emphasis on the periodic drill string. As you might expect the impedance of the drill string is a complex number, which is evaluated from a very complicated expression. However, we have discovered that the impedance at two physical locations along the length of each piece of drill pipe in the drill string always reduces to a real number. This is immensely important because it allows us to match the impedance of the drill string

  1. Wave impedances of drill strings and other periodic media.

    PubMed

    Drumheller, Douglas S

    2002-12-01

    It is commonly known that wave reflections are caused by abrupt spatial variations in the physical parameter called wave impedance. When a material contains a spatially periodic distribution of wave impedances some very interesting and complex wave propagation phenomena will occur. Two examples of such periodic structures immediately come to mind: the first is a sandwiched structure of two types of plates, say for example, identical layers of thin steel plates interspersed with identical thick aluminum plates; and the second is a large number of identical long thin pipes that are connected from end to end with identical short heavy threaded couplings. The pipe assembly is our primary concern here because it represents the drill string, used worldwide to drill for natural energy resources. We want to understand how waves propagate through drill strings because we want to use them as a means of communication. But while the second structure is our primary concern, it is the study of the first structure, composed of layers, that is the truly historical problem and the source of much of our understanding of this rich set of wave physics. Traditionally, wave propagation in periodic media has been studied as an eigenvalue problem. The eigenvalues themselves yield information about phase velocities, group velocities, passbands, and stopbands. Most often the analysis has stopped there and the eigenvectors have been ignored. Here we turn our attention to the eigenvectors, using them to evaluate the impedance of the periodic structure with particular emphasis on the periodic drill string. As you might expect the impedance of the drill string is a complex number, which is evaluated from a very complicated expression. However, we have discovered that the impedance at two physical locations along the length of each piece of drill pipe in the drill string always reduces to a real number. This is immensely important because it allows us to match the impedance of the drill string

  2. Skin Membrane Electrical Impedance Properties under the Influence of a Varying Water Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Björklund, Sebastian; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas; Nowacka, Agnieszka; Dahi, Ihab; Topgaard, Daniel; Sparr, Emma; Engblom, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) is an effective permeability barrier. One strategy to increase drug delivery across skin is to increase the hydration. A detailed description of how hydration affects skin permeability requires characterization of both macroscopic and molecular properties and how they respond to hydration. We explore this issue by performing impedance experiments on excised skin membranes in the frequency range 1 Hz to 0.2 MHz under the influence of a varying gradient in water activity (aw). Hydration/dehydration induces reversible changes of membrane resistance and effective capacitance. On average, the membrane resistance is 14 times lower and the effective capacitance is 1.5 times higher when the outermost SC membrane is exposed to hydrating conditions (aw = 0.992), as compared to the case of more dehydrating conditions (aw = 0.826). Molecular insight into the hydration effects on the SC components is provided by natural-abundance 13C polarization transfer solid-state NMR and x-ray diffraction under similar hydration conditions. Hydration has a significant effect on the dynamics of the keratin filament terminals and increases the interchain spacing of the filaments. The SC lipids are organized into lamellar structures with ∼ 12.6 nm spacing and hexagonal hydrocarbon chain packing with mainly all-trans configuration of the acyl chains, irrespective of hydration state. Subtle changes in the dynamics of the lipids due to mobilization and incorporation of cholesterol and long-chain lipid species into the fluid lipid fraction is suggested to occur upon hydration, which can explain the changes of the impedance response. The results presented here provide information that is useful in explaining the effect of hydration on skin permeability. PMID:23790372

  3. Microgravity Environment Description Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard; McPherson, Kevin; Hrovat, Kenneth; Moskowitz, Milton; Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Reckart, Timothy

    1997-01-01

    The Microgravity Measurement and Analysis Project (MMAP) at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) manages the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) and the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) instruments to measure the microgravity environment on orbiting space laboratories. These laboratories include the Spacelab payloads on the shuttle, the SPACEHAB module on the shuttle, the middeck area of the shuttle, and Russia's Mir space station. Experiments are performed in these laboratories to investigate scientific principles in the near-absence of gravity. The microgravity environment desired for most experiments would have zero acceleration across all frequency bands or a true weightless condition. This is not possible due to the nature of spaceflight where there are numerous factors which introduce accelerations to the environment. This handbook presents an overview of the major microgravity environment disturbances of these laboratories. These disturbances are characterized by their source (where known), their magnitude, frequency and duration, and their effect on the microgravity environment. Each disturbance is characterized on a single page for ease in understanding the effect of a particular disturbance. The handbook also contains a brief description of each laboratory.

  4. CGL description revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunana, P.; Zank, G. P.; Goldstein, M. L.; Webb, G. M.; Adhikari, L.

    2016-03-01

    Solar wind observational studies have emphasized that the solar wind plasma data is bounded by the mirror and firehose instabilities, and it is often believed that these instabilities are of a purely kinetic nature. The simplest fluid model that generalizes magnetohydrodynamics with anisotropic temperatures is the Chew-Goldberger-Low model (CGL). Here we briefly revisit the CGL description and discuss its (otherwise well-documented) linear firehose and mirror instability thresholds; namely that the firehose instability threshold is identical to the one found from linear kinetic theory and that the mirror threshold contains a factor of 6 error. We consider a simple higher-order fluid model with time dependent heat flux equations and show that the mirror instability threshold is correctly reproduced. We also present fully nonlinear three-dimensional simulations of freely decaying turbulence for the Hall-CGL model with isothermal electrons. The spatial resolution of these simulations is 5123 and the formation of a spectral break in magnetic and velocity field spectra around the proton inertial length is found.

  5. Trusting Description: Authenticity, Accountability, and Archival Description Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacNeil, Heather

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that one of the purposes of archival description is to establish grounds for presuming the authenticity of the records being described. The article examines the implications of this statement by examining the relationship between and among authenticity, archival description, and archival accountability, assessing how this…

  6. Characterization of flow-through electrode processes by AC impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, C.Y. ); Selman, J.R. )

    1993-04-01

    Flow-through porous electrodes, such as packed-bed and fluidized-bed electrodes, are attractive for electrowinning, electro-organic synthesis and flow-battery applications. The extensive surface area of the porous electrodes makes high volumetric reaction rate more possible than in a cell with smooth electrodes. Forced convection also enhances mass-transfer rate and hence reduces concentration polarization. AC-impedance method has been used successfully in characterizing a packed-bed flow-through electrode system. A macrohomogeneous model was developed to simulate the effect of structural, physical and flow parameters. The relative importance of kinetics and mass transfer can be inferred from the AC-impedance analysis. Kinetic information about copper deposition in supported cupric sulfate solution has been obtained successfully using this technique.

  7. An impedance-based integrated biosensor for suspended DNA characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hanbin; Wallbank, Richard W. R.; Chaji, Reza; Li, Jiahao; Suzuki, Yuji; Jiggins, Chris; Nathan, Arokia

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we describe a novel integrated biosensor for performing dielectric spectroscopy to analyze biological samples. We analyzed biomolecule samples with different concentrations and demonstrated that the solution's impedance is highly correlated with the concentration, indicating that it may be possible to use this sensor as a concentration sensor. In contrast with standard spectrophotometers, this sensor offers a low-cost and purely electrical solution for the quantitative analysis of biomolecule solutions. In addition to determining concentrations, we found that the sample solution impedance is highly correlated with the length of the DNA fragments, indicating that the sizes of PCR products could be validated with an integrated chip-based, sample-friendly system within a few minutes. The system could be the basis of a rapid, low-cost platform for DNA characterization with broad applications in cancer and genetic disease research. PMID:24060937

  8. ICD lead failure detection through high frequency impedance.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, Daniel T; Swerdlow, Charles D; Kroll, Mark W; Seifert, Gregory J; Lichter, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    Abrasion-induced insulation breach is a common failure mode of silicone-body, transvenous, implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads. It is caused either by external compression or internal motion of conducting cables. The present method of monitoring lead integrity measures low frequency conductor impedance. It cannot detect insulation failures until both the silicone lead body and inner fluoropolymer insulation have been breached completely, exposing conductors directly to blood or tissue. Thus the first clinical presentation may be either failure to deliver a life-saving shock or painful, inappropriate shocks in normal rhythm. We present a new method for identifying lead failure based on high frequency impedance measurements. This method was evaluated in 3D electromagnetic simulation and bench testing to identify insulation defects in the St. Jude Medical Riata® lead, which is prone to insulation breach.

  9. Impedance matching wireless power transmission system for biomedical devices.

    PubMed

    Lum, Kin Yun; Lindén, Maria; Tan, Tian Swee

    2015-01-01

    For medical application, the efficiency and transmission distance of the wireless power transfer (WPT) are always the main concern. Research has been showing that the impedance matching is one of the critical factors for dealing with the problem. However, there is not much work performed taking both the source and load sides into consideration. Both sides matching is crucial in achieving an optimum overall performance, and the present work proposes a circuit model analysis for design and implementation. The proposed technique was validated against experiment and software simulation. Result was showing an improvement in transmission distance up to 6 times, and efficiency at this transmission distance had been improved up to 7 times as compared to the impedance mismatch system. The system had demonstrated a near-constant transfer efficiency for an operating range of 2cm-12cm. PMID:25980873

  10. Traceable calibration of impedance heads and artificial mastoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, D. A.; Dickinson, L. P.; Bell, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Artificial mastoids are devices which simulate the mechanical characteristics of the human head, and in particular of the bony structure behind the ear. They are an essential tool in the calibration of bone-conduction hearing aids and audiometers. With the emergence of different types of artificial mastoids in the market, and the realisation that the visco-elastic part of these instruments changes over time, the development of a method of traceable calibration of these devices without relying on commercial software has become important for national metrology institutes. This paper describes commercially available calibration methods, and the development of a traceable calibration method including the traceable calibration of the impedance head used to measure the mechanical impedance of the artificial mastoid.

  11. Meandered-line antenna with integrated high-impedance surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Forman, Michael A.

    2010-09-01

    A reduced-volume antenna composed of a meandered-line dipole antenna over a finite-width, high-impedance surface is presented. The structure is novel in that the high-impedance surface is implemented with four Sievenpiper via-mushroom unit cells, whose area is optimized to match the meandered-line dipole antenna. The result is an antenna similar in performance to patch antenna but one fourth the area that can be deployed directly on the surface of a conductor. Simulations demonstrate a 3.5 cm ({lambda}/4) square antenna with a bandwidth of 4% and a gain of 4.8 dBi at 2.5 GHz.

