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Sample records for implant surface technology

  1. Advancing dental implant surface technology--from micron- to nanotopography.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Gustavo; Mendonça, Daniela B S; Aragão, Francisco J L; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2008-10-01

    Current trends in clinical dental implant therapy include use of endosseous dental implant surfaces embellished with nanoscale topographies. The goal of this review is to consider the role of nanoscale topographic modification of titanium substrates for the purpose of improving osseointegration. Nanotechnology offers engineers and biologists new ways of interacting with relevant biological processes. Moreover, nanotechnology has provided means of understanding and achieving cell specific functions. The various techniques that can impart nanoscale topographic features to titanium endosseous implants are described. Existing data supporting the role of nanotopography suggest that critical steps in osseointegration can be modulated by nanoscale modification of the implant surface. Important distinctions between nanoscale and micron-scale modification of the implant surface are presently considered. The advantages and disadvantages of nanoscale modification of the dental implant surface are discussed. Finally, available data concerning the current dental implant surfaces that utilize nanotopography in clinical dentistry are described. Nanoscale modification of titanium endosseous implant surfaces can alter cellular and tissue responses that may benefit osseointegration and dental implant therapy.

  2. Plasma source ion implantation technology for engineering surfaces of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, E. H.; Lawrence, D. F.; Sridharan, K.; Sandstrom, P. W.

    2001-07-01

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation* (PSII) is a non-line-of-sight technique for energetic ion surface modification of materials. At the University of Wisconsin there are presently three PSII systems two of which measure about 1 m3 and a third that measures 0.1 m3. Plasma generation is achieved in vacuum through filamentary, RF, DC-pulsed, or glow discharge. High voltage pulsing is achieved using a tetrode modulator that pulses at up to 60kV or by a solid-state pulser that can supply 20kV. Recently, a crossatron modulator capable of 40kV and 1kA peak anode current was built in-house. Surface properties of a wide range of materials have been beneficially modified using PSII in ion implantation, film deposition, energetic ion mixing, and sputtering modes. Industrial field testing of PSII-treated parts has yielded promising results but successful commercialization requires judicious selection of applications which effectively exploit the unique aspects of PSII as a surface modification tool.*J.R. Conrad U.S. Patent#4764394, 1988

  3. Biomedical interfaces: titanium surface technology for implants and cell carriers.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Martin; Trentin, Diana; Textor, Marcus; Tosatti, Samuele G P

    2006-12-01

    Titanium and its alloys have become key materials for biomedical applications, mainly owing to their compatibility with human tissues and their mechanical strength. Effects of surface topography on cell and tissue response have been investigated extensively in the past, while (bio)chemical surface modification and its combination with designed topographies have remained largely unexplored. The following report describes some of the strategies used or intended to modify titanium surfaces, based on biological principles, with a focus on ultrathin biomimetic adlayers. One of the visions behind such approaches is to achieve improved healing and integration responses after implantation for patients, especially for those suffering from deficiencies, for example, diabetes or osteoporosis, two diseases that have increased drastically in our society during the last century.

  4. Surface characterization and biocompatibility of titanium alloys implanted with nitrogen by Hardion+ technology.

    PubMed

    Gordin, D M; Gloriant, T; Chane-Pane, V; Busardo, D; Mitran, V; Höche, D; Vasilescu, C; Drob, S I; Cimpean, A

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the new Hardion+ micro-implanter technology was used to modify surface properties of biomedical pure titanium (CP-Ti) and Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloy by implantation of nitrogen ions. This process is based on the use of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to produce a multienergetic ion beam from multicharged ions. After implantation, surface analysis methods revealed the formation of titanium nitride (TiN) on the substrate surfaces. An increase in superficial hardness and a significant reduction of friction coefficient were observed for both materials when compared to non-implanted samples. Better corrosion resistance and a significant decrease in ion release rates were observed for N-implanted biomaterials due to the formation of the protective TiN layer on their surfaces. In vitro tests performed on human fetal osteoblasts indicated that the cytocompatibility of N-implanted CP-Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy was enhanced in comparison to that of the corresponding non treated samples. Consequently, Hardion+ implantation technique can provide titanium alloys with better qualities in terms of corrosion resistance, cell proliferation, adhesion and viability.

  5. Ion beam technology applications study. [ion impact, implantation, and surface finishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Zafran, S.; Komatsu, G. K.

    1978-01-01

    Specific perceptions and possible ion beam technology applications were obtained as a result of a literature search and contact interviews with various institutions and individuals which took place over a 5-month period. The use of broad beam electron bombardment ion sources is assessed for materials deposition, removal, and alteration. Special techniques examined include: (1) cleaning, cutting, and texturing for surface treatment; (2) crosslinking of polymers, stress relief in deposited layers, and the creation of defect states in crystalline material by ion impact; and (3) ion implantation during epitaxial growth and the deposition of neutral materials sputtered by the ion beam. The aspects, advantages, and disadvantages of ion beam technology and the competitive role of alternative technologies are discussed.

  6. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Eriberto; Sbricoli, Luca; Guazzo, Riccardo; Tocco, Ilaria; Roman, Marco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Stellini, Edoardo; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Sivolella, Stefano; Zavan, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration) is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years. PMID:23344062

  7. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  8. Photonic technologies for visual implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, Ruediger; Praemassing, F.; Puettjer, D.; Stawski, N.; Jaeger, Dieter

    2003-02-01

    In this paper two applications of photonic technologies for visual implants in the field of medicine are presented. Both are technical systems working as vision aid for people suffering from blindness due to damages in their visual system. The first system is a retinal implant (RI), the second an intraocular vision aid (IoVA) for people with opaque cornea.

  9. The combination of digital surface scanners and cone beam computed tomography technology for guided implant surgery using 3Shape implant studio software: a case history report.

    PubMed

    Lanis, Alejandro; Álvarez Del Canto, Orlando

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of virtual engineering into dentistry and the digitization of information are providing new perspectives and innovative alternatives for dental treatment modalities. The use of digital surface scanners with surgical planning software allows for the combination of the radiographic, prosthetic, surgical, and laboratory fields under a common virtual scenario, permitting complete digital treatment planning. In this article, the authors present a clinical case in which a guided implant surgery was performed based on a complete digital surgical plan combining the information from a cone beam computed tomography scan and the virtual simulation obtained from the 3Shape TRIOS intraoral surface scanner. The information was imported to and combined in the 3Shape Implant Studio software for guided implant surgery planning. A surgical guide was obtained by a 3D printer, and the surgical procedure was done using the Biohorizons Guided Surgery Kit and its protocol. PMID:25822304

  10. The combination of digital surface scanners and cone beam computed tomography technology for guided implant surgery using 3Shape implant studio software: a case history report.

    PubMed

    Lanis, Alejandro; Álvarez Del Canto, Orlando

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of virtual engineering into dentistry and the digitization of information are providing new perspectives and innovative alternatives for dental treatment modalities. The use of digital surface scanners with surgical planning software allows for the combination of the radiographic, prosthetic, surgical, and laboratory fields under a common virtual scenario, permitting complete digital treatment planning. In this article, the authors present a clinical case in which a guided implant surgery was performed based on a complete digital surgical plan combining the information from a cone beam computed tomography scan and the virtual simulation obtained from the 3Shape TRIOS intraoral surface scanner. The information was imported to and combined in the 3Shape Implant Studio software for guided implant surgery planning. A surgical guide was obtained by a 3D printer, and the surgical procedure was done using the Biohorizons Guided Surgery Kit and its protocol.

  11. SURFACE CHEMISTRY INFLUENCE IMPLANT BIOCOMPATIBILITY

    PubMed Central

    Thevenot, Paul; Hu, Wenjing; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    Implantable medical devices are increasingly important in the practice of modern medicine. Unfortunately, almost all medical devices suffer to a different extent from adverse reactions, including inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis and infection. To improve the safety and function of many types of medical implants, a major need exists for development of materials that evoked desired tissue responses. Because implant-associated protein adsorption and conformational changes thereafter have been shown to promote immune reactions, rigorous research efforts have been emphasized on the engineering of surface property (physical and chemical characteristics) to reduce protein adsorption and cell interactions and subsequently improve implant biocompatibility. This brief review is aimed to summarize the past efforts and our recent knowledge about the influence of surface functionality on protein:cell:biomaterial interactions. It is our belief that detailed understandings of bioactivity of surface functionality provide an easy, economic, and specific approach for the future rational design of implantable medical devices with desired tissue reactivity and, hopefully, wound healing capability. PMID:18393890

  12. Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Mathias; McAlpine, David

    2015-12-30

    This special issue contains a collection of 13 papers highlighting the collaborative research and engineering project entitled Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology-ABCIT-as well as research spin-offs from the project. In this introductory editorial, a brief history of the project is provided, alongside an overview of the studies.

  13. Tribological performance of surfaces enhanced by texturing and nitrogen implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Derong; Zhang, Qi; Qin, Zhenbo; Luo, Qin; Wu, Zhong; Liu, Lei

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a novel texturing technology by means of electrodepositon is introduced. Textured surface covered with small bumps with the average size of 28 μm in diameter and 10 μm in height was fabricated. The trough around the bumps acts as the pocket to trap the debris. The nitrogen implantation was used to enhance the tribological properties of textured surfaces. The effects of implanted energy and dose on the structures of coating and tribological performances of textured surfaces were studied. The results show that the formation of Cr2N or CrN depends on the implanted dose. After nitrogen ion implantation, the friction coefficient of textured surface reduced and the wear resistance of textured surface was improved. The wear resistance enhances with increase of implanted dose, and has little to do with implanted energy.

  14. Implant surfaces and interface processes.

    PubMed

    Kasemo, B; Gold, J

    1999-06-01

    The past decades and current R&D of biomaterials and medical implants show some general trends. One major trend is an increased degree of functionalization of the material surface, better to meet the demands of the biological host system. While the biomaterials of the past and those in current use are essentially bulk materials (metals, ceramics, polymers) or special compounds (bioglasses), possibly with some additional coating (e.g., hydroxyapatite), the current R&D on surface modifications points toward much more complex and multifunctional surfaces for the future. Such surface modifications can be divided into three classes, one aiming toward an optimized three-dimensional physical microarchitecture of the surface (pore size distributions, "roughness", etc.), the second one focusing on the (bio) chemical properties of surface coatings and impregnations (ion release, multi-layer coatings, coatings with biomolecules, controlled drug release, etc.), and the third one dealing with the viscoelastic properties (or more generally the micromechanical properties) of material surfaces. These properties are expected to affect the interfacial processes cooperatively, i.e., there are likely synergistic effects between and among them: The surface is "recognized" by the biological system through the combined chemical and topographic pattern of the surface, and the viscoelastic properties. In this presentation, the development indicated above is discussed briefly, and current R&D in this area is illustrated with a number of examples from our own research. The latter include micro- and nanofabrication of surface patterns and topographies by the use of laser machining, photolithographic techniques, and electron beam and colloidal lithographies to produce controlled structures on implant surfaces in the size range 10 nm to 100 microns. Examples of biochemical modifications include mono- or lipid membranes and protein coatings on different surfaces. A new method to evaluate, e

  15. Surface biotechnology for refining cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Tan, Fei; Walshe, Peter; Viani, Laura; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2013-12-01

    The advent of the cochlear implant is phenomenal because it is the first surgical prosthesis that is capable of restoring one of the senses. The subsequent rapid evolution of cochlear implants through increasing complexity and functionality has been synchronized with the recent advancements in biotechnology. Surface biotechnology has refined cochlear implants by directly influencing the implant–tissue interface. Emerging surface biotechnology strategies are exemplified by nanofibrous polymeric materials, topographical surface modification, conducting polymer coatings, and neurotrophin-eluting implants. Although these novel developments have received individual attention in the recent literature, the time has come to investigate their collective applications to cochlear implants to restore lost hearing. PMID:24404581

  16. Surface biotechnology for refining cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Tan, Fei; Walshe, Peter; Viani, Laura; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2013-12-01

    The advent of the cochlear implant is phenomenal because it is the first surgical prosthesis that is capable of restoring one of the senses. The subsequent rapid evolution of cochlear implants through increasing complexity and functionality has been synchronized with the recent advancements in biotechnology. Surface biotechnology has refined cochlear implants by directly influencing the implant–tissue interface. Emerging surface biotechnology strategies are exemplified by nanofibrous polymeric materials, topographical surface modification, conducting polymer coatings, and neurotrophin-eluting implants. Although these novel developments have received individual attention in the recent literature, the time has come to investigate their collective applications to cochlear implants to restore lost hearing.

  17. Using Aerospace Technology To Design Orthopedic Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Technology originally developed to optimize designs of composite-material aerospace structural components used to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants. Development effort focused on designing knee implants, long-term goal to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants in general.

  18. Antimicrobial technology in orthopedic and spinal implants

    PubMed Central

    Eltorai, Adam EM; Haglin, Jack; Perera, Sudheesha; Brea, Bielinsky A; Ruttiman, Roy; Garcia, Dioscaris R; Born, Christopher T; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Infections can hinder orthopedic implant function and retention. Current implant-based antimicrobial strategies largely utilize coating-based approaches in order to reduce biofilm formation and bacterial adhesion. Several emerging antimicrobial technologies that integrate a multidisciplinary combination of drug delivery systems, material science, immunology, and polymer chemistry are in development and early clinical use. This review outlines orthopedic implant antimicrobial technology, its current applications and supporting evidence, and clinically promising future directions. PMID:27335811

  19. RFID technology for human implant devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, Hervé

    2011-09-01

    This article presents an overview on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology for human implants and investigates the technological feasibility of such implants for locating and tracking persons or for remotely controlling human biological functions. Published results on the miniaturization of implantable passive RFID devices are reported as well as a discussion on the choice of the transmission frequency in wireless communication between a passive RFID device implanted inside human body and an off-body interrogator. The two techniques (i.e., inductive coupling and electromagnetic coupling) currently used for wirelessly supplying power to and read data from a passive implantable RFID device are described and some documented biomedical and therapeutic applications of human RFID-implant devices are finally reported.

  20. Contaminated implant surfaces: an in vitro comparison of implant surface coating and treatment modalities for decontamination.

    PubMed

    Dennison, D K; Huerzeler, M B; Quinones, C; Caffesse, R G

    1994-10-01

    The relationship between implant surfaces and decontamination treatments was studied in vitro to determine which implant surfaces were most effectively decontaminated, and which treatment was most effective for treating a particular implant surface. The implants used in the study were press fit cylindrical titanium units with machined, plasma sprayed, and hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces. Radioactive endotoxin (125I-LPS) was prepared from Porphyromonas gingivalis (ATCC 33277). Implants were coated with 125I-LPS and treated by burnishing with a cotton pellet soaked in water, citric acid solution (CA), or 0.12% chlorhexidine (CHX); or treated with an air-powder abrasive (AIR). Radioactivity was determined after each of two treatment cycles. The results for each implant surface were analyzed using ANOVA to determine differences between treatments. The remaining 125I-LPS after two treatment cycles were: for machined implants AIR < CA, with AIR = water = CHX and water = CHX = CA; for plasma sprayed implants AIR < water = CHX = CA; for hydroxyapatite implants AIR = CA < water < CHX. In evaluating treatment modalities, it was found that machined implants were decontaminated more effectively than the other surfaces by all treatments; the exception was citric acid treatment which was equally effective on either machined or hydroxyapatite surfaces. These results indicate that machined implants (without surface coating) are most readily decontaminated by a variety of methods; this characteristic should be considered, since long-term success of implants may involve treating periimplantitis. Further, the results indicate that air abrasives are effective for decontaminating implant surface, with the exception that hydroxyapatite coated surfaces can be treated equally with air abrasives or citric acid.

  1. Energy conservation potential of surface modification technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Le, H.K.; Horne, D.M.; Silberglitt, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    This report assesses the energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries. The energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries is assessed by estimating their friction and wear tribological sinks and the subsequent reduction in these sinks when surface modified tools are used. Ion implantation, coatings, and laser and electron beam surface modifications are considered.

  2. Surface analysis of four dental implant systems.

    PubMed

    Olefjord, I; Hansson, S

    1993-01-01

    Dental implants obtained from four suppliers were analyzed by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Three of the implants were delivered in a sterilized condition, while the fourth implant was delivered in a plasma-sprayed condition. The covering oxide layer consisted mainly of TiO2. Divalent and trivalent states of titanium were also detected, showing that TiO and Ti2O3 layers occurred. The thickness of the oxide formed on the plasma-sprayed implant was 3.4 nm. The oxide thicknesses of the sterilized implants were 4.6 +/- 0.4 nm. The surfaces of all samples were covered with organic contaminants. A strong fluorine signal was obtained from one sample, indicating that the supplier etches the implants in hydrofluoric acid. Calcium and zinc were found on the surfaces of all samples from one supplier, while calcium and silicon were found on the surfaces of the implants from another supplier. It is suggested that inorganic contaminants should be avoided because these species can possibly provoke the dissolution of titanium.

  3. Surface morphologies of He-implanted tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, M. E.; Meyer, F. W.; Hijazi, H.; Unocic, K. A.; Garrison, L. M.; Parish, C. M.

    2016-09-01

    Surface morphologies of tungsten surfaces, both polycrystalline and single-crystal [1 1 0], were investigated using SEM and FIB/SEM techniques after implantations at elevated surfaces temperatures (1200-1300 K) using well-characterized, mono-energetic He ion beams with a wide range of ion energies (218 eV-250 keV). Nanofuzz was observed on polycrystalline tungsten (PCW) following implantation of 100-keV He ions at a flux threshold of 0.9 × 1016 cm-2 s-1, but not following 200-keV implantations with similar fluxes. No nanofuzz formation was observed on single-crystal [1 1 0] tungsten (SCW), despite fluxes exceeding those demonstrated previously to produce nanofuzz on polycrystalline tungsten. Pre-damaging the single-crystal tungsten with implanted C impurity interstitials did not significantly affect the surface morphologies resulting from the high-flux He ion implantations. The main factor leading to the different observed surface structures for the pristine and C-implanted single-crystal W samples appeared to be the peak He ion flux characterizing the different exposures. It was speculated that nanofuzz formation was not observed for any SCW target exposures because of increased incubation fluences required for such targets.

  4. Implantable Micropump Technologies for Murine Intracochlear Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. G.; Waldron, M. J.; Frisina, R. D.; Borkholder, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the very small size of the mouse inner ear, 600 nL volume, developing effective, controlled infusion systems is quite challenging. Key technologies have been created to minimize both size and power for an implantable pump for murine intracochlear infusions. A method for coupling fine capillary tubing to microfluidic channels is presented which provides low volume, biocompatible interconnects withstanding pressures as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) and consuming less than 20 nL of volume exiting in-plane with the pump. Surface micromachined resistive bridges integrated into the flow channel for anemometry based flow rate measurement have been optimized for low power operation in the ultra-low flow rate regime. A process for creation of deformable diaphragms over pump chambers with simultaneous coating of the microfluidic channels has been developed allowing integration of a biocompatible fluid flow path. These advances represent enabling capabilities for a drug delivery system suitable for space constrained applications such as subcutaneous implantation in mice. PMID:21096713

  5. Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology

    PubMed Central

    McAlpine, David

    2015-01-01

    This special issue contains a collection of 13 papers highlighting the collaborative research and engineering project entitled Advancing Binaural Cochlear Implant Technology—ABCIT—as well as research spin-offs from the project. In this introductory editorial, a brief history of the project is provided, alongside an overview of the studies. PMID:26721929

  6. Microsystem technologies for ophtalmological implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokwa, Wilfried

    2003-01-01

    Due to the low power consumption CMOS electronics is ideal for the use in implanted systems. This paper presents two projects working on ophthalmological implants. Both systems are powered by an external RF-field. One system has been developed to measure the intraocular pressure continuously which is important for the therapy of glaucoma patients. The system consists of a micro coil and an integrated pressure transponder chip built into an artificial soft lens. A second example is a very complex system for epiretinal stimulation of the nerve cells of the retina. With such a system it might be possible to give blind people that are suffering from retinitis pigmentosa some visual contact to their surrounding.

  7. Industrial applications of ion implantation into metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.

    1987-07-01

    The modern materials processing technique, ion implantation, has intriguing and attractive features that stimulate the imaginations of scientists and technologists. Success of the technique for introducing dopants into semiconductors has resulted in a stable and growing infrastructure of capital equipment and skills for use of the technique in the economy. Attention has turned to possible use of ion implantation for modification of nearly all surface related properties of materials - optical, chemical and corrosive, tribological, and several others. This presentation provides an introduction to fundamental aspects of equipment, technique, and materials science of ion implantation. Practical and economic factors pertaining to the technology are discussed. Applications and potential applications are surveyed. There are already available a number of ion-implanted products, including ball-and-roller bearings and races, punches-and-dies, injection screws for plastics molding, etc., of potential interest to the machine tool industry.

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: Microsystem technologies for implantable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Receveur, Rogier A. M.; Lindemans, Fred W.; de Rooij, Nicolaas F.

    2007-05-01

    Microsystem technologies (MST) have become the basis of a large industry. The advantages of MST compared to other technologies provide opportunities for application in implantable biomedical devices. This paper presents a general and broad literature review of MST for implantable applications focused on the technical domain. A classification scheme is introduced to order the examples, basic technological building blocks relevant for implantable applications are described and finally a case study on the role of microsystems for one clinical condition is presented. We observe that the microfabricated parts span a wide range for implantable applications in various clinical areas. There are 94 active and 67 commercial 'end items' out of a total of 142. End item refers to the total concept, of which the microsystem may only be a part. From the 105 active end items 18 (13% of total number of end items) are classified as products. From these 18 products, there are only two for chronic use. The number of active end items in clinical, animal and proto phase for chronic use is 17, 13 and 20, respectively. The average year of first publication of chronic end items that are still in the animal or clinical phase is 1994 (n = 7) and 1993 (n = 11), respectively. The major technology market combinations are sensors for cardiovascular, drug delivery for drug delivery and electrodes for neurology and ophthalmology. Together these form 51% of all end items. Pressure sensors form the majority of sensors and there is just one product (considered to be an implantable microsystem) in the neurological area. Micro-machined ceramic packages, glass sealed packages and polymer encapsulations are used. Glass to metal seals are used for feedthroughs. Interconnection techniques such as flip chip, wirebonding or conductive epoxy as used in the semiconductor packaging and assembly industry are also used for manufacturing of implantable devices. Coatings are polymers or metal. As an alternative to

  9. Early tissue reaction to textured breast implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brohim, R M; Foresman, P A; Hildebrandt, P K; Rodeheaver, G T

    1992-04-01

    Capsular contracture around breast implants with smooth surfaces continues to be an unpredictable complication. Some surgeons believe that silicone implants covered with porous polyurethane foam have a lowered potential to contract. These textured implants are not as biocompatible as silicone. Recently, silicone implants with textured surfaces have been introduced with the hope that the incidence of unacceptable implant contracture will be reduced. Using a rat implant model, the tissue reaction to textured implant surfaces was assessed. The implant surfaces evaluated were Silastic II, Siltex, MISTI, Biocell, Silastic MSI, and Même. Disks of each implant material were implanted under the dorsal skin of rats for a period of 28 days. Each implant with its surrounding tissue was excised, processed for histological analysis, and assessed for the tissue's response to the implant with particular emphasis on the formation of a continuous collagen capsule. The results indicated that the magnitude of surface texturing influenced the development of a complete capsule. Implant surfaces with a texture of less than 150 microns in height or depth (Silastic II, Siltex, and MISTI) resulted in the formation of complete capsules. An implant (Biocell) with irregular texturing (200-350 microns) produced an organized capsule over most of its surface with localized interruptions of the capsule at the sites of its deepest cavities. Implant surfaces with texturing that exceeded 350 microns in height or depth (Silastic MSI and Même) resulted in inhibition of the formation of a continuous capsule during this 28-day study.

  10. New advanced surface modification technique: titanium oxide ceramic surface implants: long-term clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Gyorgy; Kovacs, Lajos; Barabas, Jozsef; Nemeth, Zsolt; Maironna, Carlo

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background to advanced surface modification technologies and to present a new technique, involving the formation of a titanium oxide ceramic coating, with relatively long-term results of its clinical utilization. Three general techniques are used to modify surfaces: the addition or removal of material and the change of material already present. Surface properties can also be changed without the addition or removal of material, through the laser or electron beam thermal treatment. The new technique outlined in this paper relates to the production of a corrosion-resistant 2000-2500 A thick, ceramic oxide layer with a coherent crystalline structure on the surface of titanium implants. The layer is grown electrochemically from the bulk of the metal and is modified by heat treatment. Such oxide ceramic-coated implants have a number of advantageous properties relative to implants covered with various other coatings: a higher external hardness, a greater force of adherence between the titanium and the oxide ceramic coating, a virtually perfect insulation between the organism and the metal (no possibility of metal allergy), etc. The coated implants were subjected to various physical, chemical, electronmicroscopic, etc. tests for a qualitative characterization. Finally, these implants (plates, screws for maxillofacial osteosynthesis and dental root implants) were applied in surgical practice for a period of 10 years. Tests and the experience acquired demonstrated the good properties of the titanium oxide ceramic-coated implants.

  11. Decontamination of dental implant surface in peri-implantitis treatment: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago-Vera, Pedro; Solá-Ruiz, María F.; Ferrer-García, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Etiological treatment of peri-implantitis aims to reduce the bacterial load within the peri-implant pocket and decontaminate the implant surface in order to promote osseointegration. The aim of this literature review was to evaluate the efficacy of different methods of implant surface decontamination. A search was conducted using the PubMed (Medline) database, which identified 36 articles including in vivo and in vitro studies, and reviews of different decontamination systems (chemical, mechanical, laser and photodynamic therapies). There is sufficient consensus that, for the treatment of peri-implant infections, the mechanical removal of biofilm from the implant surface should be supplemented by chemical decontamination with surgical access. However, more long-term research is needed to confirm this and to establish treatment protocols responding to different implant characterics. Key words:Peri-implantitis, treatment, decontamination, implant surface, laser. PMID:23986023

  12. Enhancing osseointegration using surface-modified titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Oh, N.; Liu, Y.; Chen, W.; Oh, S.; Appleford, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Bumgardner, J.; Haggard, W.; Ong, J.

    2006-07-01

    Osseointegrated dental implants are used to replace missing teeth. The success of implants is due to osseointegration or the direct contact of the implant surface and bone without a fibrous connective tissue interface. This review discusses the enhancement of osseointegration by means of anodized microporous titanium surfaces, functionally macroporous graded titanium coatings, nanoscale titanium surfaces, and different bioactive factors.

  13. Antibacterial Surface Treatment for Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Jiri; Holinka, Martin; Moucha, Calin S.

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the projected increased usage of implantable devices in medicine will result in a natural rise in the number of infections related to these cases. Some patients are unable to autonomously prevent formation of biofilm on implant surfaces. Suppression of the local peri-implant immune response is an important contributory factor. Substantial avascular scar tissue encountered during revision joint replacement surgery places these cases at an especially high risk of periprosthetic joint infection. A critical pathogenic event in the process of biofilm formation is bacterial adhesion. Prevention of biomaterial-associated infections should be concurrently focused on at least two targets: inhibition of biofilm formation and minimizing local immune response suppression. Current knowledge of antimicrobial surface treatments suitable for prevention of prosthetic joint infection is reviewed. Several surface treatment modalities have been proposed. Minimizing bacterial adhesion, biofilm formation inhibition, and bactericidal approaches are discussed. The ultimate anti-infective surface should be “smart” and responsive to even the lowest bacterial load. While research in this field is promising, there appears to be a great discrepancy between proposed and clinically implemented strategies, and there is urgent need for translational science focusing on this topic. PMID:25116685

  14. Antibacterial surface treatment for orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Jiri; Holinka, Martin; Moucha, Calin S

    2014-08-11

    It is expected that the projected increased usage of implantable devices in medicine will result in a natural rise in the number of infections related to these cases. Some patients are unable to autonomously prevent formation of biofilm on implant surfaces. Suppression of the local peri-implant immune response is an important contributory factor. Substantial avascular scar tissue encountered during revision joint replacement surgery places these cases at an especially high risk of periprosthetic joint infection. A critical pathogenic event in the process of biofilm formation is bacterial adhesion. Prevention of biomaterial-associated infections should be concurrently focused on at least two targets: inhibition of biofilm formation and minimizing local immune response suppression. Current knowledge of antimicrobial surface treatments suitable for prevention of prosthetic joint infection is reviewed. Several surface treatment modalities have been proposed. Minimizing bacterial adhesion, biofilm formation inhibition, and bactericidal approaches are discussed. The ultimate anti-infective surface should be "smart" and responsive to even the lowest bacterial load. While research in this field is promising, there appears to be a great discrepancy between proposed and clinically implemented strategies, and there is urgent need for translational science focusing on this topic.

  15. Effect of Platelet-Rich-Plasma (PRP) and Implant Surface Topography on Implant Stability and Bone

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Renu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of Platelet-Rich-Plasma (PRP) and different implant surface topography on implant stability and bone levels around immediately loaded dental implants. Materials and Methods: Dental implants were placed in subjects divided into two groups and four subgroups on basis of implant treatment with PRP and implant surface topography used. A total of 30 implants were placed, 15 in each group. For PRP group, implants were placed after surface treatment with PRP. Temporization was done within two weeks and final prosthesis was given after three months. Implant stability was measured with Periotest at baseline, one month and three months. Bone height was measured on mesial & distal side on standardized IOPA x-rays. Results: A statistically significant difference was noticed in implant stability with PRP at baseline. The effect of PRP on bone height changes was not statistically significant. A synergistic effect of PRP and square thread-form was observed on improved implant stability and bone levels; however, no such effect is seen with PRP and reverse buttress thread-form. Conclusion: Within the limitation of this study, enhancement on implant stability and bone healing was observed with PRP treated implant surfaces, and with use of implant with square thread-form. PMID:25121060

  16. Surface segregation during alloy sputtering and implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Hans Henrik; Stenum, Bjarne; Sørensen, Tom; Whitlow, Harry J.

    1983-05-01

    The angular distribution of material sputtered from a two-component system carries information on concentration gradients close to the target surface. The surface layer will preferentially reduce that part of the flux from deeper layers, which exits from the target at angles far away from the surface normal. If a concentration gradient exists the element being depleted from the very surface will hence be emitted with a more forward-pointed angular distribution than that of the component in which the surface is enriched. An earlier setup for measurements of differential angular distributions has been improved to give higher sensitivity and reproducibility of measurement. The sputtered material is collected on cylindrically mounted thin carbon collectors and analysed with Rutherford backscattering. The setup has been used to investigate surface segregation in sputtered and ion-implanted alloys. Copper targets implanted to saturation with 45 keV Bi + at 77 K are found to have weak copper segregation at the surface. Alloy samples sputtered with argon at energies higher than 20 keV are found to have the weaker-bound component segregated to the surface (Ag from AgAu, Cu from CuPt, Au from Cu 3Au, Pd from Ni 5Pd, and Ni from NiPt) even at 77 K, where thermal segregation is usually prohibited. The segregated component is exactly the one in which the surfaces are usually assumed to be depleted of due to preferential sputtering. Chemical driving forces may be utilized to invert the segregation. For example oxygen will drive Ni to the surface instead of Pd from a Ni 5Pd sample.

  17. The implant surface characteristics and peri-implantitis. An evidence-based update.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, C Davila; Almas, K

    2016-03-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease of the peri-implant mucosa with the loss of supporting bone. Because of the absence of an un-inflamed connective tissue zone between the healthy and diseased sites, peri-implant lesions are thought to progress more rapidly than periodontal lesions, suggesting the importance of early diagnosis and intervention if possible. A number of risk factors have been identified that may lead to the initiation and progression of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, eg., previous periodontal disease, poor plaque control, inability to clean, residual cement, smoking, genetic factors, diabetes, occlusal overload, rheumatoid arthritis, increased time of loading and alcohol consumption. At present there is not much literature available, highlighting the relationship between implant surface characteristics and peri-implant diseases. Implant surface characteristics vary with respect to topography, roughness and clinical composition, including turned, blasted, acid etched, porous sintered, oxidized, plasma sprayed and hydroxyapatite coated surfaces and their combinations. So the aim of this review is to explore the relationship between the characteristics of implant surface, the prevalence and incidence of peri-implantitis. This would help to identify plausible influence of surface characteristics, oral hygiene instructions and maintenance of implants for the long-term uneventful success of implant therapy. PMID:27434917

  18. Bacterial adhesion on ion-implanted stainless steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q.; Liu, Y.; Wang, C.; Wang, S.; Peng, N.; Jeynes, C.

    2007-08-01

    Stainless steel disks were implanted with N +, O + and SiF 3+, respectively at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. The surface properties of the implanted surfaces were analyzed, including surface chemical composition, surface topography, surface roughness and surface free energy. Bacterial adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, which frequently cause medical device-associated infections was evaluated under static condition and laminar flow condition. The effect of contact time, growth media and surface properties of the ion-implanted steels on bacterial adhesion was investigated. The experimental results showed that SiF 3+-implanted stainless steel performed much better than N +-implanted steel, O +-implanted steel and untreated stainless steel control on reducing bacterial attachment under identical experimental conditions.

  19. Decontamination of dental implant surface in peri-implantitis treatment: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Mellado-Valero, Ana; Buitrago-Vera, Pedro; Solá-Ruiz, María-Fernanda; Ferrer-García, Juan-Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Etiological treatment of peri-implantitis aims to reduce the bacterial load within the peri-implant pocket and decontaminate the implant surface in order to promote osseointegration. The aim of this literature review was to evaluate the efficacy of different methods of implant surface decontamination. A search was conducted using the PubMed (Medline) database, which identified 36 articles including in vivo and in vitro studies, and reviews of different decontamination systems (chemical, mechanical, laser and photodynamic therapies). There is sufficient consensus that, for the treatment of peri-implant infections, the mechanical removal of biofilm from the implant surface should be supplemented by chemical decontamination with surgical access. However, more long-term research is needed to confirm this and to establish treatment protocols responding to different implant characterics.

  20. Surface Modifications and Their Effects on Titanium Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Jemat, A.; Ghazali, M. J.; Razali, M.; Otsuka, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This review covers several basic methodologies of surface treatment and their effects on titanium (Ti) implants. The importance of each treatment and its effects will be discussed in detail in order to compare their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. Published literature for the last 18 years was selected with the use of keywords like titanium dental implant, surface roughness, coating, and osseointegration. Significant surface roughness played an important role in providing effective surface for bone implant contact, cell proliferation, and removal torque, despite having good mechanical properties. Overall, published studies indicated that an acid etched surface-modified and a coating application on commercial pure titanium implant was most preferable in producing the good surface roughness. Thus, a combination of a good surface roughness and mechanical properties of titanium could lead to successful dental implants. PMID:26436097

  1. Surface Modifications and Their Effects on Titanium Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Jemat, A; Ghazali, M J; Razali, M; Otsuka, Y

    2015-01-01

    This review covers several basic methodologies of surface treatment and their effects on titanium (Ti) implants. The importance of each treatment and its effects will be discussed in detail in order to compare their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. Published literature for the last 18 years was selected with the use of keywords like titanium dental implant, surface roughness, coating, and osseointegration. Significant surface roughness played an important role in providing effective surface for bone implant contact, cell proliferation, and removal torque, despite having good mechanical properties. Overall, published studies indicated that an acid etched surface-modified and a coating application on commercial pure titanium implant was most preferable in producing the good surface roughness. Thus, a combination of a good surface roughness and mechanical properties of titanium could lead to successful dental implants.

  2. Surface characterization of commercial oral implants on the nanometer level.

    PubMed

    Svanborg, Lory Melin; Andersson, Martin; Wennerberg, Ann

    2010-02-01

    Lately, there has been a growing interest in how the presence of nanometer structures on a bone integrated implant surface influences the healing process. Recent in vitro studies have revealed an increased osteoblast response to different nanophase surfaces. Some commercial implant brands claim their implants have nanometer structures. However, at present, there are no studies where the nano topography of today's commercially available oral implants has been investigated. The aim of this study was to characterize commercial oral implants on the nanometer level and to investigate whether or not the nanometer surface roughness was correlated to the more well-known micrometer roughness on the implants. Twelve different commercial screw-shaped oral implants with various surface modifications were examined using scanning electron microscopy and a white light interferometer. The interferometer is suitable for detection of nanoscale roughness in the vertical dimension; however, limitation exists on the horizontal due to the wavelength of the light. A 1 x 1 microm Gaussian filter was found to be useful for identifying nm roughness with respect to height deviation. The results demonstrated that an implant that was smooth on the micrometer level was not necessarily smooth on the nanometer level. Different structures in the nanometer scale was found on some of the implants, indicating that to fully understand the relationship between the properties of an implant surface and its osseointegration behavior, a characterization at the nanometer scale might be relevant.

  3. Changes in the surface of bone and acid-etched and sandblasted implants following implantation and removal

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Cennet Neslihan; Ertugrul, Abdullah Seckin; Eskitascioglu, Murat; Eskitascioglu, Gurcan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether there are any changes in the surface of bone or implant structures following the removal of a screwed dental implant. Materials and Methods: For this, six individual samples of acid-etched and sandblasted implants from three different manufacturers’ implant systems were used. They were screwed in a D1 bovine bone, and they were removed after primary stabilization. The bone and implant surfaces are evaluated with scanning electron microscope. Results: Through examination of the surfaces of the bone prior to implantation and of the used and unused implant surfaces, it was found that inhomogeneity in the implant surface can cause microcracking in the bone. Conclusions: This is attributed to the stress induced during the implantation of self-tapping implants and suggests that a tap drill may be required in some instances to protect the implant surface. PMID:27011744

  4. Bone tissue response to plasma-nitrided titanium implant surfaces

    PubMed Central

    FERRAZ, Emanuela Prado; SVERZUT, Alexander Tadeu; FREITAS, Gileade Pereira; SÁ, Juliana Carvalho; ALVES, Clodomiro; BELOTI, Marcio Mateus; ROSA, Adalberto Luiz

    2015-01-01

    A current goal of dental implant research is the development of titanium (Ti) surfaces to improve osseointegration. Plasma nitriding treatments generate surfaces that favor osteoblast differentiation, a key event to the process of osteogenesis. Based on this, it is possible to hypothesize that plasma-nitrided Ti implants may positively impact osseointegration. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo bone response to Ti surfaces modified by plasma-nitriding treatments. Material and Methods Surface treatments consisted of 20% N2 and 80% H2, 450°C and 1.5 mbar during 1 h for planar and 3 h for hollow cathode. Untreated surface was used as control. Ten implants of each surface were placed into rabbit tibiae and 6 weeks post-implantation they were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Results Bone formation was observed in contact with all implants without statistically significant differences among the evaluated surfaces in terms of bone-to-implant contact, bone area between threads, and bone area within the mirror area. Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma nitriding treatments generate Ti implants that induce similar bone response to the untreated ones. Thus, as these treatments improve the physico-chemical properties of Ti without affecting its biocompatibility, they could be combined with modifications that favor bone formation in order to develop new implant surfaces. PMID:25760262

  5. Regenerative therapy of deep peri-implant infrabony defects after CO2 laser implant surface decontamination.

    PubMed

    Romanos, Georgios E; Nentwig, Georg H

    2008-06-01

    The treatment of a peri-implant infrabony defect is difficult because of contamination of the implant surface and adjacent tissues. This case series addresses the ability of a carbon dioxide (CO2) laser to decontaminate failing implants in 15 patients. Clinical and radiologic data are presented with regard to using the laser in combination with bone grafting and a barrier. Augmentation with autogenous bone grafting material (n = 10) or a xenogenic bone grafting material (BioOss) (n = 9) was used, and bone grafts were covered with a collagen membrane. Clinical and radiologic parameters were evaluated postoperatively. After an observation period of 27 months (+/- 17.83), almost complete bone fill in the peri-implant defect was accomplished. These preliminary clinical and radiologic findings suggest that decontamination of the implant surfaces with the CO2 laser in combination with augmentative techniques can be an effective treatment method for peri-implantitis.

  6. Comparison of peri-implant bone formation around injection-molded and machined surface zirconia implants in rabbit tibiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Kyun; Woo, Kyung Mi; Shon, Won-Jun; Ahn, Jin-Soo; Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare osseointegration and surface characteristics of zirconia implants made by the powder injection molding (PIM) technique against those made by the conventional milling procedure in rabbit tibiae. Surface characteristics of 2 types of implants were evaluated. Sixteen rabbits received 2 types of external hex implants with similar geometry, either machined zirconia implants or PIM zirconia implants, in the tibiae. Removal torque tests and histomorphometric analyses were performed. The roughness of the PIM zirconia implants was higher than that of machined zirconia implants. The PIM zirconia implants exhibited significantly higher bone-implant contact and removal torque values than the machined zirconia implants (p<0.001). The osseointegration of the PIM zirconia implant is promising, and PIM, using the roughened mold etching technique, can produce substantially rougher surfaces on zirconia implants. PMID:26235717

  7. In vivo surface roughness evolution of a stressed metallic implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Henry

    2016-10-01

    Implant-associated infection, a serious medical issue, is caused by the adhesion of bacteria to the surface of biomaterials; for this process the surface roughness is an important property. Surface nanotopography of medical implant devices can control the extent of bacterial attachment by modifying the surface morphology; to this end a model is introduced to facilitate the analysis of a nanoscale smooth surface subject to mechanical loading and in vivo corrosion. At nanometre scale rough surface promotes friction, hence reduces the mobility of the bacteria; this sessile environment expedites the biofilm growth. This manuscript derives the controlling equation for surface roughness evolution for metallic implant subject to in-plane stresses, and predicts the in vivo roughness changes within 6 h of continued mechanical loading at different stress level. This paper provides analytic tool and theoretical information for surface nanotopography of medical implant devices.

  8. Toward bioinspired parylene-C coatings of implant surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lai; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2012-04-01

    The external surfaces of an implanted prosthesis must be biocompatible. As the properties of a biological surface vary, often gradually but also abruptly, the implant surface should be endowed with a gradient of surface roughness and wettability for good integration with proteins and cells. We have made free-standing, flexible, fibrous, nano/micro-textured thin films of parylene-C with thickness-controlled surface morphology and hydrophobicity; furthermore, varying degrees of hydrophilicity are displayed after oxygen-plasma treatment. The bioinspired thin films are mechanically robust and have been shown to support both protein binding and cellular attachment as well as growth. By conformally covering an implant surface with patches of these thin films of varying thickness and oxygen-plasma-treatment duration, gradients of protein/cell attachment can be tailored and thus tissue integration can be managed on different parts of the implant surface.

  9. Surface topographical and structural analysis of Ag+-implanted polymethylmethacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Shafaq; Rafique, M. Shahid; Saleemi, Farhat; Naab, Fabian; Toader, Ovidiu; Sagheer, Riffat; Bashir, Shazia; Zia, Rehana; Siraj, Khurram; Iqbal, Saman

    2016-08-01

    Specimens of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) were implanted with 400-keV Ag+ ions at different ion fluences ranging from 1 × 1014 to 5 × 1015 ions/cm2 using a 400-kV NEC ion implanter. The surface topographical features of the implanted PMMA were investigated by a confocal microscope. Modifications in the structural properties of the implanted specimens were analyzed in comparison with pristine PMMA by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. UV-Visible spectroscopy was applied to determine the effects of ion implantation on optical transmittance of the implanted PMMA. The confocal microscopic images revealed the formation of hillock-like microstructures along the ion track on the implanted PMMA surface. The increase in ion fluence led to more nucleation of hillocks. The XRD pattern confirmed the amorphous nature of pristine and implanted PMMA, while the Raman studies justified the transformation of Ag+-implanted PMMA into amorphous carbon at the ion fluence of ⩾5 × 1014 ions/cm2. Moreover, the decrease in optical transmittance of PMMA is associated with the formation of hillocks and ion-induced structural modifications after implantation.

  10. Temperature dependent surface modification of T91 steel under 3.25 MeV Fe-ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huiping; Wang, Zhiguang; Cui, Minghuan; Li, Bingsheng; Gao, Xing; Sun, Jianrong; Yao, Cunfeng; Wei, Kongfang; Shen, Tielong; Pang, Lilong; Zhu, Yabin; Li, Yuanfei; Wang, Ji; Xie, Erqing

    2015-01-01

    Ion implantation is an established technique for modifying the surface properties of a wide range of materials. In this research, temperature dependent surface modification induced by Fe-ion implantation in T91 steel was investigated. The T91 samples were implanted with 3.25 MeV Fe-ions to fluence of 1.7 × 1016 ions/cm2 at room temperature, 300 and 450 °C, respectively. After implantation, the T91 samples were characterized by means of positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy (PADBS) and nano-indention technology (NIT). It was found that the concentration of open-volume defects in T91 samples decreased with increasing implantation temperature. From NIT analysis, it was found that all the samples were hardened after implantation and the hardness of the implanted T91 samples increased with increasing implantation temperature.

  11. Nanotubular surface modification of metallic implants via electrochemical anodization technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Ning; Jin, Ming; Zheng, Yudong; Guan, Yueping; Lu, Xin; Luo, Jing-Li

    2014-01-01

    Due to increased awareness and interest in the biomedical implant field as a result of an aging population, research in the field of implantable devices has grown rapidly in the last few decades. Among the biomedical implants, metallic implant materials have been widely used to replace disordered bony tissues in orthopedic and orthodontic surgeries. The clinical success of implants is closely related to their early osseointegration (ie, the direct structural and functional connection between living bone and the surface of a load-bearing artificial implant), which relies heavily on the surface condition of the implant. Electrochemical techniques for modifying biomedical implants are relatively simple, cost-effective, and appropriate for implants with complex shapes. Recently, metal oxide nanotubular arrays via electrochemical anodization have become an attractive technique to build up on metallic implants to enhance the biocompatibility and bioactivity. This article will thoroughly review the relevance of electrochemical anodization techniques for the modification of metallic implant surfaces in nanoscale, and cover the electrochemical anodization techniques used in the development of the types of nanotubular/nanoporous modification achievable via electrochemical approaches, which hold tremendous potential for bio-implant applications. In vitro and in vivo studies using metallic oxide nanotubes are also presented, revealing the potential of nanotubes in biomedical applications. Finally, an outlook of future growth of research in metallic oxide nanotubular arrays is provided. This article will therefore provide researchers with an in-depth understanding of electrochemical anodization modification and provide guidance regarding the design and tuning of new materials to achieve a desired performance and reliable biocompatibility.

  12. Nanotubular surface modification of metallic implants via electrochemical anodization technique

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu-Ning; Jin, Ming; Zheng, Yudong; Guan, Yueping; Lu, Xin; Luo, Jing-Li

    2014-01-01

    Due to increased awareness and interest in the biomedical implant field as a result of an aging population, research in the field of implantable devices has grown rapidly in the last few decades. Among the biomedical implants, metallic implant materials have been widely used to replace disordered bony tissues in orthopedic and orthodontic surgeries. The clinical success of implants is closely related to their early osseointegration (ie, the direct structural and functional connection between living bone and the surface of a load-bearing artificial implant), which relies heavily on the surface condition of the implant. Electrochemical techniques for modifying biomedical implants are relatively simple, cost-effective, and appropriate for implants with complex shapes. Recently, metal oxide nanotubular arrays via electrochemical anodization have become an attractive technique to build up on metallic implants to enhance the biocompatibility and bioactivity. This article will thoroughly review the relevance of electrochemical anodization techniques for the modification of metallic implant surfaces in nanoscale, and cover the electrochemical anodization techniques used in the development of the types of nanotubular/nanoporous modification achievable via electrochemical approaches, which hold tremendous potential for bio-implant applications. In vitro and in vivo studies using metallic oxide nanotubes are also presented, revealing the potential of nanotubes in biomedical applications. Finally, an outlook of future growth of research in metallic oxide nanotubular arrays is provided. This article will therefore provide researchers with an in-depth understanding of electrochemical anodization modification and provide guidance regarding the design and tuning of new materials to achieve a desired performance and reliable biocompatibility. PMID:25258532

  13. Evaluating the Feasibility of Using Remote Technology for Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goehring, Jenny L.; Hughes, Michelle L.; Baudhuin, Jacquelyn L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of remote technology to provide cochlear implant services has gained popularity in recent years. This article contains a review of research evaluating the feasibility of remote service delivery for recipients of cochlear implants. To date, published studies have determined that speech-processor programming levels and other objective tests…

  14. Bone Response to Surface-Modified Titanium Implants: Studies on the Early Tissue Response to Implants with Different Surface Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Larsson Wexell, C.; Thomsen, P.; Aronsson, B.-O.; Tengvall, P.; Rodahl, M.; Lausmaa, J.; Kasemo, B.; Ericson, L. E.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of experimental studies, the bone formation around systematically modified titanium implants is analyzed. In the present study, three different surface modifications were prepared and evaluated. Glow-discharge cleaning and oxidizing resulted in a highly stoichiometric TiO2 surface, while a glow-discharge treatment in nitrogen gas resulted in implants with essentially a surface of titanium nitride, covered with a very thin titanium oxide. Finally, hydrogen peroxide treatment of implants resulted in an almost stoichiometric TiO2, rich in hydroxyl groups on the surface. Machined commercially pure titanium implants served as controls. Scanning Auger Electron Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy revealed no significant differences in oxide thickness or surface roughness parameters, but differences in the surface chemical composition and apparent topography were observed. After surface preparation, the implants were inserted in cortical bone of rabbits and evaluated after 1, 3, and 6 weeks. Light microscopic evaluation of the tissue response showed that all implants were in contact with bone and had a large proportion of newly formed bone within the threads after 6 weeks. There were no morphological differences between the four groups. Our study shows that a high degree of bone contact and bone formation can be achieved with titanium implants of different surface composition and topography. PMID:24174936

  15. Biofunctionalization of surfaces by energetic ion implantation: Review of progress on applications in implantable biomedical devices and antibody microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, Marcela M. M.

    2014-08-01

    Despite major research efforts in the field of biomaterials, rejection, severe immune responses, scar tissue and poor integration continue to seriously limit the performance of today's implantable biomedical devices. Implantable biomaterials that interact with their host via an interfacial layer of active biomolecules to direct a desired cellular response to the implant would represent a major and much sought after improvement. Another, perhaps equally revolutionary, development that is on the biomedical horizon is the introduction of cost-effective microarrays for fast, highly multiplexed screening for biomarkers on cell membranes and in a variety of analyte solutions. Both of these advances will rely on effective methods of functionalizing surfaces with bioactive molecules. After a brief introduction to other methods currently available, this review will describe recently developed approaches that use energetic ions extracted from plasma to facilitate simple, one-step covalent surface immobilization of bioactive molecules. A kinetic theory model of the immobilization process by reactions with long-lived, mobile, surface-embedded radicals will be presented. The roles of surface chemistry and microstructure of the ion treated layer will be discussed. Early progress on applications of this technology to create diagnostic microarrays and to engineer bioactive surfaces for implantable biomedical devices will be reviewed.

  16. Detoxification of Implant Surfaces Affected by Peri-Implant Disease: An Overview of Surgical Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wilson Jr, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Peri-implantitis is one of the major causes of implant failure. The detoxification of the implant surface is necessary to obtain reosseointegration. The aim of this review was to summarize in vitro and in vivo studies as well as clinical trials that have evaluated surgical approaches for detoxification of the implant body surfaces. Materials and Methods. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE (PubMed) from 1966 to 2013. The outcome variables were the ability of the therapeutic method to eliminate the biofilm and endotoxins from the implant surface, the changes in clinical parameters, radiographic bone fill, and histological reosseointegration. Results. From 574 articles found, 76 were analyzed. The findings, advantages, and disadvantages of using mechanical, chemical methods and lasers are discussed. Conclusions. Complete elimination of the biofilms is difficult to achieve. All therapies induce changes of the chemical and physical properties of the implant surface. Partial reosseointegration after detoxification has been reported in animals. Combination protocols for surgical treatment of peri-implantitis in humans have shown some positive clinical and radiographic results, but long-term evaluation to evaluate the validity and reliability of the techniques is needed. PMID:23983691

  17. Impact of Dental Implant Surface Modifications on Osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Ralf; Stadlinger, Bernd; Schwarz, Frank; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Jung, Ole; Precht, Clarissa; Kloss, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Ebker, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to review different surface modifications of dental implants and their effect on osseointegration. Common marketed as well as experimental surface modifications are discussed. Discussion. The major challenge for contemporary dental implantologists is to provide oral rehabilitation to patients with healthy bone conditions asking for rapid loading protocols or to patients with quantitatively or qualitatively compromised bone. These charging conditions require advances in implant surface design. The elucidation of bone healing physiology has driven investigators to engineer implant surfaces that closely mimic natural bone characteristics. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of surface modifications that beneficially alter the topography, hydrophilicity, and outer coating of dental implants in order to enhance osseointegration in healthy as well as in compromised bone. In the first part, this paper discusses dental implants that have been successfully used for a number of years focusing on sandblasting, acid-etching, and hydrophilic surface textures. Hereafter, new techniques like Discrete Crystalline Deposition, laser ablation, and surface coatings with proteins, drugs, or growth factors are presented. Conclusion. Major advancements have been made in developing novel surfaces of dental implants. These innovations set the stage for rehabilitating patients with high success and predictable survival rates even in challenging conditions.

  18. Impact of Dental Implant Surface Modifications on Osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Ralf; Stadlinger, Bernd; Schwarz, Frank; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Jung, Ole; Precht, Clarissa; Kloss, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Ebker, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to review different surface modifications of dental implants and their effect on osseointegration. Common marketed as well as experimental surface modifications are discussed. Discussion. The major challenge for contemporary dental implantologists is to provide oral rehabilitation to patients with healthy bone conditions asking for rapid loading protocols or to patients with quantitatively or qualitatively compromised bone. These charging conditions require advances in implant surface design. The elucidation of bone healing physiology has driven investigators to engineer implant surfaces that closely mimic natural bone characteristics. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of surface modifications that beneficially alter the topography, hydrophilicity, and outer coating of dental implants in order to enhance osseointegration in healthy as well as in compromised bone. In the first part, this paper discusses dental implants that have been successfully used for a number of years focusing on sandblasting, acid-etching, and hydrophilic surface textures. Hereafter, new techniques like Discrete Crystalline Deposition, laser ablation, and surface coatings with proteins, drugs, or growth factors are presented. Conclusion. Major advancements have been made in developing novel surfaces of dental implants. These innovations set the stage for rehabilitating patients with high success and predictable survival rates even in challenging conditions. PMID:27478833

  19. Impact of Dental Implant Surface Modifications on Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Ralf; Stadlinger, Bernd; Schwarz, Frank; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Jung, Ole; Precht, Clarissa; Kloss, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to review different surface modifications of dental implants and their effect on osseointegration. Common marketed as well as experimental surface modifications are discussed. Discussion. The major challenge for contemporary dental implantologists is to provide oral rehabilitation to patients with healthy bone conditions asking for rapid loading protocols or to patients with quantitatively or qualitatively compromised bone. These charging conditions require advances in implant surface design. The elucidation of bone healing physiology has driven investigators to engineer implant surfaces that closely mimic natural bone characteristics. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of surface modifications that beneficially alter the topography, hydrophilicity, and outer coating of dental implants in order to enhance osseointegration in healthy as well as in compromised bone. In the first part, this paper discusses dental implants that have been successfully used for a number of years focusing on sandblasting, acid-etching, and hydrophilic surface textures. Hereafter, new techniques like Discrete Crystalline Deposition, laser ablation, and surface coatings with proteins, drugs, or growth factors are presented. Conclusion. Major advancements have been made in developing novel surfaces of dental implants. These innovations set the stage for rehabilitating patients with high success and predictable survival rates even in challenging conditions. PMID:27478833

  20. Method For Silicon Surface Texturing Using Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kadakia, Nirag; Naczas, Sebastian; Bakhru, Hassaram; Huang Mengbing

    2011-06-01

    As the semiconductor industry continues to show more interest in the photovoltaic market, cheaper and readily integrable methods of silicon solar cell production are desired. One of these methods - ion implantation - is well-developed and optimized in all commercial semiconductor fabrication facilities. Here we have developed a silicon surface texturing technique predicated upon the phenomenon of surface blistering of H-implanted silicon, using only ion implantation and thermal annealing. We find that following the H implant with a second, heavier implant markedly enhances the surface blistering, causing large trenches that act as a surface texturing of c-Si. We have found that this method reduces total broadband Si reflectance from 35% to below 5percent;. In addition, we have used Rutherford backscattering/channeling measurements investigate the effect of ion implantation on the crystallinity of the sample. The data suggests that implantation-induced lattice damage is recovered upon annealing, reproducing the original monocrystalline structure in the previously amorphized region, while at the same time retaining the textured surface.

  1. New horizon for infection prevention technology and implantable device.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yusuke; Ueda, Marehiko; Kobayashi, Yoshio; Schwab, Joerg O

    2016-08-01

    There has been a significant increase in the number of patients receiving cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIED) over the last two decades. CIED infection represents a serious complication after CIED implantation and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Recently, newly advanced technologies have offered attractive and suitable therapeutic alternatives. Notably, the leadless pacemaker and anti-bacterial envelope decrease the potential risk of CIED infection and the resulting mortality, when it does occur. A completely subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator is also an alternative to the transvenous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), as it does not require implantation of any transvenous or epicardial leads. Among the patients who require ICD removal and subsequent antibiotics secondary to infection, the wearable cardioverter defibrillator represents an alternative approach to inpatient monitoring for the prevention of sudden cardiac death. In this review paper, we aimed to introduce the advanced technologies and devices for prevention of CIED infection. PMID:27588153

  2. Research and Technology Transfer Ion Implantation Technology for Specialty Materials: Proceedings of a joint workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeber, Robert R.

    1991-02-01

    The ion implantation research and technology transfer workshop brought together a diverse group of academic, industrial, and government participants. Several key issues highlighted were: (1) a need exists for new technology transfer infrastructures between universities, research labs and industry; (2) ion implantation technology has promise for several Army and industry applications because of environmental concerns and technological benefits; (3) the U.S. ion implantation industry is primarily service oriented; and (4) the cost of ion implantation technology could be significantly reduced if larger scale production equipment was available for on-line processing. A need exists in the U.S. for mechanisms and funds to develop such equipment.

  3. Materials and technologies for soft implantable neuroprostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacour, Stéphanie P.; Courtine, Grégoire; Guck, Jochen

    2016-10-01

    Implantable neuroprostheses are engineered systems designed to restore or substitute function for individuals with neurological deficits or disabilities. These systems involve at least one uni- or bidirectional interface between a living neural tissue and a synthetic structure, through which information in the form of electrons, ions or photons flows. Despite a few notable exceptions, the clinical dissemination of implantable neuroprostheses remains limited, because many implants display inconsistent long-term stability and performance, and are ultimately rejected by the body. Intensive research is currently being conducted to untangle the complex interplay of failure mechanisms. In this Review, we emphasize the importance of minimizing the physical and mechanical mismatch between neural tissues and implantable interfaces. We explore possible materials solutions to design and manufacture neurointegrated prostheses, and outline their immense therapeutic potential.

  4. The influence of surface treatment on the implant roughness pattern

    PubMed Central

    ROSA, Marcio Borges; ALBREKTSSON, Tomas; FRANCISCHONE, Carlos Eduardo; SCHWARTZ FILHO, Humberto Osvaldo; WENNERBERG, Ann

    2012-01-01

    An important parameter for the clinical success of dental implants is the formation of direct contact between the implant and surrounding bone, whose quality is directly influenced by the implant surface roughness. A screw-shaped design and a surface with an average roughness of Sa of 1-2 µm showed a better result. The combination of blasting and etching has been a commonly used surface treatment technique. The versatility of this type of treatment allows for a wide variation in the procedures in order to obtain the desired roughness. Objectives To compare the roughness values and morphological characteristics of 04 brands of implants, using the same type of surface treatment. In addition, to compare the results among brands, in order to assess whether the type of treatment determines the values and the characteristics of implant surface roughness. Material and methods Three implants were purchased directly from each selected company in the market, i.e., 03 Brazilian companies (Biomet 3i of Brazil, Neodent and Titaniumfix) and 01 Korean company (Oneplant). The quantitative or numerical characterization of the roughness was performed using an interferometer. The qualitative analysis of the surface topography obtained with the treatment was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy images. Results The evaluated implants showed a significant variation in roughness values: Sa for Oneplant was 1.01 µm; Titaniumfix reached 0.90 µm; implants from Neodent 0.67 µm, and Biomet 3i of Brazil 0.53 µm. Moreover, the SEM images showed very different patterns for the surfaces examined. Conclusions The surface treatment alone is not able to determine the roughness values and characteristics. PMID:23138742

  5. Surface Engineering of Nanostructured Titanium Implants with Bioactive Ions.

    PubMed

    Kim, H-S; Kim, Y-J; Jang, J-H; Park, J-W

    2016-05-01

    Surface nanofeatures and bioactive ion chemical modification are centrally important in current titanium (Ti) oral implants for enhancing osseointegration. However, it is unclear whether the addition of bioactive ions definitively enhances the osteogenic capacity of a nanostructured Ti implant. We systematically investigated the osteogenesis process of human multipotent adipose stem cells triggered by bioactive ions in the nanostructured Ti implant surface. Here, we report that bioactive ion surface modification (calcium [Ca] or strontium [Sr]) and resultant ion release significantly increase osteogenic activity of the nanofeatured Ti surface. We for the first time demonstrate that ion modification actively induces focal adhesion development and expression of critical adhesion–related genes (vinculin, talin, and RHOA) of human multipotent adipose stem cells, resulting in enhanced osteogenic differentiation on the nanofeatured Ti surface. It is also suggested that fibronectin adsorption may have only a weak effect on early cellular events of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) at least in the case of the nanostructured Ti implant surface incorporating Sr. Moreover, results indicate that Sr overrides the effect of Ca and other important surface factors (i.e., surface area and wettability) in the osteogenesis function of various MSCs (derived from human adipose, bone marrow, and murine bone marrow). In addition, surface engineering of nanostructured Ti implants using Sr ions is expected to exert additional beneficial effects on implant bone healing through the proper balancing of the allocation of MSCs between adipogenesis and osteogenesis. This work provides insight into the future surface design of Ti dental implants using surface bioactive ion chemistry and nanotopography. PMID:26961491

  6. Microscopic Study of Surface Microtopographic Characteristics of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Sezin, M.; Croharé, L.; Ibañez, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare the micro topographic characteristics of dental implants submitted to different surface treatments, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Implants were divided into 7 groups of 3 specimens each, according to the surface treatment used: group 1: Osseotite, BIOMET 3i; group 2: SLA surface, Institut Straumann AG; group 3: Oxalife surface, Tree-Oss implant; group 4: B&W implant surface; group 5: Q-implant surface; group 6: ML implant surface; group 7: RBM surface, Rosterdent implant. The surfaces were examined under SEM (Carl Zeiss FE-SEM-SIGMA). Image Proplus software was used to determine the number and mean diameter of pores per area unit (mm). The data obtained were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. A confocal laser microscope (LEXT-OLS4100 Olympus) was used to conduct the comparative study of surface roughness (Ra). Data were analyzed using Tukey's HSD test. Results: The largest average pore diameter calculated in microns was found in group 5 (3.45 µm+/-1.91) while the smallest in group 7 (1.47µm+/-1.29). Significant differences were observed among each one of the groups studied (p<0.05). The largest number of pores/mm2 was found in group 2 (229343) and the smallest number in group 4 (10937). Group 2 showed significant differences regarding the other groups (p<0.05). The greatest roughness (Ra) was observed in group 2 (0.975µm+/-0.115) and the smallest in group 4 (0.304µm+/-0.063). Group 2 was significantly different from the other groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: The micro topography observed in the different groups presented dissimilar and specific features, depending on the chemical treatment used for the surfaces.. PMID:27335615

  7. Titanium dental implant surfaces obtained by anodic spark deposition - From the past to the future.

    PubMed

    Kaluđerović, Milena R; Schreckenbach, Joachim P; Graf, Hans-Ludwig

    2016-12-01

    stability of the implants. Additionally, potential innovations in this field such as fabrication of nanotubes on the implant surfaces as well as novel approaches (e.g. coating with proteins, nanostructured topography; combining implant body and surface derived from titanium and zirconia) are elaborated in this review. Besides, biochemical aspects on implant surface cell/tissue interaction are summarized. From the clinical point of view implant surfaces fabricated by ASD technology possess fast and improved osseointegration, high healing rates and long term prognosis. PMID:27612843

  8. Textured surface, nonsilicone gel breast implants: four years' clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Ersek, R A; Salisbury, A V

    1997-12-01

    Since the development of smooth silicone breast implants in 1962, more than 1 million women throughout the world have opted for breast augmentation surgery. Although initially successful, smooth implants are prone to develop surrounding scar capsules that may harden and contract, resulting in discomfort, weakening of the shell with rupture, asymmetry, and patient dissatisfaction. This phenomenon has been shown to occur in as many as 70 percent of implanted patients over time. We have reviewed all of our patients and the Medical Device Reporting System for Bioplasty, Inc. (Minneapolis, Minn.) for the history of this device. At 18 months, more textured implants remain soft than the smooth group. After an additional 30 months of follow-up, for a total of 48 months maximum and 18 months minimum, most textured implants still remain soft. Since 1990 we have used AU24K, bio-oncotic hydrogel filling material in molecular impact surface textured implants (MISTI) that is similar to breast tissue in color, radiodensity, and viscosity. Complications have been late leaks, infection, and capsular contracture. Several asymptomatic implants were removed because of anxiety over the FDA controversy. Our experience so far indicates that such a breast implant is a reasonable alternative to the prior art. The longer-term performance of these implants must await the availability of further clinical outcome data.

