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Sample records for impedes human pancreatic

  1. Impedance Spectroscopy of Human Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, Francisco; Bernal, José J.; Sosa, Modesto A.; Villagómez, Julio C.; Palomares, Pascual

    2004-09-01

    The blood is one of the corporal fluids more used with analytical purposes. When the blood is extracted, immediately it is affected by agents that act on it, producing transformations in its elements. Among the effects of these transformations the hemolysis phenomenon stands out, which consists of the membrane rupture and possible death of the red blood cells. The main purpose of this investigation was the quantification of this phenomenon. A Solartron SI-1260 Impedance Spectrometer was used, which covers a frequency range of work from 1 μHz to 10 MHz, and its accuracy has been tested in the accomplishment of several applications. Measurements were performed on 3 mL human blood samples, from healthy donors. Reactive strips for sugar test of 2 μL, from Bayer, were used as electrodes, which allow gathering a portion of the sample, to be analyzed by the spectrometer. Preliminary results of these measurements are presented.

  2. Three-dimensional electrical impedance tomography of human brain activity.

    PubMed

    Tidswell, T; Gibson, A; Bayford, R H; Holder, D S

    2001-02-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow and blood volume changes that occur during human brain activity will change the local impedance of that cortical area, as blood has a lower impedance than that of brain. Theoretically, such impedance changes could be measured from scalp electrodes and reconstructed into images of the internal impedance of the head. Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a newly developed technique by which impedance measurements from the surface of an object are reconstructed into impedance images. It is fast, portable, inexpensive, and noninvasive, but has a relatively low spatial resolution. EIT images were recorded with scalp electrodes and an EIT system, specially optimized for recording brain function, in 39 adult human subjects during visual, somatosensory, or motor activity. Reproducible impedance changes of about 0.5% occurred in 51/52 recordings, which lasted from 6 s after the stimulus onset to 41 s after stimulus cessation. When these changes were reconstructed into impedance images, using a novel 3-D reconstruction algorithm, 19 data sets demonstrated significant impedance changes in the appropriate cortical region. This demonstrates, for the first time, that significant impedance changes, which could form the basis for a novel neuroimaging technology, may be recorded in human subjects with scalp electrodes. The final images contained spatial noise and strategies to reduce this in future work are presented.

  3. Progression of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is significantly impeded with a combination of vaccine and COX-2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pinku; Basu, Gargi D; Tinder, Teresa L; Subramani, Durai B; Bradley, Judy M; Arefayene, Million; Skaar, Todd; De Petris, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    With a 5-year survival rate of <5%, pancreatic cancer is one of the most rapidly fatal malignancies. Current protocols for the treatment of pancreas cancer are not as effective as we desire. In this study, we show that a novel Mucin-1 (MUC1)-based vaccine in combination with a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (celecoxib), and low-dose chemotherapy (gemcitabine) was effective in preventing the progression of preneoplastic intraepithelial lesions to invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. The study was conducted in an appropriate triple transgenic model of spontaneous pancreatic cancer induced by the KRAS(G12D) mutation and that expresses human MUC1 as a self molecule. The combination treatment elicited robust antitumor cellular and humoral immune responses and was associated with increased apoptosis in the tumor. The mechanism for the increased immune response was attributed to the down-regulation of circulating prostaglandin E(2) and indoleamine 2, 3,-dioxygenase enzymatic activity, as well as decreased levels of T regulatory and myeloid suppressor cells within the tumor microenvironment. The preclinical data provide the rationale to design clinical trials with a combination of MUC1-based vaccine, celecoxib, and gemcitabine for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  4. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    cause hereditary pancreatitis in humans. Previous attempts to introduce these mutant forms of human trypsinogen into mice have failed to produce...mutations in mouse trypsinogen isoform T7. Under this aim, we had two major tasks in our SOW: Major Task 1 was the design and construction of mutant forms...of the T7 mouse trypsinogen gene and expression and purification of these mutant enzymes. Major Task 2 was to analyze autoactivation of the T7

  5. Controlled Film Architectures to Detect a Biomarker for Pancreatic Cancer Using Impedance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Soares, Andrey C; Soares, Juliana C; Shimizu, Flavio M; Melendez, Matias E; Carvalho, André L; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2015-11-25

    The need for analytical devices for detecting cancer at early stages has motivated research into nanomaterials where synergy is sought to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity in low-cost biosensors. In this study, we developed a film architecture combining self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and layer-by-layer (LbL) films of polysaccharide chitosan and the protein concanavalin A, on which a layer of anti-CA19-9 antibody was adsorbed. Using impedance spectroscopy with this biosensor, we were capable of detecting low concentrations of the antigen CA19-9, an important biomarker for pancreatic cancer. The limit of detection of 0.69U/mL reached is sufficient for detecting pancreatic cancer at very early stages. The selectivity of the biosensor was inferred from a series of control experiments with samples of cell lines that were tested positive (HT29) and negative (SW620) for the biomarker CA19-9, in addition to the lack of changes in the capacitance value for other analytes and antigen that are not related to this type of cancer. The high sensitivity and selectivity are ascribed to the very specific antigen-antibody interaction, which was confirmed with PM-IRRAS and atomic force microscopy. Also significant is that used information visualization methods to show that different cell lines and commercial samples containing distinct concentrations of CA19-9 and other analytes can be easily distinguished from each other. These computational methods are generic and may be used in optimization procedures to tailor biosensors for specific purposes, as we demonstrated here by comparing the performance of two film architectures in which the concentration of chitosan was varied.

  6. Mechanical Impedance of the Human Body in the Horizontal Direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmlund, P.; Lundström, R.

    1998-08-01

    The mechanical impedance of the seated human body in horizontal directions (fore-and-aft and lateral) was measured during different experimental conditions, such as vibration level (0·25-1·4 m/s2r.m.s.), frequency (1·13-80 Hz), body weight (54-93 kg), upper body posture (relaxed and erect) and gender. The outcome showed that impedance, normalized by the sitting weight, varies with direction, level, posture and gender. Generally the impedance spectra show one peak for the fore-and-aft (X) direction while two peaks are found in the lateral (Y) direction. Males showed a lower normalized impedance than females. Increasing fore-and-aft vibration decreases the frequency at which maximum impedance occurs but also reduces the overall magnitude. For the lateral direction a more complex pattern was found. The frequency of impedance peaks are constant with increasing vibration level. The magnitude of the second peak decreases when changing posture from erect to relaxed. Males showed a higher impedance magnitude than females and a greater dip between the two peaks. The impedance spectra for the two horizontal directions have different shapes. This supports the idea of treating them differently; such as with respect to risk assessments and development of preventative measures.

  7. Staining Protocols for Human Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Thompson, Martha L.; Heiple, Tiffany; Montgomery, Emily; Zhang, Li; Schneider, Lynda

    2012-01-01

    Estimates of islet area and numbers and endocrine cell composition in the adult human pancreas vary from several hundred thousand to several million and beta mass ranges from 500 to 1500 mg 1-3. With this known heterogeneity, a standard processing and staining procedure was developed so that pancreatic regions were clearly defined and islets characterized using rigorous histopathology and immunolocalization examinations. Standardized procedures for processing human pancreas recovered from organ donors are described in part 1 of this series. The pancreas is processed into 3 main regions (head, body, tail) followed by transverse sections. Transverse sections from the pancreas head are further divided, as indicated based on size, and numbered alphabetically to denote subsections. This standardization allows for a complete cross sectional analysis of the head region including the uncinate region which contains islets composed primarily of pancreatic polypeptide cells to the tail region. The current report comprises part 2 of this series and describes the procedures used for serial sectioning and histopathological characterization of the pancreatic paraffin sections with an emphasis on islet endocrine cells, replication, and T-cell infiltrates. Pathology of pancreatic sections is intended to characterize both exocrine, ductular, and endocrine components. The exocrine compartment is evaluated for the presence of pancreatitis (active or chronic), atrophy, fibrosis, and fat, as well as the duct system, particularly in relationship to the presence of pancreatic intraductal neoplasia4. Islets are evaluated for morphology, size, and density, endocrine cells, inflammation, fibrosis, amyloid, and the presence of replicating or apoptotic cells using H&E and IHC stains. The final component described in part 2 is the provision of the stained slides as digitized whole slide images. The digitized slides are organized by case and pancreas region in an online pathology database

  8. Staining protocols for human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Thompson, Martha L; Heiple, Tiffany; Montgomery, Emily; Zhang, Li; Schneider, Lynda

    2012-05-23

    Estimates of islet area and numbers and endocrine cell composition in the adult human pancreas vary from several hundred thousand to several million and beta mass ranges from 500 to 1500 mg. With this known heterogeneity, a standard processing and staining procedure was developed so that pancreatic regions were clearly defined and islets characterized using rigorous histopathology and immunolocalization examinations. Standardized procedures for processing human pancreas recovered from organ donors are described in part 1 of this series. The pancreas is processed into 3 main regions (head, body, tail) followed by transverse sections. Transverse sections from the pancreas head are further divided, as indicated based on size, and numbered alphabetically to denote subsections. This standardization allows for a complete cross sectional analysis of the head region including the uncinate region which contains islets composed primarily of pancreatic polypeptide cells to the tail region. The current report comprises part 2 of this series and describes the procedures used for serial sectioning and histopathological characterization of the pancreatic paraffin sections with an emphasis on islet endocrine cells, replication, and T-cell infiltrates. Pathology of pancreatic sections is intended to characterize both exocrine, ductular, and endocrine components. The exocrine compartment is evaluated for the presence of pancreatitis (active or chronic), atrophy, fibrosis, and fat, as well as the duct system, particularly in relationship to the presence of pancreatic intraductal neoplasia. Islets are evaluated for morphology, size, and density, endocrine cells, inflammation, fibrosis, amyloid, and the presence of replicating or apoptotic cells using H&E and IHC stains. The final component described in part 2 is the provision of the stained slides as digitized whole slide images. The digitized slides are organized by case and pancreas region in an online pathology database creating a

  9. Mouse Model of Human Hereditary Pancreatitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    trypsinogen cause hereditary pancreatitis in humans. Previous attempts to introduce these mutant forms of human trypsinogen into mice have failed to...cationic trypsinogen gene and obtained several new mutant strains. These newly created mouse strains will be characterized with respect to spontaneous...10 8. Special Reporting Requirements……………………………………11 9. Appendices……………………………………………………………11 4  Figure 1. Mutant forms of T7 trypsinogen

  10. Summary of Human Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Walking.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Rouse, Elliott J; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2016-01-01

    The human ankle joint plays a critical role during walking and understanding the biomechanical factors that govern ankle behavior and provides fundamental insight into normal and pathologically altered gait. Previous researchers have comprehensively studied ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during many biomechanical tasks, including locomotion; however, only recently have researchers been able to quantify how the mechanical impedance of the ankle varies during walking. The mechanical impedance describes the dynamic relationship between the joint position and the joint torque during perturbation, and is often represented in terms of stiffness, damping, and inertia. The purpose of this short communication is to unify the results of the first two studies measuring ankle mechanical impedance in the sagittal plane during walking, where each study investigated differing regions of the gait cycle. Rouse et al. measured ankle impedance from late loading response to terminal stance, where Lee et al. quantified ankle impedance from pre-swing to early loading response. While stiffness component of impedance increases significantly as the stance phase of walking progressed, the change in damping during the gait cycle is much less than the changes observed in stiffness. In addition, both stiffness and damping remained low during the swing phase of walking. Future work will focus on quantifying impedance during the "push off" region of stance phase, as well as measurement of these properties in the coronal plane.

  11. Summary of Human Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Walking

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2016-01-01

    The human ankle joint plays a critical role during walking and understanding the biomechanical factors that govern ankle behavior and provides fundamental insight into normal and pathologically altered gait. Previous researchers have comprehensively studied ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during many biomechanical tasks, including locomotion; however, only recently have researchers been able to quantify how the mechanical impedance of the ankle varies during walking. The mechanical impedance describes the dynamic relationship between the joint position and the joint torque during perturbation, and is often represented in terms of stiffness, damping, and inertia. The purpose of this short communication is to unify the results of the first two studies measuring ankle mechanical impedance in the sagittal plane during walking, where each study investigated differing regions of the gait cycle. Rouse et al. measured ankle impedance from late loading response to terminal stance, where Lee et al. quantified ankle impedance from pre-swing to early loading response. While stiffness component of impedance increases significantly as the stance phase of walking progressed, the change in damping during the gait cycle is much less than the changes observed in stiffness. In addition, both stiffness and damping remained low during the swing phase of walking. Future work will focus on quantifying impedance during the “push off” region of stance phase, as well as measurement of these properties in the coronal plane. PMID:27766187

  12. Peripancreatic fat necrosis worsens acute pancreatitis independent of pancreatic necrosis via unsaturated fatty acids increased in human pancreatic necrosis collections

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Pawan; Patel, Krutika; Durgampudi, Chandra; Trivedi, Ram N; de Oliveira, Cristiane; Crowell, Michael D; Pannala, Rahul; Lee, Kenneth; Brand, Randall; Chennat, Jennifer; Slivka, Adam; Papachristou, Georgios I; Khalid, Asif; Whitcomb, David C; DeLany, James P; Cline, Rachel A; Acharya, Chathur; Jaligama, Deepthi; Murad, Faris M; Yadav, Dhiraj; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Peripancreatic fat necrosis occurs frequently in necrotising pancreatitis. Distinguishing markers from mediators of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is important since targeting mediators may improve outcomes. We evaluated potential agents in human pancreatic necrotic collections (NCs), pseudocysts (PCs) and pancreatic cystic neoplasms and used pancreatic acini, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and an acute pancreatitis (AP) model to determine SAP mediators. Methods We measured acinar and PBMC injury induced by agents increased in NCs and PCs. Outcomes of caerulein pancreatitis were studied in lean rats coadministered interleukin (IL)-1β and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene, triolein alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat. Results NCs had higher fatty acids, IL-8 and IL-1β versus other fluids. Lipolysis of unsaturated triglyceride and resulting unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) oleic and linoleic acids induced necro-apoptosis at less than half the concentration in NCs but other agents did not do so at more than two times these concentrations. Cytokine coadministration resulted in higher pancreatic and lung inflammation than caerulein alone, but only triolein coadministration caused peripancreatic fat stranding, higher cytokines, UFAs, multisystem organ failure (MSOF) and mortality in 97% animals, which were prevented by orlistat. Conclusions UFAs, IL-1β and IL-8 are elevated in NCs. However, UFAs generated via peripancreatic fat lipolysis causes worse inflammation and MSOF, converting mild AP to SAP. PMID:25500204

  13. [Experimental study on electrical impedance properties of human hepatoma cells].

    PubMed

    Fang, Yun; Tang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Xin; Ma, Qing

    2014-10-01

    The AC impedance of human hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells were measured in our laboratory by Agilent 4294A impedance analyzer in the frequency range of 0.01-100 MHz. And then the effect of hematocrit on electrical impedance characteristics of hepatoma cells was observed by electrical impedance spectroscopy, Bode diagram, Nyquist diagram and Nichols diagram. The results showed that firstly, there is a frequency dependence, i.e., the increment of real part and the imaginary part of complex electrical impedance (δZ', δZ"), the increment of the amplitude modulus of complex electrical impedance (δ[Z *]) and phase angle (δθ) were all changed with the increasing frequency. Secondly, it showed cell volume fraction (CVF) dependence, i. e. , the increment of low-frequency limit (δZ'0, δ[Z*] 0), peak (δZ"(p), δθ(p)), area and radius (Nyquist diagram, Nichols diagram) were all increased along with the electric field frequency. Thirdly, there was the presence of two characteristic frequencies: the first characteristic frequency (f(c1)) and the second characteristic frequency (f(c2)), which were originated respectively in the polarization effects of two interfaces that the cell membrane and extracellular fluid, cell membrane and cytoplasm. A conclusion can be drawn that the electrical impedance spectroscopy is able to be used to observe the electrical characteristics of human hepatoma cells, and therefore this method can be used to investigate the electrophysiological mechanisms of liver cancer cells, and provide research tools and observation parameters, and it also has important theoretical value and potential applications for screening anticancer drugs.

  14. Experimental Models in Syrian Golden Hamster Replicate Human Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunan; Kayoumu, Abudurexiti; Lu, Guotao; Xu, Pengfei; Qiu, Xu; Chen, Liye; Qi, Rong; Huang, Shouxiong; Li, Weiqin; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George

    2016-01-01

    The hamster has been shown to share a variety of metabolic similarities with humans. To replicate human acute pancreatitis with hamsters, we comparatively studied the efficacy of common methods, such as the peritoneal injections of caerulein, L-arginine, the retrograde infusion of sodium taurocholate, and another novel model with concomitant administration of ethanol and fatty acid. The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated by serum amylase activity, pathological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and the expression of inflammation factors in pancreas. The results support that the severity of pathological injury is consistent with the pancreatitis induced in mice and rat using the same methods. Specifically, caerulein induced mild edematous pancreatitis accompanied by minimal lung injury, while L-arginine induced extremely severe pancreatic injury including necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. Infusion of Na-taurocholate into the pancreatic duct induced necrotizing pancreatitis in the head of pancreas and lighter inflammation in the distal region. The severity of acute pancreatitis induced by combination of ethanol and fatty acids was between the extent of caerulein and L-arginine induction, with obvious inflammatory cells infiltration. In view of the advantages in lipid metabolism features, hamster models are ideally suited for the studies of pancreatitis associated with altered metabolism in humans. PMID:27302647

  15. Translating discovery in zebrafish pancreatic development to human pancreatic cancer: biomarkers, targets, pathogenesis, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yee, Nelson S; Kazi, Abid A; Yee, Rosemary K

    2013-06-01

    Abstract Experimental studies in the zebrafish have greatly facilitated understanding of genetic regulation of the early developmental events in the pancreas. Various approaches using forward and reverse genetics, chemical genetics, and transgenesis in zebrafish have demonstrated generally conserved regulatory roles of mammalian genes and discovered novel genetic pathways in exocrine pancreatic development. Accumulating evidence has supported the use of zebrafish as a model of human malignant diseases, including pancreatic cancer. Studies have shown that the genetic regulators of exocrine pancreatic development in zebrafish can be translated into potential clinical biomarkers and therapeutic targets in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Transgenic zebrafish expressing oncogenic K-ras and zebrafish tumor xenograft model have emerged as valuable tools for dissecting the pathogenetic mechanisms of pancreatic cancer and for drug discovery and toxicology. Future analysis of the pancreas in zebrafish will continue to advance understanding of the genetic regulation and biological mechanisms during organogenesis. Results of those studies are expected to provide new insights into how aberrant developmental pathways contribute to formation and growth of pancreatic neoplasia, and hopefully generate valid biomarkers and targets as well as effective and safe therapeutics in pancreatic cancer.

  16. Gene profile identifies zinc transporters differentially expressed in normal human organs and human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Zhang, Y; Cui, X; Yao, W; Yu, X; Cen, P; Hodges, S E; Fisher, W E; Brunicardi, F C; Chen, C; Yao, Q; Li, M

    2013-03-01

    Deregulated expression of zinc transporters was linked to several cancers. However, the detailed expression profile of all human zinc transporters in normal human organs and in human cancer, especially in pancreatic cancer is not available. The objectives of this study are to investigate the complete expression patterns of 14 ZIP and 10 ZnT transporters in a large number of normal human organs and in human pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. We examined the expression patterns of ZIP and ZnT transporters in 22 different human organs and tissues, 11 pairs of clinical human pancreatic cancer specimens and surrounding normal/benign tissues, as well as 10 established human pancreatic cancer cell lines plus normal human pancreatic ductal epithelium (HPDE) cells, using real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that human zinc transporters have tissue specific expression patterns, and may play different roles in different organs or tissues. Almost all the ZIPs except for ZIP4, and most ZnTs were down-regulated in human pancreatic cancer tissues compared to the surrounding benign tissues. The expression patterns of individual ZIPs and ZnTs are similar among different pancreatic cancer lines. Those results and our previous studies suggest that ZIP4 is the only zinc transporter that is significantly up-regulated in human pancreatic cancer and might be the major zinc transporter that plays an important role in pancreatic cancer growth. ZIP4 might serve as a novel molecular target for pancreatic cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  17. Progression of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Is Significantly Impeded with a Combination of Vaccine and COX-2 Inhibition1

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Pinku; Basu, Gargi D.; Tinder, Teresa L.; Subramani, Durai B.; Bradley, Judy M.; Arefayene, Million; Skaar, Todd; De Petris, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    With a 5-year survival rate of <5%, pancreatic cancer is one of the most rapidly fatal malignancies. Current protocols for the treatment of pancreas cancer are not as effective as we desire. In this study, we show that a novel Mucin-1 (MUC1)-based vaccine in combination with a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (celecoxib), and low-dose chemotherapy (gemcitabine) was effective in preventing the progression of preneoplastic intraepithelial lesions to invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. The study was conducted in an appropriate triple transgenic model of spontaneous pancreatic cancer induced by the KRASG12D mutation and that expresses human MUC1 as a self molecule. The combination treatment elicited robust antitumor cellular and humoral immune responses and was associated with increased apoptosis in the tumor. The mechanism for the increased immune response was attributed to the down-regulation of circulating prostaglandin E2 and indoleamine 2, 3,-dioxygenase enzymatic activity, as well as decreased levels of T regulatory and myeloid suppressor cells within the tumor microenvironment. The preclinical data provide the rationale to design clinical trials with a combination of MUC1-based vaccine, celecoxib, and gemcitabine for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:19109152

  18. Epidermal growth factor and its receptors in human pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.F.; Pan, G.Z.; Hou, X.; Liu, T.H.; Chen, J.; Yanaihara, C.; Yanaihara, N. )

    1990-05-01

    The role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in oncogenesis and progression of malignant tumors is a subject of vast interest. In this study, radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay of EGF were established. EGF contents in malignant and benign pancreatic tumors, in normal pancreas tissue, and in culture media of a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line were determined. EGF receptor binding studies were performed. It was shown that EGF contents in pancreatic carcinomas were significantly higher than those in normal pancreas or benign pancreatic tumors. EGF was also detected in the culture medium of a pancreatic carcinoma cell line. The binding of 125I-EGF to the pancreatic carcinoma cells was time and temperature dependent, reversible, competitive, and specific. Scatchard analysis showed that the dissociation constant of EGF receptor was 2.1 X 10(-9) M, number of binding sites was 1.3 X 10(5) cell. These results indicate that there is an over-expression of EGF/EGF receptors in pancreatic carcinomas, and that an autocrine regulatory mechanism may exist in the growth-promoting effect of EGF on tumor cells.

  19. [Anti-metastasis effect of thymoquinone on human pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-Hao; Chen, Zhao; Shen, Yue; Huang, Li-Li; Jiang, Ping

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies reported that thymoquinone (TQ), a component derived from the medicinal spice Nigella sativa (also called black cumin), exhibited inhibitory effects on cell proliferation of many cancer cell lines. This study was performed to investigate the anti-metastatic effect of thymoquinone on the pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that thymoquinone suppressed the migration and invasion of Panc-1 cells in a does-dependent manner. To investigate the possible mechanisms involved in these events, Western blotting analysis was performed, and found that thymoquinone significantly down-regulates NF-kappaB and MMP-9 in Panc-1 cells. In addition, metastatic model simulating human pancreatic cancer was established by orthotropic implantation of histologically intact pancreatic tumor tissue into the pancreatic wall of nude mice. And administration of thymoquinone significantly reduced tumor metastasis compared to untreated control. Furthermore, the expression of NF-kappaB and MMP-9 in tumor tissues was also suppressed after treatment with thymoquinone. Taken together, the results indicate that thymoquinone exerts anti-metastatic activity on pancreatic cancer both in vitro and in vivo, which may be related to down-regulation of NF-kappaB and its regulated molecules such as MMP-9 protein. Consequently, these results provide important insights into thymoquinone as an antimetastatic agent for the treatment of human pancreatic cancer.

  20. Partial amino acid sequence of human pancreatic stone protein, a novel pancreatic secretory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Montalto, G; Bonicel, J; Multigner, L; Rovery, M; Sarles, H; De Caro, A

    1986-01-01

    Pancreatic stone protein (PSP) is the major organic component of human pancreatic stones. With the use of monoclonal antibody immunoadsorbents, five immunoreactive forms (PSP-S) with close Mr values (14,000-19,000) were isolated from normal pancreatic juice. By CM-Trisacryl M chromatography the lowest-Mr form (PSP-S1) was separated from the others and some of its molecular characteristics were investigated. The Mr of the PSP-S1 polypeptide chain calculated from the amino acid composition was about 16,100. The N-terminal sequences (40 residues) of PSP and PSP-S1 are identical, which suggests that the peptide backbone is the same for both of these polypeptides. The PSP-S1 sequence was determined up to residue 65 and was found to be different from all other known protein sequences. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3541906

  1. Antiproliferative and antimetastatic effects of emodin on human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, An; Chen, Hui; Wei, Weitian; Ye, Sheng; Liao, Wei; Gong, Jianming; Jiang, Zhengcai; Wang, Lian; Lin, Shengzhang

    2011-07-01

    Emodin (1, 3, 8-trihydroxy-6-methylanthraquinone) is an active constituent isolated from the root of Rheum palmatum L and is the main effective component of some Chinese herbs and plants. Pharmacological studies have demonstrated that emodin exhibits anti-cancer effects on several human cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of emodin-mediated tumor regression have not been fully defined. This study was performed to investigate the antiproliferative and antimetastatic effects of emodin on pancreatic cancer in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that emodin induced a higher percentage of growth inhibition and apoptosis in the pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 compared to that of control, and emodin suppressed the migration and invasion of SW1990 cells in a dose-dependent manner. To investigate the possible mechanisms involved in these events, we performed electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and Western blot analysis, and found that emodin significantly down-regulated NF-κB DNA-binding activity, survivin and MMP-9 in SW1990 cells. Moreover, the expression of cleaved caspase-3 was up-regulated in SW1990 cells after treatment with emodin. In addition, a metastatic model simulating human pancreatic cancer was established by orthotopic implantation of histologically intact human tumor tissue into the pancreatic wall of nude mice. Oral administration of emodin significantly decreased tumor weight and metastasis compared to control. Furthermore, the expression of NF-κB, survivin and MMP-9 were also suppressed in tumor tissues after treatment with emodin. Collectively, our results indicated that emodin exerts antiproliferative and antimetastatic activity on pancreatic cancer both in vitro and in vivo, which may be related to down-regulation of NF-κB and its regulated molecules such as survivin and MMP-9 proteins. Consequently, these results provide important insights into emodin as an anti-invasive agent for the therapy of human pancreatic cancer.

  2. A PAUF-neutralizing antibody targets both carcinoma and endothelial cells to impede pancreatic tumor progression and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Su Jin; Chang, Suhwan; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Na Young; Hwang, Yeonsil; Min, Hye Jin; Yoo, Kyung-Sook; Park, Eun Hye; Kim, Seokho; Chung, Young-Hwa; Park, Young Woo; Koh, Sang Seok

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • PMAb83, a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, impaired tumor progression in vivo. • PMAb83 attenuated aggressiveness of tumor cells and suppressed angiogenesis. • PMAb83 in combination with gemcitabine conferred improved survival of mouse model. - Abstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Here we evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, PMAb83, to provide a therapeutic intervention to treat the disease. PMAb83 reduced tumor growth and distant metastasis in orthotopically xenografted mice of human PDAC cells. PMAb83 treatment retarded proliferation along with weakened aggressiveness traits of the carcinoma cells. AKT/β-catenin signaling played a role in the carcinoma cell proliferation and the treated xenograft tumors exhibited reduced levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Moreover PMAb83 abrogated the PAUF-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, reducing the density of CD31{sup +} vessels in the treated tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, PMAb83 conferred enhanced survival of xenografted mice by about twofold compared to gemcitabine alone. Taken together, our findings show that PMAb83 treatment decreases the aggressiveness of carcinoma cells and suppresses tumor vascularization, which culminates in mitigated tumor growth and metastasis with improved survival in PDAC mouse models.

  3. Impact of Global Fxr Deficiency on Experimental Acute Pancreatitis and Genetic Variation in the FXR Locus in Human Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nijmeijer, Rian M.; Schaap, Frank G.; Smits, Alexander J. J.; Kremer, Andreas E.; Akkermans, Louis M. A.; Kroese, Alfons B. A.; Rijkers, Ger. T.; Schipper, Marguerite E. I.; Verheem, André; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Erpecum, Karel J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Infectious complications often occur in acute pancreatitis, related to impaired intestinal barrier function, with prolonged disease course and even mortality as a result. The bile salt nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), which is expressed in the ileum, liver and other organs including the pancreas, exhibits anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting NF-κB activation and is implicated in maintaining intestinal barrier integrity and preventing bacterial overgrowth and translocation. Here we explore, with the aid of complementary animal and human experiments, the potential role of FXR in acute pancreatitis. Methods Experimental acute pancreatitis was induced using the CCK-analogue cerulein in wild-type and Fxr-/- mice. Severity of acute pancreatitis was assessed using histology and a semi-quantitative scoring system. Ileal permeability was analyzed in vitro by Ussing chambers and an in vivo permeability assay. Gene expression of Fxr and Fxr target genes was studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Serum FGF19 levels were determined by ELISA in acute pancreatitis patients and healthy volunteers. A genetic association study in 387 acute pancreatitis patients and 853 controls was performed using 9 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering the complete FXR gene and two additional functional SNPs. Results In wild-type mice with acute pancreatitis, ileal transepithelial resistance was reduced and ileal mRNA expression of Fxr target genes Fgf15, SHP, and IBABP was decreased. Nevertheless, Fxr-/- mice did not exhibit a more severe acute pancreatitis than wild-type mice. In patients with acute pancreatitis, FGF19 levels were lower than in controls. However, there were no associations of FXR SNPs or haplotypes with susceptibility to acute pancreatitis, or its course, outcome or etiology. Conclusion We found no evidence for a major role of FXR in acute human or murine pancreatitis. The observed altered Fxr activity during the course of disease may be a

  4. Human pancreatic cancer fusion 2 (HPC2) 1-B3: a novel monoclonal antibody to screen for pancreatic ductal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Terry K; Hardiman, Karin; Corless, Christopher L; White, Sandra L; Bonnah, Robert; Van de Vrugt, Henry; Sheppard, Brett C; Grompe, Markus; Cosar, Ediz F; Streeter, Philip R

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND.: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is rarely detected early enough for patients to be cured. The objective of the authors was to develop a monoclonal antibody to distinguish adenocarcinoma and precancerous intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN) from benign epithelium. METHODS.: Mice were immunized with human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells and monoclonal antibodies were screened against a panel of archived pancreatic tissue sections, including pancreatitis (23 cases), grade 1 IPMN (16 cases), grade 2 IPMN (9 cases), grade 3 IPMN (13 cases), and various grades of adenocarcinoma (17 cases). One monoclonal antibody, human pancreatic cancer fusion 2 (HPC2) 1-B3, which specifically immunostained adenocarcinoma and all grades of IPMN, was isolated. Subsequently, HPC2 1-B3 was evaluated in a retrospective series of 31 fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsies from clinically suspicious pancreatic lesions that had long-term clinical follow-up. RESULTS.: HPC2 1-B3 was negative in all 31 cases of chronic pancreatitis that were tested. In contrast, HPC2 1-B3 immunostained the cytoplasm and luminal surface of all 16 well- to moderately differentiated pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. It demonstrated only weak focal staining of poorly differentiated carcinomas. All high-grade IPMNs were found to be positive for HPC2 1-B3. The majority of low-grade to intermediate-grade IPMNs were positive (66% of cases). Immunostaining a separate series of pancreatic FNA cell blocks for HPC2 1-B3 demonstrated that the relative risk for detecting at least low-grade dysplasia (2.0 [95% confidence interval, 1.23-3.26]) was statistically significant (P = .002 by the Fisher exact test). CONCLUSIONS.: To reduce the mortality of pancreatic cancer, more effective early screening methods are necessary. The data from the current study indicate that a novel monoclonal antibody, HPC2 1-B3, may facilitate the diagnosis of early pancreatic dysplasia.

  5. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... removal is sometimes performed along with a sphincterotomy. Stent placement. Using the endoscope, the doctor places a ... a narrowed pancreatic or bile duct. A temporary stent may be placed for a few months to ...

  6. Impedance sensing device for monitoring ulcer healing in human patients.

    PubMed

    Liao, Amy; Lin, Monica C; Ritz, Lauren C; Swisher, Sarah L; Ni, David; Mann, Kaylee; Khan, Yasser; Roy, Shuvo; Harrison, Michael R; Arias, Ana C; Subramanian, Vivek; Young, David; Maharbiz, Michel M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic skin wounds affect millions of people each year and take billions of dollars to treat. Ulcers are a type of chronic skin wound that can be especially painful for patients and are tricky to treat because current monitoring solutions are subjective. We have developed an impedance sensing tool to objectively monitor the progression of healing in ulcers, and have begun a clinical trial to evaluate the safety and feasibility of our device to map damaged regions of skin. Impedance data has been collected on five patients with ulcers, and impedance was found to correlate with tissue health. A damage threshold was applied to effectively identify certain regions of skin as "damaged tissue".

  7. Investigation of the Impedance Characteristic of Human Arm for Development of Robots to Cooperate with Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Mozasser; Ikeura, Ryojun; Mizutani, Kazuki

    In the near future many aspects of our lives will be encompassed by tasks performed in cooperation with robots. The application of robots in home automation, agricultural production and medical operations etc. will be indispensable. As a result robots need to be made human-friendly and to execute tasks in cooperation with humans. Control systems for such robots should be designed to work imitating human characteristics. In this study, we have tried to achieve these goals by means of controlling a simple one degree-of-freedom cooperative robot. Firstly, the impedance characteristic of the human arm in a cooperative task is investigated. Then, this characteristic is implemented to control a robot in order to perform cooperative task with humans. A human followed the motion of an object, which is moved through desired trajectories. The motion is actuated by the linear motor of the one degree-of-freedom robot system. Trajectories used in the experiments of this method were minimum jerk (the rate of change of acceleration) trajectory, which was found during human and human cooperative task and optimum for muscle movement. As the muscle is mechanically analogous to a spring-damper system, a simple second-order equation is used as models for the arm dynamics. In the model, we considered mass, stiffness and damping factor. Impedance parameter is calculated from the position and force data obtained from the experiments and based on the “Estimation of Parametric Model”. Investigated impedance characteristic of human arm is then implemented to control a robot, which performed cooperative task with human. It is observed that the proposed control methodology has given human like movements to the robot for cooperating with human.

  8. Isolation, Culture, and Imaging of Human Fetal Pancreatic Cell Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Ana D.; Kayali, Ayse G.; Hayek, Alberto; King, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    For almost 30 years, scientists have demonstrated that human fetal ICCs transplanted under the kidney capsule of nude mice matured into functioning endocrine cells, as evidenced by a significant increase in circulating human C-peptide following glucose stimulation1-9. However in vitro, genesis of insulin producing cells from human fetal ICCs is low10; results reminiscent of recent experiments performed with human embryonic stem cells (hESC), a renewable source of cells that hold great promise as a potential therapeutic treatment for type 1 diabetes. Like ICCs, transplantation of partially differentiated hESC generate glucose responsive, insulin producing cells, but in vitro genesis of insulin producing cells from hESC is much less robust11-17. A complete understanding of the factors that influence the growth and differentiation of endocrine precursor cells will likely require data generated from both ICCs and hESC. While a number of protocols exist to generate insulin producing cells from hESC in vitro11-22, far fewer exist for ICCs10,23,24. Part of that discrepancy likely comes from the difficulty of working with human fetal pancreas. Towards that end, we have continued to build upon existing methods to isolate fetal islets from human pancreases with gestational ages ranging from 12 to 23 weeks, grow the cells as a monolayer or in suspension, and image for cell proliferation, pancreatic markers and human hormones including glucagon and C-peptide. ICCs generated by the protocol described below result in C-peptide release after transplantation under the kidney capsule of nude mice that are similar to C-peptide levels obtained by transplantation of fresh tissue6. Although the examples presented here focus upon the pancreatic endoderm proliferation and β cell genesis, the protocol can be employed to study other aspects of pancreatic development, including exocrine, ductal, and other hormone producing cells. PMID:24895054

  9. Crystalline structures in human pancreatic beta cell adenoma.

    PubMed

    Mori, H; Kawai, T; Tanaka, T; Fujii, M; Takahashi, M; Miyashita, T

    1978-05-01

    An electron microscopic observation on a pancreatic tumor removed from a 34-year-old woman revealed the fine structural morphology of a functional beta cell adenoma. Characteristic PAS positive crystalline structures were frequently observed in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells. They were not bounded by a membrane and had a rectangular or irregular hexagonal shape. Highly regular patterns were seen as such as lattice or honeycomb and parallel ripple structures. They are similar to the Reinke's crystal or crystalline structures reported in human hepatocytes suffering from several different diseases and considered as a protein-carbohydrate complex. Occasionally, small paracrystalline structures appeared to indicate an immature type of these structures in the opaque fine fibrillar mass. Crystalline or paracrystalline structures were not detected in the normal pancreatic tissue removed with the tumor from the patient.

  10. Ex Vivo Human Pancreatic Slice Preparations Offer a Valuable Model for Studying Pancreatic Exocrine Biology.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tao; Dolai, Subhankar; Xie, Li; Winter, Erin; Orabi, Abrahim I; Karimian, Negar; Cosen-Binker, Laura I; Huang, Ya-Chi; Thorn, Peter; Cattral, Mark; Gaisano, Herbert Y

    2017-02-27

    A genuine understanding of human exocrine pancreas biology and pathobiology has been hampered by a lack of suitable preparations and reliance on rodent models employing dispersed acini preparations. We have developed an organotypic slice preparation of the normal portions of human pancreas obtained from cancer resections. The preparation was assessed for physiologic and pathological responses to the cholinergic agonist carbachol (Cch) and cholecystokinin (CCK-8), including 1) amylase secretion, 2) exocytosis, 3) intracellular Ca2+ responses, 4) cytoplasmic autophagic vacuole formation, and 5) protease activation. Cch and CCK-8 both dose-dependently stimulated secretory responses from human pancreas slices similar to those previously observed in dispersed rodent acini. Confocal microscopy imaging showed that these responses were accounted for by efficient apical exocytosis at physiologic doses of both agonists and by apical blockade and redirection of exocytosis to the basolateral plasma membrane at supramaximal doses. The secretory responses and exocytotic events evoked by CCK-8 were mediated by CCK-A and not CCK-B receptors. Physiologic agonist doses evoked oscillatory Ca2+ increases across the acini. Supraphysiologic doses induced formation of cytoplasmic autophagic vacuoles and activation of proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin). Maximal atropine pretreatment that completely blocked all the Cch-evoked responses did not affect any of the CCK-8-evoked responses, indicating that rather than acting on the nerves within the pancreas slice, CCK cellular actions directly affected human acinar cells. Human pancreas slices represent excellent preparations to examine pancreatic cell biology and pathobiology and could help screen for potential treatments for human pancreatitis.

  11. Proteasome regulates turnover of toxic human amylin in pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanghamitra; Trikha, Saurabh; Sarkar, Anjali; Jeremic, Aleksandar M.

    2016-01-01

    Toxic human amylin (hA) oligomers and aggregates are implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although recent studies demonstrated a causal connection between hA uptake and toxicity in pancreatic cells, the mechanism of amylin’s clearance following its internalization and its relationship to toxicity is yet to be determined, and hence was investigated here. Using pancreatic rat insulinoma β-cells and human islets as model systems, we show that hA, following its internalization, first accumulates in the cytosol followed by its translocation into nucleus, and to a lesser extent lysosomes, keeping the net cytosolic amylin content low. An increase in hA accumulation in the nucleus of pancreatic cells correlated with its cytotoxicity, suggesting that its excessive accumulation in the nucleus is detrimental. hA interacted with 20S core and 19S lid subunits of the β-cell proteasomal complex, as suggested by immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies, which subsequently resulted in a decrease in the proteasome’s proteolytic activity in these cells. In vitro binding and activity assays confirmed an intrinsic and potent ability of amylin to interact with the 20S core complex thereby modulating its proteolytic activity. Interestingly, less toxic and aggregation incapable rat amylin (rA) showed a comparable inhibitory effect on proteasome activity and protein ubiquitination, decoupling amylin aggregation/toxicity and amylin-induced protein stress. In agreement with these studies, inhibition of proteasomal proteolytic activity significantly increased intracellular amylin content and toxicity. Taken together, our results suggest a pivotal role of proteasomes in amylin’s turnover and detoxification in pancreatic cells. PMID:27340132

  12. On the effect of muscular cocontraction on the 3-D human arm impedance.

    PubMed

    Patel, Harshil; O'Neill, Gerald; Artemiadis, Panagiotis

    2014-10-01

    Humans have the inherent ability to perform highly dexterous tasks with their arms, involving maintenance of posture, movement, and interaction with the environment. The latter requires the human to control the dynamic characteristics of the upper limb musculoskeletal system. These characteristics are quantitatively represented by inertia, damping, and stiffness, which are measures of mechanical impedance. Many previous studies have shown that arm posture is a dominant factor in determining the end point impedance on a horizontal plane. This paper presents the characterization of the end point impedance of the human arm in 3-D space. Moreover, it models the regulation of the arm impedance with muscle cocontraction. The characterization is made by route of experimental trials where human subjects maintained arm posture while their arms were perturbed by a robot arm. Furthermore, the subjects were asked to control the level of their arm muscles' cocontraction, using visual feedback, in order to investigate the effect of muscle cocontraction on the arm impedance. The results of this study show an anisotropic increase of arm stiffness due to muscle cocontraction. These results could improve our understanding of the human arm biomechanics, as well as provide implications for human motor control-specifically the control of arm impedance through muscle cocontraction.

  13. TEAD and YAP regulate the enhancer network of human embryonic pancreatic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Luengo, Mario; Chhatriwala, Mariya; Berry, Andrew; Ponsa-Cobas, Joan; Maestro, Miguel Angel; Jennings, Rachel E.; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Morán, Ignasi; Castro, Natalia; Hanley, Neil A.; Gomez-Skarmeta, Jose Luis; Vallier, Ludovic; Ferrer, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The genomic regulatory programs that underlie human organogenesis are poorly understood. Pancreas development, in particular, has pivotal implications for pancreatic regeneration, cancer, and diabetes. We have now characterized the regulatory landscape of embryonic multipotent progenitor cells that give rise to all pancreatic epithelial lineages. Using human embryonic pancreas and embryonic stem cell-derived progenitors we identify stage-specific transcripts and associated enhancers, many of which are co-occupied by transcription factors that are essential for pancreas development. We further show that TEAD1, a Hippo signaling effector, is an integral component of the transcription factor combinatorial code of pancreatic progenitor enhancers. TEAD and its coactivator YAP activate key pancreatic signaling mediators and transcription factors, and regulate the expansion of pancreatic progenitors. This work therefore uncovers a central role of TEAD and YAP as signal-responsive regulators of multipotent pancreatic progenitors, and provides a resource for the study of embryonic development of the human pancreas. PMID:25915126

  14. Significance of Notch1-signaling pathway in human pancreatic development and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huankai; Zhou, Lan; Awadallah, Amad; Xin, Wei

    2013-05-01

    In animal studies, Notch1-signaling pathway plays an important role in the pancreatic embryogenesis by promoting pancreatic progenitor cells self-renewal and exocrine linage development. The persistent activation of Notch pathway could arrest the organ development and keep cells at an undifferentiated stage. Studies have shown that Notch1-signaling pathway is upregulated in invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Here we examined the expression pattern of Notch1 and Hes1 in human fetal pancreatic tissues to elucidate the role of Notch1 in human pancreatic embryonic development. We also compared Notch1 expression in tissues from PDAC, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm. Our data show that Notch1/Hes1-signaling pathway is activated during early pancreatic embryogenesis and reaches the highest at birth. After pancreas is fully developed, Notch1/Hes1 pathway is inactivated even though Notch1 protein cell-surface expression is upregulated. We also showed that the expression of both Notch1 and Hes1 are present in 50% (33/66) of PDACs, but not in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms. These findings indicate that Notch1 activation is only apparent in late stage of pancreatic carcinogenesis, suggesting that treatment with Notch-signaling inhibitors including γ-secretase should be selectively used for PDACs with confirmed Notch1-signaling activation.

  15. In vivo impedance measurements on nerves and surrounding skeletal muscles in rats and human body.

    PubMed

    Prokhorov, E; Llamas, F; Morales-Sánchez, E; González-Hernández, J; Prokhorov, A

    2002-05-01

    The aim of the work was to use impedance measurements to find the location of nerves under the human skin. In vivo impedance measurements were performed on exposed nervous and muscular tissues of rats. Similarly, the impedance measurements were also performed on the skin of six men, over the median nerve at the wrist, as well as 4-5 mm away from this location. Results obtained with rats have shown that the relative permittivity and conductivity of nerves are larger (by almost two orders of magnitude) than those observed for the muscular tissues surrounding the nerve. The results obtained on human skin in the frequency range of 20-200 kHz, when the electrodes were placed over the nerve, show lower resistance and higher capacitance than in the other areas measured. These preliminary results indicate that it may be possible to use impedance measurements to find the location of exposed nerves and also nerves under the skin.

  16. Pancreastatin producing cell line from human pancreatic islet cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, A; Tateishi, K; Tsuru, M; Jimi, A; Wakasugi, H; Ikeda, Y; Kono, A

    1990-04-30

    It has been characterized that cell line QGP-1 derived from human non-functioning pancreatic islet cell tumor produces human pancreastatin. Exponentially growing cultures produced 5.7 fmol of pancreastatin/10(6) cells/hr. Human pancreastatin immunoreactivities in plasma and tumor after xenografting with QGP-1 into nude mouse were 92.7 fmol/ml and 160.2 pmol/g wet weight, respectively. Immunocytochemical study revealed both chromogranin A and pancreastatin immunoreactive cells in the tumor. Gel filtrations of culture medium and tumor extract identified heterogenous molecular forms of PST-LI which eluted as large and smaller molecular species. These results suggest that plasma pancreastatin levels may be useful as a tumor marker of endocrine tumor of the pancreas, and the pancreastatin producing cell line may be useful for studies of the mechanism of secretions and processing of chromogranin A and pancreastatin.

  17. Hemodynamics Associated with Breathing Through an Inspiratory Impedance Threshold Device in Human Volunteers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    Hemodynamics associated with breathing through an inspiratory impedance threshold device in human volunteers Victor A. Convertino, PhD; Duane A...and animals (6–13). Building on this concept, an inspiratory impedance threshold de- vice (ITD) was designed to create a vac- uum within the chest each...associ- ated with the elevated blood pressure during inspiratory resistance (16). How- ever, stroke volume during resistance breathing with an ITD set at

  18. Human pancreatic cancer xenografts recapitulate key aspects of cancer cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Delitto, Andrea E.; Nosacka, Rachel L.; Rocha, Fernanda G.; DiVita, Bayli B.; Gerber, Michael H.; George, Thomas J.; Behrns, Kevin E.; Hughes, Steven J.; Wallet, Shannon M.; Judge, Andrew R.; Trevino, Jose G.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cachexia represents a debilitating syndrome that diminishes quality of life and augments the toxicities of conventional treatments. Cancer cachexia is particularly debilitating in patients with pancreatic cancer (PC). Mechanisms responsible for cancer cachexia are under investigation and are largely derived from observations in syngeneic murine models of cancer which are limited in PC. We evaluate the effect of human PC cells on both muscle wasting and the systemic inflammatory milieu potentially contributing to PC-associated cachexia. Specifically, human PC xenografts were generated by implantation of pancreatic cancer cells, L3.6pl and PANC-1, either in the flank or orthotopically within the pancreas. Mice bearing orthotopic xenografts demonstrated significant muscle wasting and atrophy-associated gene expression changes compared to controls. Further, despite the absence of adaptive immunity, splenic tissue from orthotopically engrafted mice demonstrated elevations in several pro-inflammatory cytokines associated with cancer cachexia, including TNFα, IL1β, IL6 and KC (murine IL8 homologue), when compared to controls. Therefore, data presented here support further investigation into the complexity of cancer cachexia in PC to identify potential targets for this debilitating syndrome. PMID:27901481

  19. Autologous Pancreatic Islet Transplantation in Human Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Maffi, Paola; Balzano, Gianpaolo; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Nano, Rita; Sordi, Valeria; Melzi, Raffaella; Mercalli, Alessia; Scavini, Marina; Esposito, Antonio; Peccatori, Jacopo; Cantarelli, Elisa; Messina, Carlo; Bernardi, Massimo; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Staudacher, Carlo; Doglioni, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Secchi, Antonio; Piemonti, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    The liver is the current site of choice for pancreatic islet transplantation, even though it is far from being ideal. We recently have shown in mice that the bone marrow (BM) may be a valid alternative to the liver, and here we report a pilot study to test feasibility and safety of BM as a site for islet transplantation in humans. Four patients who developed diabetes after total pancreatectomy were candidates for the autologous transplantation of pancreatic islet. Because the patients had contraindications for intraportal infusion, islets were infused in the BM. In all recipients, islets engrafted successfully as shown by measurable posttransplantation C-peptide levels and histopathological evidence of insulin-producing cells or molecular markers of endocrine tissue in BM biopsy samples analyzed during follow-up. Thus far, we have recorded no adverse events related to the infusion procedure or the presence of islets in the BM. Islet function was sustained for the maximum follow-up of 944 days. The encouraging results of this pilot study provide new perspectives in identifying alternative sites for islet infusion in patients with type 1 diabetes. Moreover, this is the first unequivocal example of successful engraftment of endocrine tissue in the BM in humans. PMID:23733196

  20. Differential role of Hedgehog signaling in human pancreatic (patho-) physiology: An up to date review

    PubMed Central

    Klieser, Eckhard; Swierczynski, Stefan; Mayr, Christian; Jäger, Tarkan; Schmidt, Johanna; Neureiter, Daniel; Kiesslich, Tobias; Illig, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway in drosophila melanogaster, our knowledge of the role of Hh in embryonic development, inflammation, and cancerogenesis in humans has dramatically increased over the last decades. This is the case especially concerning the pancreas, however, real therapeutic breakthroughs are missing until now. In general, Hh signaling is essential for pancreatic organogenesis, development, and tissue maturation. In the case of acute pancreatitis, Hh has a protective role, whereas in chronic pancreatitis, Hh interacts with pancreatic stellate cells, leading to destructive parenchym fibrosis and atrophy, as well as to irregular tissue remodeling with potency of initiating cancerogenesis. In vitro and in situ analysis of Hh in pancreatic cancer revealed that the Hh pathway participates in the development of pancreatic precursor lesions and ductal adenocarcinoma including critical interactions with the tumor microenvironment. The application of specific inhibitors of components of the Hh pathway is currently subject of ongoing clinical trials (phases 1 and 2). Furthermore, a combination of Hh pathway inhibitors and established chemotherapeutic drugs could also represent a promising therapeutic approach. In this review, we give a structured survey of the role of the Hh pathway in pancreatic development, pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinogenesis and pancreatic cancer as well as an overview of current clinical trials concerning Hh pathway inhibitors and pancreas cancer. PMID:27190692

  1. Characterization of resident lymphocytes in human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Radenkovic, M; Uvebrant, K; Skog, O; Sarmiento, L; Avartsson, J; Storm, P; Vickman, P; Bertilsson, P-A; Fex, M; Korgsgren, O; Cilio, C M

    2017-03-01

    The current view of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is that it is an immune-mediated disease where lymphocytes infiltrate the pancreatic islets, promote killing of beta cells and cause overt diabetes. Although tissue resident immune cells have been demonstrated in several organs, the composition of lymphocytes in human healthy pancreatic islets have been scarcely studied. Here we aimed to investigate the phenotype of immune cells associated with human islets of non-diabetic organ donors. A flow cytometry analysis of isolated islets from perfused pancreases (n = 38) was employed to identify alpha, beta, T, natural killer (NK) and B cells. Moreover, the expression of insulin and glucagon transcripts was evaluated by RNA sequencing. Up to 80% of the lymphocytes were CD3(+) T cells with a remarkable bias towards CD8(+) cells. Central memory and effector memory phenotypes dominated within the CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells and most CD8(+) T cells were positive for CD69 and up to 50-70% for CD103, both markers of resident memory cells. The frequency of B and NK cells was low in most islet preparations (12 and 3% of CD45(+) cells, respectively), and the frequency of alpha and beta cells varied between donors and correlated clearly with insulin and glucagon mRNA expression. In conclusion, we demonstrated the predominance of canonical tissue resident memory CD8(+) T cells associated with human islets. We believe that these results are important to understand more clearly the immunobiology of human islets and the disease-related phenotypes observed in diabetes.

  2. New equivalent-electrical circuit model and a practical measurement method for human body impedance.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Koyu; Kinjo, Ichiko; Zamami, Aki; Irei, Kotoyo; Nagayama, Kanako

    2015-01-01

    Human body impedance analysis is an effective tool to extract electrical information from tissues in the human body. This paper presents a new measurement method of impedance using armpit electrode and a new equivalent circuit model for the human body. The lowest impedance was measured by using an LCR meter and six electrodes including armpit electrodes. The electrical equivalent circuit model for the cell consists of resistance R and capacitance C. The R represents electrical resistance of the liquid of the inside and outside of the cell, and the C represents high frequency conductance of the cell membrane. We propose an equivalent circuit model which consists of five parallel high frequency-passing CR circuits. The proposed equivalent circuit represents alpha distribution in the impedance measured at a lower frequency range due to ion current of the outside of the cell, and beta distribution at a high frequency range due to the cell membrane and the liquid inside cell. The calculated values by using the proposed equivalent circuit model were consistent with the measured values for the human body impedance.

  3. Single-Cell Sequencing of Human Pancreatic Islets-New Kids on the Block.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rashmi B; Groop, Leif

    2016-10-11

    RNA sequencing of human pancreatic islets has provided important insights into the islet transcriptome but little information on the specific cells. In this issue, Segerstolpe et al. (2016) and Xin et al. (2016b) report on the transcriptome of single pancreatic cells from non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic donors.

  4. Quantitative assessment of the diagnostic role of human telomerase activity from pancreatic juice in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Siliang; Chen, Xiaodong; Tang, Meiyue

    2014-08-01

    Many studies have shown that human telomerase activity could play potential role as a diagnostic biomarker of pancreatic cancer (PaC). The aim of this meta-analysis is to summarize the clinical value of human telomerase activity in the diagnosis of PaC. Eligible studies from PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Ovid, Sci Verse, Science Direct, Scopus, BioMed Central, Biosis previews, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Technology of Chongqing (VIP), and Wan Fang databases were searched concerning the diagnostic value of human telomerase activity in PaC without language restriction. The quality of each study was scored with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS). Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios (PLR and NLR, respectively), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) for human telomerase activity in the diagnosis of PaC were pooled. Summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve analysis and the area under the curve (AUC) were used to estimate the overall test performance. Evidence of heterogeneity was evaluated using the Chi-square and I (2) test. Meta-Disc 1.4 and Stata 12.0 software were used to analyze the data. Nine studies with a total 186 PaC patients and 132 control individuals were included in this meta-analysis. All of the included studies are of high quality (QUADAS score ≥10). The summary estimate was 0.83 (95 % confidence interval (CI), 95 % CI = 0.77-0.88) for sensitivity and 0.72 (95 % CI = 0.64-0.79) for specificity. The positive likelihood (PLR), negative likelihood (NLR), and diagnostic odds (DOR) ratios were 3 (95 % CI = 1.67-5.41), 0.25 (95 % CI = 0.13-0.46), and 3 (95 % CI = 4.91-43.23), respectively. The area under the summary ROC curve (AUC) and Q* index for the diagnosis of PaC were 0.88 and 0.81, respectively. Our study demonstrates that telomerase could be a useful tumor marker for Pa

  5. Pancreatic Steatosis and Its Relationship to β-Cell Dysfunction in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Szczepaniak, Lidia S.; Victor, Ronald G.; Mathur, Ruchi; Nelson, Michael D.; Szczepaniak, Edward W.; Tyer, Nicole; Chen, Ida; Unger, Roger H.; Bergman, Richard N.; Lingvay, Ildiko

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate racial/ethnic differences in pancreatic triglyceride (TG) levels and their relationship to β-cell dysfunction in humans. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied black, Hispanic, and white adults who completed three research visits: screening and an oral glucose tolerance test; frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests for evaluation of β-cell function and insulin resistance; and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for evaluation of pancreatic and hepatic TG levels. RESULTS Pancreatic TG levels were higher in Hispanics and whites than in blacks (P = 0.006). Hepatic TG levels were highest in Hispanics (P = 0.004). Compensatory insulin secretion and disposition index were higher in blacks (P = 0.003 and P = 0.024, respectively). Insulin sensitivity was comparable between Hispanics and blacks and was lower than in whites (P = 0.005). In blacks, compensatory insulin secretion increased steeply with small increments in pancreatic TG levels (R2 = 0.45, slope = 247). In whites, the range of pancreatic TG levels was higher, and the slope was less steep than in blacks (R2 = 0.27, slope = 27). In Hispanics, pancreatic TG levels were similar to those of whites, but compensatory insulin secretion was described by a combination of pancreatic and hepatic TG levels and visceral fat mass ( R2 = 0.32). CONCLUSIONS In a multiethnic sample of adults with mild obesity and without diabetes, we found striking ethnic differences in the levels of pancreatic TGs and in the relationship between pancreatic TGs and β-cell dysfunction. Our data implicate pancreatic TG content measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a noninvasive novel biomarker for pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, especially in the Hispanic population. PMID:22968187

  6. Production of pancreatic hormone-expressing endocrine cells from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Kevin A; Bang, Anne G; Eliazer, Susan; Kelly, Olivia G; Agulnick, Alan D; Smart, Nora G; Moorman, Mark A; Kroon, Evert; Carpenter, Melissa K; Baetge, Emmanuel E

    2006-11-01

    Of paramount importance for the development of cell therapies to treat diabetes is the production of sufficient numbers of pancreatic endocrine cells that function similarly to primary islets. We have developed a differentiation process that converts human embryonic stem (hES) cells to endocrine cells capable of synthesizing the pancreatic hormones insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide and ghrelin. This process mimics in vivo pancreatic organogenesis by directing cells through stages resembling definitive endoderm, gut-tube endoderm, pancreatic endoderm and endocrine precursor--en route to cells that express endocrine hormones. The hES cell-derived insulin-expressing cells have an insulin content approaching that of adult islets. Similar to fetal beta-cells, they release C-peptide in response to multiple secretory stimuli, but only minimally to glucose. Production of these hES cell-derived endocrine cells may represent a critical step in the development of a renewable source of cells for diabetes cell therapy.

  7. Human Autonomic and Cerebrovascular Responses to Inspiratory Impedance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    transfer function analysis between systolic pressure and R-R interval and reflect the sensitivity (or gain) of the cardiovagal baroreflex .20,35 In a...H2000. 35. de Boer RW, Karemaker JM, Strackee J. Hemodynamic fluctuations and baroreflex sensitivity in humans: a beat-to-beat model. Am J Physiol...signals are co- herent (i.e. 0.5), transfer function magnitudes among sys- tolic pressures and R-R intervals represent arterial baroreflex gain,20 and the

  8. Growth inhibition of human pancreatic cancer cells by human interferon-beta gene combined with gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Endou, Masato; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nagata, Takuya; Tsukada, Kazuhiro; Nakahara, Norimoto; Tsuno, Takaya; Osawa, Hirokatsu; Kuno, Tomohiko; Fujita, Mitsugu; Hatano, Manabu; Yoshida, Jun

    2005-02-01

    We examined the anti-tumor effect of cationic multilamellar liposome containing human IFN-beta (huIFN-beta) gene against cultured human pancreatic cancer cells. We also evaluated the combined effect of huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes and gemcitabine. Furthermore, we examined the anti-tumor mechanisms of the therapy, with emphasis on the Ras-related signal pathway. Three human pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPc-1, MIAPaCa-2, and PANC-1) were used in this study. The growth inhibition together with the therapy were evaluated by WST-1 assay; the production of huIFN-beta protein was measured by ELISA; the cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed using a FACScan flow cytometer; the protein levels of Son of sevenless (SOS-1) and Ras-GAP were measured by Western blotting; and the activation of Ras-GTP was evaluated by the immunoprecipitation method. As a result, we found that huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes demonstrated a strong anti-tumor effect against human pancreatic cancer cells. The treatment that combined huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes and gemcitabine was more effective than each treatment alone. Although gemcitabine remarkably reduced the level of SOS-1, the above combined therapy reduced the level of SOS-1 even more significantly. Both huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes and the com-bination of huIFN-beta gene entrapped in liposomes and gemcitabine increased the level of Ras-GAP, and decreased the activity of Ras-GTP. These results suggest that this combination therapy can induce strong anti-tumor activity against human pancreatic cancer cells through the regulation of the Ras-related signal pathway.

  9. Influence of sodium chloride content in electrolyte solution on electrochemical impedance measurements of human dentin

    PubMed Central

    Eldarrat, Aziza; High, Alec; Kale, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of sodium chloride (NaCl) content in electrolyte solution on electrochemical impedance measurements of human dentin by employing electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Materials and Methods: Dentin samples were prepared from extracted molars. Electrochemical impedance measurements were carried out over a wide frequency range (0.01Hz-10MHz). After measurements, samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Results: Electrochemical impedance measurements showed that the mean values of dentin electrical resistance were 4284, 2062, 1336, 53 and 48kΩ at different NaCl contents in electrolyte solution. One-way ANOVA test of mean values of dentin electrical resistance revealed a significant difference (P < 0.0001) as a function of NaCl content in electrolyte solution. Comparing electrical resistance values of dentin samples at 0.05% w/v and 0.9% w/v concentrations were found to be significantly different (P < 0.05 at 95% confidence level). Scanning electron microscopy revealed structure of dentin sample with intertubular dentin matrix and distribution of patent dentinal tubules. Conclusion: This in vitro study indicated, through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, that electrical resistance of dentin was affected by the concentration of NaCl in electrolyte solution. It is clear from the current study that NaCl concentration in electrolyte solution has a marked influence on dentin electrical resistance. Therefore, this baseline data need to be considered in any future study on dental samples. PMID:28348614

  10. Biologic and immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stromal cells derived from human pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    KIM, JAEHYUP; BREUNIG, MELISSA J.; ESCALANTE, LEAH E.; BHATIA, NEEHAR; DENU, RYAN A.; DOLLAR, BRIDGET A.; STEIN, ANDREW P.; HANSON, SUMMER E.; NADERI, NADIA; RADEK, JAMES; HAUGHY, DERMOT; BLOOM, DEBRA D.; ASSADI-PORTER, FARIBA M.; HEMATTI, PEIMAN

    2012-01-01

    Background aims Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have now been shown to reside in numerous tissues throughout the body, including the pancreas. Ex vivo culture-expanded MSC derived from many tissues display important interactions with different types of immune cells in vitro and potentially play a significant role in tissue homeostasis in vivo. In this study, we investigated the biologic and immunomodulatory properties of human pancreatic islet-derived MSC. Methods We culture-expanded MSC from cadaveric human pancreatic islets and characterized them using flow cytometry, differentiation assays and nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics. We also investigated the immunologic properties of pancreatic islet-derived MSC compared with bone marrow (BM) MSC. Results Pancreatic islet and BM-derived MSC expressed the same cell-surface markers by flow cytometry, and both could differentiate into bone, fat and cartilage. Metabolomics analysis of MSC from BM and pancreatic islets also showed a similar set of metabolic markers but quantitative polymerase chain reactions showed that pancreatic islet MSC expressed more interleukin(IL)-1b, IL-6, STAT3 and FGF9 compared with BM MSC, and less IL-10. However, similar to BM MSC, pancreatic islet MSC were able to suppress proliferation of allogeneic T lymphocytes stimulated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. Conclusions Our in vitro analysis shows pancreatic islet-derived MSC have phenotypic, biologic and immunomodulatory characteristics similar, but not identical, to BM-derived MSC. We propose that pancreatic islet-derived MSC could potentially play an important role in improving the outcome of pancreatic islet transplantation by promoting engraftment and creating a favorable immune environment for long-term survival of islet allografts. PMID:22571381

  11. Therapy of human pancreatic carcinoma based on suppression of HMGA1 protein synthesis in preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Trapasso, Francesco; Sarti, Manuela; Cesari, Rossano; Yendamuri, Sai; Dumon, Kristoffel R; Aqeilan, Rami I; Pentimalli, Francesca; Infante, Luisa; Alder, Hansjuerg; Abe, Nobutsugu; Watanabe, Takashi; Viglietto, Giuseppe; Croce, Carlo M; Fusco, Alfredo

    2004-09-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is one of the most aggressive tumors, and, being refractory to conventional therapies, is an excellent target for new therapeutic approaches. Based on our previous finding of high HMGA1 expression in pancreatic cancer cells compared to normal pancreatic tissue, we evaluated whether suppression of HMGA1 protein expression could be a treatment option for patients affected by pancreatic cancer. Here we report that HMGA1 proteins are overexpressed in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines, and their downregulation through an adenovirus carrying the HMGA1 gene in an antisense orientation (Ad Yas-GFP) results in the death of three human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines (PANC1, Hs766T and PSN1). Pretreatment of PANC1 and PSN1 cells with Ad Yas-GFP suppressed and reduced, respectively, their ability to form xenograft tumors in nude mice. To further verify the role of HMGA1 in pancreatic tumorigenesis, we used a HMGA1 antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN); its addition induced a decrease in HMGA1 protein levels and a significant reduction of the proliferation rate of PANC1-, Hs766T- and PSN1-treated cells. Therefore, suppression of HMGA1 protein synthesis by an HMGA1 antisense approach seems to be a feasible treatment strategy in pancreatic carcinomas.

  12. SIRT1 promotes the proliferation and metastasis of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jianguang; Chu, Zhijie; Ma, Pengfei; Meng, Yuanpu; Yang, Yanhui

    2017-03-01

    SIRT1 plays an important role in human malignant progression, inducing cancer cell proliferation and metastasis by regulating downstream gene expressions. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms in which SIRT1 promotes pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis. The aim of this study is to investigate the SIRT1 expression levels and biological functions in promoting pancreatic cancer progression. We first investigated the expression of SIRT1 in a series of pancreatic cancer tissues as well as in a panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines. The effect of SIRT1 on cell activity was explored by knockdown experiments. Cell growth was measured using the MTT assay and colony-formation assay. Migration and invasion were tested using transwell assay. Our results showed that the expression of SIRT1 was significantly up-regulated both in pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. Knockdown of SIRT1 suppressed cell proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cells. This is the first report to disclose the role of SIRT1 in regulation of pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and migration, which may provide a potential therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer patients.

  13. A map of open chromatin in human pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Gaulton, Kyle J.; Nammo, Takao; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Simon, Jeremy M.; Giresi, Paul G.; Fogarty, Marie P.; Panhuis, Tami M.; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Secchi, Antonio; Bosco, Domenico; Berney, Thierry; Montanya, Eduard; Mohlke, Karen L.; Lieb, Jason D.; Ferrer, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Tissue-specific transcriptional regulation is central to human disease1. To identify regulatory DNA active in human pancreatic islets, we profiled chromatin by FAIRE (Formaldehyde-Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements)2–4 coupled with high-throughput sequencing. We identified ~80,000 open chromatin sites. Comparison of islet FAIRE-seq to five non-islet cell lines revealed ~3,300 physically linked clusters of islet-selective open chromatin sites, which typically encompassed single genes exhibiting islet-specific expression. We mapped sequence variants to open chromatin sites and found that rs7903146, a TCF7L2 intronic variant strongly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D)5, is located in islet-selective open chromatin. We show that rs7903146 heterozygotes exhibit allelic imbalance in islet FAIRE signal, and that the variant alters enhancer activity, indicating that genetic variation at this locus acts in cis with local chromatin and regulatory changes. These findings illuminate the tissue-specific organization of cis-regulatory elements, and show that FAIRE-seq can guide identification of regulatory variants important for disease. PMID:20118932

  14. Endogenous Semaphorin-7A Impedes Human Lung Fibroblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Esnault, Stephane; Torr, Elizabeth E.; Bernau, Ksenija; Johansson, Mats W.; Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Sandbo, Nathan; Jarjour, Nizar N.

    2017-01-01

    Semaphorin-7A is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, initially characterized as an axon guidance protein. Semaphorin-7A also contributes to immune cell regulation and may be an essential pro-fibrotic factor when expressed by non-fibroblast cell types (exogenous). In mouse models, semaphorin-7A was shown to be important for TGF-ß1-induced pulmonary fibrosis characterized by myofibroblast accumulation and extracellular matrix deposition, but the cell-specific role of semaphorin-7A was not examined in fibroblasts. The purpose of this study is to determine semaphorin-7A expression by fibroblasts and to investigate the function of endogenously expressed semaphorin-7A in primary human lung fibroblasts (HLF). Herein, we show that non-fibrotic HLF expressed high levels of cell surface semaphorin-7A with little dependence on the percentage of serum or recombinant TGF-ß1. Semaphorin-7A siRNA strongly decreased semaphorin-7A mRNA expression and reduced cell surface semaphorin-7A. Reduction of semaphorin-7A induced increased proliferation and migration of non-fibrotic HLF. Also, independent of the presence of TGF-ß1, the decline of semaphorin-7A by siRNA was associated with increased α-smooth muscle actin production and gene expression of periostin, fibronectin, laminin, and serum response factor (SRF), indicating differentiation into a myofibroblast. Conversely, overexpression of semaphorin-7A in the NIH3T3 fibroblast cell line reduced the production of pro-fibrotic markers. The inverse association between semaphorin-7A and pro-fibrotic fibroblast markers was further analyzed using HLF from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) (n = 6) and non-fibrotic (n = 7) lungs. Using these 13 fibroblast lines, we observed that semaphorin-7A and periostin expression were inversely correlated. In conclusion, our study indicates that endogenous semaphorin-7A in HLF plays a role in maintaining fibroblast homeostasis by preventing up-regulation of pro-fibrotic genes. Therefore

  15. Evaluation of immunohistochemical staining for glucagon in human pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Gurlo, Tatyana; Butler, Peter C; Butler, Alexandra E

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence (IF) staining techniques are important diagnostic tools of anatomic pathology in the clinical setting and widely used analytical tools in research laboratories. In diabetes research, they are routinely used for the assessment of beta- and alpha-cell mass, for assessment of endocrine cell distribution within the pancreas, for evaluation of islet composition and islet morphology. Here, we present the evaluation of IHC techniques for the detection of alpha-cells in human pancreatic tissue. We compared the Horse Radish Peroxidase (HRP)-based method utilizing DAB Peroxidase Substrate to the Alkaline Phosphatase (AP)-based method utilizing Vector Red substrate. We conclude that HRP-DAB staining is a robust and reliable method for detection of alpha-cells using either rabbit polyclonal or mouse monoclonal anti-glucagon antibodies. However, AP-Vector Red staining should be used with caution, because it is affected by the dehydration with ethanol and toluene preceding the mounting of slides with Permount mounting medium. When AP-Vector Red is a preferable method for alpha-cell labeling, slides should be mounted using aqueous mounting medium or, alternatively, they could be air-dried before permanent mounting.

  16. Expression of receptors for gut peptides in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma and tumour-free pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, C.; Biemond, I.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Verspaget, W.; Lamers, C. B.