  12. Determination of soil moisture distribution from impedance and gravimetric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Stephen G.; Layman, Robert; Campbell, Jeffrey E.; Walsh, John; Mckim, Harlan J.

    1992-01-01

    Daily measurements of the soil dielectric properties at 5 and 10 cm were obtained at five locations throughout the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) test site during the 1987 intensive field campaigns (IFCs). An automated vector voltmeter was used to monitor the complex electrical impedance, at 10 MHz, of cylindrical volumes of soil delineated by specially designed soil moisture probes buried at these locations. The objective of this exercise was to test the hypothesis that the soil impedance is sensitive to the moisture content of the soil and that the imaginary part (that is, capacitive reactance) can be used to calculate the volumetric water content of the soil. These measurements were compared with gravimetric samples collected at these locations by the FIFE staff science team.

  13. Impedance matched joined drill pipe for improved acoustic transmission

    DOEpatents

    Moss, William C.

    2000-01-01

    An impedance matched jointed drill pipe for improved acoustic transmission. A passive means and method that maximizes the amplitude and minimize the temporal dispersion of acoustic signals that are sent through a drill string, for use in a measurement while drilling telemetry system. The improvement in signal transmission is accomplished by replacing the standard joints in a drill string with joints constructed of a material that is impedance matched acoustically to the end of the drill pipe to which it is connected. Provides improvement in the measurement while drilling technique which can be utilized for well logging, directional drilling, and drilling dynamics, as well as gamma-ray spectroscopy while drilling post shot boreholes, such as utilized in drilling post shot boreholes.

  14. Potassium polytitanate gas-sensor study by impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, F S; Varezhnikov, A S; Kiselev, I; Kolesnichenko, V V; Burmistrov, I N; Sommer, M; Fuchs, D; Kübel, C; Gorokhovsky, A V; Sysoev, V V

    2015-10-15

    Nanocrystalline potassium polytitanates K2O·nTiO2·mH2O represent a new type of semiconducting compounds which are characterized by a high specific surface that makes them promising for use in gas sensors. In this work, we have studied potassium polytitanate mesoporous nanoparticle agglomerates placed over a SiO2/Si substrate equipped with multiple coplanar electrodes to measure the electrical response to various organic vapors, 1000 ppm of concentration, mixed with air by impedance spectrometry in range of the 10(-2)-10(6) Hz. The recorded impedance data for each sensor segment are associated with RC components of an equivalent circuit which are applied to selectively recognize the test vapors exploiting a "multisensor array" approach. PMID:26515008

  15. High accuracy particle analysis using sheathless microfluidic impedance cytometry.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Daniel; Caselli, Federica; Bisegna, Paolo; Morgan, Hywel

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a new design of microfluidic impedance cytometer enabling accurate characterization of particles without the need for focusing. The approach uses multiple pairs of electrodes to measure the transit time of particles through the device in two simultaneous different current measurements, a transverse (top to bottom) current and an oblique current. This gives a new metric that can be used to estimate the vertical position of the particle trajectory through the microchannel. This parameter effectively compensates for the non-uniform electric field in the channel that is an unavoidable consequence of the use of planar parallel facing electrodes. The new technique is explained and validated using numerical modelling. Impedance data for 5, 6 and 7 μm particles are collected and compared with simulations. The method gives excellent coefficient of variation in (electrical) radius of particles of 1% for a sheathless configuration.

  16. Wearable lung-health monitoring system with electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sunjoo; Lee, Jaehyuk; Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    2015-08-01

    The wearable lung-health monitoring system is proposed with an electrical impedance tomography (EIT). The proposed system has light belt-type form factor which is implemented with the EIT integrated circuit (IC) on the planar-fashionable circuit board (P-FCB) technology. The EIT IC provides programmable current stimulation which is optimally controlled by the results of contact impedance monitoring. The measured data is transmitted to the mobile device and the lung EIT images are reconstructed and displayed with up to 20 frames/s real-time. From the lung EIT image, the measured lung air volume ratio can be used as an indicator of the lung-health, and other various parameters can be extracted to monitor lung status. The proposed wearable system achieves the user convenience for lung-health monitoring which can be used personally at home. The proposed system is fully implemented and verified on both in-vitro and in-vivo tests.

  17. Longitudinal Impedance Tomography for Blood Pressure Characterization of Valve Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Vahabi, Zahra; Amirfattahi, Rasool

    2015-01-01

    Aorta is formed in a dynamic environment which gives rise to imbalances between many forces that tend to extend the diameter and length. Furthermore, internal forces tend to resist this extension. Impedance tomography can show this imbalance to stimulate the stenosis of aortic valve, growth of the elastic, collagen and to effectively reduce the stresses in the underlying tissue. In blood flow, auscultation noises occurred and in the echocardiography decrease in left ventricular ejection speed can be observed. In this paper, we have modeled an aorta based on anatomical studies to simulate natural, 20% and 30% stenosis as usual heart disease to early diagnosis. Valve deformation causes different impedance tomography in 3D mesh of aorta as blood pressure. Remodeling of aorta and its flow is found when a cylindrical slice of the fully retracted blood aorta is cut longitudinally through the wall. PMID:26120568

  18. [A Meridian Visualization System Based on Impedance and Binocular Vision].

    PubMed

    Su, Qiyan; Chen, Xin

    2015-03-01

    To ensure the meridian can be measured and displayed correctly on the human body surface, a visualization method based on impedance and binocular vision is proposed. First of all, using alternating constant current source to inject current signal into the human skin surface, then according to the low impedance characteristics of meridian, the multi-channel detecting instrument detects voltage of each pair of electrodes, thereby obtaining the channel of the meridian location, through the serial port communication, data is transmitted to the host computer. Secondly, intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of cameras are obtained by Zhang's camera calibration method, and 3D information of meridian location is got by corner selection and matching of the optical target, and then transform coordinate of 3D information according to the binocular vision principle. Finally, using curve fitting and image fusion technology realizes the meridian visualization. The test results show that the system can realize real-time detection and accurate display of meridian. PMID:26524777

  19. Towards a graphene-based quantum impedance standard

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmbach, C.-C.; Schurr, J. Ahlers, F. J.; Müller, A.; Novikov, S.; Lebedeva, N.; Satrapinski, A.

    2014-08-18

    Precision measurements of the quantum Hall resistance with alternating current (ac) in the kHz range were performed on epitaxial graphene in order to assess its suitability as a quantum standard of impedance. The quantum Hall plateaus measured with alternating current were found to be flat within one part in 10{sup 7}. This is much better than for plain GaAs quantum Hall devices and shows that the magnetic-flux-dependent capacitive ac losses of the graphene device are less critical. The observed frequency dependence of about −8 × 10{sup −8}/kHz is comparable in absolute value to the positive frequency dependence of plain GaAs devices, but the negative sign is attributed to stray capacitances which we believe can be minimized by a careful design of the graphene device. Further improvements thus may lead to a simpler and more user-friendly quantum standard for both resistance and impedance.

  20. Experimental Impedance of Single Liner Elements with Bias Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Follet, J. I.; Betts, J. F.; Kelly, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to generate a high quality database, from which the effects of a mean bias flow on the acoustic impedance of lumped-element single-degree-of-freedom liners was determined. Acoustic impedance measurements were made using the standard two-microphone method in the NASA Langley Normal Incidence Tube. Each liner consisted of a perforated sheet with a constant-area cavity. Liner resistance was shown to increase and to become less frequency and sound pressure level dependent as the bias flow was increased. The resistance was also consistently lower for a negative bias flow (suction) than for a positive bias flow (blowing) of equal magnitude. The slope of the liner reactance decreased with increased flow.

  1. Estimating surface acoustic impedance with the inverse method.

    PubMed

    Piechowicz, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    Sound field parameters are predicted with numerical methods in sound control systems, in acoustic designs of building and in sound field simulations. Those methods define the acoustic properties of surfaces, such as sound absorption coefficients or acoustic impedance, to determine boundary conditions. Several in situ measurement techniques were developed; one of them uses 2 microphones to measure direct and reflected sound over a planar test surface. Another approach is used in the inverse boundary elements method, in which estimating acoustic impedance of a surface is expressed as an inverse boundary problem. The boundary values can be found from multipoint sound pressure measurements in the interior of a room. This method can be applied to arbitrarily-shaped surfaces. This investigation is part of a research programme on using inverse methods in industrial room acoustics. PMID:21939599

  2. Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

    2013-06-04

    This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

  3. Non-Intrusive Impedance-Based Cable Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Simpson, Howard J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A non-intrusive electrical cable tester determines the nature and location of a discontinuity in a cable through application of an oscillating signal to one end of the cable. The frequency of the oscillating signal is varied in increments until a minimum, close to zero voltage is measured at a signal injection point which is indicative of a minimum impedance at that point. The frequency of the test signal at which the minimum impedance occurs is then employed to determine the distance to the discontinuity by employing a formula which relates this distance to the signal frequency and the velocity factor of the cable. A numerically controlled oscillator is provided to generate the oscillating signal, and a microcontroller automatically controls operation of the cable tester to make the desired measurements and display the results. The device is contained in a portable housing which may be hand held to facilitate convenient use of the device in difficult to access locations.

  4. Dielectrophoresis and dielectrophoretic impedance detection of adenovirus and rotavirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Michihiko; Ding, Zhenhao; Suehiro, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is the electrical detection of pathogenic viruses, namely, adenovirus and rotavirus, using dielectrophoretic impedance measurement (DEPIM). DEPIM consists of two simultaneous processes: dielectrophoretic trapping of the target and measurement of the impedance change and increase in conductance with the number of trapped targets. This is the first study of applying DEPIM, which was originally developed to detect bacteria suspended in aqueous solutions, to virus detection. The dielectric properties of the viruses were also investigated in terms of their dielectrophoretic behavior. Although their estimated dielectric properties were different from those of bacteria, the trapped viruses increased the conductance of the microelectrode in a manner similar to that in bacteria detection. We demonstrated the electrical detection of viruses within 60 s at concentrations as low as 70 ng/ml for adenovirus and 50 ng/ml for rotavirus.

  5. Structural damage identification using piezoelectric impedance and Bayesian inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuai, Q.; Zhou, K.; Tang, J.

    2015-04-01

    Structural damage identification is a challenging subject in the structural health monitoring research. The piezoelectric impedance-based damage identification, which usually utilizes the matrix inverse-based optimization, may in theory identify the damage location and damage severity. However, the sensitivity matrix is oftentimes ill-conditioned in practice, since the number of unknowns may far exceed the useful measurements/inputs. In this research, a new method based on intelligent inference framework for damage identification is presented. Bayesian inference is used to directly predict damage location and severity using impedance measurement through forward prediction and comparison. Gaussian process is employed to enrich the forward analysis result, thereby reducing computational cost. Case study is carried out to illustrate the identification performance.