  9. Thin hydroxyapatite surface layers on titanium produced by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, H.; Bethge, K.; Bilger, G.; Jones, D.; Symietz, I.

    2002-11-01

    In medicine metallic implants are widely used as hip replacement protheses or artificial teeth. The biocompatibility is in all cases the most important requirement. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) is frequently used as coating on metallic implants because of its high acceptance by the human body. In this paper a process is described by which a HAp surface layer is produced by ion implantation with a continuous transition to the bulk material. Calcium and phosphorus ions are successively implanted into titanium under different vacuum conditions by backfilling oxygen into the implantation chamber. Afterwards the implanted samples are thermally treated. The elemental composition inside the implanted region was determined by nuclear analysis methods as (α,α) backscattering and the resonant nuclear reaction 1H( 15N,αγ) 12C. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate the formation of HAp. In addition a first biocompatibility test was performed to compare the growing of marrow bone cells on the implanted sample surface with that of titanium.

  10. Nanomaterials and synergistic low intensity direct current (LIDC) stimulation technology for orthopaedic implantable medical devices

    PubMed Central

    Samberg, Meghan E.; Cohen, Paul H.; Wysk, Richard A.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials play a significant role in biomedical research and applications due to their unique biological, mechanical, and electrical properties. In recent years, they have been utilised to improve the functionality and reliability of a wide range of implantable medical devices ranging from well-established orthopaedic residual hardware devices (e.g. hip implants) that can repair defects in skeletal systems to emerging tissue engineering scaffolds that can repair or replace organ functions. This review summarizes the applications and efficacies of these nanomaterials that include synthetic or naturally occurring metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites in orthopaedic implants, the largest market segment of implantable medical devices. The importance of synergistic engineering techniques that can augment or enhance the performance of nanomaterial applications in orthopaedic implants is also discussed,, the focus being on a low intensity direct electric current (LIDC) stimulation technology to promote the long-term antibacterial efficacy of oligodynamic metal-based surfaces by ionization, while potentially accelerating tissue growth and osseointegration. While many nanomaterials have clearly demonstrated their ability to provide more effective implantable medical surfaces, further decisive investigations are necessary before they can translate into medically safe and commercially viable clinical applications. The paper concludes with a discussion about some of the critical impending issues with the application of nanomaterials-based technologies in implantable medical devices, and potential directions to address these. PMID:23335493

  11. Controlled implant/soft tissue interaction by nanoscale surface modifications of 3D porous titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Elisabeth; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Salou, Laetitia; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Helene; Layrolle, Pierre; Debry, Christian; Lavalle, Philippe; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2015-06-01

    Porous titanium implants are widely employed in the orthopaedics field to ensure good bone fixation. Recently, the use of porous titanium implants has also been investigated in artificial larynx development in a clinical setting. Such uses necessitate a better understanding of the interaction of soft tissues with porous titanium structures. Moreover, surface treatments of titanium have been generally evaluated in planar structures, while the porous titanium implants have complex 3 dimensional (3D) architectures. In this study, the determining factors for soft tissue integration of 3D porous titanium implants were investigated as a function of surface treatments via quantification of the interaction of serum proteins and cells with single titanium microbeads (300-500 μm in diameter). Samples were either acid etched or nanostructured by anodization. When the samples are used in 3D configuration (porous titanium discs of 2 mm thickness) in vivo (in subcutis of rats for 2 weeks), a better integration was observed for both anodized and acid etched samples compared to the non-treated implants. If the implants were also pre-treated with rat serum before implantation, the integration was further facilitated. In order to understand the underlying reasons for this effect, human fibroblast cell culture tests under several conditions (directly on beads, beads in suspension, beads encapsulated in gelatin hydrogels) were conducted to mimic the different interactions of cells with Ti implants in vivo. Physical characterization showed that surface treatments increased hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and roughness. Surface treatments also resulted in improved adsorption of serum albumin which in turn facilitated the adsorption of other proteins such as apolipoprotein as quantified by protein sequencing. The cellular response to the beads showed considerable difference with respect to the cell culture configuration. When the titanium microbeads were entrapped in cell

  12. Lethal photosensitization for decontamination of implant surfaces in the treatment of peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Dörtbudak, O; Haas, R; Bernhart, T; Mailath-Pokorny, G

    2001-04-01

    Peri-implantitis is considered to be a multifactorial process involving bacterial contamination of the implant surface. A previous study demonstrated that a combination of toluidine blue O (100 microgram/ml) and irradiation with a diode soft laser with a wavelength of 905 nm results in an elimination of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia), and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) on different implant surfaces (machined, plasma-flame-sprayed, etched, hydroxyapatite-coated). The aim of this study was to examine the laser effect in vivo. In 15 patients with IMZ implants who showed clinical and radiographic signs of peri-implantitis, toluidine blue O was applied to the implant surface for 1 min and the surface was then irradiated with a diode soft laser with a wavelength of 690 nm for 60 s. Bacterial samples were taken before and after application of the dye and after lasing. The cultures were evaluated semiquantitatively for A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, and P. intermedia. It was found that the combined treatment reduced the bacterial counts by 2 log steps on average. The application of TBO and laser resulted in a significant reduction (P<0.0001) of the initial values in all 3 groups of bacteria. Complete elimination of bacteria was not achieved.

  13. A Brief Historical Perspective on Dental Implants, Their Surface Coatings and Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Celeste M

    2014-01-01

    This review highlights a brief, chronological sequence of the history of dental implants. This historical perspective begins with ancient civilizations and spotlights predominant dentists and their contributions to implant development through time. The physical, chemical and biologic properties of various dental implant surfaces and coatings are discussed, and specific surface treatments include an overview of machined implants, etched implants, and sand-blasted implants. Dental implant coatings such as hydroxyapatite, fluoride, and statin usage are further reviewed. PMID:24894638

  14. Method For Silicon Surface Texturing Using Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadakia, Nirag; Naczas, Sebastian; Bakhru, Hassaram; Huang, Mengbing

    2011-06-01

    As the semiconductor industry continues to show more interest in the photovoltaic market, cheaper and readily integrable methods of silicon solar cell production are desired. One of these methods—ion implantation—is well-developed and optimized in all commercial semiconductor fabrication facilities. Here we have developed a silicon surface texturing technique predicated upon the phenomenon of surface blistering of H-implanted silicon, using only ion implantation and thermal annealing. We find that following the H implant with a second, heavier implant markedly enhances the surface blistering, causing large trenches that act as a surface texturing of c-Si. We have found that this method reduces total broadband Si reflectance from 35% to below 5percent;. In addition, we have used Rutherford backscattering/channeling measurements investigate the effect of ion implantation on the crystallinity of the sample. The data suggests that implantation-induced lattice damage is recovered upon annealing, reproducing the original monocrystalline structure in the previously amorphized region, while at the same time retaining the textured surface.

  15. Influence of ion implantation on titanium surfaces for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krischok, Stefan; Blank, Claudia; Engel, Michael; Gutt, Richard; Ecke, Gernot; Schawohl, Jens; Spieß, Lothar; Schrempel, Frank; Hildebrand, Gerhard; Liefeith, Klaus

    2007-09-01

    The implantation of ions into the near surface layer is a new approach to improve the osseointegration of metallic biomaterials like titanium. Meanwhile it is well known that surface topography and surface physico-chemistry as well as visco-elastic properties influence the cell response after implantation of implants into the human body. To optimize the cell response of titanium, ion implantation techniques have been used to integrate calcium and phosphorus, both elements present in the inorganic bone phase. In this context, the concentration profile of the detected elements and their chemical state have been investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling. Ion implantation leads to strong changes of the chemical composition of the near surface region, which are expected to modify the biofunctionality as observed in previous experiments on the cell response. The co-implantation of calcium and phosphorus samples, which showed best results in the performed tests (biological and physical), leads to a strong modification of the chemical surface composition.

  16. Ion sources for ion implantation technology (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Shigeki Hamamoto, Nariaki; Inouchi, Yutaka; Umisedo, Sei; Miyamoto, Naoki

    2014-02-15

    Ion sources for ion implantation are introduced. The technique is applied not only to large scale integration (LSI) devices but also to flat panel display. For LSI fabrication, ion source scheduled maintenance cycle is most important. For CMOS image sensor devices, metal contamination at implanted wafer is most important. On the other hand, to fabricate miniaturized devices, cluster ion implantation has been proposed to make shallow PN junction. While for power devices such as silicon carbide, aluminum ion is required. For doping processes of LCD fabrication, a large ion source is required. The extraction area is about 150 cm × 10 cm, and the beam uniformity is important as well as the total target beam current.

  17. Surface induced reactivity for titanium by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Pham, M T; Reuther, H; Matz, W; Mueller, R; Steiner, G; Oswald, S; Zyganov, I

    2000-06-01

    Calcium and phosphorus storage in a thin layer of titanium surface was achieved by ion implantation. We study the reactivity of this surface in response to a hydrothermal treatment. The incipient implanted species are observed to convert to Ca(2+) and PO(4)(3-), the precursors for generating calcium phosphate polymorphs. Hydroxyapatite is formed from these precursors by an interface-liquid mediated mineralization preceded by the hydrolysis of oxygen compounds of Ca and P from the solid phase. The morphology and organization of apatite mineral is controlled by the fluid dynamics reflecting the surface remodeling to adapt to the available local environment. Exposed to calcium and phosphate ion containing solution, the hydrothermally treated surface templates hydroxyapatite deposition. Ca and P implanted Ti surface was shown to be chemically and morphologically actively involved in the interfacial reactions.

  18. Influence of Implant Surfaces on Osseointegration: A Histomorphometric and Implant Stability Study in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Soares, Priscilla Barbosa Ferreira; Moura, Camilla Christian Gomes; Claudino, Marcela; Carvalho, Valessa Florindo; Rocha, Flaviana Soares; Zanetta-Barbosa, Darceny

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stability and osseointegration of implant with different wettability using resonance frequency analysis (RFA) and histomorphometric analysis (bone implant contact, BIC; and bone area fraction occupied, BAFO) after 2 and 4 weeks in rabbit tibiae. Thirty-two Morse taper implants (length 7 mm, diameter 3.5 mm) were divided according to surface characteristics (n=8): Neo, sandblasted and dual acid-etched; and Aq, sandblasted followed by dual acid-etched and maintained in an isotonic solution of 0.9% sodium chloride. Sixteen New Zealand rabbits were used. Two implants of each group were installed in the right and left tibiae according to the experimental periods. The RFA (Ostell(r)) was obtained immediately and after the sacrifice (2 and 4 weeks). The bone/implant blocks were processed for histomorphometric analysis. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test and Pearson's correlation for ISQ, BIC and BAFO parameters (p=0.05). No significant effect of implant, period of evaluation or interaction between implant and period of evaluation was found for BIC and BAFO values (p>0.05). Only period of evaluation had significant effect for RFA values at 4 weeks (p=0.001), and at 2 weeks (p<0.001). RFA values were significantly higher at the final period of evaluation compared with those obtained at early periods. There was a significant correlation between BIC values and BAFO values (p=0.009). Both implant surfaces, Aq and Neo, were able to produce similar implant bone integration when normal cortical bone instrumentation was performed. PMID:26647927

  19. The osseous response to corundum blasted implant surfaces in a canine hip model.

    PubMed

    Hacking, S A; Bobyn, J D; Tanzer, M; Krygier, J J

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the radiographic and histologic response to corundum blasted implant surfaces of varying roughness in a canine total hip arthroplasty model. Three types of tapered femoral implants were made from titanium alloy and were identical in every respect except surface finish. The entire surface of the femoral implant had a 2.9-, 4.2-, or 6.7-micron average surface roughness (Ra) from blasting with 60-, 24-, or 16-grit corundum particles, respectively. Twenty-two stems in 11 dogs were evaluated at 6 months. Twenty-one of the stems showed osseointegration, whereas in one stem a fibrous interface developed. Abundant new periimplant bone formation occurred, particularly within the intramedullary canal where trabeculae spanned implant to endosteal cortex gaps as large as 5 mm. Bone apposition with the 60-, 24-, and 16-grit stems averaged 31.7%, 32%, and 27.9%, respectively; the differences were not statistically significant. However, the pattern of new bone formation was different in that the average length of each region of bone apposition for the 60- and 24-grit surfaces was 50% greater than that for the coarser 16-grit surface. The observations of this study indicate that because of their highly osteoconductive nature, corundum blasted surfaces represent an important and valuable technology for the design of noncemented implants. PMID:10416415

  20. Mechanical assessment of grit blasting surface treatments of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Shemtov-Yona, K; Rittel, D; Dorogoy, A

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the influence of surface preparation treatments of dental implants on their potential (mechanical) fatigue failure, with emphasis on grit-blasting. The investigation includes limited fatigue testing of implants, showing the relationship between fatigue life and surface damage condition. Those observations are corroborated by a detailed failure analysis of retrieved fracture dental implants. In both cases, the negative effect of embedded alumina particles related to the grit-blasting process is identified. The study also comprises a numerical simulation part of the grit blasting process that reveals, for a given implant material and particle size, the existence of a velocity threshold, below which the rough surface is obtained without damage, and beyond which the creation of significant surface damage will severely reduce the fatigue life, thus increasing fracture probability. The main outcome of this work is that the overall performance of dental implants comprises, in addition to the biological considerations, mechanical reliability aspects. Fatigue fracture is a central issue, and this study shows that uncontrolled surface roughening grit-blasting treatments can induce significant surface damage which accelerate fatigue fracture under certain conditions, even if those treatments are beneficial to the osseointegration process. PMID:25173238

  1. Controlled implant/soft tissue interaction by nanoscale surface modifications of 3D porous titanium implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, Elisabeth; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Salou, Laetitia; Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Helene; Layrolle, Pierre; Debry, Christian; Lavalle, Philippe; Engin Vrana, Nihal

    2015-05-01

    Porous titanium implants are widely employed in the orthopaedics field to ensure good bone fixation. Recently, the use of porous titanium implants has also been investigated in artificial larynx development in a clinical setting. Such uses necessitate a better understanding of the interaction of soft tissues with porous titanium structures. Moreover, surface treatments of titanium have been generally evaluated in planar structures, while the porous titanium implants have complex 3 dimensional (3D) architectures. In this study, the determining factors for soft tissue integration of 3D porous titanium implants were investigated as a function of surface treatments via quantification of the interaction of serum proteins and cells with single titanium microbeads (300-500 μm in diameter). Samples were either acid etched or nanostructured by anodization. When the samples are used in 3D configuration (porous titanium discs of 2 mm thickness) in vivo (in subcutis of rats for 2 weeks), a better integration was observed for both anodized and acid etched samples compared to the non-treated implants. If the implants were also pre-treated with rat serum before implantation, the integration was further facilitated. In order to understand the underlying reasons for this effect, human fibroblast cell culture tests under several conditions (directly on beads, beads in suspension, beads encapsulated in gelatin hydrogels) were conducted to mimic the different interactions of cells with Ti implants in vivo. Physical characterization showed that surface treatments increased hydrophilicity, protein adsorption and roughness. Surface treatments also resulted in improved adsorption of serum albumin which in turn facilitated the adsorption of other proteins such as apolipoprotein as quantified by protein sequencing. The cellular response to the beads showed considerable difference with respect to the cell culture configuration. When the titanium microbeads were entrapped in cell

  2. Study on application of aerospace technology to improve surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Youngblood, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The areas where aerospace technology could be used to improve the reliability and performance of metallic, orthopedic implants was assessed. Specifically, comparisons were made of material controls, design approaches, analytical methods and inspection approaches being used in the implant industry with hardware for the aerospace industries. Several areas for possible improvement were noted such as increased use of finite element stress analysis and fracture control programs on devices where the needs exist for maximum reliability and high structural performance.

  3. Modification of anti-bacterial surface properties of textile polymers by vacuum arc ion source implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Oks, E. M.; Oztarhan, A.; Akpek, A.; Hames-Kocabas, E.; Urkac, E. S.; Brown, I. G.

    2014-08-01

    Ion implantation provides an important technology for the modification of material surface properties. The vacuum arc ion source is a unique instrument for the generation of intense beams of metal ions as well as gaseous ions, including mixed metal-gas beams with controllable metal:gas ion ratio. Here we describe our exploratory work on the application of vacuum arc ion source-generated ion beams for ion implantation into polymer textile materials for modification of their biological cell compatibility surface properties. We have investigated two specific aspects of cell compatibility: (i) enhancement of the antibacterial characteristics (we chose to use Staphylococcus aureus bacteria) of ion implanted polymer textile fabric, and (ii) the "inverse" concern of enhancement of neural cell growth rate (we chose Rat B-35 neuroblastoma cells) on ion implanted polymer textile. The results of both investigations were positive, with implantation-generated antibacterial efficiency factor up to about 90%, fully comparable to alternative conventional (non-implantation) approaches and with some potentially important advantages over the conventional approach; and with enhancement of neural cell growth rate of up to a factor of 3.5 when grown on suitably implanted polymer textile material.

  4. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Kulikov, Stanislav; Osorio, Ivan; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  5. Decontamination of dental implant surfaces by means of photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Marotti, Juliana; Tortamano, Pedro; Cai, Silvana; Ribeiro, Martha Simões; Franco, João Eduardo Miranda; de Campos, Tomie Toyota

    2013-01-01

    Several implant surface debridement methods have been reported for the treatment of peri-implantitis, however, some of them can damage the implant surface or promote bacterial resistance. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new treatment option for peri-implantitis. The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze implant surface decontamination by means of PDT. Sixty implants were equally distributed (n = 10) into four groups and two subgroups. In group G1 there was no decontamination, while in G2 decontamination was performed with chlorhexidine. G3 (PDT - laser + dye) and G4 (laser, without dye) were divided into two subgroups each; with PDT performed for 3 min in G3a and G4a, and for 5 min in G3b and G4b. After 5 min in contact with methylene blue dye (G3), the implants were irradiated (G3 and G4) with a low-level laser (GaAlAs, 660 nm, 30 mW) for 3 or 5 min (7.2 and 12 J). After the dilutions, culture media were kept in an anaerobic atmosphere for 1 week, and then colony forming units were counted. There was a significant difference (p < 0.001) between G1 and the other groups, and between G4 in comparison with G2 and G3. Better decontamination was obtained in G2 and G3, with no statistically significant difference between them. The results of this study suggest that photodynamic therapy can be considered an efficient method for reducing bacteria on implant surfaces, whereas laser irradiation without dye was less efficient than PDT.

  6. Surface Passivation and Junction Formation Using Low Energy Hydrogen Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fonash, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    New applications for high current, low energy hydrogen ion implants on single crystal and polycrystal silicon grain boundaries are discussed. The effects of low energy hydrogen ion beams on crystalline Si surfaces are considered. The effect of these beams on bulk defects in crystalline Si is addressed. Specific applications of H+ implants to crystalline Si processing are discussed. In all of the situations reported on, the hydrogen beams were produced using a high current Kaufman ion source.

  7. Adherent endotoxin on dental implant surfaces: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Morra, Marco; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Cascardo, Giovanna; Bellanda, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Osteoimmunology is the crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems, suggesting a role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the stimulation of osteoclast activity. Endotoxin or bacterial challenges to inflammatory cells are directly relevant to dental implant pathologies involving bone resorption, such as osseointegration failure and peri-implantitis. While the endotoxin amount on implant devices is regulated by standards, it is unknown whether commercially available dental implants elicit different levels of adherent-endotoxin stimulated cytokines. The objective of this work is to develop a model system and evaluate endotoxin-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes relevant to osteoclast activation on commercially available dental implants. Murine J774-A1 macrophages were cultured on Ti disks with different level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination to define the time-course of the inflammatory response to endotoxin, as evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The developed protocol was then used to measure adherent endotoxin on commercially available packaged and sterile dental implants in the "as-implanted" condition. Results show that tested dental implants induce variable expression of endotoxin-stimulated genes, sometimes above the level expected to promote bone resorption in vivo. Results are unaffected by the specific surface treatment; rather, they likely reflect care in cleaning and packaging protocols. In conclusion, expression of genes that enhance osteoclast activity through endotoxin stimulation of inflammatory cells is widely different on commercially available dental implants. A reappraisal of the clinical impact of adherent endotoxins on dental (and bone) implant devices is required in light of increasing knowledge on crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems.

  8. Conducting shrinkable nanocomposite based on au-nanoparticle implanted plastic sheet: tunable thermally induced surface wrinkling.

    PubMed

    Greco, Francesco; Bellacicca, Andrea; Gemmi, Mauro; Cappello, Valentina; Mattoli, Virgilio; Milani, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    A thermally shrinkable and conductive nanocomposite material is prepared by supersonic cluster beam implantation (SCBI) of neutral Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) into a commercially available thermo-retractable polystyrene (PS) sheet. Micronanowrinkling is obtained during shrinking, which is studied by means of SEM, TEM and AFM imaging. Characteristic periodicity is determined and correlated with nanoparticle implantation dose, which permits us to tune the topographic pattern. Remarkable differences emerged with respect to the well-known case of wrinkling of bilayer metal-polymer. Wrinkled composite surfaces are characterized by a peculiar multiscale structuring that promises potential technological applications in the field of catalytic surfaces, sensors, biointerfaces, and optics, among others. PMID:25811100

  9. On the characteristics of ion implanted metallic surfaces inducing dropwise condensation of steam.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Michael H; Leipertz, Alfred; Fröba, Andreas P

    2010-04-20

    The present work provides new information on the characteristics of ion implanted metallic surfaces responsible for the adjustment of stable dropwise condensation (DWC) of steam. The results are based on condensation experiments and surface analyses via contact angle (CA) and surface free energy (SFE) measurements as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For studying possible influences of the base material and the implanted ion species, commercially pure titanium grade 1, aluminum alloy Al 6951, and stainless steel AISI 321 were treated with N(+), C(+), O(+), or Ar(+) using ion beam implantation technology. The studies suggest that chemically inhomogeneous surfaces are instrumental in inducing DWC. As this inhomogeneity is apparently caused by particulate precipitates bonded to the metal surface, the resulting nanoscale surface roughness may also influence the condensation form. On such surfaces nucleation mechanisms seem to be capable of maintaining DWC even when CA and SFE measurements indicate increased wettability. The precipitates are probably formed due to the supersaturation of ion implanted metal surfaces with doping elements. For high-alloyed materials like AISI 321 or Hastelloy C-276, oxidation stimulated by the condensation process obviously tends to produce similar surfaces suitable for DWC.

  10. Advances in the surface modification techniques of bone-related implants for last 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Chen, Cen; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Lee, In-Seop

    2014-01-01

    At the time of implanting bone-related implants into human body, a variety of biological responses to the material surface occur with respect to surface chemistry and physical state. The commonly used biomaterials (e.g. titanium and its alloy, Co–Cr alloy, stainless steel, polyetheretherketone, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene and various calcium phosphates) have many drawbacks such as lack of biocompatibility and improper mechanical properties. As surface modification is very promising technology to overcome such problems, a variety of surface modification techniques have been being investigated. This review paper covers recent advances in surface modification techniques of bone-related materials including physicochemical coating, radiation grafting, plasma surface engineering, ion beam processing and surface patterning techniques. The contents are organized with different types of techniques to applicable materials, and typical examples are also described. PMID:26816626

  11. Self-organized surface ripple pattern formation by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofsäss, Hans; Zhang, Kun; Bobes, Omar

    2016-10-01

    Ion induced ripple pattern formation on solid surfaces has been extensively studied in the past and the theories describing curvature dependent ion erosion as well as redistribution of recoil atoms have been very successful in explaining many features of the pattern formation. Since most experimental studies use noble gas ion irradiation, the incorporation of the ions into the films is usually neglected. In this work we show that the incorporation or implantation of non-volatile ions also leads to a curvature dependent term in the equation of motion of a surface height profile. The implantation of ions can be interpreted as a negative sputter yield; and therefore, the effect of ion implantation is opposite to the one of ion erosion. For angles up to about 50°, implantation of ions stabilizes the surface, whereas above 50°, ion implantation contributes to the destabilization of the surface. We present simulations of the curvature coefficients using the crater function formalism and we compare the simulation results to the experimental data on the ion induced pattern formation using non-volatile ions. We present several model cases, where the incorporation of ions is a crucial requirement for the pattern formation.

  12. Antimicrobial surfaces for craniofacial implants: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Actis, Lisa; Gaviria, Laura; Guda, Teja

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to regain function and aesthetics in the craniofacial region, different biomaterials, including titanium, hydroxyapatite, biodegradable polymers and composites, have been widely used as a result of the loss of craniofacial bone. Although these materials presented favorable success rates, osseointegration and antibacterial properties are often hard to achieve. Although bone-implant interactions are highly dependent on the implant's surface characteristics, infections following traumatic craniofacial injuries are common. As such, poor osseointegration and infections are two of the many causes of implant failure. Further, as increasingly complex dental repairs are attempted, the likelihood of infection in these implants has also been on the rise. For these reasons, the treatment of craniofacial bone defects and dental repairs for long-term success remains a challenge. Various approaches to reduce the rate of infection and improve osseointegration have been investigated. Furthermore, recent and planned tissue engineering developments are aimed at improving the implants' physical and biological properties by improving their surfaces in order to develop craniofacial bone substitutes that will restore, maintain and improve tissue function. In this review, the commonly used biomaterials for craniofacial bone restoration and dental repair, as well as surface modification techniques, antibacterial surfaces and coatings are discussed. PMID:24471018

  13. Surface modification of Natural Rubber by ion implantation: Evidence for implant doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predeep, P.; Najidha, S.; Sreeja, R.; Saxena, N. S.

    2005-12-01

    Ion implantation is one of the most powerful and well-known technique for surface modification in polymers. Thin films of Natural Rubber were modified by the implantation of 60 keV N + ions to the fluences of 10 11-10 15 cm -2. The electrical conductivity measurements of irradiated sample show 10 orders of magnitude compared to pristine state. Along with conductivity change there was a noticeable change in color to a dense shiny black for the most highly conducting films. The analysis of temperature dependence of dc electrical conductivity data reveals a three-dimensional variable range hopping mechanism. The microstructural evolution of the virgin and ion-beam modified samples was investigated by spectroscopic analysis such as UV/Vis & FTIR. These spectral studies gave evidence for the production of conjugate double bonds, which is a clear cut indication of implant doping. This is an important result since ion implantation usually does not produce doping in polymeric materials and only a few reports about the possibility of implant doping in polymers are available. The significant aspect of this study is that this confirms, the Natural Rubber's potential to be used as a microelectronic device material. Also an attempt has been made to compare the conductivity enhancement in Natural Rubber by chemical and implant doping.

  14. Cellular Responses Evoked by Different Surface Characteristics of Intraosseous Titanium Implants

    PubMed Central

    Feller, Liviu; Jadwat, Yusuf; Khammissa, Razia A. G.; Meyerov, Robin; Lemmer, Johan

    2015-01-01

    The properties of biomaterials, including their surface microstructural topography and their surface chemistry or surface energy/wettability, affect cellular responses such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration. The nanotopography of moderately rough implant surfaces enhances the production of biological mediators in the peri-implant microenvironment with consequent recruitment of differentiating osteogenic cells to the implant surface and stimulates osteogenic maturation. Implant surfaces with moderately rough topography and with high surface energy promote osteogenesis, increase the ratio of bone-to-implant contact, and increase the bonding strength of the bone to the implant at the interface. Certain features of implant surface chemistry are also important in enhancing peri-implant bone wound healing. It is the purpose of this paper to review some of the more important features of titanium implant surfaces which have an impact on osseointegration. PMID:25767803

  15. Biofilm Disrupting Technology for Orthopedic Implants: What’s on the Horizon?

    PubMed Central

    Connaughton, Alexander; Childs, Abby; Dylewski, Stefan; Sabesan, Vani J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of orthopedic implants in joints has revolutionized the treatment of patients with many debilitating chronic musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis. However, the introduction of foreign material into the human body predisposes the body to infection. The treatment of these infections has become very complicated since the orthopedic implants serve as a surface for multiple species of bacteria to grow at a time into a resistant biofilm layer. This biofilm layer serves as a protectant for the bacterial colonies on the implant making them more resistant and difficult to eradicate when using standard antibiotic treatment. In some cases, the use of antibiotics alone has even made the bacteria more resistant to treatment. Thus, there has been surge in the creation of non-antibiotic anti-biofilm agents to help disrupt the biofilms on the orthopedic implants to help eliminate the infections. In this study, we discuss infections of orthopedic implants in the shoulder then we review the main categories of anti-biofilm agents that have been used for the treatment of infections on orthopedic implants. Then, we introduce some of the newer biofilm disrupting technology that has been studied in the past few years that may advance the treatment options for orthopedic implants in the future. PMID:25705632

  16. Surface analysis of titanium coated silicone rubber biological implants

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, J.D.; Hutchinson, W.B.

    1987-01-01

    A wide variety of materials are used today in the fabrication of biomedical implants. Various plastics, ceramics, metals, and composites are found in dozens of applications as biomaterials. The biological interactions between the implant surfaces and the proteins and cells of the body sometimes cause problems such as inflammation, thrombosis, and encapsulation. Coating the implants with a biocompatible material such as titanium could alleviate these problems. In an effort to improve the biological compatibility of silicone rubber vascular grafts, thin layers of titanium were sputter deposited onto medical grade silicone rubber. The surfaces of two such samples were then characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), electron probe microanalysis (EPM), and ion microprobe mass analysis (IMMA).

  17. Chemical modification of pure titanium surfaces for oral implants.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, J; Castro, F

    1999-01-01

    A technique that achieves different pure titanium surfaces depending on acid concentration and exposure time is described. It is possible to obtain, with the same chemical treatment, both large pits and small rugosities. This technique may have interesting applications in oral implants.

  18. Corneal epithelialisation on surface-modified hydrogel implants: artificial cornea.

    PubMed

    Ma, Aihua; Zhao, Bojun; Bentley, Adam J; Brahma, Arun; MacNeil, Sheila; Martin, Francis L; Rimmer, Stephen; Fullwood, Nigel J

    2011-03-01

    The objective was to investigate corneal re-epithelialisation of surface-modified polymethacrylate hydrogel implants in order to evaluate them as potential materials for an artificial cornea. Polymethacrylate hydrogels were modified with amines and then coated with different extracellular matrix proteins (collagen I, IV, laminin and fibronectin). The modified hydrogels were surgically implanted into bovine corneas maintained in a 3-D culture system for 5 days. The epithelial growth across the implant surface was evaluated using fluorescent, light and electron microscopy. Full epithelialisation was achieved on 1,4-diaminobutane-modified hydrogels after coating with collagen IV. Hydrogels modified with 1,4-diaminobutane but without further coating only showed partial re-epithelialisation. Hydrogels modified with other amines (1,2-diaminoethane or 1,3-diaminopropane) showed only partial re-epithelialisation; further coating with extracellular matrix proteins improved epithelialisation of these surfaces but did not result in complete re-epithelialisation. Evaluation of the corneas implanted with the 1,4-diaminobutane-modified hydrogels coated with collagen IV showed that the artificial corneas remain clear, integrate well and become covered by a healthy stratified epithelium. In conclusion the 1,4-diaminobutane surface-modified hydrogel coated with collagen IV supported the growth of a stable stratified epithelium. With further refinement this hydrogel has the potential to be used clinically for an artificial cornea. PMID:21287242

  19. Cryogenic ion implantation near amorphization threshold dose for halo/extension junction improvement in sub-30 nm device technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hugh; Todorov, Stan; Colombeau, Benjamin; Rodier, Dennis; Kouzminov, Dimitry; Zou Wei; Guo Baonian; Khasgiwale, Niranjan; Decker-Lucke, Kurt

    2012-11-06

    We report on junction advantages of cryogenic ion implantation with medium current implanters. We propose a methodical approach on maximizing cryogenic effects on junction characteristics near the amorphization threshold doses that are typically used for halo implants for sub-30 nm technologies. BF{sub 2}{sup +} implant at a dose of 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13}cm{sup -2} does not amorphize silicon at room temperature. When implanted at -100 Degree-Sign C, it forms a 30 - 35 nm thick amorphous layer. The cryogenic BF{sub 2}{sup +} implant significantly reduces the depth of the boron distribution, both as-implanted and after anneals, which improves short channel rolloff characteristics. It also creates a shallower n{sup +}-p junction by steepening profiles of arsenic that is subsequently implanted in the surface region. We demonstrate effects of implant sequences, germanium preamorphization, indium and carbon co-implants for extension/halo process integration. When applied to sequences such as Ge+As+C+In+BF{sub 2}{sup +}, the cryogenic implants at -100 Degree-Sign C enable removal of Ge preamorphization, and form more active n{sup +}-p junctions and steeper B and In halo profiles than sequences at room temperature.

  20. The evolution of cochlear implant technology and its clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Hainarosie, M; Zainea, V; Hainarosie, R

    2014-01-01

    The article presents a brief history of the development of the cochlear implant, from its beginnings to the present day. After a short description of the device, it describes the evolution of the technology for three of the top manufacturing companies, from the first model marketed, to the latest. It presents the technological advancements from one model to the next, taking into account the exterior design, processing capabilities and functionality. PMID:25870662

  1. The evolution of cochlear implant technology and its clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Hainarosie, M; Zainea, V; Hainarosie, R

    2014-01-01

    The article presents a brief history of the development of the cochlear implant, from its beginnings to the present day. After a short description of the device, it describes the evolution of the technology for three of the top manufacturing companies, from the first model marketed, to the latest. It presents the technological advancements from one model to the next, taking into account the exterior design, processing capabilities and functionality.

  2. Surface topography and wetting modifications of PEEK for implant applications.

    PubMed

    Akkan, Cagri Kaan; Hammadeh, Mohammed Eid; May, Alexander; Park, Hai-Woong; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Strunskus, Thomas; Aktas, Oral Cenk

    2014-09-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is considered as a substitute for metallic implant materials due to its extremely low elastic modulus (3-4 GPa). Despite its good mechanical properties, PEEK exhibits a slow integration with the bone tissue due to its relatively inert surface and low biocompatibility. We introduced a dual modification method, which combines the laser and plasma surface treatments to achieve hierarchically patterned PEEK surfaces. While the plasma treatment leads to nanotopography, the laser treatment induces microstructures over the PEEK surface. On the other hand, plasma and laser treatments induce inhomogeneity in the surface chemistry in addition to the tailored surface topography. Therefore, we coated the structured PEEK surfaces with a thin alumina layer by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to get identical surface chemistry on each substrate. Such alumina-coated PEEK surfaces are used as a model to investigate the effect of the surface topography on the wetting independent from the surface chemistry. Prepared surfaces bring advantages of enhanced wetting, multiscaled topography, proven biocompatibility (alumina layer), and low elastic modulus (PEEK as substrate), which together may trigger the use of PEEK in bone and other implant applications.

  3. Glaucoma drainage implant surgery and ocular surface transplant graft preservation.

    PubMed

    Aref, Ahmad A; Sivaraman, Kavitha R; Djalilian, Ali R

    2015-05-01

    Glaucoma may develop or worsen after ocular surface transplantation and often requires surgical management for adequate intraocular pressure control. Traditional glaucoma filtering procedures in patients with prior ocular surface transplant may be problematic for several reasons, which include mechanical disruption of the pre-existing graft, epithelial and stem cell toxicity induced by antifibrotic agents, and increased risk of future corneal transplantation failure. We describe the implantation of a glaucoma drainage implant via a limbal-based conjunctival incision with tube placement in the ciliary sulcus in three eyes of two patients with prior ocular surface transplantation. At a follow-up interval of 3-7 months, all three eyes have excellent postoperative control of intraocular pressure, stable vision, and healthy ocular surface grafts.

  4. Comparative surface microanalysis of failed Brånemark implants.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, C; Olivé, J

    1992-01-01

    The chemical composition and topography of an implant surface determine the human immunologic system response. This study compared the surfaces of 13 Brånemark oral implants, 11 that came from retrieved specimens which failed initially or did not osseointegrate and 2 that were never implanted (controls). The period of implantation in human jaws varied between 3 and 20 months. After cleaning and sterilization, the topography, surface chemical composition, and thickness of the oxide layer were studied. The results obtained with scanning electron microscopy did not show any significant topographic differences among the specimens. X-ray spectrographic microanalysis showed very similar composition (titanium and amounts less than 0.5% of other elements) in the outermost layer of the analyzed specimens. The Auger spectroscope revealed considerable percentage differences in the amount of carbon and silicon in the last monolayers, which could be attributed to handling or to an inadequate cleaning process. This places the retrieved specimens out of the acceptable statistical limits of contamination by introducing a factor of doubt for long-term prognosis in the hypothetical situation of their re-use. PMID:1398830

  5. Comparative surface microanalysis of failed Brånemark implants.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, C; Olivé, J

    1992-01-01

    The chemical composition and topography of an implant surface determine the human immunologic system response. This study compared the surfaces of 13 Brånemark oral implants, 11 that came from retrieved specimens which failed initially or did not osseointegrate and 2 that were never implanted (controls). The period of implantation in human jaws varied between 3 and 20 months. After cleaning and sterilization, the topography, surface chemical composition, and thickness of the oxide layer were studied. The results obtained with scanning electron microscopy did not show any significant topographic differences among the specimens. X-ray spectrographic microanalysis showed very similar composition (titanium and amounts less than 0.5% of other elements) in the outermost layer of the analyzed specimens. The Auger spectroscope revealed considerable percentage differences in the amount of carbon and silicon in the last monolayers, which could be attributed to handling or to an inadequate cleaning process. This places the retrieved specimens out of the acceptable statistical limits of contamination by introducing a factor of doubt for long-term prognosis in the hypothetical situation of their re-use.

  6. Optimal design of composite hip implants using NASA technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, T. A.; Saravanos, D. A.; Davy, D. T.; Waters, S. A.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Using an adaptation of NASA software, we have investigated the use of numerical optimization techniques for the shape and material optimization of fiber composite hip implants. The original NASA inhouse codes, were originally developed for the optimization of aerospace structures. The adapted code, which was called OPORIM, couples numerical optimization algorithms with finite element analysis and composite laminate theory to perform design optimization using both shape and material design variables. The external and internal geometry of the implant and the surrounding bone is described with quintic spline curves. This geometric representation is then used to create an equivalent 2-D finite element model of the structure. Using laminate theory and the 3-D geometric information, equivalent stiffnesses are generated for each element of the 2-D finite element model, so that the 3-D stiffness of the structure can be approximated. The geometric information to construct the model of the femur was obtained from a CT scan. A variety of test cases were examined, incorporating several implant constructions and design variable sets. Typically the code was able to produce optimized shape and/or material parameters which substantially reduced stress concentrations in the bone adjacent of the implant. The results indicate that this technology can provide meaningful insight into the design of fiber composite hip implants.

  7. Surface modification of SKD-61 steel by ion implantation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, F. L.; Lo, Y.-L.; Yu, Y.-C.

    2007-07-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how ion implantation affects the surface characteristics and nitrogenizing depth of the thin film by the use of a NEC 9SDH-2 3 MV Pelletron accelerator that implants nitrogen ions into SKD-61 tool steels for surface modification. Nitrogen ions were implanted into the surface layer of materials so that the hardness of modified films could be improved. Also, the nitride film stripping problems of the traditional nitrogenizing treatment could be overcome by a new approach in surface process engineering. As nitrogen ions with high velocity impacted on the surface of the substrate, the ions were absorbed and accumulated on the surface of the substrate. The experiments were performed with two energies (i.e., 1 and 2 MeV) and different doses (i.e., 2.5x10{sup 15}, 7.5x10{sup 15}, and 1.5x10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}). Nitrogen ions were incorporated into the interface and then diffused through the metal to form a nitride layer. Analysis tools included the calculation of stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM), the detection of a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and nanoindentation testing. Through the depth analysis of SIMS, the effects of the ion-implanted SKD-61 steels after heating at 550 deg. C in a vacuum furnace were examined. The nanoindenting results indicate the variation of hardness of SKD-61 steels with the various ion doses. It reaches two to three times the original hardness of SKD-61 steels.

  8. Surface microanalytical studies of nitrogen ion-implanted steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Charles G.; Meeker, G. P.; Baumann, Scott M.; Norberg, James C.; Legg, Keith O.

    1985-03-01

    Five types of industrial steels, 1018, 52100, M-2, 440C, and 304 were ion implanted with nitrogen and subjected to surface microanalysis by three independent surface techniques: AES, RBS, and SIMS. The results provided understanding for earlier observations of the properties of various types of steel after nitrogen implantation. The steels that retained the most nitrogen and that have been reported to benefit the most in improved tribological properties from ion implantation were ferritic carbon and austenitic stainless steels, such as soft 1018 and 304, respectively. Heat-treated martensitic carbon steels such as 52100 and M-2 tool steel were found to retain the least nitrogen, and they have been reported to benefit less from nitrogen implantation; however, the interaction of transition metal carbides in M-2 with nitrogen has not been clarified. The data showed that 440C steel retained as much nitrogen as 1018 and 304, but treatment benefits may be limited to improvements in properties related to toughness and impact resistance.

  9. Enhanced surface hardness in nitrogen-implanted silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Uslu, C.; Lee, D.H.; Berta, Y.

    1995-06-01

    Preliminary studies have been performed on the feasibility of carbon-silicon nitride formation ({beta}-Si{sub 1.5}C{sub 1.5}N{sub 4}, the homologue of equilibrium {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} or hypothetical {beta}-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) by high dose N{sup +}-implantation into polycrystalline {beta}-SiC (cubic). Thin films were formed using 100 keV implantations with varying ion doses in the range from 1.1 x 10{sup 17} to 27.1 x 10{sup 17} N/cm{sup 2}, and target temperatures between -196{degrees}C and 980{degrees}C. X-ray diffraction with a position-sensitive detector and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed that the as-implanted surfaces (up to 860{degrees}C) contained {approximately}0.1 {mu}m thick buried amorphous layers. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy showed that the peak concentration of nitrogen saturated up to approximately 54 at. % with increasing doses, suggesting formation of a new phase. Implantation to doses of 1.1 x 10{sup 17} and 2.3 x 10{sup 17} N/cm{sup 2} at 980{degrees}C caused enhanced surface hardness compared to SiC.

  10. Osteoblastic cell behaviour on different titanium implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Le Guehennec, Laurent; Lopez-Heredia, Marco-Antonio; Enkel, Benedicte; Weiss, Pierre; Amouriq, Yves; Layrolle, Pierre

    2008-05-01

    The osseointegration of oral implants is related to the early interactions between osteoblastic cells and titanium surfaces. The behaviour of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells was compared on four different titanium surfaces: mirror-polished (Smooth-Ti), alumina grit-blasted (Alumina-Ti) or biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic grit-blasted (BCP-Ti) and a commercially available implant surface (SLA). Scanning electron microscopy and profilometry showed distinct microtopographies. The BCP-Ti group had higher average surface roughness (Ra=2.5 microm) than the other grit-blasted groups. Hydrophilicity and surfaces energies were determined on the different substrates by dynamic contact angle measurements. The most hydrophilic surface was the Alumina-Ti discs, while SLA was the most hydrophobic. The titanium surfaces were all oxidized as TiO2 and polluted by carbon contaminants, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Alumina-Ti samples also exhibited aluminium peaks as a result of the blasting. The BCP-Ti discs contained traces of calcium and phosphorus. MC3T3-E1 cells attached, spread and proliferated on the substrates. For both the SLA and BCP-Ti groups, the entire surface was covered with a layer of osteoblastic cells after 2 days. At high magnification, the cells exhibited cytoplasmic extensions and filopodia. Compared with plastic, cell viability was similar with the Smooth-Ti, slightly lower with the Alumina-Ti and superior with the SLA and BCP-Ti groups. Alkaline phosphatase activity increased with the culture time whatever the substrate. This study shows that BCP-blasting produces rough titanium implants without surface contaminants. PMID:18226985

  11. Titanium oral implants: surface characteristics, interface biology and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Palmquist, Anders; Omar, Omar M.; Esposito, Marco; Lausmaa, Jukka; Thomsen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Bone-anchored titanium implants have revolutionized oral healthcare. Surface properties of oral titanium implants play decisive roles for molecular interactions, cellular response and bone regeneration. Nevertheless, the role of specific surface properties, such as chemical and phase composition and nanoscale features, for the biological in vivo performance remains to be established. Partly, this is due to limited transfer of state-of-the-art preparation techniques to complex three-dimensional geometries, analytical tools and access to minute, intact interfacial layers. As judged by the available results of a few randomized clinical trials, there is no evidence that any particular type of oral implant has superior long-term success. Important insights into the recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells, cell–cell communication at the interface and high-resolution imaging of the interface between the surface oxide and the biological host are prerequisites for the understanding of the mechanisms of osseointegration. Strategies for development of the next generation of material surface modifications for compromised tissue are likely to include time and functionally programmed properties, pharmacological modulation and incorporation of cellular components. PMID:20591849

  12. [Possibilities for improvement of the surface properties of dental implants (2). The use of ceramic oxides in surface coating for titanium and tantalum implants].

    PubMed

    Szabó, G; Kovács, L; Vargha, K

    1995-02-01

    A corrosion-resistant, 2000-2500 A thick, ceramic oxide layer with a coherent crystalline structure was produced on the surface of titanium implants. The layer contains a bioactive component, it is made from the material of the implant, adheres well and gives an aesthetically pleasant impression. The coated implants were subjected to various physical, chemical electronmicroscopic, etc. tests for their qualitative characterization. These tests demonstrated the good properties of the implants. The procedure is protected internationally by patents.

  13. Surface Functionalization of Orthopedic Titanium Implants with Bone Sialoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, Ulrike; Ackermann, Angelika; Anthonissen, Joris; Kaufmann, Kerstin B.; Brendel, Christian; Götz, Hermann; Rommens, Pol M.; Hofmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic implant failure due to aseptic loosening and mechanical instability remains a major problem in total joint replacement. Improving osseointegration at the bone-implant interface may reduce micromotion and loosening. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) has been shown to enhance bone formation when coated onto titanium femoral implants and in rat calvarial defect models. However, the most appropriate method of BSP coating, the necessary level of BSP coating, and the effect of BSP coating on cell behavior remain largely unknown. In this study, BSP was covalently coupled to titanium surfaces via an aminosilane linker (APTES), and its properties were compared to BSP applied to titanium via physisorption and untreated titanium. Cell functions were examined using primary human osteoblasts (hOBs) and L929 mouse fibroblasts. Gene expression of specific bone turnover markers at the RNA level was detected at different intervals. Cell adhesion to titanium surfaces treated with BSP via physisorption was not significantly different from that of untreated titanium at any time point, whereas BSP application via covalent coupling caused reduced cell adhesion during the first few hours in culture. Cell migration was increased on titanium disks that were treated with higher concentrations of BSP solution, independent of the coating method. During the early phases of hOB proliferation, a suppressive effect of BSP was observed independent of its concentration, particularly when BSP was applied to the titanium surface via physisorption. Although alkaline phosphatase activity was reduced in the BSP-coated titanium groups after 4 days in culture, increased calcium deposition was observed after 21 days. In particular, the gene expression level of RUNX2 was upregulated by BSP. The increase in calcium deposition and the stimulation of cell differentiation induced by BSP highlight its potential as a surface modifier that could enhance the osseointegration of orthopedic implants. Both

  14. Priming the Surface of Orthopedic Implants for Osteoblast Attachment in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kiat Hwa; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The development of better orthopedic implants is incessant. While current implants can function reliably in the human body for a long period of time, there are still a significant number of cases for which the implants can fail prematurely due to poor osseointegration of the implant with native bone. Increasingly, it is recognized that it is extremely important to facilitate the attachment of osteoblasts on the implant so that a proper foundation of extracellular matrix (ECM) can be laid down for the growth of new bone tissue. In order to facilitate the osseointegration of the implant, both the physical nanotopography and chemical functionalization of the implant surface have to be optimized. In this short review, however, we explore how simple chemistry procedures can be used to functionalize the surfaces of three major classes of orthopedic implants, i.e. ceramics, metals, and polymers, so that the attachment of osteoblasts on implants can be facilitated in order to promote implant osseointegration.

  15. Priming the Surface of Orthopedic Implants for Osteoblast Attachment in Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kiat Hwa; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The development of better orthopedic implants is incessant. While current implants can function reliably in the human body for a long period of time, there are still a significant number of cases for which the implants can fail prematurely due to poor osseointegration of the implant with native bone. Increasingly, it is recognized that it is extremely important to facilitate the attachment of osteoblasts on the implant so that a proper foundation of extracellular matrix (ECM) can be laid down for the growth of new bone tissue. In order to facilitate the osseointegration of the implant, both the physical nanotopography and chemical functionalization of the implant surface have to be optimized. In this short review, however, we explore how simple chemistry procedures can be used to functionalize the surfaces of three major classes of orthopedic implants, i.e. ceramics, metals, and polymers, so that the attachment of osteoblasts on implants can be facilitated in order to promote implant osseointegration. PMID:26392807

  16. Metal ion implantation for large scale surface modification

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.

    1992-10-01

    Intense energetic beams of metal ions can be produced by using a metal vapor vacuum arc as the plasma discharge from which the ion beam is formed. We have developed a number of ion sources of this kind and have built a metal ion implantation facility which can produce repetitively pulsed ion beams with mean ion energy up to several hundred key, pulsed beam current of more than an ampere, and time averaged current of several tens of milliamperes delivered onto a downstream target. We've also done some preliminary work on scaling up this technology to very large size. For example, a 50-cm diameter (2000 cm[sup 2]) set of beam formation electrodes was used to produce a pulsed titanium beam with ion current over 7 amperes at a mean ion energy of 100 key. Separately, a dc embodiment has been used to produce a dc titanium ion beam with current over 600 mA, power supply limited in this work, and up to 6 amperes of dc plasma ion current was maintained for over an hour. In a related program we've developed a plasma immersion method for applying thin metallic and compound films in which the added species is atomically mixed to the substrate. By adding a gas flow to the process, well-bonded compound films can also be formed; metallic films and multilayers as well as oxides and nitrides with mixed transition zones some hundreds of angstroms thick have been synthesized. Here we outline these parallel metal-plasma-based research programs and describe the hardware that we've developed and some of the surface modification research that we've done with it.

  17. Laser bioengineering of glass-titanium implants surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusquiños, F.; Arias-González, F.; Penide, J.; del Val, J.; Comesaña, R.; Quintero, F.; Riveiro, A.; Boutinguiza, M.; Pascual, M. J.; Durán, A.; Pou, J.

    2013-11-01

    Osseointegration is the mean challenge when surgical treatments fight against load-bearing bone diseases. Absolute bone replacement by a synthetic implant has to be completed not only from the mechanics point of view, but also from a biological approach. Suitable strength, resilience and stress distribution of titanium alloy implants are spoiled by the lack of optimal biological characteristics. The inert quality of extra low interstitial titanium alloy, which make it the most attractive metallic alloy for biomedical applications, oppose to an ideal surface with bone cell affinity, and capable to stimulate bone attachment bone growth. Diverse laser treatments have been proven as effective tools to modify surface properties, such as wettability in contact to physiological fluids, or osteoblast guided and slightly enhanced attachment. The laser surface cladding can go beyond by providing titanium alloy surfaces with osteoconduction and osteoinduction properties. In this research work, the laser radiation is used to produce bioactive glass coatings on Ti6Al4V alloy substrates. Specific silicate bioactive glass compositions has been investigated to achieve suitable surface tension and viscosity temperature behavior during processing, and to provide with the required release of bone growth gene up regulation agents in the course of resorption mediated by physiological fluids. The produced coatings and interfaces, the surface osteoconduction properties, and the chemical species release in simulated physiological fluid were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), hot stage microscopy (HSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X ray fluorescence (XRF), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  18. Method for Fabricating Soft Tissue Implants with Microscopic Surface Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor); Rutledge, Sharon K. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A method for fabricating soft tissue implants using a mold. The cavity surface of an initially untextured mold. made of an organic material such as epoxy. is given a thin film coating of material that has pinholes and is resistant to atomic particle bombardment. The mold cavity surface is then subjected to atomic particle bombardment, such as when placed in an isotropic atomic oxygen environment. Microscopic depressions in the mold cavity surface are created at the pinhole sites on the thin film coating. The thin film coating is removed and the mold is then used to cast the soft tissue implant. The thin film coating having pinholes may be created by chilling the mold below the dew point such that water vapor condenses upon it; distributing particles, that can partially dissolve and become attached to the mold cavity surface, onto the mold cavity surface; removing the layer of condensate, such as by evaporation; applying the thin film coating over the entire mold surface; and, finally removing the particles, such as by dissolving or brushing it off. Pinholes are created in the thin film coating at the sites previously occupied by the particles.

  19. Histologic analysis of resorbable blasting media surface implants retrieved from humans: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyung-In; Kim, Young-Kyun; Moon, Sang-Woon; Kim, Su-Gwan; Lim, Sung-Chul; Yun, Pil-Young

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the degree of osseointegration of resorbable blasting media (RBM) surface implants retrieved from humans. Three implants in the mandibular molar region that were surface-treated with RBM were retrieved from two patients. The implants were used to manufacture specimens in order to measure the bone-implant contact (BIC) ratio. The BIC ratios of the three implants were found to be an average of 69.0%±9.1%. In conclusion, that RBM surface implants are integrated into the host environment with histological significance and the BIC ratio of the RBM surface-treated implant was not significantly different from that of other surface-treated implants. PMID:26904493

  20. Histologic analysis of resorbable blasting media surface implants retrieved from humans: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the degree of osseointegration of resorbable blasting media (RBM) surface implants retrieved from humans. Three implants in the mandibular molar region that were surface-treated with RBM were retrieved from two patients. The implants were used to manufacture specimens in order to measure the bone-implant contact (BIC) ratio. The BIC ratios of the three implants were found to be an average of 69.0%±9.1%. In conclusion, that RBM surface implants are integrated into the host environment with histological significance and the BIC ratio of the RBM surface-treated implant was not significantly different from that of other surface-treated implants. PMID:26904493

  1. Near-surface recrystallization of the amorphous implanted layer of ion implanted 6H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhudzai, R. J.; van der Berg, N. G.; Malherbe, J. B.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; Theron, C. C.; Buys, A. V.; Botha, A. J.; Wendler, E.; Wesch, W.

    2014-08-01

    The recrystallization and subsequent crystal growth during annealing of amorphous surface layers on 6H-SiC produced by ion implantation is investigated. Amorphous surface layers were produced by ion implantation of 360 keV ions of iodine, silver, xenon, cesium and strontium into single crystalline 6H-silicon carbide samples. The ion fluence for all the implantations were in the order of 1016 cm-2. Vacuum annealing of the damaged silicon carbide samples was then performed. The microstructure of SiC surfaces before and after annealing was investigated using a high resolution field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM analysis was complimented by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). SEM images acquired by an in-lens detector using an accelerating voltage of 2 kV show nano-crystallites developed for all implanted samples after annealing. Larger and more faceted crystallites along with elongated thin crystallites were observed for iodine and xenon implanted 6H-SiC. Crystallites formed on surfaces implanted with strontium and cesium were smaller and less faceted. Strontium, silver and cesium implanted samples also exhibited more cavities on the surface. AFM was used to evaluate the effect of annealing on the surface roughness. For all the amorphous surfaces which were essentially featureless, the root mean square (rms) roughness was approximately 1 nm. The roughness increased to approximately 17 nm for the iodine implanted sample after annealing with the surface roughness below this value for all the other samples. AFM also showed that the largest crystals grew to heights of about 17, 20, 45, 50 and 65 nm for Sr, Cs, Ag, Xe and I implanted samples after annealing at 1200 °C for 5 h respectively. SEM images and AFM analysis suggest that iodine is more effective in promoting crystal growth during the annealing of bombardment-induced amorphous SiC layers than the rest of the ions we implanted. In samples of silicon carbide co-implanted with iodine and silver, few

  2. Surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Rautray, Tapash R; Narayanan, R; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2010-05-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. In view of this, the current review casts new light on surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion beam implantation.

  3. The roles of different scale ranges of surface implant topography on the stability of the bone/implant interface.

    PubMed

    Davies, John E; Ajami, Elnaz; Moineddin, Rahim; Mendes, Vanessa C

    2013-05-01

    We sought to deconvolute the effects of sub-micron topography and microtopography on the phenomena of bone bonding and interfacial stability of endosseous implants. To address this experimentally, we implanted custom-made titanium alloy implants of varying surface topographical complexity in rat femora, for 6, 9 or 12 days. The five surfaces were polished, machined, dual acid etched, and two forms of grit blasted and acid etched; each surface type was further modified with the deposition of nanocrystals of calcium phosphate to make a total of 10 materials groups (n = 10 for each time point; total 300 implants). At sacrifice, we subjected the bone-implant interface to a mechanical disruption test. We found that even the smoothest surfaces, when modified with sub-micron scale crystals, could be bone-bonding. However, as locomotor loading through bone to the implant increased with time of healing, such interfaces failed while others, with sub-micron features superimposed on surfaces of increasing microtopographical complexity remained intact under loading. We demonstrate here that higher order, micron or coarse-micron, topography is a requirement for longer-term interfacial stability. We show that each of these topographical scale-ranges represents a scale-range seen in natural bone tissue. Thus, what emerges from an analysis of our findings is a new means by which biologically-relevant criteria can be employed to assess the importance of implant surface topography at different scale-ranges. PMID:23415644

  4. Plasma-based ion implantation and deposition: A review of physics,technology, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, Jacques; Anders, Andre

    2005-05-16

    After pioneering work in the 1980s, plasma-based ion implantation (PBII) and plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBIID) can now be considered mature technologies for surface modification and thin film deposition. This review starts by looking at the historical development and recalling the basic ideas of PBII. Advantages and disadvantages are compared to conventional ion beam implantation and physical vapor deposition for PBII and PBIID, respectively, followed by a summary of the physics of sheath dynamics, plasma and pulse specifications, plasma diagnostics, and process modeling. The review moves on to technology considerations for plasma sources and process reactors. PBII surface modification and PBIID coatings are applied in a wide range of situations. They include the by-now traditional tribological applications of reducing wear and corrosion through the formation of hard, tough, smooth, low-friction and chemically inert phases and coatings, e.g. for engine components. PBII has become viable for the formation of shallow junctions and other applications in microelectronics. More recently, the rapidly growing field of biomaterial synthesis makes used of PBII&D to produce surgical implants, bio- and blood-compatible surfaces and coatings, etc. With limitations, also non-conducting materials such as plastic sheets can be treated. The major interest in PBII processing originates from its flexibility in ion energy (from a few eV up to about 100 keV), and the capability to efficiently treat, or deposit on, large areas, and (within limits) to process non-flat, three-dimensional workpieces, including forming and modifying metastable phases and nanostructures. We use the acronym PBII&D when referring to both implantation and deposition, while PBIID implies that deposition is part of the process.

  5. Evaluation of Stability of Surface-Treated Mini-Implants in Diabetic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Nam-Hee; Kim, Eun-Young; Paek, Janghyun; Kook, Yoon-Ah; Jeong, Do-Min; Cho, Il-Sik; Nelson, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of surface treatment of mini-implants in diabetes-induced rabbits by comparing osseointegration around mini-implants. Methods. Twelve New Zealand white rabbits were divided into two groups (alloxan-induced diabetic group and control group). A total of 48 mini-implants were placed after four weeks of diabetic induction. 24 mini-implants were surface-treated with SLA (sandblasted with large grit, and acid etched) and the remaining 24 mini-implants had smooth surfaces. Four weeks after placement, 32 mini-implants were removed from 4 control and 4 diabetic rabbits. Insertion and removal torques were measured. The remaining 16 mini-implants from the two groups were histomorphometrically analyzed. Results. Maximum insertion torque showed no difference between diabetic and control groups, but total insertion energy was higher in control group. In surface-treated mini-implants, maximum removal torque was higher in both diabetic and control groups. Bone-implant contact (BIC) was increased in the control group when compared to the diabetic group. Surface-treated group had higher BIC than smooth surface group in both control and diabetic groups. However, there was no significantly statistical difference. Conclusions. Type 1 diabetes mellitus and surface treatment method of mini-implant affected primary stability of mini-implants. In addition, the use of orthodontic mini-implants in a diabetic patient is likely to show results similar to the healthy patient. PMID:24971093

  6. Ion implantation: surface treatment for improving the bone integration of titanium and Ti6Al4V dental implants.

    PubMed

    De Maeztu, Miguel A; Alava, J Iñaki; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2003-02-01

    Dental implants subjected to surface treatment have shown better bone integration than implants which have only been turned (machined). Three main types of treatment are presently available: the addition of material or coating, the removal of material, and surface modification. Ion implantation corresponds to the third approach. A histomorphometric study is made following the rabbit tibial bone placement of 88 commercial dental implants of pure titanium and Ti6AI4V subjected to surface treatment in the form of different ion implants (C+, CO+, N+, Ne+). Light microscopic, scanning electron microscopic (SEM), electron microsonde (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies were made. The results indicate improved bone integration (expressed as percentage bone-implant contact) in those specimens subjected to ion implantation versus the non-treated controls, the difference being statistically significant for the groups treated with C+ and CO+. In these groups, XPS showed a Ti-O-C junction (bone-implant interface) involving covalent type bonds, these being stronger and more stable than the ion-type bonds usually established between the titanium oxide and bone.

  7. In vitro and in vivo studies of surface-structured implants for bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Lu; Feng, Bo; Wang, Peizhi; Ding, Siyang; Liu, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Jie; Yu, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Background and methods Micronanoscale topologies play an important role in implant osteointegration and determine the success of an implant. We investigated the effect of three different implant surface topologies on osteoblast response and bone regeneration. In this study, implants with nanotubes and micropores were used, and implants with flat surfaces were used as the control group. Results Our in vitro studies showed that the nanostructured topologies improved the proliferation, differentiation, and development of the osteoblastic phenotype. Histological analysis further revealed that the nanotopology increased cell aggregation at the implant-tissue interfaces and enhanced bone-forming ability. Pushout testing indicated that the nanostructured topology greatly increased the bone-implant interfacial strength within 4 weeks of implantation. Conclusion Nanotopography may improve regeneration of bone tissue and shows promise for dental implant applications. PMID:23028216

  8. Surface modification for titanium implants by hydroxyapatite nanocomposite

    PubMed Central

    Family, Roxana; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran; Namjoy Nik, Shahram; Nemati, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Background: Titanium (Ti) implants are commonly coated with hydroxyapatite (HA). However, HA has some disadvantages such as brittleness, low tensile strength and fracture toughness. It is desirable to combine the excellent mechanical properties of ZrO2 and the chemical inertness of Al2O3 with respect to the purpose of this project which was coating Ti implants with HA-ZrO2-Al2O3 to modify the surface of these implants by adding ZrO2 and Al2O3 to HA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of hydroxyapatite coating nonocomposite. Methods: From September 2009 to January2011, functionally graded HA-Al2O3-ZrO2 and HA coatings were applied on Ti samples. HA-Al2O3-ZrO2 and HA sols were orderly dip coated on the substrates and calcined. Scanning electron microscopy and EDS were used to estimate the particle size of the surfaces and for morphological analysis. The morphology of non-coated HA-coated HA-Al2O3-ZrO2 (composite-coated) and double-layer composite coated samples were compared with one other. Mechanical test (heat & quench) was also done for comparing single-phase (HA), composite and double-layer composite samples. Results: The morphology of HA-Al2O3-ZrO2 coating is more homogenous than HA-coated and uncoated samples. Furthermore, single-layer coating is more homogenous than double-layer coating. EDS analysis was done on HA-coated sample and showed that the Ca/P ratio in the film was similar to the theoretical value 1.67 in HA. Conclusion: Surface modification of Ti implants can be done by coating them with single-layer of HA-Al2O3-ZrO2. Single-layer hydroxyapatite-alumina-zirconia coated sample has the most homogenous morphology on the surface. PMID:24009915

  9. Bone contact around osseointegrated implants: histologic analysis of a dual-acid-etched surface implant in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Bugea, Calogero; Luongo, Roberto; Di Iorio, Donato; Cocchetto, Roberto; Celletti, Renato

    2008-04-01

    The clinical applicability and predictability of osseointegrated implants in healthy patients have been studied extensively. Although successful treatment of patients with medical conditions including diabetes, arthritis, and cardiovascular disease has been described, insufficient information is available to determine the effects of diabetes on the process of osseointegration. An implant placed and intended to support an overdenture in a 65-year-old diabetic woman was prosthetically unfavorable and was retrieved after 2 months. It was then analyzed histologically. No symptoms of implant failure were detected, and histomorphometric evaluation showed the bone-to-implant contact percentage to be 80%. Osseointegration can be obtained when implants with a dual-acid-etched surface are placed in properly selected diabetic patients. PMID:18546810

  10. Treatment of the contaminated implant surface using the Er,Cr:YSGG laser.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert J

    2004-06-01

    Treatment of the contaminated implant surface by mechanical and chemotherapeutic means has met with mixed success. Incomplete surface debridement or alteration of the implant surface could compromise attempts at grafting and reintegration of the implant body. Development of a laser system operating at 2780 nm and using an ablative hydrokinetic process offers the possibility for more efficient decontamination and debridement. The Er,Cr: YSGG laser is evaluated and compared with the most commonly used chemotherapeutic modality for treatment of the implant surface. A scanning electron microscope study is presented comparing YSGG ablation to citric acid treatment of the titanium plasma sprayed and HA-coated implant surface. We can conclude that laser ablation using the YSGG laser is highly efficient at removing potential contaminants on the roughened implant surface while demonstrating no effects on the titanium substrate.