    1997-01-01

    Gut hormones that modulate the growth of normal pancreas may also modulate the growth of cancers originating from pancreas. This study visualized and compared the receptors for cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin (BBS), secretin and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in tumour-free tissue sections of human pancreas (n = 10) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (n = 12) with storage phosphor autoradiography using radioligands. CCK-B receptors, present in control pancreata, were not detected in any of the pancreatic cancers. BBS receptors were visualized in control pancreata, but they were absent in 10 of 12 pancreatic cancers. In 5 of 12 pancreatic cancers, receptors for secretin were visualized, while binding for secretin was present in all tumour-free pancreata. Conversely, no specific binding of VIP was detected in control pancreata but was identified in 3 of 12 pancreatic cancer specimens. It is concluded that the expression of gut peptide receptors in pancreatic cancer differs from that in tumour-free pancreas. Receptors for these peptides are present in only a minority of pancreatic cancer specimens. Images Figure 1 PMID:9166939

  17. Pancreatic endoproteases and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor immunoreactivity in human Paneth cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bohe, M; Borgström, A; Lindström, C; Ohlsson, K

    1986-01-01

    Normal and metaplastic gastrointestinal mucosa obtained at surgical resection were studied by light microscopy, using the unlabelled antibody enzyme method for immunohistochemical staining of lysozyme, pancreatic endoproteases, and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI). Paneth cells in the mucosa of normal small intestine, gastric mucosa with intestinal metaplasia, and colonic metaplastic mucosa were found to contain anionic trypsin, cationic trypsin, lysozyme, and PSTI immunoreactivity, but not chymotrypsin and elastase immunoreactivity. Normal gastric and colonic mucosa and some goblet cells in the small intestine showed positive PSTI immunoreactivity but no endoprotease immunoreactivity. The presence of immunoreactive trypsin and immunoreactive PSTI in the Paneth cells, which are of secretory type, probably indicates an important extrapancreatic source of these proteins rather than a storage of endocytosed material. Images PMID:3525612

  18. Individual in-vitro sensitivities of human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moesta, K. T.; Dmytrijuk, Andrew; Schlag, Peter M.; Mang, Thomas S.

    1992-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising alternative in the treatment of pancreatic cancer in man, due to the low sensitivity of the normal pancreas to PDT as shown in preclinical studies. Investigations on four human pancreatic cancer lines (MIA PaCa-2, PaCa 1, PaCa 3, and CAPAN 2) in vitro demonstrated a considerable variety in PDT-sensitivity proportional to the degree of differentiation, which was related to photosensitizer-uptake (PhotofrinTM). The well differentiated pancreatic tumor line Capan 2 showed a close relationship between high cell density and increased PDT-resistance. The Photofrin uptake of Capan 2 at high cell densities could be increased by short trypsinization prior to photosensitizer exposure. The data supports the hypothesis that a complex intercellular organization reduces the cell surface available for photosensitizer uptake and may cause the relative PDT resistance of normal pancreatic tissues and highly differentiated tumors.

  19. Preliminary study of cytotoxic effects of photodynamic therapy and immunotherapy on human pancreatic cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luowei; Liu, Bolin; Chen, Yang K.; Li, Zhaoshen; Hetzel, Fred W.; Huang, Zheng

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the western world. The disease is very resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. One reason for that is the resistance of pancreatic cancer cells to apoptosis. Among the current investigational approaches, targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER-1/EGFR) and interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT) show promises. When used alone or together, these new approaches might provide an alternative modality to treat pancreatic cancer. This study examined and compared cytotoxic effects of antibody C225 (an anti-HER-1/EGFR monoclonal antibody) and Photofrin-mediated PDT on two human pancreatic cancer cell lines (BxPc-3, HPAF-II). Preliminary in vitro data indicated that these treatments could block various proliferation pathways of pancreatic cancer cells through different mechanisms. For instance, PDT could induce early apoptosis. C225 could induce G1 arrest. These findings might help to design new strategies such as the combination of PDT and immunotherapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Toll-like receptor 7 regulates pancreatic carcinogenesis in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Atsuo; Graffeo, Christopher S; Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Rehman, Adeel; Hackman, Michael; Fallon, Nina; Barilla, Rocky M; Henning, Justin R; Jamal, Mohsin; Rao, Raghavendra; Greco, Stephanie; Deutsch, Michael; Medina-Zea, Marco V; Bin Saeed, Usama; Ego-Osuala, Melvin O; Hajdu, Cristina; Miller, George

    2012-11-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an aggressive cancer that interacts with stromal cells to produce a highly inflammatory tumor microenvironment that promotes tumor growth and invasiveness. The precise interplay between tumor and stroma remains poorly understood. TLRs mediate interactions between environmental stimuli and innate immunity and trigger proinflammatory signaling cascades. Our finding that TLR7 expression is upregulated in both epithelial and stromal compartments in human and murine pancreatic cancer led us to postulate that carcinogenesis is dependent on TLR7 signaling. In a mouse model of pancreatic cancer, TLR7 ligation vigorously accelerated tumor progression and induced loss of expression of PTEN, p16, and cyclin D1 and upregulation of p21, p27, p53, c-Myc, SHPTP1, TGF-β, PPARγ, and cyclin B1. Furthermore, TLR7 ligation induced STAT3 activation and interfaced with Notch as well as canonical NF-κB and MAP kinase pathways, but downregulated expression of Notch target genes. Moreover, blockade of TLR7 protected against carcinogenesis. Since pancreatic tumorigenesis requires stromal expansion, we proposed that TLR7 ligation modulates pancreatic cancer by driving stromal inflammation. Accordingly, we found that mice lacking TLR7 exclusively within their inflammatory cells were protected from neoplasia. These data suggest that targeting TLR7 holds promise for treatment of human pancreatic cancer.

  1. microRNA regulation of human pancreatic cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi-Fan; Hannafon, Bethany N.

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small non-coding RNAs that function primarily in the post transcriptional regulation of gene expression in plants and animals. Deregulation of miRNA expression in cancer cells, including pancreatic cancer cells, is well documented, and the involvement of miRNAs in orchestrating tumor genesis and cancer progression has been recognized. This review focuses on recent reports demonstrating that miRNAs are involved in regulation of pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs). A number of miRNA species have been identified to be involved in regulating pancreatic CSCs, including miR-21, miR-34, miR-1246, miR-221, the miR-17-92 cluster, the miR-200 and let-7 families. Furthermore, the Notch-signaling pathway and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process are associated with miRNA regulation of pancreatic CSCs. Given the significant contribution of CSCs to chemo-resistance and tumor progression, a better understanding of how miRNAs function in pancreatic CSCs could provide novel strategies for the development of therapeutics and diagnostics for this devastating disease. PMID:28217707

  2. Exocrine pancreatic disorders in transsgenic mice expressing human keratin 8

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, M. Llanos; Bravo, Ana; Ramírez, Angel; Escobar, Gabriela Morreale de; Were, Felipe; Merlino, Glenn; Vidal, Miguel; Jorcano, José L.

    1999-01-01

    Keratins K8 and K18 are the major components of the intermediate-filament cytoskeleton of simple epithelia. Increased levels of these keratins have been correlated with various tumor cell characteristics, including progression to malignancy, invasive behavior, and drug sensitivity, although a role for K8/K18 in tumorigenesis has not yet been demonstrated. To examine the function of these keratins, we generated mice expressing the human K8 (hk8) gene, which leads to a moderate keratin-content increase in their simple epithelia. These mice displayed progressive exocrine pancreas alterations, including dysplasia and loss of acinar architecture, redifferentiation of acinar to ductal cells, inflammation, fibrosis, and substitution of exocrine by adipose tissue, as well as increased cell proliferation and apoptosis. Histological changes were not observed in other simple epithelia, such as the liver. Electron microscopy showed that transgenic acinar cells have keratins organized in abundant filament bundles dispersed throughout the cytoplasm, in contrast to control acinar cells, which have scarce and apically concentrated filaments. The phenotype found was very similar to that reported for transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative mutant TGF-β type II receptor (TGFβRII mice). We show that these TGFβRII mutant mice also have elevated K8/K18 levels. These results indicate that simple epithelial keratins play a relevant role in the regulation of exocrine pancreas homeostasis and support the idea that disruption of mechanisms that normally regulate keratin expression in vivo could be related to inflammatory and neoplastic pancreatic disorders. PMID:10359568

  3. Electric impedance of human embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Onnela, Niina; Savolainen, Virpi; Juuti-Uusitalo, Kati; Vaajasaari, Hanna; Skottman, Heli; Hyttinen, Jari

    2012-02-01

    The barrier properties of epithelium are conventionally defined by transepithelial resistance (TER). TER provides information about the tightness of the epithelium. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) provides additional information regarding cell membrane properties, such as changes in electric capacitance and possible parallel or serial pathways that may correlate with the morphology of the cell layer. This study presents EIS of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell model of the putative RPE differentiated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-RPE). The generally utilized RPE cell model, ARPE-19, was used as immature control. The measured EIS was analyzed by fitting an equivalent electrical circuit model describing the resistive and capacitive properties of the RPE. Our results indicated that TER of hESC-RPE cells was close to the values of human RPE presented in the literature. This provides evidence that the stem cell-derived RPE in vitro can reach high-barrier function. Furthermore, hESC-RPE cells produced impedance spectra that can be modeled by the equivalent circuit of one time constant. ARPE-19 cells produced low-barrier properties, that is, an impedance spectra that suggested poor maturation of ARPE-19 cells. To conclude, EIS could give us means for non-invasively estimating the functionality and maturation of differentiated-RPE cells.

  4. Long-term measurement of impedance in chronically implanted depth and subdural electrodes during responsive neurostimulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Sillay, Karl A; Rutecki, Paul; Cicora, Kathy; Worrell, Greg; Drazkowski, Joseph; Shih, Jerry J; Sharan, Ashwini D; Morrell, Martha J; Williams, Justin; Wingeier, Brett

    2013-09-01

    Long-term stability of the electrode-tissue interface may be required to maintain optimal neural recording with subdural and deep brain implants and to permit appropriate delivery of neuromodulation therapy. Although short-term changes in impedance at the electrode-tissue interface are known to occur, long-term changes in impedance have not previously been examined in detail in humans. To provide further information about short- and long-term impedance changes in chronically implanted electrodes, a dataset from 191 persons with medically intractable epilepsy participating in a trial of an investigational responsive neurostimulation device (the RNS(®) System, NeuroPace, Inc.) was reviewed. Monopolar impedance measurements were available for 391 depth and subdural leads containing a total of 1564 electrodes; measurements were available for median 802 days post-implant (range 28-1634). Although there were statistically significant short-term impedance changes, long-term impedance was stable after one year. Impedances for depth electrodes transiently increased during the third week after lead implantation and impedances for subdural electrodes increased over 12 weeks post-implant, then were stable over the subsequent long-term follow-up. Both depth and subdural electrode impedances demonstrated long-term stability, suggesting that the quality of long-term electrographic recordings (the data used to control responsive brain stimulation) can be maintained over time.

  5. LTB4 stimulates growth of human pancreatic cancer cells via MAPK and PI-3 kinase pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W.-G.; Ding, X.-Z.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Bell, Richard H.; Adrian, Thomas E. . E-mail: tadrian@northwestern.edu

    2005-09-30

    We have previously shown the importance of LTB4 in human pancreatic cancer. LTB4 receptor antagonists block growth and induce apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we investigated the effect of LTB4 on proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells and the mechanisms involved. LTB4 stimulated DNA synthesis and proliferation of both PANC-1 and AsPC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells, as measured by thymidine incorporation and cell number. LTB4 stimulated rapid and transient activation of MEK and ERK1/2 kinases. The MEK inhibitors, PD98059 and U0126, blocked LTB4-stimulated ERK1/2 activation and cell proliferation. LTB4 also stimulated phosphorylation of p38 MAPK; however, the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, failed to block LTB4-stimulated growth. The activity of JNK/SAPK was not affected by LTB4 treatment. Phosphorylation of Akt was also induced by LTB4 and this effect was blocked by the PI-3 kinase inhibitor wortmannin, which also partially blocked LTB4-stimulated cell proliferation. In conclusion, LTB4 stimulates proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells through MEK/ERK and PI-3 kinase/Akt pathways, while p38 MPAK and JNK/SAPK are not involved.

  6. Nanog Predicts Poor Prognosis in Human Pancreatic Cancer and Is Downregulated by QingyihuaJi Formula in Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Libin; Dong, Lei; Weng, Lao I.; Wang, Peng; Hua, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Qingyihuaji formula (QYHJ), confirmed efficacious in a series of clinical trials, has been applied to human pancreatic carcinoma treatment in Shanghai Cancer Center for years. Recent evidence highlighted that pluripotent stem cells transcription factor Nanog plays a pivotal role in carcinogenesis. However, there is little published information regarding the underlying clinical significance and mechanisms of transcription factor Nanog in pancreatic cancer. In this study, our results indicated that Nanog is overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer stem cells and downregulated by QYHJ, which may contribute to explain the clinical effectiveness of QYHJ and provide advanced pancreatic cancer patients with a new therapeutic option, supporting our hypothesis that the degradation pathway is another mechanism by which QYHJ affects Nanog expression. PMID:27829864

  7. cDNA cloning and sequence analysis of human pancreatic procarboxypeptidase A1.

    PubMed Central

    Catasús, L; Villegas, V; Pascual, R; Avilés, F X; Wicker-Planquart, C; Puigserver, A

    1992-01-01

    Using polyclonal antibodies raised against human pancreatic procarboxypeptidases, a full-length cDNA coding for an A-type proenzyme was isolated from a lambda gt11 human pancreatic library. This cDNA contains standard 3' and 5' flanking regions, a poly(A)+ tail and a central region of 1260 nucleotides coding for a protein of 419 amino acids. On the basis of sequence comparisons, the human protein was classified as a procarboxypeptidase A1 which is very similar to the previously described A1 forms from rat and bovine pancreatic glands. The presence of the amino acid sequences assumed to be of importance for the zymogen inhibition by its activation segment, primarily on the basis of the recently reported crystal structure of the B form, further supports the proposed classification. PMID:1417781

  8. Anisotropy of human muscle via non invasive impedance measurements. Frequency dependence of the impedance changes during isometric contractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashuri, Hektor

    In this thesis we present non invasive muscle impedance measurements using rotatable probes extending the work done by Aaron et al. (1997) by measuring not only the real part of the impedance but the imaginary part as well. The results reveal orientations of underlying muscle fibers via minima in resistance and reactance versus angle curves, suggesting this method as potentially useful for studying muscle properties in clinical and physiological research. Calculations of the current distribution for a slab of material with anisotropic conductivity show that the current distribution depends strongly on the separation of two current electrodes and as well as on its conducting anisotropy. Forearm muscle impedance measurements at 50 kHz done by Shiffman et al. (2003) had shown that both resistance (R) and reactance (X) increase during isometric contraction. We have extended these measurements in the 3 to 100 kHz range and we found that resistance (R) and reactance (X) both increase and their changes increased or decreased at frequency dependent rates. Analysis based on circuit models of changes in R and X during the short contraction pulses showed that the extra cellular fluid resistance increased by 3.9 +/- 1.4 %, while the capacitance increased by 5.6 +/- 2 %. For long contraction pulses at very low frequencies: (1) there was practically no change in R during contraction, which implies that these changes are due to cellular membrane or intracellular effects with the extra cellular water component not participating, and (2) in post contraction stage there were no morphological changes which means that drifts in R can only be due to physiological changes. Following Shiffman et al. (2003) we measured impedance changes of R and X during a triangular shaped pulse of force generated via isometric forearm muscle contraction at 50 kHz. We measured these changes in 3-100 kHz frequency range for a stair case pulse of forces and the results showed that they are frequency

  9. Reconstituting development of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia from primary human pancreas duct cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jonghyeob; Snyder, Emily R.; Liu, Yinghua; Gu, Xueying; Wang, Jing; Flowers, Brittany M.; Kim, Yoo Jung; Park, Sangbin; Szot, Gregory L.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Longacre, Teri A.; Kim, Seung K.

    2017-01-01

    Development of systems that reconstitute hallmark features of human pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs), the precursor to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, could generate new strategies for early diagnosis and intervention. However, human cell-based PanIN models with defined mutations are unavailable. Here, we report that genetic modification of primary human pancreatic cells leads to development of lesions resembling native human PanINs. Primary human pancreas duct cells harbouring oncogenic KRAS and induced mutations in CDKN2A, SMAD4 and TP53 expand in vitro as epithelial spheres. After pancreatic transplantation, mutant clones form lesions histologically similar to native PanINs, including prominent stromal responses. Gene expression profiling reveals molecular similarities of mutant clones with native PanINs, and identifies potential PanIN biomarker candidates including Neuromedin U, a circulating peptide hormone. Prospective reconstitution of human PanIN development from primary cells provides experimental opportunities to investigate pancreas cancer development, progression and early-stage detection. PMID:28272465

  10. A genetically engineered human pancreatic β cell line exhibiting glucose-inducible insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Ravassard, Philippe; Hazhouz, Yasmine; Pechberty, Séverine; Bricout-Neveu, Emilie; Armanet, Mathieu; Czernichow, Paul; Scharfmann, Raphael

    2011-09-01

    Despite intense efforts over the past 30 years, human pancreatic β cell lines have not been available. Here, we describe a robust technology for producing a functional human β cell line using targeted oncogenesis in human fetal tissue. Human fetal pancreatic buds were transduced with a lentiviral vector that expressed SV40LT under the control of the insulin promoter. The transduced buds were then grafted into SCID mice so that they could develop into mature pancreatic tissue. Upon differentiation, the newly formed SV40LT-expressing β cells proliferated and formed insulinomas. The resulting β cells were then transduced with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), grafted into other SCID mice, and finally expanded in vitro to generate cell lines. One of these cell lines, EndoC-βH1, expressed many β cell-specific markers without any substantial expression of markers of other pancreatic cell types. The cells secreted insulin when stimulated by glucose or other insulin secretagogues, and cell transplantation reversed chemically induced diabetes in mice. These cells represent a unique tool for large-scale drug discovery and provide a preclinical model for cell replacement therapy in diabetes. This technology could be generalized to generate other human cell lines when the cell type-specific promoter is available.

  11. Differences in acoustic impedance of fresh and embedded human trabecular bone samples-Scanning acoustic microscopy and numerical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ojanen, Xiaowei; Töyräs, Juha; Inkinen, Satu I; Malo, Markus K H; Isaksson, Hanna; Jurvelin, Jukka S

    2016-09-01

    Trabecular bone samples are traditionally embedded and polished for scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). The effect of sample processing, including dehydration, on the acoustic impedance of bone is unknown. In this study, acoustic impedance of human trabecular bone samples (n = 8) was experimentally assessed before (fresh) and after embedding using SAM and two-dimensional (2-D) finite-difference time domain simulations. Fresh samples were polished with sandpapers of different grit (P1000, P2500, and P4000). Experimental results indicated that acoustic impedance of samples increased significantly after embedding [mean values 3.7 MRayl (fresh), 6.1 MRayl (embedded), p < 0.001]. After polishing with different papers, no significant changes in acoustic impedance were found, even though higher mean values were detected after polishing with finer (P2500 and P4000) papers. A linear correlation (r = 0.854, p < 0.05) was found between the acoustic impedance values of embedded and fresh bone samples polished using P2500 SiC paper. In numerical simulations dehydration increased the acoustic impedance of trabecular bone (38%), whereas changes in surface roughness of bone had a minor effect on the acoustic impedance (-1.56%/0.1 μm). Thereby, the numerical simulations corroborated the experimental findings. In conclusion, acoustic impedance measurement of fresh trabecular bone is possible and may provide realistic material values similar to those of living bone.

  12. Remote detection of human electroencephalograms using ultrahigh input impedance electric potential sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harland, C. J.; Clark, T. D.; Prance, R. J.

    2002-10-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate the use of very high performance, ultrahigh impedance, electric potential probes in the detection of electrical activity in the brain. We show that these sensors, requiring no electrical or physical contact with the body, can be used to monitor the human electroencephalogram (EEG) revealing, as examples, the α and β rhythms and the α blocking phenomenon. We suggest that the advantages offered by these sensors compared with the currently used contact (Ag/AgCl) electrodes may act to stimulate new developments in multichannel EEG monitoring and in real-time electrical imaging of the brain.

  13. Electrochemical characterization of human skin by impedance spectroscopy: the effect of penetration enhancers.

    PubMed

    Kontturi, K; Murtomäki, L; Hirvonen, J; Paronen, P; Urtti, A

    1993-03-01

    The electrochemical properties of human cadaver skin were studied in a diffusion cell with impedance spectroscopy as a function of time in the absence and presence of penetration enhancers dodecyl N,N-dimethylamino acetate and Azone. An improved electrochemical model of skin is presented, and combining the novel model with modern fractal mathematics, the effect of enhancers on the surface of skin is demonstrated. The enhancers appeared to open new penetration routes and increase the ohmic resistance, capacitive properties, and fractal dimension of skin, which means a rougher or more heterogeneous surface.

  14. Microvesicle removal of anticancer drugs contributes to drug resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan-Chari, Vandhana; Kohan, Hamed Gilzad; Asimakopoulos, Alexandros G.; Sudha, Thangirala; Sell, Stewart; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Boroujerdi, Mehdi; Davis, Paul J.; Mousa, Shaker A.

    2016-01-01

    High mortality in pancreatic cancer patients is partly due to resistance to chemotherapy. We describe that human pancreatic cancer cells acquire drug resistance by a novel mechanism in which they expel and remove chemotherapeutic drugs from the microenvironment via microvesicles (MVs). Using human pancreatic cancer cells that exhibit varied sensitivity to gemcitabine (GEM), we show that GEM exposure triggers the cancer cells to release MVs in an amount that correlates with that cell line's sensitivity to GEM. The importance of MV-release in gaining drug resistance in GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer cells was confirmed when the inhibition of MV-release sensitized the cells to GEM treatment, both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, MVs remove drugs that are internalized into the cells and that are in the microenvironment. The differences between the drug-resistant and drug-sensitive pancreatic cancer cell lines tested here are explained based on the variable content of influx/efflux proteins present on MVs, which directly dictates the ability of MVs either to trap GEM or to allow GEM to flow back to the microenvironment. PMID:27391262

  15. Nucleotide sequence of cloned cDNA for human pancreatic kallikrein.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, D; Kitamura, N; Nakanishi, S

    1985-12-31

    Cloned cDNA sequences for human pancreatic kallikrein have been isolated and determined by molecular cloning and sequence analysis. The identity between human pancreatic and urinary kallikreins is indicated by the complete coincidence between the amino acid sequence deduced from the cloned cDNA sequence and that reported partially for urinary kallikrein. The active enzyme form of the human pancreatic kallikrein consists of 238 amino acids and is preceded by a signal peptide and a profragment of 24 amino acids. A sequence comparison of this with other mammalian kallikreins indicates that key amino acid residues required for both serine protease activity and kallikrein-like cleavage specificity are retained in the human sequence, and residues corresponding to some external loops of the kallikrein diverge from other kallikreins. Analyses by RNA blot hybridization, primer extension, and S1 nuclease mapping indicate that the pancreatic kallikrein mRNA is also expressed in the kidney and sublingual gland, suggesting the active synthesis of urinary kallikrein in these tissues. Furthermore, the tissue-specific regulation of the expression of the members of the human kallikrein gene family has been discussed.

  16. Cloning and functional expression of a human pancreatic islet glucose-transporter cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Permutt, M.A.; Koranyi, L.; Keller, K.; Lacy, P.E.; Scharp, D.W.; Mueckler, M. )

    1989-11-01

    Previous studies have suggested that pancreatic islet glucose transport is mediated by a high-K{sub m}, low-affinity facilitated transporter similar to that expressed in liver. To determine the relationship between islet and liver glucose transporters, liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clones were isolated from a human liver cDNA library. The liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA clone hybridized to mRNA transcripts of the same size in human liver and pancreatic islet RNA. A cDNA library was prepared from purified human pancreatic islet tissue and screened with human liver-type glucose-transporter cDNA. The authors isolated two overlapping cDNA clones encompassing 2600 base pairs, which encode a pancreatic islet protein identical in sequence to that of the putative liver-type glucose-transporter protein. Xenopus oocytes injected with synthetic mRNA transcribed from a full-length cDNA construct exhibited increased uptake of 2-deoxyglucose, confirming the functional identity of the clone. These cDNA clones can now be used to study regulation of expression of the gene and to assess the role of inherited defects in this gene as a candidate for inherited susceptibility to non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  17. Elevated Serum Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 in Humans with Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vivek K.; Beaver, Kristin M.; Fisher, ffolliott M.; Singhal, Garima; Dushay, Jody R.; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Flier, Sarah N.

    2016-01-01

    Background The metabolic regulator Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 (FGF21) is highly expressed in the acinar pancreas, but its role in pancreatic function is obscure. It appears to play a protective role in acute experimental pancreatitis in mice. The aim of this study was to define an association between FGF21 and the course and resolution of acute pancreatitis in humans. Methods and Principal Findings Twenty five subjects with acute pancreatitis admitted from May to September 2012 to the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) were analyzed. Serial serum samples were collected throughout hospitalization and analyzed for FGF21 levels by ELISA. Twenty healthy subjects sampled three times over a four week period were used as controls. We found that, in patients with pancreatitis, serum FGF21 rises significantly and peaks four to six days after the maximum lipase level, before slowly declining. Maximum FGF21 levels were significantly greater than baseline levels for acute pancreatitis subjects (1733 vs. 638 pg/mL, P = 0.003). This maximum value was significantly greater than the highest value observed for our control subjects (1733 vs. 322 pg/mL, P = 0.0002). The ratio of active to total FGF21 did not change during the course of the disease (42.5% vs. 44.4%, P = 0.58). Fold increases in FGF21 were significantly greater in acute pancreatitis subjects than the fold difference seen in healthy subjects (4.7 vs. 2.0, P = 0.01). Higher fold changes were also seen in severe compared to mild pancreatitis (18.2 vs. 4.4, P = 0.01). The timing of maximum FGF21 levels correlated with day of successful return to oral intake (R2 = 0.21, P = 0.04). Conclusions Our results demonstrate that serum FGF21 rises significantly in humans with acute pancreatitis. The pancreas may be contributing to increased FGF21 levels following injury and FGF21 may play a role in the recovery process. PMID:27832059

  18. TLR7 and TLR8 expression increases tumor cell proliferation and promotes chemoresistance in human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    GRIMMIG, TANJA; MATTHES, NIELS; HOELAND, KATHARINA; TRIPATHI, SUDIPTA; CHANDRAKER, ANIL; GRIMM, MARTIN; MOENCH, ROMANA; MOLL, EVA-MARIA; FRIESS, HELMUT; TSAUR, IGOR; BLAHETA, ROMAN A.; GERMER, CRISTOPH T.; WAAGA-GASSER, ANA MARIA; GASSER, MARTIN

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation as an important epigenetic and environmental factor for putative tumorigenesis and tumor progression may be associated with specific activation of Toll-like receptors (TLR). Recently, carcinogenesis has been suggested to be dependent on TLR7 signaling. In the present study, we determined the role of both TLR7 and TLR8 expression and signaling in tumor cell proliferation and chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. Expression of TLR7/TLR8 in UICC stage I–IV pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, normal pancreatic tissue and human pancreatic (PANC1) cancer cell line was examined. For in vitro/in vivo studies TLR7/TLR8 overexpressing PANC1 cell lines were generated and analyzed for effects of (un-)stimulated TLR expression on tumor cell proliferation and chemoresistance. TLR expression was increased in pancreatic cancer, with stage-dependent upregulation in advanced tumors, compared to earlier stages and chronic pancreatitis. Stimulation of TLR7/TLR8 overexpressing PANC1 cells resulted in elevated NF-κB and COX-2 expression, increased cancer cell proliferation and reduced chemosensitivity. More importantly, TLR7/TLR8 expression increased tumor growth in vivo. Our data demonstrate a stage-dependent upregulation of both TLR7 and TLR8 expression in pancreatic cancer. Functional analysis in human pancreatic cancer cells point to a significant role of both TLRs in chronic inflammation-mediated TLR7/TLR8 signaling leading to tumor cell proliferation and chemoresistance. PMID:26134824

  19. Guidelines to electrode positioning for human and animal electrical impedance myography research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Benjamin; Pacheck, Adam; Rutkove, Seward B.

    2016-09-01

    The positioning of electrodes in electrical impedance myography (EIM) is critical for accurately assessing disease progression and effectiveness of treatment. In human and animal trials for neuromuscular disorders, inconsistent electrode positioning adds errors to the muscle impedance. Despite its importance, how the reproducibility of resistance and reactance, the two parameters that define EIM, are affected by changes in electrode positioning remains unknown. In this paper, we present a novel approach founded on biophysical principles to study the reproducibility of resistance and reactance to electrode misplacements. The analytical framework presented allows the user to quantify a priori the effect on the muscle resistance and reactance using only one parameter: the uncertainty placing the electrodes. We also provide quantitative data on the precision needed to position the electrodes and the minimum muscle length needed to achieve a pre-specified EIM reproducibility. The results reported here are confirmed with finite element model simulations and measurements on five healthy subjects. Ultimately, our data can serve as normative values to enhance the reliability of EIM as a biomarker and facilitate comparability of future human and animal studies.

  20. Guidelines to electrode positioning for human and animal electrical impedance myography research

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Benjamin; Pacheck, Adam; Rutkove, Seward B.

    2016-01-01

    The positioning of electrodes in electrical impedance myography (EIM) is critical for accurately assessing disease progression and effectiveness of treatment. In human and animal trials for neuromuscular disorders, inconsistent electrode positioning adds errors to the muscle impedance. Despite its importance, how the reproducibility of resistance and reactance, the two parameters that define EIM, are affected by changes in electrode positioning remains unknown. In this paper, we present a novel approach founded on biophysical principles to study the reproducibility of resistance and reactance to electrode misplacements. The analytical framework presented allows the user to quantify a priori the effect on the muscle resistance and reactance using only one parameter: the uncertainty placing the electrodes. We also provide quantitative data on the precision needed to position the electrodes and the minimum muscle length needed to achieve a pre-specified EIM reproducibility. The results reported here are confirmed with finite element model simulations and measurements on five healthy subjects. Ultimately, our data can serve as normative values to enhance the reliability of EIM as a biomarker and facilitate comparability of future human and animal studies. PMID:27585740

  1. Circadian pancreatic enzyme pattern and relationship between secretory and motor activity in fasting humans.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jutta; Layer, Peter

    2002-08-01

    It is unknown whether nonparallel pancreatic enzyme output occurs under basal conditions in humans. We aimed to determine whether the circadian or wake-sleep cycle influences the relationship among pancreatic enzymes or between pancreatic secretory and jejunal motor activity. Using orojejunal multilumen intubation, we measured enzyme outputs and proximal jejunal motility index during consecutive daytime and nighttime periods in each of seven fasting, healthy volunteers. Enzyme outputs were correlated tightly during daytime phases of wakefulness and nighttime phases of sleep (r > 0.72, P < 0.001). During nocturnal phases of wakefulness, output of proteases (r = 0.84, P < 0.001), but not of amylase and trypsin (r = 0.12), remained associated. Nocturnally, particularly during sleep, pancreatic secretory activity was directly correlated with jejunal motility index (r > 0.50, P < 0.001). In conclusion, parallel secretion of pancreatic enzymes dominates throughout the circadian cycle. Nonparallel secretion during nocturnal phases of wakefulness may be due to merely circadian effects or to the coupling of the wake-sleep and the circadian cycle. The association between fluctuations of secretory and motor activity appears to be particularly tight during the night.

  2. Radiosensitization of human pancreatic cancer cells by MLN4924, an investigational NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dongping; Li, Hua; Yu, Jie; Sebolt, Jonathan T; Zhao, Lili; Lawrence, Theodore S; Smith, Peter G; Morgan, Meredith A; Sun, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is used in locally advanced pancreatic cancers in which it can improve survival in combination with gemcitabine. However, prognosis is still poor in this setting in which more effective therapies remain needed. MLN4924 is an investigational small molecule currently in phase I clinical trials. MLN4924 inhibits NAE (NEDD8 Activating Enzyme), a pivotal regulator of the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCF (SKP1, Cullins, and F-box protein), that has been implicated recently in DNA damage and repair. In this study, we provide evidence that MLN4924 can be used as an effective radiosensitizer in pancreatic cancer. Specifically, MLN4924 (20-100 nmol/L) effectively inhibited cullin neddylation and sensitized pancreatic cancer cells to ionizing radiation in vitro with a sensitivity enhancement ratio of approximately 1.5. Mechanistically, MLN4924 treatment stimulated an accumulation of several SCF substrates, including CDT1, WEE1, and NOXA, in parallel with an enhancement of radiation-induced DNA damage, aneuploidy, G(2)/M phase cell-cycle arrest, and apoptosis. RNAi-mediated knockdown of CDT1 and WEE1 partially abrogated MLN4924-induced aneuploidy, G(2)/M arrest, and radiosensitization, indicating a causal effect. Furthermore, MLN4924 was an effective radiosensitizer in a mouse xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer. Our findings offer proof-of-concept for use of MLN4924 as a novel class of radiosensitizer for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  3. Impaired growth of pancreatic exocrine cells in transgenic mice expressing human activin {beta}E subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Osamu . E-mail: ohashim@vmas.kitasato-u.ac.jp; Ushiro, Yuuki; Sekiyama, Kazunari; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Yoshioka, Kazuki; Mutoh, Ken-Ichiro; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa

    2006-03-10

    Activins, TGF-{beta} superfamily members, have multiple functions in a variety of cells and tissues. Recently, additional activin {beta} subunit genes, {beta}C and {beta}E, have been identified. To explore the role of activin E, we created transgenic mice overexpressing human activin {beta}E subunit. There were pronounced differences in the pancreata of the transgenic animals as compared with their wild-type counterparts. Pancreatic weight, expressed relative to total body weight, was significantly reduced. Histologically, adipose replacement of acini in the exocrine pancreas was observed. There was a significant decrease in the number of PCNA-positive cells in the acinar cells, indicating reduced proliferation in the exocrine pancreas of the transgenic mice. However, quantitative pancreatic morphometry showed that the total number and mass of the islets of the transgenic mice were comparable with those of the nontransgenic control mice. Our findings suggest a role for activin E in regulating the proliferation of pancreatic exocrine cells.

  4. Hyperglycemia impedes definitive endoderm differentiation of human embryonic stem cells by modulating histone methylation patterns.

    PubMed

    Chen, A C H; Lee, Y L; Fong, S W; Wong, C C Y; Ng, E H Y; Yeung, W S B

    2017-03-10

    Exposure to maternal diabetes during fetal growth is a risk factor for the development of type II diabetes (T2D) in later life. Discovery of the mechanisms involved in this association should provide valuable background for therapeutic treatments. Early embryogenesis involves epigenetic changes including histone modifications. The bivalent histone methylation marks H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 are important for regulating key developmental genes during early fetal pancreas specification. We hypothesized that maternal hyperglycemia disrupted early pancreas development through changes in histone bivalency. A human embryonic stem cell line (VAL3) was used as the cell model for studying the effects of hyperglycemia upon differentiation into definitive endoderm (DE), an early stage of the pancreatic lineage. Hyperglycemic conditions significantly down-regulated the expression levels of DE markers SOX17, FOXA2, CXCR4 and EOMES during differentiation. This was associated with retention of the repressive histone methylation mark H3K27me3 on their promoters under hyperglycemic conditions. The disruption of histone methylation patterns was observed as early as the mesendoderm stage, with Wnt/β-catenin signaling being suppressed during hyperglycemia. Treatment with Wnt/β-catenin signaling activator CHIR-99021 restored the expression levels and chromatin methylation status of DE markers, even in a hyperglycemic environment. The disruption of DE development was also found in mouse embryos at day 7.5 post coitum from diabetic mothers. Furthermore, disruption of DE differentiation in VAL3 cells led to subsequent impairment in pancreatic progenitor formation. Thus, early exposure to hyperglycemic conditions hinders DE development with a possible relationship to the later impairment of pancreas specification.

  5. A metastatic nude-mouse model of human pancreatic cancer constructed orthotopically with histologically intact patient specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, X; Guadagni, F; Hoffman, R M

    1992-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most intractable and least understood of all human cancers. Pancreatic cancers is the fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States with less than 2% of the patients surviving for 5 yr. In an effort to help develop more effective treatment modalities for pancreatic cancer and improve detection, we report an animal model for individual human pancreatic-cancer patients. The model involves orthotopic transplantation of histologically intact pancreatic-cancer specimens to the nude-mouse pancreas, which can result in models that resemble the clinical picture including (i) extensive local tumor growth, (ii) extension of the locally growing human pancreatic cancer to the nude-mouse stomach and duodenum, (iii) metastases of the human pancreatic tumor to the nude-mouse liver and regional lymph nodes, and (iv) distant metastases of the human pancreatic tumor to the nude-mouse adrenal gland, diaphragm, and mediastinal lymph nodes. In a series of five patient cases, a 100% take rate has been demonstrated, and of 17 mice transplanted, 15 supported tumor growth. Immunohistochemical analysis of the antigenic phenotype of the transplanted human pancreatic tumors showed a similar pattern of expression of two different human tumor-associated antigens, such as tumor-associated glycoprotein 72 and carcinoembryonic antigen in the transplanted tumors when compared with the original surgical biopsy, suggesting similarity between the two. This model should, therefore, prove valuable for treatment evaluation of individual cancer patients, as well as for evaluation of experimental treatment modalities for this disease. Images PMID:1608975

  6. Primary outgrowth cultures are a reliable source of human pancreatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Song; Delitto, Daniel; Zhang, Dongyu; Sorenson, Heather L; Sarosi, George A; Thomas, Ryan M; Behrns, Kevin E; Wallet, Shannon M; Trevino, Jose G; Hughes, Steven J

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances demonstrate a critical yet poorly understood role for the pancreatic stellate cell (PSC) in the pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic cancer (PC). Progress in this area has been hampered by the availability, fidelity, and/or reliability of in vitro models of PSCs. We examined whether outgrowth cultures from human surgical specimens exhibited reproducible phenotypic and functional characteristics of PSCs. PSCs were cultured from surgical specimens of healthy pancreas, CP and PC. Growth dynamics, phenotypic characteristics, soluble mediator secretion profiles and co-culture with PC cells both in vitro and in vivo were assessed. Forty-seven primary cultures were established from 52 attempts, demonstrating universal α-smooth muscle actin and glial fibrillary acidic protein but negligible epithelial surface antigen expression. Modification of culture conditions consistently led to cytoplasmic lipid accumulation, suggesting induction of a quiescent phenotype. Secretion of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines did not significantly differ between donor pathologies, but did evolve over time in culture. Co-culture of PSCs with established PC cell lines resulted in significant changes in levels of multiple secreted mediators. Primary PSCs co-inoculated with PC cells in a xenograft model led to augmented tumor growth and metastasis. Therefore, regardless of donor pathology, outgrowth cultures produce PSCs that demonstrate consistent growth and protein secretion properties. Primary cultures from pancreatic surgical specimens, including malignancies, may represent a reliable source of human PSCs.

  7. Relationship between pancreatic vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) and insulin expression in human pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Saisho, Yoshifumi; Harris, Paul E.; Butler, Alexandra E.; Galasso, Ryan; Gurlo, Tatyana; Rizza, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) is expressed in pancreatic beta cells and has recently been proposed as a target for measurement of beta cell mass in vivo. We questioned, (1) What proportion of beta cells express VMAT2? (2) Is VMAT2 expressed by other pancreatic endocrine or non-endocrine cells? (3) Is the relationship between VMAT2 and insulin expression disturbed in type 1 (T1DM) or type 2 diabetes (T2DM)? Human pancreas (7 non-diabetics, 5 T2DM, 10 T1DM) was immunostained for insulin, VMAT2 and other pancreatic hormones. Most beta cells expressed VMAT2. VMAT2 expression was not changed by the presence of diabetes. In tail of pancreas VMAT2 immunostaining closely correlated with insulin staining. However, VMAT2 was also expressed in some pancreatic polypeptide (PP) cells. Although VMAT2 was not excluded as a target for beta cell mass measurement, expression of VMAT2 in PP cells predicts residual VMAT2 expression in human pancreas even in the absence of beta cells. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10735-008-9195-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18791800

  8. Protein-G-based human immunoglobulin G biosensing by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsugimura, Kaiki; Ohnuki, Hitoshi; Endo, Hideaki; Tsuya, Daijyu; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2016-02-01

    A highly sensitive biosensor based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was developed for the determination of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). Protein G, which specifically binds to IgG, was employed as the molecular receptor. Protein G was covalently immobilized on interdigitated electrodes through a mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) composed of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) and 6-mercaptohexanol. It was found that the mixing ratio of the SAM markedly affected the sensor performance. The sample prepared on 25% MUA SAM exhibited a linear behavior in the concentration range of 0.01-10 ng/mL, which is a record low detection for EIS-based IgG sensors. On the other hand, the sample on 100% MUA SAM showed no IgG-sensing action. A possible mechanism of the mixing ratio that affects the sensing performance was proposed.

  9. TGF-β1 promotes acinar to ductal metaplasia of human pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Akanuma, Naoki; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Halff, Glenn A.; Washburn, William K.; Sun, Luzhe; Wang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that pancreatitis-induced acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM) is a key event for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) initiation. However, there has not been an adequate system to explore the mechanisms of human ADM induction. We have developed a flow cytometry-based, high resolution lineage tracing method and 3D culture system to analyse ADM in human cells. In this system, well-known mouse ADM inducers did not promote ADM in human cells. In contrast, TGF-β1 efficiently converted human acinar cells to duct-like cells (AD) in a SMAD-dependent manner, highlighting fundamental differences between the species. Functionally, AD cells gained transient proliferative capacity. Furthermore, oncogenic KRAS did not induce acinar cell proliferation, but did sustain the proliferation of AD cells, suggesting that oncogenic KRAS requires ADM-associated-changes to promote PDAC initiation. This ADM model provides a novel platform to explore the mechanisms involved in the development of human pancreatic diseases. PMID:27485764

  10. Establishment of three-dimensional cultures of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M.; Menter, David G.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Reddy, Shrikanth A.G. . E-mail: sa08366@wotan.mdacc.tmc.edu

    2007-07-06

    Three-dimensional (3D) cultures of epithelial cells offer singular advantages for studies of morphogenesis or the role of cancer genes in oncogenesis. In this study, as part of establishing a 3D culture system of pancreatic duct epithelial cells, we compared human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDE-E6E7) with pancreatic cancer cell lines. Our results show, that in contrast to cancer cells, HPDE-E6E7 organized into spheroids with what appeared to be apical and basal membranes and a luminal space. Immunostaining experiments indicated that protein kinase Akt was phosphorylated (Ser473) and CTMP, a negative Akt regulator, was expressed in both HPDE-E6E7 and cancer cells. However, a nuclear pool of CTMP was detectable in HPDE-E6E7 cells that showed a dynamic concentrated expression pattern, a feature that further distinguished HPDE-E637 cells from cancer cells. Collectively, these data suggest that 3D cultures of HPDE-E6E7 cells are useful for investigating signaling and morphological abnormalities in pancreatic cancer cells.

  11. Berberine inhibits cell growth and mediates caspase-independent cell death in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Garcia, Lina; Efferth, Thomas; Torres, Amada; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Youns, Mahmoud

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies with an increasing incidence worldwide. In addition to the poor survival rates, combinations using gemcitabine as a backbone have failed to show any benefit beyond monotherapy. These facts underscore an urgent need for novel therapeutic options and motivated us to study the effect of berberine on pancreatic cancer cells. Here, we undertook an mRNA-based gene expression profiling study in order to get deeper insight into the molecular targets mediating the growth inhibitory effects of berberine on pancreatic cancer cells compared to normal ones. Twenty-four hours after treatment, berberine showed preferential selectivity toward pancreatic cancer cells compared to normal ones. Moreover, expression profiling and Ingenuity pathway analysis results showed that the cytotoxicity of berberine was accompanied with an activation of BRCA1-mediated DNA damage response, G1/S and G2/M cell cycle checkpoint regulation, and P53 signalling pathways. The activation of these signalling pathways might be explained by the fact that berberine intercalates DNA and induces DNA strand break through inhibition of topoisomerases and induction of DNA lesions.

  12. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy biosensor with interdigitated electrode for detection of human immunoglobulin A.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Ryuzo; Ohnuki, Hitoshi; Wang, Huihui; Yokoyama, Takuya; Endo, Hideaki; Tsuya, Daiju; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2013-02-15

    Interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) that have a series of parallel microband electrodes with alternating microbands connected together were utilized in electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to build a label-free human immunoglobulin A (IgA) immunosensor. Anti-human IgA (anti-IgA) was employed as an IgA receptor and was covalently immobilized on the IDE surface through a self-assembled monolayer, as confirmed by atomic force microscopy. EIS measurements revealed that the specific adsorption of IgA onto the immobilized anti-IgA gave rise to a clear increase in the value of interfacial charge transfer resistance (R(ct)). A linear relationship between ΔR(ct) and the logarithm of IgA concentration was found for the concentration range of 0.01-100 ng/mL. No modulation of R(ct) was detected by immersing the sensor in solutions of other proteins such as human immunoglobulin G or bovine serum albumin, which confirmed a high selectivity of this immunosensor for IgA. These results demonstrated that the anti-IgA receptor simply immobilized on the IDE surface can provide a sensitive biosensor.

  13. Zyflamend Suppresses Growth and Sensitizes Human Pancreatic Tumors to Gemcitabine in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Through Modulation of Multiple Targets

    PubMed Central

    Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B.; Sung, Bokyung; Ravindran, Jayaraj; Diagaradjane, Parmeswaran; Deorukhkar, Amit; Dey, Sanjit; Koca, Cemile; Tong, Zhimin; Gelovani, Juri G.; Guha, Sushovan; Krishnan, Sunil; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2011-01-01

    Agents that can potentiate the efficacy of standard chemotherapy against pancreatic cancer are of great interest. Because of their low cost and safety, patients commonly use a variety of dietary supplements, although evidence of their efficacy is often lacking. One such commonly used food supplement, Zyflamend, is a polyherbal preparation with potent anti-inflammatory activities, and preclinical efficacy against prostate and oral cancer. Whether Zyflamend has any efficacy against human pancreatic cancer alone or in combination with gemcitibine, a commonly used agent, was examined in cell cultures and in an orthotopic mouse model. In vitro, Zyflamend inhibited the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cell lines regardless of p53 status and also enhanced gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. This finding correlated with inhibition of NF-κB activation by Zyflamend and suppression of cyclin D1, c-myc, COX-2, Bcl-2, IAP, survivin, VEGF, ICAM-1, and CXCR4. In nude mice, oral administration of Zyflamend alone significantly inhibited the growth of orthotopically transplanted human pancreatic tumors, and when combined with gemcitabine, further enhanced the antitumor effects. Immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses of tumor tissue showed that the suppression of pancreatic cancer growth correlated with inhibition of proliferation index marker (Ki-67), COX-2, MMP-9, NF-κB, and VEGF. Overall, these results suggest that the concentrated multiherb product Zyflamend alone can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic tumors and, in addition, can sensitize pancreatic cancers to gemcitabine through the suppression of multiple targets linked to tumorigenesis. PMID:21935918

  14. miR-92a/DUSP10/JNK signalling axis promotes human pancreatic cancer cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    He, Gengsheng; Zhang, Lei; Li, Qing; Yang, Longqiu

    2014-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common types of cancers in the whole world with a poor prognosis. Finding out how the cancer form and develop is the most important way to cure this cancer. miRNAs, 21-22 nucleotides regulatory small non-coding RNAs, have been found to be critical involved in the growth of pancreatic cancer. In this study, we found that miR-92a was up regulated in three kinds of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. There is a correlation between miR-92a and malignant degree of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Then we found that miR-92a was essential for promoting cell proliferation in human pancreatic cancer. Inhibition of the function of miR-92a repressed the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. Further, we found that miR-92a enhanced the activation of JNK signalling pathway by directly targeting the JNK signalling inhibitor DUSP10. DUSP10 is responsible for miR-92a induced JNK signalling and cell proliferation. Altogether, our study showed a miR-92a/DUSP10/JNK signalling pathway that plays an important role in regulating the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells.

  15. Effects of recombinant human canstatin protein in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiao-Ping; Li, Zhao-Shen; Zhu, Ren-Min; Tu, Zhen-Xing; Gao, Jun; Pan, Xue; Gong, Yan-Fang; Jin, Jing; Man, Xiao-Hua; Wu, Hong-Yu; Xu, Ai-Fang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of canstatin, a newly discovered endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis, in the treatment of pancreatic cancer in vivo. METHODS: The canstatin cDNA fragment was synthesized and amplified from the total RNA extracted from human placenta tissues by RT-PCR. The resulting product was firstly cloned into pUCm-T vector, then into plasmid pET-22b (+) and transformed into E. coli BL21. Isopropyl-1-thio-b-Dgalactopyran-oside (IPTG) was used to induce the expression of canstatin protein and affinity chromatography was used to purify the protein. To determine the activity of purified recombinant human canstatin (rhCanstatin), orthotopic xenograft human pancreatic cancer models were established. Human pancreatic cancer cells (SW1990) were injected into the pancreas of BALB/c nude mice. Twenty-four nude mice with orthotopic xenograft tumor were randomly divided into 3 groups 10 d after the inoculation, and were treated with PBS 0.3 mL, or canstatin 5 mg/kg, or 10 mg/kg per day for 3 wk intraperitoneally. When the experiment was over, all tumors were resected and the effects of rhCanstatin on tumor growth, microvessel density (MVD) were analyzed. RESULTS: After IPTG induction, SDS-PAGE showed a new monomeric 24 kDa protein band. This protein was purified through affinity chromatography and refolded through dialysis with a final concentration of 60 mg/L. In orthotopic pancreatic cancer models, the final tumor volume in groups treated with PBS, canstatin 5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg were 355.21 ± 39.54 mm3, 112.73 ± 10.47 mm3, and 61.75 ± 6.99 mm3 respectively. The immunohistochemical examination showed that the MVD in tumors treated with canstatin was significantly less than that in other group. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate that the rhCanstatin effectively retards the growth of pancreatic cancer in a dose-dependent manner through inhibiting angiogenesis and may be a promising therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer treatment in the clinic. PMID:17075979

  16. Biomechanical wall properties of the human rectum. A study with impedance planimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Dall, F H; Jørgensen, C S; Houe, D; Gregersen, H; Djurhuus, J C

    1993-01-01

    Biomechanical properties of the rectal wall were studied in 17 healthy adult volunteers (nine men and eight women). With impedance planimetry it is possible to obtain simultaneous measurements of pressure and rectal cross sectional area (CSA) during balloon inflations. Rectal distensions were done with an intraluminal balloon using specified pressures up to 40 cmH2O above baseline rectal pressure. Balloon inflation elicited a phase of rapid increase in rectal CSA followed by a phase of slow increase until a steady state was reached. Steady state occurred within 67 to 140 seconds with the shortest period at the highest distension pressures. Steady state rectal CSA values had a non-linear relation to increasing distension pressure. Rectal CSA values in women showed a tendency of being slightly higher than male values at all pressure steps with a significant difference at 3 and 5 cm H2O. Biomechanical parameters were calculated from rectal CSA pressure relations. Circumferential wall tension increased in a linear way. Rectal compliance decreased in a non-linear way with no further decline between 30 and 40 cmH2O. The pressure elastic modulus increased steeply until a distension pressure of 35 cmH2O with no further increase to 40 cmH2O. This suggests that rectal tone is reduced as the muscle fails to resist further distension at 35 cmH2O and higher pressures. Impedance planimetry offers new possibilities for investigation of anorectal physiology through the study of segmental biomechanical wall properties of the human rectum. PMID:8244148

  17. Effect of Wasabi Component 6-(Methylsulfinyl)hexyl Isothiocyanate and Derivatives on Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2014-01-01

    The naturally occurring compound 6-(methylsulfinyl)hexyl isothiocyanate (6-MITC) was isolated from Wasabia japonica (Wasabi), a pungent spice used in Japanese food worldwide. The synthetic derivatives 6-(methylsulfenyl)hexyl isothiocyanate (I7447) and 6-(methylsulfonyl)hexyl isothiocyanate (I7557) are small molecule compounds derived from 6-MITC. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of these compounds on human pancreatic cancer cells. Human pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1 and BxPC-3 were used to perform an MTT assay for cell viability and Liu's stain for morphological observation. The cell cycle was analyzed by DNA histogram. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity was used as a marker for cancer stem cells (CSC). Western blotting was performed for the expression of proteins related to CSC signaling. The results showed that compounds 6-MITC and I7557, but not I7447, inhibited viability of both PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. Morphological observation showed mitotic arrest and apoptosis in 6-MITC- and I7557-treated cells. These two compounds induced G2/M phase arrest and hypoploid population. Percentages of ALDH-positive PANC-1 cells were markedly reduced by 6-MITC and I7557 treatment. The expression of CSC signaling molecule SOX2, but not NOTCH1, ABCG2, Sonic hedgehog, or OCT4, was inhibited by 6-MITC and I7557. In conclusion, wasabi compounds 6-MITC and I7557 may possess activity against the growth and CSC phenotypes of human pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:24575144

  18. Tumor-specific gene therapy for pancreatic cancer using human neural stem cells encoding carboxylesterase

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seon-A; Yoon, Seung-Bin; Kim, Seung U.; Lee, Hong J.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignant human diseases lacking effective treatment. Its extremely low survival rate necessitates development of novel therapeutic approach. Human neural stem cells (NSCs) are known to have tumor-tropic effect. We genetically engineered them to express rabbit carboxyl esterase (F3.CE), which activates prodrug CPT-11(irinotecan) into potent metabolite SN-38. We found significant inhibition of the growth of BxPC3 human pancreatic cancer cell line in vitro by F3.CE in presence of CPT-11. Apoptosis was also markedly increased in BxPC3 cells treated with F3.CE and CPT-11. The ligand VEGF and receptor VEGF-1(Flt1) were identified to be the relevant tumor-tropic chemoattractant. We confirmed in vivo that in mice injected with BxPC3 on their skin, there was significant reduction of tumor size in those treated with both F3.CE and BxPC3 adjacent to the cancer mass. Administration of F3.CE in conjunction with CPT-11 could be a new possibility as an effective treatment regimen for patients suffering from advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:27659534

  19. A scalable system for production of functional pancreatic progenitors from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Thomas C; Young, Holly Y; Agulnick, Alan D; Babin, M Josephine; Baetge, Emmanuel E; Bang, Anne G; Bhoumik, Anindita; Cepa, Igor; Cesario, Rosemary M; Haakmeester, Carl; Kadoya, Kuniko; Kelly, Jonathan R; Kerr, Justin; Martinson, Laura A; McLean, Amanda B; Moorman, Mark A; Payne, Janice K; Richardson, Mike; Ross, Kelly G; Sherrer, Eric S; Song, Xuehong; Wilson, Alistair Z; Brandon, Eugene P; Green, Chad E; Kroon, Evert J; Kelly, Olivia G; D'Amour, Kevin A; Robins, Allan J

    2012-01-01

    Development of a human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-based therapy for type 1 diabetes will require the translation of proof-of-principle concepts into a scalable, controlled, and regulated cell manufacturing process. We have previously demonstrated that hESC can be directed to differentiate into pancreatic progenitors that mature into functional glucose-responsive, insulin-secreting cells in vivo. In this study we describe hESC expansion and banking methods and a suspension-based differentiation system, which together underpin an integrated scalable manufacturing process for producing pancreatic progenitors. This system has been optimized for the CyT49 cell line. Accordingly, qualified large-scale single-cell master and working cGMP cell banks of CyT49 have been generated to provide a virtually unlimited starting resource for manufacturing. Upon thaw from these banks, we expanded CyT49 for two weeks in an adherent culture format that achieves 50-100 fold expansion per week. Undifferentiated CyT49 were then aggregated into clusters in dynamic rotational suspension culture, followed by differentiation en masse for two weeks with a four-stage protocol. Numerous scaled differentiation runs generated reproducible and defined population compositions highly enriched for pancreatic cell lineages, as shown by examining mRNA expression at each stage of differentiation and flow cytometry of the final population. Islet-like tissue containing glucose-responsive, insulin-secreting cells was generated upon implantation into mice. By four- to five-months post-engraftment, mature neo-pancreatic tissue was sufficient to protect against streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemia. In summary, we have developed a tractable manufacturing process for the generation of functional pancreatic progenitors from hESC on a scale amenable to clinical entry.

  20. microRNA and gene networks in human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, MINGHUI; XU, ZHIWEN; WANG, KUNHAO; WANG, NING; LI, YANG

    2013-01-01

    To date, scientists have obtained a substantial amount of knowledge with regard to genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) in pancreatic cancer (PC). However, deciphering the regulatory mechanism of these genes and miRNAs remains difficult. In the present study, three regulatory networks consisting of a differentially-expressed network, a related network and a global network, were constructed in order to identify the mechanisms and certain key miRNA and gene pathways in PC. The interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and miRNAs, miRNAs and target genes and an miRNA and its host gene were investigated. The present study compared and analyzed the similarities and differences between the three networks in order to distinguish the key pathways. Certain pathways involving the differentially-expressed genes and miRNAs demonstrated specific features. TP53 and hsa-miR-125b were observed to form a self-adaptation association. A further 16 significant differentially-expressed miRNAs were obtained and it was observed that an miRNA and its host gene exhibit specific features in PC, for example, hsa-miR-196a-1 and its host gene, HOXB7, form a self-adaptation association. The differentially-expressed network partially illuminated the mechanism of PC. The present study provides comprehensive data that is associated with PC and may aid future studies in obtaining pertinent data results with regards to PC. In the future, an improved understanding of PC may be obtained through an increased knowledge of the occurrence, mechanism, improvement, metastasis and treatment of the disease. PMID:24137477

  1. Selective ex-vivo photothermal ablation of human pancreatic cancer with albumin functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Mocan, Lucian; Tabaran, Flaviu A; Mocan, Teodora; Bele, Constantin; Orza, Anamaria Ioana; Lucan, Ciprian; Stiufiuc, Rares; Manaila, Ioana; Iulia, Ferencz; Dana, Iancu; Zaharie, Florin; Osian, Gelu; Vlad, Liviu; Iancu, Cornel

    2011-01-01

    The process of laser-mediated ablation of cancer cells marked with biofunctionalized carbon nanotubes is frequently called “nanophotothermolysis”. We herein present a method of selective nanophotothermolisys of pancreatic cancer (PC) using multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized with human serum albumin (HSA). With the purpose of testing the therapeutic value of these nanobioconjugates, we have developed an ex-vivo experimental platform. Surgically resected specimens from patients with PC were preserved in a cold medium and kept alive via intra-arterial perfusion. Additionally, the HSA-MWCNTs have been intra-arterially administered in the greater pancreatic artery under ultrasound guidance. Confocal and transmission electron microscopy combined with immunohistochemical staining have confirmed the selective accumulation of HSA-MWCNTs inside the human PC tissue. The external laser irradiation of the specimen has significantly produced extensive necrosis of the malign tissue after the intra-arterial administration of HSA-MWCNTs, without any harmful effects on the surrounding healthy parenchyma. We have obtained a selective photothermal ablation of the malign tissue based on the selective internalization of MWCNTs with HSA cargo inside the pancreatic adenocarcinoma after the ex-vivo intra-arterial perfusion. PMID:21720504

  2. Ras-driven transformation of human nestin-positive pancreatic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Paul M; Lee, Kwang M; Ouellette, Michel M; Kim, Hong Jin; Groehler, Angela L; Khazak, Vladimir; Der, Channing J

    2008-01-01

    Mutational activation of the K-Ras oncogene is well established as a key genetic step in the development and growth of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. However, the means by which aberrant Ras signaling promotes uncontrolled pancreatic tumor cell growth remains to be fully elucidated. The recent use of primary human cells to study Ras-mediated oncogenesis provides important model cell systems to dissect this signaling biology. This chapter describes the establishment and characterization of telomerase-immortalized human pancreatic duct-derived cells to study mechanisms of Ras growth transformation. An important strength of this model system is the ability of mutationally activated K-Ras to cause potent growth transformation in vitro and in vivo. We have utilized this cell system to evaluate the antitumor activity of small molecule inhibitors of the Raf-MEK-ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade. This model will be useful for genetic and pharmacologic dissection of the contribution of downstream effector signaling in Ras-dependent growth transformation.

  3. Angiogenic gene signature in human pancreatic cancer correlates with TGF-beta and inflammatory transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Julie L.; Korc, Murray

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) are hypovascular, but overexpress pro-angiogenic factors and exhibit regions of microvasculature. Using RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we previously reported that ∼12% of PDACs have an angiogenesis gene signature with increased expression of multiple pro-angiogenic genes. By analyzing the recently expanded TCGA dataset, we now report that this signature is present in ∼35% of PDACs but that it is mostly distinct from an angiogenesis signature present in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs). These PDACs exhibit a transcriptome that reflects active TGF-β signaling, and up-regulation of several pro-inflammatory genes, and many members of JAK signaling pathways. Moreover, expression of SMAD4 and HDAC9 correlates with endothelial cell abundance in PDAC tissues. Concomitantly targeting the TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI) kinase with SB505124 and JAK1-2 with ruxolitinib suppresses JAK1 phosphorylation and blocks proliferative cross-talk between human pancreatic cancer cells (PCCs) and human endothelial cells (ECs), and these anti-proliferative effects were mimicked by JAK1 silencing in ECs. By contrast, either inhibitor alone does not suppress their enhanced proliferation in 3D co-cultures. These findings suggest that targeting both TGF-β and JAK1 signaling could be explored therapeutically in the 35% of PDAC patients whose cancers exhibit an angiogenesis gene signature. PMID:26586478

  4. Knowledge Gaps in Rodent Pancreas Biology: Taking Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Beta Cells into Our Own Hands

    PubMed Central

    Santosa, Munirah Mohamad; Low, Blaise Su Jun; Pek, Nicole Min Qian; Teo, Adrian Kee Keong

    2016-01-01

    In the field of stem cell biology and diabetes, we and others seek to derive mature and functional human pancreatic β cells for disease modeling and cell replacement therapy. Traditionally, knowledge gathered from rodents is extended to human pancreas developmental biology research involving human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). While much has been learnt from rodent pancreas biology in the early steps toward Pdx1+ pancreatic progenitors, much less is known about the transition toward Ngn3+ pancreatic endocrine progenitors. Essentially, the later steps of pancreatic β cell development and maturation remain elusive to date. As a result, the most recent advances in the stem cell and diabetes field have relied upon combinatorial testing of numerous growth factors and chemical compounds in an arbitrary trial-and-error fashion to derive mature and functional human pancreatic β cells from hPSCs. Although this hit-or-miss approach appears to have made some headway in maturing human pancreatic β cells in vitro, its underlying biology is vaguely understood. Therefore, in this mini-review, we discuss some of these late-stage signaling pathways that are involved in human pancreatic β cell differentiation and highlight our current understanding of their relevance in rodent pancreas biology. Our efforts here unravel several novel signaling pathways that can be further studied to shed light on unexplored aspects of rodent pancreas biology. New investigations into these signaling pathways are expected to advance our knowledge in human pancreas developmental biology and to aid in the translation of stem cell biology in the context of diabetes treatments. PMID:26834702

  5. Knowledge Gaps in Rodent Pancreas Biology: Taking Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Beta Cells into Our Own Hands.

    PubMed

    Santosa, Munirah Mohamad; Low, Blaise Su Jun; Pek, Nicole Min Qian; Teo, Adrian Kee Keong

    2015-01-01

    In the field of stem cell biology and diabetes, we and others seek to derive mature and functional human pancreatic β cells for disease modeling and cell replacement therapy. Traditionally, knowledge gathered from rodents is extended to human pancreas developmental biology research involving human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). While much has been learnt from rodent pancreas biology in the early steps toward Pdx1(+) pancreatic progenitors, much less is known about the transition toward Ngn3(+) pancreatic endocrine progenitors. Essentially, the later steps of pancreatic β cell development and maturation remain elusive to date. As a result, the most recent advances in the stem cell and diabetes field have relied upon combinatorial testing of numerous growth factors and chemical compounds in an arbitrary trial-and-error fashion to derive mature and functional human pancreatic β cells from hPSCs. Although this hit-or-miss approach appears to have made some headway in maturing human pancreatic β cells in vitro, its underlying biology is vaguely understood. Therefore, in this mini-review, we discuss some of these late-stage signaling pathways that are involved in human pancreatic β cell differentiation and highlight our current understanding of their relevance in rodent pancreas biology. Our efforts here unravel several novel signaling pathways that can be further studied to shed light on unexplored aspects of rodent pancreas biology. New investigations into these signaling pathways are expected to advance our knowledge in human pancreas developmental biology and to aid in the translation of stem cell biology in the context of diabetes treatments.

  6. Distribution of mechanical impedance at the fingers and the palm of the human hand.

    PubMed

    Dong, R G; Wu, J Z; McDowell, T W; Welcome, D E; Schopper, A W

    2005-05-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the complex biodynamic response of the human fingers-hand-arm system may help researchers determine the causation of injuries arising from hand-transmitted vibration. This study theoretically demonstrates that the mechanical impedance (MI) in a hand power grip, as a measure of the biodynamic response of the system, can be divided into finger MI and palm MI. A methodology is developed to measure them separately and to investigate their distribution characteristics. This study involves 6 adult male subjects, constant-velocity sinusoidal excitations at 10 different discrete frequencies (16, 25, 40, 63, 100, 160, 250, 400, 630, 1000 Hz), and three different hand-handle coupling conditions. Our results suggest that at low frequencies (40 Hz), the palm MI is substantially higher than the finger MI; the majority of the hand MI remains distributed at the palm up to 100 Hz; and at frequencies higher than 160 Hz, the finger MI is comparable to or higher than the palm MI. Furthermore, at frequencies equal to or above 100 Hz, the finger MI is practically independent of the palm-handle coupling conditions. Knowledge of the MI distribution pattern may increase the understanding of vibration transmission to the hand and aid in the development of effective isolation devices.

  7. Early Developmental Perturbations in a Human Stem Cell Model of MODY5/HNF1B Pancreatic Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Adrian Kee Keong; Lau, Hwee Hui; Valdez, Ivan Achel; Dirice, Ercument; Tjora, Erling; Raeder, Helge; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Patients with an HNF1BS148L/+ mutation (MODY5) typically exhibit pancreatic hypoplasia. However, the molecular mechanisms are unknown due to inaccessibility of patient material and because mouse models do not fully recapitulate MODY5. Here, we differentiated MODY5 human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into pancreatic progenitors, and show that the HNF1BS148L/+ mutation causes a compensatory increase in several pancreatic transcription factors, and surprisingly, a decrease in PAX6 pancreatic gene expression. The lack of suppression of PDX1, PTF1A, GATA4, and GATA6 indicates that MODY5-mediated pancreatic hypoplasia is mechanistically independent. Overexpression studies demonstrate that a compensatory increase in PDX1 gene expression is due to mutant HNF1BS148L/+ but not wild-type HNF1B or HNF1A. Furthermore, HNF1B does not appear to directly regulate PAX6 gene expression necessary for glucose tolerance. Our results demonstrate compensatory mechanisms in the pancreatic transcription factor network due to mutant HNF1BS148L/+ protein. Thus, patients typically develop MODY5 but not neonatal diabetes despite exhibiting pancreatic hypoplasia. PMID:26876668

  8. Assessment of human body impedance for safety requirements against contact currents for frequencies up to 110 MHz.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Valerio; Beeckman, Pierre A; Lampasi, Domenico Alessandro; Feliziani, Mauro

    2011-02-01

    This paper deals with contact currents that may occur when the human body is in contact with two electrodes at different electrical potentials, e.g., an electrical/electronic device and the floor. Actually, any device must comply not only with electromagnetic compatibility and safety requirements, but also with specific electromagnetic field exposure recommendations in order to prevent health hazards for the occupational and general public population. Since the contact currents depend on the applied voltage and on the human body impedance, this last parameter has been measured for several configurations in a broadband frequency range, from 40 Hz to 110 MHz. From the measurement results, a new equivalent circuit of the human body impedance is derived by using a vector-fitting procedure. This equivalent circuit is very easy and can be adopted for compliance tests against contact currents.

  9. Study of human serum albumin-TiO(2) nanocrystalline electrodes interaction by impedance electrochemical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Oliva, F Y; Avalle, L B; Macagno, V A; De Pauli, C P

    2001-07-02

    The adsorption of human serum albumin (HSA) onto nanocrystalline TiO(2) electrodes was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in function of pH and electrode potential. The characterization and physico-chemical properties of the TiO(2) electrode were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), cyclic voltammetry and capacitance measurements. The impedance response of the particulate TiO(2) electrode/protein interface was fitted using an equivalent circuit model to describe the adsorption process. The adsorbed protein layer, which is formed as soon as the protein is injected into the solution and becomes in contact with the electrode, was investigated as a function of electrode potential and solution pH. The measurements were performed under pseudo-steady-state and steady-state conditions, which gave information about the different states of the system. With the pseudo-steady state measurements, it was possible to determine two rate constants of the protein adsorption process, which correspond to two different states of the protein. The shortest one was associated with the first contact between the protein and the substrate and the second relaxation time, with the protein suffering an structural rearrangement due to the interaction with the TiO(2) electrode. It was detected that at sufficiently long times (approx. 1 h, where the system was under steady state conditions), a quasi-reversible protein adsorption mechanism was established. The measurements performed as a function of frequency under steady-state conditions, an equivalent circuit with a Warburg element gave the better fitting to data taken at -0.585 V closer to the oxide flat band potential and it was associated with protein diffusion. Experimental results obtained at only one frequency as a function of potential could be fitted to a model that takes into account non-specific and probable specific protein adsorption, which renders to be

  10. Oncolytic Activity of Avian Influenza Virus in Human Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Pizzuto, Matteo S.; Silic-Benussi, Micol; Pavone, Silvia; Ciminale, Vincenzo; Capua, Ilaria

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is the most lethal form of human cancer, with dismal survival rates due to late-stage diagnoses and a lack of efficacious therapies. Building on the observation that avian influenza A viruses (IAVs) have a tropism for the pancreas in vivo, the present study was aimed at testing the efficacy of IAVs as oncolytic agents for killing human PDA cell lines. Receptor characterization confirmed that human PDA cell lines express the alpha-2,3- and the alpha-2,6-linked glycan receptor for avian and human IAVs, respectively. PDA cell lines were sensitive to infection by human and avian IAV isolates, which is consistent with this finding. Growth kinetic experiments showed preferential virus replication in PDA cells over that in a nontransformed pancreatic ductal cell line. Finally, at early time points posttreatment, infection with IAVs caused higher levels of apoptosis in PDA cells than gemcitabine and cisplatin, which are the cornerstone of current therapies for PDA. In the BxPC-3 PDA cell line, apoptosis resulted from the engagement of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Importantly, IAVs did not induce apoptosis in nontransformed pancreatic ductal HPDE6 cells. Using a model based on the growth of a PDA cell line as a xenograft in SCID mice, we also show that a slightly pathogenic avian IAV significantly inhibited tumor growth following intratumoral injection. Taken together, these results are the first to suggest that IAVs may hold promise as future agents of oncolytic virotherapy against pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. IMPORTANCE Despite intensive studies aimed at designing new therapeutic approaches, PDA still retains the most dismal prognosis among human cancers. In the present study, we provide the first evidence indicating that avian IAVs of low pathogenicity display a tropism for human PDA cells, resulting in viral RNA replication and a potent induction of apoptosis in vitro and antitumor effects in vivo. These

  11. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into pancreatic endoderm in patterned size-controlled clusters.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Dennis; Mendelsohn, Adam D; Seerke, Rina; Desai, Tejal A; German, Michael S

    2011-05-01

    Pancreatic β-cells function optimally when clustered in islet-like structures. However, nutrient and oxygen deprivation limits the viability of cells at the core of excessively large clusters. Hence, production of functional β-cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) for patients with diabetes would benefit from the growth and differentiation of these cells in size-controlled aggregates. In this study, we controlled cluster size by seeding hESCs onto glass cover slips patterned by the covalent microcontact-printing of laminin in circular patches of 120 μm in diameter. These were used as substrates to grow and differentiate hESCs first into SOX17-positive/SOX7-negative definitive endoderm, after which many clusters released and formed uniformly sized three-dimensional clusters. Both released clusters and those that remained attached differentiated into HNF1β-positive primitive gut tube-like cells with high efficiency. Further differentiation yielded pancreatic endoderm-like cells that co-expressed PDX1 and NKX6.1. Controlling aggregate size allows efficient production of uniformly-clustered pancreatic endocrine precursors for in vivo engraftment or further in vitro maturation.