  6. Evaluation of non toxic alkyd primers by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, L.S.; Garcia, G. |; Lopez, C.

    1998-12-31

    The purpose of this work was to compare the protective capacity of several alkyd primers pigmented with 12.1 volume percent either of calcium phosphate or micronized zinc phosphate as anticorrosive pigments. A paint containing zinc chromate was used as reference. The performance of these paints on steel was assessed through Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) using a 3% NaCl solution. After 576 hr immersion, the paint with calcium phosphate and specially that with micronized zinc phosphate, showed a better behavior than paint with zinc chromate. Paint rating, using impedance parameters (ionic resistance and capacitance of the paint film, and breakpoint frequency), was in agreement with the visible paint deterioration and corrosion, In addition, there was a good correlation between these parameter and the open circuit corrosion potential of the metallic substrate.

  7. Characterization of DUT impedance in immunity test setups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanpour Razavi, Seyyed Ali; Frei, Stephan

    2016-09-01

    Several immunity test procedures for narrowband radiated electromagnetic energy are available for automotive components. The ISO 11452 series describes the most commonly used test methods. The absorber line shielded enclosure (ALSE) is often considered as the most reliable method. However, testing with the bulk current injection (BCI) can be done with less efforts and is often preferred. As the test setup in both procedures is quite similar, there were several trials for finding appropriate modifications to the BCI in order to increase the matching to the ALSE. However, the lack of knowledge regarding the impedance of the tested component, makes it impossible to find the equivalent current to be injected by the BCI and a good match cannot be achieved. In this paper, three approaches are proposed to estimate the termination impedance indirectly by using different current probes.

  8. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as stepped impedance resonators (SIRs) is investigated. Single element simulation results in free space and in a phantom at 7 tesla (298 MHz) demonstrate the rationale and feasibility of the SIR design strategy. Simulation and image results at 7 tesla in a phantom and human head illustrate the improvements in transmit magnetic field, as well as, RF efficiency (transmit magnetic field versus SAR) when two different SIR designs are incorporated in 8-element volume coil configurations and compared to a volume coil consisting of microstrip elements. PMID:23508243

  9. Object impedance control for cooperative manipulation - Theory and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stanley A.; Cannon, Robert H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the dynamic control module of the Dynamic and Strategic Control of Cooperating Manipulators (DASCCOM) project at Stanford University's Aerospace Robotics Laboratory. First, the cooperative manipulation problem is analyzed from a systems perspective, and the desirable features of a control system for cooperative manipulation are discussed. Next, a control policy is developed that enforces a controlled impedance not of the individual arm endpoints, but of the manipulated object itself. A parallel implementation for a multiprocessor system is presented. The controller fully compensates for the system dynamics and directly controls the object internal forces. Most importantly, it presents a simple, powerful, intuitive interface to higher level strategic control modules. Experimental results from a dual two-link-arm robotic system are used to compare the object impedance controller with other strategies, both for free-motion slews and environmental contact.

  10. Intrathoracic impedance monitor alarm in a patient with cardiac resynchronisation therapy and advanced lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cvijić, Marta; Zižek, David; Antolič, Bor; Zupan, Igor

    2013-01-01

    The intrathoracic impedance monitor system measures impedance between the device case and the right ventricular coil and reflects intrathoracic fluid status. It is used to detect early volume overload in patients with chronic heart failure. We report a case of inappropriate activation of the intrathoracic impedance monitor alarm in a patient with epidermoid lung cancer and pleural carcinosis.

  11. Studies on Electrical behavior of Glucose using Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juansah, Jajang; Yulianti, Wina

    2016-01-01

    In this work we report the electrical characteristics of glucose at different frequencies. We show the correlation between electrical properties (impedance, reactance, resistance and conductance) of glucose and glucose concentration. Electrical property measurements on glucose solution were performed in order to formulate the correlation. The measurements were conducted for frequencies between 50 Hz and 1 MHz. From the measurements, we developed a single-pole Cole-Cole graph as a function of glucose concentration.

  12. Insulator-based DEP with impedance measurements for analyte detection

    DOEpatents

    Davalos, Rafael V.; Simmons, Blake A.; Crocker, Robert W.; Cummings, Eric B.

    2010-03-16

    Disclosed herein are microfluidic devices for assaying at least one analyte specie in a sample comprising at least one analyte concentration area in a microchannel having insulating structures on or in at least one wall of the microchannel which provide a nonuniform electric field in the presence of an electric field provided by off-chip electrodes; and a pair of passivated sensing electrodes for impedance detection in a detection area. Also disclosed are assay methods and methods of making.

  13. "Paradoxical" reduction in postexercise ejection time and increased transthoracic impedance.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Kotilainen, P; Haffty, B; Jolda, R; Bishop, R; Spodick, D

    1978-12-01

    Despite decreasing heart rate, left ventricular ejection time (LVET) transiently falls immediately following bicycle exercise. In seven normal, untrained subjects LVET decreases at 15 s postexercise corresponded (r = 0.78) with an increase in transthoracic electrical impedance (Z) consistent with decreased venous return to the thorax. Because the determinants of LVET are stroke volume (SV) and ejection rate, the deltaZ implies that decreased SV contributed to the "paradoxical" fall in LVET.

  14. On the propagation of plane waves above an impedance surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, F. H.; Vanmoorhem, W. K.

    1990-01-01

    The propagation of grazing incidence plane waves along a finite impedance boundary is investigated. A solution of the semi-infinite problem, where a harmonic motion, parallel to the boundary, is imposed along a line perpendicular to the boundary, is obtained. This solution consists of quasiplane waves, waves moving parallel to the boundary with amplitude and phase variations perpendicular to the boundary. Several approximations to the full solution are considered.

  15. Artificial impedance ground planes for low profile antenna applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMichael, Ian T.

    Recent interest in artificial impedance surfaces for low-profile antennas has led to extensive research with the goal of optimizing the ground plane's characteristics for a given antenna configuration and broadening the operational bandwidth, or alternatively creating a multi-band functionality. A method of determining the optimal reflection phase for a low-profile dipole antenna over an electromagnetic band gap (EBG) ground plane has been developed based on image theory and is presented with experimental and numerical validation. A new artificial impedance surface has also been developed, which is composed of an annular slot ring on a thin grounded dielectric. The main difference between the proposed ground plane and a conventional EBG is that the high impedance condition exists only in the vicinity of the slot and is therefore best suited for antennas with a current distribution that has a similar shape as the annular slot ring. It is shown that a loop antenna positioned closely over an annular slot loaded ground plane exhibits approximately the same gain as a loop antenna over a conventional EBG ground plane. The advantage of the new structure is its lack of periodicity, which significantly eases manufacturing. Additionally, it is shown that multiple concentric slot rings can be designed into the ground plane, which excites multiple resonances in low-profile wideband antennas. The result is a multi-band high impedance ground plane constructed using a simple arrangement of annular slots. Finally, a manufacturing technique is presented for the application of arbitrarily configured EBG antennas to handheld dual-sensor landmine detection systems. It is shown that creating an EBG antenna using very thin layers of metal will enable it to be used for ground penetrating radar (GPR) when it is co-located with a low frequency metal detector without compromising the operation of the metal detector. The potential benefit of such an antenna would be a lower profile sensor

  16. A General approach for calculating coupling impedances of small discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergei S.; Gluckstern, Robert L.; Stupakov, Gennady V.

    A general theory of the beam interaction with small discontinuities of the vacuum chamber is developed taking into account the reaction of radiated waves back on the discontinuity. The reactive impedance calculated earlier is reproduced as the first order, and the resistive one as the second order of a perturbation theory based on this general approach. The theory also gives, in a very natural way, the results for the trapped modes due to small discontinuities obtained earlier by a different method.

  17. Impedance microflow cytometry for viability studies of microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Berardino, Marco; Hebeisen, Monika; Hessler, Thomas; Ziswiler, Adrian; Largiadèr, Stephanie; Schade, Grit

    2011-02-01

    Impedance-based Coulter counters and its derivatives are widely used cell analysis tools in many laboratories and use normally DC or low frequency AC to perform these electrical analyses. The emergence of micro-fabrication technologies in the last decade, however, provides a new means of measuring electrical properties of cells. Microfluidic approaches combined with impedance spectroscopy measurements in the radio frequency (RF) range increase sensitivity and information content and thus push single cell analyses beyond simple cell counting and sizing applications towards multiparametric cell characterization. Promising results have been shown already in the fields of cell differentiation and blood analysis. Here we emphasize the potential of this technology by presenting new data obtained from viability studies on microorganisms. Impedance measurements of several yeast and bacteria strains performed at frequencies around 10 MHz enable an easy discrimination between dead and viable cells. Moreover, cytotoxic effects of antibiotics and other reagents, as well as cell starvation can also be monitored easily. Control analyses performed with conventional flow cytometers using various fluorescent dyes (propidium iodide, oxonol) indicate a good correlation and further highlight the capability of this device. The label-free approach makes on the one hand the use of usually expensive fluorochromes obsolete, on the other hand practically eliminates laborious sample preparation procedures. Until now, online cell monitoring was limited to the determination of viable biomass, which provides rather poor information of a cell culture. Impedance microflow cytometry, besides other aspects, proposes a simple solution to these limitations and might become an important tool for bioprocess monitoring applications in the biotech industry.

  18. Some Nonlinear Reconstruction Algorithms for Electrical Impedance Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2001-03-09

    An impedance camera [Henderson and Webster, 1978; Dines and Lytle, 1981]--or what is now more commonly called electrical impedance tomography--attempts to image the electrical impedance (or just the conductivity) distribution inside a body using electrical measurements on its boundary. The method has been used successfully in both biomedical [Brown, 1983; Barber and Brown, 1986; J. C. Newell, D. G. Gisser, and D. Isaacson, 1988; Webster, 1990] and geophysical applications [Wexler, Fry, and Neurnan, 1985; Daily, Lin, and Buscheck, 1987], but the analysis of optimal reconstruction algorithms is still progressing [Murai and Kagawa, 1985; Wexler, Fry, and Neurnan, 1985; Kohn and Vogelius, 1987; Yorkey and Webster, 1987; Yorkey, Webster, and Tompkins, 1987; Berryman and Kohn, 1990; Kohn and McKenney, 1990; Santosa and Vogelius, 1990; Yorkey, 1990]. The most common application is monitoring the influx or efflux of a highly conducting fluid (such as brine in a porous rock or blood in the human body) through the volume being imaged. For biomedical applications, this met hod does not have the resolution of radiological methods, but it is comparatively safe and inexpensive and therefore provides a valuable alternative when continuous monitoring of a patient or process is desired. The following discussion is intended first t o summarize the physics of electrical impedance tomography, then to provide a few details of the data analysis and forward modeling requirements, and finally to outline some of the reconstruction algorithms that have proven to be most useful in practice. Pointers to the literature are provided throughout this brief narrative and the reader is encouraged to explore the references for more complete discussions of the various issues raised here.