  11. Treatment of the contaminated implant surface using the Er,Cr:YSGG laser.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert J

    2004-06-01

    Treatment of the contaminated implant surface by mechanical and chemotherapeutic means has met with mixed success. Incomplete surface debridement or alteration of the implant surface could compromise attempts at grafting and reintegration of the implant body. Development of a laser system operating at 2780 nm and using an ablative hydrokinetic process offers the possibility for more efficient decontamination and debridement. The Er,Cr: YSGG laser is evaluated and compared with the most commonly used chemotherapeutic modality for treatment of the implant surface. A scanning electron microscope study is presented comparing YSGG ablation to citric acid treatment of the titanium plasma sprayed and HA-coated implant surface. We can conclude that laser ablation using the YSGG laser is highly efficient at removing potential contaminants on the roughened implant surface while demonstrating no effects on the titanium substrate. PMID:15179093

  12. Adaptation of NASA technology for the optimum design of orthopedic knee implants.

    PubMed

    Saravanos, D A; Mraz, P J; Davy, D T; Hopkins, D A

    1991-03-01

    NASA technology originally developed for designing aircraft turbine-engine blades has been adapted and applied to orthopedic knee implants. This article describes a method for tailoring an implant for optimal interaction with the environment of the tibia. The implant components are designed to control stresses in the bone for minimizing bone degradation and preventing failures. Engineers expect the tailoring system to improve knee prosthesis design and allow customized implants for individual patients. PMID:10150099

  13. In vivo biofilm on the surface of a surgical mesh implant.

    PubMed

    Reśliński, Adrian; Mikucka, Agnieszka; Szmytkowski, Jakub; Gospodarek, Eugenia; Dabrowiecki, Stanisław

    2009-01-01

    Mesh hernioplasty is among the most frequently performed surgical procedures. The introduction of mesh implants has decreased recurrence rates, but the use of synthetic materials carries the risk of infection and biofilm formation. This paper presents the course of the disease in the case of biofilm formation on the surface of an implanted surgical mesh. Antimicrobial therapy and partial removal of the implant were unsuccessful. Recurring surgical site infection could be managed only through total excision of the infected implant.

  14. Tailoring biomaterial surface properties to modulate host-implant interactions: implication in cardiovascular and bone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pacelli, Settimio; Manoharan, Vijayan; Desalvo, Anna; Lomis, Nikita; Jodha, Kartikeya Singh

    2016-01-01

    Host body response to a foreign medical device plays a critical role in defining its fate post implantation. It is thus important to control host-material interactions by designing innovative implant surfaces. In the recent years, biochemical and topographical features have been explored as main target to produce this new type of bioinert or bioresponsive implants. The review discusses specific biofunctional materials and strategies to achieve a precise control over implant surface properties and presents possible solutions to develop next generation of implants, particularly in the fields of bone and cardiovascular therapy. PMID:27630769

  15. Tailoring biomaterial surface properties to modulate host-implant interactions: implication in cardiovascular and bone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pacelli, Settimio; Manoharan, Vijayan; Desalvo, Anna; Lomis, Nikita; Jodha, Kartikeya Singh

    2016-01-01

    Host body response to a foreign medical device plays a critical role in defining its fate post implantation. It is thus important to control host-material interactions by designing innovative implant surfaces. In the recent years, biochemical and topographical features have been explored as main target to produce this new type of bioinert or bioresponsive implants. The review discusses specific biofunctional materials and strategies to achieve a precise control over implant surface properties and presents possible solutions to develop next generation of implants, particularly in the fields of bone and cardiovascular therapy.

  16. A cochlear implant fabricated using a bulk silicon-surface micromachining process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Tracy Elizabeth

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation presents the design and fabrication of two generations of a silicon microelectrode array for use in a cochlear implant. A cochlear implant is a device that is inserted into the inner ear and uses electrical stimulation to provide sound sensations to the profoundly deaf. The first-generation silicon cochlear implant is a passive device fabricated using silicon microprobe technology developed at the University of Michigan. It contains twenty-two iridium oxide (IrO) stimulating sites that are 250 mum in diameter and spaced at 750 mum intervals. In-vivo recordings were made in guinea pig auditory cortex in response to electrical stimulation with this device, verifying its ability to electrically evoke an auditory response. Auditory thresholds as low as 78 muA were recorded. The second-generation implant is a thirty-two site, four-channel device with on-chip CMOS site-selection circuitry and integrated position sensing. It was fabricated using a novel bulk silicon surface micromachining process which was developed as a part of this dissertation work. While the use of semiconductor technology offers many advantages in fabricating cochlear implants over the methods currently used, it was felt that even further advantages could be gained by developing a new micromachining process which would allow circuitry to be distributed along the full length of the cochlear implant substrate. The new process uses electropolishing of an n+ bulk silicon sacrificial layer to undercut and release n- epitaxial silicon structures from the wafer. An extremely abrupt etch-stop between the n+ and n- silicon is obtained, with no electropolishing taking place in the n-type silicon that is doped lower than 1 x 1017 cm-3 in concentration. Lateral electropolishing rates of up to 50 mum/min were measured using this technique, allowing one millimeter-wide structures to be fully undercut in as little as 10 minutes. The new micromachining process was integrated with a standard p

  17. Retrospective study of sintered porous-surfaced dental implants placed in the augmented sinus.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Dong-Seok; Lee, Jae-Mok; Park, In-Sook; Jung, Heui-Seung; Park, Do-Young; Shin, Im-Hee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical and radiographic outcomes of sintered porous-surfaced dental implants placed in partially edentulous posterior maxillae. The study group consisted of 42 partially edentulous patients who received sinus augmentation using the lateral window technique or crestal approach at Catholic University Hospital of Daegu and one private clinic. The 42 patients received a total of 92 sintered porous-surfaced dental implants in the edentulous posterior maxillae. All implants were restored with fixed prostheses. Of the 92 implants, 17 implants were restored with individual (nonsplinted) crowns, while 75 implants were splinted to other implants. Panoramic views and periapical radiographs using the standardized long-cone paralleling technique were taken at the first visit, postoperatively, at the time of prosthesis seating, and at a follow-up visit. Survival rates of implants in relation to location, length, diameter, crown-to-implant (C/I) ratio, and type of prosthesis were investigated. Statistical data were analyzed using software with the chi-square test. Of the 92 implants, 8 (8.7%) were removed, and the cumulative survival rate was 91.3% after a maximum 9-year functional period (mean: 72.8 months; range: 11 to 107 months). There were no statistical differences in relation to the location of implants, C/I ratio, or type of prosthesis. However, there were statistical differences in relation to the length and diameter of implants. Average crestal bone loss was 0.68 mm at 1-year follow-up and 1.13 mm at final examination. All implants were inserted in the augmented maxillary sites. The cumulative survival rate of sintered porous-surfaced implants in posterior maxillae was 91.3%. Sintered porous-surfaced implants showed satisfactory results in the edentulous posterior maxillae. PMID:25006774

  18. Surface passivation of an implantable semiconductor multielectrode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Steven P.

    1986-12-01

    An effective passivation material was needed for the protection of a semiconductor multielectrode array during long-term bio-implantations. The following properties were required: a large electrical resistivity, a small relative dielectric constant, good adhesion to silicon dioxide and aluminum, impermeability to water and ionic contaminants, chemical stability in water, and a thermal coefficient of expansion compatible with those of aluminum and silicon dioxide. Three materials were examined: Du Pont PI-2555, Accuglass 407, and Diffusion Technology U-1A. The first is a polyimide, and the latter two are polysiloxanes. The latter were found to be permeable to ionic contaminants and eliminated. The polyimide possesses all of the desired properties. Several multielectrode arrays were passivated with polyimide using conventional photolithography and wet etching techniques. These arrays were tested in vitro in a saline solution for thirty days. The aluminum metallization on the multielectrode array was heavily corroded by the saline solution, resulting in changes in the integrated circuits's electrical parameters.

  19. Enhanced osseointegration of titanium implants with nanostructured surfaces: an experimental study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Salou, Laëtitia; Hoornaert, Alain; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are commonly used for dental implants because of their good mechanical properties and biocompatibility. The surface properties of titanium implants are key factors for rapid and stable bone tissue integration. Micro-rough surfaces are commonly prepared by grit-blasting and acid-etching. However, proteins and cells interact with implant surfaces in the nanometer range. The aim of this study was to compare the osseointegration of machined (MA), standard alumina grit-blasted and acid-etched (MICRO) and nanostructured (NANO) implants in rabbit femurs. The MICRO surface exhibited typical random cavities with an average roughness of 1.5 μm, while the NANO surface consisted of a regular array of titanium oxide nanotubes 37±11 nm in diameter and 160 nm thick. The MA and NANO surfaces had a similar average roughness of 0.5 μm. The three groups of implants were inserted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand White rabbits. After 4 weeks, the pull-out test gave higher values for the NANO than for the other groups. Histology corroborated a direct apposition of bone tissue on to the NANO surface. Both the bone-to-implant contact and bone growth values were higher for the NANO than for the other implant surfaces. Overall, this study shows that the nanostructured surface improved the osseointegration of titanium implants and may be an alternative to conventional grit-blasted and acid-etched surface treatments.

  20. Enhancement of surface wettability via the modification of microtextured titanium implant surfaces with polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Hwa; Schwartz, Zvi; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Boyan, Barbara D; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2011-05-17

    Micrometer- and submicrometer-scale surface roughness enhances osteoblast differentiation on titanium (Ti) substrates and increases bone-to-implant contact in vivo. However, the low surface wettability induced by surface roughness can retard initial interactions with the physiological environment. We examined chemical modifications of Ti surfaces [pretreated (PT), R(a) ≤ 0.3 μm; sand blasted/acid etched (SLA), R(a) ≥ 3.0 μm] in order to modify surface hydrophilicity. We designed coating layers of polyelectrolytes that did not alter the surface microstructure but increased surface ionic character, including chitosan (CHI), poly(L-glutamic acid) (PGA), and poly(L-lysine) (PLL). Ti disks were cleaned and sterilized. Surface chemical composition, roughness, wettability, and morphology of surfaces before and after polyelectrolyte coating were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact mode profilometry, contact angle measurement, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). High-resolution XPS spectra data validated the formation of polyelectrolyte layers on top of the Ti surface. The surface coverage of the polyelectrolyte adsorbed on Ti surfaces was evaluated with the pertinent SEM images and XPS peak intensity as a function of polyelectrolyte adsorption time on the Ti surface. PLL was coated in a uniform thin layer on the PT surface. CHI and PGA were coated evenly on PT, albeit in an incomplete monolayer. CHI, PGA, and PLL were coated on the SLA surface with complete coverage. The selected polyelectrolytes enhanced surface wettability without modifying surface roughness. These chemically modified surfaces on implant devices can contribute to the enhancement of osteoblast differentiation.

  1. Surface and implantation effects on p-n junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schacham, Samuel E.; Finkman, Eliezer

    1990-01-01

    The contribution of the graded region of implanted p-n junctions is analyzed using an exponential profile. Though previously neglected, it was recently shown that this contribution to the saturation current of HgCdTe diodes is significant. Assuming a dominant Auger recombination, an analytical solution to the continuity equation is obtained. An expression for the current generation by the graded region is presented for both ohmic and reflecting boundary conditions. A revised condition for a wide region is derived. When the region is narrow, the current differs drastically from that of the zero-gradient case. The effects of the junction depth and the substrate and surface concentrations on the current are investigated. It is shown that the reverse current does not saturate.

  2. Bone attachment to glass-fibre-reinforced composite implant with porous surface.

    PubMed

    Mattila, R H; Laurila, P; Rekola, J; Gunn, J; Lassila, L V J; Mäntylä, T; Aho, A J; Vallittu, P K

    2009-06-01

    A method has recently been developed for producing fibre-reinforced composites (FRC) with porous surfaces, intended for use as load-bearing orthopaedic implants. This study focuses on evaluation of the bone-bonding behaviour of FRC implants. Three types of cylindrical implants, i.e. FRC implants with a porous surface, solid polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) implants and titanium (Ti) implants, were inserted in a transverse direction into the intercondular trabeculous bone area of distal femurs and proximal tibias of New Zealand White rabbits. Animals were sacrificed at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post operation, and push-out tests (n=5-6 per implant type per time point) were then carried out. At 12 weeks the shear force at the porous FRC-bone interface was significantly higher (283.3+/-55.3N) than the shear force at interfaces of solid PMMA/bone (14.4+/-11.0 N; p<0.001) and Ti/bone (130.6+/-22.2N; p=0.001). Histological observation revealed new bone growth into the porous surface structure of FRC implants. Solid PMMA and Ti implants were encapsulated mostly with fibrous connective tissue. Finite element analysis (FEA) revealed that porous FRC implants had mechanical properties which could be tailored to smooth the shear stress distribution at the bone-implant interface and reduce the stress-shielding effect. PMID:19268643

  3. Ion beam sputter modification of the surface morphology of biological implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigand, A. J.; Banks, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    The surface chemistry and texture of materials used for biological implants may significantly influence their performance and biocompatibility. Recent interest in the microscopic control of implant surface texture has led to the evaluation of ion beam sputtering as a potentially useful surface roughening technique. Ion sources, similar to electron bombardment ion thrusters designed for propulsive applications, are used to roughen the surfaces of various biocompatible alloys or polymer materials. These materials are typically used for dental implants, orthopedic prostheses, vascular prostheses, and artificial heart components. Masking techniques and resulting surface textures are described along with progress concerning evaluation of the biological response to the ion beam sputtered surfaces.

  4. Ion-beam-sputter modification of the surface morphology of biological implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigand, A. J.; Banks, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    The surface chemistry and texture of materials used for biological implants may significantly influence their performance and biocompatibility. Recent interest in the microscopic control of implant surface texture has led to the evaluation of ion-beam sputtering as a potentially useful surface roughening technique. Ion sources, similar to electron-bombardment ion thrusters designed for propulsive applications, are used to roughen the surfaces of various biocompatible alloys or polymer materials. These materials are typically used for dental implants, orthopedic prostheses, vascular prostheses, and artificial heart components. Masking techniques and resulting surface textures are described along with progress concerning evaluation of the biological response to the ion-beam-sputtered surfaces.

  5. Enhancing surface free energy and hydrophilicity through chemical modification of microstructured titanium implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rupp, F; Scheideler, L; Olshanska, N; de Wild, M; Wieland, M; Geis-Gerstorfer, J

    2006-02-01

    Roughness-induced hydrophobicity, well-known from natural plant surfaces and intensively studied toward superhydrophobic surfaces, has currently been identified on microstructured titanium implant surfaces. Studies indicate that microstructuring by sandblasting and acid etching (SLA) enhances the osteogenic properties of titanium. The undesired initial hydrophobicity, however, presumably decelerates primary interactions with the aqueous biosystem. To improve the initial wettability and to retain SLA microstructure, a novel surface modification was tested. This modification differs from SLA by its preparation after acid etching, which was done under protective gas conditions following liquid instead of dry storage. We hypothesized that this modification should have increased wettability due to the prevention of contaminations that occurs during air contact. The main outcome of dynamic wettability measurements was that the novel modification shows increased surface free energy (SFE) and increased hydrophilicity with initial water contact angles of 0 degrees compared to 139.9 degrees for SLA. This hydrophilization was kept even after any drying. Reduced hydrocarbon contaminations were identified to play a possible role in altered surface thermodynamics. Such surfaces aim to retain the hydrophilicity and natural high surface energy of the Ti dioxide surface until surgical implants' insertion and are compared in this in vitro study with structural surface variants of titanium to compare roughness and chemically induced wettability. PMID:16270344

  6. Effects of Surface Charges on Dental Implants: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cecilia Yan; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Tang, Alexander Tin Hong

    2012-01-01

    Osseointegration is a major factor influencing the success of dental implantation. To achieve rapid and strong, durable osseointegration, biomaterial researchers have investigated various surface treatment methods for dental subgingival titanium (Ti) implants. This paper focuses on surface-charge modification on the surface of titanium dental implants, which is a relatively new and very promising methodology for improving the implants' osseointegration properties. We give an overview on both theoretical explanations on how surface-charge affects the implants' osseointegration, as well as a potential surface charge modification method using sandblasting. Additionally, we discuss insights on the important factors affecting effectiveness of surface-charge modification methods and point out several interesting directions for future investigations on this topic. PMID:23093962

  7. A contact mechanics model for ankle implants with inclusion of surface roughness effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodaei, M.; Farhang, K.; Maani, N.

    2014-02-01

    Total ankle replacement is recognized as one of the best procedures to treat painful arthritic ankles. Even though this method can relieve patients from pain and reproduce the physiological functions of the ankle, an improper design can cause an excessive amount of metal debris due to wear, causing toxicity in implant recipient. This paper develops a contact model to treat the interaction of tibia and talus implants in an ankle joint. The contact model describes the interaction of implant rough surfaces including both elastic and plastic deformations. In the model, the tibia and the talus surfaces are viewed as macroscopically conforming cylinders or conforming multi-cylinders containing micrometre-scale roughness. The derived equations relate contact force on the implant and the minimum mean surface separation of the rough surfaces. The force is expressed as a statistical integral function of asperity heights over the possible region of interaction of the roughness of the tibia and the talus implant surfaces. A closed-form approximate equation relating contact force and minimum separation is used to obtain energy loss per cycle in a load-unload sequence applied to the implant. In this way implant surface statistics are related to energy loss in the implant that is responsible for internal void formation and subsequent wear and its harmful toxicity to the implant recipient.

  8. Energy Absorption in a Load-Unload Cycle of Knee Implant Using Fractal Model of Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodaei, Mohammad; Farhang, Kambiz

    2016-05-01

    Roughness measurement of knee implant surfaces is investigated. The study of roughness measurement show that the topography of knee implant surface is multi-scale and surface spectra follows a power law behavior. A magnification of rough surface topography implies that there is no difference between original and magnified profile of implant surface. For implant surface, statistical parameters such as variance of height, curvature, and slope are found to be scale-dependent. Fractal representation of implant surface shows that the size-distribution of the multi-scale contacts spots follows a power law and is characterized by the fractal dimension of implant surface. Fractal surface description of the rough surfaces of knee implant is used to obtain force-displacement relationship of the contact force. Using an approximate function through the fusion of two piecewise functions, energy absorption of a knee implant in a single cycle of load-unload is obtained.

  9. Early detachment of titanium particles from various different surfaces of endosseous dental implants.

    PubMed

    Franchi, M; Bacchelli, B; Martini, D; Pasquale, V De; Orsini, E; Ottani, V; Fini, M; Giavaresi, G; Giardino, R; Ruggeri, A

    2004-05-01

    Titanium (Ti) endosseous dental screws with different surfaces (smooth titanium--STi, titanium plasma-sprayed-TPS, alumina oxide sandblasted and acid-etched--Al-SLA, zirconium oxide sandblasted and acid etched--Zr-SLA) were implanted in femura and tibiae of sheep to investigate the biological evolution of the peri-implant tissues and detachment of Ti debris from the implant surfaces in early healing. Implants were not loaded. Sections of the screws and the peri-implant tissues obtained by sawing and grinding were analysed by light microscopy immediately after implantation (time 0) and after 14 days. All samples showed new bone trabeculae and vascularised medullary spaces in those areas where gaps between the implants and host bone were visible. In contrast, no osteogenesis was induced in the areas where the implants were initially positioned in close contact with the host bone. Chips of the pre-existing bone inducing new peri-implant neo-osteogenesis were surrounded by new bone trabeculae. The threads of some screws appeared to be deformed where the host bone showed fractures. Ti granules of 3-60 microm were detectable only in the peri-implant tissues of TPS implants both immediately after surgery and after 14 days, thus suggesting that this phenomenon may be related to the friction of the TPS coating during surgical insertion. PMID:14741589

  10. Early detachment of titanium particles from various different surfaces of endosseous dental implants.

    PubMed

    Franchi, M; Bacchelli, B; Martini, D; Pasquale, V De; Orsini, E; Ottani, V; Fini, M; Giavaresi, G; Giardino, R; Ruggeri, A

    2004-05-01

    Titanium (Ti) endosseous dental screws with different surfaces (smooth titanium--STi, titanium plasma-sprayed-TPS, alumina oxide sandblasted and acid-etched--Al-SLA, zirconium oxide sandblasted and acid etched--Zr-SLA) were implanted in femura and tibiae of sheep to investigate the biological evolution of the peri-implant tissues and detachment of Ti debris from the implant surfaces in early healing. Implants were not loaded. Sections of the screws and the peri-implant tissues obtained by sawing and grinding were analysed by light microscopy immediately after implantation (time 0) and after 14 days. All samples showed new bone trabeculae and vascularised medullary spaces in those areas where gaps between the implants and host bone were visible. In contrast, no osteogenesis was induced in the areas where the implants were initially positioned in close contact with the host bone. Chips of the pre-existing bone inducing new peri-implant neo-osteogenesis were surrounded by new bone trabeculae. The threads of some screws appeared to be deformed where the host bone showed fractures. Ti granules of 3-60 microm were detectable only in the peri-implant tissues of TPS implants both immediately after surgery and after 14 days, thus suggesting that this phenomenon may be related to the friction of the TPS coating during surgical insertion.

  11. Surface analytical studies of maxillofacial implants: influence of the preoperational treatment and the human body on the surface properties of retrieved implants.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Gábor; Sebők, Béla; Szabó, Péter J; Joób, Arpád F; Szabó, György

    2014-05-01

    In the present work, surface analytical investigation of unimplanted as well as retrieved pyrolytic carbon-covered carbon/carbon composite implants and Ti osteosynthesis plates is reported. The Ti plates were covered by a 200-nm-thick, anodically and thermally formed TiO2 layer. Our results suggest that although the oxide layer on the Ti miniplates remained stable during the time spent in the human body, there is still material transport between the implant and the human body. In case of the carbon/carbon composite implants, damage of the carbon fibers constituting the material was found on one side of the sterile implant and attributed to the manufacturing process. The NaCl crystals originally present on the surface of the sterile material disappeared during the time spent in the human body. As a result of the interaction with the human body, a new surface layer (mainly constituted of carbon) appeared on the implant. The results indicate that both the time spent in the human organism and the preparation of the implants before operation can have detectable effects on the investigated surface properties. Surface analytical investigations could therefore provide information not only about the biocompatibility of these materials but also about the effect of their treatment before operation.

  12. In vitro studies on the effect of cleaning methods on different implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Augthun, M; Tinschert, J; Huber, A

    1998-08-01

    The effect of specific cleaning procedures was examined on the surfaces of 3 implant types with different coatings and shapes (plasma sprayed [PS]; hydroxyapatite coated [HA] implants; and smooth titanium surface screws) using a scanning electron microscope. Each implant was treated for 60 seconds per instrument with one of 6 different hygiene measures: plastic curet, metal curet, diamond polishing device, ultrasonic scaler, air-powder-water spray with sodium hydrocarbonate solution, and chlorhexidine 0.1% solution rinse. The air-powder-abrasive system, chlorhexidine rinse, and curettage with a plastic instrument caused little or no surface damage in all but the hydroxyapatite-coated fixtures. Therefore, these 3 methods were tested to determine their cleaning efficacy in a second clinical study, which did not include the HA-coated fixture. Two implants were placed on the facial aspects of both upper molar regions using individual acrylic plates. Thus, 2 fixtures on each side were examined in each patient. The examination revealed that only the sodium hydrocarbonate spray yielded a clean fixture without damage to the implant surface. In a third stage, which imitated the clinical procedure of the second approach, the cell growth of mouse-fibroblasts on implant surfaces was examined after cleaning the surface with plastic scaler and the air-abrasive system, which represents the least damaging and most effective methods. In contrast to the implant surfaces treated with plastic scalers, mostly vital cells were found on implants sprayed with the air-abrasive system. PMID:9736367

  13. Temperature increases during surface decontamination of titanium implants using CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Mouhyi, J; Sennerby, L; Nammour, S; Guillaume, P; Van Reck, J

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of the present in vitro investigation was to measure temperature changes at the implant surface when using pulsed CO2 laser in a simulated implant surface decontamination protocol. Six threaded titanium implants were placed in a fresh resected pig mandible. A 4 x 4 mm defect was created buccally to each implant in order to expose the implant head and approximately 5 threads. Temperature changes were monitored by two thermocouples placed near the dehiscence and at the apical part of the implant. Several setting combinations of the CO2 laser with regard to output power, pulse width, pulse repetition rate and irradiation time were tested on dry and wet (distilled water) surfaces. Only minor temperature increases were measured when lasing wet titanium surfaces, while the temperature at dry surfaces exceeded the proposed thresholds for bone damage at clinically relevant settings. It is concluded that the CO2 laser when used on a wet implant surface in a pulsed mode at 8 W/10 ms/20 hz during 5 s induces a temperature increase of less than 3 degrees C. This would minimize the risk of temperature induced tissue damage as a result of lasing implant surfaces.

  14. Evaluation of Implant Collar Surfaces for Marginal Bone Loss: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is important to understand the influence of different collar designs on peri-implant marginal bone loss, especially in the critical area. Objectives. The purpose of the present systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare dental implants with different collar surfaces, evaluating marginal bone loss and survival rates of implants. Methods. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, randomized controlled trials, and prospective and retrospective studies, which evaluated dental implants with different collar surface in the same study. Results. Twelve articles were included, with a total of 492 machined, 319 rough-surfaced, and 352 rough-surfaced microthreaded neck implants. There was less marginal bone loss at implants with rough-surfaced and rough-surfaced microthreaded neck than at machined-neck implants (difference in means: 0.321, 95% CI: 0.149 to 0.493; p < 0.01). Conclusion. Rough and rough-surfaced microthreaded implants are considered a predictable treatment for preserving early marginal bone loss. PMID:27493957

  15. Osseointegration on metallic implant surfaces: effects of microgeometry and growth factor treatment.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Sally R; Simon, Jordan; Alexander, Harold; Dennis, Michael; Ricci, John L

    2002-01-01

    Orthopedic implants often loosen due to the invasion of fibrous tissue. The aim of this study was to devise a novel implant surface that would speed healing adjacent to the surface, and create a stable interface for bone integration, by using a chemoattractant for bone precursor cells, and by controlling tissue migration at implant surfaces via specific surface microgeometry design. Experimental surfaces were tested in a canine implantable chamber that simulates the intramedullary bone response around total joint implants. Titanium and alloy surfaces were prepared with specific microgeometries, designed to optimize tissue attachment and control fibrous encapsulation. TGF beta, a mitogen and chemoattractant (Hunziker EB, Rosenberg LC. J Bone Joint Surg Am 1996;78:721-733) for osteoprogenitor cells, was used to recruit progenitor cells to the implant surface and to enhance their proliferation. Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CS) was the delivery vehicle for TGF beta; CS resorbs rapidly and appears to be osteoconductive. Animals were sacrificed at 6 and 12 weeks postoperatively. Results indicated that TGFbeta can be reliably released in an active form from a calcium sulfate carrier in vivo. The growth factor had a significant effect on bone ingrowth into implant channels at an early time period, although this effect was not seen with higher doses at later periods. Adjustment of dosage should render TGF beta more potent at later time periods. Calcium sulfate treatment without TGF beta resulted in a significant increase in bone ingrowth throughout the 12-week time period studied. Bone response to the microgrooved surfaces was dramatic, causing greater ingrowth in 9 of the 12 experimental conditions. Microgrooves also enhanced the mechanical strength of CS-coated specimens. The grooved surface was able to control the direction of ingrowth. This surface treatment may result in a clinically valuable implant design to induce rapid ingrowth and a strong bone-implant interface

  16. The Influence of Implant Abutment Surface Roughness and the Type of Cement on Retention of Implant Supported Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, M. Sushender; Reddy, C. Rajaneesh; Pithani, Padmaja; R, Santosh Kumar; Kulkarni, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To provide relative data on the retentive characters of the commonly used cements on different implant abutment surfaces. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 implant abutments were divided into 2 groups. Ten implants were unaltered and ten were air borne particle abraded with 50μ aluminium oxide. Three luting agents (Tempbond, IRM and ImProv) were used to secure the crowns to abutments. All the crowns were removed from the abutment with an Instron machine at 0.5mm per minute and tensile bond strengths were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Anova, Paired t-test and Post-Hoc tests. Results: IRM showed the highest mean tensile strength among the three cements when used with treated and untreated implant abutment surfaces. Change in the abutment surface roughness had no effect on the mean tensile bond strength of TempBond and IRM cements, whereas ImProv cement showed reduced tensile strength with sandblasted surface. Conclusion: When increased retention is required IRM cement with either sandblasted or milled surface could be used and when retrievability is required cements of choice could be either TempBond or ImProv. PMID:25954694

  17. The effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation on hydroxyapatite-coated implants and fluoride-modified TiO2-blasted implant surfaces: a microstructural analysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung-Il; Lee, Eun-Kwon; Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Hun; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kwon, Young-Hyuk; Herr, Yeek; Chung, Jong-Hyuk

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microscopic changes and surface roughness on hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated implants following exposure to different powers and durations of Er:YAG laser irradiation in order to determine the proper pulse energy level and irradiation time. Ten HA-coated implants and ten fluoride-modified TiO2 implants were used. The implants were divided into a control (one implant) and test group (nine implants) for each implant type. Implants in the test groups were sub-divided into three groups (three implants per group) based on the applied laser pulse energy and irradiation time. The measurement of surface roughness was performed on all implants in the test groups using a white light interferometer before and after laser irradiation. R a values were recorded and compared in order to evaluate changes in surface roughness. For HA-coated implants, the R a values increased in all test groups after laser irradiation. However, mean R a values in the fluoride-modified TiO2-blasted implant test group were decreased after irradiation. There was no statistical difference. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed surface alterations in both the HA-coated and fluoridated TiO2-blasted implants irradiated for 1.5 min at 100 mJ/pulse, 10 Hz. When the pulse energy and irradiation time increased, greater surface alterations, including surface flattening and microfractures, were observed. In conclusion, the results of the current study suggest that no changes could be observed in both HA-coated implants and fluoride-modified TiO2-blasted implants after irradiation at an intensity of 100 mJ/pulse, 10 Hz for 1 min performed to achieve surface detoxification.

  18. Effects of calcium-modified titanium implant surfaces on platelet activation, clot formation, and osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Anitua, Eduardo; Prado, Roberto; Orive, Gorka; Tejero, Ricardo

    2015-03-01

    The clinical success of load bearing dental and orthopedic implants relies on adequate osseointegration. Because of its favorable properties, titanium is generally considered as the material of choice. Following implant placement, titanium surfaces establish an ionic equilibrium with the surrounding tissues in which calcium plays major roles. Calcium is a cofactor of the coagulation cascade that mediates plasma protein adsorption and intervenes in a number of other intra and extracellular processes relevant for bone regeneration. In this study, titanium surfaces were modified with calcium ions (Ca(2+) surfaces) and their responses to in vitro and in vivo models were analyzed. Unlike unmodified surfaces, Ca(2+) surfaces were superhydrophilic and induced surface clot formation, platelet adsorption and activation when exposed to blood plasma. Interestingly, in vivo osseointegration using a peri-implant gap model in rabbit demonstrated that Ca(2+) surfaces significantly improved peri-implant bone volume and density at 2 weeks and bone implant contact at 8 weeks as compared to the unmodified controls. The combination of Ca(2+) surfaces with plasma rich in growth factors produced significantly more bone contact already at 2 weeks of implantation. These findings suggest the importance of the provisional matrix formation on tissue integration and highlight the clinical potential of Ca(2+) titanium surfaces as efficient stimulators of implant osseointegration.

  19. Bone regeneration associated with nontherapeutic and therapeutic surface coatings for dental implants in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Hamdan S; Jansen, John A

    2013-06-01

    Oral implantology is considered as the treatment of choice for replacing missing teeth in elderly people. However, implant complications may occur in patients with osteoporosis. The pathogenesis underlying osteoporosis is due to an alteration in bone cell response to hormonal, nutritional, and aging factors. For such challenging situations, improved bone regeneration has been shown around dental implants for certain surface modifications. These modifications include coatings of titanium implants with calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics. Surface coating developments also allow for the addition of organic biomolecules, like growth factors, into the inorganic coatings that increase the bone formation process at the bone-implant interface. The application of therapeutic-based coatings is becoming a rapidly growing research field of interest. CaP-coated implants have the ability to incorporate anti-osteoporotic drugs, which then can be locally released over time from an implant surface in a controlled manner. Thus, it can be anticipated that nontherapeutic and/or therapeutic coated implants can significantly increase low bone density as well as improve impaired bone regeneration in osteoporosis. This review aims to provide a thorough understanding of the underlying mechanisms for impaired bone regeneration around dental implants in osteoporosis. Secondly, the review will focus on biological interactions and beneficial role of the surface-coated (i.e., nontherapeutics and therapeutics) bone implants in osteoporotic bone tissue.

  20. A Review on the Wettability of Dental Implant Surfaces: Theoretical and Experimental Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Frank; Gittens, Rolando A.; Scheideler, Lutz; Marmur, Abraham; Boyan, Barbara D.; Schwartz, Zvi; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The surface wettability of biomaterials determines the biological cascade of events at the biomaterial/host interface. Wettability is modulated by surface characteristics, such as surface chemistry and surface topography. However, the design of current implant surfaces focuses mainly on specific micro- and nanotopographical features and is still far from predicting the concomitant wetting behavior. There is an increasing interest in understanding the wetting mechanisms of implant surfaces and the role of wettability on the biological response at the implant/bone or implant/soft tissue interface. Fundamental knowledge related to the influence of surface roughness (i.e., a quantification of surface topography) on titanium and titanium alloy surface wettability, and the different associated wetting regimes, can improve our understanding of the role of wettability of rough implant surfaces on the biological outcome. Such an approach has been applied to biomaterial surfaces only in a limited way. Focusing on titanium dental and orthopaedic implants, the present study reviews the current knowledge on the wettability of biomaterial surfaces, encompassing basic and applied aspects that include measurement techniques, thermodynamic aspects of wetting, and models predicting topographical and roughness effects on the wetting behavior. PMID:24590162

  1. Prediction of lubrication regimes in wrist implants with spherical bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pylios, T; Shepherd, D E T

    2004-03-01

    The wrist joint is frequently affected by rheumatoid arthritis, resulting in wrist pain, deformity and ultimately loss of function. Artificial wrist implants have been introduced to treat the rheumatoid wrist, to attempt to alleviate pain and restore some function to the joint. The aim of this study was to predict the likely lubrication regimes that occur in wrist implants with spherical bearing surfaces. The implant was modelled as an equivalent ball-on-plane. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory was used to determine the minimum film thickness for the implant under different load, entraining velocity, lubricant viscosity, size of implant and material combinations. The results show that the highest film thickness is found in large implants, with high viscosity, high entraining velocity and low load. Hard-on-soft material combinations will operate with a boundary lubrication regime. Material combinations involving ceramic bearing surfaces have the potential to operate with a mixed lubrication regime.

  2. The biomedical properties of polyethylene terephthalate surface modified by silver ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Li, Jianxin; Shen, Liru; Ling, Ren; Xu, Zejin; Zhao, Ansha; Leng, Yongxiang; Huang, Nan

    2007-04-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film is modified by Ag ion implantation with a fluence 1 × 1016 ions/cm2. The results of X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that silver has been successfully implanted into the surface of PET. The PET samples modified by silver ion implantation have significantly bactericidal property. The capacity of the staphylococcus epidermidis (SE) adhered on the Ag+ implanted PET surface is 5.3 × 106 CFU/ml, but the capacity of the SE adhered on the untreated PET film is 2.23 × 107 CFU/ml. The thromboembolic property is evaluated by in vitro platelet adhesion test, and there is not statistically difference between the untreated PET and the Ag+ implanted PET for the number of adhered and activated platelets. The PET implanted by silver ion has not acute toxicity to endothelial cell (EC) which was evaluated by the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) test.

  3. [Surface modifications to improve biocompatibility and mechanical properties of orthopedic implants].

    PubMed

    Thull, R

    2003-01-01

    State of the art surface modifications on metallic materials for orthopedic and dental implants permit clinical application if implant design,manufacturing process as well as function and duration of implantation are harmonized with each other. Keeping these prerequisites in mind,hydroxylapatite is suited for closer connection of fixation elements in hard tissue. PVD or PECVD modifications can make gliding surfaces or surfaces of fixation elements abrasion resistant if the pressure-area ratio does not exceed threshold values in cases of surfaces moving relative to each other

  4. Tantalum implanted entangled porous titanium promotes surface osseointegration and bone ingrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Qiao, Yuqin; Cheng, Mengqi; Jiang, Guofeng; He, Guo; Chen, Yunsu; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-05-01

    Porous Ti is considered to be an ideal graft material in orthopaedic and dental surgeries due to its similar spatial structures and mechanical properties to cancellous bone. In this work, to overcome the bioinertia of Ti, Ta-implanted entangled porous titanium (EPT) was constructed by plasma immersion ion implantation & deposition (PIII&D) method. Ca-implanted and unimplanted EPTs were investigated as control groups. Although no difference was found in surface topography and mechanical performances, both Ca- and Ta-implanted groups had better effects in promoting MG-63 cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization than those of unimplanted group. The expression of osteogenic-related markers examined by qRT-PCR and western blotting was upregulated in Ca- and Ta-implanted groups. Moreover, Ta-implanted EPT group could reach a higher level of these effects than that of Ca-implanted group. Enhanced osseointegration of both Ca- and Ta-implanted EPT implants was demonstrated through in vivo experiments, including micro-CT evaluation, push-out test, sequential fluorescent labeling and histological observation. However, the Ta-implanted group possessed more stable and continuous osteogenic activity. Our results suggest that Ta-implanted EPT can be developed as one of the highly efficient graft material for bone reconstruction situations.

  5. Tantalum implanted entangled porous titanium promotes surface osseointegration and bone ingrowth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Qiao, Yuqin; Cheng, Mengqi; Jiang, Guofeng; He, Guo; Chen, Yunsu; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-01-01

    Porous Ti is considered to be an ideal graft material in orthopaedic and dental surgeries due to its similar spatial structures and mechanical properties to cancellous bone. In this work, to overcome the bioinertia of Ti, Ta-implanted entangled porous titanium (EPT) was constructed by plasma immersion ion implantation &deposition (PIII&D) method. Ca-implanted and unimplanted EPTs were investigated as control groups. Although no difference was found in surface topography and mechanical performances, both Ca- and Ta-implanted groups had better effects in promoting MG-63 cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization than those of unimplanted group. The expression of osteogenic-related markers examined by qRT-PCR and western blotting was upregulated in Ca- and Ta-implanted groups. Moreover, Ta-implanted EPT group could reach a higher level of these effects than that of Ca-implanted group. Enhanced osseointegration of both Ca- and Ta-implanted EPT implants was demonstrated through in vivo experiments, including micro-CT evaluation, push-out test, sequential fluorescent labeling and histological observation. However, the Ta-implanted group possessed more stable and continuous osteogenic activity. Our results suggest that Ta-implanted EPT can be developed as one of the highly efficient graft material for bone reconstruction situations.

  6. Tantalum implanted entangled porous titanium promotes surface osseointegration and bone ingrowth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Qiao, Yuqin; Cheng, Mengqi; Jiang, Guofeng; He, Guo; Chen, Yunsu; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-01-01

    Porous Ti is considered to be an ideal graft material in orthopaedic and dental surgeries due to its similar spatial structures and mechanical properties to cancellous bone. In this work, to overcome the bioinertia of Ti, Ta-implanted entangled porous titanium (EPT) was constructed by plasma immersion ion implantation & deposition (PIII&D) method. Ca-implanted and unimplanted EPTs were investigated as control groups. Although no difference was found in surface topography and mechanical performances, both Ca- and Ta-implanted groups had better effects in promoting MG-63 cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization than those of unimplanted group. The expression of osteogenic-related markers examined by qRT-PCR and western blotting was upregulated in Ca- and Ta-implanted groups. Moreover, Ta-implanted EPT group could reach a higher level of these effects than that of Ca-implanted group. Enhanced osseointegration of both Ca- and Ta-implanted EPT implants was demonstrated through in vivo experiments, including micro-CT evaluation, push-out test, sequential fluorescent labeling and histological observation. However, the Ta-implanted group possessed more stable and continuous osteogenic activity. Our results suggest that Ta-implanted EPT can be developed as one of the highly efficient graft material for bone reconstruction situations. PMID:27185196

  7. Tantalum implanted entangled porous titanium promotes surface osseointegration and bone ingrowth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Qiao, Yuqin; Cheng, Mengqi; Jiang, Guofeng; He, Guo; Chen, Yunsu; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-01-01

    Porous Ti is considered to be an ideal graft material in orthopaedic and dental surgeries due to its similar spatial structures and mechanical properties to cancellous bone. In this work, to overcome the bioinertia of Ti, Ta-implanted entangled porous titanium (EPT) was constructed by plasma immersion ion implantation &deposition (PIII&D) method. Ca-implanted and unimplanted EPTs were investigated as control groups. Although no difference was found in surface topography and mechanical performances, both Ca- and Ta-implanted groups had better effects in promoting MG-63 cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization than those of unimplanted group. The expression of osteogenic-related markers examined by qRT-PCR and western blotting was upregulated in Ca- and Ta-implanted groups. Moreover, Ta-implanted EPT group could reach a higher level of these effects than that of Ca-implanted group. Enhanced osseointegration of both Ca- and Ta-implanted EPT implants was demonstrated through in vivo experiments, including micro-CT evaluation, push-out test, sequential fluorescent labeling and histological observation. However, the Ta-implanted group possessed more stable and continuous osteogenic activity. Our results suggest that Ta-implanted EPT can be developed as one of the highly efficient graft material for bone reconstruction situations. PMID:27185196

  8. Assessment of modified gold surfaced titanium implants on skeletal fixation.

    PubMed

    Zainali, Kasra; Danscher, Gorm; Jakobsen, Thomas; Baas, Jorgen; Møller, Per; Bechtold, Joan E; Soballe, Kjeld

    2013-01-01

    Noncemented implants are the primary choice for younger patients undergoing total hip replacements. However, the major concern in this group of patients regarding revision is the concern from wear particles, periimplant inflammation, and subsequently aseptic implant loosening. Macrophages have been shown to liberate gold ions through the process termed dissolucytosis. Furthermore, gold ions are known to act in an anti-inflammatory manner by inhibiting cellular NF-κB-DNA binding. The present study investigated whether partial coating of titanium implants could augment early osseointegration and increase mechanical fixation. Cylindrical porous coated Ti-6Al-4V implants partially coated with metallic gold were inserted in the proximal region of the humerus in ten canines and control implants without gold were inserted in contralateral humerus. Observation time was 4 weeks. Biomechanical push out tests and stereological histomorphometrical analyses showed no statistically significant differences in the two groups. The unchanged parameters are considered an improvement of the coating properties, as a previous complete gold-coated implant showed inferior mechanical fixation and reduced osseointegration compared to control titanium implants in a similar model. Since sufficient early mechanical fixation is achieved with this new coating, it is reasonable to investigate the implant further in long-term studies. PMID:22847873

  9. Surface stiffening and enhanced photoluminescence of ion implanted cellulose - polyvinyl alcohol - silica composite.

    PubMed

    Shanthini, G M; Sakthivel, N; Menon, Ranjini; Nabhiraj, P Y; Gómez-Tejedor, J A; Meseguer-Dueñas, J M; Gómez Ribelles, J L; Krishna, J B M; Kalkura, S Narayana

    2016-11-20

    Novel Cellulose (Cel) reinforced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-Silica (Si) composite which has good stability and in vitro degradation was prepared by lyophilization technique and implanted using N(3+) ions of energy 24keV in the fluences of 1×10(15), 5×10(15) and 1×10(16)ions/cm(2). SEM analysis revealed the formation of microstructures, and improved the surface roughness on ion implantation. In addition to these structural changes, the implantation significantly modified the luminescent, thermal and mechanical properties of the samples. The elastic modulus of the implanted samples has increased by about 50 times compared to the pristine which confirms that the stiffness of the sample surface has increased remarkably on ion implantation. The photoluminescence of the native cellulose has improved greatly due to defect site, dangling bonds and hydrogen passivation. Electric conductivity of the ion implanted samples was improved by about 25%. Hence, low energy ion implantation tunes the mechanical property, surface roughness and further induces the formation of nano structures. MG63 cells seeded onto the scaffolds reveals that with the increase in implantation fluence, the cell attachment, viability and proliferation have improved greatly compared to pristine. The enhancement of cell growth of about 59% was observed in the implanted samples compared to pristine. These properties will enable the scaffolds to be ideal for bone tissue engineering and imaging applications. PMID:27561534

  10. Surface stiffening and enhanced photoluminescence of ion implanted cellulose - polyvinyl alcohol - silica composite.

    PubMed

    Shanthini, G M; Sakthivel, N; Menon, Ranjini; Nabhiraj, P Y; Gómez-Tejedor, J A; Meseguer-Dueñas, J M; Gómez Ribelles, J L; Krishna, J B M; Kalkura, S Narayana

    2016-11-20

    Novel Cellulose (Cel) reinforced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-Silica (Si) composite which has good stability and in vitro degradation was prepared by lyophilization technique and implanted using N(3+) ions of energy 24keV in the fluences of 1×10(15), 5×10(15) and 1×10(16)ions/cm(2). SEM analysis revealed the formation of microstructures, and improved the surface roughness on ion implantation. In addition to these structural changes, the implantation significantly modified the luminescent, thermal and mechanical properties of the samples. The elastic modulus of the implanted samples has increased by about 50 times compared to the pristine which confirms that the stiffness of the sample surface has increased remarkably on ion implantation. The photoluminescence of the native cellulose has improved greatly due to defect site, dangling bonds and hydrogen passivation. Electric conductivity of the ion implanted samples was improved by about 25%. Hence, low energy ion implantation tunes the mechanical property, surface roughness and further induces the formation of nano structures. MG63 cells seeded onto the scaffolds reveals that with the increase in implantation fluence, the cell attachment, viability and proliferation have improved greatly compared to pristine. The enhancement of cell growth of about 59% was observed in the implanted samples compared to pristine. These properties will enable the scaffolds to be ideal for bone tissue engineering and imaging applications.

  11. Early osseointegration driven by the surface chemistry and wettability of dental implants

    PubMed Central

    SARTORETTO, Suelen Cristina; ALVES, Adriana Terezinha Neves Novellino; RESENDE, Rodrigo Figueiredo Britto; CALASANS-MAIA, José; GRANJEIRO, José Mauro; CALASANS-MAIA, Mônica Diuana

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of two different commercially available dental implants on osseointegration. The surfaces were sandblasting and acid etching (Group 1) and sandblasting and acid etching, then maintained in an isotonic solution of 0.9% sodium chloride (Group 2). Material and Methods X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed for surface chemistry analysis. Surface morphology and topography was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy (CM), respectively. Contact angle analysis (CAA) was employed for wetting evaluation. Bone-implant-contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupied (BAFO) analysis were performed on thin sections (30 μm) 14 and 28 days after the installation of 10 implants from each group (n=20) in rabbits’ tibias. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA at the 95% level of significance considering implantation time and implant surface as independent variables. Results Group 2 showed 3-fold less carbon on the surface and a markedly enhanced hydrophilicity compared to Group 1 but a similar surface roughness (p>0.05). BIC and BAFO levels in Group 2 at 14 days were similar to those in Group 1 at 28 days. After 28 days of installation, BIC and BAFO measurements of Group 2 were approximately 1.5-fold greater than in Group 1 (p<0.05). Conclusion The surface chemistry and wettability implants of Group 2 accelerate osseointegration and increase the area of the bone-to-implant interface when compared to those of Group 1. PMID:26221922

  12. Histological Evaluation of Nano-Micro Titanium Implant Surface Treatment in Beagle Humerus.

    PubMed

    Yun, Kwidug; Kang, Seongsoo; Oh, Gyejeong; Lim, Hyunpil; Lee, Kwangmin; Yang, Hongso; Vang, Mongsook; Park, Sangwon

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of nano-micro titanium implant surface using histology in beagle dogs. A total of 48 screw-shaped implants (Megagen, Daegu, Korea) which dimensions were 4 mm in diameter and 8.5 mm in length, were used. The implants were classified into 4 groups (n = 12): machined surface (M group), RBM (Resorbable Blasting Media) surface (R group), nano surface which is nanotube formation on the machined surface (MA group) and nano-micro surface which is nanotube formation on the RBM surface (RA group). Anodic oxidation was performed at a constant voltage of 20 V for 10 min using a DC power supply (Fine Power F-3005; SG EMD, Anyang, Korea). The bone blocks were investigated using histology. There was no inflammation around implants, and new bone formation was shown along with the nano-micro titanium implant surfaces. The amount of bone formation was increased depending on time comparing 4 weeks and 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, lamellar bone was more formed along with the nano-micro titanium implant surfaces than 4 weeks. It indicated that nano-micro surface showed good result in terms of osseointegration.

  13. Histological Evaluation of Nano-Micro Titanium Implant Surface Treatment in Beagle Humerus.

    PubMed

    Yun, Kwidug; Kang, Seongsoo; Oh, Gyejeong; Lim, Hyunpil; Lee, Kwangmin; Yang, Hongso; Vang, Mongsook; Park, Sangwon

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of nano-micro titanium implant surface using histology in beagle dogs. A total of 48 screw-shaped implants (Megagen, Daegu, Korea) which dimensions were 4 mm in diameter and 8.5 mm in length, were used. The implants were classified into 4 groups (n = 12): machined surface (M group), RBM (Resorbable Blasting Media) surface (R group), nano surface which is nanotube formation on the machined surface (MA group) and nano-micro surface which is nanotube formation on the RBM surface (RA group). Anodic oxidation was performed at a constant voltage of 20 V for 10 min using a DC power supply (Fine Power F-3005; SG EMD, Anyang, Korea). The bone blocks were investigated using histology. There was no inflammation around implants, and new bone formation was shown along with the nano-micro titanium implant surfaces. The amount of bone formation was increased depending on time comparing 4 weeks and 12 weeks. At 12 weeks, lamellar bone was more formed along with the nano-micro titanium implant surfaces than 4 weeks. It indicated that nano-micro surface showed good result in terms of osseointegration. PMID:27433693

  14. Cracks and blisters formed close to a silicon wafer surface by He-H co-implantation at low energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkashin, N.; Daghbouj, N.; Darras, F.-X.; Fnaiech, M.; Claverie, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have studied the effect of reducing the implantation energy towards low keV values on the areal density of He and H atoms stored within populations of blister cavities formed by co-implantation of the same fluence of He then H ions into Si(001) wafers and annealing. Using a variety of experimental techniques, we have measured blister heights and depth from the surface, diameter, areal density of the cracks from which they originate as functions of implantation energy and fluence. We show that there is a direct correlation between the diameters of the cracks and the heights of the associated blisters. This correlation only depends on the implantation energy, i.e., only on the depth at which the cracks are located. Using finite element method modeling, we infer the pressure inside the blister cavities from the elastic deformations they generate, i.e., from the height of the blisters. From this, we demonstrate that the gas pressure within a blister only depends on the diameter of the associated crack and not on its depth position and derive an analytical expression relating these parameters. Relating the pressure inside a blister to the respective concentrations of gas molecules it contains, we deduce the areal densities of He and H atoms contained within the populations of blisters. After low-energy implantations (8 keV He+, 3 keV H+), all the implanted He and H atoms contribute to the formation of the blisters. There is no measurable exo-diffusion of any of the implanted gases, in contrast to what was assumed at the state of the art to explain the failure of the Smart-Cut technology when using very low energy ion implantation for the fabrication of ultra-thin layers. Alternative explanations must be investigated.

  15. Cracks and blisters formed close to a silicon wafer surface by He-H co-implantation at low energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cherkashin, N. Darras, F.-X.; Claverie, A.; Daghbouj, N.; Fnaiech, M.

    2015-12-28

    We have studied the effect of reducing the implantation energy towards low keV values on the areal density of He and H atoms stored within populations of blister cavities formed by co-implantation of the same fluence of He then H ions into Si(001) wafers and annealing. Using a variety of experimental techniques, we have measured blister heights and depth from the surface, diameter, areal density of the cracks from which they originate as functions of implantation energy and fluence. We show that there is a direct correlation between the diameters of the cracks and the heights of the associated blisters. This correlation only depends on the implantation energy, i.e., only on the depth at which the cracks are located. Using finite element method modeling, we infer the pressure inside the blister cavities from the elastic deformations they generate, i.e., from the height of the blisters. From this, we demonstrate that the gas pressure within a blister only depends on the diameter of the associated crack and not on its depth position and derive an analytical expression relating these parameters. Relating the pressure inside a blister to the respective concentrations of gas molecules it contains, we deduce the areal densities of He and H atoms contained within the populations of blisters. After low-energy implantations (8 keV He{sup +}, 3 keV H{sup +}), all the implanted He and H atoms contribute to the formation of the blisters. There is no measurable exo-diffusion of any of the implanted gases, in contrast to what was assumed at the state of the art to explain the failure of the Smart-Cut technology when using very low energy ion implantation for the fabrication of ultra-thin layers. Alternative explanations must be investigated.

  16. An Introduction to Cochlear Implant Technology, Activation, and Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Jan A.; Teagle, Holly F. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides information about the hardware components and speech-processing strategies of cochlear implant systems. The use of assistive listening devices with cochlear implants is also discussed. A brief description of surgical procedures and the initial activation of the device are also presented, along with programming considerations.…

  17. Science and technology of biocompatible thin films for implantable biomedical devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Kabius, B.; Auciello, O.; Materials Science Division

    2010-01-01

    This presentation focuses on reviewing research to develop two critical biocompatible film technologies to enable implantable biomedical devices, namely: (1) development of bioinert/biocompatible coatings for encapsulation of Si chips implantable in the human body (e.g., retinal prosthesis implantable in the human eye) - the coating involves a novel ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) film or hybrid biocompatible oxide/UNCD layered films; and (2) development of biocompatible films with high-dielectric constant and microfabrication process to produce energy storage super-capacitors embedded in the microchip to achieve full miniaturization for implantation into the human body.

  18. Adaptation of NASA technology for the optimization of orthopedic knee implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA technology originally developed for the optimization of composite structures (engine blades) is adapted and applied to the optimization of orthopedic knee implants. A method is developed enabling the tailoring of the implant for optimal interaction with the environment of the tibia. The shape of the implant components are optimized, such that the stresses in the bone are favorably controlled to minimize bone degradation and prevent failures. A pilot tailoring system is developed and the feasibility of the concept is elevated. The optimization system is expected to provide the means for improving knee prosthesis and individual implant tailoring for each patient.

  19. Histomorphometric and biomechanical analyses of osseointegration of four different orthodontic mini implant surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Sumit

    Objective: To evaluate the osseointegration potential of four different surfaces of mini-implants. We hypothesized that mini-implants surface roughness alters the intrinsic biomechanical properties of the bone integrated to titanium. Materials and Methods: Mini implants and circular discs were made from alloy Ti6Al4V grade 5. On the basis of surface treatment study was divided into 4 groups: Group 1: Machined: no surface treatment, Group 2: Acid etched: with hydrochloric acid, Group 3: Grit Blasted with alumina and Group 4: Grit blasted +Acid etched. Surface roughness parameters (mean surface roughness: Ra and Quadratic Average roughness: Rq) of the four discs from each group were measured by the optical profilometer. Contact angle measurement of 3 discs from each group was done with a Goniometer. Contact angle of liquids with different hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity were measured. 128 mini implants, differing in surface treatment, were placed into the tibias and femurs of 8 adult male New Zealand white rabbits. Biomechanical properties (Removal torque and hardness) measurements and histomorphometric observations were measured. Results: Ra and Rq of groups were: Machined (1.17+/-0.11, 2.59+/-0.09) Acid etched (1.82+/-0.04, 3.17+/-0.13), Grit blasted (4.83+/-0.23, 7.04+/-0.08), Grit blasted + Acid etched (3.64+/-0.03, 4.95+/-0.04) respectively. Group 4 had significantly (p=0.000) lower Ra and Rq than Group 3. The interaction between the groups and liquid was significant. Group 4 had significantly lower contact angle measurements (40.4°, 26.9°), both for blood and NaCl when compared to other three groups (p≤0.01). Group 4 had significantly higher torque than Group 3 (Tibia: 13.67>9.07N-cm; Femur: 18.21>14.12N-cm), Group 4 (Tibia: 13.67>9.78N-cm; Femur: 18.21>12.87N-cm), and machined (Tibia: 13.67>4.08N-cm; Femur: 18.21>6.49N-cm). SEM analysis reveals significantly more bone implant gap in machined implant surfaces than treated implant surfaces. Bone to implant

  20. N and Cr ion implantation of natural ruby surfaces and their characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. Sudheendra; Sahoo, Rakesh K.; Dash, Tapan; Magudapathy, P.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Nayak, B. B.; Mishra, B. K.

    2016-04-01

    Energetic ions of N and Cr were used to implant the surfaces of natural rubies (low aesthetic quality). Surface colours of the specimens were found to change after ion implantation. The samples without and with ion implantation were characterized by diffuse reflectance spectra in ultra violet and visible region (DRS-UV-Vis), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nano-indentation. While the Cr-ion implantation produced deep red surface colour (pigeon eye red) in polished raw sample (without heat treatment), the N-ion implantation produced a mixed tone of dark blue, greenish blue and violet surface colour in the heat treated sample. In the case of heat treated sample at 3 × 1017 N-ions/cm2 fluence, formation of colour centres (F+, F2, F2+ and F22+) by ion implantation process is attributed to explain the development of the modified surface colours. Certain degree of surface amorphization was observed to be associated with the above N-ion implantation.

  1. The effect of controlled microrobotized blasting on implant surface texturing and early osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Gil, Luiz F; Marin, Charles; Teixeira, Hellen; Marão, Heloisa F; Tovar, Nick; Khan, Rehan; Bonfante, Estevam A; Janal, Malvin; Coelho, Paulo G

    2016-02-01

    Surface topography modifications have become a key strategy for hastening the host-to-implant response to implantable materials. The present study evaluated the effect of three different carefully controlled surface texture patterns achieved through microrobotized blasting (controlled to high, medium and low roughness) relative to a larger scale blasting procedure (control) in early osseointegration in a canine model. Four commercially pure grade 2 titanium alloy implants (one of each surface) were bilaterally placed in the radii of six beagle dogs and allowed end points of 1 and 6 weeks in vivo. Following sacrifice, implants in bone were non-decalcified processed for bone morphologic and histometric (bone-to-implant contact; bone area fraction occupancy) evaluation. Surface topography was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and optical interferometry. Results showed initial osteogenic tissue interaction at one week and new bone in intimate contact with all implant surfaces at 6 weeks. At 1 and 6 weeks in vivo, higher bone-to-implant and bone area fraction occupancy were observed for the high texture pattern microrobotized blasted surface relative to others.

  2. Nano- and Micro-Scale Oxidative Patterning of Titanium Implant Surfaces for Improved Surface Wettability.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-hye; Son, Jun Sik; Choi, Seok Hwa; Kim, Kyo-han; Kwon, Tae-yub

    2016-02-01

    A simple and scalable surface modification treatment is demonstrated, in which nano- and microscale features are introduced into the surface of titanium (Ti) substrates by means of a novel and eco-friendly oxidative aqueous solution composed of hydrogen peroxide (H202) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). By immersing mirror-polished Ti discs in an aqueous mixture of 30 wt% H2O2/5 wt% NaHCO3 at 23 +/- 3 degrees C for 4 h, it was confirmed that this mixture is capable of generating microscale topographies on Ti surfaces. It also simultaneously formed nanochannels that were regularly arranged in a comb-like pattern on the Ti surface, thus forming a hierarchical surface structure. Further, these nano/micro-textured Ti surfaces showed great surface roughness and excellent wettability when compared with control Ti surfaces. This study demonstrates that a H2O2/NaHCO3 mixture can be effectively utilized to create reproducible nano/microscale topographies on Ti implant surfaces, thus providing an economical new oxidative solution that may be used effectively and safely as a Ti surface modification treatment.

  3. Nano- and Micro-Scale Oxidative Patterning of Titanium Implant Surfaces for Improved Surface Wettability.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-hye; Son, Jun Sik; Choi, Seok Hwa; Kim, Kyo-han; Kwon, Tae-yub

    2016-02-01

    A simple and scalable surface modification treatment is demonstrated, in which nano- and microscale features are introduced into the surface of titanium (Ti) substrates by means of a novel and eco-friendly oxidative aqueous solution composed of hydrogen peroxide (H202) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). By immersing mirror-polished Ti discs in an aqueous mixture of 30 wt% H2O2/5 wt% NaHCO3 at 23 +/- 3 degrees C for 4 h, it was confirmed that this mixture is capable of generating microscale topographies on Ti surfaces. It also simultaneously formed nanochannels that were regularly arranged in a comb-like pattern on the Ti surface, thus forming a hierarchical surface structure. Further, these nano/micro-textured Ti surfaces showed great surface roughness and excellent wettability when compared with control Ti surfaces. This study demonstrates that a H2O2/NaHCO3 mixture can be effectively utilized to create reproducible nano/microscale topographies on Ti implant surfaces, thus providing an economical new oxidative solution that may be used effectively and safely as a Ti surface modification treatment. PMID:27433692

  4. Surface modification of biomaterials using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tao; Qiao, Yuqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2012-01-01

    Although remarkable progress has been made on biomaterial research, the ideal biomaterial that satisfies all the technical requirements and biological functions is not available up to now. Surface modification seems to be a more economic and efficient way to adjust existing conventional biomaterials to meet the current and ever-evolving clinical needs. From an industrial perspective, plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D) is an attractive method for biomaterials owing to its capability of treating objects with irregular shapes, as well as the control of coating composition. It is well acknowledged that the physico-chemical characteristics of biomaterials are the decisive factors greatly affecting the biological responses of biomaterials including bioactivity, haemocompatibility and antibacterial activity. Here, we mainly review the recent advances in surface modification of biomaterials via PIII&D technology, especially titanium alloys and polymers used for orthopaedic, dental and cardiovascular implants. Moreover, the variations of biological performances depending on the physico-chemical properties of modified biomaterials will be discussed. PMID:23741609

  5. Titanium implants with modified surfaces: meta-analysis of in vivo osteointegration.

    PubMed

    Gasik, Michael; Braem, Annabel; Chaudhari, Amol; Duyck, Joke; Vleugels, Jozef

    2015-04-01

    Titanium-based implants are widely used in modern clinical practice, but their "optimal" properties in terms of porosity and topology, roughness and hydrophilic parameters are being a subject of intensive discussions. Recent in vitro results have shown a possibility to optimize the surface of an implant with maximal repelling of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis) and improvement in human osteogenic and endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. In this work, these different grades titanium implants were tested in vivo using the same analytical methodology. In addition to material parameters, key histomorphometrical parameters such a regeneration area, bone adaptation area and bone-to-implant contact were determined after 2 and 4weeks of implantation in rabbit animal model. Porous implants have more clear differences than non-porous ones, with the best optimum values obtained on hydrothermally treated electrophoretically deposited titanium. These in vivo data correlate well with the optimal prediction made by in vitro tests.

  6. Swelling or erosion on the surface of patterned GaN damaged by heavy ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yuan; Lan, Chune; Xue, Jianming; Yan, Sha; Wang, Yugang; Xu, Fujun; Shen, Bo; Zhang, Yanwen

    2010-06-08

    Wurtzite undoped GaN epilayers (0 0 0 1) was implanted with 500 keV Au+ ions at room temperature under different doses, respectively. Ion implantation was performed through photoresist masks on GaN to produce alternating strips. The experimental results showed that the step height of swelling and decomposition in implanted GaN depended on ion dose and annealing temperature, i.e., damage level and its evolution. This damage evolution is contributed to implantation-induced defect production, and defect migration/accumulation occurred at different levels of displacement per atom. The results suggest that the swelling is due to the formation of porous structures in the amorphous region of implanted GaN. The decomposition of implanted area can be attributed to the disorder saturation and the diffusion of surface amorphous layer.

  7. Surface hardness changes induced by O-, Ca- or P-ion implantation into titanium.

    PubMed

    Ikeyama; Nakao; Morikawa; Yokogawa; Wielunski; Clissold; Bell

    2000-12-30

    Titanium or titanium alloys are very attractive biomedical materials. Biocompatible elements of oxygen, calcium and phosphorus were implanted into titanium and changes of surface hardness were measured using an ultra micro indenter (UMIS-2000). A multiple load-partial unload procedure that can reveal a hardness versus depth profile was adopted. Depth profiles of concentration of implanted ions were obtained by SIMS measurement. For O and P implantation, it is observed that the hardness increases with the increases in the dose. O implantation produced the largest increase in hardness, up to 2.2 times higher than the unimplanted titanium. On the other hand, Ca implantation produced only a small increase in the hardness that was independent of the ion dose. The surface oxide layer of a Ca implanted titanium sample was much thicker than the unimplanted samples or those implanted with O and P ions. The depth of maximum hardness increases with increasing energy of implanted ions. The depths of the maximum hardness occur at indentation depths of one-third to one-eighth of the mean ranges of implanted ions.