  12. Antitumor effect of Kanglaite® injection in human pancreatic cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Kanglaite® injection (KLT), with a main ingredient of Coix seed oil (a traditional Chinese medicine), has been widely used for cancer treatment in China. KLT has an inhibitory effect on many kinds of tumors and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling promotes cell survival, proliferation, and progression in cancer cells. Therefore, targeting this pathway may lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches for human cancers. Methods Here, we examined the effects of KLT on the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in pancreatic cancer xenografts in mice, and assessed its therapeutic potential. Growth and apoptosis of tumor xenografts were examined, and the expression levels of genes and proteins involved in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway were measured by RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Results Our results revealed that KLT dramatically inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer xenografts and induced apoptosis simultaneously. Furthermore, it downregulated the expression of phospho-Akt and phospho-mTOR. Conclusions These results suggest that KLT can suppress growth and induce apoptosis of pancreatic cancer xenografts. Moreover, KLT can downregulate the expression of phospho-Akt and phospho-mTOR to modulate the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:25005526

  13. Copper(II)–human amylin complex protects pancreatic cells from amylin toxicity†‡

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Elizabeth C.; Ha, Emmeline; Singh, Sanghamitra; Legesse, Linda; Ahmad, Sana; Karnaukhova, Elena; Donaldson, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Human amylin-derived oligomers and aggregates are believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In addition to amylin-evoked cell attrition, T2DM is often accompanied by elevated serum copper levels. Although previous studies have shown that human amylin, in the course of its aggregation, produces hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in solution, and that this process is exacerbated in the presence of copper(II) ions (Cu2+), very little is known about the mechanism of interaction between Cu2+ and amylin in pancreatic β-cells, including its pathological significance. Hence, in this study we investigated the mechanism by which Cu2+ and human amylin catalyze formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells and in vitro, and examined the modulatory effect of Cu2+ on amylin aggregation and toxicity in pancreatic rat insulinoma (RIN-m5F) β-cells. Our results indicate that Cu2+ interacts with human and rat amylin to form metalo-peptide complexes with low aggregative and oxidative properties. Human and non-amyloidogenic rat amylin produced minute (nM) amounts of H2O2, the accumulation of which was slightly enhanced in the presence of Cu2+. In a marked contrast to human and rat amylin, and in the presence of the reducing agents glutathione and ascorbate, Cu2+ produced μM concentrations of H2O2 surpassing the amylin effect by several fold. The current study shows that human and rat amylin not only produce but also quench H2O2, and that human but not rat amylin significantly decreases the amount of H2O2 in solution produced by Cu2+ and glutathione. Similarly, human amylin was found to also decrease hydroxyl radical formation elicited by Cu2+ and glutathione. Furthermore, Cu2+ mitigated the toxic effect of human amylin by inhibiting activation of pro-apoptotic caspase-3 and stress-kinase signaling pathways in rat pancreatic insulinoma cells in part by stabilizing human amylin in its native conformational state. This sacrificial quenching

  14. Regeneration of insulin-producing pancreatic cells using a volatile bioactive compound and human teeth.

    PubMed

    Okada, Mio; Imai, Toshio; Yaegaki, Ken; Ishkitiev, Nikolay; Tanaka, Tomoko

    2014-10-30

    Transplantation of insulin (INS)-secreting cells differentiated in vitro from stem cells promises a safer and easier treatment of severe diabetes mellitus. A volatile bioactive compound, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), promotes cell differentiation; human tooth-pulp stem cells undergo hepatic differentiation. The aim of this study is to develop a novel protocol using H2S to enhance pancreatic differentiation from the CD117(+) cell fraction of human tooth pulp. During the differentiation, the cells were exposed to 0.1 ng ml(-1) H2S. Immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, determination of INS c-peptide content and flow cytometry of pancreatically related markers were carried out. Expression of WNT and the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway were also determined by PCR array. After differentiation, INS, glucagon (GCG), somatostatin (SST) and pancreatic polypeptide (PPY) were positive when examined by immunofluorescence. INS and GCG were also determined flow-cytometrically. Only the cells expressing INS increased after H2S exposure. The number of cells expressing GCG was significantly decreased. Genes involved in canonical WNT and the WNT/calcium pathways were highly expressed after H2S exposure. H2S accelerated INS synthesis and secretion by regenerated INS-producing cells from human teeth. All signaling pathway functions of the PI3K-AKT pathway were extremely activated by H2S exposure. The matured INS-producing cells originating in human teeth were increased by H2S in order to control blood-glucose level.

  15. Upregulation of extrinsic apoptotic pathway in curcumin-mediated antiproliferative effect on human pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Youns, Mahmoud; Fathy, Gihan Mahmoud

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human cancers, with almost identical incidence and mortality rates. Curcumin, derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa, has a long history of use as coloring agent and for a wide variety of disorders. Here, the antiproliferative activity of curcumin and its modulatory effect on gene expression of pancreatic cancer cell lines were investigated. The effect of curcumin on cellular proliferation and viability was monitored by sulphurhodamine B assay. Apoptotic effect was evaluated by flow cytometry and further confirmed by measuring amount of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragments. Analysis of gene expression was performed with and without curcumin treatment using microarray expression profiling techniques. Array results were confirmed by real-time PCR. ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) has been used to classify the list of differentially expressed genes and to indentify common biomarkergenes modulating the chemopreventive effect of curcumin. Results showed that curcumin induces growth arrest and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cell lines. Its effect was more obvious on the highly COX-2 expressing cell line. Additionally, the expression of 366 and 356 cancer-related genes, involved in regulation of apoptosis, cell cycle, metastasis, was significantly altered after curcumin treatment in BxPC-3 and MiaPaCa-2 cells, respectively. Our results suggested that up-regulation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway was among signaling pathways modulating the growth inhibitory effects of curcumin on pancreatic cancer cells. Curcumin effect was mediated through activation of TNFR, CASP 8, CASP3, BID, BAX, and down-regulation of NFκB, NDRG 1, and BCL2L10 genes.

  16. Characterization of the mechanical behavior of human skin by means of impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavšelj, N.; Mitar, M.; Hart, F. X.; Miklavčič, D.

    2010-04-01

    There is increased interest for the use of impedance spectroscopy to measure skin dielectric properties in vivo. The aim of such measurements can be either to evaluate the hydration state of the skin, to detect diseased states such as skin cancer, to follow the progress of transdermal drug delivery, or simply to gather data on skin tissue impedance to be used in theoretical studies. However, obtaining reliable data can be difficult. Namely, skin is a highly nonhomogeneous multi-layered structure whose composition and dimensions differ depending on the location on the body and interindividual variations. Also, impedance measurements on skin are accompanied by a number of artefacts. We performed a series of impedance measurements using an Agilent/HP 4284A precision LCR meter with parallel plate electrodes pressed on the skin, at different locations on the body. We observed substantial impedance changes over the course of the measurement. These changes can be mainly attributed to skin deformation caused by the electrodes pressing against skin. The analysis showed that skin mechanical properties and layer thicknesses can be inferred from these temporal changes. Such data on mechanical properties of skin tissue give valuable extra information, crucial for successful estimation of the impedance of different skin layers.

  17. Applied Developmental Biology: Making Human Pancreatic Beta Cells for Diabetics.

    PubMed

    Melton, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the genes and signaling pathways that determine the differentiation and fate of a cell is a central goal of developmental biology. Using that information to gain mastery over the fates of cells presents new approaches to cell transplantation and drug discovery for human diseases including diabetes.

  18. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... meals throughout the day that are high in carbohydrates and low in protein and fat. Pancreatic enzymes ... the Pancreas NPF Centers Pancreatitis Centers Pancreatitis Center Application Pancreatic Cancer Centers Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer Pancreas ...

  19. Biotin uptake by mouse and human pancreatic beta cells/islets: a regulated, lipopolysaccharide-sensitive carrier-mediated process.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Sekar, Thillai V; Said, Hamid M

    2014-08-01

    Biotin is essential for the normal function of pancreatic beta cells. These cells obtain biotin from their surroundings via transport across their cell membrane. Little is known about the uptake mechanism involved, how it is regulated, and how it is affected by internal and external factors. We addressed these issues using the mouse-derived pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells and freshly isolated mouse and human primary pancreatic beta cells as models. The results showed biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells occurs via a Na(+)-dependent, carrier-mediated process, that is sensitive to desthiobiotin, as well as to pantothenic acid and lipoate; the process is also saturable as a function of concentration (apparent Km = 22.24 ± 5.5 μM). These cells express the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT), whose knockdown (with doxycycline-inducible shRNA) led to a sever inhibition in biotin uptake. Similarly, uptake of biotin by mouse and human primary pancreatic islets is Na(+)-dependent and carrier-mediated, and both cell types express SMVT. Biotin uptake by pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells is also adaptively regulated (via transcriptional mechanism) by extracellular substrate level. Chronic treatment of pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) leads to inhibition in biotin uptake. This inhibition is mediated via a Toll-Like receptor 4-mediated process and involves a decrease in membrane expression of SMVT. These findings show, for the first time, that pancreatic beta cells/islets take up biotin via a specific and regulated carrier-mediated process, and that the process is sensitive to the effect of LPS.

  20. Pancreatic beta cells and islets take up thiamin by a regulated carrier-mediated process: studies using mice and human pancreatic preparations

    PubMed Central

    Mee, Lisa; Nabokina, Svetlana M.; Sekar, V. Thillai; Subramanian, Veedamali S.; Maedler, Kathrin; Said, Hamid M.

    2009-01-01

    Thiamin is essential for the normal function of the endocrine pancreas, but very little is known about uptake mechanism(s) and regulation by beta cells. We addressed these issues using mouse-derived pancreatic beta-TC-6 cells, and freshly isolated primary mouse and human pancreatic islets. Results showed that thiamin uptake by beta-TC-6 cells involves a pH (but not Na+)-dependent carrier-mediated process that is saturable at both the nanomolar (apparent Km = 37.17 ± 9.9 nM) and micromolar (apparent Km = 3.26 ± 0.86 μM) ranges, cis-inhibited by thiamin structural analogs, and trans-stimulated by unlabeled thiamin. Involvement of carrier-mediated process was also confirmed in primary mouse and human pancreatic islets. Both THTR-1 and THTR-2 were found to be expressed in these mouse and human pancreatic preparations. Maintaining beta-TC-6 cells in the presence of a high level of thiamin led to a significant (P < 0.01) decrease in thiamin uptake, which was associated with a significant downregulation in level of expression of THTR-1 and THTR-2 at the protein and mRNA levels and a decrease in transcriptional (promoter) activity. Modulators of intracellular Ca2+/calmodulin- and protein-tyrosine kinase-mediated pathways also altered thiamin uptake. Finally, confocal imaging of live beta-TC-6 cells showed that clinical mutants of THTR-1 have mixed expression phenotypes and all led to impairment in thiamin uptake. These studies demonstrate for the first time that thiamin uptake by the endocrine pancreas is carrier mediated and is adaptively regulated by the prevailing vitamin level via transcriptional mechanisms. Furthermore, clinical mutants of THTR-1 impair thiamin uptake via different mechanisms. PMID:19423748

  1. Forkhead Protein FoxO1 Acts as a Repressor to Inhibit Cell Differentiation in Human Fetal Pancreatic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zongzhe; Tian, Jingjing; Zhang, Wenjian; Yan, Hao; Liu, Liping; Huang, Zhenhe; Lou, Jinning

    2017-01-01

    Our colleagues have reported previously that human pancreatic progenitor cells can readily differentiate into insulin-containing cells. Particularly, transplantation of these cell clusters upon in vitro induction for 3-4 w partially restores hyperglycemia in diabetic nude mice. In this study, we used human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells to identify the forkhead protein FoxO1 as the key regulator for cell differentiation. Thus, induction of human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells for 1 week led to increase of the pancreatic β cell markers such as Ngn3, but decrease of stem cell markers including Oct4, Nanog, and CK19. Of note, FoxO1 knockdown or FoxO1 inhibitor significantly upregulated Ngn3 and insulin as well as the markers such as Glut2, Kir6.2, SUR1, and VDCC, which are designated for mature β cells. On the contrary, overexpression of FoxO1 suppressed the induction and reduced expression of these β cell markers. Taken together, these results suggest that FoxO1 may act as a repressor to inhibit cell differentiation in human fetal pancreatic progenitor cells. PMID:28349071

  2. [Design of High Frequency Signal Detecting Circuit of Human Body Impedance Used for Ultrashort Wave Diathermy Apparatus].

    PubMed

    Fan, Xu; Wang, Yunguang; Cheng, Haiping; Chong, Xiaochen

    2016-02-01

    The present circuit was designed to apply to human tissue impedance tuning and matching device in ultra-short wave treatment equipment. In order to judge if the optimum status of circuit parameter between energy emitter circuit and accepter circuit is in well syntony, we designed a high frequency envelope detect circuit to coordinate with automatic adjust device of accepter circuit, which would achieve the function of human tissue impedance matching and tuning. Using the sampling coil to receive the signal of amplitude-modulated wave, we compared the voltage signal of envelope detect circuit with electric current of energy emitter circuit. The result of experimental study was that the signal, which was transformed by the envelope detect circuit, was stable and could be recognized by low speed Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) and was proportional to the electric current signal of energy emitter circuit. It could be concluded that the voltage, transformed by envelope detect circuit can mirror the real circuit state of syntony and realize the function of human tissue impedance collecting.

  3. Neurotransmitters act as paracrine signals to regulate insulin secretion from the human pancreatic islet.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Menegaz, Danusa; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2014-08-15

    In this symposium review we discuss the role of neurotransmitters as paracrine signals that regulate pancreatic islet function. A large number of neurotransmitters and their receptors has been identified in the islet, but relatively little is known about their involvement in islet biology. Interestingly, neurotransmitters initially thought to be present in autonomic axons innervating the islet are also present in endocrine cells of the human islet. These neurotransmitters can thus be released as paracrine signals to help control hormone release. Here we propose that the role of neurotransmitters may extend beyond controlling endocrine cell function to work as signals modulating vascular flow and immune responses within the islet.

  4. Establishment of a carcinoembryonic antigen-producing cell line from human pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kaku, M; Nishiyama, T; Yagawa, K; Abe, M

    1980-10-01

    A human pancreatic carcinoma cell line of islet cell origin (QGP-1) has been established and maintained for over two years. The parent tumor and the cultured cell line produce carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and there is no evidence of hormone secretion from the tumor cells. The epithelioid cells, which had migrated from rounded, irregular cell aggregates, grow as a confluent monolayer with piling up of cells in some areas, and have a population doubling time of 3.5 days. The modal chromosome number was 50. Exponentially growing cultures produce 76.3 ng of CEA/10(6) cells after 7 days. CEA production was confirmed by immuno-peroxidase staining.

  5. Plasticity of Adult Human Pancreatic Duct Cells by Neurogenin3-Mediated Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Bonné, Stefan; Heremans, Yves; Borup, Rehannah; Van de Casteele, Mark; Ling, Zhidong; Pipeleers, Daniel; Ravassard, Philippe; Nielsen, Finn; Ferrer, Jorge; Heimberg, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Duct cells isolated from adult human pancreas can be reprogrammed to express islet beta cell genes by adenoviral transduction of the developmental transcription factor neurogenin3 (Ngn3). In this study we aimed to fully characterize the extent of this reprogramming and intended to improve it. Methods The extent of the Ngn3-mediated duct-to-endocrine cell reprogramming was measured employing genome wide mRNA profiling. By modulation of the Delta-Notch signaling or addition of pancreatic endocrine transcription factors Myt1, MafA and Pdx1 we intended to improve the reprogramming. Results Ngn3 stimulates duct cells to express a focused set of genes that are characteristic for islet endocrine cells and/or neural tissues. This neuro-endocrine shift however, is incomplete with less than 10% of full duct-to-endocrine reprogramming achieved. Transduction of exogenous Ngn3 activates endogenous Ngn3 suggesting auto-activation of this gene. Furthermore, pancreatic endocrine reprogramming of human duct cells can be moderately enhanced by inhibition of Delta-Notch signaling as well as by co-expressing the transcription factor Myt1, but not MafA and Pdx1. Conclusions/Interpretation The results provide further insight into the plasticity of adult human duct cells and suggest measurable routes to enhance Ngn3-mediated in vitro reprogramming protocols for regenerative beta cell therapy in diabetes. PMID:22606327

  6. Efficient gene delivery and silencing of mouse and human pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In view of the importance of beta cells in glucose homeostasis and the profound repercussions of beta cell pathology on human health, the acquisition of tools to study pancreatic islet function is essential for the design of alternative novel therapies for diabetes. One promising approach toward this goal involves the modification of gene expression profile of beta cells. Results This study describes a new method of gene and siRNA delivery into human pancreatic islets by microporation technology. We demonstrated that mild islet distention with accutase greatly enhanced the transfection efficiency without compromising in vitro function (secretion, apoptosis and viability). As an example, the recently identified gene involved in type 2 diabetes, ZnT8, can be over-expressed or silenced by RNA interference using this technology. Microporation can also be used on rodent islets. Conclusions Taken together, our results demonstrate that microporation technology can be used to modify gene expression in whole rodent and human islets without altering their in vitro function and will be key to the elucidation of the factors responsible for proper islet function. PMID:20353585

  7. FLIP switches Fas-mediated glucose signaling in human pancreatic cells from apoptosis to cell replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maedler, Kathrin; Fontana, Adriano; Ris, Frédéric; Sergeev, Pavel; Toso, Christian; Oberholzer, José; Lehmann, Roger; Bachmann, Felix; Tasinato, Andrea; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Halban, Philippe A.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2002-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus results from an inadequate adaptation of the functional pancreatic cell mass in the face of insulin resistance. Changes in the concentration of glucose play an essential role in the regulation of cell turnover. In human islets, elevated glucose concentrations impair cell proliferation and induce cell apoptosis via up-regulation of the Fas receptor. Recently, it has been shown that the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP may divert Fas-mediated death signals into those for cell proliferation in lymphatic cells. We observed expression of FLIP in human pancreatic cells of nondiabetic individuals, which was decreased in tissue sections of type 2 diabetic patients. In vitro exposure of islets from nondiabetic organ donors to high glucose levels decreased FLIP expression and increased the percentage of apoptotic terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells; FLIP was no longer detectable in such TUNEL-positive cells. Up-regulation of FLIP, by incubation with transforming growth factor or by transfection with an expression vector coding for FLIP, protected cells from glucose-induced apoptosis, restored cell proliferation, and improved cell function. The beneficial effects of FLIP overexpression were blocked by an antagonistic anti-Fas antibody, indicating their dependence on Fas receptor activation. The present data provide evidence for expression of FLIP in the human cell and suggest a novel approach to prevent and treat diabetes by switching Fas signaling from apoptosis to proliferation.

  8. Cyclin C stimulates β-cell proliferation in rat and human pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Palomares, Margarita; López-Acosta, José Francisco; Villa-Pérez, Pablo; Moreno-Amador, José Luis; Muñoz-Barrera, Jennifer; Fernández-Luis, Sara; Heras-Pozas, Blanca; Perdomo, Germán; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Activation of pancreatic β-cell proliferation has been proposed as an approach to replace reduced functional β-cell mass in diabetes. Quiescent fibroblasts exit from G0 (quiescence) to G1 through pRb phosphorylation mediated by cyclin C/cdk3 complexes. Overexpression of cyclin D1, D2, D3, or cyclin E induces pancreatic β-cell proliferation. We hypothesized that cyclin C overexpression would induce β-cell proliferation through G0 exit, thus being a potential therapeutic target to recover functional β-cell mass. We used isolated rat and human islets transduced with adenovirus expressing cyclin C. We measured multiple markers of proliferation: [3H]thymidine incorporation, BrdU incorporation and staining, and Ki67 staining. Furthermore, we detected β-cell death by TUNEL, β-cell differentiation by RT-PCR, and β-cell function by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Interestingly, we have found that cyclin C increases rat and human β-cell proliferation. This augmented proliferation did not induce β-cell death, dedifferentiation, or dysfunction in rat or human islets. Our results indicate that cyclin C is a potential target for inducing β-cell regeneration. PMID:25564474

  9. Electrical Cell-Substrate Impedance Spectroscopy Can Monitor Age-Grouped Human Adipose Stem Cell Variability During Osteogenic Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, Rachel C; Zhang, Jianlei; Griffith, Emily H; Frank, Matthew W; Starly, Binil; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2017-02-01

    Human adipose stem cells (hASCs) are an attractive cell source for bone tissue engineering applications. However, a critical issue to be addressed before widespread hASC clinical translation is the dramatic variability in proliferative capacity and osteogenic potential among hASCs isolated from different donors. The goal of this study was to test our hypothesis that electrical cell-substrate impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) could track complex bioimpedance patterns of hASCs throughout proliferation and osteogenic differentiation to better understand and predict variability among hASC populations. Superlots composed of hASCs from young (aged 24-36 years), middle-aged (aged 48-55 years), and elderly (aged 60-81 years) donors were seeded on gold electrode arrays. Complex impedance measurements were taken throughout proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. During osteogenic differentiation, four impedance phases were identified: increase, primary stabilization, drop phase, and secondary stabilization. Matrix deposition was first observed 48-96 hours after the impedance maximum, indicating, for the first time, that ECIS can identify morphological changes that correspond to late-stage osteogenic differentiation. The impedance maximum was observed at day 10.0 in young, day 6.1 in middle-aged, and day 1.3 in elderly hASCs, suggesting that hASCs from younger donors require a longer time to differentiate than do hASCs from older donors, but young hASCs proliferated more and accreted more calcium long-term. This is the first study to use ECIS to predict osteogenic potential of multiple hASC populations and to show that donor age may temporally control onset of osteogenesis. These findings could be critical for development of patient-specific bone tissue engineering and regenerative medicine therapies. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:502-511.

  10. IP-10/CXCL10 induction in human pancreatic cancer stroma influences lymphocytes recruitment and correlates with poor survival.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, Serena; Jamieson, Nigel B; Lim, Su Yin; Griffiths, Kristin L; Carvalho-Gaspar, Manuela; Al-Assar, Osama; Yameen, Sabira; Carter, Ross C; McKay, Colin J; Spoletini, Gabriele; D'Ugo, Stefano; Silva, Michael A; Sansom, Owen J; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Muschel, Ruth J; Brunner, Thomas B

    2014-11-30

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is characterized by an abundant desmoplastic reaction driven by pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) that contributes to tumor progression. Here we sought to characterize the interactions between pancreatic cancer cells (PCCs) and PSCs that affect the inflammatory and immune response in pancreatic tumors. Conditioned media from mono- and cocultures of PSCs and PCCs were assayed for expression of cytokines and growth factors. IP-10/CXCL10 was the most highly induced chemokine in coculture of PSCs and PCCs. Its expression was induced in the PSCs by PCCs. IP-10 was elevated in human PDAC specimens, and positively correlated with high stroma content. Furthermore, gene expression of IP-10 and its receptor CXCR3 were significantly associated with the intratumoral presence of regulatory T cells (Tregs). In an independent cohort of 48 patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, high IP-10 expression levels correlated with decreased median overall survival. Finally, IP-10 stimulated the ex vivo recruitment of CXCR3+ effector T cells as well as CXCR3+ Tregs derived from patients with PDAC. Our findings suggest that, in pancreatic cancer, CXCR3+ Tregs can be recruited by IP-10 expressed by PSCs in the tumor stroma, leading to immunosuppressive and tumor-promoting effects.

  11. Study Of Laser Hyperthermia, Photodynamic Therapy And The Combined Therapy For Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajiri, Hisao

    1988-06-01

    I have conducted laser hyperthermia, photodynamic therapy (PDT) and the combined therapy of laser hyperthermia and PDT for solid tumor of human pancreatic carcinoma transplanted to nude mice. Following experimental therapies have begun 5-6 weeks after transplantation. 1) Laser hyperthermia: The Frosted Probe was punctured under controlling temperature near the margin of a tumor at 42-43C with 3W for 10 minutes. This therapy caused 70-80% necrosis of the total area of pancreatic tumors after 7 days of the treatment. 2) PDT: Argon dye laser was irradiated into a tumor with 300-400mW in 72 hours after hematoporphyrine derivative (HpD) in a dose of 3mg/kg was intravenously injected. Histological changes detected 7 days after the therapy were coagulated necrosis and fibrosis in the tissues ranging from 30-50% of the area. 3) The combined therapy of laser hyperthermia and PDT: A new quartz fiber, which was originally designed to deliver both Nd:YAG laser and argon dye laser simultaneously, was used. Conditions of laser hyperthermia and PDT were same as above. Necrosis amounted 100% of the total area in tumors of 3 out of 6 mice histopathologically 7 days after the therapy. As for the remaining 3 mice, almost all tissues changed into necrosis. Effects of thermal and laser energy to the tumor tissues were also studied by in vitro experiments under the same conditions. The most remarkable decrease in viability was recognized in the combined therapy of laser hyperthermia and PDT among three types of therapies in vitro. The combined therapy of laser hyperthermia and PDT has proven to be highly effective by in vivo and in vitro study using human pancreatic cancer cell line. It will thus be possible to adopt the therapy, with the use of the new quartz fiber, as one of the useful endoscopic laser therapies.

  12. Characterization of vectorial chloride transport pathways in the human pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma cell line HPAF.

    PubMed

    Fong, Peying; Argent, Barry E; Guggino, William B; Gray, Michael A

    2003-08-01

    Pancreatic duct cells express a Ca2+-activated Cl- conductance (CaCC), upregulation of which may be beneficial to patients with cystic fibrosis. Here, we report that HPAF, a human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell line that expresses CaCC, develops into a high-resistance, anion-secreting epithelium. Mucosal ATP (50 microM) caused a fourfold increase in short-circuit current (Isc), a hyperpolarization of transepithelial potential difference (from -4.9 +/- 0.73 to -8.5 +/- 0.84 mV), and a fall in resistance to less than one-half of resting values. The effects of ATP were inhibited by mucosal niflumic acid (100 microM), implicating an apical CaCC in the response. RT-PCR indicated expression of hClC-2, hClC-3, and hClC-5, but surprisingly not hCLCA-1 or hCLCA-2. K+ channel activity was necessary to maintain the ATP-stimulated Isc. Using a pharmacological approach, we found evidence for two types of K+ channels in the mucosal and serosal membranes of HPAF cells, one activated by chlorzoxazone (500 microM) and sensitive to clotrimazole (30 microM), as well as one blocked by clofilium (100 microM) but not chromanol 293B (5 microM). RT-PCR indicated expression of the Ca2+-activated K+ channel KCNN4, as well as the acid-sensitive, four transmembrane domain, two pore K+ channel, KCNK5 (hTASK-2). Western blot analysis verified the expression of CLC channels, as well as KCNK5. We conclude that HPAF will be a useful model system for studying channels pertinent to anion secretion in human pancreatic duct cells.

  13. [Chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, T; Katada, N; Nishimura, D; Hoshino, H; Shimizu, F; Suzuki, R; Sano, H; Kato, K

    1998-11-01

    MRCP has been recognized as a safe and noninvasive diagnostic method. In the present study we evaluated the usefulness of MRCP in diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis. Two-dimensional fast asymmetric spin-echo (FASE) MRCP was performed in 40 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 13 with acute pancreatitis. In 29 patients (72.5%) with chronic pancreatitis and 9 (66.7%) with acute pancreatitis, main pancreatic duct (MPD) was visualized entirely. MRCP could demonstrate the characteristic findings of chronic pancreatitis such as dilatation and irregularity of MPD in most cases. In acute pancreatitis, MRCP indicated that MPD was normal in diameter, but irregular in configuration compared with that of the control group. MRCP may facilitate the diagnosis of chronic and acute pancreatitis.

  14. A study on transmission characteristics and specific absorption rate using impedance-matched electrodes for various human body communication.

    PubMed

    Machida, Yuta; Yamamoto, Takahiko; Koshiji, Kohji

    2013-01-01

    Human body communication (HBC) is a new communication technology that has presented potential applications in health care and elderly support systems in recent years. In this study, which is focused on a wearable transmitter and receiver for HBC in a body area network (BAN), we performed electromagnetic field analysis and simulation using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method with various models of the human body. Further we redesigned a number of impedance-matched electrodes to allow transmission without stubs or transformers. The specific absorption rate (SAR) and transmission characteristics S21 of these electrode structures were compared for several models.

  15. Human pancreatic islets develop through fusion of distinct β and α/δ islets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Inchul

    2016-10-01

    Human pancreatic islets show unique architecture in which α and δ cells are mostly at the peripheral and perivascular areas. It has remained unknown how such prototype is realized in every islet. Here, I report that fetal islets develop first in two distinct types consisting of β or α/δ cells, respectively. The α/δ islets are variable in shape, composed of α and δ cells evenly intermixed. They are vascularized better but encapsulated poorer than β islets in general. During the development, the β and α/δ islets adjoin and fuse with each other in such a way that α and δ cells form a crescent on β cells and, then, progress to encompass and encroach into β cells. Most mature-form islets appear to develop through the fusion. Islets at various stages of fusion are present concurrently until late gestation, suggesting that the islet fusion is an ongoing developmental process. The α/δ islets appear to play a primary role for the process, approaching toward the fusion partner actively. Direct connection is present between the α/δ islets and neural ganglia undergoing active neurogenesis, suggesting an organ-wide neuroendocrine network development. The fusion of precursor islets appears to be a principle of human pancreatic development providing the prototype of mature islets. The complex development might be a reference for in vitro reproduction of biologically competent islets.

  16. Immobilization of primary cultures of insulin-releasing human pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Marluce da Cunha; da Conceição, Mateus Meneghesso; Ferreira, Ari José Scattone; Labriola, Letícia; dos Santos, Patrícia Barros; Tonso, Aldo; Pereira, Carlos Augusto; El-Dorry, Hamza; Sogayar, Mari Cleide

    2009-01-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic islets isolated from organ donors constitutes a promising alternative treatment for type1 Diabetes, however, it is severely limited by the shortage of organ donors. Ex-vivo islet cell cultures appear as an attractive but still elusive approach for curing type 1 Diabetes. It has recently been shown that, even in the absence of fibrotic overgrowth, several factors, such as insufficient nutrition of the islet core, represent a major barrier for long-term survival of islets grafts. The use of immobilized dispersed cells may contribute to solve this problem due to conceivably easier nutritional and oxygen support to the cells.  Therefore, we set out to establish an immobilization method for primary cultures of human pancreatic cells by adsorption onto microcarriers (MCs). Dispersed human islets cells were seeded onto Cytodex1 microcarriers and cultured in bioreactors for up to eight days. The cell number increased and islet cells maintained their insulin secretion levels throughout the time period studied. Moreover, the cells also presented a tendency to cluster upon five days culturing.  Therefore, this procedure represents a useful tool for controlled studies on islet cells physiology and, also, for biotechnological applications.

  17. Inhibition of human pancreatic cancer growth in nude mice by boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Yanagië, H; Tomita, T; Kobayashi, H; Fujii, Y; Nonaka, Y; Saegusa, Y; Hasumi, K; Eriguchi, M; Kobayashi, T; Ono, K

    1997-01-01

    Immunoliposomes were prepared by conjugating anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody with liposomes containing [10B]compound. These immunoliposomes were shown to bind selectively to human pancreatic carcinoma cells (AsPC-1) bearing CEA on their surface. The cytotoxic effects of locally injected [10B]compound, multilamellar liposomes containing [10B]compound or [10B]immunoliposomes (anti-CEA) on human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice were evaluated with thermal neutron irradiation. After thermal neutron irradiation of mice injected with [10B]solution, 10B-containing liposomes or [10B]immunoliposomes, AsPC-1 tumour growth was suppressed relative to controls. Injection of [10B]immunoliposomes caused the greatest tumour suppression with thermal neutron irradiation in vivo. Histopathologically, hyalinization and necrosis were found in 10B-treated tumours, while tumour tissue injected with saline or saline-containing immunoliposomes showed neither destruction nor necrosis. These results suggest that intratumoral injection of boronated immunoliposomes can increase the retention of 10B atoms by tumour cells, causing tumour growth suppression in vivo upon thermal neutron irradiation. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) with intratumoral injection of immunoliposomes is able to destroy malignant cells in the marginal portion between normal tissues and cancer tissues from the side of 4He generation.

  18. Differential gene expression of the key signalling pathway in para-carcinoma, carcinoma and relapse human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zheng-Yan; Sun, Ran; Ma, Yu-Shui; Fu, Da; Lai, Xiao-Long; Li, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Xing-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Lv, Zhong-Wei; Cong, Xian-Ling; Li, Wen-Ping

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) has a high rate of mortality and a poorly understood mechanism of progression. Investigation of the molecular mechanism of PC and exploration of the specific markers for early diagnosis and specific targets of therapy are key points to prevent and treat PC effectively and to improve their prognosis. In our study, expression profiles experiment of para-carcinoma, carcinoma and relapse human PC was performed using Agilent human whole genomic oligonucleotide microarrays with 45 000 probes. Differentially expressed genes related with PC were screened and analysed further by Gene Ontology term analysis and Kyoto encyclopaedia of genes and genomes pathway analysis. Our results showed that there were 3853 differentially expressed genes associated with pancreatic carcinogenesis and relapse. In addition, our study found that PC was related to the Jak-STAT signalling pathway, PPAR signalling pathway and Calcium signalling pathway, indicating their potential roles in pancreatic carcinogenesis and progress.

  19. Numb/Notch signaling pathway modulation enhances human pancreatic cancer cell radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yi-Liang; Min, Min; Shen, Wei; Liu, Yan

    2016-11-01

    The present study aims to evaluate whether repression of the Numb/Notch signaling pathway affects the radiosensitivity of human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Different doses of X-rays (0, 2, 3, 4, and 5 Gy) were applied to the PANC-1, SW1990, and MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cell lines, and the Numb/Notch pathway inhibitor DAPT was added at different doses (0, 1, 3, and 5 μmol/l). MTT assay, colony formation assay, flow cytometry, scratch assay, and Transwell experiments were performed, and qRT-PCR and Western blot were conducted for the detection of Numb expression. Tumorigenicity assay in nude mice was carried out to verify the influence of blocker of the Numb/Notch signaling pathway on the radiosensitivity of xenograft tumors. The MTT assay, colony formation assay and flow cytometry experiments revealed that proliferation decreased as radiation dose increased. The viability of PANC-1 cells at 5 Gy, SW 1990 cells at 4 Gy and 5 Gy, and MIA PaCa-2 cells at 2-5 Gy was significantly lower than that of non-irradiated cells (all P < 0.05). The migration and invasion assays indicated that the PANC-1 cell line was least radiosensitive, while the MIA PaCa-2 cell line was the most radiosensitive. Numb expression significantly increased with increasing radiation dose, whereas the expression of Hes1, Notch1, and Hes5 significantly decreased compared to non-irradiated cells (P < 0.05). Compared to untreated control cells, DAPT dose dependently increased Numb expression and inhibited Notch1, Hes1, and Hes5 expressions at 2 Gy (P < 0.05). Subcutaneous tumorigenicity assay in nude mice demonstrated that DAPT increased the radiosensitivity of PANC-1, SW 1990, and MIA PaCa-2 cells. These findings suggest that Numb/Notch signaling in pancreatic cancer cells is associated with X-ray radiation and that inhibition of the Numb/Notch signaling pathway can enhance radiosensitivity, suggesting that inhibition of the Numb/Notch signaling pathway may serve as a potential

  20. Optical Imaging of Drug-Induced Metabolism Changes in Murine and Human Pancreatic Cancer Organoids Reveals Heterogeneous Drug Response

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Alex J.; Castellanos, Jason A.; Nagathihalli, Nagaraj S.; Merchant, Nipun B.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Three-dimensional organoids derived from primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas are an attractive platform for testing potential anticancer drugs on patient-specific tissue. Optical metabolic imaging (OMI) is a novel tool used to assess drug-induced changes in cellular metabolism, and its quantitative end point, the OMI index, is evaluated as a biomarker of drug response in pancreatic cancer organoids. Methods Optical metabolic imaging is used to assess both malignant cell and fibroblast drug response within primary murine and human pancreatic cancer organoids. Results Anticancer drugs induce significant reductions in the OMI index of murine and human pancreatic cancer organoids. Subpopulation analysis of OMI data revealed heterogeneous drug response and elucidated responding and nonresponding cell populations for a 7-day time course. Optical metabolic imaging index significantly correlates with immunofluorescence detection of cell proliferation and cell death. Conclusions Optical metabolic imaging of primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma organoids is highly sensitive to drug-induced metabolic changes, provides a nondestructive method for monitoring dynamic drug response, and presents a novel platform for patient-specific drug testing and drug development. PMID:26495796

  1. The ryanodine receptor is expressed in human pancreatic acinar cells and contributes to acinar cell injury.

    PubMed

    Lewarchik, Christopher M; Orabi, Abrahim I; Jin, Shunqian; Wang, Dong; Muili, Kamaldeen A; Shah, Ahsan U; Eisses, John F; Malik, Adeel; Bottino, Rita; Jayaraman, Thottala; Husain, Sohail Z

    2014-09-01

    Physiological calcium (Ca(2+)) signals within the pancreatic acinar cell regulate enzyme secretion, whereas aberrant Ca(2+) signals are associated with acinar cell injury. We have previously identified the ryanodine receptor (RyR), a Ca(2+) release channel on the endoplasmic reticulum, as a modulator of these pathological signals. In the present study, we establish that the RyR is expressed in human acinar cells and mediates acinar cell injury. We obtained pancreatic tissue from cadaveric donors and identified isoforms of RyR1 and RyR2 by qPCR. Immunofluorescence staining of the pancreas showed that the RyR is localized to the basal region of the acinar cell. Furthermore, the presence of RyR was confirmed from isolated human acinar cells by tritiated ryanodine binding. To determine whether the RyR is functionally active, mouse or human acinar cells were loaded with the high-affinity Ca(2+) dye (Fluo-4 AM) and stimulated with taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate (TLCS) (500 μM) or carbachol (1 mM). Ryanodine (100 μM) pretreatment reduced the magnitude of the Ca(2+) signal and the area under the curve. To determine the effect of RyR blockade on injury, human acinar cells were stimulated with pathological stimuli, the bile acid TLCS (500 μM) or the muscarinic agonist carbachol (1 mM) in the presence or absence of the RyR inhibitor ryanodine. Ryanodine (100 μM) caused an 81% and 47% reduction in acinar cell injury, respectively, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase leakage (P < 0.05). Taken together, these data establish that the RyR is expressed in human acinar cells and that it modulates acinar Ca(2+) signals and cell injury.

  2. Transgenic expression of the human growth hormone minigene promotes pancreatic β-cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Baan, Mieke; Kibbe, Carly R; Bushkofsky, Justin R; Harris, Ted W; Sherman, Dawn S; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic mouse models are designed to study the role of specific proteins. To increase transgene expression the human growth hormone (hGH) minigene, including introns, has been included in many transgenic constructs. Until recently, it was thought that the hGH gene was not spliced, transcribed, and translated to produce functional hGH protein. We generated a transgenic mouse with the transcription factor Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) followed by the hGH minigene, under control of the mouse insulin promoter (MIP) to target expression specifically in the pancreatic β-cell. Expression of FoxM1 in isolated pancreatic islets in vitro stimulates β-cell proliferation. We aimed to investigate the effect of FoxM1 on β-cell mass in a mouse model for diabetes mellitus. However, we found inadvertent coexpression of hGH protein from a spliced, bicistronic mRNA. MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice had lower blood glucose and higher pancreatic insulin content, due to increased β-cell proliferation. hGH signals through the murine prolactin receptor, and expression of its downstream targets tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (Tph1), tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2), and cytokine-inducible SH2 containing protein (Cish) was increased. Conversely, transcriptional targets of FoxM1 were not upregulated. Our data suggest that the phenotype of MIP-FoxM1-hGH mice is due primarily to hGH activity and that the FoxM1 protein remains largely inactive. Over the past decades, multiple transgenic mouse strains were generated that make use of the hGH minigene to increase transgene expression. Our work suggests that each will need to be carefully screened for inadvertent hGH production and critically evaluated for the use of proper controls.

  3. Nickel nanowires induced and reactive oxygen species mediated apoptosis in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Zakir; Kleve, Maurice G

    2011-01-01

    Background The ability to evade apoptosis is one of the key properties of cancer. The apoptogenic effect of nickel nanowires (Ni NWs) on cancer cell lines has never been adequately addressed. Due to the unique physicochemical characteristics of Ni NWs, we envision the development of a novel anticancer therapeutics specifically for pancreatic cancer. Thus, we investigated whether Ni NWs induce ROS-mediated apoptosis in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma (Panc-1) cells. Methods In this study Ni NWs were fabricated using the electrodeposition method. Synthesized Ni NWs were physically characterized by energy dispersive X-ray analysis, UV-Vis spectroscopy of NanoDrop 2000 (UV-Vis), magnetization study, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Assessment of morphological apoptotic characteristics by phase contrast microscopy (PCM), Ni-NWs-induced apoptosis staining with ethidium bromide (EB) and acridine orange (AO) followed by fluorescence microscopy (FM) was performed. For molecular biological and biochemical characterization, Panc-1 cell culture and cytotoxic effect of Ni NWs were determined by using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Quantitative apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry staining with propidium iodide through cell cycle arrest and generation of ROS using 2′, 7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate fluorescence intensity. In all experiments, Panc-1 cancer cells without any treatment were used as the negative controls. Results The intracellular uptake of Ni NWs through endocytosis by Panc-1 cells was observed by PCM. EB and AO staining of FM and MTT assay qualitatively and quantitatively confirmed the extent of apoptosis. Flow cytometric cell cycle arrest and ROS generation indicated Ni NWs as inducers of apoptotic cell death. Conclusion We investigated the role of Ni NWs as inducers of ROS-mediated apoptosis in Panc-1 cells. These results suggested that Ni NWs could be an effective

  4. Pancreatic Ductal Perfusion at Organ Procurement Enhances Islet Yield in Human Islet Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Masayuki; Kanak, Mazhar A.; Shahbazov, Rauf; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Lawrence, Michael C.; Naziruddin, Bashoo; Levy, Marlon F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pancreas preservation is a major factor influencing the results of islet cell transplantation. This study evaluated the effects of two different solutions for pancreatic ductal perfusion (PDP) at organ procurement. Methods Eighteen human pancreases were assigned to three groups: non-PDP (control), PDP with ET-Kyoto solution, and PDP with cold storage/purification stock solution. Pancreatic islets were isolated according to the modified Ricordi method. Results No significant differences in donor characteristics, including cold ischemia time, were observed between the three groups. All islet isolations in the PDP groups had >400,000 IEQ in total islet yield post-purification, a significant increase when compared with the control (P = 0.04 and <0.01). The islet quality assessments—including an in vivo diabetic nude mice assay and the response of high-mobility group box protein 1 to cytokine stimulation—also showed no significant differences. The proportion of TUNEL-positive cells showing apoptosis in islets in the PDP groups was significantly lower than in the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion Both ET-Kyoto solution and cold storage/purification stock solution are suitable for PDP and consistently resulted in isolation success. Further studies with a larger number of pancreas donors should be done to compare the effects of the PDP solutions. PMID:25058879

  5. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... fluids through an intravenous (IV) tube in your vein and nutrition through a feeding tube or IV. ...

  6. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... hospital for: Pain medicines Fluids given through a vein (IV) Stopping food or fluid by mouth to ...

  7. Activation of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor inhibits growth and promotes apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells in a cAMP-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hejun; Wei, Rui; Wang, Liang; Tian, Qing; Tao, Ming; Ke, Jing; Liu, Ye; Hou, Wenfang; Zhang, Lin; Yang, Jin; Hong, Tianpei

    2014-06-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) promotes pancreatic β-cell regeneration through GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) activation. However, whether it promotes exocrine pancreas growth and thereby increases the risk of pancreatic cancer has been a topic of debate in recent years. Clinical data and animal studies published so far have been controversial. In the present study, we report that GLP-1R activation with liraglutide inhibited growth and promoted apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cell lines in vitro and attenuated pancreatic tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model in vivo. These effects of liraglutide were mediated through activation of cAMP production and consequent inhibition of Akt and ERK1/2 signaling pathways in a GLP-1R-dependent manner. Moreover, we examined GLP-1R expression in human pancreatic cancer tissues and found that 43.3% of tumor tissues were GLP-1R-null. In the GLP-1R-positive tumor tissues (56.7%), the level of GLP-1R was lower compared with that in tumor-adjacent normal pancreatic tissues. Furthermore, the GLP-1R-positive tumors were significantly smaller than the GLP-1R-null tumors. Our study shows for the first time that GLP-1R activation has a cytoreductive effect on human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, which may help address safety concerns of GLP-1-based therapies in the context of human pancreatic cancer.

  8. Induction of human pancreatic beta cell replication by inhibitors of dual specificity tyrosine regulated kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Alvarez-Perez, Juan-Carlos; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Liu, Hongtao; Sivendran, Sharmila; Bender, Aaron; Kumar, Anil; Sanchez, Roberto; Scott, Donald K.; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Stewart, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Types 1 and 2 diabetes affect some 380 million people worldwide. Both result ultimately from a deficiency of functional pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. Beta cells proliferate in humans during a brief temporal window beginning around the time of birth, with peak beta cell labeling indices achieving approximately 2% in first year of life1-4. In embryonic life and after early childhood, beta cell replication rates are very low. While beta cell expansion seems an obvious therapeutic approach to beta cell deficiency, adult human beta cells have proven recalcitrant to such efforts1-8. Hence, there remains an urgent need for diabetes therapeutic agents that can induce regeneration and expansion of adult human beta cells in vivo or ex vivo. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput small molecule screen (HTS) revealing a novel class of human beta cell mitogenic compounds, analogues of the small molecule, harmine. We also define dual specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase-1a (DYRK1A) as the likely target of harmine, and the Nuclear Factors of activated T-cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors as likely mediators of human beta cell proliferation as well as beta cell differentiation. These observations suggest that harmine analogues (“harmalogs”) may have unique therapeutic promise for human diabetes therapy. Enhancing potency and beta cell specificity are important future challenges. PMID:25751815

  9. The novel mTORC1/2 dual inhibitor INK-128 suppresses survival and proliferation of primary and transformed human pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lou, Hai-zhou; Weng, Xiao-chuan; Pan, Hong-ming; Pan, Qin; Sun, Peng; Liu, Li-li; Chen, Bin

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • INK-128 inhibits the survival and growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. • INK-128 blocks mTORC1/2 activation simultaneously in pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 down-regulates cyclin D1 and causes pancreatic cancer cell cycle arrest. • INK-128 significantly increases sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. - Abstract: Pancreatic cancer has one of worst prognosis among all human malignancies around the world, the development of novel and more efficient anti-cancer agents against this disease is urgent. In the current study, we tested the potential effect of INK-128, a novel mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2) dual inhibitor, against pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Our results demonstrated that INK-128 concentration- and time-dependently inhibited the survival and growth of pancreatic cancer cells (both primary cells and transformed cells). INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. Further, INK-128 dramatically inhibited phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and Akt at Ser 473 in pancreatic cancer cells. Meanwhile, it downregulated cyclin D1 expression and caused cell cycle arrest. Finally, we found that a low concentration of INK-128 significantly increased the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Together, our in vitro results suggest that INK-128 might be further investigated as a novel anti-cancer agent or chemo-adjuvant for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  10. Conditionally immortalized human pancreatic stellate cell lines demonstrate enhanced proliferation and migration in response to IGF-I

    SciTech Connect

    Rosendahl, Ann H.; Gundewar, Chinmay; Said Hilmersson, Katarzyna; Ni, Lan; Saleem, Moin A.; Andersson, Roland

    2015-01-15

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a key role in the dense desmoplastic stroma associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Studies on human PSCs have been minimal due to difficulty in maintaining primary PSC in culture. We have generated the first conditionally immortalized human non-tumor (NPSC) and tumor-derived (TPSC) pancreatic stellate cells via transformation with the temperature-sensitive SV40 large T antigen and human telomerase (hTERT). These cells proliferate at 33°C. After transfer to 37°C, the SV40LT is switched off and the cells regain their primary PSC phenotype and growth characteristics. NPSC contained cytoplasmic vitamin A-storing lipid droplets, while both NPSC and TPSC expressed the characteristic markers αSMA, vimentin, desmin and GFAP. Proteome array analysis revealed that of the 55 evaluated proteins, 27 (49%) were upregulated ≥3-fold in TPSC compared to NPSC, including uPA, pentraxin-3, endoglin and endothelin-1. Two insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) were inversely expressed. Although discordant IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 levels, IGF-I was found to stimulate proliferation of both NPSC and TPSC. Both basal and IGF-I stimulated motility was significantly enhanced in TPSC compared to NPSC. In conclusion, these cells provide a unique resource that will facilitate further study of the active stroma compartment associated with pancreatic cancer. - Highlights: • Generation of human conditionally immortalized human pancreatic stellate cell lines. • Temperature-sensitive SV40LT allows switch to primary PSC phenotype characteristics. • Proteome profiling revealed distinct expression patterns between TPSC and NPSC. • Enhanced IGF-I-stimulated proliferation and motility by TPSC compared to NPSC.

  11. Electron Impedances

    SciTech Connect

    P Cameron

    2011-12-31

    It is only recently, and particularly with the quantum Hall effect and the development of nanoelectronics, that impedances on the scale of molecules, atoms and single electrons have gained attention. In what follows the possibility that characteristic impedances might be defined for the photon and the single free electron is explored is some detail, the premise being that the concepts of electrical and mechanical impedances are relevant to the elementary particle. The scale invariant quantum Hall impedance is pivotal in this exploration, as is the two body problem and Mach's principle.

  12. Molecular and immunochemical analyses of RB1 and cyclin D1 in human ductal pancreatic carcinomas and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Lang, D; Geradts, J; Obara, T; Klein-Szanto, A J; Lynch, H T; Ruggeri, B A

    1996-02-01

    Somatic mutations in the retinoblastoma-1 gene (RB1) and loss of RB1 protein function have been implicated in a number of human malignancies, but the role of RB1 gene and protein abnormalities in ductal pancreatic cancer (DPCA) is virtually unknown. We therefore analyzed expression of the RB1 protein immunohistochemically and/or by western blotting in a total of 54 sporadic and eight familial cases of archival and frozen DPCA and in 18 pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by using the antibodies RB-WL-1, 84-B3-1, and PMG3-245. Mutations in the RB1 promotor region and exons 13-21 of the RB1 gene were likewise examined by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analyses and DNA sequencing of genomic DNA from 30 microdissected primary pancreatic tumors and the pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. Moreover, amplification and expression of a major regulatory component of RB1 function, cyclin D1, were assessed by southern and immunohistochemical analyses, respectively. The DPCAs were heterogeneous in both the intensity of RB1 nuclear staining and the percentage of immunoreactive cells. The tumors often had areas where RB1 staining was weak or absent adjacent to normal pancreatic tissue; however, only two of 32 archival cases and one of 30 frozen cases of DPCA completely lacked RB1 nuclear staining. Immunohistochemical and western blot analyses of 18 pancreatic carcinoma cell lines demonstrated the absence of RB1 expression in only two cell lines, Capan-1 and QGP-1. Analyses of the RB1 gene and promotor region by SSCP and DNA sequencing largely confirmed the immunochemical findings. Three of 30 primary carcinomas had abnormalities revealed by SSCP analyses. In one case a single base-pair deletion was confirmed in exon 18 and resulted in premature termination and the absence of detectable RB1 protein. A second case had TAC-->TTC missense mutation in exon 13. The third primary carcinoma could not be reliably sequenced because it had a low percentage of epithelial cells. The

  13. Adult Human Biliary Tree Stem Cells Differentiate to β-Pancreatic Islet Cells by Treatment with a Recombinant Human Pdx1 Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Scafetta, Gaia; Renzi, Anastasia; De Canio, Michele; Sicilia, Francesca; Nevi, Lorenzo; Casa, Domenico; Panetta, Rocco; Berloco, Pasquale Bartolomeo; Reid, Lola M.; Federici, Giorgio; Gaudio, Eugenio; Maroder, Marella; Alvaro, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Generation of β-pancreatic cells represents a major goal in research. The aim of this study was to explore a protein-based strategy to induce differentiation of human biliary tree stem cells (hBTSCs) towards β-pancreatic cells. A plasmid containing the sequence of the human pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1) has been expressed in E. coli. Epithelial-Cell-Adhesion-Molecule positive hBTSCs or mature human hepatocyte cell line, HepG2, were grown in medium to which Pdx1 peptide was added. Differentiation toward pancreatic islet cells were evaluated by the expression of the β-cell transcription factors, Pdx1 and musculoapo-neurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A, and of the pancreatic hormones, insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, investigated by real time polymerase chain reaction, western blot, light microscopy and immunofluorescence. C-peptide secretion in response to high glucose was also measured. Results indicated how purified Pdx1 protein corresponding to the primary structure of the human Pdx1 by mass spectroscopy was efficiently produced in bacteria, and transduced into hBTSCs. Pdx1 exposure triggered the expression of both intermediate and mature stage β-cell differentiation markers only in hBTSCs but not in HepG2 cell line. Furthermore, hBTSCs exposed to Pdx1 showed up-regulation of insulin, glucagon and somatostatin genes and formation of 3-dimensional islet-like structures intensely positive for insulin and glucagon. Finally, Pdx1-induced islet-like structures exhibited glucose-regulated C-peptide secretion. In conclusion, the human Pdx1 is highly effective in triggering hBTSC differentiation toward functional β-pancreatic cells. PMID:26252949

  14. Human pancreatic stellate cells modulate 3D collagen alignment to promote the migration of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Drifka, Cole R; Loeffler, Agnes G; Esquibel, Corinne R; Weber, Sharon M; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Kao, W John

    2016-12-01

    A hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the ability for cancer cells to aggressively infiltrate and navigate through a dense stroma during the metastatic process. Key features of the PDAC stroma include an abundant population of activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and highly aligned collagen fibers; however, important questions remain regarding how collagen becomes aligned and what the biological manifestations are. To better understand how PSCs, aligned collagen, and PDAC cells might cooperate during the transition to invasion, we utilized a microchannel-based in vitro tumor model and advanced imaging technologies to recreate and examine in vivo-like heterotypic interactions. We found that PSCs participate in a collaborative process with cancer cells by orchestrating the alignment of collagen fibers that, in turn, are permissive to enhanced cell migration. Additionally, direct contact between PSCs, collagen, and PDAC cells is critical to invasion and co-migration of both cell types. This suggests PSCs may accompany and assist in navigating PDAC cells through the stromal terrain. Together, our data provides a new role for PSCs in stimulating the metastatic process and underscores the importance of collagen alignment in cancer progression.

  15. Electric impedance sensing in cell-substrates for rapid and selective multipotential differentiation capacity monitoring of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Reitinger, Stephan; Wissenwasser, Jürgen; Kapferer, Werner; Heer, Rudolf; Lepperdinger, Günter

    2012-04-15

    Biosensor systems which enable impedance measurements on adherent cell layers under label-free conditions are considered powerful tools for monitoring specific biological characteristics. A radio frequency identification-based sensor platform was adopted to characterize cultivation and differentiation of human bone marrow-derived multipotent stem cells (bmMSC) over periods of up to several days and weeks. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing was achieved through fabrication of sensitive elements onto glass substrates which comprised two comb-shaped interdigitated gold electrodes covering an area of 1.8 mm×2 mm. The sensing systems were placed into the wells of a 6-well tissue culture plate, stacked onto a reader unit and could thus be handled and operated under sterile conditions. Continuous measurements were carried out with a sinusoidal voltage of 35 mV at a frequency of 10 kHz. After seeding of human bmMSC, this sensor was able to trace significant impedance changes contingent upon cell spreading and adhesion. The re-usable system was further proven suitable for live examination of cell-substrate attachment or continuous cell monitoring up to several weeks. Induction of either osteogenic or adipogenic differentiation could be validated in bmMSC cultures within a few days, in contrast to state-of-the-art protocols, which require several weeks of cultivation time. In the context of medical cell production in a GMP-compliant process, the here presented interdigitated electric microsensor technology allows the documentation of MSC quality in a fast, efficient and reliable fashion.

  16. A nuclear-directed human pancreatic ribonuclease (PE5) targets the metabolic phenotype of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vert, Anna; Castro, Jessica; Ribó, Marc; Benito, Antoni; Vilanova, Maria

    2016-04-05

    Ribonucleases represent a new class of antitumor RNA-damaging drugs. However, many wild-type members of the vertebrate secreted ribonuclease family are not cytotoxic because they are not able to evade the cytosolic ribonuclease inhibitor. We previously engineered the human pancreatic ribonuclease to direct it to the cell nucleus where the inhibitor is not present. The best characterized variant is PE5 that kills cancer cells through apoptosis mediated by the p21(WAF1/CIP1) induction and the inactivation of JNK. Here, we have used microarray-derived transcriptional profiling to identify PE5 regulated genes on the NCI/ADR-RES ovarian cancer cell line. RT-qPCR analyses have confirmed the expression microarray findings. The results show that PE5 cause pleiotropic effects. Among them, it is remarkable the down-regulation of multiple genes that code for enzymes involved in deregulated metabolic pathways in cancer cells.

  17. Recycling of epidermal growth factor in a human pancreatic carcinoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Korc, M.; Magun, B.E.

    1985-09-01

    PANC-1 human pancreatic carcinoma cells readily bound and internalized /sup 125/I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF). Bound /sup 125/I-labeled EGF was then partially processed to a number of high molecular weight acidic species. Percoll gradient centrifugation of cell homogenates indicated that the majority of /sup 125/I activity localized to several intracellular vesicular compartments. Both intact EGF and its processed species were subsequently released into the incubation medium. A major portion of the released radioactivity was capable of rebinding to the cell. Only a small amount of bound /sup 125/I-labeled EGF was degraded to low molecular weight products, and this degradation was completely blocked by methylamine. These findings suggest that in PANC-1 cells, bound EGF undergoes only limited processing. Both intact EGF and its major processed species bypass the cellular degradative pathways, are slowly released from the cell, and then rebind to the cell.

  18. Lipid-Conjugation of Endogenous Neuropeptides: Improved Biotherapy against Human Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Gopakumar; Lepetre, Sinda; Maksimenko, Andrei; Mura, Simona; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides are small neuronal signaling molecules that act as neuromodulators for a variety of neural functions including analgesia, reproduction, social behavior, learning, and memory. One of the endogenous neuropeptides—Met-Enkephalin (Met-Enk), has been shown to display an inhibitory effect on cell proliferation and differentiation. Here, a novel lipid-modification approach is shown to create a small library of neuropeptides that will allow increased bioavailability and plasma stability after systemic administration. It is demonstrated, on an experimental model of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma, that lipid conjugation of Met-Enk enhances its tumor suppression efficacy compared to its nonlipidated counterparts, both in vitro and in vivo. More strikingly, the in vivo studies show that a combination therapy with a reduced concentration of Gemcitabine has suppressed the tumor growth considerably even three weeks after the last treatment. PMID:25694262

  19. The tumor-educated-macrophage increase of malignancy of human pancreatic cancer is prevented by zoledronic acid.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Maawy, Ali; Hassanein, Mohamed K; Menen, Rhiana; Momiyama, Masashi; Murakami, Takashi; Miwa, Shinji; Yamamoto, Mako; Uehara, Fuminari; Yano, Shuya; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    We previously defined macrophages harvested from the peritoneal cavity of nude mice with subcutaneous human pancreatic tumors as "tumor-educated-macrophages" (Edu) and macrophages harvested from mice without tumors as "naïve-macrophages" (Naïve), and demonstrated that Edu-macrophages promoted tumor growth and metastasis. In this study, Edu- and Naïve-macrophages were compared for their ability to enhance pancreatic cancer malignancy at the cellular level in vitro and in vivo. The inhibitory efficacy of Zoledronic acid (ZA) on Edu-macrophage-enhanced metastasis was also determined. XPA1 human pancreatic cancer cells in Gelfoam co-cultured with Edu-macrophages proliferated to a greater extent compared to XPA1 cells cultured with Naïve-macrophages (P = 0.014). XPA1 cells exposed to conditioned medium harvested from Edu culture significantly increased proliferation (P = 0.016) and had more migration stimulation capability (P<0.001) compared to cultured cancer cells treated with the conditioned medium from Naïve. The mitotic index of the XPA1 cells, expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm, significantly increased in vivo in the presence of Edu- compared to Naïve-macrophages (P = 0.001). Zoledronic acid (ZA) killed both Edu and Naïve in vitro. Edu promoted tumor growth and metastasis in an orthotopic mouse model of the XPA1 human pancreatic cancer cell line. ZA reduced primary tumor growth (P = 0.006) and prevented metastasis (P = 0.025) promoted by Edu-macrophages. These results indicate that ZA inhibits enhanced primary tumor growth and metastasis of human pancreatic cancer induced by Edu-macrophages.

  20. Protection of Human Pancreatic Islets from Lipotoxicity by Modulation of the Translocon

    PubMed Central

    Alam, M. R.; Dingreville, F.; Berlé, C.; Burda-Jacob, K.; Chauvin, M. A.; Chikh, K.; Païta, L.; Al-Mawla, R.; Crola Da Silva, C.; Rieusset, J.; Thivolet, C.; Van Coppenolle, F.; Madec, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by peripheral insulin resistance and pancreatic beta cell dysfunction. Elevated free fatty acids (FFAs) may impair beta cell function and mass (lipotoxicity). Altered calcium homeostasis may be involved in defective insulin release. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the major intracellular calcium store. Lipotoxicity induces ER stress and in parallel an ER calcium depletion through unknown ER calcium leak channels. The main purposes of this study is first to identify one of these channels and secondly, to check the opportunity to restore beta cells function (i.e., insulin secretion) after pharmacological inhibition of ER calcium store depletion. We investigated the functionality of translocon, an ER calcium leak channel and its involvement on FFAs-induced alterations in MIN6B1 cells and in human pancreatic islets. We evidenced that translocon acts as a functional ER calcium leak channel in human beta cells using anisomycin and puromycin (antibiotics), respectively blocker and opener of this channel. Puromycin induced a significant ER calcium release, inhibited by anisomycin pretreatment. Palmitate treatment was used as FFA model to induce a mild lipotoxic effect: ER calcium content was reduced, ER stress but not apoptosis were induced and glucose induced insulin secretion was decreased in our beta cells. Interestingly, translocon inhibition by chronic anisomycin treatment prevented dysfunctions induced by palmitate, avoiding reticular calcium depletion, ER stress and restoring insulin secretion. Our results provide for the first time compelling evidence that translocon actively participates to the palmitate-induced ER calcium leak and insulin secretion decrease in beta cells. Its inhibition reduces these lipotoxic effects. Taken together, our data indicate that TLC may be a new potential target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26862742

  1. Label-free electrochemical impedance biosensor to detect human interleukin-8 in serum with sub-pg/ml sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R; Deacon, S E; Nowak, D; George, S E; Szymonik, M P; Tang, A A S; Tomlinson, D C; Davies, A G; McPherson, M J; Wälti, C

    2016-06-15

    Biosensors with high sensitivity and short time-to-result that are capable of detecting biomarkers in body fluids such as serum are an important prerequisite for early diagnostics in modern healthcare provision. Here, we report the development of an electrochemical impedance-based sensor for the detection in serum of human interleukin-8 (IL-8), a pro-angiogenic chemokine implicated in a wide range of inflammatory diseases. The sensor employs a small and robust synthetic non-antibody capture protein based on a cystatin scaffold that displays high affinity for human IL-8 with a KD of 35 ± 10 nM and excellent ligand specificity. The change in the phase of the electrochemical impedance from the serum baseline, ∆θ(ƒ), measured at 0.1 Hz, was used as the measure for quantifying IL-8 concentration in the fluid. Optimal sensor signal was observed after 15 min incubation, and the sensor exhibited a linear response versus logarithm of IL-8 concentration from 900 fg/ml to 900 ng/ml. A detection limit of around 90 fg/ml, which is significantly lower than the basal clinical levels of 5-10 pg/ml, was observed. Our results are significant for the development of point-of-care and early diagnostics where high sensitivity and short time-to-results are essential.

  2. Label-free electrochemical impedance biosensor to detect human interleukin-8 in serum with sub-pg/ml sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, R.; Deacon, S.E.; Nowak, D.; George, S.E.; Szymonik, M.P.; Tang, A.A.S.; Tomlinson, D.C.; Davies, A.G.; McPherson, M.J.; Wälti, C.

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors with high sensitivity and short time-to-result that are capable of detecting biomarkers in body fluids such as serum are an important prerequisite for early diagnostics in modern healthcare provision. Here, we report the development of an electrochemical impedance-based sensor for the detection in serum of human interleukin-8 (IL-8), a pro-angiogenic chemokine implicated in a wide range of inflammatory diseases. The sensor employs a small and robust synthetic non-antibody capture protein based on a cystatin scaffold that displays high affinity for human IL-8 with a KD of 35±10 nM and excellent ligand specificity. The change in the phase of the electrochemical impedance from the serum baseline, ∆θ(ƒ), measured at 0.1 Hz, was used as the measure for quantifying IL-8 concentration in the fluid. Optimal sensor signal was observed after 15 min incubation, and the sensor exhibited a linear response versus logarithm of IL-8 concentration from 900 fg/ml to 900 ng/ml. A detection limit of around 90 fg/ml, which is significantly lower than the basal clinical levels of 5–10 pg/ml, was observed. Our results are significant for the development of point-of-care and early diagnostics where high sensitivity and short time-to-results are essential. PMID:26897263

  3. Structural Basis for Accelerated Cleavage of Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor (BPTI) by Human Mesotrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Salameh,M.; Soares, A.; Hockla, A.; Radisky, E.

    2008-01-01

    Human mesotrypsin is an isoform of trypsin that displays unusual resistance to polypeptide trypsin inhibitors and has been observed to cleave several such inhibitors as substrates. Whereas substitution of arginine for the highly conserved glycine 193 in the trypsin active site has been implicated as a critical factor in the inhibitor resistance of mesotrypsin, how this substitution leads to accelerated inhibitor cleavage is not clear. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) forms an extremely stable and cleavage-resistant complex with trypsin, and thus provides a rigorous challenge of mesotrypsin catalytic activity toward polypeptide inhibitors. Here, we report kinetic constants for mesotrypsin and the highly homologous (but inhibitor sensitive) human cationic trypsin, describing inhibition by, and cleavage of BPTI, as well as crystal structures of the mesotrypsin-BPTI and human cationic trypsin-BPTI complexes. We find that mesotrypsin cleaves BPTI with a rate constant accelerated 350-fold over that of human cationic trypsin and 150,000-fold over that of bovine trypsin. From the crystal structures, we see that small conformational adjustments limited to several side chains enable mesotrypsin-BPTI complex formation, surmounting the predicted steric clash introduced by Arg-193. Our results show that the mesotrypsin-BPTI interface favors catalysis through (a) electrostatic repulsion between the closely spaced mesotrypsin Arg-193 and BPTI Arg-17, and (b) elimination of two hydrogen bonds between the enzyme and the amine leaving group portion of BPTI. Our model predicts that these deleterious interactions accelerate leaving group dissociation and deacylation.

  4. Induction of Apoptosis in Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells and Therapy of Orthotopic Human Pancreatic Carcinoma in Nude Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Kenji; Kim, Sun-Jin; Thaker, Premal; Yazici, Sertac; Nam, Do-Hyun; He, Junqin; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Chiao, Paul J; Sclabas, Guido M; Abbruzzese, James L; Hamilton, Stanley R; Fidler, Isaiah J

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Although gemcitabine has been accepted as the first-line chemotherapeutic reagent for advanced pancreatic cancer, improvement of response rate and survival is not sufficient and patients often develop resistance. We hypothesized that the inhibition of phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) on tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells, combined with gemcitabine, would overcome the resistance to gemcitabine in orthotopic pancreatic tumor animal model. L3.6pl, human pancreatic cancer cells growing in the pancreas, and tumor-associated endothelial cells in microorgan environment highly expressed phosphorylated EGFR, VEGFR, and Akt, which regulates antiapoptotic mechanism. Oral administration of AEE788 (dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor against EGFR and VEGFR) inhibited the phosphorylation of EGFR, VEGFR, and Akt on tumor-associated endothelial cells as well as tumor cells. Although intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of gemcitabine showed limited inhibitory effect on tumor growth, combination with AEE788 and gemcitabine produced nearly 95% inhibition of tumor growth in parallel with a high level of apoptosis on tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells, and decreased microvascular density and proliferation rate. Collectively, these data indicate that dual inhibition of phosphorylation of EGFR and VEGFR, in combination with gemcitabine, produces apoptosis of tumor-associated endothelial cells and significantly suppresses human pancreatic cancer in nude mice. PMID:16026649

  5. Bisdemethoxycurcumin exerts pro-apoptotic effects in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells through mitochondrial dysfunction and a GRP78-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haopeng; Fan, Shengjun; An, Yu; Wang, Xin; Pan, Yan; Xiaokaiti, Yilixiati; Duan, Jianhui; Li, Xin; Tie, Lu; Ye, Min; Li, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy, which is intrinsically resistant to current chemotherapies. Herein, we investigate whether bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC), a derivative of curcumin, potentiates gemcitabine in human pancreatic cancer cells. The result suggests that BDMC sensitizes gemcitabine by inducing mitochondrial dysfunctions and apoptosis in PANC-1 and MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells. Utilizing two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we identify 13 essential proteins with significantly altered expressions in response to gemcitabine alone or combined with BDMC. Protein-protein interaction network analysis pinpoints glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) as the key hub activated by BDMC. We then reveal that BDMC upregulates GRP78 and facilitates apoptosis through eIF2α/CHOP pathway. Moreover, DJ-1 and prohibitin, two identified markers of chemoresistance, are increased by gemcitabine in PANC-1 cells. This could be meaningfully reversed by BDMC, suggesting that BDMC partially offsets the chemoresistance induced by gemcitabine. In summary, these findings show that BDMC promotes apoptosis through a GRP78-dependent pathway and mitochondrial dysfunctions, and potentiates the antitumor effect of gemcitabine in human pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:27845899

  6. Interferon γ inhibits growth of human pancreatic carcinoma cells via caspase-1 dependent induction of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Detjen, K; Farwig, K; Welzel, M; Wiedenmann, B; Rosewicz, S

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—The poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer is partly due to resistance to a broad spectrum of apoptotic stimuli. To identify intact proapoptotic pathways of potential clinical relevance, we characterised the effects of interferon γ (IFN-γ) on growth and survival in human pancreatic cancer cells.
METHODS—IFN-γ receptor expression and signal transduction were examined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunoprecipitation, western blot analysis, and transactivation assays. Effects on cell growth and survival were evaluated in terms of cell numbers, colony formation, cell cycle analysis, DNA fragmentation, and poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage.
RESULTS—All four pancreatic cancer cell lines examined expressed functional IFN-γ receptors and downstream effectors, including the putative tumour suppressor interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1). IFN-γ treatment profoundly inhibited anchorage dependent and independent growth of pancreatic cancer cells. Cell cycle analyses revealed subdiploid cells suggesting apoptosis, which was confirmed by demonstration of DNA fragmentation and PARP cleavage. Time and dose dependency of apoptosis induction and growth inhibition correlated closely, identifying apoptosis as the main, if not exclusive, mechanism responsible for growth inhibition. Apoptosis was preceded by upregulation of procaspase-1 and accompanied by proteolytic activation. Furthermore, the caspase inhibitor z-vad-fmk completely prevented IFN-γ mediated apoptosis.
CONCLUSIONS—These results identify an intact proapoptotic pathway in pancreatic cancer cells and suggest that IRF-1 and/or procaspase-1 may represent potential therapeutic targets to be further explored.