  19. Voltage Biasing, Cyclic Voltammetry, & Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy for Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, Seth J.; Richner, Tom J.; Brodnick, Sarah K.; Kipke, Daryl R.; Williams, Justin C.; Otto, Kevin J.

    2012-01-01

    Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) measure properties of the electrode-tissue interface without additional invasive procedures, and can be used to monitor electrode performance over the long term. EIS measures electrical impedance at multiple frequencies, and increases in impedance indicate increased glial scar formation around the device, while cyclic voltammetry measures the charge carrying capacity of the electrode, and indicates how charge is transferred at different voltage levels. As implanted electrodes age, EIS and CV data change, and electrode sites that previously recorded spiking neurons often exhibit significantly lower efficacy for neural recording. The application of a brief voltage pulse to implanted electrode arrays, known as rejuvenation, can bring back spiking activity on otherwise silent electrode sites for a period of time. Rejuvenation alters EIS and CV, and can be monitored by these complementary methods. Typically, EIS is measured daily as an indication of the tissue response at the electrode site. If spikes are absent in a channel that previously had spikes, then CV is used to determine the charge carrying capacity of the electrode site, and rejuvenation can be applied to improve the interface efficacy. CV and EIS are then repeated to check the changes at the electrode-tissue interface, and neural recordings are collected. The overall goal of rejuvenation is to extend the functional lifetime of implanted arrays. PMID:22395095

  20. Study of surfactant-skin interactions by skin impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guojin; Moore, David J

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) plays a very critical physiological role as skin barrier in regulating water loss through the skin and protects the body from a wide range of physical and chemical exogenous insults. Surfactant-containing formulations can induce skin damage and irritation owing to surfactant absorption and penetration. It is generally accepted that reduction in skin barrier properties occurs only after surfactants have penetrated/permeated into the skin barrier. To mitigate the harshness of surfactant-based cleansing products, penetration/permeation of surfactants should be reduced. Skin impedance measurements have been taken in vitro on porcine skin using vertical Franz diffusion cells to investigate the impact of surfactants, temperature and pH on skin barrier integrity. These skin impedance results demonstrate excellent correlation with other published methods for assessing skin damage and irritation from different surfactant chemistry, concentration, pH, time of exposure and temperature. This study demonstrates that skin impedance can be utilized as a routine approach to screen surfactant-containing formulations for their propensity to compromise the skin barrier and hence likely lead to skin irritation. PMID:21923733

  1. The IMPACT shirt: textile integrated and portable impedance cardiography.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Mark; Mühlsteff, Jens; Sipilä, Auli; Kamppi, Merja; Koskela, Anne; Myry, Manu; Wan, Tingting; Leonhardt, Steffen; Walter, Marian

    2014-06-01

    Measurement of hemodynamic parameters such as stroke volume (SV) via impedance cardiography (ICG) is an easy, non-invasive and inexpensive way to assess the health status of the heart. We present a possibility to use this technology for monitoring risk patients at home. The IMPACT Shirt (IMPedAnce Cardiography Textile) has been developed with integrated textile electrodes and textile wiring, as well as with portable miniaturized hardware. Several textile materials were characterized in vitro and in vivo to analyze their performance with regard to washability, and electrical characteristics such as skin-electrode impedance, capacitive coupling and subjective tactile feeling. The small lightweight hardware measures ECG and ICG continuously and transmits wireless data via Bluetooth to a mobile phone (Android) or PC for further analysis. A lithium polymer battery supplies the circuit and can be charged via a micro-USB. Results of a proof-of-concept trial show excellent agreement between SV assessed by a commercial device and the developed system. The IMPACT Shirt allows monitoring of SV and ECG on a daily basis at the patient's home.

  2. Embedded silver PDMS electrodes for single cell electrical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yuan; Xu, Zhensong; Cachia, Mark A.; Nguyen, John; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device with wide channels and embedded AgPDMS electrodes for measuring the electrical properties of single cells. The work demonstrates the feasibility of using a large channel design and embedded electrodes for impedance spectroscopy to circumvent issues such as channel clogging and limited device re-usability. AgPDMS electrodes were formed on channel sidewalls for impedance detection and cell electrical properties measurement. Equivalent circuit models were used to interpret multi-frequency impedance data to quantify each cell’s cytoplasm conductivity and specific membrane capacitance. T24 cells were tested to validate the microfluidic system and modeling results. Comparisons were then made by measuring two leukemia cell lines (AML-2 and HL-60) which were found to have different cytoplasm conductivity values (0.29  ±  0.15 S m-1 versus 0.47  ±  0.20 S m-1) and specific membrane capacitance values (41  ±  25 mF m-2 versus 55  ±  26 mF m-2) when the cells were flown through the wide channel and measured by the AgPDMS electrodes.

  3. Optimal impedance on transmission of Lorentz force EMATs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isla, Julio; Seher, Matthias; Challis, Richard; Cegla, Frederic

    2016-02-01

    Electromagnetic-acoustic transducers (EMATs) are attractive for non-destructive inspections because direct contact with the specimen under test is not required. This advantage comes at a high cost in sensitivity and therefore it is important to optimise every aspect of an EMAT. The signal strength produced by EMATs is in part determined by the coil impedance regardless of the transduction mechanism (e.g. Lorentz force, magnetostriction, etc.). There is very little literature on how to select the coil impedance that maximises the wave intensity; this paper addresses that gap. A transformer circuit is used to model the interaction between the EMAT coil and the eddy currents that are generated beneath the coil in the conducting specimen. Expressions for the coil impedances that satisfy the maximum efficiency and maximum power transfer conditions on transmission are presented. To support this analysis, a tunable coil that consists of stacked identical thin layers independently accessed is used so that the coil inductance can be modified while leaving the radiation pattern of the EMAT unaffected.

  4. Development of electrical impedance tomography of microwave ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwan, A.; Wi, H.; Nguyen, D. T.; Jones, P.; Lam, V.; Hawthorne, W. J.; Barry, M. A.; Oh, T. I.

    2014-04-01

    In this study we assess the feasibility of electrical impedance tomography (EIT) to track the temperature changes during ablation in an ex-vivo ovine liver and in-vivo porcine model. 208 tetrapolar electrical impedance measurements were obtained at 30 frame/s from a 16 electrode EIT system. In the porcine model ventilation artefact was removed by low pass filtering and successful ablation related impedance change image sequences were reconstructed from four of nine liver ablations. This study indicates feasibility of the technique but was limited in the porcine model due to electrode difficulties and the difficulty in positioning the microwave applicator under ultrasound. EIT is more convenient and lower cost than other temperature monitoring methods such as MRI but spatial resolution is constrained by the relatively low number of independent measurements and ill posed reconstruction problem. Future improvements include the use of an internal electrode that could be in practice located on the microwave applicator to provide the reconstruction algorithm with improved prior information and local information of conductivity changes due to ablation.

  5. Time-domain fitting of battery electrochemical impedance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, S. M. M.; Birkl, C. R.; Howey, D. A.

    2015-08-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is an effective technique for diagnosing the behaviour of electrochemical devices such as batteries and fuel cells, usually by fitting data to an equivalent circuit model (ECM). The common approach in the laboratory is to measure the impedance spectrum of a cell in the frequency domain using a single sine sweep signal, then fit the ECM parameters in the frequency domain. This paper focuses instead on estimation of the ECM parameters directly from time-domain data. This may be advantageous for parameter estimation in practical applications such as automotive systems including battery-powered vehicles, where the data may be heavily corrupted by noise. The proposed methodology is based on the simplified refined instrumental variable for continuous-time fractional systems method ('srivcf'), provided by the Crone toolbox [1,2], combined with gradient-based optimisation to estimate the order of the fractional term in the ECM. The approach was tested first on synthetic data and then on real data measured from a 26650 lithium-ion iron phosphate cell with low-cost equipment. The resulting Nyquist plots from the time-domain fitted models match the impedance spectrum closely (much more accurately than when a Randles model is assumed), and the fitted parameters as separately determined through a laboratory potentiostat with frequency domain fitting match to within 13%.

  6. Impedance spectroscopic characterization of gadolinium substituted cobalt ferrite ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Md. T. Ramana, C. V.

    2014-10-28

    Gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2−x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4}, referred to CFGO) with variable Gd content (x = 0.0–0.4) have been synthesized by solid state ceramic method. The crystal structure and impedance properties of CFGO compounds have been evaluated. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that CFGO crystallize in the inverse spinel phase. The CFGO compounds exhibit lattice expansion due to substitution of larger Gd ions into the crystal lattice. Impedance spectroscopy analysis was performed under a wide range of frequency (f = 20 Hz–1 MHz) and temperature (T = 303–573 K). Electrical properties of Gd incorporated Co ferrite ceramics are enhanced compared to pure CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} due to the lattice distortion. Impedance spectroscopic analysis illustrates the variation of bulk grain and grain-boundary contributions towards the electrical resistance and capacitance of CFGO materials with temperature. A two-layer heterogeneous model consisting of moderately conducting grain interior (ferrite-phase) regions separated by insulating grain boundaries (resistive-phase) accurately account for the observed temperature and frequency dependent electrical characteristic of CFGO ceramics.

  7. Electrical impedance characterization of cell growth on interdigitated microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi Hyun; Pyun, Jae-Chul; Cho, Sungbo

    2014-11-01

    Electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing is a method for label-free and real-time monitoring of biological cells, which has been increasingly employed in the diagnostic and pharmaceutical industries. In this study, we fabricated an interdigitated electrode (IDE) array, which consists of 10 fingers, with a length of 1.2 mm, width of 50 μm, spacing of 50 μm, and thickness of 75 nm. The impedance spectra of the fabricated IDE were measured without or with cells in the frequency range of 100 Hz to 100 kHz using a lock-in amplifier based system and characterized by equivalent circuit modelling. Regarding the total impedance as a series resistance (R) and capacitance (C) model, R and C parameters were traced at a selected frequency during cell growth. It was able to monitor cell adherence and proliferation dependent on the behaviours and characteristics of cells on the fabricated IDE array by monitoring RC parameters. The degree of changes in RC value during cell growth was dependent on the type of cells used.

