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Sample records for implantable 96-channel neural

  1. A Fully Implantable 96-channel Neural Data Acquisition System

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Michael; Bossetti, Chad A; Jochum, Thomas A; Callender, Stephen H; Nicolelis, Miguel A L; Turner, Dennis A; Wolf, Patrick D

    2009-01-01

    A fully implantable neural data acquisition system is a key component of a clinically viable brain-machine interface. This type of system must communicate with the outside world and obtain power without the use of wires that cross through the skin. We present a 96-channel fully implantable neural data acquisition system. This system performs spike detection and extraction within the body and wirelessly transmits data to an external unit. Power is supplied wirelessly through the use of inductively-coupled coils. The system was implanted acutely in sheep and successfully recorded, processed, and transmitted neural data. Bidirectional communication between the implanted system and an external unit was successful over a range of 2 m. The system is also shown to integrate well into a brain-machine interface. This demonstration of a high channel-count fully implanted neural data acquisition system is a critical step in the development of a clinically viable brain-machine interface. PMID:19255459

  2. A fully implantable 96-channel neural data acquisition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizk, Michael; Bossetti, Chad A.; Jochum, Thomas A.; Callender, Stephen H.; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.; Turner, Dennis A.; Wolf, Patrick D.

    2009-04-01

    A fully implantable neural data acquisition system is a key component of a clinically viable brain-machine interface. This type of system must communicate with the outside world and obtain power without the use of wires that cross through the skin. We present a 96-channel fully implantable neural data acquisition system. This system performs spike detection and extraction within the body and wirelessly transmits data to an external unit. Power is supplied wirelessly through the use of inductively coupled coils. The system was implanted acutely in sheep and successfully recorded, processed and transmitted neural data. Bidirectional communication between the implanted system and an external unit was successful over a range of 2 m. The system is also shown to integrate well into a brain-machine interface. This demonstration of a high channel-count fully implanted neural data acquisition system is a critical step in the development of a clinically viable brain-machine interface.

  3. A fully implantable 96-channel neural data acquisition system.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Michael; Bossetti, Chad A; Jochum, Thomas A; Callender, Stephen H; Nicolelis, Miguel A L; Turner, Dennis A; Wolf, Patrick D

    2009-04-01

    A fully implantable neural data acquisition system is a key component of a clinically viable brain-machine interface. This type of system must communicate with the outside world and obtain power without the use of wires that cross through the skin. We present a 96-channel fully implantable neural data acquisition system. This system performs spike detection and extraction within the body and wirelessly transmits data to an external unit. Power is supplied wirelessly through the use of inductively coupled coils. The system was implanted acutely in sheep and successfully recorded, processed and transmitted neural data. Bidirectional communication between the implanted system and an external unit was successful over a range of 2 m. The system is also shown to integrate well into a brain-machine interface. This demonstration of a high channel-count fully implanted neural data acquisition system is a critical step in the development of a clinically viable brain-machine interface.

  4. A 96-channel neural stimulation system for driving AIROF microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Troyk, P; Cogan, S

    2004-01-01

    We present the design and testing of a 96-channel stimulation system to drive activated iridium oxide (AIROF) microelectrodes within safe charge-injection limits. Our system improves upon the traditional capacitively coupled, symmetric charge-balanced biphasic stimulation waveform so as to maximize charge-injection capacity without endangering the microelectrodes. It can deliver computer-controlled cathodic current pulse for to up to 96 AIROF microelectrodes and positively bias them during the inter-pulse interval. The stimulation system is comprised of (1) 12 custom-designed PCB boards each hosting an 8-channel ASIC chip, (2) a motherboard to communicate between these 12 boards and the PC, (3) the PC interface equipped with a DIO card and the corresponding software. We plan to use this system in animal experiments for intracortical neural stimulation of implanted electrodes within our visual prosthesis project.

  5. Implantable Neural Interfaces for Sharks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    neural codes from peripheral nerve using electrode arrays; Use simple chemical stimuli & multiple locations Completed Amino acid – evoked...rosette · Odorant perfusion across the olfactory rosette (amino acids : histidine, glutamate, cysteine) Implantable Neural Interfaces for Sharks...methane sulphonate ) at 100 mg/L on spontaneous activity recorded in the olfactory lobe. Rate histograms in 5 sec bins as a function of time. The

  6. Miniaturized neural interfaces and implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, Thomas; Boretius, Tim; Ordonez, Juan; Hassler, Christina; Henle, Christian; Meier, Wolfgang; Plachta, Dennis T. T.; Schuettler, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Neural prostheses are technical systems that interface nerves to treat the symptoms of neurological diseases and to restore sensory of motor functions of the body. Success stories have been written with the cochlear implant to restore hearing, with spinal cord stimulators to treat chronic pain as well as urge incontinence, and with deep brain stimulators in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Highly complex neural implants for novel medical applications can be miniaturized either by means of precision mechanics technologies using known and established materials for electrodes, cables, and hermetic packages or by applying microsystems technologies. Examples for both approaches will be introduced and discussed. Electrode arrays for recording of electrocorticograms during presurgical epilepsy diagnosis have been manufactured using approved materials and a marking laser to achieve an integration density that is adequate in the context of brain machine interfaces, e.g. on the motor cortex. Microtechnologies have to be used for further miniaturization to develop polymer-based flexible and light weighted electrode arrays to interface the peripheral and central nervous system. Polyimide as substrate and insulation material will be discussed as well as several application examples for nerve interfaces like cuffs, filament like electrodes and large arrays for subdural implantation.

  7. Cochlear Implant Using Neural Prosthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shweta; Singh, Shashi kumar; Dubey, Pratik Kumar

    2012-10-01

    This research is based on neural prosthetic device. The oldest and most widely used of these electrical, and often computerized, devices is the cochlear implant, which has provided hearing to thousands of congenitally deaf people in this country. Recently, the use of the cochlear implant is expanding to the elderly, who frequently suffer major hearing loss. More cutting edge are artificial retinas, which are helping dozens of blind people see, and ìsmartî artificial arms and legs that amputees can maneuver by thoughts alone, and that feel more like real limbs.Research, which curiosity led to explore frog legs dancing during thunderstorms, a snail shapedorgan in the inner ear, and how various eye cells react to light, have fostered an understanding of how to ìtalkî to the nervous system. That understanding combined with the miniaturization of electronics and enhanced computer processing has enabled prosthetic devices that often can bridge the gap in nerve signaling that is caused by disease or injury.

  8. A fully implantable rodent neural stimulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, D. W. J.; Grayden, D. B.; Shepherd, R. K.; Fallon, J. B.

    2012-02-01

    The ability to electrically stimulate neural and other excitable tissues in behaving experimental animals is invaluable for both the development of neural prostheses and basic neurological research. We developed a fully implantable neural stimulator that is able to deliver two channels of intra-cochlear electrical stimulation in the rat. It is powered via a novel omni-directional inductive link and includes an on-board microcontroller with integrated radio link, programmable current sources and switching circuitry to generate charge-balanced biphasic stimulation. We tested the implant in vivo and were able to elicit both neural and behavioural responses. The implants continued to function for up to five months in vivo. While targeted to cochlear stimulation, with appropriate electrode arrays the stimulator is well suited to stimulating other neurons within the peripheral or central nervous systems. Moreover, it includes significant on-board data acquisition and processing capabilities, which could potentially make it a useful platform for telemetry applications, where there is a need to chronically monitor physiological variables in unrestrained animals.

  9. Implantable neurotechnologies: a review of integrated circuit neural amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kian Ann; Greenwald, Elliot; Xu, Yong Ping; Thakor, Nitish V

    2016-01-01

    Neural signal recording is critical in modern day neuroscience research and emerging neural prosthesis programs. Neural recording requires the use of precise, low-noise amplifier systems to acquire and condition the weak neural signals that are transduced through electrode interfaces. Neural amplifiers and amplifier-based systems are available commercially or can be designed in-house and fabricated using integrated circuit (IC) technologies, resulting in very large-scale integration or application-specific integrated circuit solutions. IC-based neural amplifiers are now used to acquire untethered/portable neural recordings, as they meet the requirements of a miniaturized form factor, light weight and low power consumption. Furthermore, such miniaturized and low-power IC neural amplifiers are now being used in emerging implantable neural prosthesis technologies. This review focuses on neural amplifier-based devices and is presented in two interrelated parts. First, neural signal recording is reviewed, and practical challenges are highlighted. Current amplifier designs with increased functionality and performance and without penalties in chip size and power are featured. Second, applications of IC-based neural amplifiers in basic science experiments (e.g., cortical studies using animal models), neural prostheses (e.g., brain/nerve machine interfaces) and treatment of neuronal diseases (e.g., DBS for treatment of epilepsy) are highlighted. The review concludes with future outlooks of this technology and important challenges with regard to neural signal amplification.

  10. Implantable neurotechnologies: a review of integrated circuit neural amplifiers

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Elliot; Xu, Yong Ping; Thakor, Nitish V.

    2016-01-01

    Neural signal recording is critical in modern day neuroscience research and emerging neural prosthesis programs. Neural recording requires the use of precise, low-noise amplifier systems to acquire and condition the weak neural signals that are transduced through electrode interfaces. Neural amplifiers and amplifier-based systems are available commercially or can be designed in-house and fabricated using integrated circuit (IC) technologies, resulting in very large-scale integration or application-specific integrated circuit solutions. IC-based neural amplifiers are now used to acquire untethered/portable neural recordings, as they meet the requirements of a miniaturized form factor, light weight and low power consumption. Furthermore, such miniaturized and low-power IC neural amplifiers are now being used in emerging implantable neural prosthesis technologies. This review focuses on neural amplifier-based devices and is presented in two interrelated parts. First, neural signal recording is reviewed, and practical challenges are highlighted. Current amplifier designs with increased functionality and performance and without penalties in chip size and power are featured. Second, applications of IC-based neural amplifiers in basic science experiments (e.g., cortical studies using animal models), neural prostheses (e.g., brain/nerve machine interfaces) and treatment of neuronal diseases (e.g., DBS for treatment of epilepsy) are highlighted. The review concludes with future outlooks of this technology and important challenges with regard to neural signal amplification. PMID:26798055

  11. Functional and Histological Effects of Chronic Neural Electrode Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Sahyouni, Ronald; Chang, David T.; Moshtaghi, Omid; Mahmoodi, Amin; Djalilian, Hamid R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Permanent injury to the cranial nerves can often result in a substantial reduction in quality of life. Novel and innovative interventions can help restore form and function in nerve paralysis, with bioelectric interfaces among the more promising of these approaches. The foreign body response is an important consideration for any bioelectric device as it influences the function and effectiveness of the implant. The purpose of this review is to describe tissue and functional effects of chronic neural implantation among the different categories of neural implants and highlight advances in peripheral and cranial nerve stimulation. Data Sources: PubMed, IEEE, and Web of Science literature search. Review Methods: A review of the current literature was conducted to examine functional and histologic effects of bioelectric interfaces for neural implants. Results Bioelectric devices can be characterized as intraneural, epineural, perineural, intranuclear, or cortical depending on their placement relative to nerves and neuronal cell bodies. Such devices include nerve‐specific stimulators, neuroprosthetics, brainstem implants, and deep brain stimulators. Regardless of electrode location and interface type, acute and chronic histological, macroscopic and functional changes can occur as a result of both passive and active tissue responses to the bioelectric implant. Conclusion A variety of chronically implantable electrodes have been developed to treat disorders of the peripheral and cranial nerves, to varying degrees of efficacy. Consideration and mitigation of detrimental effects at the neural interface with further optimization of functional nerve stimulation will facilitate the development of these technologies and translation to the clinic. Level of Evidence 3. PMID:28894826

  12. Insulation lifetime improvement of polyimide thin film neural implants.

    PubMed

    Ceyssens, Frederik; Puers, Robert

    2015-10-01

    This work deals with studying and improving the insulation lifetime of polyimide-insulated thin film neural implants, or related polyimide-based medical implants. The evolution of the leak impedance of insulated conductors was investigated in saline water at 40 °C. The fabrication process as commonly found in literature for polyimide/platinum/polyimide microelectrode arrays was compared with three possible improvements: one based on lowering the curing temperature of the lower layer, one based on chemical activation and one based on an additional plasma activation step. The lower curing temperature process was found to yield a 7.5-fold improved lifetime compared with the state of the art process. Also, the leak impedances found after soak testing are an order of magnitude higher compared to the standard process. By improving the lifetime and insulation impedance of polyimide insulation with one order of magnitude, this work increases the applicability of polyimide in chronic thin film neural implants considerably.

  13. This Neural Implant is designed to be implanted in the Human Central and Nervous System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-10-19

    A new class of neural implants being developed at the Livermore Lab are the first clinical quality devices capable of two-way conversations with the human nervous systems. Unlike existing interfaces that only sense or only stimulate, these devices are capable of stimulating and sensing using both electric and chemical signals.

  14. This Neural Implant is designed to be implanted in the Human Central and Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-29

    A new class of neural implants being developed at the Livermore Lab are the first clinical quality devices capable of two-way conversations with the human nervous systems. Unlike existing interfaces that only sense or only stimulate, these devices are capable of stimulating and sensing using both electric and chemical signals.

  15. Feasibility study for future implantable neural-silicon interface devices.

    PubMed

    Al-Armaghany, Allann; Yu, Bo; Mak, Terrence; Tong, Kin-Fai; Sun, Yihe

    2011-01-01

    The emerging neural-silicon interface devices bridge nerve systems with artificial systems and play a key role in neuro-prostheses and neuro-rehabilitation applications. Integrating neural signal collection, processing and transmission on a single device will make clinical applications more practical and feasible. This paper focuses on the wireless antenna part and real-time neural signal analysis part of implantable brain-machine interface (BMI) devices. We propose to use millimeter-wave for wireless connections between different areas of a brain. Various antenna, including microstrip patch, monopole antenna and substrate integrated waveguide antenna are considered for the intra-cortical proximity communication. A Hebbian eigenfilter based method is proposed for multi-channel neuronal spike sorting. Folding and parallel design techniques are employed to explore various structures and make a trade-off between area and power consumption. Field programmable logic arrays (FPGAs) are used to evaluate various structures.

  16. 96-Channel receive-only head coil for 3 Tesla: design optimization and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Graham C; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Potthast, Andreas; Schmitt, Melanie; Alagappan, Vijay; Wald, Lawrence L

    2009-09-01

    The benefits and challenges of highly parallel array coils for head imaging were investigated through the development of a 3T receive-only phased-array head coil with 96 receive elements constructed on a close-fitting helmet-shaped former. We evaluated several designs for the coil elements and matching circuitry, with particular attention to sources of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss, including various sources of coil loading and coupling between the array elements. The SNR and noise amplification (g-factor) in accelerated imaging were quantitatively evaluated in phantom and human imaging and compared to a 32-channel array built on an identical helmet-shaped former and to a larger commercial 12-channel head coil. The 96-channel coil provided substantial SNR gains in the distal cortex compared to the 12- and 32-channel coils. The central SNR for the 96-channel coil was similar to the 32-channel coil for optimum SNR combination and 20% lower for root-sum-of-squares combination. There was a significant reduction in the maximum g-factor for 96 channels compared to 32; for example, the 96-channel maximum g-factor was 65% of the 32-channel value for acceleration rate 4. The performance of the array is demonstrated in highly accelerated brain images.

  17. 96-Channel Receive-Only Head Coil for 3 Tesla: Design Optimization and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Wiggins, Graham C.; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Potthast, Andreas; Schmitt, Melanie; Alagappan, Vijay; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2010-01-01

    The benefits and challenges of highly parallel array coils for head imaging were investigated through the development of a 3T receive-only phased-array head coil with 96 receive elements constructed on a close-fitting helmet-shaped former. We evaluated several designs for the coil elements and matching circuitry, with particular attention to sources of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss, including various sources of coil loading and coupling between the array elements. The SNR and noise amplification (g-factor) in accelerated imaging were quantitatively evaluated in phantom and human imaging and compared to a 32-channel array built on an identical helmet-shaped former and to a larger commercial 12-channel head coil. The 96-channel coil provided substantial SNR gains in the distal cortex compared to the 12- and 32-channel coils. The central SNR for the 96-channel coil was similar to the 32-channel coil for optimum SNR combination and 20% lower for root-sum-of-squares combination. There was a significant reduction in the maximum g-factor for 96 channels compared to 32; for example, the 96-channel maximum g-factor was 65% of the 32-channel value for acceleration rate 4. The performance of the array is demonstrated in highly accelerated brain images. PMID:19623621

  18. Neurobiochemical changes in the vicinity of a nanostructured neural implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérces, Zsófia; Tóth, Kinga; Márton, Gergely; Pál, Ildikó; Kováts-Megyesi, Bálint; Fekete, Zoltán; Ulbert, István; Pongrácz, Anita

    2016-10-01

    Neural interface technologies including recording and stimulation electrodes are currently in the early phase of clinical trials aiming to help patients with spinal cord injuries, degenerative disorders, strokes interrupting descending motor pathways, or limb amputations. Their lifetime is of key importance; however, it is limited by the foreign body response of the tissue causing the loss of neurons and a reactive astrogliosis around the implant surface. Improving the biocompatibility of implant surfaces, especially promoting neuronal attachment and regeneration is therefore essential. In our work, bioactive properties of implanted black polySi nanostructured surfaces (520-800 nm long nanopillars with a diameter of 150-200 nm) were investigated and compared to microstructured Si surfaces in eight-week-long in vivo experiments. Glial encapsulation and local neuronal cell loss were characterised using GFAP and NeuN immunostaining respectively, followed by systematic image analysis. Regarding the severity of gliosis, no significant difference was observed in the vicinity of the different implant surfaces, however, the number of surviving neurons close to the nanostructured surface was higher than that of the microstructured ones. Our results imply that the functionality of implanted microelectrodes covered by Si nanopillars may lead to improved long-term recordings.

  19. Neurobiochemical changes in the vicinity of a nanostructured neural implant

    PubMed Central

    Bérces, Zsófia; Tóth, Kinga; Márton, Gergely; Pál, Ildikó; Kováts-Megyesi, Bálint; Fekete, Zoltán; Ulbert, István; Pongrácz, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Neural interface technologies including recording and stimulation electrodes are currently in the early phase of clinical trials aiming to help patients with spinal cord injuries, degenerative disorders, strokes interrupting descending motor pathways, or limb amputations. Their lifetime is of key importance; however, it is limited by the foreign body response of the tissue causing the loss of neurons and a reactive astrogliosis around the implant surface. Improving the biocompatibility of implant surfaces, especially promoting neuronal attachment and regeneration is therefore essential. In our work, bioactive properties of implanted black polySi nanostructured surfaces (520–800 nm long nanopillars with a diameter of 150–200 nm) were investigated and compared to microstructured Si surfaces in eight-week-long in vivo experiments. Glial encapsulation and local neuronal cell loss were characterised using GFAP and NeuN immunostaining respectively, followed by systematic image analysis. Regarding the severity of gliosis, no significant difference was observed in the vicinity of the different implant surfaces, however, the number of surviving neurons close to the nanostructured surface was higher than that of the microstructured ones. Our results imply that the functionality of implanted microelectrodes covered by Si nanopillars may lead to improved long-term recordings. PMID:27775024

  20. Microchip-Embedded Capacitors for Implantable Neural Stimulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auciello, Orlando

    Miniaturization of microchips for implantation in the human body (e.g., microchip for the artificial retina to restore sight to people blinded by retina photoreceptors degeneration) requires the integration of high-capacitance (≥ 10 μF) energy-storage capacitors into the microchip. These capacitors would be based on high-dielectric constant layers, preferably made of materials that are bioinert (not affected by human body fluids) and are biocompatible (do not elicit adverse reactions in the human body). This chapter focuses on reviewing the work being done at Argonne National Laboratory (Materials Science Division and Center for Nanoscale Materials) to develop high-capacitance microchip-embedded capacitors based on novel high-K dielectric layers (TiAlOx or TiO2/Al2O3 superlattices). The microchip-embedded capacitor provides energy storage and electromagnetic signal coupling needed for neural stimulations. Advances in neural prostheses such as artificial retinas and cochlear implants require miniaturization of device size to minimize tissue damage and improve device/tissue interfaces in the human body. Therefore, development of microchip-embedded capacitors is critical to achieve full-implantable biomedical device miniaturization.

  1. In vitro and in vivo analysis and characterization of engineered spinal neural implants (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shor, Erez; Shoham, Shy; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord injury is a devastating medical condition. Recent developments in pre-clinical and clinical research have started to yield neural implants inducing functional recovery after spinal cord transection injury. However, the functional performance of the transplants was assessed using histology and behavioral experiments which are unable to study cell dynamics and the therapeutic response. Here, we use neurophotonic tools and optogenetic probes to investigate cellular level morphology and activity characteristics of neural implants over time at the cellular level. These methods were used in-vitro and in-vivo, in a mouse spinal cord injury implant model. Following previous attempts to induce recovery after spinal cord injury, we engineered a pre-vascularized implant to obtain better functional performance. To image network activity of a construct implanted in a mouse spinal cord, we transfected the implant to express GCaMP6 calcium activity indicators and implanted these constructs under a spinal cord chamber enabling 2-photon chronic in vivo neural activity imaging. Activity and morphology analysis image processing software was developed to automatically quantify the behavior of the neural and vascular networks. Our experimental results and analyses demonstrate that vascularized and non-vascularized constructs exhibit very different morphologic and activity patterns at the cellular level. This work enables further optimization of neural implants and also provides valuable tools for continuous cellular level monitoring and evaluation of transplants designed for various neurodegenerative disease models.

  2. A power and data link for a wireless-implanted neural recording system.

    PubMed

    Rush, Alexander D; Troyk, Philip R

    2012-11-01

    A wireless cortical neural recording system with a miniature-implanted package is needed in a variety of neuroscience and biomedical applications. Toward that end, we have developed a transcutaneous two-way communication and power system for wireless neural recording. Wireless powering and forward data transmission (into the body) at 1.25 Mbps is achieved using a frequency-shift keying modulated class E converter. The reverse telemetry (out of the body) carrier frequency is generated using an integer-N phase-locked loop, providing the necessary wideband data link to support simultaneous reverse telemetry from multiple implanted devices on separate channels. Each channel is designed to support reverse telemetry with a data rate in excess of 3 Mbps, which is sufficient for our goal of streaming 16 channels of raw neural data. We plan to incorporate this implantable power and telemetry system in a 1-cm diameter single-site cortical neural recording implant.

  3. Improved polyimide thin-film electrodes for neural implants.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Juan S; Boehler, Christian; Schuettler, Martin; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Thin-film electrode arrays for neural implants are necessary when large integration densities of stimulating or recording channels are required. However, delamination of the metallic layers from the polymer substrate leads to early failure of the device. Based on new adhesion studies of polyimide to SiC and diamond-like carbon (DLC) the authors successfully fabricated a 232-channel electrode array for retinal stimulation with improved adhesion. Layers of SiC and DLC were integrated into the fabrication procedure of polyimide-platinum (Pt) arrays to create fully coated metal wires, which adhere to the polyimide substrate even after 1 year of accelerated aging in saline solution. Studies on the inter-diffusion of Pt and SiC were conducted to establish an optimal thickness for a gold core of the platinum tracks, which is used for reducing the electrical track resistance. Furthermore, the electrochemical behaviour of the stimulating contacts coated with IrOx were studied in a long-term pulse tests over millions of pulses showing no deterioration of the coating.

  4. Identity and conflicts in the ethics of neural implants.

    PubMed

    Echarte, L E; García-Valdecasas, M

    2014-01-01

    The development of neuroprosthetics has given rise to significant theoretical and practical challenges concerning personal identity. The Extended Mind Theory (EMT) attempts to provide an answer to these challenges by arguing that the mind and the external world are co-extensive to the point that both can make a seamless unified entity. The EMT also proposes that physical states determine the nature of mental states. Here, we propose a non-deterministic and less locationist view of mental states that we will call iEMT. The iEMT articulates, firstly, that the co-extensivity of the mind and the world does not justify the dissolution of the mind in the objects of the external world with which the mind interacts. Consequently, the agent's mind is still part of his unique personal identity. Secondly, neural implants cannot be regarded as mere replacement parts in the context of a weak concept of personal identity. Thirdly, there are no compelling reasons to believe or to fear that neuroprosthetics can alter personal identity at the profound level.

  5. A configurable realtime DWT-based neural data compression and communication VLSI system for wireless implants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuning; Kamboh, Awais M; Mason, Andrew J

    2014-04-30

    This paper presents the design of a complete multi-channel neural recording compression and communication system for wireless implants that addresses the challenging simultaneous requirements for low power, high bandwidth and error-free communication. The compression engine implements discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and run length encoding schemes and offers a practical data compression solution that faithfully preserves neural information. The communication engine encodes data and commands separately into custom-designed packet structures utilizing a protocol capable of error handling. VLSI hardware implementation of these functions, within the design constraints of a 32-channel neural compression implant, is presented. Designed in 0.13μm CMOS, the core of the neural compression and communication chip occupies only 1.21mm(2) and consumes 800μW of power (25μW per channel at 26KS/s) demonstrating an effective solution for intra-cortical neural interfaces.

  6. A Fully-Implantable Cochlear Implant SoC with Piezoelectric Middle-Ear Sensor and Arbitrary Waveform Neural Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yip, Marcus; Jin, Rui; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Stankovic, Konstantina M; Chandrakasan, Anantha P

    2015-01-01

    A system-on-chip for an invisible, fully-implantable cochlear implant is presented. Implantable acoustic sensing is achieved by interfacing the SoC to a piezoelectric sensor that detects the sound-induced motion of the middle ear. Measurements from human cadaveric ears demonstrate that the sensor can detect sounds between 40 and 90 dB SPL over the speech bandwidth. A highly-reconfigurable digital sound processor enables system power scalability by reconfiguring the number of channels, and provides programmable features to enable a patient-specific fit. A mixed-signal arbitrary waveform neural stimulator enables energy-optimal stimulation pulses to be delivered to the auditory nerve. The energy-optimal waveform is validated with in-vivo measurements from four human subjects which show a 15% to 35% energy saving over the conventional rectangular waveform. Prototyped in a 0.18 μm high-voltage CMOS technology, the SoC in 8-channel mode consumes 572 μW of power including stimulation. The SoC integrates implantable acoustic sensing, sound processing, and neural stimulation on one chip to minimize the implant size, and proof-of-concept is demonstrated with measurements from a human cadaver ear.

  7. A Fully-Implantable Cochlear Implant SoC with Piezoelectric Middle-Ear Sensor and Arbitrary Waveform Neural Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Marcus; Jin, Rui; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Stankovic, Konstantina M.; Chandrakasan, Anantha P.

    2015-01-01

    A system-on-chip for an invisible, fully-implantable cochlear implant is presented. Implantable acoustic sensing is achieved by interfacing the SoC to a piezoelectric sensor that detects the sound-induced motion of the middle ear. Measurements from human cadaveric ears demonstrate that the sensor can detect sounds between 40 and 90 dB SPL over the speech bandwidth. A highly-reconfigurable digital sound processor enables system power scalability by reconfiguring the number of channels, and provides programmable features to enable a patient-specific fit. A mixed-signal arbitrary waveform neural stimulator enables energy-optimal stimulation pulses to be delivered to the auditory nerve. The energy-optimal waveform is validated with in-vivo measurements from four human subjects which show a 15% to 35% energy saving over the conventional rectangular waveform. Prototyped in a 0.18 μm high-voltage CMOS technology, the SoC in 8-channel mode consumes 572 μW of power including stimulation. The SoC integrates implantable acoustic sensing, sound processing, and neural stimulation on one chip to minimize the implant size, and proof-of-concept is demonstrated with measurements from a human cadaver ear. PMID:26251552

  8. A biomimetic adaptive algorithm and low-power architecture for implantable neural decoders.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Benjamin I; Wattanapanitch, Woradorn; Penagos, Hector L; Musallam, Sam; Andersen, Richard A; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2009-01-01

    Algorithmically and energetically efficient computational architectures that operate in real time are essential for clinically useful neural prosthetic devices. Such devices decode raw neural data to obtain direct control signals for external devices. They can also perform data compression and vastly reduce the bandwidth and consequently power expended in wireless transmission of raw data from implantable brain-machine interfaces. We describe a biomimetic algorithm and micropower analog circuit architecture for decoding neural cell ensemble signals. The decoding algorithm implements a continuous-time artificial neural network, using a bank of adaptive linear filters with kernels that emulate synaptic dynamics. The filters transform neural signal inputs into control-parameter outputs, and can be tuned automatically in an on-line learning process. We provide experimental validation of our system using neural data from thalamic head-direction cells in an awake behaving rat.

  9. A Biomimetic Adaptive Algorithm and Low-Power Architecture for Implantable Neural Decoders

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Benjamin I.; Wattanapanitch, Woradorn; Penagos, Hector L.; Musallam, Sam; Andersen, Richard A.; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2010-01-01

    Algorithmically and energetically efficient computational architectures that operate in real time are essential for clinically useful neural prosthetic devices. Such devices decode raw neural data to obtain direct control signals for external devices. They can also perform data compression and vastly reduce the bandwidth and consequently power expended in wireless transmission of raw data from implantable brain-machine interfaces. We describe a biomimetic algorithm and micropower analog circuit architecture for decoding neural cell ensemble signals. The decoding algorithm implements a continuous-time artificial neural network, using a bank of adaptive linear filters with kernels that emulate synaptic dynamics. The filters transform neural signal inputs into control-parameter outputs, and can be tuned automatically in an on-line learning process. We provide experimental validation of our system using neural data from thalamic head-direction cells in an awake behaving rat. PMID:19964345

  10. An implantable neural activity monitor with nonlinear gain-controlled amplifier.

    PubMed

    Kyoso, Masaki; Takeda, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    An implantable neural spike monitor with nonlinear amplifier was proposed for robust measurement against noise. In embedded electrophysiological signal processing systems, detection performance depends on signal to noise ratio (SNR), however, it is getting worth after implantation because of neoformation surrounding the electrodes and so on. We proposed a spike enhancer in this study. It has two remarkable function; automatic gain optimization with feedback loop and SNR improvement by nonlinear amplifier. In this report, the system performance was evaluated without feedback loop. A prototype circuit is prepared with small number of parts and tested on input-output characteristics. For the final evaluation, neural spike signal from somatosensory cortex of a rat was applied to the circuit. The test results show that system can expand SNR on neural spike signal from rat. It indicates that the spike enhancer can improve total performance of neural activity processing system.

  11. Improved diagnosis of breast implant rupture with sonographic findings and artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Venta, L A; Salchenberger, L M; Venta, E R

    1998-04-01

    The authors evaluated the use of sonographic findings combined with artificial neural networks as an aid to the diagnosis of breast implant rupture. From a database of 78 breast implants that were evaluated prospectively with sonography and then surgically removed, sonographic findings and surgical results were used to train and test backpropagation and radial basis function artificial neural networks by using the leave-one-out method. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to compare the performance of the different neural networks with that of the radiologists involved. By using the ROC area index as a measure of performance, the artificial neural network (Az = 0.8744) outperformed the radiologists (Az = 0.8057), although not by a statistically significant difference (P = .09). The best-performing network used, in addition to the sonographic findings, the diagnosis of the radiologist as an input. This network (Az = 0.9245) outperformed both the radiologists and the "unaided" networks by a statistically significant margin (P = .02 for radiologists, P = .04 for the unaided network). The network performed remarkably well in those cases in which the radiologists classified the implant as indeterminate, predicting the correct diagnosis in 23 of 25 cases (92%). The results suggest that artificial neural networks in tandem with the unaided radiologic diagnosis can improve the accuracy rate in the detection of implant rupture based on sonographic findings. This "team" approach provided the best results.

  12. Polymeric Packaging for Fully Implantable Wireless Neural Microsensors

    PubMed Central

    Aceros, Juan; Yin, Ming; Borton, David A.; Patterson, William R.; Bull, Christopher; Nurmikko, Arto V.

    2014-01-01

    We present polymeric packaging methods used for subcutaneous, fully implantable, broadband, and wireless neurosensors. A new tool for accelerated testing and characterization of biocompatible polymeric packaging materials and processes is described along with specialized test units to simulate our fully implantable neurosensor components, materials and fabrication processes. A brief description of the implantable systems is presented along with their current encapsulation methods based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Results from in-vivo testing of multiple implanted neurosensors in swine and non-human primates are presented. Finally, a novel augmenting polymer thin film material to complement the currently employed PDMS is introduced. This thin layer coating material is based on the Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) process of Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and Oxygen (O2). PMID:23365999

  13. Polymeric packaging for fully implantable wireless neural microsensors.

    PubMed

    Aceros, Juan; Yin, Ming; Borton, David A; Patterson, William R; Bull, Christopher; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2012-01-01

    We present polymeric packaging methods used for subcutaneous, fully implantable, broadband, and wireless neurosensors. A new tool for accelerated testing and characterization of biocompatible polymeric packaging materials and processes is described along with specialized test units to simulate our fully implantable neurosensor components, materials and fabrication processes. A brief description of the implantable systems is presented along with their current encapsulation methods based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Results from in-vivo testing of multiple implanted neurosensors in swine and non-human primates are presented. Finally, a novel augmenting polymer thin film material to complement the currently employed PDMS is introduced. This thin layer coating material is based on the Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) process of Hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) and Oxygen (O(2)).