  8. In vivo biocompatibility of Mg implants surface modified by nanostructured merwinite/PEO.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Mehdi; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Savabi, Omid; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tayebi, Lobat

    2015-05-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys have been suggested as biodegradable bone implant materials due to their good intrinsic biocompatibility and great mechanical properties. Although magnesium has attractive properties as an orthopedic implant material, its quick degradation and low bioactivity may lead to the loss of mechanical integrity of the implant during the bone healing process. In this paper, we endeavor to surmount the abovementioned defects using the surface coating technique. We have recently coated AZ91 magnesium implants with merwinite (Ca3MgSi2O8) through the coupling of plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) and electrophoretic deposition method. In this work, we are specifically focused on the in vivo examinations of the coated implants in comparison with the uncoated one. For the in vivo experiment, the rod samples, including the uncoated and merwinite/PEO coated implants, were imbedded into the greater trochanter of rabbits. The results of the in vivo animal test indicated an improvement in biodegradability including slower implant weight loss, reduction in Mg ion released from the coated implants in the blood plasma, lesser release of hydrogen bubbles and an improvement in biocompatibility including an increase in the amount of bone formation and ultimately a mild bone inflammation after the surgery according to the histological images. In summary, proper surface treatment of magnesium implants such as silicate bioactive ceramics may improve their biocompatibility under physiological conditions to making them suitable and applicable for future clinical applications.

  9. Computer-aided manufacturing technologies for guided implant placement.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Jörg; Stachulla, Gerhard; Ritter, Lutz; Dreiseidler, Timo; Mischkowski, Robert A; Keeve, Erwin; Zöller, Joachim E

    2010-01-01

    Implant treatment increasingly focuses on the reduction of treatment time and postoperative impairment. The improvement of 3D dental diagnosis by ConeBeam computed tomography allows detailed preparation for the surgical placement of dental implants under prosthetic considerations. While the first generation of implant planning software used high-contrast multislice computed tomography, software that has been specifically designed for ConeBeam computed tomography is now available. Implant placement can be performed using surgical guides or under the control of optical tracking systems. Surgical guides are more commonly used in private office owing to their availability. The accuracy for both techniques is clinically acceptable for achieving implant placement in critical anatomical indications. When using prefabricated superstructures and in flapless surgery, special abutments or an adjusted workflow are still necessary to compensate misfits of between 150 and 600 microm. The proposition to ensure proper implant placement by dentists with limited surgical experience through the use of surgical guides is unlikely to be successful, because there is also a specific learning curve for guided implant placement. Current and future development will continue to decrease the classical laboratory-technician work and will integrate the fabrication of superstructures with virtual treatment planning from the start.

  10. Bacterial inactivation/sterilization by argon plasma treatment on contaminated titanium implant surfaces:In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Annunziata, Marco; Donnarumma, Giovanna; Caputo, Pina; Nastri, Livia; Guida, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background Surface treatment by argon plasma is widely used as the last step of the manufacturing process of titanium implant fixtures before their sterilization by gamma rays. The possibility of using such a technology in the daily clinical practice is particularly fascinating. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of the argon plasma treatment on different titanium implant surfaces previously exposed In vitro to bacterial contamination. Material and Methods Sterile c.p. titanium implant discs with turned (T, Sa: 0.8 µm ), sandblasted/acid-etched (SAE, Sa: 1.3 µm) and titanium plasma sprayed (TPS, Sa: 3.0µm) surface were used in this study. A strain of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans ATCC3718 was grown at 37°C under anaerobic conditions for 24 h and then transferred on six discs for each of the three surface types. After 24 hours, a half of the contaminated discs (control group) were directly used to evaluate the colony forming units (CFUs). The other half of the contaminated discs (test group) were treated in an argon plasma chamber for 12 minutes at room temperature prior to be analyzed for CFU counting. All assays were performed using triplicate samples of each material in 3 different experiments. Results When the CFU counting was carried out on control discs, a total of 1.50x106±1.4x105, 1.55x106±7.07x104 and 3.15x106±2.12x105 CFU was respectively assessed for T, SAE and TPS discs, without statistically significant differences among the three surfaces. On the contrary, any trace of bacterial contamination was assessed for titanium discs treated in the argon plasma chamber prior to be analyzed, irrespectively to the implant surface tested. Conclusions Within the limit of this study, reported data suggested that the argon plasma technology could be efficiently used to decontaminate/sterilize previously infected titanium implant surfaces. Key words:Argon plasma, titanium implant surface, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. PMID

  11. Surface treatment of silicone rubber by carbon negative-ion implantation for nerve regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Izukawa, Masayoshi; Ikeguchi, Ryosuke; Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Sato, Hiroko; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2004-07-01

    Surface treatment of silicone rubber by carbon negative ion-implantation was investigated for nerve regeneration by "tubulation". Silicone rubber had its surface property altered to be more hydrophilic by carbon negative-ion implantation. The extracellular matrices of proteins in culture medium adsorbed on the implanted surface rather than unimplanted ones. These improvements in wettability and adsorption properties of proteins were respected to contribute to the regeneration of a nerve-lacking system. An in vivo regeneration test of rat sciatic nerves with silicone-rubber tubes was performed. Using a tube in which the inner surface was implanted with carbon negative ions, the sciatic nerve was regenerated through the inter-stump gap of 15 mm between the proximal and distal nerve stumps and electrical stimulation was transported through the regenerated nerve. Thus, the nerve system was recovered. However, with the unimplanted tube, the nerve was not regenerated at all.

  12. A Novel Multi-Phosphonate Surface Treatment of Titanium Dental Implants: A Study in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    von Salis-Soglio, Marcella; Stübinger, Stefan; Sidler, Michéle; Klein, Karina; Ferguson, Stephen J.; Kämpf, Käthi; Zlinszky, Katalin; Buchini, Sabrina; Curno, Richard; Péchy, Péter; Aronsson, Bjorn-Owe; von Rechenberg, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate a new multi-phosphonate surface treatment (SurfLink®) in an unloaded sheep model. Treated implants were compared to control implants in terms of bone to implant contact (BIC), bone formation, and biomechanical stability. The study used two types of implants (rough or machined surface finish) each with either the multi-phosphonate Wet or Dry treatment or no treatment (control) for a total of six groups. Animals were sacrificed after 2, 8, and 52 weeks. No adverse events were observed at any time point. At two weeks, removal torque showed significantly higher values for the multi-phosphonate treated rough surface (+32% and +29%, Dry and Wet, respectively) compared to rough control. At 52 weeks, a significantly higher removal torque was observed for the multi-phosphonate treated machined surfaces (+37% and 23%, Dry and Wet, respectively). The multi-phosphonate treated groups showed a positive tendency for higher BIC with time and increased new-old bone ratio at eight weeks. SEM images revealed greater amounts of organic materials on the multi-phosphonate treated compared to control implants, with the bone fracture (from the torque test) appearing within the bone rather than at the bone to implant interface as it occurred for control implants. PMID:25215424

  13. A Review on the Wettability of Dental Implant Surfaces II: Biological and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Gittens, Rolando A.; Scheideler, Lutz; Rupp, Frank; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D.

    2014-01-01

    Dental and orthopaedic implants have been under continuous advancement to improve their interactions with bone and ensure a successful outcome for patients. Surface characteristics such as surface topography and surface chemistry can serve as design tools to enhance the biological response around the implant, with in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies confirming their effects. However, the comprehensive design of implants to promote early and long-term osseointegration requires a better understanding of the role of surface wettability and the mechanisms by which it affects the surrounding biological environment. This review provides a general overview of the available information about the contact angle values of experimental and of marketed implant surfaces, some of the techniques used to modify surface wettability of implants, and results from in vitro and clinical studies. We aim to expand the current understanding on the role of wettability of metallic implants at their interface with blood and the biological milieu, as well as with bacteria, and hard and soft tissues. PMID:24709541

  14. Zinc ion implantation-deposition technique improves the osteoblast biocompatibility of titanium surfaces

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, YONGQIANG; XU, JUAN; CHEN, JING; QI, MENGCHUN; XIE, XUEHONG; HU, MIN

    2015-01-01

    The plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) technique was used to implant zinc (Zn) ions into smooth surfaces of pure titanium (Ti) disks for investigation of tooth implant surface modification. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the surface structure and chemical composition of a modified Ti surface following Zn ion implantation and deposition and to examine the effect of such modification on osteoblast biocompatibility. Using the PIIID technique, Zn ions were deposited onto the smooth surface of pure Ti disks. The physical structure and chemical composition of the modified surface layers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. In vitro culture assays using the MG-63 bone cell line were performed to determine the effects of Zn-modified Ti surfaces following PIIID on cellular function. Acridine orange staining was used to detect cell attachment to the surfaces and cell cycle analysis was performed using flow cytometry. SEM revealed a rough ‘honeycomb’ structure on the Zn-modified Ti surfaces following PIIID processing and XPS data indicated that Zn and oxygen concentrations in the modified Ti surfaces increased with PIIID processing time. SEM also revealed significantly greater MG-63 cell growth on Zn-modified Ti surfaces than on pure Ti surfaces (P<0.05). Flow cytometric analysis revealed increasing percentages of MG-63 cells in S phase with increasing Zn implantation and deposition, suggesting that MG-63 apoptosis was inhibited and MG-63 proliferation was promoted on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces. The present results suggest that modification with Zn-PIIID may be used to improve the osteoblast biocompatibility of Ti implant surfaces. PMID:25673139

  15. Modulating macrophage polarization with divalent cations in nanostructured titanium implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Ho; Kim, Youn-Jeong; Jang, Je-Hee; Park, Jin-Woo

    2016-02-26

    Nanoscale topographical modification and surface chemistry alteration using bioactive ions are centrally important processes in the current design of the surface of titanium (Ti) bone implants with enhanced bone healing capacity. Macrophages play a central role in the early tissue healing stage and their activity in response to the implant surface is known to affect the subsequent healing outcome. Thus, the positive modulation of macrophage phenotype polarization (i.e. towards the regenerative M2 rather than the inflammatory M1 phenotype) with a modified surface is essential for the osteogenesis funtion of Ti bone implants. However, relatively few advances have been made in terms of modulating the macrophage-centered early healing capacity in the surface design of Ti bone implants for the two important surface properties of nanotopography and and bioactive ion chemistry. We investigated whether surface bioactive ion modification exerts a definite beneficial effect on inducing regenerative M2 macrophage polarization when combined with the surface nanotopography of Ti. Our results indicate that nanoscale topographical modification and surface bioactive ion chemistry can positively modulate the macrophage phenotype in a Ti implant surface. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that chemical surface modification using divalent cations (Ca and Sr) dramatically induces the regenerative M2 macrophage phenotype of J774.A1 cells in nanostructured Ti surfaces. In this study, divalent cation chemistry regulated the cell shape of adherent macrophages and markedly up-regulated M2 macrophage phenotype expression when combined with the nanostructured Ti surface. These results provide insight into the surface engineering of future Ti bone implants that are harmonized between the macrophage-governed early wound healing process and subsequent mesenchymal stem cell-centered osteogenesis function.

  16. Modulating macrophage polarization with divalent cations in nanostructured titanium implant surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung-Ho; Kim, Youn-Jeong; Jang, Je-Hee; Park, Jin-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Nanoscale topographical modification and surface chemistry alteration using bioactive ions are centrally important processes in the current design of the surface of titanium (Ti) bone implants with enhanced bone healing capacity. Macrophages play a central role in the early tissue healing stage and their activity in response to the implant surface is known to affect the subsequent healing outcome. Thus, the positive modulation of macrophage phenotype polarization (i.e. towards the regenerative M2 rather than the inflammatory M1 phenotype) with a modified surface is essential for the osteogenesis funtion of Ti bone implants. However, relatively few advances have been made in terms of modulating the macrophage-centered early healing capacity in the surface design of Ti bone implants for the two important surface properties of nanotopography and and bioactive ion chemistry. We investigated whether surface bioactive ion modification exerts a definite beneficial effect on inducing regenerative M2 macrophage polarization when combined with the surface nanotopography of Ti. Our results indicate that nanoscale topographical modification and surface bioactive ion chemistry can positively modulate the macrophage phenotype in a Ti implant surface. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that chemical surface modification using divalent cations (Ca and Sr) dramatically induces the regenerative M2 macrophage phenotype of J774.A1 cells in nanostructured Ti surfaces. In this study, divalent cation chemistry regulated the cell shape of adherent macrophages and markedly up-regulated M2 macrophage phenotype expression when combined with the nanostructured Ti surface. These results provide insight into the surface engineering of future Ti bone implants that are harmonized between the macrophage-governed early wound healing process and subsequent mesenchymal stem cell-centered osteogenesis function.

  17. [Influence of an Er:YAG laser on the surface structure of titanium implants].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Frank; Rothamel, Daniel; Becker, Jürgen

    2003-01-01

    In addition to conventional treatment modalities (mechanical and chemical), the use of lasers has been proposed for cleaning and detoxification of implant surfaces. The aim of the present clinical investigation was (1) to evaluate the effects of an Er:YAG laser on the surface properties of titanium implants in vivo and (2) to determine the effectiveness of this treatment modality for subgingival calculus removal. This investigation was conducted on eight implants of two patients, considered for explantation due to severe peri-implantitis inflammation. Immediately before explanatation, six implants were instrumented subgingivally with an Er:YAG laser (100 mJ/pulse and 10 Hz). Two implants served as a control. All titanium implants were examined using scanning electron microscopy by one calibrated and blinded examiner. In comparison to the untreated control group, non-surgical instrumentation of titanium implants with an Er:YAG laser resulted in an effective removal of subgingival calculus without leading to any thermal damages. However, all samples of the test group revealed amounts of residual debris which should be taken into account under clinical conditions.

  18. Surface modification of poly(propylene carbonate) by oxygen ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jizhong; Kang, Jiachen; Hu, Ping; Meng, Qingli

    2007-04-01

    Poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC) was implanted by oxygen ion with energy of 40 keV. The influence of experimental parameters was investigated by varying ion fluence from 1 × 10 12 to 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. XPS, SEM, surface roughness, wettability, hardness, and modulus were employed to investigate structure and properties of the as-implanted PPC samples. Eight chemical groups, i.e., carbon, C sbnd H, C sbnd O sbnd C, C sbnd O, O sbnd C sbnd O, C dbnd O, ?, and ? groups were observed on surfaces of the as-implanted samples. The species and relative intensities of the chemical groups changed with increasing ion fluence. SEM images displayed that irradiation damage was related strongly with ion fluence. Both surface-recovering and shrunken behavior were observed on surface of the PPC sample implanted with fluence of 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. As increasing ion fluence, the surface roughness of the as-implanted PPC samples increased firstly, reached the maximum value of 159 nm, and finally decreased down the minimum value. The water droplet contact angle of the as-implanted PPC samples changed gradually with fluence, and reached the minimum value of 70° with fluence of 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. The hardness and modulus of the as-implanted PPC samples increased with increasing ion fluence, and reached their corresponding maximum values with fluence of 1 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. The experimental results revealed that oxygen ion fluence closely affected surface chemical group, morphology, surface roughness, wettability, and mechanical properties of the as-implanted PPC samples.

  19. A pilot study comparing screw-shaped implants. Surface analysis and histologic evaluation of bone healing.

    PubMed

    Lucchini, J P; Aurelle, J L; Therin, M; Donath, K; Becker, W

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare surface treatment and bone formation adjacent to 2 screw shaped implants of similar design manufactured by two different companies. The test implants were manufactured by SERF (Decines, France), while the controls were manufactured by Nobelpharma (Goteborg, Sweden). The surface of 3 standard 3.75 mm test and 3 standard 3.75 mm control implants were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray micro-analysis, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and surface topography analysis. There was a microscopic difference on the thread design (SEM). Test threads were flat at the edge, while controls appeared rounded at the edge of the threads. Tests and controls were made of commercially pure titanium, with a regular topography. Results of ESCA indicated that the carbon peak for SERF implants was slightly higher than for the Brånemark implants. 5 test and 5 control implants were installed into the epiphyseal head of the femur of 2 ewes using a standardized surgical technique. In order to stain the bone for histologic analysis, oxytetracycline injections were given 17 and 8 days before the animals were sacrificed. The animals were sacrificed 12 weeks after implant placement. Histomorphometric analysis indicated that there was an average bone to implant contact orf 68% for the test implants and 61% for the controls. There were no statistical differences between tests and controls. The preliminary results of this pilot study indicated that early bone healing for the 2 screw shaped implants investigated were similar.

  20. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of novel implantation technology in hydrogel contact lenses for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Maulvi, Furqan A; Lakdawala, Dhara H; Shaikh, Anjum A; Desai, Ankita R; Choksi, Harsh H; Vaidya, Rutvi J; Ranch, Ketan M; Koli, Akshay R; Vyas, Bhavin A; Shah, Dinesh O

    2016-03-28

    Glaucoma is commonly treated using eye drops, which is highly inefficient due to rapid clearance (low residence time) from ocular surface. Contact lenses are ideally suited for controlled drug delivery to cornea, but incorporation of any drug loaded particulate system (formulation) affect the optical and physical property of contact lenses. The objective of the present work was to implant timolol maleate (TM) loaded ethyl cellulose nanoparticle-laden ring in hydrogel contact lenses that could provide controlled drug delivery at therapeutic rates without compromising critical lens properties. TM-implant lenses were developed, by dispersing TM encapsulated ethyl cellulose nanoparticles in acrylate hydrogel (fabricated as ring implant) and implanted the same in hydrogel contact lenses (sandwich system). The TM-ethyl cellulose nanoparticles were prepared by double emulsion method at different ratios of TM to ethyl cellulose. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed the transformation of TM to amorphous state. In vitro release kinetic data showed sustained drug release within the therapeutic window for 168h (NP 1:3 batch) with 150μg loading. Cytotoxicity and ocular irritation study demonstrated the safety of TM-implant contact lenses. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rabbit tear fluid showed significant increase in mean residence time (MRT) and area under curve (AUC), with TM-implant contact lenses in comparison to eye drop therapy. In vivo pharmacodynamic data in rabbit model showed sustained reduction in intra ocular pressure for 192h. The study demonstrated the promising potential of implantation technology to treat glaucoma using contact lenses, and could serve as a platform for other ocular diseases.

  1. Identification card and codification of the chemical and morphological characteristics of 14 dental implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dohan Ehrenfest, David M; Vazquez, Lydia; Park, Yeong-Joon; Sammartino, Gilberto; Bernard, Jean-Pierre

    2011-10-01

    Dental implants are commonly used in daily practice; however, most surgeons do not really know the characteristics of these biomedical devices they are placing in their patients. The objective of this work is to describe the chemical and morphological characteristics of 14 implant surfaces available on the market and to establish a simple and clear identification (ID) card for all of them, following the classification procedure developed in the Dohan Ehrenfest et al (2010) Codification (DEC) system. Fourteen implant surfaces were characterized: TiUnite (Nobel Biocare), Ospol (Ospol), Kohno HRPS (Sweden & Martina), Osseospeed (AstraTech), Ankylos (Dentsply Friadent), MTX (Zimmer), Promote (Camlog), BTI Interna (Biotechnology Institute), EVL Plus (SERF), Twinkon Ref (Tekka), Ossean (Intra-Lock), NanoTite (Biomet 3I), SLActive (ITI Straumann), Integra-CP/NanoTite (Bicon). Three samples of each implant were analyzed. Superficial chemical composition was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy/electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and the 100 nm in-depth profile was established using Auger electron spectroscopy. The microtopography was quantified using light interferometry. The general morphology and nanotopography were evaluated using a field emission-scanning electron microscope. Finally, the characterization code of each surface was established using the DEC system, and the main characteristics of each surface were summarized in a reader-friendly ID card. From a chemical standpoint, of the 14 different surfaces, 10 were based on a commercially pure titanium (grade 2 or 4), 3 on a titanium-aluminum alloy (grade 5 titanium), and one on a calcium phosphate core. Nine surfaces presented different forms of chemical impregnation or discontinuous coating of the titanium core, and 3 surfaces were covered with residual aluminablasting particles. Twelve surfaces presented different degrees of inorganic pollutions, and 2 presented a severe organic pollution

  2. Laser-induced novel patterns: As smart strain actuators for new-age dental implant surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelen, Serap; Özden, Hüseyin

    2012-12-01

    Surface morphologies of titanium implants are of crucial importance for long-term mechanical adaptation for following implantation. One major problem is the stress shielding effect which originates from the mismatch of the bone and the implant elasticity. It is time for a paradigm shift and for an exploration of novel smart surfaces to prevent this problem. Several surface treatment methods have traditionally been used to modify the surface morphology of titanium dental implants. The laser micro-machining can be considered as a unique and promising, non-contact, no media, contamination free, and flexible treatment method for modifying surface properties of materials in the biomedical industry. The aim of the present study is two folds; to develop novel 3D smart surfaces which can be acted as strain actuators by nanosecond laser pulse energies and irradiation strategies. And analyze these smart surface morphologies using finite element methods in order to estimate their internal stiffness values which play a great role on stress shielding effect. Novel 3D smart strain actuators were prepared using an ytterbium fiber laser (λ = 1060 nm) with 200-250 ns pulse durations on commercial pure titanium dental implant material specimen surfaces and optimum operation parameters were suggested.

  3. Method For Plasma Source Ion Implantation And Deposition For Cylindrical Surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Fetherston, Robert P. , Shamim, Muhammad M. , Conrad, John R.

    1997-12-02

    Uniform ion implantation and deposition onto cylindrical surfaces is achieved by placing a cylindrical electrode in coaxial and conformal relation to the target surface. For implantation and deposition of an inner bore surface the electrode is placed inside the target. For implantation and deposition on an outer cylindrical surface the electrode is placed around the outside of the target. A plasma is generated between the electrode and the target cylindrical surface. Applying a pulse of high voltage to the target causes ions from the plasma to be driven onto the cylindrical target surface. The plasma contained in the space between the target and the electrode is uniform, resulting in a uniform implantation or deposition of the target surface. Since the plasma is largely contained in the space between the target and the electrode, contamination of the vacuum chamber enclosing the target and electrodes by inadvertent ion deposition is reduced. The coaxial alignment of the target and the electrode may be employed for the ion assisted deposition of sputtered metals onto the target, resulting in a uniform coating of the cylindrical target surface by the sputtered material. The independently generated and contained plasmas associated with each cylindrical target/electrode pair allows for effective batch processing of multiple cylindrical targets within a single vacuum chamber, resulting in both uniform implantation or deposition, and reduced contamination of one target by adjacent target/electrode pairs.

  4. Time-dependent release of growth factors from implant surfaces treated with plasma rich in growth factors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ilárduya, María Belén; Trouche, Elodie; Tejero, Ricardo; Orive, Gorka; Reviakine, Ilya; Anitua, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGFs) technology is an autologous platelet-rich plasma approach that provides a pool of growth factors and cytokines that have been shown to increase tissue regeneration and accelerate dental implant osseointegration. In this framework, the spatiotemporal release of growth factors and the establishment of a provisional fibrin matrix are likely to be key aspects governing the stimulation of the early phases of tissue regeneration around implants. We investigated the kinetics of growth factor release at implant surfaces functionalized either with PRGFs or platelet-poor plasma and correlated the results obtained with the morphology of the resulting interfaces. Our main finding is that activation and clot formation favors longer residence times of the growth factors at the interfaces studied, probably due to their retention in the adsorbed fibrin matrix. The concentration of the platelet-derived growth factors above the interfaces becomes negligible after 2-4 days and is significantly higher in the case of activated interfaces than in the case of nonactivated ones, whereas that of the plasmatic hepatocyte growth factor is independent of platelet concentration and activation, and remains significant for up to 9 days. Platelet-rich plasma preparations should be activated to permit growth factor release and thereby facilitate implant surface osseointegration.

  5. Exploration technology surface systems: Surface Habitats And Construction (SHAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschbein, Murray

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of exploration technology program - surface systems are: (1) to develop technology emplace and to build an outpost on the moon and Mars; and (2) to develop concepts for permanent habitats and enclosures on the Moon and Mars.

  6. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  7. Current trends in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja; Ong, Joo L

    2014-04-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants.

  8. Plasma-based ion implantation: a valuable technology for the elaboration of innovative materials and nanostructured thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vempaire, D.; Pelletier, J.; Lacoste, A.; Béchu, S.; Sirou, J.; Miraglia, S.; Fruchart, D.

    2005-05-01

    Plasma-based ion implantation (PBII), invented in 1987, can now be considered as a mature technology for thin film modification. After a brief recapitulation of the principle and physics of PBII, its advantages and disadvantages, as compared to conventional ion beam implantation, are listed and discussed. The elaboration of thin films and the modification of their functional properties by PBII have already been achieved in many fields, such as microelectronics (plasma doping/PLAD), biomaterials (surgical implants, bio- and blood-compatible materials), plastics (grafting, surface adhesion) and metallurgy (hard coatings, tribology), to name a few. The major advantages of PBII processing lie, on the one hand, in its flexibility in terms of ion implantation energy (from 0 to 100 keV) and operating conditions (plasma density, collisional or non-collisional ion sheath), and, on the other hand, in the easy transferrability of processes from the laboratory to industry. The possibility of modifying the composition and physical nature of the films, or of drastically changing their physical properties over several orders of magnitude makes this technology very attractive for the elaboration of innovative materials, including metastable materials, and the realization of micro- or nanostructures. A review of the state of the art in these domains is presented and illustrated through a few selected examples. The perspectives opened up by PBII processing, as well as its limitations, are discussed.

  9. Zinc-ion implanted and deposited titanium surfaces reduce adhesion of Streptococccus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Juan; Ding, Gang; Li, Jinlu; Yang, Shenhui; Fang, Bisong; Sun, Hongchen; Zhou, Yanmin

    2010-10-01

    While titanium (Ti) is a commonly used dental implant material with advantageous biocompatible and mechanical properties, native Ti surfaces do not have the ability to prevent bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition and bacterial adhesive properties of zinc (Zn) ion implanted and deposited Ti surfaces (Zn-PIIID-Ti) as potential dental implant materials. Surfaces of pure Ti (cp-Ti) were modified with increasing concentrations of Zn using plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID), and elemental surface compositions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). To evaluate bacterial responses, Streptococcus mutans were seeded onto the modifiedTi surfaces for 48 h and subsequently observed by scanning electron microscopy. Relative numbers of bacteria on each surface were assessed by collecting the adhered bacteria, reculturing and counting colony forming units after 48 h on bacterial grade plates. Ti, oxygen and carbon elements were detected on all surfaces by XPS. Increased Zn signals were detected on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces, correlating with an increase of Zn-deposition time. Substantial numbers of S. mutans adhered to cp-Ti samples, whereas bacterial adhesion on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces signficantly decreased as the Zn concentration increased ( p < 0.01). In conclusion, PIIID can successfully introduce Zn onto a Ti surface, forming a modified surface layer bearing Zn ions that consequently deter adhesion of S. mutans, a common bacterium in the oral environment.

  10. Plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes: An emerging technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1986-01-01

    A broad understanding of the numerous ion or plasma assisted surface coating/modification processes is sought. An awareness of the principles of these processes is needed before discussing in detail the ion nitriding technology. On the basis of surface modifications arising from ion or plasma energizing and interactions, it can be broadly classified as deposition of distinct overlay coatings (sputtering-dc, radio frequency, magnetron, reactive; ion plating-diode, triode) and surface property modification without forming a discrete coating (ion implantation, ion beam mixing, laser beam irradiation, ion nitriding, ion carburizing, plasma oxidation). These techniques offer a great flexibility and are capable in tailoring desirable chemical and structural surface properties independent of the bulk properties.

  11. MicroCT Analysis of Micro-Nano Titanium Implant Surface on the Osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Ban, Jaesam; Kang, Seongsoo; Kim, Jihyun; Lee, Kwangmin; Hyunpil, Lim; Vang, Mongsook; Yang, Hongso; Oh, Gyejeong; Kim, Hyunseung; Hwang, Gabwoon; Jung, Yongho; Lee, Kyungku; Park, Sangwon; Yunl, Kwidug

    2015-01-01

    This study was to investigate the effects of micro-nano titanium implant surface on the osseointegration. A total of 36 screw-shaped implants were used. The implant surfaces were classified into 3 groups (n = 12): machined surface (M group), nanosurface which is nanotube formation on the machined surface (MA group) and nano-micro surface which is nanotube formation on the RBM surface (RA group). Anodic oxidation was performed at a 20 V for 10 min with 1 M H3PO4 and 1.5 wt% HF solutions. The implants were installed on the humerus on 6 beagles. After 4 and 12 weeks, the morphometric analysis with micro CT (skyscan 1172, SKYSCAN, Antwerpen, Belgium) was done. The data were statistically analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Bone mineral density and bone volume were significantly increased depending on time. RA group showed the highest bone mineral density and bone volume at 4 weeks and 12 weeks significantly. It indicated that nano-micro titanium implant surface showed faster and more mature osseointegration.

  12. Surface Damage on Dental Implants with Release of Loose Particles after Insertion into Bone

    PubMed Central

    Senna, Plinio; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha; Kates, Stephen; Meirelles, Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Background Modern dental implants present surface features of distinct dimensions that can be damaged during the insertion procedure into bone. Purpose The aims of this study were (1) to quantify by means of roughness parameters the surface damage caused by the insertion procedure of dental implants and (2) to investigate the presence of loose particles at the interface. Materials and Methods Three groups of dental implants representing different surface topographies were inserted in fresh cow rib bone blocks. The surface roughness was characterized by interferometry on the same area before and after the insertion. SEM-BSD analysis was used to identify loose particles at the interface. Results The amplitude and hybrid roughness parameters of all three groups were lower after insertion. The surface presenting predominance of peaks (Ssk>0) associated to higher structures (height parameters) presented higher damage associated to more pronounced reduction of material volume. SEM-BSD images revealed loose titanium and aluminum particles at the interface mainly at the crestal cortical bone level. Conclusions Shearing forces during the insertion procedure alters the surface of dental implants. Loose metal particles can be generated at bone-implant interface especially around surfaces composed mainly by peaks and with increased height parameters. PMID:24283455

  13. Effect of cleaning and sterilization on titanium implant surface properties and cellular response

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Hwa; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Baier, Robert E.; Meyer, Anne E.; Tannenbaum, Rina; Boyan, Barbara D.; Schwartz, Zvi

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) has been widely used as an implant material due to the excellent biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of its oxide surface. Biomaterials must be sterile before implantation, but the effects of sterilization on their surface properties have been less well studied. The effects of cleaning and sterilization on surface characteristics were bio-determined using contaminated and pure Ti substrata first manufactured to present two different surface structures: pretreated titanium (PT, Ra = 0.4 μm) (i.e. surfaces that were not modified by sandblasting and/or acid etching); (SLA, Ra = 3.4 μm). Previously cultured cells and associated extracellular matrix were removed from all bio-contaminated specimens by cleaning in a sonicator bath with a sequential acetone–isopropanol–ethanol–distilled water protocol. Cleaned specimens were sterilized with autoclave, gamma irradiation, oxygen plasma, or ultraviolet light. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact angle measurements, profilometry, and scanning electron microscopy were used to examine surface chemical components, hydrophilicity, roughness, and morphology, respectively. Small organic molecules present on contaminated Ti surfaces were removed with cleaning. XPS analysis confirmed that surface chemistry was altered by both cleaning and sterilization. Cleaning and sterilization affected hydrophobicity and roughness. These modified surface properties affected osteogenic differentiation of human MG63 osteoblast-like cells. Specifically, autoclaved SLA surfaces lost the characteristic increase in osteoblast differentiation seen on starting SLA surfaces, which was correlated with altered surface wettability and roughness. These data indicated that recleaned and resterilized Ti implant surfaces cannot be considered the same as the first surfaces in terms of surface properties and cell responses. Therefore, the reuse of Ti implants after resterilization may not result in the same tissue responses as

  14. Modification of inflammatory response to implanted biomedical materials in vivo by surface bound superoxide dismutase mimics.

    PubMed

    Udipi, K; Ornberg, R L; Thurmond, K B; Settle, S L; Forster, D; Riley, D

    2000-09-15

    The healing response to implanted biomedical materials involves varying degrees and stages of inflammation and healing which in some cases leads to device failure. In this article, we describe synthetic methods and in vivo results of a novel surface treatment for biomedical materials involving covalent conjugation of a low molecular weight superoxide dismutase mimic (SODm), which imparts anti-inflammatory character to the material. SODm investigated in this study are a new class of anti-inflammatory drugs consisting of a Mn(II) complex of a macrocyclic polyamine ring that catalyze the dismutation of superoxide at rates equivalent to that of native enzyme. The SODms were covalently linked to small disks of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene, poly(etherurethane urea), and tantalum metal at two concentrations and implanted in a subcutaneous rat implant model for 3, 7, 14, and 28 days. Histological examination of the implant tissue performed at 3 and 28 days revealed striking anti-inflammatory effects on both acute and chronic inflammatory responses. At 3 days, the formation of a neutrophil-rich acute inflammatory infiltrate seen in control implants was inhibited for all three materials treated with SODm. At 28 days, foreign body giant cell formation (number of FBGCs per field) and fibrous capsule formation (mean thickness of implant capsule) were also significantly inhibited over untreated control implants. A mechanism based on our current understanding of superoxide as an inflammatory mediator at implanted biomedical materials is proposed.

  15. Temperature evaluation of dental implant surface irradiated with high-power diode laser.

    PubMed

    Rios, F G; Viana, E R; Ribeiro, G M; González, J C; Abelenda, A; Peruzzo, D C

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of peri-implantitis and the absence of a standard approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface have led to searches for effective therapies. Since the source of diode lasers is portable, has reduced cost, and does not cause damage to the titanium surface of the implant, high-power diode lasers have been used for this purpose. The effect of laser irradiation on the implants is the elevation of the temperature surface. If this elevation exceeds 47 °C, the bone tissue is irreversibly damaged, so for a safety therapy, the laser parameters should be controlled. In this study, a diode laser of GaAsAl was used to irradiate titanium dental implants, for powers 1.32 to 2.64 W (real) or 2.00 to 4.00 W (nominal), in continuous/pulsed mode DC/AC, with exposure time of 5/10 s, with/without air flow for cooling. The elevation of the temperature was monitored in real time in two positions: cervical and apical. The best results for decontamination using a 968-nm diode laser were obtained for a power of 1.65 and 1.98 W (real) for 10 s, in DC or AC mode, with an air flow of 2.5 l/min. In our perspective in this article, we determine a suggested approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface using a 968-nm diode laser. PMID:27365109

  16. Temperature evaluation of dental implant surface irradiated with high-power diode laser.

    PubMed

    Rios, F G; Viana, E R; Ribeiro, G M; González, J C; Abelenda, A; Peruzzo, D C

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of peri-implantitis and the absence of a standard approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface have led to searches for effective therapies. Since the source of diode lasers is portable, has reduced cost, and does not cause damage to the titanium surface of the implant, high-power diode lasers have been used for this purpose. The effect of laser irradiation on the implants is the elevation of the temperature surface. If this elevation exceeds 47 °C, the bone tissue is irreversibly damaged, so for a safety therapy, the laser parameters should be controlled. In this study, a diode laser of GaAsAl was used to irradiate titanium dental implants, for powers 1.32 to 2.64 W (real) or 2.00 to 4.00 W (nominal), in continuous/pulsed mode DC/AC, with exposure time of 5/10 s, with/without air flow for cooling. The elevation of the temperature was monitored in real time in two positions: cervical and apical. The best results for decontamination using a 968-nm diode laser were obtained for a power of 1.65 and 1.98 W (real) for 10 s, in DC or AC mode, with an air flow of 2.5 l/min. In our perspective in this article, we determine a suggested approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface using a 968-nm diode laser.

  17. Optimizing implant placement and aesthetics: technology to the rescue!

    PubMed

    Kosinski, Timothy

    2009-08-01

    The goal for this patient was to create an aesthetic smile design using individual dental implants to reconstruct the edentulous spaces. Procera crowns aesthetically restored the separate and distinct teeth (Figures 18 and 19). The patient was thrilled with the final aesthetic result, and she was able to smile confidently again.

  18. A phone-assistive device based on Bluetooth technology for cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Qian, Haifeng; Loizou, Philipos C; Dorman, Michael F

    2003-09-01

    Hearing-impaired people, and particularly hearing-aid and cochlear-implant users, often have difficulty communicating over the telephone. The intelligibility of telephone speech is considerably lower than the intelligibility of face-to-face speech. This is partly because of lack of visual cues, limited telephone bandwidth, and background noise. In addition, cellphones may cause interference with the hearing aid or cochlear implant. To address these problems that hearing-impaired people experience with telephones, this paper proposes a wireless phone adapter that can be used to route the audio signal directly to the hearing aid or cochlear implant processor. This adapter is based on Bluetooth technology. The favorable features of this new wireless technology make the adapter superior to traditional assistive listening devices. A hardware prototype was built and software programs were written to implement the headset profile in the Bluetooth specification. Three cochlear implant users were tested with the proposed phone-adapter and reported good speech quality.

  19. Tissue response to surface-treated tantalum implants: preliminary observations in primates.

    PubMed

    Meenaghan, M A; Natiella, J R; Moresi, J L; Flynn, H E; Wirth, J E; Baier, R E

    1979-07-01

    Samples of capacitor grade tantalum were surface-treated by a variety of methods. These surface treatments allowed testing of the same basic material which was mill-finished, metallurgically polished, electrochemically oxidized, sintered with a porous surface, and glow-discharged. Surface characterization was accomplished by contact angle measurements, Scanning Electron Microscopy, energy-dispensed x-ray analysis, and internal reflection spectroscopy. Subsequent to characterization, the material was surgically implanted in the subperiosteal region of the mandible, the buccal mucosa, and the subcutaneous paravertebral region of the back of Macaca speciosa (stumptail monkey). The tissue reaction at intervals of up to three weeks was evaluated morphologically and ultrastructurally. Significant differences in tissue response were noted at the interfaces with glow-discharge-treated versus lower surface energy samples. Adjacent to the glow-discharge-treated implants, two distinct tissue zones were identified. Zone No. 1, nearest the implant, exhibited an increased cellularity. This consisted of 4-5 layers of highly active mesenchymal cells or fibroblast-like cells with spindle-shaped nuclei and prominent cytoplasmic features. At various foci along the interface, hyperchromatic nuclear forms were noted to project into the space left by removal of the implant. These observations, coupled with a predominance of intercellular ground-substance material and less collagen at the interface, may indicate some form of bioadhesion. The deeper Zone No. 2 was 2-3 times as thick consisted of typical fibroblastic cells with a lamellar configuration, bordered by an occasional delicate-lined space. Independent of implantation site or surface texture, all other implants showed occasional multinucleated giant cells and a decrease in the cellular character of Zone No. 1. Both zones were reduced in thickness and composed of more mature fibroblasts. Some specimens exhibited intracytoplasmic

  20. Surface-mediated bone tissue morphogenesis from tunable nanolayered implant coatings*

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nisarg J.; Hyder, Md. Nasim; Moskowitz, Joshua S.; Quadir, Mohiuddin A.; Morton, Stephen W.; Seeherman, Howard J.; Padera, Robert F.; Spector, Myron; Hammond, Paula T.

    2014-01-01

    The functional success of a biomedical implant critically depends on its stable bonding with the host tissue. Aseptic implant loosening accounts for over half of all joint replacement failures. Various materials, including metals and plastic, confer mechanical integrity to the device, but often these materials are not suitable for direct integration with the host tissue, which leads to implant loosening and patient morbidity. We describe a self-assembled, osteogenic, polymer-based conformal coating that promotes stable mechanical fixation of an implant in a surrogate rodent model. A single modular, polymer-based multilayered coating was deposited using a water-based layer-by-layer approach, by which each element was introduced on the surface in nanoscale layers. Osteoconductive hydroxyapatite (HAP) and osteoinductive bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) contained within the nanostructured coating acted synergistically to induce osteoblastic differentiation of endogenous progenitor cells within the bone marrow, without indications of a foreign body response. The tuned release of BMP-2, controlled by a hydrolytically degradable poly(β-amino ester), was essential for tissue regeneration and, in the presence of HAP, the modular coating encouraged the direct deposition of highly cohesive trabecular bone on the implant surface. The bone-implant interfacial tensile strength was significantly higher than standard bone cement, did not fracture at the interface, and had long-term stability. Collectively, these results suggest that the multilayered coating system promotes biological fixation of orthopedic and dental implants to improve surgical outcomes by preventing loosening and premature failure. PMID:23803705

  1. Modification of titanium and titanium dioxide surfaces by ion implantation: Combined XPS and DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukhvalov, D. W.; Korotin, D. M.; Efremov, A. V.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Borchers, Ch.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Gunderov, D. V.; Valiev, R. Z.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Cholakh, S. O.

    2015-04-01

    The results of XPS measurements (core levels and valence bands) of P+, Ca+, P+Ca+ and Ca+P+ ion implanted (E=30 keV, D=1x1017 cm-2) commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations demonstrates formation of various structural defects in titanium dioxide films formed on the surface of implanted materials. We have found that for double implantation (Ti:P+,Ca+ and Ti:Ca+,P+) the outermost surface layer formed mainly by Ca and P, respectively, i.e. the implantation sequence is very important. The DFT calculations show that under P+ and Ca+P+ ion implantation the formation energies for both cation (P-Ti) and anion (P-O) substitutions are comparable which can induce the creation of [PO4]3- and Ti-P species. For Ca+ and P+Ca+-ion implantation the calculated formation energies correspond to Ca2+-Ti4+ cation substitution. This conclusion is in agreement with XPS Ca 2p and Ti 2p core levels and valence band measurements and DFT calculations of electronic structure of related compounds. The conversion of implanted ions to Ca2+ and [PO4]3- species provides a good biocompatibility of cp-Ti for further formation of hydroxyapatite.

  2. Investigation of the surface of implanted silicon crystal by the contact angle

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedeva, N.N.; Bakovets, V.V.; Sedymova, E.A.; Pridachin, N.B.

    1987-03-01

    The authors study the dependence of the critical contact angle of silicon upon the dose of its irradiation by argon and boron ions. It is established that the system of immiscible liquids ether-water can be successfully used to study the influence of ion implantation of silicon on its wettability by water. The change in the wettability of implanted silicon is related to the increase in the level of the defect state of the layer surface. Wetting of implanted silicon by melts at high temperatures can be used for studying the kinetics and the annealing mechanism of defects.

  3. Deterioration mechanisms of joint prosthesis materials. Several solutions by ion implantation surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Rieu, J; Pichat, A; Rabbe, L M; Chabrol, C; Robelet, M

    1990-07-01

    Materials for orthopaedic implants can fail for several combined reasons: corrosion, fatigue and wear for metals, wear and creep for polymers, fracture for ceramics. Some typical cases are analysed and it is demonstrated that ion implantation improves metals and polymers used for joint prosthesis. Implantations of nitrogen, oxygen and argon ions modify the structure of a 2-500 nm thick layer in the materials. The results of friction tests on the couple metal-polymer are correlated with the surface properties. PMID:2397260

  4. Corrosion behavior of surface films on boron-implanted high purity iron and stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. J.; Carter, W. B.; Hochman, R. F.; Meletis, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    Boron (dose, 2 x 10 to the 17th ions/sq cm) was implanted into high purity iron, AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel, and AISI 440C martensitic stainless steel, at 40 keV. The film structure of implanted samples was examined and characterized by contrast and diffraction analyses utilizing transmission electron microscopy. The effect of B(+) ion implantation on the corrosion behavior was studied using the potentiodynamic polarization technique. Tests were performed in deaerated 1 N H2SO4 and 0.1 M NaCl solutions. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology of the corroded surfaces after testing.

  5. Quenching of surface-exciton emission from ZnO nanocombs by plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Tay, B. K.; Sun, X. W.; Sze, J. Y.; Han, Z. J.; Wang, J. X.; Zhang, X. H.; Li, Y. B.; Zhang, S.

    2007-08-13

    Surface modification of ZnO nanocombs was performed through a Ti plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) with low bias voltages ranging from 0 to 5 kV to quench surface-originated exciton emission. The ion energy dependent surface modification on ZnO was investigated using transmission electron microscopy and temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL). The surface exciton (SX) was clearly identified for the as-grown sample at 4.5 K, and complete quenching was observed for sample treated with 5 kV PIII due to surface state passivation. The SX related surface states were located within 5 nm in depth from the surface corresponding to the implantation depth of 5 kV PIII. Room-temperature PL enhancement of these surface-modified ZnO nanocombs was observed and discussed. The results show that PIII can become a viable technique for nanostructure surface passivation.

  6. Microstructures of Si surface layers implanted with Cu

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Myers, S.M.

    1993-12-31

    Microstructures of Si ion-implanted with Cu have been characterized by TEM after annealing. For 1.2 at.%, the Cu is trapped at planar defects, but for 10 at.%, {eta}-Cu{sub 3}Si forms and Cu diffuses at its equilibrium solubility. These observations allow proper evaluation of the binding energies of Cu to previously formed internal cavities (2.2 eV) and {eta}-Cu{sub 3}Si (1.7 eV). The 10 at.% Cu layer promotes oxidation of Si catalyzed by {eta}-Cu{sub 3}Si. The microstructures also indicate that Si implanted with {approximately}2 at.% Cu reforms epitaxially with embedded defects after 8 hr at 700C, but for {approximately}10 at.% Cu, epitaxy is not recovered after 6 hours at 600C.

  7. Biomechanical evaluation and surface characterization of a nano-modified surface on PEEK implants: a study in the rabbit tibia.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Pär; Jimbo, Ryo; Kjellin, Per; Currie, Fredrik; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Wennerberg, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) is today frequently used as a biomaterial in different medical operations due to its excellent mechanical and chemical properties. However, the untreated surface of PEEK is bioinert and hydrophobic, and it does not osseointegrate in its pure form. The aim of this study was to evaluate a unique nano-modified surface of PEEK with respect to osseointegration. Forty-eight threaded, non-cutting PEEK implants were inserted bilaterally in the tibia of 24 rabbits. Half of the implants (n=24) were coated with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (test) and the remaining implants (n=24) were left uncoated (control). Half of the animals (n=12) were euthanized after 3 weeks of healing and the remaining (n=12) after 12 weeks. The implant retention was measured with a removal torque apparatus. Surface analysis was performed with interferometry, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photon spectroscopy to relate the removal torque to the applied surface. The test implants revealed a significantly higher retention after 3 weeks (P=0.05) and 12 weeks (P=0.028) compared to controls. The result of the present study proves that the addition of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite coating to PEEK surfaces significantly increases its removal torque and biocompatibility. PMID:25152620

  8. Biomechanical evaluation and surface characterization of a nano-modified surface on PEEK implants: a study in the rabbit tibia

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Pär; Jimbo, Ryo; Kjellin, Per; Currie, Fredrik; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Wennerberg, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) is today frequently used as a biomaterial in different medical operations due to its excellent mechanical and chemical properties. However, the untreated surface of PEEK is bioinert and hydrophobic, and it does not osseointegrate in its pure form. The aim of this study was to evaluate a unique nano-modified surface of PEEK with respect to osseointegration. Forty-eight threaded, non-cutting PEEK implants were inserted bilaterally in the tibia of 24 rabbits. Half of the implants (n=24) were coated with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (test) and the remaining implants (n=24) were left uncoated (control). Half of the animals (n=12) were euthanized after 3 weeks of healing and the remaining (n=12) after 12 weeks. The implant retention was measured with a removal torque apparatus. Surface analysis was performed with interferometry, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photon spectroscopy to relate the removal torque to the applied surface. The test implants revealed a significantly higher retention after 3 weeks (P=0.05) and 12 weeks (P=0.028) compared to controls. The result of the present study proves that the addition of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite coating to PEEK surfaces significantly increases its removal torque and biocompatibility. PMID:25152620

  9. Nanomodified Peek Dental Implants: Bioactive Composites and Surface Modification—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Siddiqui, Fahad; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this review is to summarize and evaluate the relevant literature regarding the different ways how polyetheretherketone (PEEK) can be modified to overcome its limited bioactivity, and thereby making it suitable as a dental implant material. Study Selection. An electronic literature search was conducted via the PubMed and Google Scholar databases using the keywords “PEEK dental implants,” “nano,” “osseointegration,” “surface treatment,” and “modification.” A total of 16 in vivo and in vitro studies were found suitable to be included in this review. Results. There are many viable methods to increase the bioactivity of PEEK. Most methods focus on increasing the surface roughness, increasing the hydrophilicity and coating osseoconductive materials. Conclusion. There are many ways in which PEEK can be modified at a nanometer level to overcome its limited bioactivity. Melt-blending with bioactive nanoparticles can be used to produce bioactive nanocomposites, while spin-coating, gas plasma etching, electron beam, and plasma-ion immersion implantation can be used to modify the surface of PEEK implants in order to make them more bioactive. However, more animal studies are needed before these implants can be deemed suitable to be used as dental implants. PMID:26495000

  10. Nanomodified Peek Dental Implants: Bioactive Composites and Surface Modification-A Review.

    PubMed

    Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Siddiqui, Fahad; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this review is to summarize and evaluate the relevant literature regarding the different ways how polyetheretherketone (PEEK) can be modified to overcome its limited bioactivity, and thereby making it suitable as a dental implant material. Study Selection. An electronic literature search was conducted via the PubMed and Google Scholar databases using the keywords "PEEK dental implants," "nano," "osseointegration," "surface treatment," and "modification." A total of 16 in vivo and in vitro studies were found suitable to be included in this review. Results. There are many viable methods to increase the bioactivity of PEEK. Most methods focus on increasing the surface roughness, increasing the hydrophilicity and coating osseoconductive materials. Conclusion. There are many ways in which PEEK can be modified at a nanometer level to overcome its limited bioactivity. Melt-blending with bioactive nanoparticles can be used to produce bioactive nanocomposites, while spin-coating, gas plasma etching, electron beam, and plasma-ion immersion implantation can be used to modify the surface of PEEK implants in order to make them more bioactive. However, more animal studies are needed before these implants can be deemed suitable to be used as dental implants. PMID:26495000

  11. Simultaneous Sterilization With Surface Modification Of Plastic Bottle By Plasma-Based Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Sakudo, N.; Ikenaga, N.; Ikeda, F.; Nakayama, Y.; Kishi, Y.; Yajima, Z.

    2011-01-07

    Dry sterilization of polymeric material is developed. The technique utilizes the plasma-based ion implantation which is same as for surface modification of polymers. Experimental data for sterilization are obtained by using spores of Bacillus subtilis as samples. On the other hand we previously showed that the surface modification enhanced the gas barrier characteristics of plastic bottles. Comparing the implantation conditions for the sterilization experiment with those for the surface modification, we find that both sterilization and surface modification are simultaneously performed in a certain range of implantation conditions. This implies that the present bottling system for plastic vessels will be simplified and streamlined by excluding the toxic peroxide water that has been used in the traditional sterilization processes.

  12. Simultaneous Sterilization With Surface Modification Of Plastic Bottle By Plasma-Based Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakudo, N.; Ikenaga, N.; Ikeda, F.; Nakayama, Y.; Kishi, Y.; Yajima, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Dry sterilization of polymeric material is developed. The technique utilizes the plasma-based ion implantation which is same as for surface modification of polymers. Experimental data for sterilization are obtained by using spores of Bacillus subtilis as samples. On the other hand we previously showed that the surface modification enhanced the gas barrier characteristics of plastic bottles. Comparing the implantation conditions for the sterilization experiment with those for the surface modification, we find that both sterilization and surface modification are simultaneously performed in a certain range of implantation conditions. This implies that the present bottling system for plastic vessels will be simplified and streamlined by excluding the toxic peroxide water that has been used in the traditional sterilization processes.

  13. Oriented collagen as a potential cochlear implant electrode surface coating to achieve directed neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Kirkwood, John E; Lai, Edwina; Dazert, Stefan; Fuller, Gerald G; Heller, Stefan

    2012-04-01

    In patients with severe to profound hearing loss, cochlear implants (CIs) are currently the only therapeutic option when the amplification with conventional hearing aids does no longer lead to a useful hearing experience. Despite its great success, there are patients in which benefit from these devices is rather limited. One reason may be a poor neuron-device interaction, where the electric fields generated by the electrode array excite a wide range of tonotopically organized spiral ganglion neurons at the cost of spatial resolution. Coating of CI electrodes to provide a welcoming environment combined with suitable surface chemistry (e.g. with neurotrophic factors) has been suggested to create a closer bioelectrical interface between the electrode array and the target tissue, which might lead to better spatial resolution, better frequency discrimination, and ultimately may improve speech perception in patients. Here we investigate the use of a collagen surface with a cholesteric banding structure, whose orientation can be systemically controlled as a guiding structure for neurite outgrowth. We demonstrate that spiral ganglion neurons survive on collagen-coated surfaces and display a directed neurite growth influenced by the direction of collagen fibril deposition. The majority of neurites grow parallel to the orientation direction of the collagen. We suggest collagen coating as a possible future option in CI technology to direct neurite outgrowth and improve hearing results for affected patients.

  14. Electrostatic self-assembly of multilayer copolymeric membranes on the surface of porous tantalum implants for sustained release of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinming; Chen, Muwan; Feng, Wenzhou; Liang, Jiabi; Zhao, Huibin; Tian, Lin; Chao, Hui; Zou, Xuenong

    2011-01-01

    Many studies in recent years have focused on surface engineering of implant materials in order to improve their biocompatibility and other performance. Porous tantalum implants have increasingly been used in implant surgeries, due to their biocompatibility, physical stability, and good mechanical strength. In this study we functionalized the porous tantalum implant for sustained drug delivery capability via electrostatic self-assembly of polyelectrolytes of hyaluronic acid, methylated collagen, and terpolymer on the surface of a porous tantalum implant. The anticancer drug doxorubicin was encapsulated into the multilayer copolymer membranes on the porous tantalum implants. Results showed the sustained released of doxorubicin from the functionalized porous tantalum implants for up to 1 month. The drug release solutions in 1 month all had inhibitory effects on the proliferation of chondrosarcoma cell line SW1353. These results suggest that this functionalized implant could be used in reconstructive surgery for the treatment of bone tumor as a local, sustained drug delivery system.

  15. Laser-Modified Surface Enhances Osseointegration and Biomechanical Anchorage of Commercially Pure Titanium Implants for Bone-Anchored Hearing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Omar; Simonsson, Hanna; Palmquist, Anders; Thomsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants inserted in the temporal bone are a vital component of bone-anchored hearing systems (BAHS). Despite low implant failure levels, early loading protocols and simplified procedures necessitate the application of implants which promote bone formation, bone bonding and biomechanical stability. Here, screw-shaped, commercially pure titanium implants were selectively laser ablated within the thread valley using an Nd:YAG laser to produce a microtopography with a superimposed nanotexture and a thickened surface oxide layer. State-of-the-art machined implants served as controls. After eight weeks’ implantation in rabbit tibiae, resonance frequency analysis (RFA) values increased from insertion to retrieval for both implant types, while removal torque (RTQ) measurements showed 153% higher biomechanical anchorage of the laser-modified implants. Comparably high bone area (BA) and bone-implant contact (BIC) were recorded for both implant types but with distinctly different failure patterns following biomechanical testing. Fracture lines appeared within the bone ~30–50 μm from the laser-modified surface, while separation occurred at the bone-implant interface for the machined surface. Strong correlations were found between RTQ and BIC and between RFA at retrieval and BA. In the endosteal threads, where all the bone had formed de novo, the extracellular matrix composition, the mineralised bone area and osteocyte densities were comparable for the two types of implant. Using resin cast etching, osteocyte canaliculi were observed directly approaching the laser-modified implant surface. Transmission electron microscopy showed canaliculi in close proximity to the laser-modified surface, in addition to a highly ordered arrangement of collagen fibrils aligned parallel to the implant surface contour. It is concluded that the physico-chemical surface properties of laser-modified surfaces (thicker oxide, micro- and nanoscale texture) promote bone bonding

  16. Surface engineering of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass with low energy Ar- or Ca-ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Zhu, Chao; Muntele, Claudiu I; Zhang, Tao; Liaw, Peter K; He, Wei

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, low energy ion implantation was employed to engineer the surface of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG), aiming at improving the biocompatibility and imparting bioactivity to the surface. Ca- or Ar-ions were implanted at 10 or 50 keV at a fluence of 8 × 10(15)ions/cm(2) to (Zr0.55Al0.10Ni0.05Cu0.30)99Y1 (at.%) BMG. The effects of ion implantation on material properties and subsequent cellular responses were investigated. Both Ar- and Ca-ion implantations were suggested to induce atom displacements on the surfaces according to the Monte-Carlo simulation. The change of atomic environment of Zr in the surface regions as implied by the alteration in X-ray absorption measurements at Zr K-edge. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the ion implantation process has modified the surface chemical compositions and indicated the presence of Ca after Ca-ion implantation. The surface nanohardness has been enhanced by implantation of either ion species, with Ca-ion implantation showing more prominent effect. The BMG surfaces were altered to be more hydrophobic after ion implantation, which can be attributed to the reduced amount of hydroxyl groups on the implanted surfaces. Higher numbers of adherent cells were found on Ar- and Ca-ion implanted samples, while more pronounced cell adhesion was observed on Ca-ion implanted substrates. The low energy ion implantation resulted in concurrent modifications in atomic structure, nanohardness, surface chemistry, hydrophobicity, and cell behavior on the surface of the Zr-based BMG, which were proposed to be mutually correlated with each other. PMID:25492195

  17. Controlled removal of ceramic surfaces with combination of ions implantation and ultrasonic energy

    DOEpatents

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Rankin, Janet; Thevenard, Paul; Romana, Laurence J.

    1995-01-01

    A method for tailoring or patterning the surface of ceramic articles is provided by implanting ions to predetermined depth into the ceramic material at a selected surface location with the ions being implanted at a fluence and energy adequate to damage the lattice structure of the ceramic material for bi-axially straining near-surface regions of the ceramic material to the predetermined depth. The resulting metastable near-surface regions of the ceramic material are then contacted with energy pulses from collapsing, ultrasonically-generated cavitation bubbles in a liquid medium for removing to a selected depth the ion-damaged near-surface regions containing the bi-axially strained lattice structure from the ceramic body. Additional patterning of the selected surface location on the ceramic body is provided by implanting a high fluence of high-energy, relatively-light ions at selected surface sites for relaxing the bi-axial strain in the near-surface regions defined by these sites and thereby preventing the removal of such ion-implanted sites by the energy pulses from the collapsing ultrasonic cavitation bubbles.

  18. Ion Implant Technology for Intermediate Band Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olea, Javier; Pastor, David; Luque, María Toledano; Mártil, Ignacio; Díaz, Germán González

    This chapter describes the creation of an Intermediate Band (IB) on single crystal silicon substrates by means of high-dose Ti implantation and subsequent Pulsed Laser Melting (PLM). The Ti concentration over the Mott limit is confirmed by Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) measurements and the recovery of the crystallinity after annealing by means of Glancing Incidence X Ray Diffraction (GIXRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) measurements show that most of the atoms are located interstitially. Analysis of the sheet resistance and mobility measured using the van der Pauw geometry shows a temperature-dependent decoupling between the implanted layer and the substrate. This decoupling and the high laminated conductivity of the implanted layer could not be explained except if we assume that an IB has been formed in the semiconductor. A specific model for the bilayer electrical behaviour has been developed. The fitting of this model and also the simulation of the sheet resistance with the ATLAS code allow to determine that the IB energetic position is located around 0.36-0.38 eV below the conduction band. Carriers at the IB have a density very similar to the Ti concentration and behave as holes with mobilities as low as 0.4 cm2 Vs- 1.

  19. Corrosion of phosphate-enriched titanium oxide surface dental implants (TiUnite) under in vitro inflammatory and hyperglycemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Messer, Regina L W; Seta, Francesca; Mickalonis, John; Brown, Yolanda; Lewis, Jill B; Wataha, John C

    2010-02-01

    Endosseous dental implants use is increasing in patients with systemic conditions that compromise wound healing. Manufacturers recently have redesigned implants to ensure more reliable and faster osseointegration. One design strategy has been to create a porous phosphate-enriched titanium oxide (TiUnite) surface to increase surface area and enhance interactions with bone. In the current study, the corrosion properties of TiUnite implants were studied in cultures of monocytic cells and solutions simulating inflammatory and hyperglycemic conditions. Furthermore, to investigate whether placement into bone causes enough mechanical damage to alter implant corrosion properties, the enhanced surface implants as well as machined titanium implants were placed into human cadaver mandibular bone, the bone removed, and the corrosion properties measured. Implant corrosion behavior was characterized by open circuit potentials, linear polarization resistance, and electrical impedance spectroscopy. In selected samples, THP1 cells were activated with lipopolysaccharide prior to implant exposure to simulate an inflammatory environment. No significant differences in corrosion potentials were measured between the TiUnite implants and the machined titanium implants in previous studies. TiUnite implants exhibited lower corrosion rates in all simulated conditions than observed in PBS, and EIS measurements revealed two time constants which shifted with protein-containing electrolytes. In addition, the TiUnite implants displayed a significantly lower corrosion rate than the machined titanium implants after placement into bone. The current study suggests that the corrosion risk of the enhanced oxide implant is lower than its machined surface titanium implant counterpart under simulated conditions of inflammation, elevated dextrose concentrations, and after implantation into bone.

  20. Formation of Wear Resistant Steel Surfaces by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mändl, S.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2003-08-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a versatile and fast method for implanting energetic ions into large and complex shaped three-dimensional objects where the ions are accelerated by applying negative high voltage pulses to a substrate immersed in a plasma. As the line-of-sight restrictions of conventional implanters are circumvented, it results in a fast and cost-effective technology. Implantation of nitrogen at 30 - 40 keV at moderate temperatures of 200 - 400 °C into steel circumvents the diminishing thermal nitrogen activation encountered, e.g., in plasma nitriding in this temperature regime, thus enabling nitriding of additional steel grades. Nitride formation and improvement of the mechanical properties after PIII are presented for several steel grades, including AISI 316Ti (food industry), AISI D2 (used for bending tools) and AISI 1095 (with applications in the textile industry).

  1. Formation of Wear Resistant Steel Surfaces by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Maendl, S.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2003-08-26

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a versatile and fast method for implanting energetic ions into large and complex shaped three-dimensional objects where the ions are accelerated by applying negative high voltage pulses to a substrate immersed in a plasma. As the line-of-sight restrictions of conventional implanters are circumvented, it results in a fast and cost-effective technology. Implantation of nitrogen at 30 - 40 keV at moderate temperatures of 200 - 400 deg. C into steel circumvents the diminishing thermal nitrogen activation encountered, e.g., in plasma nitriding in this temperature regime, thus enabling nitriding of additional steel grades. Nitride formation and improvement of the mechanical properties after PIII are presented for several steel grades, including AISI 316Ti (food industry), AISI D2 (used for bending tools) and AISI 1095 (with applications in the textile industry)

  2. Technological, biological, and acoustical constraints to music perception in cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Limb, Charles J; Roy, Alexis T

    2014-02-01

    Despite advances in technology, the ability to perceive music remains limited for many cochlear implant users. This paper reviews the technological, biological, and acoustical constraints that make music an especially challenging stimulus for cochlear implant users, while highlighting recent research efforts to overcome these shortcomings. The limitations of cochlear implant devices, which have been optimized for speech comprehension, become evident when applied to music, particularly with regards to inadequate spectral, fine-temporal, and dynamic range representation. Beyond the impoverished information transmitted by the device itself, both peripheral and central auditory nervous system deficits are seen in the presence of sensorineural hearing loss, such as auditory nerve degeneration and abnormal auditory cortex activation. These technological and biological constraints to effective music perception are further compounded by the complexity of the acoustical features of music itself that require the perceptual integration of varying rhythmic, melodic, harmonic, and timbral elements of sound. Cochlear implant users not only have difficulty perceiving spectral components individually (leading to fundamental disruptions in perception of pitch, melody, and harmony) but also display deficits with higher perceptual integration tasks required for music perception, such as auditory stream segregation. Despite these current limitations, focused musical training programs, new assessment methods, and improvements in the representation and transmission of the complex acoustical features of music through technological innovation offer the potential for significant advancements in cochlear implant-mediated music perception.

  3. The effect of plasma surface treatment on the bioactivity of titanium implant materials (in vitro)

    PubMed Central

    Abdelrahim, Ramy A.; Badr, Nadia A.; Baroudi, Kusai

    2016-01-01

    Background: The surface of an implantable biomaterial plays a very important role in determining the biocompatibility, osteoinduction, and osteointegration of implants because it is in intimate contact with the host bone and soft tissues. Objective: This study was aimed to assess the effect of plasma surface treatment on the bioactivity of titanium alloy (Ti–6Al–4V). Materials and Methods: Fifteen titanium alloy samples were used in this study. The samples were divided into three groups (with five samples in each group). Five samples were kept untreated and served as control (group A). Another five plasma samples were sprayed for nitrogen ion implantation on their surfaces (group B) and the last five samples were pre-etched with acid before plasma treatment (group C). All the investigated samples were immersed for 7 days in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) which was used as a simulating body fluid (SBF) at pH 7.4 and 37°C. HBSS was renewed every 3 days. The different surfaces were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXA), and Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Results: Nitriding of Ti-alloy samples via plasma nitrogen ion implantation increased the bioactivity of titanium. Moreover, the surface topography affected the chemical structure of the formed apatite. Increasing the surface roughness enhanced the bioactivity of the implant material. Conclusions: Nitridation can be exploited as an effective way to promote the formation of bone-like material on the implant surface. PMID:27011927

  4. In vitro osteoinduction of human mesenchymal stem cells in biomimetic surface modified titanium alloy implants.

    PubMed

    Santander, Sonia; Alcaine, Clara; Lyahyai, Jaber; Pérez, Maria Angeles; Rodellar, Clementina; Doblaré, Manuel; Ochoa, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Interaction between cells and implant surface is crucial for clinical success. This interaction and the associated surface treatment are essential for achieving a fast osseointegration process. Several studies of different topographical or chemical surface modifications have been proposed previously in literature. The Biomimetic Advanced Surface (BAS) topography is a combination of a shot blasting and anodizing procedure. Macroroughness, microporosity of titanium oxide and Calcium/Phosphate ion deposition is obtained. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMCSs) response in vitro to this treatment has been evaluated. The results obtained show an improved adhesion capacity and a higher proliferation rate when hMSCs are cultured on treated surfaces. This biomimetic modification of the titanium surface induces the expression of osteblastic differentiation markers (RUNX2 and Osteopontin) in the absence of any externally provided differentiation factor. As a main conclusion, our biomimetic surface modification could lead to a substantial improvement in osteoinduction in titanium alloy implants.