Keywords: interferon γ; apoptosis; caspase-1;interferon regulatory factor; pancreatic cancer PMID:11454803

  7. Bcl-xL inhibition by molecular-targeting drugs sensitizes human pancreatic cancer cells to TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Hari, Yoko; Harashima, Nanae; Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Harada, Mamoru

    2015-12-08

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis in various types of cancer cells without damaging normal cells. However, in terms of pancreatic cancer, not all cancer cells are sensitive to TRAIL. In this study, we examined a panel of human pancreatic cancer cell lines for TRAIL sensitivity and investigated the effects of Bcl-2 family inhibitors on their response to TRAIL. Both ABT-263 and ABT-737 inhibited the function of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-w. Of the nine pancreatic cancer cell lines tested, six showed no or low sensitivity to TRAIL, which correlated with protein expression of Bcl-xL. ABT-263 significantly sensitized four cell lines (AsPC-1, Panc-1, CFPAC-1, and Panc10.05) to TRAIL, with reduced cell viability and increased apoptosis. Knockdown of Bcl-xL, but not Bcl-2, by siRNA transfection increased the sensitivity of AsPC-1 and Panc-1 cells to TRAIL. ABT-263 treatment had no effect on protein expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, or c-FLIPs. In Panc-1 cells, ABT-263 increased the surface expression of death receptor (DR) 5; the NF-κB pathway, but not endoplasmic reticulum stress, participated in the increase. In xenograft mouse models, the combination of TRAIL and ATB-737 suppressed the in vivo tumor growth of AsPC-1 and Panc-1 cells. These results indicate that Bcl-xL is responsible for TRAIL resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells, and that Bcl-2 family inhibitors could represent promising reagents to sensitize human pancreatic cancers in DR-targeting therapy.

  8. Purinergic regulation of CFTR and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels and K(+) channels in human pancreatic duct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Haanes, Kristian A; Novak, Ivana

    2013-04-01

    Purinergic agonists have been considered for the treatment of respiratory epithelia in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The pancreas, one of the most seriously affected organs in CF, expresses various purinergic receptors. Studies on the rodent pancreas show that purinergic signaling regulates pancreatic secretion. In the present study we aim to identify Cl(-) and K(+) channels in human pancreatic ducts and their regulation by purinergic receptors. Human pancreatic duct epithelia formed by Capan-1 or CFPAC-1 cells were studied in open-circuit Ussing chambers. In Capan-1 cells, ATP/UTP effects were dependent on intracellular Ca(2+). Apically applied ATP/UTP stimulated CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) (CaCC) channels, which were inhibited by CFTRinh-172 and niflumic acid, respectively. The basolaterally applied ATP stimulated CFTR. In CFPAC-1 cells, which have mutated CFTR, basolateral ATP and UTP had negligible effects. In addition to Cl(-) transport in Capan-1 cells, the effects of 5,6-dichloro-1-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one (DC-EBIO) and clotrimazole indicated functional expression of the intermediate conductance K(+) channels (IK, KCa3.1). The apical effects of ATP/UTP were greatly potentiated by the IK channel opener DC-EBIO. Determination of RNA and protein levels revealed that Capan-1 cells have high expression of TMEM16A (ANO1), a likely CaCC candidate. We conclude that in human pancreatic duct cells ATP/UTP regulates via purinergic receptors both Cl(-) channels (TMEM16A/ANO1 and CFTR) and K(+) channels (IK). The K(+) channels provide the driving force for Cl(-)-channel-dependent secretion, and luminal ATP provided locally or secreted from acini may potentiate secretory processes. Future strategies in augmenting pancreatic duct function should consider sidedness of purinergic signaling and the essential role of K(+) channels.

  9. Efficacy of irreversible electroporation in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma: advanced murine model

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Prejesh; Li, Yan; Li, Suping; St Hill, Charles R; Martin, Robert CG

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a promising cell membrane ablative modality for pancreatic cancer. There have been recent concerns regarding local recurrence and the potential use of IRE as a debulking (partial ablation) modality. We hypothesize that incomplete ablation leads to early recurrence and a more aggressive biology. We created the first ever heterotopic murine model by inoculating BALB/c nude mice in the hindlimb with a subcutaneous injection of Panc-1 cells, an immortalized human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line. Tumors were allowed to grow from 0.75 to 1.5 cm and then treated with the goal of complete ablation or partial ablation using standard IRE settings. Animals were recovered and survived for 2 days (n = 6), 7 (n = 6), 14 (n = 6), 21 (n = 6), 30 (n = 8), and 60 (n = 8) days. All 40 animals/tumors underwent successful IRE under general anesthesia with muscle paralysis. The mean tumor volume of the animals undergoing ablation was 1,447.6 mm3 ± 884). Histologically, in the 14-, 21-, 30-, and 60-day survival groups the entire tumor was nonviable, with a persistent tumor nodule completely replaced fibrosis. In the group treated with partial ablation, incomplete electroporation/recurrences (N = 10 animals) were seen, of which 66% had confluent tumors and this was a significant predictor of recurrence (P < 0.001). Recurrent tumors were also significantly larger (mean 4,578 mm3 ± SD 877 versus completed electroporated tumors 925.8 ± 277, P < 0.001). Recurrent tumors had a steeper growth curve (slope = 0.73) compared with primary tumors (0.60, P = 0.02). Recurrent tumors also had a significantly higher percentage of EpCAM expression, suggestive of stem cell activation. Tumors that recur after incomplete electroporation demonstrate a biologically aggressive tumor that could be more resistant to standard of care chemotherapy. Clinical correlation of this data is limited, but should be considered when IRE of pancreatic cancer is being

  10. Fucosyltransferase activities in human pancreatic tissue: comparative study between cancer tissues and established tumoral cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mas, E; Pasqualini, E; Caillol, N; El Battari, A; Crotte, C; Lombardo, D; Sadoulet, M O

    1998-06-01

    Human pancreatic cancer is characterized by an alteration in fucose-containing surface blood group antigens such as H antigen, Lewis b, Lewis y, and sialyl-Lewis. These carbohydrate determinants can be synthesized by sequential action of alpha(2,3) sialyltransferases or alpha(1,2) fucosyltransferases (Fuc-T) and alpha(1,3/1,4) fucosyltransferases on (poly)N-acetyllactosamine chains. Therefore, the expression and the function of seven fucosyltransferases were investigated in normal and cancer pancreatic tissues and in four pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. Transcripts of FUT1, FUT2, FUT3, FUT4, FUT5, and FUT7 were detected by RT-PCR in carcinoma cell lines as well as in normal and tumoral tissues. Interestingly, the FUT6 message was only detected in tumoral tissues. Analysis of the acceptor substrate specificity for fucosyltransferases indicated that alpha(1,2) Fuc-T, alpha(1,3) Fuc-T, and alpha(1,4) Fuc-T were expressed in microsome preparations of all tissues as demonstrated by fucose incorporation into phenyl beta-d-galactoside, 2'-fucosyllactose, N-acetyllactosamine, 3'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, and lacto-N-biose. However, these fucosyltransferase activities varied between tissues. A substantial decrease of alpha(1,2) Fuc-T activity was observed in tumoral tissues and cell lines compared to normal tissues. Conversely, the activity of alpha(1,4) Fuc-T, which generates Lewis a and sialyl-Lewis a structures, and that of alpha(1,3) Fuc-T, able to generate a lactodifucotetraose structure, were very important in SOJ-6 and BxPC-3 cell lines. These increases correlated with an enhanced expression of Lewis a, sialyl-Lewis a, and Lewis y on the cell surface. The activity of alpha(1,3) Fuc-T, which participates in the synthesis of the sialyl-Lewis x structure, was not significantly modified in cell lines compared to normal tissues. However, the sialyl-Lewis x antigen was expressed preferentially on the surface of SOJ-6 and BxPC-3 cell lines but was not detected on Panc-1

  11. Selection of polymers for application in scaffolds applicable for human pancreatic islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Smink, Alexandra M; de Haan, Bart J; Paredes-Juarez, Genaro A; Wolters, Anouk H G; Kuipers, Jeroen; Giepmans, Ben N G; Schwab, Leendert; Engelse, Marten A; van Apeldoorn, Aart A; de Koning, Eelco; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2016-05-13

    The liver is currently the site for transplantation of islets in humans. This is not optimal for islets, but alternative sites in humans are not available. Polymeric scaffolds in surgically accessible areas are a solution. As human donors are rare, the polymers should not interfere with functional survival of human-islets. We applied a novel platform to test the adequacy of polymers for application in scaffolds for human-islet transplantation. Viability, functionality, and immune parameters were included to test poly(D,L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (PDLLCL), poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/polybutylene terephthalate (PEOT/PBT) block copolymer, and polysulfone. The type of polymer influenced the functional survival of human islets. In islets cultured on PDLLCL the glucagon-producing α-cells and insulin-producing β-cells contained more hormone granules than in islets in contact with PEOT/PBT or polysulfone. This was studied with ultrastructural analysis by electron microscopy (nanotomy) during 7 d of culture. PDLLCL was also associated with statistically significant lower release of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA, a so called danger-associate molecular pattern (DAMP)) from islets on PDLLCL when compared to the other polymers. DAMPs support undesired immune responses. Hydrophilicity of the polymers did not influence dsDNA release. Islets on PDLLCL also showed less cellular outgrowth. These outgrowing cells were mainly fibroblast and some β-cells undergoing epithelial to mesenchymal cell transition. None of the polymers influenced the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. As PDLLCL was associated with less release of DAMPs, it is a promising candidate for creating a scaffold for human islets. Our study demonstrates that for sensitive, rare cadaveric donor tissue such as pancreatic islets it might be necessary to first select materials that do not influence functionality before proposing the biomaterial for in vivo application. Our presented platform may facilitate

  12. Pasireotide and octreotide antiproliferative effects and sst2 trafficking in human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cultures.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amira; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Albertelli, Manuela; Barbieri, Federica; Brue, Thierry; Niccoli, Patricia; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Monges, Genevieve; Garcia, Stephane; Ferone, Diego; Florio, Tullio; Enjalbert, Alain; Moutardier, Vincent; Schonbrunn, Agnes; Gerard, Corinne; Barlier, Anne; Saveanu, Alexandru

    2014-10-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) raise difficult therapeutic problems despite the emergence of targeted therapies. Somatostatin analogs (SSA) remain pivotal therapeutic drugs. However, the tachyphylaxis and the limited antitumoral effects observed with the classical somatostatin 2 (sst2) agonists (octreotide and lanreotide) led to the development of new SSA, such as the pan sst receptor agonist pasireotide. Our aim was to compare the effects of pasireotide and octreotide on cell survival, chromogranin A (CgA) secretion, and sst2 phosphorylation/trafficking in pancreatic NET (pNET) primary cells from 15 tumors. We established and characterized the primary cultures of human pancreatic tumors (pNETs) as powerful preclinical models for understanding the biological effects of SSA. At clinically relevant concentrations (1-10 nM), pasireotide was at least as efficient as octreotide in inhibiting CgA secretion and cell viability through caspase-dependent apoptosis during short treatments, irrespective of the expression levels of the different sst receptors or the WHO grade of the parental tumor. Interestingly, unlike octreotide, which induces a rapid and persistent partial internalization of sst2 associated with its phosphorylation on Ser341/343, pasireotide did not phosphorylate sst2 and induced a rapid and transient internalization of the receptor followed by a persistent recycling at the cell surface. These results provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of striking differences in the dynamics of sst2 trafficking in pNET cells treated with the two SSAs, but with similar efficiency in the control of CgA secretion and cell viability.

  13. Structure of Human Pancreatic Lipase-Related Protein 2 with the Lid in an Open Conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Eydoux, Cecilia; Spinelli, Silvia; Davis, Tara L.; Walker, John R.; Seitova, Alma; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; De Caro, Alain; Cambillau, Christian; Carriere, Frederic

    2008-10-02

    Access to the active site of pancreatic lipase (PL) is controlled by a surface loop, the lid, which normally undergoes conformational changes only upon addition of lipids or amphiphiles. Structures of PL with their lids in the open and functional conformation have required cocrystallization with amphiphiles. Here we report two crystal structures of wild-type and unglycosylated human pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (HPLRP2) with the lid in an open conformation in the absence of amphiphiles. These structures solved independently are strikingly similar, with some residues of the lid being poorly defined in the electron-density map. The open conformation of the lid is however different from that previously observed in classical liganded PL, suggesting different kinetic properties for HPLRP2. Here we show that the HPLRP2 is directly inhibited by E600, does not present interfacial activation, and acts preferentially on substrates forming monomers or small aggregates (micelles) dispersed in solution like monoglycerides, phospholipids and galactolipids, whereas classical PL displays reverse properties and a high specificity for unsoluble substrates like triglycerides and diglycerides forming oil-in-water interfaces. These biochemical properties imply that the lid of HPLRP2 is likely to spontaneously adopt in solution the open conformation observed in the crystal structure. This open conformation generates a large cavity capable of accommodating the digalactose polar head of galactolipids, similar to that previously observed in the active site of the guinea pig PLRP2, but absent from the classical PL. Most of the structural and kinetic properties of HPLRP2 were found to be different from those of rat PLRP2, the structure of which was previously obtained with the lid in a closed conformation. Our findings illustrate the essential role of the lid in determining the substrate specificity and the mechanism of action of lipases.

  14. Structure of human pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 with the lid in an open conformation.

    PubMed

    Eydoux, Cécilia; Spinelli, Silvia; Davis, Tara L; Walker, John R; Seitova, Alma; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; De Caro, Alain; Cambillau, Christian; Carrière, Frédéric

    2008-09-09

    Access to the active site of pancreatic lipase (PL) is controlled by a surface loop, the lid, which normally undergoes conformational changes only upon addition of lipids or amphiphiles. Structures of PL with their lids in the open and functional conformation have required cocrystallization with amphiphiles. Here we report two crystal structures of wild-type and unglycosylated human pancreatic lipase-related protein 2 (HPLRP2) with the lid in an open conformation in the absence of amphiphiles. These structures solved independently are strikingly similar, with some residues of the lid being poorly defined in the electron-density map. The open conformation of the lid is however different from that previously observed in classical liganded PL, suggesting different kinetic properties for HPLRP2. Here we show that the HPLRP2 is directly inhibited by E600, does not present interfacial activation, and acts preferentially on substrates forming monomers or small aggregates (micelles) dispersed in solution like monoglycerides, phospholipids and galactolipids, whereas classical PL displays reverse properties and a high specificity for unsoluble substrates like triglycerides and diglycerides forming oil-in-water interfaces. These biochemical properties imply that the lid of HPLRP2 is likely to spontaneously adopt in solution the open conformation observed in the crystal structure. This open conformation generates a large cavity capable of accommodating the digalactose polar head of galactolipids, similar to that previously observed in the active site of the guinea pig PLRP2, but absent from the classical PL. Most of the structural and kinetic properties of HPLRP2 were found to be different from those of rat PLRP2, the structure of which was previously obtained with the lid in a closed conformation. Our findings illustrate the essential role of the lid in determining the substrate specificity and the mechanism of action of lipases.

  15. Global epigenomic analysis of primary human pancreatic islets provides insights into type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Stitzel, Michael L.; Sethupathy, Praveen; Pearson, Daniel S.; Chines, Peter S.; Song, Lingyun; Erdos, Michael R.; Welch, Ryan; Parker, Stephen C. J.; Boyle, Alan P.; Scott, Laura J.; Margulies, Elliott H.; Boehnke, Michael; Furey, Terrence S.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Collins, Francis S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Identifying cis-regulatory elements is important to understand how human pancreatic islets modulate gene expression in physiologic or pathophysiologic (e.g., diabetic) conditions. We conducted genome-wide analysis of DNase I hypersensitive sites, histone H3 lysine methylation modifications (K4me1, K4me3, K79me2), and CCCTC factor (CTCF) binding in human islets. This identified ~18,000 putative promoters (several hundred unannotated and islet-active). Surprisingly, active promoter modifications were absent at genes encoding islet-specific hormones, suggesting a distinct regulatory mechanism. Of 34,039 distal (non-promoter) regulatory elements, 47% are islet-unique and 22% are CTCF-bound. In the 18 type 2 diabetes (T2D)-associated loci, we identified 118 putative regulatory elements and confirmed enhancer activity for 12/33 tested. Among 6 regulatory elements harboring T2D-associated variants, 2 exhibit significant allele-specific differences in activity. These findings present a global snapshot of the human islet epigenome and should provide functional context for non-coding variants emerging from genetic studies of T2D and other islet disorders. PMID:21035756

  16. An effective purification method using large bottles for human pancreatic islet isolation.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Masayuki; Itoh, Takeshi; Iwahashi, Shuichi; Takita, Morihito; Sugimoto, Koji; Kanak, Mazhar A; Chujo, Daisuke; Naziruddin, Bashoo; Levy, Marlon F; Grayburn, Paul A; Matsumoto, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    The purification process is one of the most difficult procedures in pancreatic islet isolation. It was demonstrated that the standard purification method using a COBE 2991 cell processor with Ficoll density gradient solution harmed islets mechanically by high shear force. We reported that purification using large bottles with a lower viscosity gradient solution could improve the efficacy of porcine islet purification. In this study, we examined whether the new bottle purification method could improve the purification of human islets. Nine human pancreata from brain-dead donors were used. After pancreas digestion, the digested tissue was divided into three groups. Each group was purified by continuous density gradient using ET-Kyoto and iodixanol gradient solution with either the standard COBE method (COBE group) or the top loading (top group) or bottom loading (bottom group) bottle purification methods. Islet yield, purity, recovery rate after purification, and in vitro and in vivo viability were compared. Islet yield per pancreas weight (IE/g) and the recovery rate in the top group were significantly higher than in the COBE and bottom groups. Furthermore, the average size of purified islets in the top group was significantly larger than in the COBE group, which indicated that the bottle method could reduce the shear force to the islets. In vivo viability was also significantly higher in the top group compared with the COBE group. In conclusion, the top-loading bottle method could improve the quality and quantity of human islets after purification.

  17. Genome-wide screen identifies PVT1 as a regulator of Gemcitabine sensitivity in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    You, Lei; Chang, De; Du, Hong-Zhen; Zhao, Yu-Pei

    2011-04-01

    Gemcitabine has been a first-line chemotherapy agent for advanced pancreatic cancer, which is associated with one of the lowest 5 years survival rates among human cancers. Due to our lack of understanding of the genetic determinants of Gemcitabine sensitivity in pancreatic cancer, the therapeutic effectiveness of Gemcitabine chemotherapy is typically unpredictable. Using a genome-wide and piggyBac transposon-based genetic screening platform, we identified the PVT1 gene as a regulator of Gemcitabine sensitivity and showed that functional inactivation of the PVT1 gene led to enhanced Gemcitabine sensitivity in human pancreatic cancer ASPC-1 cells. The integration of the piggyBac transposon-based vector system into intron 3 of PVT1 was within a common site of oncogenic retroviral insertions and chromosomal translocations. PVT1 is a non-protein encoding gene; the genomic arrangement of PVT1 and its co-amplification with MYC have been implicated in the tumorigenesis of a variety of cancers. The molecular mechanism of PVT1 transcripts in gene regulation remains a puzzle. We demonstrated that overexpression of a full length PVT1 cDNA in the antisense orientation reconstituted enhanced sensitivity to Gemcitabine in naïve ASPC-1 cells, whereas overexpression of a full length PVT1 cDNA in the sense orientation resulted in decreased sensitivity to Gemcitabine. Our results identified PVT1 as a regulator of Gemcitabine sensitivity in pancreatic cancer cells and validated the genome-wide genetic screening approach for the identification of genetic determinants as well as potential biomarkers for the rational design of Gemcitabine chemotherapies for pancreatic cancer.

  18. Effect of prolonged exposure to sublethal concentrations of DDT and DDE on protein expression in human pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Pavlikova, Nela; Smetana, Pavel; Halada, Petr; Kovar, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Pollution of the environment represents one of less explored potential reasons for the worldwide epidemic of type 2 diabetes. One of the most prevalent organochlorine pollutants remains the pesticide DDT and its degradation product DDE. Despite some epidemiologic correlations between levels of DDT and DDE in human organism and the prevalence of diabetes, there is almost no information about the exact targets of these compounds inside pancreatic beta cells. To detect functional areas of pancreatic beta cells that could be affected by exposure to DDT and DDE, we analyzed changes in protein expression in the NES2Y human pancreatic beta cell line exposed to three sublethal concentrations (0.1 μM, 1 μM, 10 μM) of DDT and DDE for 1 month. Protein separation and identification was achieved using high-resolution 2D-electrophoresis, computer analysis and mass spectrometry. With these techniques, four proteins were found downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDT: three cytoskeletal proteins (cytokeratin 8, cytokeratin 18 and actin) and one protein involved in glycolysis (alpha-enolase). Two proteins were downregulated after exposure to 10 μM DDE: cytokeratin 18 and heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1 (HNRH1). These changes correlate with previously described effects of other stress conditions (e.g. exposure to palmitate, hyperglycemia, imidazoline derivative, and cytokines) on protein expression in pancreatic beta cells. We conclude that cytoskeletal proteins and their processing, glucose metabolism, and mRNA processing may represent targets affected by exposure to conditions hostile to pancreatic beta cells, including exposure to DDT and DDE.

  19. Transcript profiling identifies novel key players mediating the growth inhibitory effect of NS-398 on human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Youns, Mahmoud; Efferth, Thomas; Hoheisel, Jörg D

    2011-01-10

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive human malignancies with an increasing incidence worldwide. Despite an increase in the number of systemic treatments available for pancreatic cancer, the impact of therapy on the clinical course of the disease has been modest, underscoring an urgent need for new therapeutic options. Although selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors have been demonstrated to have cancer-preventive effects, the mechanism of their effects is not clearly known. Moreover, there have been no unbiased studies to identify novel molecular targets of NS-398 regarding pancreatic cancer. Here we undertook a gene expression profiling study to identify novel molecular targets modulating the growth inhibitory effects of NS-398 on pancreatic cancer cell lines. Our mRNA-based gene expression results showed that the growth inhibitory effect of NS-398 was accompanied with an activation of G1/S and G2/M cell cycle regulation, P53 signalling, apoptotic, aryl hydrocarbon receptor and death receptor signalling pathways. Moreover, we reported, for the first time, that the growth inhibitory effect of NS-398 is mediated by down-regulation of RRM2, CTGF, MCM2 and PCNA and up-regulation of NAG-1 in all cell lines.

  20. Smad4 inhibits cell migration via suppression of JNK activity in human pancreatic carcinoma PANC-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XUEYING; CAO, JUNXIA; PEI, YUJUN; ZHANG, JIYAN; WANG, QINGYANG

    2016-01-01

    Smad4 is a common Smad and is a key downstream regulator of the transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway, in which Smad4 often acts as a potent tumor suppressor and functions in a highly context-dependent manner, particularly in pancreatic cancer. However, little is known regarding whether Smad4 regulates other signaling pathways involved in pancreatic cancer. The present study demonstrated that Smad4 downregulates c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity using a Smad4 loss-of-function or gain-of-function analysis. Additionally, stable overexpression of Smad4 clearly affected the migration of human pancreatic epithelioid carcinoma PANC-1 cells, but did not affect cell growth. In addition, the present study revealed that upregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 is required for the reduction of JNK activity by Smad4, leading to a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor expression and inhibiting cell migration. Overall, the present findings indicate that Smad4 may suppress JNK activation and inhibit the tumor characteristics of pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:27123137

  1. Endothelial cells mediate islet-specific maturation of human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Maria; Mathew, Shibin; Mamiya, Hikaru; Goh, Saik Kia; Banerjee, Ipsita

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) can be best achieved by closely recapitulating the in vivo developmental niche. Thus, implementation of directed differentiation strategies has yielded encouraging results in the area of pancreatic islet differentiation. These strategies have concentrated on direct addition of chemical signals, however, other aspect of the developmental niche are yet to be explored. During development, pancreatic progenitor (PP) cells grow as an epithelial sheet, which aggregates with endothelial cells (ECs) during the final stages of maturation. Several findings suggest that the interactions with EC play a role in pancreatic development. In this study, we recapitulated this phenomenon in an in vitro environment by maturing the human ESC (hESC)-derived PP cells in close contact with ECs. We find that co-culture with different ECs (but not fibroblast) alone results in pancreatic islet-specific differentiation of hESC-derived PP cells even in the absence of additional chemical induction. The differentiated cells responded to exogenous glucose levels by enhanced C-peptide synthesis. The co-culture system aligned well with endocrine development as determined by comprehensive analysis of involved signaling pathways. By recapitulating cell-cell interaction aspects of the developmental niche we achieved a differentiation model that aligns closely with islet organogenesis.

  2. Glucosyl epi-cyclophellitol allows mechanism-based inactivation and structural analysis of human pancreatic α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Caner, Sami; Zhang, Xiaohua; Jiang, Jianbing; Chen, Hong-Ming; Nguyen, Nham T; Overkleeft, Hermen; Brayer, Gary D; Withers, Stephen G

    2016-04-01

    As part of a search for selective, mechanism-based covalent inhibitors of human pancreatic α-amylase we describe the chemoenzymatic synthesis of the disaccharide analog α-glucosyl epi-cyclophellitol, demonstrate its stoichiometric reaction with human pancreatic α-amylase and evaluate the time dependence of its inhibition. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the covalent derivative so formed confirms its reaction at the active site with formation of a covalent bond to the catalytic nucleophile D197. The structure illuminates the interactions with the active site and confirms OH4' on the nonreducing end sugar as a good site for attachment of fluorescent tags in generating probes for localization and quantitation of amylase in vivo.

  3. Induction of matrix metalloprotease-1 gene expression by retinoic acid in the human pancreatic tumour cell line Dan-G

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Z von; Riecken, E-O; Rosewicz, S

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of retinoic acid (RA) on matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1) gene expression in the human pancreatic tumour cell line Dan-G. 13-cis RA results in a time- and dose-dependent increase of MMP-1 protein concentration. These stimulatory effects were paralleled by a time- and dose-dependent increase of MMP-1 mRNA steady-state concentrations. Nuclear run-on analysis revealed that the increase of MMP-1 mRNA was partially due to an increase of MMP-1 gene transcription. In addition, 13-cis RA treatment results in an increase of MMP-1 mRNA stability. These data demonstrate that RA stimulates MMP-1 gene expression in human pancreatic carcinoma cells by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10362099

  4. [Experimental models of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ceranowicz, Piotr; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembiński, Artur

    2015-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is a severe disease with high mortality. Clinical studies can bring some data about etiology, pathogenesis and the course of acute pancreatitis. However, studies concerning early events of this disease and the new concepts of treatment cannot be performed on humans, due to ethical reasons. Animal models of acute pancreatitis have been developed to solve this problem. This review presents currently used experimental models of acute pancreatitis, their properties and clinical relevance. Experimental models of acute pancreatitis can be divided into in vivo (non-invasive and invasive) and ex vivo models. The onset, development, severity and extent of acute pancreatitis, as well as the mortality, vary considerably between these different models. Animal models reproducibly produce mild, moderate or severe acute pancreatitis. One of the most commonly used models of acute pancreatitis is created by administration of supramaximal doses of cerulein, an analog of cholecystokinin. This model produces acute mild edematous pancreatitis in rats, whereas administration of cerulein in mice leads to the development of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis evoked by retrograde administration of sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct is the most often used model of acute severe necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. Ex vivo models allow to eliminate the influence of hormonal and nervous factors on the development of acute pancreatitis.

  5. Human pancreatic cancer tumors are nutrient poor and tumor cells actively scavenge extracellular protein.

    PubMed

    Kamphorst, Jurre J; Nofal, Michel; Commisso, Cosimo; Hackett, Sean R; Lu, Wenyun; Grabocka, Elda; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Miller, George; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Thompson, Craig B; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2015-02-01

    Glucose and amino acids are key nutrients supporting cell growth. Amino acids are imported as monomers, but an alternative route induced by oncogenic KRAS involves uptake of extracellular proteins via macropinocytosis and subsequent lysosomal degradation of these proteins as a source of amino acids. In this study, we examined the metabolism of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a poorly vascularized lethal KRAS-driven malignancy. Metabolomic comparisons of human PDAC and benign adjacent tissue revealed that tumor tissue was low in glucose, upper glycolytic intermediates, creatine phosphate, and the amino acids glutamine and serine, two major metabolic substrates. Surprisingly, PDAC accumulated essential amino acids. Such accumulation could arise from extracellular proteins being degraded through macropinocytosis in quantities necessary to meet glutamine requirements, which in turn produces excess of most other amino acids. Consistent with this hypothesis, active macropinocytosis is observed in primary human PDAC specimens. Moreover, in the presence of physiologic albumin, we found that cultured murine PDAC cells grow indefinitely in media lacking single essential amino acids and replicate once in the absence of free amino acids. Growth under these conditions was characterized by simultaneous glutamine depletion and essential amino acid accumulation. Overall, our findings argue that the scavenging of extracellular proteins is an important mode of nutrient uptake in PDAC.

  6. PPM1D exerts its oncogenic properties in human pancreatic cancer through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Guo, Bo-Min; Kang, Jie; Deng, Xian-Zhao; Fan, You-Ben; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Ai, Kai-Xing

    2016-03-01

    Protein phosphatase, Mg(2+)/Mn(2+) dependent, 1D (PPM1D) is emerging as an oncogene by virtue of its negative control on several tumor suppressor pathways. However, the clinical significance of PPM1D in pancreatic cancer (PC) has not been defined. In this study, we determined PPM1D expression in human PC tissues and cell lines and their irrespective noncancerous controls. We subsequently investigated the functional role of PPM1D in the migration, invasion, and apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 PC cells in vitro and explored the signaling pathways involved. Furthermore, we examined the role of PPM1D in PC tumorigenesis in vivo. Our results showed that PPM1D is overexpressed in human PC tissues and cell lines and significantly correlated with tumor growth and metastasis. PPM1D promotes PC cell migration and invasion via potentiation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway through downregulation of apoptosis-stimulating of p53 protein 2 (ASPP2). In contrast to PPM1D, our results showed that ASPP2 is downregulated in PC tissues. Additionally, PPM1D suppresses PC cell apoptosis via inhibition of the p38 MAPK/p53 pathway through both dephosphorylation of p38 MAPK and downregulation of ASPP2. Furthermore, PPM1D promotes PC tumor growth in vivo. Our results demonstrated that PPM1D is an oncogene in PC.

  7. Isolation and functional expression of human pancreatic peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, K; Arakawa, F; Misumi, Y; Treston, A M; Vos, M; Matsuoka, Y

    1994-11-30

    Pancreastatin (PST) is processed from chromogranin A and the C-terminal amide of the peptide is an absolute requirement for biological activities. Human pancreatic carcinoma cells QGP-1 which produce both chromogranin A and PST were used to isolate cDNAs encoding two forms of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM). The two forms are a full length bifunctional enzyme and a variant lacking the transmembrane domain-coding region. When the cDNAs of these two forms were expressed in COS-7 cells, cells transfected with the predicted soluble form released into the culture medium a very much higher amidating activity which converts human chromogranin A-(273-302) to PST-29. The optimal pH for amidating activity was 5.4 and Cu2+, ascorbate and catalase were required as cofactors for the both forms of PAM. Km values for the membrane-bound and the soluble forms of PAM were 15.7 +/- 3.1 microM and 12.4 +/- 1.6 microM, respectively. These results demonstrate that both forms of PAM can function in the posttranslational processing of chromogranin A to PST in the environment of a secretory vesicle.

  8. Long-acting lipidated analogue of human pancreatic polypeptide is slowly released into circulation.

    PubMed

    Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Elling, Christian E; Madsen, Andreas N; Little, Paul B; Lundgren, Karsten; Gerlach, Lars-Ole; Bergmann, Ralf; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2011-04-28

    The main disadvantages of peptide pharmaceuticals are their rapid degradation and excretion, their low hydrophilicity, and low shelf lifes. These bottlenecks can be circumvented by acylation with fatty acids (lipidation) or polyethylene glycol (PEGylation). Here, we describe the modification of a human pancreatic polypeptide analogue specific for the human (h)Y(2) and hY(4) receptor with PEGs of different size and palmitic acid. Receptor specificity was demonstrated by competitive binding studies. Modifications had only a small influence on binding affinities and no influence on secondary structure. Both modifications improved pharmacokinetic properties of the hPP analogue in vivo and in vitro, however, lipidation showed a greater resistance to degradation and excretion than PEGylation. Furthermore, the lipidated peptide is taken up and degraded solely by the liver but not the kidneys. Lipidation resulted in prolonged action of the hPP analogue in respect of reducing food intake in mice after subcutaneous administration. Therefore, the lipidated hPP analogue could constitute a potential new therapeutic agent against obesity.

  9. Human pancreatic cancer tumors are nutrient poor and tumor cells actively scavenge extracellular protein

    PubMed Central

    Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Nofal, Michel; Commisso, Cosimo; Hackett, Sean R.; Lu, Wenyun; Grabocka, Elda; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Miller, George; Drebin, Jeffrey A.; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Thompson, Craig B.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Glucose and amino acids are key nutrients supporting cell growth. Amino acids are imported as monomers, but an alternative route induced by oncogenic KRAS involves uptake of extracellular proteins via macropinocytosis and subsequent lysosomal degradation of these proteins as a source of amino acids. In this study, we examined the metabolism of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a poorly vascularized lethal KRAS-driven malignancy. Metabolomic comparisons of human PDAC and benign adjacent tissue revealed that tumor tissue was low in glucose, upper glycolytic intermediates, creatine phosphate and the amino acids glutamine and serine, two major metabolic substrates. Surprisingly, PDAC accumulated essential amino acids. Such accumulation could arise from extracellular proteins being degraded through macropinocytosis in quantities necessary to meet glutamine requirements, which in turn produces excess of most other amino acids. Consistent with this hypothesis, active macropinocytosis is observed in primary human PDAC specimens. Moreover, in the presence of physiological albumin, we found that cultured murine PDAC cells grow indefinitely in media lacking single essential amino acids, and replicate once in the absence of free amino acids. Growth under these conditions was characterized by simultaneous glutamine depletion and essential amino acid accumulation. Overall, our findings argue that the scavenging of extracellular proteins is an important mode of nutrient uptake in PDAC. PMID:25644265

  10. Process techniques for human thoracic electrical bio-impedance signal in remote healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Muhammad Zia Ur; Mirza, Shafi Shahsavar

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of thoracic electrical bio-impedance (TEB) facilitates heart stroke volume in sudden cardiac arrest. This Letter proposes several efficient and computationally simplified adaptive algorithms to display high-resolution TEB component. In a clinical environment, TEB signal encounters with various physiological and non-physiological phenomenon, which masks the tiny features that are important in identifying the intensity of the stroke. Moreover, computational complexity is an important parameter in a modern wearable healthcare monitoring tool. Hence, in this Letter, the authors propose a new signal conditioning technique for TEB enhancement in remote healthcare systems. For this, the authors have chosen higher order adaptive filter as a basic element in the process of TEB. To improve filtering capability, convergence speed, to reduce computational complexity of the signal conditioning technique, the authors apply data normalisation and clipping the data regressor. The proposed implementations are tested on real TEB signals. Finally, simulation results confirm that proposed regressor clipped normalised higher order filter is suitable for a practical healthcare system.

  11. The Metastatic Potential and Chemoresistance of Human Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwandin, Vikash J.; Bishop, J. Michael; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) typically have the capacity to evade chemotherapy and may be the principal source of metastases. CSCs for human pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) have been identified, but neither the metastatic potential nor the chemoresistance of these cells has been adequately evaluated. We have addressed these issues by examining side-population (SP) cells isolated from the Panc-1 and BxPC3 lines of human PDAC cells, the oncogenotypes of which differ. SP cells could be isolated from monolayers of Panc-1, but only from spheroids of BxPC3. Using orthotopic xenografts into the severely immunocompromised NSG mouse, we found that SP cells isolated from both cell lines produced tumors that were highly metastatic, in contrast to previous experience with PDAC cell lines. SP cells derived from both cell lines expressed the ABCG2 transporter, which was demonstrably responsible for the SP phenotype. SP cells gave rise to non-SP (NSP) cells in vitro and in vivo, a transition that was apparently due to posttranslational inhibition of the ABCG2 transporter. Twenty-two other lines of PDAC cells also expressed ABCG2. The sensitivity of PDAC SP cells to the vinca alkaloid vincristine could be greatly increased by verapamil, a general inhibitor of transporters. In contrast, verapamil had no effect on the killing of PDAC cells by gemcitabine, the current first-line therapeutic for PDAC. We conclude that the isolation of SP cells can be a convenient and effective tool for the study of PDAC CSCs; that CSCs may be the principal progenitors of metastasis by human PDAC; that the ABCG2 transporter is responsible for the SP phenotype in human PDAC cells, and may be a ubiquitous source of drug-resistance in PDAC, but does not confer resistance to gemcitabine; and that inhibition of ABCG2 might offer a useful adjunct in a therapeutic attack on the CSCs of PDAC. PMID:26859746

  12. Antitumor Indolequinones Induced Apoptosis in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells via Inhibition of Thioredoxin Reductase and Activation of Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chao; Siegel, David; Newsome, Jeffery; Chilloux, Aurelie; Moody, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Indolequinones (IQs) were developed as potential antitumor agents against human pancreatic cancer. IQs exhibited potent antitumor activity against the human pancreatic cancer cell line MIA PaCa-2 with growth inhibitory IC50 values in the low nanomolar range. IQs were found to induce time- and concentration-dependent apoptosis and to be potent inhibitors of thioredoxin reductase 1 (TR1) in MIA PaCa-2 cells at concentrations equivalent to those inducing growth-inhibitory effects. The mechanism of inhibition of TR1 by the IQs was studied in detail in cell-free systems using purified enzyme. The C-terminal selenocysteine of TR1 was characterized as the primary adduction site of the IQ-derived reactive iminium using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Inhibition of TR1 by IQs in MIA PaCa-2 cells resulted in a shift of thioredoxin-1 redox state to the oxidized form and activation of the p38/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Oxidized thioredoxin is known to activate apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, an upstream activator of p38/JNK in the MAPK signaling cascade and this was confirmed in our study providing a potential mechanism for IQ-induced apoptosis. These data describe the redox and signaling events involved in the mechanism of growth inhibition induced by novel inhibitors of TR1 in human pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:22147753

  13. Enhanced expression of epidermal growth factor receptor correlates with alterations of chromosome 7 in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Korc, M; Meltzer, P; Trent, J

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the gene for the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor has been mapped to chromosome 7p, the short arm of chromosome 7 [Shimizu, N., Kondo, I., Gamou, M. A., Behzadian, A. & Shimizu, Y. (1984) Somatic Cell Mol. Genet. 10, 45-53]. Utilizing EGF binding in saturation studies, karyology, and cDNA hybridization experiments, we have sought to determine whether there is a correlation between dosage or alteration of chromosome 7 and enhanced expression of EGF receptor in cultured human pancreatic carcinoma cells. Saturation binding studies with 125I-labeled EGF were performed at 4 degrees C with four established human pancreatic cancer cell lines: T3M4, PANC-1, COLO 357, and UACC-462. Analysis of binding data revealed enhanced numbers of EGF receptors in all four cell lines. Chromosome banding analysis revealed clonal structural alterations of chromosome 7p in the cell lines T3M4, PANC-1, and COLO 357, whereas UACC-462 displayed multiple copies of chromosome 7. Hybridization studies using a radiolabeled EGF receptor cDNA probe failed to demonstrate DNA sequence amplification in any cell line but confirmed the presence of EGF receptor mRNA in these cells in approximate proportion to EGF receptor number. Our results suggest that enhanced expression of EGF receptor in human pancreatic cancer can be associated with either structural or numerical alterations of chromosome 7. Images PMID:3014534

  14. Pathogenic cellular role of the p.L104P human cationic trypsinogen variant in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Balázs, Anita; Hegyi, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the PRSS1 gene encoding human cationic trypsinogen are associated with hereditary and sporadic chronic pancreatitis. High-penetrance PRSS1 mutations found in hereditary pancreatitis alter activation and/or degradation of cationic trypsinogen, thereby promoting intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation. In contrast, a number of rare PRSS1 variants identified in subjects with sporadic chronic pancreatitis cause misfolding and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Mutation p.L104P is unique among natural PRSS1 variants, since it affects the substrate binding site of trypsin. The aim of the present study was to establish the clinical significance of variant p.L104P through functional analysis. We found that p.L104P trypsin exhibited decreased activity on peptide and protein substrates; however, autoactivation was slightly accelerated. Remarkably, binding of the physiological trypsin inhibitor serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) was decreased by 70-fold. In the presence of the trypsinogen-degrading enzyme chymotrypsin C, mutant p.L104P autoactivated to higher trypsin levels than wild-type trypsinogen. This apparent resistance to degradation was due to slower cleavage at Arg122 rather than Leu81. Finally, secretion of mutant p.L104P from transfected cells was markedly reduced due to intracellular retention and aggregation with concomitant elevation of ER stress markers. We conclude that PRSS1 variant p.L104P exhibits a variety of phenotypic changes that can increase risk for chronic pancreatitis. Mutation-induced misfolding and associated ER stress are the dominant effects that support a direct pathogenic role in chronic pancreatitis. PMID:26822915

  15. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  16. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Acute pancreatitis Chronic pancreatitis Pancreatic abscess Shock Review Date 10/27/2015 Updated by: Subodh K. ... gastroenterologist with Gastrointestinal Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  17. Alternatively activated macrophages promote pancreatic fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jing; Sharma, Vishal; Hsieh, Michael H.; Chawla, Ajay; Murali, Ramachandran; Pandol, Stephen J.; Habtezion, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive and irreversible inflammatory and fibrotic disease with no cure. Unlike acute pancreatitis, we find that alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) are dominant in mouse and human CP. AAMs are dependent on IL-4 and IL-13 signaling and we show that mice lacking IL-4Rα, myeloid specific IL-4Rα, and IL-4/IL-13 were less susceptible to pancreatic fibrosis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that mouse and human pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are a source of IL-4/IL-13. Notably, we show that pharmacologic inhibition of IL-4/IL-13 in human ex-vivo studies as well as in established mouse CP decreases pancreatic AAMs and fibrosis. We identify a critical role for macrophages in pancreatic fibrosis and in turn PSCs as important inducers of macrophage alternative activation. Our study challenges and identifies pathways involved in cross talk between macrophages and PSCs that can be targeted to reverse or halt pancreatic fibrosis progression. PMID:25981357

  18. CDGSH iron sulfur domain 2 activates proliferation and EMT of pancreatic cancer cells via Wnt/β-catenin pathway and has prognostic value in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Bai, Yuan-Song; Wang, Qing

    2016-10-26

    Recently, increasing evidence has shown that CDGSH iron sulfur domain2 (CISD2) is involved in the initiation and metastasis of several cancers. However, the evidence of its potential role in pancreatic cancer is still lacking. In our present study, CISD2 was found to be increased in pancreatic cancer samples and multiple cell lines. Moreover, statistical analysis revealed that a high level of CISD2 was related to advanced clinical stage, advanced T-stage, positive vascular invasion, positive distant metastasis, and larger tumor size. In addition, multivariate analysis suggests that CISD2 was an independent prognostic factor in pancreatic cancer. Importantly, downregulation of CISD2 was capable of inhibiting the survival and growth of pancreatic cancer cells. Mechanistic study showed that inactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway contributed to the CISD2 deficit-induced death of pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that CISD2 silencing significantly inhibited EMT via the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Finally, in nude mice, CISD2 deficit suppressed the tumorigenesis of pancreatic cancer cells. Collectively, our study demonstrated that CISD2 could be an independent prognostic factor for pancreatic cancer and suggested that the CISD2/Wnt/β-catenin pathway contributes to the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells and EMT, hinting at a novel promising molecular target in the therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer.

  19. Cephalic phase pancreatic polypeptide responses to liquid and solid stimuli in humans.

    PubMed

    Teff, Karen L

    2010-03-03

    The hormone, pancreatic polypeptide (PP) is postulated to be involved in body weight regulation. PP release is dependent on vagal activation and is a marker of vagal efferent activity. Because vagal activity plays a role in glucose homeostasis, elucidating the conditions of activation has important implications for nutrient metabolism. In humans, modified sham-feeding is known to elicit vagally-mediated hormonal responses. We present results of 3 studies in which healthy human subjects tasted various stimuli including sweet and salty liquids, unflavored and flavored gum and mixed nutrient foods flavored with either sweet or salt and rendered palatable or unpalatable. We examined the effects of these stimuli on PP levels relative to fasting. We found that liquids flavored with either glucose or salt, did not elicit an increase in PP levels greater than fasting. Similarly, chewing gum, whether unflavored or flavored with a non-nutritive sweetener or the sweetener paired with a mint flavor, did not significantly increase PP levels. In contrast, when subjects tasted mixed nutrient foods, these reliably elicited increases in PP levels at 4 min post-stimulus (sweet palatable, p<0.002; sweet unpalatable, p<0.001; salty, palatable, p<0.05, salty unpalatable, p<0.05). The magnitude of release was influenced by the flavor, i.e. a sweet palatable stimulus (320.1+/-93.7 pg/ml/30 min) elicited the greatest increase in PP compared with a salty palatable stimulus (142.4+/-88.7 pg/ml/30 min; p<0.05). These data suggest that liquids and chewing gum do not provide adequate stimulation for vagal efferent activation in humans and that mixed nutrient foods are the optimal stimuli.

  20. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  1. Development of a dielectric equivalent gel for better impedance matching for human skin.

    PubMed

    Sunaga, Takahiro; Ikehira, Hiroo; Furukawa, Shigeo; Tamura, Mitsuru; Yoshitome, Eiji; Obata, Takayuki; Shinkai, Hiroshi; Tanada, Shuji; Murata, Hajime; Sasaki, Yasuhito

    2003-04-01

    It would be useful to develop a tissue equivalent gel to improve the uniformity of the electromagnetic field in the human body, and for making a tissue equivalent dielectric human phantom. In this study, solid type, water based gelatin-honey gels were developed which have the electrical characteristics of skin tissue. It was demonstrated that a stable and homogeneous gel, with a relative dielectric constant epsilon ' chosen from desired ranges found in skin, can be made for 200-400 MHz.

  2. Micro electrical impedance spectroscopy on a needle for ex vivo discrimination between human normal and cancer renal tissues.

    PubMed

    Yun, Joho; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Park, Yangkyu; Cha, Jung-Joon; Lee, Jeong Zoo; Shin, Dong Gil; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    The ex-vivo discrimination between human normal and cancer renal tissues was confirmed using μEoN (micro electrical impedance spectroscopy-on-a-needle) by measuring and comparing the electrical impedances in the frequency domain. To quantify the extent of discrimination between dissimilar tissues and to determine the optimal frequency at which the discrimination capability is at a maximum, discrimination index (DI) was employed for both magnitude and phase. The highest values of DI for the magnitude and phase were 5.15 at 1 MHz and 3.57 at 1 kHz, respectively. The mean magnitude and phase measured at the optimal frequency for normal tissues were 5013.40 ± 94.39 Ω and -68.54 ± 0.72°, respectively; those for cancer tissues were 4165.19 ± 70.32 Ω and -64.10 ± 0.52°, respectively. A statistically significant difference (p< 0.05) between the two tissues was observed at all the investigated frequencies. To extract the electrical properties (resistance and capacitance) of these bio-tissues through curve fitting with experimental results, an equivalent circuit was proposed based on the μEoN structure on the condition that the μEoN was immersed in the bio-tissues. The average and standard deviation of the extracted resistance and capacitance for the normal tissues were 6.22 ± 0.24 kΩ and 280.21 ± 32.25 pF, respectively, and those for the cancer tissues were 5.45 ± 0.22 kΩ and 376.32 ± 34.14 pF, respectively. The electrical impedance was higher in the normal tissues compared with the cancer tissues. The μEoN could clearly discriminate between normal and cancer tissues by comparing the results at the optimal frequency (magnitude and phase) and those of the curve fitting (extracted resistance and capacitance).

  3. The structure of human pancreatic alpha-amylase at 1.8 A resolution and comparisons with related enzymes.

    PubMed

    Brayer, G D; Luo, Y; Withers, S G

    1995-09-01

    The structure of human pancreatic alpha-amylase has been determined to 1.8 A resolution using X-ray diffraction techniques. This enzyme is found to be composed of three structural domains. The largest is Domain A (residues 1-99, 169-404), which forms a central eight-stranded parallel beta-barrel, to one end of which are located the active site residues Asp 197, Glu 233, and Asp 300. Also found in this vicinity is a bound chloride ion that forms ligand interactions to Arg 195, Asn 298, and Arg 337. Domain B is the smallest (residues 100-168) and serves to form a calcium binding site against the wall of the beta-barrel of Domain A. Protein groups making ligand interactions to this calcium include Asn 100, Arg 158, Asp 167, and His 201. Domain C (residues 405-496) is made up of anti-parallel beta-structure and is only loosely associated with Domains A and B. It is notable that the N-terminal glutamine residue of human pancreatic alpha-amylase undergoes a posttranslational modification to form a stable pyrrolidone derivative that may provide protection against other digestive enzymes. Structure-based comparisons of human pancreatic alpha-amylase with functionally related enzymes serve to emphasize three points. Firstly, despite this approach facilitating primary sequence alignments with respect to the numerous insertions and deletions present, overall there is only approximately 15% sequence homology between the mammalian and fungal alpha-amylases. Secondly, in contrast, these same studies indicate that significant structural homology is present and of the order of approximately 70%. Thirdly, the positioning of Domain C can vary considerably between alpha-amylases. In terms of the more closely related porcine enzyme, there are four regions of polypeptide chain (residues 237-250, 304-310, 346-354, and 458-461) with significantly different conformations from those in human pancreatic alpha-amylase. At least two of these could play a role in observed differential

  4. Functional Proteomics Screen Enables Enrichment of Distinct Cell Types from Human Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Sharivkin, Revital; Walker, Michael D.; Soen, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The current world-wide epidemic of diabetes has prompted attempts to generate new sources of insulin-producing cells for cell replacement therapy. An inherent challenge in many of these strategies is the lack of cell-surface markers permitting isolation and characterization of specific cell types from differentiating stem cell populations. Here we introduce an iterative proteomics procedure allowing tag-free isolation of cell types based on their function. Our method detects and associates specific cell-surface markers with particular cell functionality by coupling cell capture on antibody arrays with immunofluorescent labeling. Using this approach in an iterative manner, we discovered marker combinations capable of enriching for discrete pancreatic cell subtypes from human islets of Langerhans: insulin-producing beta cells (CD9high/CD56+), glucagon-producing alpha cells (CD9- /CD56+) and trypsin-producing acinar cells (CD9- /CD56-). This strategy may assist future beta cell research and the development of diagnostic tools for diabetes. It can also be applied more generally for function-based purification of desired cell types from other limited and heterogeneous biological samples. PMID:25706282

  5. Pancreatic β-Cell Membrane Fluidity and Toxicity Induced by Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Species

    PubMed Central

    Pilkington, Emily H.; Gurzov, Esteban N.; Kakinen, Aleksandr; Litwak, Sara A.; Stanley, William J.; Davis, Thomas P.; Ke, Pu Chun

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) into fibrils and plaques is associated with pancreatic β-cell loss in type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, due to the rapidness of hIAPP conversion in aqueous phase, exactly which hIAPP species is responsible for the observed toxicity and through what mechanisms remains ambiguous. In light of the importance of understanding hIAPP toxicity for T2D here we show a biophysical scheme based on the use of a lipophilic Laurdan dye for examining MIN6 cell membranes upon exposure to fresh and oligomeric hIAPP as well as mature amyloid. It has been found that all three hIAPP species, especially fresh hIAPP, enhanced membrane fluidity and caused losses in cell viability. The cell generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), however, was the most pronounced with mature amyloid hIAPP. The correlation between changes in membrane fluidity and cell viability and their lack of correlation with ROS production suggest hIAPP toxicity is elicited through both physical and biochemical means. This study offers a new insight into β-cell toxicity induced by controlled hIAPP species, as well as new biophysical methodologies that may prove beneficial for the studies of T2D as well as neurological disorders. PMID:26880502

  6. Pancreatic β-Cell Membrane Fluidity and Toxicity Induced by Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilkington, Emily H.; Gurzov, Esteban N.; Kakinen, Aleksandr; Litwak, Sara A.; Stanley, William J.; Davis, Thomas P.; Ke, Pu Chun

    2016-02-01

    Aggregation of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) into fibrils and plaques is associated with pancreatic β-cell loss in type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, due to the rapidness of hIAPP conversion in aqueous phase, exactly which hIAPP species is responsible for the observed toxicity and through what mechanisms remains ambiguous. In light of the importance of understanding hIAPP toxicity for T2D here we show a biophysical scheme based on the use of a lipophilic Laurdan dye for examining MIN6 cell membranes upon exposure to fresh and oligomeric hIAPP as well as mature amyloid. It has been found that all three hIAPP species, especially fresh hIAPP, enhanced membrane fluidity and caused losses in cell viability. The cell generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), however, was the most pronounced with mature amyloid hIAPP. The correlation between changes in membrane fluidity and cell viability and their lack of correlation with ROS production suggest hIAPP toxicity is elicited through both physical and biochemical means. This study offers a new insight into β-cell toxicity induced by controlled hIAPP species, as well as new biophysical methodologies that may prove beneficial for the studies of T2D as well as neurological disorders.

  7. Epidrug-induced upregulation of functional somatostatin type 2 receptors in human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Marije J; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Dogan, Fadime; Farrell, William E; Feelders, Richard A; Lamberts, Steven W J; de Herder, Wouter W; Vitale, Giovanni; Hofland, Leo J

    2016-05-19

    Somatostatin receptors are a pivotal target for treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET), either with somatostatin analogues (SSA) or radiolabeled SSA. The highest affinity target for the most commonly used SSA is the somatostatin receptor type 2 (sst2). An important factor that may complicate treatment efficacy, is the variable number of receptors expressed on pNETs. Gene expression is subject to complex regulation, in which epigenetics has a central role. In this study we explored the possible role of epigenetic modifications in the variations in sst2 expression levels in two human pNET cell lines, BON-1 and QGP-1. We found upregulation of sst2 mRNA after treatment with the epidrugs 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and valproic acid (VPA), an increased uptake of radiolabeled octreotide, as well as increased sensitivity to the SSA octreotide in functional cAMP inhibition. At epigenetic level we observed low methylation levels of the sst2 gene promoter region irrespective of expression. Activating histone mark H3K9Ac can be regulated with epidrug treatment, with an angle of effect corresponding to the effect on mRNA expression. Repressive histone mark H3K27me3 is not regulated by either 5-aza-dC or VPA. We conclude that epidrug treatment, in particular with combined 5-aza-dC and VPA treatment, might hold promise for improving and adding to current SSA treatment strategies of patients with pNETs.

  8. Increased levels of 3-hydroxykynurenine parallel disease severity in human acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Skouras, Christos; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Homer, Natalie Z. M.; Murray, Toby B. J.; Robertson, Darren; Briody, Lesley; Paterson, Finny; Spence, Heather; Derr, Lisa; Hayes, Alastair J.; Tsoumanis, Andreas; Lyster, Dawn; Parks, Rowan W.; Garden, O. James; Iredale, John P.; Uings, Iain J.; Liddle, John; Wright, Wayne L.; Dukes, George; Webster, Scott P.; Mole, Damian J.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) protects against multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) in experimental acute pancreatitis (AP). We aimed to precisely define the kynurenine pathway activation in relation to AP and AP-MODS in humans, by carrying out a prospective observational study of all persons presenting with a potential diagnosis of AP for 90 days. We sampled peripheral venous blood at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 168 hours post-recruitment. We measured tryptophan metabolite concentrations and analysed these in the context of clinical data and disease severity indices, cytokine profiles and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations. 79 individuals were recruited (median age: 59.6 years; 47 males, 59.5%). 57 met the revised Atlanta definition of AP: 25 had mild, 23 moderate, and 9 severe AP. Plasma 3-hydroxykynurenine concentrations correlated with contemporaneous APACHE II scores (R2 = 0.273; Spearman rho = 0.581; P < 0.001) and CRP (R2 = 0.132; Spearman rho = 0.455, P < 0.001). Temporal profiling showed early tryptophan depletion and contemporaneous 3-hydroxykynurenine elevation. Furthermore, plasma concentrations of 3-hydroxykynurenine paralleled systemic inflammation and AP severity. These findings support the rationale for investigating early intervention with a KMO inhibitor, with the aim of reducing the incidence and severity of AP-associated organ dysfunction. PMID:27669975

  9. Human Pancreatic β Cell lncRNAs Control Cell-Specific Regulatory Networks.

    PubMed

    Akerman, Ildem; Tu, Zhidong; Beucher, Anthony; Rolando, Delphine M Y; Sauty-Colace, Claire; Benazra, Marion; Nakic, Nikolina; Yang, Jialiang; Wang, Huan; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Moran, Ignasi; Garcia-Hurtado, Javier; Castro, Natalia; Gonzalez-Franco, Roser; Stewart, Andrew F; Bonner, Caroline; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Berney, Thierry; Groop, Leif; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Pattou, Francois; Argmann, Carmen; Schadt, Eric; Ravassard, Philippe; Ferrer, Jorge

    2017-02-07

    Recent studies have uncovered thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human pancreatic β cells. β cell lncRNAs are often cell type specific and exhibit dynamic regulation during differentiation or upon changing glucose concentrations. Although these features hint at a role of lncRNAs in β cell gene regulation and diabetes, the function of β cell lncRNAs remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the function of β cell-specific lncRNAs and transcription factors using transcript knockdowns and co-expression network analysis. This revealed lncRNAs that function in concert with transcription factors to regulate β cell-specific transcriptional networks. We further demonstrate that the lncRNA PLUTO affects local 3D chromatin structure and transcription of PDX1, encoding a key β cell transcription factor, and that both PLUTO and PDX1 are downregulated in islets from donors with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. These results implicate lncRNAs in the regulation of β cell-specific transcription factor networks.

  10. Establishing the catalytic mechanism of human pancreatic α-amylase with QM/MM methods.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Gaspar P; Brás, Natércia F; Perez, Marta A S; Fernandes, Pedro A; Russo, Nino; Ramos, Maria J; Toscano, Marirosa

    2015-06-09

    In this work, we studied the catalytic mechanism of human pancreatic α-amylase (HPA). Our goal was to determine the catalytic mechanism of HPA with atomic detail using computational methods. We demonstrated that the HPA catalytic mechanism consists of two steps, the first of which (glycosylation step) involves breaking the glycosidic bond to culminate in the formation of a covalent intermediate. The second (deglycosylation step) consists of the addition of a water molecule to release the enzyme/substrate covalent intermediate, completing the hydrolysis of the sugar. The active site was very open to the solvent. Our mechanism basically differs from the previously proposed mechanism by having two water molecules instead of only one near the active site that participate in the mechanism. We also demonstrate the relevant role of the three catalytic amino acids, two aspartate residues and a glutamate (D197, E233, and D300), during catalysis. It was also shown that the rate limiting step was glycosylation, and its activation energy was in agreement with experimental values obtained for HPA. The experimental activation energy was 14.4 kcal mol(-1), and the activation energy obtained computationally was 15.1 kcal mol(-1).

  11. Preferentially Cytotoxic Constituents of Andrographis paniculata and their Preferential Cytotoxicity against Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sullim; Morita, Hiroyuki; Tezuka, Yasuhiro

    2015-07-01

    In the course of our search for anticancer agents based on a novel anti-austerity strategy, we found that the 70% EtOH extract of the crude drug Andrographis Herba (aerial parts of Andrographis paniculata), used in Japanese Kampo medicines, killed PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells preferentially in nutrient-deprived medium (NDM). Phytochemical investigation of the 70% EtOH extract led to the isolation of 21 known compounds consisting of six labdane-type diterpenes (11, 15, 17-19, 21), six flavones (5, 7, 10, 12, 14, 20), three flavanones (2, 6, 16), two sterols (3, 8), a fatty acid (1), a phthalate (4), a triterpene (9), and a monoterpene (13). Among them, 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (17) displayed the most potent preferential cytotoxicity against PANC-1 and PSN-1 cells with PC50 values of 10.0 μM and 9.27 μM, respectively. Microscopical observation, double staining with ethidium bromide (EB) and acridine orange (AO), and flow cytometry with propidium iodide/annexin V double staining indicated that 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (17) triggered apoptosis-like cell death in NDM with an amino acids and/or serum-sensitive mode.

  12. Impact of exposure to low concentrations of nitric oxide on protein profile in murine and human pancreatic islet cells

    PubMed Central

    Tapia-Limonchi, Rafael; Díaz, Irene; Cahuana, Gladys M; Bautista, Mario; Martín, Franz; Soria, Bernat; Tejedo, Juan R; Bedoya, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Homeostatic levels of nitric oxide (NO) protect efficiently against apoptotic death in both human and rodent pancreatic β cells, but the protein profile of this action remains to be determined. We have applied a 2 dimensional LC-MS-MALDI-TOF/TOF-based analysis to study the impact of protective NO in rat insulin-producing RINm5F cell line and in mouse and human pancreatic islets (HPI) exposed to serum deprivation condition. 24 proteins in RINm5F and 22 in HPI were identified to undergo changes in at least one experimental condition. These include stress response mitochondrial proteins (UQCRC2, VDAC1, ATP5C1, ATP5A1) in RINm5F cells and stress response endoplasmic reticulum proteins (HSPA5, PDIA6, VCP, GANAB) in HPI. In addition, metabolic and structural proteins, oxidoreductases and chaperones related with protein metabolism are also regulated by NO treatment. Network analysis of differentially expressed proteins shows their interaction in glucocorticoid receptor and NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response pathways and eNOS signaling. The results indicate that exposure to exogenous NO counteracts the impact of serum deprivation on pancreatic β cell proteome. Species differences in the proteins involved are apparent. PMID:25658244

  13. Evidence that P12, a specific variant of P16{sup INK4A}, plays a suppressive role in human pancreatic carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Poi, Ming J.; Knobloch, Thomas J.; Yuan, Chunhua; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Weghorst, Christopher M.; Li, Junan

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •P12, a variant of P16{sup INK4A}, inhibits the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. •P12 is distinct from P16 in function and structure. •Genetic alterations of p12 are prevalent in human pancreatic carcinoma. •P12 represents a potential pancreas-specific tumor suppressor. -- Abstract: The INK4a-ARF locus plays a central role in the development of pancreatic tumors as evidenced by the fact that up to 98% of pancreatic tumor specimens harbored genetic alterations at the INK4a-ARF locus. Interestingly, in addition to the well-known P16{sup INK4A} (P16) and P14ARF tumor suppressors, the INK4a-ARF locus in pancreas encodes another protein, P12, whose structure, function, and contributions to pancreatic carcinogenesis remain to be elucidated. In the current study, we demonstrated that over-expression of p12 in human pancreatic cancer cells led to cell arrest at the G1 phase and such cell cycle arrest was related to down-regulation of a number of oncogenes, such as c-Jun, Fos, and SEI1. Furthermore, unlike P16, P12 did not retain any cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4)-inhibitory activity. Instead, P12 exhibited a transactivating activity not found in P16. We also examined the genetic status of p12 in a cohort of 40 pancreatic tumor specimens and found that p12 alteration was prevalent in pancreatic tumors with an incidence of 70% (28/40). These results support that P12 is a tumor suppressive protein distinct from P16, and its genetic inactivation is associated with pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  14. Mathematical modeling of reflectance and intrinsic fluorescence for cancer detection in human pancreatic tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert H.; Chandra, Malavika; Scheiman, James; Simeone, Diane; McKenna, Barbara; Purdy, Julianne; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has a five-year survival rate of only 4%, largely because an effective procedure for early detection has not been developed. In this study, mathematical modeling of reflectance and fluorescence spectra was utilized to quantitatively characterize differences between normal pancreatic tissue, pancreatitis, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Initial attempts at separating the spectra of different tissue types involved dividing fluorescence by reflectance, and removing absorption artifacts by applying a "reverse Beer-Lambert factor" when the absorption coefficient was modeled as a linear combination of the extinction coefficients of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin. These procedures demonstrated the need for a more complete mathematical model to quantitatively describe fluorescence and reflectance for minimally-invasive fiber-based optical diagnostics in the pancreas.

  15. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gerloff, Andreas; Singer, Manfred V; Feick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated. PMID:20617020

  16. Echovirus 6 Infects Human Exocrine and Endocrine Pancreatic Cells and Induces Pro-Inflammatory Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Sarmiento, Luis; Frisk, Gun; Anagandula, Mahesh; Hodik, Monika; Barchetta, Ilaria; Netanyah, Eitan; Cabrera-Rode, Eduardo; Cilio, Corrado M.

    2017-01-01

    Human enteroviruses (HEV), especially coxsackievirus serotype B (CVB) and echovirus (E), have been associated with diseases of both the exocrine and endocrine pancreas, but so far evidence on HEV infection in human pancreas has been reported only in islets and ductal cells. This study aimed to investigate the capability of echovirus strains to infect human exocrine and endocrine pancreatic cells. Infection of explanted human islets and exocrine cells with seven field strains of E6 caused cytopathic effect, virus titer increase and production of HEV protein VP1 in both cell types. Virus particles were found in islets and acinar cells infected with E6. No cytopathic effect or infectious progeny production was observed in exocrine cells exposed to the beta cell-tropic strains of E16 and E30. Endocrine cells responded to E6, E16 and E30 by upregulating the transcription of interferon-induced with helicase C domain 1 (IF1H1), 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase 1 (OAS1), interferon-β (IFN-β), chemokine (C–X–C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10) and chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5). Echovirus 6, but not E16 or E30, led to increased transcription of these genes in exocrine cells. These data demonstrate for the first time that human exocrine cells represent a target for E6 infection and suggest that certain HEV serotypes can replicate in human pancreatic exocrine cells, while the pancreatic endocrine cells are permissive to a wider range of HEV. PMID:28146100

  17. PERIOD1 is an anti-apoptotic factor in human pancreatic and hepatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Fuyuki; Nagata, Chihiro; Liu, Yang; Suzuki, Takahiro; Kondo, Jun; Morohashi, Satoko; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Kato, Yukio; Kijima, Hiroshi

    2009-12-01

    PERIOD1 (PER1) is a clock gene. We examined the effect of knockdown of PER1 on apoptosis in pancreatic cancer (MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. Transfection of siRNA against PER1 into these cells increased the cleaved forms of caspases and poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase and induced apoptosis in all three cell lines. In the two pancreatic cancer cell lines, PER1 knockdown resulted in upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2. Expression of p53 was not altered in the two pancreatic cancer cell lines containing mutated p53, but was upregulated in the HepG2 cells containing wild-type p53. Cell proliferation of MIA PaCa-2 and HepG2 was inhibited by PER1 knockdown. We also examined, by immunohistochemical staining, the expression of PER1 in pancreatic cancer tissue and found that PER1 was strongly expressed in pancreatic cancer cells. These results indicate that PER1 acts as an anti-apoptotic factor in pancreatic cancer cells.

  18. Detection and localization of Mip-3alpha/LARC/Exodus, a macrophage proinflammatory chemokine, and its CCR6 receptor in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kleeff, J; Kusama, T; Rossi, D L; Ishiwata, T; Maruyama, H; Friess, H; Büchler, M W; Zlotnik, A; Korc, M

    1999-05-17

    Macrophage Proinflammatory Human Chemokine-3alpha (Mip-3alpha/LARC/Exodus) belongs to a large family of chemotactic cytokines, which participate in directing inflammatory cell migration and in modulating angiogenesis. Mip-3alpha signals through a recently identified G-protein linked 7-transmembrane receptor, CCR6. In this study, we have characterized the expression of Mip-3alpha and CCR6 in 12 normal and 16 cancerous human pancreatic tissues and in 4 cultured pancreatic cancer cell lines, and assessed the effects of Mip-3alpha on growth and invasion of these cell lines. Pancreatic cancer tissues markedly overexpressed Mip-3alpha in comparison with normal pancreatic samples. By in situ hybridization Mip-3alpha and CCR6 mRNA moieties were present in cancer cells within the tumors. In addition, Mip-3alpha was abundant in the macrophages infiltrating the tumor mass. Mip-3alpha and its receptor CCR6 were expressed in all 4 tested pancreatic cancer cell lines. Mip-3alpha stimulated the growth of one cell line, enhanced the migration of another cell line, and was without effect in the other 2 cell lines. Together, our findings suggest that Mip-3alpha has the potential to act via autocrine and paracrine mechanisms to contribute to the pathobiology of human pancreatic cancer.