  14. Tissue-compliant neural implants from microfabricated carbon nanotube multilayer composite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huanan; Patel, Paras R; Xie, Zhixing; Swanson, Scott D; Wang, Xueding; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2013-09-24

    Current neural prosthetic devices (NPDs) induce chronic inflammation due to complex mechanical and biological reactions related, in part, to staggering discrepancies of mechanical properties with neural tissue. Relatively large size of the implants and traumas to blood-brain barrier contribute to inflammation reactions, as well. Mitigation of these problems and the realization of long-term brain interface require a new generation of NPDs fabricated from flexible materials compliant with the brain tissue. However, such materials will need to display hard-to-combine mechanical and electrical properties which are not available in the toolbox of classical neurotechnology. Moreover, these new materials will concomitantly demand different methods of (a) device micromanufacturing and (b) surgical implantation in brains because currently used processes take advantage of high stiffness of the devices. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) serve as a promising foundation for such materials because of their record mechanical and electrical properties, but CNT-based tissue-compliant devices have not been realized yet. In this study, we formalize the mechanical requirements to tissue-compliant implants based on critical rupture strength of brain tissue and demonstrate that miniature CNT-based devices can satisfy these requirements. We fabricated them using MEMS-like technology and miniaturized them so that at least two dimensions of the electrodes would be comparable to brain tissue cells. The nanocomposite-based flexible neural electrodes were implanted into the rat motor cortex using a surgical procedure specifically designed for soft tissue-compliant implants. The post-surgery implant localization in the motor cortex was successfully visualized with magnetic resonance and photoacoustic imaging. In vivo functionality was demonstrated by successful registration of the low-frequency neural recording in the live brain of anesthetized rats. Investigation of inflammation processes around these

  15. A response surface model predicting the in vivo insertion behavior of micromachined neural implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrei, A.; Welkenhuysen, M.; Nuttin, B.; Eberle, W.

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical damage caused by the insertion of a foreign body into living tissue is inevitable, especially when a considerable stiffness mismatch is present, as in the case of micromachined neural implants and brain tissue. However, the response surface model based on a central composite experimental design described in this study showed that for particular configurations of the implant tip angle, width, thickness or insertion speed, some of these factors could be safely increased without causing an unwanted significant force or tissue dimpling increase. The model covers chisel tip angles between 10° and 50°, implant widths within the 200-400 µm range and thicknesses between 50 and 150 µm. The insertion speed has been varied from 10 up to 100 µm s-1 to reach a final insertion depth of 6 mm. Coating the implant with parylene C proved to be beneficial in reducing the friction between the implant and the surrounding tissue. Successfully validated for a particular implant geometry, this model could be used as an insertion behavior prediction tool for the design optimization of future neural implants.

  16. A 96-channel FPGA-based time-to-digital converter

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdan, Mircea; Frisch, Henry; Heintz, Mary; Paramonov, Alexander; Sanders, Harold; Chappa, Steve; DeMaat, Robert; Klein, Rod; Miao, Ting; Phillips, Thomas J; Wilson, Peter

    2005-02-01

    We describe an FPGA-based, 96-channel, time-to-digital converter (TDC) intended for use with the Central Outer Tracker (COT) [1] in the CDF Experiment [2] at the Fermilab Tevatron. The COT system is digitized and read out by 315 TDC cards, each serving 96 wires of the chamber. The TDC is physically configured as a 9U VME card. The functionality is almost entirely programmed in firmware in two Altera Stratix FPGA’s. The special capabilities of this device are the availability of 840 MHz LVDS inputs, multiple phase-locked clock modules, and abundant memory. The TDC system operates with an input resolution of 1.2 ns, a minimum input pulse width of 4.8 ns and a minimum separation of 4.8 ns between pulses. Each input can accept up to 7 hits per collision. The time-to-digital conversion is done by first sampling each of the 96 inputs in 1.2-ns bins and filling a circular memory; the memory addresses of logical transitions (edges) in the input data are then translated into the time of arrival and width of the COT pulses. Memory pipelines with a depth of 5.5 μs allow deadtime-less operation in the first-level trigger; the data are multiple-buffered to diminish deadtime in the second-level trigger. The complete process of edge-detection and filling of buffers for readout takes 12 μs. The TDC VME interface allows a 64-bit Chain Block Transfer of multiple boards in a crate with transfer-rates up to 47 Mbytes/sec. The TDC also contains a separately-programmed data path that produces prompt trigger data every Tevatron crossing. The trigger bits are clocked onto the P3 VME backplane connector with a 22-ns clock for transmission to the trigger. The full TDC design and multi-card test results are described. The physical simplicity ensures low-maintenance; the functionality being in firmware allows reprogramming for other applications.

  17. A fully integrated mixed-signal neural processor for implantable multichannel cortical recording.

    PubMed

    Sodagar, Amir M; Wise, Kensall D; Najafi, Khalil

    2007-06-01

    A 64-channel neural processor has been developed for use in an implantable neural recording microsystem. In the Scan Mode, the processor is capable of detecting neural spikes by programmable positive, negative, or window thresholding. Spikes are tagged with their associated channel addresses and formed into 18-bit data words that are sent serially to the external host. In the Monitor Mode, two channels can be selected and viewed at high resolution for studies where the entire signal is of interest. The processor runs from a 3-V supply and a 2-MHz clock, with a channel scan rate of 64 kS/s and an output bit rate of 2 Mbps.

  18. Neural Probes with Integrated Temperature Sensors for Monitoring Retina and Brain Implantation and Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaqi; Xie, Hui; Chung, Tsing; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang; Pang, Stella W

    2017-09-01

    Gold (Au) resistive temperature sensors were integrated on flexible polyimide-based neural probes to monitor temperature changes during neural probe implantation and stimulation. Temperature changes were measured as neural probes were implanted to infer the positions of the neural probes, and as the retina or the deep brain region was stimulated electrically. The temperature sensor consisted of a serpentine Au resistor and surrounded by four Au electrodes with 200 and [Formula: see text] diameter (dia.). The Au temperature sensors had temperature coefficient of 0.32%, and they were biocompatible and small in size. In vivo measurements of temperature changes during implantation and stimulation were carried out in the retina and deep brain region in rats. The desired implantation position was reached when temperature measured by the sensor increased to the calibrated level and became stable. There was no temperature increase when low level stimulation current of 8 and [Formula: see text] each for the two 200- and 400- [Formula: see text]-dia. electrodes, respectively, were applied. When higher level stimulation current of 100 and [Formula: see text] each were applied to the two 200- and 400- [Formula: see text]-dia. electrodes, respectively, maximum temperature increases of 1.2 °C in retina and 1 °C in deep brain region were found.

  19. Extracellular matrix proteins as temporary coating for thin-film neural implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceyssens, Frederik; Deprez, Marjolijn; Turner, Neill; Kil, Dries; van Kuyck, Kris; Welkenhuysen, Marleen; Nuttin, Bart; Badylak, Stephen; Puers, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Objective. This study investigates the suitability of a thin sheet of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins as a resorbable coating for temporarily reinforcing fragile or ultra-low stiffness thin-film neural implants to be placed on the brain, i.e. microelectrocorticographic (µECOG) implants. Approach. Thin-film polyimide-based electrode arrays were fabricated using lithographic methods. ECM was harvested from porcine tissue by a decellularization method and coated around the arrays. Mechanical tests and an in vivo experiment on rats were conducted, followed by a histological tissue study combined with a statistical equivalence test (confidence interval approach, 0.05 significance level) to compare the test group with an uncoated control group. Main results. After 3 months, no significant damage was found based on GFAP and NeuN staining of the relevant brain areas. Significance. The study shows that ECM sheets are a suitable temporary coating for thin µECOG neural implants.

  20. In vitro study of the electromagnetic interaction between wireless phones and an implantable neural stimulator.

    PubMed

    Grant, Hank; Heirman, Donald; Kuriger, Glenn; Ravindran, Murali Manohar

    2004-07-01

    Several clinical and laboratory studies have demonstrated electromagnetic interaction between implantable medical devices like pacemakers and cell phones being operated in close proximity. Those devices are largely now immune to phone interaction or procedures have been established to limit their interaction. The use of cell phones near people with implanted neural stimulators has not been studied. This research was initiated to investigate electromagnetic interaction between current cell phone technology and specific models of Cyberonics neural stimulators. Out of 1080 test runs conducted for this study, no interactions were observed, and it was concluded that the phone technologies examined in this study did not adversely affect the Cyberonics NeuroStar (Model 102) NeuroCybernetic Prosthesis (NCP) System. This article provides details on the experimental procedure that was used, which can also be used to test other neural stimulators and test technologies, and the results obtained. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Learning-induced synaptic potentiation in implanted neural precursor cell-derived neurons

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungjoon; Heo, Hwon; Han, Ma Eum; Choi, Kyuhyun; Yi, Jee Hyun; Kang, Shin Jung; Kwon, Yunhee Kim; Shin, Ki Soon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal loss caused by neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury and stroke results in cognitive dysfunctioning. Implantation of neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) can improve the brain function by replacing lost neurons. Proper synaptic integration following neuronal differentiation of implanted cells is believed to be a prerequisite for the functional recovery. In the present study, we characterized the functional properties of immortalized neural progenitor HiB5 cells implanted into the rat hippocampus with chemically induced lesion. The implanted HiB5 cells migrated toward CA1 pyramidal layer and differentiated into vGluT1-positive glutamatergic neurons with morphological and electrophysiological properties of endogenous CA1 pyramidal cells. Functional synaptic integration of HiB5 cell-derived neurons was also evidenced by immunohistochemical and electrophysiological data. Lesion-caused memory deficit was significantly recovered after the implantation when assessed by inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning. Remarkably, IA learning preferentially produced long-term potentiation (LTP) at the synapses onto HiB5 cell-derived neurons, which occluded paring protocol-induced LTP ex vivo. We conclude that the implanted HiB5 cell-derived neurons actively participate in learning process through LTP formation, thereby counteracting lesion-mediated memory impairment. PMID:26634434

  2. Contacting the brain--aspects of a technology assessment of neural implants.

    PubMed

    Decker, Michael; Fleischer, Torsten

    2008-12-01

    The public interest in neural implants has grown considerably in recent years. Progress within related research areas in combination with increasing--albeit overly optimistic and indiscriminate--mass media coverage have led to the impression that the possibilities of neural prosthetics have grown enormously. But a closer look reveals that the reasons for the intensified interest are varied and cannot be attributed to technical progress alone. Some neural prostheses that have been under development for many years have not left the clinical development phase despite intensive research activities. Other implants, like cardiac pacemakers and cochlea implants, are mature products that have already been implanted in a large number of patients. From the public perspective and in media reports, progress in the development of neural implants is associated with new achievements in other fields of neuroscience. Communications on new applications of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may suggest that a number of cognitive functions are now easily accessible with technological means. The fact that the interpretation of the results of fMRI studies depends on many conditions and is partly disputed also within the scientific community has been discussed in many publications but only very limited, in the general media. Besides this, research results and implementations in the area of electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography have sparked further debate on the question of free will, on determinism and indeterminism, and have attracted a large media response. The purpose of this paper is to discuss some societal and ethical aspects of neural implants from a technology assessment perspective. Technology assessment (TA) aims at providing knowledge about impacts and consequences of (new) technologies as well as about political and societal ways of dealing with them. It reflects about implementation conditions of technology and potential technology conflicts. Over the

  3. A neural network model for optimizing vowel recognition by cochlear implant listeners.

    PubMed

    Chang, C H; Anderson, G T; Loizou, P C

    2001-03-01

    Due to the variability in performance among cochlear implant (CI) patients, it is becoming increasingly important to find ways to optimally fit patients with speech processing strategies. This paper proposes an approach based on neural networks, which can be used to automatically optimize the performance of CI patients. The neural network model is implemented in two stages. In the first stage, a neural network is trained to mimic the CI patient's performance on the vowel identification task. The trained neural network is then used in the second stage to adjust a free parameter to improve vowel recognition performance for each individual patient. The parameter examined in this study was a weighting function applied to the compressed channel amplitudes extracted from a 6-channel continuous interleaved sampling (CIS) strategy. Two types of weighting functions were examined, one which assumed channel interaction, and one which assumed no interaction between channels. Results showed that the neural network models closely matched the performance of five Med-EI/CIS-Link implant patients. The resulting weighting functions obtained after neural network training improved vowel performance, with the larger improvement (4%) attained by the weighting function which modeled channel interaction.

  4. Recent Progress of Development of Optogenetic Implantable Neural Probes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hubin

    2017-08-11

    As a cell type-specific neuromodulation method, optogenetic technique holds remarkable potential for the realisation of advanced neuroprostheses. By genetically expressing light-sensitive proteins such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in cell membranes, targeted neurons could be controlled by light. This new neuromodulation technique could then be applied into extensive brain networks and be utilised to provide effective therapies for neurological disorders. However, the development of novel optogenetic implants is still a key challenge in the field. The major requirements include small device dimensions, suitable spatial resolution, high safety, and strong controllability. In this paper, I present a concise review of the significant progress that has been made towards achieving a miniaturised, multifunctional, intelligent optogenetic implant. I identify the key limitations of current technologies and discuss the possible opportunities for future development.

  5. An Implantable Neural Sensing Microsystem with Fiber-Optic Data Transmission and Power Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sunmee; Borton, David A.; Kang, Mingyu; Nurmikko, Arto V.; Song, Yoon-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a prototype cortical neural sensing microsystem for brain implantable neuroengineering applications. Its key feature is that both the transmission of broadband, multichannel neural data and power required for the embedded microelectronics are provided by optical fiber access. The fiber-optic system is aimed at enabling neural recording from rodents and primates by converting cortical signals to a digital stream of infrared light pulses. In the full microsystem whose performance is summarized in this paper, an analog-to-digital converter and a low power digital controller IC have been integrated with a low threshold, semiconductor laser to extract the digitized neural signals optically from the implantable unit. The microsystem also acquires electrical power and synchronization clocks via optical fibers from an external laser by using a highly efficient photovoltaic cell on board. The implantable unit employs a flexible polymer substrate to integrate analog and digital microelectronics and on-chip optoelectronic components, while adapting to the anatomical and physiological constraints of the environment. A low power analog CMOS chip, which includes preamplifier and multiplexing circuitry, is directly flip-chip bonded to the microelectrode array to form the cortical neurosensor device. PMID:23666130

  6. An implantable neural sensing microsystem with fiber-optic data transmission and power delivery.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunmee; Borton, David A; Kang, Mingyu; Nurmikko, Arto V; Song, Yoon-Kyu

    2013-05-10

    We have developed a prototype cortical neural sensing microsystem for brain implantable neuroengineering applications. Its key feature is that both the transmission of broadband, multichannel neural data and power required for the embedded microelectronics are provided by optical fiber access. The fiber-optic system is aimed at enabling neural recording from rodents and primates by converting cortical signals to a digital stream of infrared light pulses. In the full microsystem whose performance is summarized in this paper, an analog-to-digital converter and a low power digital controller IC have been integrated with a low threshold, semiconductor laser to extract the digitized neural signals optically from the implantable unit. The microsystem also acquires electrical power and synchronization clocks via optical fibers from an external laser by using a highly efficient photovoltaic cell on board. The implantable unit employs a flexible polymer substrate to integrate analog and digital microelectronics and on-chip optoelectronic components, while adapting to the anatomical and physiological constraints of the environment. A low power analog CMOS chip, which includes preamplifier and multiplexing circuitry, is directly flip-chip bonded to the microelectrode array to form the cortical neurosensor device.

  7. Soft implantable microelectrodes for future medicine: prosthetics, neural signal recording and neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong Hoon; Kim, Hanseop; Kim, Jeong Hun; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2016-03-21

    Implantable devices have provided various potential diagnostic options and therapeutic methods in diverse medical fields. A variety of hard-material-based implantable electrodes have been developed. However, several limitations for their chronic implantation remain, including mechanical mismatches at the interface between the electrode and the soft tissue, and biocompatibility. Soft-material-based implantable devices are suitable candidates for complementing the limitations of hard electrodes. Advances in microtechnology and materials science have largely solved many challenges, such as optimization of shape, minimization of infection, enhancement of biocompatibility and integration with components for diverse functions. Significant strides have also been made in mechanical matching of electrodes to soft tissue. In this review, we provide an overview of recent advances in soft-material-based implantable electrodes for medical applications, categorized according to their implantation site and material composition. We then review specific applications in three categories: neuroprosthetics, neural signal recording, and neuromodulation. Finally, we describe various strategies for the future development and application of implantable, soft-material-based devices.

  8. Elastomeric and soft conducting microwires for implantable neural interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kolarcik, Christi L.; Luebben, Silvia D.; Sapp, Shawn A.; Hanner, Jenna; Snyder, Noah; Kozai, Takashi D.Y.; Chang, Emily; Nabity, James A.; Nabity, Shawn T.; Lagenaur, Carl F.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Current designs for microelectrodes used for interfacing with the nervous system elicit a characteristic inflammatory response that leads to scar tissue encapsulation, electrical insulation of the electrode from the tissue and ultimately failure. Traditionally, relatively stiff materials like tungsten and silicon are employed which have mechanical properties several orders of magnitude different from neural tissue. This mechanical mismatch is thought to be a major cause of chronic inflammation and degeneration around the device. In an effort to minimize the disparity between neural interface devices and the brain, novel soft electrodes consisting of elastomers and intrinsically conducting polymers were fabricated. The physical, mechanical and electrochemical properties of these materials were extensively characterized to identify the formulations with the optimal combination of parameters including Young’s modulus, elongation at break, ultimate tensile strength, conductivity, impedance and surface charge injection. Our final electrode has a Young’s modulus of 974 kPa which is five orders of magnitude lower than tungsten and significantly lower than other polymer-based neural electrode materials. In vitro cell culture experiments demonstrated the favorable interaction between these soft materials and neurons, astrocytes and microglia, with higher neuronal attachment and a two-fold reduction in inflammatory microglia attachment on soft devices compared to stiff controls. Surface immobilization of neuronal adhesion proteins on these microwires further improved the cellular response. Finally, in vivo electrophysiology demonstrated the functionality of the elastomeric electrodes in recording single unit activity in the rodent visual cortex. The results presented provide initial evidence in support of the use of soft materials in neural interface applications. PMID:25993261

  9. Materials approaches for modulating neural tissue responses to implanted microelectrodes through mechanical and biochemical means

    PubMed Central

    Sommakia, Salah; Lee, Heui C.; Gaire, Janak; Otto, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Implantable intracortical microelectrodes face an uphill struggle for widespread clinical use. Their potential for treating a wide range of traumatic and degenerative neural disease is hampered by their unreliability in chronic settings. A major factor in this decline in chronic performance is a reactive response of brain tissue, which aims to isolate the implanted device from the rest of the healthy tissue. In this review we present a discussion of materials approaches aimed at modulating the reactive tissue response through mechanical and biochemical means. Benefits and challenges associated with these approaches are analyzed, and the importance of multimodal solutions tested in emerging animal models are presented. PMID:25530703

  10. Towards closed-loop neuromodulation: a wireless miniaturized neural implant SoC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wentai; Wang, Po-Min; Lo, Yi-Kai

    2017-05-01

    This work reports a platform technology toward the development of closed-loop neuromodulation. A neural implant based on the SoC developed in our laboratory is used as an example to illustrate the necessary functionalities for the efficacious implantable system. We also present an example of using the system to investigate the epidural stimulation for partial motor function recovery after spinal cord injury in a rat model. This hardware-software co-design tool demonstrate its promising potential towards an effective closed-loop neuromodulation for various biomedical applications.

  11. A neural signal processor for an implantable multi-channel cortical recording microsystem.

    PubMed

    Sodagar, Amir M; Wise, Kensall D; Najafi, Khalil

    2006-01-01

    A 64-channel neural processor has been developed for use in an implantable neural recording microsystem. In the scan mode, the processor is capable of detecting positive, negative, and biphasic spikes with programmable thresholds. It collects action potential information from the input channels, tags the activities with the associated channel address, compresses and finally packs the activity information in a serial digital bit stream to be sent to an external host. In the monitor mode, two channels can be selected and viewed at high resolution for studies where the entire signal is of interest.

  12. An implantable wireless neural interface for recording cortical circuit dynamics in moving primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borton, David A.; Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Nurmikko, Arto

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Neural interface technology suitable for clinical translation has the potential to significantly impact the lives of amputees, spinal cord injury victims and those living with severe neuromotor disease. Such systems must be chronically safe, durable and effective. Approach. We have designed and implemented a neural interface microsystem, housed in a compact, subcutaneous and hermetically sealed titanium enclosure. The implanted device interfaces the brain with a 510k-approved, 100-element silicon-based microelectrode array via a custom hermetic feedthrough design. Full spectrum neural signals were amplified (0.1 Hz to 7.8 kHz, 200× gain) and multiplexed by a custom application specific integrated circuit, digitized and then packaged for transmission. The neural data (24 Mbps) were transmitted by a wireless data link carried on a frequency-shift-key-modulated signal at 3.2 and 3.8 GHz to a receiver 1 m away by design as a point-to-point communication link for human clinical use. The system was powered by an embedded medical grade rechargeable Li-ion battery for 7 h continuous operation between recharge via an inductive transcutaneous wireless power link at 2 MHz. Main results. Device verification and early validation were performed in both swine and non-human primate freely-moving animal models and showed that the wireless implant was electrically stable, effective in capturing and delivering broadband neural data, and safe for over one year of testing. In addition, we have used the multichannel data from these mobile animal models to demonstrate the ability to decode neural population dynamics associated with motor activity. Significance. We have developed an implanted wireless broadband neural recording device evaluated in non-human primate and swine. The use of this new implantable neural interface technology can provide insight into how to advance human neuroprostheses beyond the present early clinical trials. Further, such tools enable mobile

  13. An Implantable Wireless Neural Interface for Recording Cortical Circuit Dynamics in Moving Primates

    PubMed Central

    Borton, David A.; Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Nurmikko, Arto

    2013-01-01

    Objective Neural interface technology suitable for clinical translation has the potential to significantly impact the lives of amputees, spinal cord injury victims, and those living with severe neuromotor disease. Such systems must be chronically safe, durable, and effective. Approach We have designed and implemented a neural interface microsystem, housed in a compact, subcutaneous, and hermetically sealed titanium enclosure. The implanted device interfaces the brain with a 510k-approved, 100-element silicon-based MEA via a custom hermetic feedthrough design. Full spectrum neural signals were amplified (0.1Hz to 7.8kHz, ×200 gain) and multiplexed by a custom application specific integrated circuit, digitized, and then packaged for transmission. The neural data (24 Mbps) was transmitted by a wireless data link carried on an frequency shift key modulated signal at 3.2GHz and 3.8GHz to a receiver 1 meter away by design as a point-to-point communication link for human clinical use. The system was powered by an embedded medical grade rechargeable Li-ion battery for 7-hour continuous operation between recharge via an inductive transcutaneous wireless power link at 2MHz. Main results Device verification and early validation was performed in both swine and non-human primate freely-moving animal models and showed that the wireless implant was electrically stable, effective in capturing and delivering broadband neural data, and safe for over one year of testing. In addition, we have used the multichannel data from these mobile animal models to demonstrate the ability to decode neural population dynamics associated with motor activity. Significance We have developed an implanted wireless broadband neural recording device evaluated in non-human primate and swine. The use of this new implantable neural interface technology can provide insight on how to advance human neuroprostheses beyond the present early clinical trials. Further, such tools enable mobile patient use, have

  14. Chronic in-vivo testing of a 16-channel implantable wireless neural stimulator.

    PubMed

    Bredeson, Samuel; Kanneganti, Aswini; Deku, Felix; Cogan, Stuart; Romero-Ortega, Mario; Troyk, Philip

    2015-08-01

    Here, we report on chronic in-vivo testing of a 16-channel wireless floating microelectrode array (WFMA) in a rat sciatic nerve model. Muscle threshold currents, charge injection levels, and charge density were monitored for electrodes of two WFMA devices implanted into animal subjects over a five month period. This type of wireless stimulation device could eliminate problems associated with percutaneous connectors for a variety of neural prostheses and other medical devices.

  15. A Chronically Implantable Bidirectional Neural Interface for Non-human Primates.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Misako; Sugano, Eriko; Tomita, Hiroshi; Fujii, Naotaka

    2017-01-01

    Optogenetics has potential applications in the study of epilepsy and neuroprostheses, and for studies on neural circuit dynamics. However, to achieve translation to clinical usage, optogenetic interfaces that are capable of chronic stimulation and monitoring with minimal brain trauma are required. We aimed to develop a chronically implantable device for photostimulation of the brain of non-human primates. We used a micro-light-emitting diode (LED) array with a flexible polyimide film. The array was combined with a whole-cortex electrocorticographic (ECoG) electrode array for simultaneous photostimulation and recording. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was virally transduced into the cerebral cortex of common marmosets, and then the device was epidurally implanted into their brains. We recorded the neural activity during photostimulation of the awake monkeys for 4 months. The neural responses gradually increased after the virus injection for ~8 weeks and remained constant for another 8 weeks. The micro-LED and ECoG arrays allowed semi-invasive simultaneous stimulation and recording during long-term implantation in the brains of non-human primates. The development of this device represents substantial progress in the field of optogenetic applications.

  16. Ultrasmall implantable composite microelectrodes with bioactive surfaces for chronic neural interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kozai, Takashi D. Yoshida; Langhals, Nicholas B.; Patel, Paras R.; Deng, Xiaopei; Zhang, Huanan; Smith, Karen L.; Lahann, Joerg; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2012-01-01

    Implantable neural microelectrodes that can record extracellular biopotentials from small, targeted groups of neurons are critical for neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications including brain-controlled prosthetic devices. The crucial material-dependent problem is developing microelectrodes that record neural activity from the same neurons for years with high fidelity and reliability. Here, we report the development of an integrated composite electrode consisting of a carbon-fibre core, a poly(p-xylylene)-based thin-film coating that acts as a dielectric barrier and that is functionalized to control intrinsic biological processes, and a poly(thiophene)-based recording pad. The resulting implants are an order of magnitude smaller than traditional recording electrodes, and more mechanically compliant with brain tissue. They were found to elicit much reduced chronic reactive tissue responses and enabled single-neuron recording in acute and early chronic experiments in rats. This technology, taking advantage of new composites, makes possible highly selective and stealthy neural interface devices towards realizing long-lasting implants. PMID:23142839

  17. Ultrasmall implantable composite microelectrodes with bioactive surfaces for chronic neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kozai, Takashi D Yoshida; Langhals, Nicholas B; Patel, Paras R; Deng, Xiaopei; Zhang, Huanan; Smith, Karen L; Lahann, Joerg; Kotov, Nicholas A; Kipke, Daryl R

    2012-12-01

    Implantable neural microelectrodes that can record extracellular biopotentials from small, targeted groups of neurons are critical for neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications including brain-controlled prosthetic devices. The crucial material-dependent problem is developing microelectrodes that record neural activity from the same neurons for years with high fidelity and reliability. Here, we report the development of an integrated composite electrode consisting of a carbon-fibre core, a poly(p-xylylene)-based thin-film coating that acts as a dielectric barrier and that is functionalized to control intrinsic biological processes, and a poly(thiophene)-based recording pad. The resulting implants are an order of magnitude smaller than traditional recording electrodes, and more mechanically compliant with brain tissue. They were found to elicit much reduced chronic reactive tissue responses and enabled single-neuron recording in acute and early chronic experiments in rats. This technology, taking advantage of new composites, makes possible highly selective and stealthy neural interface devices towards realizing long-lasting implants.

  18. Two-photon imaging of chronically implanted neural electrodes: Sealing methods and new insights

    PubMed Central

    Kozai, Takashi D. Y.; Eles, James R.; Vazquez, Alberto L.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Background Two-photon microscopy has enabled the visualization of dynamic tissue changes to injury and disease in vivo. While this technique has provided powerful new information, in vivo two-photon chronic imaging around tethered cortical implants, such as microelectrodes or neural probes, present unique challenges. New Method A number of strategies are described to prepare a cranial window to longitudinally observe the impact of neural probes on brain tissue and vasculature for up to 3 months. Results It was found that silastic sealants limit cell infiltration into the craniotomy, thereby limiting light scattering and preserving window clarity over time. In contrast, low concentration hydrogel sealants failed to prevent cell infiltration and their use at high concentration displaced brain tissue and disrupted probe performance. Comparison with Existing Method(s) The use of silastic sealants allows for a suitable imaging window for long term chronic experiments and revealed new insights regarding the dynamic leukocyte response around implants and the nature of chronic BBB leakage in the sub-dural space. Conclusion The presented method provides a valuable tool for evaluating the chronic inflammatory response and the performance of emerging implantable neural technologies. PMID:26526459

  19. Ultrasmall implantable composite microelectrodes with bioactive surfaces for chronic neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida Kozai, Takashi D.; Langhals, Nicholas B.; Patel, Paras R.; Deng, Xiaopei; Zhang, Huanan; Smith, Karen L.; Lahann, Joerg; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2012-12-01

    Implantable neural microelectrodes that can record extracellular biopotentials from small, targeted groups of neurons are critical for neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications including brain-controlled prosthetic devices. The crucial material-dependent problem is developing microelectrodes that record neural activity from the same neurons for years with high fidelity and reliability. Here, we report the development of an integrated composite electrode consisting of a carbon-fibre core, a poly(p-xylylene)-based thin-film coating that acts as a dielectric barrier and that is functionalized to control intrinsic biological processes, and a poly(thiophene)-based recording pad. The resulting implants are an order of magnitude smaller than traditional recording electrodes, and more mechanically compliant with brain tissue. They were found to elicit much reduced chronic reactive tissue responses and enabled single-neuron recording in acute and early chronic experiments in rats. This technology, taking advantage of new composites, makes possible highly selective and stealthy neural interface devices towards realizing long-lasting implants.

  20. Novel multi-sided, microelectrode arrays for implantable neural applications

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, John P.; Langhals, Nick B.; Anderson, David J.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2014-01-01

    A new parylene-based microfabrication process is presented for neural recording and drug delivery applications. We introduce a large design space for electrode placement and structural flexibility with a six mask process. By using chemical mechanical polishing, electrode sites may be created top-side, back-side, or on the edge of the device having three exposed sides. Added surface area was achieved on the exposed edge through electroplating. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) modified edge electrodes having an 85-μm2 footprint resulted in an impedance of 200 kΩ at 1 kHz. Edge electrodes were able to successfully record single unit activity in acute animal studies. A finite element model of planar and edge electrodes relative to neuron position reveals that edge electrodes should be beneficial for increasing the volume of tissue being sampled in recording applications. PMID:21301965

  1. Novel multi-sided, microelectrode arrays for implantable neural applications.

    PubMed

    Seymour, John P; Langhals, Nick B; Anderson, David J; Kipke, Daryl R

    2011-06-01

    A new parylene-based microfabrication process is presented for neural recording and drug delivery applications. We introduce a large design space for electrode placement and structural flexibility with a six mask process. By using chemical mechanical polishing, electrode sites may be created top-side, back-side, or on the edge of the device having three exposed sides. Added surface area was achieved on the exposed edge through electroplating. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) modified edge electrodes having an 85-μm(2) footprint resulted in an impedance of 200 kΩ at 1 kHz. Edge electrodes were able to successfully record single unit activity in acute animal studies. A finite element model of planar and edge electrodes relative to neuron position reveals that edge electrodes should be beneficial for increasing the volume of tissue being sampled in recording applications.

  2. A preferential design approach for energy-efficient and robust implantable neural signal processing hardware.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Seetharam; Chiel, Hillel J; Bhunia, Swarup

    2009-01-01

    For implantable neural interface applications, it is important to compress data and analyze spike patterns across multiple channels in real time. Such a computational task for online neural data processing requires an innovative circuit-architecture level design approach for low-power, robust and area-efficient hardware implementation. Conventional microprocessor or Digital Signal Processing (DSP) chips would dissipate too much power and are too large in size for an implantable system. In this paper, we propose a novel hardware design approach, referred to as "Preferential Design" that exploits the nature of the neural signal processing algorithm to achieve a low-voltage, robust and area-efficient implementation using nanoscale process technology. The basic idea is to isolate the critical components with respect to system performance and design them more conservatively compared to the noncritical ones. This allows aggressive voltage scaling for low power operation while ensuring robustness and area efficiency. We have applied the proposed approach to a neural signal processing algorithm using the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) and observed significant improvement in power and robustness over conventional design.