  8. Consideration of impedance matching techniques for efficient piezoelectric energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeoungwoo; Priya, Shashank; Stephanou, Harry; Uchino, Kenji

    2007-09-01

    This study investigates multiple levels of impedance-matching methods for piezoelectric energy harvesting in order to enhance the conversion of mechanical to electrical energy. First, the transduction rate was improved by using a high piezoelectric voltage constant (g) ceramic material having a magnitude of g33 = 40 x 10(-3) V m/N. Second, a transducer structure, cymbal, was optimized and fabricated to match the mechanical impedance of vibration source to that of the piezoelectric transducer. The cymbal transducer was found to exhibit approximately 40 times higher effective strain coefficient than the piezoelectric ceramics. Third, the electrical impedance matching for the energy harvesting circuit was considered to allow the transfer of generated power to a storage media. It was found that, by using the 10-layer ceramics instead of the single layer, the output current can be increased by 10 times, and the output load can be reduced by 40 times. Furthermore, by using the multilayer ceramics the output power was found to increase by 100%. A direct current (DC)-DC buck converter was fabricated to transfer the accumulated electrical energy in a capacitor to a lower output load. The converter was optimized such that it required less than 5 mW for operation.

  9. An analysis of the acoustic input impedance of the ear.

    PubMed

    Withnell, Robert H; Gowdy, Lauren E

    2013-10-01

    Ear canal acoustics was examined using a one-dimensional lossy transmission line with a distributed load impedance to model the ear. The acoustic input impedance of the ear was derived from sound pressure measurements in the ear canal of healthy human ears. A nonlinear least squares fit of the model to data generated estimates for ear canal radius, ear canal length, and quantified the resistance that would produce transmission losses. Derivation of ear canal radius has application to quantifying the impedance mismatch at the eardrum between the ear canal and the middle ear. The length of the ear canal was found, in general, to be longer than the length derived from the one-quarter wavelength standing wave frequency, consistent with the middle ear being mass-controlled at the standing wave frequency. Viscothermal losses in the ear canal, in some cases, may exceed that attributable to a smooth rigid wall. Resistance in the middle ear was found to contribute significantly to the total resistance. In effect, this analysis "reverse engineers" physical parameters of the ear from sound pressure measurements in the ear canal.

  10. Embedded silver PDMS electrodes for single cell electrical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yuan; Xu, Zhensong; Cachia, Mark A.; Nguyen, John; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a microfluidic device with wide channels and embedded AgPDMS electrodes for measuring the electrical properties of single cells. The work demonstrates the feasibility of using a large channel design and embedded electrodes for impedance spectroscopy to circumvent issues such as channel clogging and limited device re-usability. AgPDMS electrodes were formed on channel sidewalls for impedance detection and cell electrical properties measurement. Equivalent circuit models were used to interpret multi-frequency impedance data to quantify each cell’s cytoplasm conductivity and specific membrane capacitance. T24 cells were tested to validate the microfluidic system and modeling results. Comparisons were then made by measuring two leukemia cell lines (AML-2 and HL-60) which were found to have different cytoplasm conductivity values (0.29  ±  0.15 S m‑1 versus 0.47  ±  0.20 S m‑1) and specific membrane capacitance values (41  ±  25 mF m‑2 versus 55  ±  26 mF m‑2) when the cells were flown through the wide channel and measured by the AgPDMS electrodes.

  11. Dielectric and impedance spectroscopic studies of neodymium gallate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhya, Anup Pradhan; Dutta, Alo; Sinha, T. P.

    2016-05-01

    The AC electrical properties of a polycrystalline neodymium gallate, NdGaO3 (NGO), synthesized by the sol-gel method have been investigated by employing impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range from 42 Hz to 5 MHz and in the temperature range from 323 K to 593 K. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic phase with Pbnm space group at room temperature. Two relaxation processes with different relaxation times are observed from the impedance as well as modulus spectroscopic measurements, which have been attributed to the grain and the grain boundary effects at different temperatures in NGO. The complex impedance data are analyzed by an electrical equivalent circuit consisting of a resistance and a constant phase element in parallel. It has been observed that the value of the capacitance and the resistance associated with the grain boundary is higher than those associated with the grain. The temperature dependent electrical conductivity shows the negative temperature coefficient of resistance. The frequency dependent conductivity spectra are found to follow the power law.

  12. Consideration of impedance matching techniques for efficient piezoelectric energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeoungwoo; Priya, Shashank; Stephanou, Harry; Uchino, Kenji

    2007-09-01

    This study investigates multiple levels of impedance-matching methods for piezoelectric energy harvesting in order to enhance the conversion of mechanical to electrical energy. First, the transduction rate was improved by using a high piezoelectric voltage constant (g) ceramic material having a magnitude of g33 = 40 x 10(-3) V m/N. Second, a transducer structure, cymbal, was optimized and fabricated to match the mechanical impedance of vibration source to that of the piezoelectric transducer. The cymbal transducer was found to exhibit approximately 40 times higher effective strain coefficient than the piezoelectric ceramics. Third, the electrical impedance matching for the energy harvesting circuit was considered to allow the transfer of generated power to a storage media. It was found that, by using the 10-layer ceramics instead of the single layer, the output current can be increased by 10 times, and the output load can be reduced by 40 times. Furthermore, by using the multilayer ceramics the output power was found to increase by 100%. A direct current (DC)-DC buck converter was fabricated to transfer the accumulated electrical energy in a capacitor to a lower output load. The converter was optimized such that it required less than 5 mW for operation. PMID:17941391

  13. Study of surfactant-skin interactions by skin impedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guojin; Moore, David J

    2012-02-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) plays a very critical physiological role as skin barrier in regulating water loss through the skin and protects the body from a wide range of physical and chemical exogenous insults. Surfactant-containing formulations can induce skin damage and irritation owing to surfactant absorption and penetration. It is generally accepted that reduction in skin barrier properties occurs only after surfactants have penetrated/permeated into the skin barrier. To mitigate the harshness of surfactant-based cleansing products, penetration/permeation of surfactants should be reduced. Skin impedance measurements have been taken in vitro on porcine skin using vertical Franz diffusion cells to investigate the impact of surfactants, temperature and pH on skin barrier integrity. These skin impedance results demonstrate excellent correlation with other published methods for assessing skin damage and irritation from different surfactant chemistry, concentration, pH, time of exposure and temperature. This study demonstrates that skin impedance can be utilized as a routine approach to screen surfactant-containing formulations for their propensity to compromise the skin barrier and hence likely lead to skin irritation.

  14. A comprehensive impedance journey to continuous microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sevda, Surajbhan; Chayambuka, Kudakwashe; Sreekrishnan, T R; Pant, Deepak; Dominguez-Benetton, Xochitl

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to characterize the impedance response of an air-cathode MFC operating in a continuous mode and to determine intrinsic properties that define its performance which are crucial to be controlled for scalability purposes. The limiting step on electricity generation is the anodic electrochemically-active biofilm, independently of the external resistance, Rext, utilized. However, for Rext below 3 kΩ the internal impedance of the bioanode remained invariable, in good correspondence to the power density profile. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) had an effect on the impedance of both the bioanode and the air-cathode and especially on the overall MFC. The lowest HRT at which the MFC was operable was 3h. Yet, the variation on the HRT did not have a significant impact on power generation. A two constant phase element-model was associated with the EIS response of both bioanode and air-cathode, respectively. Consistency was found between the CPE behaviour and the normal power-law distribution of local resistivity with a uniform dielectric constant, which represented consistent values with the electrical double layer, the Nernst diffusion layer and presumably the biofilm thickness. These results have future implications on MFC monitoring and control, as well as in providing critical parameters for scale-up. PMID:25921205

  15. Application of impedance measurement techniques to accelerating cavity mode characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S. M.; Stefan, P. M.

    1993-11-01

    Impedance measurements, using a central wire to simulate the electron beam, were performed on a 52 MHz accelerating cavity at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This cavity was recently installed in the X-ray storage ring at the NSLS as a part of an upgrade of the ring. To damp higher-order modes (HOM) in this cavity, damping antennas have been installed. We implemented the impedance measurement technique to characterize the cavity modes up to 1 GHz and confirm the effectiveness of the damping antennas. Scattering parameters were measured using a network analyzer (HP 8510B) with a personal computer as a controller. Analysis based on S and T parameters for the system was used to solve for the cavity impedance, Z( ω), as a function of the measured transmission response, S21( ω). Search techniques were used to find the shunt resistance Rsh, and Q from the calculated Z( ω) for different modes. Our results for {R}/{Q} showed good agreement with URMEL simulations. The values of Q were compared with other independent Q measurement techniques. Our analytical technique offers an alternative approach for cases where full thru-reflection-line (TRL) calibration is not feasible and a more time-effective technique for obtaining {R}/{Q}, compared with the bead-pull method.

  16. ONERA-NASA Cooperative Effort on Liner Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primus, Julien; Piot, Estelle; Simon, Frank; Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R

    2013-01-01

    As part of a cooperation between ONERA and NASA, the liner impedance eduction methods developed by the two research centers are compared. The NASA technique relies on an objective function built on acoustic pressure measurements located on the wall opposite the test liner, and the propagation code solves the convected Helmholtz equation in uniform ow using a finite element method that implements a continuous Galerkin discretization. The ONERA method uses an objective function based either on wall acoustic pressure or on acoustic velocity acquired above the liner by Laser Doppler Anemometry, and the propagation code solves the linearized Euler equations by a discontinuous Galerkin discretization. Two acoustic liners are tested in both ONERA and NASA ow ducts and the measured data are treated with the corresponding impedance eduction method. The first liner is a wire mesh facesheet mounted onto a honeycomb core, designed to be linear with respect to incident sound pressure level and to grazing ow velocity. The second one is a conventional, nonlinear, perforate-over-honeycomb single layer liner. Configurations without and with ow are considered. For the nonlinear liner, the comparison of liner impedance educed by NASA and ONERA shows a sensitivity to the experimental conditions, namely to the nature of the source and to the sample width.