  19. Toll Like Receptor 2, 4, and 9 Signaling Promotes Autoregulative Tumor Cell Growth and VEGF/PDGF Expression in Human Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grimmig, Tanja; Moench, Romana; Kreckel, Jennifer; Haack, Stephanie; Rueckert, Felix; Rehder, Roberta; Tripathi, Sudipta; Ribas, Carmen; Chandraker, Anil; Germer, Christoph T.; Gasser, Martin; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria

    2016-01-01

    Toll like receptor (TLR) signaling has been suggested to play an important role in the inflammatory microenvironment of solid tumors and through this inflammation-mediated tumor growth. Here, we studied the role of tumor cells in their process of self-maintaining TLR expression independent of inflammatory cells and cytokine milieu for autoregulative tumor growth signaling in pancreatic cancer. We analyzed the expression of TLR2, -4, and -9 in primary human cancers and their impact on tumor growth via induced activation in several established pancreatic cancers. TLR-stimulated pancreatic cancer cells were specifically investigated for activated signaling pathways of VEGF/PDGF and anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL expression as well as tumor cell growth. The primary pancreatic cancers and cell lines expressed TLR2, -4, and -9. TLR-specific stimulation resulted in activated MAP-kinase signaling, most likely via autoregulative stimulation of demonstrated TLR-induced VEGF and PDGF expression. Moreover, TLR activation prompted the expression of Bcl-xL and has been demonstrated for the first time to induce tumor cell proliferation in pancreatic cancer. These findings strongly suggest that pancreatic cancer cells use specific Toll like receptor signaling to promote tumor cell proliferation and emphasize the particular role of TLR2, -4, and -9 in this autoregulative process of tumor cell activation and proliferation in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27941651

  20. Lupeol, a fruit and vegetable based triterpene, induces apoptotic death of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells via inhibition of Ras signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Mohammad; Kaur, Satwinderjeet; Kweon, Mee-Hyang; Adhami, Vaqar Mustafa; Afaq, Farrukh; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2005-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an exceptionally aggressive disease, the treatment of which has largely been unsuccessful due to higher resistance offered by pancreatic cancer cells to conventional approaches such as surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. The aberration of Ras oncoprotein has been linked to the induction of multiple signaling pathways and to the resistance offered by pancreatic cancer cells to apoptosis. Therefore, there is a need for development of new and effective chemotherapeutic agents which can target multiple pathways to induce responsiveness of pancreatic cancer cells to death signals. In this study, human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells AsPC-1 were used to investigate the effect of Lupeol on cell growth and its effects on the modulation of multiple Ras-induced signaling pathways. Lupeol caused a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth as assessed by MTT assay and induction of apoptosis as assessed by flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy and western blotting. Lupeol treatment to cells was found to significantly reduce the expression of Ras oncoprotein and modulate the protein expression of various signaling molecules involved in PKCalpha/ODC, PI3K/Akt and MAPKs pathways along with a significant reduction in the activation of NFkappaB signaling pathway. Our data suggest that Lupeol can adopt a multi-prong strategy to target multiple signaling pathways leading to induction of apoptosis and inhibition of growth of pancreatic cancer cells. Lupeol could be a potential agent against pancreatic cancer, however, further in-depth in vivo studies are warranted.

  1. Investigation of the interaction between quercetin and human serum albumin by multiple spectra, electrochemical impedance spectra and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jie; Zou, Ting; Wang, Li; Zhang, Yezhong; Liu, Yi

    2014-12-01

    Quercetin (Qu), a flavonoid compound, exists widely in the human diet and exhibits a variety of pharmacological activities. This work is aimed at studying the effect of Qu on the bioactive protein, human serum albumin (HSA) under simulated biophysical conditions. Multiple spectroscopic methods (including fluorescence and circular dichroism), electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) and molecular modeling were employed to investigate the interaction between Qu and HSA. The fluorescence quenching and EIS experimental results showed that the fluorescence quenching of HSA was caused by formation of a Qu-HSA complex in the ground state, which belonged to the static quenching mechanism. Based on the calculated thermodynamic parameters, it concluded that the interaction was a spontaneous process and hydrogen bonds combined with van der Waal's forces played a major role in stabilizing the Qu-HSA complex. Molecular modeling results demonstrated that several amino acids participated in the binding process and the formed Qu-HSA complex was stabilized by H-bonding network at site I in sub-domain IIA, which was further confirmed by the site marker competitive experiments. The evidence from circular dichroism (CD) indicated that the secondary structure and microenvironment of HSA were changed. Alterations in the conformation of HSA were observed with a reduction in the amount of α helix from 59.9% (free HSA) to 56% (Qu-HSA complex), indicating a slight unfolding of the protein polypeptides.

  2. Use of 3-D magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography in detecting human cerebral stroke: a simulation study*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Nuo; Zhu, Shan-an; He, Bin

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a new three dimensional (3-D) conductivity imaging approach and have used it to detect human brain conductivity changes corresponding to acute cerebral stroke. The proposed Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) approach is based on the J-Substitution algorithm and is expanded to imaging 3-D subject conductivity distribution changes. Computer simulation studies have been conducted to evaluate the present MREIT imaging approach. Simulations of both types of cerebral stroke, hemorrhagic stroke and ischemic stroke, were performed on a four-sphere head model. Simulation results showed that the correlation coefficient (CC) and relative error (RE) between target and estimated conductivity distributions were 0.9245±0.0068 and 8.9997%±0.0084%, for hemorrhagic stroke, and 0.6748±0.0197 and 8.8986%±0.0089%, for ischemic stroke, when the SNR (signal-to-noise radio) of added GWN (Gaussian White Noise) was 40. The convergence characteristic was also evaluated according to the changes of CC and RE with different iteration numbers. The CC increases and RE decreases monotonously with the increasing number of iterations. The present simulation results show the feasibility of the proposed 3-D MREIT approach in hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke detection and suggest that the method may become a useful alternative in clinical diagnosis of acute cerebral stroke in humans. PMID:15822161

  3. Sensitivity field distributions for segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis based on real human anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, A. A.; Kramarenko, V. K.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Rudnev, S. G.; Salamatova, V. Yu; Smirnov, A. V.; Vassilevski, Yu V.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, an adaptive unstructured tetrahedral mesh generation technology is applied for simulation of segmental bioimpedance measurements using high-resolution whole-body model of the Visible Human Project man. Sensitivity field distributions for a conventional tetrapolar, as well as eight- and ten-electrode measurement configurations are obtained. Based on the ten-electrode configuration, we suggest an algorithm for monitoring changes in the upper lung area.

  4. Non-invasive measurement of cholesterol in human blood by impedance technique: an investigation by 3D finite element field modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristovich, Ekaterina; Khan, Sanowar

    2013-06-01

    This paper concerns detection of particle concentration (e.g. cholesterol) in conductive media (e.g. human blood) by impedance technique. The technique is based on changes in the impedance measurement across a given conducting medium due to changes in the particle concentration. The impedance is calculated by calculating the current through the conducting media produced by electric field distribution between two electrodes. This is done by modelling and computation of 3D electric fields between the electrodes for known voltages applied between them using the well-known finite element method (FEM). The complexity of such FE models is attributed to particle distribution, their geometric and material parameters, and their shape and size which can be of many orders of magnitude smaller than the overall problem domain under investigation. This paper overcomes this problem by adopting an effective particle coagulation (aggregation) strategy in FE modelling without significantly affecting the accuracy of field computation.

  5. Solving the forward problem in electrical impedance tomography for the human head using IDEAS (integrated design engineering analysis software), a finite element modelling tool.

    PubMed

    Bayford, R H; Gibson, A; Tizzard, A; Tidswell, T; Holder, D S

    2001-02-01

    If electrical impedance tomography is to be used as a clinical tool, the image reconstruction algorithms must yield accurate images of impedance changes. One of the keys to producing an accurate reconstructed image is the inclusion of prior information regarding the physical geometry of the object. To achieve this, many researchers have created tools for solving the forward problem by means of finite element methods (FEMs). These tools are limited, allowing only a set number of meshes to be produced from the geometric information of the object. There is a clear need for geometrical accurate FEM models to improve the quality of the reconstructed images. We present a commercial tool called IDEAS, which can be used to create FEM meshes for these models. The application of this tool is demonstrated by using segmented data from the human head to model impedance changes inside the head.

  6. Purification and assay of secretory lithostathine in human pancreatic juice by fast protein liquid chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, A; Mezzi, G; Malesci, A

    1995-01-01

    Impaired secretion of lithostathine, a pancreatic glycoprotein capable of inhibiting the growth of CaCO3 crystals, has been reported in chronic calcifying pancreatitis. Controversial results were obtained, however, using immunoassays with different antibodies. The aim of this study was to purify and to measure juice lithostathine by a non-immunological method. Fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on a cation exchange column eluted by a sodium chloride gradient, was used. The conditions appropriate to separate secretory (S) from hydrolysed (H) isoforms of immunopurified lithostathine were also used for juice analysis. Pancreatic juice was collected by endoscopic cannulation of the major pancreatic duct, after secretin stimulation, from eight patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) and from eight controls. In all samples, S-isoforms of lithostathine (ranging from 16 to 19 Mr at SDS-PAGE) were the only constituent of two of the 15 peaks in which FPLC resolved the pancreatic proteins. The nature of these two peaks was confirmed by their coelution with immunopurified S-lithostathine and by immunoblot analysis with polyclonal anti-lithostathine antibodies. The ratio between the area of S-lithostathine peaks and the total area of proteic eluates, was always lower in CP patients (5.3 micrograms/mg of protein, median value; 0.2-15.4, range) than in controls (35.2 micrograms/mg; 16.6-55.9). It is concluded that lithostathine can be purified and measured in pancreatic juice by FPLC. Our results with a nonimmunological assay confirm a reduced secretion of lithostathine in patients with CP. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7737574

  7. Treating Diet-Induced Diabetes and Obesity with Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Progenitor Cells and Antidiabetic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bruin, Jennifer E.; Saber, Nelly; Braun, Natalie; Fox, Jessica K.; Mojibian, Majid; Asadi, Ali; Drohan, Campbell; O’Dwyer, Shannon; Rosman-Balzer, Diana S.; Swiss, Victoria A.; Rezania, Alireza; Kieffer, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived pancreatic progenitor cells effectively reverse hyperglycemia in rodent models of type 1 diabetes, but their capacity to treat type 2 diabetes has not been reported. An immunodeficient model of type 2 diabetes was generated by high-fat diet (HFD) feeding in SCID-beige mice. Exposure to HFDs did not impact the maturation of macroencapsulated pancreatic progenitor cells into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells following transplantation, and the cell therapy improved glucose tolerance in HFD-fed transplant recipients after 24 weeks. However, since diet-induced hyperglycemia and obesity were not fully ameliorated by transplantation alone, a second cohort of HFD-fed mice was treated with pancreatic progenitor cells combined with one of three antidiabetic drugs. All combination therapies rapidly improved body weight and co-treatment with either sitagliptin or metformin improved hyperglycemia after only 12 weeks. Therefore, a stem cell-based therapy may be effective for treating type 2 diabetes, particularly in combination with antidiabetic drugs. PMID:25801507

  8. Endogenously Expressed IL-4Rα Promotes the Malignant Phenotype of Human Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Traub, Benno; Sun, Lie; Ma, Yongsu; Xu, Pengfei; Lemke, Johannes; Paschke, Stephan; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Knippschild, Uwe; Kornmann, Marko

    2017-03-28

    Exogenous interleukin-4 (IL-4) has been demonstrated to affect the growth of different human malignancies including pancreatic cancer cells. The aim of our study was to determine the role of endogenously expressed IL-4-receptor-α-chain (IL-4Rα) in pancreatic cancer cells. IL-4Rα-suppression was achieved by generating Capan-1 cells stably expressing shRNA targeting IL-4Rα. The malignant phenotype was characterized by assessing growth properties, directional and non-directional cell movement in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Signaling pathways were analyzed upon IL-4 and IL-13 stimulation of wildtype (WT) and control-transfected cells compared to IL-4Rα-knockdown cells. Silencing of IL-4Rα resulted in reduced anchorage-dependent cell growth (p < 0.05) and reduced anchorage-independent colony size (p < 0.001) in vitro. Moreover, cell movement and migration was inhibited. IL-4 and IL-13 stimulation of Capan-1-WT cells induced activation of similar pathways like stimulation with Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I. This activation was reduced after IL-4Rα downregulation while IGF-I signaling seemed to be enhanced in knockdown-clones. Importantly, IL-4Rα silencing also significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. The present study indicates that endogenously expressed IL-4 and IL-4Rα contribute to the malignant phenotype of pancreatic cancer cells by activating diverse pro-oncogenic signaling pathways. Addressing these pathways may contribute to the treatment of the disease.

  9. MicroRNA-21 induces 5-fluorouracil resistance in human pancreatic cancer cells by regulating PTEN and PDCD4.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xueju; Wang, Weibin; Wang, Lanlan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xian; Chen, Mingtai; Wang, Fang; Yu, Jia; Ma, Yanni; Sun, Guotao

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer patients are often resistant to chemotherapy treatment, which results in poor prognosis. The objective of this study was to delineate the mechanism by which miR-21 induces drug resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in human pancreatic cancer cells (PATU8988 and PANC-1). We report that PATU8988 cells resistant to 5-FU express high levels of miR-21 in comparison to sensitive primary PATU8988 cells. Suppression of miR-21 expression in 5-Fu-resistant PATU8988 cells can alleviate its 5-FU resistance. Meanwhile, lentiviral vector-mediated overexpression of miR-21 not only conferred resistance to 5-FU but also promoted proliferation, migration, and invasion of PATU8988 and PANC-1 cells. The proresistance effects of miR-21 were attributed to the attenuated expression of tumor suppressor genes, including PTEN and PDCD4. Overexpression of PTEN and PDCD4 antagonized miR-21-induced resistance to 5-FU and migration activity. Our work demonstrates that miR-21 can confer drug resistance to 5-FU in pancreatic cancer cells by regulating the expression of tumor suppressor genes, as the target genes of miR-21, PTEN and PDCD4 can rescue 5-FU sensitivity and the phenotypic characteristics disrupted by miR-21.

  10. Liposomal insulin promoter-thymidine kinase gene therapy followed by ganciclovir effectively ablates human pancreatic cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, James X; Liu, Shi-He; Nemunaitis, John J; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2015-04-10

    PDX1 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and activates the insulin promoter (IP). Adenoviral IP-thymidine kinase and ganciclovir (TK/GCV) suppresses human pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) in mice, but repeated doses carry significant toxicity. We hypothesized that multiple cycles of liposomal IP-TK/GCV ablate human PDAC in SCID mice with minimal toxicity compared to adenoviral IP-TK/GCV. SCID mice with intraperitoneal human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 tumor implants were given a single cycle of 35 µg iv L-IP-TK, or four cycles of 1, 10, 20, 30, or 35 µg iv L-IP-TK (n = 20 per group), followed by intraperitoneal GCV. Insulin and glucose levels were monitored in mice treated with four cycles of 35 µg iv L-IP-TK. We found that four cycles of 10-35 µg L-IP-TK/GCV ablated more PANC-1 tumor volume compared to a single cycle with 35 µg. Mice that received four cycles of 10 µg L-IP-TK demonstrated the longest survival (P < 0.05), with a median survival of 126 days. In comparison, mice that received a single cycle of 35 µg L-IP-TK/GCV or GCV alone survived a median of 92 days and 68.7 days, respectively. There were no significant changes in glucose or insulin levels following treatment. In conclusion, multiple cycles of liposomal IP-TK/GCV ablate human PDAC in SCID mice with minimal toxicity, suggesting non-viral vectors are superior to adenoviral vectors for IP-gene therapy.

  11. Overexpression and biological function of IQGAP3 in human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weihong; Xu, Bin; Yao, Yiting; Yu, Xiaoling; Cao, Hua; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jie; Sheng, Huiming

    2016-01-01

    IQGAP3 (IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein3) belongs to IQGAP family. Recent studies have investigated that IQGAP3 was overexpressed in several tumor tissues. This study was designed to explore the expression and role of IQGAP3 in pancreatic cancer, a highly lethal disease. IQGAP3 mRNA expression was significantly increased in pancreatic cancer tissues, compared with non-cancerous tissues. Moreover, its expression was strongly associated with tumor size, differentiation, lymph node metastasis and patients’ overall survival. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) on The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset showed that cell apoptosis, metastasis and Cdc42 pathways were strongly associated with IQGAP3 expression in pancreatic cancer patients. Knocking down of IQGAP3 in two pancreatic cancer cell lines with high level of IQGAP3 (BXPC-3 and SW1990) significantly inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and induced cell apoptosis. Moreover, silencing of IQGAP3 also affected the expression of cell apoptosis-, metastasis- and Cdc42 pathway-related proteins. Cdc42 knockdown had similar inhibitory effects on the cellular behavior of BXPC-3 cells. In conclusion, IQGAP3 may act as an oncogene in pancreatic cancer through regulating Cdc42 expression. Our data suggest IQGAP3 might be a novel diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for this cancer. PMID:28078013

  12. Heat shock protein induction in rat pancreatic islets by recombinant human interleukin 1 beta.

    PubMed

    Helqvist, S; Polla, B S; Johannesen, J; Nerup, J

    1991-03-01

    Interleukin 1 beta, potentiated by tumour necrosis factor alpha, is cytotoxic to pancreatic Beta cells in vitro. We have hypothesized that interleukin 1 beta induces oxygen free radicals in Beta cells. Since cytotoxicity induced by free radicals and by heat may activate the same cellular repair mechanism (the heat shock response), the aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of protein synthesis in isolated islets after exposure to interleukin 1 beta (150 pg/ml, 24 h), tumour necrosis factor alpha (50 ng/ml, 24 h) heat shock (43 degrees C, 30 min) and H2O2 (0.1 mmol/l, 20 min). By polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, autoradiography, Western-blot analysis and partial peptide mapping of 35S-methionine labelled islets, interleukin 1 beta was found to induce a 73 kilodalton protein belonging to the heat shock protein family heat shock protein 70, a heat shock protein 90, and haem oxygenase. A minor induction of heat shock protein 73 and haem oxygenase was seen after H2O2. Interleukin 1 beta did not induce heat shock proteins in rat thyroid cells, rat mesangial cells or in human monocytes. Tumour necrosis factor alpha did not induce selective protein synthesis. Pre-exposure of islets to heat, tumour necrosis factor alpha, or H2O2 did not prevent the impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin release seen after 24 h of interleukin 1 beta exposure. The data are compatible with free radical induction by interleukin 1 beta. However, the heat shock response is not specific for oxidative injury, and previous studies have shown discrepant effects as to a protective effect of free radical scavengers against interleukin 1 beta-mediated beta-cytotoxicity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Intracellular Ca2+ signals in human-derived pancreatic somatostatin-secreting cells (QGP-1N).

    PubMed

    Squires, P E; Amiranoff, B; Dunne, M J

    1994-10-01

    Single-cell microfluorimetry techniques have been used to examine the effects of acetylcholine (0.1-100 microM) on the intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) in a human-derived pancreatic somatostatin-secreting cell line, QGP-1N. When applied to the bath solution, acetylcholine was found to evoke a marked and rapid increase in [Ca2+]i at all concentrations tested. These responses were either sustained, or associated with the generation of complex patterns of [Ca2+]i transients. Overall, the pattern of response was concentration related. In general, 0.1-10 microM acetylcholine initiated a series of repetitive oscillations in cytoplasmic Ca2+, whilst at higher concentrations the responses consisted of a rapid rise in [Ca2+]i followed by a smaller more sustained increase. Without external Ca2+, 100 microM acetylcholine caused only a transient rise in [Ca2+]i, whereas lower concentrations of the agonist were able to initiate, but not maintain, [Ca2+]i oscillations. Acetylcholine-evoked Ca2+ signals were abolished by atropine (1-10 microM), verapamil (100 microM) and caffeine (20 mM). Nifedipine failed to have any significant effect upon agonist-evoked increases in [Ca2+]i, whilst 50 mM KCl, used to depolarise the cell membrane, only elicited a transient increase in [Ca2+]i. Ryanodine (50-500 nM) and caffeine (1-20 mM) did not increase basal Ca2+ levels, but the Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors 2,5-di(tert-butyl)-hydroquinone (TBQ) and thapsigargin both elevated [Ca2+]i levels. These data demonstrate for the first time cytosolic Ca2+ signals in single isolated somatostatin-secreting cells of the pancreas. We have demonstrated that acetylcholine will evoke both Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ mobilisation, and we have partially addressed the subcellular mechanism responsible for these events.

  14. Stromal remodeling by the BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 suppresses the progression of human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Keisuke; Tateishi, Keisuke; Kudo, Yotaro; Hoshikawa, Mayumi; Tanaka, Mariko; Nakatsuka, Takuma; Fujiwara, Hiroaki; Miyabayashi, Koji; Takahashi, Ryota; Tanaka, Yasuo; Ijichi, Hideaki; Nakai, Yousuke; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Aoki, Taku; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro; Fukayama, Masashi; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) proteins, a family of chromatin reader proteins, have therapeutic efficacy against various malignancies. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor effects in distinct tumor types remain elusive. Here, we show a novel antitumor mechanism of BET inhibition in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We found that JQ1, a BET inhibitor, decreased desmoplastic stroma, a hallmark of PDAC, and suppressed the growth of patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDX) of PDACs. In vivo antitumor effects of JQ1 were not always associated with the JQ1 sensitivity of respective PDAC cells, and were rather dependent on the suppression of tumor-promoting activity in cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). JQ1 inhibited Hedgehog and TGF-β pathways as potent regulators of CAF activation and suppressed the expression of α-SMA, extracellular matrix, cytokines, and growth factors in human primary CAFs. Consistently, conditioned media (CM) from CAFs promoted the proliferation of PDAC cells along with the activation of ERK, AKT, and STAT3 pathways, though these effects were suppressed when CM from JQ1-treated CAFs was used. Mechanistically, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that JQ1 reduced TGF-β–dependent gene expression by disrupting the recruitment of the transcriptional machinery containing BET proteins. Finally, combination therapy with gemcitabine plus JQ1 showed greater efficacy than gemcitabine monotherapy against PDAC in vivo. Thus, our results reveal BET proteins as the critical regulators of CAF-activation and also provide evidence that stromal remodeling by epigenetic modulators can be a novel therapeutic option for PDAC. PMID:27528027

  15. Operon for Biosynthesis of Lipstatin, the Beta-Lactone Inhibitor of Human Pancreatic Lipase

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Tingli; Zhang, Daozhong; Lin, Shuangjun; Long, Qingshan; Wang, Yemin; Ou, Hongyu; Kang, Qianjin; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Lipstatin, isolated from Streptomyces toxytricini as a potent and selective inhibitor of human pancreatic lipase, is a precursor for tetrahydrolipstatin (also known as orlistat, Xenical, and Alli), the only FDA-approved antiobesity medication for long-term use. Lipstatin features a 2-hexyl-3,5-dihydroxy-7,10-hexadecadienoic-β-lactone structure with an N-formyl-l-leucine group attached as an ester to the 5-hydroxy group. It has been suggested that the α-branched 3,5-dihydroxy fatty acid β-lactone moiety of lipstatin in S. toxytricini is derived from Claisen condensation between two fatty acid substrates, which are derived from incomplete oxidative degradation of linoleic acid based on feeding experiments. In this study, we identified a six-gene operon (lst) that was essential for the biosynthesis of lipstatin by large-deletion, complementation, and single-gene knockout experiments. lstA, lstB, and lstC, which encode two β-ketoacyl–acyl carrier protein synthase III homologues and an acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) synthetase homologue, were indicated to be responsible for the generation of the α-branched 3,5-dihydroxy fatty acid backbone. Subsequently, the nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene lstE and the putative formyltransferase gene lstF were involved in decoration of the α-branched 3,5-dihydroxy fatty acid chain with an N-formylated leucine residue. Finally, the 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-homologous gene lstD might be responsible for the reduction of the β-keto group of the biosynthetic intermediate, thereby facilitating the formation of the unique β-lactone ring. PMID:25239907

  16. DUSP28 links regulation of Mucin 5B and Mucin 16 to migration and survival of AsPC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungwhoi; Lee, Jungsul; Yun, Jeong-Hun; Jeong, Dae Gwin; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2016-09-01

    The prognosis of pancreatic cancer has not improved despite considerable and continuous effort. Dual-specificity phosphatase 28 (DUSP28) is highly expressed in human pancreatic cancers and exerts critical effects. However, knowledge of its function in pancreatic cancers is extremely limited. Here, we demonstrate the peculiar role of DUSP28 in pancreatic cancers. Analysis using the Gene Expression Omnibus public microarray database indicated higher DUSP28, MUC1, MUC4, MUC5B, MUC16 and MUC20 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in pancreatic cancers compared with normal pancreas tissues. DUSP28 expression in human pancreatic cancer correlated positively with those of MUC1, MUC4, MUC5B, MUC16 and MUC20. In contrast, there were no significant correlations between DUSP28 and mucins in normal pancreas tissues. Decreased DUSP28 expression resulted in down-regulation of MUC5B and MUC16 at both the mRNA and protein levels; furthermore, transfection with small interfering RNA (siRNA) for MUC5B and MUC16 inhibited the migration and survival of AsPC-1 cells. In addition, transfection of siRNA for MUC5B and MUC16 resulted in a significant decrease in phosphorylation of FAK and ERK1/2 compared with transfection with scrambled-siRNA. These results collectively indicate unique links between DUSP28 and MUC5B/MUC16 and their roles in pancreatic cancer; moreover, they strongly support a rationale for targeting DUSP28 to inhibit development of malignant pancreatic cancer.

  17. Measurement of electrode-tissue interface impedance for improvement of a transcutaneous data transmission using human body as transmission medium.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Eiji; Kato, Yoshikuni; Kikuchi, Sakiko; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    The electrical property between an electrode and skin or tissue is one of the important issues for communication performance of the transcutaneous communication system (TCS) using a human body as a conductive medium.In this study, we used a simple method to measure interface resistance between the electrode and skin on the surface of the body. The electrode-electrode impedance was measured by a commercially available LCR meter with changes in the distance between two electrodes on an arm of a healthy male subject, and we obtained the tissue resistivity and electrode-skin interface resistance using the cross-sectional area of the arm.We also measured transmission gain of the TCS on the surface of the body, and we investigated the relationship between electrode-skin interface resistance and transmission gain. We examined four kinds of electrodes: a stainless steel electrode, a titanium electrode, an Ag-AgCl electrode and an Ag-AgCl paste electrode. The stainless steel electrode, which had lower electrode-skin resistance, had higher transmission gain.The results indicate that an electrode that has lower electrode-skin resistance will contribute to improvement of the performance of the TCS and that electrode-skin interface resistance is one of valuable evaluation parameters for selecting an optimum electrode for the TCS.

  18. Solanine Induces Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongwei; Lv, Chongqing; Yang, Longlong; Wang, Yingxiu; Zhang, Qingshun; Yu, Suhui; Kong, Hongru; Wang, Meng; Xie, Jianming; Zhang, Chunwu; Zhou, Mengtao

    2014-01-01

    Steroid alkaloids have been suggested as potential anticancer compounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of how steroid alkaloids inhibit the tumor growth are largely unknown. Here, we reported that solanine, a substance of steroid alkaloids, has a positive effect on the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In pancreatic cancer cells and nu/nu nude mice model, we found that solanine inhibited cancer cells growth through caspase-3 dependent mitochondrial apoptosis. Mechanically, solanine promotes the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (MPTP) by downregulating the Bcl-2/Bax ratio; thereafter, Cytochrome c and Smac are released from mitochondria into cytosol to process the caspase-3 zymogen into an activated form. Moreover, we found that the expression of tumor metastasis related proteins, MMP-2 and MMP-9, was also decreased in the cells treated with solanine. Therefore, our results suggested that solanine was an effective compound for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24949471

  19. Solanine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongwei; Lv, Chongqing; Yang, Longlong; Wang, Yingxiu; Zhang, Qingshun; Yu, Suhui; Kong, Hongru; Wang, Meng; Xie, Jianming; Zhang, Chunwu; Zhou, Mengtao

    2014-01-01

    Steroid alkaloids have been suggested as potential anticancer compounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of how steroid alkaloids inhibit the tumor growth are largely unknown. Here, we reported that solanine, a substance of steroid alkaloids, has a positive effect on the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In pancreatic cancer cells and nu/nu nude mice model, we found that solanine inhibited cancer cells growth through caspase-3 dependent mitochondrial apoptosis. Mechanically, solanine promotes the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (MPTP) by downregulating the Bcl-2/Bax ratio; thereafter, Cytochrome c and Smac are released from mitochondria into cytosol to process the caspase-3 zymogen into an activated form. Moreover, we found that the expression of tumor metastasis related proteins, MMP-2 and MMP-9, was also decreased in the cells treated with solanine. Therefore, our results suggested that solanine was an effective compound for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Transcriptional Control of Tight Junction Proteins via a Protein Kinase C Signal Pathway in Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase-Transfected Human Pancreatic Duct Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Kojima, Takashi; Ito, Tatsuya; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Imamura, Masafumi; Son, Seiichi; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Murata, Masaki; Nagayama, Minoru; Nobuoka, Takayuki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Hirata, Koichi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2010-01-01

    In human pancreatic cancer, integral membrane proteins of tight junction claudins are abnormally regulated, making these proteins promising molecular diagnostic and therapeutic targets. However, the regulation of claudin-based tight junctions remains unknown not only in the pancreatic cancer cells but also in normal human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cells. To investigate the regulation of tight junction molecules including claudins in normal HPDE cells, we introduced the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene into HPDE cells in primary culture. The hTERT-transfected HPDE (hTERT-HPDE) cells were positive for the pancreatic duct epithelial markers such as CK7, CK19, and carbonic anhydrase isozyme 2 and expressed epithelial tight junction molecules claudin-1, -4, -7 and, -18, occludin, JAM-A, ZO-1, ZO-2, and tricellulin. By treatment with fetal bovine serum or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), the tight junction molecules were up-regulated at the transcriptional level via a protein kinase C (PKC) signal pathway. A PKC-α inhibitor, Gö6976, prevented up-regulation of claudin-4 by TPA. Furthermore, a PKC-δ inhibitor, rottlerin, prevented up-regulation of claudin-7, occludin, ZO-1, and ZO-2 by TPA. By GeneChip analysis, up-regulation of the transcription factor ELF3 was observed in both fetal bovine serum- and TPA-treated cells. Treatment with small interfering RNAs of ELF3 prevented up-regulation of claudin-7 by TPA. These data suggest that tight junctions of normal HPDE cells were at least in part regulated via a PKC signal pathway by transcriptional control. PMID:20566751

  1. Smaller, softer, lower-impedance electrodes for human neuroprosthesis: a pragmatic approach

    PubMed Central

    Castagnola, Elisa; Ansaldo, Alberto; Maggiolini, Emma; Ius, Tamara; Skrap, Miran; Ricci, Davide; Fadiga, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Finding the most appropriate technology for building electrodes to be used for long term implants in humans is a challenging issue. What are the most appropriate technologies? How could one achieve robustness, stability, compatibility, efficacy, and versatility, for both recording and stimulation? There are no easy answers to these questions as even the most fundamental and apparently obvious factors to be taken into account, such as the necessary mechanical, electrical and biological properties, and their interplay, are under debate. We present here our approach along three fundamental parallel pathways: we reduced electrode invasiveness and size without impairing signal-to-noise ratio, we increased electrode active surface area by depositing nanostructured materials, and we protected the brain from direct contact with the electrode without compromising performance. Altogether, these results converge toward high-resolution ECoG arrays that are soft and adaptable to cortical folds, and have been proven to provide high spatial and temporal resolution. This method provides a piece of work which, in our view, makes several steps ahead in bringing such novel devices into clinical settings, opening new avenues in diagnostics of brain diseases, and neuroprosthetic applications. PMID:24795621

  2. K-Ras promotes growth transformation and invasion of immortalized human pancreatic cells by Raf and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Paul M; Groehler, Angela L; Lee, Kwang M; Ouellette, Michel M; Khazak, Vladimir; Der, Channing J

    2007-03-01

    Mutational activation of the K-Ras oncogene is well established as a key genetic step in the development and growth of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. However, the mechanism by which aberrant Ras signaling promotes uncontrolled pancreatic tumor cell growth remains to be fully elucidated. The recent use of primary human cells to study Ras-mediated oncogenesis provides important model cell systems to dissect this mechanism. We have used a model of telomerase-immortalized human pancreatic duct-derived cells (E6/E7/st) to study mechanisms of Ras growth transformation. First, we found that human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes, which block the function of the p53 and Rb tumor suppressors, respectively, and SV40 small t antigen were required to allow mutant K-Ras(12D) growth transformation. Second, K-Ras(12D) caused growth transformation in vitro, including enhanced growth rate and loss of density dependency for growth, anchorage independence, and invasion through reconstituted basement membrane proteins, and tumorigenic transformation in vivo. Third, we determined that the Raf, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and Ral guanine nucleotide exchange factor effector pathways were activated, although extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity was not up-regulated persistently. Finally, pharmacologic inhibition of Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK and PI3K signaling impaired K-Ras-induced anchorage-independent growth and invasion. In summary, our studies established, characterized, and validated E6/E7/st cells for the study of Ras-induced oncogenesis.

  3. Microfluidic platform for assessing pancreatic islet functionality through dielectric spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Heileman, K.; Daoud, J.; Hasilo, C.; Gasparrini, M.; Paraskevas, S.; Tabrizian, M.

    2015-01-01

    Human pancreatic islets are seldom assessed for dynamic responses to external stimuli. Thus, the elucidation of human islet functionality would provide insights into the progression of diabetes mellitus, evaluation of preparations for clinical transplantation, as well as for the development of novel therapeutics. The objective of this study was to develop a microfluidic platform for in vitro islet culture, allowing the multi-parametric investigation of islet response to chemical and biochemical stimuli. This was accomplished through the fabrication and implementation of a microfluidic platform that allowed the perifusion of islet culture while integrating real-time monitoring using impedance spectroscopy, through microfabricated, interdigitated electrodes located along the microchamber arrays. Real-time impedance measurements provide important dielectric parameters, such as cell membrane capacitance and cytoplasmic conductivity, representing proliferation, differentiation, viability, and functionality. The perifusion of varying glucose concentrations and monitoring of the resulting impedance of pancreatic islets were performed as proof-of-concept validation of the lab-on-chip platform. This novel technique to elucidate the underlying mechanisms that dictate islet functionality is presented, providing new information regarding islet function that could improve the evaluation of islet preparations for transplantation. In addition, it will lead to a better understanding of fundamental diabetes-related islet dysfunction and the development of therapeutics through evaluation of potential drug effects. PMID:26339324

  4. Coproduction of carcinoembryonic antigen and nonspecific cross-reacting antigen by a continuous cell line from a human pancreatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, M; Ichiki, S; Kuroki, M; Matsuoka, Y

    1982-08-01

    A simultaneous production of nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) by the same individual cells of an established human pancreatic cell line (QGP-1) was demonstrated by the immunoperoxidase method. Kinetics of cell proliferation and production of CEA and NCA were analyzed, and active synthesis of both antigens was found to be accompanied with the active proliferation of cultured cells. Both antigens in culture medium were purified by immunoadsorption and gel filtration. Immunochemical studies confirmed that CEA and NCA produced by the QGP-1 cells had properties identical to those of authentic CEA derived from metastatic colorectal carcinoma and to those of NCA from normal lungs, respectively.

  5. The Frequency Spectral Properties of Electrode-Skin Contact Impedance on Human Head and Its Frequency-Dependent Effects on Frequency-Difference EIT in Stroke Detection from 10Hz to 1MHz

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ge; Li, Weichen; Fu, Feng; Shi, Xuetao; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2017-01-01

    Frequency-difference electrical impedance tomography (fdEIT) reconstructs frequency-dependent changes of a complex impedance distribution. It has a potential application in acute stroke detection because there are significant differences in impedance spectra between stroke lesions and normal brain tissues. However, fdEIT suffers from the influences of electrode-skin contact impedance since contact impedance varies greatly with frequency. When using fdEIT to detect stroke, it is critical to know the degree of measurement errors or image artifacts caused by contact impedance. To our knowledge, no study has systematically investigated the frequency spectral properties of electrode-skin contact impedance on human head and its frequency-dependent effects on fdEIT used in stroke detection within a wide frequency band (10 Hz-1 MHz). In this study, we first measured and analyzed the frequency spectral properties of electrode-skin contact impedance on 47 human subjects’ heads within 10 Hz-1 MHz. Then, we quantified the frequency-dependent effects of contact impedance on fdEIT in stroke detection in terms of the current distribution beneath the electrodes and the contact impedance imbalance between two measuring electrodes. The results showed that the contact impedance at high frequencies (>100 kHz) significantly changed the current distribution beneath the electrode, leading to nonnegligible errors in boundary voltages and artifacts in reconstructed images. The contact impedance imbalance at low frequencies (<1 kHz) also caused significant measurement errors. We conclude that the contact impedance has critical frequency-dependent influences on fdEIT and further studies on reducing such influences are necessary to improve the application of fdEIT in stroke detection. PMID:28107524

  6. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  7. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Staging of Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Whipple Procedure Complementary Therapies Pancreatic Cancer Support ...

  8. FLIP switches Fas-mediated glucose signaling in human pancreatic β cells from apoptosis to cell replication

    PubMed Central

    Maedler, Kathrin; Fontana, Adriano; Ris, Frédéric; Sergeev, Pavel; Toso, Christian; Oberholzer, José; Lehmann, Roger; Bachmann, Felix; Tasinato, Andrea; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Halban, Philippe A.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2002-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus results from an inadequate adaptation of the functional pancreatic β cell mass in the face of insulin resistance. Changes in the concentration of glucose play an essential role in the regulation of β cell turnover. In human islets, elevated glucose concentrations impair β cell proliferation and induce β cell apoptosis via up-regulation of the Fas receptor. Recently, it has been shown that the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP may divert Fas-mediated death signals into those for cell proliferation in lymphatic cells. We observed expression of FLIP in human pancreatic β cells of nondiabetic individuals, which was decreased in tissue sections of type 2 diabetic patients. In vitro exposure of islets from nondiabetic organ donors to high glucose levels decreased FLIP expression and increased the percentage of apoptotic terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated UTP end labeling (TUNEL)-positive β cells; FLIP was no longer detectable in such TUNEL-positive β cells. Up-regulation of FLIP, by incubation with transforming growth factor β or by transfection with an expression vector coding for FLIP, protected β cells from glucose-induced apoptosis, restored β cell proliferation, and improved β cell function. The beneficial effects of FLIP overexpression were blocked by an antagonistic anti-Fas antibody, indicating their dependence on Fas receptor activation. The present data provide evidence for expression of FLIP in the human β cell and suggest a novel approach to prevent and treat diabetes by switching Fas signaling from apoptosis to proliferation. PMID:12060768

  9. Hepatic steatosis depresses alpha-1-antitrypsin levels in human and rat acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Du, Jianjun; Yu, Pengfei; Bai, Bin; Zhao, Zhanwei; Wang, Shiqi; Zhu, Junjie; Feng, Quanxin; Gao, Yun; Zhao, Qingchuan; Liu, Chaoxu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis (HS) can exacerbate acute pancreatitis (AP). This study aimed to investigate the relation between α1-antitrypsin (AAT) and acute pancreatitis when patients have HS. Using proteomic profiling, we identified 18 differently expressed proteins pots in the serum of rats with or without HS after surgical establishment of AP. AAT was found to be one of the significantly down-regulated proteins. AAT levels were significantly lower in hepatic steatosis acute pancreatitis (HSAP) than in non-HSAP (NHSAP) (P < 0.001). To explore the clinical significance of these observations, we measured the levels of AAT in the serum of 240 patients with HSAP, NHSAP, fatty liver disease (FLD), or no disease. Compared with healthy controls, serum AAT levels in patients with NHSAP were significantly higher (P < 0.01), while in patients with HSAP serum AAT levels were significantly lower (P < 0.01). Further studies showed that acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE-II) scores were negatively correlated with serum AAT levels (r = −0.85, P < 0.01). In conclusion, low serum levels of AAT in patients with HSAP are correlated with disease severity and AAT may represent a potential target for therapies aiming to improve pancreatitis. PMID:26634430

  10. Hepatic steatosis depresses alpha-1-antitrypsin levels in human and rat acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Du, Jianjun; Yu, Pengfei; Bai, Bin; Zhao, Zhanwei; Wang, Shiqi; Zhu, Junjie; Feng, Quanxin; Gao, Yun; Zhao, Qingchuan; Liu, Chaoxu

    2015-12-04

    Hepatic steatosis (HS) can exacerbate acute pancreatitis (AP). This study aimed to investigate the relation between α1-antitrypsin (AAT) and acute pancreatitis when patients have HS. Using proteomic profiling, we identified 18 differently expressed proteins pots in the serum of rats with or without HS after surgical establishment of AP. AAT was found to be one of the significantly down-regulated proteins. AAT levels were significantly lower in hepatic steatosis acute pancreatitis (HSAP) than in non-HSAP (NHSAP) (P < 0.001). To explore the clinical significance of these observations, we measured the levels of AAT in the serum of 240 patients with HSAP, NHSAP, fatty liver disease (FLD), or no disease. Compared with healthy controls, serum AAT levels in patients with NHSAP were significantly higher (P < 0.01), while in patients with HSAP serum AAT levels were significantly lower (P < 0.01). Further studies showed that acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE-II) scores were negatively correlated with serum AAT levels (r = -0.85, P < 0.01). In conclusion, low serum levels of AAT in patients with HSAP are correlated with disease severity and AAT may represent a potential target for therapies aiming to improve pancreatitis.

  11. Human omentum fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells transdifferentiates into pancreatic islet-like cluster.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, M; Indumathi, S; Harikrishnan, R; Mishra, Rashmi; Lissa, R P; Rajkumar, J S; Sudarsanam, D

    2013-10-01

    Current protocols of islet cell transplantation for the treatment of diabetes mellitus have been hampered by islet availability and allograft rejection. Although bone marrow and subcutaneous adipose tissue stem cells feature their tissue repair efficacy, applicability of stem cells from various sources is being researched to develop a promising therapy for diabetes mellitus. Although omentum fat has emerged as an innovative source of stem cells, the dearth of researches confirming its transdifferentiation potential limits its applicability as a regenerative tool in diabetic therapy. Thus, this work is a maiden attempt to explore the colossal potency of omentum fat-derived stem cells on its lucrative differentiation ability. The plasticity of omentum fat stem cells was substantiated by transdifferentiation into pancreatic islet-like clusters, which was confirmed by dithizone staining and immunocytochemistry for insulin. It was also confirmed by the expression of pancreatic endocrine markers nestin and pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx 1) using Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), neurogenic 3, islet-1 transcription factor, paired box gene 4, Pdx 1 and insulin using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and through insulin secretion assay. This study revealed the in vitro differentiation potency of omentum fat stem cells into pancreatic islet-like clusters. However, further research pursuits exploring its in vivo endocrine efficacy would make omentum fat stem cells a superior source for β-cell replacement therapy.

  12. Adoptive immunotherapy of human pancreatic cancer with lymphokine-activated killer cells and interleukin-2 in a nude mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Marincola, F.M.; Da Pozzo, L.F.; Drucker, B.J.; Holder, W.D. Jr. )

    1990-11-01

    A pancreatic cancer cell line was grown in orthotopic and heterotopic positions in young Swiss/NIH nude mice, which were tested with adoptive immunotherapy. Mice were injected with 1 x 10(7) human cancer cells in the subcutaneous tissue and duodenal lobe of the pancreas. The mice were randomly divided into four groups: group IA (LAK + IL-2) (N = 25) received 2 X 10(7) human lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells from normal donors by tail vein injection followed by 10,000 units of human recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) given intraperitoneally every 12 hours for 28 days; group IB (IL-2) (N = 27) was given the same dose of IL-2 alone; group IC (RPMI-1640) (N = 18) received a placebo consisting of 1 ml of RPMI-1640 intraperitoneally every 12 hours; and group ID (LAK) (N = 14) received 2 X 10(7) LAK cells but no IL-2. Toxicity was significantly higher in group IB, with a mortality rate of 45.5% (10/22 animals) versus a 0% mortality (0/25) in group IA. None of the group IA or IB animals died of pancreatic cancer during the experiment. The animals that did not receive IL-2 died before 28 days in 14.2% of group IC and in 16.7% of group ID. The area under the growth curve of subcutaneous tumors during the course of treatment and the pancreatic tumor weight at the end of treatment were compared in each group. Subcutaneous tumors had a reduced rate of growth in group IA animals compared to all the other treatments. Pancreatic tumor growth was slowed in group IA. The animals treated with IL-2 alone (group IB) showed some slowing of tumor growth that was intermediate between group IA, group IC, and group ID. A similar experiment was done with irradiated (375 rad) mice. Nine nude mice with tumors were treated with LAK + IL-2 (group IIA), eight received IL-2 alone (group IIB), and seven received placebo (group IIC).

  13. Ellagic acid inhibits the proliferation of human pancreatic carcinoma PANC-1 cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hao; Lu, Chenglin; Tang, Ribo; Pan, Yiming; Bao, Shanhua; Qiu, Yudong; Xie, Min

    2017-01-25

    Ellagic aicd (EA), a dietary polyphenolic compound found in plants and fruits, possesses various pharmacological activities. This study investigated the effect of EA on human pancreatic carcinoma PANC-1 cells both in vitro and in vivo; and defined the associated molecular mechanisms. In vitro, the cell growth and repairing ability were assessed by CCK-8 assay and wound healing assay. The cell migration and invasion activity was evaluated by Tanswell assay. In vivo, PANC-1 cell tumor-bearing mice were treated with different concentrations of EA. We found that EA significantly inhibited cell growth, cell repairing activity, and cell migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of PANC-1 xenografted mice with EA resulted in significant inhibition in tumor growth and prolong mice survival rate. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis showed that EA increased the percentage of cells in the G1 phase of cell cycle. Western blot analysis revealed that EA inhibited the expression of COX-2 and NF-κB. In addition, EA reversed epithelial to mesenchymal transition by up-regulating E-cadherin and down-regulating Vimentin. In summary, the present study demonstrated that EA inhibited cell growth, cell repairing activity, cell migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner. EA also effectively inhibit human pancreatic cancer growth in mice. The anti-tumor effect of EA might be related to cell cycle arrest, down-regulating the expression of COX-2 and NF-κB, reversing epithelial to mesenchymal transition by up-regulating E-cadherin and down-regulating Vimentin. Our findings suggest that the use of EA would be beneficial for the management of pancreatic cancer.

  14. Prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer patients with increased regucalcin gene expression: Overexpression of regucalcin suppresses the proliferation in human pancreatic cancer MIA PaCa-2 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Osuka, Satoru; Weitzmann, M Neale; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Shoji, Mamoru; Murata, Tomiyasu

    2016-05-01

    Approximately 90% of all pancreatic cancers are pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC). PDAC is a highly aggressive malignancy and is one of the deadliest. This poor clinical outcome is due to the prominent resistance of pancreatic cancer to drug and radiation therapies. Regucalcin plays a pivotal role as a suppressor protein in signal transduction in various types of cells including tumor tissues. We demonstrated that the prolonged survival is induced in PDAC patients with increased regucalcin gene expression using a dataset of PDAC obtained from GEO database (GSE17891) together with the clinical annotation data file. Moreover, overexpression of regucalcin with full length was demonstrated to suppress the proliferation, cell death and migration in human pancreatic cancer MIA PaCa-2 (K-ras mutated) cells that possess resistance to drug and radiation therapies. Suppressive effects of regucalcin on cell proliferation and death were not seen in the cells overexpressed with regucalcin cDNA alternatively spliced variants (deleted exon 4 or deleted exon 4 and 5). Regucalcin was suggested to induce G1 and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in MIA PaCa-2 cells. Suppressive effects of regucalcin on cell proliferation were independent of cell death. Overexpression of regucalcin was found to suppress signaling pathways including Akt, MAP kinase and SAPK/JNK, to increase the protein levels of p53, a tumor suppresser, and to decrease K-ras, c-fos and c-jun, a oncogene, by suppressing signaling pathways that are related to signaling of K-ras. Regucalcin may play a potential role as a suppressor protein in human pancreatic cancer.

  15. Effects of Inspiratory Impedance on Hemodynamic Responses to a Squat-stand Test in Human Volunteers: Implications for Treatment of Orthostatic Hypotension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-28

    impedance on hemodynamic responses to a squat–stand test in human volunteers: implications for treatment of orthostatic hypotension Accepted: 14...Convertino et al. 1998; Fig. 3 ). In the present study, we used the beat-to-beat measurements of hemodynamic responses during the initial 10-s time interval of...to maintaining adequate cerebral blood perfusion as indicated by the significant amelio- ration of subjective symptoms. Clinical implications Breathing

  16. Senescence Mediated by p16INK4a Impedes Reprogramming of Human Corneal Endothelial Cells into Neural Crest Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wen-Juan; Tseng, Scheffer C. G.; Chen, Shuangling; Tighe, Sean; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Xin; Chen, Szu-Yu; Su, Chen-Wei; Zhu, Ying-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) have limited proliferative capacity due to “contact-inhibition” at G1 phase. Such contact-inhibition can be delayed from Day 21 to Day 42 by switching EGF-containing SHEM to LIF/bFGF-containing MESCM through transient activation of LIF-JAK1-STAT3 signaling that delays eventual nuclear translocation of p16INK4a. Using the latter system, we have reported a novel tissue engineering technique by implementing 5 weekly knockdowns with p120 catenin (p120) and Kaiso siRNAs since Day 7 to achieve effective expansion of HCEC monolayers to a transplantable size with a normal HCEC density, through reprogramming of HCECs into neural crest progenitors by activating p120-Kaiso-RhoA-ROCK-canonical BMP signaling. Herein, we noted that a single knockdown with p120-Kaiso siRNAs at Day 42 failed to achieve such reprogramming when contact inhibition transitioned to senescence with nuclear translocation of p16INK4a. In contrast, 5 weekly knockdowns with p120-Kaiso siRNAs since Day 7 precluded senescence mediated by p16INK4a by inducing nuclear translocation of Bmi1 because of sustained activation of JAK2-STAT3 signaling downstream of p120-Kaiso-RhoA-ROCK signaling. STAT3 or Bmi1 siRNA impeded nuclear exclusion of p16INK4a and suppressed the reprogramming induced by p120-Kaiso siRNAs, suggesting that another important engineering strategy of HCEC lies in prevention of senescence mediated by nuclear translocation of p16INK4a. PMID:27739458

  17. Ductal pancreatic cancer modeling and drug screening using human pluripotent stem cell- and patient-derived tumor organoids.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling; Holtzinger, Audrey; Jagan, Ishaan; BeGora, Michael; Lohse, Ines; Ngai, Nicholas; Nostro, Cristina; Wang, Rennian; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Crawford, Howard C; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Kalloger, Steve E; Renouf, Daniel J; Connor, Ashton A; Cleary, Sean; Schaeffer, David F; Roehrl, Michael; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Gallinger, Steven; Keller, Gordon; Muthuswamy, Senthil K

    2015-11-01

    There are few in vitro models of exocrine pancreas development and primary human pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We establish three-dimensional culture conditions to induce the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into exocrine progenitor organoids that form ductal and acinar structures in culture and in vivo. Expression of mutant KRAS or TP53 in progenitor organoids induces mutation-specific phenotypes in culture and in vivo. Expression of TP53(R175H) induces cytosolic SOX9 localization. In patient tumors bearing TP53 mutations, SOX9 was cytoplasmic and associated with mortality. We also define culture conditions for clonal generation of tumor organoids from freshly resected PDAC. Tumor organoids maintain the differentiation status, histoarchitecture and phenotypic heterogeneity of the primary tumor and retain patient-specific physiological changes, including hypoxia, oxygen consumption, epigenetic marks and differences in sensitivity to inhibition of the histone methyltransferase EZH2. Thus, pancreatic progenitor organoids and tumor organoids can be used to model PDAC and for drug screening to identify precision therapy strategies.

  18. Ductal pancreatic cancer modeling and drug screening using human pluripotent stem cell and patient-derived tumor organoids

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ling; Holtzinger, Audrey; Jagan, Ishaan; BeGora, Michael; Lohse, Ines; Ngai, Nicholas; Nostro, Cristina; Wang, Rennian; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B.; Crawford, Howard C.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Kalloger, Steve E.; Renouf, Daniel J.; Connor, Ashton A; Cleary, Sean; Schaeffer, David F.; Roehrl, Michael; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Gallinger, Steven; Keller, Gordon; Muthuswamy, Senthil K.

    2016-01-01

    There are few in vitro models of exocrine pancreas development and primary human pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We establish three-dimensional culture conditions to induce the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) into exocrine progenitor organoids that form ductal and acinar structures in culture and in vivo. Expression of mutant KRAS or TP53 in progenitor organoids induces mutation-specific phenotypes in culture and in vivo. Expression of TP53R175H induced cytosolic SOX9 localization. In patient tumors bearing TP53 mutations, SOX9 was cytoplasmic and associated with mortality. Culture conditions are also defined for clonal generation of tumor organoids from freshly resected PDAC. Tumor organoids maintain the differentiation status, histoarchitecture, phenotypic heterogeneity of the primary tumor, and retain patient-specific physiologic changes including hypoxia, oxygen consumption, epigenetic marks, and differential sensitivity to EZH2 inhibition. Thus, pancreatic progenitor organoids and tumor organoids can be used to model PDAC and for drug screening to identify precision therapy strategies. PMID:26501191

  19. Pancreatic cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer, cystic pancreatic neoplasms, and other nonendocrine pancreatic tumors. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, ... by: Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. ...

  20. E2F-1 gene therapy induces apoptosis and increases chemosensitivity in human pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Mary Jane; Farmer, Michael R; Atienza, Cesar; Stilwell, Ariel; Dong, Yan Bin; Yang, Hai Liang; Wong, Sandra L; McMasters, Kelly M

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is often resistant to conventional chemotherapy. In this study, we examined the role of adenovirus-mediated overexpression of E2F-1 in inducing apoptosis and increasing the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic head exocrine adenocarcinoma cells (mutant p53) were treated by mock infection or adenoviruses expressing beta-galactosidase or E2F-1 (Ad-E2F-1) alone or in combination with sublethal concentrations of each chemotherapeutic drug. Cell growth and viability were assessed at selected time points. Apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry, characteristic changes in cell morphology and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Western blot analysis was used to examine the expression of E2F-1 and Bcl-2 family member proteins and PARP cleavage. Western blot analysis revealed marked overexpression of E2F-1 at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 20 and 70. By 3 days after infection, Ad-E2F-1 treatment at an MOI of 70 resulted in approximately a 20-fold reduction in cell growth and 60% reduction in cell viability as compared to mock-infected cells. Cell cycle analysis, PARP cleavage and changes in cell morphology supported apoptosis as the mechanism of cell death in response to E2F-1. In order to test the efficacy of treatment with a combination of gene therapy and chemotherapy, we utilized concentrations of Ad-E2F-1 which reduced viability to 50% in combination with each chemotherapeutic agent. Cotreatment of the cells with E2F-1 virus and roscovitine (ROS) or etoposide resulted in an additive effect on cell growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis. Interestingly, 5-fluorouracil did not cooperate with Ad-E2F-1 in the mediation of tumor death or inhibition of cell growth. Immunoblotting for Bcl-2 family members revealed no significant changes in the expression levels of Bcl-2, Bcl X(L), Bax or Bak following gene or 'chemogene' therapy with E2F-1. However, a Bax cleavage product was noted

  1. Primary structure of human pancreatic elastase 2 determined by sequence analysis of the cloned mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, T.S.; Shen, W.F.; Largman, C.

    1987-11-17

    A cDNA encoding elastase 2 has been cloned from a human pancreatic cDNA library. The cDNA contains a translation initiation site and a poly(A) recognition site and encodes a protein of 269 amino acids, including a proposed 16-residue signal peptide. The amino acid sequence of the deduced mature protein contains a 12-residue activation peptide containing a cysteine at residue 1 similar to that of chymotryspin. The proposed active enzyme contains all of the characteristic active-site amino acids, including His-57, Asp-102, and Ser-195. The S1 binding pocket is bounded by Gly-216 and Ser-226, making this pocket intermediate in size between chymotrypsins and elastase 1 or protease E, consistent with the substrate specificity of elastase 2 for long-chain aliphatic or aromatic amino acids. Computer modeling studies using the amino acid sequence of elastase 2 superimposed on the X-ray structure of porcine elastase 1 suggest that a change of Gln-192 in elastase 1 to Asn-192 in elastase 2 may account for the lower catalytic efficiency of the latter enzyme. Several basic residues appear to be near the ends of the extended binding pocket of elastases which might serve to anchor the enzyme to the elastin substrate. These studies indicate that elastases 2 and elastase 1 both contain an Arg-65A as well as a basic dipeptide at 223/224 which is not present in chymotrypsins. In addition, Arg-217A is present in humaan elastase 2 but absent in rat pancreatic protein which has been proposed to be an elastase 2 on the basis of sequence homology, but which was not isolated during screening of rat pancreatic tissue extracts for elastolytic activity.

  2. Melatonin influences somatostatin secretion from human pancreatic δ-cells via MT1 and MT2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Zibolka, Juliane; Mühlbauer, Eckhard; Peschke, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Melatonin is an effector of the diurnal clock on pancreatic islets. The membrane receptor-transmitted inhibitory influence of melatonin on insulin secretion is well established and contrasts with the reported stimulation of glucagon release from α-cells. Virtually, nothing is known concerning the melatonin-mediated effects on islet δ-cells. Analysis of a human pancreatic δ-cell model, the cell line QGP-1, and the use of a somatostatin-specific radioimmunoassay showed that melatonin primarily has an inhibitory effect on somatostatin secretion in the physiological concentration range. In the pharmacological range, melatonin elicited slightly increased somatostatin release from δ-cells. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is the major second messenger dose-dependently stimulating somatostatin secretion, in experiments employing the membrane-permeable 8-Br-cAMP. 8-Br-cyclic guanosine monophosphate proved to be of only minor relevance to somatostatin release. As the inhibitory effect of 1 nm melatonin was reversed after incubation of QGP-1 cells with the nonselective melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole, but not with the MT2-selective antagonist 4-P-PDOT (4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetraline), an involvement of the MT1 receptor can be assumed. Somatostatin release from the δ-cells at low glucose concentrations was significantly inhibited during co-incubation with 1 nm melatonin, an effect which was less pronounced at higher glucose levels. Transient expression experiments, overexpressing MT1, MT2, or a deletion variant as a control, indicated that the MT1 and not the MT2 receptor was the major transmitter of the inhibitory melatonin effect. These data point to a significant influence of melatonin on pancreatic δ-cells and on somatostatin release.

  3. Demonstration and immunochemical characterization of carcinoembryonic antigen in human pancreatic juice.

    PubMed

    McCabe, R P; Kupchik, H Z; Saravis, C A; Broitman, S A; Gregg, J A; Zamcheck, N

    1976-05-01

    Pancreatic juice collected from 10 patients without evidence of malignant disease of the pancreas or other organs was pooled, extracted, and fractionated by Sepharose 6-B and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) activity in the material was demonstrated and studied by: a) radioimmunoassay, b) competitive binding to antibodies against CEA, c) precipitin inhibition, and d) Ouchterlony analysis. The immunochemical identity of the active material to CEA purified from liver metastases of colon cancer was demonstrated.

  4. Intra-tumoral heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery and mass transport in human pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, Eugene J.; Baio, Flavio E.; Ondari, Alexander; Truty, Mark J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Thomas, Ryan M.; Chen, Rong; Chatterjee, Deyali; Kang, Ya'an; Zhang, Joy; Court, Laurence; Bhosale, Priya R.; Tamm, Eric P.; Qayyum, Aliya; Crane, Christopher H.; Javle, Milind; Katz, Matthew H.; Gottumukkala, Vijaya N.; Rozner, Marc A.; Shen, Haifa; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Yuling; Plunkett, William; Abbruzzese, James L.; Wolff, Robert A.; Maitra, Anirban; Ferrari, Mauro; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Fleming, Jason B.

    2014-12-01

    There is substantial heterogeneity in the clinical behavior of pancreatic cancer and in its response to therapy. Some of this variation may be due to differences in delivery of cytotoxic therapies between patients and within individual tumors. Indeed, in 12 patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, we previously demonstrated wide inter-patient variability in the delivery of gemcitabine as well as in the mass transport properties of tumors as measured by computed tomography (CT) scans. However, the variability of drug delivery and transport properties within pancreatic tumors is currently unknown. Here, we analyzed regional measurements of gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the tumors of the same 12 patients to understand the degree of intra-tumoral heterogeneity of drug delivery. We also developed a volumetric segmentation approach to measure mass transport properties from the CT scans of these patients and tested inter-observer agreement with this new methodology. Our results demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery within individual pancreatic tumors and across the patient cohort, with gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the inner portion of the tumors ranging from 38 to 74% of the total. Similarly, the CT-derived mass transport properties of the tumors had a high degree of heterogeneity, ranging from minimal difference to almost 200% difference between inner and outer portions of the tumor. Our quantitative method to derive transport properties from CT scans demonstrated less than 5% difference in gemcitabine prediction at the average CT-derived transport value across observers. These data illustrate significant inter-patient and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the delivery of gemcitabine, and highlight how this variability can be reproducibly accounted for using principles of mass transport. With further validation as a biophysical marker, transport properties of tumors may be useful in patient selection for therapy and prediction of

  5. The inhibitory effects of xanthohumol, a prenylated chalcone derived from hops, on cell growth and tumorigenesis in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiliang; Zhao, Senlin; Xu, Ling; Lu, Yingying; Lu, Zhanjun; Chen, Congying; Ni, Jianbo; Wan, Rong; Yang, Lijuan

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most lethal human malignancies worldwide. Here, we demonstrated that xanthohumol (XN), the most abundant prenylated chalcone isolated from hops, inhibited the growth of cultured PC cells and their subcutaneous xenograft tumors. XN treatment was found to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of PC cells (PANC-1, BxPC-3) by inhibiting phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and expression of its downstream targeted genes cyclinD1, survivin, and Bcl-xL at the messenger RNA level, which involved in regulation of apoptosis and the cell cycle. Overall, our results suggested that XN presents a promising candidate therapeutic agent against human PC and the STAT3 signaling pathway is its key molecular target.

  6. Acquired resistance to gemcitabine and cross-resistance in human pancreatic cancer clones.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Takizawa-Hashimoto, Asako; Takeuchi, Osamu; Watanabe, Yukiko; Atsuda, Koichiro; Asanuma, Fumiki; Yamada, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of gemcitabine (GEM), a standard treatment agent for pancreatic cancer, is insufficient because of primary or acquired resistance to this drug. Patients with tumors intrinsically sensitive to GEM gradually acquire resistance and require a shift to second agents, which are associated with the risk of cross-resistance. However, whether cross-resistance is actually present has long been disputed. Using six GEM-resistant and four highly GEM-resistant clones derived from the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3, we determined the resistance of each clone and parent cell line to GEM and four anticancer agents (5-FU, CDDP, CPT-11, and DTX). The GEM-resistant clones had different resistances to GEM and other agents, and did not develop a specific pattern of cross-resistance. This result shows that tumor cells are heterogeneous. However, all highly GEM-resistant clones presented overexpression of ribonucleotide reductase subunit M1 (RRM1), a target enzyme for metabolized GEM, and showed cross-resistance with 5-FU. The expression level of RRM1 was high; therefore, resistance to GEM was high. We showed that a tumor cell acquired resistance to GEM, and cross-resistance developed in one clone. These results suggest that only cells with certain mechanisms for high-level resistance to GEM survive against selective pressure applied by highly concentrated GEM. RRM1 may be one of the few factors that can induce high resistance to GEM and a suitable therapeutic target for GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer.

  7. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A.; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W.; Strowski, Mathias Z.

    2016-01-01

    Highly Ca2+ permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca2+ response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca2+-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation. PMID:27450545

  8. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W; Strowski, Mathias Z

    2016-08-01

    Highly Ca(2+) permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca(2+) response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation.

  9. Trimeprazine increases IRS2 in human islets and promotes pancreatic β cell growth and function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Yu, Yue; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Opare-Addo, Lynn; Rozzo, Aldo; Sadagurski, Marianna; Norquay, Lisa; Reed, Jessica E.; El Khattabi, Ilham; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C.; Sharma, Arun

    2016-01-01

    The capacity of pancreatic β cells to maintain glucose homeostasis during chronic physiologic and immunologic stress is important for cellular and metabolic homeostasis. Insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) is a regulated adapter protein that links the insulin and IGF1 receptors to downstream signaling cascades. Since strategies to maintain or increase IRS2 expression can promote β cell growth, function, and survival, we conducted a screen to find small molecules that can increase IRS2 mRNA in isolated human pancreatic islets. We identified 77 compounds, including 15 that contained a tricyclic core. To establish the efficacy of our approach, one of the tricyclic compounds, trimeprazine tartrate, was investigated in isolated human islets and in mouse models. Trimeprazine is a first-generation antihistamine that acts as a partial agonist against the histamine H1 receptor (H1R) and other GPCRs, some of which are expressed on human islets. Trimeprazine promoted CREB phosphorylation and increased the concentration of IRS2 in islets. IRS2 was required for trimeprazine to increase nuclear Pdx1, islet mass, β cell replication and function, and glucose tolerance in mice. Moreover, trimeprazine synergized with anti-CD3 Abs to reduce the progression of diabetes in NOD mice. Finally, it increased the function of human islet transplants in streptozotocin-induced (STZ-induced) diabetic mice. Thus, trimeprazine, its analogs, or possibly other compounds that increase IRS2 in islets and β cells without adverse systemic effects might provide mechanism-based strategies to prevent the progression of diabetes. PMID:27152363

  10. Oridonin inhibition and miR‑200b‑3p/ZEB1 axis in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Gui, Zhifang; Luo, Feng; Yang, Yayang; Shen, Can; Li, Shuquan; Xu, Jian

    2017-01-01

    The relationship among oridonin, miR-200b-3p and pancreatic cancer on epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was investigated for the molecular mechanism or signaling pathways on the migration in pancreatic cancer. BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cells were cultivated and the IC50 of oridonin in BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cells were obtained by the CCK-8 array. The expression of miR‑200b-3p was verified by using real-time PCR and its target gene was predicted. BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cells were treated with oridonin or transfected by miR-200b-3p, those cells were used for western blot assay, Transwell assay, ELISA, immunofluorescence staining, tumorigenesis assay in nude mice and immunohistochemical assay to verify the effects of oridonin or miR-200b-3p on pancreatic cancer. We found that oridonin inhibited the proliferation of BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. miR-200b-3p was downregulated by oridonin in BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cells. ZEB1 was a target gene for miR-200b-3p. Oridonin or overexpression of miR‑200b-3p can inhibit the cell migration in BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cells. miR-200b-3p can inhibit the EMT and oridonin can inhibit the expression of ZEB1, N-cadherin and fibronectin but not increase the expression of E-cadherin, while the cell adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were decreased by oridonin in BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cells and the cytoskeleton was altered by oridonin in PANC-1 cells compared with the control. In summary, the results demonstrate that miR‑200b-3p was able to inhibit the EMT of human pancreatic cancer in vivo and in vitro by targeted ZEB1. In vitro, oridonin had a certain effect on the migration in BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cells, but not though type III EMT by miR-200-3p/ZEB1 axis, and may be related to type Ⅱ EMT, tumor microenvironment or altering the cytoskeleton. In vivo, oridonin inhibited the cancer migration in the nude mouse model though inhibiting EMT.

  11. EPA, an omega-3 fatty acid, induces apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells: role of ROS accumulation, caspase-8 activation, and autophagy induction.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Masayuki; Kang, Ki Sung; Okada, Kazushi; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2013-01-01

    In a recent study, we showed that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), two common omega-3 fatty acids, can cause ROS accumulation and subsequently induce caspase-8-dependent apoptosis in human breast cancer cells (Kang et al. [2010], PLoS ONE 5: e10296). In this study, we showed that the pancreas has a unique ability to accumulate EPA at a level markedly higher than several other tissues analyzed. Based on this finding, we sought to further investigate the anticancer actions of EPA and its analog DHA in human pancreatic cancer cells using both in vitro and in vivo models. EPA and DHA were found to induce ROS accumulation and caspase-8-dependent cell death in human pancreatic cancer cells (MIA-PaCa-2 and Capan-2) in vitro. Feeding animals with a diet supplemented with 5% fish oil, which contains high levels of EPA and DHA, also strongly suppresses the growth of MIA-PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer xenografts in athymic nude mice, by inducing oxidative stress and cell death. In addition, we showed that EPA can concomitantly induce autophagy in these cancer cells, and the induction of autophagy diminishes its ability to induce apoptotic cell death. It is therefore suggested that combination of EPA with an autophagy inhibitor may be a useful strategy in increasing the therapeutic effectiveness in pancreatic cancer.

  12. Prevention and delay in progression of human pancreatic cancer by stable overexpression of the opioid growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Zagon, Ian S; Kreiner, Shawn; Heslop, Jeffery J; Conway, Andrea B; Morgan, Clinton R; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2008-08-01

    This study examined overexpression of the opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) in pancreatic cancer cells and phenotypic changes in tumorigenicity. Tumors of MIA PaCa-2 cells transfected with OGFr cDNA (OGFr-1) had 3.3 times more OGFr than empty vector (EV) neoplasias, and 4.3 times more OGFr than tumors from wild-type (WT) mice. No differences in OGFr binding were detected between tumors of EV and WT animals. Tumor incidence in OGFr-1 animals was reduced by up to 50% from EV mice. Latency times for OGFr-1 tumor expression were increased 30%, tumor volume was decreased 70%, and DNA synthesis was reduced 24% relative to EV mice. Exogenous OGF reduced OGFr-1 tumor volume up to 55% compared to OGFr-1 mice given vehicle. These data support OGFr gene function as a regulator of cell proliferation that impacts on tumorigenic expression, and suggest that molecular and pharmacological manipulation of OGFr may prevent or delay human pancreatic cancer.

  13. Calcitriol enhances gemcitabine antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo by promoting apoptosis in a human pancreatic carcinoma model system

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei-Dong; Ma, Yingyu; Flynn, Geraldine; Muindi, Josephia R; Kong, Rui-Xian; Trump, Donald L

    2010-01-01

    Gemcitabine is the standard care chemotherapeutic agent to treat pancreatic cancer. Previously we demonstrated that calcitriol (1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol) has significant anti-proliferative effects in vitro and in vivo in multiple tumor models and enhances the activity of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. We therefore investigated whether calcitriol could potentiate the cytotoxic activity of gemcitabine in the human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 model system. Isobologram analysis revealed that calcitriol and gemcitabine had synergistic antiproliferative effect over a wide range of drug concentrations. Calcitriol did not reduce the cytidine deaminase activity in Capan-1 tumors nor in the livers of Capan-1 tumor bearing mice. Calcitriol and gemcitabine combination promoted apoptosis in Capan-1 cells compared with either agent alone. The combination treatment also increased the activation of caspases-8, -9, -6 and -3 in Capan-1 cells. This result was confirmed by substrate-based caspase activity assay. Akt phosphorylation was reduced by calcitriol and gemcitabine combination treatment compared to single agent treatment. However, ERK1/2 phosphorylation was not modulated by either agent alone or by the combination. Tumor regrowth delay studies showed that calcitriol in combination with gemcitabine resulted in a significant reduction of Capan-1 tumor volume compared to single agent treatment. Our study suggests that calcitriol and gemcitabine in combination promotes caspase-dependent apoptosis, which may contribute to increased anti-tumor activity compared to either agent alone. PMID:20699664

  14. Effects of carbon-ion beams on human pancreatic cancer cell lines that differ in genetic status.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshifumi; Asano, Takehide; Kenmochi, Takashi; Iwakawa, Mayumi; Imai, Takashi; Ochiai, Takenori

    2004-02-01

    The relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) of carbon-ion beams at 3 different linear energy transfer (LET) values (13, 50, and 80 keV/microm) accelerated by the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba on human pancreatic cancer cell lines differing in genetic status was determined. The RBE values were calculated as D10, the dose (Gy) required to reduce the surviving fraction to 10%, relative to X-rays. We also investigated apoptosis and the relationship between D10 and the cell cycle checkpoint using morphologic examination and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. The RBE values calculated by the D10 values ranged from 1.16 to 1.77 for the 13-keV/microm beam and from 1.83 to 2.46 for the 80-keV/microm beam. A correlation between the D10 values of each cell line and intensity of G2/M arrest was observed. In contrast, LET values did not clearly correlate with induction of apoptosis. These results suggest that carbon-ion beam therapy is a promising modality. Elucidation of the mechanisms of G2/M arrest and apoptosis may provide clues to enhancing the effects of radiation on pancreatic cancer.