  3. Multichannel neural recording with a 128 Mbps UWB wireless transmitter for implantable brain-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ando, H; Takizawa, K; Yoshida, T; Matsushita, K; Hirata, M; Suzuki, T

    2015-01-01

    To realize a low-invasive and high accuracy BMI (Brain-machine interface) system, we have already developed a fully-implantable wireless BMI system which consists of ECoG neural electrode arrays, neural recording ASICs, a Wi-Fi based wireless data transmitter and a wireless power receiver with a rechargeable battery. For accurate estimation of movement intentions, it is important for a BMI system to have a large number of recording channels. In this paper, we report a new multi-channel BMI system which is able to record up to 4096-ch ECoG data by multiple connections of 64-ch ASICs and time division multiplexing of recorded data. This system has an ultra-wide-band (UWB) wireless unit for transmitting the recorded neural signals to outside the body. By preliminary experiments with a human body equivalent liquid phantom, we confirmed 4096-ch UWB wireless data transmission at 128 Mbps mode below 20 mm distance.

  4. Neural signal processing and closed-loop control algorithm design for an implanted neural recording and stimulation system.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Lei; McConley, Marc; Angermueller, Kai; Goldberg, David; Corba, Massimiliano; Kim, Louis; Moran, James; Parks, Philip D; Sang Chin; Widge, Alik S; Dougherty, Darin D; Eskandar, Emad N

    2015-08-01

    A fully autonomous intracranial device is built to continually record neural activities in different parts of the brain, process these sampled signals, decode features that correlate to behaviors and neuropsychiatric states, and use these features to deliver brain stimulation in a closed-loop fashion. In this paper, we describe the sampling and stimulation aspects of such a device. We first describe the signal processing algorithms of two unsupervised spike sorting methods. Next, we describe the LFP time-frequency analysis and feature derivation from the two spike sorting methods. Spike sorting includes a novel approach to constructing a dictionary learning algorithm in a Compressed Sensing (CS) framework. We present a joint prediction scheme to determine the class of neural spikes in the dictionary learning framework; and, the second approach is a modified OSort algorithm which is implemented in a distributed system optimized for power efficiency. Furthermore, sorted spikes and time-frequency analysis of LFP signals can be used to generate derived features (including cross-frequency coupling, spike-field coupling). We then show how these derived features can be used in the design and development of novel decode and closed-loop control algorithms that are optimized to apply deep brain stimulation based on a patient's neuropsychiatric state. For the control algorithm, we define the state vector as representative of a patient's impulsivity, avoidance, inhibition, etc. Controller parameters are optimized to apply stimulation based on the state vector's current state as well as its historical values. The overall algorithm and software design for our implantable neural recording and stimulation system uses an innovative, adaptable, and reprogrammable architecture that enables advancement of the state-of-the-art in closed-loop neural control while also meeting the challenges of system power constraints and concurrent development with ongoing scientific research designed

  5. A three-dimensional neural recording microsystem with implantable data compression circuitry.

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, Roy H., III; Wise, Kensall D.

    2005-01-01

    A 256-site, fully implantable, 3-D neural recording microsystem has been developed. The microsystem incorporates four active neural probes with integrated circuitry for site selection, amplification, and multiplexing. The probes drive an embedded data-compression ASIC that successfully detects neural spikes in the presence of neural and circuit noise. The spike detection ASIC achieves a factor of 12 bandwidth reduction while preserving the key features of the action potential waveshape necessary for spike discrimination. This work extends the total number of neural channels that can be recorded across a transcutaneous inductively coupled wireless link from 25 to 312. When a spike is detected, this ASIC serially shifts the 5-bit amplitude and 5-bit address of the spike off of the chip over a single 2.5 Mb/s wired or wireless line. The spike detection ASIC occupies 6 mm{sup 2} in 0.5 {micro}m features and consumes 2.6 mW while the entire microsystem consumes 5.4 mW of power from a 3-V supply.

  6. Studies in RF Power Communication, SAR, and Temperature Elevation in Wireless Implantable Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujuan; Tang, Lin; Rennaker, Robert; Hutchens, Chris; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2013-01-01

    Implantable neural interfaces are designed to provide a high spatial and temporal precision control signal implementing high degree of freedom real-time prosthetic systems. The development of a Radio Frequency (RF) wireless neural interface has the potential to expand the number of applications as well as extend the robustness and longevity compared to wired neural interfaces. However, it is well known that RF signal is absorbed by the body and can result in tissue heating. In this work, numerical studies with analytical validations are performed to provide an assessment of power, heating and specific absorption rate (SAR) associated with the wireless RF transmitting within the human head. The receiving antenna on the neural interface is designed with different geometries and modeled at a range of implanted depths within the brain in order to estimate the maximum receiving power without violating SAR and tissue temperature elevation safety regulations. Based on the size of the designed antenna, sets of frequencies between 1 GHz to 4 GHz have been investigated. As expected the simulations demonstrate that longer receiving antennas (dipole) and lower working frequencies result in greater power availability prior to violating SAR regulations. For a 15 mm dipole antenna operating at 1.24 GHz on the surface of the brain, 730 uW of power could be harvested at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) SAR violation limit. At approximately 5 cm inside the head, this same antenna would receive 190 uW of power prior to violating SAR regulations. Finally, the 3-D bio-heat simulation results show that for all evaluated antennas and frequency combinations we reach FCC SAR limits well before 1 °C. It is clear that powering neural interfaces via RF is possible, but ultra-low power circuit designs combined with advanced simulation will be required to develop a functional antenna that meets all system requirements. PMID:24223123

  7. Studies in RF power communication, SAR, and temperature elevation in wireless implantable neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yujuan; Tang, Lin; Rennaker, Robert; Hutchens, Chris; Ibrahim, Tamer S

    2013-01-01

    Implantable neural interfaces are designed to provide a high spatial and temporal precision control signal implementing high degree of freedom real-time prosthetic systems. The development of a Radio Frequency (RF) wireless neural interface has the potential to expand the number of applications as well as extend the robustness and longevity compared to wired neural interfaces. However, it is well known that RF signal is absorbed by the body and can result in tissue heating. In this work, numerical studies with analytical validations are performed to provide an assessment of power, heating and specific absorption rate (SAR) associated with the wireless RF transmitting within the human head. The receiving antenna on the neural interface is designed with different geometries and modeled at a range of implanted depths within the brain in order to estimate the maximum receiving power without violating SAR and tissue temperature elevation safety regulations. Based on the size of the designed antenna, sets of frequencies between 1 GHz to 4 GHz have been investigated. As expected the simulations demonstrate that longer receiving antennas (dipole) and lower working frequencies result in greater power availability prior to violating SAR regulations. For a 15 mm dipole antenna operating at 1.24 GHz on the surface of the brain, 730 uW of power could be harvested at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) SAR violation limit. At approximately 5 cm inside the head, this same antenna would receive 190 uW of power prior to violating SAR regulations. Finally, the 3-D bio-heat simulation results show that for all evaluated antennas and frequency combinations we reach FCC SAR limits well before 1 °C. It is clear that powering neural interfaces via RF is possible, but ultra-low power circuit designs combined with advanced simulation will be required to develop a functional antenna that meets all system requirements.

  8. Advances in Cochlear Implant Telemetry: Evoked Neural Responses, Electrical Field Imaging, and Technical Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Mens, Lucas H. M.

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade, cochlear implantation has evolved into a well-established treatment of deafness, predominantly because of many improvements in speech processing and the controlled excitation of the auditory nerve. Cochlear implants now also feature telemetry, which is highly useful to monitor the proper functioning of the implanted electronics and electrode contacts. Telemetry can also support the clinical management in young children and difficult cases where neural unresponsiveness is suspected. This article will review recent advances in the telemetry of the electrically evoked compound action potential that have made these measurements simple and routine procedures in most cases. The distribution of the electrical stimulus itself sampled by “electrical field imaging” reveals general patterns of current flow in the normal cochlea and gross abnormalities in individual patients; models have been developed to derive more subtle insights from an individual electrical field imaging. Finally, some thoughts are given to the extended application of telemetry, for example, in monitoring the neural responses or in combination with other treatments of the deaf ear. PMID:17709572

  9. Cell fouling resistance of PEG-grafted polyimide film for neural implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Dong Nyoung; Yang, Dae Hyeok; Lee, Jung Bok; Bae, Min Su; Park, Ha Na; Kwon, Il Keun

    2011-11-01

    Recently, neural prosthetic electrodes covered with polyimide (PI) have been developed for chronic recording and stimulation of nervous system function. However, when these devices are implanted onto the nerve trunk, nerves might be damaged by the presence of the electrode due to the mechanical mismatch between the stiff probe and the soft biological tissue. Consequently, newly formed tissue layer may isolate the electrode from neural tissue, resulting in poor signal detection. In this study, we found a method to solve this problem. As the method, we designed and prepared poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-grafted PI film to function cell fouling resistance. The PEG-grafted PI film was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and static water contact angle measurements. Protein adsorption experiment was carried out to evaluate protein fouling resistance because protein adsorption is closely related to cell adhesion. In vitro cell behavior on PEG-grafted PI film was evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and CCK assays. The results showed that PEG-grafted PI film has characteristics of protein and cell fouling resistances as compared to bare and hydrolyzed PI films under in vitro. We suggested that PEG-grafted PI film can be useful for a neural implantable electrode.

  10. Cell fouling resistance of PEG-grafted polyimide film for neural implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Dong Nyoung; Yang, Dae Hyeok; Lee, Jung Bok; Bae, Min Su; Park, Ha Na; Kwon, Il Keun

    2012-04-01

    Recently, neural prosthetic electrodes covered with polyimide (PI) have been developed for chronic recording and stimulation of nervous system function. However, when these devices are implanted onto the nerve trunk, nerves might be damaged by the presence of the electrode due to the mechanical mismatch between the stiff probe and the soft biological tissue. Consequently, newly formed tissue layer may isolate the electrode from neural tissue, resulting in poor signal detection. In this study, we found a method to solve this problem. As the method, we designed and prepared poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-grafted PI film to function cell fouling resistance. The PEG-grafted PI film was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and static water contact angle measurements. Protein adsorption experiment was carried out to evaluate protein fouling resistance because protein adsorption is closely related to cell adhesion. In vitro cell behavior on PEG-grafted PI film was evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and CCK assays. The results showed that PEG-grafted PI film has characteristics of protein and cell fouling resistances as compared to bare and hydrolyzed PI films under in vitro. We suggested that PEG-grafted PI film can be useful for a neural implantable electrode.

  11. Antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective layer-by-layer coatings for neural implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiling; Nong, Jia; Zhong, Yinghui

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Infection, inflammation, and neuronal loss are common issues that seriously affect the functionality and longevity of chronically implanted neural prostheses. Minocycline hydrochloride (MH) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic and effective anti-inflammatory drug that also exhibits potent neuroprotective activities. In this study, we investigated the development of biocompatible thin film coatings capable of sustained release of MH for improving the long term performance of implanted neural electrodes. Approach. We developed a novel magnesium binding-mediated drug delivery mechanism for controlled and sustained release of MH from an ultrathin hydrophilic layer-by-layer (LbL) coating and characterized the parameters that control MH loading and release. The anti-biofilm, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective potencies of the LbL coating and released MH were also examined. Main results. Sustained release of physiologically relevant amount of MH for 46 days was achieved from the Mg2+-based LbL coating at a thickness of 1.25 μm. In addition, MH release from the LbL coating is pH-sensitive. The coating and released MH demonstrated strong anti-biofilm, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective potencies. Significance. This study reports, for the first time, the development of a bioactive coating that can target infection, inflammation, and neuroprotection simultaneously, which may facilitate the translation of neural interfaces to clinical applications.

  12. Toward a distributed free-floating wireless implantable neural recording system.

    PubMed

    Pyungwoo Yeon; Xingyuan Tong; Byunghun Lee; Mirbozorgi, Abdollah; Ash, Bruce; Eckhardt, Helmut; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2016-08-01

    To understand the complex correlations between neural networks across different regions in the brain and their functions at high spatiotemporal resolution, a tool is needed for obtaining long-term single unit activity (SUA) across the entire brain area. The concept and preliminary design of a distributed free-floating wireless implantable neural recording (FF-WINeR) system are presented, which can enabling SUA acquisition by dispersedly implanting tens to hundreds of untethered 1 mm3 neural recording probes, floating with the brain and operating wirelessly across the cortical surface. For powering FF-WINeR probes, a 3-coil link with an intermediate high-Q resonator provides a minimum S21 of -22.22 dB (in the body medium) and -21.23 dB (in air) at 2.8 cm coil separation, which translates to 0.76%/759 μW and 0.6%/604 μW of power transfer efficiency (PTE) / power delivered to a 9 kΩ load (PDL), in body and air, respectively. A mock-up FF-WINeR is implemented to explore microassembly method of the 1×1 mm2 micromachined silicon die with a bonding wire-wound coil and a tungsten micro-wire electrode. Circuit design methods to fit the active circuitry in only 0.96 mm2 of die area in a 130 nm standard CMOS process, and satisfy the strict power and performance requirements (in simulations) are discussed.

  13. Histological evaluation of flexible neural implants; flexibility limit for reducing the tissue response?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Heui Chang; Ejserholm, Fredrik; Gaire, Janak; Currlin, Seth; Schouenborg, Jens; Wallman, Lars; Bengtsson, Martin; Park, Kinam; Otto, Kevin J.

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Flexible neural probes are hypothesized to reduce the chronic foreign body response (FBR) mainly by reducing the strain-stress caused by an interplay between the tethered probe and the brain’s micromotion. However, a large discrepancy of Young’s modulus still exists (3-6 orders of magnitude) between the flexible probes and the brain tissue. This raises the question of whether we need to bridge this gap; would increasing the probe flexibility proportionally reduce the FBR? Approach. Using novel off-stoichiometry thiol-enes-epoxy (OSTE+) polymer probes developed in our previous work, we quantitatively evaluated the FBR to four types of probes with different softness: silicon (~150 GPa), polyimide (1.5 GPa), OSTE+Hard (300 MPa), and OSTE+Soft (6 MPa). Main results. We observed a significant reduction in the fluorescence intensity of biomarkers for activated microglia/macrophages and blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakiness around the three soft polymer probes compared to the silicon probe, both at 4 weeks and 8 weeks post-implantation. However, we did not observe any consistent differences in the biomarkers among the polymer probes. Significance. The results suggest that the mechanical compliance of neural probes can mediate the degree of FBR, but its impact diminishes after a hypothetical threshold level. This infers that resolving the mechanical mismatch alone has a limited effect on improving the lifetime of neural implants.

  14. Development of a stereotaxic device for low impact implantation of neural constructs or pieces of neural tissues into the mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Jozwiak, Andrzej; Liu, Yiwen; Yang, Ying; Gates, Monte A

    2014-01-01

    Implanting pieces of tissue or scaffolding material into the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is wrought with difficulties surrounding the size of tools needed to conduct such implants and the ability to maintain the orientation and integrity of the constructs during and after their transplantation. Here, novel technology has been developed that allows for the implantation of neural constructs or intact pieces of neural tissue into the CNS with low trauma. By "laying out" (instead of forcibly expelling) the implantable material from a thin walled glass capillary, this technology has the potential to enhance neural transplantation procedures by reducing trauma to the host brain during implantation and allowing for the implantation of engineered/dissected tissues or constructs in such a way that their orientation and integrity are maintained in the host. Such technology may be useful for treating various CNS disorders which require the reestablishment of point-to-point contacts (e.g., Parkinson's disease) across the adult CNS, an environment which is not normally permissive to axonal growth.

  15. Flexible, Polarization-Diverse UWB Antennas for Implantable Neural Recording Systems.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Hadi; Mirbozorgi, S Abdollah; Ameli, Reza; Rusch, Leslie A; Gosselin, Benoit

    2016-02-01

    Implanted antennas for implant-to-air data communications must be composed of material compatible with biological tissues. We design single and dual-polarization antennas for wireless ultra-wideband neural recording systems using an inhomogeneous multi-layer model of the human head. Antennas made from flexible materials are more easily adapted to implantation; we investigate both flexible and rigid materials and examine performance trade-offs. The proposed antennas are designed to operate in a frequency range of 2-11 GHz (having S11 below -10 dB) covering both the 2.45 GHz (ISM) band and the 3.1-10.6 GHz UWB band. Measurements confirm simulation results showing flexible antennas have little performance degradation due to bending effects (in terms of impedance matching). Our miniaturized flexible antennas are 12 mm×12 mm and 10 mm×9 mm for single- and dual-polarizations, respectively. Finally, a comparison is made of four implantable antennas covering the 2-11 GHz range: 1) rigid, single polarization, 2) rigid, dual polarization, 3) flexible, single polarization and 4) flexible, dual polarization. In all cases a rigid antenna is used outside the body, with an appropriate polarization. Several advantages were confirmed for dual polarization antennas: 1) smaller size, 2) lower sensitivity to angular misalignments, and 3) higher fidelity.

  16. Nanofibers implant functionalized by neural growth factor as a strategy to innervate a bioengineered tooth.

    PubMed

    Eap, Sandy; Bécavin, Thibault; Keller, Laetitia; Kökten, Tunay; Fioretti, Florence; Weickert, Jean-Luc; Deveaux, Etienne; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia; Kuchler-Bopp, Sabine

    2014-03-01

    Current strategies for jaw reconstruction require multiple procedures, to repair the bone defect, to offer sufficient support, and to place the tooth implant. The entire procedure can be painful and time-consuming, and the desired functional repair can be achieved only when both steps are successful. The ability to engineer combined tooth and bone constructs, which would grow in a coordinated fashion with the surrounding tissues, could potentially improve the clinical outcomes and also reduce patient suffering. A unique nanofibrous and active implant for bone-tooth unit regeneration and also the innervation of this bioengineered tooth are demonstrated. A nanofibrous polycaprolactone membrane is functionalized with neural growth factor, along with dental germ, and tooth innervation follows. Such innervation allows complete functionality and tissue homeostasis of the tooth, such as dentinal sensitivity, odontoblast function, masticatory forces, and blood flow. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Design and evaluation of carbon nanofiber and silicon materials for neural implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenzie, Janice L.

    Reduction of glial scar tissue around central nervous system implants is necessary for improved efficacy in chronic applications. Design of materials that possess tunable properties inspired by native biological tissue and elucidation of pertinent cellular interactions with these materials was the motivation for this study. Since nanoscale carbon fibers possess the fundamental dimensional similarities to biological tissue and have attractive material properties needed for neural biomaterial implants, this present study explored cytocompatibility of these materials as well as modifications to traditionally used silicon. On silicon materials, results indicated that nanoscale surface features reduced astrocyte functions, and could be used to guide neurite extension from PC12 cells. Similarly, it was determined that astrocyte functions (key cells in glial scar tissue formation) were reduced on smaller diameter carbon fibers (125 nm or less) while PC12 neurite extension was enhanced on smaller diameter carbon fibers (100 nm or less). Further studies implicated laminin adsorption as a key mechanism in enhancing astrocyte adhesion to larger diameter fibers and at the same time encouraging neurite extension on smaller diameter fibers. Polycarbonate urethane (PCU) was then used as a matrix material for the smaller diameter carbon fibers (100 and 60 nm). These composites proved very versatile since electrical and mechanical properties as well as cell functions and directionality could be influenced by changing bulk and surface composition and features of these matrices. When these composites were modified to be smooth at the micronscale and only rough at the nanoscale, P19 cells actually submerged philopodia, extensions, or whole cells bodies beneath the PCU in order to interact with the carbon nanofibers. These carbon nanofiber composites that have been formulated are a promising material to coat neural probes and thereby enhance functionality at the tissue interface. This

  18. Evoked EMG-based torque prediction under muscle fatigue in implanted neural stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashibe, Mitsuhiro; Zhang, Qin; Guiraud, David; Fattal, Charles

    2011-10-01

    In patients with complete spinal cord injury, fatigue occurs rapidly and there is no proprioceptive feedback regarding the current muscle condition. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the muscle state and assess the expected muscle response to improve the current FES system toward adaptive force/torque control in the presence of muscle fatigue. Our team implanted neural and epimysial electrodes in a complete paraplegic patient in 1999. We carried out a case study, in the specific case of implanted stimulation, in order to verify the corresponding torque prediction based on stimulus evoked EMG (eEMG) when muscle fatigue is occurring during electrical stimulation. Indeed, in implanted stimulation, the relationship between stimulation parameters and output torques is more stable than external stimulation in which the electrode location strongly affects the quality of the recruitment. Thus, the assumption that changes in the stimulation-torque relationship would be mainly due to muscle fatigue can be made reasonably. The eEMG was proved to be correlated to the generated torque during the continuous stimulation while the frequency of eEMG also decreased during fatigue. The median frequency showed a similar variation trend to the mean absolute value of eEMG. Torque prediction during fatigue-inducing tests was performed based on eEMG in model cross-validation where the model was identified using recruitment test data. The torque prediction, apart from the potentiation period, showed acceptable tracking performances that would enable us to perform adaptive closed-loop control through implanted neural stimulation in the future.

  19. Residual Neural Processing of Musical Sound Features in Adult Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Timm, Lydia; Vuust, Peter; Brattico, Elvira; Agrawal, Deepashri; Debener, Stefan; Büchner, Andreas; Dengler, Reinhard; Wittfoth, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Auditory processing in general and music perception in particular are hampered in adult cochlear implant (CI) users. To examine the residual music perception skills and their underlying neural correlates in CI users implanted in adolescence or adulthood, we conducted an electrophysiological and behavioral study comparing adult CI users with normal-hearing age-matched controls (NH controls). We used a newly developed musical multi-feature paradigm, which makes it possible to test automatic auditory discrimination of six different types of sound feature changes inserted within a musical enriched setting lasting only 20 min. The presentation of stimuli did not require the participants’ attention, allowing the study of the early automatic stage of feature processing in the auditory cortex. For the CI users, we obtained mismatch negativity (MMN) brain responses to five feature changes but not to changes of rhythm, whereas we obtained MMNs for all the feature changes in the NH controls. Furthermore, the MMNs to deviants of pitch of CI users were reduced in amplitude and later than those of NH controls for changes of pitch and guitar timber. No other group differences in MMN parameters were found to changes in intensity and saxophone timber. Furthermore, the MMNs in CI users reflected the behavioral scores from a respective discrimination task and were correlated with patients’ age and speech intelligibility. Our results suggest that even though CI users are not performing at the same level as NH controls in neural discrimination of pitch-based features, they do possess potential neural abilities for music processing. However, CI users showed a disrupted ability to automatically discriminate rhythmic changes compared with controls. The current behavioral and MMN findings highlight the residual neural skills for music processing even in CI users who have been implanted in adolescence or adulthood. Highlights: -Automatic brain responses to musical feature changes

  20. Residual neural processing of musical sound features in adult cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Timm, Lydia; Vuust, Peter; Brattico, Elvira; Agrawal, Deepashri; Debener, Stefan; Büchner, Andreas; Dengler, Reinhard; Wittfoth, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Auditory processing in general and music perception in particular are hampered in adult cochlear implant (CI) users. To examine the residual music perception skills and their underlying neural correlates in CI users implanted in adolescence or adulthood, we conducted an electrophysiological and behavioral study comparing adult CI users with normal-hearing age-matched controls (NH controls). We used a newly developed musical multi-feature paradigm, which makes it possible to test automatic auditory discrimination of six different types of sound feature changes inserted within a musical enriched setting lasting only 20 min. The presentation of stimuli did not require the participants' attention, allowing the study of the early automatic stage of feature processing in the auditory cortex. For the CI users, we obtained mismatch negativity (MMN) brain responses to five feature changes but not to changes of rhythm, whereas we obtained MMNs for all the feature changes in the NH controls. Furthermore, the MMNs to deviants of pitch of CI users were reduced in amplitude and later than those of NH controls for changes of pitch and guitar timber. No other group differences in MMN parameters were found to changes in intensity and saxophone timber. Furthermore, the MMNs in CI users reflected the behavioral scores from a respective discrimination task and were correlated with patients' age and speech intelligibility. Our results suggest that even though CI users are not performing at the same level as NH controls in neural discrimination of pitch-based features, they do possess potential neural abilities for music processing. However, CI users showed a disrupted ability to automatically discriminate rhythmic changes compared with controls. The current behavioral and MMN findings highlight the residual neural skills for music processing even in CI users who have been implanted in adolescence or adulthood. -Automatic brain responses to musical feature changes reflect the

  1. Implantable neural spike detection using lifting-based stationary wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuning; Mason, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Spike detection from high data rate neural recordings is desired to ease the bandwidth bottleneck of bio-telemetry. An appropriate spike detection method should be able to detect spikes under low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) while meeting the power and area constraints of implantation. This paper introduces a spike detection system utilizing lifting-based stationary wavelet transform (SWT) that decomposes neural signals into 2 levels using 'symmlet2' wavelet basis. This approach enables accurate spike detection down to an SNR of only 2. The lifting-based SWT architecture permits a hardware implementation consuming only 6.6 μW power and 0.07 mm(2) area for 32 channels with 3.2 MHz master clock.

  2. Monopolar Detection Thresholds Predict Spatial Selectivity of Neural Excitation in Cochlear Implants: Implications for Speech Recognition

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to (1) investigate the potential of using monopolar psychophysical detection thresholds for estimating spatial selectivity of neural excitation with cochlear implants and to (2) examine the effect of site removal on speech recognition based on the threshold measure. Detection thresholds were measured in Cochlear Nucleus® device users using monopolar stimulation for pulse trains that were of (a) low rate and long duration, (b) high rate and short duration, and (c) high rate and long duration. Spatial selectivity of neural excitation was estimated by a forward-masking paradigm, where the probe threshold elevation in the presence of a forward masker was measured as a function of masker-probe separation. The strength of the correlation between the monopolar thresholds and the slopes of the masking patterns systematically reduced as neural response of the threshold stimulus involved interpulse interactions (refractoriness and sub-threshold adaptation), and spike-rate adaptation. Detection threshold for the low-rate stimulus most strongly correlated with the spread of forward masking patterns and the correlation reduced for long and high rate pulse trains. The low-rate thresholds were then measured for all electrodes across the array for each subject. Subsequently, speech recognition was tested with experimental maps that deactivated five stimulation sites with the highest thresholds and five randomly chosen ones. Performance with deactivating the high-threshold sites was better than performance with the subjects’ clinical map used every day with all electrodes active, in both quiet and background noise. Performance with random deactivation was on average poorer than that with the clinical map but the difference was not significant. These results suggested that the monopolar low-rate thresholds are related to the spatial neural excitation patterns in cochlear implant users and can be used to select sites for more optimal speech

  3. Neural ITD coding with bilateral cochlear implants: effect of binaurally coherent jitter

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yoojin; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Poor sensitivity to the interaural time difference (ITD) constrains the ability of human bilateral cochlear implant users to listen in everyday noisy acoustic environments. ITD sensitivity to periodic pulse trains degrades sharply with increasing pulse rate but can be restored at high pulse rates by jittering the interpulse intervals in a binaurally coherent manner (Laback and Majdak. Binaural jitter improves interaural time-difference sensitivity of cochlear implantees at high pulse rates. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105: 814–817, 2008). We investigated the neural basis of the jitter effect by recording from single inferior colliculus (IC) neurons in bilaterally implanted, anesthetized cats. Neural responses to trains of biphasic pulses were measured as a function of pulse rate, jitter, and ITD. An effect of jitter on neural responses was most prominent for pulse rates above 300 pulses/s. High-rate periodic trains evoked only an onset response in most IC neurons, but introducing jitter increased ongoing firing rates in about half of these neurons. Neurons that had sustained responses to jittered high-rate pulse trains showed ITD tuning comparable with that produced by low-rate periodic pulse trains. Thus, jitter appears to improve neural ITD sensitivity by restoring sustained firing in many IC neurons. The effect of jitter on IC responses is qualitatively consistent with human psychophysics. Action potentials tended to occur reproducibly at sparse, preferred times across repeated presentations of high-rate jittered pulse trains. Spike triggered averaging of responses to jittered pulse trains revealed that firing was triggered by very short interpulse intervals. This suggests it may be possible to restore ITD sensitivity to periodic carriers by simply inserting short interpulse intervals at select times. PMID:22592306

  4. Current focussing in cochlear implants: an analysis of neural recruitment in a computational model.

    PubMed

    Kalkman, Randy K; Briaire, Jeroen J; Frijns, Johan H M

    2015-04-01

    Several multipolar current focussing strategies are examined in a computational model of the implanted human cochlea. The model includes a realistic spatial distribution of cell bodies of the auditory neurons throughout Rosenthal's canal. Simulations are performed of monopolar, (partial) tripolar and phased array stimulation. Excitation patterns, estimated thresholds, electrical dynamic range, excitation density and neural recruitment curves are determined and compared. The main findings are: (I) Current focussing requires electrical field interaction to induce spatially restricted excitation patterns. For perimodiolar electrodes the distance to the neurons is too small to have sufficient electrical field interaction, which results in neural excitation near non-centre contacts. (II) Current focussing only produces spatially restricted excitation patterns when there is little or no excitation occurring in the peripheral processes, either because of geometrical factors or due to neural degeneration. (III) The model predicts that neural recruitment with electrical stimulation is a three-dimensional process; regions of excitation not only expand in apical and basal directions, but also by penetrating deeper into the spiral ganglion. (IV) At equal loudness certain differences between the spatial excitation patterns of various multipoles cannot be simulated in a model containing linearly aligned neurons of identical morphology. Introducing a form of variability in the neurons, such as the spatial distribution of cell bodies in the spiral ganglion used in this study, is therefore essential in the modelling of spread of excitation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled .

  5. Comprehensive characterization and failure modes of tungsten microwire arrays in chronic neural implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Abhishek; Xue, Qing-Shan; Sankar, Viswanath; Nishida, Toshikazu; Shaw, Gerry; Streit, Wolfgang J.; Sanchez, Justin C.

    2012-10-01

    For nearly 55 years, tungsten microwires have been widely used in neurophysiological experiments in animal models to chronically record neuronal activity. While tungsten microwires initially provide stable recordings, their inability to reliably record high-quality neural signals for tens of years has limited their efficacy for neuroprosthetic applications in humans. Comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of electrode performance and failure is necessary for developing next generation neural interfaces for humans. In this study, we evaluated the abiotic (electrophysiology, impedance, electrode morphology) and biotic (microglial reactivity, blood-brain barrier disruption, biochemical markers of axonal injury) effects of 16-channel, 50 µm diameter, polyimide insulated tungsten microwires array for implant durations that ranged from acute to up to 9 months in 25 rats. Daily electrode impedance spectroscopy, electrophysiological recordings, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) withdrawals, and histopathological analysis were performed to study the time-varying effects of chronic electrode implantation. Structural changes at the electrode recording site were observed as early as within 2-3 h of electrode insertion. Abiotic analysis indicated the first 2-3 weeks following surgery was the most dynamic period in the chronic electrode lifetime as there were greater variations in the electrode impedance, functional electrode performance, and the structural changes occurring at the electrode recording tips. Electrode recording site deterioration continued for the long-term chronic animals as insulation damage occurred and recording surface became more recessed over time. In general, electrode impedance and functional performance had smaller daily variations combined with reduced electrode recording site changes during the chronic phase. Histopathological studies were focused largely on characterizing microglial cell responses to electrode implantation. We found that

  6. Brain Tissue Responses to Neural Implants Impact Signal Sensitivity and Intervention Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Implantable biosensors are valuable scientific tools for basic neuroscience research and clinical applications. Neurotechnologies provide direct readouts of neurological signal and neurochemical processes. These tools are generally most valuable when performance capacities extend over months and years to facilitate the study of memory, plasticity, and behavior or to monitor patients’ conditions. These needs have generated a variety of device designs from microelectrodes for fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) and electrophysiology to microdialysis probes for sampling and detecting various neurochemicals. Regardless of the technology used, the breaching of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) to insert devices triggers a cascade of biochemical pathways resulting in complex molecular and cellular responses to implanted devices. Molecular and cellular changes in the microenvironment surrounding an implant include the introduction of mechanical strain, activation of glial cells, loss of perfusion, secondary metabolic injury, and neuronal degeneration. Changes to the tissue microenvironment surrounding the device can dramatically impact electrochemical and electrophysiological signal sensitivity and stability over time. This review summarizes the magnitude, variability, and time course of the dynamic molecular and cellular level neural tissue responses induced by state-of-the-art implantable devices. Studies show that insertion injuries and foreign body response can impact signal quality across all implanted central nervous system (CNS) sensors to varying degrees over both acute (seconds to minutes) and chronic periods (weeks to months). Understanding the underlying biological processes behind the brain tissue response to the devices at the cellular and molecular level leads to a variety of intervention strategies for improving signal sensitivity and longevity. PMID:25546652

  7. BER performance of implant-to-air high-speed UWB data communications for neural recording systems.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, H; Mirbozorgi, S A; Rusch, L A; Gosselin, B

    2014-01-01

    Implant-to-air ultra-wideband communication systems are interesting for neural recording systems due to their low power consumption and high data-rates. In this paper we investigate the performance of an implant-to-air wireless link using a realistic model of the biological channel for neural recording systems. We propose an optimized fifth-derivative Gaussian pulse as a transmitted waveform for different modulations: binary phase shift keying (BPSK), on-off keying (OOK) and differential phase shift keying (DPSK). Monitoring of neural responses with high resolution in the brain requires a high data rate link as the number of electrodes is increased. Each electrode needs a data rate around 800 kb/s to support its neural channel. As we target more than 512 electrodes, we require a data link higher than 400 Mbps.