  5. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  6. Plasma immersion ion implantation for the efficient surface modification of medical materials

    SciTech Connect

    Slabodchikov, Vladimir A. Borisov, Dmitry P. Kuznetsov, Vladimir M.

    2015-10-27

    The paper reports on a new method of plasma immersion ion implantation for the surface modification of medical materials using the example of nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloys much used for manufacturing medical implants. The chemical composition and surface properties of NiTi alloys doped with silicon by conventional ion implantation and by the proposed plasma immersion method are compared. It is shown that the new plasma immersion method is more efficient than conventional ion beam treatment and provides Si implantation into NiTi surface layers through a depth of a hundred nanometers at low bias voltages (400 V) and temperatures (≤150°C) of the substrate. The research results suggest that the chemical composition and surface properties of materials required for medicine, e.g., NiTi alloys, can be successfully attained through modification by the proposed method of plasma immersion ion implantation and by other methods based on the proposed vacuum equipment without using any conventional ion beam treatment.

  7. Optical studies of cobalt implanted rutile TiO2 (110) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Shalik Ram; Padmanabhan, B.; Chanda, Anupama; Mishra, Indrani; Malik, V. K.; Mishra, N. C.; Kanjilal, D.; Varma, Shikha

    2016-11-01

    Present study investigates the photoabsorption properties of single crystal rutile TiO2 (110) surfaces after they have been implanted with low fluences of cobalt ions. The surfaces, after implantation, demonstrate fabrication of nanostructures and anisotropic nano-ripple patterns. Creation of oxygen vacancies (Ti3+ states), development of cobalt nano-clusters as well as band gap modifications have also been observed. Results presented here demonstrate that fabrication of self organized nanostructures, upon implantation, along with the development of oxygen vacancies and ligand field transitions of cobalt ion promote the enhancement of photo-absorbance in both UV (∼2 times) and visible (∼5 times) regimes. These investigations on nanostructured TiO2 surfaces can be important for photo-catalysis.

  8. [Surface analysis of intramuscular bioglass ceramic implants using pro ton-induced x-ray emission].

    PubMed

    Dittmar, A; Schwabe, F; Thieme, V; Hofmann, H; Berger, G

    1984-01-01

    The method of the proton induced x-ray emission ( PIXE ) was used for the investigation of ion exchange processes on the surface of intramuscularly implanted Bioglass-Ceramics. This method allows a simultaneous analysis free from destruction in concentrations ranges of ppm for several elements. The measurements were carried out with different proton energy, in that manner a relative quantity analysis was possible in different layers. A durable two-layered surface already originates in a short time after the implantation on the implant interface. This one consists of a layer rich in calcium and phosphorus as well as a second zone rich in silicon. The meaning of this two-layered surface for the bio-activity and the bio-stability of the material is discussed.

  9. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqiu; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-01-01

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110mAg from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent experimental efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermal exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. The nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.

  10. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    SciTech Connect

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqui; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-10-05

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110m Ag from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent research efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermal exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. In conclusion, the nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.

  11. Antimicrobial activity of the surface coatings on TiAlZr implant biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Ionita, Daniela; Grecu, Mihaela; Ungureanu, Camelia; Demetrescu, Ioana

    2011-12-01

    This study is devoted to antimicrobial activity of new surface coatings on TiAlZr. Ti alloys such as TiAlZr are used as implant biomaterials, but, despite the good behavior of such alloys in simulated conditions, bacterial infections appear after the introduction of an implant into the body. The infections are typically caused by the adherence and colonization of bacteria on the surfaces of the implants. The study presents preparation and surface morphology characterization of coatings obtained via anodizing, as well as biomimetic coatings with hydroxyapatite and silver ions with and without antibiotic. The percentage inhibition of Escherichia coli bacteria growth was evaluated for each of the studied coating, and a Trojan-horse model of silver nanoparticles (nAg) antibacterial activity at interface was proposed. Such coatings could be more important taking into account that antibacterial treatments with antibiotics are becoming less effective due to their intensive use.

  12. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqui; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-10-05

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110m Ag from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent research efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermalmore » exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. In conclusion, the nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.« less

  13. In vitro evaluation of the antibiofilm properties of chlorhexidine and delmopinol on dental implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ready, Derren; Theodoridis, Georgios; Green, Ingrid; Ciric, Lena; Pratten, Jonathan; Tay, Weiming; McDonald, Ailbhe

    2015-06-01

    Biofilm development on the internal surfaces of dental implants and dental implant components may be associated with peri-implant hard and soft tissue abnormalities. Currently, no protocols have been established for effective disinfection of removable implant components. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibiofilm properties of commonly used dental antimicrobial agents (chlorhexidine and delmopinol) on multispecies biofilms. Biofilms of 48 h and 168 h maturity were exposed to 0.2% chlorhexidine, 2% chlorhexidine and a product containing 0.2% delmopinol for 5, 10 and 20 min. 2% chlorhexidine was the most effective agent, achieving a total viable biofilm reduction ranging from 96.2% to >99.99% depending on the time of exposure and the stage of biofilm development. PMID:25963339

  14. Surface anatomy for implantation of external ventricular drainage: Some surgical remarks

    PubMed Central

    Mostofi, Kevyan; Khouzani, Reza K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: External ventricular drainage (EVD) is an emergency process intended to reduce intracranial hypertension resulting from the obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. This creates a temporary situation to extract CSF that cannot pass through normally. Knowing the surface anatomy for EVD implantation is important to prevent its inadvertent complications. The external landmarks have been designed in this anatomic study to review the classical landmarks and come up with new landmarks to improve this simple but lifesaving procedure. Methods: From November 1998 to October 2012, we implanted 439 EVDs. Results: In the first years, we employed usual landmarks to implant 97 EVDs. Since 2002, we used modified anatomical landmarks to implant 342 EVDs directly in the third ventricle. Conclusion: Using effective landmarks for EVD implementation allows the catheter to be inserted in the third ventricle. In addition, it permits more precise accuracy to ensure a safer procedure with fewer complications.

  15. Fabrication of highly homogeneous surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates using Ag ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenqing; Xiao, Xiangheng; Dai, Zhigao; Wu, Wei; Cheng, Li; Mei, Fei; Zhang, Xingang; Jiang, Changzhong

    2016-06-01

    In recent times, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has attracted attention for its excellent potential application in chemical and biological detection. In this work, we demonstrate that a highly homogeneous SERS substrate can be realized by Ag ion implantation and the subsequent annealing process. Both the implantation and annealing parameters have been optimized for a high sensitivity SERS substrate. The SERS measurement indicates that a sample implanted by 20 kV Ag ions with a dosage of 3  ×  1016 ions cm-2 exhibits the highest SERS activity. In addition, the SERS activity of the Ag-implanted substrates depends highly on the annealing temperature and time. Since none of the fabrication processes contain chemical reactions, our substrate is a clean system without any chemical residues.

  16. Surface anatomy for implantation of external ventricular drainage: Some surgical remarks

    PubMed Central

    Mostofi, Kevyan; Khouzani, Reza K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: External ventricular drainage (EVD) is an emergency process intended to reduce intracranial hypertension resulting from the obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. This creates a temporary situation to extract CSF that cannot pass through normally. Knowing the surface anatomy for EVD implantation is important to prevent its inadvertent complications. The external landmarks have been designed in this anatomic study to review the classical landmarks and come up with new landmarks to improve this simple but lifesaving procedure. Methods: From November 1998 to October 2012, we implanted 439 EVDs. Results: In the first years, we employed usual landmarks to implant 97 EVDs. Since 2002, we used modified anatomical landmarks to implant 342 EVDs directly in the third ventricle. Conclusion: Using effective landmarks for EVD implementation allows the catheter to be inserted in the third ventricle. In addition, it permits more precise accuracy to ensure a safer procedure with fewer complications. PMID:27625894

  17. Science and technology of biocompatible thin films for implantable biomedical devices.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Kabius, Bernd; Auciello, Orlando

    2010-01-01

    This presentation focuses on reviewing research to develop two critical biocompatible film technologies to enable implantable biomedical devices, namely: 1) development of bioinert/biocompatible coatings for encapsulation of Si chips implantable in the human body (e.g., retinal prosthesis implantable in the human eye)-the coating involves a novel ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) film or hybrid biocompatible oxide/UNCD layered films; and 2) development of biocompatible films with high-dielectric constant and microfabrication process to produce energy storage super-capacitors embedded in the microchip to achieve full miniaturization for implantation into the human bodynovel Al2O3/TiO2 nanolaminates exhibit abnormally high dielectric constant to enable super-capacitors with very high-capacitance.

  18. Regulatory science of new technology: tendency of medical professionals' interests on silicone breast implants.

    PubMed

    Nakazaki, Tomomichi; Ikeda, Koji; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka; Umezu, Mitsuo

    2016-09-01

    New technology related to artificial organs is most attractive for worldwide researchers. We believe they must contribute for the future patients against untreatable diseases. Regulatory science is a new science to establish 'social acceptance' of new technology into the clinical market as soon as possible. In the history of silicone breast implants, we could recognize risks many times; however, we missed such chances to prevent a subsequent crisis. We analyzed the trend of published literature related to silicone breast implants to review the medical professionals' interests on such risks. This trend showed, despite issues of a social acceptance of silicone breast implants in a few countries, other countries' medical professionals had no interest. Our hypothesis is 'medical professionals face the government and do not have contributed to re-establish the social acceptance of new technologies for patients'. Any technology does not have the complete evidence of safety, efficacy and quality, despite regulatory authorities' review and approval with clinical evidences. medical professionals need to conduct subsequently the epidemiological study, to take a meta-analysis periodically and to create/update the guidance for their patients under their professional ethics after the marketing of new technologies. We need to take seriously the 'lesson learned' from the history of silicone breast implants for all kind of new technologies existed in the present.

  19. Molecular dynamics study on splitting of hydrogen-implanted silicon in Smart-Cut® technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bing, Wang; Bin, Gu; Rongying, Pan; Sijia, Zhang; Jianhua, Shen

    2015-03-01

    Defect evolution in a single crystal silicon which is implanted with hydrogen atoms and then annealed is investigated in the present paper by means of molecular dynamics simulation. By introducing defect density based on statistical average, this work aims to quantitatively examine defect nucleation and growth at nanoscale during annealing in Smart-Cut® technology. Research focus is put on the effects of the implantation energy, hydrogen implantation dose and annealing temperature on defect density in the statistical region. It is found that most defects nucleate and grow at the annealing stage, and that defect density increases with the increase of the annealing temperature and the decrease of the hydrogen implantation dose. In addition, the enhancement and the impediment effects of stress field on defect density in the annealing process are discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11372261), the Excellent Young Scientists Supporting Project of Science and Technology Department of Sichuan Province (No. 2013JQ0030), the Supporting Project of Department of Education of Sichuan Province (No. 2014zd3132), the Opening Project of Key Laboratory of Testing Technology for Manufacturing Process, Southwest University of Science and Technology-Ministry of Education (No. 12zxzk02), the Fund of Doctoral Research of Southwest University of Science and Technology (No. 12zx7106), and the Postgraduate Innovation Fund Project of Southwest University of Science and Technology (No. 14ycxjj0121).

  20. Innovative Laser Ablation Technology for Surface Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Winston C. H.

    2003-06-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a novel laser ablation in liquid for surface decontamination. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary contamination. Another aim is to make this surface decontamination technology becomes economically feasible for large scale decontamination.

  1. Mechanism for diamond nucleation and growth on single crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, T. P.; Xiong, Fulin; Chang, R. P. H.; White, C. W.

    1992-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of diamond crystals on single-crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon ions is studied. Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition is used for diamond growth. The single-crystal copper substrates were implanted either at room or elevated temperature with carbon ions prior to diamond nucleation. This procedure leads to the formation of a graphite film on the copper surface which greatly enhances diamond crystallite nucleation. A simple lattice model is constructed for diamond growth on graphite as 111 line (diamond) parallel to 0001 line (graphite) and 110 line (diamond) parallel to 1 1 -2 0 (graphite).

  2. Surface modification of Ti dental implants by Nd:YVO 4 laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Francisco J. C.; Marques, Rodrigo F. C.; Filho, Edson de A.; Guastaldi, Antonio C.

    2007-09-01

    Surface modifications have been applied in endosteal bone devices in order to improve the osseointegration through direct contact between neoformed bone and the implant without an intervening soft tissue layer. Surface characteristics of titanium implants have been modified by addictive methods, such as metallic titanium, titanium oxide and hydroxyapatite powder plasma spray, as well as by subtractive methods, such as acid etching, acid etching associated with sandblasting by either AlO 2 or TiO 2, and recently by laser ablation. Surface modification for dental and medical implants can be obtained by using laser irradiation technique where its parameters like repetition rate, pulse energy, scanning speed and fluency must be taken into accounting to the appropriate surface topography. Surfaces of commercially pure Ti (cpTi) were modified by laser Nd:YVO 4 in nine different parameters configurations, all under normal atmosphere. The samples were characterized by SEM and XRD refined by Rietveld method. The crystalline phases αTi, βTi, Ti 6O, Ti 3O and TiO were formed by the melting and fast cooling processes during irradiation. The resulting phases on the irradiated surface were correlated with the laser beam parameters. The aim of the present work was to control titanium oxides formations in order to improve implants osseointegration by using a laser irradiation technique which is of great importance to biomaterial devices due to being a clean and reproducible process.

  3. Comparison of surface characteristics of retrieved cobalt-chromium femoral heads with and without ion implantation.

    PubMed

    McGrory, Brian J; Ruterbories, James M; Pawar, Vivek D; Thomas, Reginald K; Salehi, Abraham B

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation of CoCr is reported to produce increased surface hardness and a lower friction surface. Femoral heads with and without ion implantation retrieved from 1997 to 2003 were evaluated for surface roughness (average surface roughness [Ra], mean peak height [Rpm], and maximum distance from peak to valley [Rmax]), nanohardness, and the ion-treated layer thickness. The difference in average Rmax (P = .033) and average Rpm (P = .008) was statistically significant, but there was no correlation between the average or maximum roughness parameters (average surface roughness, Rmax, and Rpm) and time in vivo (P > .05). Overall, nanohardness was greater for the low-friction ion-treated heads (P < .001); and it decreased with increasing time in vivo (P = .01). Ion treatment produces an increased surface hardness, but the advantage of this increased hardness appears to dissipate over time in vivo.

  4. Evolution and acceptability of medical applications of RFID implants among early users of technology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alan D

    2007-01-01

    RFID as a wireless identification technology that may be combined with microchip implants have tremendous potential in today's market. Although these implants have their advantages and disadvantages, recent improvements how allowed for implants designed for humans. Focus was given to the use of RFID tags and its effects on technology and CRM through a case study on VeriChip, the only corporation to hold the rights and the patent to the implantable chip for humans, and an empirically based study on working professionals to measure perceptions by early adopters of such technology. Through hypotheses-testing procedures, it was found that although some resistance to accept microchip implants was found in several applications, especially among gender, it was totally expected that healthcare and medical record keeping activities would be universally treated in a positive light and the use of authorities (namely governmental agencies) would be equally treated in a negative light by both sexes. Future trends and recommendations are presented along with statistical results collected through personal interviews.

  5. Morphologies of fibroblast cells cultured on surfaces of PHB films implanted by hydroxyl ions.

    PubMed

    Hou, T; Zhang, J Z; Kong, L J; Zhang, X E; Hu, P; Zhang, D M; Li, N

    2006-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) films were implanted with 40 keV hydroxyl ions with fluences ranging from 1 x 10(12) to 1 x 10(15) ions/cm2, respectively. The as-implanted PHB films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and water contact angle measurements. The surface structures and properties of the as-implanted PHB films were closely related with hydroxyl ion fluence. They were further investigated by inoculating 3T6 fibroblasts cells on their surfaces. Morphologies of the 3T6 fibroblast cells cultured on surfaces of the as-implanted PHB films were observed by SEM. Characterization of the cultural 3T6 cells was analyzed qualitatively. The preliminary experimental results reveal that the bioactivity of the PHB films modified by hydroxyl ion implantation was improved at different levels, and the fluence of 1 x 10(13) ions/cm2 is optimal for PHB film. PMID:16909942

  6. Effects of zinc-substituted nano-hydroxyapatite coatings on bone integration with implant surfaces*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shi-fang; Dong, Wen-jing; Jiang, Qiao-hong; He, Fu-ming; Wang, Xiao-xiang; Yang, Guo-li

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a zinc-substituted nano-hydroxyapatite (Zn-HA) coating, applied by an electrochemical process, on implant osseointegraton in a rabbit model. Methods: A Zn-HA coating or an HA coating was deposited using an electrochemical process. Surface morphology was examined using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The crystal structure and chemical composition of the coatings were examined using an X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A total of 78 implants were inserted into femurs and tibias of rabbits. After two, four, and eight weeks, femurs and tibias were retrieved and prepared for histomorphometric evaluation and removal torque (RTQ) tests. Results: Rod-like HA crystals appeared on both implant surfaces. The dimensions of the Zn-HA crystals seemed to be smaller than those of HA. XRD patterns showed that the peaks of both coatings matched well with standard HA patterns. FTIR spectra showed that both coatings consisted of HA crystals. The Zn-HA coating significantly improved the bone area within all threads after four and eight weeks (P<0.05), the bone to implant contact (BIC) at four weeks (P<0.05), and RTQ values after four and eight weeks (P<0.05). Conclusions: The study showed that an electrochemically deposited Zn-HA coating has potential for improving bone integration with an implant surface. PMID:23733429

  7. Annealing Effects on the Surface Plasmon of MgO Implanted with Gold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueda, A.; Mu, R.; Tung, Y. -S.; Henderson, D. O.; White, C. W.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zhu, Jane G.; Wang, P. W.

    1997-01-01

    Gold ion implantation was carried out with the energy of 1.1 MeV into (100) oriented MgO single crystal. Implanted doses are 1, 3, 6, 10 x 10(exp 16) ions/sq cm. The gold irradiation results in the formation of gold ion implanted layer with a thickness of 0.2 microns and defect formation. In order to form gold colloids from the as-implanted samples, we annealed the gold implanted MgO samples in three kinds of atmospheres: (1)Ar only, (2)H2 and Ar, and (3)O2 and Ar. The annealing over 1200 C enhanced the gold colloid formation which shows surface plasmon resonance band of gold. The surface plasmon bands of samples annealed in three kinds of atmospheres were found to be at 535 nm (Ar only), 524 nm(H2+Ar), and 560 nm (02+Ar), The band positions of surface plasmon can be reversibly changed by an additional annealing.

  8. Deformation characteristics of the near-surface layers of zirconia ceramics implanted with aluminum ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghyngazov, S. A.; Vasiliev, I. P.; Frangulyan, T. S.; Chernyavski, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of ion treatment on the phase composition and mechanical properties of the near-surface layers of zirconium ceramic composition 97 ZrO2-3Y2O3 (mol%) was studied. Irradiation of the samples was carried out by accelerated ions of aluminum with using vacuum-arc source Mevva 5-Ru. Ion beam had the following parameters: the energy of the accelerated ions E = 78 keV, the pulse current density Ji = 4mA / cm2, current pulse duration equal τ = 250 mcs, pulse repetition frequency f = 5 Hz. Exposure doses (fluence) were 1016 и 1017 ion/cm2. The depth distribution implanted ions was studied by SIMS method. It is shown that the maximum projected range of the implanted ions is equal to 250 nm. Near-surface layers were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) at fixed glancing incidence angle. It is shown that implantation of aluminum ions into the ceramics does not lead to a change in the phase composition of the near-surface layer. The influence of implanted ions on mechanical properties of ceramic near-surface layers was studied by the method of dynamic nanoindentation using small loads on the indenter P=300 mN. It is shown that in ion- implanted ceramic layer the processes of material recovery in the deformed region in the unloading mode proceeds with higher efficiency as compared with the initial material state. The deformation characteristics of samples before and after ion treatment have been determined from interpretation of the resulting P-h curves within the loading and unloading sections by the technique proposed by Oliver and Pharr. It was found that implantation of aluminum ions in the near-surface layer of zirconia ceramics increases nanohardness and reduces the Young's modulus.

  9. Electric Arc and Electrochemical Surface Texturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Snyder, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    Surface texturing of conductive materials can readily be accomplished by means of a moving electric arc which produces a plasma from the environmental gases as well as from the vaporized substrate and arc electrode materials. As the arc is forced to move across the substrate surface, a condensate from the plasma re-deposits an extremely rough surface which is intimately mixed and attached to the substrate material. The arc textured surfaces produce greatly enhanced thermal emittance and hold potential for use as high temperature radiator surfaces in space, as well as in systems which use radiative heat dissipation such as computer assisted tomography (CAT) scan systems. Electrochemical texturing of titanium alloys can be accomplished by using sodium chloride solutions along with ultrasonic agitation to produce a random distribution of craters on the surface. The crater size and density can be controlled to produce surface craters appropriately sized for direct bone in-growth of orthopaedic implants. Electric arc texturing and electrochemical texturing techniques, surface properties and potential applications will be presented.

  10. Fission Surface Power Technology Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.; Mason, Lee S.; Houts, Michael G.; Harlow, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Power is a critical consideration in planning exploration of the surfaces of the Moon, Mars, and beyond. Nuclear power is an important option, especially for locations in the solar system where sunlight is limited in availability or intensity. NASA is maintaining the option for fission surface power for the Moon and Mars by developing and demonstrating technology for an affordable fission surface power system. Because affordability drove the determination of the system concept that this technology will make possible, low development and recurring costs result, while required safety standards are maintained. However, an affordable approach to fission surface power also provides the benefits of simplicity, robustness, and conservatism in design. This paper will illuminate the multiplicity of benefits to an affordable approach to fission surface power, and will describe how the foundation for these benefits is being developed and demonstrated in the Exploration Technology Development Program s Fission Surface Power Project.

  11. Microwave-assisted fabrication of titanium implants with controlled surface topography for rapid bone healing.

    PubMed

    Kutty, Muralithran G; De, Alok; Bhaduri, Sarit B; Yaghoubi, Alireza

    2014-08-27

    Morphological surface modifications have been reported to enhance the performance of biomedical implants. However, current methods of introducing graded porosity involves postprocessing techniques that lead to formation of microcracks, delamination, loss of fatigue strength, and, overall, poor mechanical properties. To address these issues, we developed a microwave sintering procedure whereby pure titanium powder can be readily densified into implants with graded porosity in a single step. Using this approach, surface topography of implants can be closely controlled to have a distinctive combination of surface area, pore size, and surface roughness. In this study, the effect of various surface topographies on in vitro response of neonatal rat calvarial osteoblast in terms of attachment and proliferation is studied. Certain graded surfaces nearly double the chance of cell viability in early stages (∼one month) and are therefore expected to improve the rate of healing. On the other hand, while the osteoblast morphology significantly differs in each sample at different periods, there is no straightforward correlation between early proliferation and quantitative surface parameters such as average roughness or surface area. This indicates that the nature of cell-surface interactions likely depends on other factors, including spatial parameters. PMID:25095907

  12. Plasma Surface Functionalized Polyetheretherketone for Enhanced Osseo-Integration at Bone-Implant Interface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Wong, Hoi Man; Lui, So Ching; Chong, Eva Y W; Wu, Guosong; Zhao, Xiaoli; Wang, Chong; Pan, Haobo; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Wu, Shuilin; Chu, Paul K; Yeung, Kelvin W K

    2016-02-17

    This study aims at improving osseo-integration at the bone-implant interface of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) by water (H2O) and ammonia (NH3) plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). The pertinent surface characteristics including surface energy, roughness, morphology, and chemical composition are investigated systematically and the in vitro biological performance is evaluated by cell adhesion and proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, real-time RT-PCR evaluation, and mineralization tests. In vivo osseo-integration is examined via implanting samples into the distal femur of the rats. The hydrophilicity, surface roughness, cell adhesion, and proliferation, ALP activity, and osteogenic differentiation after H2O PIII or NH3 PIII are improved significantly. Furthermore, substantially enhanced osseo-integration is achieved in vivo. Nonline-of-sight plasma surface functionalization, which is particularly suitable for biomedical implants with an irregular geometry, does not alter the bulk compressive yield strength and elastic modulus of the materials. Consequently, the favorable bulk attributes of PEEK are preserved while the surface biological properties are enhanced thus boding well for wider orthopedic application of the biopolymer. PMID:26796319

  13. Ti implants with nanostructured and HA-coated surfaces for improved osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Sirin, Hasret Tolga; Vargel, Ibrahim; Kutsal, Tulin; Korkusuz, Petek; Piskin, Erhan

    2016-05-01

    This study was aimed at comparing the osseointegration of titanium (Ti)-based Küntscher nails (K-nails) and plates with modified nanostructured and hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces in a rat femur model. Material surfaces were first modified via a simple anodization protocol in which the materials were treated in hydrogen fluoride (1% w/w) at 20 V. This modification resulted in tubular titanium oxide nanostructures of 40-65 nm in diameter. Then, hydroxyapatite-deposited layers, formed of particles (1-5) μm, were produced via incubation in a simulated body fluid, followed by annealing at 500°C. Both surface modifications significantly improved cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as compared to the control (non-modified Ti implants). The controls and modified nails and plates were implanted in the femur of 21 male Sprague-Dawley rats. The implants, with surrounding tissues, were removed after 10 weeks, and then mechanical tests (torque and pull-out) were performed, which showed that the modified K-nails exhibited significantly better osseointegration than the controls. Histologic examinations of the explants containing plates showed similar results, and the modified plates exhibited significantly better osseointegration than the controls. Surface nanostructuring of commercially available titanium-based implants by a very simple method - anodization - seems to be a viable method for increasing osseointegration without the use of bioactive surface coatings such as hydroxyapatite. PMID:26496822

  14. Effect of modifications of dual acid-etched implant surfaces on periimplant bone formation. Part II: calcium phosphate coatings.

    PubMed

    Schliephake, H; Aref, A; Scharnweber, D; Rösler, S; Sewing, A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that calcium phosphate coatings of dual acid-etched surfaces (DAEs) can improve periimplant bone regeneration. Ten adult female foxhounds received experimental titanium screw implants in the mandible 3 months after removal of all premolar teeth. Five types of surface states were evaluated in each animal: (i) implants with a machined surface (MS) (Control 1); (ii) implants with a DAE (Control 2); (iii) implants with a DAE coated with collagen I (Control 3); (iv) implants with a DAE with mineralized collagen I; and (v) implants with a DAE with a hydroxylapatite (HA) coating. Periimplant bone regeneration was assessed by histomorphometry after 1 and 3 months in five dogs each by measuring bone implant contact (BIC) and the volume density of the newly formed periimplant bone (BVD). After 1 month, mean BIC of experimental implants did not differ significantly from implants with DAE and collagen-coated surfaces, but was significantly higher than the MS implants. BVD was enhanced significantly only in implants with mineralized collagen coating compared with DAE and collagen-coated controls. After 3 months, the mean values of BIC had increased significantly in the group of implants with HA and mineralized collagen coating but were not significantly different from implants with DAE and collagen-coated surfaces. The same held true for the mean BVD values. In conclusion, the present study could not verify the hypothesis that calcium phosphate coatings of DAEs in the present form enhanced periimplant bone formation compared with the DAE surface alone. PMID:19126106

  15. Influence of hydrogen fluence on surface blistering of H and He co-implanted Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jiayun; Xue, Zhongying; Zhang, Miao; Wei, Xing; Wang, Gang; Di, Zengfeng

    2016-02-01

    The effect of hydrogen fluence on surface blistering of H and He co-implanted Ge is investigated using atom force microscope, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. With a fixed He, we find that for 1 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence, only a few small dome-shaped blisters appear, for 3 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence, large blisters as well as craters are formed, while for 5 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence, no blisters can be observed. The strain evolution and platelet forming tendency are found to be relevant for the different blistering phenomenon. The weak blistering phenomenon for 1 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence may be attributed to less "free" H for the building up of internal pressure of platelets and the sustained growth of platelets. While the absence of blistering phenomenon for 5 × 1016 cm-2 H implantation fluence is likely due to the retarded relief of the decreased uniform compressive stress throughout the damage region.

  16. Ion implantation effects on surface-mechanical properties of metals and polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, G.R.

    1993-04-01

    Fatigue of 8 complex alloys based on Fe-13Cr-15Ni-2Mo-2Mn-0.2Ti-0.8Si- 0.06C, and single-crystal Fe-15Cr-15Ni, implanted with 400-keV B[sup +] and 550-keV N[sup +] (total dose 2.3[times]10[sup 16] ions/cm[sup 2]) was examined. 600 C creep was also examined. The dual implantation increased hardness but decreased fatigue life of the 8 complex alloys. An optimum strengthening level and a shift to grain boundary cracking were determined. The single crystals also showed reduced fatigue life after implantation. High temperature creep of E1 and B1 alloys were improved by the dual implantation. Four polymers (PE, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyethersulfone) were implanted with 200keV B[sup +] to 3 different doses. PS was also implanted with both B[sup +] and Ar[sup +]. Near-surface hardness and tribological properties were measured. The hardness increased with dose and energy; wear also improved, with an optimum dose. (DLC)

  17. Ion implantation effects on surface-mechanical properties of metals and polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, G.R.

    1993-04-01

    Fatigue of 8 complex alloys based on Fe-13Cr-15Ni-2Mo-2Mn-0.2Ti-0.8Si- 0.06C, and single-crystal Fe-15Cr-15Ni, implanted with 400-keV B{sup +} and 550-keV N{sup +} (total dose 2.3{times}10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}) was examined. 600 C creep was also examined. The dual implantation increased hardness but decreased fatigue life of the 8 complex alloys. An optimum strengthening level and a shift to grain boundary cracking were determined. The single crystals also showed reduced fatigue life after implantation. High temperature creep of E1 and B1 alloys were improved by the dual implantation. Four polymers (PE, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyethersulfone) were implanted with 200keV B{sup +} to 3 different doses. PS was also implanted with both B{sup +} and Ar{sup +}. Near-surface hardness and tribological properties were measured. The hardness increased with dose and energy; wear also improved, with an optimum dose. (DLC)

  18. A strontium-incorporated nanoporous titanium implant surface for rapid osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjie; Cao, Huiliang; Zhang, Xiaochen; Li, Guanglong; Chang, Qing; Zhao, Jun; Qiao, Yuqin; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-03-01

    Rapid osseointegration of dental implants will shorten the period of treatment and enhance the comfort of patients. Due to the vital role of angiogenesis played during bone development and regeneration, it might be feasible to promote rapid osseointegration by modifying the implant surface to gain a combined angiogenesis/osteogenesis inducing capacity. In this study, a novel coating (MAO-Sr) with strontium-incorporated nanoporous structures on titanium implants was generated via a new micro-arc oxidation, in an attempt to induce angiogenesis and osteogenesis to enhance rapid osseointegration. In vitro, the nanoporous structure significantly enhanced the initial adhesion of canine BMSCs. More importantly, sustained release of strontium ions also displayed a stronger effect on the BMSCs in facilitating their osteogenic differentiation and promoting the angiogenic growth factor secretion to recruit endothelial cells and promote blood vessel formation. Advanced mechanism analyses indicated that MAPK/Erk and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways were involved in these effects of the MAO-Sr coating. Finally, in the canine dental implantation study, the MAO-Sr coating induced faster bone formation within the initial six weeks and the osseointegration effect was comparable to that of the commercially available ITI implants. These results suggest that the MAO-Sr coating has the potential for future use in dental implants. PMID:26881868

  19. Surface modification by metal ion implantation forming metallic nanoparticles in an insulating matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Sgubin, L. G.; Cattani, M.; Brown, I. G.

    2014-08-01

    There is special interest in the incorporation of metallic nanoparticles in a surrounding dielectric matrix for obtaining composites with desirable characteristics such as for surface plasmon resonance, which can be used in photonics and sensing, and controlled surface electrical conductivity. We have investigated nanocomposites produced by metal ion implantation into insulating substrates, where the implanted metal self-assembles into nanoparticles. The nanoparticles nucleate near the maximum of the implantation depth profile (projected range), which can be estimated by computer simulation using the TRIDYN code. TRIDYN is a Monte Carlo simulation program based on the TRIM (Transport and Range of Ions in Matter) code that takes into account compositional changes in the substrate due to two factors: previously implanted dopant atoms, and sputtering of the substrate surface. Our study show that the nanoparticles form a bidimentional array buried a few nanometers below the substrate surface. We have studied Au/PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate), Pt/PMMA, Ti/alumina and Au/alumina systems. Transmission electron microscopy of the implanted samples show that metallic nanoparticles form in the insulating matrix. These nanocomposites have been characterized by measuring the resistivity of the composite layer as a function of the implantation dose. The experimental results are compared with a model based on percolation theory, in which electron transport through the composite is explained by conduction through a random resistor network formed by the metallic nanoparticles. Excellent agreement is found between the experimental results and the predictions of the theory. We conclude in that the conductivity process is due only to percolation (when the conducting elements are in geometric contact) and that the contribution from tunneling conduction is negligible.

  20. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants to enhance osteogenic activity and in vivo osseointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Lv, Kaige; Zhang, Wenjie; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-08-01

    Thermal oxidation, which serves as a low-cost, effective and relatively simple/facile method, was used to modify a micro-structured titanium surface in ambient atmosphere at 450 °C for different time periods to improve in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. The surface morphology, crystallinity of the surface layers, chemical composition and chemical states were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cell behaviours including cell adhesion, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were observed in vitro study. The ability of the titanium surface to promote osseointegration was evaluated in an in vivo animal model. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants maintained the microstructure and, thus, both slightly changed the nanoscale structure of titanium and enhanced the crystallinity of the titanium surface layer. Cells cultured on the three oxidized titanium surfaces grew well and exhibited better osteogenic activity than did the control samples. The in vivo bone-implant contact also showed enhanced osseointegration after several hours of oxidization. This heat-treated titanium enhanced the osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs and improved osseointegration in vivo, suggesting that surface thermal oxidation could potentially be used in clinical applications to improve bone-implant integration.

  1. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants to enhance osteogenic activity and in vivo osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Lv, Kaige; Zhang, Wenjie; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-01-01

    Thermal oxidation, which serves as a low-cost, effective and relatively simple/facile method, was used to modify a micro-structured titanium surface in ambient atmosphere at 450 °C for different time periods to improve in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. The surface morphology, crystallinity of the surface layers, chemical composition and chemical states were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cell behaviours including cell adhesion, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were observed in vitro study. The ability of the titanium surface to promote osseointegration was evaluated in an in vivo animal model. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants maintained the microstructure and, thus, both slightly changed the nanoscale structure of titanium and enhanced the crystallinity of the titanium surface layer. Cells cultured on the three oxidized titanium surfaces grew well and exhibited better osteogenic activity than did the control samples. The in vivo bone-implant contact also showed enhanced osseointegration after several hours of oxidization. This heat-treated titanium enhanced the osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs and improved osseointegration in vivo, suggesting that surface thermal oxidation could potentially be used in clinical applications to improve bone-implant integration. PMID:27546196

  2. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants to enhance osteogenic activity and in vivo osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Lv, Kaige; Zhang, Wenjie; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-01-01

    Thermal oxidation, which serves as a low-cost, effective and relatively simple/facile method, was used to modify a micro-structured titanium surface in ambient atmosphere at 450 °C for different time periods to improve in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. The surface morphology, crystallinity of the surface layers, chemical composition and chemical states were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cell behaviours including cell adhesion, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were observed in vitro study. The ability of the titanium surface to promote osseointegration was evaluated in an in vivo animal model. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants maintained the microstructure and, thus, both slightly changed the nanoscale structure of titanium and enhanced the crystallinity of the titanium surface layer. Cells cultured on the three oxidized titanium surfaces grew well and exhibited better osteogenic activity than did the control samples. The in vivo bone-implant contact also showed enhanced osseointegration after several hours of oxidization. This heat-treated titanium enhanced the osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs and improved osseointegration in vivo, suggesting that surface thermal oxidation could potentially be used in clinical applications to improve bone-implant integration. PMID:27546196

  3. RTV silicone rubber surface modification for cell biocompatibility by negative-ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chenlong; Wang, Guangfu; Chu, Yingjie; Xu, Ya; Qiu, Menglin; Xu, Mi

    2016-03-01

    A negative cluster ion implantation system was built on the injector of a GIC4117 tandem accelerator. Next, the system was used to study the surface modification of room temperature vulcanization silicone rubber (RTV SR) for cell biocompatibility. The water contact angle was observed to decrease from 117.6° to 99.3° as the C1- implantation dose was increased to 1 × 1016 ions/cm2, and the effects of C1-, C2- and O1- implantation result in only small differences in the water contact angle at 3 × 1015 ions/cm2. These findings indicate that the hydrophilicity of RTV SR improves as the dose is increased and that the radiation effect has a greater influence than the doping effect on the hydrophilicity. There are two factors influence hydrophilicity of RTV: (1) based on the XPS and ATR-FTIR results, it can be inferred that ion implantation breaks the hydrophobic functional groups (Sisbnd CH3, Sisbnd Osbnd Si, Csbnd H) of RTV SR and generates hydrophilic functional groups (sbnd COOH, sbnd OH, Sisbnd (O)x (x = 3,4)). (2) SEM reveals that the implanted surface of RTV SR appears the micro roughness such as cracks and wrinkles. The hydrophilicity should be reduced due to the lotus effect (Zhou Rui et al., 2009). These two factors cancel each other out and make the C-implantation sample becomes more hydrophilic in general terms. Finally, cell culture demonstrates that negative ion-implantation is an effective method to improve the cell biocompatibility of RTV SR.

  4. In vitro evaluation of a multispecies oral biofilm on different implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Violant, Deborah; Galofré, Marta; Nart, José; Teles, Ricardo Patricio

    2014-06-01

    Biofilm accumulation on implant surfaces is one of the most important factors for early and late implant failure. Because of the related clinical implications, the aim of this in vitro study was to compare the bacterial cell attachment of a four-species oral biofilm on titanium discs of purity grade 2 and 4, with machined surfaces and etched-thermochemically modified with Avantblast®. The in vitro biofilm model was composed of early (Actinomyces naeslundii, Streptococcus gordonii), secondary (Veillonella parvula), and intermediate (Fusobacterium nucleatum ssp. polymorphum) colonizers of tooth surfaces. A total of 36 discs were divided into four groups: Tigr2-c (titanium grade 2, machined surface), Tigr2-t (titanium grade 2, modified surface with Avantblast®), Tigr4-c (titanium grade 4, machined surface), Tigr4-t (titanium grade 4, modified surface with Avantblast®). The experiment was repeated three times. Biofilm viability was tested with 1% 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride solution and bacterial cell quantification by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Descriptive analysis was performed to evaluate biofilm composition and differences between groups were checked with the Mann-Whitney test (p < 0.05). After one week, multispecies biofilms showed a similar pattern of bacterial composition on all analyzed implant surfaces. The most prevalent bacterium was V. parvula (∼50% of the total biomass), followed by S. gordonii (∼30%), F. nucleatum ssp. polymorphum (∼10%) and A. naeslundii (<5%). Total bacterial biomass was significantly higher in both grade-4-titanium surfaces (p < 0.05). The results demonstrated that not only implant surface treatment, but also titanium purity, influence early bacterial colonization.

  5. The role of angiogenesis in implant dentistry part I: Review of titanium alloys, surface characteristics and treatments

    PubMed Central

    Asatourian, Armen; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis plays an important role in osseointegration process by contributing to inflammatory and regenerative phases of surrounding alveolar bone. The present review evaluated the effect of titanium alloys and their surface characteristics including: surface topography (macro, micro, and nano), surface wettability/energy, surface hydrophilicity or hydrophobicity, surface charge, and surface treatments of dental implants on angiogenesis events, which occur during osseointegration period. Material and Methods An electronic search was performed in PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases via OVID using the keywords mentioned in the PubMed and MeSH headings regarding the role of angiogenesis in implant dentistry from January 2000-April 2014. Results Of the 2,691 articles identified in our initial search results, only 30 met the inclusion criteria set for this review. The hydrophilicity and topography of dental implants are the most important and effective surface characteristics in angiogenesis and osteogenesis processes. The surface treatments or modifications of dental implants are mainly directed through the enhancement of biological activity and functionalization in order to promote osteogenesis and angiogenesis, and accelerate the osseointegration procedure. Conclusions Angiogenesis is of great importance in implant dentistry in a manner that most of the surface characteristics and treatments of dental implants are directed toward creating a more pro-angiogenic surface on dental implants. A number of studies discussed the effect of titanium alloys, dental implant surface characteristic and treatments on agiogenesis process. However, clinical trials and in-vivo studies delineating the mechanisms of dental implants, and their surface characteristics or treatments, action in angiogenesis processes are lagging. Key words:Angiogenesis, dental implant, osseointergration. PMID:27031073

  6. Enhanced osteointegration on tantalum-implanted polyetheretherketone surface with bone-like elastic modulus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tao; Wen, Jin; Qian, Shi; Cao, Huiliang; Ning, Congqin; Pan, Xiaoxia; Jiang, Xinquan; Liu, Xuanyong; Chu, Paul K

    2015-05-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) possesses a similar elastic modulus as bones but yet suffers from bio-inertness and poor osteogenesis. In this work, tantalum ions are implanted energetically into PEEK by plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) to form Ta2O5 nanoparticles in the near surface. Nanoindentation reveals that the surface elastic modulus of the Ta ion implanted PEEK is closer to that of human cortical bones. In vitro cell adhesion, alkaline phosphatase activity, collagen secretion, extracellular matrix mineralization, and real-time PCR analyses disclose enhanced adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (bMSCs) on the Ta-PIII modified PEEK. In vivo evaluation of the cortico-cancellous rat femur model by means of micro-CT, sequential fluorescent labeling, and histological analysis after 8 weeks confirms significantly improved osteointegration. The bone-like elastic modulus and modified surface topography of the Ta-PIII modified PEEK synergistically induce osteogenic differentiation of bMSCs and the surface-modified materials have large potential in dental and orthopedic implants.

  7. Electrochemical behavior of nano and femtosecond laser textured titanium alloy for implant surface modification.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Won-Gi; Choe, Han-Cheol

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the electrochemical behavior of nano and femtosecond laser textured titanium alloy for implant surface modification has been researched using the potentiostat equipment. Cp-Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy, located on X-Y motorized stage, were irradiated using femtosecond laser. The corrosion properties were examined by a potentiodynamic and AC impedance test.

  8. Calcium Plasma Implanted Titanium Surface with Hierarchical Microstructure for Improving the Bone Formation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mengqi; Qiao, Yuqin; Wang, Qi; Jin, Guodong; Qin, Hui; Zhao, Yaochao; Peng, Xiaochun; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2015-06-17

    Introducing hierarchical microstructure and bioactive trace elements simultaneously onto the surface of titanium implant is a very effective way to improve the osseointegration between bone and implant. In this work, hierarchical topography was prepared on Ti surface via acid etching and sandblasting (SLA) to form micropits and microcavities then underwent Ca plasma immersion ion implantation (Ca-PIII) process. The surface wettability and roughness did not change obviously before and after Ca-PIII process. The in vitro evaluations including cell adhesion, activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteogenic genes (Runx2, OSX, ALP, BSP, Col1a1, OPN, and OC), and protein (BSP, Col1a1, OPN, and OC) expressions revealed that the introduction of Ca ions onto the surface of SLA-treated Ti can promote greater osteoblasts adhesion, spread and proliferation, which in return further accelerated the maturation and mineralization of osteoblasts. More importantly, in vivo evaluations including Micro-CT evaluation, histological observations, push-out test, sequential fluorescent labeling and histological observations verified that Ca-SLA-treated Ti implants could efficiently promote new bone formation in early times. These promising results suggest that Ca-SLA-treated Ti has the potential for future application in orthopedic field.

  9. Room-temperature attachment of PLGA microspheres to titanium surfaces for implant-based drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Dongqin; Liu, Qing; Wang, Dongwei; Xie, Tao; Guo, Tailin; Duan, Ke; Weng, Jie

    2014-08-01

    Drug release from implant surfaces is an effective approach to impart biological activities, (e.g., antimicrobial and osteogenic properties) to bone implants. Coatings of polylactide-based polymer are a candidate for this purpose, but a continuous (fully covering) coating may be non-optimal for implant-bone fixation. This study reports a simple room-temperature method for attaching poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres to titanium (Ti) surfaces. Microspheres were prepared with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) or polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as the emulsifier. Microspheres were attached to Ti discs by pipetting as a suspension onto the surfaces followed by vacuum drying. After immersion in shaking water bath for 14 d, a substantial proportion of the microspheres remained attached to the discs. In contrast, if the vacuum-drying procedure was omitted, only a small fraction of the microspheres remained attached to the discs after immersion for only 5 min. Microspheres containing triclosan (a broad-spectrum antibiotic) were attached by porous-surfaced Ti discs. In vitro experiments showed that the microsphere-carrying discs were able to kill Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia Coli, and support the adhesion and growth of primary rat osteoblasts. This simple method may offer a flexible technique for bone implant-based drug release.

  10. Synergistic effects of surface chemistry and topologic structure from modified microarc oxidation coatings on Ti implants for improving osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Wei, Daqing; Cao, Jianyun; Feng, Wei; Cheng, Su; Du, Qing; Li, Baoqiang; Wang, Yaming; Jia, Dechang; Zhou, Yu

    2015-04-29

    Microarc oxidation (MAO) coating containing Ca, P, Si, and Na elements on a titanium (Ti) implant has been steam-hydrothermally treated and further mediated by post-heat treatment to overcome the compromised bone-implant integration. The bone regeneration, bone-implant contact, and biomechanical push-out force of the modified Ti implants are discussed thoroughly in this work. The best in vivo performances for the steam-hydrothermally treated one is attributed to the synergistic effects of surface chemistry and topologic structure. Through post-heat treatment, we can decouple the effects of surface chemistry and the nanoscale topologic structure easily. Attributed to the excellent in vivo performance of the surface-modified Ti implant, the steam-hydrothermal treatment could be a promising strategy to improve the osseointegration of the MAO coating covered Ti implant.

  11. Mechanical properties of nitrogen-rich surface layers on SS304 treated by plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, B. B.; Mändl, S.; Oliveira, R. M.; Ueda, M.

    2014-08-01

    The formation of hard and wear resistant surface regions for austenitic stainless steel through different nitriding and nitrogen implantation processes at intermediate temperatures is an established technology. As the inserted nitrogen remains in solid solution, an expanded austenite phase is formed, accounting for these surface improvements. However, experiments on long-term behavior and exact wear processes within the expanded austenite layer are still missing. Here, the modified layers were produced using plasma immersion ion implantation with nitrogen gas and had a thickness of up to 4 μm, depending on the processing temperature. Thicker layers or those with higher surface nitrogen contents presented better wear resistance, according to detailed microscopic investigation on abrasion, plastic deformation, cracking and redeposition of material inside the wear tracks. At the same time, cyclic fatigue testing employing a nanoindenter equipped with a diamond ball was carried out at different absolute loads and relative unloadings. As the stress distribution between the modified layer and the substrate changes with increasing load, additional simulations were performed for obtaining these complex stress distributions. While high nitrogen concentration and/or thicker layers improve the wear resistance and hardness, these modifications simultaneously reduce the surface fatigue resistance.

  12. Surface drilling technologies for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacic, J. D.; Rowley, J. C.; Cort, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    Rock drilling and coring conceptual designs for the surface activities associated with a manned Mars mission are proposed. Straightforward extensions of equipment and procedures used on Earth are envisioned for the sample coring and shallow high explosive shot holes needed for tunneling and seismic surveying. A novel rocket exhaust jet piercing method is proposed for very rapid drilling of shot holes required for explosive excavation of emergency radiation shelters. Summaries of estimated equipment masses and power requirements are provided, and the indicated rotary coring rigs are scaled from terrestrial equipment and use compressed CO2 from the Martian atmosphere for core bit cooling and cuttings removal. A mass of 120 kg and power of 3 kW(e) are estimated for a 10 m depth capability. A 100 m depth capacity core rig requires about 1150 kg and 32 km(e). The rocket exhaust jet equipment devised for shallow (3m) explosive emplacement shot holes requires no surface power beyond an electrical ignition system, and might have a 15 kg mass.

  13. Tailored surface modification by ion implantation and laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picraux, S. T.; Pope, L. E.

    1984-11-01

    Techniques and applications of ion- and laser-beam treatment of surface and near surface materials to control the composition and microstructure are explored. The processes are especially useful in miniaturized electronic components with large surface/volume ratios. Laser beams permit selective, extremely short interval high energy heating of specific molecules in surfaces and studies of transient and metastable states that are otherwise unattainable. The applications affect the wear, friction, hardness, adhesion, fatigue, toughness, ductility, corrosion resistance, and electromagnetic properties of the materials. Beam treatments have been successfully applied to polymers, ceramics, metals, and microprocessors, often causing new performance characteristics to appear. The techniques are noted to relax the usual constraints of thermal equilibrium and thereby increase the understanding of materials.

  14. Surface treatment of a titanium implant using low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-Young; Tang, Tianyu; Ok, Jung-Woo; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Ho-Jun; Lee, Hae June

    2015-09-01

    During the last two decades, atmospheric pressure plasmas(APP) are widely used in diverse fields of biomedical applications, reduction of pollutants, and surface treatment of materials. Applications of APP to titanium surface of dental implants is steadily increasing as it renders surfaces wettability and modifies the oxide layer of titanium that hinders the interaction with cells and proteins. In this study, we have treated the titanium surfaces of screw-shaped implant samples using a plasma jet which is composed of a ceramic coaxial tube of dielectrics, a stainless steel inner electrode, and a coper tube outer electrode. The plasma ignition occurred with Ar gas flow between two coaxial metal electrodes and a sinusoidal bias voltage of 3 kV with a frequency of 20 kHz. Titanium materials used in this study are screw-shaped implants of which diameter and length are 5 mm and 13 mm, respectively. Samples were mounted at a distance of 5 mm below the plasma source, and the plasma treatment time was set to 3 min. The wettability of titanium surface was measured by the moving speed of water on its surface, which is enhanced by plasma treatment. The surface roughness was also measured by atomic force microscopy. The optimal condition for wettability change is discussed.

  15. Surface modification of titanium using steel slag ball and shot blasting treatment for biomedical implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arifvianto, Budi; Suyitno; Mahardika, Muslim

    2013-08-01

    Surface modification is often performed using grit or shot blasting treatment for improving the performances of biomedical implants. The effects of blasting treatments using steel slag balls and spherical shots on the surface and subsurface of titanium were studied in this paper. The treatments were conducted for 60-300 s using 2-5 mm steel slag balls and 3.18 mm spherical shots. The surface morphology, roughness, and elemental composition of titanium specimens were examined prior to and after the treatments. Irregular and rough titanium surfaces were formed after the treatment with the steel slag balls instead of the spherical shots. The former treatment also introduced some bioactive elements on the titanium surface, but the latter one yielded a harder surface layer. In conclusion, both steel slag ball and shot blasting treatment have their own specialization in modifying the surface of metallic biomaterials. Steel slag ball blasting is potential for improving the osseointegration quality of implants; but the shot blasting is more appropriate for improving the mechanical properties of temporary and load bearing implants, such as osteosynthesis plates.

  16. Surface Properties and Osteoblastic Cytocompatibility of Two Blasted and Acid-Etched Titanium Implant Systems with Distinct Microtopography

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Pedro; Gomes, Pedro de Sousa; Sampaio, Paula; Juodzbalys, Gintaras; Afonso, Américo

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The aim of this study is to compare two commercially available screw-type sandblasted and acid-etched (SLA) Ti implant systems from Eckermann Laboratorium S.L., with similar geometry and distinct microtopography, regarding surface properties and osteoblastic cytocompatibility. Material and Methods Implant I (referred as a conventional SLA system) and Implant II (a system patented as Eckcyte®) were characterized for macro and microtopograpphy, surface roughness and chemical composition. For the cytocompatibility studies, human bone marrow osteoblastic cells were seeded over the implants' surface, and the cell response was assessed for cell adhesion and proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and matrix mineralization. Results Implant I presented a rough surface with irregularly shaped and sized cavities among flatter-appearing areas, whereas Implant II exhibited a homogeneous rough microporous surface. Compared to Implant I, Implant II presented higher Ra values (0.8 [SD 0.008] μm and 1.21 [SD 0.15] μm, respectively, P < 0.05) and also increased values of Rz, Rt and Rsm, a more negative value of Rsk, and similar RKu values. XPS showed the expected presence of Ti, O, C and N; Al, Si, F, P and Ca were detected in low concentrations. Implant II exhibited significantly lower Al levels. Both implants supported the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic cells. Implant II showed a thicker fibrilar cell layer and an earlier onset and more abundant matrix mineralization. Conclusions The homogeneous rough and microporous surface of Implant II is most probably a main contributor for its improved cell response. PMID:24422006

  17. Implantable sensor technology: measuring bone and joint biomechanics of daily life in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Stresses and strains are major factors influencing growth, remodeling and repair of musculoskeletal tissues. Therefore, knowledge of forces and deformation within bones and joints is critical to gain insight into the complex behavior of these tissues during development, aging, and response to injury and disease. Sensors have been used in vivo to measure strains in bone, intraarticular cartilage contact pressures, and forces in the spine, shoulder, hip, and knee. Implantable sensors have a high impact on several clinical applications, including fracture fixation, spine fixation, and joint arthroplasty. This review summarizes the developments in strain-measurement-based implantable sensor technology for musculoskeletal research. PMID:23369655

  18. Fission Surface Power Technology Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.; Mason, Lee S.; Harlow, Scott

    2009-01-01

    With the potential future deployment of a lunar outpost there is expected to be a clear need for a high-power, lunar surface power source to support lunar surface operations independent of the day-night cycle, and Fission Surface Power (FSP) is a very effective solution for power levels above a couple 10 s of kWe. FSP is similarly enabling for the poorly illuminated surface of Mars. The power levels/requirements for a lunar outpost option are currently being studied, but it is known that cost is clearly a predominant concern to decision makers. This paper describes the plans of NASA and the DOE to execute an affordable fission surface power system technology development project to demonstrate sufficient technology readiness of an affordable FSP system so viable and cost-effective FSP system options will be available when high power lunar surface system choices are expected to be made in the early 2010s.

  19. The influence of surface-blasting on the incorporation of titanium-alloy implants in a rabbit intramedullary model.

    PubMed

    Feighan, J E; Goldberg, V M; Davy, D; Parr, J A; Stevenson, S

    1995-09-01

    The apposition of new bone to polished solid implants and to implants with surfaces that had been blasted with one of three methods of grit-blasting was studied in a rabbit intramedullary model to test the hypothesis that blasted implant surfaces support osseous integration. Intramedullary titanium-alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) plugs, press-fit into the distal aspect of the femoral canal, were implanted bilaterally in fifty-six rabbits. Four surface treatments were studied: polished (a surface roughness of 0.4 to 0.6 micrometer) and blasted with stainless-steel shot (a surface roughness of five to seven micrometers), with thirty-six-grit aluminum oxide (a surface roughness of five to seven micrometers), or with sixty-grit aluminum oxide (a surface roughness of three to five micrometers). Localized attachment of new bone to the surfaces of the blasted implants was present radiographically at twelve weeks. The total bone area was significantly affected by the level of the section (the diaphysis had a greater bone area than the proximal part of the metaphysis and the proximal part of the metaphysis had a greater bone area than the distal part of the metaphysis; p < 0.001) and the quadrant within each section (the posterior and anterior quadrants had greater bone area than the medial and lateral quadrants; p < 0.00001). The length of the bone-implant interface was significantly affected by the surface treatment (the length of the bone-implant interface for the implants that had been blasted with sixty-grit aluminum oxide was greater than the length for the polished implants; p = 0.02), the time after implantation (the interface was longer at six and twelve weeks than at three weeks; p < 0.00001), and the level of the section (the interface was longer at the diaphysis than at the proximal part of the metaphysis and longer at the proximal part of the metaphysis than at the distal part of the metaphysis; p = 0.004). Blasting of the surface of titanium-alloy implants did not have an

  20. Surface evaluation of orthopedic hip implants marketed in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, M. M.; Trommer, R. M.; Maru, M. M.; Roesler, C. R. M.; Barros, W. S.; Dutra, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    One of the factors that contribute to the quality of total hip prostheses is the degree of accuracy in the manufacturing of the joint surfaces. The dimensional control of joint components is important because of its direct influence on the durability and, consequently, in the patients’ life quality. This work presents studies on the form and roughness of orthopedic hip prostheses marketed in Brazil. The results provide data for quality control of the surfaces of the femoral heads and acetabular components of hip prostheses and indicate the need of improvement in the procedures used to this control.

  1. Using QCM-D to study the adhesion of human gingival fibroblasts on implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Westas, Emma; Svanborg, Lory Melin; Wallin, Patric; Bauer, Brigitte; Ericson, Marica B; Wennerberg, Ann; Mustafa, Kamal; Andersson, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Sealing the soft tissue-implant interface is one of the key issues in preventing transcutaneous implant-associated infections. A promising surface modification for improving osseointegration and possibly soft tissue integration is to coat the implant surface with hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles. When new implant materials are developed, their ability to facilitate cell attachment and spreading are commonly investigated in vitro to establish their potential for good in vivo performance. However, commonly used techniques, such as microscopy methods, are time consuming, invasive, and subjective. This is the first study using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, where the real-time adhesion of biopsy-derived human gingival fibroblasts onto titanium and nanostructured HA was investigated. Experiments were performed for at least 16 h, and we found that cellular attachment and spreading kinetics can be followed in situ by observing the change in dissipation and frequency with time. Interestingly, a correlation between cell coverage and the magnitude of dissipation shift reached at the end of the experiment was found, but no such trend was observed for the frequency. Furthermore, the level of cell coverage was found to influence the cellular attachment and spreading behavior. No difference in cell response to the two surface types, Ti and nanostructured HA, was found. PMID:25779215

  2. In vivo degradation of orthodontic miniscrew implants: surface analysis of as-received and retrieved specimens.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro; Muguruma, Takeshi; Kawaguchi, Masahiro; Yasuda, Yoshitaka; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated in vivo degradation of Ti-6Al-4V alloy miniscrew implants. Miniscrew implants were placed in patients, and the surfaces were studied upon retrieval by scanning electron microscopy, microscale X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis and nanoindentation testing. Bone-like structures were formed on the retrieved specimens. The hardness and elastic modulus of the surfaces of the retrieved specimens were significantly lower than the as-received specimens, although no statistically significant differences were observed for the hardness and elastic modulus in the bulk region. Thick organic over-layer containing carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen, with the thickness greater than 50 nm, covered the retrieved specimens, and higher concentrations of hydrogen were detected in the retrieved specimens compared with the as-received specimens. Minimal degradation of the bulk mechanical properties of miniscrew implants was observed after clinical use, although precipitation of bone-like structures, formation of a carbonaceous contamination layer, and hydrogen absorption were observed on the surfaces of miniscrew implants. PMID:25631268

  3. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Coating on Implant Surfaces Reduces Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Na, Manli; Jarneborn, Anders; Jacobsson, Gunnar; Peetermans, Marijke; Verhamme, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices are a major medical challenge because of their high prevalence and antibiotic resistance. As fibrin plays an important role in S. aureus biofilm formation, we hypothesize that coating of the implant surface with fibrinolytic agents can be used as a new method of antibiofilm prophylaxis. The effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) coating on S. aureus biofilm formation was tested with in vitro microplate biofilm assays and an in vivo mouse model of biofilm infection. tPA coating efficiently inhibited biofilm formation by various S. aureus strains. The effect was dependent on plasminogen activation by tPA, leading to subsequent local fibrin cleavage. A tPA coating on implant surfaces prevented both early adhesion and later biomass accumulation. Furthermore, tPA coating increased the susceptibility of biofilm infections to antibiotics. In vivo, significantly fewer bacteria were detected on the surfaces of implants coated with tPA than on control implants from mice treated with cloxacillin. Fibrinolytic coatings (e.g., with tPA) reduce S. aureus biofilm formation both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting a novel way to prevent bacterial biofilm infections of indwelling medical devices. PMID:26519394

  4. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Reducing the influence of STI on SONOS memory through optimizing added boron implantation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xu; Feng, Yan; Zhiguo, Li; Fan, Yang; Yonggang, Wang; Jianguang, Chang

    2010-09-01

    The influence of shallow trench isolation (STI) on a 90 nm polysilicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon structure non-volatile memory has been studied based on experiments. It has been found that the performance of edge memory cells adjacent to STI deteriorates remarkably. The compressive stress and boron segregation induced by STI are thought to be the main causes of this problem. In order to mitigate the STI impact, an added boron implantation in the STI region is developed as a new solution. Four kinds of boron implantation experiments have been implemented to evaluate the impact of STI on edge cells, respectively. The experimental results show that the performance of edge cells can be greatly improved through optimizing added boron implantation technology.

  5. Endothelial retention and phenotype on carbonized cardiovascular implant surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Frendl, Chris; Tucker, Scott; Khan, Nadeem; Esch, Mandy; Kanduru, Shrinidhi; Cao, Thong M.; García, Andrés J.; King, Michael R.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2014-01-01

    Heart valve disease is an increasing clinical burden for which there is no effective treatment outside of prosthetic replacement. Over the last 20 years, clinicians have increasingly preferred the use of biological prosthetics to mechanical valves despite their superior durability because of the lifelong anticoagulation therapy that is required. Mechanical valve surface engineering has largely focused on being as non-thrombogenic as possible, but despite decades of iteration has had insufficient impact on the anticoagulation burden. In this study, we systematically evaluate the potential for endothelialization of the pyrolytic carbon surface used in mechanical valves. We compared adsorbed adhesion ligand type (collagen I, fibronectin, laminin, and purified adhesion domain fragments GFOGER and FN7-10) and concentration on endothelial adhesion rates and adhesion strength on Medtronic-Hall prosthetic valve surfaces. Regardless of ligand type or concentration, endothelial adhesion strengthening was insufficient for their intended ultra-high shear stress environment. We then hypothesized that microfabricated trenches would reduce shear stress to tolerable levels while maintaining endothelial access to the flow stream, thereby promoting a confluent and anticoagulant endothelial monolayer. Computational fluid dynamics simulations predicted an empirical relationship of channel width, depth, and spacing that would maintain interior surface shear stress within tolerable levels. Endothelial cells seeded to confluence in these channels retained a confluent monolayer when exposed to 600 dynes/cm2 shear stress for 48 hours regardless of applied adhesive ligand. Furthermore, sheared EC expressed a mature anti-coagulant profile, including endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), VE-cadherin, and significantly downregulated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). As a final test, channeled pyrolytic carbon surfaces with confluent EC reduced human platelet adhesion 1000-fold

  6. Technology developments to initiate a next generation of cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Volckaerts, B; Corless, A R; Mercanzini, A; Silmon, A M; Bertsch, A; Van Himbeeck, C; Wasikiewicz, J; Vanden Bulcke, M; Vadgama, P; Renaud, P

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of the EU-supported research project Healthy Aims, we developed a range of novel electrode arrays and related technologies for use in hearing prosthesis. This paper summarizes our ongoing research activities on alternative electrode manufacturing routes, functional electrode interfaces and smart intra-cochlear and intra-modiolus electrode arrays.

  7. Strategies For Immobilization Of Bioactive Organic Molecules On Titanium Implant Surfaces - A Review.

    PubMed

    Panayotov, Ivan V; Vladimirov, Boyan S; Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves C; Levallois, Bernard; Cuisinier, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Numerous approaches have been used to improve the tissue-implant interface of titanium (Ti) and titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). They all aim at increasing cell migration and attachment to the metal, preventing unspecific protein adsorption and improving post-implantation healing process. Promising methods for titanium and titanium alloy surface modification are based on the immobilization of biologically active organic molecules. New and interesting biochemical approaches to such surface modification include layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolyte films, phage display-selected surface binding peptides and self-assembled DNA monolayer systems. The present review summarizes the scientific information about these methods, which are at in vitro or in vivo development stages, and hopes to promote their future application in dental implantology and in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  8. Ion implanted, radical-rich surfaces for the rapid covalent immobilization of active biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsh, Stacey L.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Bax, Daniel V.; Kondyurin, Alexey; Kosobrodova, Elena; Tsoutas, Kostadinos; Tran, Clara T. H.; Waterhouse, Anna; Yin, Yongbai; Nosworthy, Neil J.; McKenzie, David R.; dos Remedios, Christobal G.; Ng, Martin K. C.; Weiss, Anthony S.