  17. Sound propagation in a refracting atmosphere above an impedance discontinuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taherzadeh, Shahram; Harrop, Nick

    2002-11-01

    de Jongs formulation of sound propagation above a ground with a single impedance change has been extended to include effects of a refracting atmosphere and atmospheric turbulence. The theory is compared with a numerical algorithm based on a hybrid Boundary Integral Equation/Fast Field Program developed for predicting the propagation of sound in a refracting atmosphere above an uneven, discontinuous terrain. By using the analogy of sound diffraction over curved surfaces to atmospheric refraction over flat ground surfaces, the effect of temperature and wind velocity gradients in the presence of flat ground surfaces can be studied. Measurements of the excess attenuation of sound from a point source over a mixed impedance curved surface are carried out in an anechoic chamber as well as outdoor measurements over a tarmac-grass discontinuity. These measurements are compared with predictions based on the extended de Jong theory and the hybrid BIE/FFP algorithm in the nonturbulent case. Results show that where there is a single discontinuity between acoustically hard and finite impedance surfaces both models are found to give satisfactory agreement with measured data except when the discontinuity is midway between the source and the detector.

  18. An adaptive high and low impedance fault detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D.C. ); Khan, S.H. )

    1994-10-01

    An integrated high impedance fault (HIF) and low impedance fault (LIF) detection method is proposed in this paper. For a HIF detection, the proposed technique is based on a number of characteristics of the HIF current. These characteristics are: fault current magnitude, magnitude of the 3rd harmonic current, magnitude of the 5th harmonic current, the angle of the third harmonic current, the angle difference between the third harmonics current and the fundamental voltage, negative sequence current of HIF. These characteristics are identified by modeling the distribution feeders in EMTP. Apart from these characteristics, the above ambient (average) negative sequence current is also considered. An adjustable block out region around the average load current is provided. The average load current is calculated at every 18,000 cycles (5 minutes) interval. This adaptive feature will not only make the proposed scheme more sensitive to the low fault current, but it will also prevent the relay from tripping during the normal load current. In this paper, the logic circuit required for implementing the proposed HIF detection methods is also included. With minimal modifications, the logic developed for the HIF detection can be applied for the low impedance fault (LIF) detection. A complete logic circuit which detects both the HIF and LIF is proposed. Using this combined logic, the need of installing separate devices for HIF and LIF detection can be eliminated.

  19. Impedance and dielectric properties of mercury cuprate at nonsuperconducting state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Z. Güven; Çataltepe, Ö. Aslan; Onbaşlı, Ü.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, impedance and dielectric properties of nonsuperconducting state of the mercury-based cuprate have been investigated by impedance measurements within the frequency interval of 10 Hz-10 MHz for the first time. The dielectric loss factor (tgδ) and ac conductivity (σac) parameters have also been calculated for non-superconducting state. According to impedance spectroscopy analysis, the equivalent circuit of the mercury cuprate system manifests itself as a semicircle in the Nyquist plot that corresponds to parallel connected resistance-capacitance circuit. The oscillation frequency of the circuit has been determined as approximately 45 kHz which coincides with the low frequency radio waves. Moreover, it has been revealed that the mercury-based cuprate investigated has high dielectric constants and hence it may be utilized in microelectronic industry such as capacitors, memory devices etc., at room temperature. In addition, negative capacitance (NC) effect has been observed for the mercury cuprate regardless of the operating temperatures at nonsuperconducting state. Referring to dispersions in dielectric properties, the main contribution to dielectric response of the system has been suggested as dipolar and interfacial polarization mechanisms.

  20. Damage Diagnosis in Semiconductive Materials Using Electrical Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Richard W.; Hinton, Yolanda L.

    2008-01-01

    Recent aerospace industry trends have resulted in an increased demand for real-time, effective techniques for in-flight structural health monitoring. A promising technique for damage diagnosis uses electrical impedance measurements of semiconductive materials. By applying a small electrical current into a material specimen and measuring the corresponding voltages at various locations on the specimen, changes in the electrical characteristics due to the presence of damage can be assessed. An artificial neural network uses these changes in electrical properties to provide an inverse solution that estimates the location and magnitude of the damage. The advantage of the electrical impedance method over other damage diagnosis techniques is that it uses the material as the sensor. Simple voltage measurements can be used instead of discrete sensors, resulting in a reduction in weight and system complexity. This research effort extends previous work by employing finite element method models to improve accuracy of complex models with anisotropic conductivities and by enhancing the computational efficiency of the inverse techniques. The paper demonstrates a proof of concept of a damage diagnosis approach using electrical impedance methods and a neural network as an effective tool for in-flight diagnosis of structural damage to aircraft components.

  1. Pathogen identification using peptide nanotube biosensors and impedance AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccuspie, Robert I.

    Pathogen identification at highly sensitive levels is crucial to meet urgent needs in fighting the spread of disease or detecting bioterrorism events. Toward that end, a new method for biosensing utilizing fluorescent antibody nanotubes is proposed. Fundamental studies on the self-assembly of these peptide nanotubes are performed, as are applications of aligning these nanotubes on surfaces. As biosensors, these nanotubes incorporate recognition units with antibodies at their ends and fluorescent signaling units at their sidewalls. When viral pathogens were mixed with these antibody nanotubes in solution, the nanotubes rapidly aggregated around the viruses. The size of the aggregates increased as the concentration of viruses increased, as detected by flow cytometry on the order of attomolar concentrations by changes in fluorescence and light scattering intensities. This enabled determination of the concentrations of viruses at trace levels (102 to 106 pfu/mL) within 30 minutes from the receipt of samples to the final quantitative data analysis, as demonstrated on Adenovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Influenza, and Vaccinia virus. As another separate approach, impedance AFM is used to study the electrical properties of individual viruses and nanoparticles used as model systems. The design, development, and implementation of the impedance AFM for an Asylum Research platform is described, as well as its application towards studying the impedance of individual nanoparticles as a model system for understanding the fundamental science of how the life cycle of a virus affects its electrical properties. In combination, these approaches fill a pressing need to quantify viruses both rapidly and sensitively.

  2. Characteristics of the plasma impedance probe with constant bias

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, David D.; Walker, David N.; Messer, Sarah J.; Amatucci, William E.

    2005-09-15

    The impedance of a small spherical probe immersed in a uniform plasma is measured by recording the reflection coefficient of an applied signal using a network analyzer. This impedance has a resonance at the plasma frequency where the imaginary part goes to zero, a feature that has made this measurement a good way of determining electron density. When the plasma potential is positive with respect to the sphere - for example, if the sphere is electrically floating or grounded, a second resonance occurs at {omega}<{omega}{sub pe} due to the capacitance created by the depleted electron density in the sheath. A greatly increased power deposition occurs at this lower resonance, whose frequency can be controlled by applying a dc bias which changes the sheath width. As the bias is increased the value of this frequency becomes smaller until the resonance disappears completely at V{sub probe}=V{sub plasma}. As the bias is further increased past the plasma potential, an electron sheath forms with its own resonance, which is at a lower frequency than the resonance associated with the ion sheath. The impedance of the electron sheath can be approximated using sheath transit time perturbation theory for a space charge limited diode. As with the ion sheath resonance, the largest energy deposition occurs at the lower of the two resonant frequencies.

  3. Effect of Electrode Belt and Body Positions on Regional Pulmonary Ventilation- and Perfusion-Related Impedance Changes Measured by Electric Impedance Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ericsson, Elin; Tesselaar, Erik; Sjöberg, Folke

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-induced or ventilator-associated lung injury (VILI/VALI) is common and there is an increasing demand for a tool that can optimize ventilator settings. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) can detect changes in impedance caused by pulmonary ventilation and perfusion, but the effect of changes in the position of the body and in the placing of the electrode belt on the impedance signal have not to our knowledge been thoroughly evaluated. We therefore studied ventilation-related and perfusion-related changes in impedance during spontaneous breathing in 10 healthy subjects in five different body positions and with the electrode belt placed at three different thoracic positions using a 32-electrode EIT system. We found differences between regions of interest that could be attributed to changes in the position of the body, and differences in impedance amplitudes when the position of the electrode belt was changed. Ventilation-related changes in impedance could therefore be related to changes in the position of both the body and the electrode belt. Perfusion-related changes in impedance were probably related to the interference of major vessels. While these findings give us some insight into the sources of variation in impedance signals as a result of changes in the positions of both the body and the electrode belt, further studies on the origin of the perfusion-related impedance signal are needed to improve EIT further as a tool for the monitoring of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. PMID:27253433

  4. High Dynamic Range Complex Impedance Measurement System for Petrophysical Usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; He, X.; Yao, H.; Tan, S.; Shi, H.; Shen, R.; Yan, C.; Zeng, P.; He, L.; Qiao, N.; Xi, F.; Zhang, H.; Xie, J.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral induced polarization method (SIP) or complex resistivity method is increasing its application in metalliferous ore exploration, hydrocarbon exploration, underground water exploration, monitoring of environment pollution, and the evaluation of environment remediation. And the measurement of complex resistivity or complex impedance of rock/ore sample and polluted water plays a fundamental role in improving the application effect of SIP and the application scope of SIP. However, current instruments can't guaranty the accuracy of measurement when the resistance of sample is less than 10Ω or great than 100kΩ. A lot of samples, such as liquid, polluted sea water, igneous rock, limestone, and sandstone, can't be measured with reliable complex resistivity result. Therefore, this problem projects a shadow in the basic research and application research of SIP. We design a high precision measurement system from the study of measurement principle, sample holder, and measurement instrument. We design input buffers in a single board. We adopt operation amplifier AD549 in this system because of its ultra-high input impedance and ultra-low current noise. This buffer is good in acquiring potential signal across high impedance sample. By analyzing the sources of measurement error and errors generated by the measurement system, we propose a correction method to remove the error in order to achieve high quality complex impedance measurement for rock and ore samples. This measurement system can improve the measurement range of the complex impedance to 0.1 Ω ~ 10 GΩ with amplitude error less than 0.1% and phase error less than 0.1mrad when frequency ranges as 0.01 Hz ~ 1 kHz. We tested our system on resistors with resistance as 0.1Ω ~ 10 GΩ in frequency range as 1 Hz ~ 1000 Hz, and the measurement error is less than 0.1 mrad. We also compared the result with LCR bridge and SCIP, we can find that the bridge's measuring range only reaches 100 MΩ, SCIP's measuring range

  5. Tunable impedance matching network fundamental limits and practical considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Wesley N.