  8. Electrode impedance analysis of chronic tungsten microwire neural implants: understanding abiotic vs. biotic contributions.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Viswanath; Patrick, Erin; Dieme, Robert; Sanchez, Justin C; Prasad, Abhishek; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Changes in biotic and abiotic factors can be reflected in the complex impedance spectrum of the microelectrodes chronically implanted into the neural tissue. The recording surface of the tungsten electrode in vivo undergoes abiotic changes due to recording site corrosion and insulation delamination as well as biotic changes due to tissue encapsulation as a result of the foreign body immune response. We reported earlier that large changes in electrode impedance measured at 1 kHz were correlated with poor electrode functional performance, quantified through electrophysiological recordings during the chronic lifetime of the electrode. There is a need to identity the factors that contribute to the chronic impedance variation. In this work, we use numerical simulation and regression to equivalent circuit models to evaluate both the abiotic and biotic contributions to the impedance response over chronic implant duration. COMSOL® simulation of abiotic electrode morphology changes provide a possible explanation for the decrease in the electrode impedance at long implant duration while biotic changes play an important role in the large increase in impedance observed initially.

  9. Electrode impedance analysis of chronic tungsten microwire neural implants: understanding abiotic vs. biotic contributions

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Viswanath; Patrick, Erin; Dieme, Robert; Sanchez, Justin C.; Prasad, Abhishek; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Changes in biotic and abiotic factors can be reflected in the complex impedance spectrum of the microelectrodes chronically implanted into the neural tissue. The recording surface of the tungsten electrode in vivo undergoes abiotic changes due to recording site corrosion and insulation delamination as well as biotic changes due to tissue encapsulation as a result of the foreign body immune response. We reported earlier that large changes in electrode impedance measured at 1 kHz were correlated with poor electrode functional performance, quantified through electrophysiological recordings during the chronic lifetime of the electrode. There is a need to identity the factors that contribute to the chronic impedance variation. In this work, we use numerical simulation and regression to equivalent circuit models to evaluate both the abiotic and biotic contributions to the impedance response over chronic implant duration. COMSOL® simulation of abiotic electrode morphology changes provide a possible explanation for the decrease in the electrode impedance at long implant duration while biotic changes play an important role in the large increase in impedance observed initially. PMID:24847248

  10. Neural Coding of Interaural Time Differences with Bilateral Cochlear Implants in Unanesthetized Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Kenneth E.; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Although bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) provide improvements in sound localization and speech perception in noise over unilateral CIs, bilateral CI users' sensitivity to interaural time differences (ITDs) is still poorer than normal. In particular, ITD sensitivity of most CI users degrades with increasing stimulation rate and is lacking at the high carrier pulse rates used in CI processors to deliver speech information. To gain a better understanding of the neural basis for this degradation, we characterized ITD tuning of single neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) for pulse train stimuli in an unanesthetized rabbit model of bilateral CIs. Approximately 73% of IC neurons showed significant ITD sensitivity in their overall firing rates. On average, ITD sensitivity was best for pulse rates near 80–160 pulses per second (pps) and degraded for both lower and higher pulse rates. The degradation in ITD sensitivity at low pulse rates was caused by strong, unsynchronized background activity that masked stimulus-driven responses in many neurons. Selecting synchronized responses by temporal windowing revealed ITD sensitivity in these neurons. With temporal windowing, both the fraction of ITD-sensitive neurons and the degree of ITD sensitivity decreased monotonically with increasing pulse rate. To compare neural ITD sensitivity to human performance in ITD discrimination, neural just-noticeable differences (JNDs) in ITD were computed using signal detection theory. Using temporal windowing at lower pulse rates, and overall firing rate at higher pulse rates, neural ITD JNDs were within the range of perceptual JNDs in human CI users over a wide range of pulse rates. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many profoundly deaf people wearing cochlear implants (CIs) still face challenges in everyday situations, such as understanding conversations in noise. Even with CIs in both ears, they have difficulty making full use of subtle differences in the sounds reaching the two ears [interaural

  11. Longitudinal Analysis of the Absence of Intraoperative Neural Response Telemetry in Children using Cochlear Implants.

    PubMed

    Moura, Amanda Christina Gomes de; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valéria Schmidt; Couto, Maria Ines Vieira; Brito, Rubens; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Befi-Lopes, Debora Maria; Matas, Carla Gentile; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2014-10-01

    Introduction Currently the cochlear implant allows access to sounds in individuals with profound hearing loss. The objective methods used to verify the integrity of the cochlear device and the electrophysiologic response of users have noted these improvements. Objective To establish whether the evoked compound action potential of the auditory nerve can appear after electrical stimulation when it is absent intraoperatively. Methods The clinical records of children implanted with the Nucleus Freedom (Cochlear Ltd., Australia) (CI24RE) cochlear implant between January 2009 and January 2010 with at least 6 months of use were evaluated. The neural response telemetry (NRT) thresholds of electrodes 1, 6, 11, 16, and 22 during surgery and after at least 3 months of implant use were analyzed and correlated with etiology, length of auditory deprivation, and chronological age. These data were compared between a group of children exhibiting responses in all of the tested electrodes and a group of children who had at least one absent response. Results The sample was composed of clinical records of 51 children. From these, 21% (11) showed no NRT in at least one of the tested electrodes. After an average of 4.9 months of stimulation, the number of individuals exhibiting absent responses decreased from 21 to 11% (n = 6). Conclusion It is feasible that absent responses present after a period of electrical stimulation. In our sample, 45% (n = 5) of the patients with intraoperative absence exhibited a positive response after an average of 4.9 months of continued electrical stimulation.

  12. Longitudinal Analysis of the Absence of Intraoperative Neural Response Telemetry in Children using Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Amanda Christina Gomes de; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valéria Schmidt; Couto, Maria Ines Vieira; Brito, Rubens; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Befi-Lopes, Debora Maria; Matas, Carla Gentile; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Currently the cochlear implant allows access to sounds in individuals with profound hearing loss. The objective methods used to verify the integrity of the cochlear device and the electrophysiologic response of users have noted these improvements. Objective To establish whether the evoked compound action potential of the auditory nerve can appear after electrical stimulation when it is absent intraoperatively. Methods The clinical records of children implanted with the Nucleus Freedom (Cochlear Ltd., Australia) (CI24RE) cochlear implant between January 2009 and January 2010 with at least 6 months of use were evaluated. The neural response telemetry (NRT) thresholds of electrodes 1, 6, 11, 16, and 22 during surgery and after at least 3 months of implant use were analyzed and correlated with etiology, length of auditory deprivation, and chronological age. These data were compared between a group of children exhibiting responses in all of the tested electrodes and a group of children who had at least one absent response. Results The sample was composed of clinical records of 51 children. From these, 21% (11) showed no NRT in at least one of the tested electrodes. After an average of 4.9 months of stimulation, the number of individuals exhibiting absent responses decreased from 21 to 11% (n = 6). Conclusion It is feasible that absent responses present after a period of electrical stimulation. In our sample, 45% (n = 5) of the patients with intraoperative absence exhibited a positive response after an average of 4.9 months of continued electrical stimulation. PMID:25992123

  13. Neuron cell positioning on polystyrene in culture by silver-negative ion implantation and region control of neural outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiroko; Baba, Takahiro; Ikemura, Shin'ichi; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2000-05-01

    A new method to control the position of neuron cell attachment and extension region of neural outgrowth has been developed by using a pattering ion implantation with silver-negative ions into polystyrene dishes. This technique offers a promising method to form an artificially designed neural network in cell culture in vitro. Silver-negative ions were implanted into non-treated polystyrene dishes (NTPS) at conditions of 20 keV and 3×1015 ions/cm2 through a pattering mask, which had as many as 67 slits of 60 μm in width and 4 mm in length with a spacing of 60 μm. For cell culture in vitro, nerve cells of PC-12h (rat adrenal phechromocytoma) were used because they respond to a nerve growth factor (NGF). In the first 2 days in culture without NGF, we observed a selective cell attachment only to the ion-implanted region in patterning Ag- implanted polystyrene sample (p-Ag/NTPS). In another 2 days in culture with NGF, the nerve cells expanded neurites only over the ion-implanted region. For collagen-coated p-Ag/NTPS sample of which collagen was coated after the ion implantation (Collagen/p-Ag/NTPS), most nerve cells were also attached on the ion-implanted region. However, neurites expanded in both ion-implanted and unimplanted regions. The contact angle of NTPS decreased after the ion implantation from 86° to 74°. The region selectivity of neuron attachment and neurite extension is considered to be due to contact angle lowering by the ion implantation as radiation effect on the surface.

  14. Electronic performance of a dual inductive link for a wireless neural recording implant.

    PubMed

    Rush, Alexander; Troyk, R

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a dual inductive link to provide two-way wireless communication and power for a neural recording system. Particular emphasis is placed on explaining the challenges associated with two inductive links operating in the same space and possible solutions. This system uses a class E converter to sustain a large AC current in an external coil for transcutaneous energy transfer to an implant coil. A telemetry circuit generates a reverse-telemetry carrier frequency using an Integer-N PLL to support multiple outward data channels. Interference from the class E converter fundamental and harmonics is rejected using a differential coil configuration. An approach to filtering harmonic interference from the external power coil is also presented.

  15. Bio-Impedance Characterization Technique with Implantable Neural Stimulator Using Biphasic Current Stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yi-Kai; Chang, Chih-Wei; Liu, Wentai

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the bio-impedance and its equivalent circuit model at the electrode-electrolyte/tissue interface is important in the application of functional electrical stimulation. Impedance can be used as a merit to evaluate the proximity between electrodes and targeted tissues. Understanding the equivalent circuit parameters of the electrode can further be leveraged to set a safe boundary for stimulus parameters in order not to exceed the water window of electrodes. In this paper, we present an impedance characterization technique and implement a proof-of-concept system using an implantable neural stimulator and an off-the-shelf microcontroller. The proposed technique yields the parameters of the equivalent circuit of an electrode through large signal analysis by injecting a single low-intensity biphasic current stimulus with deliberately inserted inter-pulse delay and by acquiring the transient electrode voltage at three well-specified timings. Using low-intensity stimulus allows the derivation of electrode double layer capacitance since capacitive charge-injection dominates when electrode overpotential is small. Insertion of the inter-pulse delay creates a controlled discharge time to estimate the Faradic resistance. The proposed method has been validated by measuring the impedance of a) an emulated Randles cells made of discrete circuit components and b) a custom-made platinum electrode array in-vitro, and comparing estimated parameters with the results derived from an impedance analyzer. The proposed technique can be integrated into implantable or commercial neural stimulator system at low extra power consumption, low extra-hardware cost, and light computation. PMID:25569999

  16. Bio-impedance characterization technique with implantable neural stimulator using biphasic current stimulus.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yi-Kai; Chang, Chih-Wei; Liu, Wentai

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the bio-impedance and its equivalent circuit model at the electrode-electrolyte/tissue interface is important in the application of functional electrical stimulation. Impedance can be used as a merit to evaluate the proximity between electrodes and targeted tissues. Understanding the equivalent circuit parameters of the electrode can further be leveraged to set a safe boundary for stimulus parameters in order not to exceed the water window of electrodes. In this paper, we present an impedance characterization technique and implement a proof-of-concept system using an implantable neural stimulator and an off-the-shelf microcontroller. The proposed technique yields the parameters of the equivalent circuit of an electrode through large signal analysis by injecting a single low-intensity biphasic current stimulus with deliberately inserted inter-pulse delay and by acquiring the transient electrode voltage at three well-specified timings. Using low-intensity stimulus allows the derivation of electrode double layer capacitance since capacitive charge-injection dominates when electrode overpotential is small. Insertion of the inter-pulse delay creates a controlled discharge time to estimate the Faradic resistance. The proposed method has been validated by measuring the impedance of a) an emulated Randles cells made of discrete circuit components and b) a custom-made platinum electrode array in-vitro, and comparing estimated parameters with the results derived from an impedance analyzer. The proposed technique can be integrated into implantable or commercial neural stimulator system at low extra power consumption, low extra-hardware cost, and light computation.

  17. Neural progenitor cell implants modulate vascular endothelial growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in rat axotomized neurons.

    PubMed

    Talaverón, Rocío; Matarredona, Esperanza R; de la Cruz, Rosa R; Pastor, Angel M

    2013-01-01

    Axotomy of central neurons leads to functional and structural alterations which largely revert when neural progenitor cells (NPCs) are implanted in the lesion site. The new microenvironment created by NPCs in the host tissue might modulate in the damaged neurons the expression of a high variety of molecules with relevant roles in the repair mechanisms, including neurotrophic factors. In the present work, we aimed to analyze changes in neurotrophic factor expression in axotomized neurons induced by NPC implants. For this purpose, we performed immunofluorescence followed by confocal microscopy analysis for the detection of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and nerve growth factor (NGF) on brainstem sections from rats with axotomy of abducens internuclear neurons that received NPC implants (implanted group) or vehicle injections (axotomized group) in the lesion site. Control abducens internuclear neurons were strongly immunoreactive to VEGF and BDNF but showed a weak staining for NT-3 and NGF. Comparisons between groups revealed that lesioned neurons from animals that received NPC implants showed a significant increase in VEGF content with respect to animals receiving vehicle injections. However, the immunoreactivity for BDNF, which was increased in the axotomized group as compared to control, was not modified in the implanted group. The modifications induced by NPC implants on VEGF and BDNF content were specific for the population of axotomized abducens internuclear neurons since the neighboring abducens motoneurons were not affected. Similar levels of NT-3 and NGF immunolabeling were obtained in injured neurons from axotomized and implanted animals. Among all the analyzed neurotrophic factors, only VEGF was expressed by the implanted cells in the lesion site. Our results point to a role of NPC implants in the modulation of neurotrophic factor expression by lesioned central neurons, which might

  18. Neural Progenitor Cell Implants Modulate Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression in Rat Axotomized Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Talaverón, Rocío; Matarredona, Esperanza R.; de la Cruz, Rosa R.; Pastor, Angel M.

    2013-01-01

    Axotomy of central neurons leads to functional and structural alterations which largely revert when neural progenitor cells (NPCs) are implanted in the lesion site. The new microenvironment created by NPCs in the host tissue might modulate in the damaged neurons the expression of a high variety of molecules with relevant roles in the repair mechanisms, including neurotrophic factors. In the present work, we aimed to analyze changes in neurotrophic factor expression in axotomized neurons induced by NPC implants. For this purpose, we performed immunofluorescence followed by confocal microscopy analysis for the detection of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and nerve growth factor (NGF) on brainstem sections from rats with axotomy of abducens internuclear neurons that received NPC implants (implanted group) or vehicle injections (axotomized group) in the lesion site. Control abducens internuclear neurons were strongly immunoreactive to VEGF and BDNF but showed a weak staining for NT-3 and NGF. Comparisons between groups revealed that lesioned neurons from animals that received NPC implants showed a significant increase in VEGF content with respect to animals receiving vehicle injections. However, the immunoreactivity for BDNF, which was increased in the axotomized group as compared to control, was not modified in the implanted group. The modifications induced by NPC implants on VEGF and BDNF content were specific for the population of axotomized abducens internuclear neurons since the neighboring abducens motoneurons were not affected. Similar levels of NT-3 and NGF immunolabeling were obtained in injured neurons from axotomized and implanted animals. Among all the analyzed neurotrophic factors, only VEGF was expressed by the implanted cells in the lesion site. Our results point to a role of NPC implants in the modulation of neurotrophic factor expression by lesioned central neurons, which might

  19. Mechanical failure modes of chronically implanted planar silicon-based neural probes for laminar recording.

    PubMed

    Kozai, Takashi D Y; Catt, Kasey; Li, Xia; Gugel, Zhannetta V; Olafsson, Valur T; Vazquez, Alberto L; Cui, X Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating intracortical electrode arrays that record brain activity longitudinally are powerful tools for basic neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications. However, regardless of the technology used, signals recorded by these electrodes degrade over time. The failure mechanisms of these electrodes are understood to be a complex combination of the biological reactive tissue response and material failure of the device over time. While mechanical mismatch between the brain tissue and implanted neural electrodes have been studied as a source of chronic inflammation and performance degradation, the electrode failure caused by mechanical mismatch between different material properties and different structural components within a device have remained poorly characterized. Using Finite Element Model (FEM) we simulate the mechanical strain on a planar silicon electrode. The results presented here demonstrate that mechanical mismatch between iridium and silicon leads to concentrated strain along the border of the two materials. This strain is further focused on small protrusions such as the electrical traces in planar silicon electrodes. These findings are confirmed with chronic in vivo data (133-189 days) in mice by correlating a combination of single-unit electrophysiology, evoked multi-unit recordings, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy from traces and electrode sites with our modeling data. Several modes of mechanical failure of chronically implanted planar silicon electrodes are found that result in degradation and/or loss of recording. These findings highlight the importance of strains and material properties of various subcomponents within an electrode array. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanical failure modes of chronically implanted planar silicon-based neural probes for laminar recording

    PubMed Central

    Kozai, Takashi D. Y.; Catt, Kasey; Li, Xia; Gugel, Zhannetta V.; Olafsson, Valur T.; Vazquez, Alberto L.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating intracortical electrode arrays that record brain activity longitudinally are powerful tools for basic neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications. However, regardless of the technology used, signals recorded by these electrodes degrade over time. The failure mechanisms of these electrodes are understood to be a complex combination of the biological reactive tissue response and material failure of the device over time. While mechanical mismatch between the brain tissue and implanted neural electrodes have been studied as a source of chronic inflammation and performance degradation, the electrode failure caused by mechanical mismatch between different material properties and different structural components within a device have remained poorly characterized. Using Finite Element Model (FEM) we simulate the mechanical strain on a planar silicon electrode. The results presented here demonstrate that mechanical mismatch between iridium and silicon leads to concentrated strain along the border of the two materials. This strain is further focused on small protrusions such as the electrical traces in planar silicon electrodes. These findings are confirmed with chronic in vivo data (133–189 days) in mice by correlating a combination of single-unit electrophysiology, evoked multi-unit recordings, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy from traces and electrode sites with our modeling data. Several modes of mechanical failure of chronically implanted planar silicon electrodes are found that result in degradation and/or loss of recording. These findings highlight the importance of strains and material properties of various subcomponents within an electrode array. PMID:25453935

  1. Linear-phase delay filters for ultra-low-power signal processing in neural recording implants.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Benoit; Sawan, Mohamad; Kerherve, Eric

    2010-06-01

    We present the design and implementation of linear-phase delay filters for ultra-low-power signal processing in neural recording implants. We use these filters as low-distortion delay elements along with an automatic biopotential detector to perform integral waveform extraction and efficient power management. The presented delay elements are realized employing continuous-time OTA-C filters featuring 9th-order equiripple transfer functions with constant group delay. Such analog delay enables processing neural waveforms with reduced overhead compared to a digital delay since it does not requires sampling and digitization. It uses an allpass transfer function for achieving wider constant-delay bandwidth than all-pole does. Two filters realizations are compared for implementing the delay element: the Cascaded structure and the Inverse follow-the-leader feedback filter. Their respective strengths and drawbacks are assessed by modeling parasitics and non-idealities of OTAs, and by transistor-level simulations. A budget of 200 nA is used in both filters. Experimental measurements with the chosen filter topology are presented and discussed.

  2. Energy-efficient multi-mode compressed sensing system for implantable neural recordings.

    PubMed

    Suo, Yuanming; Zhang, Jie; Xiong, Tao; Chin, Peter S; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Tran, Trac D

    2014-10-01

    Widely utilized in the field of Neuroscience, implantable neural recording devices could capture neuron activities with an acquisition rate on the order of megabytes per second. In order to efficiently transmit neural signals through wireless channels, these devices require compression methods that reduce power consumption. Although recent Compressed Sensing (CS) approaches have successfully demonstrated their power, their full potential is yet to be explored. Built upon our previous on-chip CS implementation, we propose an energy efficient multi-mode CS framework that focuses on improving the off-chip components, including (i) a two-stage sensing strategy, (ii) a sparsifying dictionary directly using data, (iii) enhanced compression performance from Full Signal CS mode and Spike Restoration mode to Spike CS + Restoration mode and; (iv) extension of our framework to the Tetrode CS recovery using joint sparsity. This new framework achieves energy efficiency, implementation simplicity and system flexibility simultaneously. Extensive experiments are performed on simulation and real datasets. For our Spike CS + Restoration mode, we achieve a compression ratio of 6% with a reconstruction SNDR > 10 dB and a classification accuracy > 95% for synthetic datasets. For real datasets, we get a 10% compression ratio with  ∼  10 dB for Spike CS + Restoration mode.

  3. A neural-based vocoder implementation for evaluating cochlear implant coding strategies.

    PubMed

    El Boghdady, Nawal; Kegel, Andrea; Lai, Wai Kong; Dillier, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Most simulations of cochlear implant (CI) coding strategies rely on standard vocoders that are based on purely signal processing techniques. However, these models neither account for various biophysical phenomena, such as neural stochasticity and refractoriness, nor for effects of electrical stimulation, such as spectral smearing as a function of stimulus intensity. In this paper, a neural model that accounts for stochastic firing, parasitic spread of excitation across neuron populations, and neuronal refractoriness, was developed and augmented as a preprocessing stage for a standard 22-channel noise-band vocoder. This model was used to subjectively and objectively assess consonant discrimination in commercial and experimental coding strategies. Stimuli consisting of consonant-vowel (CV) and vowel-consonant-vowel (VCV) tokens were processed by either the Advanced Combination Encoder (ACE) or the Excitability Controlled Coding (ECC) strategies, and later resynthesized to audio using the aforementioned vocoder model. Baseline performance was measured using unprocessed versions of the speech tokens. Behavioural responses were collected from seven normal hearing (NH) volunteers, while EEG data were recorded from five NH participants. Psychophysical results indicate that while there may be a difference in consonant perception between the two tested coding strategies, mismatch negativity (MMN) waveforms do not show any marked trends in CV or VCV contrast discrimination.

  4. Implantable liquid metal-based flexible neural microelectrode array and its application in recovering animal locomotion functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rui; Liu, Jing

    2017-10-01

    With significant advantages in rapidly restoring the nerve function, electrical stimulation of nervous tissue is a crucial treatment of peripheral nerve injuries leading to common movement disorder. However, the currently available stimulating electrodes generally based on rigid conductive materials would cause a potential mechanical mismatch with soft neural tissues which thus reduces long-term effects of electrical stimulation. Here, we proposed and fabricated a flexible neural microelectrode array system based on the liquid metal GaIn alloy (75.5% Ga and 24.5% In by weight) and via printing approach. Such an alloy with a unique low melting point (10.35 °C) owns excellent electrical conductivity and high compliance, which are beneficial to serve as implantable flexible neural electrodes. The flexible neural microelectrode array embeds four liquid metal electrodes and stretchable interconnects in a PDMS membrane (500 µm in thickness) that possess a lower elastic modulus (1.055 MPa), which is similar to neural tissues with elastic moduli in the 0.1–1.5 MPa range. The electrical experiments indicate that the liquid metal interconnects could sustain over 7000 mechanical stretch cycles with resistance approximately staying at 4 Ω. Over the conceptual experiments on animal sciatic nerve electrical stimulation, the dead bullfrog implanted with flexible neural microelectrode array could even rhythmically contract and move its lower limbs under the electrical stimulations from the implant. This demonstrates a highly efficient way for quickly recovering biological nerve functions. Further, the good biocompatibility of the liquid metal material was justified via a series of biological experiments. This liquid metal modality for neural stimulation is expected to play important roles as biologic electrodes to overcome the fundamental mismatch in mechanics between biological tissues and electronic devices in the coming time.

  5. Speech enhancement based on neural networks improves speech intelligibility in noise for cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Goehring, Tobias; Bolner, Federico; Monaghan, Jessica J M; van Dijk, Bas; Zarowski, Andrzej; Bleeck, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Speech understanding in noisy environments is still one of the major challenges for cochlear implant (CI) users in everyday life. We evaluated a speech enhancement algorithm based on neural networks (NNSE) for improving speech intelligibility in noise for CI users. The algorithm decomposes the noisy speech signal into time-frequency units, extracts a set of auditory-inspired features and feeds them to the neural network to produce an estimation of which frequency channels contain more perceptually important information (higher signal-to-noise ratio, SNR). This estimate is used to attenuate noise-dominated and retain speech-dominated CI channels for electrical stimulation, as in traditional n-of-m CI coding strategies. The proposed algorithm was evaluated by measuring the speech-in-noise performance of 14 CI users using three types of background noise. Two NNSE algorithms were compared: a speaker-dependent algorithm, that was trained on the target speaker used for testing, and a speaker-independent algorithm, that was trained on different speakers. Significant improvements in the intelligibility of speech in stationary and fluctuating noises were found relative to the unprocessed condition for the speaker-dependent algorithm in all noise types and for the speaker-independent algorithm in 2 out of 3 noise types. The NNSE algorithms used noise-specific neural networks that generalized to novel segments of the same noise type and worked over a range of SNRs. The proposed algorithm has the potential to improve the intelligibility of speech in noise for CI users while meeting the requirements of low computational complexity and processing delay for application in CI devices.

  6. Strategies to Enhance Implantation and Survival of Stem Cells After Their Injection in Ischemic Neural Tissue.

    PubMed

    Sandvig, Ioanna; Gadjanski, Ivana; Vlaski-Lafarge, Marija; Buzanska, Leonora; Loncaric, Darija; Sarnowska, Ana; Rodriguez, Laura; Sandvig, Axel; Ivanovic, Zoran

    2017-04-15

    High post-transplantation cell mortality is the main limitation of various approaches that are aimed at improving regeneration of injured neural tissue by an injection of neural stem cells (NSCs) and mesenchymal stromal cells (MStroCs) in and/or around the lesion. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to identify efficient ways to increase cell transplant viability. We have previously proposed the "evolutionary stem cell paradigm," which explains the association between stem cell anaerobic/microaerophilic metabolic set-up and stem cell self-renewal and inhibition of differentiation. Applying these principles, we have identified the main critical point in the collection and preparation of these cells for experimental therapy: exposure of the cells to atmospheric O2, that is, to oxygen concentrations that are several times higher than the physiologically relevant ones. In this way, the primitive anaerobic cells become either inactivated or adapted, through commitment and differentiation, to highly aerobic conditions (20%-21% O2 in atmospheric air). This inadvertently compromises the cells' survival once they are transplanted into normal tissue, especially in the hypoxic/anoxic/ischemic environment, which is typical of central nervous system (CNS) lesions. In addition to the findings suggesting that stem cells can shift to glycolysis and can proliferate in anoxia, recent studies also propose that stem cells may be able to proliferate in completely anaerobic or ischemic conditions by relying on anaerobic mitochondrial respiration. In this systematic review, we propose strategies to enhance the survival of NSCs and MStroCs that are implanted in hypoxic/ischemic neural tissue by harnessing their anaerobic nature and maintaining as well as enhancing their anaerobic properties via appropriate ex vivo conditioning.

  7. KDI: a wireless power-efficient modular platform for pre-clinical evaluation of implantable neural recording designs.

    PubMed

    Foerster, M; Burdin, F; Seignon, F; Lambert, A; Vasquez, C; Charvet, G

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a power-efficient modular wireless platform which has been designed for prototyping and pre-clinical evaluations of neural recording implants. This Kit for Designing Implants (KDI) is separated in function specific modules of 34×34mm which can be assembled as needed. Five modules have been designed and optimized for ultra-low power consumption and a protective casing has been designed for pre-clinical trials. Two different wireless modules have been compared and the KDI performances have been evaluated in terms of modularity, wireless throughput and power consumption.

  8. Implantable Graphene-based Neural Electrode Interfaces for Electrophysiology and Neurochemistry in In Vivo Hyperacute Stroke Model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ta-Chung; Chuang, Min-Chieh; Chu, Chao-Yi; Huang, Wei-Chen; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Chao-Ting; Chu, Wei-Lin; Chen, San-Yuan; Chen, You-Yin

    2016-01-13

    Implantable microelectrode arrays have attracted considerable interest due to their high temporal and spatial resolution recording of neuronal activity in tissues. We herein presented an implantable multichannel neural probe with multiple real-time monitoring of neural-chemical and neural-electrical signals by a nonenzymatic neural-chemical interface, which was designed by creating the newly developed reduced graphene oxide-gold oxide (rGO/Au2O3) nanocomposite electrode. The modified electrode on the neural probe was prepared by a facile one-step cyclic voltammetry (CV) electrochemical method with simultaneous occurrence of gold oxidation and GOs reduction to induce the intimate attachment by electrostatic interaction using chloride ions (Cl(-)). The rGO/Au2O3-modified electrode at a low deposition scan rate of 10 mVs(-1) displayed significantly improved electrocatalytic activity due to large active areas and well-dispersive attached rGO sheets. The in vitro amperometric response to H2O2 demonstrated a fast response of less than 5 s and a very low detection limit of 0.63 μM. In in vivo hyperacute stroke model, the concentration of H2O2 was measured as 100.48 ± 4.52 μM for rGO/Au2O3 electrode within 1 h photothrombotic stroke, which was much higher than that (71.92 μM ± 2.52 μM) for noncoated electrode via in vitro calibration. Simultaneously, the somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) test provided reliable and precise validation for detecting functional changes of neuronal activities. This newly developed implantable probe with localized rGO/Au2O3 nanocomposite electrode can serve as a rapid and reliable sensing platform for practical H2O2 detection in the brain or for other neural-chemical molecules in vivo.

  9. In vivo monitoring of glial scar proliferation on chronically implanted neural electrodes by fiber optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yijing; Martini, Nadja; Hassler, Christina; Kirch, Robert D.; Stieglitz, Thomas; Seifert, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2014-01-01

    In neural prosthetics and stereotactic neurosurgery, intracortical electrodes are often utilized for delivering therapeutic electrical pulses, and recording neural electrophysiological signals. Unfortunately, neuroinflammation impairs the neuron-electrode-interface by developing a compact glial encapsulation around the implants in long term. At present, analyzing this immune reaction is only feasible with post-mortem histology; currently no means for specific in vivo monitoring exist and most applicable imaging modalities can not provide information in deep brain regions. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a well established imaging modality for in vivo studies, providing cellular resolution and up to 1.2 mm imaging depth in brain tissue. A fiber based spectral domain OCT was shown to be capable of minimally invasive brain imaging. In the present study, we propose to use a fiber based spectral domain OCT to monitor the progression of the tissue's immune response through scar encapsulation progress in a rat animal model. A fine fiber catheter was implanted in rat brain together with a flexible polyimide microelectrode in sight both of which acts as a foreign body and induces the brain tissue immune reaction. OCT signals were collected from animals up to 12 weeks after implantation and thus gliotic scarring in vivo monitored for that time. Preliminary data showed a significant enhancement of the OCT backscattering signal during the first 3 weeks after implantation, and increased attenuation factor of the sampled tissue due to the glial scar formation. PMID:25191264

  10. Energy harvesting from cerebrospinal fluid pressure fluctuations for self-powered neural implants.

    PubMed

    Beker, Levent; Benet, Arnau; Meybodi, Ali Tayebi; Eovino, Ben; Pisano, Albert P; Lin, Liwei

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a novel method to generate electrical energy by converting available mechanical energy from pressure fluctuations of the cerebrospinal fluid within lateral ventricles of the brain is presented. The generated electrical power can be supplied to the neural implants and either eliminate their battery need or extend the battery lifespan. A diaphragm type harvester comprised of piezoelectric material is utilized to convert the pressure fluctuations to electrical energy. The pressure fluctuations cause the diaphragm to bend, and the strained piezoelectric materials generate electricity. In the framework of this study, an energy harvesting structure having a diameter of 2.5 mm was designed and fabricated using microfabrication techniques. A 1:1 model of lateral ventricles was 3D-printed from raw MRI images to characterize the harvester. Experimental results show that a maximum power of 0.62 nW can be generated from the harvester under similar physical conditions in lateral ventricles which corresponds to energy density of 12.6 nW/cm(2). Considering the available area within the lateral ventricles and the size of harvesters that can be built using microfabrication techniques it is possible to amplify to power up to 26 nW. As such, the idea of generating electrical energy by making use of pressure fluctuations within brain is demonstrated in this work via the 3D-printed model system.