    2013-04-01

    Protein immobilization through the use of direct radical induced covalent coupling is described. Ions implanted in a polymer surface generate a highly cross-linked surface layer that is rich in radicals. These radicals can diffuse to the surface and covalently immobilize physically adsorbed proteins, as illustrated in a kinetic model for the covalent attachment process. Radical induced covalent coupling provides rapid covalent attachment, while also retaining native protein conformation and enabling control over the composition of the adsorbed protein layer when adsorbed from a protein mixture. Advantages of using this method for improving the biocompatibility of implanted biomedical devices and for immobilizing antibodies in protein microarrays for disease diagnosis and early detection are highlighted.

  9. Lunar Surface Systems Supportability Technology Development Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Struk, Peter M.; Green, Jennifer L.; Chau, Savio N.; Curell, Philip C.; Dempsey, Cathy A.; Patterson, Linda P.; Robbins, William; Steele, Michael A.; DAnnunzio, Anthony; Meseroll, Robert; Quiter, John; Shannon, Russell; Easton, John W.; Madaras, Eric I.; BrownTaminger, Karen M.; Tabera, John T.; Tellado, Joseph; Williams, Marth K.; Zeitlin, Nancy P.

    2011-01-01

    The Lunar Surface Systems Supportability Technology Development Roadmap is a guide for developing the technologies needed to enable the supportable, sustainable, and affordable exploration of the Moon and other destinations beyond Earth. Supportability is defined in terms of space maintenance, repair, and related logistics. This report considers the supportability lessons learned from NASA and the Department of Defense. Lunar Outpost supportability needs are summarized, and a supportability technology strategy is established to make the transition from high logistics dependence to logistics independence. This strategy will enable flight crews to act effectively to respond to problems and exploit opportunities in an environment of extreme resource scarcity and isolation. The supportability roadmap defines the general technology selection criteria. Technologies are organized into three categories: diagnostics, test, and verification; maintenance and repair; and scavenge and recycle. Furthermore, "embedded technologies" and "process technologies" are used to designate distinct technology types with different development cycles. The roadmap examines the current technology readiness level and lays out a four-phase incremental development schedule with selection decision gates. The supportability technology roadmap is intended to develop technologies with the widest possible capability and utility while minimizing the impact on crew time and training and remaining within the time and cost constraints of the program.

  10. [Development and evaluation of a new surface treatment method for titanium alloy implants].

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Akira

    2004-06-01

    We developed and evaluated a new method of titanium surface treatment for direct bone fixation of implants. This method consists of hydroxyapatite (HA) flame coating onto a porous titanium surface which is arc-sprayed with pure titanium material in argon gas at atmospheric pressure. The surface roughness of the porous layer was 360 microm, Rmax, and showed higher resistance to blast erosion in comparison with the conventional low-pressure plasma-sprayed porous layers of titanium. The thickness of the HA layer was between 20 and 40 microm considering the balance of bone conduction effect of HA and the possibility of mechanical detachment of the layers from the porous titanium. Short-term animal tests showed excellent results. This new surface treatment method was applied to cementless total hip joints which were used clinically. The results obtained from observations of the retrieved specimens show that the thickness of the HA coating layer is sufficient for the new bone formation after implantation. It was concluded that the new surface treatment method for titanium alloy implants is effective and successful for direct bone fixation. PMID:15301280

  11. A low-frequency versatile wireless power transfer technology for biomedical implants.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Junmin; Lan, Di; Chao; Liou, Shyshenq; Shahnasser, Hamid; Fechter, Richard; Hirose, Shinjiro; Harrison, Michael; Roy, Shuvo

    2013-08-01

    Implantable biomedical sensors and actuators are highly desired in modern medicine. In many cases, the implant's electrical power source profoundly determines its overall size and performance . The inductively coupled coil pair operating at the radio-frequency (RF) has been the primary method for wirelessly delivering electrical power to implants for the last three decades . Recent designs significantly improve the power delivery efficiency by optimizing the operating frequency, coil size and coil distance . However, RF radiation hazard and tissue absorption are the concerns in the RF wireless power transfer technology (RF-WPTT) , . Also, it requires an accurate impedance matching network that is sensitive to operating environments between the receiving coil and the load for efficient power delivery . In this paper, a novel low-frequency wireless power transfer technology (LF-WPTT) using rotating rare-earth permanent magnets is demonstrated. The LF-WPTT is able to deliver 2.967 W power at  ∼ 180 Hz to an 117.1 Ω resistor over 1 cm distance with 50% overall efficiency. Because of the low operating frequency, RF radiation hazard and tissue absorption are largely avoided, and the power delivery efficiency from the receiving coil to the load is independent of the operating environment. Also, there is little power loss observed in the LF-WPTT when the receiving coil is enclosed by non-magnetic implant-grade stainless steel. PMID:23893211

  12. Fabrication of an implant-supported overdenture using CAD/CAM technology: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Rinke, Sven; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2013-02-01

    This case report describes a new method for the fabrication of implant-supported overdentures that are rigidly retained by custom tapered abutments milled from commercially pure titanium using CAD/CAM technology. The dentition of a 60-year-old woman was restored with six implants in the edentulous maxilla. An implant-supported overdenture retained by custom tapered abutments was fabricated using CAD/CAM technology. Screw-retained abutments were designed and milled with a taper of 6 degrees. The reinforcing metallic denture base with integrated secondary crowns, exactly fitting on the tapered abutments, was fabricated from the same data set. The secondary structures could be seated tensionfree on the six abutments, creating friction in the final position. No clinical complications were observed at the 12-month follow-up examination, and the patient remained satisfied with the function and esthetics of the restoration. This case demonstrates the practicality of a fully CAD/CAM fabrication of an implant-supported overdenture retained by friction only. Controlled clinical studies are needed to evaluate the long-term performance of this type of restoration.

  13. A low-frequency versatile wireless power transfer technology for biomedical implants.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Junmin; Lan, Di; Chao; Liou, Shyshenq; Shahnasser, Hamid; Fechter, Richard; Hirose, Shinjiro; Harrison, Michael; Roy, Shuvo

    2013-08-01

    Implantable biomedical sensors and actuators are highly desired in modern medicine. In many cases, the implant's electrical power source profoundly determines its overall size and performance . The inductively coupled coil pair operating at the radio-frequency (RF) has been the primary method for wirelessly delivering electrical power to implants for the last three decades . Recent designs significantly improve the power delivery efficiency by optimizing the operating frequency, coil size and coil distance . However, RF radiation hazard and tissue absorption are the concerns in the RF wireless power transfer technology (RF-WPTT) , . Also, it requires an accurate impedance matching network that is sensitive to operating environments between the receiving coil and the load for efficient power delivery . In this paper, a novel low-frequency wireless power transfer technology (LF-WPTT) using rotating rare-earth permanent magnets is demonstrated. The LF-WPTT is able to deliver 2.967 W power at  ∼ 180 Hz to an 117.1 Ω resistor over 1 cm distance with 50% overall efficiency. Because of the low operating frequency, RF radiation hazard and tissue absorption are largely avoided, and the power delivery efficiency from the receiving coil to the load is independent of the operating environment. Also, there is little power loss observed in the LF-WPTT when the receiving coil is enclosed by non-magnetic implant-grade stainless steel.

  14. Surface modification of investment cast-316L implants: microstructure effects.

    PubMed

    El-Hadad, Shimaa; Khalifa, Waleed; Nofal, Adel

    2015-03-01

    Artificial femur stem of 316L stainless steel was fabricated by investment casting using vacuum induction melting. Different surface treatments: mechanical polishing, thermal oxidation and immersion in alkaline solution were applied. Thicker hydroxyapatite (HAP) layer was formed in the furnace-oxidized samples as compared to the mechanically polished ones. The alkaline treatment enhanced the precipitation of HAP on the samples. It was also observed that the HAP precipitation responded differently to the different phases of the microstructure. The austenite phase was observed to have more homogeneous and smoother layer of HAP. In addition, the growth of HAP was sometimes favored on the austenite phase rather than on ferrite phase.

  15. A spectroscopic study of the near-surface layers of a glass modified by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Deshkovskaya, A.A.; Komar, V.P.; Skornyakov, I.V.

    1985-07-01

    The mechanism of the complex physiocochemical processes leading to the structural changes in glass under ion implantation is discussed in this paper. Specimens of Pyrex-type silicate glasses manufactured in the form of polished, plane-parallel plates 10 x 10 x 1 mm were studied. As the doping impurities singly charged ions B/sup +/, N/sup +/, O/sup +/, P/sup +/, Ar/sup +/, BF/sub 2//sup +/, As/sup +/, Sb/sup +/, and Pb/sup +/ were used and also the double charged P/sup + +/ ions. The implantation was done at room temperature on a ''Vesuvius-1'' type of equipment with an attachment that makes it possible to obtain high-energy ions beams. When studying the structural damage, the implanted glasses and the mechanism by which it is caused, the authors used infrared spectroscopy of the multiple frustrated total internal reflection (MFTIR) which makes it possible to analyze the deeper surface layers of the material in addition to the use of IR spectroscopy which gives information on the surface of the glass. Of all the possible reasons for the structural damage in a Pyrex glass caused by ion implantation, the dominant role is shown to itself is not so important as its capacity for interaction with its environment.

  16. Temperature change during non-contact diode laser irradiation of implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Geminiani, Alessandro; Caton, Jack G; Romanos, Georgios E

    2012-03-01

    A temperature increase of more than 10°C can compromise bone vitality. Laser radiation with different wavelengths has been used for the treatment of peri-implantitis, but little is known about the effect of laser irradiation on temperature rise on the implant surface. In this study, the temperature gradient (∆T) generated by laser irradiation of implant surface using two diode lasers (810 nm and a 980 nm) with 2 W of power has been recorded by two thermocouples (one in the cervical area and one in the apical area) and studied. The 810-nm diode laser showed the following results: after 60 s of irradiation with 2 W of continuous mode the temperature gradient in the cervical area of the implant (∆Tc) was 37.2°C, while in the apical area (∆Ta) was 27.2°C. The 980-nm diode laser showed the following results: after 60 s of irradiation with 2 W continuous mode ∆Tc was 41.1°C, and ∆Ta was 30.6°C. The 810-nm diode laser with 2 W continuous mode generated a temperature increase of 10°C after only 14 s. The 980-nm diode lasers groups produced a much more rapid temperature increase. In only 12 s, the continuous wave of 980 nm reached the 10°C temperature rise. From the present in vitro study it was concluded that the irradiation of implant surfaces with diode lasers may produce a temperature increase above the critical threshold (10°C ) after only 10 s.

  17. The effect of microstructured surfaces and laminin-derived peptide coatings on soft tissue interactions with titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Werner, Sandra; Huck, Olivier; Frisch, Benoît; Vautier, Dominique; Elkaim, René; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Brunel, Gérard; Tenenbaum, Henri

    2009-04-01

    In the present study, we investigated the dental implant protection from peri-implant inflammation by improving the soft tissue adhesion on the titanium surface. Porous titanium was used to create, at the level of the transmucosal part of the implants (the "neck"), a microstructured 3-dimensional surface that would tightly seal the interface between the implant and soft tissue. Cell-specific adhesion properties were induced via an adhesion peptide derived from laminin-5 coupled to native or cross-linked PLL/PGA multilayered polyelectrolyte films (MPFs), which are used for biomedical device coatings. Porous titanium exhibited good cell-adhesion properties, but the colonisation of the material was further improved by a coating with laminin-5 functionalised MPFs and especially with (PLL/PGA)(6,5)-PGA-peptide film. Focal contact formation was observed on cross-linked architectures, reflecting cell anchorage on these surfaces. In contrast, when seeded on laminin-5-functionalised native films, epithelial cells formed only very diffuse focal contacts, but adhered via hemidesmosome formation. In vivo experiments confirmed that the porous titanium was colonised by cells of soft tissue. Altogether, the results indicate that the microstructure of the implant neck combined with a specific bioactive coating could constitute efficient routes to improve the integration of soft tissue on titanium dental implants, which could significantly protect implants from peri-implant inflammation and enhance long-term implant stabilisation.

  18. Mg ion implantation on SLA-treated titanium surface and its effects on the behavior of mesenchymal stem cell.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kim, Jin Seong; Park, Young Min; Choi, Bo-Young; Lee, Jun

    2013-04-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is one of the most important ions associated with bone osseointegration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cellular effects of Mg implantation in titanium (Ti) surfaces treated with sand blast using large grit and acid etching (SLA). Mg ions were implanted into the surface via vacuum arc source ion implantation. The surface morphology, chemical properties, and the amount of Mg ion release were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were used to evaluate cellular parameters such as proliferation, cytotoxicity, and adhesion morphology by MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM. Furthermore, osteoblast differentiation was determined on the basis of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the degree of calcium accumulation. In the Mg ion-implanted disk, 2.3×10(16) ions/cm(2) was retained. However, after Mg ion implantation, the surface morphology did not change. Implanted Mg ions were rapidly released during the first 7 days in vitro. The MTS assay, live/dead assay, and SEM demonstrated increased cell attachment and growth on the Mg ion-implanted surface. In particular, Mg ion implantation increased the initial cell adhesion, and in an osteoblast differentiation assay, ALP activity and calcium accumulation. These findings suggest that Mg ion implantation using the plasma source ion implantation (PSII) technique may be useful for SLA-treated Ti dental implants to improve their osseointegration capacity.

  19. Fission Surface Power Technology Development Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.; Mason, Lee S.; Houts, Michael G.; Harlow, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Power is a critical consideration in planning exploration of the surfaces of the Moon, Mars, and places beyond. Nuclear power is an important option, especially for locations in the solar system where sunlight is limited or environmental conditions are challenging (e.g., extreme cold, dust storms). NASA and the Department of Energy are maintaining the option for fission surface power for the Moon and Mars by developing and demonstrating technology for a fission surface power system. The Fission Surface Power Systems project has focused on subscale component and subsystem demonstrations to address the feasibility of a low-risk, low-cost approach to space nuclear power for surface missions. Laboratory demonstrations of the liquid metal pump, reactor control drum drive, power conversion, heat rejection, and power management and distribution technologies have validated that the fundamental characteristics and performance of these components and subsystems are consistent with a Fission Surface Power preliminary reference concept. In addition, subscale versions of a non-nuclear reactor simulator, using electric resistance heating in place of the reactor fuel, have been built and operated with liquid metal sodium-potassium and helium/xenon gas heat transfer loops, demonstrating the viability of establishing system-level performance and characteristics of fission surface power technologies without requiring a nuclear reactor. While some component and subsystem testing will continue through 2011 and beyond, the results to date provide sufficient confidence to proceed with system level technology readiness demonstration. To demonstrate the system level readiness of fission surface power in an operationally relevant environment (the primary goal of the Fission Surface Power Systems project), a full scale, 1/4 power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) is under development. The TDU will consist of a non-nuclear reactor simulator, a sodium-potassium heat transfer loop, a power

  20. A strontium-incorporated nanoporous titanium implant surface for rapid osseointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenjie; Cao, Huiliang; Zhang, Xiaochen; Li, Guanglong; Chang, Qing; Zhao, Jun; Qiao, Yuqin; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-02-01

    Rapid osseointegration of dental implants will shorten the period of treatment and enhance the comfort of patients. Due to the vital role of angiogenesis played during bone development and regeneration, it might be feasible to promote rapid osseointegration by modifying the implant surface to gain a combined angiogenesis/osteogenesis inducing capacity. In this study, a novel coating (MAO-Sr) with strontium-incorporated nanoporous structures on titanium implants was generated via a new micro-arc oxidation, in an attempt to induce angiogenesis and osteogenesis to enhance rapid osseointegration. In vitro, the nanoporous structure significantly enhanced the initial adhesion of canine BMSCs. More importantly, sustained release of strontium ions also displayed a stronger effect on the BMSCs in facilitating their osteogenic differentiation and promoting the angiogenic growth factor secretion to recruit endothelial cells and promote blood vessel formation. Advanced mechanism analyses indicated that MAPK/Erk and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways were involved in these effects of the MAO-Sr coating. Finally, in the canine dental implantation study, the MAO-Sr coating induced faster bone formation within the initial six weeks and the osseointegration effect was comparable to that of the commercially available ITI implants. These results suggest that the MAO-Sr coating has the potential for future use in dental implants.Rapid osseointegration of dental implants will shorten the period of treatment and enhance the comfort of patients. Due to the vital role of angiogenesis played during bone development and regeneration, it might be feasible to promote rapid osseointegration by modifying the implant surface to gain a combined angiogenesis/osteogenesis inducing capacity. In this study, a novel coating (MAO-Sr) with strontium-incorporated nanoporous structures on titanium implants was generated via a new micro-arc oxidation, in an attempt to induce angiogenesis and osteogenesis to

  1. Novel anodization technique using a block copolymer template for nanopatterning of titanium implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, Terje; McNamara, Laura E; Yang, Li; Dalby, Matthew J; Su, Bo

    2012-11-01

    Precise surface nanopatterning is a promising route for predictable control of cellular behavior on biomedical materials. There is currently a gap in taking such precision engineered surfaces from the laboratory to clinically relevant implant materials such as titanium (Ti). In this work, anodization of Ti surfaces was performed in combination with block copolymer templates to create highly ordered and tunable oxide nanopatterns. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses showed that the composition of the anodized structures was mainly titania with small amounts of nitrogen left from the block copolymer. It was further demonstrated that these nanopatterns can be superimposed on more complex shaped Ti surfaces such as microbeads, using the same technique. Human mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on Ti microbead surfaces, with and without nanopatterns, in vitro to study the effect of nanotopography on Ti surfaces. The results presented in this work demonstrate a promising method of producing highly defined and well-arranged surface nanopatterns on Ti implant surfaces.

  2. [Comparative animal experimental study on the importance of the surface structure for the stability of extension implantations].

    PubMed

    Dördelmann, K; Tetsch, P; Ibing, G

    1977-04-01

    An animal experimental study was undertaken where the embedding of extension implants with a smooth or porous surface was histologically examined. Under extreme functional stress there occurs a mobility of the implants with the formation of a broad connective tissue zone, inflammatory reactions and ingrowth of epithelium, which is independent of the surface structure. Implants under less stress show a narrower connective tissue layer which narrows itself further if the surface is porous. The possible causes of this tissue reaction are discussed. PMID:266991

  3. Study of the amorphization of surface silicon layers implanted by low-energy helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, A. A.; Myakon'kikh, A. V.; Oreshko, A. P.; Shemukhin, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The structural changes in surface layers of Si(001) substrates subjected to plasma-immersion implantation by (2-5)-keV helium ions to a dose of D = 6 × 1015-5 × 1017 cm-2 have been studied by highresolution X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering, and spectral ellipsometry. It is found that the joint application of these methods makes it possible to determine the density depth distribution ρ( z) in an implanted layer, its phase state, and elemental composition. Treatment of silicon substrates in helium plasma to doses of 6 × 1016 cm-2 leads to the formation of a 20- to 30-nm-thick amorphized surface layer with a density close to the silicon density. An increase in the helium dose causes the formation of an internal porous layer.

  4. Complete oral rehabilitation with implants using CAD/CAM technology, stereolithography, and conoscopic holography.

    PubMed

    Bentz, Robert M; Balshi, Stephen F

    2012-02-01

    A 64-year-old totally edentulous female initially presented with ill-fitting removable prostheses. A comprehensive treatment plan with dental implants was accepted by the patient. Clinical and laboratory procedures were executed using various computer technologies including computed tomography, rapid prototyping, and optical scanning using conoscopic holography. A review of the patient's treatment and various modalities used are the focus of this patient report.

  5. Sustained ibuprofen release using composite poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/titanium dioxide nanotubes from Ti implant surface.

    PubMed

    Jia, Huiying; Kerr, Lei L

    2013-07-01

    Developing coatings on implant surface as drug carriers can reduce organ toxicity and effectively deliver drug locally to the target compared with the oral approach. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube has great potential for this application for widely used Ti implants because of its high surface area, ability to promote bone growth, and biocompatibility. However, there are two issues needed to be solved before further advancing TiO2 nanotubes technology as drug carriers: uncontrolled drug release and poor mechanical properties. In this study, a drug carrier using a composite of biodegradable polymer/TiO2 nanotubes is engineered. Ibuprofen is selected as a concept drug because it is a commonly used anti-inflammatory, fever, and pain-reducing drug. In addition, ibuprofen has a very short plasma half-life of only 1-3 h. A simple characterization method is developed to investigate the infiltration of polymer into TiO2 nanotubes. Good infiltration was observed of polymer into TiO2 nanotubes. The synthesized drug carrier demonstrated much better sustained drug release profiles for ibuprofen of 5 days (low-molecular-weight polymer) and 9 days (high-molecular-weight polymer) compared with 30 min of pure TiO2 nanotubes. The drug carrier also exhibited much improved mechanical strength and flexibility compared with pure TiO2 nanotubes. PMID:23657983

  6. Sustained ibuprofen release using composite poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/titanium dioxide nanotubes from Ti implant surface.

    PubMed

    Jia, Huiying; Kerr, Lei L

    2013-07-01

    Developing coatings on implant surface as drug carriers can reduce organ toxicity and effectively deliver drug locally to the target compared with the oral approach. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube has great potential for this application for widely used Ti implants because of its high surface area, ability to promote bone growth, and biocompatibility. However, there are two issues needed to be solved before further advancing TiO2 nanotubes technology as drug carriers: uncontrolled drug release and poor mechanical properties. In this study, a drug carrier using a composite of biodegradable polymer/TiO2 nanotubes is engineered. Ibuprofen is selected as a concept drug because it is a commonly used anti-inflammatory, fever, and pain-reducing drug. In addition, ibuprofen has a very short plasma half-life of only 1-3 h. A simple characterization method is developed to investigate the infiltration of polymer into TiO2 nanotubes. Good infiltration was observed of polymer into TiO2 nanotubes. The synthesized drug carrier demonstrated much better sustained drug release profiles for ibuprofen of 5 days (low-molecular-weight polymer) and 9 days (high-molecular-weight polymer) compared with 30 min of pure TiO2 nanotubes. The drug carrier also exhibited much improved mechanical strength and flexibility compared with pure TiO2 nanotubes.

  7. Studies on the surface modification of TiN coatings using MEVVA ion implantation with selected metallic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, L. P.; Purushotham, K. P.; Manory, R. R.

    2016-02-01

    Improvement in the performance of TiN coatings can be achieved using surface modification techniques such as ion implantation. In the present study, physical vapor deposited (PVD) TiN coatings were implanted with Cr, Zr, Nb, Mo and W using the metal evaporation vacuum arc (MEVVA) technique at a constant nominal dose of 4 × 1016 ions cm-2 for all species. The samples were characterized before and after implantation, using Rutherford backscattering (RBS), glancing incident angle X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy. Friction and wear studies were performed under dry sliding conditions using a pin-on-disc CSEM Tribometer at 1 N load and 450 m sliding distance. A reduction in the grain size and surface roughness was observed after implantation with all five species. Little variation was observed in the residual stress values for all implanted TiN coatings, except for W implanted TiN which showed a pronounced increase in compressive residual stress. Mo-implanted samples showed a lower coefficient of friction and higher resistance to breakdown during the initial stages of testing than as-received samples. Significant reduction in wear rate was observed after implanting with Zr and Mo ions compared with unimplanted TiN. The presence of the Ti2N phase was observed with Cr implantation.

  8. Characterization and biocompatibility of a titanium dental implant with a laser irradiated and dual-acid etched surface.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shan-Hui; Liu, Bai-Shuan; Lin, Wen-Hung; Chiang, Heng-Chieh; Huang, Shih-Ching; Cheng, Shih-Shyong

    2007-01-01

    The biological properties of commercial pure titanium (cp-Ti) dental implants can be improved by surface treatment. In this study, the cp-Ti surfaces were prepared to enable machined surfaces (TM) to be compared to the machined, sandblasted, laser irradiated and dual-acid etched surfaces (TA). The surface elements and roughness were characterized. The biocompatibility was evaluated by cell and organ culture in vitro. The removal torque was measured in rabbit implantation. Surface characterization revealed that TA surface was more oxidized than TM surface. The TA surface had micrometric, beehive-like coarse concaves. The average roughness (2.28 mum) was larger than that typical of acid-etched surfaces. Extracts of both materials were not cytotoxic to bone cells. The morphology of cells attached on the TA surface was superior to that on the TM surface. TA promoted cell migration and repaired damaged bones more effectively in organ culture. The formation of bone-like nodules on TA disk exceeded that on TM disk. Rabbit tibia implantation also proved that TA implant had greater removal torque value. These results suggested that TA had good osteoconductivity and was a potential material for dental implantation. PMID:17264387

  9. A novel method for local administration of strontium from implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Forsgren, Johan; Engqvist, Håkan

    2010-05-01

    This study proves that a film of Strontianite (SrCO(3)) successfully can be formed on a bioactive surface of sodium titanate when exposed to a strontium acetate solution. This Strontianite film is believed to enable local release of strontium ions from implant surfaces and thus stimulate bone formation in vivo. Depending on the method, different types of films were achieved with different release rates of strontium ions, and the results points at the possibility to tailor the rate and amount of strontium that is to be released from the surface. Strontium has earlier been shown to be highly involved in the formation of new bone as it stimulates the replication of osteoblasts and decreases the activity of osteoclasts. The benefit of strontium has for example been proved in studies where the number of vertebral compression fractures in osteoporotic persons was drastically reduced in patients receiving therapeutical doses of strontium. Therefore, it is here suggested that the bone healing process around an implant may be improved if strontium is administered locally at the site of the implant. The films described in this paper were produced by a simple immersion process where alkali treated titanium was exposed to an aqueous solution containing strontium acetate. By heating the samples at different times during the process, different release rates of strontium ions were achieved when the samples were exposed to simulated body fluid. The strontium containing films also promoted precipitation of bone like apatite when exposed to a simulated body fluid. PMID:20162327

  10. Nanoscale triboactivity of functionalized c-Si surfaces by Fe+ ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, B.; Alves, E.; Colaço, R.

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, we present a study of the effect of Fe+ ion implantation on the tribological response at nanoscale contact lengths of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. (1 0 0) silicon wafers were implanted with Fe+ at a fluence of 2  ×  1017 cm-2, followed by annealing treatments at temperatures of 800 °C and 1000 °C. After microstructural characterization, nanoabrasive wear tests were performed with an atomic force microscope (AFM) using an AFM diamond tip with a stiff steel cantilever that enables the application of loads between 1 μN and 8 μN. After the nanowear tests, the same AFM was used to visualize and measure the worn craters. It was observed that the as-implanted samples present the poorest nanowear response, i.e. the highest wear rate, even higher than that of the unimplanted Si wafers used as a reference. Nevertheless, annealing treatments result in a measurable increase in the nanowear resistance. In this way we show that Fe+ ion implantation of c-Si, followed by the proper post-heat treatment, results in the formation of FeSi2 nanoprecipitates finely dispersed in a recrystallized matrix. This can be a valuable way of optimizing the nanotribological behavior of silicon.

  11. Nanoscale triboactivity of functionalized c-Si surfaces by Fe⁺ ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Nunes, B; Alves, E; Colaço, R

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, we present a study of the effect of Fe(+) ion implantation on the tribological response at nanoscale contact lengths of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. (1 0 0) silicon wafers were implanted with Fe(+) at a fluence of 2  ×  10(17) cm(-2), followed by annealing treatments at temperatures of 800 °C and 1000 °C. After microstructural characterization, nanoabrasive wear tests were performed with an atomic force microscope (AFM) using an AFM diamond tip with a stiff steel cantilever that enables the application of loads between 1 μN and 8 μN. After the nanowear tests, the same AFM was used to visualize and measure the worn craters. It was observed that the as-implanted samples present the poorest nanowear response, i.e. the highest wear rate, even higher than that of the unimplanted Si wafers used as a reference. Nevertheless, annealing treatments result in a measurable increase in the nanowear resistance. In this way we show that Fe(+) ion implantation of c-Si, followed by the proper post-heat treatment, results in the formation of FeSi2 nanoprecipitates finely dispersed in a recrystallized matrix. This can be a valuable way of optimizing the nanotribological behavior of silicon. PMID:26931630

  12. Mechanism of cell integration on biomaterial implant surfaces in the presence of bacterial contamination.

    PubMed

    Yue, Chongxia; van der Mei, Henny C; Kuijer, Roel; Busscher, Henk J; Rochford, Edward T J

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial contamination during biomaterial implantation is often unavoidable, yielding a combat between cells and bacteria. Here we aim to determine the modulatory function of bacterial components on stem-cell, fibroblast, and osteoblast adhesion to a titanium alloy, including the role of toll-like-receptors (TLRs). Presence of heat-sacrificed Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa induced dose and cell-type dependent responses. Stem-cells were most sensitive to bacterial presence, demonstrating decreased adhesion number yet increased adhesion effort with a relatively large focal adhesion contact area. Blocking TLRs had no effect on stem-cell adhesion in presence of S. aureus, but blocking both TLR2 and TLR4 induced an increased adhesion effort in presence of E. coli. Neither lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, nor bacterial DNA provoked the same cell response as did whole bacteria. Herewith we suggest a new mechanism as to how biomaterials are integrated by cells despite the unavoidable presence of bacterial contamination. Stimulation of host cell integration of implant surfaces may open a new window to design new biomaterials with enhanced healing, thereby reducing the risk of biomaterial-associated infection of both "hardware-based" implants as well as of tissue-engineered constructs, known to suffer from similarly high infection risks as currently prevailing in "hardware-based" implants. PMID:25966819

  13. A novel surface treatment for porous metallic implants that improves the rate of bony ongrowth.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Fintan J; Cottrell, Jocelyn M; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Crowder, Katherine N; Doty, Stephen B; Avaltroni, Michael J; Warren, Russell F; Wright, Timothy M; Schwartz, Jeffrey

    2008-09-15

    Rapid implant fixation could prove beneficial in a host of clinical applications from total joint arthroplasty to trauma. We hypothesized that a novel self-assembled monolayer of phosphonate molecules (SAMP) covalently bonded to the oxide surface of titanium alloy would enhance bony integration. Beaded metallic rods were treated with one of three coatings: SAMP, SAMP + RGD peptide, or hydroxyapatite. Rods were inserted retrogradely into both distal femurs of 60 rabbits. Fifteen rabbits were sacrificed at 2, 4, 8, and 16 weeks. At each time, seven specimens for mechanical pull-out testing and three for histomorphometric analysis were available for each coating. At four weeks, both SAMP groups had significantly higher failure loads when compared to hydroxyapatite (p < 0.01). No significant differences were found among groups at other times, though the SAMP-alone group remained stronger at 16 weeks. Histology showed abundant new bone formation around all the three groups, though more enhanced formation was apparent in the two SAMP groups. With this novel treatment, with or without RGD, the failure load of implants doubled in half the time as compared with hydroxyapatite. Where early implant fixation is important, the SAMP treatment provides a simple, cost-effective enhancement to bony integration of orthopaedic implants.

  14. Silicone Implants with Smooth Surfaces Induce Thinner but Denser Fibrotic Capsules Compared to Those with Textured Surfaces in a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sebastian; Hirche, Christoph; Reichenberger, Matthias A.; Kiefer, Jurij; Diehm, Yannick; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Alhefzi, Muayyad; Bueno, Ericka M.; Kneser, Ulrich; Pomahac, Bohdan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Capsular contracture is the most frequent long-term complication after implant-based breast reconstruction or augmentation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of implant surface properties on fibrotic capsule formation in an animal model. Materials and Methods Twenty-four rats received 1 scaled down silicone implant each; 12 of the rats received implants with textured surfaces, and the other 12 received implants with smooth surfaces. After 60 and 120 days, rats in each group underwent 7-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and high-resolution ultrasound (HR-US), and specimens of the capsules were acquired and used to measure capsule thickness through histology, collagen density through picro sirius red staining, and analyses of expression of pro-fibrotic and inflammatory genes (Collagen1-4, TGFb1, TGFb3, Smad3, IL4, IL10, IL13, CD68) through qRT-PCR. Furthermore, MRI data were processed to obtain capsule volume and implant surface area. Results On day 60, histology and HR-US showed that fibrotic capsules were significantly thicker in the textured implant group with respect to the smooth implant group (p<0.05). However, this difference did not persist on day 120 (p=0.56). Capsule thickness decreased significantly over the study period in both smooth and textured implant groups (p<0.05). Thickness measurements were substantiated by MRI analysis and volumes changed accordingly. Implant surface area did not vary between study dates, but it was different between implant types. On day 60, the density of collagen in the fibrotic capsules was significantly lower in the textured implant group with respect to the smooth group (p<0.05), but again this difference did not persist on day 120 (p=0.67). Collagen 1 and CD68 were respectively over- and under expressed in the textured implant group on day 60. Significant differences in the expression of other genes were not observed. Conclusion Silicone implants with textured surfaces led to temporarily

  15. Surface Topographical Changes of a Failing Acid-Etched Long-Term in Function Retrieved Dental Implant.

    PubMed

    Monje, Alberto; González-García, Raúl; Fernández-Calderón, María Coronada; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; González-Martín, María Luisa; Del Amo, Fernando Suarez-Lopez; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Wang, Hom-Lay; Monje, Florencio

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to report the main topographical and chemical changes of a failing 18-year in function retrieved acid-etching implant in the micro- and nanoscales. A partially edentulous 45 year old rehabilitated with a dental implant at 18 years of age exhibited mobility. After careful examination, a 3.25 × 13-mm press-fit dental implant was retrieved. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis was carried out to study topographical changes of the retrieved implant compared with an unused implant with similar topographical characteristics. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was used to study the surface composition of the retrieved failing implant. Clear changes related to the dual dioxide layer are present as visible in ≥×500 magnification. In addition, it was found that, for the retrieved implant, the surface composition consisted mainly of Ti2p, O1s, C1s, and Al2p. Also, a meaningful decrease of N and C was noticed, whereas the peaks of Ti2p, Al2p, and O1s increased when analyzing deeper (up to ×2000s) in the sample. It was shown that the superficial surface of a retrieved press-fit dual acid-etched implant 18 years after placement is impaired. However, the causes and consequences for these changes cannot be determined. PMID:25642739

  16. Surface Topographical Changes of a Failing Acid-Etched Long-Term in Function Retrieved Dental Implant.

    PubMed

    Monje, Alberto; González-García, Raúl; Fernández-Calderón, María Coronada; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; González-Martín, María Luisa; Del Amo, Fernando Suarez-Lopez; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Wang, Hom-Lay; Monje, Florencio

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to report the main topographical and chemical changes of a failing 18-year in function retrieved acid-etching implant in the micro- and nanoscales. A partially edentulous 45 year old rehabilitated with a dental implant at 18 years of age exhibited mobility. After careful examination, a 3.25 × 13-mm press-fit dental implant was retrieved. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis was carried out to study topographical changes of the retrieved implant compared with an unused implant with similar topographical characteristics. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was used to study the surface composition of the retrieved failing implant. Clear changes related to the dual dioxide layer are present as visible in ≥×500 magnification. In addition, it was found that, for the retrieved implant, the surface composition consisted mainly of Ti2p, O1s, C1s, and Al2p. Also, a meaningful decrease of N and C was noticed, whereas the peaks of Ti2p, Al2p, and O1s increased when analyzing deeper (up to ×2000s) in the sample. It was shown that the superficial surface of a retrieved press-fit dual acid-etched implant 18 years after placement is impaired. However, the causes and consequences for these changes cannot be determined.

  17. Relevant aspects in the surface properties in titanium dental implants for the cellular viability.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Ortega, E; Alfonso-Rodríguez, C A; Monsalve-Guil, L; España-López, A; Jiménez-Guerra, A; Garzón, I; Alaminos, M; Gil, F J

    2016-07-01

    Roughness and topographical features are the most relevant of the surface properties for a dental implant for its osseointegration. For that reason, we studied the four surfaces more used in titanium dental implants: machined, sandblasted, acid etching and sandblasted plus acid etching. The roughness and wettability (contact angle and surface free energy) was studied by means 3D-interferometric microscope and sessile drop method. Normal human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) were obtained from small oral mucosa biopsies and were used for cell cultures. To analyze cell integrity, we first quantified the total amount of DNA and LDH released from dead cells to the culture medium. Then, LIVE/DEAD assay was used as a combined method assessing cell integrity and metabolism. All experiments were carried out on each cell type cultured on each Ti material for 24h, 48h and 72h. To evaluate the in vivo cell adhesion capability of each Ti surface, the four types of discs were grafted subcutaneously in 5 Wistar rats. Sandblasted surfaces were significantly rougher than acid etching and machined. Wettability and surface free energy decrease when the roughness increases in sand blasted samples. This fact favors the protein adsorption. The DNA released by cells cultured on the four Ti surfaces did not differ from that of positive control cells (p>0.05). The number of cells per area was significantly lower (p<0.05) in the sand-blasted surface than in the machined and surface for both cell types (7±2 cells for HGF and 10±5 cells for SAOS-2). The surface of the machined-type discs grafted in vivo had a very small area occupied by cells and/or connective tissue (3.5%), whereas 36.6% of the sandblasted plus acid etching surface, 75.9% of sandblasted discs and 59.6% of acid etching discs was covered with cells and connective tissue. Cells cultured on rougher surfaces tended to exhibit attributes of more differentiated osteoblasts than cells cultured on smoother surfaces. These surface

  18. Relevant aspects in the surface properties in titanium dental implants for the cellular viability.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Ortega, E; Alfonso-Rodríguez, C A; Monsalve-Guil, L; España-López, A; Jiménez-Guerra, A; Garzón, I; Alaminos, M; Gil, F J

    2016-07-01

    Roughness and topographical features are the most relevant of the surface properties for a dental implant for its osseointegration. For that reason, we studied the four surfaces more used in titanium dental implants: machined, sandblasted, acid etching and sandblasted plus acid etching. The roughness and wettability (contact angle and surface free energy) was studied by means 3D-interferometric microscope and sessile drop method. Normal human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) were obtained from small oral mucosa biopsies and were used for cell cultures. To analyze cell integrity, we first quantified the total amount of DNA and LDH released from dead cells to the culture medium. Then, LIVE/DEAD assay was used as a combined method assessing cell integrity and metabolism. All experiments were carried out on each cell type cultured on each Ti material for 24h, 48h and 72h. To evaluate the in vivo cell adhesion capability of each Ti surface, the four types of discs were grafted subcutaneously in 5 Wistar rats. Sandblasted surfaces were significantly rougher than acid etching and machined. Wettability and surface free energy decrease when the roughness increases in sand blasted samples. This fact favors the protein adsorption. The DNA released by cells cultured on the four Ti surfaces did not differ from that of positive control cells (p>0.05). The number of cells per area was significantly lower (p<0.05) in the sand-blasted surface than in the machined and surface for both cell types (7±2 cells for HGF and 10±5 cells for SAOS-2). The surface of the machined-type discs grafted in vivo had a very small area occupied by cells and/or connective tissue (3.5%), whereas 36.6% of the sandblasted plus acid etching surface, 75.9% of sandblasted discs and 59.6% of acid etching discs was covered with cells and connective tissue. Cells cultured on rougher surfaces tended to exhibit attributes of more differentiated osteoblasts than cells cultured on smoother surfaces. These surface

  19. Surface modification of traditional and bioresorbable metallic implant materials for improved biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Emily K.

    Due to their strength, elasticity, and durability, a variety of metal alloys are commonly used in medical implants. Traditionally, corrosion-resistant metals have been preferred. These permanent materials can cause negative systemic and local tissue effects in the long-term. Permanent stenting can lead to late-stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis. Metallic pins and screws for fracture fixation can corrode and fail, cause loss of bone mass, and contribute to inflammation and pain at the implant site, requiring reintervention. Corrodible metallic implants have the potential to prevent many of these complications by providing transient support to the affected tissue, dissolving at a rate congruent with the healing of the tissue. Alloys of iron and manganese (FeMn) exhibit similar fatigue strength, toughness, and elasticity compared with 316L stainless steel, making them very attractive candidates for bioresorbable stents and temporary fracture fixation devices. Much attention in recent years has been given to creating alloys with ideal mechanical properties for various applications. Little work has been done on determining the blood compatibility of these materials or on examining how their surfaces can be improved to improve cell adhesion, however. We examined thethrombogenic response of blood exposed to various resorbable ferrous stent materials through contact with porcine blood. The resorbable materials induced comparable or lower levels of several coagulation factors compared with 316L stainless steel. Little platelet adhesion was observed on any of the tested materials. Endothelialization is an important process after the implantation of a vascular stent, as it prevents damage to the vessel wall that can accelerate neointimal hyperplasia. Micromotion can lead to the formation of fibrous tissue surrounding an orthopedic implant, loosening, and ultimately failure of the implant. Nanoscale features were created on the surfaces of noble metal coatings, silicon

  20. Effects of fluoride-ion-implanted titanium surface on the cytocompatibility in vitro and osseointegatation in vivo for dental implant applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-jin; Liu, Hui-ying; Ren, Xiang; Sun, Hui-yan; Zhu, Li-ying; Ying, Xiao-xia; Hu, Shu-hai; Qiu, Ze-wen; Wang, Lang-ping; Wang, Xiao-feng; Ma, Guo-wu

    2015-12-01

    As an attractive technique for the improvement of biomaterials, Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) has been applied to modifying the titanium material for dental implant application. The present study investigated the cytocompatibility and early osseointegration of fluoride-ion-implanted titanium (F-Ti) surface and implants, both characterizing in their composition of titanium oxide and titanium fluoride. The cytocompatibility of F-Ti was evaluated in vitro by using scanning electron microscope, Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, alkaline phosphatase activity assay, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that the F-Ti weakened the effects that Porphyromonas gingivalis exerted on the MG-63 cells in terms of morphology, proliferation, differentiation, and genetic expression when MG-63 cells and Porphyromonas gingivalis were co-cultured on the surface of F-Ti. Meanwhile, the osteogenic activity of F-Ti implants was assessed in vivo via evaluating the histological morphology and estimating histomorphometric parameters. The analysis of toluidine blue staining indicated that the new bone was more mature in subjects with F-Ti group, which exhibited the Haversian system, and the mean bone-implant contact value of F-Ti group was slightly higher than that of cp-Ti group (p>0.05). Fluorescence bands were wider and brighter in the F-Ti group, and the intensity of fluorochromes deposited at the sites of mineralized bone formation was significantly higher for F-Ti surfaces than for cp-Ti surfaces, within the 2nd, 3rd and 4th weeks (p<0.05). An indication is that the fluoride modified titanium can promote cytocompatibility and early osseointegration, thus providing a promising alternative for clinical use.

  1. Surface modification of silicone medical materials by plasma-based ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Yokota, Toshihiko; Kato, Rui; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Iwaki, Masaya; Terai, Takayuki; Takahashi, Noriyoshi; Miyasato, Tomonori; Ujiie, Hiroshi

    2007-04-01

    Silicone (polydimethylsiloxane) sheets and tubes for medical use were irradiated with inert gas ions using plasma-based ion implantation (PBII). The affinity of the surface with tissue examined by an animal test was improved by the irradiation at optimal conditions. The cell attachment percentage increased at an applied voltage of less than -7.5 kV; however, it decreased at higher voltage. The specimens irradiated at higher voltages were more hydrophobic than unirradiated specimens. The surface became rough with increasing voltage and textures, and small domains appeared. This effect was caused by different etching speeds in the amorphous and crystalline areas.

  2. Significance of Nano- and Microtopography for Cell-Surface Interactions in Orthopaedic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, M.; Zilkens, C.; Zanger, K.; Krauspe, R.

    2007-01-01

    Cell-surface interactions play a crucial role for biomaterial application in orthopaedics. It is evident that not only the chemical composition of solid substances influence cellular adherence, migration, proliferation and differentiation but also the surface topography of a biomaterial. The progressive application of nanostructured surfaces in medicine has gained increasing interest to improve the cytocompatibility and osteointegration of orthopaedic implants. Therefore, the understanding of cell-surface interactions is of major interest for these substances. In this review, we elucidate the principle mechanisms of nano- and microscale cell-surface interactions in vitro for different cell types onto typical orthopaedic biomaterials such as titanium (Ti), cobalt-chrome-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys, stainless steel (SS), as well as synthetic polymers (UHMWPE, XLPE, PEEK, PLLA). In addition, effects of nano- and microscaled particles and their significance in orthopaedics were reviewed. The significance for the cytocompatibility of nanobiomaterials is discussed critically. PMID:18274618

  3. Novel Laser Ablation Technology for Surface Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chung H.

    2004-06-01

    Laser ablation for surface cleaning has been pursued for the removal of paint on airplanes. It has also been pursued for the cleaning of semiconductor surfaces. However, all these approaches have been pursued by laser ablation in air. For highly contaminated surface, laser ablation in air can easily cause secondary contamination. Thus it is not suitable to apply to achieve surface decontamination for DOE facilities since many of these facilities have radioactive contaminants on the surface. Any secondary contamination will be a grave concern. The objective of this project is to develop a novel technology for laser ablation in liquid for surface decontamination. It aims to achieve more efficient surface decontamination without secondary contamination and to evaluate the economic feasibility for large scale surface decontamination with laser ablation in liquid. When laser ablation is pursued in the solution, all the desorbed contaminants will be confined in liquid. The contaminants can be precipitated and subsequently contained in a small volume for disposal. It can reduce the risk of the decontamination workers. It can also reduce the volume of contaminants dramatically.

  4. Titanium dental implants surface-immobilized with gold nanoparticles as osteoinductive agents for rapid osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong Nyoung; Ko, Wan-Kyu; Lee, Hak Rae; Lee, Sang Jin; Lee, Donghyun; Um, Soong Ho; Lee, Jung Haeng; Woo, Yi-Hyung; Zhang, Lijie Grace; Lee, Deok-Won; Kwon, Il Keun

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are quite attractive materials for use as osteogenic agents due to their potential effects on the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation. In this study, an osseo-integrated titanium (Ti) implant surface coated with GNPs was used for promotion of bone regeneration. We prepared a silanized Ti surface by chemical treatment of (3-Mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and immobilized the GNP layer (Ti-GNP) on their surfaces via Au-S bonding. The GNP layer is uniformly immobilized on the surface and the layer covers the titanium oxide surface well, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Ti-GNP was used to investigate the effectiveness of this system both in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro results showed that the Ti-GNP significantly enhances the osteogenic differentiation with increased mRNA expression of osteogenic differentiation specific genes in human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Furthermore, the in vivo results showed that Ti-GNP had a significant influence on the osseous interface formation. Through these in vitro and vivo tests, we found that Ti-GNP can be useful as osseo-integration inducing dental implants for formation of an osseous interface and maintenance of nascent bone formation. PMID:26874978

  5. Endothelialization of implanted cardiovascular biomaterial surfaces: the development from in vitro to in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Liu, Shihui; Zhang, Kun; Chen, Junying; Huang, Nan

    2014-10-01

    Restenosis and thrombosis formation after cardiovascular devices implantation continue to be problematic. Although various platforms and parameters of cardiovascular devices have been designed and optimized over the years, postoperative complications are hard to avoid. The native vascular endothelium always provide a nonthrombogenic surface as well as prevent intimal overproliferation, thereby, the presence of a confluent endothelial cell layer on material surfaces have been widely accepted as an ideal approach to improve the biocompatibility of implanted cardiovascular materials. Endothelialization on biomaterial surfaces is initially developed by in vitro cell seeding. However, numerous no-perfect parts of this method are existed for clinical use. The emergency of endothelial progenitor cells may provide a promising way for setting these limitations. Over the last decades, countless researches about EPCs-based in vivo induced self-endothelialization have been reported and mainly focused on cellular therapy, pharmacological therapy, materials designing, or surface biofunctional modification. This review details the development of endothelialization on cardiovascular material surfaces from in vitro to in vivo. Endothelialization progress on the basis of molecular biological level and bioinformatics theory is expected to be the key point in the coming decades.

  6. Influence of Surrounding Cations on the Surface Degradation of Magnesium Alloy Implants under a Compressive Pressure.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chengyun; Zhou, Lei; Zhu, Ye; Li, Ying; Yu, Peng; Wang, Shuangying; He, Tianrui; Li, Weiping; Tan, Guoxin; Wang, Yingjun; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-12-22

    The effect of cations in the surrounding solutions on the surface degradation of magnesium alloys, a well-recognized biodegradable biomaterial, has been neglected compared with the effect of anions in the past. To better simulate the compressive environment where magnesium alloys are implanted into the body as a cardiovascular stent, a device is designed and employed in the test so that a pressure, equivalent to the vascular pressure, can be directly applied to the magnesium alloy implants when the alloys are immersed in a medium containing one of the cations (K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+)) found in blood plasma. The surface degradation behaviors of the magnesium alloys in the immersion test are then investigated using hydrogen evolution, mass loss determination, electron microscopy, pH value, and potentiodynamic measurements. The cations are found to promote the surface degradation of the magnesium alloys with the degree decreased in the order of K(+) > Na(+) > Ca(2+) > Mg(2+). The possible mechanism of the effects of the cations on the surface degradation is also discussed. This study will allow us to predict the surface degradation of magnesium alloys in the physiological environment and to promote the further development of magnesium alloys as biodegradable biomaterials.

  7. Spectroscopy in the analysis of bacterial and eukaryotic cell footprints on implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kaivosoja, E; Virtanen, S; Rautemaa, R; Lappalainen, R; Konttinen, Y T

    2012-07-12

    We tested the suitability of two spectroscopic methods, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), in the recognition of bacterial and eukaryotic cell footprints on implant surfaces. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and Staphylococcus aureus were cultured on sample surfaces and detached using trypsin. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the processed surfaces did not contain any human or microbial cells. The footprints were then analysed using XPS and ToF-SIMS. XPS results showed no significant differences between the footprints, but principal component analysis of the ToF-SIMS data enabled clear separation of MSC-footprints from the S. aureus and co-culture footprints (p < 0.03). ToF-SIMS also demonstrated 'race for the surface' between proteins, which suggest surface charge (zeta-potential) dependent protein adsorption. ToF-SIMS differentiated eukaryotic and bacterial footprints and has potential for post-hoc detection of implant-related infections based on the typical ToF-SIMS spectra.

  8. Titanium dental implants surface-immobilized with gold nanoparticles as osteoinductive agents for rapid osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong Nyoung; Ko, Wan-Kyu; Lee, Hak Rae; Lee, Sang Jin; Lee, Donghyun; Um, Soong Ho; Lee, Jung Haeng; Woo, Yi-Hyung; Zhang, Lijie Grace; Lee, Deok-Won; Kwon, Il Keun

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are quite attractive materials for use as osteogenic agents due to their potential effects on the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation. In this study, an osseo-integrated titanium (Ti) implant surface coated with GNPs was used for promotion of bone regeneration. We prepared a silanized Ti surface by chemical treatment of (3-Mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and immobilized the GNP layer (Ti-GNP) on their surfaces via Au-S bonding. The GNP layer is uniformly immobilized on the surface and the layer covers the titanium oxide surface well, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Ti-GNP was used to investigate the effectiveness of this system both in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro results showed that the Ti-GNP significantly enhances the osteogenic differentiation with increased mRNA expression of osteogenic differentiation specific genes in human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Furthermore, the in vivo results showed that Ti-GNP had a significant influence on the osseous interface formation. Through these in vitro and vivo tests, we found that Ti-GNP can be useful as osseo-integration inducing dental implants for formation of an osseous interface and maintenance of nascent bone formation.

  9. Surface damage of metallic implants due to mechanical loading and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaejoong

    The present study investigates interfacial damage mechanism of modular implants due to synergetic action of mechanical contact loading and corrosion. Modular implants are manufactured such that surfaces have a characteristic degree of roughness determined by tool tip size and motion of tool path or feeding speed. The central hypothesis for this work is that during contact loading of metallic implants, mechanisms of damage and dissolution are determined by contact loads, plastic deformation, residual stresses and environmental conditions at the nanoscale surface asperities; while during subsequent rest periods, mechanism of metallic dissolution is determined by the environmental conditions and residual stress field induced due to long range elastic interactions of the plastically deformed asperities. First part of the thesis is focused on investigating the mechanisms underlying surface roughness evolution due to stress-assisted dissolution during the rest period. The latter part is focused on investigating material removal mechanisms during single asperity contact of implant surfaces. Experimental study was performed to elucidate the roughness evolution mechanism by combined effect of multi-asperity contact and environmental corrosion. Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum specimen was subjected to either contact loading alone or alternating contact loading and exposure to reactive environment. Roughness of the specimen surface was monitored by optical profilometry and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) calculation was used to characterize the evolving behavior of roughness modes. Finite element analysis (FEA) was employed to identify influences of surface morphological configurations and contact pressures on the residual stress development. Analytical model of multi-asperity contact has been developed for prediction of residual stress field for different roughness configurations during varying magnitude of contact loads based on elastic inclusion theory. Experimental results

  10. Collagen-functionalised titanium surfaces for biological sealing of dental implants: effect of immobilisation process on fibroblasts response.

    PubMed

    Marín-Pareja, Nathalia; Salvagni, Emiliano; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Aparicio, Conrado; Ginebra, Maria-Pau

    2014-10-01

    The clinical success of a dental implant requires not only an optimum osseointegration, but also the development of a biological sealing; i.e., a soft tissue seal around the transmucosal part of the implant. A promising approach to improve the biological seal of dental implants is the biomimetic modification of titanium surfaces with proteins or peptides that have specific cell-binding moieties. In this work we investigated the process of immobilising collagen on smooth and rough titanium surfaces and its effect on human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cell response. Titanium samples were activated by either oxygen plasma or acid etching to generate a smooth or nanorough surface, respectively. Subsequently, collagen grafting was achieved by either physisorption or covalent bonding through organosilane chemistry. The biofunctionalised titanium samples were then tested for stability and characterised by fluorescent labelling, wettability, OWLS and XPS studies. Biological characterisation was also performed through HDF adhesion, proliferation and gene expression. Covalent-bonded collagen showed higher stability than physisorbed collagen. A significant overexpression of the genes involved in fibroblast activation and extracellular matrix remodelling was observed in the collagen-coated surfaces. This effect was more pronounced on smooth than on rough surfaces. Immobilised collagen on the smooth plasma-treated surfaces favoured both fibroblast adhesion and activation. This study provides essential information for the design of implants with optimal biological sealing, a key aspect to avoid peri-implantitis and ensure long-lasting implant fixation.

  11. Effects of hydrofluoric acid and anodised micro and micro/nano surface implants on early osseointegration in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Gao, Yuan; Shao, Bo; Xiao, Jianrui; Hu, Kaijin; Kong, Liang

    2012-12-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid and anodised micro and micro/nano surface implants on bony ingrowth in the earliest stage of implantation in rats. Sixty cylindrical screwed titanium alloy implants with machined, micro, and hierarchical hybrid micro/nano surfaces (n=20 in each group) were inserted into the distal femurs of 30 female Sprague-Dawley rats. In vivo microcomputed tomography (micro CT) was used to assess microarchitectural changes in the bone around the implants 2 weeks after implantation. All the animals were then killed and the femurs with implants harvested for histological analysis and pull-out testing. Micro CT analysis showed that the trabecular thickness and the bone:volume ratio (bone volume:total volume) (BV:TV) increased significantly in the micro/nano group compared with the other two groups, while the trabecular separation decreased significantly in the micro/nano group compared with the machined group. The mean (SD) bone-implant contacts (%) were 38.94 (9.48), 41.67 (8.71), and 51.49 (12.49) in the machined, micro, and micro/nano groups, respectively. The maximum pull-out forces (N) were 64.95 (6.11), 71.45 (7.15), and 81.90 (13.1), respectively. Both bone-implant contacts and maximum pull-out forces were significantly higher in the micro/nano group, but there was no significant difference between the micro group and the machined group. These data indicate that the hierarchical hybrid micro/nano surface of the implant can promote osseointegration in the earliest stage of implantation, and may be a promising option for further clinical use.

  12. A noninterventional study documenting use and success of implants with a new chemically modified titanium surface in daily dental practice.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Giuseppe; Oteri, Giacomo

    2010-01-01

    A new chemically modified titanium surface, SLActive, has recently been developed. The results obtained in controlled clinical trials indicate that this implant can be safely used and that it offers predictable results. The goal of this noninterventional study was to verify that the success rates of implants used in daily dental practice are comparable to those reported in controlled clinical trials. This study was a prospective, noninterventional study using implants with a chemically modified surface according to the daily dental practice procedures applied by private practitioners. The choice of the implantation procedure and the loading protocol were the responsibility of the investigator and were chosen according to the patient's needs. Thirty clinical centers actively participated in this study, and 226 patients were treated, of which, 8 patients were lost to follow-up. Because of the noninterventional design of the study, the patients were not selected according to strictly defined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Thus, the study included individuals with risk factors such as smoking (24%), untreated gingivitis or periodontitis (9%), and bruxism (6%). The implants were equally distributed between mandible (46%) and maxilla (54%). A bone augmentation procedure was done in 31% of the cases. Early loading (functional loading between 48 hours and 3 months after implant insertion) was applied most frequently (48%), followed by the conventional loading protocol (3 to 6 months after implant placement, 34%). Immediate restoration and immediate loading were rare (7% and 2%, respectively). Of 276 implants inserted and documented, 5 implants failures were reported, all of which were associated with a sinus floor augmentation procedure. The survival rate was 98.2% at the 1-year follow-up visit. The results showed that implants with a chemically modified surface can be successfully restored with success rates similar to those reported in formal clinical trials under more

  13. Surface modification and fatigue behavior of nitinol for load bearing implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Sheldon A.

    Musculoskeletal disorders are recognized amongst the most significant human health problems that exist today. Even though considerable research and development has gone towards understanding musculoskeletal disorders, there is still lack of bone replacement materials that are appropriate for restoring lost structures and functions, particularly for load-bearing applications. Many materials on the market today, such as titanium and stainless steel, suffer from significantly higher modulus than natural bone and low bioactivity leading to stress shielding and implant loosening over longer time use. Nitinol (NiTi) is an equiatomic intermetallic compound of nickel and titanium whose unique biomechanical and biological properties contributed to its increasing use as a biomaterial. An innovative method for creating dense and porous net shape NiTi alloy parts has been developed to improve biological properties while maintaining comparable or better mechanical properties than commercial materials that are currently in use. Laser engineered net shaping (LENS(TM)) and surface electrochemistry modification was used to create dense/porous samples and micro textured surfaces on NiTi parts, respectively. Porous implants are known to promote cell adhesion and have a low elastic modulus, a combination that can significantly increase the life of an implant. However, porosity can significantly reduce the fatigue life of an implant, and very little work has been reported on the fatigue behavior of bulk porous metals, specifically on porous nitinol alloy. High-cycle rotating bending and compression-compression fatigue behavior of porous NiTi fabricated using LENS(TM) were studied. In cyclic compression loading, plastic strain increased with increasing porosity and it was evident that maximum strain was achieved during the first 50000 cycles and remained constant throughout the remaining loading. No failures were observed due to loading up to 150% of the yield strength. When subjected

  14. An experiment on the dynamics of ion implantation and sputtering of surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, G. M.; Barnard, H. A.; Kesler, L. A.; Peterson, E. E.; Stahle, P. W.; Sullivan, R. M.; Whyte, D. G.; Woller, K. B.

    2014-02-15

    A major impediment towards a better understanding of the complex plasma-surface interaction is the limited diagnostic access to the material surface while it is undergoing plasma exposure. The Dynamics of ION Implantation and Sputtering Of Surfaces (DIONISOS) experiment overcomes this limitation by uniquely combining powerful, non-perturbing ion beam analysis techniques with a steady-state helicon plasma exposure chamber, allowing for real-time, depth-resolved in situ measurements of material compositions during plasma exposure. Design solutions are described that provide compatibility between the ion beam analysis requirements in the presence of a high-intensity helicon plasma. The three primary ion beam analysis techniques, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection, and nuclear reaction analysis, are successfully implemented on targets during plasma exposure in DIONISOS. These techniques measure parameters of interest for plasma-material interactions such as erosion/deposition rates of materials and the concentration of plasma fuel species in the material surface.

  15. Control of surface morphology of carbide coating on Co-Cr-Mo implant alloy.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, N S; Topoleski, L D T

    2005-07-01

    Wear of materials used in artificial joints is a common failure mode of artificial joints. A low wear rate for implants is believed to be critical for extending implant service time. We developed a carbide-coated Co-Cr-Mo implant alloy created in plasma of methane and hydrogen mixed gas by a microwave plasma-assisted surface reaction. The carbide-coated Co-Cr-Mo has a unique "brain coral-like" surface morphology and is much harder than uncoated Co-Cr-Mo. The effect of plasma processing time and temperature on the surface morphology of the top carbide layer was studied toward optimizing the surface coating. The ratios of average roughness, Ra, core roughness, Rk, and summation of core roughness, reduced peak height (Rpk) and reduced valley depth (Rvk), Rk+Rpk+Rvk, for the 6-h/985 degrees C coating to those for the 0.5-h/985 degrees C coating were 1.9, 1.7, and 1.9, respectively. The ratios of Ra, Rk, and Rk+Rpk+Rvk for the 4-h/1000 degrees C coating to those for the 4-h/939 degrees C coating were 2.3, 2.3, and 2.0, respectively. With the proper combination of plasma processing time and temperature, it may be possible to change the thickness of the peak-valley top cluster by fourfold from approximately 0.6 microm to approximately 2.5 microm. Finally, the growth mechanism of the carbide layers on Co-Cr-Mo was discussed in the context of atomic composition analysis. PMID:15965597

  16. Magnesium ion implantation on a micro/nanostructured titanium surface promotes its bioactivity and osteogenic differentiation function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Zhang, Wenjie; Xu, Lianyi; Pan, Hongya; Wen, Jin; Wu, Qianju; She, Wenjun; Jiao, Ting; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2014-01-01

    As one of the important ions associated with bone osseointegration, magnesium was incorporated into a micro/nanostructured titanium surface using a magnesium plasma immersion ion-implantation method. Hierarchical hybrid micro/nanostructured titanium surfaces followed by magnesium ion implantation for 30 minutes (Mg30) and hierarchical hybrid micro/nanostructured titanium surfaces followed by magnesium ion implantation for 60 minutes (Mg60) were used as test groups. The surface morphology, chemical properties, and amount of magnesium ions released were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, field-emission transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (rBMMSCs) were used to evaluate cell responses, including proliferation, spreading, and osteogenic differentiation on the surface of the material or in their medium extraction. Greater increases in the spreading and proliferation ability of rBMMSCs were observed on the surfaces of magnesium-implanted micro/nanostructures compared with the control plates. Furthermore, the osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) genes were upregulated on both surfaces and in their medium extractions. The enhanced cell responses were correlated with increasing concentrations of magnesium ions, indicating that the osteoblastic differentiation of rBMMSCs was stimulated through the magnesium ion function. The magnesium ion-implanted micro/nanostructured titanium surfaces could enhance the proliferation, spreading, and osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs, suggesting they have potential application in improving bone-titanium integration. PMID:24940056

  17. Microstructure of spinel islands on the sapphire surface grown by ion implantation and annealing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Liu, X P; Qin, G W

    2014-09-01

    Fe ions were implanted into α-Al2O3 single crystals (sapphire) at energy of 50 keV and annealed in an oxidizing environment. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation indicated that Fe ions in the near surface region precipitated as α-Fe2O3 islands and spinel islands on the specimen surface, at the same time, Fe ions in the region away from the surface precipitated as α-Fe particles in the interior region of specimen. Two orientation relationships (ORs) between the spinel islands and sapphire substrate were discovered as follows: (111)spinel∥(0001)sapphire, [1 1 2¯]spinel∥[1 1 2¯ 0]sapphire and (1 1 2¯)spinel∥(0 0 0 1)sapphire, [1 1 1]spinel∥[1 1 2¯ 0]sapphire. The first OR was frequently observed in the spinel/sapphire system, however, the second OR has never been reported before. The interfaces between the spinel islands and sapphire substrate are a type-3 incoherent interface (i.e. low-index OR in at least one direction with an ill-matched low-index habit planes). The formation of spinel islands on the specimen surface can be attributed to the oxidizing atmosphere and the low accelerating voltage for ion implantation.

  18. XPS and SIMS study of the surface and interface of aged C+ implanted uranium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Donald, Scott B.; Siekhaus, Wigbert J.; Nelson, Art J.