    As wireless devices continue to increase in utility while decreasing in dimension, design of the RF front-end becomes more complex. It is common for a single handheld device to operate on a plethora of frequency bands, utilize multiple antennae, and be subjected to a variety of environments. One complexity in particular which arises from these factors is that of impedance mismatch. Recently, tunable impedance matching networks have begun to be implemented to address this problem. This dissertation presents the first in-depth study on the frequency tuning range of tunable impedance matching networks. Both the fundamental limitations of ideal networks as well as practical considerations for design and implementation are addressed. Specifically, distributed matching networks with a single tuning element are investigated for use with parallel resistor-capacitor and series resistor-inductor loads. Analytical formulas are developed to directly calculate the frequency tuning range TR of ideal topologies. The theoretical limit of TR for these topologies is presented and discussed. Additional formulas are developed which address limitations in transmission line characteristic impedance and varactor range. Equations to predict loss due to varactor quality factor are demonstrated and the ability of parasitics to both increase and decrease TR are shown. Measured results exemplify i) the potential to develop matching networks with a small impact from parasitics, ii) the need for accurate knowledge of parasitics when designing near transition points in optimal parameters, iii) the importance of using a transmission line with the right characteristic impedance, and iv) the ability to achieve extremely low loss at the design frequency with a lossy varactor under the right conditions (measured loss of -0.07 dB). In the area of application, tunable matching networks are designed and measured for mobile handset antennas, demonstrating up to a 3 dB improvement in power delivered to a

  6. Effect of Resonator Axis Skew on Normal Incidence Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrott, Tony L.; Jones, Michael G.; Homeijer, Brian

    2003-01-01

    High by-pass turbofan engines have fewer fan blades and lower rotation speeds than their predecessors. Consequently, the noise suppression at the low frequency end of the noise spectra has become an increasing concern. This has led to a renewed emphasis on improving noise suppression efficiency of passive, duct liner treatments at the lower frequencies. For a variety of reasons, passive liners are comprised of locally-reacting, resonant absorbers. One reason for this design choice is to satisfy operational and economic requirements. The simplest liner design consists of a single layer of honeycomb core sandwiched between a porous facesheet and an impervious backing plate. These resonant absorbing structures are integrated into the nacelle wall and are very ef- ficient over a limited bandwidth centered on their resonance frequency. Increased noise suppression bandwidth and greater suppression at lower frequencies is typically achieved for conventional liners by increasing the liner depth and incorporating thin porous septa into the honeycomb core. However, constraints on liner depth in modern high by-pass engine nacelles severely limit the suppression bandwidth extension to lower frequencies. Also, current honeycomb core liners may not be suitable for irregular geometric volumes heretofore not considered. It is of interest, therefore, to find ways to circumvent liner depth restrictions and resonator cavity shape constraints. One way to increase effective liner depth is to skew the honeycomb core axis relative to the porous facesheet surface. Other possibilities are to alter resonator cavity shape, e.g. high aspect ratio, narrow channels that possibly include right angle bends, 180. channel fold-backs, and splayed channel walls to conform to irregular geometric constraints. These possibilities constitute the practical motivation for expanding impedance modeling capability to include unconventional resonator orientations and shapes. The work reported in this paper is

  7. Surface impedance based microwave imaging method for breast cancer screening: contrast-enhanced scenario.

    PubMed

    Güren, Onan; Çayören, Mehmet; Ergene, Lale Tükenmez; Akduman, Ibrahim

    2014-10-01

    A new microwave imaging method that uses microwave contrast agents is presented for the detection and localization of breast tumours. The method is based on the reconstruction of breast surface impedance through a measured scattered field. The surface impedance modelling allows for representing the electrical properties of the breasts in terms of impedance boundary conditions, which enable us to map the inner structure of the breasts into surface impedance functions. Later a simple quantitative method is proposed to screen breasts against malignant tumours where the detection procedure is based on weighted cross correlations among impedance functions. Numerical results demonstrate that the method is capable of detecting small malignancies and provides reasonable localization.

  8. A direct method for measuring acoustic ground impedance in long-range propagation experiments.

    PubMed

    Soh, Jin H; Gilbert, Kenneth E; Frazier, W M Garth; Talmadge, Carrick L; Waxler, Roger

    2010-11-01

    A method is reported for determining ground impedance in long-range propagation experiments by using the definition of impedance directly. The method is envisioned as way of measuring the impedence at multiple locations along the propagation path, using the signals broadcast during the experiment itself. In a short-range (10 m) test, the direct method was in good agreement with a more conventional model-based least-squares method. The utility of the direct method was demonstrated in a 400 m propagation experiment in a agricultural field. The resulting impedance was consistent with the impedance measured previously in the same field. PMID:21110540

  9. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy system and methods for determining spatial locations of defects

    DOEpatents

    Glenn, David F.; Matthern, Gretchen E.; Propp, W. Alan; Glenn, Anne W.; Shaw, Peter G.

    2006-08-08

    A method and apparatus for determining spatial locations of defects in a material are described. The method includes providing a plurality of electrodes in contact with a material, applying a sinusoidal voltage to a select number of the electrodes at a predetermined frequency, determining gain and phase angle measurements at other of the electrodes in response to applying the sinusoidal voltage to the select number of electrodes, determining impedance values from the gain and phase angle measurements, computing an impedance spectrum for an area of the material from the determined impedance values, and comparing the computed impedance spectrum with a known impedance spectrum to identify spatial locations of defects in the material.

  10. Single HeLa and MCF-7 cell measurement using minimized impedance spectroscopy and microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min-Haw; Kao, Min-Feng; Jang, Ling-Sheng

    2011-06-01

    This study presents an impedance measurement system for single-cell capture and measurement. The microwell structure which utilizes nDEP force is used to single-cell capture and a minimized impedance spectroscopy which includes a power supply chip, an impedance measurement chip and a USB microcontroller chip is used to single-cell impedance measurement. To improve the measurement accuracy of the proposed system, Biquadratic fitting is used in this study. The measurement accuracy and reliability of the proposed system are compared to those of a conventional precision impedance analyzer. Moreover, a stable material, latex beads, is used to study the impedance measurement using the minimized impedance spectroscopy with cell-trapping device. Finally, the proposed system is used to measure the impedance of HeLa cells and MCF-7 cells. The impedance of single HeLa cells decreased from 9.55 × 103 to 3.36 × 103 Ω and the impedance of single MCF-7 cells decreased from 3.48 × 103 to 1.45 × 103 Ω at an operate voltage of 0.5 V when the excitation frequency was increased from 11 to 101 kHz. The results demonstrate that the proposed impedance measurement system successfully distinguishes HeLa cells and MCF-7 cells.

  11. Time and frequency dependence of disposable ECG electrode-skin impedance.

    PubMed

    Olson, W H; Schmincke, D R; Henley, B L

    1979-01-01

    The magnitude and phase of disposable electrode-skin impedance were studied as functions of time, 0-48 hours, and frequency, 1 Hz-1 kHz. For both unabraded and mildly abraded skin, the impedance decreased as a function of time steadily or exponentially with time constants of several hours. Impedance decreased as a function of frequency by factors of 2 to 20 with greatest change at low frequencies. For heavily abraded skin, the impedance decreased slightly and then increased as a function of time especially at low frequencies. Impedance imbalance between pairs of identical electrodes applied in a like manner to the forearm were often greater than k omega, nearly equal to individual electrode-skin impedances, and decreased with time. Electrode impedance imbalance is particularly important because it affects noise levels in ECG recordings.

  12. Human body impedance for electromagnetic hazard analysis in the VLF to MF band

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, H.; Chatterjee, I.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1984-08-01

    A knowledge of the average electrical impedance of the human body is essential for the analysis of electromagnetic hazards in the VLF to MF band. The purpose of the measurements was to determine the average body impedance of several human subjects as a function of frequency. Measurements were carried out with the subjects standing barefoot on a ground plane and touching various metal electrodes with the hand or index finger. The measured impedance includes the electrode polarization and skin impedances, spread impedance near the electrode, body impedance, stray capacitance between the body surface and ground, and inductance due to the body and grounding strap. These components are separated and simplified equivalent circuits are presented for body impedance of humans exposed to free-space electromagnetic waves as well as in contact with large ungrounded metallic objects therein.

  13. Microelectrical Impedance Spectroscopy for the Differentiation between Normal and Cancerous Human Urothelial Cell Lines: Real-Time Electrical Impedance Measurement at an Optimal Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yangkyu; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Yun, Joho; Seo, Seungwan; Park, Chang-Ju; Lee, Jeong Zoo; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To distinguish between normal (SV-HUC-1) and cancerous (TCCSUP) human urothelial cell lines using microelectrical impedance spectroscopy (μEIS). Materials and Methods. Two types of μEIS devices were designed and used in combination to measure the impedance of SV-HUC-1 and TCCSUP cells flowing through the channels of the devices. The first device (μEIS-OF) was designed to determine the optimal frequency at which the impedance of two cell lines is most distinguishable. The μEIS-OF trapped the flowing cells and measured their impedance at a frequency ranging from 5 kHz to 1 MHz. The second device (μEIS-RT) was designed for real-time impedance measurement of the cells at the optimal frequency. The impedance was measured instantaneously as the cells passed the sensing electrodes of μEIS-RT. Results. The optimal frequency, which maximized the average difference of the amplitude and phase angle between the two cell lines (p < 0.001), was determined to be 119 kHz. The real-time impedance of the cell lines was measured at 119 kHz; the two cell lines differed significantly in terms of amplitude and phase angle (p < 0.001). Conclusion. The μEIS-RT can discriminate SV-HUC-1 and TCCSUP cells by measuring the impedance at the optimal frequency determined by the μEIS-OF. PMID:26998490

  14. Electronic state of vortices in YBa2Cu3Oy investigated by complex surface impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Yoshishige; Iwaya, Katsuya; Kinoshita, Kentarou; Hanaguri, Tetsuo; Kitano, Haruhisa; Maeda, Atsutaka; Shibata, Kenji; Nishizaki, Terukazu; Kobayashi, Norio

    2001-05-01

    The electromagnetic response to microwaves in the mixed state of YBa2Cu3Oy (YBCO) was measured in order to investigate the electronic state inside and outside the vortex core. The magnetic-field dependence of the complex surface impedance at low temperatures was in good agreement with a general vortex dynamics description assuming that the field-independent viscous damping force and the linear restoring force were acting on the vortices. In other words, both real and imaginary parts of the complex resistivity, ρ1, and ρ2, were linear in B. This is explained by theories for d-wave superconductors. Using analysis based on the Coffey-Clem description of the complex penetration depth, we estimated that the vortex viscosity η at 10 K was (4-5)×10-7 Ns/m2. This value corresponds to ω0τ~0.3-0.5, where ω0 and τ are the minimal gap frequency and the quasiparticle lifetime in the vortex core, respectively. These results suggest that the vortex core in YBCO is not in the deeply superclean regime but in the moderately clean regime. Investigation of the moderately clean vortex core in high-temperature superconductors is significant because physically new effects may be expected due to d-wave characteristics and to the quantum nature of cuprate superconductors. The behavior of Zs as a function of B across the first order transition (FOT) of the vortex lattice was also investigated. Unlike Bi2Sr2CaCu2Oy (BSCCO), no distinct anomaly was observed around the FOT in YBCO. Our results suggest that the rapid increase of Xs due to the change of superfluid density at the FOT would be observed only in highly anisotropic two-dimensional vortex systems like BSCCO. We discuss these results in terms of the difference of the interlayer coupling and the energy scale between the two materials.