  11. Autonomous control for mechanically stable navigation of microscale implants in brain tissue to record neural activity.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sindhu; Kumar, Swathy Sampath; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2016-08-01

    Emerging neural prosthetics require precise positional tuning and stable interfaces with single neurons for optimal function over a lifetime. In this study, we report an autonomous control to precisely navigate microscale electrodes in soft, viscoelastic brain tissue without visual feedback. The autonomous control optimizes signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of single neuronal recordings in viscoelastic brain tissue while maintaining quasi-static mechanical stress conditions to improve stability of the implant-tissue interface. Force-displacement curves from microelectrodes in in vivo rodent experiments are used to estimate viscoelastic parameters of the brain. Using a combination of computational models and experiments, we determined an optimal movement for the microelectrodes with bidirectional displacements of 3:2 ratio between forward and backward displacements and a inter-movement interval of 40 s for minimizing mechanical stress in the surrounding brain tissue. A regulator with the above optimal bidirectional motion for the microelectrodes in in vivo experiments resulted in significant reduction in the number of microelectrode movements (0.23 movements/min) and longer periods of stable SNR (53 % of the time) compared to a regulator using a conventional linear, unidirectional microelectrode movement (with 1.48 movements/min and stable SNR 23 % of the time).

  12. A wireless power interface for rechargeable battery operated neural recording implants.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Principe, Jose C; Bashirullah, Rizwan

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated analog front-end for wireless powering and recharging of miniature Li-ion batteries used in implantable neural recording microsystems. DC signal extraction from a wireless carrier is accomplished using Schottky barrier contact diodes with lower forward voltage drop for improved efficiency. The battery charger employs a new control loop that relaxes comparator resolution requirements, provides simultaneous operation of constant-current and constant-voltage loops, and eliminates the external current sense resistor from the charging path. The accuracy of the end-of-charge detection is primarily determined by the voltage drop across matched resistors and current-sources and the offset voltage of the sense comparator. Experimental results in 0.6 mum bulk CMOS technology indicate that +/- 1.3% (or +/-20 microA) end-of-charge accuracy can be obtained under worst-case conditions for a comparator offset voltage of +/-5mV. The circuits occupy 1.735 mm(2) with a power dissipation of 8.4 mW when delivering a load current of 1.5 mA at 4.1 V (or 6.15 mW) for an efficiency of 73%

  13. Modeling the Electrode-Neuron Interface of Cochlear Implants: Effects of Neural Survival, Electrode Placement, and the Partial Tripolar Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Goldwyn, Joshua H.; Bierer, Steven M.; Bierer, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    The partial tripolar electrode configuration is a relatively novel stimulation strategies that can generate more spatially focused electric fields than the commonly used monopolar configuration. Focused stimulation strategies should improve spectral resolution in cochlear implant users, but may also be more sensitive to local irregularities in the electrode-neuron interface. In this study, we develop a practical computer model of cochlear implant stimulation that can simulate neural activation in a simplified cochlear geometry and we relate the resulting patterns of neural activity to basic psychophysical measures. We examine how two types of local irregularities in the electrode-neuron interface, variations in spiral ganglion nerve density and electrode position within the scala tympani, affect the simulated neural activation patterns and how these patterns change with electrode configuration. The model shows that higher partial tripolar fractions activate more spatially restricted populations of neurons at all current levels and require higher current levels to excite a given number of neurons. We find that threshold levels are more sensitive at high partial tripolar fractions to both types of irregularities, but these effects are not independent. In particular, at close electrode-neuron distances, activation is typically more spatially localized which leads to a greater influence of neural dead regions. PMID:20580801

  14. Chronic multisite brain recordings from a totally implantable bidirectional neural interface: experience in 5 patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Swann, Nicole C; de Hemptinne, Coralie; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Qasim, Salman; Ostrem, Jill L; Galifianakis, Nicholas B; Luciano, Marta San; Wang, Sarah S; Ziman, Nathan; Taylor, Robin; Starr, Philip A

    2017-04-14

    OBJECTIVE Dysfunction of distributed neural networks underlies many brain disorders. The development of neuromodulation therapies depends on a better understanding of these networks. Invasive human brain recordings have a favorable temporal and spatial resolution for the analysis of network phenomena but have generally been limited to acute intraoperative recording or short-term recording through temporarily externalized leads. Here, the authors describe their initial experience with an investigational, first-generation, totally implantable, bidirectional neural interface that allows both continuous therapeutic stimulation and recording of field potentials at multiple sites in a neural network. METHODS Under a physician-sponsored US Food and Drug Administration investigational device exemption, 5 patients with Parkinson's disease were implanted with the Activa PC+S system (Medtronic Inc.). The device was attached to a quadripolar lead placed in the subdural space over motor cortex, for electrocorticography potential recordings, and to a quadripolar lead in the subthalamic nucleus (STN), for both therapeutic stimulation and recording of local field potentials. Recordings from the brain of each patient were performed at multiple time points over a 1-year period. RESULTS There were no serious surgical complications or interruptions in deep brain stimulation therapy. Signals in both the cortex and the STN were relatively stable over time, despite a gradual increase in electrode impedance. Canonical movement-related changes in specific frequency bands in the motor cortex were identified in most but not all recordings. CONCLUSIONS The acquisition of chronic multisite field potentials in humans is feasible. The device performance characteristics described here may inform the design of the next generation of totally implantable neural interfaces. This research tool provides a platform for translating discoveries in brain network dynamics to improved neurostimulation

  15. Activation of expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor at the site of implantation of allogenic and xenogenic neural stem (progenitor) cells in rats with ischemic cortical stroke.

    PubMed

    Chekhonin, V P; Lebedev, S V; Volkov, A I; Pavlov, K A; Ter-Arutyunyants, A A; Volgina, N E; Savchenko, E A; Grinenko, N F; Lazarenko, I P

    2011-02-01

    Ischemic stroke was modeled in the sensorimotor zone of the brain cortex in adult rats. Rat embryonic nervous tissue, neural stem cells from human olfactory epithelium, and rat fibroblasts (cell control) were implanted into the peri-infarction area of rats of different groups immediately after stroke modeling. Expression of BDNF mRNA was analyzed 7 days after surgery by real-time PCR. BDNF expression in cell preparation before their implantation was minimum. The expression of BDNF mRNA increased by 5-6 times in the areas of implantation of rat fibroblasts and human olfactory epithelium and by 23 times in the area of implantation of rat embryonic nervous tissue compared to periinfarction areas without cell implantation. These findings confirm the possibility of realization of the therapeutic effects of neural stem cells via expression of trophic factors.

  16. Package architecture and component design for an implanted neural stimulator with closed loop control.

    PubMed

    Bjune, Caroline K; Marinis, Thomas F; Brady, Jeanne M; Moran, James; Wheeler, Jesse; Sriram, Tirunelveli S; Parks, Philip D; Widge, Alik S; Dougherty, Darin D; Eskandar, Emad N

    2015-08-01

    An implanted neural stimulator with closed loop control requires electrodes for stimulation pulses and recording neuron activity. Our system features arrays of 64 electrodes. Each electrode can be addressed through a cross bar switch, to enable it to be used for stimulation or recording. This electrode switch, a bank of low noise amplifiers with an integrated analog to digital converter, power conditioning electronics, and a communications and control gate array are co-located with the electrode array in a 14 millimeter diameter satellite package that is designed to be flush mounted in a skull burr hole. Our system features five satellite packages connected to a central hub processor-controller via ten conductor cables that terminate in a custom designed, miniaturized connector. The connector incorporates features of high reliability, military grade devices and utilizes three distinct seals to isolate the contacts from fluid permeation. The hub system is comprised of a connector header, hermetic electronics package, and rechargeable battery pack, which are mounted on and electrically interconnected by a flexible circuit board. The assembly is over molded with a compliant silicone rubber. The electronics package contains two antennas, a large coil, used for recharging the battery and a high bandwidth antenna that is used to download data and update software. The package is assembled from two machined alumina pieces, a flat base with brazed in, electrical feed through pins and a rectangular cover with rounded corners. Titanium seal rings are brazed onto these two pieces so that they can be sealed by laser welding. A third system antenna is incorporated in the flexible circuit board. It is used to communicate with an externally worn control package, which monitors the health of the system and allows both the user and clinician to control or modify various system function parameters.

  17. A Hardware-Efficient Scalable Spike Sorting Neural Signal Processor Module for Implantable High-Channel-Count Brain Machine Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuning; Boling, Sam; Mason, Andrew J

    2017-08-01

    Next-generation brain machine interfaces demand a high-channel-count neural recording system to wirelessly monitor activities of thousands of neurons. A hardware efficient neural signal processor (NSP) is greatly desirable to ease the data bandwidth bottleneck for a fully implantable wireless neural recording system. This paper demonstrates a complete multichannel spike sorting NSP module that incorporates all of the necessary spike detector, feature extractor, and spike classifier blocks. To meet high-channel-count and implantability demands, each block was designed to be highly hardware efficient and scalable while sharing resources efficiently among multiple channels. To process multiple channels in parallel, scalability analysis was performed, and the utilization of each block was optimized according to its input data statistics and the power, area and/or speed of each block. Based on this analysis, a prototype 32-channel spike sorting NSP scalable module was designed and tested on an FPGA using synthesized datasets over a wide range of signal to noise ratios. The design was mapped to 130 nm CMOS to achieve 0.75 μW power and 0.023 mm(2) area consumptions per channel based on post synthesis simulation results, which permits scalability of digital processing to 690 channels on a 4×4 mm(2) electrode array.

  18. Neural response to sandblasted/acid-etched, TiO-blasted, polished, and mechanochemically polished/nanostructured titanium implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Onur, Mehmet A; Sezgin, Aysun; Gürpinar, Aylin; Sommer, Andrei; Akça, Kivanç; Cehreli, Murat

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore morphologic, functional, and behavioral effects of rough (sandblasted-large grid/acid-etched (SLA) and TiO2 blasted), mechanically polished, and mechanochemically polished titanium implant surfaces on nerves. The compound action potentials (cAPs) of sciatic nerves of sacrificed Wistar rats (n=10) were quantified at the in vitro level, while contacting disk-shaped test specimens. The test specimens were also implanted directly on the sciatic nerves of another group of animals (n=33), hot-plate tests were undertaken for 10 consecutive days, and then the animals were sacrificed. Quantification of signal transduction speeds and cAPs of the nerves of these animals were undertaken at the in vitro level. Finally, the nerves were processed for histologic analysis. The signal transduction speeds and duration of cAPs of all groups were similar (P>0.05), whereas the amplitudes of cAPs of nerves contacting SLA implants were higher than those of TiO2 blasted and mechanochemically polished surfaces (P<0.05). Response latencies of nerves contacting mechanically polished specimens were slightly higher than the other groups (P>0.05). Histologic evaluations did not reveal any signs of adverse tissue response adjacent to specimens tested. Rough and polished titanium implant surfaces lead to similar neural response in vivo and in vitro that fall into physiologic limits.

  19. An implantable two axis micromanipulator made with a 3D printer for recording neural activity in free-swimming fish.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Loranzie S; Van Wert, Jacey C; Mensinger, Allen F

    2017-08-15

    Chronically implanted electrodes allow monitoring neural activity from free moving animals. While a wide variety of implanted headstages, microdrives and electrodes exist for terrestrial animals, few have been developed for use with aquatic animals. A two axis micromanipulator was fabricated with a Formlabs 3D printer for implanting electrodes into free-swimming oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau). The five piece manipulator consisted of a base, body, electrode holder, manual screw drive and locking nut. The manipulator measured approximately 25×20×30mm (l×w×h) and weighed 5.28g after hand assembly. Microwire electrodes were inserted successfully with the manipulator to record high fidelity signals from the anterior lateral line nerve of the toadfish. The micromanipulator allowed the chronically implanted electrodes to be repositioned numerous times to record from multiple sites and extended successful recording time in the toadfish by several days. Three dimensional printing allowed an inexpensive (<$US 5 material), two axis micromanipulator to be printed relatively rapidly (<2h) to successfully record from multiple sites in the anterior lateral line nerve of free-swimming toadfish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of the resistive properties of bone on neural excitation and electric fields in cochlear implant models.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, T K; Hanekom, T; Hanekom, J J

    2015-09-01

    The resistivity of bone is the most variable of all the tissues in the human body, ranging from 312 Ω cm to 84,745 Ω cm. Volume conduction models of cochlear implants have generally used a resistivity value of 641 Ω cm for the bone surrounding the cochlea. This study investigated the effect that bone resistivity has on modelled neural thresholds and intracochlear potentials using user-specific volume conduction models of implanted cochleae applying monopolar stimulation. The complexity of the description of the head volume enveloping the cochlea was varied between a simple infinite bone volume and a detailed skull containing a brain volume, scalp and accurate return electrode position. It was found that, depending on the structure of the head model and implementation of the return electrode, different bone resistivity values are necessary to match model predictions to data from literature. Modelled forward-masked spatial tuning curve (fmSTC) widths and slopes and intracochlear electric field profile length constants were obtained for a range of bone resistivity values for the various head models. The predictions were compared to measurements found in literature. It was concluded that, depending on the head model, a bone resistivity value between 3500 Ω cm and 10,500 Ω cm allows prediction of neural and electrical responses that match measured data. A general recommendation is made to use a resistivity value of approximately 10,000 Ω cm for bone volumes in conduction models of the implanted cochlea when neural excitation is predicted and a value of approximately 6500 Ω cm when predicting electric fields inside the cochlear duct.

  1. [The application of artificial neural network on the assessment of lexical tone production of pediatric cochlear implant users].

    PubMed

    Mao, Y T; Chen, Z M; Xu, L

    2017-08-07

    Objective: The present study was carried out to explore the tone production ability of the Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants (CI) by using an artificial neural network model and to examine the potential contributing factors underlining their tone production performance. The results of this study might provide useful guidelines for post-operative rehabilitation processes of pediatric CI users. Methods: Two hundred and seventy-eight prelingually deafened children who received unilateral CI participated in this study. As controls, 170 similarly-aged children with normal hearing (NH) were recruited. A total of 36 Chinese monosyllabic words were selected as the tone production targets. Vocal production samples were recorded and the fundamental frequency (F0) contour of each syllable was extracted using an auto-correlation algorithm followed by manual correction. An artificial neural network was created in MATLAB to classify the tone production. The relationships between tone production and several demographic factors were evaluated. Results: Pediatric CI users produced Mandarin tones much less accurately than did the NH children (58.8% vs. 91.5% correct). Tremendous variability in tone production performance existed among the CI children. Tones 2 and 3 were produced less accurately than tones 1 and 4 for both groups. For the CI group, all tones when in error tended to be judged as tone 1. The tone production accuracy was negatively correlated with age at implantation and positively correlated with CI use duration with correlation coefficients (r) of -0.215 (P=0.003) and 0.203 (P=0.005), respectively. Age was one of the determinants of tonal ability for NH children. Conclusions: For children with severe to profound hearing loss, early implantation and persistent use of CI are beneficial to their tone production development. Artificial neural network is a convenient and reliable assessment tool for the development of tonal ability of hearing

  2. Multistage Nonlinear Optimization to Recover Neural Activation Patterns From Evoked Compound Action Potentials of Cochlear Implant Users.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Stefano; Gaudrain, Etienne; Deeks, John M; Carlyon, Robert P

    2016-04-01

    Electrically evoked compound action potentials (ECAPs) have been employed as a measure of neural activation evoked by cochlear implant (CI) stimulation. A forward-masking procedure is commonly used to reduce stimulus artefacts. This method estimates the joint neural activation produced by two electrodes-one acting as probe and the other as masker; as such, the measured ECAPs depend on the activation patterns produced by both. We describe an approach--termed panoramic ECAP ("PECAP")--that allows reconstruction of the underlying neural activation pattern of individual channels from ECAP amplitudes. The proposed approach combines two constrained nonlinear optimization stages. PECAP was validated against simulated and physiological data from CI users. The physiological data consisted of ECAPs measured from four users of Cochlear devices. For each subject, an 18 ×18 ECAP amplitude matrix was measured using a forward-masking method. The results from computer simulations indicate that our approach can reliably estimate the underlying activation patterns from ECAP amplitudes even for instances of neural "dead regions" or cross-turn stimulation. The operating signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for the proposed algorithm was 5 dB or higher, which matched well the SNR measured from human physiological data. Human ECAPs were fitted with our procedure to determine neural activation patterns. PECAP can be used to identify undesirable features of the neural activation pattern of individual CI users. Our approach may have clinical application as an objective measure of electrode-to-neuron interface and may be used to devise ad hoc stimulation strategies.

  3. Examining the electro-neural interface of cochlear implant users using psychophysics, CT scans, and speech understanding.

    PubMed

    Long, Christopher J; Holden, Timothy A; McClelland, Gary H; Parkinson, Wendy S; Shelton, Clough; Kelsall, David C; Smith, Zachary M

    2014-04-01

    This study examines the relationship between focused-stimulation thresholds, electrode positions, and speech understanding in deaf subjects treated with a cochlear implant (CI). Focused stimulation is more selective than monopolar stimulation, which excites broad regions of the cochlea, so may be more sensitive as a probe of neural survival patterns. Focused thresholds are on average higher and more variable across electrodes than monopolar thresholds. We presume that relatively high focused thresholds are the result of larger distances between the electrodes and the neurons. Two factors are likely to contribute to this distance: (1) the physical position of electrodes relative to the modiolus, where the excitable auditory neurons are normally located, and (2) the pattern of neural survival along the length of the cochlea, since local holes in the neural population will increase the distance between an electrode and the nearest neurons. Electrode-to-modiolus distance was measured from high-resolution CT scans of the cochleae of CI users whose focused-stimulation thresholds were also measured. A hierarchical set of linear models of electrode-to-modiolus distance versus threshold showed a significant increase in threshold with electrode-to-modiolus distance (average slope = 11 dB/mm). The residual of these models was hypothesized to reflect neural survival in each subject. Consonant-Nucleus-Consonant (CNC) word scores were significantly correlated with the within-subject variance of threshold (r(2) = 0.82), but not with within-subject variance of electrode distance (r(2) = 0.03). Speech understanding also significantly correlated with how well distance explained each subject's threshold data (r(2) = 0.63). That is, subjects with focused thresholds that were well described by electrode position had better speech scores. Our results suggest that speech understanding is highly impacted by individual patterns of neural survival and that these patterns manifest themselves

  4. A 110-nW in-channel sigma-delta converter for large-scale neural recording implants.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, M; Maghsoudloo, E; Sawan, M; Gosselin, B

    2016-08-01

    Advancement in wireless and microsystems technology have ushered in new devices that can directly interface with the central nervous system for stimulating and/or monitoring neural circuitry. In this paper, we present an ultra low-power sigma-delta analog-to-digital converter (ADC) intended for utilization into large-scale multi-channel neural recording implants. This proposed design, which provides a resolution of 9 bits using a one-bit oversampled ADC, presents several desirable features that allow for an in-channel ADC scheme, where one sigma-delta converter is provided for each channel, enabling development of scalable systems that can interface with different types of high-density neural microprobes. The proposed circuit, which have been fabricated in a TSMC 180-nm CMOS process, employs a first order noise shaping topology with a passive integrator and a low-supply voltage of 0.6 V to achieve ultra low-power consumption and small size. The proposed ADC clearly outperforms other designs with a power consumption as low as 110 nW for a precision of 9 bits (11-fJ per conversion), a silicon area of only 82 μm × 84 μm and one of the best reported figure of merit among recently published data converters utilized in similar applications.

  5. Utilising reinforcement learning to develop strategies for driving auditory neural implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Geoffrey W.; Zambetta, Fabio; Li, Xiaodong; Paolini, Antonio G.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. In this paper we propose a novel application of reinforcement learning to the area of auditory neural stimulation. We aim to develop a simulation environment which is based off real neurological responses to auditory and electrical stimulation in the cochlear nucleus (CN) and inferior colliculus (IC) of an animal model. Using this simulator we implement closed loop reinforcement learning algorithms to determine which methods are most effective at learning effective acoustic neural stimulation strategies. Approach. By recording a comprehensive set of acoustic frequency presentations and neural responses from a set of animals we created a large database of neural responses to acoustic stimulation. Extensive electrical stimulation in the CN and the recording of neural responses in the IC provides a mapping of how the auditory system responds to electrical stimuli. The combined dataset is used as the foundation for the simulator, which is used to implement and test learning algorithms. Main results. Reinforcement learning, utilising a modified n-Armed Bandit solution, is implemented to demonstrate the model’s function. We show the ability to effectively learn stimulation patterns which mimic the cochlea’s ability to covert acoustic frequencies to neural activity. Time taken to learn effective replication using neural stimulation takes less than 20 min under continuous testing. Significance. These results show the utility of reinforcement learning in the field of neural stimulation. These results can be coupled with existing sound processing technologies to develop new auditory prosthetics that are adaptable to the recipients current auditory pathway. The same process can theoretically be abstracted to other sensory and motor systems to develop similar electrical replication of neural signals.

  6. NMR Parameters Determination through ACE Committee Machine with Genetic Implanted Fuzzy Logic and Genetic Implanted Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asoodeh, Mojtaba; Bagheripour, Parisa; Gholami, Amin

    2015-06-01

    Free fluid porosity and rock permeability, undoubtedly the most critical parameters of hydrocarbon reservoir, could be obtained by processing of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) log. Despite conventional well logs (CWLs), NMR logging is very expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, idea of synthesizing NMR log from CWLs would be of a great appeal among reservoir engineers. For this purpose, three optimization strategies are followed. Firstly, artificial neural network (ANN) is optimized by virtue of hybrid genetic algorithm-pattern search (GA-PS) technique, then fuzzy logic (FL) is optimized by means of GA-PS, and eventually an alternative condition expectation (ACE) model is constructed using the concept of committee machine to combine outputs of optimized and non-optimized FL and ANN models. Results indicated that optimization of traditional ANN and FL model using GA-PS technique significantly enhances their performances. Furthermore, the ACE committee of aforementioned models produces more accurate and reliable results compared with a singular model performing alone.

  7. Rapid evaluation of the durability of cortical neural implants using accelerated aging with reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takmakov, Pavel; Ruda, Kiersten; Phillips, K. Scott; Isayeva, Irada S.; Krauthamer, Victor; Welle, Cristin G.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. A challenge for implementing high bandwidth cortical brain-machine interface devices in patients is the limited functional lifespan of implanted recording electrodes. Development of implant technology currently requires extensive non-clinical testing to demonstrate device performance. However, testing the durability of the implants in vivo is time-consuming and expensive. Validated in vitro methodologies may reduce the need for extensive testing in animal models. Approach. Here we describe an in vitro platform for rapid evaluation of implant stability. We designed a reactive accelerated aging (RAA) protocol that employs elevated temperature and reactive oxygen species (ROS) to create a harsh aging environment. Commercially available microelectrode arrays (MEAs) were placed in a solution of hydrogen peroxide at 87 °C for a period of 7 days. We monitored changes to the implants with scanning electron microscopy and broad spectrum electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (1 Hz-1 MHz) and correlated the physical changes with impedance data to identify markers associated with implant failure. Main results. RAA produced a diverse range of effects on the structural integrity and electrochemical properties of electrodes. Temperature and ROS appeared to have different effects on structural elements, with increased temperature causing insulation loss from the electrode microwires, and ROS concentration correlating with tungsten metal dissolution. All array types experienced impedance declines, consistent with published literature showing chronic (>30 days) declines in array impedance in vivo. Impedance change was greatest at frequencies <10 Hz, and smallest at frequencies 1 kHz and above. Though electrode performance is traditionally characterized by impedance at 1 kHz, our results indicate that an impedance change at 1 kHz is not a reliable predictive marker of implant degradation or failure. Significance. ROS, which are known to be present in vivo, can create

  8. Rapid evaluation of the durability of cortical neural implants using accelerated aging with reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Takmakov, Pavel; Ruda, Kiersten; Phillips, K Scott; Isayeva, Irada S; Krauthamer, Victor; Welle, Cristin G

    2017-01-01

    Objective A challenge for implementing high bandwidth cortical brain–machine interface devices in patients is the limited functional lifespan of implanted recording electrodes. Development of implant technology currently requires extensive non-clinical testing to demonstrate device performance. However, testing the durability of the implants in vivo is time-consuming and expensive. Validated in vitro methodologies may reduce the need for extensive testing in animal models. Approach Here we describe an in vitro platform for rapid evaluation of implant stability. We designed a reactive accelerated aging (RAA) protocol that employs elevated temperature and reactive oxygen species (ROS) to create a harsh aging environment. Commercially available microelectrode arrays (MEAs) were placed in a solution of hydrogen peroxide at 87 °C for a period of 7 days. We monitored changes to the implants with scanning electron microscopy and broad spectrum electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (1 Hz–1 MHz) and correlated the physical changes with impedance data to identify markers associated with implant failure. Main results RAA produced a diverse range of effects on the structural integrity and electrochemical properties of electrodes. Temperature and ROS appeared to have different effects on structural elements, with increased temperature causing insulation loss from the electrode microwires, and ROS concentration correlating with tungsten metal dissolution. All array types experienced impedance declines, consistent with published literature showing chronic (>30 days) declines in array impedance in vivo. Impedance change was greatest at frequencies <10 Hz, and smallest at frequencies 1 kHz and above. Though electrode performance is traditionally characterized by impedance at 1 kHz, our results indicate that an impedance change at 1 kHz is not a reliable predictive marker of implant degradation or failure. Significance ROS, which are known to be present in vivo, can create

  9. Lab-on-a-brain: implantable micro-optical fluidic devices for neural cell analysis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Nagaoka, Akira; Noguchi, Jun; Akagi, Takanori; Kasai, Haruo; Ichiki, Takanori

    2014-10-22

    The high-resolution imaging of neural cells in vivo has brought about great progress in neuroscience research. Here, we report a novel experimental platform, where the intact brain of a living mouse can be studied with the aid of a surgically implanted micro-optical fluidic device; acting as an interface between neurons and the outer world. The newly developed device provides the functions required for the long-term and high-resolution observation of the fine structures of neurons by two-photon laser scanning microscopy and the microfluidic delivery of chemicals or drugs directly into the brain. A proof-of-concept experiment of single-synapse stimulation by two-photon uncaging of caged glutamate and observation of dendritic spine shrinkage over subsequent days demonstrated a promising use for the present technology.

  10. Lab-on-a-brain: Implantable micro-optical fluidic devices for neural cell analysis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Nagaoka, Akira; Noguchi, Jun; Akagi, Takanori; Kasai, Haruo; Ichiki, Takanori

    2014-10-01

    The high-resolution imaging of neural cells in vivo has brought about great progress in neuroscience research. Here, we report a novel experimental platform, where the intact brain of a living mouse can be studied with the aid of a surgically implanted micro-optical fluidic device; acting as an interface between neurons and the outer world. The newly developed device provides the functions required for the long-term and high-resolution observation of the fine structures of neurons by two-photon laser scanning microscopy and the microfluidic delivery of chemicals or drugs directly into the brain. A proof-of-concept experiment of single-synapse stimulation by two-photon uncaging of caged glutamate and observation of dendritic spine shrinkage over subsequent days demonstrated a promising use for the present technology.

  11. Neural adaptation and perceptual learning using a portable real-time cochlear implant simulator in natural environments.

    PubMed

    Smalt, Christopher J; Talavage, Thomas M; Pisoni, David B; Svirsky, Mario A

    2011-01-01

    A portable real-time speech processor that implements an acoustic simulation model of a cochlear implant (CI) has been developed on the Apple iPhone / iPod Touch to permit testing and experimentation under extended exposure in real-world environments. This simulator allows for both a variable number of noise band channels and electrode insertion depth. Utilizing this portable CI simulator, we tested perceptual learning in normal hearing listeners by measuring word and sentence comprehension behaviorally before and after 2 weeks of exposure. To evaluate changes in neural activation related to adaptation to transformed speech, fMRI was also conducted. Differences in brain activation after training occurred in the inferior frontal gyrus and areas related to language processing. A 15-20% improvement in word and sentence comprehension of cochlear implant simulated speech was also observed. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of a portable CI simulator as a research tool and provide new information about the physiological changes that accompany perceptual learning of degraded auditory input.

  12. A Highly Compliant Serpentine Shaped Polyimide Interconnect for Front-End Strain Relief in Chronic Neural Implants

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Viswanath; Sanchez, Justin C.; McCumiskey, Edward; Brown, Nagid; Taylor, Curtis R.; Ehlert, Gregory J.; Sodano, Henry A.; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2013-01-01

    While the signal quality of recording neural electrodes is observed to degrade over time, the degradation mechanisms are complex and less easily observable. Recording microelectrodes failures are attributed to different biological factors such as tissue encapsulation, immune response, and disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and non-biological factors such as strain due to micromotion, insulation delamination, corrosion, and surface roughness on the recording site (1–4). Strain due to brain micromotion is considered to be one of the important abiotic factors contributing to the failure of the neural implants. To reduce the forces exerted by the electrode on the brain, a high compliance 2D serpentine shaped electrode cable was designed, simulated, and measured using polyimide as the substrate material. Serpentine electrode cables were fabricated using MEMS microfabrication techniques, and the prototypes were subjected to load tests to experimentally measure the compliance. The compliance of the serpentine cable was numerically modeled and quantitatively measured to be up to 10 times higher than the compliance of a straight cable of same dimensions and material. PMID:24062716

  13. Feature extraction using extrema sampling of discrete derivatives for spike sorting in implantable upper-limb neural prostheses.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Majid; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Next generation neural interfaces for upper-limb (and other) prostheses aim to develop implantable interfaces for one or more nerves, each interface having many neural signal channels that work reliably in the stump without harming the nerves. To achieve real-time multi-channel processing it is important to integrate spike sorting on-chip to overcome limitations in transmission bandwidth. This requires computationally efficient algorithms for feature extraction and clustering suitable for low-power hardware implementation. This paper describes a new feature extraction method for real-time spike sorting based on extrema analysis (namely positive peaks and negative peaks) of spike shapes and their discrete derivatives at different frequency bands. Employing simulation across different datasets, the accuracy and computational complexity of the proposed method are assessed and compared with other methods. The average classification accuracy of the proposed method in conjunction with online sorting (O-Sort) is 91.6%, outperforming all the other methods tested with the O-Sort clustering algorithm. The proposed method offers a better tradeoff between classification error and computational complexity, making it a particularly strong choice for on-chip spike sorting.

  14. Vacuum-actuated percutaneous insertion/implantation tool for flexible neural probes and interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Sheth, Heeral; Bennett, William J.; Pannu, Satinderpall S.; Tooker, Angela C.

    2017-03-07

    A flexible device insertion tool including an elongated stiffener with one or more suction ports, and a vacuum connector for interfacing the stiffener to a vacuum source, for attaching the flexible device such as a flexible neural probe to the stiffener during insertion by a suction force exerted through the suction ports to, and to release the flexible device by removing the suction force.

  15. Experimental and theoretical characterization of implantable neural microelectrodes modified with conducting polymer nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Abidian, Mohammad Reza; Martin, David C

    2008-03-01

    Neural prostheses transduce bioelectric signals to electronic signals at the interface between neural tissue and neural microelectrodes. A low impedance electrode-tissue interface is important for the quality of signal during recording as well as quantity of applied charge density during stimulation. However, neural microelectrode sites exhibit high impedance because of their small geometric surface area. Here we analyze nanostructured-conducting polymers that can be used to significantly decrease the impedance of microelectrode typically by about two orders of magnitude and increase the charge transfer capacity of microelectrodes by three orders of magnitude. In this study poly(pyrrole) (PPy) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanotubes were electrochemically polymerized on the surface of neural microelectrode sites (1250 microm(2)). An equivalent circuit model comprising a coating capacitance in parallel with a pore resistance and interface impedance in series was developed and fitted to experimental results to characterize the physical and electrical properties of the interface. To confirm that the fitting parameters correlate with physical quantities of interface, theoretical equations were used to calculate the parameter values thereby validating the proposed model. Finally, an apparent diffusion coefficient was calculated for PPy film (29.2+/-1.1 x 10(-6) cm(2)/s), PPy nanotubes (PPy NTs) (72.4+/-3.3 x 10(-6) cm(2)/s), PEDOT film (7.4+/-2.1 x 10(-6) cm(2)/s), and PEDOT nanotubes (PEDOT NTs) (13.0+/-1.8 x 10(-6) cm(2)/s). The apparent diffusion coefficient of conducting polymer nanotubes was larger than the corresponding conducting polymer films.