    2016-09-08

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in combination with secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling were used to investigate the surface and interfacial chemistry of C+ ion implanted polycrystalline uranium subsequently oxidized in air for over 10 years at ambient temperature. The original implantation of 33 keV C+ ions into U238 with a dose of 4.3 × 1017 cm–3 produced a physically and chemically modified surface layer that was characterized and shown to initially prevent air oxidation and corrosion of the uranium after 1 year in air at ambient temperature. The aging of the surface and interfacial layers were examined by using themore » chemical shift of the U 4f, C 1s, and O 1s photoelectron lines. In addition, valence band spectra were used to explore the electronic structure of the aged carbide surface and interface layer. Moreover, the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling results for the aged sample confirmed an oxidized uranium carbide layer over the carbide layer/U metal interface.« less

  19. Ultrasmall implantable composite microelectrodes with bioactive surfaces for chronic neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida Kozai, Takashi D.; Langhals, Nicholas B.; Patel, Paras R.; Deng, Xiaopei; Zhang, Huanan; Smith, Karen L.; Lahann, Joerg; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2012-12-01

    Implantable neural microelectrodes that can record extracellular biopotentials from small, targeted groups of neurons are critical for neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications including brain-controlled prosthetic devices. The crucial material-dependent problem is developing microelectrodes that record neural activity from the same neurons for years with high fidelity and reliability. Here, we report the development of an integrated composite electrode consisting of a carbon-fibre core, a poly(p-xylylene)-based thin-film coating that acts as a dielectric barrier and that is functionalized to control intrinsic biological processes, and a poly(thiophene)-based recording pad. The resulting implants are an order of magnitude smaller than traditional recording electrodes, and more mechanically compliant with brain tissue. They were found to elicit much reduced chronic reactive tissue responses and enabled single-neuron recording in acute and early chronic experiments in rats. This technology, taking advantage of new composites, makes possible highly selective and stealthy neural interface devices towards realizing long-lasting implants.

  20. Ultrasmall implantable composite microelectrodes with bioactive surfaces for chronic neural interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kozai, Takashi D. Yoshida; Langhals, Nicholas B.; Patel, Paras R.; Deng, Xiaopei; Zhang, Huanan; Smith, Karen L.; Lahann, Joerg; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2012-01-01

    Implantable neural microelectrodes that can record extracellular biopotentials from small, targeted groups of neurons are critical for neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications including brain-controlled prosthetic devices. The crucial material-dependent problem is developing microelectrodes that record neural activity from the same neurons for years with high fidelity and reliability. Here, we report the development of an integrated composite electrode consisting of a carbon-fibre core, a poly(p-xylylene)-based thin-film coating that acts as a dielectric barrier and that is functionalized to control intrinsic biological processes, and a poly(thiophene)-based recording pad. The resulting implants are an order of magnitude smaller than traditional recording electrodes, and more mechanically compliant with brain tissue. They were found to elicit much reduced chronic reactive tissue responses and enabled single-neuron recording in acute and early chronic experiments in rats. This technology, taking advantage of new composites, makes possible highly selective and stealthy neural interface devices towards realizing long-lasting implants. PMID:23142839

  1. Ultrasmall implantable composite microelectrodes with bioactive surfaces for chronic neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kozai, Takashi D Yoshida; Langhals, Nicholas B; Patel, Paras R; Deng, Xiaopei; Zhang, Huanan; Smith, Karen L; Lahann, Joerg; Kotov, Nicholas A; Kipke, Daryl R

    2012-12-01

    Implantable neural microelectrodes that can record extracellular biopotentials from small, targeted groups of neurons are critical for neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications including brain-controlled prosthetic devices. The crucial material-dependent problem is developing microelectrodes that record neural activity from the same neurons for years with high fidelity and reliability. Here, we report the development of an integrated composite electrode consisting of a carbon-fibre core, a poly(p-xylylene)-based thin-film coating that acts as a dielectric barrier and that is functionalized to control intrinsic biological processes, and a poly(thiophene)-based recording pad. The resulting implants are an order of magnitude smaller than traditional recording electrodes, and more mechanically compliant with brain tissue. They were found to elicit much reduced chronic reactive tissue responses and enabled single-neuron recording in acute and early chronic experiments in rats. This technology, taking advantage of new composites, makes possible highly selective and stealthy neural interface devices towards realizing long-lasting implants. PMID:23142839

  2. Ultrasmall implantable composite microelectrodes with bioactive surfaces for chronic neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kozai, Takashi D Yoshida; Langhals, Nicholas B; Patel, Paras R; Deng, Xiaopei; Zhang, Huanan; Smith, Karen L; Lahann, Joerg; Kotov, Nicholas A; Kipke, Daryl R

    2012-12-01

    Implantable neural microelectrodes that can record extracellular biopotentials from small, targeted groups of neurons are critical for neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications including brain-controlled prosthetic devices. The crucial material-dependent problem is developing microelectrodes that record neural activity from the same neurons for years with high fidelity and reliability. Here, we report the development of an integrated composite electrode consisting of a carbon-fibre core, a poly(p-xylylene)-based thin-film coating that acts as a dielectric barrier and that is functionalized to control intrinsic biological processes, and a poly(thiophene)-based recording pad. The resulting implants are an order of magnitude smaller than traditional recording electrodes, and more mechanically compliant with brain tissue. They were found to elicit much reduced chronic reactive tissue responses and enabled single-neuron recording in acute and early chronic experiments in rats. This technology, taking advantage of new composites, makes possible highly selective and stealthy neural interface devices towards realizing long-lasting implants.

  3. Airport Surface Movement Technologies: Atlanta Demonstrations Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted in August 1997 at the Hartsfield Atlanta (ATL) International Airport as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. This research was aimed at investigating technology to improve the safety and efficiency of aircraft movements on the surface during the operational phases of roll-out, turnoff, and taxi in any weather condition down to a runway visual range of 300 feet. The system tested at ATL was composed of airborne and ground-based components that were integrated to provide both the flight crew and controllers with supplemental information to enable safe, expedient surface operations. Experimental displays were installed on a Boeing 757-200 research aircraft in both headup and head-down formats. On the ground, an integrated system maintained surveillance of the airport surface and a controller interface provided routing and control instructions. While at ATL, the research aircraft performed a series of flight and taxi operations to show the validity of the operational concept at a major airport facility, to validate simulation findings, and to assess each of the individual technologies performance in an airport environment. The concept was demonstrated to over 100 visitors from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the aviation community. This paper gives an overview of the LVLASO system and ATL test activities.

  4. Determination of Ni Release in NiTi SMA with Surface Modification by Nitrogen Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Camargo, Eliene Nogueira; Oliveira Lobo, Anderson; Silva, Maria Margareth Da; Ueda, Mario; Garcia, Edivaldo Egea; Pichon, Luc; Reuther, Helfried; Otubo, Jorge

    2011-07-01

    NiTi SMA is a promising material in the biomedical area due to its mechanical properties and biocompatibility. However, the nickel in the alloy may cause allergic and toxic reactions and thus limiting its applications. It was evaluated the influence of surface modification in NiTi SMA by nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (varying temperatures, and exposure time as follows: <250 °C/2 h, 290 °C/2 h, and 560 °C/1 h) in the amount of nickel released using immersion test in simulated body fluid. The depth of the nitrogen implanted layer increased as the implantation temperature increased resulting in the decrease of nickel release. The sample implanted in high implantation temperature presented 35% of nickel release reduction compared to reference sample.

  5. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  6. Microparticle entrapment for drug release from porous-surfaced bone implants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongwei; Liu, Qing; Xiao, Dongqin; Guo, Tailin; Ma, Yunqing; Duan, Ke; Wang, Jianxin; Lu, Xiong; Feng, Bo; Weng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Metallic bone implants face interfacial concerns, such as infection and insufficient bone formation. Combination of drug-loaded microparticles with the implant surface is a promising approach to reducing the concerns. The present study reports a simple method for this purpose. Drug-loaded chitosan and alginate microparticles were separately prepared by emulsion methods. Dry microparticles were introduced into porous titanium (Ti) coatings on Ti discs, and induced to agglomerate in pores by wetting with water. Agglomerates were stably entrapped in the pores: 77-82% retained in the coating after immersion in a water bath for 7 d. Discs carrying drug-loaded microparticles showed a rapid release within 6 h and a subsequent slow release up to 1 d. After coculture with Staphylococcus epidermidis for 24 h, the discs formed inhibition zones, confirming antibacterial properties. These suggest that the microparticle entrapment-based method is a promising method for reducing some of the bone-implant interfacial concerns.

  7. Tribocorrosion behaviour of anodic treated titanium surfaces intended for dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, A. C.; Oliveira, F.; Wenger, F.; Ponthiaux, P.; Celis, J.-P.; Rocha, L. A.

    2013-10-01

    Tribocorrosion plays an important role in the lifetime of metallic implants. Once implanted, biomaterials are subjected to micro-movements in aggressive biological fluids. Titanium is widely used as an implant material because it spontaneously forms a compact and protective nanometric thick oxide layer, mainly TiO2, in ambient air. That layer provides good corrosion resistance, and very low toxicity, but its low wear resistance is a concern. In this work, an anodizing treatment was performed on commercial pure titanium to form a homogeneous thick oxide surface layer in order to provide bioactivity and improve the biological, chemical and mechanical properties. Anodizing was performed in an electrolyte containing β-glycerophosphate and calcium acetate. The influence of the calcium acetate content on the tribocorrosion behaviour of the anodized material was studied. The concentration of calcium acetate in the electrolyte was found to largely affect the crystallographic structure of the resulting oxide layer. Better tribocorrosion behaviour was noticed on increasing the calcium acetate concentration.

  8. Design of a radio-linked implantable cochlear prosthesis using surface acoustic wave devices.

    PubMed

    Jeutter, D C; Josse, F

    1993-01-01

    Cochlear prosthesis systems for postlingually deaf individuals (those who have become deaf due to disease or injury after having developed mature speech capability) are considered. These systems require the surgical implantation of an array of electrodes within the cochlea and are driven by processed sound signals from outside the body. A system that uses an analog signal approach for transcutaneous transfer of six processed speech data channels using frequency multiplexing is described. The system utilizes a filterbank of six narrowband surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters in the range 72-78 MHz with a 1.2-MHz channel spacing to multiplex the six carrier signals, frequency modulated, by the processed speech signals, onto a composite signal. The same SAW filters are used in the receiver filterbank for signal separation, but are housed in a miniaturized package. The system includes a portable transmitter and a receiver package which is to be implanted in the patient. The implanted circuits are supplied exclusively from power transferred from outside the body via a separate 10-MHz transcutaneous link.

  9. Microparticle entrapment for drug release from porous-surfaced bone implants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongwei; Liu, Qing; Xiao, Dongqin; Guo, Tailin; Ma, Yunqing; Duan, Ke; Wang, Jianxin; Lu, Xiong; Feng, Bo; Weng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Metallic bone implants face interfacial concerns, such as infection and insufficient bone formation. Combination of drug-loaded microparticles with the implant surface is a promising approach to reducing the concerns. The present study reports a simple method for this purpose. Drug-loaded chitosan and alginate microparticles were separately prepared by emulsion methods. Dry microparticles were introduced into porous titanium (Ti) coatings on Ti discs, and induced to agglomerate in pores by wetting with water. Agglomerates were stably entrapped in the pores: 77-82% retained in the coating after immersion in a water bath for 7 d. Discs carrying drug-loaded microparticles showed a rapid release within 6 h and a subsequent slow release up to 1 d. After coculture with Staphylococcus epidermidis for 24 h, the discs formed inhibition zones, confirming antibacterial properties. These suggest that the microparticle entrapment-based method is a promising method for reducing some of the bone-implant interfacial concerns. PMID:26057256

  10. [Hearing implants].

    PubMed

    Stokroos, Robert J; George, Erwin L J

    2013-01-01

    In the Netherlands, more than 1.5 million people suffer from sensorineural hearing loss or deafness. However, fitting conventional hearing aids does not provide a solution for everyone. In recent decades, developments in medical technology have produced implantable and other devices that restore both sensorineural and conductive hearing losses. These hearing devices can be categorized into bone conductive devices, implantable middle ear prostheses, cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants. Furthermore, new implants aimed at treating tinnitus and loss of vestibular function have recently been developed.

  11. Making it stick: the role of structural design in implantable technologies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wontae; Leask, Richard L; Moraes, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Designing technologies that work within the human body requires innovation at the interface of biology, engineering, and material sciences. The human body presents a surprisingly hostile environment towards technologies designed to improve health, and recent approaches to these problems have leveraged the links between material form and function to improve implantable systems. The use of physical structure has emerged as a key design parameter in developing these systems, and has recently been applied to make significant progress in the field. Here, we highlight recent studies that demonstrate the innovative use of structure in the design of technologies meant to operate within the human body, with a specific focus on improving their biointegration, delivery, and functionality. PMID:26446511

  12. Making it stick: the role of structural design in implantable technologies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wontae; Leask, Richard L; Moraes, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Designing technologies that work within the human body requires innovation at the interface of biology, engineering, and material sciences. The human body presents a surprisingly hostile environment towards technologies designed to improve health, and recent approaches to these problems have leveraged the links between material form and function to improve implantable systems. The use of physical structure has emerged as a key design parameter in developing these systems, and has recently been applied to make significant progress in the field. Here, we highlight recent studies that demonstrate the innovative use of structure in the design of technologies meant to operate within the human body, with a specific focus on improving their biointegration, delivery, and functionality.

  13. [SIMS (secondary ion mass spectroscopy) and XPS (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) study of titanium implant surfaces coated with anodic titanium-oxide layer].

    PubMed

    Suba, Csongor; Velich, Norbert; Vida, György; Kovács, Lajos; Kiss, Gábor; Szabó, György

    2003-10-01

    The demands that must be satisfied by titanium implants applied in medical practice include chemical and physical durability. An anodic oxide protective layer formed on the surface of titanium implants serves for the better attainment of this aim. The composition of the passivizing layer and the changes in its thickness and binding state can be studied by method of material science, e.g. by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In this way a possibility arises for the material technological classification of the Ti-TiO2 layer structure and for the observation of the physical and chemical reactions that occur between the implants and the tissues in the organism. The present XPS examinations revealed that the binding state of the titanium forming the surface of the plates involve neither significant quantities of titanium oxide nor impurities. In the SIMS investigation the thickness of the titanium oxide layer was found to be 120-150 nm. Determination of the thickness of the surface, the binding state of the titanium and the exact proportions of the impurities and additives furnishes a possibility for a subsequent comparison with the surface structure of plates removed from the organism. It is important for the assessment of the practical value of the protective layer.

  14. Silver nanoparticle-enriched diamond-like carbon implant modification as a mammalian cell compatible surface with antimicrobial properties

    PubMed Central

    Gorzelanny, Christian; Kmeth, Ralf; Obermeier, Andreas; Bauer, Alexander T.; Halter, Natalia; Kümpel, Katharina; Schneider, Matthias F.; Wixforth, Achim; Gollwitzer, Hans; Burgkart, Rainer; Stritzker, Bernd; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-01-01

    The implant-bone interface is the scene of competition between microorganisms and distinct types of tissue cells. In the past, various strategies have been followed to support bony integration and to prevent bacterial implant-associated infections. In the present study we investigated the biological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces containing silver nanoparticles. DLC is a promising material for the modification of medical implants providing high mechanical and chemical stability and a high degree of biocompatibility. DLC surface modifications with varying silver concentrations were generated on medical-grade titanium discs, using plasma immersion ion implantation-induced densification of silver nanoparticle-containing polyvinylpyrrolidone polymer solutions. Immersion of implants in aqueous liquids resulted in a rapid silver release reducing the growth of surface-bound and planktonic Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Due to the fast and transient release of silver ions from the modified implants, the surfaces became biocompatible, ensuring growth of mammalian cells. Human endothelial cells retained their cellular differentiation as indicated by the intracellular formation of Weibel-Palade bodies and a high responsiveness towards histamine. Our findings indicate that the integration of silver nanoparticles into DLC prevents bacterial colonization due to a fast initial release of silver ions, facilitating the growth of silver susceptible mammalian cells subsequently. PMID:26955791

  15. Silver nanoparticle-enriched diamond-like carbon implant modification as a mammalian cell compatible surface with antimicrobial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorzelanny, Christian; Kmeth, Ralf; Obermeier, Andreas; Bauer, Alexander T.; Halter, Natalia; Kümpel, Katharina; Schneider, Matthias F.; Wixforth, Achim; Gollwitzer, Hans; Burgkart, Rainer; Stritzker, Bernd; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-03-01

    The implant-bone interface is the scene of competition between microorganisms and distinct types of tissue cells. In the past, various strategies have been followed to support bony integration and to prevent bacterial implant-associated infections. In the present study we investigated the biological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) surfaces containing silver nanoparticles. DLC is a promising material for the modification of medical implants providing high mechanical and chemical stability and a high degree of biocompatibility. DLC surface modifications with varying silver concentrations were generated on medical-grade titanium discs, using plasma immersion ion implantation-induced densification of silver nanoparticle-containing polyvinylpyrrolidone polymer solutions. Immersion of implants in aqueous liquids resulted in a rapid silver release reducing the growth of surface-bound and planktonic Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Due to the fast and transient release of silver ions from the modified implants, the surfaces became biocompatible, ensuring growth of mammalian cells. Human endothelial cells retained their cellular differentiation as indicated by the intracellular formation of Weibel-Palade bodies and a high responsiveness towards histamine. Our findings indicate that the integration of silver nanoparticles into DLC prevents bacterial colonization due to a fast initial release of silver ions, facilitating the growth of silver susceptible mammalian cells subsequently.

  16. Surface damage on diamond membranes fabricated by ion implantation and lift-off

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, V. S.; Alves, A. D. C.; Fairchild, B. A.; Ganesan, K.; McCallum, J. C.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Rubanov, S.; Kalish, R.; Feldman, L. C.

    2011-06-06

    Thin membranes with excellent optical properties are essential elements in diamond based photonic systems. Due to the chemical inertness of diamond, ion beam processing must be employed to carve photonic structures. One method to realize such membranes is ion-implantation graphitization followed by chemical removal of the sacrificial graphite. The interface revealed when the sacrificial layer is removed has interesting properties. To investigate this interface, we employed the surface sensitive technique of grazing angle channeled Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Even after high temperature annealing and chemical etching a thin layer of damaged diamond remains, however, it is removed by hydrogen plasma exposure.

  17. Finite element analysis on influence of implant surface treatments, connection and bone types.

    PubMed

    Santiago Junior, Joel Ferreira; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Almeida, Daniel Augusto de Faria; de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araujo; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effect of different dental implant designs, bone type, loading, and surface treatment on the stress distribution around the implant by using the 3D finite-element method. Twelve 3D models were developed with Invesalius 3.0, Rhinoceros 4.0, and Solidworks 2010 software. The analysis was processed using the FEMAP 10.2 and NeiNastran 10.0 software. The applied oblique forces were 200 N and 100 N. The results were analyzed using maps of maximum principal stress and bone microstrain. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The results showed that the Morse taper design was most efficient in terms of its distribution of stresses (p<0.05); the external hexagon with platform switching did not show a significant difference from an external hexagon with a standard platform (p>0.05). The different bone types did not show a significant difference in the stress/strain distribution (p>0.05). The surface treatment increased areas of stress concentration under axial loading (p<0.05) and increased areas of microstrain under axial and oblique loading (p<0.05) on the cortical bone. The Morse taper design behaved better biomechanically in relation to the bone tissue. The treated surface increased areas of stress and strain on the cortical bone tissue.

  18. Measurement and image processing evaluation of surface modifications of dental implants G4 pure titanium created by different techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bulutsuz, A. G.; Demircioglu, P. Bogrekci, I.; Durakbasa, M. N.

    2015-03-30

    Foreign substances and organic tissue interaction placed into the jaw in order to eliminate tooth loss involves a highly complex process. Many biological reactions take place as well as the biomechanical forces that influence this formation. Osseointegration denotes to the direct structural and functional association between the living bone and the load-bearing artificial implant's surface. Taking into consideration of the requirements in the manufacturing processes of the implants, surface characterizations with high precise measurement techniques are investigated and thus long-term success of dental implant is emphasized on the importance of these processes in this study. In this research, the detailed surface characterization was performed to identify the dependence of the manufacturing techniques on the surface properties by using the image processing methods and using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for morphological properties in 3D and Taylor Hobson stylus profilometer for roughness properties in 2D. Three implant surfaces fabricated by different manufacturing techniques were inspected, and a machined surface was included into the study as a reference specimen. The results indicated that different surface treatments were strongly influenced surface morphology. Thus 2D and 3D precise inspection techniques were highlighted on the importance for surface characterization. Different image analyses techniques such as Dark-light technique were used to verify the surface measurement results. The computational phase was performed using image processing toolbox in Matlab with precise evaluation of the roughness for the implant surfaces. The relationship between the number of black and white pixels and surface roughness is presented. FFT image processing and analyses results explicitly imply that the technique is useful in the determination of surface roughness. The results showed that the number of black pixels in the image increases with increase in surface

  19. Measurement and image processing evaluation of surface modifications of dental implants G4 pure titanium created by different techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulutsuz, A. G.; Demircioglu, P.; Bogrekci, I.; Durakbasa, M. N.; Katiboglu, A. B.

    2015-03-01

    Foreign substances and organic tissue interaction placed into the jaw in order to eliminate tooth loss involves a highly complex process. Many biological reactions take place as well as the biomechanical forces that influence this formation. Osseointegration denotes to the direct structural and functional association between the living bone and the load-bearing artificial implant's surface. Taking into consideration of the requirements in the manufacturing processes of the implants, surface characterizations with high precise measurement techniques are investigated and thus long-term success of dental implant is emphasized on the importance of these processes in this study. In this research, the detailed surface characterization was performed to identify the dependence of the manufacturing techniques on the surface properties by using the image processing methods and using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) for morphological properties in 3D and Taylor Hobson stylus profilometer for roughness properties in 2D. Three implant surfaces fabricated by different manufacturing techniques were inspected, and a machined surface was included into the study as a reference specimen. The results indicated that different surface treatments were strongly influenced surface morphology. Thus 2D and 3D precise inspection techniques were highlighted on the importance for surface characterization. Different image analyses techniques such as Dark-light technique were used to verify the surface measurement results. The computational phase was performed using image processing toolbox in Matlab with precise evaluation of the roughness for the implant surfaces. The relationship between the number of black and white pixels and surface roughness is presented. FFT image processing and analyses results explicitly imply that the technique is useful in the determination of surface roughness. The results showed that the number of black pixels in the image increases with increase in surface

  20. Modelling of the mechanical behavior of a polyurethane finger interphalangeal joint endoprosthesis after surface modification by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beliaev, A.; Svistkov, A.; Iziumov, R.; Osorgina, I.; Kondyurin, A.; Bilek, M.; McKenzie, D.

    2016-04-01

    Production of biocompatible implants made of polyurethane treated with plasma is very perspective. During plasma treatment the surface of polyurethane acquires unique physic-chemical properties. However such treatment may change the mechanical properties of polyurethane which may adversely affect the deformation behaviour of the real implant. Therefore careful study of the mechanical properties of the plasma-modified polyurethane is needed. In this paper, experimental observations of the elastic characteristics of plasma treated polyurethane and modelling of the deformation behaviour of polyurethane bio-implants are reported.

  1. Influence of a nanometer-scale surface enhancement on de novo bone formation on titanium implants: a histomorphometric study in human maxillae.

    PubMed

    Goené, Ronnie J; Testori, Tiziano; Trisi, Paolo

    2007-06-01

    In this prospective randomized controlled clinical study, small titanium implants were placed in posterior maxillae for the purpose of assessing the rate and extent of new bone development. Nine pairs of site evaluation implants were placed in posterior areas of maxillae and retrieved with trephine drills after 4 or 8 weeks of unloaded healing. The amount of bone in linear contact (%) with the implant surface was used to determine the osteoconductive potential of the implant surface. Implant surfaces were dual acid etched (n = 9) (controls) or dual acid etched and further conditioned with nanometer-scale crystals of calcium phosphate (n = 9) (test implants), and the surfaces were compared. The implants and surrounding tissues were processed for histologic analysis. The mean bone-to-implant contact value for the test surface was significantly increased over that of the control implants at both time intervals (P <.01). For the implants/patients included in this study, the addition of a nanometer-scale calcium phosphate treatment to a dual acid-etched implant surface appeared to increase the extent of bone development after 4 and 8 weeks of healing. PMID:17694944

  2. New developments in surface technology and prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himmer, Thomas; Beyer, Eckhard

    2003-03-01

    Novel lightweight applications in the automotive and aircraft industries require advanced materials and techniques for surface protection as well as direct and rapid manufacturing of the related components and tools. The manufacturing processes presented in this paper are based on multiple additive and subtractive technologies such as laser cutting, laser welding, direct laser metal deposition, laser/plasma hybrid spraying technique or CNC milling. The process chain is similar to layer-based Rapid Prototyping Techniques. In the first step, the 3D CAD geometry is sliced into layers by a specially developed software. These slices are cut by high speed laser cutting and then joined together. In this way laminated tools or parts are built. To improve surface quality and to increase wear resistance a CNC machining center is used. The system consists of a CNC milling machine, in which a 3 kW Nd:YAG laser, a coaxial powder nozzle and a digitizing system are integrated. Using a new laser/plasma hybrid spraying technique, coatings can be deposited onto parts for surface protection. The layers show a low porosity and high adhesion strength, the thickness is up to 0.3 mm, and the lower effort for preliminary surface preparation reduces time and costs of the whole process.

  3. Mechanical and Histological Effects of Resorbable Blasting Media Surface Treatment on the Initial Stability of Orthodontic Mini-Implants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of resorbable blasting media (RBM) treatment on early stability of orthodontic mini-implants by mechanical, histomorphometric, and histological analyses. Methods. Ninety-six (64 for mechanical study and 32 for histological study and histomorphometric analysis) titanium orthodontic mini-implants (OMIs) with machined (machined group) or RBM-treated (CaP) surface (RBM group) were implanted in the tibiae of 24 rabbits. Maximum initial torque (MIT) was measured during insertion, and maximum removal torque (MRT) and removal angular momentum (RAM) were measured at 2 and 4 weeks after implantation. Bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area (BA) were analyzed at 4 weeks after implantation. Results. RBM group exhibited significantly lower MIT and significantly higher MRT and RAM at 2 weeks than machined group. No significant difference in MRT, RAM, and BIC between the two groups was noted at 4 weeks, although BA was significantly higher in RBM group than in machined group. RBM group showed little bone resorption, whereas machined group showed new bone formation after bone resorption. Conclusions. RBM surface treatment can provide early stability of OMIs around 2 weeks after insertion, whereas stability of machined surface OMIs may decrease in early stages because of bone resorption, although it can subsequently recover by new bone apposition. PMID:26942200

  4. Bioactive glass microspheres as osteopromotive inlays in macrotextured surfaces of Ti and CoCr alloy bone implants: trapezoidal surface grooves without inlay most efficient in resisting torsional forces.

    PubMed

    Keränen, Pauli; Moritz, Niko; Alm, Jessica J; Ylänen, Heimo; Kommonen, Bertel; Aro, Hannu T

    2011-10-01

    We have tested the efficacy of porous bioactive glass (BG) inlays in enhancement of implant osseointegration. A total of 24 sheep underwent bilateral surgical implantation of three parallel implants on the anteromedial cortical surface of each tibia. The disc-shaped implants made of Ti6Al4V or cobalt chromium (CoCr) alloys had two parallel surface grooves (trapezoidal space with bottom widening) filled with sintered 100% bioactive glass microspheres or a selected mixture of bioactive and biocompatible glass microspheres. The surface of uncoated control implants was smooth, grit-blasted or had unfilled grooves. A subgroup of control smooth CoCr implants was coated with two or three BG layers. Implant incorporation with bone was evaluated using torque testing to failure, scanning electron microscopy and morphometry at 12 and 25 weeks. A total of 144 in vivo implants and 16 ex vivo cemented control implants were analyzed. Control Ti6Al4V implants with unfilled trapezoidal grooves showed highest torsional failure loads with excellent ingrowth of new bone and remodeling of ingrown bone into lamellar bone. Implants with BG inlays and microroughened control Ti6Al4V implants showed significantly lower torsional failure loads than control Ti6Al4V implants with unfilled grooves. In conclusion, BG inlays failed to enhance biological implant fixation. Macrotextured surface was more effective than grit-blasting in promotion of mechanical incorporation.

  5. Fabrication of surface magnetic nanoclusters using low energy ion implantation and electron beam annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J.; Leveneur, J.; Williams, G. V. M.; Mitchell, D. R. G.; Markwitz, A.

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic nanoclusters have novel applications as magnetic sensors, spintronic and biomedical devices, as well as applications in more traditional materials such as high-density magnetic storage media and high performance permanent magnets. We describe a new synthesis protocol which combines the advantages of ion implantation and electron beam annealing (EBA) to produce surface iron nanoclusters. We compare the structure, composition and magnetic properties of iron nanoclusters fabricated by low dose 15 keV Fe implantation into SiO2 followed by 1000 °C EBA or furnace annealing. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images together with superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry measurements show that only EBA leads to the rapid formation of surface crystalline Fe spherical nanoclusters, showing magnetic moments per Fe atom comparable to that of bulk bcc Fe and superparamagnetic properties. We propose a fabrication mechanism which includes e-beam enhanced desorption of SiO2. This method has potential for fabricating nanoscale magnetic sensors integrated in microelectronic devices.

  6. Effects of He + ion implantation on surface properties of UV-cured Bis-GMA/TEGDMA bio-compatible resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, G. G.; Esparza, J.; Rodríguez, R. J.; Manso-Silván, M.; Palomares, J.; Juhasz, J.; Best, S.; Mattilla, R.; Vallittu, P.; Achanta, S.; Giazzon, M.; Weder, G.; Donati, I.

    2011-01-01

    This work reports on the surface characterisation of 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxyl-oxypropoxy)phenyl]propane/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate bio-compatible resins after high energy He + ion implantation treatments. The samples have been characterised by diffuse reflectance FT-IR, X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy, ultramicro-hardness and nano-scratch wear tests. In addition, osteblast cell assays MG-63 have been used to test the bio-compatibility of the resin surfaces after the ion implantation treatments. It has been observed that the maximum surface hardening of the resin surfaces is achieved at He-ion implantation energies of around 50 keV and fluences of 1 × 10 16 cm -2. At 50 keV of He-ion bombardment, the wear rate of the resin surface decreases by a factor 2 with respect to the pristine resin. Finally, in vitro tests indicate that the He-ion implantation does not affect to the cell-proliferation behaviour of the UV-cured resins. The enhancement of the surface mechanical properties of these materials can have beneficial consequences, for instance in preventing wear and surface fatigue of bone-fixation prostheses, whose surfaces are continuously held to sliding and shearing contacts of sub-millimetre scale lengths.

  7. Accelerating aging of zirconia femoral head implants: change of surface structure and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, S; Vohra, Yogesh K; Lemons, Jack E; Ueno, Masaru; Ikeda, Junji

    2007-05-01

    Recently, alternations of zirconia ceramic femoral heads of total hip prostheses during in vivo conditions have caused concern in the medical disciplines regarding phase transformation of zirconia prosthetic components. In this paper, we have investigated the mechanical and structural properties of different laboratory aged zirconia femoral heads and correlated changes in mechanical properties with the phase compositions of the sample. From laser microscope observation, cross-sectional Scanning electron microscopy imaging, and X-ray diffraction analysis on the surface of the zirconia femoral heads, we found monoclinic to tetragonal phase transformation in zirconia prostheses over time during the aging process in the laboratory. Mechanical properties, mainly hardness (H) and Young's modulus (E) values, were measured by nanoindentation technique on the surface of these implants. The results showed that both H and E values decreased with increased monoclinic phase in zirconia, thus confirming a phase transformation over time during aging.

  8. Biocompatible carbohydrate-functionalized stainless steel surfaces: a new method for passivating biomedical implants.

    PubMed

    Slaney, Anne M; Wright, Vincent A; Meloncelli, Peter J; Harris, Kenneth D; West, Lori J; Lowary, Todd L; Buriak, Jillian M

    2011-05-01

    A convenient method for passivating and functionalizing stainless steel is described. Several methods of coating stainless steel (SS) samples with silica were investigated and of these methods, a thin (less than 15 nm thick) layer of silica created by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was found to give superior performance in electrochemical testing. These interfaces were then used as a platform for further functionalization with molecules of biological interest. Specifically, the SS samples were functionalized with biologically significant carbohydrates [N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) and D-galactose (Gal)] that contain trialkoxysilane derivatives as chemical handles for linking to the surface. The presence and biological availability of these moieties on the silica coated SS were confirmed by XPS analysis and an enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA) using complementary lectins that specifically recognize the surface-bound carbohydrate. This method has the potential of being adapted to the functionalization of stainless steel biomedical implants with other biologically relevant carbohydrates.

  9. Osseointegration of titanium implants functionalised with phosphoserine-tethered poly(epsilon-lysine) dendrons: a comparative study with traditional surface treatments in sheep.

    PubMed

    Stübinger, Stefan; Nuss, Katja; Bürki, Alexander; Mosch, Isabel; le Sidler, Miché; Meikle, Steve T; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Santin, Matteo

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the osseointegrative potential of phosphoserine-tethered dendrons when applied as surface functionalisation molecules on titanium implants in a sheep model after 2 and 8 weeks of implantation. Uncoated and dendron-coated implants were implanted in six sheep. Sandblasted and etched (SE) or porous additive manufactured (AM) implants with and without additional dendron functionalisation (SE-PSD; AM-PSD) were placed in the pelvic bone. Three implants per group were examined histologically and six implants were tested biomechanically. After 2 and 8 weeks the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) total values of SE implants (43.7±12.2; 53.3±9.0%) and SE-PSD (46.7±4.5; 61.7±4.9%) as well as AM implants (20.49±5.1; 43.9±9.7%) and AM-PSD implants (19.7±3.5; 48.3±15.6%) showed no statistically significant differences. For SE-PSD and AM-PSD a separate analysis of only the cancellous BIC demonstrated a statistically significant difference after 2 and 8 weeks. Biomechanical findings proved the overall increased stability of the porous implants after 8 weeks. Overall, the great effect of implant macro design on osseointegration was further supported by additional phosphoserine-tethered dendrons for SE and AM implants.

  10. Thermal migration of deuterium implanted in graphite: Influence of free surface proximity and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guillou, M.; Moncoffre, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Pipon, Y.; Ammar, M. R.; Rouzaud, J. N.; Deldicque, D.

    2016-03-01

    This paper is a contribution to the study of the behavior of activation products produced in irradiated nuclear graphite, graphite being the moderator of the first French generation of CO2 cooled nuclear fission reactors. This paper is focused on the thermal release of Tritium, a major contributor to the initial activity, taking into account the role of the free surfaces (open pores and graphite surface). Two kinds of graphite were compared. On one hand, Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG), a model well graphitized graphite, and on the other hand, SLA2, a porous less graphitized nuclear graphite. Deuterium ion implantation at three different energies 70, 200 and 390 keV allows simulating the presence of Tritium at three different depths, corresponding respectively to projected ranges Rp of 0.75, 1.7 and 3.2 μm. The D isotopic tracing is performed thanks to the D(3He,p)4He nuclear reaction. The graphite structure is studied by Raman microspectrometry. Thermal annealing is performed in the temperature range 200-1200 °C up to 300 h annealing time. As observed in a previous study, the results show that the D release occurs according to three kinetic regimes: a rapid permeation through open pores, a transient regime corresponding to detrapping and diffusion of D located at low energy sites correlated to the edges of crystallites and finally a saturation regime attributed to detrapping of interstitial D located at high energy sites inside the crystallites. Below 600 °C, D release is negligible whatever the implantation depth and the graphite type. The present paper clearly puts forward that above 600 °C, the D release decreases at deeper implantation depths and strongly depends on the graphite structure. In HOPG where high energy sites are more abundant, the D release is less dependent on the surface proximity compared to SLA2. In SLA2, in which the low energy sites prevail, the D release curves are clearly shifted towards lower temperatures when D is located

  11. The use of CAD/CAM technology to fabricate a custom ceramic implant abutment: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Martinna de Mendonça e; Kempen, Juan; Lourenço, Eduardo José Veras; Telles, Daniel de Moraes

    2014-05-01

    Well-placed dental implants are a prerequisite of functional and esthetically successful dental implant-supported crowns. The presence of soft tissue is essential for excellent esthetics because the dental implant or titanium abutment may become visible if the soft-tissue contour is not acceptable. This clinical report describes the use of a custom ceramic implant abutment designed with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology by milling a zirconia framework that was cemented extraorally to a prefabricated titanium abutment with a reduced diameter. This ceramic abutment has the strength and precise fit of a titanium interface and also the esthetic advantages of shaded custom-milled zirconia, with no visible metal. PMID:24433839

  12. The use of CAD/CAM technology to fabricate a custom ceramic implant abutment: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Martinna de Mendonça e; Kempen, Juan; Lourenço, Eduardo José Veras; Telles, Daniel de Moraes

    2014-05-01

    Well-placed dental implants are a prerequisite of functional and esthetically successful dental implant-supported crowns. The presence of soft tissue is essential for excellent esthetics because the dental implant or titanium abutment may become visible if the soft-tissue contour is not acceptable. This clinical report describes the use of a custom ceramic implant abutment designed with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology by milling a zirconia framework that was cemented extraorally to a prefabricated titanium abutment with a reduced diameter. This ceramic abutment has the strength and precise fit of a titanium interface and also the esthetic advantages of shaded custom-milled zirconia, with no visible metal.

  13. Passive mechanisms of surfaces produced by ion-beam mixing and ion implantation. Annual report, October 1988-November 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Natishan, P.M.; McCafferty, E.; Hubler, G.K.

    1990-05-01

    The corrosion behavior of Mo-Al, Cr-Al and Cr-Mo-Al surface alloys produced by ion implantation and ion beam mixing was examined in deaerated, 0.1M NaC1. The polarization behavior of the ion implanted samples was similar to that of Al and the pitting potentials of the ion implanted samples were 115 to 155 mV higher than that of Al. From the standpoint of the Ph sub pzc model this behavior would be explained by the presence of the implanted cations in the stable oxide lattice. There was incomplete mixing of the coating and substrate for the ion beam mixed samples, and the mixed elements remained almost entirely in the metallic state so that the desired mixed oxide films were not formed. Ion beam mixing did impart additional stability compared to as-deposited samples since themixing process produced more compact coatings.

  14. Fabrication of the mandibular implant-supported fixed restoration using CAD/CAM technology: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Reshad, Mamaly; Cascione, Domenico; Aalam, Alexandre Amir

    2009-11-01

    The mandibular implant-supported fixed restoration is an appropriate treatment choice for patients with inadequate bone volume in the posterior mandible. Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has broadened the scope and application for this treatment option. A milled titanium bar retaining individual all-ceramic zirconium oxide crowns, with composite resin replicating gingival tissues, is recommended as an acceptable variation for this type of prosthesis. An alternative method for fabricating a mandibular implant-supported fixed restoration using CAD/CAM technology is described.

  15. Near surface silicide formation after off-normal Fe-implantation of Si(001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Khanbabaee, B. Pietsch, U.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Hübner, R.; Grenzer, J.; Facsko, S.

    2014-07-14

    We report on formation of non-crystalline Fe-silicides of various stoichiometries below the amorphized surface of crystalline Si(001) after irradiation with 5 keV Fe{sup +} ions under off-normal incidence. We examined samples prepared with ion fluences of 0.1 × 10{sup 17} and 5 × 10{sup 17} ions cm{sup −2} exhibiting a flat and patterned surface morphology, respectively. Whereas the iron silicides are found across the whole surface of the flat sample, they are concentrated at the top of ridges at the rippled surface. A depth resolved analysis of the chemical states of Si and Fe atoms in the near surface region was performed by combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation. The chemical shift and the line shape of the Si 2p core levels and valence bands were measured and associated with the formation of silicide bonds of different stoichiometric composition changing from an Fe-rich silicides (Fe{sub 3}Si) close to the surface into a Si-rich silicide (FeSi{sub 2}) towards the inner interface to the Si(001) substrate. This finding is supported by XAS analysis at the Fe K-edge which shows changes of the chemical environment and the near order atomic coordination of the Fe atoms in the region close to surface. Because a similar Fe depth profile has been found for samples co-sputtered with Fe during Kr{sup +} ion irradiation, our results suggest the importance of chemically bonded Fe in the surface region for the process of ripple formation.

  16. Surgical planning and prosthesis construction using computer technology and medical imaging for immediate loading of implants in the pterygomaxillary region.

    PubMed

    Balshi, Stephen F; Wolfinger, Glenn J; Balshi, Thomas J

    2006-06-01

    This report describes a protocol that uses computerized tomography (CT), computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) technology, and the Internet to plan placement of anterior and posterior dental implants and construct a precise surgical template and definitive prosthesis, which is connected at the time of implant placement. This procedure drastically reduces surgical treatment time and the recovery period. Patients with an edentulous arch had a denture with radiopaque markers constructed for CT scans of the appropriate jaw. The CT images, with acquisition slices of 0.5 mm, were transferred into a three-dimensional image-based program for planning and strategic placement of dental implants. After implants were virtually placed on the computer, the surgical treatment plan was sent to a manufacturing facility for construction of a surgical template and the prosthesis, Special surgical guide components were also manufactured for placement of implants in the pterygomaxillary region. The manufactured surgical components, surgical template, and definitive prosthesis were then delivered to the clinical site. Implant placement surgery was performed using the surgical template, without a flap, and the prosthesis was delivered, achieving immediate functional loading. Minor occlusal adjustments were made. The total surgical treatment time required was less than 60 minutes. Postoperative symptoms, such as pain, swelling, and inflammation, were minimal. Identification of the bone in relationship to the tooth position via three-dimensional CT prior to surgery allows precise placement of implants. CAD/CAM technology using the three-dimensional images allows for fabrication of the surgical guide and final prosthesis. This is a significant advancement in implant dentistry and prosthodontics.

  17. Accuracy of Implant Position Transfer and Surface Detail Reproduction with Different Impression Materials and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alikhasi, Marzieh; Siadat, Hakimeh; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of implant position transfer and surface detail reproduction using two impression techniques and materials. Materials and Methods: A metal model with two implants and three grooves of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 mm in depth on the flat superior surface of a die was fabricated. Ten regular-body polyether (PE) and 10 regular-body polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions with square and conical transfer copings using open tray and closed tray techniques were made for each group. Impressions were poured with type IV stone, and linear and angular displacements of the replica heads were evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Also, accurate reproduction of the grooves was evaluated by a video measuring machine (VMM). These measurements were compared with the measurements calculated on the reference model that served as control, and the data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and t-test at P= 0.05. Results: There was less linear displacement for PVS and less angular displacement for PE in closed-tray technique, and less linear displacement for PE in open tray technique (P<0.001). Also, the open tray technique showed less angular displacement with the use of PVS impression material. Detail reproduction accuracy was the same in all the groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: The open tray technique was more accurate using PE, and also both closed tray and open tray techniques had acceptable results with the use of PVS. The choice of impression material and technique made no significant difference in surface detail reproduction. PMID:27252761

  18. Culture surfaces coated with various implant materials affect chondrocyte growth and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hambleton, J; Schwartz, Z; Khare, A; Windeler, S W; Luna, M; Brooks, B P; Dean, D D; Boyan, B D

    1994-07-01

    The effect on chondrocyte metabolism of culture surfaces sputter-coated with various materials used for orthopaedic implants was studied and correlated with the stage of cartilage cell maturation. Confluent, fourth-passage chondrocytes from the costochondral resting zone and growth zone of rats were cultured for 6 or 9 days on 24-well plates sputter-coated with ultrathin films of titanium, titanium dioxide, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, and calcium phosphate (1.67:1). Corona-discharged tissue culture plastic served as the control. The effect of surface material was examined with regard to cell morphology; cell proliferation (cell number) and DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation); RNA synthesis ([3H]uridine incorporation); collagenase-digestible protein, noncollagenase-digestible protein, and percentage of collagen production; and alkaline phosphatase-specific activity, both in the cell layer and in trypsinized chondrocytes. Cell morphology was dependent on surface material; only cells cultured on titanium had an appearance similar to that of cells cultured on plastic. While titanium or titanium dioxide surfaces had no effect on cell number or [3H]thymidine incorporation, aluminum oxide, calcium phosphate, and zirconium oxide surfaces inhibited both parameters. Cells cultured on aluminum oxide, calcium phosphate, zirconium oxide, and titanium dioxide exhibited decreased collagenase-digestible protein, noncollagenase-digestible protein, and percentage of collagen production, but [3H]uridine incorporation was decreased only in those chondrocytes cultured on aluminum oxide, calcium phosphate, or zirconium oxide. Chondrocytes cultured on titanium had greater alkaline phosphatase-specific activity than did cells cultured on plastic, but the incorporation of [3H]uridine and production of collagenase-digestible protein, noncollagenase-digestible protein, and percentage of collagen was comparable. The response of chondrocytes from the growth zone and resting zone

  19. Enhancement of surface properties of SAE 1020 by chromium plasma immersion recoil implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, M.; Mello, C. B.; Beloto, A. F.; Rossi, J. O.; Reuther, H.

    2007-04-01

    SAE 1020 steel is commonly used as concrete reinforcement and small machine parts, but despite its good mechanical properties, as ductility, hardness and wear resistance, it is susceptible to severe corrosion. It is well known that chromium content above 12% in Fe alloys increases their corrosion resistance. In order to obtain this improvement, we studied the introduction of chromium atoms into the matrix of SAE 1020 steel by recoil implantation process using a plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) system. Potentiodynamic scans showed that the presence of Cr film leads to a gain in the corrosion potential, from -650 mV to -400 mV. After PIII treatment, the corrosion potential increased further to -340 mV, but the corrosion current density presented no significant change. Vickers microhardness tests showed surface hardness increase of up to about 27% for the treated samples. Auger electron spectroscopy showed that, for a 30 nm film, Cr was introduced for about 20 nm into the steel matrix. Tribology tests, of pin-on-disk type, showed that friction coefficient of treated samples was reduced by about 50% and a change in wear mechanism, from adhesive to abrasive mode, occurred.

  20. Nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers incorporating an ion implanted aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, J. T.; Cohen, D. A.; Yonkee, B. P.; Farrell, R. M.; Margalith, T.; Lee, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Speck, J. S.; Nakamura, S.

    2015-07-01

    We report on our recent progress in improving the performance of nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) by using an Al ion implanted aperture and employing a multi-layer electron-beam evaporated ITO intracavity contact. The use of an ion implanted aperture improves the lateral confinement over SiNx apertures by enabling a planar ITO design, while the multi-layer ITO contact minimizes scattering losses due to its epitaxially smooth morphology. The reported VCSEL has 10 QWs, with a 3 nm quantum well width, 1 nm barriers, a 5 nm electron-blocking layer, and a 6.95- λ total cavity thickness. These advances yield a single longitudinal mode 406 nm nonpolar VCSEL with a low threshold current density (˜16 kA/cm2), a peak output power of ˜12 μW, and a 100% polarization ratio. The lasing in the current aperture is observed to be spatially non-uniform, which is likely a result of filamentation caused by non-uniform current spreading, lateral optical confinement, contact resistance, and absorption loss.

  1. Comparison of the Effect of Three Abutment-implant Connections on Stress Distribution at the Internal Surface of Dental Implants: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Raoofi, Saeed; Khademi, Maryam; Amid, Reza; Kadkhodazadeh, Mahdi; Movahhedi, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to determine the stress patterns within an implant and the effect of different types of connections on load transfer. Materials and methods. Three different types of implant-abutment connections were selected for this study. Sample A: 1.5-mm deep internal hex corresponding to a lead-in bevel; sample B: a tri-channel internal connection; and sample C: in-ternal Morse taper with 110 degrees of tapering and 6 anti-rotational grooves. Four types of loading conditions were simu-lated in a finite element model, with the maximum von Mises stress set as output variables. Results. The maximum stress concentration at the inner surface of the fixtures was higher than the stress value in bone in all of the samples. Stress values in sample B were the lowest amongst all of the models. Any alterations in the amount and direction of the 100-N axial load resulted in an increase in fixture surfaces stress. Overall, the highest amount of stress (112 MPa) was detected in sample C at the inner surface of the fixture under a non-axial load of 300 N. Conclusion. Stress concentration decreased when the internal surface area increased. Creating three or six stops in the internal surface of the fixtures resulted in a decrease in stress. PMID:24082983

  2. Surface Characteristics and Bioactivity of a Novel Natural HA/Zircon Nanocomposite Coated on Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Karamian, Ebrahim; Khandan, Amirsalar

    2014-01-01

    The surface characteristics of implant which influence the speed and strength of osseointegration include surface chemistry, crystal structure and crystallinity, roughness, strain hardening, and presence of impurities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioactivity and roughness of a novel natural hydroxyapatite/zircon (NHA/zircon) nanobiocomposite, coated on 316L stainless steel (SS) soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF). NHA/zircon nanobiocomposite was fabricated with 0 wt.%, 5 wt.%, 10 wt.%, and 15 wt.% of zircon in NHA using ball mill for 20 minutes. The composite mixture was coated on 316L SS using plasma spray method. The results are estimated using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation to evaluate surface morphology, X-ray diffraction (XRD) to analyze phase composition, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique to evaluate the shape and size of prepared NHA. Surfaces roughness tester was performed to characterize the coated nanocomposite samples. The maximum average Ra (14.54 μm) was found in the NHA 10 wt.% of zircon coating. In addition, crystallinity (Xc) was measured by XRD data, which indicated the minimum value (Xc = 41.1%) for the sample containing 10 wt.% of zircon. Maximum bioactivity occurred in the sample containing 10 wt.% of zircon, which was due to two reasons: first, the maximum roughness and, second, the minimum crystallinity of nanobiocomposite coating. PMID:24822204

  3. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  4. Probing the nanoadhesion of Streptococcus sanguinis to titanium implant surfaces by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Aguayo, Sebastian; Donos, Nikolaos; Spratt, Dave; Bozec, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    As titanium (Ti) continues to be utilized in great extent for the fabrication of artificial implants, it is important to understand the crucial bacterium–Ti interaction occurring during the initial phases of biofilm formation. By employing a single-cell force spectroscopy technique, the nanoadhesive interactions between the early-colonizing Streptococcus sanguinis and a clinically analogous smooth Ti substrate were explored. Mean adhesion forces between S. sanguinis and Ti were found to be 0.32±0.00, 1.07±0.06, and 4.85±0.56 nN for 0, 1, and 60 seconds contact times, respectively; while adhesion work values were reported at 19.28±2.38, 104.60±7.02, and 1,317.26±197.69 aJ for 0, 1, and 60 seconds, respectively. At 60 seconds surface delays, minor-rupture events were modeled with the worm-like chain model yielding an average contour length of 668±12 nm. The mean force for S. sanguinis minor-detachment events was 1.84±0.64 nN, and Poisson analysis decoupled this value into a short-range force component of −1.60±0.34 nN and a long-range force component of −0.55±0.47 nN. Furthermore, a solution of 2 mg/mL chlorhexidine was found to increase adhesion between the bacterial probe and substrate. Overall, single-cell force spectroscopy of living S. sanguinis cells proved to be a reliable way to characterize early-bacterial adhesion onto machined Ti implant surfaces at the nanoscale. PMID:27103802

  5. Probing the nanoadhesion of Streptococcus sanguinis to titanium implant surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Sebastian; Donos, Nikolaos; Spratt, Dave; Bozec, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    As titanium (Ti) continues to be utilized in great extent for the fabrication of artificial implants, it is important to understand the crucial bacterium-Ti interaction occurring during the initial phases of biofilm formation. By employing a single-cell force spectroscopy technique, the nanoadhesive interactions between the early-colonizing Streptococcus sanguinis and a clinically analogous smooth Ti substrate were explored. Mean adhesion forces between S. sanguinis and Ti were found to be 0.32±0.00, 1.07±0.06, and 4.85±0.56 nN for 0, 1, and 60 seconds contact times, respectively; while adhesion work values were reported at 19.28±2.38, 104.60±7.02, and 1,317.26±197.69 aJ for 0, 1, and 60 seconds, respectively. At 60 seconds surface delays, minor-rupture events were modeled with the worm-like chain model yielding an average contour length of 668±12 nm. The mean force for S. sanguinis minor-detachment events was 1.84±0.64 nN, and Poisson analysis decoupled this value into a short-range force component of -1.60±0.34 nN and a long-range force component of -0.55±0.47 nN. Furthermore, a solution of 2 mg/mL chlorhexidine was found to increase adhesion between the bacterial probe and substrate. Overall, single-cell force spectroscopy of living S. sanguinis cells proved to be a reliable way to characterize early-bacterial adhesion onto machined Ti implant surfaces at the nanoscale. PMID:27103802

  6. Study of millisecond laser annealing on ion implanted soi and application to scaled finfet technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalak, Tyler J.

    The fabrication of metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET) requires the engineering of low resistance, low leakage, and extremely precise p-n junctions. The introduction of finFET technology has introduced new challenges for traditional ion implantation and annealing techniques in junction design as the fin widths continue to decrease for improved short channel control. This work investigates the use of millisecond scanning laser annealing in the formation of n-type source/drain junctions in next generation MOSFET. We present a model to approximate the true thermal profile for a commercial laser annealing process which allows us to represent more precisely specific thermal steps using Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD). Sheet resistance and Hall Effect measurements for blanket films are used to correlate dopant activation and mobility with the regrowth process during laser anneal. We show the onset of high conductivity associated with completion of solid phase epitaxial regrowth (SPER) in the films. The Lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (LKMC) model shows excellent agreement with cross section transmission electron microscopy (TEM), correlating the increase of conductivity with completion of crystal regrowth, increased activation, and crystal quality at various temperatures. As scaled devices move into the non-planar geometries and possibly adopt silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates, the crystal regrowth and dopant activation of amorphizing implants becomes more complicated and doping methods must adapt accordingly. Following the concept of the more recently proposed hot ion implantation and the benefits of laser anneal, we investigate a possible process flow for a 10/14 nm node SOI finFET by utilizing process and device TCAD. Device simulation parameters for the 10/14 nm node device are taken from a calibrated model based on fabricated non-planar 40 nm gate length device finFET. The implications on device performance are considered for the

  7. Co-Culture of S. epidermidis and Human Osteoblasts on Implant Surfaces: An Advanced In Vitro Model for Implant-Associated Infections

    PubMed Central

    Zaatreh, Sarah; Wegner, Katharina; Strauß, Madlen; Pasold, Juliane; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Podbielski, Andreas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Bader, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Total joint arthroplasty is one of the most frequent and effective surgeries today. However, despite improved surgical techniques, a significant number of implant-associated infections still occur. Suitable in vitro models are needed to test potential approaches to prevent infection. In the present study, we aimed to establish an in vitro co-culture setup of human primary osteoblasts and S. epidermidis to model the onset of implant-associated infections, and to analyze antimicrobial implant surfaces and coatings. Materials and Methods For initial surface adhesion, human primary osteoblasts (hOB) were grown for 24 hours on test sample discs made of polystyrene, titanium alloy Ti6Al4V, bone cement PALACOS R®, and PALACOS R® loaded with antibiotics. Co-cultures were performed as a single-species infection on the osteoblasts with S. epidermidis (multiplicity of infection of 0.04), and were incubated for 2 and 7 days under aerobic conditions. Planktonic S. epidermidis was quantified by centrifugation and determination of colony-forming units (CFU). The quantification of biofilm-bound S. epidermidis on the test samples was performed by sonication and CFU counting. Quantification of adherent and vital primary osteoblasts on the test samples was performed by trypan-blue staining and counting. Scanning electron microscopy was used for evaluation of topography and composition of the species on the sample surfaces. Results After 2 days, we observed approximately 104 CFU/ml biofilm-bound S. epidermidis (103 CFU/ml initial population) on the antibiotics-loaded bone cement samples in the presence of hOB, while no bacteria were detected without hOB. No biofilm-bound bacteria were detectable after 7 days in either case. Similar levels of planktonic bacteria were observed on day 2 with and without hOB. After 7 days, about 105 CFU/ml planktonic bacteria were present, but only in the absence of hOB. Further, no bacteria were observed within the biofilm, while the number

  8. Micro-topography and reactivity of implant surfaces: an in vitro study in simulated body fluid (SBF).

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, M G; Taddei, P; Siboni, F; Perrotti, V; Iezzi, G; Piattelli, A; Prati, C

    2015-02-01

    The creation of micro-textured dental implant surfaces possessing a stimulating activity represents a challenge in implant dentistry; particularly, the formation of a thin, biologically active, calcium-phosphate layer on their surface could help to strengthen the bond to the surrounding bone. The aim of the present study was to characterize in terms of macrostructure, micro-topography and reactivity in simulated body fluid (SBF), the surface of titanium (Ti) implants blasted with TiO2 particles, acid etched with hydrofluoric acid, and activated with Ca and Mg-containing nanoparticles. Sandblasted and acid-etched implants were analyzed by ESEM-EDX (environmental scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray system) to study the micromorphology of the surface and to perform elemental X-ray microanalysis (microchemical analyses) and element mapping. ESEM-EDX analyses were performed at time 0 and after a 28-day soaking period in SBF Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) following ISO 23317 (implants for surgery—in vitro evaluation for apatite-forming ability of implant materials). Microchemical analyses (weight % and atomic %) and element mapping were carried out to evaluate the relative element content, element distribution, and calcium/phosphorus (Ca/P) atomic ratio. Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the possible presence of impurities due to manufacturing and to investigate the phases formed upon HBSS soaking. Micro-morphological analyses showed a micro-textured, highly rough surface with microgrooves. Microchemical analyses showed compositional differences among the apical, middle, and distal thirds. The micro-Raman analyses of the as-received implant showed the presence of amorphous Ti oxide and traces of anatase, calcite, and a carbonaceous material derived from the decomposition of an organic component of lipidic nature (presumably used as lubricant). A uniform layer of Ca-poor calcium phosphates (CaPs) (Ca/P ratio <1.47) was observed after

  9. Bone Response to Four Dental Implants with Different Surface Topographies: A Histologic and Histometric Study in Minipigs.

    PubMed

    Kalemaj, Zamira; Scarano, Antonio; Valbonetti, Luca; Rapone, Biagio; Grassi, Felice Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated four implant surfaces in a minipig model: (1) Kohno Straight dual-engineered surface (DES) (Sweden & Martina); (2) SLActive (Straumann); (3) SM Biotite-H coated with Brushite (DIO); and (4) UF hybrid sandblasted and acid etched (HAS) (DIO). The surfaces presented different topographic features on the macro-, micro-, and nanoscales. After 12 weeks in vivo, significant differences were observed in bone-to-implant contact. UF HAS, presenting moderate microroughness and high nanoroughness, showed some advantage compared to nanorough SM Biotite-H and SLActive. A more pronounced difference was observed between UF HAS and Kohno Straight DES, characterized by a nanosmooth surface. Newly formed bone was observed around all surfaces. PMID:27560680

  10. Electrochemical behaviour and surface characterisation of Zr exposed to an SBF solution containing glycine, in view of dental implant applications.

    PubMed

    Bozzini, Benedetto; Carlino, Paolo; Mele, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Zr and Ti alloys are extensively used in the biomedical field owing to their optimal mechanical properties and excellent corrosion resistance. Fully ceramic implants based on zirconia are appealing with respect to the traditional Ti-based metallic ones for several reasons, such as: (i) improved aesthetic impact, (ii) better biocompatibility and (iii) better osteointegration. Nevertheless, fully ceramic implants exhibit serious mechanical and clinical drawbacks, chiefly brittleness and impossibility of post-implant position adjustments. In this paper we propose the novel approach of using a metal-based system, consisting of metallic Zr, for the bulk of the implant and an electrochemically grown zirconia coating, ensuring contact of the ceramic with the biological environment and isolation from the underlying metal. This solution combines the outstanding mechanical properties of the metal in the bulk with the optimal biochemical properties exclusively where they are needed: at the surface. The present paper-focussed on the electrochemical behaviour of the proposed system at the implant-wound and implant-growing bone interface-reports a time-dependent electrochemical corrosion study of zirconia-coated zirconium, performed in the following ways: (i) exposure and measurements in SBF (simulating the inorganic part of human plasma, relevant to wound chemistry), (ii) exposure and measurements in SBF with added glycine (the simplest, ubiquitous amino acid found in proteins), (iii) exposure in SBF with added glycine and measurements in SBF. Electrochemical impedance spectra were measured and interpreted with the equivalent-circuit approach, yielding estimates of the time-variation of the oxide film thickness and resistance were estimated. FT-IR, Surface Raman and VIS reflectance spectroscopies were used to characterise the surface before and after the exposure to SBF solutions. Spectroelectrochemical measurements revealed an higher corrosion resistance of the oxide films

  11. Ironic Technology: Old Age and the implantable cardioverter defibrillator in US health care

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Sharon R.; Mueller, Paul S.; Ottenberg, Abigale L.; Koenig, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    We take the example of cardiac devices, specifically the implantable cardioverter defibrillator, or ICD, to explore the complex cultural role of technology in medicine today. We focus on persons age 80 and above, for whom ICD use is growing in the U.S. We highlight an ironic feature of this device. While it postpones death and ‘saves’ life by thwarting a lethal heart rhythm, it also prolongs living in a state of dying from heart failure. In that regard the ICD is simultaneously a technology of life extension and dying. We explore that irony among the oldest age group -- those whose considerations of medical interventions are framed by changing societal assumptions of what constitutes premature death, the appropriate time for death and medicine’s goals in an aging society. Background to the rapidly growing use of this device among the elderly is the ‘technological imperative’ in medicine, bolstered today by the value given to evidence-based studies. We show how evidence contributes to standards of care and to the expansion of Medicare reimbursement criteria. Together, those factors shape the ethical necessity of physicians offering and patients accepting the ICD in late life. Two ethnographic examples document the ways in which those factors are lived in treatment discussions and in expectations about death and longevity. PMID:21126815

  12. Ion implantation modified stainless steel as a substrate for hydroxyapatite deposition. Part I. Surface modification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Pramatarova, L; Pecheva, E; Krastev, V; Riesz, F

    2007-03-01

    Material surfaces play critical role in biology and medicine since most biological reactions occur on surfaces and interfaces. There are many examples showing that the surface properties of the materials control and are directly involved in biological reactions and processes in-vitro like blood compatibility, protein absorption, cell development, etc. The rules that govern the diversity of biological surface phenomenon are fundamental physical laws. Stainless steel doped with Cr, Ni and Mo is widely used material in medicine and dentistry due to its excellent corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. The interest in this material has stimulated extensive studies on improving its bone-bonding properties. This paper describes the surface modification of Cr-Ni stainless steel (AISI 316) by a whole surface sequential implantation of Ca and P ions (the basic ions of hydroxyapatite). Three groups of stainless steel samples are prepared: (i) ion-implanted, (ii) ion-implanted and thermally treated at 600( composite function)C in air for 1 h and (iii) initials. The surface chemistry and topography before and after the surface modification are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, magic mirror method, atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements.

  13. Contact mechanics and elastohydrodynamic lubrication in a novel metal-on-metal hip implant with an aspherical bearing surface.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingen; Gao, Leiming; Liu, Feng; Yang, Peiran; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-03-22

    Diameter and diametral clearance of the bearing surfaces of metal-on-metal hip implants and structural supports have been recognised as key factors to reduce the dry contact and hydrodynamic pressures and improve lubrication performance. On the other hand, application of aspherical bearing surfaces can also significantly affect the contact mechanics and lubrication performance by changing the radius of the curvature of a bearing surface and consequently improving the conformity between the head and the cup. In this study, a novel metal-on-metal hip implant employing a specific aspherical bearing surface, Alpharabola, as the acetabular surface was investigated for both contact mechanics and elastohydrodynamic lubrication under steady-state conditions. When compared with conventional spherical bearing surfaces, a more uniform pressure distribution and a thicker lubricant film thickness within the loaded conjunction were predicted for this novel Alpharabola hip implant. The effects of the geometric parameters of this novel acetabular surface on the pressure distribution and lubricant thickness were investigated. A significant increase in the predicted lubricant film thickness and a significant decrease in the dry contact and hydrodynamic pressures were found with appropriate combinations of these geometric parameters, compared with the spherical bearing surface.

  14. Wear-reducing Surface Functionalization of Implant Materials Using Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldorf, P.; Peters, R.; Reichel, S.; Schulz, A.-P.; Wendlandt, R.

    The aim of the project called "EndoLas" is the development of a reproducible and reliable method for a functionalization of articulating surfaces on hip joint endoprostheses due to a reduction of abrasion and wear by the generation of micro structures using ultrashort laser pulses. On the one hand, the microstructures shall ensure the capture of abraded particles, which cause third-body wear and thereby increase aseptic loosening. On the other hand, the structures shall improve or maintain the tribologically important lubricating film. Thereby, the cavities serve as a reservoir for the body's own synovial fluid. The dry friction, which promotes abrasion and is a part of the mixed friction in the joint, shall therefore be reduced. In experimental setups it was shown, that the abrasive wear can be reduced significantly due to micro-structuring the articulating implant surfaces. To shape the fine and deterministic cavities on the surfaces, an ultra-short pulsed laser, which is integrated in a high-precision, 5-axes micro-machining system, was used. The laser system, based on an Yb:YAG thin-disk regenerative amplifier, has an average output power of 50 W at the fundamental wavelength of 1030 nm, a maximum repetition rate of 400 kHz and a pulse duration of 6 ps. Due to this, a maximum pulse energy of 125 μJ is achievable. Furthermore external second and third harmonic generation enables the usage of wavelengths in the green and violet spectral range.