  15. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E.; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L.; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E.; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F.; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts. PMID:26964500

  16. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-03-11

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts.

  17. Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells Induce a MyD88-Dependent Stromal Response to Promote a Tumor-Tolerant Immune Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Delitto, Daniel; Delitto, Andrea E; DiVita, Bayli B; Pham, Kien; Han, Song; Hartlage, Emily R; Newby, Brittney N; Gerber, Michael H; Behrns, Kevin E; Moldawer, Lyle L; Thomas, Ryan M; George, Thomas J; Brusko, Todd M; Mathews, Clayton E; Liu, Chen; Trevino, Jose G; Hughes, Steven J; Wallet, Shannon M

    2017-02-01

    Cancer cells exert mastery over the local tumor-associated stroma (TAS) to configure protective immunity within the tumor microenvironment. The immunomodulatory character of pancreatic lysates of patients with cancer differs from those with pancreatitis. In this study, we evaluated the cross-talk between pancreatic cancer and its TAS in primary human cell culture models. Upon exposure of TAS to pancreatic cancer cell-conditioned media, we documented robust secretion of IL6 and IL8. This TAS response was MyD88-dependent and sufficient to directly suppress both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation, inducing Th17 polarization at the expense of Th1. We found that patients possessed a similar shift in circulating effector memory Th17:Th1 ratios compared with healthy controls. The TAS response also directly suppressed CD8(+) T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Overall, our results demonstrate how TAS contributes to the production of an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment in pancreatic cancer. Cancer Res; 77(3); 672-83. ©2016 AACR.

  18. Frequency and spectrum of c-Ki-ras mutations in human sporadic colon carcinoma, carcinomas arising in ulcerative colitis, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Burmer, G.C.; Rabinovitch, P.S.; Loeb, L.A. )

    1991-06-01

    Sporadic colon carcinomas, carcinomas arising in chronic ulcerative colitis, and pancreatic adenocarcinomas have been analyzed for the presence of c-Ki-ras mutations by a combination of histological enrichment, cell sorting, polymerase chain reaction, and direct sequencing. Although 60% (37/61) of sporadic colon carcinomas contained mutations in codon 12, only 1 of 17 specimens of dysplasia or carcinoma from ulcerative colitis patients contained c-Ki-ras mutations, despite a high frequency of aneuploid tumors. In contrast, a higher percentage (16/20 = 80%) of pancreatic adenocarcinomas contained mutations in c-Ki-ras 2, despite a lower frequency of DNA aneuploidy in these neoplasms. Moreover, the spectrum of mutations differed between sporadic colon carcinoma, where the predominant mutation was a G to A transition, and pancreatic carcinomas, which predominantly contained G to C or T transversions. These results suggest that the etiology of ras mutations is different in these three human neoplasms.

  19. Ultrasound-guided direct delivery of 3-bromopyruvate blocks tumor progression in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ota, Shinichi; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H; Buijs, Manon; Wijlemans, Joost W; Kwak, Byung Kook; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2013-06-01

    Studies in animal models of cancer have demonstrated that targeting tumor metabolism can be an effective anticancer strategy. Previously, we showed that inhibition of glucose metabolism by the pyruvate analog, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), induces anticancer effects both in vitro and in vivo. We have also documented that intratumoral delivery of 3-BrPA affects tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor model of human liver cancer. However, the efficacy of such an approach in a clinically relevant orthotopic tumor model has not been reported. Here, we investigated the feasibility of ultrasound (US) image-guided delivery of 3-BrPA in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer and evaluated its therapeutic efficacy. In vitro, treatment of Panc-1 cells with 3-BrPA resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability. The loss of viability correlated with a dose-dependent decrease in the intracellular ATP level and lactate production confirming that disruption of energy metabolism underlies these 3-BrPA-mediated effects. In vivo, US-guided delivery of 3-BrPA was feasible and effective as demonstrated by a marked decrease in tumor size on imaging. Further, the antitumor effect was confirmed by (1) a decrease in the proliferative potential by Ki-67 immunohistochemical staining and (2) the induction of apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5-triphospate nick end labeling staining. We therefore demonstrate the technical feasibility of US-guided intratumoral injection of 3-BrPA in a mouse model of human pancreatic cancer as well as its therapeutic efficacy. Our data suggest that this new therapeutic approach consisting of a direct intratumoral injection of antiglycolytic agents may represent an exciting opportunity to treat patients with pancreas cancer.

  20. Immunoscintigraphy of human pancreatic carcinoma in nude mice with I-131-F(ab')/sub 2/-fragments of monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Senekowitsch, R.; Maul, F.D.; Wenisch, H.J.C.; Kriegel, H.; Hor, G.

    1985-05-01

    In the present study radioiodinated F(ab')/sub 2/-fragments of CA19-9 and antibody that reacts specifically with human gastrointestinal cancer were examined for their ability to detect human pancreatic carcinoma hosted in nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice received 80..mu..Ci of I-131-F(ab')/sub 2/ with a specific activity of 1.8..mu..Ci/..mu..g. All mice were imaged after the injection and every 24hr up to 6 days. The retained radioactivity was also registered with a whole-body counter immediately after imaging. As a control F(ab's)/sub 2/ of a nonspecific antibody were administered in parallel to another group of animals bearing the same tumor. Three animals of each group were killed at 1,2,4 and 8 days for determination of the distribution of both labeled antibody-fragments. On scintigraphic images obtained with the CA19-9-F(ab')/sub 2/ the tumors could be visualized 24hr after injection, the best dilineation however was achieved 96hr p.i.. The biodistribution data exhibited a more rapid blood clearance for the specific fragments compared to that for the unspecific ones. Tumors showed an increase in uptake up to 48hr reaching 1.7% of the injected dose per gram, declining to values of 0.08%/g at day 6 p.i.. The highest tumor-to-blood ratios were found after 96h. They were 7 for the CA19-9-fragments compared to 1.5 for the unspecific fragments. The whole body counting revealed a more rapid excretion for the fragments of the specific monoclonal antibodies than for the unspecific ones. In summary the authors were able to show that CA19-9-F(ab')/sub 2/-fragments can be used for immunodetection of human pancreatic carcinoma hosted in nude mice.

  1. Glucose-induced β cell production of IL-1β contributes to glucotoxicity in human pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Maedler, Kathrin; Sergeev, Pavel; Ris, Frédéric; Oberholzer, José; Joller-Jemelka, Helen I.; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Kaiser, Nurit; Halban, Philippe A.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2002-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes, chronic hyperglycemia is suggested to be detrimental to pancreatic β cells, causing impaired insulin secretion. IL-1β is a proinflammatory cytokine acting during the autoimmune process of type 1 diabetes. IL-1β inhibits β cell function and promotes Fas-triggered apoptosis in part by activating the transcription factor NF-κB. Recently, we have shown that increased glucose concentrations also induce Fas expression and β cell apoptosis in human islets. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that IL-1β may mediate the deleterious effects of high glucose on human β cells. In vitro exposure of islets from nondiabetic organ donors to high glucose levels resulted in increased production and release of IL-1β, followed by NF-κB activation, Fas upregulation, DNA fragmentation, and impaired β cell function. The IL-1 receptor antagonist protected cultured human islets from these deleterious effects. β cells themselves were identified as the islet cellular source of glucose-induced IL-1β. In vivo, IL-1β–producing β cells were observed in pancreatic sections of type 2 diabetic patients but not in nondiabetic control subjects. Similarly, IL-1β was induced in β cells of the gerbil Psammomys obesus during development of diabetes. Treatment of the animals with phlorizin normalized plasma glucose and prevented β cell expression of IL-1β. These findings implicate an inflammatory process in the pathogenesis of glucotoxicity in type 2 diabetes and identify the IL-1β/NF-κB pathway as a target to preserve β cell mass and function in this condition. PMID:12235117

  2. Ligand Stimulation of ErbB4 and A Constitutively-Active ErbB4 Mutant Result in Different Biological Responses In Human Pancreatic Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mill, Christopher P.; Gettinger, Kathleen L.; Riese, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Indeed, it has been estimated that 37,000 Americans will die from this disease in 2010. Late diagnosis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance of these tumors are major reasons for poor patient outcome, spurring the search for pancreatic cancer early diagnostic and therapeutic targets. ErbB4 (HER4) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), a family that also includes the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ErbB1/HER1), Neu/ErbB2/HER2, and ErbB3/HER3. These RTKs play central roles in many human malignancies by regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, invasiveness, motility, and apoptosis. In this report we demonstrate that human pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibit minimal ErbB4 expression; in contrast, these cell lines exhibit varied and in some cases abundant expression and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB3. Expression of a constitutively-dimerized and -active ErbB4 mutant inhibits clonogenic proliferation of CaPan-1, HPAC, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 pancreatic tumor cell lines. In contrast, expression of wild-type ErbB4 in pancreatic tumor cell lines potentiates stimulation of anchorage-independent colony formation by the ErbB4 ligand Neuregulin1β. These results illustrate the multiple roles that ErbB4 may be playing in pancreatic tumorigenesis and tumor progression. PMID:21110957

  3. Ligand stimulation of ErbB4 and a constitutively-active ErbB4 mutant result in different biological responses in human pancreatic tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mill, Christopher P.; Gettinger, Kathleen L.; Riese, David J.

    2011-02-15

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Indeed, it has been estimated that 37,000 Americans will die from this disease in 2010. Late diagnosis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance of these tumors are major reasons for poor patient outcome, spurring the search for pancreatic cancer early diagnostic and therapeutic targets. ErbB4 (HER4) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), a family that also includes the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ErbB1/HER1), Neu/ErbB2/HER2, and ErbB3/HER3. These RTKs play central roles in many human malignancies by regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, invasiveness, motility, and apoptosis. In this report we demonstrate that human pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibit minimal ErbB4 expression; in contrast, these cell lines exhibit varied and in some cases abundant expression and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB3. Expression of a constitutively-dimerized and -active ErbB4 mutant inhibits clonogenic proliferation of CaPan-1, HPAC, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 pancreatic tumor cell lines. In contrast, expression of wild-type ErbB4 in pancreatic tumor cell lines potentiates stimulation of anchorage-independent colony formation by the ErbB4 ligand Neuregulin 1{beta}. These results illustrate the multiple roles that ErbB4 may be playing in pancreatic tumorigenesis and tumor progression.

  4. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-14

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  5. Pancreatic Transdifferentiation and Glucose-Regulated Production of Human Insulin in the H4IIE Rat Liver Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Binhai; Tao, Chang; Swan, Margaret Anne; Joachim, Nichole; Martiniello-Wilks, Rosetta; Nassif, Najah T.; O’Brien, Bronwyn A.; Simpson, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the limitations of current treatment regimes, gene therapy is a promising strategy being explored to correct blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the current study, we used a retroviral vector to deliver either the human insulin gene alone, the rat NeuroD1 gene alone, or the human insulin gene and rat NeuroD1 genes together, to the rat liver cell line, H4IIE, to determine if storage of insulin and pancreatic transdifferentiation occurred. Stable clones were selected and expanded into cell lines: H4IIEins (insulin gene alone), H4IIE/ND (NeuroD1 gene alone), and H4IIEins/ND (insulin and NeuroD1 genes). The H4IIEins cells did not store insulin; however, H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells stored 65.5 ± 5.6 and 1475.4 ± 171.8 pmol/insulin/5 × 106 cells, respectively. Additionally, several β cell transcription factors and pancreatic hormones were expressed in both H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells. Electron microscopy revealed insulin storage vesicles in the H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cell lines. Regulated secretion of insulin to glucose (0–20 mmol/L) was seen in the H4IIEins/ND cell line. The H4IIEins/ND cells were transplanted into diabetic immunoincompetent mice, resulting in normalization of blood glucose. This data shows that the expression of NeuroD1 and insulin in liver cells may be a useful strategy for inducing islet neogenesis and reversing diabetes. PMID:27070593

  6. Loss of SOD3 (EcSOD) expression promotes an aggressive phenotype in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Brianne R.; Fath, Melissa A.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Hrabe, Jennifer E.; Button, Anna M.; Allen, Bryan G.; Case, Adam J.; Altekruse, Sean; Wagner, Brett A.; Buettner, Garry R.; Lynch, Charles F.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Cozen, Wendy; Beardsley, Robert A.; Keene, Jeffery; Henry, Michael D.; Domann, Frederick E.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Mezhir, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells are known to produce excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly superoxide, which may contribute to the aggressive and refractory nature of this disease. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EcSOD) is an antioxidant enzyme that catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide in the extracellular environment. The current work tests the hypothesis that EcSOD modulates PDA growth and invasion by modifying the redox balance in PDA. Experimental Design We evaluated the prognostic significance of EcSOD in a human tissue microarray of patients with PDA. EcSOD overexpression was performed in PDA cell lines and animal models of disease. The impact of EcSOD on PDA cell lines was evaluated with Matrigel invasion in combination with a superoxide-specific SOD mimic and a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor to determine the mechanism of action of EcSOD in PDA. Results Loss of EcSOD expression is a common event in PDA, which correlated with worse disease biology. Overexpression of EcSOD in PDA cell lines resulted in decreased invasiveness that appeared to be related to reactions of superoxide with nitric oxide. Pancreatic cancer xenografts overexpressing EcSOD also demonstrated slower growth and peritoneal metastasis. Over-expression of EcSOD or treatment with a superoxide-specific SOD mimic caused significant decreases in PDA cell invasive capacity. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that loss of EcSOD leads to increased reactions of superoxide with nitric oxide which contributes to the invasive phenotype. These results allow for the speculation that superoxide dismutase mimetics might inhibit PDA progression in human clinical disease. PMID:25634994

  7. HDAC inhibitors, MS-275 and salermide, potentiates the anticancer effect of EF24 in human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yar Saglam, Atiye Seda; Yilmaz, Akin; Onen, Hacer Ilke; Alp, Ebru; Kayhan, Handan; Ekmekci, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a major role in the regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression by changing acetylation status of histone and non-histone proteins. MS-275 (entinostat, MS) is a well-known benzamide-based HDACI and Salermide (SAL), a reverse amide compound HDACI, have antiproliferative effects on several human cancer cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of HDACIs (MS and SAL) alone and/or combined use with EF24 (EF), a novel synthetic curcumin analog, on human pancreatic cancer cell line (BxPC-3). In vitro, BxPC-3 cells were exposed to varying concentrations of MS, SAL with or without EF, and their effects on cell viability, acetylated Histone H3 and H4 levels, cytotoxicity, and cleaved caspase 3 levels, and cell cycle distribution were measured. The viability of BxPC-3 cells decreased significantly after treatment with EF, MS and SAL treatments. MS and SAL treatment increased the acetylation of histone H3 and H4 in a dose dependent manner. MS and SAL alone or combined with EF were increased the number of cells in G1 phase. In addition, treatment with agents significantly decreased the ratio of cell in G2/M phase. There were significant dose-dependent increases at cleaved Caspase 3 levels after MS treatment but not after SAL treatment. Our results showed that HDAC inhibitors (MS and SAL), when combined with EF, may effectively reduce pancreatic cancer cell (BxPC-3) progression and stop the cell cycle at G1 phase. Further molecular analyses are needed to understand the fundamental molecular consequences of HDAC inhibition in pancreas cancer cells. PMID:27330528

  8. Fluorescence-guided surgery in combination with UVC irradiation cures metastatic human pancreatic cancer in orthotopic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Maawy, Ali; Zhang, Yong; Sato, Sho; Murakami, Takashi; Yamamoto, Mako; Uehara, Fuminari; Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Momiyama, Masashi; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if ultraviolet light (UVC) irradiation in combination with fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) can eradicate metastatic human pancreatic cancer in orthotopic nude-mouse models. Two weeks after orthotopic implantation of human MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells, expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP), in nude mice, bright-light surgery (BLS) was performed on all tumor-bearing mice (n = 24). After BLS, mice were randomized into 3 treatment groups; BLS-only (n = 8) or FGS (n = 8) or FGS-UVC (n = 8). The residual tumors were resected using a hand-held portable imaging system under fluorescence navigation in mice treated with FGS and FGS-UVC. The surgical resection bed was irradiated with 2700 J/m2 UVC (254 nm) in the mice treated with FGS-UVC. The average residual tumor area after FGS (n = 16) was significantly smaller than after BLS only (n = 24) (0.135±0.137 mm2 and 3.338±2.929 mm2, respectively; p = 0.007). The BLS treated mice had significantly reduced survival compared to FGS- and FGS-UVC-treated mice for both relapse-free survival (RFS) (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively) and overall survival (OS) (p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively). FGS-UVC-treated mice had increased RFS and OS compared to FGS-only treated mice (p = 0.008 and p = 0.025, respectively); with RFS lasting at least 150 days indicating the animals were cured. The results of the present study suggest that UVC irradiation in combination with FGS has clinical potential to increase survival.

  9. Pancreatic Transdifferentiation and Glucose-Regulated Production of Human Insulin in the H4IIE Rat Liver Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Ren, Binhai; Tao, Chang; Swan, Margaret Anne; Joachim, Nichole; Martiniello-Wilks, Rosetta; Nassif, Najah T; O'Brien, Bronwyn A; Simpson, Ann M

    2016-04-08

    Due to the limitations of current treatment regimes, gene therapy is a promising strategy being explored to correct blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the current study, we used a retroviral vector to deliver either the human insulin gene alone, the rat NeuroD1 gene alone, or the human insulin gene and rat NeuroD1 genes together, to the rat liver cell line, H4IIE, to determine if storage of insulin and pancreatic transdifferentiation occurred. Stable clones were selected and expanded into cell lines: H4IIEins (insulin gene alone), H4IIE/ND (NeuroD1 gene alone), and H4IIEins/ND (insulin and NeuroD1 genes). The H4IIEins cells did not store insulin; however, H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells stored 65.5 ± 5.6 and 1475.4 ± 171.8 pmol/insulin/5 × 10⁶ cells, respectively. Additionally, several β cell transcription factors and pancreatic hormones were expressed in both H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells. Electron microscopy revealed insulin storage vesicles in the H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cell lines. Regulated secretion of insulin to glucose (0-20 mmol/L) was seen in the H4IIEins/ND cell line. The H4IIEins/ND cells were transplanted into diabetic immunoincompetent mice, resulting in normalization of blood glucose. This data shows that the expression of NeuroD1 and insulin in liver cells may be a useful strategy for inducing islet neogenesis and reversing diabetes.

  10. Development and evaluation of bevacizumab-modified pegylated cationic liposomes using cellular and in vivo models of human pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuesters, Geoffrey M.

    Targeting the tumor vascular supply in a homogenous manner is a difficult task to achieve with the use of pegylated cationic liposomes (PCLs) alone. Our formulation consisting of bevacizumab conjugated to the distal end of PEG on PCLs was thus developed in an effort to eliminate some of this heterogeneity as well as to increase tumor targeting overall. This study focuses on pancreatic cancer, which has the poorest five-year survival rate of all cancers because of its late diagnosis. The addition of bevacizumab will target tumor areas because it binds to VEGF which is secreted by tumors in high levels. In vitro, we showed that pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1, HPAF-II and PANC-1) all secrete VEGF into media at different levels, with Capan-1 producing the most and HPAF-II producing the least. A murine endothelial cell line, MS1-VEGF, produces and secretes the most VEGF. A human microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1) was grown in two different conditions, with and without VEGF in the media. Modifying PCLs with bevacizumab enhanced the binding and uptake of PCLs by some pancreatic and endothelial cells in vitro, particularly the cells that had or secreted the most significant amount of VEGF in the media. This translated into enhanced tumor targeting in a biodistribution study using a Capan-1 subcutaneous pancreatic tumor model. This also showed enhanced blood retention compared to the unmodified PCLs while it diminished uptake by the spleen and increased uptake by the kidney. To test the therapeutic benefit of this enhanced uptake and targeting, an anti-angiogenic agent, 2-methoxyestradiol was incorporated into the formulation with 20% incorporation efficiency. Both the unmodified and modified drug-loaded PCLs were the least efficacious against Capan-1, moderately effective against HPAF-II, PANC-1, MS1-VEGF and HMEC-1 grown without VEGF in the media and most efficacious against HMEC-1 grown with VEGF which had the most VEGF present in the media. Multiple in vivo

  11. Evaluation of the Significance of Starch Surface Binding Sites on Human Pancreatic α-Amylase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohua; Caner, Sami; Kwan, Emily; Li, Chunmin; Brayer, Gary D; Withers, Stephen G

    2016-11-01

    Starch provides the major source of caloric intake in many diets. Cleavage of starch into malto-oligosaccharides in the gut is catalyzed by pancreatic α-amylase. These oligosaccharides are then further cleaved by gut wall α-glucosidases to release glucose, which is absorbed into the bloodstream. Potential surface binding sites for starch on the pancreatic amylase, distinct from the active site of the amylase, have been identified through X-ray crystallographic analyses. The role of these sites in the degradation of both starch granules and soluble starch was probed by the generation of a series of surface variants modified at each site to disrupt binding. Kinetic analysis of the binding and/or cleavage of substrates ranging from simple maltotriosides to soluble starch and insoluble starch granules has allowed evaluation of the potential role of each such surface site. In this way, two key surface binding sites, on the same face as the active site, are identified. One site, containing a pair of aromatic residues, is responsible for attachment to starch granules, while a second site featuring a tryptophan residue around which a malto-oligosaccharide wraps is shown to heavily influence soluble starch binding and hydrolysis. These studies provide insights into the mechanisms by which enzymes tackle the degradation of largely insoluble polymers and also present some new approaches to the interrogation of the binding sites involved.

  12. Amblyomin-X induces ER stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and caspase activation in human melanoma and pancreatic tumor cell.

    PubMed

    Morais, Katia L P; Pacheco, Mario Thiego Fernandes; Berra, Carolina Maria; Bosch, Rosemary V; Sciani, Juliana Mozer; Chammas, Roger; de Freitas Saito, Renata; Iqbal, Asif; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana Marisa

    2016-04-01

    During the last two decades, new insights into proteasome function and its role in several human diseases made it a potential therapeutic target. In this context, Amblyomin-X is a Kunitz-type FXa inhibitor similar to endogenous tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and is a novel proteasome inhibitor. Herein, we have demonstrated Amblyomin-X cytotoxicity to different tumor cells lines such as pancreatic (Panc1, AsPC1BxPC3) and melanoma (SK-MEL-5 and SK-MEL-28). Of note, Amblyomin-X was not cytotoxic to normal human fibroblast cells. In addition, Amblyomin-X promoted accumulation of ER stress markers (GRP78 and GADD153) in sensitive (SK-MEL-28) and bortezomib-resistant (Mia-PaCa-2) tumor cells. The intracellular calcium concentration [Ca(2+)] i was slightly modulated in human tumor cells (SK-MEL-28 and Mia-PaCa-2) after 24 h of Amblyomin-X treatment. Furthermore, Amblyomin-X induced mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome-c release, PARP cleavage, and activation of caspase cascade in both human tumor (SK-MEL-28 and Mia-PaCa-2) cells. These investigations might help in further understanding of the antitumor properties of Amblyomin-X.

  13. Tolerance induction and reversal of diabetes in mice transplanted with human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm.

    PubMed

    Szot, Gregory L; Yadav, Mahesh; Lang, Jiena; Kroon, Evert; Kerr, Justin; Kadoya, Kuniko; Brandon, Eugene P; Baetge, Emmanuel E; Bour-Jordan, Hélène; Bluestone, Jeffrey A

    2015-02-05

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease caused by T cell-mediated destruction of insulin-producing β cells in the islets of Langerhans. In most cases, reversal of disease would require strategies combining islet cell replacement with immunotherapy that are currently available only for the most severely affected patients. Here, we demonstrate that immunotherapies that target T cell costimulatory pathways block the rejection of xenogeneic human embryonic-stem-cell-derived pancreatic endoderm (hESC-PE) in mice. The therapy allowed for long-term development of hESC-PE into islet-like structures capable of producing human insulin and maintaining normoglycemia. Moreover, short-term costimulation blockade led to robust immune tolerance that could be transferred independently of regulatory T cells. Importantly, costimulation blockade prevented the rejection of allogeneic hESC-PE by human PBMCs in a humanized model in vivo. These results support the clinical development of hESC-derived therapy, combined with tolerogenic treatments, as a sustainable alternative strategy for patients with T1D.

  14. Imaging of human pancreatic cancer xenografts by single-photon emission computed tomography with 99mTc-Hynic-PEG-AE105

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIN; TIAN, YE; SUN, FANGFANG; FENG, HONGBO; YANG, CHUN; GONG, XIAOYAN; TAN, GUANG

    2015-01-01

    The elevated expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is associated with the poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer patients. Thus, uPAR is a promising candidate as a molecular target for the non-invasive imaging of pancreatic cancer. The present study aimed to develop a technetium-99m (99mTc)-labeled uPAR-binding peptide for non-invasive single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) assessment of uPAR expression in pancreatic cancer xenograft models. A linear high-affinity uPAR peptide antagonist, Hynic-PEG-AE105, was labeled with 99mTc. Human uPAR-positive pancreatic cancer BxPC-3 cells were inoculated into nude mice. SPECT was performed in the pancreatic cancer xenograft mice models. The results showed that the rate of the 99mTc labeling of Hynic-PEG-AE105 was 97.72±1.73%. The tumor uptake of 99mTc-Hynic-PEG-AE105 was higher than the control inactive peptide 99mTc-Hynic-PEG-AE105mut at 4 h (3.37±0.11 vs. 1.36±0.18; P<0.001) and 6 h (3.64±0.25 vs. 1.28±0.20; P<0.001) (n=10). Moreover, a significant correlation was observed between the tumor uptake of 99mTc-Hynic-PEG-AE105 and uPAR expression (r=0.791, P=0.006). In conclusion, in the present study, a peptide-based SPECT tracer, 99mTc-Hynic-PEG-AE105, with a high purity and specific radioactivity was synthesized. 99mTc-Hynic-PEG-AE105 is a promising agent for the non-invasive determination of uPAR expression in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26622829

  15. Co-expression of CD133, CD44v6 and human tissue factor is associated with metastasis and poor prognosis in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Li, Zhonghu; Jiang, Peng; Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Yujun; Jiang, Yan; He, Yu; Li, Xiaowu

    2014-08-01

    The metastasis-related molecules CD133, CD44v6 and human tissue factor (TF) have been shown to be associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. This study aimed to determine whether co-expression of these three molecules was associated with metastasis and overall prognosis in pancreatic carcinoma. We analyzed the expression profiles of these three molecules by immunohistochemistry and evaluated the relationship of their expression profiles with metastasis and prognosis in 109 pancreatic carcinomas. The results showed that the expression levels of CD133, CD44v6 and TF were increased in pancreatic carcinoma. Co-expression of CD133, CD44v6 and TF (tri-expression) was also detected in pancreatic carcinoma. Clinical analysis showed that individual expression of CD133, CD44v6 or TF was associated with vessel invasion, lymph node metastasis and liver metastasis, while tri-expression was associated with lymph node metastasis. Survival analysis showed that patients with co-expression of CD133 and TF or tri-expression had lower and the lowest overall survival rates, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that T-factor, lymph node metastasis, TNM stage, and individual levels or tri-expression of CD133, CD44v6 and TF were survival risk factors. Multivariate analysis showed that tri-expression of CD133, CD44v6 and TF was an independent predictor of survival. These results suggest that overexpression of CD133, CD44v6 and TF is associated with pancreatic carcinoma metastasis. Tri-expression of these three molecules may be a useful predictor for pancreatic carcinoma prognosis.

  16. Therapeutic targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu®) disables cancer cell survival in human pancreatic cancer with acquired chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    O’Shea, Leah K; Abdulkhalek, Samar; Allison, Stephanie; Neufeld, Ronald J; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance to drug therapy, along with high rates of metastasis, contributes to the low survival rate in patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. An alternate treatment for human pancreatic cancer involving targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu®) was investigated in human pancreatic cancer (PANC1) cells with acquired resistance to cisplatin and gemcitabine. Its efficacy in overcoming the intrinsic resistance of the cell to chemotherapeutics and metastasis was evaluated. Methods Microscopic imaging, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and WST-1 cell viability assays were used to evaluate cell survival, morphologic changes, and expression levels of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and VE-cadherin before and after treatment with oseltamivir phosphate in PANC1 cells with established resistance to cisplatin, gemcitabine, or a combination of the two agents, and in archived paraffin-embedded PANC1 tumors grown in RAGxCγ double mutant mice. Results Oseltamivir phosphate overcame the chemoresistance of PANC1 to cisplatin and gemcitabine alone or in combination in a dose-dependent manner, and disabled the cancer cell survival mechanism(s). Oseltamivir phosphate also reversed the epithelial-mesenchymal transition characteristic of the phenotypic E-cadherin to N-cadherin changes associated with resistance to drug therapy. Low-dose oseltamivir phosphate alone or in combination with gemcitabine in heterotopic xenografts of PANC1 tumors growing in RAGxCγ double mutant mice did not prevent metastatic spread to the liver and lung. Conclusion Therapeutic targeting of Neu1 sialidase with oseltamivir phosphate at the growth factor receptor level disables the intrinsic signaling platform for cancer cell survival in human pancreatic cancer with acquired chemoresistance. These findings provide evidence for oseltamivir phosphate (Tamiflu) as a potential therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer resistant to drug therapy. PMID:24470763

  17. Wogonin induces Beclin-1/PI3K and reactive oxygen species-mediated autophagy in human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-Jun; Sun, Shi-Jie; Gao, Jie; Sun, Fu-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Wogonin is considered to be an inhibitor of myeloid cell leukemia 1 and B-cell lymphoma 2, and a potential antitumor drug due to its ability to induce apoptosis in certain cancer cells; however, few previous studies have reported on wogonin-induced autophagy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of wogonin on autophagy in human pancreatic cancer cells (HPCCs), elucidate its mechanism, and identify strategies to increase its effectiveness as an anti-cancer treatment. HPCCs were treated with wogonin and autophagy was detected in the cells. The mechanism of wogonin-related autophagy was investigated, and the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) was used to assess the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in wogonin-related autophagy. The results demonstrated that wogonin may induce autophagy by activating the Beclin-1/phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and ROS pathways in HPCCs, and may enhance ROS generation, followed by the activation of the AKT/ULK1/4E-BP1/CYLD pathway and inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway. The incubation of HPCCs with wogonin and the antioxidant NAC, revealed that the effects of wogonin-enhanced ROS generation on autophagy-related molecules were inhibited, contributing to the inhibition of autophagy and increasing the cell death ratio through apoptosis activation in HPCCs. These studies suggest that autophagy activation, via the ROS pathway, by the antitumor drug wogonin in HPCCs may partially reduce the antitumor effects of the drug, and that the antioxidant NAC may enhance the antitumor effectiveness of wogonin via the inhibition of ROS-enhanced autophagy and the subsequent promotion of apoptosis. Therefore, the present research suggests that wogonin combined with NAC may be a novel combination therapy for clinical pancreatic cancer therapy trials. PMID:28105213

  18. MicroRNA-222 Controls Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Line Capan-2 Proliferation by P57 Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yingying; Wang, Yuqiong; Yang, Yuefeng; Liu, Jingqi; Song, Yang; Cao, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyu; Yang, Wenzhuo; Wang, Fei; Gao, Jun; Li, Zhaoshen; Yang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most common cancers and has a poor prognosis due to late diagnosis and ineffective therapeutic multimodality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) are a group of non-coding, small RNAs with active biological activities. In our investigation, human pancreatic cancer cell line Capan-2 were transfected with miR-222 mimics, inhibitors or their negative controls. Cell proliferation was assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), EdU incorporation assay and cell cycle determination by flow cytometry. MiR-222 and putative target gene expression levels including p27, p57 and PTEN were determined using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions and Western blotting. Our results showed that miR-222 could lead to increased vitality and proliferative rate of Capan-2 cells, and also higher S-phase and lower G1-phase of cell cycle. Further, we found p57 at protein level, but not p27 nor PTEN, was regulated by miR-222 in Capan-2 cells. Finally, we co-transfected miR-222 inhibitor and p57 si-RNA into Capan-2 cells, and found that proliferation-suppressing effects of miR-222 inhibitor on Capan-2 cells could be partially reversed by silencing p57. Our results indicate that miR-222 controls Capan-2 cell proliferation by targeting p57. This study provides a novel idea for developing effective therapeutic strategy for PC patients through inhibiting miR-222. PMID:26535064

  19. Gedunin and Azadiradione: Human Pancreatic Alpha-Amylase Inhibiting Limonoids from Neem (Azadirachta indica) as Anti-Diabetic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Zinjarde, Smita; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu; RaviKumar, Ameeta

    2015-01-01

    Human pancreatic α-amylase (HPA) inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower postprandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. Limonoids from Azadirachta indica known for their therapeutic potential were screened for pancreatic α-amylase inhibition, a known anti-diabetic target. Studies were carried out to reveal their mode of action so as to justify their hypoglycemic potential. Of the nine limonoids isolated/semi-synthesized from A.indica and screened for α-amylase inhibition, azadiradione and exhibited potential inhibition with an IC50 value of 74.17 and 68.38 μM, respectively against HPA under in vitro conditions. Further screening on AR42J α-amylase secretory cell line for cytotoxicity and bioactivity revealed that azadiradione and gedunin exhibited cytotoxicity with IC50 of 11.1 and 13.4μM. Maximal secreted α-amylase inhibition of 41.8% and 53.4% was seen at 3.5 and 3.3μM, respectively. Michaelis-Menten kinetics suggested a mixed mode of inhibition with maltopentaose (Ki 42.2, 18.6 μM) and starch (Ki′ 75.8, 37.4 μM) as substrate with a stiochiometry of 1:1 for both azadiradione and gedunin, respectively. The molecular docking simulation indicated plausible π-alkyl and alkyl-alkyl interactions between the aromatic amino acids and inhibitors. Fluorescence and CD confirmed the involvement of tryptophan and tyrosine in ligand binding to HPA. Thermodynamic parameters suggested that binding is enthalpically and entropically driven with ΔG° of -21.25 kJ mol-1 and -21.16 kJ mol-1 for azadiradione and gedunin, respectively. Thus, the limonoids azadiradione and gedunin could bind and inactivate HPA (anti-diabetic target) and may prove to be lead drug candidates to reduce/control post-prandial hyperglycemia. PMID:26469405

  20. MicroRNA-222 Controls Human Pancreatic Cancer Cell Line Capan-2 Proliferation by P57 Targeting.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingying; Wang, Yuqiong; Yang, Yuefeng; Liu, Jingqi; Song, Yang; Cao, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyu; Yang, Wenzhuo; Wang, Fei; Gao, Jun; Li, Zhaoshen; Yang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most common cancers and has a poor prognosis due to late diagnosis and ineffective therapeutic multimodality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) are a group of non-coding, small RNAs with active biological activities. In our investigation, human pancreatic cancer cell line Capan-2 were transfected with miR-222 mimics, inhibitors or their negative controls. Cell proliferation was assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), EdU incorporation assay and cell cycle determination by flow cytometry. MiR-222 and putative target gene expression levels including p27, p57 and PTEN were determined using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions and Western blotting. Our results showed that miR-222 could lead to increased vitality and proliferative rate of Capan-2 cells, and also higher S-phase and lower G1-phase of cell cycle. Further, we found p57 at protein level, but not p27 nor PTEN, was regulated by miR-222 in Capan-2 cells. Finally, we co-transfected miR-222 inhibitor and p57 si-RNA into Capan-2 cells, and found that proliferation-suppressing effects of miR-222 inhibitor on Capan-2 cells could be partially reversed by silencing p57. Our results indicate that miR-222 controls Capan-2 cell proliferation by targeting p57. This study provides a novel idea for developing effective therapeutic strategy for PC patients through inhibiting miR-222.

  1. Role of human lipocalin proteins in abdominal obesity after acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ruma G; Pendharkar, Sayali A; Plank, Lindsay D; Petrov, Maxim S

    2017-03-07

    Lipocalin proteins are small regulatory peptides implicated in metabolism, inflammation, and immunity. Although lipocalin proteins have been linked to various clinical conditions, their role in the acute inflammatory setting, such as acute pancreatitis (AP), has only been sparsely investigated. Two members of the lipocalin family, lipocalin-2 (LCN-2) and retinol binding protein -4 (RBP-4), play an important role in obesity and insulin resistance. In this study, we analysed circulating levels of LCN-2 and RBP-4 in 92 individuals after AP, of whom 41 individuals had abdominal obesity and 51 did not. Binary logistic regression analyses were performed to determine whether abdominal obesity was associated with the two lipocalin proteins. Lipocalin-2 was significantly associated with abdominal obesity in the unadjusted model (Odds ratio (OR)=1.014 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.000, 1.028], P=0.05) and after adjusting for patient related (age, ethnicity, and diabetes mellitus) and pancreatitis related (aetiology, severity, recurrence, and duration of AP) characteristics (OR=1.018 [95% CI: 1.001, 1.036], p=0.04). Further, the association of LCN-2 with waist circumference was significant in individuals with alcohol aetiology of AP (β=1.082 [95% CI: 1.011, 1.158], p=0.02]. The association between RBP-4 and abdominal obesity was not significant in both unadjusted and adjusted models. These findings indicate that circulating levels of LCN-2 in patients after AP may play a role in chronic low grade inflammation associated with abdominal adiposity and that alcohol consumption may further exacerbate adipose tissue dysfunction.

  2. ADVANCES IN IMPEDANCE THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2009-06-05

    We review recent progress in the following areas of the impedance theory: calculation of impedance of tapers and small angle collimators; optical approximation and parabolic equation for the high-frequency impedance; impedance due to resistive inserts in a perfectly conducting pipe.

  3. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Links Oxidative Stress to Impaired Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function Caused by Human Oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Favre, Dimitri; Ezanno, Hélène; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonner, Caroline; Gmyr, Valéry; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Gauthier, Benoit R.; Widmann, Christian; Waeber, Gérard; Pattou, François; Froguel, Philippe; Abderrahmani, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentration of the pro-atherogenic oxidized low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) triggers adverse effects in pancreatic beta-cells and is associated with type 2 diabetes. Here, we investigated whether the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key player coupling oxidative stress to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by human oxidized LDL. We found that human oxidized LDL activates ER stress as evidenced by the activation of the inositol requiring 1α, and the elevated expression of both DDIT3 (also called CHOP) and DNAJC3 (also called P58IPK) ER stress markers in isolated human islets and the mouse insulin secreting MIN6 cells. Silencing of Chop and inhibition of ER stress markers by the chemical chaperone phenyl butyric acid (PBA) prevented cell death caused by oxidized LDL. Finally, we found that oxidative stress accounts for activation of ER stress markers induced by oxidized LDL. Induction of Chop/CHOP and p58IPK/P58IPK by oxidized LDL was mimicked by hydrogen peroxide and was blocked by co-treatment with the N-acetylcystein antioxidant. As a conclusion, the harmful effects of oxidized LDL in beta-cells requires ER stress activation in a manner that involves oxidative stress. This mechanism may account for impaired beta-cell function in diabetes and can be reversed by antioxidant treatment. PMID:27636901

  4. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  5. Sclareolide enhances gemcitabine‑induced cell death through mediating the NICD and Gli1 pathways in gemcitabine‑resistant human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Wang, Ye; Zhang, Wen-Long; Dong, Mao-Sheng; Zhang, Jian-Hua

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a type of cancer, which rapidly develops resistance to chemotherapy. Gemcitabine is the treatment used clinically, however, gemcitabine resistance leads to limited efficacy and patient survival rates of only a few months following diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer and to select targeted agents combined with gemcitabine to promote the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Panc‑1 and ASPC‑1 human pancreatic cancer cells (HPCCs) were used to establish the experimental model, and HPCCs were exposed to gemcitabine of serially increased concentrations to generate gemcitabine‑resistant cells (GR‑HPCCs). The anticancer effect of gemcitabine combined with sclareolide was then assessed. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) and ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase 1 (RRM1) were detected in the HPCCs and GR‑HPCCs, and the mechanisms were investigated. Sclareolide resensitized the GR‑HPCCs to gemcitabine. The expression levels of hENT1 and RRM1 were lower and higher, respectively, in GR‑HPCCs, compared with HPCCs. Sclareolide upregulated hENT1, downregulated RRM1 and inhibited gemcitabine‑induced EMT through the TWIST1/Slug pathway in the GR‑HPCCs. In addition, sclareolide mediated the NOTCH 1 intracellular cytoplasmic domain (NICD)/glioma‑associated oncogene 1 (Gli1) pathway, which triggered TWIST1/Slug‑hENT1/RRM1 signaling and resensitized GR‑HPCCs to gemcitabine. Finally, sclareolide resensitized GR‑HPCCs to gemcitabine through inducing apoptosis; in vivo, the co‑administraion of sclareolide and gemcitabine effectively suppressed tumor growth. Sclareolide may be a novel agent in combination with gemcitabine for the treatment of gemcitabine‑resistant pancreatic cancer, which resensitizes GR‑HPCCs to gemcitabine through mediating NICD and Gli1.

  6. Characterization of P4 ATPase Phospholipid Translocases (Flippases) in Human and Rat Pancreatic Beta Cells: THEIR GENE SILENCING INHIBITS INSULIN SECRETION.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Israr-ul H; Longacre, Melissa J; Paulusma, Coen C; Stoker, Scott W; Kendrick, Mindy A; MacDonald, Michael J

    2015-09-18

    The negative charge of phosphatidylserine in lipid bilayers of secretory vesicles and plasma membranes couples the domains of positively charged amino acids of secretory vesicle SNARE proteins with similar domains of plasma membrane SNARE proteins enhancing fusion of the two membranes to promote exocytosis of the vesicle contents of secretory cells. Our recent study of insulin secretory granules (ISG) (MacDonald, M. J., Ade, L., Ntambi, J. M., Ansari, I. H., and Stoker, S. W. (2015) Characterization of phospholipids in insulin secretory granules in pancreatic beta cells and their changes with glucose stimulation. J. Biol. Chem. 290, 11075-11092) suggested that phosphatidylserine and other phospholipids, such as phosphatidylethanolamine, in ISG could play important roles in docking and fusion of ISG to the plasma membrane in the pancreatic beta cell during insulin exocytosis. P4 ATPase flippases translocate primarily phosphatidylserine and, to a lesser extent, phosphatidylethanolamine across the lipid bilayers of intracellular vesicles and plasma membranes to the cytosolic leaflets of these membranes. CDC50A is a protein that forms a heterodimer with P4 ATPases to enhance their translocase catalytic activity. We found that the predominant P4 ATPases in pure pancreatic beta cells and human and rat pancreatic islets were ATP8B1, ATP8B2, and ATP9A. ATP8B1 and CDC50A were highly concentrated in ISG. ATP9A was concentrated in plasma membrane. Gene silencing of individual P4 ATPases and CDC50A inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin release in pure beta cells and in human pancreatic islets. This is the first characterization of P4 ATPases in beta cells. The results support roles for P4 ATPases in translocating phosphatidylserine to the cytosolic leaflets of ISG and the plasma membrane to facilitate the docking and fusion of ISG to the plasma membrane during insulin exocytosis.

  7. Immunological and Functional Characterization of RhoGDI3 and Its Molecular Targets RhoG and RhoB in Human Pancreatic Cancerous and Normal Cells.

    PubMed

    de León-Bautista, Mercedes Piedad; Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria Del Carmen; Casique-Aguirre, Diana; Almaraz-Salinas, Manuel; Parraguirre-Martinez, Sara; Olivo-Diaz, Angelica; Thompson-Bonilla, María Del Rocío; Vargas, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    RhoGDI proteins have been implicated in several human cancers; changes in their expression levels have shown pro- or anti-tumorigenic effects. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a complex pathology, with poor prognosis, and most patients die shortly after diagnosis. Efforts have been focused on understanding the role of RhoGDI's in PDAC, specially, RhoGDI1 and RhoGDI2. However, the role of RhoGDI3 has not been studied in relation to cancer or to PDAC. Here, we characterized the expression and functionality of RhoGDI3 and its target GTPases, RhoG and RhoB in pancreatic cell lines from both normal pancreatic tissue and tissue in late stages of PDAC, and compared them to human biopsies. Through immunofluorescences, pulldown assays and subcellular fractionation, we found a reduction in RhoGDI3 expression in the late stages of PDAC, and this reduction correlates with tumor progression and aggressiveness. Despite the reduction in the expression of RhoGDI3 in PDAC, we found that RhoB was underexpressed while RhoG was overexpressed, suggesting that cancerous cells preserve their capacity to activate this pathway, thus these cells may be more eager to response to the stimuli needed to proliferate and become invasive unlike normal cells. Surprisingly, we found nuclear localization of RhoGDI3 in non-cancerous pancreatic cell line and normal pancreatic tissue biopsies, which could open the possibility of novel nuclear functions for this protein, impacting gene expression regulation and cellular homeostasis.

  8. Immunological and Functional Characterization of RhoGDI3 and Its Molecular Targets RhoG and RhoB in Human Pancreatic Cancerous and Normal Cells

    PubMed Central

    de León-Bautista, Mercedes Piedad; Cardenas-Aguayo, Maria del Carmen; Casique-Aguirre, Diana; Almaraz-Salinas, Manuel; Parraguirre-Martinez, Sara; Olivo-Diaz, Angelica; Thompson-Bonilla, María del Rocío

    2016-01-01

    RhoGDI proteins have been implicated in several human cancers; changes in their expression levels have shown pro- or anti-tumorigenic effects. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a complex pathology, with poor prognosis, and most patients die shortly after diagnosis. Efforts have been focused on understanding the role of RhoGDI's in PDAC, specially, RhoGDI1 and RhoGDI2. However, the role of RhoGDI3 has not been studied in relation to cancer or to PDAC. Here, we characterized the expression and functionality of RhoGDI3 and its target GTPases, RhoG and RhoB in pancreatic cell lines from both normal pancreatic tissue and tissue in late stages of PDAC, and compared them to human biopsies. Through immunofluorescences, pulldown assays and subcellular fractionation, we found a reduction in RhoGDI3 expression in the late stages of PDAC, and this reduction correlates with tumor progression and aggressiveness. Despite the reduction in the expression of RhoGDI3 in PDAC, we found that RhoB was underexpressed while RhoG was overexpressed, suggesting that cancerous cells preserve their capacity to activate this pathway, thus these cells may be more eager to response to the stimuli needed to proliferate and become invasive unlike normal cells. Surprisingly, we found nuclear localization of RhoGDI3 in non-cancerous pancreatic cell line and normal pancreatic tissue biopsies, which could open the possibility of novel nuclear functions for this protein, impacting gene expression regulation and cellular homeostasis. PMID:27832197

  9. Inconsistent formation and nonfunction of insulin-positive cells from pancreatic endoderm derived from human embryonic stem cells in athymic nude rats.

    PubMed

    Matveyenko, Aleksey V; Georgia, Senta; Bhushan, Anil; Butler, Peter C

    2010-11-01

    Embryonic stem cell therapy has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy to restore β-cell mass and function in T1DM. Recently, a group from Novocell (now ViaCyte) reported successful development of glucose-responsive islet-like structures after implantation of pancreatic endoderm (PE) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) into immune-deficient mice. Our objective was to determine whether implantation of hESC-derived pancreatic endoderm from Novocell into athymic nude rats results in development of viable glucose-responsive pancreatic endocrine tissue. Athymic nude rats were implanted with PE derived from hESC either via implantation into the epididymal fat pads or by subcutaneous implantation into TheraCyte encapsulation devices for 20 wk. Blood glucose, weight, and human insulin/C-peptide secretion were monitored by weekly blood draws. Graft β-cell function was assessed by a glucose tolerance test, and graft morphology was assessed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. At 20 wk postimplantation, epididymal fat-implanted PE progressed to develop islet-like structures in 50% of implants, with a mean β-cell fractional area of 0.8 ± 0.3%. Human C-peptide and insulin were detectable, but at very low levels (C-peptide = 50 ± 26 pmol/l and insulin = 15 ± 7 pmol/l); however, there was no increase in human C-peptide/insulin levels after glucose challenge. There was no development of viable pancreatic tissue or meaningful secretory function when human PE was implanted in the TheraCyte encapsulation devices. These data confirm that islet-like structures develop from hESC differentiated to PE by the protocol developed by NovoCell. However, the extent of endocrine cell formation and secretory function is not yet sufficient to be clinically relevant.

  10. Suppression of metastasis of human pancreatic cancer cells to the liver by small interfering RNA-mediated targeting of the midkine gene

    PubMed Central

    YU, LI; FAN, YU; CHEN, BAODING; HU, YUE; GAO, YINA; WEI, DA

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to ascertain whether suppression of midkine (MK) expression in pancreatic cancer cells inhibits metastasis to the liver. Human pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cells were transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting MK. siRNA against MK was observed to reduce the expression of MK mRNA and protein in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and to decrease the number of migrating and tissue-penetrating cells in a concentration-dependent manner (P<0.005). Extracellular vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations were markedly reduced for the siRNA-transfected cells compared with those that were non-siRNA-transfected. The liver transmission rate and tumor nodule number in the animals harboring the siRNA-transfected cells were lower compared with those in the animals harboring the non-siRNA-transfected cells (P<0.005). These data indicate that metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells to the liver requires the expression of MK. The downregulation of VEGF expression is essential to the mechanism whereby suppression of MK expression constrains the metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells to the liver. PMID:24179520

  11. Identification of a macromolecule containing an anticarcinoembryonic antigen-reactive substance and immunoglobulin M in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S R; Van Dusen, L R; Douglass, H O; Holyoke, E D; Chu, T M

    1978-11-01

    Ascitic fluid from a patient with carcinoma of the pancreas was fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation. The fraction precipitated between 25 and 50% saturation of ammonium sulfate was sequentially chromatographed on Sephadex G-200 and Sepharose 6B. A macromolecular fraction (greater than 10(6) daltons) obtained was found to react with both antihuman IgM and antiserum to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). This fraction was further purified by adsorption with protein A-Sepharose CL-4B and chromatography on DEAE-Sephacel. The purified macromolecular fraction had a sedimentation value of 28S as determined by ultracentrifugation. Upon dissociation of the purified macromolecule at pH 2.3 and purification of the dissociated components on Sepharose CL-2B and BioGel A 1.5M, a 19S protein and a 5S protein were recovered. The 19S protein showed a complete line of identity with a reference human IgM when reacted with antihuman IgM in gel diffusion, whereas the 5S protein showed a partial immunologic identity with colon CEA against anti-CEA. These results indicated the existence of an IgM-containing macromolecular complex with an anti-CEA cross-reactive substance in the extracellular fluid of human pancreatic cancer.

  12. Hypoxia induces upregulation of the deoxyribonuclease I gene in the human pancreatic cancer cell line QGP-1.

    PubMed

    Kominato, Yoshihiko; Iida, Reiko; Nakajima, Tamiko; Tajima, Yutaka; Takagi, Rie; Makita, Chikako; Kishi, Koichiro; Ueki, Misuzu; Kawai, Yasuyuki; Yasuda, Toshihiro

    2007-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that ischemia caused by acute myocardial infarction induces an abrupt increase of serum deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) activity. In this study, we examined whether hypoxia can affect the levels of DNase I activity and/or its transcripts in vitro. We first exposed the human pancreatic cancer cell line QGP-1, which is the first documented DNase-I-producing cell line, to hypoxia (2% O2), and found that this induced a significant increase in both the activity and transcripts of DNase I. This response was mediated by increased transcription only from exon 1a of the two alternative transcription-initiating exons utilized simultaneously in the human DNase I gene (DNASE1); exposure of QGP-1 cells to hypoxia for 24 h resulted in a 15-fold increase of DNASE1 transcripts starting from exon 1a compared with the expression level under normoxic conditions. Promoter, electrophoretic mobility shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with QGP-1 cells exposed to hypoxia or normoxia showed that the region just upstream from exon 1a was involved in this response in a hypoxia-induced factor-1-independent, but at least in a Sp1 transcription factor-dependent manner possibly through enhanced binding of Sp1 protein to the promoter. These results indicate that DNASE1 expression is upregulated by hypoxia in the cells.

  13. An electrochemical impedance investigation of the behaviour of anodically oxidised titanium in human plasma and cognate fluids, relevant to dental applications.

    PubMed

    Bozzini, B; Carlino, P; D'Urzo, L; Pepe, V; Mele, C; Venturo, F

    2008-11-01

    In dental applications, the contact between the metal implant and the receiving living tissue is made through the oxide layer on the implant surface, which allows the osseointegration process. In dentistry, the passive film formed on titanium seems to be more stable and protective than that formed on the Ti alloys, customarily used in other medical applications. Corrosion of titanium alloys in the mouth can result from the presence of a number of corrosive species, such as the hydrogen ion (H(+)), sulfide compounds (S(2-)), dissolved oxygen (O(2)) and Cl(-) and can result in the release of Ti(4+) ions that, in turn, brings about the reduction of alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblastic cells. The present study reports a time-dependent electrochemical corrosion study of titanium in contact with the following biologically relevant solutions: (i) SBF (simulating the inorganic part of human plasma), (ii) SBF with added ovalbumin (a protein simulating the post-implant environment) and (iii) human plasma. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on the corrosion of Ti in human plasma. The electrochemical measurements are based on electrochemical impedance spectrometry. Impedance spectra were interpreted on the basis of the equivalent-circuit approach and estimates of the time-variation of oxide film thickness and resistance were computed. Surface Raman spectroscopy was used to characterise the structure of as-anodised and corroded TiO(2) films: the effects of phosphate and organic incorporation were highlighted. EIS and surface Raman measurements have demonstrated that the corrosion resistance of the oxide films formed on Ti is strongly affected by the presence of biomolecules in the chloride- and phosphate-based aqueous solution. In particular, ovalbumin increases corrosion performance and human plasma is found to be remarkably more aggressive in comparison to SBF. These results suggest some caution in extrapolating corrosion results obtained

  14. An electrochemical quartz crystal impedance study on anti-human immunoglobulin G immobilization in the polymer grown during dopamine oxidation at an Au electrode.

    PubMed

    He, Hua; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2005-09-15

    The polymeric film grown during dopamine oxidation at an Au electrode was studied as a novel matrix for immobilizing anti-human immunoglobulin G (IgG) via the electrochemical quartz crystal impedance analysis (EQCIA) method. The growth of the polymeric films at Au electrodes during dopamine oxidation in neutral phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and the immobilization of anti-human IgG into the polymeric films during their growth have been traced at real time. Lysozyme control experiments suggested that anti-human IgG was electrostatically incorporated into the polymeric film. Also, the porosity of the polymeric films has been discussed by measuring the "wet" and "dry" frequency shifts. Compared with a polypyrrole film immobilized with anti-human IgG, the proposed matrix possessed a larger amount of specific binding sites for human IgG by subsequent immunoreaction tests. The association constant of the anti-human IgG immunoreaction was obtained with satisfactory results.

  15. Secretion of neurotensin from a human pancreatic islet cell carcinoma cell line (QGP-1N).

    PubMed

    Tateishi, K; Funakoshi, A; Kitayama, N; Matsuoka, Y

    1993-12-10

    Effects of various secretagogues on secretion of neurotensin from a pancreatic islet cell carcinoma cell line (QGP-1N) were examined. Carbachol stimulated secretion of neurotensin concentration-dependently in the range of 10(-6) - 10(-4) M. The neurotensin secretion stimulated with 10(-5) M carbachol was completely inhibited by atropine at 10(-5) M. Phorbol ester and calcium ionophore (A23187) stimulated secretion of neurotensin. The removal of extracellular Ca2+ suppressed the secretion through the stimulation with 10(-5) M carbachol. Fluoride, an activator of guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein, stimulated secretion of neurotensin. Neurotensin released into culture medium through stimulation with carbachol coeluted with neurotensin 1-13 on a gel-chromatography. Our results suggest that secretion of neurotensin from QGP-1N cells is mainly regulated by acetylcholine through muscarinic receptors coupled to G protein and that an increase in intracellular Ca2+ and protein kinase C play an important role in stimulus-secretion coupling.

  16. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  17. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Keith J

    2006-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterised by pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis leading eventually to destruction of pancreatic parenchyma and loss of exocrine and endocrine function. A model of interactions between environmental triggers of pancreatic inflammation and disease susceptibility or modifying genes (including PRSS1, SPINK1 and CFTR) provides a framework within which to understand disease pathogenesis. Early in the disease, when fibrosis is mild and pancreatic damage limited, it is difficult to distinguish CP from recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) although it is likely these represent opposite ends of a spectrum of disease with a common aetiology in which CP represents either a later disease stage or disease in individuals predisposed to generate a chronic fibrogenic inflammatory response. Pain is a dominant feature resulting in part from neuroimmune interactions within the pancreas. Diagnosis at an early stage of disease is challenging, though in later stages is dependent upon the demonstration of pancreatic fibrosis and duct ectasia using one or more imaging modalities including transabdominal and endoscopic ultrasound, CT and MRCP or ERCP. Current treatments are largely supportive and reactive. The challenge for pediatricians is to achieve diagnosis at an early stage of the disease and to develop treatments that can alter its natural history.

  18. Biophysical and pharmacological properties of the voltage-gated potassium current of human pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, James; Sanchez, Manuel; Wunderler, Denize; Yan, Lizhen; Bugianesi, Randal M; Dick, Ivy E; Clark, Sam A; Brochu, Richard M; Priest, Birgit T; Kohler, Martin G; McManus, Owen B

    2005-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) currents of human pancreatic islet cells were studied by whole-cell patch clamp recording. On average, 75% of the cells tested were identified as β-cells by single cell, post-recording RT-PCR for insulin mRNA. In most cells, the dominant Kv current was a delayed rectifier. The delayed rectifier activated at potentials above −20 mV and had a V½ for activation of −5.3 mV. Onset of inactivation was slow for a major component (τ= 3.2 s at +20 mV) observed in all cells; a smaller component (τ= 0.30 s) with an amplitude of ∼25% was seen in some cells. Recovery from inactivation had a τ of 2.5 s at −80 mV and steady-state inactivation had a V½ of −39 mV. In 12% of cells (21/182) a low-threshold, transient Kv current (A-current) was present. The A-current activated at membrane potentials above −40 mV, inactivated with a time constant of 18.5 ms at −20 mV, and had a V½ for steady-state inactivation of −52 mV. TEA inhibited total Kv current with an IC50= 0.54 mm and PAC, a disubstituted cyclohexyl Kv channel inhibitor, inhibited with an IC50= 0.57 μm. The total Kv current was insensitive to margatoxin (100 nm), agitoxin-2 (50 nm), kaliotoxin (50 nm) and ShK (50 nm). Hanatoxin (100 nm) inhibited total Kv current by 65% at +20 mV. Taken together, these data provide evidence of at least two distinct types of Kv channels in human pancreatic β-cells and suggest that more than one type of Kv channel may be involved in the regulation of glucose-dependent insulin secretion. PMID:15932888

  19. Two-dimensional culture of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells results in an irreversible transition from epithelial to mesenchymal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ya'an; Zhang, Ran; Suzuki, Rei; Li, Shao-qiang; Roife, David; Truty, Mark J; Chatterjee, Deyali; Thomas, Ryan M; Cardwell, James; Wang, Yu; Wang, Huamin; Katz, Matthew H; Fleming, Jason B

    2015-02-01

    Many commercially available cell lines have been in culture for ages, acquiring phenotypes that differ from the original cancers from which these cell lines were derived. Therefore, research on new cell lines could improve the success rates of translational research in cancer. We have developed methods for the isolation and culture of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells from murine xenografts of human PDAC. We hypothesize that phenotypes of PDAC cells are modified by in vitro culture conditions over time and by in vivo implantation. Patient-derived xenografts were created in immunodeficient mice using surgically resected tumor specimens. These murine xenografts were then used to establish human PDAC cell lines in culture. Earlier (<5) passage and later (>20) passage cell lines were evaluated separately regarding proliferation, cell cycle, genetic mutations, invasiveness, chemosensitivity, tumorigenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) status, and proteomics. Later passage cells accelerated their doubling time and colony formation, and were more concentrated in the G0/G1 phase and less in the G2/M checkpoint phase. Later passage cells were more sensitive to gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil than earlier passage cells, but all four new cell lines were more chemo-resistant compared with commercial ATCC cell lines. EMT induction was observed when establishing and passaging cell lines in vitro and furthermore by growing them as subcutaneous tumors in vivo. This study demonstrates a novel approach to the establishment of PDAC cell lines and observes a process by which newly established cell lines undergo phenotypic changes during in vitro culture and in vivo tumorigenesis. This may help explain differences of treatment effects often observed between experiments conducted in vitro, in vivo, and in human clinical trials.

  20. Antiausterity agents from Uvaria dac and their preferential cytotoxic activity against human pancreatic cancer cell lines in a nutrient-deprived condition.

    PubMed

    Awale, Suresh; Ueda, Jun-ya; Athikomkulchai, Sirivan; Abdelhamed, Sherif; Yokoyama, Satoru; Saiki, Ikuo; Miyatake, Ryuta

    2012-06-22

    Human pancreatic cancer cell lines are known for their inherent tolerance to nutrition starvation, which enables them to survive under a hypovascular (austerity) tumor microenvironment. The search for agents that preferentially retard the survival of cancer cells under low nutrition conditions (antiausterity agent) is a novel approach to anticancer drug discovery. In this study, it was found that a dichloromethane extract of the stem of Uvaria dac preferentially inhibited PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells survival under nutrition-deprived conditions at a concentration of 10 μg/mL. Workup of this bioactive extract led to the discovery of (+)-grandifloracin (8) as a potent antiausterity agent as evaluated in a panel of four human pancreatic cancer cell lines, PANC-1 (PC(50), 14.5 μM), PSN-1 (PC(50), 32.6 μM), MIA PaCa-2 (PC(50), 17.5 μM), and KLM-1 (32.7 μM). (+)-Grandifloracin (8) has been isolated from a natural source for the first time. Its absolute stereochemistry was established by single-crystal X-ray crystallography and circular dichroism spectroscopic analysis. In addition to this, seven other new highly oxygenated cyclohexene derivatives, named uvaridacanes A (1) and B (2), uvaridacols A-D (3, 4, 6, 7), and uvaridapoxide A (5), were also isolated and structurally characterized.

  1. Accelerated Maturation of Human Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Progenitor Cells into Insulin-Secreting Cells in Immunodeficient Rats Relative to Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bruin, Jennifer E.; Asadi, Ali; Fox, Jessica K.; Erener, Suheda; Rezania, Alireza; Kieffer, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are a potential source of transplantable cells for treating patients with diabetes. To investigate the impact of the host recipient on hESC-derived pancreatic progenitor cell maturation, cells were transplanted into immunodeficient SCID-beige mice or nude rats. Following the transplant, basal human C-peptide levels were consistently higher in mice compared with rats, but only rats showed robust meal- and glucose-responsive human C-peptide secretion by 19–21 weeks. Grafts from rats contained a higher proportion of insulin:glucagon immunoreactivity, fewer exocrine cells, and improved expression of mature β cell markers compared with mice. Moreover, ECM-related genes were enriched, the collagen network was denser, and blood vessels were more intricately integrated into the engrafted endocrine tissue in rats relative to mice. Overall, hESC-derived pancreatic progenitor cells matured faster in nude rats compared with SCID-beige mice, indicating that the host recipient can greatly influence the fate of immature pancreatic progenitor cells post-transplantation. PMID:26677767

  2. Calix[6]arene bypasses human pancreatic cancer aggressiveness: downregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases and induction of cell death by reticulum stress and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Pelizzaro-Rocha, Karin Juliane; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta Regina; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Reis, Fabiano Souza; de Fátima, Angelo; Ferreira-Halder, Carmen Veríssima

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks fourth among cancer-related causes of death in North America. Minimal progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with late-stage tumors. Moreover, pancreatic cancer aggressiveness is closely related to high levels of pro-survival mediators, which can ultimately lead to rapid disease progression, resistance and metastasis. The main goal of this study was to define the mechanisms by which calix[6]arene, but not other calixarenes, efficiently decreases the aggressiveness of a drug resistant human pancreas carcinoma cell line (Panc-1). Calix[6]arene was more potent in reducing Panc-1 cell viability than gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. In relation to the underlying mechanisms of cytotoxic effects, it led to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase through downregulation of PIM1, CDK2, CDK4 and retinoblastoma proteins. Importantly, calix[6]arene abolished signal transduction of Mer and AXL tyrosine kinase receptors, both of which are usually overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Accordingly, inhibition of PI3K and mTOR was also observed, and these proteins are positively modulated by Mer and AXL. Despite decreasing the phosphorylation of AKT at Thr308, calix[6]arene caused an increase in phosphorylation at Ser473. These findings in conjunction with increased BiP and IRE1-α provide a molecular basis explaining the capacity of calix[6]arene to trigger endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death. Our findings highlight calix[6]arene as a potential candidate for overcoming pancreatic cancer aggressiveness. Importantly, we provide evidence that calix[6]arene affects a broad array of key targets that are usually dysfunctional in pancreatic cancer, a highly desirable characteristic for chemotherapeutics.

  3. Disposition of the Dietary Mutagen 2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5- f ]quinoxaline in Healthy and Pancreatic Cancer Compromised Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Malfatti, Michael A.; Kuhn, Edward A.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vickers, Selwyn M.; Jensen, Eric H.; Strayer, Lori; Anderson, Kristin E.

    2016-02-26

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. Once diagnosed, prognosis is poor with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Exposure to carcinogenic heterocyclic amines (HCAs) derived from cooked meat has been shown to be positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk. To evaluate the processes that determines the carcinogenic potential of HCAs for human pancreas, 14-carbon labeled 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), a putative human carcinogenic HCA found in well-done cooked meat, was administered at a dietary relevant dose to human volunteers diagnosed with pancreatic cancer undergoing partial pancreatectomy and healthy control volunteers. After 14C-MeIQx exposure, blood and urine was collected for pharmacokinetic and metabolite analysis. MeIQx-DNA adducts levels were quantified by accelerator mass spectrometry from pancreatic tissue excised during surgery from the cancer patient group. Pharmacokinetic analysis of plasma revealed a rapid distribution of MeIQx with a plasma elimination half-life of approximately 3.5 hr in 50% of the cancer patients and all of the control volunteers. In 2 of the 4 cancer patients very low levels of MeIQx were detected in plasma and urine suggesting low absorption from the gut into the plasma. Urinary metabolite analysis revealed five MeIQx metabolites with 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline-8-carboxylic acid being the most abundant accounting for 25%–50% of the recovered 14-carbon/ml urine. We found there was no discernable difference in metabolite levels between the cancer patient volunteers and the control group. MeIQx-DNA adduct analysis of pancreas and duodenum tissue revealed adduct levels indistinguishable from background levels. Lastly, although other meat-derived HCA mutagens have been shown to bind DNA in pancreatic tissue, indicating that exposure to HCAs from cooked meat cannot be discounted as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, the results from this current

  4. Effects of IL-6 and AG490 on regulation of Stat3 signaling pathway and invasion of human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) is a member of the Janus-activated kinase(Jak)/Stat signaling pathway. Abnormal activation of Stat3 plays a critical role in metastasis and invasion in varieties of human tumors including pancreatic cancer. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms of activation and blocking of the Stat3 signaling pathway and its effects on invasion and metastasis of human pancreatic cancer cells. Methods The Jak inhibitor AG490 and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were added to the culture media of human pancreatic cancer cells SW1990 and Capan-2, respectively. Cell growth was measured by MTT assays. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry were performed to detect phosphorylated Stat3 (p-Stat3) protein, while VEGF and MMP-2 mRNA and protein expression were examined with fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. The invasion ability of SW1990 and Capan-2 cells was determined by cell invasion assay. Results Stat3 was activated by IL-6 in Capan-2 cells; protein expression of p-Stat3 was increased significantly in Capan-2 cells. IL-6 remarkably promoted the growth of Capan-2 cells (P < 0.05), and VEGF and MMP-2 mRNA and protein expression were increased significantly. Also, IL-6 increased the invasion ability of Capan-2 cells. AG490 inhibited Stat3 activation in SW1990 cells. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry analysis showed that p-Stat3 protein expression was decreased significantly with AG490 treatment in SW1990 cells. AG490 remarkably inhibited the growth of Capan-2 cells (P < 0.05), and VEGF and MMP-2 mRNA and protein expression was decreased significantly. And AG490 decreased the invasion ability of SW1990 cells. Conclusions Abnormal activation of Stat3 plays an important role in the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer. Activation and blocking of the Stat3 signaling pathway can affect invasion ability and expression of the VEGF and MMP-2 genes in

  5. Disposition of the Dietary Mutagen 2-Amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5- f ]quinoxaline in Healthy and Pancreatic Cancer Compromised Humans

    DOE PAGES

    Malfatti, Michael A.; Kuhn, Edward A.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; ...

    2016-02-26

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. Once diagnosed, prognosis is poor with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Exposure to carcinogenic heterocyclic amines (HCAs) derived from cooked meat has been shown to be positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk. To evaluate the processes that determines the carcinogenic potential of HCAs for human pancreas, 14-carbon labeled 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), a putative human carcinogenic HCA found in well-done cooked meat, was administered at a dietary relevant dose to human volunteers diagnosed with pancreatic cancer undergoing partial pancreatectomy and healthy control volunteers. After 14C-MeIQx exposure,more » blood and urine was collected for pharmacokinetic and metabolite analysis. MeIQx-DNA adducts levels were quantified by accelerator mass spectrometry from pancreatic tissue excised during surgery from the cancer patient group. Pharmacokinetic analysis of plasma revealed a rapid distribution of MeIQx with a plasma elimination half-life of approximately 3.5 hr in 50% of the cancer patients and all of the control volunteers. In 2 of the 4 cancer patients very low levels of MeIQx were detected in plasma and urine suggesting low absorption from the gut into the plasma. Urinary metabolite analysis revealed five MeIQx metabolites with 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline-8-carboxylic acid being the most abundant accounting for 25%–50% of the recovered 14-carbon/ml urine. We found there was no discernable difference in metabolite levels between the cancer patient volunteers and the control group. MeIQx-DNA adduct analysis of pancreas and duodenum tissue revealed adduct levels indistinguishable from background levels. Lastly, although other meat-derived HCA mutagens have been shown to bind DNA in pancreatic tissue, indicating that exposure to HCAs from cooked meat cannot be discounted as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, the results from this

  6. Distinct differences in the responses of the human pancreatic β-cell line EndoC-βH1 and human islets to proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Oleson, Bryndon J; McGraw, Jennifer A; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Annamalai, Mani; Chen, Jing; Bushkofsky, Justin R; Davis, Dawn B; Corbett, John A; Mathews, Clayton E

    2015-09-01

    While insulinoma cells have been developed and proven to be extremely useful in studies focused on mechanisms controlling β-cell function and viability, translating findings to human β-cells has proven difficult because of the limited access to human islets and the absence of suitable insulinoma cell lines of human origin. Recently, a human β-cell line, EndoC-βH1, has been derived from human fetal pancreatic buds. The purpose of this study was to determine whether human EndoC-βH1 cells respond to cytokines in a fashion comparable to human islets. Unlike most rodent-derived insulinoma cell lines that respond to cytokines in a manner consistent with rodent islets, EndoC-βH1 cells fail to respond to a combination of cytokines (IL-1, IFN-γ, and TNF) in a manner consistent with human islets. Nitric oxide, produced following inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, is a major mediator of cytokine-induced human islet cell damage. We show that EndoC-βH1 cells fail to express iNOS or produce nitric oxide in response to this combination of cytokines. Inhibitors of iNOS prevent cytokine-induced loss of human islet cell viability; however, they do not prevent cytokine-induced EndoC-βH1 cell death. Stressed human islets or human islets expressing heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) are resistant to cytokines, and, much like stressed human islets, EndoC-βH1 cells express HSP70 under basal conditions. Elevated basal expression of HSP70 in EndoC-βH1 cells is consistent with the lack of iNOS expression in response to cytokine treatment. While expressing HSP70, EndoC-βH1 cells fail to respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress activators, such as thapsigargin. These findings indicate that EndoC-βH1 cells do not faithfully recapitulate the response of human islets to cytokines. Therefore, caution should be exercised when making conclusions regarding the actions of cytokines on human islets when using this human-derived insulinoma cell line.