  16. Experimental and theoretical characterization of implantable neural microelectrodes modified with conducting polymer nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Abidian, Mohammad Reza; Martin, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Neural prostheses transduce bioelectric signals to electronic signals at the interface between neural tissue and neural microelectrodes. A low impedance electrode-tissue interface is important for the quality of signal during recording as well as quantity of applied charge density during stimulation. However, neural microelectrode sites exhibit high impedance because of their small geometric surface area. Here we analyze nanostructured-conducting polymers that can be used to significantly decrease the impedance of microelectrode typically by about two orders of magnitude and increase the charge transfer capacity of microelectrodes by three orders of magnitude. In this study poly(pyrrole) (PPy) and poly(3, 4- ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanotubes were electrochemically polymerized on the surface of neural microelectrode sites (1250 μm2). An equivalent circuit model comprising a coating capacitance in parallel with a pore resistance and interface impedance in series was developed and fitted to experimental results to characterize the physical and electrical properties of the interface. To confirm that the fitting parameters correlate with physical quantities of interface, theoretical equations were used to calculate the parameter values thereby validating the proposed model. Finally, an apparent diffusion coefficient was calculated for PPy film (29.2 ± 1.1 cm2/s), PPy nanotubes (72.4 ± 3.3 cm2/s), PEDOT film (7.4 ± 2.1 cm2/s), and PEDOT nanotubes (13.0 ± 1.8 cm2/s). The apparent diffusion coefficient of conducting polymer nanotubes was larger than the corresponding conducting polymer films. PMID:18093644

  17. Implanted neural electrodes cause chronic, local inflammation that is correlated with local neurodegeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, George C.; Rees, Howard D.; Levey, Allan I.; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2009-10-01

    Prosthetic devices that are controlled by intracortical electrodes recording one's 'thoughts' are a reality today, and no longer merely in the realm of science fiction. However, widespread clinical use of implanted electrodes is hampered by a lack of reliability in chronic recordings, independent of the type of electrodes used. One major hypothesis has been that astroglial scar electrically impedes the electrodes. However, there is a temporal discrepancy between stabilization of scar's electrical properties and recording failure with recording failure lagging by 1 month. In this study, we test a possible explanation for this discrepancy: the hypothesis that chronic inflammation, due to the persistent presence of the electrode, causes a local neurodegenerative state in the immediate vicinity of the electrode. Through modulation of chronic inflammation via stab wound, electrode geometry and age-matched control, we found that after 16 weeks, animals with an increased level of chronic inflammation were associated with increased neuronal and dendritic, but not axonal, loss. We observed increased neuronal and dendritic loss 16 weeks after implantation compared to 8 weeks after implantation, suggesting that the local neurodegenerative state is progressive. After 16 weeks, we observed axonal pathology in the form of hyperphosphorylation of the protein tau in the immediate vicinity of the microelectrodes (as observed in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies). The results of this study suggest that a local, late onset neurodegenerative disease-like state surrounds the chronic electrodes and is a potential cause for chronic recording failure. These results also inform strategies to enhance our capability to attain reliable long-term recordings from implantable electrodes in the CNS.

  18. Implanted neural electrodes cause chronic, local inflammation that is correlated with local neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    McConnell, George C; Rees, Howard D; Levey, Allan I; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2009-10-01

    Prosthetic devices that are controlled by intracortical electrodes recording one's 'thoughts' are a reality today, and no longer merely in the realm of science fiction. However, widespread clinical use of implanted electrodes is hampered by a lack of reliability in chronic recordings, independent of the type of electrodes used. One major hypothesis has been that astroglial scar electrically impedes the electrodes. However, there is a temporal discrepancy between stabilization of scar's electrical properties and recording failure with recording failure lagging by 1 month. In this study, we test a possible explanation for this discrepancy: the hypothesis that chronic inflammation, due to the persistent presence of the electrode, causes a local neurodegenerative state in the immediate vicinity of the electrode. Through modulation of chronic inflammation via stab wound, electrode geometry and age-matched control, we found that after 16 weeks, animals with an increased level of chronic inflammation were associated with increased neuronal and dendritic, but not axonal, loss. We observed increased neuronal and dendritic loss 16 weeks after implantation compared to 8 weeks after implantation, suggesting that the local neurodegenerative state is progressive. After 16 weeks, we observed axonal pathology in the form of hyperphosphorylation of the protein tau in the immediate vicinity of the microelectrodes (as observed in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies). The results of this study suggest that a local, late onset neurodegenerative disease-like state surrounds the chronic electrodes and is a potential cause for chronic recording failure. These results also inform strategies to enhance our capability to attain reliable long-term recordings from implantable electrodes in the CNS.

  19. Measuring quality of life in stroke subjects receiving an implanted neural prosthesis for drop foot.

    PubMed

    Kottink, Anke I; Ijzerman, Maarten J; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina G; Hermens, Hermie J

    2010-05-01

    The aim was to determine if the treatment of a drop foot by means of an implantable two-channel peroneal nerve stimulator improves health-related quality of life (HRQoL). All subjects were measured at baseline and after a follow-up period of 12 and 26 weeks. Twenty-nine stroke survivors with chronic hemiplegia with drop foot who fulfilled the predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in the present randomized controlled trial. The intervention group received an implantable two-channel peroneal nerve stimulator for correction of their drop foot. The control group continued using their conventional walking device, consisting of an ankle-foot orthosis, orthopedic shoes, or no device. HRQoL was assessed in two different ways: (i) by taking descriptive measures, that is, the Short Form-36 (SF-36; generic measure) and the Disability Impact Profile (DIP; specific measure); and (ii) by obtaining preference-based utilities both measured with the time trade-off (direct way) and by calculating them from the EuroQol (EQ-5D) and SF-36. A significant positive effect of the implantable device was found on the physical functioning domain, the general health domain, and the physical component summary score of the SF-36. For the DIP, a significant improvement was found on the domains mobility, self-care, and psychological status in the intervention group. Regarding the preference-based utility measures, a significant effect was found for the utility index calculated from the EQ-5D. The implantable two-channel peroneal nerve stimulator seems to be efficient to improve HRQoL, mainly the domains related to physical functioning. A relation was present between the utility indexes calculated from the EQ-5D and SF-36.

  20. Neural Correlates of Speech Processing in Prelingually Deafened Children and Adolescents with Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Ortmann, Magdalene; Knief, Arne; Deuster, Dirk; Brinkheetker, Stephanie; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, Antoinette am; Dobel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Prelingually deafened children with cochlear implants stand a good chance of developing satisfactory speech performance. Nevertheless, their eventual language performance is highly variable and not fully explainable by the duration of deafness and hearing experience. In this study, two groups of cochlear implant users (CI groups) with very good basic hearing abilities but non-overlapping speech performance (very good or very bad speech performance) were matched according to hearing age and age at implantation. We assessed whether these CI groups differed with regard to their phoneme discrimination ability and auditory sensory memory capacity, as suggested by earlier studies. These functions were measured behaviorally and with the Mismatch Negativity (MMN). Phoneme discrimination ability was comparable in the CI group of good performers and matched healthy controls, which were both better than the bad performers. Source analyses revealed larger MMN activity (155–225 ms) in good than in bad performers, which was generated in the frontal cortex and positively correlated with measures of working memory. For the bad performers, this was followed by an increased activation of left temporal regions from 225 to 250 ms with a focus on the auditory cortex. These results indicate that the two CI groups developed different auditory speech processing strategies and stress the role of phonological functions of auditory sensory memory and the prefrontal cortex in positively developing speech perception and production. PMID:23861784

  1. Implantable neurotechnologies: a review of micro- and nanoelectrodes for neural recording.

    PubMed

    Patil, Anoop C; Thakor, Nitish V

    2016-01-01

    Electrodes serve as the first critical interface to the biological organ system. In neuroprosthetic applications, for example, electrodes interface to the tissue for either signal recording or tissue stimulation. In this review, we consider electrodes for recording neural activity. Recording electrodes serve as wiretaps into the neural tissues, providing readouts of electrical activity. These signals give us valuable insights into the organization and functioning of the nervous system. The recording interfaces have also shown promise in aiding treatment of motor and sensory disabilities caused by neurological disorders. Recent advances in fabrication technology have generated wide interest in creating tiny, high-density electrode interfaces for neural tissues. An ideal electrode should be small enough and be able to achieve reliable and conformal integration with the structures of the nervous system. As a result, the existing electrode designs are being shrunk and packed to form small form factor interfaces to tissue. Here, an overview of the historic and state-of-the-art electrode technologies for recording neural activity is presented first with a focus on their development road map. The fact that the dimensions of recording electrode sites are being scaled down from micron to submicron scale to enable dense interfaces is appreciated. The current trends in recording electrode technologies are then reviewed. Current and future considerations in electrode design, including the use of inorganic nanostructures and biologically inspired or biocomapatible materials are discussed, along with an overview of the applications of flexible materials and transistor transduction schemes. Finally, we detail the major technical challenges facing chronic use of reliable recording electrode technology.

  2. Neural control of cursor trajectory and click by a human with tetraplegia 1000 days after implant of an intracortical microelectrode array

    PubMed Central

    Simeral, J D; Kim, S-P; Black, M J; Donoghue, J P; Hochberg, L R

    2013-01-01

    The ongoing pilot clinical trial of the BrainGate neural interface system aims in part to assess the feasibility of using neural activity obtained from a small-scale, chronically implanted, intracortical microelectrode array to provide control signals for a neural prosthesis system. Critical questions include how long implanted microelectrodes will record useful neural signals, how reliably those signals can be acquired and decoded, and how effectively they can be used to control various assistive technologies such as computers and robotic assistive devices, or to enable functional electrical stimulation of paralyzed muscles. Here we examined these questions by assessing neural cursor control and BrainGate system characteristics on five consecutive days 1000 days after implant of a 4 × 4 mm array of 100 microelectrodes in the motor cortex of a human with longstanding tetraplegia subsequent to a brainstem stroke. On each of five prospectively-selected days we performed time-amplitude sorting of neuronal spiking activity, trained a population-based Kalman velocity decoding filter combined with a linear discriminant click state classifier, and then assessed closed-loop point-and-click cursor control. The participant performed both an eight-target center-out task and a random target Fitts metric task which was adapted from a human-computer interaction ISO standard used to quantify performance of computer input devices. The neural interface system was further characterized by daily measurement of electrode impedances, unit waveforms and local field potentials. Across the five days, spiking signals were obtained from 41 of 96 electrodes and were successfully decoded to provide neural cursor point-and-click control with a mean task performance of 91.3% ± 0.1% (mean ± s.d.) correct target acquisition. Results across five consecutive days demonstrate that a neural interface system based on an intracortical microelectrode array can provide repeatable, accurate point

  3. Neural control of cursor trajectory and click by a human with tetraplegia 1000 days after implant of an intracortical microelectrode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeral, J. D.; Kim, S.-P.; Black, M. J.; Donoghue, J. P.; Hochberg, L. R.

    2011-04-01

    The ongoing pilot clinical trial of the BrainGate neural interface system aims in part to assess the feasibility of using neural activity obtained from a small-scale, chronically implanted, intracortical microelectrode array to provide control signals for a neural prosthesis system. Critical questions include how long implanted microelectrodes will record useful neural signals, how reliably those signals can be acquired and decoded, and how effectively they can be used to control various assistive technologies such as computers and robotic assistive devices, or to enable functional electrical stimulation of paralyzed muscles. Here we examined these questions by assessing neural cursor control and BrainGate system characteristics on five consecutive days 1000 days after implant of a 4 × 4 mm array of 100 microelectrodes in the motor cortex of a human with longstanding tetraplegia subsequent to a brainstem stroke. On each of five prospectively-selected days we performed time-amplitude sorting of neuronal spiking activity, trained a population-based Kalman velocity decoding filter combined with a linear discriminant click state classifier, and then assessed closed-loop point-and-click cursor control. The participant performed both an eight-target center-out task and a random target Fitts metric task which was adapted from a human-computer interaction ISO standard used to quantify performance of computer input devices. The neural interface system was further characterized by daily measurement of electrode impedances, unit waveforms and local field potentials. Across the five days, spiking signals were obtained from 41 of 96 electrodes and were successfully decoded to provide neural cursor point-and-click control with a mean task performance of 91.3% ± 0.1% (mean ± s.d.) correct target acquisition. Results across five consecutive days demonstrate that a neural interface system based on an intracortical microelectrode array can provide repeatable, accurate point

  4. Manufacturing, assembling and packaging of miniaturized implants for neural prostheses and brain-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    Implantable medical devices to interface with muscles, peripheral nerves, and the brain have been developed for many applications over the last decades. They have been applied in fundamental neuroscientific studies as well as in diagnosis, therapy and rehabilitation in clinical practice. Success stories of these implants have been written with help of precision mechanics manufacturing techniques. Latest cutting edge research approaches to restore vision in blind persons and to develop an interface with the human brain as motor control interface, however, need more complex systems and larger scales of integration and higher degrees of miniaturization. Microsystems engineering offers adequate tools, methods, and materials but so far, no MEMS based active medical device has been transferred into clinical practice. Silicone rubber, polyimide, parylene as flexible materials and silicon and alumina (aluminum dioxide ceramics) as substrates and insulation or packaging materials, respectively, and precious metals as electrodes have to be combined to systems that do not harm the biological target structure and have to work reliably in a wet environment with ions and proteins. Here, different design, manufacturing and packaging paradigms will be presented and strengths and drawbacks will be discussed in close relation to the envisioned biological and medical applications.

  5. A Single-Chip Full-Duplex High Speed Transceiver for Multi-Site Stimulating and Recording Neural Implants.

    PubMed

    Mirbozorgi, S Abdollah; Bahrami, Hadi; Sawan, Mohamad; Rusch, Leslie A; Gosselin, Benoit

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel, fully-integrated, low-power full-duplex transceiver (FDT) to support high-density and bidirectional neural interfacing applications (high-channel count stimulating and recording) with asymmetric data rates: higher rates are required for recording (uplink signals) than stimulation (downlink signals). The transmitter (TX) and receiver (RX) share a single antenna to reduce implant size and complexity. The TX uses impulse radio ultra-wide band (IR-UWB) based on an edge combining approach, and the RX uses a novel 2.4-GHz on-off keying (OOK) receiver. Proper isolation (>20 dB) between the TX and RX path is implemented 1) by shaping the transmitted pulses to fall within the unregulated UWB spectrum (3.1-7 GHz), and 2) by space-efficient filtering (avoiding a circulator or diplexer) of the downlink OOK spectrum in the RX low-noise amplifier. The UWB 3.1-7 GHz transmitter can use either OOK or binary phase shift keying (BPSK) modulation schemes. The proposed FDT provides dual band 500-Mbps TX uplink data rate and 100 Mbps RX downlink data rate, and it is fully integrated into standard TSMC 0.18- μm CMOS within a total size of 0.8 mm(2). The total measured power consumption is 10.4 mW in full duplex mode (5 mW at 100 Mbps for RX, and 5.4 mW at 500 Mbps or 10.8 pJ/bit for TX). Additionally, a 3-coil inductive link along with on-chip power management circuits allows to powering up the implantable transceiver wirelessly by delivering 25 mW extracted from a 13.56-MHz carrier signal, at a total efficiency of 41.6%.

  6. An implantable neural probe with monolithically integrated dielectric waveguide and recording electrodes for optogenetics applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fan; Stark, Eran; Im, Maesoon; Cho, Il-Joo; Yoon, Eui-Sung; Buzsáki, György; Wise, Kensall D; Yoon, Euisik

    2013-10-01

    Optogenetics promises exciting neuroscience research by offering optical stimulation of neurons with unprecedented temporal resolution, cell-type specificity and the ability to excite as well as to silence neurons. This work provides the technical solution to deliver light to local neurons and record neural potentials, facilitating local circuit analysis and bridging the gap between optogenetics and neurophysiology research. We have designed and obtained the first in vivo validation of a neural probe with monolithically integrated electrodes and waveguide. High spatial precision enables optical excitation of targeted neurons with minimal power and recording of single-units in dense cortical and subcortical regions. The total coupling and transmission loss through the dielectric waveguide at 473 nm was 10.5 ± 1.9 dB, corresponding to an average output intensity of 9400 mW mm(-2) when coupled to a 7 mW optical fiber. Spontaneous field potentials and spiking activities of multiple Channelrhodopsin-2 expressing neurons were recorded in the hippocampus CA1 region of an anesthetized rat. Blue light stimulation at intensity of 51 mW mm(-2) induced robust spiking activities in the physiologically identified local populations. This minimally invasive, complete monolithic integration provides unmatched spatial precision and scalability for future optogenetics studies at deep brain regions with high neuronal density.

  7. An implantable neural probe with monolithically integrated dielectric waveguide and recording electrodes for optogenetics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fan; Stark, Eran; Im, Maesoon; Cho, Il-Joo; Yoon, Eui-Sung; Buzsáki, György; Wise, Kensall D.; Yoon, Euisik

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Optogenetics promises exciting neuroscience research by offering optical stimulation of neurons with unprecedented temporal resolution, cell-type specificity and the ability to excite as well as to silence neurons. This work provides the technical solution to deliver light to local neurons and record neural potentials, facilitating local circuit analysis and bridging the gap between optogenetics and neurophysiology research. Approach. We have designed and obtained the first in vivo validation of a neural probe with monolithically integrated electrodes and waveguide. High spatial precision enables optical excitation of targeted neurons with minimal power and recording of single-units in dense cortical and subcortical regions. Main results. The total coupling and transmission loss through the dielectric waveguide at 473 nm was 10.5 ± 1.9 dB, corresponding to an average output intensity of 9400 mW mm-2 when coupled to a 7 mW optical fiber. Spontaneous field potentials and spiking activities of multiple Channelrhodopsin-2 expressing neurons were recorded in the hippocampus CA1 region of an anesthetized rat. Blue light stimulation at intensity of 51 mW mm-2 induced robust spiking activities in the physiologically identified local populations. Significance. This minimally invasive, complete monolithic integration provides unmatched spatial precision and scalability for future optogenetics studies at deep brain regions with high neuronal density.

  8. Congenital and prolonged adult-onset deafness cause distinct degradations in neural ITD coding with bilateral cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Kenneth E; Chung, Yoojin; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2013-06-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (CI) users perform poorly on tasks involving interaural time differences (ITD), which are critical for sound localization and speech reception in noise by normal-hearing listeners. ITD perception with bilateral CI is influenced by age at onset of deafness and duration of deafness. We previously showed that ITD coding in the auditory midbrain is degraded in congenitally deaf white cats (DWC) compared to acutely deafened cats (ADC) with normal auditory development (Hancock et al., J. Neurosci, 30:14068). To determine the relative importance of early onset of deafness and prolonged duration of deafness for abnormal ITD coding in DWC, we recorded from single units in the inferior colliculus of cats deafened as adults 6 months prior to experimentation (long-term deafened cats, LTDC) and compared neural ITD coding between the three deafness models. The incidence of ITD-sensitive neurons was similar in both groups with normal auditory development (LTDC and ADC), but significantly diminished in DWC. In contrast, both groups that experienced prolonged deafness (LTDC and DWC) had broad distributions of best ITDs around the midline, unlike the more focused distributions biased toward contralateral-leading ITDs present in both ADC and normal-hearing animals. The lack of contralateral bias in LTDC and DWC results in reduced sensitivity to changes in ITD within the natural range. The finding that early onset of deafness more severely degrades neural ITD coding than prolonged duration of deafness argues for the importance of fitting deaf children with sound processors that provide reliable ITD cues at an early age.

  9. Insertion shuttle with carboxyl terminated self-assembled monolayer coatings for implanting flexible polymer neural probes in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida Kozai, Takashi D.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2011-01-01

    Penetrating microscale microelectrodes made from flexible polymers tend to bend or deflect and may fail to reach their target location. The development of flexible neural probes requires methods for reliable and controlled insertion into the brain. Previous approaches for implanting flexible probes into the cortex required modifications that negate the flexibility, limit the functionality, or restrict the design of the probe. This study investigated the use of an electronegative self-assembled monolayer (SAM) as a coating on a stiff insertion shuttle to carry a polymer probe into the cerebral cortex, and then the detachment of the shuttle from the probe by altering the shuttle’s hydrophobicity. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polyimide probes were inserted into an agarose in vitro brain model using silicon insertion shuttles. The silicon shuttles were coated with a carboxyl terminal SAM. The precision of insertion using the shuttle was measured by the percentage displacement of the probe upon shuttle removal after the probe was fully inserted. The average relative displacement of polyimide probes inserted with SAM-coated shuttles was (1.0 ± 0.66)% of the total insertion depth compared to (26.5 ± 3.7)% for uncoated silicon shuttles. The average relative displacement of PDMS probes was (2.1 ± 1.1)% of the insertion depth compared to 100% (complete removal) for uncoated silicon shuttles. SAM-coated shuttles were further validated through their use to reliably insert PDMS probes in the cerebral cortex of rodents. This study found that SAM-coated silicon shuttles are a viable method for accurately and precisely inserting flexible neural probes in the brain. PMID:19666051

  10. A Wireless and Batteryless Microsystem with Implantable Grid Electrode/3-Dimensional Probe Array for ECoG and Extracellular Neural Recording in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Chiou, Jin-Chern

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of an integrated wireless microsystem platform that provides the possibility to support versatile implantable neural sensing devices in free laboratory rats. Inductive coupled coils with low dropout regulator design allows true long-term recording without limitation of battery capacity. A 16-channel analog front end chip located on the headstage is designed for high channel account neural signal conditioning with low current consumption and noise. Two types of implantable electrodes including grid electrode and 3D probe array are also presented for brain surface recording and 3D biopotential acquisition in the implanted target volume of tissue. The overall system consumes less than 20 mA with small form factor, 3.9 × 3.9 cm2 mainboard and 1.8 × 3.4 cm2 headstage, is packaged into a backpack for rats. Practical in vivo recordings including auditory response, brain resection tissue and PZT-induced seizures recording demonstrate the correct function of the proposed microsystem. Presented achievements addressed the aforementioned properties by combining MEMS neural sensors, low-power circuit designs and commercial chips into system-level integration. PMID:23567528

  11. Evaluating multipulse integration as a neural-health correlate in human cochlear-implant users: Relationship to spatial selectivity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ning; Pfingst, Bryan E

    2016-09-01

    The decrease of psychophysical detection thresholds as a function of pulse rate for a fixed-duration electrical pulse train is referred to as multipulse integration (MPI). The MPI slopes correlate with anatomical and physiological indices of cochlear health in guinea pigs with cochlear implants. The aim of the current study was to assess whether the MPI slopes were related to the spatial spread of activation by electrical stimulation. The hypothesis was that MPI is dependent on the total number of excitable neurons at the stimulation site, with broader neural excitation producing a steeper threshold decrease as a function of stimulation rate. MPI functions were measured at all stimulation sites in 22-site electrode arrays in human subjects. Some sites with steep MPI functions and other sites with shallow functions were assessed for spatial spread of excitation at 900 pps using a forward-masking paradigm. The results showed a correlation between the slopes of the forward-masking functions and the steepness of MPI, with broader stimulation predicting greater integration. The results are consistent with the idea that integration of multiple pulses in a pulse train relies on the number of excitable neurons at the stimulation site.

  12. A wireless transmission neural interface system for unconstrained non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Leon, Jose A; Parajuli, Arun; Franklin, Robert; Sorenson, Michael; Felleman, Daniel J; Hansen, Bryan J; Hu, Ming; Dragoi, Valentin

    2015-10-01

    Studying the brain in large animal models in a restrained laboratory rig severely limits our capacity to examine brain circuits in experimental and clinical applications. To overcome these limitations, we developed a high-fidelity 96-channel wireless system to record extracellular spikes and local field potentials from the neocortex. A removable, external case of the wireless device is attached to a titanium pedestal placed in the animal skull. Broadband neural signals are amplified, multiplexed, and continuously transmitted as TCP/IP data at a sustained rate of 24 Mbps. A Xilinx Spartan 6 FPGA assembles the digital signals into serial data frames for transmission at 20 kHz though an 802.11n wireless data link on a frequency-shift key-modulated signal at 5.7-5.8 GHz to a receiver up to 10 m away. The system is powered by two CR123A, 3 V batteries for 2 h of operation. We implanted a multi-electrode array in visual area V4 of one anesthetized monkey (Macaca fascicularis) and in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) of a freely moving monkey (Macaca mulatta). The implanted recording arrays were electrically stable and delivered broadband neural data over a year of testing. For the first time, we compared dlPFC neuronal responses to the same set of stimuli (food reward) in restrained and freely moving conditions. Although we did not find differences in neuronal responses as a function of reward type in the restrained and unrestrained conditions, there were significant differences in correlated activity. This demonstrates that measuring neural responses in freely moving animals can capture phenomena that are absent in the traditional head-fixed paradigm. We implemented a wireless neural interface for multi-electrode recordings in freely moving non-human primates, which can potentially move systems neuroscience to a new direction by allowing one to record neural signals while animals interact with their environment.

  13. A wireless transmission neural interface system for unconstrained non-human primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Leon, Jose A.; Parajuli, Arun; Franklin, Robert; Sorenson, Michael; Felleman, Daniel J.; Hansen, Bryan J.; Hu, Ming; Dragoi, Valentin

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Studying the brain in large animal models in a restrained laboratory rig severely limits our capacity to examine brain circuits in experimental and clinical applications. Approach. To overcome these limitations, we developed a high-fidelity 96-channel wireless system to record extracellular spikes and local field potentials from the neocortex. A removable, external case of the wireless device is attached to a titanium pedestal placed in the animal skull. Broadband neural signals are amplified, multiplexed, and continuously transmitted as TCP/IP data at a sustained rate of 24 Mbps. A Xilinx Spartan 6 FPGA assembles the digital signals into serial data frames for transmission at 20 kHz though an 802.11n wireless data link on a frequency-shift key-modulated signal at 5.7-5.8 GHz to a receiver up to 10 m away. The system is powered by two CR123A, 3 V batteries for 2 h of operation. Main results. We implanted a multi-electrode array in visual area V4 of one anesthetized monkey (Macaca fascicularis) and in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) of a freely moving monkey (Macaca mulatta). The implanted recording arrays were electrically stable and delivered broadband neural data over a year of testing. For the first time, we compared dlPFC neuronal responses to the same set of stimuli (food reward) in restrained and freely moving conditions. Although we did not find differences in neuronal responses as a function of reward type in the restrained and unrestrained conditions, there were significant differences in correlated activity. This demonstrates that measuring neural responses in freely moving animals can capture phenomena that are absent in the traditional head-fixed paradigm. Significance. We implemented a wireless neural interface for multi-electrode recordings in freely moving non-human primates, which can potentially move systems neuroscience to a new direction by allowing one to record neural signals while animals interact with their environment.

  14. Implantable polyimide cable for multichannel high-data-rate neural recording microsystems.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Park, Woo-Tae; Cheng, Min-Yuan; An, Jing-Zhi; Xue, Rui-Feng; Tan, Kwan-Ling; Je, Minkyu

    2012-02-01

    To avoid or minimize postimplantation injury as a result of brain micromotion relative to the skull, a flexible multichannel polyimide (PI) cable was designed and microfabricated for data and power transmission between an intracranial IC recording from a neural probe array and an extracranial IC exchanging power and data wirelessly with an external unit. Surface characteristics, electrical properties, and cytocompatibility of the PI ribbon cable were investigated in this study. Scanning electron microscopic examination and atomic force microscopy analyses showed that the surface of the PI ribbon cable became significantly rougher due to the reactive oxygen ion etching process to open bonding pads. The enhanced surface roughness was also responsible for the increase in wettability and water absorption rate. However, water permeability measurement revealed that the micromachining fabrication process did not meaningfully affect the acceptable water vapor transmission rate of PI. Moreover, electrical properties, such as insertion loss, isolation between channels and data transmission capacity, were assessed for each channel of the PI ribbon cable on the basis of scattering parameter (S-parameter) measurement. Finally, 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and live/dead intracellular staining tests were carried out to evaluate cell behaviors on the PI ribbon cable, indicating that the PI ribbon cable did not have acute cytotoxicity and appeared to be as cytocompatible as blank PI foils. © 2011 IEEE

  15. Bottom-up SiO2 embedded carbon nanotube electrodes with superior performance for integration in implantable neural microsystems.

    PubMed

    Musa, Silke; Rand, Danielle R; Cott, Daire J; Loo, Josine; Bartic, Carmen; Eberle, Wolfgang; Nuttin, Bart; Borghs, Gustaaf

    2012-06-26

    The reliable integration of carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes in future neural probes requires a proper embedding of the CNTs to prevent damage and toxic contamination during fabrication and also to preserve their mechanical integrity during implantation. Here we describe a novel bottom-up embedding approach where the CNT microelectrodes are encased in SiO(2) and Parylene C with lithographically defined electrode openings. Vertically aligned CNTs are grown on microelectrode arrays using low-temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition compatible with wafer-scale CMOS processing. Electrodes with 5, 10, and 25 μm diameter are realized. The CNT electrodes are characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry and compared against cofabricated Pt and TiN electrodes. The superior performance of the CNTs in terms of impedance (≤4.8 ± 0.3 kΩ at 1 kHz) and charge-storage capacity (≥513.9 ± 61.6 mC/cm(2)) is attributed to an increased wettability caused by the removal of the SiO(2) embedding in buffered hydrofluoric acid. Infrared spectroscopy reveals an unaltered chemical fingerprint of the CNTs after fabrication. Impedance monitoring during biphasic current pulsing with increasing amplitudes provides clear evidence of the onset of gas evolution at CNT electrodes. Stimulation is accordingly considered safe for charge densities ≤40.7 mC/cm(2). In addition, prolonged stimulation with 5000 biphasic current pulses at 8.1, 40.7, and 81.5 mC/cm(2) increases the CNT electrode impedance at 1 kHz only by 5.5, 1.2, and 12.1%, respectively. Finally, insertion of CNT electrodes with and without embedding into rat brains demonstrates that embedded CNTs are mechanically more stable than non-embedded CNTs.

  16. Platelet-rich plasma for regeneration of neural feedback pathways around dental implants: a concise review and outlook on future possibilities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Bornstein, Michael M; Lambrichts, Ivo; Yu, Hai-Yang; Politis, Constantinus; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2017-03-01

    Along with the development of new materials, advanced medical imaging and surgical techniques, osseointegrated dental implants are considered a successful and constantly evolving treatment modality for the replacement of missing teeth in patients with complete or partial edentulism. The importance of restoring the peripheral neural feedback pathway and thus repairing the lack of periodontal mechanoreceptors after tooth extraction has been highlighted in the literature. Nevertheless, regenerating the nerve fibers and reconstructing the neural feedback pathways around osseointegrated implants remain a challenge. Recent studies have provided evidence that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy is a promising treatment for musculoskeletal injuries. Because of its high biological safety, convenience and usability, PRP therapy has gradually gained popularity in the clinical field. Although much remains to be learned, the growth factors from PRP might play key roles in peripheral nerve repair mechanisms. This review presents known growth factors contributing to the biological efficacy of PRP and illustrates basic and (pre-)clinical evidence regarding the use of PRP and its relevant products in peripheral nerve regeneration. In addition, the potential of local application of PRP for structural and functional recovery of injured peripheral nerves around dental implants is discussed.

  17. Platelet-rich plasma for regeneration of neural feedback pathways around dental implants: a concise review and outlook on future possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Bornstein, Michael M; Lambrichts, Ivo; Yu, Hai-Yang; Politis, Constantinus; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2017-01-01

    Along with the development of new materials, advanced medical imaging and surgical techniques, osseointegrated dental implants are considered a successful and constantly evolving treatment modality for the replacement of missing teeth in patients with complete or partial edentulism. The importance of restoring the peripheral neural feedback pathway and thus repairing the lack of periodontal mechanoreceptors after tooth extraction has been highlighted in the literature. Nevertheless, regenerating the nerve fibers and reconstructing the neural feedback pathways around osseointegrated implants remain a challenge. Recent studies have provided evidence that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) therapy is a promising treatment for musculoskeletal injuries. Because of its high biological safety, convenience and usability, PRP therapy has gradually gained popularity in the clinical field. Although much remains to be learned, the growth factors from PRP might play key roles in peripheral nerve repair mechanisms. This review presents known growth factors contributing to the biological efficacy of PRP and illustrates basic and (pre-)clinical evidence regarding the use of PRP and its relevant products in peripheral nerve regeneration. In addition, the potential of local application of PRP for structural and functional recovery of injured peripheral nerves around dental implants is discussed. PMID:28282030

  18. Engineering angiogenesis following spinal cord injury: A coculture of neural progenitor and endothelial cells in a degradable polymer implant leads to an increase in vessel density and formation of the blood-spinal cord barrier

    PubMed Central

    Rauch, Millicent Ford; Hynes, Sara Royce; Bertram, James; Redmond, Andrew; Robinson, Rebecca; Williams, Cicely; Xu, Hao; Madri, Joseph A.; Lavik, Erin B.