  15. Effect of borehole design on electrical impedance tomography measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozaffari, Amirpasha; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Treichel, Andrea; Zimmermann, Egon; Kelter, Matthias; Vereecken, Harry

    2015-04-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a sophisticated non-invasive tool to investigate the subsurface in engineering and environmental studies. To increase the depth of investigation, EIT measurements can be made in boreholes. However, the presence of the borehole may affect EIT measurements. Here, we aim to investigate the effect of different borehole components on EIT measurements using 2,5-D and 3D finite element modeling and unstructured meshes. To investigate the effect of different borehole components on EIT measurements, a variety of scenarios were designed. In particular, the effect of the water-filled borehole, the PVC casing, and the gravel filter were investigated relative to complex resistivity simulations for a homogenous medium with chain and electrode modules. It was found that the results of the complex resistivity simulations were best understood using the sensitivity distribution of the electrode configuration under consideration. In all simulations, the sensitivity in the vicinity of the borehole was predominantly negative. Therefore, the introduction of the water-filled borehole caused an increase in the real part of the impedance, and a decrease (more negative) in the imaginary part of the simulated impedance. The PVC casing mostly enhanced the effect of the water-filled borehole described above, although this effect was less clear for some electrode configuration. The effect of the gravel filter mostly reduced the effect of the water-filled borehole with PVC casing. For EIT measurements in a single borehole, the highest simulated phase error was 12% for a Wenner configuration with electrode spacing of 0.33 m. This error decreased with increasing electrode spacing. In the case of cross-well configurations, the error in the phase shit was as high as 6%. Here, it was found that the highest errors occur when both current electrodes are located in the same borehole. These results indicated that cross-well measurements are less affected by the

  16. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy to Characterize Inflammatory Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fei; Dai, Xiaohu; Beebe, Tyler; Hsiai, Tzung

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and therapy, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Predicting metabolically active atherosclerotic lesions has remained an unmet clinical need. We hereby developed an electrochemical strategy to characterize the inflammatory states of high-risk atherosclerotic plaques. Using the concentric bipolar microelectrodes, we sought to demonstrate distinct Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopic (EIS) measurements for unstable atherosclerotic plaques that harbored active lipids and inflammatory cells. Using equivalent circuits to simulate vessel impedance at the electrode-endoluminal tissue interface, we demonstrated specific electric elements to model working and counter electrode interfaces as well as the tissue impedance. Using explants of human coronary, carotid, and femoral arteries at various Stary stages of atherosclerotic lesions (n = 15), we performed endoluminal EIS measurements (n = 147) and validated with histology and immunohistochemistry. We computed the vascular tissue resistance using the equivalent circuit model and normalized the resistance to the lesion-free regions. Tissue resistance was significantly elevated in the oxLDL-rich thin-cap atheromas (1.57±0.40, n = 14, p < 0.001) and fatty streaks (1.36±0.28, n = 33, p < 0.001) as compared with lesion-free region (1.00±0.18, n = 82) or oxLDL-absent fibrous atheromas (0.86±0.30, n = 12). Tissue resistance was also elevated in the calcified core of fibrous atheroma (2.37±0.60, n = 6, p < 0.001). Despite presence of fibrous structures, tissue resistance between ox-LDL-absent fibroatheroma and the lesion-free regions was statistically insignificant (0.86±0.30, n = 12, p > 0.05). Hence, we demonstrate that the application of EIS strategy was sensitive to detect fibrous cap oxLDL-rich lesions and specific to distinguish oxLDL-absent fibroatheroma. PMID:21959227

  17. Optimization of Microphone Locations for Acoustic Liner Impedance Eduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; June, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Two impedance eduction methods are explored for use with data acquired in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube. The first is an indirect method based on the convected Helmholtz equation, and the second is a direct method based on the Kumaresan and Tufts algorithm. Synthesized no-flow data, with random jitter to represent measurement error, are used to evaluate a number of possible microphone locations. Statistical approaches are used to evaluate the suitability of each set of microphone locations. Given the computational resources required, small sample statistics are employed for the indirect method. Since the direct method is much less computationally intensive, a Monte Carlo approach is employed to gather its statistics. A comparison of results achieved with full and reduced sets of microphone locations is used to determine which sets of microphone locations are acceptable. For the indirect method, each array that includes microphones in all three regions (upstream and downstream hard wall sections, and liner test section) provides acceptable results, even when as few as eight microphones are employed. The best arrays employ microphones well away from the leading and trailing edges of the liner. The direct method is constrained to use microphones opposite the liner. Although a number of arrays are acceptable, the optimum set employs 14 microphones positioned well away from the leading and trailing edges of the liner. The selected sets of microphone locations are also evaluated with data measured for ceramic tubular and perforate-over-honeycomb liners at three flow conditions (Mach 0.0, 0.3, and 0.5). They compare favorably with results attained using all 53 microphone locations. Although different optimum microphone locations are selected for the two impedance eduction methods, there is significant overlap. Thus, the union of these two microphone arrays is preferred, as it supports usage of both methods. This array contains 3 microphones in the upstream

  18. Fully Parallel Electrical Impedance Tomography Using Code Division Multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Tšoeu, M S; Inggs, M R

    2016-06-01

    Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) has been dominated by the use of Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) and Frequency Division Multiplexing (FDM) as methods of achieving orthogonal injection of excitation signals. Code Division Multiplexing (CDM), presented in this paper is an alternative that eliminates temporal data inconsistencies of TDM for fast changing systems. Furthermore, this approach eliminates data inconsistencies that arise in FDM when frequency bands of current injecting electrodes are chosen over frequencies that have large changes in the imaged object's impedance. To the authors knowledge no fully functional wideband system or simulation platform using simultaneous injection of Gold codes currents has been reported. In this paper, we formulate, simulate and develop a fully functional pseudo-random (Gold) code driven EIT system with 15 excitation currents and 16 separate voltage measurement electrodes. In the work we verify the use of CDM as a multiplexing modality in simultaneous injection EIT, using a prototype system with an overall bandwidth of 15 kHz, and attainable speed of 462 frames/s using codes with a period of 31 chips. Simulations and experiments are performed using the Electrical Impedance and Diffuse Optics Reconstruction Software (EIDORS). We also propose the use of image processing on reconstructed images to establish their quality quantitatively without access to raw reconstruction data. The results of this study show that CDM can be successfully used in EIT, and gives results of similar visual quality to TDM and FDM. Achieved performance shows average position error of 3.5% and size error of 6.2%. PMID:26731774

  19. Bonding and impedance matching of acoustic transducers using silver epoxy.

    PubMed

    Son, Kyu Tak; Lee, Chin C

    2012-04-01

    Silver epoxy was selected to bond transducer plates on glass substrates. The properties and thickness of the bonding medium affect the electrical input impedance of the transducer. Thus, the thickness of the silver epoxy bonding layer was used as a design parameter to optimize the structure for the transducer input impedance to match the 50 Ω output impedance of most radio frequency (RF) generators. Simulation and experimental results show that nearly perfect matching is achieved without using any matching circuit. At the matching condition, the transducer operates at a frequency band a little bit below the half-wavelength resonant frequency of the piezoelectric plate. In experiments, lead titanate (PT) piezoelectric plates were employed. Both full-size, 11.5 mm × 2 mm × 0.4 mm, and half-size, 5.75 mm × 2 mm × 0.4 mm, can be well matched using optimal silver epoxy thickness. The transducer assemblies demonstrate high efficiency. The conversion loss from electrical power to acoustic power in soda-lime glass is 4.3 dB. This loss is low considering the fact that the transducers operate at off-resonance by 12%. With proper choice of silver epoxy thickness, the transducer can be matched at the fundamental, the 3rd and 5th harmonic frequencies. This leads to the possible realization of triple-band transducers. Reliability was assessed with thermal cycling test according to Telcordia GR-468-Core recommendation. Of the 30 transducer assemblies tested, none broke until 2900 cycles and 27 have sustained beyond 4050 cycles.

  20. Chronic impedance spectroscopy of an endovascular stent-electrode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opie, Nicholas L.; John, Sam E.; Rind, Gil S.; Ronayne, Stephen M.; Grayden, David B.; Burkitt, Anthony N.; May, Clive N.; O’Brien, Terence J.; Oxley, Thomas J.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Recently, we reported a minimally invasive stent-electrode array capable of recording neural signals from within a blood vessel. We now investigate the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements to infer changes occurring to the electrode–tissue interface from devices implanted in a cohort of sheep for up to 190 days. Approach. In a cohort of 15 sheep, endovascular stent-electrode arrays were implanted in the superior sagittal sinus overlying the motor cortex for up to 190 days. EIS was performed routinely to quantify viable electrodes for up to 91 days. An equivalent circuit model (ECM) was developed from the in vivo measurements to characterize the electrode–tissue interface changes occurring to the electrodes chronically implanted within a blood vessel. Post-mortem histological assessment of stent and electrode incorporation into the wall of the cortical vessels was compared to the electrical impedance measurements. Main results. EIS could be used to infer electrode viability and was consistent with x-ray analysis performed in vivo, and post-mortem evaluation. Viable electrodes exhibited consistent 1 kHz impedances across the 91 day measurement period, with the peak resistance frequency for the acquired data also stable over time. There was a significant change in 100 Hz phase angles, increasing from ‑67.8° ± 8.8° at day 0 to ‑43.8° ± 0.8° at day 91, which was observed to stabilize after eight days. ECM’s modeled to the data suggested this change was due to an increase in the capacitance of the electrode–tissue interface. This was supported by histological assessment with >85% of the implanted stent struts covered with neointima and incorporated into the blood vessel within two weeks. Conclusion. This work demonstrated that EIS could be used to determine the viability of electrode implanted chronically within a blood vessel. Impedance measurements alone were not observed to be a useful predictor of alterations