  7. Curcumin inhibits H2O2-induced invasion and migration of human pancreatic cancer via suppression of the ERK/NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lei; Liu, Jiangbo; Zhang, Lun; Xiao, Xue; Li, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a natural polyphenol present in turmeric, possesses a wide spectrum of pharmacological properties, including antioxidant and antitumor metastatic activities. However, the underlying mechanisms by which curcumin suppresses the metastasis of pancreatic cancer are still not fully elucidated. Our previous study demonstrated that a moderate amount of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is able to promote pancreatic cancer invasion. The aim of this study was to determine whether curcumin can suppress H2O2-induced tumor invasive and migratory abilities. Human pancreatic cancer BxPC-3 and Panc-1 cells were exposed to H2O2 with or without curcumin or N-acetylcysteine (NAC; a scavenger of free radicals). The effects of curcumin on pancreatic cancer cell proliferation was analyzed using MTT assay. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorecein diacetate. The cellular invasive and migratory abilities were analyzed using Transwell Matrigel invasion assay and wound healing assay, respectively. The expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were determined using qT-PCR and western blotting at mRNA and protein level. The activation of p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p-nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were measured by western blotting. Our data showed that curcumin inhibited cancer cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Curcumin and NAC were able to inhibit H2O2-induced ROS production, reduce the migration and invasion, and decrease the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in pancreatic cancer cells. In addition, the H2O2‑induced elevation of p-ERK and p-NF-κB in BxPC-3 and Panc-1 cells were reduced by curcumin, NAC and PD 98059 (an ERK inhibitor). These data indicate that curcumin suppresses pancreatic cancer migration and invasion through the inhibition of the ROS/ERK/NF-κB signaling pathway. This study suggests that curcumin may be a potential anticancer agent for

  8. Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases: Effects of altered expression in breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dates, Centdrika R; Fahmi, Tariq; Pyrek, Sebastian J; Yao-Borengasser, Aiwei; Borowa-Mazgaj, Barbara; Bratton, Stacie M; Kadlubar, Susan A; Mackenzie, Peter I; Haun, Randy S; Radominska-Pandya, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Increased aerobic glycolysis and de novo lipid biosynthesis are common characteristics of invasive cancers. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are phase II drug metabolizing enzymes that in normal cells possess the ability to glucuronidate these lipids and speed their excretion; however, de-regulation of these enzymes in cancer cells can lead to an accumulation of bioactive lipids, which further fuels cancer progression. We hypothesize that UGT2B isoform expression is down-regulated in cancer cells and that exogenous re-introduction of these enzymes will reduce lipid content, change the cellular phenotype, and inhibit cancer cell proliferation. In this study, steady-state mRNA levels of UGT isoforms from the 2B family were measured using qPCR in 4 breast cancer and 5 pancreatic cancer cell lines. Expression plasmids for UGT2B isoforms known to glucuronidate cellular lipids, UGT2B4, 2B7, and 2B15 were transfected into MCF-7 and Panc-1 cells, and the cytotoxic effects of these enzymes were analyzed using trypan blue exclusion, annexin V/PI staining, TUNEL assays, and caspase-3 immunohistochemistry. There was a significant decrease in cell proliferation and a significant increase in the number of dead cells after transfection with each of the 3 UGT isoforms in both cell lines. Cellular lipids were also found to be significantly decreased after transfection. The results presented here support our hypothesis and emphasize the important role UGTs can play in cellular proliferation and lipid homeostasis. Evaluating the effect of UGT expression on the lipid levels in cancer cell lines can be relevant to understanding the complex regulation of cancer cells, identifying the roles of UGTs as "lipid-controllers" in cellular homeostasis, and illustrating their suitability as targets for future clinical therapy development.

  9. Pancreatic Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... fluid can be collected from the cyst for analysis in a laboratory for possible signs of cancer. The characteristics and location of the pancreatic cyst, with your age and sex, can help doctors pinpoint the type of cyst ...

  10. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... mg/dL Injury to the pancreas from an accident Other causes include: After certain procedures used to ... pressure Rapid heart rate Rapid breathing (respiratory) rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes ...

  11. Pancreatitis - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... an organ or bone marrow transplant Cystic fibrosis Crohn disease and other disorders when the body's immune system ... lab tests to check the release of pancreatic enzymes. These include tests to check the: Blood amylase ...

  12. Pancreatic abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... high. Possible Complications Complications may include: Multiple abscesses Sepsis When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your ... 2016:chap 144. Read More Abscess Pancreatic pseudocyst Sepsis Review Date 10/27/2015 Updated by: Subodh ...

  13. Models of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lerch, Markus M; Gorelick, Fred S

    2013-06-01

    Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis have been created to examine mechanisms of pathogenesis, test therapeutic interventions, and study the influence of inflammation on the development of pancreatic cancer. In vitro models can be used to study early stage, short-term processes that involve acinar cell responses. Rodent models reproducibly develop mild or severe disease. One of the most commonly used pancreatitis models is created by administration of supraphysiologic concentrations of caerulein, an ortholog of cholecystokinin. Induction of chronic pancreatitis with factors thought to have a role in human disease, such as combinations of lipopolysaccharide and chronic ethanol feeding, might be relevant to human disease. Models of autoimmune chronic pancreatitis have also been developed. Most models, particularly of chronic pancreatitis, require further characterization to determine which features of human disease they include.

  14. Groove Pancreatitis: A Rare form of Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Bharivi; Rzouq, Fadi; Saligram, Shreyas; Nawabi, Atta; Nicola, Marian; Dennis, Katie; Ernst, Carly; Abbaszadeh, Ali; Bonino, John; Olyaee, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Context: Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis affecting the “groove” of the pancreas among the pancreatic head, duodenum, and common bile duct. The exact cause is unknown, although there are associations with long-term alcohol abuse, smoking, peptic ulcer disease, heterotopic pancreas, gastric resection, biliary disease, and anatomical or functional obstruction of the minor papilla. The diagnosis can be challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are the preferred imaging modalities. The treatment of choice is conservative although surgical intervention can sometimes be required. Case Report: A 57-year-old male with a history of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B presented with 4 days of epigastric pain. Abdominal exam revealed absent bowel sounds and epigastric tenderness. He had a creatinine of 1.72 mg/dL, potassium of 2.9 mmol/L, and a normal lipase level of 86 U/L. Liver enzymes and total bilirubin were normal. Computed tomography abdomen showed high-grade obstruction of the second portion of the duodenum without any obvious mass. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a mass at the duodenal bulb causing luminal narrowing, with biopsies negative for malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the region of the pancreatic head and descending duodenum. EUS revealed a 3 cm mass in the region of pancreatic head with irregular borders and no vascular invasion. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) was nondiagnostic. The patient then underwent a Whipple's procedure. Pathology of these specimens was negative for malignancy but was consistent with para-duodenal or groove pancreatitis. Conclusion: The low incidence of groove pancreatitis is partly due to lack of familiarity with the disease. Groove pancreatitis should be considered in the differential for patients presenting with pancreatic head lesions and no cholestatic jaundice, especially when a duodenal obstruction is present, and

  15. Production of transforming growth factor. cap alpha. in human pancreatic cancer cells: evidence for a superagonist autocrine cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.J.; Derynck, R.; Korc, M.

    1987-11-01

    Previous work showed that cultured human pancreatic cancer cells overexpress the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. In the present study, the authors sought to determine whether some of these cell lines produce transforming growth factor ..cap alpha.. (TGF-..cap alpha..). Utilizing a radiolabeled TGF-..cap alpha.. cDNA in hybridization experiments, they determined that ASPC-1, T/sub 3/M/sub 4/, PANC-1, COLO-357, and MIA PaCa-2 cell lines expressed TGF-..cap alpha.. mRNA. Serum-free medium conditioned by T/sub 3/M/sub 4/ and ASPC-1 cells contained significant amounts of TGF-..cap alpha.. protein. Although unlabeled TGF-..cap alpha.. readily competed with /sup 125/I-labeled EGF for binding, each cell line exhibited lower surface binding and internalization of /sup 125/I-labeled TGF-..cap alpha.. as compared to /sup 125/I-labeled EGF. Both TGF-..cap alpha.. and EGF significantly enhanced the anchorage-independent growth of PANC-1, T/sub 3/M/sub 4/, and ASPC-1 cells. However, TGF-..cap alpha.. was 10- to 100-fold more potent than EGF. These findings suggest that the concomitant overexpression of EGF receptors and production of TGF-..cap alpha.. may represent an efficient mechanism for certain cancer cells to obtain a growth advantage.

  16. A somatostatin-secreting cell line established from a human pancreatic islet cell carcinoma (somatostatinoma): release experiment and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, H; Hayashi, I; Kono, A

    1990-06-15

    Production and secretion of somatostatin (SRIF) were studied using a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-producing cell line (QGP-1) established from a human pancreatic islet cell carcinoma. High concentrations of SRIF (274 +/- 51 ng/mg of protein, mean +/- SD, n = 5) and CEA (3083 +/- 347 ng/mg of protein, mean +/- SD, n = 5) were present in QGP-1 cells, and the basal secretion rates of SRIF and CEA by the cells (n = 5) were 46.4 +/- 4.8 and 1690 +/- 78 pg/10(5) cells/h, respectively. Immunohistochemical studies revealed the presence of SRIF in xenografts of QGP-1 cells and colocalization of SRIF and CEA. Secretion of SRIF by QGP-1 cells was stimulated in the presence of high K+ (50 mmol) and theophylline (10 mmol), but arginine (10 mmol) and glucose (300 mg/dl) had no effect on the SRIF secretion. The QGP-1 cell line may be useful for studying the regulation mechanism of SRIF secretion.

  17. Comparison of efficacy of Salmonella typhimurium A1-R and chemotherapy on stem-like and non-stem human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Maawy, Ali; Hassanein, Mohamed K; Uehara, Fuminari; Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Momiyama, Masashi; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2013-09-01

    The XPA1 human pancreatic cancer cell line is dimorphic, with spindle stem-like cells and round non-stem cells. We report here the in vitro IC 50 values of stem-like and non-stem XPA1 human pancreatic cells cells for: (1) 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), (2) cisplatinum (CDDP), (3) gemcitabine (GEM), and (4) tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (A1-R). IC 50 values of stem-like XPA1 cells were significantly higher than those of non-stem XPA1 cells for 5-FU (P = 0.007) and CDDP (P = 0.012). In contrast, there was no difference between the efficacy of A1-R on stem-like and non-stem XPA1 cells. In vivo, 5-FU and A1-R significantly reduced the tumor weight of non-stem XPA1 cells (5-FU; P = 0.028; A1-R; P = 0.011). In contrast, only A1-R significantly reduced tumor weight of stem-like XPA1 cells (P = 0.012). The combination A1-R with 5-FU improved the antitumor efficacy compared with 5-FU monotherapy on the stem-like cells (P = 0.004). The results of the present report indicate A1-R is a promising therapy for chemo-resistant pancreatic cancer stem-like cells.

  18. Binding studies of L-tryptophan to human serum albumin with nanogold-structured sensor by piezoelectric quartz crystal impedance analysis.

    PubMed

    Long, Yumei; Yao, Shouzhuo; Chen, Jinhua

    2011-12-01

    Nanogold-modified sensor was constructed and applied to study the binding of L-tryptophan to human serum albumin (HSA) in situ by piezoelectric quartz crystal impedance (PQCI) analysis. It was interesting that the as-prepared nanogold modified sensor was more sensitive and biocompatible than bare gold electrode. The frequency changes due to protein adsorption on the nanogold-modified sensor might be described as a sum of two exponential functions and detailed explanation was given. Additionally, the kinetics of the binding process was also investigated. The binding constant (K) and the number of binding site (n) for the binding process without competitor are fitted to be 1.07 x 10(4) (mol l(-1))(-1) s(-1) and 1.13, respectively, and 2.24 x 10(3) (mol l-(1))(-1) s(-1) and 1.18, respectively for the binding process with competitor.

  19. Sinomenine promotes differentiation but impedes maturation and co-stimulatory molecule expression of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongwen; Yang, Chengying; Jin, Naishi; Xie, Zhunyi; Fei, Lie; Jia, Zhengcai; Wu, Yuzhang

    2007-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) excel at presenting antigen to T cells and thus make a key contribution to the induction of primary and secondary immune responses. Sinomenine has been used for centuries in the treatment of patients with autoimmune diseases as it possesses immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effect of sinomenine on the differentiation, maturation, and functionality of DC derived from monocytes has not been studied. We show here that DC differentiation is promoted when monocytes are treated with GM-CSF and IL-4 (IL-4) in the presence of sinomenine (200 microg/ml), as evidenced by the upregulation of CD1a while CD14 was decreased. In addition, incubation of immature DC with sinomenine significantly blunted lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced DC maturation, as shown by the reduction of expression of the maturation marker CD83 and co-stimulatory molecules, including CD86, B7-H1, and CD40. Moreover, sinomenine also prevented decreases in antigen (FITC-Dextran or Lucifer Yellow) uptake by LPS-treated DC. Mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) revealed that sinomenine-treated DC impede the secretion of the cytokines IL-2 and IFN-gamma by co-cultured CD4(+) T cells. Therefore, modulation of DC differentiation, maturation, and functionality by sinomenine is of potential relevance to its immunomodulatory effects in controlling specific immune responses in autoimmune diseases, transplantation, and other immune-mediated conditions.

  20. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  1. Synergistic cytotoxicity of red beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) extract with doxorubicin in human pancreatic, breast and prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Govind J; Rao, G Subba; Ramachandran, Cheppail; Iida, Akira; Suzuki, Nobutaka; Tokuda, Harukuni

    2013-06-26

    Although a wide variety of cytotoxic plant extracts and phytochemicals are known to act synergistically with anticancer drug doxorubicin (D), their clinical application is hindered by safety concerns of such combination therapy. Our earlier studies showed that red beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) extract (B), approved by Food and Drug Administration and European Union as red food color E162, reduced multi-organ tumor formations in various animal models when administered in drinking water. This led us to postulate that a long-term daily exposure to low doses of B through diet might be safe and sufficient to produce cancer chemopreventive effect in humans. Further, our recent comparative cytotoxic investigation with B and D in several human cancer cell lines indicated their potential for synergistic activity. Since B is considered safe for human use with no known toxicity, we conducted the present study to evaluate its synergistic antiproliferative activity with D against pancreatic (PaCa), breast (MCF-7) and prostate (PC-3) tumor cells of human origin. Different concentrations of B and D (0.29-290 μg/ml) and in various combinations (B:D ratio = 1:0, 1:1, 5:1, 1:5 and 0:1) were tested for cytotoxic effects against the three cancer cells. The viability of cells was assessed after 72 h incubation with various combinations of B and D using the trypan-blue staining method. The cytotoxic data were analyzed by the combination index method of Chou and Talalay to establish synergy between B and D. The results indicated that an overall positive reduction in drug concentration was achieved by D when combined with B in its cytotoxicity profile in the three human cancer cells tested. The synergistic cytotoxicity was best when the B:D ratio of 1:5 was used in PaCa cells at IC50, IC75 and IC90 dose levels and in MCF-7 cells at IC90 dose level. These results warrant further studies on the potential of red beetroot extract-doxorubicin combination in treating human cancers.

  2. Optical spectroscopy for clinical detection of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Malavika; Wilson, Robert H.; Scheiman, James; Simeone, Diane; McKenna, Barbara; Purdy, Julianne; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2009-07-01

    A prototype clinical fluorescence and reflectance spectrometer was developed and employed to detect human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. For the first time, quantitative pancreatic tissue models and chemometric algorithms were applied to successfully distinguish among tissue types.

  3. Ursolic acid inhibits the growth of human pancreatic cancer and enhances the antitumor potential of gemcitabine in an orthotopic mouse model through suppression of the inflammatory microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R.; Sung, Bokyung; Gupta, Subash C.; Tyagi, Amit K.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    The development of chemoresistance in human pancreatic cancer is one reason for the poor survival rate for patients with this cancer. Because multiple gene products are linked with chemoresistance, we investigated the ability of ursolic acid (UA) to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine, a standard drug used for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. These investigations were done in AsPC-1, MIA PaCa-2, and Panc-28 cells and in nude mice orthotopically implanted with Panc-28 cells. In vitro, UA inhibited proliferation, induced apoptosis, suppressed NF-κB activation and its regulated proliferative, metastatic, and angiogenic proteins. UA (20 μM) also enhanced gemcitabine (200 nM)-induced apoptosis and suppressed the expression of NF-κB-regulated proteins. In the nude mouse model, oral administration of UA (250 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth and enhanced the effect of gemcitabine (25 mg/kg). Furthermore, the combination of UA and gemcitabine suppressed the metastasis of cancer cells to distant organs such as liver and spleen. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that biomarkers of proliferation (Ki-67) and microvessel density (CD31) were suppressed by the combination of UA and gemcitabine. UA inhibited the activation of NF-κB and STAT3 and the expression of tumorigenic proteins regulated by these inflammatory transcription factors in tumor tissue. Furthermore, the combination of two agents decreased the expression of miR-29a, closely linked with tumorigenesis, in the tumor tissue. UA was found to be bioavailable in animal serum and tumor tissue. These results suggest that UA can inhibit the growth of human pancreatic tumors and sensitize them to gemcitabine by suppressing inflammatory biomarkers linked to proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. PMID:26909608

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  5. CacyBP/SIP protein promotes proliferation and G1/S transition of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiong; Mo, Ping; Li, Xiaohua; Zheng, Peichan; Zhao, Lina; Xue, Zengfu; Ren, Gui; Han, Guohong; Wang, Xin; Fan, Daiming

    2011-10-01

    Calcyclin-binding protein or Siah-1-interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP), a component of the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, could participate in beta-catenin degradation, which was found to be related to the malignant phenotypes of pancreatic cancer previously. However, the role of CacyBP/SIP itself in pancreatic cancer has not been investigated. In the present study, CacyBP/SIP expression was assayed and manipulated to reveal the potential mechanism in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis. Here, we show that CacyBP/SIP is over-expressed in pancreatic cancer cells. Down-regulation of CacyBP/SIP by small interference RNA (siRNA) severely suppresses the proliferation and tumorigenesis in pancreatic cancer. G1/S transition arrest induced by inhibition of CacyBP/SIP is at least partly mediated by down-regulation of Cyclin E and CDK2 as well as up-regulation of p27 and Rb. Collectively, CacyBP/SIP as an enhancer of pancreatic cancer malignance might develop into another possible therapeutic target.

  6. Genome Editing in hPSCs Reveals GATA6 Haploinsufficiency and a Genetic Interaction with GATA4 in Human Pancreatic Development.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhong-Dong; Lee, Kihyun; Yang, Dapeng; Amin, Sadaf; Verma, Nipun; Li, Qing V; Zhu, Zengrong; Soh, Chew-Li; Kumar, Ritu; Evans, Todd; Chen, Shuibing; Huangfu, Danwei

    2017-02-08

    Human disease phenotypes associated with haploinsufficient gene requirements are often not recapitulated well in animal models. Here, we have investigated the association between human GATA6 haploinsufficiency and a wide range of clinical phenotypes that include neonatal and adult-onset diabetes using CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)/Cas9-mediated genome editing coupled with human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) directed differentiation. We found that loss of one GATA6 allele specifically affects the differentiation of human pancreatic progenitors from the early PDX1+ stage to the more mature PDX1+NKX6.1+ stage, leading to impaired formation of glucose-responsive β-like cells. In addition to this GATA6 haploinsufficiency, we also identified dosage-sensitive requirements for GATA6 and GATA4 in the formation of both definitive endoderm and pancreatic progenitor cells. Our work expands the application of hPSCs from studying the impact of individual gene loci to investigation of multigenic human traits, and it establishes an approach for identifying genetic modifiers of human disease.

  7. Enterovirus strain and type-specific differences in growth kinetics and virus-induced cell destruction in human pancreatic duct epithelial HPDE cells.

    PubMed

    Smura, Teemu; Natri, Olli; Ylipaasto, Petri; Hellman, Marika; Al-Hello, Haider; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Roivainen, Merja

    2015-12-02

    Enterovirus infections have been suspected to be involved in the development of type 1 diabetes. However, the pathogenetic mechanism of enterovirus-induced type 1 diabetes is not known. Pancreatic ductal cells are closely associated with pancreatic islets. Therefore, enterovirus infections in ductal cells may also affect beta-cells and be involved in the induction of type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of different enterovirus strains to infect, replicate and produce cytopathic effect in human pancreatic ductal cells. Furthermore, the viral factors that affect these capabilities were studied. The pancreatic ductal cells were highly susceptible to enterovirus infections. Both viral growth and cytolysis were detected for several enterovirus serotypes. However, the viral growth and capability to induce cytopathic effect (cpe) did not correlate completely. Some of the virus strains replicated in ductal cells without apparent cpe. Furthermore, there were strain-specific differences in the growth kinetics and the ability to cause cpe within some serotypes. Viral adaptation experiments were carried out to study the potential genetic determinants behind these phenotypic differences. The blind-passage of non-lytic CV-B6-Schmitt strain in HPDE-cells resulted in lytic phenotype and increased progeny production. This was associated with the substitution of a single amino acid (K257E) in the virus capsid protein VP1 and the viral ability to use decay accelerating factor (DAF) as a receptor. This study demonstrates considerable plasticity in the cell tropism, receptor usage and cytolytic properties of enteroviruses and underlines the strong effect of single or few amino acid substitutions in cell tropism and lytic capabilities of a given enterovirus. Since ductal cells are anatomically close to pancreatic islets, the capability of enteroviruses to infect and destroy pancreatic ductal cells may also implicate in respect to enterovirus induced type 1

  8. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-mediated killing of human pancreatic islet cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Peter D; Estella, Eugene; Dudek, Nadine L; Jhala, Gaurang; Thomas, Helen E; Kay, Thomas W H; Mannering, Stuart I

    2008-09-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are believed to play an essential role in beta-cell destruction leading to development of type 1 diabetes and allogeneic islet graft failure. We aimed to identify the mechanisms used by CTL to kill human beta cells. CTL clones that recognize epitopes from influenza virus and Epstein-Barr virus restricted by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A0201 and -B0801, respectively, were used to investigate the susceptibility of human beta cells to CTL. In a short-term (5-hour) assay, CTL killed human islet cells of the appropriate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I type that had been pulsed with viral peptides. Killing was increased by pretreating islets with interferon gamma that increases MHC class I on target cells. Killing was abolished by incubation of CTL with the perforin inhibitor concanamycin A. The Fas pathway did not contribute to killing because blocking with neutralizing anti-Fas ligand antibody did not significantly reduce beta-cell killing. In conclusion, we report a novel way of investigating the interaction between CTL and human islets. Human islets were rapidly killed in vitro by MHC class I-restricted CTL predominantly by the granule exocytosis pathway.

  9. Analysis of transcription profile to reveal altered signaling pathways following the overexpression of human desumoylating isopeptidase 2 in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu-Yin; Kang, Yu-Huan; Shen, Cong-Cong; Wang, Rui-Xue; Yu, Lin; Li, Xin-Yue; Cui, Dan-Dan; Yang, Jin-Liang; Yao, Yu-Qin; Gou, Lan-Tu

    2016-01-01

    Human desumoylating isopeptidase 2 (DESI-2) is a member of the DESI family and contains a conserved PPPDE1 domain. Previous studies have demonstrated that DESI-2 overexpression may induce cell apoptosis. In the present study, differentially expressed genes were analyzed using a transcription microarray in DESI-2 overexpressing PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells. A total of 45,033 genes were examined by microarray, which identified 1,766 upregulated and 1,643 downregulated genes. A series of altered signaling pathways were analyzed, in which certain essential signaling factors, including retinoid X receptor (RXR), BH3 interacting-domain death agonist, Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) and Rho-associated protein kinase, were further investigated at the protein level. The release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspase-3 were also detected by western blot analysis. Immunohistochemistry further revealed the expression features of RXR and RhoA in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues with various DESI-2 expression levels. The results serve as a valuable reference for the further elucidation of the functions of DESI-2 in pancreatic cancer. PMID:28105175

  10. A novel STAT3 inhibitor HO-3867 induces cell apoptosis by reactive oxygen species-dependent endoplasmic reticulum stress in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan; Zhao, Chengguang; Zheng, Hailun; Lu, Kongqin; Shi, Dengjian; Liu, Zhiguo; Dai, Xuanxuan; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Xiuhua; Hu, Wanle; Liang, Guang

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy among solid tumors and has shown an increasing trend year by year. Thus, there is an urgent need for the discovery of new anticancer drugs for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. In recent years, it has been reported that the compound HO-3867, a novel analog of the natural product curcumin, showed antitumor activity with low toxicity. However, the underlying mechanism of this compound's attack on cancer cells is not very clear. In the present study, it was found that HO-3867 showed good antitumor activity at the concentration of 2 μmol/l in PANC-1 and BXPC-3 cells. Importantly, it was also found that HO-3867 treatment significantly induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human pancreatic cancer cell lines, inducing PANC-1 and BXPC-3 cells. Co-treatment with the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl cysteine, partially abrogated HO-3867-induced cell apoptosis. The activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and endoplasmic reticulum stress indicated a downstream event of ROS generation in mediating the anticancer effect of the HO-3867. In addition, independent of the ROS pathway, direct STAT3 inhibition was observed in HO-3867-induced cell apoptosis. Taken together, the results of this work suggest that both the ROS-dependent ER stress and STAT3 pathways were implicated in the cell apoptosis induced by the novel compound HO-3867.

  11. Downstream mediators of the intratumoral interferon response suppress antitumor immunity, induce gemcitabine resistance and associate with poor survival in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Delitto, Daniel; Perez, Chelsey; Han, Song; Gonzalo, David H; Pham, Kien; Knowlton, Andrea E; Graves, Christina L; Behrns, Kevin E; Moldawer, Lyle L; Thomas, Ryan M; Liu, Chen; George, Thomas J; Trevino, Jose G; Wallet, Shannon M; Hughes, Steven J

    2015-12-01

    The cancer microenvironment allows tumor cells to evade immune surveillance through a variety of mechanisms. While interferon-γ (IFNγ) is central to effective antitumor immunity, its effects on the microenvironment are not as clear and have in some cancers been shown to induce immune checkpoint ligands. The heterogeneity of these responses to IFNγ remains poorly characterized in desmoplastic malignancies with minimal inflammatory cell infiltration, such as pancreatic cancer (PC). Thus, the IFNγ response within and on key cells of the PC microenvironment was evaluated. IFNγ induced expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II on PC cell lines, primary pancreatic cancer epithelial cells (PPCE) and patient-derived tumor-associated stroma, concomitant with an upregulation of PDL1 in the absence of CD80 and CD86 expression. As expected, IFNγ also induced high levels of CXCL10 from all cell types. In addition, significantly higher levels of CXCL10 were observed in PC specimens compared to those from chronic pancreatitis, whereby intratumoral CXCL10 concentration was an independent predictor of poor survival. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a subset of CXCR3-positive cancer cells in over 90 % of PC specimens, as well as on a subset of cultured PC cell lines and PPCE, whereby exposure to CXCL10 induced resistance to the chemotherapeutic gemcitabine. These findings suggest that IFNγ has multiple effects on many cell types within the PC microenvironment that may lead to immune evasion, chemoresistance and shortened survival.

  12. IL-1β impedes the chondrogenic differentiation of synovial fluid mesenchymal stem cells in the human temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjing; Sun, Yangpeng; He, Yiqing; Zhang, Hong; Zheng, Youhua; Yao, Yu; Zhang, Zhiguang

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy has great therapeutic potential for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) cartilage repair. However, the behavior of mesenchymal stem cells in the inflammatory milieu following their delivery remains poorly understood. Synovial fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SFMSCs) are a promising resource for TMJ cartilage repair, as they are easily obtained from patients with TMJ disorders (TMD). In this study, we obtained SFMSCs from patients with TMD and expanded them in vitro; we then stimulated the cells with interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-12p. The cells expressed CD90, CD44, CD105 and CD73, and were negative for CD45, CD34, CD11b, CD19 and HLA-DR. They could be induced to differentiate into osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic and neurogenic lineages in vitro. Only the levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were upregulated significantly following stimulation with IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-12p. Furthermore, IL-6 and IL-8 expression was driven mainly by IL-1β-dependent nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway activation, and was independent of IL-8, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-12p. IL-6 and IL-8 expression was inhibited completely by treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor, BAY11-7082. SRY-box 9 (SOX9) was downregulated and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)13 was upregulated upon chondrogenic differentiation induced in the cells also exposed to IL-1β. Sulfated glycosaminoglycan production was also reduced upon chondrogenic differentiation in the presence of IL-6, but not IL-8. Thus, IL-1β in the inflammatory milieu is crucial in regulating SFMSCs. In doing so, IL-1β impedes the chondrogenic differentiation of SFMSCs. The upregulation of IL-6 and NF-κB pathway activation also contribute to this biological behavior. The findings of our study indicate the potential adverse effects of IL-1β on the chondrogenic differentiation of SFMSCs, and may thus provide new insight into the pathogenesis of TMD. PMID

  13. A pancreatic tumor-specific biomarker characterized in humans and mice as an immunogenic onco-glycoprotein is efficient in dendritic cell vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Collignon, Aurélie; Perles-Barbacaru, Adriana Teodora; Robert, Stéphane; Silvy, Françoise; Martinez, Emmanuelle; Crenon, Isabelle; Germain, Sébastien; Garcia, Stéphane; Viola, Angèle; Lombardo, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Oncofetal fucose-rich glycovariants of the pathological bile salt-dependent lipase (pBSDL) appear during human pancreatic oncogenesis and are detected by themonoclonal antibody J28 (mAbJ28). We aimed to identify murine counterparts onpancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells and tissue and investigate the potential of dendritic cells (DC) loaded with this unique pancreatic tumor antigen to promote immunotherapy in preclinical trials. Pathological BSDLs purified from pancreatic juices of patients with PDAC were cleaved to generate glycosylated C-terminal moieties (C-ter) containing mAbJ28-reactive glycoepitopes. Immunoreactivity of the murine PDAC line Panc02 and tumor tissue to mAbJ28 was detected by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. C-ter-J28+ immunization promoted Th1-dominated immune responses. In vitro C-ter-J28+-loaded DCskewed CD3+ T-cells toward Th1 polarization. C-ter-J28+-DC-vaccinations selectively enhanced cell immunoreactivity to Panc02, as demonstrated by CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell activation, increased percentages of CD4+- and CD8+-T-cells and NK1.1+ cells expressing granzyme B, and T-cell cytotoxicity. Prophylactic and therapeutic C-ter-J28+-DC-vaccinations reduced ectopic Panc02-tumor growth, provided long-lasting protection from Panc02-tumor development in 100% of micebut not from melanoma, and attenuated progression of orthotopic tumors as revealed by MRI. Thusmurine DC loaded with pancreatic tumor-specific glycoepitope C-ter-J28+ induce efficient anticancer adaptive immunity and represent a potential adjuvant therapy for patients afflicted with PDAC. PMID:26405163

  14. Characterization of the Human Pancreatic Islet Proteome by Two-Dimensional LC/MS/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, Thomas O.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Fontes, Ghislaine; Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Poitout, Vincent J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-12-01

    Research to elucidate the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus has traditionally focused on the genetic and immunological factors associated with the disease, and, until recently, has not considered the target cell. While there have been reports detailing proteomic analyses of established islet cell lines or isolated rodent islets, the information gained is not always easily extrapolated to humans. Therefore, extensive characterization of the human islet proteome could result in better understanding of islet biology and lead to more effective treatment strategies. We have applied a two-dimensional LC-MS/MS-based analysis to the characterization of the human islet proteome, resulting in the detection of 29,021 unique peptides corresponding to 4,925 proteins. As expected, major islet hormones (insulin, glucagon, somatostatin), beta-cell enriched secretory products (IAPP), ion channels (K-ATP channel), and transcription factors (PDX-1, Nkx 6.1, HNF-1 beta) were detected. In addition, significant proteome coverage of metabolic enzymes and cellular pathways was obtained, including the insulin signaling cascade and the MAP kinase, NF-κβ, and JAK/STAT pathways. This work represents the most extensive characterization of the human islet proteome to date and provides a peptide reference library that may be utilized in future studies of islet biology and type 1 diabetes.

  15. St. John's wort extract and hyperforin protect rat and human pancreatic islets against cytokine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Novelli, Michela; Beffy, Pascale; Menegazzi, Marta; De Tata, Vincenzo; Martino, Luisa; Sgarbossa, Anna; Porozov, Svetlana; Pippa, Anna; Masini, Matilde; Marchetti, Piero; Masiello, Pellegrino

    2014-02-01

    The extract of Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort, SJW) and its component hyperforin (HPF) were previously shown to inhibit cytokine-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 and nuclear factor κB and prevent apoptosis in a cultured β-cell line. Objective of this study was to assess the protection exerted by SJW and HPF on isolated rat and human islets exposed to cytokines in vitro. Functional, ultrastructural, biomolecular and cell death evaluation studies were performed. In both rat and human islets, SJW and HPF counteracted cytokine-induced functional impairment and down-regulated mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory target genes, such as iNOS, CXCL9, CXCL10, COX2. Cytokine-induced NO production from cultured islets, evaluated by nitrites measurement in the medium, was significantly reduced in the presence of the vegetal compounds. Noteworthy, the increase in apoptosis and necrosis following 48-h exposure to cytokines was fully prevented by SJW and partially by HPF. Ultrastructural morphometric analysis in human islets exposed to cytokines for 20 h showed that SJW or HPF avoided early β-cell damage (e.g., mitochondrial alterations and loss of insulin granules). In conclusion, SJW compounds protect rat and human islets against cytokine effects by counteracting key mechanisms of cytokine-mediated β-cell injury and represent promising pharmacological tools for prevention or limitation of β-cell dysfunction and loss in type 1 diabetes.

  16. Xanthohumol-Mediated Suppression of Notch1 Signaling Is Associated with Antitumor Activity in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kunnimalaiyaan, Selvi; Trevino, Jose; Tsai, Susan; Gamblin, T Clark; Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a lethal disease with limited treatment options. At the time of diagnosis, approximately 80% of these patients present with unresectable tumors caused by either locally advanced lesions or progressive metastatic growth. Therefore, development of novel treatment strategies and new therapeutics is needed. Xanthohumol (XN) has emerged as a potential compound that inhibits various types of cancer, but the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of XN remains unclear. In the present study, we have assessed the efficacy of XN on pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1, PANC-1, L3.6pl, MiaPaCa-2, 512, and 651) against cell growth in real time and using colony-forming assays. Treatment with XN resulted in reduction in cellular proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The growth suppression effect of XN in pancreatic cancer cell lines is due to increased apoptosis via the inhibition of the Notch1 signaling pathway, as evidenced by reduction in Notch1, HES-1, and survivin both at mRNA as well as protein levels. Notch1 promoter reporter analysis after XN treatment indicated that XN downregulates Notch promoter activity. Importantly, overexpression of active Notch1 in XN-treated pancreatic cancer cells resulted in negation of growth suppression. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that the growth suppressive effect of XN in pancreatic cancer cells is mainly mediated by Notch1 reduction.

  17. Xanthohumol-mediated suppression of Notch1 signaling is associated with antitumor activity in human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kunnimalaiyaan, Selvi; Trevino, Jose; Tsai, Susan; Gamblin, T. Clark; Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a lethal disease with limited treatment options. At the time of diagnosis, approximately 80% of these patients present with unresectable tumors caused by either locally advanced lesions or progressive metastatic growth. Therefore, development of novel treatment strategies and new therapeutics are needed. Xanthohumol (XN) has emerged as a potential compound that inhibits various types of cancer, but the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of XN remain unclear. In the present study, we have assessed the efficacy of XN on pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1, PANC-1, L3.6pl, MiaPaCa-2, 512, and 651) against cell growth in real time and using colony forming assays. Treatment with XN resulted in reduction in cellular proliferation in a dose and time dependent manner. The growth suppression effect of XN in pancreatic cancer cell lines is due to increased apoptosis via the inhibition of the Notch1 signaling pathway, as evidenced by reduction in Notch1, HES-1, and survivin both at mRNA as well as protein levels. Notch1 promoter reporter analysis after XN treatment indicated that XN down regulates Notch promoter activity. Importantly, overexpression of active Notch1 in XN-treated pancreatic cancer cells resulted in negation of growth suppression. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that the growth suppressive effect of XN in pancreatic cancer cells is mainly mediated by Notch1 reduction. PMID:25887885

  18. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Pancreatic Disease: A Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Hassan; Nayudu, Suresh; Akella, Sai; Glandt, Mariela; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2016-12-01

    There is an epidemic of obesity worldwide. The prevalence of obesity has doubled over the last three decades. Obesity, especially abdominal obesity is associated with insulin resistance that can lead to pancreatic steatosis and non-alcoholic fatty pancreatic disease (NAFPD). NAFPD describes a phenotype entity ranging from deposition of fat in the pancreas to pancreatic inflammation, and resultant fibrosis, which is similar to that of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFPD may represent a meaningful manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Pancreatic steatosis can be diagnosed on ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition to a correlation between pancreatic steatosis and metabolic syndrome, pancreatic steatosis may lead to a worse outcome in pancreatitis and may be an etiological factor in pancreatic cancer, but we need further research to examine the associations, pathophysiology, and the impact of pancreatic steatosis and NAFPD on the human health.

  19. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Pancreatic Disease: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Hassan; Nayudu, Suresh; Akella, Sai; Glandt, Mariela; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    There is an epidemic of obesity worldwide. The prevalence of obesity has doubled over the last three decades. Obesity, especially abdominal obesity is associated with insulin resistance that can lead to pancreatic steatosis and non-alcoholic fatty pancreatic disease (NAFPD). NAFPD describes a phenotype entity ranging from deposition of fat in the pancreas to pancreatic inflammation, and resultant fibrosis, which is similar to that of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFPD may represent a meaningful manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Pancreatic steatosis can be diagnosed on ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In addition to a correlation between pancreatic steatosis and metabolic syndrome, pancreatic steatosis may lead to a worse outcome in pancreatitis and may be an etiological factor in pancreatic cancer, but we need further research to examine the associations, pathophysiology, and the impact of pancreatic steatosis and NAFPD on the human health. PMID:28058076

  20. Discovery of novel glucose-regulated proteins in isolated human pancreatic islets using LC-MS/MS-based proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Fontes, Ghislaine; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Anderson, David J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Poitout, Vincent; Metz, Thomas O.

    2012-07-06

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing dramatically throughout the world, and the disease has become a major public health issue. The most common form of the disease, type 2 diabetes, is due in part to insufficient insulin production from the pancreatic beta-cell. Since glucose is the most potent and physiologically important regulators of beta-cell function under physiological conditions, understanding the insulin secretory defect underlying type 2 diabetes requires a better understanding of glucose regulation of beta-cell function. To this aim, a bottom-up LC-MS/MS-based proteomics approach was used to profile pooled islets from multiple donors under basal (5 mM) or high (15 mM) glucose conditions. Our analysis discovered 256 differentially abundant proteins ({approx}p < 0.05) after 24 h of high glucose exposure from more than 4500 identified in total. Several novel glucose-regulated proteins were elevated under high glucose conditions, including regulators of mRNA splicing (Pleiotropic regulator 1), processing (Retinoblastoma binding protein 6), and function (Nuclear RNA export factor 1), in addition to Neuron navigator 1 and Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Proteins whose abundances markedly decreased during incubation at 15 mM glucose included Bax inhibitor 1 and Synaptotagmin-17. Many proteins found to be differentially abundant after high glucose stimulation were uncharacterized or hypothetical. These findings expand our knowledge of glucose regulation of the human islet proteome and suggest many hitherto unknown responses to glucose that require additional studies to explore novel functional roles.

  1. Closed and open conformations of the lid domain induce different patterns of human pancreatic lipase antigenicity and immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Halimi, Hubert; De Caro, Josiane; Carrière, Frédéric; De Caro, Alain

    2005-12-01

    Epitope mapping was performed on human pancreatic lipase (HPL) using the SPOTscan method. A set of 146 short (12 amino acid residues) synthetic overlapping peptides covering the entire amino acid sequence of HPL were used to systematically assess the immunoreactivity of antisera raised in rabbits against native HPL, HPL without a lid (HPL(-lid)) and HPL covalently inhibited by diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (DP-HPL). In the latter form of HPL, the lid domain controlling the access to the active site was assumed to exist in the open conformation. All the anti-lipase sera were tested in a direct ELISA, anti-HPL serum showing the greatest antibody titer. Although from the structural point of view, the differences between the various forms of HPL were restricted to the lid domain, differences in the antigenic properties of HPL were observed with the SPOTscan method, and the anti-DP-HPL antibodies showed the strongest reactivity. Most of the peptide stretches recognized included amino acid residues which are accessible at the surface of the lipase, except for those located near the active site. Two small peptides (T173-P180, V199-A207) were identified in the vicinity of the active site, their antipeptide antibodies were produced and their reactivity towards the various forms of HPL was tested in a double sandwich ELISA. No reactivity was observed under these conditions. Two antipeptide antibodies directed against two other selected peptides, P208-V221 (belonging to the beta9 loop) and I245-F258 (belonging to the lid domain) were prepared and found to react much more strongly with DP-HPL than with HPL or HPL(-lid) in a double sandwich ELISA. These antibodies should provide useful tools for monitoring the conformational changes taking place during the opening of the HPL lid domain.

  2. Influence of type-I Interferon receptor expression level on the response to type-I Interferons in human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Booy, Stephanie; van Eijck, Casper H J; Dogan, Fadime; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Hofland, Leo J

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. Type-I interferons (e.g. IFN-α/-β) have several anti-tumour activities. Over the past few years, clinical studies evaluating the effect of adjuvant IFN-α therapy in pancreatic cancer yielded equivocal results. Although IFN-α and-β act via the type-I IFN receptor, the role of the number of receptors present on tumour cells is still unknown. Therefore, this study associated, for the first time, in a large panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines the effects of IFN-α/-β with the expression of type-I IFN receptors. The anti-tumour effects of IFN-α or IFN-β on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in 11 human pancreatic cell lines. Type-I IFN receptor expression was determined on both the mRNA and protein level. After 7 days of incubation, IFN-α significantly reduced cell growth in eight cell lines by 5–67%. IFN-β inhibited cell growth statistically significant in all cell lines by 43–100%. After 3 days of treatment, IFN-β induced significantly more apoptosis than IFN-α. The cell lines variably expressed the type-I IFN receptor. The maximal inhibitory effect of IFN-α was positively correlated with the IFNAR-1 mRNA (P < 0.05, r = 0.63), IFNAR-2c mRNA (P < 0.05, r = 0.69) and protein expression (P < 0.05, r = 0.65). Human pancreatic cancer cell lines variably respond to IFN-α and-β. The expression level of the type-I IFN receptor is of predictive value for the direct anti-tumour effects of IFN-α treatment. More importantly, IFN-β induces anti-tumour effects already at much lower concentrations, is less dependent on interferon receptor expression and seems, therefore, more promising than IFN-α. PMID:24460759

  3. Influence of type-I Interferon receptor expression level on the response to type-I Interferons in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Booy, Stephanie; van Eijck, Casper H J; Dogan, Fadime; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Hofland, Leo J

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. Type-I interferons (e.g. IFN-α/-β) have several anti-tumour activities. Over the past few years, clinical studies evaluating the effect of adjuvant IFN-α therapy in pancreatic cancer yielded equivocal results. Although IFN-α and -β act via the type-I IFN receptor, the role of the number of receptors present on tumour cells is still unknown. Therefore, this study associated, for the first time, in a large panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines the effects of IFN-α/-β with the expression of type-I IFN receptors. The anti-tumour effects of IFN-α or IFN-β on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in 11 human pancreatic cell lines. Type-I IFN receptor expression was determined on both the mRNA and protein level. After 7 days of incubation, IFN-α significantly reduced cell growth in eight cell lines by 5-67%. IFN-β inhibited cell growth statistically significant in all cell lines by 43-100%. After 3 days of treatment, IFN-β induced significantly more apoptosis than IFN-α. The cell lines variably expressed the type-I IFN receptor. The maximal inhibitory effect of IFN-α was positively correlated with the IFNAR-1 mRNA (P < 0.05, r = 0.63), IFNAR-2c mRNA (P < 0.05, r = 0.69) and protein expression (P < 0.05, r = 0.65). Human pancreatic cancer cell lines variably respond to IFN-α and -β. The expression level of the type-I IFN receptor is of predictive value for the direct anti-tumour effects of IFN-α treatment. More importantly, IFN-β induces anti-tumour effects already at much lower concentrations, is less dependent on interferon receptor expression and seems, therefore, more promising than IFN-α.

  4. [Acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Hecker, M; Mayer, K; Askevold, I; Collet, P; Weigand, M A; Krombach, G A; Padberg, W; Hecker, A

    2014-03-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially fatal disease with individually differing expression of systemic involvement. For this reason early diagnosis with subsequent risk stratification is essential in the clinical management of this frequent gastroenterological disorder. Severe forms of acute pancreatitis occur in approximately 20 % of cases often requiring intensive care monitoring and interdisciplinary therapeutic approaches. In the acute phase adequate fluid replacement and sufficient analgesic therapy is of major therapeutic importance. Concerning the administration of antibiotics and the nutritional support of patients with acute pancreatitis a change in paradigms could be observed in recent years. Furthermore, endoscopic, radiological or surgical interventions can be necessary depending on the severity of the disease and potential complications.

  5. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%.

  6. Differential sensitivity to beta-cell secretagogues in cultured rat pancreatic islets exposed to human interleukin-1 beta.

    PubMed

    Eizirik, D L; Sandler, S; Hallberg, A; Bendtzen, K; Sener, A; Malaisse, W J

    1989-08-01

    The early stages of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus are characterized by a selective inability to secrete insulin in response to glucose, coupled to a better response to nonnutrient secretagogues. The deficient glucose response may be a result of the autoimmune process directed toward the beta-cells. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) has been suggested to be one possible mediator of immunological damage of the beta-cells. In the present study we characterized the sensitivity of beta-cells to different secretagogues after human recombinant IL-1 beta (rIL-1 beta) exposure. Furthermore, experiments were performed to clarify the biochemical mechanisms behind the defective insulin response observed in these islets. Rat pancreatic islets were isolated and kept in tissue culture (medium RPMI-1640 plus 10% calf serum) for 5 days. The islets were subsequently exposed to 60 pM human recombinant IL-1 beta during 48 h in the same culture conditions as above and examined immediately after IL-1 exposure. The rIL-1 beta-treated islets showed a marked reduction of glucose-stimulated insulin release. Stimulation with arginine plus different glucose concentrations, and leucine plus glutamine partially counteracted the rIL-1 beta-induced reduction of insulin release. The activities of the glycolytic enzymes hexokinase, glucokinase, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, were similar in control and IL-1-exposed islets. Treatment with IL-1 also did not impair the activities of NADH+- and NADPH+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate-aspartate transaminase, glutamate-alanine transaminase, citrate synthase, and NAD+-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase. The oxidation of D-[6-14C]glucose and L-[U-14C]leucine were decreased by 50% in IL-1-treated islets. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in the ratios of [2-14C]pyruvate oxidation/[1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation and L-[U-14C]leucine oxidation/L-[1-14C]leucine decarboxylation, indicating that IL-1 decreases the proportion of

  7. Use of perfluorocarbon nanoparticles for non-invasive multimodal cell tracking of human pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Brad P.; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesus; Hota, Partha; Ouwerkerk, Ronald; Shamblott, Michael J.; Lauzon, Cal; Walczak, Piotr; Gilson, Wesley D.; Chacko, Vadappuram P.; Kraitchman, Dara L.; Arepally, Aravind; Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2011-01-01

    In vivo imaging of engraftment and immunorejection of transplanted islets is critical for further clinical development, with 1H MR imaging of superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled cells being the current premier modality. Using perfluorocarbon nanoparticles, we present here a strategy for non-invasive imaging of cells using other modalities. To this end, human cadaveric islets were labeled with rhodamine-perfluorooctylbromide (PFOB) nanoparticles, rhodamine-perfluoropolyether (PFPE) nanoparticles or Feridex® as control and tested in vitro for cell viability and c-peptide secretion for 1 week. 19F MRI, computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US) imaging was performed on labeled cell phantoms and on cells following transplantation beneath the kidney capsule of mice and rabbits. PFOB and PFPE-labeling did not reduce human islet viability or glucose responsiveness as compared with unlabeled cells or SPIO-labeled cells. PFOB- and PFPE-labeled islets were effectively fluorinated for visualization by 19F MRI. PFOB-labeled islets were acoustically reflective for detection by US imaging and became sufficiently brominated to become radiopaque allowing visualization with CT. Thus, perfluorocarbon nanoparticles are multimodal cellular contrast agents that may find applications in real-time targeted delivery and imaging of transplanted human islets or other cells in a clinically applicable manner using MRI, US or CT imaging. PMID:21861285

  8. Use of perfluorocarbon nanoparticles for non-invasive multimodal cell tracking of human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Brad P; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesus; Hota, Partha; Ouwerkerk, Ronald; Shamblott, Michael J; Lauzon, Cal; Walczak, Piotr; Gilson, Wesley D; Chacko, Vadappuram P; Kraitchman, Dara L; Arepally, Aravind; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2011-01-01

    In vivo imaging of engraftment and immunorejection of transplanted islets is critical for further clinical development, with (1)H MR imaging of superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled cells being the current premier modality. Using perfluorocarbon nanoparticles, we present here a strategy for non-invasive imaging of cells using other modalities. To this end, human cadaveric islets were labeled with rhodamine-perfluorooctylbromide (PFOB) nanoparticles, rhodamine-perfluoropolyether (PFPE) nanoparticles or Feridex as control and tested in vitro for cell viability and c-peptide secretion for 1 week. (19)F MRI, computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US) imaging was performed on labeled cell phantoms and on cells following transplantation beneath the kidney capsule of mice and rabbits. PFOB and PFPE-labeling did not reduce human islet viability or glucose responsiveness as compared with unlabeled cells or SPIO-labeled cells. PFOB- and PFPE-labeled islets were effectively fluorinated for visualization by (19)F MRI. PFOB-labeled islets were acoustically reflective for detection by US imaging and became sufficiently brominated to become radiopaque allowing visualization with CT. Thus, perfluorocarbon nanoparticles are multimodal cellular contrast agents that may find applications in real-time targeted delivery and imaging of transplanted human islets or other cells in a clinically applicable manner using MRI, US or CT imaging.

  9. Ran GTPase protein promotes human pancreatic cancer proliferation by deregulating the expression of Survivin and cell cycle proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Lin; Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Xiaodi; Sun, Yi; Shi, Yongquan; Fan, Hongwei; Liu, Changhao; Zhou, Jinfeng; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming; Guo, Xuegang

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Overexpression of Ran in pancreatic cancer was correlated with histological grade. •Downregulation of Ran could induce cell apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. •The effects were mediated by cell cycle proteins, Survivin and cleaved Caspase-3. -- Abstract: Ran, a member of the Ras GTPase family, has important roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we detected Ran expression in pancreatic cancer and explored its potential role on tumour progression. Overexpressed Ran in pancreatic cancer tissues was found highly correlated with the histological grade. Downregulation of Ran led to significant suppression of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase and induction of apoptosis. In vivo studies also validated that result. Further studies revealed that those effects were at least partly mediated by the downregulation of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, CDK2, CDK4, phospho-Rb and Survivin proteins and up regulation of cleaved Caspase-3.

  10. Anisotropic Artificial Impedance Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarfoth, Ryan Gordon

    Anisotropic artificial impedance surfaces are a group of planar materials that can be modeled by the tensor impedance boundary condition. This boundary condition relates the electric and magnetic field components on a surface using a 2x2 tensor. The advantage of using the tensor impedance boundary condition, and by extension anisotropic artificial impedance surfaces, is that the method allows large and complex structures to be modeled quickly and accurately using a planar boundary condition. This thesis presents the theory of anisotropic impedance surfaces and multiple applications. Anisotropic impedance surfaces are a generalization of scalar impedance surfaces. Unlike the scalar version, anisotropic impedance surfaces have material properties that are dependent on the polarization and wave vector of electromagnetic radiation that interacts with the surface. This allows anisotropic impedance surfaces to be used for applications that scalar surfaces cannot achieve. Three of these applications are presented in this thesis. The first is an anisotropic surface wave waveguide which allows propagation in one direction, but passes radiation in the orthogonal direction without reflection. The second application is a surface wave beam shifter which splits a surface wave beam in two directions and reduces the scattering from an object placed on the surface. The third application is a patterned surface which can alter the scattered radiation pattern of a rectangular shape. For each application, anisotropic impedance surfaces are constructed using periodic unit cells. These unit cells are designed to give the desired surface impedance characteristics by modifying a patterned metallic patch on a grounded dielectric substrate. Multiple unit cell geometries are analyzed in order to find the setup with the best performance in terms of impedance characteristics and frequency bandwidth.

  11. Autoimmune pancreatitis mimicking pancreatic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Dede, Kristóf; Salamon, Ferenc; Taller, András; Teknős, Dániel; Bursics, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease of unknown pathomechanism. It belongs to the IgG4-related disease family and responds well to steroids, although the relapse rate can reach up to 20–30%. Differentiating AIP from the more common pancreatic cancer can be very challenging. About 20% of AIP is diagnosed postoperatively during final histological examination. Each of the investigative tools can add something to the definitive diagnosis; the question remains whether it is possible to prevent an unnecessary resection. Through our case we would like to demonstrate the differential diagnostic opportunities and present the literary background of this issue. In conclusion, we can state that whenever a focal pancreatic lesion is encountered AIP should always be considered. PMID:24968399

  12. The antitumor activity of an anti-CD54 antibody in SCID mice xenografted with human breast, prostate, non-small cell lung, and pancreatic tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Kimberly J; Coleman, Elaine J; Vitetta, Ellen S

    2008-11-15

    We have previously described the development and testing of a monoclonal anti-human CD54 antibody (UV3) in SCID mice xenografted with human multiple myeloma, lymphoma, and melanoma cell lines. In all 3 cases, UV3 was highly effective at slowing the growth of tumors and/or prolonging survival. Since CD54 (ICAM-1) is up-regulated on many different types of cancer cells, we have now investigated the anti-tumor activity of UV3 in several other CD54(+) epithelial tumors. A panel of 16 human breast, prostate, non-small cell (NSC) lung, and pancreatic tumor cell lines was examined for reactivity with UV3, and 13 were positive. A representative CD54(+) cell line from each cancer was grown subcutaneously in SCID mice. Once the tumors were established, UV3 was administered using different dose regimens. UV3 slowed the growth of all 4 tumors, although it was not curative. When UV3 or gemcitabine were administered to SCID mice xenografted with a NSC lung tumor cell line or a pancreatic tumor cell line, UV3 was as effective as the chemotherapy alone. When gemcitabine and UV3 were administered together, the best anti-tumor responses were observed. UV3 has been chimerized (cUV3) and both toxicology studies and clinical trials are planned to assess the safety and activity of cUV3 in patients with one or more of these tumors.

  13. Cerulein Pancreatitis: Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Cerulein pancreatitis is similar to human edematous pancreatitis, manifesting with dysregulation of digestive enzyme production and cytoplasmic vacuolization, the death of acinar cells, edema formation, and infiltration of inflammatory cells into the pancreas. Reactive oxygen species are involved in nuclear factor-κB activation, cytokine expression, apoptosis and pathogenesis of pancreatitis. There is recent evidence that cerulein activates NADPH oxidase, which is a major source of reactive oxygen species during inflammation and apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cells. In addition, the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway has been suggested as being involved in inflammatory signaling in the pancreas. This review discusses the involvement of oxidative stress in inflammation and apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cells stimulated with cerulein as an in vitro model of pancreatitis. PMID:20485614

  14. Trichodermin induces c-Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent apoptosis caused by mitotic arrest and DNA damage in human p53-mutated pancreatic cancer cells and xenografts.

    PubMed

    Chien, Ming-Hsien; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Lee, Wei-Jiunn; Yeh, Yen-Hsiu; Li, Tsai-Kun; Wang, Po-Chuan; Chen, Jih-Jung; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Lin, Yung-Wei; Hsiao, Michael; Wang, Shih-Wei; Hua, Kuo-Tai

    2017-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy, which generally responds poorly to chemotherapy. In this study, trichodermin, an endophytic fungal metabolite from Nalanthamala psidii, was identified as a potent and selective antitumor agent in human pancreatic cancer. Trichodermin exhibited antiproliferative effects against pancreatic cancer cells, especially p53-mutated cells (MIA PaCa-2 and BxPC-3) rather than normal pancreatic epithelial cells. We found that trichodermin induced caspase-dependent and mitochondrial intrinsic apoptosis. Trichodermin also increased apoptosis through mitotic arrest by activating Cdc2/cyclin B1 complex activity. Moreover, trichodermin promoted the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and inhibition of JNK by its inhibitor, shRNA, or siRNA significantly reversed trichodermin-mediated caspase-dependent apoptosis. Trichodermin triggered DNA damage stress to activate p53 function for executing apoptosis in p53-mutated cells. Importantly, we demonstrated that trichodermin with efficacy similar to gemcitabine, profoundly suppressed tumor growth through inducing intratumoral DNA damage and JNK activation in orthotopic pancreatic cancer model. Based on these findings, trichodermin is a potential therapeutic agent worthy of further development into a clinical trial candidate for treating cancer, especially the mutant p53 pancreatic cancer.

  15. The role of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Peter; Rakonczay, Zoltan

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatic ducts secrete 2.5 l of alkaline, HCO3(-)-rich fluid daily which greatly contributes to the homeostasis of the pancreas. Ducts are also important in the pathophysiology of the pancreas; alteration of ductal function can lead to severe diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis. The role of pancreatic ducts in the development of acute pancreatitis has only been uncovered recently. Pancreatitis inducing agents like bile acids and ethanol dose-dependently affect pancreatic ductal secretion; low concentrations stimulate, whereas high concentrations inhibit secretion. The majority of the review will focus on the central role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a critical protein in the regulation of ductal secretion, in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis which is highlighted by numerous investigations. Downregulation of CFTR expression results in increased severity of acute pancreatitis in mice. Furthermore, human genetic studies have demonstrated statistically significant association of CFTR mutations with acute recurrent pancreatitis. Overall, the data support the involvement of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

  16. Transferrin surface-modified PLGA nanoparticles-mediated delivery of a proteasome inhibitor to human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Frasco, Manuela F; Almeida, Gabriela M; Santos-Silva, Filipe; Pereira, Maria do Carmo; Coelho, Manuel A N

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a drug delivery system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles for an efficient and targeted action of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib against pancreatic cancer cells. The PLGA nanoparticles were formulated with a poloxamer, and further surface-modified with transferrin for tumor targeting. The nanoparticles were characterized as polymer carriers of bortezomib, and the cellular uptake and growth inhibitory effects were evaluated in pancreatic cells. Cellular internalization of nanoparticles was observed in normal and cancer cells, but with higher uptake by cancer cells. The sustained release of the loaded bortezomib from PLGA nanoparticles showed cytotoxic effects against pancreatic normal and cancer cells. Noteworthy differential cytotoxicity was attained by transferrin surface-modified PLGA nanoparticles since significant cell growth inhibition by delivered bortezomib was only observed in cancer cells. These findings demonstrate that the ligand transferrin enhanced the targeted delivery of bortezomib-loaded PLGA nanoparticles to pancreatic cancer cells. These in vitro results highlight the transferrin surface-modified PLGA nanoparticles as a promising system for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

  17. Cloning of cDNAs that encode human mast cell carboxypeptidase A, and comparison of the protein with mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase A and rat pancreatic carboxypeptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, D.S.; Gurley, D.S.; Stevens, R.L.; Austen, K.F.; Serafin, W.E. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ); Sugarbaker, D.J. )

    1989-12-01

    Human skin and lung mast cells and rodent peritoneal cells contain a carboxypeptidase in their secretory granules. The authors have screened human lung cDNA libraries with a mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase A (MC-CPA) cDNA probe to isolate a near-full-length cDNA that encodes human MC-CPA. The 5{prime} end of the human MC-CPA transcript was defined by direct mRNA sequencing and by isolation and partial sequencing of the human MC-CPA gene. Human MC-CPA is predicted to be translated as a 417 amino acid preproenzyme which includes a 15 amino acid signal peptide and a 94-amino acid activation peptide. The mature human MC-CPA enzyme has a predicted size of 36.1 kDa, a net positive charge of 16 at neutral pH, and 86% amino acid sequence identity with mouse MC-CPA. DNA blot analyses showed that human MC-CPA mRNA is transcribed from a single locus in the human genome. Comparison of the human MC-CPA with mouse MC-CPA and with three rat pancreatic carboxypeptidases shows that these enzymes are encoded by distinct but homologous genes.

  18. All-trans retinoic acid enhances gemcitabine cytotoxicity in human pancreatic cancer cell line AsPC-1 by up-regulating protein expression of deoxycytidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Hiroki; Tachikawa, Masanori; Uchida, Yasuo; Inoue, Koetsu; Ohtsuka, Hideo; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Unno, Michiaki; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2017-02-12

    We previously showed that gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer chemotherapy correlates with suppressed expression of deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of gemcitabine activation. The purpose of the present study was to find a drug that might be useful to enhance the cytotoxicity of gemcitabine by increasing dCK expression in gemcitabine-resistant human pancreatic cancer cell line AsPC-1. Screening of 40 prescription drugs identified 35 with no intrinsic cytotoxicity towards AsPC-1 cells. When AsPC-1 cells were pre-incubated with these drugs and then incubated with gemcitabine, we found that all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) significantly decreased the viability by 28% compared with that of non-treated cells. Luciferase assay showed that ATRA transactivated the DCK promoter in AsPC-1 cells by about 2-fold compared with the untreated control, and an increase of dCK protein expression was confirmed by immunoblotting. ATRA decreased the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of gemcitabine by 2.8-fold (ATRA-non-treated cells, 28.8nM; ATRA-treated cells, 10.0nM). The ATRA concentration of 0.03μM was sufficient to enhance gemcitabine cytotoxicity, and the effect was well maintained in the concentration range from 0.03 to 50μM. These results indicate that ATRA enhances gemcitabine cytotoxicity by increasing dCK expression in gemcitabine-resistant human pancreatic cancer cells.

  19. Troponin I peptide (Glu94-Leu123), a cartilage-derived angiogenesis inhibitor: in vitro and in vivo effects on human endothelial cells and on pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kern, Beatrice E; Balcom, James H; Antoniu, Bozena A; Warshaw, Andrew L; Fernández-del Castillo, Carlos

    2003-12-01

    Several inhibitors of angiogenesis have been identified in bovine and shark cartilage. One of them is troponin I, which is the molecule responsible for the inhibition of the actomyosin ATPase during muscle contraction. In this study we sought to investigate if the active site of troponin I (peptide Glu94-Leu123; pTnI) is also the one responsible for the antiangiogenic properties of this protein. The effects of pTnI on endothelial cell tube formation and endothelial cell division were investigated using human umbilical vein endothelial cells, Matrigel, light microscopy, carboxyfluorescein diacetate, succinimidyl esterlabeling, and flow cytometry. Its effects on induction of ICAM-1 and production of vascular endothelial growth factor by pancreatic cancer cells (CAPAN-1) were also investigated, as was its efficacy in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer metastases. Our results show that concentrations as low as 1 pg/ml of pTnI significantly inhibit endothelial cell tube formation, and that endothelial cell division was inhibited at 96 hours by 3 microg/ml pTnI (P=0.0001). No effects were seen using troponin peptide 124-181 as a control. pTnI-treated supernatant from the pancreatic cancer cell line CAPAN-1 downregulated ICAM-1 expression on human umbilical vein endothelial cells up to 10 ng/ml pTnI, and a significant reduction in vascular endothelial growth factor production was seen by treating CAPAN-1 cells with up to 1 microg/ml pTnI. After intrasplenic injection of CAPAN-1 cells, mice treated with pTnI had fewer liver metastases compared to control mice (liver/body weight 5.5 vs. 11.1; P=0.03). The active region of troponin I is the one responsible for its antiangiogenic effect. The mechanism of action of this peptide is probably multifactorial.

  20. Quantitative analysis of cell composition and purity of human pancreatic islet preparations

    PubMed Central

    Pisania, Anna; Weir, Gordon C.; O'Neil, John J.; Omer, Abdulkadir; Tchipashvili, Vaja; Lei, Ji; Colton, Clark K.; Bonner-Weir, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Despite improvements in outcomes for human islet transplantation, characterization of islet preparations remains poorly defined. This study used both light (LM) and electron microscopy (EM) to characterize 33 islet preparations used for clinical transplants. EM allowed accurate identification and quantification of cell types with measured cell number fractions (mean ± SEM) 35.6 ± 2.1% β-cells, 12.6 ± 1.0% non-β-islet cells, (48.3 ± 2.6% total islet cells), 22.7 ± 1.5% duct cells, and 25.3 ± 1.8% acinar cells. Of the islet cells, 73.6 ± 1.7% were β cells. For comparison to the literature, estimates of cell number fraction, cell volume, and extracellular volume were combined to convert number fraction data to volume fractions applicable to cells, islets, and the entire preparation. The mathematical framework for this conversion was developed. By volume, β cells were 86.5 ± 1.1% of the total islet cell volume and 61.2 ± 0.8% of intact islets (including the extracellular volume), which is similar to that of islets in the pancreas. Our estimates gave 1560 ± 20 cells in an islet equivalent (volume of 150-μm diameter sphere), of which 1140 ± 15 were β cells. To test if LM analysis of the same tissue samples could provide reasonable estimates of purity of the islet preparations, volume fraction islet tissue was measured on thin sections available from 27 of the clinical preparations by point counting morphometrics. Islet purity (islet volume fraction) of individual preparations determined by LM and EM analysis correlated linearly with excellent agreement (R2 = 0.95). However, islet purity by conventional dithizone staining was substantially higher with a 20-30% overestimation. Thus, both EM and LM provide accurate methods to determine the cell composition of human islets preparations and can help us understand many of the discrepancies of islet composition in the literature. PMID:20697378

  1. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Database Supporting Research Raising Awareness Our Blog Patient Education Pancreas News Basics of Pancreatic Cancer FAQs The ... Detection- Goggins Lab Sol Goldman Center Discussion Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? ...

  2. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as the sudden inflammation ... the incidence of recurrent attacks minimized. Timothy Gardner, MD is Director of Pancreatic Disorders at Dartmouth-Hitchcock ...

  3. Inhibitory effects of prostaglandin E2 on collagen synthesis and cell proliferation in human stellate cells from pancreatic head adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several studies have described an increased cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in pancreatic cancer, but the role of COX-2 in tumour development and progression is not clear. The aim of the present study was to examine expression of COX-2 in cancer cells and stromal cells in pancreatic cancer specimens, and to explore the role of PGE2 in pancreatic stellate cell proliferation and collagen synthesis. Methods Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence was performed on slides from whole sections of tissue blocks using antibodies against COX-2 and α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA). Pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) were isolated from surgically resected tumour tissue by the outgrowth method. Cells were used between passages 4 and 8. Collagen synthesis was determined by [3H]-proline incorporation, or by enzyme immunoassay measurement of collagen C-peptide. DNA synthesis was measured by incorporation of [3H]-thymidine in DNA. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) was determined by radioimmunoassay. Collagen 1A1 mRNA was determined by RT-qPCR. Results Immunohistochemistry staining showed COX-2 in pancreatic carcinoma cells, but not in stromal cells. All tumours showed positive staining for αSMA in the fibrotic stroma. Cultured PSC expressed COX-2, which could be further induced by interleukin-1β (IL-1β), epidermal growth factor (EGF), thrombin, and PGE2, but not by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ). Indirect coculture with the adenocarcinoma cell line BxPC-3, but not HPAFII or Panc-1, induced COX-2 expression in PSC. Treatment of PSC with PGE2 strongly stimulated cAMP accumulation, mediated by EP2 receptors, and also stimulated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Treatment of PSC with PGE2 or forskolin suppressed both TGFβ-stimulated collagen synthesis and PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis. Conclusions The present results show that COX-2 is mainly produced in carcinoma cells and suggest that the cancer cells are the main source of PGE2 in pancreatic

  4. Pancreatic stellate cell: Pandora's box for pancreatic disease biology

    PubMed Central

    Bynigeri, Ratnakar R; Jakkampudi, Aparna; Jangala, Ramaiah; Subramanyam, Chivukula; Sasikala, Mitnala; Rao, G Venkat; Reddy, D Nageshwar; Talukdar, Rupjyoti

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) were identified in the early 1980s, but received much attention after 1998 when the methods to isolate and culture them from murine and human sources were developed. PSCs contribute to a small proportion of all pancreatic cells under physiological condition, but are essential for maintaining the normal pancreatic architecture. Quiescent PSCs are characterized by the presence of vitamin A laden lipid droplets. Upon PSC activation, these perinuclear lipid droplets disappear from the cytosol, attain a myofibroblast like phenotype and expresses the activation marker, alpha smooth muscle actin. PSCs maintain their activated phenotype via an autocrine loop involving different cytokines and contribute to progressive fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Several pathways (e.g., JAK-STAT, Smad, Wnt signaling, Hedgehog etc.), transcription factors and miRNAs have been implicated in the inflammatory and profibrogenic function of PSCs. The role of PSCs goes much beyond fibrosis/desmoplasia in PDAC. It is now shown that PSCs are involved in significant crosstalk between the pancreatic cancer cells and the cancer stroma. These interactions result in tumour progression, metastasis, tumour hypoxia, immune evasion and drug resistance. This is the rationale for therapeutic preclinical and clinical trials that have targeted PSCs and the cancer stroma. PMID:28210075

  5. Human T cells monitored by impedance spectrometry using field-effect transistor arrays: a novel tool for single-cell adhesion and migration studies.