    2009-01-01

    Angiogenesis precedes recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI), and its extent correlates with neural regeneration suggesting that angiogenesis may play a role in repair. An important precondition for studying the role of angiogenesis is the ability to induce it in a controlled manner. Previously, we showed that a coculture of endothelial cells (ECs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) promoted the formation of stable tubes in vitro and stable, functional vascular networks in vivo in a subcutaneous model. We sought to test whether a similar coculture would lead to formation of stable functional vessels in the spinal cord following injury. We created microvascular networks in a biodegradable two component implant system and tested the ability of the coculture or controls (lesion control, implant alone, implant plus ECs, or implant plus NPCs) to promote angiogenesis in a rat hemisection model of spinal cord injury. The coculture implant led to a four fold increase in functional vessels compared to the lesion control, implant alone, or implant plus NPCs groups and a 2 fold increase in functional vessels over the implant plus ECs group. Furthermore, half of the vessels in the coculture implant exhibited positive staining for the endothelial barrier antigen, a marker for formation of the blood spinal cord barrier (BSB). No other groups showed positive staining for the BSB in the injury epicenter. This work provides a novel method to induce angiogenesis following SCI and a foundation for studying its role in repair. PMID:19120441

  19. OptoZIF Drive: a 3D printed implant and assembly tool package for neural recording and optical stimulation in freely moving mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, David S.; Schroeder, Joseph B.; Telian, Gregory I.; Zhang, Zhengyang; Sunil, Smrithi; Ritt, Jason T.

    2016-12-01

    Objective. Behavioral neuroscience studies in freely moving rodents require small, light-weight implants to facilitate neural recording and stimulation. Our goal was to develop an integrated package of 3D printed parts and assembly aids for labs to rapidly fabricate, with minimal training, an implant that combines individually positionable microelectrodes, an optical fiber, zero insertion force (ZIF-clip) headstage connection, and secondary recording electrodes, e.g. for electromyography (EMG). Approach. Starting from previous implant designs that position recording electrodes using a control screw, we developed an implant where the main drive body, protective shell, and non-metal components of the microdrives are 3D printed in parallel. We compared alternative shapes and orientations of circuit boards for electrode connection to the headstage, in terms of their size, weight, and ease of wire insertion. We iteratively refined assembly methods, and integrated additional assembly aids into the 3D printed casing. Main results. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the OptoZIF Drive by performing real time optogenetic feedback in behaving mice. A novel feature of the OptoZIF Drive is its vertical circuit board, which facilities direct ZIF-clip connection. This feature requires angled insertion of an optical fiber that still can exit the drive from the center of a ring of recording electrodes. We designed an innovative 2-part protective shell that can be installed during the implant surgery to facilitate making additional connections to the circuit board. We use this feature to show that facial EMG in mice can be used as a control signal to lock stimulation to the animal’s motion, with stable EMG signal over several months. To decrease assembly time, reduce assembly errors, and improve repeatability, we fabricate assembly aids including a drive holder, a drill guide, an implant fixture for microelectode ‘pinning’, and a gold plating fixture. Significance. The

  20. Reach and grasp by people with tetraplegia using a neurally controlled robotic arm.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Leigh R; Bacher, Daniel; Jarosiewicz, Beata; Masse, Nicolas Y; Simeral, John D; Vogel, Joern; Haddadin, Sami; Liu, Jie; Cash, Sydney S; van der Smagt, Patrick; Donoghue, John P

    2012-05-16

    Paralysis following spinal cord injury, brainstem stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other disorders can disconnect the brain from the body, eliminating the ability to perform volitional movements. A neural interface system could restore mobility and independence for people with paralysis by translating neuronal activity directly into control signals for assistive devices. We have previously shown that people with long-standing tetraplegia can use a neural interface system to move and click a computer cursor and to control physical devices. Able-bodied monkeys have used a neural interface system to control a robotic arm, but it is unknown whether people with profound upper extremity paralysis or limb loss could use cortical neuronal ensemble signals to direct useful arm actions. Here we demonstrate the ability of two people with long-standing tetraplegia to use neural interface system-based control of a robotic arm to perform three-dimensional reach and grasp movements. Participants controlled the arm and hand over a broad space without explicit training, using signals decoded from a small, local population of motor cortex (MI) neurons recorded from a 96-channel microelectrode array. One of the study participants, implanted with the sensor 5 years earlier, also used a robotic arm to drink coffee from a bottle. Although robotic reach and grasp actions were not as fast or accurate as those of an able-bodied person, our results demonstrate the feasibility for people with tetraplegia, years after injury to the central nervous system, to recreate useful multidimensional control of complex devices directly from a small sample of neural signals.

  1. Partially flexible MEMS neural probe composed of polyimide and sucrose gel for reducing brain damage during and after implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Myounggun; Cho, Jeiwon; Kim, Yun Kyung; Jung, Dahee; Yoon, Eui-Sung; Shin, Sehyun; Cho, Il-Joo

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a flexible microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) neural probe that minimizes neuron damage and immune response, suitable for chronic recording applications. MEMS neural probes with various features such as high electrode densities have been actively investigated for neuron stimulation and recording to study brain functions. However, successful recording of neural signals in chronic application using rigid silicon probes still remains challenging because of cell death and macrophages accumulated around the electrodes over time from continuous brain movement. Thus, in this paper, we propose a new flexible MEMS neural probe that consists of two segments: a polyimide-based, flexible segment for connection and a rigid segment composed of thin silicon for insertion. While the flexible connection segment is designed to reduce the long-term chronic neuron damage, the thin insertion segment is designed to minimize the brain damage during the insertion process. The proposed flexible neural probe was successfully fabricated using the MEMS process on a silicon on insulator wafer. For a successful insertion, a biodegradable sucrose gel is coated on the flexible segment to temporarily increase the probe stiffness to prevent buckling. After the insertion, the sucrose gel dissolves inside the brain exposing the polyimide probe. By performing an insertion test, we confirm that the flexible probe has enough stiffness. In addition, by monitoring immune responses and brain histology, we successfully demonstrate that the proposed flexible neural probe incurs fivefold less neural damage than that incurred by a conventional silicon neural probe. Therefore, the presented flexible neural probe is a promising candidate for recording stable neural signals for long-time chronic applications.

  2. Parietal Neural Prosthetic Control of a Computer Cursor in a Graphical-User-Interface Task

    PubMed Central

    Revechkis, Boris; Aflalo, Tyson NS; Kellis, Spencer; Pouratian, Nader; Andersen, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To date, the majority of Brain Machine Interfaces have been used to perform simple tasks with sequences of individual targets in otherwise blank environments. In this study we developed a more practical and clinically relevant task that approximated modern computers and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). This task could be problematic given the known sensitivity of areas typically used for BMIs to visual stimuli, eye movements, decision-making, and attentional control. Consequently, we sought to assess the effect of a complex, GUI-like task on the quality of neural decoding. Approach A male rhesus macaque monkey was implanted with two 96-channel electrode arrays in Area 5d of the superior parietal lobule. The animal was trained to perform a GUI-like “Face in a Crowd” task on a computer screen that required selecting one cued, icon-like, face image from a group of alternatives (the “Crowd”) using a neurally controlled cursor. We assessed whether the Crowd affected decodes of intended cursor movements by comparing it to a “Crowd Off” condition in which only the matching target appeared without alternatives. We also examined if training a neural decoder with the Crowd On rather than Off had any effect on subsequent decode quality. Main Results Despite the additional demands of working with the Crowd On, the animal was able to robustly perform the task under Brain Control. The presence of the Crowd did not itself affect decode quality. Training the decoder with the Crowd On relative to Off had no negative influence on subsequent decoding performance. Additionally, the subject was able to gaze around freely without influencing cursor position. Significance Our results demonstrate that area 5d recordings can be used for decoding in a complex, GUI-like task with free gaze. Thus, this area is a promising source of signals for neural prosthetics that utilize computing devices with GUI interfaces, e.g. personal computers, mobile devices, and tablet

  3. Parietal neural prosthetic control of a computer cursor in a graphical-user-interface task.

    PubMed

    Revechkis, Boris; Aflalo, Tyson N S; Kellis, Spencer; Pouratian, Nader; Andersen, Richard A

    2014-12-01

    To date, the majority of Brain-Machine Interfaces have been used to perform simple tasks with sequences of individual targets in otherwise blank environments. In this study we developed a more practical and clinically relevant task that approximated modern computers and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). This task could be problematic given the known sensitivity of areas typically used for BMIs to visual stimuli, eye movements, decision-making, and attentional control. Consequently, we sought to assess the effect of a complex, GUI-like task on the quality of neural decoding. A male rhesus macaque monkey was implanted with two 96-channel electrode arrays in area 5d of the superior parietal lobule. The animal was trained to perform a GUI-like 'Face in a Crowd' task on a computer screen that required selecting one cued, icon-like, face image from a group of alternatives (the 'Crowd') using a neurally controlled cursor. We assessed whether the crowd affected decodes of intended cursor movements by comparing it to a 'Crowd Off' condition in which only the matching target appeared without alternatives. We also examined if training a neural decoder with the Crowd On rather than Off had any effect on subsequent decode quality. Despite the additional demands of working with the Crowd On, the animal was able to robustly perform the task under Brain Control. The presence of the crowd did not itself affect decode quality. Training the decoder with the Crowd On relative to Off had no negative influence on subsequent decoding performance. Additionally, the subject was able to gaze around freely without influencing cursor position. Our results demonstrate that area 5d recordings can be used for decoding in a complex, GUI-like task with free gaze. Thus, this area is a promising source of signals for neural prosthetics that utilize computing devices with GUI interfaces, e.g. personal computers, mobile devices, and tablet computers.

  4. Parietal neural prosthetic control of a computer cursor in a graphical-user-interface task

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revechkis, Boris; Aflalo, Tyson NS; Kellis, Spencer; Pouratian, Nader; Andersen, Richard A.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. To date, the majority of Brain-Machine Interfaces have been used to perform simple tasks with sequences of individual targets in otherwise blank environments. In this study we developed a more practical and clinically relevant task that approximated modern computers and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). This task could be problematic given the known sensitivity of areas typically used for BMIs to visual stimuli, eye movements, decision-making, and attentional control. Consequently, we sought to assess the effect of a complex, GUI-like task on the quality of neural decoding. Approach. A male rhesus macaque monkey was implanted with two 96-channel electrode arrays in area 5d of the superior parietal lobule. The animal was trained to perform a GUI-like ‘Face in a Crowd’ task on a computer screen that required selecting one cued, icon-like, face image from a group of alternatives (the ‘Crowd’) using a neurally controlled cursor. We assessed whether the crowd affected decodes of intended cursor movements by comparing it to a ‘Crowd Off’ condition in which only the matching target appeared without alternatives. We also examined if training a neural decoder with the Crowd On rather than Off had any effect on subsequent decode quality. Main results. Despite the additional demands of working with the Crowd On, the animal was able to robustly perform the task under Brain Control. The presence of the crowd did not itself affect decode quality. Training the decoder with the Crowd On relative to Off had no negative influence on subsequent decoding performance. Additionally, the subject was able to gaze around freely without influencing cursor position. Significance. Our results demonstrate that area 5d recordings can be used for decoding in a complex, GUI-like task with free gaze. Thus, this area is a promising source of signals for neural prosthetics that utilize computing devices with GUI interfaces, e.g. personal computers, mobile devices, and tablet

  5. Visualization of cortical, subcortical, and deep brain neural circuit dynamics during naturalistic mammalian behavior with head-mounted microscopes and chronically implanted lenses

    PubMed Central

    Resendez, Shanna L.; Jennings, Josh H.; Ung, Randall L.; Namboodiri, Vijay Mohan K.; Zhou, Zhe Charles; Otis, James M.; Nomura, Hiroshi; McHenry, Jenna A.; Kosyk, Oksana; Stuber, Garret D.

    2016-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators for visualizing dynamic cellular activity have greatly expanded our understanding of the brain. However, due to light scattering properties of the brain as well as the size and rigidity of traditional imaging technology, in vivo calcium imaging has been limited to superficial brain structures during head fixed behavioral tasks. This limitation can now be circumvented by utilizing miniature, integrated microscopes in conjunction with an implantable microendoscopic lens to guide light into and out of the brain, thus permitting optical access to deep brain (or superficial) neural ensembles during naturalistic behaviors. Here, we describe procedural steps to conduct such imaging studies using mice. However, we anticipate the protocol can be easily adapted for use in other small vertebrates. Successful completion of this protocol will permit cellular imaging of neuronal activity and the generation of data sets with sufficient statistical power to correlate neural activity with stimulus presentation, physiological state, and other aspects of complex behavioral tasks. This protocol takes 6–11 weeks to complete. PMID:26914316

  6. Visualization of cortical, subcortical and deep brain neural circuit dynamics during naturalistic mammalian behavior with head-mounted microscopes and chronically implanted lenses.

    PubMed

    Resendez, Shanna L; Jennings, Josh H; Ung, Randall L; Namboodiri, Vijay Mohan K; Zhou, Zhe Charles; Otis, James M; Nomura, Hiroshi; McHenry, Jenna A; Kosyk, Oksana; Stuber, Garret D

    2016-03-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators for visualizing dynamic cellular activity have greatly expanded our understanding of the brain. However, owing to the light-scattering properties of the brain, as well as the size and rigidity of traditional imaging technology, in vivo calcium imaging has been limited to superficial brain structures during head-fixed behavioral tasks. These limitations can now be circumvented by using miniature, integrated microscopes in conjunction with an implantable microendoscopic lens to guide light into and out of the brain, thus permitting optical access to deep brain (or superficial) neural ensembles during naturalistic behaviors. Here we describe steps to conduct such imaging studies using mice. However, we anticipate that the protocol can be easily adapted for use in other small vertebrates. Successful completion of this protocol will permit cellular imaging of neuronal activity and the generation of data sets with sufficient statistical power to correlate neural activity with stimulus presentation, physiological state and other aspects of complex behavioral tasks. This protocol takes 6-11 weeks to complete.

  7. LONG-TERM RELIABILITY OF AL2O3 AND PARYLENE C BILAYER ENCAPSULATED UTAH ELECTRODE ARRAY BASED NEURAL INTERFACES FOR CHRONIC IMPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xianzong; Rieth, Loren; Williams, Layne; Negi, Sandeep; Bhandari, Rajmohan; Caldwell, Ryan; Sharma, Rohit; Tathireddy, Prashant; Solzbacher, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Objective We focus on improving the long-term stability and functionality of neural interfaces for chronic implantation by using bilayer encapsulation. Approach We evaluated the long-term reliability of Utah electrode array (UEA) based neural interfaces encapsulated by 52 nm of atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 and 6 μm of Parylene C bilayer, and compared these to devices with the baseline Parylene-only encapsulation. Three variants of arrays including wired, wireless, and active UEAs were used to evaluate this bilayer encapsulation scheme, and were immersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 57 °C for accelerated lifetime testing. Main results The median tip impedance of the bilayer encapsulated wired UEAs increased from 60 kΩ to 160 kΩ during the 960 days of equivalent soak testing at 37 °C, the opposite trend as typically observed for Parylene encapsulated devices. The loss of the iridium oxide tip metallization and etching of the silicon tip in PBS solution contributed to the increase of impedance. The lifetime of fully integrated wireless UEAs was also tested using accelerated lifetime measurement techniques. The bilayer coated devices had stable power-up frequencies at ~910 MHz and constant RF signal strength of -50 dBm during up to 1044 days (still under testing) of equivalent soaking time at 37 °C. This is a significant improvement over the lifetime of ~ 100 days achieved with Parylene-only encapsulation at 37 °C. The preliminary samples of bilayer coated active UEAs with a flip-chip bonded ASIC chip had a steady current draw of ~ 3 mA during 228 days of soak testing at 37 °C. An increase in current draw has been consistently correlated to device failures, so is a sensitive metric for their lifetime. Significance The trends of increasing electrode impedance of wired devices and performance stability of wireless and active devices support the significantly greater encapsulation performance of this bilayer encapsulation compared with Parylene

  8. Long-term reliability of Al2O3 and Parylene C bilayer encapsulated Utah electrode array based neural interfaces for chronic implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xianzong; Rieth, Loren; Williams, Layne; Negi, Sandeep; Bhandari, Rajmohan; Caldwell, Ryan; Sharma, Rohit; Tathireddy, Prashant; Solzbacher, Florian

    2014-04-01

    Objective. We focus on improving the long-term stability and functionality of neural interfaces for chronic implantation by using bilayer encapsulation. Approach. We evaluated the long-term reliability of Utah electrode array (UEA) based neural interfaces encapsulated by 52 nm of atomic layer deposited Al2O3 and 6 µm of Parylene C bilayer, and compared these to devices with the baseline Parylene-only encapsulation. Three variants of arrays including wired, wireless, and active UEAs were used to evaluate this bilayer encapsulation scheme, and were immersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 57 °C for accelerated lifetime testing. Main results. The median tip impedance of the bilayer encapsulated wired UEAs increased from 60 to 160 kΩ during the 960 days of equivalent soak testing at 37 °C, the opposite trend to that typically observed for Parylene encapsulated devices. The loss of the iridium oxide tip metallization and etching of the silicon tip in PBS solution contributed to the increase of impedance. The lifetime of fully integrated wireless UEAs was also tested using accelerated lifetime measurement techniques. The bilayer coated devices had stable power-up frequencies at ˜910 MHz and constant radio-frequency signal strength of -50 dBm during up to 1044 days (still under testing) of equivalent soaking time at 37 °C. This is a significant improvement over the lifetime of ˜100 days achieved with Parylene-only encapsulation at 37 °C. The preliminary samples of bilayer coated active UEAs with a flip-chip bonded ASIC chip had a steady current draw of ˜3 mA during 228 days of soak testing at 37 °C. An increase in the current draw has been consistently correlated to device failures, so is a sensitive metric for their lifetime. Significance. The trends of increasing electrode impedance of wired devices and performance stability of wireless and active devices support the significantly greater encapsulation performance of this bilayer encapsulation compared

  9. Intracranial Injection of an Optogenetics Viral Vector Followed by Optical Cannula Implantation for Neural Stimulation in Rat Brain Cortex.

    PubMed

    Pawela, Christopher; DeYoe, Edgar; Pashaie, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics is rapidly gaining acceptance as a preferred method to study specific neuronal cell types using light. Optogenetic neuromodulation requires the introduction of a cell-specific viral vector encoding for a light activating ion channel or ion pump and the utilization of a system to deliver light stimulation to brain. Here, we describe a two-part methodology starting with a procedure to inject an optogenetic AAV virus into rat cortex followed by a second procedure to surgically implant an optical cannula for light delivery to the deeper cortical layers.

  10. Effect of insertion speed on tissue response and insertion mechanics of a chronically implanted silicon-based neural probe.

    PubMed

    Welkenhuysen, M; Andrei, A; Ameye, L; Eberle, W; Nuttin, B

    2011-11-01

    In this study, the effect of insertion speed on long-term tissue response and insertion mechanics was investigated. A dummy silicon parylene-coated probe was used in this context and implanted in the rat brain at 10 μm/s (n = 6) or 100 μm/s (n = 6) to a depth of 9 mm. The insertion mechanics were assessed by the dimpling distance, and the force at the point of penetration, at the end of the insertion phase, and after a 3-min rest period in the brain. After 6 weeks, the tissue response was evaluated by estimating the amount of gliosis, inflammation, and neuronal cell loss with immunohistochemistry. No difference in dimpling, penetration force, or the force after a 3-min rest period in the brain was observed. However, the force at the end of the insertion phase was significantly higher when inserting the probes at 100 μm/s compared to 10 μm/s. Furthermore, an expected tissue response was seen with an increase of glial and microglial reactivity around the probe. This reaction was similar along the entire length of the probe. However, evidence for a neuronal kill zone was observed only in the most superficial part of the implant. In this region, the lesion size was also greatest. Comparison of the tissue response between insertion speeds showed no differences.

  11. A neural network approach for determining gait modifications to reduce the contact force in knee joint implant.

    PubMed

    Ardestani, Marzieh Mostafavizadeh; Chen, Zhenxian; Wang, Ling; Lian, Qin; Liu, Yaxiong; He, Jiankang; Li, Dichen; Jin, Zhongmin

    2014-10-01

    There is a growing interest in non-surgical gait rehabilitation treatments to reduce the loading in the knee joint. In particular, synergetic kinematic changes required for joint offloading should be determined individually for each subject. Previous studies for gait rehabilitation designs are typically relied on a "trial-and-error" approach, using multi-body dynamic (MBD) analysis. However MBD is fairly time demanding which prevents it to be used iteratively for each subject. This study employed an artificial neural network to develop a cost-effective computational framework for designing gait rehabilitation patterns. A feed forward artificial neural network (FFANN) was trained based on a number of experimental gait trials obtained from literature. The trained network was then hired to calculate the appropriate kinematic waveforms (output) needed to achieve desired knee joint loading patterns (input). An auxiliary neural network was also developed to update the ground reaction force and moment profiles with respect to the predicted kinematic waveforms. The feasibility and efficiency of the predicted kinematic patterns were then evaluated through MBD analysis. Results showed that FFANN-based predicted kinematics could effectively decrease the total knee joint reaction forces. Peak values of the resultant knee joint forces, with respect to the bodyweight (BW), were reduced by 20% BW and 25% BW in the midstance and the terminal stance phases. Impulse values of the knee joint loading patterns were also decreased by 17% BW*s and 24%BW*s in the corresponding phases. The FFANN-based framework suggested a cost-effective forward solution which directly calculated the kinematic variations needed to implement a given desired knee joint loading pattern. It is therefore expected that this approach provides potential advantages and further insights into knee rehabilitation designs. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Magnetic Particle Imaging tracks the long-term fate of in vivo neural cell implants with high image contrast.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bo; Vazin, Tandis; Goodwill, Patrick W; Conway, Anthony; Verma, Aradhana; Saritas, Emine Ulku; Schaffer, David; Conolly, Steven M

    2015-09-11

    We demonstrate that Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) enables monitoring of cellular grafts with high contrast, sensitivity, and quantitativeness. MPI directly detects the intense magnetization of iron-oxide tracers using low-frequency magnetic fields. MPI is safe, noninvasive and offers superb sensitivity, with great promise for clinical translation and quantitative single-cell tracking. Here we report the first MPI cell tracking study, showing 200-cell detection in vitro and in vivo monitoring of human neural graft clearance over 87 days in rat brain.

  13. Magnetic Particle Imaging tracks the long-term fate of in vivo neural cell implants with high image contrast

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bo; Vazin, Tandis; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Conway, Anthony; Verma, Aradhana; Ulku Saritas, Emine; Schaffer, David; Conolly, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) enables monitoring of cellular grafts with high contrast, sensitivity, and quantitativeness. MPI directly detects the intense magnetization of iron-oxide tracers using low-frequency magnetic fields. MPI is safe, noninvasive and offers superb sensitivity, with great promise for clinical translation and quantitative single-cell tracking. Here we report the first MPI cell tracking study, showing 200-cell detection in vitro and in vivo monitoring of human neural graft clearance over 87 days in rat brain. PMID:26358296

  14. Neural substrates of conversion deafness in a cochlear implant patient: a molecular imaging study using H₂¹⁵O-PET.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Jin; Mertens, Griet; Deleye, Steven; Staelens, Steven; Ceyssens, Sarah; Gilles, Annick; de Bodt, Marc; Vanneste, Sven; De Ridder, Dirk; Kim, Euitae; Park, Sung Joon; Van de Heyning, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Conversion deafness is characterized by sudden hearing loss without any identifiable cause. In the current study, we investigated presumed conversion deafness in a cochlear implant user using H₂¹⁵O-positron emission tomography (PET) scan with speech and noise stimuli in conjunction with audiologic tests such as impedance test and auditory response telemetry. Also, by performing a follow-up PET scan after recovery and comparing prerecovery and postrecovery scans, we attempted to find possible neural substrates of conversion deafness. A 51-year-old man with conversion deafness after 4 years of successful cochlear implant use. Supportive psychotherapy. Prerecovery and postrecovery H₂¹⁵O-PET scans The prerecovery H₂¹⁵O-PET scan revealed auditory cortex activation by sound stimuli, which verified normal stimulation of the central auditory pathway. Notably, compared with the prerecovery state, the postrecovery state showed relative activation in the right auditory cortex both under the speech and noise stimulus conditions. Moreover, the bilateral prefrontal and parietal areas were activated more in the postrecovery state than in the prerecovery state. In other words, relative deactivation of the prefronto-parieto-temporal network, a network responsible for conscious sensory perception, or relative dysfunction of top-down and bottom-up attention shifting mediated by the ventral and the dorsal parietal cortices, may have resulted in conversion deafness in the patient. Relative deactivation of the prefronto-parieto-temporal network or dysfunction in the ventral and the dorsal parietal cortices may be related to the development of conversion deafness.

  15. The effects of stochastic neural activity in a model predicting intensity perception with cochlear implants: low-rate stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bruce, I C; White, M W; Irlicht, L S; O'Leary, S J; Clark, G M

    1999-12-01

    Most models of auditory nerve response to electrical stimulation are deterministic, despite significant physiological evidence for stochastic activity. Furthermore, psychophysical models and analyses of physiological data using deterministic descriptions do not accurately predict many psychophysical phenomena. In this paper we investigate whether inclusion of stochastic activity in neural models improves such predictions. To avoid the complication of interpulse interactions and to enable the use of a simpler and faster auditory nerve model we restrict our investigation to single pulses and low-rate (< 200 pulses/s) pulse trains. We apply signal detection theory to produce direct predictions of behavioral threshold, dynamic range and intensity difference limen. Specifically, we investigate threshold versus pulse duration (the strength-duration characteristics), threshold and uncomfortable loudness (and the corresponding dynamic range) versus phase duration, the effects of electrode configuration on dynamic range and on strength-duration, threshold versus number of pulses (the temporal-integration characteristics), intensity difference limen as a function of loudness, and the effects of neural survival on these measures. For all psychophysical measures investigated, the inclusion of stochastic activity in the auditory nerve model was found to produce more accurate predictions.

  16. Neo-vascularization of the stroke cavity by implantation of human neural stem cells on VEGF-releasing PLGA microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bible, Ellen; Qutachi, Omar; Chau, David Y.S.; Alexander, Morgan R.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.; Modo, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Replacing the tissue lost after a stroke potentially provides a new neural substrate to promote recovery. However, significant neurobiological and biotechnological challenges need to be overcome to make this possibility into a reality. Human neural stem cells (hNSCs) can differentiate into mature brain cells, but require a structural support that retains them within the cavity and affords the formation of a de novo tissue. Nevertheless, in our previous work, even after a week, this primitive tissue is void of a vasculature that could sustain its long-term viability. Therefore, tissue engineering strategies are required to develop a vasculature. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is known to promote the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells during angio- and arteriogenesis. VEGF by itself here did not affect viability or differentiation of hNSCs, whereas growing cells on poly(D,L-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles, with or without VEGF, doubled astrocytic and neuronal differentiation. Secretion of a burst and a sustained delivery of VEGF from the microparticles in vivo attracted endothelial cells from the host into this primate tissue and in parts established a neovasculature, whereas in other parts endothelial cells were merely interspersed with hNSCs. There was also evidence of a hypervascularization indicating that further work will be required to establish an adequate level of vascularization. It is therefore possible to develop a putative neovasculature within de novo tissue that is forming inside a tissue cavity caused by a stroke. PMID:22818980

  17. On the control of a robot hand by extracting neural signals from the PNS: preliminary results from a human implantation.

    PubMed

    Micera, S; Rigosa, J; Carpaneto, J; Citi, L; Raspopovic, S; Guglielmelli, E; Benvenuto, A; Rossini, L; Di Pino, G; Cavallo, G; Carrozza, M C; Cipriani, C; Hoffmann, K P; Dario, P; Rossini, P M

    2009-01-01

    The development of hybrid neuroprosthetic systems (HBSs) linking the human nervous system with artificial devices is an important area of research that is currently addressed by several groups to restore sensorimotor function in people affected by different disabilities. It is particularly important to establish a fast, intuitive, bidirectional flow of information between the nervous system of the user and the smart robotic device. Among the possible solutions to achieve this goal, interfaces with the peripheral nervous system and in particular intraneural electrodes can represent an interesting choice. In the present study, thin-film longitudinal intra-fascicular electrodes were implanted in the median and ulnar nerves of an amputee. The possibility of restoring the bidirectional link between the subject and the external world was investigated during a 4 week trial. The result showed that both the extraction of motor information and the restoration of sensory function are possible.

  18. Neo-vascularization of the stroke cavity by implantation of human neural stem cells on VEGF-releasing PLGA microparticles.

    PubMed

    Bible, Ellen; Qutachi, Omar; Chau, David Y S; Alexander, Morgan R; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Modo, Michel

    2012-10-01

    Replacing the tissue lost after a stroke potentially provides a new neural substrate to promote recovery. However, significant neurobiological and biotechnological challenges need to be overcome to make this possibility into a reality. Human neural stem cells (hNSCs) can differentiate into mature brain cells, but require a structural support that retains them within the cavity and affords the formation of a de novo tissue. Nevertheless, in our previous work, even after a week, this primitive tissue is void of a vasculature that could sustain its long-term viability. Therefore, tissue engineering strategies are required to develop a vasculature. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is known to promote the proliferation and migration of endothelial cells during angio- and arteriogenesis. VEGF by itself here did not affect viability or differentiation of hNSCs, whereas growing cells on poly(D,L-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles, with or without VEGF, doubled astrocytic and neuronal differentiation. Secretion of a burst and a sustained delivery of VEGF from the microparticles in vivo attracted endothelial cells from the host into this primitive tissue and in parts established a neovasculature, whereas in other parts endothelial cells were merely interspersed with hNSCs. There was also evidence of a hypervascularization indicating that further work will be required to establish an adequate level of vascularization. It is therefore possible to develop a putative neovasculature within de novo tissue that is forming inside a tissue cavity caused by a stroke. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reach and grasp by people with tetraplegia using a neurally controlled robotic arm

    PubMed Central

    Hochberg, Leigh R.; Bacher, Daniel; Jarosiewicz, Beata; Masse, Nicolas Y.; Simeral, John D.; Vogel, Joern; Haddadin, Sami; Liu, Jie; Cash, Sydney S.; van der Smagt, Patrick; Donoghue, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Paralysis following spinal cord injury (SCI), brainstem stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other disorders can disconnect the brain from the body, eliminating the ability to carry out volitional movements. A neural interface system (NIS)1–5 could restore mobility and independence for people with paralysis by translating neuronal activity directly into control signals for assistive devices. We have previously shown that people with longstanding tetraplegia can use an NIS to move and click a computer cursor and to control physical devices6–8. Able-bodied monkeys have used an NIS to control a robotic arm9, but it is unknown whether people with profound upper extremity paralysis or limb loss could use cortical neuronal ensemble signals to direct useful arm actions. Here, we demonstrate the ability of two people with long-standing tetraplegia to use NIS-based control of a robotic arm to perform three-dimensional reach and grasp movements. Participants controlled the arm over a broad space without explicit training, using signals decoded from a small, local population of motor cortex (MI) neurons recorded from a 96-channel microelectrode array. One of the study participants, implanted with the sensor five years earlier, also used a robotic arm to drink coffee from a bottle. While robotic reach and grasp actions were not as fast or accurate as those of an able-bodied person, our results demonstrate the feasibility for people with tetraplegia, years after CNS injury, to recreate useful multidimensional control of complex devices directly from a small sample of neural signals. PMID:22596161

  20. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Cochlear Implants Cochlear Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... normal ear, ear with hearing loss, and cochlear implant procedure Welcome to the Food and Drug Administration ( ...

  1. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  2. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  3. Penile Implants

    MedlinePlus

    Penile Implants Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Penile implants are devices placed inside the penis to allow men with erectile dysfunction (ED) to get an erection. Penile implants are typically recommended after other treatments for ED ...