  15. Surface treatment, corrosion behavior, and apatite-forming ability of Ti-45Nb implant alloy.

    PubMed

    Gostin, Petre F; Helth, Arne; Voss, Andrea; Sueptitz, Ralph; Calin, Mariana; Eckert, Jürgen; Gebert, Annett

    2013-02-01

    The low modulus β-type Ti-45Nb alloy is a promising new implant alloy due to its excellent mechanical biocompatibility and composition of non-toxic elements. The effect of surface treatments on the evolution of controlled topography and roughness was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy and optical profilometry. Severe mechanical treatments, for example sand-blasting, or etching treatments in strongly oxidizing acidic solutions, like HF:HNO(3) (4:1) or H(2)SO(4):H(2)O(2) (1:1) piranha solution were found to be very effective. In particular, the latter generates a nanopatterned surface topography which is expected to be promising for the stimulation of bone tissue growth. Compared to Ti and Ti-6Al-4V, the β-type Ti-45Nb alloy requires significantly longer etching durations due to the high chemical stability of Nb. Severe surface treatments alter the passive film properties, but do not deteriorate the outstanding corrosion resistance of the Ti-45Nb alloy in synthetic body fluid environments. The Ti-45Nb appears to have a lower apatite-formation ability compared to Ti. Etching with H(2)SO(4):H(2)O(2) (1:1) piranha solution inhibits apatite formation on Ti, but not on Ti-45Nb. PMID:23166048

  16. Surface studies and implanted helium measurements following NOVA high-yield DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, M.A.; Hudson, G.B.

    1997-02-18

    This paper presents the results of three March 6, 1996 direct-drive high-yield DT NOVA experiments and provides `proof-of-principal` results for the quantitative measurement of energetic He ions. Semiconductor quality Si wafers and an amorphous carbon wafer were exposed to NOVA high-yield implosions. Surface damage was sub-micron in general, although the surface ablation was slightly greater for the carbon wafer than for the Si wafers. Melting of a thin ({approx} 0.1{mu}) layer of Si was evident from microscopic investigation. Electron microscopy indicated melted blobs of many different metals (e.g. Al, Au, Ta, Fe alloys, Cu and even Cd) on the surfaces. The yield measured by determining the numbers of atoms of implanted {sup 4}He and {sup 3}He indicate the number of DT fusions to be 9.1({plus_minus}2.3) X 10{sup 12} and DD fusions to be 4.8({plus_minus}1.0) x 10{sup 10}, respectively. The helium DT fusion yield is slightly lower than that of the Cu activation measurement, which was 1.3({plus_minus}0.l) x 10{sup 13} DT fusions.

  17. Optimal Er:YAG laser irradiation parameters for debridement of microstructured fixture surfaces of titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoichi; Aoki, Akira; Mizutani, Koji; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Ichinose, Shizuko; Takasaki, Aristeo Atsushi; Schwarz, Frank; Izumi, Yuichi

    2013-07-01

    Er:YAG laser (ErL) irradiation has been reported to be effective for treating peri-implant disease. The present study seeks to evaluate morphological and elemental changes induced on microstructured surfaces of dental endosseous implants by high-pulse-repetition-rate ErL irradiation and to determine the optimal irradiation conditions for debriding contaminated microstructured surfaces. In experiment 1, dual acid-etched microstructured implants were irradiated by ErL (pulse energy, 30-50 mJ/pulse; repetition rate, 30 Hz) with and without water spray and for used and unused contact tips. Experiment 2 compared the ErL treatment with conventional mechanical treatments (metal/plastic curettes and ultrasonic scalers). In experiment 3, five commercially available microstructures were irradiated by ErL light (pulse energy, 30-50 mJ/pulse; pulse repetition rate, 30 Hz) while spraying water. In experiment 4, contaminated microstructured surfaces of three failed implants were debrided by ErL irradiation. After the experiments, all treated surfaces were assessed by stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and/or energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The stereomicroscopy, SEM, and EDS results demonstrate that, unlike mechanical treatments, ErL irradiation at 30 mJ/pulse and 30 Hz with water spray induced no color or morphological changes to the microstructures except for the anodized implant surface, which was easily damaged. The optimized irradiation parameters effectively removed calcified deposits from contaminated titanium microstructures without causing substantial thermal damage. ErL irradiation at pulse energies below 30 mJ/pulse (10.6 J/cm(2)/pulse) and 30 Hz with water spray in near-contact mode seems to cause no damage and to be effective for debriding microstructured surfaces (except for anodized microstructures). PMID:22886137

  18. Maxillomandibular relationship record for implant complete mouth rehabilitation with elastomeric material and facial surface index of existing denture

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Pravinkumar G.; Nimbalkar-Patil, Smita

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The maxillomandibular relationship (MMR) record is a critical step to establish the new occlusion in implant supported complete mouth rehabilitation. Using patients existing denture for recording the MMR requires implant definitive cast to be modified extensively to completely seat the denture (with unaltered flanges) on it. This may influence the correct seating of the denture on the implant definitive cast causing faulty recording of the MMR. Materials and Method: Elastomeric record bases, reinforced with the resin framework, are fabricated and relined with the light body elastomeric material when all the healing abutments are in place. The MMR is recorded with these elastomeric record bases using vacuum formed facial surface index of the occluded existing dentures as a guideline. Results: The elastomeric record bases with facial surface index of the existing dentures can allow clinicians to record MMR records without removing the healing abutments from the mouth with acceptable accuracy. This can save chair-side time of the procedure. The record of facial surfaces of existing complete denture in the form of vacuum formed sheet helps to set the occlusal vertical dimension. Conclusion: Use of facial surface index together with the elastomeric record bases can be the useful alternative technique to record the MMR in patients with implant supported full mouth rehabilitation. Further study is required to prove its routine clinical utility. PMID:26929537

  19. Fourier transform spectral imaging microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy for the detection of indoor common contaminants on the surface of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lutin, Anna; Bulatov, Valery; Jadwat, Yusuf; Wood, Neil H; Feller, Liviu; Schechter, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Endosteal dental implants are used routinely with high success rates to rehabilitate the integrity of the dentition. However if implant surfaces become contaminated by foreign material, osseointegration may not occur and the dental implant will fail because of the lack of mechanical stability. Detection and characterization of dental implant surface contaminants is a difficult task. In this article we investigate the application of several spectral microscopy methods to detect airborne contaminants on dental implant surfaces. We found that Fourier Transform Spectral Imaging Microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy provided the most useful information. Some implants possess weak and homogeneous auto-fluorescence and are best analyzed using FT-SIM methods, while others are Raman inactive and can be analyzed using scanning Raman microscopy.

  20. Fourier transform spectral imaging microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy for the detection of indoor common contaminants on the surface of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lutin, Anna; Bulatov, Valery; Jadwat, Yusuf; Wood, Neil H; Feller, Liviu; Schechter, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Endosteal dental implants are used routinely with high success rates to rehabilitate the integrity of the dentition. However if implant surfaces become contaminated by foreign material, osseointegration may not occur and the dental implant will fail because of the lack of mechanical stability. Detection and characterization of dental implant surface contaminants is a difficult task. In this article we investigate the application of several spectral microscopy methods to detect airborne contaminants on dental implant surfaces. We found that Fourier Transform Spectral Imaging Microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy provided the most useful information. Some implants possess weak and homogeneous auto-fluorescence and are best analyzed using FT-SIM methods, while others are Raman inactive and can be analyzed using scanning Raman microscopy. PMID:25618702

  1. Effects of CaCl2 hydrothermal treatment of titanium implant surfaces on early epithelial sealing.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Wakana; Ayukawa, Yasunori; Atsuta, Ikiru; Furuhashi, Akihiro; Yamazoe, Jyunichi; Kondo, Ryosuke; Sakaguchi, Mami; Matsuura, Yuri; Tsukiyama, Yoshihiro; Koyano, Kiyoshi

    2015-07-01

    Improvement of oral epithelial adhesion to titanium (Ti) may significantly enhance the efficacy of dental implants. We aimed to investigate whether calcium chloride (CaCl2) hydrothermally treated (HT) Ti could promote sealing of the peri-implant epithelium (PIE) around the implant. Right maxillary first molars were extracted from rats and replaced with either CaCl2-HT implants (Ca-HT group), distilled water-HT implants (DW-HT group), or untreated implants (Cont group). After 4 weeks, the implant-PIE interface of the Ca-HT group exhibited a band of immunoreactive laminin-332, similar to the tooth-junctional epithelium interface, which was absent in the Cont and DW-HT groups at the upper portion. We also investigated the effect of Ca-HT on the attachment of rat oral epithelial cells (OECs). OEC adherence onto Ca-HT Ti plates was stronger with higher expression levels of adhesion proteins compared with Cont and DW-HT groups. These results indicate that HT with CaCl2 improves the integration of soft tissue cells with the Ti implant at 4 weeks after implantation, which might facilitate the development of a soft tissue barrier around the implant.

  2. Vancomycin-Modified Implant Surface Inhibits Biofilm Formation and Supports Bone-Healing in an Infected Osteotomy Model in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Suzanne; Barr, Stephanie; Engiles, Julie; Hickok, Noreen J.; Shapiro, Irving M.; Richardson, Dean W.; Parvizi, Javad; Schaer, Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Implant-associated infections contribute to patient morbidity and health care costs. We hypothesized that surface modification of titanium fracture hardware with vancomycin would support bone-healing and prevent bacterial colonization of the implant in a large-animal model. Methods: A unilateral transverse mid-diaphyseal tibial osteotomy was performed and repaired with a titanium locking compression plate in nine sheep. Four control animals were treated with an unmodified plate and five experimental animals were treated with a vancomycin-modified plate. The osteotomy was inoculated with 2.5 × 106 colony-forming units of Staphylococcus aureus. The animals were killed at three months postoperatively, and implants were retrieved aseptically. Microbiologic and histologic analyses, scanning electron and confocal microscopy, and microcomputed tomography were performed. Results: All animals completed the study. Compared with the treatment cohort, control animals exhibited protracted lameness in the operatively treated leg. Gross findings during necropsy were consistent with an infected osteotomy accompanied by a florid and lytic callus. Microcomputed tomography and histologic analysis of the tibiae further supported the presence of septic osteomyelitis in the control cohort. Thick biofilms were also evident, and bacterial cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus in three of four control animals. In contrast, animals treated with vancomycin-treated plates exhibited a healed osteotomy site with homogenous remodeling, there was no evidence of biofilm formation on the retrieved plate, and bacterial cultures from only one of five animals were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusions: Vancomycin-derivatized plate surfaces inhibited implant colonization with Staphylococcus aureus and supported bone-healing in an infected large-animal model. Clinical Relevance: Binding of vancomycin to the surface of implants holds great promise in helping to reduce

  3. Study of the effect of H implantation and annealing on LiTaO3 surface blistering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Changdong; Lu, Fei; Ma, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    LiTaO3 samples are implanted by 120 keV hydrogen ion with different fluences at room temperature. H+ concentration and distribution is detected using Elastic recoil detection. Experimental results show that the threshold fluence for blistering in LiTaO3 surface is 6 × 1016 ion/cm2. Surface blistering phenomenon is studied by using optical microscopy, Rutherford back scattering spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Bubble growing and surface blister's dependence on annealing process is observed and analyzed. The critical internal pressure and stress of surface blistering in H+-implanted LiTaO3 is derived based on theoretical model and experimental results. Gibbs free energy and cavity critical radius are introduced to explain the blister shrink and rupture observed in the experiment.

  4. The effect of alendronate (Fosamax) and implant surface on bone integration and remodeling in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, S R; Jaffe, W L; Valle, C D; Jazrawi, L; Maurer, S; Baitner, A; Wright, K; Sala, D; Hawkins, M; Di Cesare, P E

    2001-01-01

    Patients at high risk for osteoporosis and its associated morbidity, including postmenopausal women, are being pharmacologically managed to stabilize and improve bone mass. Alendronate sodium (Fosamax) is a commonly used antiresorptive agent effective in osteopenic women for reducing bone resorption, increasing bone density, and decreasing fracture incidence. With the increased incidence of alendronate-treated women who are undergoing hip replacement or fracture repair by prosthesis placement, data are needed to predict how alendronate affects host bone integration with uncemented surfaces. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of alendronate on new bone formation and attachment to implant surfaces in a normal and simulated estrogen-deficient, calcium-deficient canine model, using an implantable bone growth chamber. Alendronate did not affect host bone integration to surfaces commonly used in uncemented total joint arthroplasty, but there were significant differences dependent solely on the type of surface.

  5. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration. PMID:27790598

  6. Semiconductor thin film transfer by wafer bonding and advanced ion implantation layer splitting technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tien-Hsi

    Wafer bonding is an attractive technology for modern semiconductor and microelectronic industry due to its variability in allowing combination of materials. Initially, the bonding of wafers of the same material, such as silicon-silicon wafer bonding has been major interest. In the meantime, research interest has shifted to the bonding of dissimilar materials such as silicon to quartz or to sapphire. Thermal stress coming from the different expansion coefficients usually is a barrier to the success of dissimilar material bonding. Thermal stress may cause debonding, sliding, cracking, thermal misfit dislocations, or film wrinkle to impair the quality of the transferred layer. This dissertation presents several effective approaches to solve the thermal stress problem. These approaches concern bonding processes (low vacuum bonding and storage), thinning (advanced ion implantation layer splitting), and annealing processes (accumulative effect of blister generation) and are combined to design the best heat-treatment cycle. For this propose the concept of hot bonding is used in order to effectively minimize the thermal mismatch of dissimilar material bonding during the bonding and thinning procedures. During the initial bonding and bond strengthening phase, the difference in the temperature between bonding and annealing processes should be decreased as much as possible to avoid excessive thermal stresses. This concept can be realized either by increasing the bonding temperature or by decreasing the annealing temperature. A thinning technique has to employed that can thin the device wafer before debonding occurs due to the thermal stress generated either from the cooling-down process in the first case or by the annealing process itself in the late case. The ion implantation layer splitting method, also known as the Smart-cutsp°ler process, developed by Bruel at LEIT in France is a practical thinning technique which satisfies the above requirement. In the study, an

  7. Surface, electrical and mechanical modifications of PMMA after implantation with laser produced iron plasma ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Qazi Salman; Bashir, Shazia; Jalil, Sohail Abdul; Shabbir, Muhammad Kaif; Mahmood, Khaliq; Akram, Mahreen; Khalid, Ayesha; Yaseen, Nazish; Arshad, Atiqa

    2016-07-01

    Laser Produced Plasma (LPP) was employed as an ion source for the modifications in surface, electrical and mechanical properties of poly methyl (methacrylate) PMMA. For this purpose Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 6 ns, 10 Hz) at a fluence of 12.7 J/cm2 was employed to generate Fe plasma. The fluence and energy measurements of laser produced Fe plasma ions were carried out by employing Thomson Parabola Technique in the presence of magnetic field strength of 0.5 T, using CR-39 as Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD). It has been observed that ion fluence ejecting from ablated plasma was maximum at an angle of 5° with respect to the normal to the Fe target surface. PMMA substrates were irradiated with Fe ions of constant energy of 0.85 MeV at various ion fluences ranging from 3.8 × 106 ions/cm2 to 1.8 × 108 ions/cm2 controlled by varying laser pulses from 3000 to 7000. Optical microscope and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) were utilized for the analysis of surface features of irradiated PMMA. Results depicted the formation of chain scission, crosslinking, dendrites and star like structures. To explore the electrical behavior, four probe method was employed. The electrical conductivity of ion irradiated PMMA was increased with increasing ion fluence. The surface hardness was measured by shore D hardness tester and results showed the monotonous increment in surface hardness with increasing ion fluence. The increasing trend of surface hardness and electrical conductivity with increasing Fe ion fluence has been well correlated with the surface morphology of ion implanted PMMA. The temperature rise of PMMA surface due to Fe ion irradiation is evaluated analytically and comes out to be in the range of 1.72 × 104 to 1.82 × 104 K. The values of total Linear Energy Transfer (LET) or stopping power of 0.8 MeV Fe ions in PMMA is 61.8 eV/Å and their range is 1.34 μm evaluated by SRIM simulation.

  8. Experimental study of turned and grit-blasted screw-shaped implants with special emphasis on effects of blasting material and surface topography.

    PubMed

    Wennerberg, A; Albrektsson, T; Johansson, C; Andersson, B

    1996-01-01

    In the rabbit tibia, commercially pure titanium implants blasted with 25-microns Al2O3 and TiO2 particles respectively were inserted and studied with respect to removal torque and histomorphometry. In the rabbit femur, as-machined implants and implants blasted with 75-microns Al2O3 particles were histomorphometrically compared. Before implant insertion, the differently produced surface topographies were characterized numerically and visually. The tibial implants blasted with different materials and the same sized (25 microns) blasting particles demonstrated similar results. Comparing implants blasted with 75-microns Al2O3 particles to as-machined implants, the blasted specimens exhibited a statistically significant higher bone-to-metal contact after 12 weeks in the rabbit bone. PMID:8962942

  9. Improve the corrosion and cytotoxic behavior of NiTi implants with use of the ion beam technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, L. L. Meisner, S. N.; Matveeva, V. A.; Matveev, A. L.

    2015-11-17

    The corrosion resistance behavior and cytotoxicity of binary NiTi-base alloy specimens subjected to surface modification by silicon ion beams and the proliferative ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) of rat marrow on an ion-implanted surface of the alloy have been studied. The silicon ion beam processing of specimen surfaces is shown to bring about a nearly two-fold improvement in the corrosion resistance of the material to attack by acqueous solutions of NaCl and human plasma and a drastic decrease in the nickel concentration after immersion of the specimens into the solutions for ∼3400 and ∼6000 h, respectively. It is found that MSC proliferation strongly depends on the surface structure, roughness and chemical condition of NiTi implants.

  10. Improve the corrosion and cytotoxic behavior of NiTi implants with use of the ion beam technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, L. L.; Matveeva, V. A.; Meisner, S. N.; Matveev, A. L.

    2015-11-01

    The corrosion resistance behavior and cytotoxicity of binary NiTi-base alloy specimens subjected to surface modification by silicon ion beams and the proliferative ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) of rat marrow on an ion-implanted surface of the alloy have been studied. The silicon ion beam processing of specimen surfaces is shown to bring about a nearly two-fold improvement in the corrosion resistance of the material to attack by acqueous solutions of NaCl and human plasma and a drastic decrease in the nickel concentration after immersion of the specimens into the solutions for ˜3400 and ˜6000 h, respectively. It is found that MSC proliferation strongly depends on the surface structure, roughness and chemical condition of NiTi implants.

  11. Plasma-deposited fluorocarbon polymer films on titanium for preventing cell adhesion: a surface finishing for temporarily used orthopaedic implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finke, B.; Testrich, H.; Rebl, H.; Walschus, U.; Schlosser, M.; Zietz, C.; Staehlke, S.; Nebe, J. B.; Weltmann, K. D.; Meichsner, J.; Polak, M.

    2016-06-01

    The design of a titanium implant surface should ideally support its later application in clinical use. Temporarily used implants have to fulfil requirements different from permanent implants: they should ensure the mechanical stabilization of the bone stock but in trauma surgery they should not be integrated into the bone because they will be removed after fracture healing. Finishing of the implant surface by a plasma-fluorocarbon-polymer (PFP) coating is a possible approach for preventing cell adhesion of osteoblasts. Two different low pressure gas-discharge plasma processes, microwave (MW 2.45 GHz) and capacitively coupled radio frequency (RF 13.56 MHz) plasma, were applied for the deposition of the PFP film using a mixture of the precursor octafluoropropane (C3F8) and hydrogen (H2). The thin films were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurements. Cell culture experiments show that cell adhesion and spreading of MG-63 osteoblasts were clearly reduced or nonexistent on these surfaces, also after 24 h of storage in the cell culture medium. In vivo data demonstrated that the local inflammatory tissue response for the PFP films deposited in MW and RF plasma were comparable to uncoated controls.

  12. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laranjeira, Marta S.; Carvalho, Ângela; Pelaez-Vargas, Alejandro; Hansford, Derek; Ferraz, Maria Pia; Coimbra, Susana; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol-gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves). Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC) and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and collagen type I (COL I) on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior.

  13. Surface texture and micromechanics of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) orthopaedic implant bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Monica A.

    2001-07-01

    Tibial bearings of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) were characterized to identify differences in morphology, surface texture (roughness and skewness), and micro-scale mechanical behavior. These orthopaedic implant components were fabricated by direct molding or by machining after isostatic compression molding. Sterilization was by gamma irradiation (3.3 Mrad) in air, followed by shelf aging for 2 years. Comparisons were made between unsterile and sterile bearings to identify differences in structure and properties related to wear debris. Characterization methods included confocal optical microscopy, nanoindentation, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and polarized light microscopy. Morphology was compared between bulk and surface (top and bottom) specimens of the bearings. Cryo-microtomy was used to prepare thin specimens transverse to the top surface for polarized microscopy. Nanoindentation was performed on the top bearing surfaces, near areas examined by confocal microscopy. Processing methods affected both small- and large-scale morphology of UHMWPE. Direct molding produced thinner lamellae, thicker long periods, and slightly lower crystallinity than isostatic compression molding. Both bearing types contained a thick interface between the crystalline and amorphous phases. Interfacial free energy varied with interface thickness. Resin particles were consolidated better in direct molded bearings than in machined bearings. Segregated amorphous regions were observed in the machined bearings. Sterilization and shelf aging affected nanometer-scale morphology. Chain scission significantly decreased the interface thickness, causing an increase in lamellar thickness and a small increase in crystallinity. Only a small decrease in the amorphous thickness resulted. Heterogeneous oxidation increased these changes in interface

  14. Method and means of directing an ion beam onto an insulating surface for ion implantation or sputtering

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Siskind, Barry

    1981-01-01

    A beam of ions is directed under control onto an insulating surface by supplying simultaneously a stream of electrons directed at the same surface in a quantity sufficient to neutralize the overall electric charge of the ion beam and result in a net zero current flow to the insulating surface. The ion beam is adapted particularly both to the implantation of ions in a uniform areal disposition over the insulating surface and to the sputtering of atoms or molecules of the insulator onto a substrate.

  15. The use of an ion-beam source to alter the surface morphology of biological implant materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigand, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    An electron bombardment, ion thruster was used as a neutralized-ion beam sputtering source to texture the surfaces of biological implant materials. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine surface morphology changes of all materials after ion-texturing. Electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis was used to determine the effects of ion texturing on the surface chemical composition of some polymers. Liquid contact angle data were obtained for ion textured and untextured polymer samples. Results of tensile and fatigue tests of ion-textured metal alloys are presented. Preliminary data of tissue response to ion textured surfaces of some metals, polytetrafluoroethylene, alumina, and segmented polyurethane were obtained.

  16. Development of a Functional Biohybrid Implant Formed from Periodontal Tissue Utilizing Bioengineering Technology.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kei; Oshima, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Naomi; Tanaka, Chie; Koitabashi, Ryosuke; Inoue, Takashi; Tsuji, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Current osseointegrated dental implants have been widely used for the rehabilitation of tooth loss. Although dental implants are considered an available treatment in the paradigm shift from traditional dental therapies, such as fixed dental bridges and removable dentures, the fundamental problems must be overcome before their clinical use in young patients who are still undergoing jawbone growth. Here, we show a novel bioengineering method for a functional biohybrid implant that is combined with adult-derived periodontal tissue and attached with bone tissue as a substitute for cementum. This biohybrid implant was successfully engrafted using the bioengineered periodontal ligament, and it restored physiological function, such as orthodontic movement through bone remodeling and appropriate responsiveness to noxious stimuli. Thus, this study represents the functional biohybrid implant's potential for clinical use as a next-generation dental implant using adult-derived tissues.

  17. Bioinspired Functional Surfaces for Technological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vipul; Kumar, Suneel; Reddy, Kumbam Lingeshwar; Bahuguna, Ashish; Krishnan, Venkata

    2016-08-01

    Biological matters have been in continuous encounter with extreme environmental conditions leading to their evolution over millions of years. The fittest have survived through continuous evolution, an ongoing process. Biological surfaces are the important active interfaces between biological matters and the environment, and have been evolving over time to a higher state of intelligent functionality. Bioinspired surfaces with special functionalities have grabbed attention in materials research in the recent times. The microstructures and mechanisms behind these functional biological surfaces with interesting properties have inspired scientists to create artificial materials and surfaces which possess the properties equivalent to their counterparts. In this review, we have described the interplay between unique multiscale (micro- and nano-scale) structures of biological surfaces with intrinsic material properties which have inspired researchers to achieve the desired wettability and functionalities. Inspired by naturally occurring surfaces, researchers have designed and fabricated novel interfacial materials with versatile functionalities and wettability, such as superantiwetting surfaces (superhydrophobic and superoleophobic), omniphobic, switching wettability and water collecting surfaces. These strategies collectively enable functional surfaces to be utilized in different applications such as fog harvesting, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), catalysis, sensing and biological applications. This paper delivers a critical review of such inspiring biological surfaces and artificial bioinspired surfaces utilized in different applications, where material science and engineering have merged by taking inspiration from the natural systems.

  18. Effect of erbium-doped: yttrium, aluminium and garnet laser irradiation on the surface microstructure and roughness of sand-blasted, large grit, acid-etched implants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Hun; Kwon, Young-Hyuk; Herr, Yeek; Shin, Seung-Il

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of erbium-doped: yttrium, aluminium and garnet (Er:YAG) laser irradiation on sand-blasted, large grit, acid-etched (SLA) implant surface microstructure according to varying energy levels and application times of the laser. Methods The implant surface was irradiated by the Er:YAG laser under combined conditions of 100, 140, or 180 mJ/pulse and an application time of 1 minute, 1.5 minutes, or 2 minutes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the surface roughness of the specimens. Results All experimental conditions of Er:YAG laser irradiation, except the power setting of 100 mJ/pulse for 1 minute and 1.5 minutes, led to an alteration in the implant surface. SEM evaluation showed a decrease in the surface roughness of the implants. However, the difference was not statistically significant. Alterations of implant surfaces included meltdown and flattening. More extensive alterations were present with increasing laser energy and application time. Conclusions To ensure no damage to their surfaces, it is recommended that SLA implants be irradiated with an Er:YAG laser below 100 mJ/pulse and 1.5 minutes for detoxifying the implant surfaces. PMID:21811689

  19. Adult stem cells properties in terms of commitment, aging and biological safety of grit-blasted and Acid-etched ti dental implants surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Bressan, Eriberto; Calvo-Guirado, José L; Degidi, Marco; Piattelli, Adriano; Zavan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is one of the most widely used biomaterials for manufacturing dental implants. The implant surface properties strongly influence osseointegration. The aim of the present study was to in vitro investigate the characteristics of Ti dental implants in terms of mutagenicity, hemocompatibility, biocompatibility, osteoinductivity and biological safety. The Ames test was used to test the mutagenicity of the Ti dental implants, and the hemolysis assay for evaluating their hemocompatibility. Human adipose - derived stem cells (ADSCs) were then seeded onto these implants in order to evaluate their cytotoxicity. Gene expression analyzing with real-time PCR was carried out to investigate the osteoinductivity of the biomaterials. Finally, the genetic stability of the cells cultured onto dental implants was determined by karyotyping. Our results demonstrated that Ti dental implants are not mutagenic, do not cause hemolysis, and are biocompatible. The MTT assay revealed that ADSCs, seeded on Ti dental implants, proliferate up to 30 days in culture. Moreover, ADSCs loaded on Ti dental implants show a substantial expression of some osteoblast specific markers, such as COL1A1, OPN, ALPL, and RUNX2, as well as chromosomal stability after 30 days of culture in a medium without osteogenic factors. In conclusion, the grit-blasted and acid-etched treatment seems to favor the adhesion and proliferation of ADSCs and improve the osteoinductivity of Ti dental implant surfaces.

  20. Adult Stem Cells Properties in Terms of Commitment, Aging and Biological Safety of Grit-Blasted and Acid-Etched Ti Dental Implants Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Bressan, Eriberto; Calvo - Guirado, José L.; Degidi, Marco; Piattelli, Adriano; Zavan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is one of the most widely used biomaterials for manufacturing dental implants. The implant surface properties strongly influence osseointegration. The aim of the present study was to in vitro investigate the characteristics of Ti dental implants in terms of mutagenicity, hemocompatibility, biocompatibility, osteoinductivity and biological safety. The Ames test was used to test the mutagenicity of the Ti dental implants, and the hemolysis assay for evaluating their hemocompatibility. Human adipose - derived stem cells (ADSCs) were then seeded onto these implants in order to evaluate their cytotoxicity. Gene expression analyzing with real-time PCR was carried out to investigate the osteoinductivity of the biomaterials. Finally, the genetic stability of the cells cultured onto dental implants was determined by karyotyping. Our results demonstrated that Ti dental implants are not mutagenic, do not cause hemolysis, and are biocompatible. The MTT assay revealed that ADSCs, seeded on Ti dental implants, proliferate up to 30 days in culture. Moreover, ADSCs loaded on Ti dental implants show a substantial expression of some osteoblast specific markers, such as COL1A1, OPN, ALPL, and RUNX2, as well as chromosomal stability after 30 days of culture in a medium without osteogenic factors. In conclusion, the grit-blasted and acid-etched treatment seems to favor the adhesion and proliferation of ADSCs and improve the osteoinductivity of Ti dental implant surfaces. PMID:25635249

  1. Direct In Vivo Inflammatory Cell-Induced Corrosion of CoCrMo Alloy Orthopedic Implant Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jeremy L.; Sivan, Shiril; Liu, Yangping; Kocagöz, Sevi; Arnholt, Christina; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy, used for over four decades in orthopedic implants, may corrode and release wear debris into the body during use. These degradation products may stimulate immune and inflammatory responses in vivo. We report here on evidence of direct inflammatory cell-induced corrosion of human implanted and retrieved CoCrMo implant surfaces. Corrosion morphology on CoCrMo implant surfaces, in unique and characteristic patterns, and the presence of cellular remnants and biological materials intimately entwined with the corrosion indicates direct cellular attack under the cell membrane region of adhered and/or migrating inflammatory cells. Evidence supports a Fenton-like reaction mechanism driving corrosion in which reactive oxygen species are the major driver of corrosion. Using in vitro tests, large increases in corrosion susceptibility of CoCrMo were seen (40 to 100 fold) when immersed in phosphate buffered saline solutions modified with hydrogen peroxide and HCl to represent the chemistry under inflammatory cells. This discovery raises significant new questions about the clinical consequences of such corrosion interactions, the role of patient inflammatory reactions, and the detailed mechanisms at play. PMID:24619511

  2. Is Graphene a Promising Nano-Material for Promoting Surface Modification of Implants or Scaffold Materials in Bone Tissue Engineering?

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ming; Liu, Yunsong; Chen, Tong; Du, Feng; Zhao, Xianghui; Xiong, Chunyang

    2014-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering promises to restore bone defects that are caused by severe trauma, congenital malformations, tumors, and nonunion fractures. How to effectively promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or seed cells has become a hot topic in this field. Many researchers are studying the ways of conferring a pro-osteodifferentiation or osteoinductive capability on implants or scaffold materials, where osteogenesis of seed cells is promoted. Graphene (G) provides a new kind of coating material that may confer the pro-osteodifferentiation capability on implants and scaffold materials by surface modification. Here, we review recent studies on the effects of graphene on surface modifications of implants or scaffold materials. The ability of graphene to improve the mechanical and biological properties of implants or scaffold materials, such as nitinol and carbon nanotubes, and its ability to promote the adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs or osteoblasts have been demonstrated in several studies. Most previous studies were performed in vitro, but further studies will explore the mechanisms of graphene's effects on bone regeneration, its in vivo biocompatibility, its ability to promote osteodifferentiation, and its potential applications in bone tissue engineering. PMID:24447041

  3. Direct in vivo inflammatory cell-induced corrosion of CoCrMo alloy orthopedic implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Jeremy L; Sivan, Shiril; Liu, Yangping; Kocagöz, Sevi B; Arnholt, Christina M; Kurtz, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloy, used for over five decades in orthopedic implants, may corrode and release wear debris into the body during use. These degradation products may stimulate immune and inflammatory responses in vivo. We report here on evidence of direct inflammatory cell-induced corrosion of human implanted and retrieved CoCrMo implant surfaces. Corrosion morphology on CoCrMo implant surfaces, in unique and characteristic patterns, and the presence of cellular remnants and biological materials intimately entwined with the corrosion indicates direct cellular attack under the cell membrane region of adhered and/or migrating inflammatory cells. Evidence supports a Fenton-like reaction mechanism driving corrosion in which reactive oxygen species are the major driver of corrosion. Using in vitro tests, large increases in corrosion susceptibility of CoCrMo were seen (40-100 fold) when immersed in phosphate buffered saline solutions modified with hydrogen peroxide and hydrochloric acid to represent the chemistry under inflammatory cells. This discovery raises significant new questions about the clinical consequences of such corrosion interactions, the role of patient inflammatory reactions, and the detailed mechanisms at play.

  4. Is graphene a promising nano-material for promoting surface modification of implants or scaffold materials in bone tissue engineering?

    PubMed

    Gu, Ming; Liu, Yunsong; Chen, Tong; Du, Feng; Zhao, Xianghui; Xiong, Chunyang; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2014-10-01

    Bone tissue engineering promises to restore bone defects that are caused by severe trauma, congenital malformations, tumors, and nonunion fractures. How to effectively promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or seed cells has become a hot topic in this field. Many researchers are studying the ways of conferring a pro-osteodifferentiation or osteoinductive capability on implants or scaffold materials, where osteogenesis of seed cells is promoted. Graphene (G) provides a new kind of coating material that may confer the pro-osteodifferentiation capability on implants and scaffold materials by surface modification. Here, we review recent studies on the effects of graphene on surface modifications of implants or scaffold materials. The ability of graphene to improve the mechanical and biological properties of implants or scaffold materials, such as nitinol and carbon nanotubes, and its ability to promote the adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs or osteoblasts have been demonstrated in several studies. Most previous studies were performed in vitro, but further studies will explore the mechanisms of graphene's effects on bone regeneration, its in vivo biocompatibility, its ability to promote osteodifferentiation, and its potential applications in bone tissue engineering.

  5. Electrophoretic deposition of nanostructured hydroxyapatite coating on AZ91 magnesium alloy implants with different surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojaee, Ramin; Fathi, Mohammadhossein; Raeissi, Keyvan

    2013-11-01

    Bio-absorbable magnesium (Mg) based alloys have been introduced as innovative orthopedic implants during recent years. It has been specified that rapid degradation of Mg based alloys in physiological environment should be restrained in order to be utilized in orthopedic trauma fixation and vascular intervention. In this developing field of healthcare materials, micro-arc oxidation (MAO), and MgF2 conversion coating were exploited as surface pre-treatment of AZ91 magnesium alloy to generate a nanostructured hydroxyapatite (n-HAp) coating via electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to characterize the obtained powder and coatings. The potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the coated and uncoated specimens, and in vitro bioactivity evaluation were performed in simulated body fluid. Results revealed that the MAO/n-HAp coated AZ91 Mg alloy samples with a rough topography and lower corrosion current density leads to a lower Mg degradation rate accompanied by high bioactivity.

  6. Effect of wear of bearing surfaces on elastohydrodynamic lubrication of metal-on-metal hip implants.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Jin, Z M; Hirt, F; Rieker, C; Roberts, P; Grigoris, P

    2005-09-01

    consistent with the minimal wear observed between 1 and 5 million cycles. However, under adverse in vivo conditions associated with start-up and stopping and depleted lubrication, wear of the bearing surfaces can still occur. An increase in the wear depth beyond a certain limit was shown to lead to the constriction of the lubricant film around the edge of the contact conjunction and consequently to a decrease in the lubricant film thickness. Continuous cycles of a running-in wear period followed by a steady state wear period may be inevitable in MOM hip implants. This highlights the importance of minimizing the wear in these devices during the initial running-in period, particularly from design and manufacturing points of view.

  7. Rationale for the Use of CAD/CAM Technology in Implant Prosthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Abduo, Jaafar; Lyons, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Despite the predictable longevity of implant prosthesis, there is an ongoing interest to continue to improve implant prosthodontic treatment and outcomes. One of the developments is the application of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) to produce implant abutments and frameworks from metal or ceramic materials. The aim of this narrative review is to critically evaluate the rationale of CAD/CAM utilization for implant prosthodontics. To date, CAD/CAM allows simplified production of precise and durable implant components. The precision of fit has been proven in several laboratory experiments and has been attributed to the design of implants. Milling also facilitates component fabrication from durable and aesthetic materials. With further development, it is expected that the CAD/CAM protocol will be further simplified. Although compelling clinical evidence supporting the superiority of CAD/CAM implant restorations is still lacking, it is envisioned that CAD/CAM may become the main stream for implant component fabrication. PMID:23690778

  8. The use of laser therapy for dental implant surface decontamination: a narrative review of in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Marina Salah; Khosa, Amardeep; Tawse-Smith, Andrew; Leichter, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this narrative review was to critically evaluate in vitro studies assessing the efficacy of lasers in the bacterial decontamination of titanium implant surfaces. The MEDLINE, Web of Knowledge and Embase electronic databases were used to search for articles relating to the use of lasers in the bacterial decontamination of titanium specimen surfaces using predetermined search statements. Clinical studies, case reports, case series, review articles and animal models were excluded. Study selection was carried out independently and then cross-checked by two authors through abstract viewing. Eighteen articles were selected for full-text analysis. Erbium-doped yttrium-aluminium-garnet lasers had a wide range of powers capable of inducing bacterial decontamination. While carbon dioxide and gallium-aluminium-arsenide diode lasers demonstrated the ability to produce bacterial decontamination, the bacterial sensitivity to each varied depending on the species involved. There is no concensus on the laser type or settings that are optimal for bacterial decontamination of titanium implant surfaces as studies employ various test specimens, contamination methodologies, irradiation settings and protocols, and outcome measures resulting in limited study comparability. More investigations are required to provide guidelines for the use of laser therapy in the decontamination of implant surfaces.

  9. Blood vessels are concentrated within the implant surface concavities: a histologic study in rabbit tibia.

    PubMed

    Scarano, Antonio; Perrotti, Vittoria; Artese, Luciano; Degidi, Marco; Degidi, Davide; Piattelli, Adriano; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2014-07-01

    Angiogenesis plays a key role in bone formation and maintenance. Bone formation has been reported to initiate in the concavities rather than the convexities in a hydroxyapatite substratum and the implant threads of dental implants. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the number of the blood vessels inside the concavities and around the convexities of the threads of implants in a rabbit tibia model. A total of 32 thread-shaped implants blasted with apatitic calcium phosphate (TCP/HA blend) (Resorbable Blast Texturing, RBT) (Maestro, BioHorizons(®), Birmingham, AL, USA) were inserted in 8 rabbits. Each rabbit received 4 implants, 2 in the right and 2 in left tibia. Implants were retrieved after 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks and treated to obtain thin ground sections. Statistically significant differences were found in the number of vessels that had formed in the concavities rather than the convexities of the implants after 1 (p = 0.000), and 2 weeks (p = 0.000), whilst no significant differences after 4 (p = 0.546) and 8 weeks (p = 0.275) were detected. The present results supported the hypothesis that blood vessel formation was stimulated by the presence of the concavities, which may provide a suitable environment in which mechanical forces, concentrations and gradients of chemotactic molecules and blood clot retention may all drive vascular and bone cell migration.

  10. Molecular impact surface textured implants (MISTI) alter beneficially breast capsule formation at 36 months.

    PubMed

    Ersek, R A

    1991-01-01

    Since the development of smooth silicone breast implants in 1962, over two million women throughout the world have opted for breast augmentation surgery. While initially successful, smooth implants are prone to developing surrounding scar capsules that may harden and contract--resulting in discomfort, weakening of the shell with rupture, unsightliness, and patient dissatisfaction. This phenomenon has been shown to occur in as much as 70% of implanted patients over time. Our work on the texturing of implantable prosthesis material (published in 1968), and subsequent discoveries, has led us to the development of textured silicone breast implants. Because the host interface is altered by the texture, collagen fibrils select a formation that is multiplanar which results in thinner, more pliable capsules that are more resilient and less likely to contract. At 18 months (August, 1989), with 116 implants, all remain soft, after an additional 18 months follow-up, for a total of 36 months maximum and 18 months minimum. The long-term performance of these implants must await the availability of further clinical data.

  11. The effect of APH treatment on surface bonding and osseointegration of Ti-6Al-7Nb implants: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy-Duong Thi; Moon, So-Hee; Oh, Tae-Ju; Park, Il-Song; Lee, Min-Ho; Bae, Tae-Sung

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of anodization-cyclic precalcification-heat (APH) treatment on the bonding ability of Ca-P coating to the parent metal and osseointegration of Ti-6Al-7Nb implants. Eighteen Ti-6Al-7Nb discs, 9 untreated and 9 APH-treated, were cultured with osteoblast cells in vitro, and the cellular differentiation ability was assayed at 1, 2, and 3 weeks. For in vivo testing, 28 Ti-6Al-7Nb implants (14 implants of each group) were inserted to rat tibias, and after each 4 and 6 weeks of implantation, bone bonding, and osseointegration were evaluated through removal torque and histological analysis. Osteoblast-culturing showed twice as much of the alkaline phosphatase activity on the treated surface at 3 weeks than on the untreated surface (p < 0.05). The treated implants exhibited higher removal torque values than the untreated ones (15.5 vs. 1.8 Ncm at 4 weeks and 19.7 vs. 2.6 Ncm at 6 weeks, p < 0.05). Moreover, the excellent bonding quality of coats was confirmed by the existence of cohesive fractures on the surface of removed APH implants (field emission scanning electron microscopy and histological observation). Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that the APH treatment significantly enhanced osseointegration of the Ti-6Al-7Nb implant, with the stable bonding between the coating and the implant surface.

  12. Surface characterization and in vivo evaluation of laser sintered and machined implants followed by resorbable-blasting media process: A study in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Michelle; Yoo, Daniel; Marin, Charles; Gil, Luiz; Shabaka, Nour; Goldstein, Matt; Janal, Malvin; Tovar, Nick; Bonfante, Estevam; Coelho, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to compare the histomorphometric and histological bone response to laser-sintered implants followed by resorbable-blasting media (RBM) process relative to standard machined/RBM surface treated implants. Material and Methods Six male sheep (n=6) received 2 Ti-6Al-4V implants (1 per surface) in each side of the mandible for 6 weeks in vivo. The histomorphometric parameters bone-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO) were evaluated. Results Optical interferometry revealed higher Sa and Sq values for the laser-sintered/RBM surface in relation to standard/RBM implants. No significant differences in BIC were observed between the two groups (p>0.2), but significantly higher BAFO was observed for standard/RBM implants (p<0.01). Conclusions The present study demonstrated that both surfaces were biocompatible and osseoconductive, and the combination of laser sintering and RBM has no advantage over the standard machined implants with subsequent RBM. Key words:Dental implants, osseointegration, resorbable- blasting media, sheep, in vivo. PMID:26827064

  13. Hafnium-implanted nickel studied with TDPAC and RBS/channeling before and after laser-surface melting and thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, E.N.; Buene, L.; McDonald, M.L.; Kotthaus, J.; Freitag, K.; Vianden, R.; Draper, C.W.

    1982-09-15

    The Hf implanted Ni system has been studied by the time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) technique and by Rutherford backscattering (RBS)/channeling. Low fluence implants were thermally annealed in vacuum at increasing temperature in order to study the evolution of substitutional and defect-associated solutes using TDPAC. Both detrapping and precipitation (or segregation) effects have been observed. Higher fluence implants were studied by both TDPAC and RBS/channeling in as-implanted as well as laser-surface-melted regimes. 10 figures.

  14. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  15. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  16. A Randomized Case-Series Study Comparing the Stability of Implant with Two Different Surfaces Placed in Fresh Extraction Sockets and Immediately Loaded.

    PubMed

    Vanden Bogaerde, Leonardo; Sennerby, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hydrophilic and moderately rough implant surfaces have been proposed to enhance the osseointegration response. Aim. The aim of this study was to compare early changes of stability for two implants with identical macrodesign but with different surface topographies. Materials and Methods. In 11 patients, a total of 22 implants (11 bimodal (minimally rough, control) and 11 proactive (moderately rough and hydrophilic, test), Neoss Ltd., Harrogate, UK) were immediately placed into fresh extraction sockets and immediately loaded. The peak insertion torque (IT) was measured in Ncm at placement. Resonance Frequency Analysis (RFA) measurements were made at baseline and 2, 4, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery. Results. The two implant types showed similar IT and RFA values at placement (NS). A dip of RFA values after 2 weeks followed by an increase was observed, where the test implant showed a less pronounced decrease and a more rapid recovery than the control implant. The test implants were significantly more stable than the control ones after 12 weeks. Conclusions. The results from the present study indicated that the hydrophilic and rougher test implant was more resistant to immediate loading and showed a significantly higher stability than the smoother control implant after 12 weeks.

  17. A Randomized Case-Series Study Comparing the Stability of Implant with Two Different Surfaces Placed in Fresh Extraction Sockets and Immediately Loaded.

    PubMed

    Vanden Bogaerde, Leonardo; Sennerby, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hydrophilic and moderately rough implant surfaces have been proposed to enhance the osseointegration response. Aim. The aim of this study was to compare early changes of stability for two implants with identical macrodesign but with different surface topographies. Materials and Methods. In 11 patients, a total of 22 implants (11 bimodal (minimally rough, control) and 11 proactive (moderately rough and hydrophilic, test), Neoss Ltd., Harrogate, UK) were immediately placed into fresh extraction sockets and immediately loaded. The peak insertion torque (IT) was measured in Ncm at placement. Resonance Frequency Analysis (RFA) measurements were made at baseline and 2, 4, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery. Results. The two implant types showed similar IT and RFA values at placement (NS). A dip of RFA values after 2 weeks followed by an increase was observed, where the test implant showed a less pronounced decrease and a more rapid recovery than the control implant. The test implants were significantly more stable than the control ones after 12 weeks. Conclusions. The results from the present study indicated that the hydrophilic and rougher test implant was more resistant to immediate loading and showed a significantly higher stability than the smoother control implant after 12 weeks. PMID:27042180

  18. A Randomized Case-Series Study Comparing the Stability of Implant with Two Different Surfaces Placed in Fresh Extraction Sockets and Immediately Loaded

    PubMed Central

    Vanden Bogaerde, Leonardo; Sennerby, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Background. Hydrophilic and moderately rough implant surfaces have been proposed to enhance the osseointegration response. Aim. The aim of this study was to compare early changes of stability for two implants with identical macrodesign but with different surface topographies. Materials and Methods. In 11 patients, a total of 22 implants (11 bimodal (minimally rough, control) and 11 proactive (moderately rough and hydrophilic, test), Neoss Ltd., Harrogate, UK) were immediately placed into fresh extraction sockets and immediately loaded. The peak insertion torque (IT) was measured in Ncm at placement. Resonance Frequency Analysis (RFA) measurements were made at baseline and 2, 4, 6, and 12 weeks after surgery. Results. The two implant types showed similar IT and RFA values at placement (NS). A dip of RFA values after 2 weeks followed by an increase was observed, where the test implant showed a less pronounced decrease and a more rapid recovery than the control implant. The test implants were significantly more stable than the control ones after 12 weeks. Conclusions. The results from the present study indicated that the hydrophilic and rougher test implant was more resistant to immediate loading and showed a significantly higher stability than the smoother control implant after 12 weeks. PMID:27042180

  19. Surface free energy and microarray deposition technology.

    PubMed

    McHale, Glen

    2007-03-01

    Microarray techniques use a combinatorial approach to assess complex biochemical interactions. The fundamental goal is simultaneous, large-scale experimentation analogous to the automation achieved in the semiconductor industry. However, microarray deposition inherently involves liquids contacting solid substrates. Liquid droplet shapes are determined by surface and interfacial tension forces, and flows during drying. This article looks at how surface free energy and wetting considerations may influence the accuracy and reliability of spotted microarray experiments.

  20. Do different implant surfaces exposed in the oral cavity of humans show different biofilm compositions and activities?

    PubMed

    Groessner-Schreiber, Birte; Hannig, Matthias; Dück, Alexander; Griepentrog, Michael; Wenderoth, Dirk F

    2004-12-01

    Osseointegrated dental implants play an important role in restorative dentistry. However, plaque accumulation may cause inflammatory reactions around the implants, sometimes leading to implant failure. In this in vivo study the influence of two physical hard coatings on bacterial adhesion was examined in comparison with a pure titanium surface. Thin glass sheets coated with titanium nitride (TiN), zirconium nitride (ZrN) or pure titanium were mounted on removable intraoral splints in two adults. After 60 h of intraoral exposure, the biofilms were analyzed to determine the number of bacteria, the types of bacteria [by applying single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP analysis) of 16S rRNA genes], and whether or not the bacteria were active (by SSCP analysis of 16S rRNA). The results showed that bacterial cell counts were higher on the pure titanium-coated glass sheets than on the glass sheets coated with TiN or ZrN. The lowest number of bacterial cells was present on theZrN-coated glass. However, the metabolic activity (RNA fingerprints) of bacteria on TiN- and ZrN-coated glass sheets seemed to be lower than the activity of bacteria on the titanium-coated surfaces, whereas SSCP fingerprints based on 16S rDNA revealed that the major 16S bands are common to all of the fingerprints, independently of the surface coating. PMID:15560835

  1. Micro-arc oxidation as a tool to develop multifunctional calcium-rich surfaces for dental implant applications.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A R; Oliveira, F; Boldrini, L C; Leite, P E; Falagan-Lotsch, P; Linhares, A B R; Zambuzzi, W F; Fragneaud, B; Campos, A P C; Gouvêa, C P; Archanjo, B S; Achete, C A; Marcantonio, E; Rocha, L A; Granjeiro, J M

    2015-09-01

    Titanium (Ti) is commonly used in dental implant applications. Surface modification strategies are being followed in last years in order to build Ti oxide-based surfaces that can fulfill, simultaneously, the following requirements: induced cell attachment and adhesion, while providing a superior corrosion and tribocorrosion performance. In this work micro-arc oxidation (MAO) was used as a tool for the growth of a nanostructured bioactive titanium oxide layer aimed to enhance cell attachment and adhesion for dental implant applications. Characterization of the surfaces was performed, in terms of morphology, topography, chemical composition and crystalline structure. Primary human osteoblast adhesion on the developed surfaces was investigated in detail by electronic and atomic force microscopy as well as immunocytochemistry. Also an investigation on the early cytokine production was performed. Results show that a relatively thick hybrid and graded oxide layer was produced on the Ti surface, being constituted by a mixture of anatase, rutile and amorphous phases where calcium (Ca) and phosphorous (P) were incorporated. An outermost nanometric-thick amorphous oxide layer rich in Ca was present in the film. This amorphous layer, rich in Ca, improved fibroblast viability and metabolic activity as well as osteoblast adhesion. High-resolution techniques allowed to understand that osteoblasts adhered less in the crystalline-rich regions while they preferentially adhere and spread over in the Ca-rich amorphous oxide layer. Also, these surfaces induce higher amounts of IFN-γ cytokine secretion, which is known to regulate inflammatory responses, bone microarchitecture as well as cytoskeleton reorganization and cellular spreading. These surfaces are promising in the context of dental implants, since they might lead to faster osseointegration. PMID:26046283

  2. Innovative regeneration technology to solve peri-implantitis by Er:YAG laser based on the microbiologic diagnosis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Atsuhiko; Ono, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an emerging problem, and corrective therapy requires a method for decontaminating the complex surface structure of the implant body and sterilizing the surrounding tissue. The erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser has proven to effectively allow tissue to regenerate when used for peri-implantitis. The power of the Er:YAG laser is absorbed by a water molecule; therefore, its target neither rises in temperature nor carbonizes. An antibacterial remedy based on the bacteriologic diagnosis, followed by debridement and sterilization of the implant surface and peri-implant tissues by Er:YAG laser is efficacious for peri-implantitis treatment. The aim of this report was to present the effectiveness of the Er:YAG laser for peri-implant bone regeneration. This case series of two patients showed that antibiotic therapy reduced the bacterial amount from the peri-implantitis sites significantly and that Er:YAG laser therapy, along with the bone augmentation, enhanced bone regeneration in the peri-implant bony defects.

  3. Microbial analysis of biofilms on cement surfaces: An investigation in cement-associated peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Korsch, Michael; Walther, Winfried; Marten, Silke-Mareike; Obst, Ursula

    2014-09-05

    The cementation of implant-supported restorations always poses the risk of excess cement retained in the peri-implant sulcus despite careful clinical control. Excess cement can become the basis of colonization by oral microorganisms. As a result of the biofilm formation peri-mucositis or peri-implantitis may develop. Complications were observed in the routine prosthetic restoration of implants when a methacrylate-based cement was used. These developed a few weeks after cementation of the suprastructure and caused bleeding on probing as well as suppuration from the peri-implant tissue. In the revision therapy, excess cement in the peri-implant sulcus was found in many cases. This excess cement was sampled from ten patients and investigated for biofilm formation. For this purpose, the cement samples were collected and analyzed for bacterial in situ colonization by 16S rDNA-based methods. In laboratory experiments, the methacrylate-based cement and two other dental cements were then investigated for their proneness to form biofilm. The results of the in situ and in vitro investigations revealed a strong tendency towards bacterial invasion of the methacrylate-based cement by opportunistic species and pathogens.

  4. Near-surface density of ion-implanted Si studied by Rutherford backscattering and total-reflection x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Klockenkaemper, R.; Becker, M.; Bohlen, A. von; Becker, H.W.; Krzyzanowska, H.; Palmetshofer, L.

    2005-08-01

    The implantation of ions in solids is of high technical relevance. The different effects within the solid target caused by the ion bombardment can be investigated by depth profiling of near-surface layers. As and Co ions were implanted in Si wafers: As ions with a fluence of 1x10{sup 17}/cm{sup 2} and an energy of 100 keV and Co ions with 1x10{sup 16}/cm{sup 2} at 25 keV. Subsequently depth profiling was carried out by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry as well as by total-reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis which was combined with differential weighing and interferometry after repeated large-surface sputter etching. Over and above the amorphization of the Si crystal, two other essential effects were observed: (i) a swelling or expansion of the original Si crystal in the near-surface region, in particular in the case of the As implantation, and (ii) a shrinking or compression of the Si crystal for deeper sublayers especially distinct for the Co implantation. On the other hand, a high surface enrichment of implanted ions was found for the As implantation while only a low surface concentration was detected for the Co implantation.

  5. High strength, surface porous polyether-ether-ketone for load-bearing orthopaedic implants

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Nathan T.; Torstrick, F. Brennan; Lee, Christopher S.D.; Dupont, Kenneth M.; Safranski, David L.; Chang, W. Allen; Macedo, Annie E.; Lin, Angela; Boothby, Jennifer M.; Whittingslow, Daniel C.; Carson, Robert A.; Guldberg, Robert E.; Gall, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Despite its widespread clinical use in load-bearing orthopaedic implants, polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) is often associated with poor osseointegration. In this study, a surface porous PEEK material (PEEK-SP) was created using a melt extrusion technique. The porous layer thickness was 399.6±63.3 µm and possessed a mean pore size of 279.9±31.6 µm, strut spacing of 186.8±55.5 µm, porosity of 67.3±3.1%, and interconnectivity of 99.9±0.1%. Monotonic tensile tests showed that PEEK-SP preserved 73.9% of the strength (71.06±2.17 MPa) and 73.4% of the elastic modulus (2.45±0.31 GPa) of as-received, injection molded PEEK. PEEK-SP further demonstrated a fatigue strength of 60.0 MPa at one million cycles, preserving 73.4% of the fatigue resistance of injection molded PEEK. Interfacial shear testing showed the pore layer shear strength to be 23.96±2.26 MPa. An osseointegration model in the rat revealed substantial bone formation within the pore layer at 6 and 12 weeks via µCT and histological evaluation. Ingrown bone was more closely apposed to the pore wall and fibrous tissue growth was reduced in PEEK-SP when compared to non-porous PEEK controls. These results indicate that PEEK-SP could provide improved osseointegration while maintaining the structural integrity necessary for load-bearing orthopaedic applications. PMID:25463499

  6. Functionalising surfaces at the nanoscale using plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Moore, R

    2009-01-01

    Plasma technology offers a highly effective toolbox for nanoscale surface engineering of materials. The potential variety of nanoscale features and new properties that can be achieved are reviewed here.

  7. Surface contamination analysis technology team overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, H. Dewitt

    1995-01-01

    A team was established which consisted of representatives from NASA (Marshall Space Flight Center and Langley Research Center), Thiokol Corporation, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, AC Engineering, SAIC, Martin Marietta, and Aerojet. The team's purpose was to bring together the appropriate personnel to determine what surface inspection techniques were applicable to multiprogram bonding surface cleanliness inspection. In order to identify appropriate techniques and their sensitivity to various contaminant families, calibration standards were developed. Producing standards included development of consistent low level contamination application techniques. Oxidation was also considered for effect on inspection equipment response. Ellipsometry was used for oxidation characterization. Verification testing was then accomplished to show that selected inspection techniques could detect subject contaminants at levels found to be detrimental to critical bond systems of interest. Once feasibility of identified techniques was shown, selected techniques and instrumentation could then be incorporated into a multipurpose inspection head and integrated with a robot for critical surface inspection. Inspection techniques currently being evaluated include optically stimulated electron emission (OSEE); near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy utilizing fiber optics; Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy; and ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence. Current plans are to demonstrate an integrated system in MSFC's Productivity Enhancement Complex within five years from initiation of this effort in 1992 assuming appropriate funding levels are maintained. This paper gives an overview of work accomplished by the team and future plans.

  8. The Effect of Laser-Etched Surface Design on Soft Tissue Healing of Two Different Implant Abutment Systems: An Experimental Study in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Neiva, Rodrigo; Tovar, Nick; Jimbo, Ryo; Gil, Luiz F; Goldberg, Paula; Barbosa, Joao Pm; Lilin, Thomas; Coelho, Paulo G

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the early soft tissue morphology around two different implant systems that received either smooth or laser-etched abutments in a beagle dog model. Implants were placed in the healed mandibular molar region of eight beagle dogs and allowed to heal for 7 weeks. When the most apical aspect of the junctional epithelium (JE) was above or within the upper half of the laser-etched region, fibers were oriented perpendicular to the abutment surface. In contrast, JE positioned within the lower half of the laser-etched region or within or below the implant-abutment gap level presented fibers oriented parallel to the abutment surface. PMID:27560671

  9. In situ plasma fabrication of ceramic-like structure on polymeric implant with enhanced surface hardness, cytocompatibility and antibacterial capability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Haigang; Yang, Kun; Wang, Gexia; Wang, Pingli; Ji, Junhui; Chu, Paul K

    2016-05-01

    Polymeric materials are commonly found in orthopedic implants due to their unique mechanical properties and biocompatibility but the poor surface hardness and bacterial infection hamper many biomedical applications. In this study, a ceramic-like surface structure doped with silver is produced by successive plasma implantation of silicon (Si) and silver (Ag) into the polyamine 66 (PA66) substrate. Not only the surface hardness and elastic modulus are greatly enhanced due to the partial surface carbonization and the ceramic-like structure produced by the reaction between energetic Si and the carbon chain of PA66, but also the antibacterial activity is improved because of the combined effects rendered by Ag and SiC structure. Furthermore, the modified materials which exhibit good cytocompatibility upregulate bone-related genes and proteins expressions of the contacted bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). For the first time, it explores out that BMSCs osteogenesis on the antibacterial ceramic-like structure is mediated via the iNOS and nNOS signal pathways. The results reveal that in situ plasma fabrication of an antibacterial ceramic-like structure can endow PA66 with excellent surface hardness, cytocompatibility, as well as antibacterial capability. PMID:26825052

  10. [Pathology of implants].

    PubMed

    Mittermayer, C; Eblenkamp, M; Richter, H A; Zwadlo-Klarwasser, G; Bhardwaj, R S; Klosterhalfen, B

    2002-01-01

    Progress in the surgery of implants and biomaterials can be accomplished by: 1. Painstakingly analysing and registering of defaulting implants after explantation within a "National Registry of Implant Pathology". 2. Development of a DNA-microarray named "Implantat/Chronic Wound" in order to discover the differential transcriptional activities of cells brought into contact with different foreign surfaces. 3. Predictive cell-engineering combined with custom-made implant surfaces with the aim of optimal patient care.

  11. Potential applications of a small high-surface-area platinum electrode as an implanted impedance biosensor or recording electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yvonne Y.; Millard, Rodney E.; Tykocinski, Michael; Lui, Xuguang; Clark, Graeme M.; Cowan, Robert S. C.

    2001-03-01

    A small Platinum (Pt) electrode (geometric area: ~0.43 mm2) was treated in an electrochemical etching process, to produce a highly porous columnar thin layer (~600 nm) on the surface of the electrode. The modified Pt electrode (Pt-p) showed similar electrical properties to a platinum-black electrode but with high mechanical integrity. Previous studies of chronic stimulation had also shown good biocompatibility and surface stability over several months implantation. This paper discusses the potential applications of the modified electrode as an implanted bio-sensor: (1) as a recording electrode compared to an untreated Pt electrode. (2) as a probe in detecting electrical characteristics of living biological material adjacent to the electrode in vivo, which may correlate to inflammation or trauma repair. Results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) revealed much lower electrode interface polarisation impedance, reduced overall electrode impedance, and a largely constant impedance above 100 Hz for the Pt-p electrode compared with untreated Pt electrodes. This provides a platform for recording biological events with low noise interference. Results of A.C. impedance spectroscopy of the high surface area electrode only reflect changes in the surrounding biological environment in the frequency range (1 k Hz to 100 k Hz), interference from electrode polarisation impedance can be neglected. The results imply that the surface-modified electrode is a good candidate for application to implantable biosensors for detecting bio-electric events. The modification procedure and its high surface area concept could have application to a smart MEMS device or microelectrode.

  12. Evaluation of an IBAD thin-film process as an alternative method for surface incorporation of bioceramics on dental implants: a study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Paulo G; Suzuki, Marcelo

    2005-03-01

    Thin-film bioceramic coatings are potential alternatives to overcome the limitations provided by other commercially available coating techniques like PSHA, where variable bioceramic dissolution added to a metalloceramic weak link are process- inherent. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the overall and site specific (to 0.5 mm from implant surface) levels of osseoactivity around a thin-film (IBAD processed) coated titanium alloy implant versus a non surface modified (sand-blasted/acid etched) titanium alloy implant in a canine model. The surgical model comprised the proximal tibiae epiphyses with four implants placed in each limb remaining for 2 and 4 weeks in-vivo. 10 mg/Kg oxytetracycline was administered 48 hours prior to euthanization. The limbs were retrieved by sharp dissection, reduced to blocks, and subsequently nondecalcified processed for fluorescent microscopy. Micrographs (20x mag) were acquired around the implant perimeter and merged for overall biological response evaluations, and four micrographs (40x mag. subdivided in rectangles) were acquired along one of the implant sides for tetracycline labeled area fraction quantification. The results showed biocompatible and osseoconductive properties for the thin-film coated and uncoated titanium alloy implants. Tetracycline labeled area fraction analyses showed that the thin-film coated implants presented significantly higher overall and site specific osseoactivity levels at 2 and 4 weeks. The site specific osseoactivity values were significantly higher compared to overall values for control and thin-film coated implants at both times in-vivo. According to the results obtained in this study, thin-film coated implants enhanced biological response at the early implantation times evaluated. PMID:20944888

  13. Controlled release of chlorhexidine antiseptic from microporous amorphous silica applied in open porosity of an implant surface.

    PubMed

    Verraedt, Els; Braem, Annabel; Chaudhari, Amol; Thevissen, Karin; Adams, Erwin; Van Mellaert, Lieve; Cammue, Bruno P A; Duyck, Joke; Anné, Jozef; Vleugels, Jef; Martens, Johan A

    2011-10-31

    Amorphous microporous silica (AMS) serving as a reservoir for controlled release of a bioactive agent was applied in the open porosity of a titanium coating on a Ti-6Al-4V metal substrate. The pores of the AMS emptied by calcination were loaded with chlorhexidine diacetate (CHX) via incipient wetness impregnation with CHX solution, followed by solvent evaporation. Using this CHX loaded AMS system on titanium substrate sustained release of CHX into physiological medium was obtained over a 10 day-period. CHX released from the AMS coating was demonstrated to be effective in killing planktonic cultures of the human pathogens Candida albicans and Staphylococcus epidermidis. This surface modification of titanium bodies with AMS controlled release functionality for a bioactive compound potentially can be applied on dental and orthopaedic implants to abate implant-associated microbial infection. PMID:21798323

  14. Comparative Study of the Early Loading of Resorbable Blasting Media and Sandblasting with Large-grit and Acid-etching Surface Implants: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Beom; Kim, Young-Kyun; Kim, Su-Gwan; Oh, Ji-Su; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study compares the prognosis (the survival rate and marginal bone loss) of resorbable blasting media (RBM) surface implants and sandblasting with large-grit and acid-etching (SLA) surface implants in the early loading. Methods: This study targeted 123 patients treated by implants installation from January 2008 to March 2010. The loading was initiated in the maxilla within three to four months and in the mandible within one to two months. The types of restoration were single crown and fixed partial prosthesis. Those functioned over one year. The implants were classified by the surface of implants as Group 1: RBM surface (GS III; OSSTEM, Busan, Korea) and, Group 2: SLA surface (Superline; Dentium, Seoul, Korea). The groups were categorized by maxilla and mandible and compared by survival rate, marginal bone loss through clinical records evaluation, and radiographic measurements. Results: The marginal bone loss in the maxilla was 0.14±0.34 mm (Group 1) and 0.30±0.37 mm (Group 2), a statistically significant difference (P <0.05). In the mandible those were 0.28±0.54 mm (Group 1) and 0.20±0.33 mm (Group 2), not significant (P >0.05). There was no significant difference of marginal bone loss between maxilla and mandible by groups. During observation there was no implant