    PubMed

    Law, Jessica Ka Yan; Susloparova, Anna; Vu, Xuan Thang; Zhou, Xiao; Hempel, Felix; Qu, Bin; Hoth, Markus; Ingebrandt, Sven

    2015-05-15

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the immune system by recognizing and eliminating pathogen-infected and tumorigenic cells. In order to achieve their function, T cells have to migrate throughout the whole body and identify the respective targets. In conventional immunology studies, interactions between CTLs and targets are usually investigated using tedious and time-consuming immunofluorescence imaging. However, there is currently no straightforward measurement tool available to examine the interaction strengths. In the present study, adhesion strengths and migration of single human CD8(+) T cells on pre-coated field-effect transistor (FET) devices (i.e. fibronectin, anti-CD3 antibody, and anti-LFA-1 antibody) were measured using impedance spectroscopy. Adhesion strengths to different protein and antibody coatings were compared. By fitting the data to an electronically equivalent circuit model, cell-related parameters (cell membrane capacitance referring to cell morphology and seal resistance referring to adhesion strength) were obtained. This electronically-assessed adhesion strength provides a novel, fast, and important index describing the interaction efficiency. Furthermore, the size of our detection transistor gates as well as their sensitivity reaches down to single cell resolution. Real-time motions of individually migrating T cells can be traced using our FET devices. The in-house fabricated FETs used in the present study are providing a novel and very efficient insight to individual cell interactions.

  6. Phosphorylation of serine 264 impedes active site accessibility in the E1 component of the human pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Franziska; Ciszak, Ewa; Korotchkina, Lioubov; Golbik, Ralph; Spinka, Michael; Dominiak, Paulina; Sidhu, Sukhdeep; Brauer, Johanna; Patel, Mulchand S; Tittmann, Kai

    2007-05-29

    At the junction of glycolysis and the Krebs cycle in cellular metabolism, the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. In mammals, PDHc is tightly regulated by phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of three serine residues in the thiamin-dependent pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) component. In vivo, inactivation of human PDHc correlates mostly with phosphorylation of serine 264, which is located at the entrance of the substrate channel leading to the active site of E1. Despite intense investigations, the molecular mechanism of this inactivation has remained enigmatic. Here, a detailed analysis of microscopic steps of catalysis in human wild-type PDHc-E1 and pseudophosphorylation variant Ser264Glu elucidates how phosphorylation of Ser264 affects catalysis. Whereas the intrinsic reactivity of the active site in catalysis of pyruvate decarboxylation remains nearly unaltered, the preceding binding of substrate to the enzyme's active site via the substrate channel and the subsequent reductive acetylation of the E2 component are severely slowed in the phosphorylation variant. The structure of pseudophosphorylation variant Ser264Glu determined by X-ray crystallography reveals no differences in the three-dimensional architecture of the phosphorylation loop or of the active site, when compared to those of the wild-type enzyme. However, the channel leading to the active site is partially obstructed by the side chain of residue 264 in the variant. By analogy, a similar obstruction of the substrate channel can be anticipated to result from a phosphorylation of Ser264. The kinetic and thermodynamic results in conjunction with the structure of Ser264Glu suggest that phosphorylation blocks access to the active site by imposing a steric and electrostatic barrier for substrate binding and active site coupling with the E2 component. As a Ser264Gln variant, which carries no charge at position 264, is also selectively

  7. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future.

  8. Pancreatic cancer, inflammation, and microbiome.

    PubMed

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P; Pushalkar, Smruti; Saxena, Deepak; Miller, George

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. No effective screening methods exist, and available treatment modalities do not effectively treat the disease. Inflammatory conditions such as pancreatitis represent a well-known risk factor for pancreatic cancer development. Yet only in the past 2 decades has pancreatic cancer been recognized as an inflammation-driven cancer, and the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenic role of inflammation are beginning to be explored in detail. A substantial amount of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that bacteria are likely to influence this process by activating immune receptors and perpetuating cancer-associated inflammation. The recent explosion of investigations of the human microbiome have highlighted how perturbations of commensal bacterial populations can promote inflammation and promote disease processes, including carcinogenesis. The elucidation of the interplay between inflammation and microbiome in the context of pancreatic carcinogenesis will provide novel targets for intervention to prevent and treat pancreatic cancer more efficiently. Further studies toward this direction are urgently needed.

  9. α-Mangostin-encapsulated PLGA nanoparticles inhibit pancreatic carcinogenesis by targeting cancer stem cells in human, and transgenic (KrasG12D, and KrasG12D/tp53R270H) mice

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Raj Kumar; Yu, Wei; Shrivastava, Anju; Shankar, Sharmila; Srivastava, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of sonic hedgehog (Shh) in cancer stem cell (CSC) has been demonstrated with aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer. In order to enhance the biological activity of α-mangostin, we formulated mangostin-encapsulated PLGA nanoparticles (Mang-NPs) and examined the molecular mechanisms by which they inhibit human and KC mice (PdxCre;LSL-KrasG12D) pancreatic CSC characteristics in vitro, and pancreatic carcinogenesis in KPC (PdxCre;LSLKrasG12D;LSL-Trp53R172H) mice. Mang-NPs inhibited human and KrasG12D mice pancreatic CSC characteristics in vitro. Mang-NPs also inhibited EMT by up-regulating E-cadherin and inhibiting N-cadherin and transcription factors Slug, and pluripotency maintaining factors Nanog, c-Myc, and Oct4. Furthermore, Mang-NPs inhibited the components of Shh pathway and Gli targets. In vivo, Mang-NPs inhibited the progression of pancreatic intraneoplasia to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and liver metastasis in KPC mice. The inhibitory effects of Mang-NPs on carcinogenesis in KPC mice were associated with downregulation of pluripotency maintaining factors (c-Myc, Nanog and Oct4), stem cell markers (CD24 and CD133), components of Shh pathway (Gli1, Gli2, Patched1/2, and Smoothened), Gli targets (Bcl-2, XIAP and Cyclin D1), and EMT markers and transcription factors (N-cadherin, Slug, Snail and Zeb1), and upregulation of E-cadherin. Overall, our data suggest that Mang-NPs can inhibit pancreatic cancer growth, development and metastasis by targeting Shh pathway. PMID:27624879

  10. Antitumor activity of a combination of trastuzumab (Herceptin) and oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 on human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-overexpressing pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Hiroyuki; Yanoma, Shunsuke; Takemiya, Shouji; Sugimasa, Yukio; Akaike, Makoto; Yukawa, Norio; Rino, Yasushi; Imada, Toshio

    2007-08-01

    The cytotoxic effect of trastuzumab in combination with oral fluoropyrimidine S-1 on human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing human pancreatic cancer cell line TRG in vitro and in vivo was investigated. HER2 expression in TRG was analyzed by RT-PCR and flow cytometry. For in vitro experiments, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was used instead of S-1. In vivo studies were conducted with TRG xenografts in athymic mice. Trastuzumab (10 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally once a week for 4 weeks. S-1 (10 mg/kg) was administered orally 5 days a week for 4 weeks. The results showed that TRG cells were positive for HER2 mRNA and overexpressed HER2 protein. Either trastuzumab or 5-FU concentration-dependently inhibited the growth of TRG cells. The combination of trastuzumab and 5-FU resulted in a significant inhibition of growth of TRG cells compared to either agent alone (P<0.001). Incubation of TRG cells with peripheral blood mononuclear cells after treatment with trastuzumab enhanced the antiproliferative effect of trastuzumab, which could be the result of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The combination of trastuzumab and S-1 resulted in a significant reduction in xenograft volume compared to each agent alone (P<0.0001). In conclusion, this study showed that combination therapy with trastuzumab and S-1 may be effective for HER2-overexpressing pancreatic cancer patients.

  11. Exosomal lipids induce human pancreatic tumoral MiaPaCa-2 cells resistance through the CXCR4-SDF-1α signaling axis

    PubMed Central

    Beloribi-Djefaflia, Sadia; Siret, Carole; Lombardo, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that exosomes secreted by human pancreatic tumor cells induce cell death through the inhibition of the Notch-1 survival pathway (Ristorcelli et al., 2009). We demonstrated that exosomal lipids evoked apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer SOJ-6 cells. Based on the lipid composition of efficient exosomes we designed Synthetic Exosome-Like Nanoparticles (SELN) in which the ratio ordered lipids versus disordered lipids was equal to 6.0 (SELN6.0). These SELN decreased SOJ-6 cells survival by inhibiting the Notch-1 pathway. However MiaPaCa-2 cells were resistant to exosomes (Ristorcelli et al., 2008) and to SELN6.0 (Beloribi et al.,2012). In this paper we aimed at deciphering the reason(s) of this resistance. We observed, in presence of SELN6.0, that the expression of the Notch IntraCytoplasmic Domain (NICD) decreases in MiaPaCa-2 cells but neither Hes-1, the nuclear target of NICD, nor the ratio Bax/Bcl-2 were affected. We further showed that in MiaPaCa-2 cells SELN6.0 induced the activation of NF-kB, which promotes the expression and the secretion of SDF-1α. This chemokine interacts with its receptor CXCR4 on MiaPaCa-2 cells and activates the Akt survival pathway protecting cells from death. This activation process promoted by exosomal lipids could have implications in tumor progression and drug resistance. PMID:25821841

  12. Camptothecin analog (CPT-11)-sensitive human pancreatic tumor cell line QGP-1N shows resistance to SN-38, an active metabolite of CPT-11.

    PubMed

    Takeda, S; Shimazoe, T; Kuga, H; Sato, K; Kono, A

    1992-10-15

    In the course of our study to determine the cross-sensitivity between CPT-11 and its active metabolite, SN-38, we found a SN-38-resistant human pancreatic tumor cell line, QGP-1N, which shows sensitivity to CPT-11. The IC50 of SN-38 was 152 times greater for QGP-1N than for SUIT-2, also a human pancreatic tumor cell line, whose IC50 of CPT-11 was similar to that for QGP-1N. The uptakes of CPT-11 and SN-38 and the intracellular conversion of CPT-11 to SN-38 could not explain the difference in sensitivity. DNA synthesis of QGP-1N cells was inhibited by CPT-11 which did not affect that of SUIT-2, while SN-38 inhibited the DNA synthesis of SUIT-2 at lower concentrations than that of QGP-1N. The inhibition test of topoisomerase I catalytic activity by CPT-11 or SN-38 revealed no difference in the biochemical properties of the topoisomerase I enzymes to the compounds between these two cell lines. These results indicate that CPT-11 should have its own inhibitory effect on DNA synthesis through a yet unknown mechanism in QGP-1N cells, although SN-38 plays an essential role in the antitumor activity of CPT-11 in SUIT-2 cells. In some cases, the antitumor effect of CPT-11 might be consequent not only on SN-38 but also on CPT-11 itself.

  13. Discovering Bisdemethoxycurcumin from Curcuma longa rhizome as a potent small molecule inhibitor of human pancreatic α-amylase, a target for type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Sudha; Zinjarde, Smita; Bhargava, Shobha; Rajamohanan, P R; Ravikumar, Ameeta

    2012-12-15

    Curcuma longa rhizome is used extensively in culinary preparations in Far East and South-East Asia. Health benefits of curcuminoids from C. longa as antioxidants, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory molecules have been well documented. We report here for the first time that Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) from C. longa, acts as an inhibitor to inactivate human pancreatic α-amylase, a therapeutic target for oral hypoglycemic agents in type-2 diabetes. Bioactivity guided isolation of rhizome isopropanol extract led to the identification by HPLC and NMR of BDMC as a lead small molecule inhibitor of porcine and human pancreatic α-amylase with an IC(50) value of 0.026 and 0.025 mM, respectively. Kinetic analysis revealed that using starch as the substrate, HPA exhibited an uncompetitive mode of inhibition with an apparent K(i) of 3.0 μM. The study gains importance as BDMC could be a good drug candidate in development of new inhibitors of HPA and of functional foods for controlling starch digestion in order to reduce post-prandial hyperglycemia.

  14. Pancreatic abscesses.

    PubMed

    Shi, E C; Yeo, B W; Ham, J M

    1984-09-01

    This paper presents the clinical features and problems in the management of 34 patients with pancreatic abscesses. In the majority of patients the abscesses developed following an attack of pancreatitis due to alcohol or gallstones. The abscesses were usually multilocular, and often had spread widely in the retroperitoneal space. Invasion into surrounding viscera or the peritoneal cavity occurred in 12 instances, and eight patients developed major bleeding into the abscess cavity. Obstructive complications (affecting bowel, common bile duct and large veins) occurred in eight patients. Twelve of the 34 patients (35 per cent) died, most deaths being due to failure to control sepsis (seven patients) or to massive bleeding from the abscess cavity (three patients). The mortality of this condition is likely to remain high, but may be reduced by better drainage techniques at the initial exploration. The importance of the infra-mesocolic approach for drainage is emphasized.

  15. Enzymatically degradable poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels for the 3D culture and release of human embryonic stem cell derived pancreatic precursor cell aggregates.

    PubMed

    Amer, Luke D; Holtzinger, Audrey; Keller, Gordon; Mahoney, Melissa J; Bryant, Stephanie J

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to develop a three dimensional culture platform for aggregates of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived pancreatic progenitors that enables long-term culture, maintains aggregate size and morphology, does not adversely affect differentiation and provides a means for aggregate recovery. A platform was developed with poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels containing collagen type I, for cell-matrix interactions, and peptide crosslinkers, for facile recovery of aggregates. The platform was first demonstrated with RIN-m5F cells, showing encapsulation and subsequent release of single cells and aggregates without adversely affecting viability. Aggregates of hESC-derived pancreatic progenitors with an effective diameter of 82 (15)μm were either encapsulated in hydrogels or cultured in suspension for 28 days. At day 14, aggregate viability was maintained in the hydrogels, but significantly reduced (88%) in suspension culture. However by day 28, viability was reduced under both culture conditions. Aggregate size was maintained in the hydrogels, but in suspension was significantly higher (∼ 2-fold) by day 28. The ability to release aggregates followed by a second enzyme treatment to achieve single cells enabled assessment by flow cytometry. Prior to encapsulation, there were 39% Pdx1(+)/Nkx6.1(+) cells, key endocrine markers required for β-cell maturation. The fraction of doubly positive cells was not affected in hydrogels but was slightly and significantly lower in suspension culture by 28 days. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a MMP-sensitive PEG hydrogel containing collagen type I is a promising platform for hESC-derived pancreatic progenitors that maintains viable aggregates, aggregate size, and progenitor state and offers facile recovery of aggregates.

  16. Crohn's disease-specific pancreatic autoantibodies are specifically present in ruminants with paratuberculosis: implications for the pathogenesis of the human disease.

    PubMed

    Liaskos, Christos; Spyrou, Vassiliki; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Athanasiou, Labrini V; Orfanidou, Timoklia; Mavropoulos, Athanasios; Reinhold, Dirk; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Amiridis, Georgios S; Billinis, Charalambos; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2013-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) induces paratuberculosis (ptb) in ruminants and has clinical and histological features resebling Crohn's disease (CD). Pancreatic autoantibodies (PAB) targeting glycoprotein 2 (GP2) are specifically found in CD, but it is currently unknown whether these autoantibodies can be found in ruminants with ptb. IgG anti-MAP and anti-GP2 antibodies were tested by ELISA in 286 ruminants (212 sheep and 74 cattle). PAB testing was performed by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) using anti-sheep or anti-cattle specific antisera. PCR analysis confirmed the presence of MAP in anti-MAP positive samples. Anti-GP2 antibodies were more prevalent in anti-MAP antibody positive (26.9%) than in anti-MAP negative ruminants (8.7%, p < 0.001). Anti-GP2 antibodies were found in 16/70 (22.9%) anti-MAP positive sheep compared to 10/142 (7%, p = 0.001) anti-MAP antibody negative and in anti-MAP positive cattle than in negative counterparts (5/8 versus 8/66, p = 0.003). Absorbance values for anti-GP2 antibodies were higher in cattle than in sheep (mean 21 AU/mL ± 25.4SD versus 12.2 AU/mL ± 23 SD, p < 0.001). There was no correlation between anti-GP2 and anti-MAP antibody concentrations. Anti-GP2 antibodies persisted up to 1/1000 and showed the characteristic IIF pancreatic pattern seen by anti-GP2 antibody positive CD samples. This is the first study to demonstrate the presence of CD-specific GP2-reactive pancreatic autoantibodies in MAP-infected ruminants. Our data suggest that CD and ptb are characterised by an antigen-driven loss of immunological tolerance to GP2, implying commonalities in the immunopathogenesis of the human and ruminant inflammatory bowel disorder.

  17. Exocrine Pancreatic Carcinogenesis and Autotaxin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kadekar, Sandeep; Silins, Ilona; Korhonen, Anna; Dreij, Kristian; Al-Anati, Lauy; Högberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    Exocrine pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with an exceptionally high mortality rate. Genetic analysis suggests a causative role for environmental factors, but consistent epidemiological support is scarce and no biomarkers for monitoring the effects of chemical pancreatic carcinogens are available. With the objective to identify common traits for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors we studied the National Toxicology Program (NTP) bioassay database. We found that male rats were affected more often than female rats and identified eight chemicals that induced exocrine pancreatic tumors in males only. For a hypothesis generating process we used a text mining tool to analyse published literature for suggested mode of actions (MOA). The resulting MOA analysis suggested inflammatory responses as common feature. In cell studies we found that all the chemicals increased protein levels of the inflammatory protein autotaxin (ATX) in Panc-1, MIA PaCa-2 or Capan-2 cells. Induction of MMP-9 and increased invasive migration were also frequent effects, consistent with ATX activation. Testosterone has previously been implicated in pancreatic carcinogenesis and we found that it increased ATX levels. Our data show that ATX is a target for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors in rats. Several lines of evidence implicate ATX and its product lysophosphatidic acid in human pancreatic cancer. Mechanisms of action may include stimulated invasive growth and metastasis. ATX may interact with hormones or onco- or suppressor-genes often deregulated in exocrine pancreatic cancer. Our data suggest that ATX is a target for chemicals promoting pancreatic tumor development. PMID:22952646

  18. Overview Of Impedance Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abele, John E.

    1989-08-01

    Electrical impedance has been one of the many "tools of great promise" that physicians have employed in their quest to measure and/or monitor body function or physiologic events. So far, the expectations for its success have always exceeded its performance. In simplistic terms, physiologic impedance is a measure of the resistance in the volume between electrodes which changes as a function of changes in that volume, the relative impedance of that volume, or a combination of these two. The history and principles of electrical impedance are very nicely reviewed by Geddes and Baker in their textbook "Principles of Applied Biomedical Instrumentation". It is humbling, however, to note that Cremer recorded variations in electrical impedance in frog hearts as early as 1907. The list of potential applications includes the measurement of thyroid function, estrogen activity, galvanic skin reflex, respiration, blood flow by conductivity dilution, nervous activity and eye movement. Commercial devices employing impedance have been and are being used to measure respiration (pneumographs and apneamonitors), pulse volume (impedance phlebographs) and even noninvasive cardiac output.

  19. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Valente, Roberto; Del Chiaro, Marco; Permert, Johan; Löhr, J-Matthias

    2017-02-23

    Abstract: Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor's metabolism (Warburg effect) and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  20. A microfluidic array for real-time live-cell imaging of human and rodent pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Nourmohammadzadeh, Mohammad; Xing, Yuan; Lee, Jin Wuk; Bochenek, Matthew A; Mendoza-Elias, Joshua E; McGarrigle, James J; Marchese, Enza; Chun-Chieh, Yeh; Eddington, David T; Oberholzer, José; Wang, Yong

    2016-04-21

    In this study, we present a microfluidic array for high-resolution imaging of individual pancreatic islets. The device is based on hydrodynamic trapping principle and enables real-time analysis of islet cellular responses to insulin secretagogues. This device has significant advantages over our previously published perifusion chamber device including significantly increased analytical power and assay sensitivity, as well as improved spatiotemporal resolution. The islet array, with live-cell multiparametric imaging integration, provides a better tool to understand the physiological and pathophysiological changes of pancreatic islets through the analysis of single islet responses. This platform demonstrates the feasibility of array-based islet cellular analysis and opens up a new modality to conduct informative and quantitive evaluation of islets and cell-based screening for new diabetes treatments.

  1. Loss of acinar cell IKKα triggers spontaneous pancreatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Wu, Xuefeng; Holzer, Ryan G.; Lee, Jun-Hee; Todoric, Jelena; Park, Eek-Joong; Ogata, Hisanobu; Gukovskaya, Anna S.; Gukovsky, Ilya; Pizzo, Donald P.; VandenBerg, Scott; Tarin, David; Atay, Çiǧdem; Arkan, Melek C.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Moscat, Jorge; Diaz-Meco, Maria; Dawson, David; Erkan, Mert; Kleeff, Jörg; Karin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease that causes progressive destruction of pancreatic acinar cells and, ultimately, loss of pancreatic function. We investigated the role of IκB kinase α (IKKα) in pancreatic homeostasis. Pancreas-specific ablation of IKKα (IkkαΔpan) caused spontaneous and progressive acinar cell vacuolization and death, interstitial fibrosis, inflammation, and circulatory release of pancreatic enzymes, clinical signs resembling those of human chronic pancreatitis. Loss of pancreatic IKKα causes defective autophagic protein degradation, leading to accumulation of p62-mediated protein aggregates and enhanced oxidative and ER stress in acinar cells, but none of these effects is related to NF-κB. Pancreas-specific p62 ablation prevented ER and oxidative stresses and attenuated pancreatitis in IkkαΔpan mice, suggesting that cellular stress induced by p62 aggregates promotes development of pancreatitis. Importantly, downregulation of IKKα and accumulation of p62 aggregates were also observed in chronic human pancreatitis. Our studies demonstrate that IKKα, which may control autophagic protein degradation through its interaction with ATG16L2, plays a critical role in maintaining pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis, whose dysregulation promotes pancreatitis through p62 aggregate accumulation. PMID:23563314

  2. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  3. Adult Human Pancreatic Islet Beta-Cells Display Limited Turnover and Long Lifespan as Determined by In-Vivo Thymidine Analog Incorporation and Radiocarbon Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, S; Kushner, J A; Buchholz, B A; Meeker, A K; Stein, G M; Hsieh, M; Kirby, M; Pechhold, S; Liu, E H; Harlan, D M; Tisdale, J F

    2010-03-15

    Diabetes mellitus results from an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin producing pancreatic beta-cells. The adult human beta-cell's turnover rate remains unknown. We employed novel techniques to examine adult human islet beta-cell turnover and longevity in vivo. Subjects enrolled in NIH clinical trials received thymidine analogues [iododeoxyuridine (IdU) or bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)] 8-days to 4-years prior to death. Archival autopsy samples from ten patients (aged 17-74 years) were employed to assess beta-cell turnover by scoring nuclear analog labeling within insulin staining cells. Human adult beta-cell longevity was determined by estimating the cells genomic DNA integration of atmospheric carbon-14 ({sup 14}C). DNA was purified from pancreatic islets isolated from cadaveric donors; whole islet prep DNA was obtained from a 15 year old donor, and purified beta-cell DNA was obtained from two donors (age 48 and 80 years). {sup 14}C levels were then determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Cellular 'birth date' was determined by comparing the subject's DNA {sup 14}C content relative to a well-established {sup 14}C atmospheric prevalence curve. In the two subjects less than age 20 years, 1-2% of the beta-cell nuclei co-stained for BrdU/IdU. No beta-cell nuclei co-stained in the eight patients more than 30 years old. Consistent with the BrdU/IdU turnover data, beta-cell DNA {sup 14}C content indicated the cells 'birth date' occurred within the subject's first 30 years of life. Under typical circumstances, adult human beta-cells and their cellular precursors are established by young adulthood.

  4. Id3 upregulates BrdU incorporation associated with a DNA damage response, not replication, in human pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hee; Hao, Ergeng; Levine, Fred; Itkin-Ansari, Pamela

    2011-01-01

    Elucidating mechanisms of cell cycle control in normally quiescent human pancreatic β-cells has the potential to impact regeneration strategies for diabetes. Previously we demonstrated that Id3, a repressor of basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) proteins, was sufficient to induce cell cycle entry in pancreatic duct cells, which are closely related to β-cells developmentally. We hypothesized that Id3 might similarly induce cell cycle entry in primary human β-cells. To test this directly, adult human β-cells were transduced with adenovirus expressing Id3. Consistent with a replicative response, β-cells exhibited BrdU incorporation. Further, Id3 potently repressed expression of the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p57Kip2, a gene which is also silenced in a rare β-cell hyperproliferative disorder in infants. Surprisingly, however, BrdU positive β-cells did not express the proliferation markers Ki67 and pHH3. Instead, BrdU uptake reflected a DNA damage response, as manifested by hydroxyurea incorporation, γH2AX expression and 53BP1 subcellular relocalization. The uncoupling of BrdU uptake from replication raises a cautionary note about interpreting studies relying solely upon BrdU incorporation as evidence of β-cell proliferation. The data also establish that loss of p57Kip2 is not sufficient to induce cell cycle entry in adult β-cells. Moreover, the differential responses to Id3 between duct and β-cells reveal that β-cells possess intrinsic resistance to cell cycle entry not common to all quiescent epithelial cells in the adult human pancreas. The data provide a much needed comparative model for investigating the molecular basis for this resistance in order to develop a strategy for improving replication competence in β-cells. PMID:21964314

  5. Plumbagin induces cell cycle arrest and autophagy and suppresses epithelial to mesenchymal transition involving PI3K/Akt/mTOR-mediated pathway in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Qi; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yu, Song-Ning; Pan, Shu-Ting; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Wang, Dong; Yang, Yin-Xue; Yang, Tianxing; Sun, Tao; Li, Min; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Plumbagin (PLB), an active naphthoquinone compound, has shown potent anticancer effects in preclinical studies; however, the effect and underlying mechanism of PLB for the treatment of pancreatic cancer is unclear. This study aimed to examine the pancreatic cancer cell killing effect of PLB and investigate the underlying mechanism in human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. The results showed that PLB exhibited potent inducing effects on cell cycle arrest in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells via the modulation of cell cycle regulators including CDK1/CDC2, cyclin B1, cyclin D1, p21 Waf1/Cip1, p27 Kip1, and p53. PLB treatment concentration- and time-dependently increased the percentage of autophagic cells and significantly increased the expression level of phosphatase and tensin homolog, beclin 1, and the ratio of LC3-II over LC3-I in both PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. PLB induced inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) pathways and activation of 5'-AMP-dependent kinase as indicated by their altered phosphorylation, contributing to the proautophagic activities of PLB in both cell lines. Furthermore, SB202190, a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, and wortmannin, a potent, irreversible, and selective PI3K inhibitor, remarkably enhanced PLB-induced autophagy in PANC-1 and BxPC-3 cells, indicating the roles of PI3K and p38 MAPK mediated signaling pathways in PLB-induced autophagic cell death in both cell lines. In addition, PLB significantly inhibited epithelial to mesenchymal transition phenotype in both cell lines with an increase in the expression level of E-cadherin and a decrease in N-cadherin. Moreover, PLB treatment significantly suppressed the expression of Sirt1 in both cell lines. These findings show that PLB promotes cell cycle arrest and autophagy but inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition phenotype in pancreatic cancer cells with the involvement of PI3

  6. Identifying microRNA-mRNA regulatory network in gemcitabine-resistant cells derived from human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yehua; Pan, Yan; Xu, Litao; Chen, Lianyu; Liu, Luming; Chen, Hao; Chen, Zhen; Meng, Zhiqiang

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is unresectable in over 80 % of patients owing to difficulty in early diagnosis. Chemotherapy is the most frequently adopted therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. The development of drug resistance to gemcitabine (GEM), which is always used in standard chemotherapy, often results in therapeutic failure. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the gemcitabine resistance remain unclear. Therefore, we sought to explore the microRNA-mRNA network that is associated with the development of gemcitabine resistance and to identify molecular targets for overcoming the gemcitabine resistance. By exposing SW1990 pancreatic cancer cells to long-term gemcitabine with increasing concentrations, we established a gemcitabine-resistant cell line (SW1990/GEM) with a high IC50 (the concentration needed for 50 % growth inhibition, 847.23 μM). The mRNA and microRNA expression profiles of SW1990 cells and SW1990/GEM cells were determined using RNA-seq analysis. By comparing the results in control SW1990 cells, 507 upregulated genes and 550 downregulated genes in SW1990/GEM cells were identified as differentially expressed genes correlated with gemcitabine sensitivity. Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that the differentially expressed genes were related to diverse biological processes. The upregulated genes were mainly associated with drug response and apoptosis, and the downregulated genes were correlated with cell cycle progression and RNA splicing. Concurrently, the differentially expressed microRNAs, which are the important player in drug resistance development, were also examined in SW1990/GEM cells, and 56 differential microRNAs were identified. Additionally, the expression profiles of selected genes and microRNAs were confirmed by using Q-PCR assays. Furthermore, combining the differentially expressed microRNAs and mRNAs as well as the predicted targets for these microRNAs, a core microRNA-mRNA regulatory network was constructed, which included hub micro

  7. The changes of the frequency specific impedance of the human body due to the resonance in the kHz range in cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalak, K. P.; Nawrocka-Bogusz, H.

    2011-12-01

    The frequency-specific absorption of kHz signals has been postulated for different tissues, trace elements, vitamins, toxins, pathogens, allergens etc. for low-power (μV) signals. An increase in the impedance of the human body is observed only up to the given power of the applied signal. The highest amplification of the given signal being damped by the body makes it possible to determine the intensity of the given process in the body (e.g. amount of the toxin, trace element, intensity of the allergy) being connected with a given frequency spectrum of the signal. The mechanism of frequency-specific absorption can be explained by means of the Quantum Field Theory being applied to the structure of the water. Substantially high coincidence between the frequencies of the rotation of free quasi-excited electrons in coherent domains of water and the frequencies being used in the MORA diagnostics (Med-Tronic GmbH, EN ISO 13485, EN ISO 9001) can be observed. These frequencies are located in the proximity of f = 7kHz · i (i = 1,3,5,7,...). This fact suggests that the coherent domains with the admixtures of the given substances create structure-specific coherent domains that possess frequency-specific absorption spectra. The diagnostic tool called "MORA System diagnosis" was used to investigate 102 patients with different types and stages of cancer. Many signals were observed to be absorbed by many cancer patients, e.g.: 'Cellular defense system', 'Degeneration tendencies', Manganese, Magnesium, Zinc, Selenium, Vitamin E, Glutamine, Glutathione, Cysteine, Candida albicans, Mycosis. The results confirm the role of oxidative stress, immunological system deficiency and mitochondria malfunction in the development of cancer.

  8. Photothermal Treatment of Human Pancreatic Cancer Using PEGylated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Induces Apoptosis by Triggering Mitochondrial Membrane Depolarization Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mocan, Teodora; Matea, Cristian T.; Cojocaru, Iulia; Ilie, Ioana; Tabaran, Flaviu A.; Zaharie, Florin; Iancu, Cornel; Bartos, Dana; Mocan, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most lethal solid tumor in humans, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Thermally active carbon nanotubes have already brought to light promising results in PC research and treatment. We report here the construct of a nano-biosystem based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes and polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules validated through AFM, UV-Vis and DLS. We next studied the photothermal effect of these PEG-ylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (5, 10 and 50 μg/mL, respectively) on pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1) and further analyzed the molecular and cellular events involved in cell death occurrence. Using cell proliferation, apoptosis, membrane polarization and oxidative stress assays for ELISA, fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry we show here that hyperthermia following MWCNTs-PEG laser mediated treatment (808 nm, 2W) leads to mitochondrial membrane depolarization that activates the flux of free radicals within the cell and the oxidative state mediate cellular damage in PC cells via apoptotic pathway. Our results are of decisive importance especially in regard with the development of novel nano-biosystems capable to target mitochondria and to synergically act both as cytotoxic drug as well as thermally active agents in order to overcome one of the most common problem met in oncology, that of intrinsic resistance to chemotherapeutics. PMID:25258649

  9. Progesterone inhibits proliferation and modulates expression of proliferation-Related genes in classical progesterone receptor-negative human BxPC3 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, Alexey I; Maslakova, Aitsana A; Polikarpova, Anna V; Bulanova, Elena A; Guseva, Alexandra A; Morozov, Ivan A; Rubtsov, Petr M; Smirnova, Olga V; Shchelkunova, Tatiana A

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that progesterone may possess anti-tumorigenic properties. However, a growth-modulatory role of progestins in human cancer cells remains obscure. With the discovery of a new class of membrane progesterone receptors (mPRs) belonging to the progestin and adipoQ receptor gene family, it becomes important to study the effect of this hormone on proliferation of tumor cells that do not express classical nuclear progesterone receptors (nPRs). To identify a cell line expressing high levels of mPRs and lacking nPRs, we examined mRNA levels of nPRs and three forms of mPRs in sixteen human tumor cell lines of different origin. High expression of mPR mRNA has been found in pancreatic adenocarcinoma BxPC3 cells, while nPR mRNA has not been detected in these cells. Western blot analysis confirmed these findings at the protein level. We revealed specific binding of labeled progesterone in these cells with affinity constant similar to that of human mPR expressed in yeast cells. Progesterone at high concentration of 20 μM significantly reduced the mRNA levels of proliferation markers Ki67 and PCNA, as well as of cyclin D1, and increased the mRNA levels of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27. Progesterone (1 μM and 20 μM) significantly inhibited proliferative activity of BxPC3 cells. These results point to anti-proliferative effects of the progesterone high concentrations on BxPC3 cells and suggest that activation of mPRs may mediate this action. Our data are a starting point for further investigations regarding the application of progesterone in pancreatic cancer.

  10. Obesity, starch digestion and amylase: association between copy number variants at human salivary (AMY1) and pancreatic (AMY2) amylase genes.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Danielle; Dhar, Sugandha; Mitchell, Laura M; Fu, Beiyuan; Tyson, Jess; Shwan, Nzar A A; Yang, Fengtang; Thomas, Mark G; Armour, John A L

    2015-06-15

    The human salivary amylase genes display extensive copy number variation (CNV), and recent work has implicated this variation in adaptation to starch-rich diets, and in association with body mass index. In this work, we use paralogue ratio tests, microsatellite analysis, read depth and fibre-FISH to demonstrate that human amylase CNV is not a smooth continuum, but is instead partitioned into distinct haplotype classes. There is a fundamental structural distinction between haplotypes containing odd or even numbers of AMY1 gene units, in turn coupled to CNV in pancreatic amylase genes AMY2A and AMY2B. Most haplotypes have one copy each of AMY2A and AMY2B and contain an odd number of copies of AMY1; consequently, most individuals have an even total number of AMY1. In contrast, haplotypes carrying an even number of AMY1 genes have rearrangements leading to CNVs of AMY2A/AMY2B. Read-depth and experimental data show that different populations harbour different proportions of these basic haplotype classes. In Europeans, the copy numbers of AMY1 and AMY2A are correlated, so that phenotypic associations caused by variation in pancreatic amylase copy number could be detected indirectly as weak association with AMY1 copy number. We show that the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay previously applied to the high-throughput measurement of AMY1 copy number is less accurate than the measures we use and that qPCR data in other studies have been further compromised by systematic miscalibration. Our results uncover new patterns in human amylase variation and imply a potential role for AMY2 CNV in functional associations.

  11. Arterio-Pancreatic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ser Yee; Ng, Kheng Hong; Sebastian, Mathew George

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a single-organ disorder that has multi-organ sequelae. As a result, it can have varied presentations. Acute pancreatitis presenting as acute limb ischemia is rare. We present a patient with acute pancreatitis presenting with bilateral lower limb ischemia. The episode of acute pancreatitis resolved but the acute lower limb ischemia precipitated as the pancreatitis progressed, and necessitated bilateral above-knee amputations. We review the literature and discuss the pathogenesis of such a phenomenon. PMID:22347150

  12. Sann-Joong-Kuey-Jian-Tang decreases the protein expression of mammalian target of rapamycin but increases microtubule associated protein II light chain 3 expression to inhibit human BxPC‑3 pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Chin-Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Sann‑Joong‑Kuey‑Jian‑Tang (SJKJT), a Traditional Chinese Medicinal prescription, has been used for the treatment of lymphadenopathy and solid tumors, and has shown therapeutic potential in a number of human malignant tumor cell lines, such as Hep‑G2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Previous mechanistic studies demonstrated that SJKJT inhibited the proliferation of BxPC‑3 pancreatic carcinoma cells through the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in vitro. SJKJT was also shown to be cytotoxic to colo 205 colon cancer cells by inducing autophagy in vitro. The present study therefore investigated molecular mechanisms of autophagy in human BxPC‑3 pancreatic cancer cells treated with SJKJT. The cytotoxic effects of SJKJT on BxPC‑3 human pancreatic carcinoma cells were evaluated using an MTT assay. Furthermore, the expression of autophagy‑associated proteins, including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), beclin‑1, autophagocytosis‑associated protein (Atg)3, Atg7, Atg5‑Atg12 and microtubule‑associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3‑II), was assessed using western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that BxPC‑3 cells treated with SJKJT exhibited decreased expression levels of mTOR and increased expression of LC3‑II protein. In addition, the expression of the beclin‑1, Atg3, Atg7 and Atg5‑Atg12 proteins was increased during the first 24 h, but decreased from 48 to 72 h. The results showed that SJKJT inhibited the proliferation of human BxPC‑3 pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. A possible underlying molecular mechanism may be the induction of autophagy. Further investigation into the therapeutic potential of SJKJT in human pancreatic cancer is required.

  13. MUC1 Regulates PDGFA Expression During Pancreatic Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sahraei, Mahnaz; Roy, Lopamudra Das; Curry, Jennifer M; Teresa, Tinder L; Nath, Sritama; Besmer, Dahlia; Kidiyoor, Amritha; Dalia, Ritu; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDA) has one of the worst prognoses of all cancers. Mucin 1 (MUC1), a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein, is a key modulator of several signaling pathways that affect oncogenesis, motility, and metastasis. Its expression is known to be associated with poor prognosis in patients. However, the precise mechanism remains elusive. We report a novel association of MUC1 with Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-A (PDGFA). PDGFA is one of the many drivers of tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis in PDA. Using mouse PDA models as well as human samples, we show clear evidence that MUC1 regulates the expression and secretion of PDGFA. This, in turn, influences proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells leading to higher tumor burden in vivo. In addition, we reveal that MUC1 over expressing cells are heavily dependent on PDGFA both for proliferation and invasion while MUC1-null cells are not. Moreover, PDGFA and MUC1 are critical for translocation of βcatenin to the nucleus for oncogenesis to ensue. Finally, we elucidate the underlying mechanism by which MUC1 regulates PDGFA expression and secretion in pancreatic cancer cells. We show that MUC1 associates with Hif1-α, a known transcription factor involved in controlling PDGFA expression. Furthermore, MUC1 facilitates Hif1-α translocation to the nucleus. In summary, we have demonstrated that MUC1-induced invasion and proliferation occurs via increased exogenous production of PDGFA. Thus, impeding MUC1 regulation of PDGFA signaling may be therapeutically beneficial for patients with PDA. PMID:22266848

  14. ATP-gated P2X3 receptors constitute a positive autocrine signal for insulin release in the human pancreatic β cell

    PubMed Central

    Jacques-Silva, M. Caroline; Correa-Medina, Mayrin; Cabrera, Over; Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Makeeva, Natalia; Fachado, Alberto; Diez, Juan; Berman, Dora M.; Kenyon, Norma S.; Ricordi, Camillo; Pileggi, Antonello; Molano, R. Damaris; Berggren, Per-Olof; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular ATP has been proposed as a paracrine signal in rodent islets, but it is unclear what role ATP plays in human islets. We now show the presence of an ATP signaling pathway that enhances the human β cell's sensitivity and responsiveness to glucose fluctuations. By using in situ hybridization, RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting as well as recordings of cytoplasmic-free Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, and hormone release in vitro, we show that human β cells express ionotropic ATP receptors of the P2X3 type and that activation of these receptors by ATP coreleased with insulin amplifies glucose-induced insulin secretion. Released ATP activates P2X3 receptors in the β-cell plasma membrane, resulting in increased [Ca2+]i and enhanced insulin secretion. Therefore, in human islets, released ATP forms a positive autocrine feedback loop that sensitizes the β cell's secretory machinery. This may explain how the human pancreatic β cell can respond so effectively to relatively modest changes in glucose concentration under physiological conditions in vivo. PMID:20308565

  15. Effects of La0.2Ce0.6Eu0.2F3 nanocrystals capped with polyethylene glycol on human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Nathan J.; Glazener, Natasha N.; Rivera, Antonio C.; Akins, Brian A.; Armijo, Leisha M.; Plumley, John B.; Cook, Nathaniel C.; Sugar, Jacqueline M.; Chan, Rana; Brandt, Yekaterina I.; Smolyakov, Gennady A.; Heintz, Philip H.; Osiński, Marek

    2013-02-01

    Lanthanide fluoride colloidal nanocrystals offer a way to improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer through the enhanced absorption of ionizing radiation, in addition to providing visible luminescence. In order to explore this possibility, tests with a kilovoltage therapy unit manufactured by the Universal X-Ray Company were performed to estimate the energy sensitivity of this technique. La0.2Ce0.6Eu0.2F3 nanocrystals capped with polyethylene glycol of molecular weight 6000 were synthesized, suspended in deionized water, and made tolerant to biological ionic pressures by incubation with fetal bovine serum. These nanocrystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering, muffle furnace ashing, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Clonogenic assays were performed on the cells to assay the cytotoxicity and radiotoxicity of the nanocrystals on the human pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1, purchased from ATCC.

  16. The Pancreatic Islet Regulome Browser

    PubMed Central

    Mularoni, Loris; Ramos-Rodríguez, Mireia; Pasquali, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    The pancreatic islet is a highly specialized tissue embedded in the exocrine pancreas whose primary function is that of controlling glucose homeostasis. Thus, understanding the transcriptional control of islet-cell may help to puzzle out the pathogenesis of glucose metabolism disorders. Integrative computational analyses of transcriptomic and epigenomic data allows predicting genomic coordinates of putative regulatory elements across the genome and, decipher tissue-specific functions of the non-coding genome. We herein present the Islet Regulome Browser, a tool that allows fast access and exploration of pancreatic islet epigenomic and transcriptomic data produced by different labs worldwide. The Islet Regulome Browser is now accessible on the internet or may be installed locally. It allows uploading custom tracks as well as providing interactive access to a wealth of information including Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) variants, different classes of regulatory elements, together with enhancer clusters, stretch-enhancers and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic progenitors and adult human pancreatic islets. Integration and visualization of such data may allow a deeper understanding of the regulatory networks driving tissue-specific transcription and guide the identification of regulatory variants. We believe that such tool will facilitate the access to pancreatic islet public genomic datasets providing a major boost to functional genomics studies in glucose metabolism related traits including diabetes. PMID:28261261

  17. Bilateral Impedance Control For Telemanipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Christopher L.

    1993-01-01

    Telemanipulator system includes master robot manipulated by human operator, and slave robot performing tasks at remote location. Two robots electronically coupled so slave robot moves in response to commands from master robot. Teleoperation greatly enhanced if forces acting on slave robot fed back to operator, giving operator feeling he or she manipulates remote environment directly. Main advantage of bilateral impedance control: enables arbitrary specification of desired performance characteristics for telemanipulator system. Relationship between force and position modulated at both ends of system to suit requirements of task.

  18. Impeded Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Xue, Wei

    2016-12-01

    We consider dark matter models in which the mass splitting between the dark matter particles and their annihilation products is tiny. Compared to the previously proposed Forbidden Dark Matter scenario, the mass splittings we consider are much smaller, and are allowed to be either positive or negative. To emphasize this modification, we dub our scenario "Impeded Dark Matter". We demonstrate that Impeded Dark Matter can be easily realized without requiring tuning of model parameters. For negative mass splitting, we demonstrate that the annihilation cross-section for Impeded Dark Matter depends linearly on the dark matter velocity or may even be kinematically forbidden, making this scenario almost insensitive to constraints from the cosmic microwave background and from observations of dwarf galaxies. Accordingly, it may be possible for Impeded Dark Matter to yield observable signals in clusters or the Galactic center, with no corresponding signal in dwarfs. For positive mass splitting, we show that the annihilation cross-section is suppressed by the small mass splitting, which helps light dark matter to survive increasingly stringent constraints from indirect searches. As specific realizations for Impeded Dark Matter, we introduce a model of vector dark matter from a hidden SU(2) sector, and a composite dark matter scenario based on a QCD-like dark sector.

  19. p38 MAPK Is Activated but Does Not Play a Key Role during Apoptosis Induction by Saturated Fatty Acid in Human Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Šrámek, Jan; Němcová-Fürstová, Vlasta; Balušíková, Kamila; Daniel, Petr; Jelínek, Michael; James, Roger F.; Kovář, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Saturated stearic acid (SA) induces apoptosis in the human pancreatic β-cells NES2Y. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are unclear. We showed that apoptosis-inducing concentrations of SA activate the p38 MAPK signaling pathway in these cells. Therefore, we tested the role of p38 MAPK signaling pathway activation in apoptosis induction by SA in NES2Y cells. Crosstalk between p38 MAPK pathway activation and accompanying ERK pathway inhibition after SA application was also tested. The inhibition of p38 MAPK expression by siRNA silencing resulted in a decrease in MAPKAPK-2 activation after SA application, but it had no significant effect on cell viability or the level of phosphorylated ERK pathway members. The inhibition of p38 MAPK activity by the specific inhibitor SB202190 resulted in inhibition of MAPKAPK-2 activation and noticeable activation of ERK pathway members after SA treatment but in no significant effect on cell viability. p38 MAPK overexpression by plasmid transfection produced an increase in MAPKAPK-2 activation after SA exposure but no significant influence on cell viability or ERK pathway activation. The activation of p38 MAPK by the specific activator anisomycin resulted in significant activation of MAPKAPK-2. Concerning the effect on cell viability, application of the activator led to apoptosis induction similar to application of SA (PARP cleavage and caspase-7, -8, and -9 activation) and in inhibition of ERK pathway members. We demonstrated that apoptosis-inducing concentrations of SA activate the p38 MAPK signaling pathway and that this activation could be involved in apoptosis induction by SA in the human pancreatic β-cells NES2Y. However, this involvement does not seem to play a key role. Crosstalk between p38 MAPK pathway activation and ERK pathway inhibition in NES2Y cells seems likely. Thus, the ERK pathway inhibition by p38 MAPK activation does not also seem to be essential for SA-induced apoptosis. PMID:26861294

  20. Dual inhibition of Janus and Src family kinases by novel indirubin derivative blocks constitutively-activated Stat3 signaling associated with apoptosis of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangkil; Wen, Wei; Schroeder, Anne; Herrmann, Andreas; Yu, Hua; Cheng, Xinlai; Merz, Karl-Heinz; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Li, Hongzhi; Yuan, Yate-Ching; Jove, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Constitutively-activated JAK/Stat3 or Src/Stat3 signaling plays a crucial role in tumor cell survival, proliferation, angiogenesis and immune suppression. Activated JAK/Stat3 or Src/Stat3 has been validated as a promising molecular target for cancer therapy. However, prolonged inhibition of Src family kinases (SFKs) leads to reactivation of signal transducer and activator of transcript 3 (Stat3) and tumor cell survival through altered JAK/Stat3 interaction. This compensatory feedback suggests that dual inhibition of Janus kinases (JAKs) and SFKs might be a promising strategy for targeting downstream Stat3 signaling in the clinic. In this study, we identify that the natural product derivative E738 is a novel dual inhibitor of JAKs and SFKs. The IC(50) values of E738 against recombinant JAKs and SFKs in vitro are in the ranges of 0.7-74.1 nM and 10.7-263.9 nM, respectively. We observed that phosphorylation of both Jak2 and Src was substantially inhibited in the submicromolar range by E738 in cultured human pancreatic tumor cells, followed by blockade of downstream Stat3 activation. E738 down-regulated expression of the Stat3 target proteins Mcl-1 and survivin, associated with induction of apoptosis. Computational models and molecular dynamics simulations of E738/Tyk2 or E738/Src in silico suggest that E738 inhibits both tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2) and Src as an ATP-competitive ligand. Moreover, the planar E738 molecule demonstrates a strong binding affinity in the compact ATP-binding site of Tyk2. In sum, E738 is the first dual inhibitor of JAKs and SFKs, followed by inhibition of Stat3 signaling. Thus, according to in vitro experiments, E738 is a promising new therapeutic agent for human pancreatic cancer treatment by blocking both oncogenic pathways simultaneously.

  1. Boswellic acid suppresses growth and metastasis of human pancreatic tumors in an orthotopic nude mouse model through modulation of multiple targets.

    PubMed

    Park, Byoungduck; Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PaCa) is one of the most lethal cancers, with an estimated 5-year survival of <5% even when patients are given the best treatment available. In addition, these treatments are often toxic and expensive, thus new agents which are safe, affordable and effective are urgently needed. We describe here the results of our study with acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA), an agent obtained from an Ayurvedic medicine, gum resin of Boswellia serrata. Whether AKBA has an activity against human PaCa, was examined in in vitro models and in an orthotopic nude mouse model of PaCa. We found that AKBA inhibited the proliferation of four different PaCa cell lines (AsPC-1, PANC-28, and MIA PaCa-2 with K-Ras and p53 mutations, and BxPC-3 with wild-type K-Ras and p53 mutation). These effects correlated with an inhibition of constitutively active NF-κB and suppression of NF-κB regulating gene expression. AKBA also induced apoptosis, and sensitized the cells to apoptotic effects of gemcitabine. In the orthotopic nude mouse model of PaCa, p.o. administration of AKBA alone (100 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the tumor growth; this activity was enhanced by gemcitabine. In addition, AKBA inhibited the metastasis of the PaCa to spleen, liver, and lungs. This correlated with decreases in Ki-67, a biomarker of proliferation, and CD31, a biomarker of microvessel density, in the tumor tissue. AKBA produced significant decreases in the expression of NF-κB regulating genes in the tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis also showed AKBA downregulated the expression of COX-2, MMP-9, CXCR4, and VEGF in the tissues. Overall these results demonstrate that AKBA can suppress the growth and metastasis of human pancreatic tumors in an orthotopic nude mouse model that correlates with modulation of multiple targets.

  2. Targeting pancreatitis blocks tumor-initiating stem cells and pancreatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Madka, Venkateshwar; Brewer, Misty; Ritchie, Rebekah L.; Lightfoot, Stan; Kumar, Gaurav; Sadeghi, Michael; Patlolla, Jagan Mohan R.; Yamada, Hiroshi Y.; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; May, Randal; Houchen, Courtney W.; Steele, Vernon E.; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMs) for pancreatic cancer (PC) that recapitulates human disease progression has helped to identify new strategies to delay/inhibit PC development. We first found that expression of the pancreatic tumor-initiating/cancer stem cells (CSC) marker DclK1 occurs in early stage PC and in both early and late pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and that it increases as disease progresses in GEM and also in human PC. Genome-wide next generation sequencing of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) from GEM mice revealed significantly increased DclK1 along with inflammatory genes. Genetic ablation of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) decreased DclK1 in GEM. Induction of inflammation/pancreatitis with cerulein in GEM mice increased DclK1, and the novel dual COX/5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) inhibitor licofelone reduced it. Dietary licofelone significantly inhibited the incidence of PDAC and carcinoma in situ with significant inhibition of pancreatic CSCs. Licofelone suppressed pancreatic tumor COX-2 and 5-LOX activities and modulated miRNAs characteristic of CSC and inflammation in correlation with PDAC inhibition. These results offer a preclinical proof of concept to target the inflammation initiation to inhibit cancer stem cells early for improving the treatment of pancreatic cancers, with immediate clinical implications for repositioning dual COX/5-LOX inhibitors in human trials for high risk patients. PMID:25906749

  3. [External pancreatic fistulas management].

    PubMed

    Stepan, E V; Ermolov, A S; Rogal', M L; Teterin, Yu S

    2017-01-01

    The main principles of treatment of external postoperative pancreatic fistulas are viewed in the article. Pancreatic trauma was the reason of pancreatic fistula in 38.7% of the cases, operations because of acute pancreatitis - in 25.8%, and pancreatic pseudocyst drainage - in 35.5%. 93 patients recovered after the treatment. Complex conservative treatment of EPF allowed to close fistulas in 74.2% of the patients with normal patency of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). The usage of octreotide 600-900 mcg daily for at least 5 days to decrease pancreatic secretion was an important part of the conservative treatment. Endoscopic papillotomy was performed in patients with major duodenal papilla obstruction and interruption of transporting of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Stent of the main pancreatic duct was indicated in patients with extended pancreatic duct stenosis to normalize transport of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Surgical formation of anastomosis between distal part of the main pancreatic duct and gastro-intestinal tract was carried out when it was impossible to fulfill endoscopic stenting of pancreatic duct either because of its interruption and diastasis between its ends, or in the cases of unsuccessful conservative treatment of external pancreatic fistula caused by drainage of pseudocyst.

  4. Role of fibrosis-related genes and pancreatic duct obstruction in rat pancreatitis models: implications for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, M; Suda, K; Kuwayama, C; Abe, H; Kakinuma, C

    2007-10-01

    Human chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible fibrosis, whereas pancreatic fibrosis in animal models is reversible. In this study, we compare the development of pancreatic fibrosis in the dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) model, WBN/Kob rats and bile duct-ligated (BDL) rats. DBTC (8 mg/kg) was administered to LEW rats, and the pancreas was histopathologically investigated sequentially. Male and female WBN/Kob rats aged 4, 6 and 8 months were also examined. BDL rats were prepared by ligation of the bile duct at the duodenal portion and sacrificed at 3 or 7 days after ligation. Fibrosis in the DBTC model peaked after 1 week and was limited to the areas around the pancreatic ducts after 2 weeks, and was composed of both type I and type III collagen. In contrast, fibrosis in male WBN/Kob rats peaked at age 4 months, expanded into intralobular area, and was composed of type III collagen. It exhibited almost no type I collagen and a marked tendency to regress. Pancreatic fibrosis in BDL rats was somewhat difficult to induce and required increased stimulation. This suggests that fibrosis in human biliary pancreatitis may gradually form based on weak, continuous stimulation. We conclude that type I collagen may be involved in the progression of irreversible fibrosis. The imbalance between synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrix molecules or degree of stimulation over a certain period may lead to pancreatic fibrosis. Gene expressions of prolyl hydroxylase and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase-2 were elevated.

  5. Kindlin-2 in pancreatic stellate cells promotes the progression of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naoki; Masamune, Atsushi; Hamada, Shin; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a pivotal role in pancreatic fibrosis associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Kindlin-2 is a focal adhesion protein that regulates the activation of integrins. This study aimed to clarify the role of kindlin-2 in PSCs in pancreatic cancer. Kindlin-2 expression in 79 resected pancreatic cancer tissues was examined by immunohistochemical staining. Kindlin-2-knockdown immortalized human PSCs were established using small interfering RNA. Pancreatic cancer cells were treated with conditioned media of PSCs, and the cell proliferation and migration were examined. SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were subcutaneously injected into nude mice alone or with PSCs and the size of the tumors was monitored. Kindlin-2 expression was observed in PDAC and the peritumoral stroma. Stromal kindlin-2 expression was associated with shorter recurrence-free survival time after R0 resection. Knockdown of kindlin-2 resulted in decreased proliferation, migration, and cytokine expression in PSCs. The PSC-induced proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cells were suppressed by kindlin-2 knockdown in PSCs. In vivo, co-injection of PSCs increased the size of the tumors, but this effect was abolished by kindlin-2 knockdown in PSCs. In conclusion, kindlin-2 in PSCs promoted the progression of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Glucose- and GTP-dependent stimulation of the carboxyl methylation of CDC42 in rodent and human pancreatic islets and pure beta cells. Evidence for an essential role of GTP-binding proteins in nutrient-induced insulin secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Kowluru, A; Seavey, S E; Li, G; Sorenson, R L; Weinhaus, A J; Nesher, R; Rabaglia, M E; Vadakekalam, J; Metz, S A

    1996-01-01

    Several GTP-binding proteins (G-proteins) undergo post-translational modifications (isoprenylation and carboxyl methylation) in pancreatic beta cells. Herein, two of these were identified as CDC42 and rap 1, using Western blotting and immunoprecipitation. Confocal microscopic data indicated that CDC42 is localized only in islet endocrine cells but not in acinar cells of the pancreas. CDC42 undergoes a guanine nucleotide-specific membrane association and carboxyl methylation in normal rat islets, human islets, and pure beta (HIT or INS-1) cells. GTPgammaS-dependent carboxyl methylation of a 23-kD protein was also demonstrable in secretory granule fractions from normal islets or beta cells. AFC (a specific inhibitor of prenyl-cysteine carboxyl methyl transferases) blocked the carboxyl methylation of CDC42 in five types of insulin-secreting cells, without blocking GTPgammaS-induced translocation, implying that methylation is a consequence (not a cause) of transfer to membrane sites. High glucose (but not a depolarizing concentration of K+) induced the carboxyl methylation of CDC42 in intact cells, as assessed after specific immunoprecipitation. This effect was abrogated by GTP depletion using mycophenolic acid and was restored upon GTP repletion by coprovision of guanosine. In contrast, although rap 1 was also carboxyl methylated, it was not translocated to the particulate fraction by GTPgammaS; furthermore, its methylation was also stimulated by 40 mM K+ (suggesting a role which is not specific to nutrient stimulation). AFC also impeded nutrient-induced (but not K+-induced) insulin secretion from islets and beta cells under static or perifusion conditions, whereas an inactive structural analogue of AFC failed to inhibit insulin release. These effects were reproduced not only by S-adenosylhomocysteine (another methylation inhibitor), but also by GTP depletion. Thus, the glucose- and GTP-dependent carboxyl methylation of G-proteins such as CDC42 is an obligate step in

  7. Acute pancreatitis: Manifestation of acute HIV infection in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Anas; Altaf, Muhammad; Sferra, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Pancreatitis in the pediatric age group is not as common as in adults. Etiologies are various and differ from those in adults. Although infectious etiology accounts for a significant number of cases of pancreatitis, acute infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was rarely reported as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in adults. Acute pancreatitis has never been reported as a presenting manifestation of acute HIV infection in children. Case Report: We describe a pediatric patient who presented with acute pancreatitis that revealed acute HIV infection. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis as a primary manifestation of HIV infection is very rare. It may represent an uncommon aspect of primary HIV infection. We suggest that acute HIV infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute pancreatitis at all ages. PMID:23569476

  8. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.

    1993-01-01

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductor allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology.

  9. Superconducting active impedance converter

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, D.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.

    1993-11-16

    A transimpedance amplifier for use with high temperature superconducting, other superconducting, and conventional semiconductors allows for appropriate signal amplification and impedance matching to processing electronics. The amplifier incorporates the superconducting flux flow transistor into a differential amplifier configuration which allows for operation over a wide temperature range, and is characterized by high gain, relatively low noise, and response times less than 200 picoseconds over at least a 10-80 K. temperature range. The invention is particularly useful when a signal derived from either far-IR focal plane detectors or from Josephson junctions is to be processed by higher signal/higher impedance electronics, such as conventional semiconductor technology. 12 figures.

  10. Identification of KIAA1199 as a Biomarker for Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Han Na; Jun, Sohee; Oh, Ah-Young; Srivastava, Mrinal; Lee, Sunhye; Taniguchi, Cullen M.; Zhang, Songlin; Lee, Won Sup; Chen, Junjie; Park, Bum-Joon; Park, Jae-Il

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancers and has an extremely poor prognosis. Despite recent progress in both basic and clinical research, most pancreatic cancers are detected at an incurable stage owing to the absence of disease-specific symptoms. Thus, developing novel approaches for detecting pancreatic cancer at an early stage is imperative. Our in silico and immunohistochemical analyses showed that KIAA1199 is specifically expressed in human pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, the early lesion of pancreatic cancer, in a genetically engineered mouse model and in human patient samples. We also detected secreted KIAA1199 protein in blood samples obtained from pancreatic cancer mouse models, but not in normal mice. Furthermore, we found that assessing KIAA1199 autoantibody increased the sensitivity of detecting pancreatic cancer. These results indicate the potential benefits of using KIAA1199 as a biomarker for early-stage pancreatic cancer. PMID:27922049

  11. Ferulic acid decreases cell viability and colony formation while inhibiting migration of MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fahrioğlu, Umut; Dodurga, Yavuz; Elmas, Levent; Seçme, Mücahit

    2016-01-15

    Novel and combinatorial treatment methods are becoming sought after entities in cancer treatment and these treatments are even more valuable for pancreatic cancer. The scientists are always on the lookout for new chemicals to help them in their fight against cancer. In this study, we examine the effects of ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic compound, on gene expression, viability, colony formation and migration/invasion in the cultured MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cell. Cytotoxic effects of FA were determined by using trypan blue dye exclusion test and Cell TiterGlo (CTG) assay. IC50 dose in MIA PaCa-2 cells was detected as 500μM/ml at the 72nd hour. Expression profiles of certain cell cycle and apoptosis genes such as CCND1 (cyclin D1),CDK4, CDK6, RB, p21, p16, p53, caspase-3, caspase-9, caspase-8, caspase-10, Bcl-2, BCL-XL,BID, DR4,DR5,FADD,TRADD,PARP, APAF, Bax, Akt, PTEN, PUMA, NOXA, MMP2, MMP9, TIMP1 and TIMP2 were determined by real-time PCR. The effect of FA on cell viability was determined by CellTiter-Glo® Luminescent Cell Viability Assay. Additionally, effects of FA on colony formation and invasion were also investigated. It was observed that FA caused a significant decrease in the expression of CCND1, CDK 4/6, Bcl2 and caspase 8 and 10 in the MIA PaCa-2 cells while causing an increase in the expression of p53, Bax, PTEN caspase 3 and 9. FA was observed to decrease colony formation while inhibiting cell invasion and migration as observed by the BioCoat Matrigel Invasion Chamber guide and colony formation assays. In conclusion, FA is thought to behave as an anti-cancer agent by affecting cell cycle, apoptotic, invasion and colony formation behavior of MIA PaCa-2 cells. Therefore, FA is placed as a strong candidate for further studies aimed at finding a better, more effective treatment approach for pancreatic cancer.

  12. Pancreatic stellate cells promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Watanabe, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiromichi; Hamada, Shin; Satoh, Kennichi; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Recent studies have shown that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promote the progression of pancreatic cancer. {yields} Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. {yields} PSCs decreased the expression of epithelial markers but increased that of mesenchymal markers, along with increased migration. {yields} This study suggests epithelial-mesenchymal transition as a novel mechanism by which PSCs contribute to the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells. -- Abstract: The interaction between pancreatic cancer cells and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), a major profibrogenic cell type in the pancreas, is receiving increasing attention. There is accumulating evidence that PSCs promote the progression of pancreatic cancer by increasing cancer cell proliferation and invasion as well as by protecting them from radiation- and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis. Because epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, we hypothesized that PSCs promote EMT in pancreatic cancer cells. Panc-1 and SUIT-2 pancreatic cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with human PSCs isolated from patients undergoing operation for pancreatic cancer. The expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was examined by real-time PCR and immunofluorescent staining. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was examined by scratch and two-chamber assays. Pancreatic cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs showed loose cell contacts and a scattered, fibroblast-like appearance. The expression of E-cadherin, cytokeratin 19, and membrane-associated {beta}-catenin was decreased, whereas vimentin and Snail (Snai-1) expression was increased more in cancer cells co-cultured with PSCs than in mono-cultured cells. The migration of pancreatic cancer cells was increased by co-culture with PSCs. The PSC-induced decrease of E-cadherin expression was not altered

  13. Longitudinal impedance of RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Mernick, K.

    2015-05-03

    The longitudinal impedance of the two RHIC rings has been measured using the effect of potential well distortion on longitudinal Schottky measurements. For the blue RHIC ring Im(Z/n) = 1.5±0.2Ω. For the yellow ring Im(Z/n) = 5.4±1Ω.

  14. Curcumin and its cyclohexanone analogue inhibited human Equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Revalde, Jezrael L; Li, Yan; Wijeratne, Tharaka S; Bugde, Piyush; Hawkins, Bill C; Rosengren, Rhonda J; Paxton, James W

    2017-03-29

    Our group investigated combining the phytochemical curcumin and gemcitabine in a liposome, to improve gemcitabine's activity against pancreatic tumours. While optimising the curcumin: gemcitabine ratio for co-encapsulation, we found that increasing curcumin concentrations relative to gemcitabine resulted in antagonistic interactions. As curcumin is a promiscuous transporter inhibitor; we suspected that increased resistance occurred via inhibition of Equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1)-mediated gemcitabine uptake. To test our hypothesis, we determined whether curcumin and a related analogue, 2,6-bis((3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)methylene)-cyclohexanone (or A13), inhibited ENT1-mediated accumulation of [(3)H]uridine and [(3)H]gemcitabine into pancreatic cancer cells. We then confirmed the inhibition of gemcitabine accumulation by investigating whether curcumin/A13 could increase gemcitabine resistance in growth inhibition assays. We found that curcumin and A13 concentration-dependently inhibited the ENT1-mediated accumulation of both uridine and gemcitabine in MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells. We also found that non-toxic concentrations of curcumin and A13 significantly increased the resistance of both cell lines to gemcitabine. Increased resistance only occurred when curcumin/A13 was co-incubated with gemcitabine, and not with sequential exposure (i.e., curcumin first, followed by gemcitabine, or vice versa). We also found that the curcumin analogue (3E,5E)-3,5-bis[(2-fluorophenyl)methylene]-4-piperidinone (or EF24) did not inhibit gemcitabine accumulation, making it more suitable in combinations than curcumin/A13. From these results, we concluded that curcumin and A13 are inhibitors of the ENT1 transporter, but only at high concentrations (2-20µM). Curcumin is unlikely to inhibit gemcitabine uptake in tumours but may interfere with the oral absorption of ENT1 substrates due to high gut concentrations readily achievable from over-the-counter tablets/capsules.

  15. Isolation, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human Nkx6.1 gene (NKX6A), a new pancreatic islet homeobox gene

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Hiroshi; Permutt, M.A.; Veile, R.

    1997-03-01

    Nkx6.1 (gene symbol NKX6A), a new member of the NK homeobox gene family, was recently identified in rodent pancreatic islet 13-cell lines. The pattern of expression suggested that this gene product might be important for control of islet development and/or regulation of insulin biosynthesis. We now report cloning of human NKX6A, characterization of its genomic structure, and its chromosomal localization. The predicted protein of human NKX6A contained 367 amino acids and had 97% identity to the hamster protein. The highly conserved NK decapeptide and homeodomain regions were identical between human and hamster, suggesting functional importance of these domains. The coding region spanned approximately 4.8 kb and was composed of three exons. The gene was localized to four CEPH {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} yeast artificial chromosome clones (914B4, 951G9, 981D6, and 847133), and a nearby polymorphic marker (D4S1538) on chromosome 4 was identified <1270 kb from the gene. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we also determined that NKX6A maps to 4q21.2-q22. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  16. An IFIH1 gene polymorphism associated with risk for autoimmunity regulates canonical antiviral defence pathways in Coxsackievirus infected human pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Domsgen, Erna; Lind, Katharina; Kong, Lingjia; Hühn, Michael H.; Rasool, Omid; van Kuppeveld, Frank; Korsgren, Olle; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin

    2016-01-01

    The IFIH1 gene encodes the pattern recognition receptor MDA5. A common polymorphism in IFIH1 (rs1990760, A946T) confers increased risk for autoimmune disease, including type 1-diabetes (T1D). Coxsackievirus infections are linked to T1D and cause beta-cell damage in vitro. Here we demonstrate that the rs1990760 polymorphism regulates the interferon (IFN) signature expressed by human pancreatic islets following Coxsackievirus infection. A strong IFN signature was associated with high expression of IFNλ1 and IFNλ2, linking rs1990760 to the expression of type III IFNs. In the high-responding genotype, IRF-1 expression correlated with that of type III IFN, suggesting a positive-feedback on type III IFN transcription. In summary, our study uncovers an influence of rs1990760 on the canonical effector function of MDA5 in response to an acute infection of primary human parenchymal cells with a clinically relevant virus linked to human T1D. It also highlights a previously unrecognized connection between the rs1990760 polymorphism and the expression level of type III IFNs. PMID:28000722

  17. Recycler short kicker beam impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, Jim; Fellenz, Brian; /Fermilab

    2009-07-01

    Measured longitudinal and calculated transverse beam impedance is presented for the short kicker magnets being installed in the Fermilab Recycler. Fermi drawing number ME-457159. The longitudinal impedance was measured with a stretched wire and the Panofsky equation was used to estimate the transverse impedance. The impedance of 3319 meters (the Recycler circumference) of stainless vacuum pipe is provided for comparison. Although measurements where done to 3GHz, impedance was negligible above 30MHz. The beam power lost to the kicker impedance is shown for a range of bunch lengths. The measurements are for one kicker assuming a rotation frequency of 90KHz. Seven of these kickers are being installed.

  18. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas, common hepatic artery, and portal vein. Also shown ... and superior mesenteric artery. Stage III pancreatic cancer. Cancer ... near the pancreas. These include the superior mesenteric artery, celiac axis, ...

  19. Surgery for pancreatic cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007649.htm Surgery for pancreatic cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... surgery are used in the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer. Whipple procedure: This is the most common surgery ...

  20. Pancreatic pseudocysts and aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

    2010-01-01

    A number of methods are available for the drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts, including percutaneous, endoscopic and open approaches. The author reviewed the most rently reports, and and summarized the latest advances in the pancreatic pseudocysts. PMID:22558566

  1. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-02-06

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  2. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  3. Electrical Impedance Tomography Technology (EITT) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J.

    2014-01-01

    Development of a portable, lightweight device providing two-dimensional tomographic imaging of the human body using impedance mapping. This technology can be developed to evaluate health risks and provide appropriate medical care on the ISS, during space travel and on the ground.

  4. Experimental Models of Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by interstitial edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and acinar cell necrosis, depending on its severity. Regardless of the extent of tissue injury, acute pancreatitis is a completely reversible process with evident normal tissue architecture after recovery. Its pathogenic mechanism has been known to be closely related to intracellular digestive enzyme activation. In contrast to acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible tissue damage such as acinar cell atrophy and pancreatic fibrosis that results in exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Recently, many studies of chronic pancreatitis have been prompted by the discovery of the pancreatic stellate cell, which has been identified and distinguished as the key effector cell of pancreatic fibrosis. However, investigations into the pathogenesis and treatment of pancreatitis face many obstacles because of its anatomical location and disparate clinical course. Due to these difficulties, most of our knowledge on pancreatitis is based on research conducted using experimental models of pancreatitis. In this review, several experimental models of pancreatitis will be discussed in terms of technique, advantages, and limitations. PMID:24944983

  5. Chronic pancreatitis: relation to acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Uomo, G; Rabitti, P G

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between chronic pancreatitis (CP) and other pancreatic diseases, such as acute pancreatitis (AP) and pancreatic cancer (PK), remains a fairly debated question. The progression from alcoholic AP to CP is controversial, and some long-term epidemiological studies suggest that alcoholic CP might be the result of recurrent alcoholic AP (necrosis-fibrosis sequence) and a subgroup of alcoholics may present recurrent AP without progression to CP. Other predisposing factors (genetic, nutritional, environmental) seems to be important in inducing different outcomes of pancreatic damage due to alcohol. However, recurrent episodes of AP are clearly involved in pathophysiology of CP in patients with hereditary pancreatitis. A relationship between CP and subsequent PK development has long been suspected, but we actually don't know whether this association is direct or is the result of confounding factors, such as alcohol intake or cigarette smoking. Many issues should be considered as indicators of a causal association, and several of them are not fulfilled. Nonetheless, epidemiological studies (case-control or cohort studies) showed that the risk of PK is increased in patients with CP; the risk is significantly higher in tropical calcifying CP and hereditary pancreatitis. Studies on growth factors, oncogenes, tumor-suppressor genes, and angiogenesis suggest that the sequence PC-KP is plausible from the biological standpoint.

  6. Preclinical fluorescent mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)