  4. Analysis of Al2O3—parylene C bilayer coatings and impact of microelectrode topography on long term stability of implantable neural arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Ryan; Mandal, Himadri; Sharma, Rohit; Solzbacher, Florian; Tathireddy, Prashant; Rieth, Loren

    2017-08-01

    Objective. Performance of many dielectric coatings for neural electrodes degrades over time, contributing to loss of neural signals and evoked percepts. Studies using planar test substrates have found that a novel bilayer coating of atomic-layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 and parylene C is a promising candidate for neural electrode applications, exhibiting superior stability to parylene C alone. However, initial results from bilayer encapsulation testing on non-planar devices have been less positive. Our aim was to evaluate ALD Al2O3-parylene C coatings using novel test paradigms, to rigorously evaluate dielectric coatings for neural electrode applications by incorporating neural electrode topography into test structure design. Approach. Five test devices incorporated three distinct topographical features common to neural electrodes, derived from the utah electrode array (UEA). Devices with bilayer (52 nm Al2O3  +  6 µm parylene C) were evaluated against parylene C controls (N  ⩾  6 per device type). Devices were aged in phosphate buffered saline at 67 °C for up to 311 d, and monitored through: (1) leakage current to evaluate encapsulation lifetimes (>1 nA during 5VDC bias indicated failure), and (2) wideband (1-105 Hz) impedance. Main results. Mean-times-to-failure (MTTFs) ranged from 12 to 506 d for bilayer-coated devices, versus 10 to  >2310 d for controls. Statistical testing (log-rank test, α  =  0.05) of failure rates gave mixed results but favored the control condition. After failure, impedance loss for bilayer devices continued for months and manifested across the entire spectrum, whereas the effect was self-limiting after several days, and restricted to frequencies  <100 Hz for controls. These results correlated well with observations of UEAs encapsulated with bilayer and control films. Significance. We observed encapsulation failure modes and behaviors comparable to neural electrode performance which were undetected in

  5. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Griggs, Jason A

    2017-10-01

    Systematic reviews of literature over the period between 2008 and 2017 are discussed regarding clinical evidence for the factors affecting survival and failure of dental implants. The factors addressed include publication bias, tooth location, insertion torque, collar design, implant-abutment connection design, implant length, implant width, bone augmentation, platform switching, surface roughness, implant coatings, and the use of ceramic materials in the implant body and abutment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bilateral cochlear implantation: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Rose J; Buchman, Craig A

    2009-10-01

    The goal of this review is to examine the most recent literature exploring the indications, outcomes, and long-term benefit of bilateral cochlear implantation in children and adults. The indications for cochlear implantation have expanded, as many unilaterally implanted individuals are able to achieve open-set word recognition. Despite the benefits seen in unilateral implantation, many individuals have difficulty perceiving speech in noisy environments. Bilateral cochlear implantation has made great strides in providing individuals access to sound information from both ears, allowing improved speech perception in quiet and in noise, as well as sound localization. Recently, the House Cochlear Implant study group released a position statement in which the group strongly endorsed bilateral cochlear implantation. Improved speech perception in quiet has also been demonstrated by many groups with bilateral implantation. Improved sound localization abilities have been shown to be dependent on interaural level differences. The binaural benefits of head shadow and summation have been long shown in bilaterally implanted individuals. Recently, a growth in squelch has been seen in these individuals likely as a result of increased experience with both implants. This may indicate neural integration of the inputs over time. The literature supports the binaural benefit of bilateral cochlear implantation with demonstrated improved speech perception outcomes in quiet and in noise, sound localization data, and subjective benefits.

  7. Evaluating Multipulse Integration as a Neural-Health Correlate in Human Cochlear-Implant Users: Relationship to Psychometric Functions for Detection

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ning; Dong, Lixue

    2017-01-01

    In electrical hearing, multipulse integration (MPI) describes the rate at which detection threshold decreases with increasing stimulation rate in a fixed-duration pulse train. In human subjects, MPI has been shown to be dependent on the psychophysically estimated spread of neural excitation at a high stimulation rate, with broader spread predicting greater integration. The first aim of the present study was to replicate this finding using alternative methods for measuring MPI and spread of neural excitation. The second aim was to test the hypothesis that MPI is related to the slope of the psychometric function for detection. Specifically, a steep d' versus stimulus level function would predict shallow MPI since the amount of current reduction necessary to compensate for an increase in stimulation rate to maintain threshold would be small. The MPI function was measured by obtaining adaptive detection thresholds at 160 and 640 pulses per second. Spread of neural excitation was measured by forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves. All psychophysical testing was performed in a monopolar stimulation mode (MP 1 + 2). Results showed that MPI was correlated with the slopes of the tuning curves, with broader tuning predicting steeper MPI, confirming the earlier finding. However, there was no relationship between MPI and the slopes of the psychometric functions. These results suggest that a broad stimulation of the cochlea facilitates MPI. MPI however is not related to the estimated neural excitation growth with current level near the behavioral threshold, at least in monopolar stimulation.

  8. Evaluating Multipulse Integration as a Neural-Health Correlate in Human Cochlear-Implant Users: Relationship to Psychometric Functions for Detection

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lixue

    2017-01-01

    In electrical hearing, multipulse integration (MPI) describes the rate at which detection threshold decreases with increasing stimulation rate in a fixed-duration pulse train. In human subjects, MPI has been shown to be dependent on the psychophysically estimated spread of neural excitation at a high stimulation rate, with broader spread predicting greater integration. The first aim of the present study was to replicate this finding using alternative methods for measuring MPI and spread of neural excitation. The second aim was to test the hypothesis that MPI is related to the slope of the psychometric function for detection. Specifically, a steep d’ versus stimulus level function would predict shallow MPI since the amount of current reduction necessary to compensate for an increase in stimulation rate to maintain threshold would be small. The MPI function was measured by obtaining adaptive detection thresholds at 160 and 640 pulses per second. Spread of neural excitation was measured by forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves. All psychophysical testing was performed in a monopolar stimulation mode (MP 1 + 2). Results showed that MPI was correlated with the slopes of the tuning curves, with broader tuning predicting steeper MPI, confirming the earlier finding. However, there was no relationship between MPI and the slopes of the psychometric functions. These results suggest that a broad stimulation of the cochlea facilitates MPI. MPI however is not related to the estimated neural excitation growth with current level near the behavioral threshold, at least in monopolar stimulation. PMID:28150534

  9. An Electronic System for Ultra-low Power Hearing Implants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-15

    cochlear implants , in hybrid cochlear implants and hearing aids, in intelligent personal protective equipment, and in noise dosimeters. Summary of...medical devices including cochlear implants for the deaf, hybrid hearing implants , brain-machine interfaces, and other neural stimulation devices. In...Technical 05/11/2009-09/30/2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER An Electronic System for Ultra-low Power Hearing Implants Sb. GRANT NUMBER

  10. IMPORTANCE OF COCHLEAR HEALTH FOR IMPLANT FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Pfingst, Bryan E.; Zhou, Ning; Colesa, Deborah J.; Watts, Melissa M.; Strahl, Stefan B.; Garadat, Soha N.; Schvartz-Leyzac, Kara C.; Budenz, Cameron L.; Raphael, Yehoash; Zwolan, Teresa A.

    2014-01-01

    Amazing progress has been made in providing useful hearing to hearing-impaired individuals using cochlear implants, but challenges remain. One such challenge is understanding the effects of partial degeneration of the auditory nerve, the target of cochlear implant stimulation. Here we review studies from our human and animal laboratories aimed at characterizing the health of the implanted cochlea and the auditory nerve. We use the data on cochlear and neural health to guide rehabilitation strategies. The data also motivate the development of tissue-engineering procedures to preserve or build a healthy cochlea and improve performance obtained by cochlear implant recipients or eventually replace the need for a cochlear implant. PMID:25261772

  11. Brain plasticity under cochlear implant stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kral, Andrej; Tillein, Jochen

    2006-01-01

    The benefit of cochlear implantation crucially depends on the ability of the brain to learn to classify neural activity evoked by the cochlear implant. Brain plasticity is a complex property with massive developmental changes after birth. The present paper reviews the experimental work on auditory plasticity and focuses on the plasticity required for adaptation to cochlear implant stimulation. It reviews the data on developmental sensitive periods in auditory plasticity of hearing, hearing-impaired and deaf, cochlear-implanted, animals. Based on the analysis of the above findings in animals and comparable data from humans, a cochlear implantation within the first 2 years of age is recommended.

  12. Evaluating multipulse integration as a neural-health correlate in human cochlear-implant users: Relationship to forward-masking recovery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ning; Pfingst, Bryan E

    2016-03-01

    The present study evaluated the slopes of threshold-versus-pulse-rate functions (multipulse integration, MPI) in humans with cochlear implants in relation to recovery from 300-ms forward maskers. MPI has been correlated with spiral ganglion cell density in animals. The present study showed that steeper MPI functions were correlated with faster recovery from forward masking. The findings suggested that the variations in the MPI slopes are explained not only by the quantity of neurons contributing to the integration process but also by the neurons' temporal response characteristics and possibly central inhibition.

  13. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  14. Penile Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Three-piece inflatable implants use a fluid-filled reservoir implanted under the abdominal wall, a pump and ... an erection, you pump the fluid from the reservoir into the cylinders. Afterward, you release the valve ...

  15. Therapy using implanted organic bioelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Amanda; Song, Zhiyang; Nilsson, David; Meyerson, Björn A.; Simon, Daniel T.; Linderoth, Bengt; Berggren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Many drugs provide their therapeutic action only at specific sites in the body, but are administered in ways that cause the drug’s spread throughout the organism. This can lead to serious side effects. Local delivery from an implanted device may avoid these issues, especially if the delivery rate can be tuned according to the need of the patient. We turned to electronically and ionically conducting polymers to design a device that could be implanted and used for local electrically controlled delivery of therapeutics. The conducting polymers in our device allow electronic pulses to be transduced into biological signals, in the form of ionic and molecular fluxes, which provide a way of interfacing biology with electronics. Devices based on conducting polymers and polyelectrolytes have been demonstrated in controlled substance delivery to neural tissue, biosensing, and neural recording and stimulation. While providing proof of principle of bioelectronic integration, such demonstrations have been performed in vitro or in anesthetized animals. Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of an implantable organic electronic delivery device for the treatment of neuropathic pain in an animal model. Devices were implanted onto the spinal cord of rats, and 2 days after implantation, local delivery of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was initiated. Highly localized delivery resulted in a significant decrease in pain response with low dosage and no observable side effects. This demonstration of organic bioelectronics-based therapy in awake animals illustrates a viable alternative to existing pain treatments, paving the way for future implantable bioelectronic therapeutics. PMID:26601181

  16. Electronic dura mater for long-term multimodal neural interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minev, Ivan R.; Musienko, Pavel; Hirsch, Arthur; Barraud, Quentin; Wenger, Nikolaus; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Gandar, Jérôme; Capogrosso, Marco; Milekovic, Tomislav; Asboth, Léonie; Torres, Rafael Fajardo; Vachicouras, Nicolas; Liu, Qihan; Pavlova, Natalia; Duis, Simone; Larmagnac, Alexandre; Vörös, Janos; Micera, Silvestro; Suo, Zhigang; Courtine, Grégoire; Lacour, Stéphanie P.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical mismatch between soft neural tissues and stiff neural implants hinders the long-term performance of implantable neuroprostheses. Here, we designed and fabricated soft neural implants with the shape and elasticity of dura mater, the protective membrane of the brain and spinal cord. The electronic dura mater, which we call e-dura, embeds interconnects, electrodes, and chemotrodes that sustain millions of mechanical stretch cycles, electrical stimulation pulses, and chemical injections. These integrated modalities enable multiple neuroprosthetic applications. The soft implants extracted cortical states in freely behaving animals for brain-machine interface and delivered electrochemical spinal neuromodulation that restored locomotion after paralyzing spinal cord injury.

  17. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications. PMID:27879873

  18. High Productivity Implantation ''PARTIAL IMPLANT''

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Masayoshi; Miyamoto, Naoki; Sakai, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Takao

    2008-11-03

    The patterned ion implantation 'PARTIAL IMPLANT' has been developed as a productivity improvement tool. The Partial Implant can form several different ion dose areas on the wafer surface by controlling the speed of wafer moving and the stepwise rotation of twist axis. The Partial Implant system contains two implant methods. One method is 'DIVIDE PARTIAL IMPLANT', that is aimed at reducing the consumption of the wafer. The Divide Partial Implant evenly divides dose area on one wafer surface into two or three different dose part. Any dose can be selected in each area. So the consumption of the wafer for experimental implantation can be reduced. The second method is 'RING PARTIAL IMPLANT' that is aimed at improving yield by correcting electrical characteristic of devices. The Ring Partial Implant can form concentric ion dose areas. The dose of wafer external area can be selected to be within plus or minus 30% of dose of wafer central area. So the electrical characteristic of devices can be corrected by controlling dose at edge side on the wafer.

  19. Recent refinements to cranial implants for rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jessica M.; Cohen, Yale E.; Shirley, Harry; Tsunada, Joji; Bennur, Sharath; Christison-Lagay, Kate; Veeder, Christin L.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of cranial implants revolutionized primate neurophysiological research because they allow researchers to stably record neural activity from monkeys during active behavior. Cranial implants have improved over the years since their introduction, but chronic implants still increase the risk for medical complications including bacterial contamination and resultant infection, chronic inflammation, bone and tissue loss and complications related to the use of dental acrylic. These complications can lead to implant failure and early termination of study protocols. In an effort to reduce complications, we describe several refinements that have helped us improve cranial implants and the wellbeing of implanted primates. PMID:27096188

  20. Recent refinements to cranial implants for rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jessica M; Cohen, Yale E; Shirley, Harry; Tsunada, Joji; Bennur, Sharath; Christison-Lagay, Kate; Veeder, Christin L

    2016-05-01

    The advent of cranial implants revolutionized primate neurophysiological research because they allow researchers to stably record neural activity from monkeys during active behavior. Cranial implants have improved over the years since their introduction, but chronic implants still increase the risk for medical complications including bacterial contamination and resultant infection, chronic inflammation, bone and tissue loss and complications related to the use of dental acrylic. These complications can lead to implant failure and early termination of study protocols. In an effort to reduce complications, we describe several refinements that have helped us improve cranial implants and the wellbeing of implanted primates.

  1. Endodontic implants

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rakesh K.; Tikku, A. P.; Chandra, Anil; Wadhwani, K. K.; Ashutosh kr; Singh, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic implants were introduced back in 1960. Endodontic implants enjoyed few successes and many failures. Various reasons for failures include improper case selection, improper use of materials and sealers and poor preparation for implants. Proper case selection had given remarkable long-term success. Two different cases are being presented here, which have been treated successfully with endodontic implants and mineral trioxide aggregate Fillapex (Andreaus, Brazil), an MTA based sealer. We suggest that carefully selected cases can give a higher success rate and this method should be considered as one of the treatment modalities. PMID:25298723

  2. Cognitive neural prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Richard A; Hwang, Eun Jung; Mulliken, Grant H

    2010-01-01

    The cognitive neural prosthetic (CNP) is a very versatile method for assisting paralyzed patients and patients with amputations. The CNP records the cognitive state of the subject, rather than signals strictly related to motor execution or sensation. We review a number of high-level cortical signals and their application for CNPs, including intention, motor imagery, decision making, forward estimation, executive function, attention, learning, and multi-effector movement planning. CNPs are defined by the cognitive function they extract, not the cortical region from which the signals are recorded. However, some cortical areas may be better than others for particular applications. Signals can also be extracted in parallel from multiple cortical areas using multiple implants, which in many circumstances can increase the range of applications of CNPs. The CNP approach relies on scientific understanding of the neural processes involved in cognition, and many of the decoding algorithms it uses also have parallels to underlying neural circuit functions.

  3. Cognitive Neural Prosthetics

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Richard A.; Hwang, Eun Jung; Mulliken, Grant H.

    2010-01-01

    The cognitive neural prosthetic (CNP) is a very versatile method for assisting paralyzed patients and patients with amputations. The CNP records the cognitive state of the subject, rather than signals strictly related to motor execution or sensation. We review a number of high-level cortical signals and their application for CNPs, including intention, motor imagery, decision making, forward estimation, executive function, attention, learning, and multi-effector movement planning. CNPs are defined by the cognitive function they extract, not the cortical region from which the signals are recorded. However, some cortical areas may be better than others for particular applications. Signals can also be extracted in parallel from multiple cortical areas using multiple implants, which in many circumstances can increase the range of applications of CNPs. The CNP approach relies on scientific understanding of the neural processes involved in cognition, and many of the decoding algorithms it uses also have parallels to underlying neural circuit functions. PMID:19575625

  4. About Implantable Contraception

    MedlinePlus

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet About Implantable Contraception KidsHealth > For Parents > About Implantable Contraception Print A ... How Much Does It Cost? What Is Implantable Contraception? Implantable contraception (often called the birth control implant) ...

  5. Resorbable scaffold based chronic neural electrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Ceyssens, Frederik; van Kuyck, Kris; Vande Velde, Greetje; Welkenhuysen, Marleen; Stappers, Linda; Nuttin, Bart; Puers, Robert

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a novel type of neural electrode array for future brain-machine interfaces (BMI) and neural implants requiring high resolution recording and stimulation on the surface of brain lesions or on the cortex. The devices differ on two points from commonly used thin film electrode arrays: first, the thin film backbone of the implant is exceptionally thin (down to 5 microns) and finely patterned into spring-like structures. This increases the flexibility of the electrode array and allows stretching and conforming better to a quasi spherical cavity surface. Second, the thin film backbone of the device is reinforced with a porous layer of resorbable chitosan. This design aims at minimal invasiveness and low mechanical irritation during prolonged use, while the chitosan matrix ensures the implant is stiff enough for practical handling during the implantation procedure and dissolves afterwards. Furthermore, the chitosan adds haemostatic and antiseptic properties to the implant and improves adhesion. In the article, the design and fabrication process are presented. In vitro and long term in vivo test results over a 12 month period are shown. By adopting the use of a resorbable scaffold-like material as main constituent of neural implants, the presented work opens up the possibility of applying tissue engineering techniques to further improve neural implant technology.

  6. Materials and technologies for soft implantable neuroprostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacour, Stéphanie P.; Courtine, Grégoire; Guck, Jochen

    2016-10-01

    Implantable neuroprostheses are engineered systems designed to restore or substitute function for individuals with neurological deficits or disabilities. These systems involve at least one uni- or bidirectional interface between a living neural tissue and a synthetic structure, through which information in the form of electrons, ions or photons flows. Despite a few notable exceptions, the clinical dissemination of implantable neuroprostheses remains limited, because many implants display inconsistent long-term stability and performance, and are ultimately rejected by the body. Intensive research is currently being conducted to untangle the complex interplay of failure mechanisms. In this Review, we emphasize the importance of minimizing the physical and mechanical mismatch between neural tissues and implantable interfaces. We explore possible materials solutions to design and manufacture neurointegrated prostheses, and outline their immense therapeutic potential.

  7. Ultrasoft microwire neural electrodes improve chronic tissue integration.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhanhong Jeff; Kolarcik, Christi L; Kozai, Takashi D Y; Luebben, Silvia D; Sapp, Shawn A; Zheng, Xin Sally; Nabity, James A; Cui, X Tracy

    2017-02-06

    Chronically implanted neural multi-electrode arrays (MEA) are an essential technology for recording electrical signals from neurons and/or modulating neural activity through stimulation. However, current MEAs, regardless of the type, elicit an inflammatory response that ultimately leads to device failure. Traditionally, rigid materials like tungsten and silicon have been employed to interface with the relatively soft neural tissue. The large stiffness mismatch is thought to exacerbate the inflammatory response. In order to minimize the disparity between the device and the brain, we fabricated novel ultrasoft electrodes consisting of elastomers and conducting polymers with mechanical properties much more similar to those of brain tissue than previous neural implants. In this study, these ultrasoft microelectrodes were inserted and released using a stainless steel shuttle with polyethyleneglycol (PEG) glue. The implanted microwires showed functionality in acute neural stimulation. When implanted for 1 or 8weeks, the novel soft implants demonstrated significantly reduced inflammatory tissue response at week 8 compared to tungsten wires of similar dimension and surface chemistry. Furthermore, a higher degree of cell body distortion was found next to the tungsten implants compared to the polymer implants. Our results support the use of these novel ultrasoft electrodes for long term neural implants.

  8. Ultrasoft microwire neural electrodes improve chronic tissue integration

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhanhong Jeff; Kolarcik, Christi L.; Kozai, Takashi D.Y.; Luebben, Silvia D.; Sapp, Shawn A.; Zheng, Xin Sally; Nabity, James A.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2017-01-01

    Chronically implanted neural multi-electrode arrays (MEA) are an essential technology for recording electrical signals from neurons and/or modulating neural activity through stimulation. However, current MEAs, regardless of the type, elicit an inflammatory response that ultimately leads to device failure. Traditionally, rigid materials like tungsten and silicon have been employed to interface with the relatively soft neural tissue. The large stiffness mismatch is thought to exacerbate the inflammatory response. In order to minimize the disparity between the device and the brain, we fabricated novel ultrasoft electrodes consisting of elastomers and conducting polymers with mechanical properties much more similar to those of brain tissue than previous neural implants. In this study, these ultrasoft microelectrodes were inserted and released using a stainless steel shuttle with polyethyleneglycol (PEG) glue. The implanted microwires showed functionality in acute neural stimulation. When implanted for 1 or 8 weeks, the novel soft implants demonstrated significantly reduced inflammatory tissue response at week 8 compared to tungsten wires of similar dimension and surface chemistry. Furthermore, a higher degree of cell body distortion was found next to the tungsten implants compared to the polymer implants. Our results support the use of these novel ultrasoft electrodes for long term neural implants. PMID:28185910

  9. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... bilateral cochlear implantation: a review. Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg . 2007;15(5):315-318. PMID: 17823546. ... BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  10. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant (Supprelin LA) is used to treat central precocious puberty (CPP; a condition causing children to enter puberty too soon, resulting in faster than normal bone growth and development of sexual characteristics) in girls ...

  11. Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the United States: saline-filled and silicone gel-filled. Both types have a silicone outer shell. ... them. Provide information on saline-filled and silicone gel-filled breast implants, including data supporting a reasonable ...

  12. Cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Connell, Sarah S; Balkany, Thomas J

    2006-08-01

    Cochlear implants are cost-effective auditory prostheses that safely provide a high-quality sensation of hearing to adults who are severely or profoundly deaf. In the past 5 years, progress has been made in hardware and software design, candidate selection, surgical techniques, device programming, education and rehabilitation,and, most importantly, outcomes. Cochlear implantation in the elderly is well tolerated and provides marked improvement in auditory performance and psychosocial functioning.

  13. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  14. Cochlear implant in incomplete partition type I.

    PubMed

    Berrettini, S; Forli, F; De Vito, A; Bruschini, L; Quaranta, N

    2013-02-01

    In this investigation, we report on 4 patients affected by incomplete partition type I submitted to cochlear implant at our institutions. Preoperative, surgical, mapping and follow-up issues as well as results in cases with this complex malformation are described. The cases reported in the present study confirm that cochlear implantation in patients with incomplete partition type I may be challenging for cochlear implant teams. The results are variable, but in many cases satisfactory, and are mainly related to the surgical placement of the electrode and residual neural nerve fibres. Moreover, in some cases the association of cochlear nerve abnormalities and other disabilities may significantly affect results.

  15. Importance of cochlear health for implant function.

    PubMed

    Pfingst, Bryan E; Zhou, Ning; Colesa, Deborah J; Watts, Melissa M; Strahl, Stefan B; Garadat, Soha N; Schvartz-Leyzac, Kara C; Budenz, Cameron L; Raphael, Yehoash; Zwolan, Teresa A

    2015-04-01

    Amazing progress has been made in providing useful hearing to hearing-impaired individuals using cochlear implants, but challenges remain. One such challenge is understanding the effects of partial degeneration of the auditory nerve, the target of cochlear implant stimulation. Here we review studies from our human and animal laboratories aimed at characterizing the health of the implanted cochlea and the auditory nerve. We use the data on cochlear and neural health to guide rehabilitation strategies. The data also motivate the development of tissue-engineering procedures to preserve or build a healthy cochlea and improve performance obtained by cochlear implant recipients or eventually replace the need for a cochlear implant. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled .

  16. Clinical translation of a high performance neural prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gilja, Vikash; Pandarinath, Chethan; Blabe, Christine H.; Nuyujukian, Paul; Simeral, John D.; Sarma, Anish A.; Sorice, Brittany L.; Perge, János A.; Jarosiewicz, Beata; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Shenoy, Krishna V.; Henderson, Jaimie M.

    2016-01-01

    Neural prostheses have the potential to improve the quality of life of individuals with paralysis by directly mapping neural activity to limb and computer control signals. We translated a neural prosthetic system previously developed in animal model studies for use by two individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) implanted with intracortical microelectrode arrays. Measured more than a year post-implantation, the demonstrated neural cursor control has the highest published performance achieved by a person to date, more than double that of previous pilot clinical trial participants. PMID:26413781

  17. NeuroMEMS: Neural Probe Microtechnologies

    PubMed Central

    HajjHassan, Mohamad; Chodavarapu, Vamsy; Musallam, Sam

    2008-01-01

    Neural probe technologies have already had a significant positive effect on our understanding of the brain by revealing the functioning of networks of biological neurons. Probes are implanted in different areas of the brain to record and/or stimulate specific sites in the brain. Neural probes are currently used in many clinical settings for diagnosis of brain diseases such as seizers, epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer's, and dementia. We find these devices assisting paralyzed patients by allowing them to operate computers or robots using their neural activity. In recent years, probe technologies were assisted by rapid advancements in microfabrication and microelectronic technologies and thus are enabling highly functional and robust neural probes which are opening new and exciting avenues in neural sciences and brain machine interfaces. With a wide variety of probes that have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date, this review aims to provide an overview of the advances and recent progress in the microfabrication techniques of neural probes. In addition, we aim to highlight the challenges faced in developing and implementing ultra-long multi-site recording probes that are needed to monitor neural activity from deeper regions in the brain. Finally, we review techniques that can improve the biocompatibility of the neural probes to minimize the immune response and encourage neural growth around the electrodes for long term implantation studies. PMID:27873894

  18. Performance sustaining intracortical neural prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuyujukian, Paul; Kao, Jonathan C.; Fan, Joline M.; Stavisky, Sergey D.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Neural prostheses, or brain-machine interfaces, aim to restore efficient communication and movement ability to those suffering from paralysis. A major challenge these systems face is robust performance, particularly with aging signal sources. The aim in this study was to develop a neural prosthesis that could sustain high performance in spite of signal instability while still minimizing retraining time. Approach. We trained two rhesus macaques implanted with intracortical microelectrode arrays 1-4 years prior to this study to acquire targets with a neurally-controlled cursor. We measured their performance via achieved bitrate (bits per second, bps). This task was repeated over contiguous days to evaluate the sustained performance across time. Main results. We found that in the monkey with a younger (i.e., two year old) implant and better signal quality, a fixed decoder could sustain performance for a month at a rate of 4 bps, the highest achieved communication rate reported to date. This fixed decoder was evaluated across 22 months and experienced a performance decline at a rate of 0.24 bps yr-1. In the monkey with the older (i.e., 3.5 year old) implant and poorer signal quality, a fixed decoder could not sustain performance for more than a few days. Nevertheless, performance in this monkey was maintained for two weeks without requiring additional online retraining time by utilizing prior days’ experimental data. Upon analysis of the changes in channel tuning, we found that this stability appeared partially attributable to the cancelling-out of neural tuning fluctuations when projected to two-dimensional cursor movements. Significance. The findings in this study (1) document the highest-performing communication neural prosthesis in monkeys, (2) confirm and extend prior reports of the stability of fixed decoders, and (3) demonstrate a protocol for system stability under conditions where fixed decoders would otherwise fail. These improvements to decoder

  19. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  20. Thin microelectrodes reduce GFAP expression in the implant site in rodent somatosensory cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stice, Paula; Gilletti, Aaron; Panitch, Alyssa; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that neural implants with reduced cross-sectional areas will have less glial scarring associated with implantation injury in long-term experiments. In this study, we implanted nine adult rats with two different implants of 12 µm (n = 6), and 25 µm (n = 6) diameters (cross-sectional areas of 68 µm2, 232 µm2 respectively) and the expression of glial fibrilliary acidic protein (GFAP) was assessed after 2 weeks and 4 weeks of implantation. In order to facilitate implantation, the 12 µm diameter implants were coated with poly-glycolic acid (PGA), a biodegradable polymer that degraded within minutes of implantation. In n = 3 animals, 25 µm diameter implants also coated with PGA were implanted and assessed for GFAP expression at the end of 4 weeks of implantation. Statistical analysis of the GFAP expression around the different implants demonstrated that after 2 weeks of implantation there is no statistically significant difference in GFAP expression between the 12 µm and the 25 µm diameter implants. However, after 4 weeks of implantation the implant site of 12 µm diameter implants exhibited a statistically significant reduction in GFAP expression when compared to the implant sites of the 25 µm diameter implants (both with and without the PGA coating). We conclude that in neural implants that are tethered to the skull, implant cross-sectional areas of 68 µm2 and smaller could lead to a reduced glial scarring under chronic conditions. Future studies with longer implant durations can confirm if this observation remains consistent beyond 4 weeks.

  1. A pre-clinical murine model of oral implant osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Mouraret, S; Hunter, D J; Bardet, C; Brunski, J B; Bouchard, P; Helms, J A

    2014-01-01

    Many of our assumptions concerning oral implant osseointegration are extrapolated from experimental models studying skeletal tissue repair in long bones. This disconnect between clinical practice and experimental research hampers our understanding of bone formation around oral implants and how this process can be improved. We postulated that oral implant osseointegration would be fundamentally equivalent to implant osseointegration elsewhere in the body. Mice underwent implant placement in the edentulous ridge anterior to the first molar and peri-implant tissues were evaluated at various timepoints after surgery. Our hypothesis was disproven; oral implant osseointegration is substantially different from osseointegration in long bones. For example, in the maxilla peri-implant pre-osteoblasts are derived from cranial neural crest whereas in the tibia peri-implant osteoblasts are derived from mesoderm. In the maxilla, new osteoid arises from periostea of the maxillary bone but in the tibia the new osteoid arises from the marrow space. Cellular and molecular analyses indicate that osteoblast activity and mineralization proceeds from the surfaces of the native bone and osteoclastic activity is responsible for extensive remodeling of the new peri-implant bone. In addition to histologic features of implant osseointegration, molecular and cellular assays conducted in a murine model provide new insights into the sequelae of implant placement and the process by which bone is generated around implants. © 2013.

  2. A pre-clinical murine model of oral implant osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Mouraret, S.; Hunter, D.J.; Bardet, C.; Brunski, J.B.; Bouchard, P.; Helms, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Many of our assumptions concerning oral implant osseointegration are extrapolated from experimental models studying skeletal tissue repair in long bones. This disconnect between clinical practice and experimental research hampers our understanding of bone formation around oral implants and how this process can be improved. We postulated that oral implant osseointegration would be fundamentally equivalent to implant osseointegration elsewhere in the body. Mice underwent implant placement in the edentulous ridge anterior to the first molar and peri-implant tissues were evaluated at various timepoints after surgery. Our hypothesis was disproven; oral implant osseointegration is substantially different from osseointegration in long bones. For example, in the maxilla peri-implant pre-osteoblasts are derived from cranial neural crest whereas in the tibia peri-implant osteoblasts are derived from mesoderm. In the maxilla, new osteoid arises from periostea of the maxillary bone but in the tibia the new osteoid arises from the marrow space. Cellular and molecular analyses indicate that osteoblast activity and mineralization proceeds from the surfaces of the native bone and osteoclastic activity is responsible for extensive remodeling of the new peri-implant bone. In addition to histologic features of implant osseointegration, molecular and cellular assays conducted in a murine model provide new insights into the sequelae of implant placement and the process by which bone is generated around implants. PMID:23886841

  3. Active Microelectronic Neurosensor Arrays for Implantable Brain Communication Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Song, Y.-K.; Borton, D. A.; Park, S.; Patterson, W. R.; Bull, C. W.; Laiwalla, F.; Mislow, J.; Simeral, J. D.; Donoghue, J. P.; Nurmikko, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    We have built a wireless implantable microelectronic device for transmitting cortical signals transcutaneously. The device is aimed at interfacing a microelectrode array cortical to an external computer for neural control applications. Our implantable microsystem enables presently 16-channel broadband neural recording in a non-human primate brain by converting these signals to a digital stream of infrared light pulses for transmission through the skin. The implantable unit employs a flexible polymer substrate onto which we have integrated ultra-low power amplification with analog multiplexing, an analog-to-digital converter, a low power digital controller chip, and infrared telemetry. The scalable 16-channel microsystem can employ any of several modalities of power supply, including via radio frequency by induction, or infrared light via a photovoltaic converter. As of today, the implant has been tested as a sub-chronic unit in non-human primates (~ 1 month), yielding robust spike and broadband neural data on all available channels. PMID:19502132

  4. Developing implantable neuroprosthetics: a new model in pig.

    PubMed

    Borton, David; Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Agha, Naubahar; Minxha, Juri; Komar, Jacob; Patterson, William; Bull, Christopher; Nurmikko, Arto

    2011-01-01

    A new model has been established in the domestic pig for neural prosthetic device development and testing. To this end, we report on a complete neural prosthetic developmental system using a wireless sensor as the implant, a pig as the animal model, and a novel data acquisition paradigm for actuator control. A new type of stereotactic frame with clinically-inspired fixations pins that place the pig brain in standard surgical plane was developed and tested with success during the implantation of the microsystem. The microsystem implanted was an ultra-low power (12.5 mW) 16-channel intracortical/epicranial device transmitting broadband (40 kS/s) data over a wireless infrared telemetric link. Pigs were implanted and neural data was collected over a period of 5 weeks, clearly showing single unit spiking activity.

  5. Developing Implantable Neuroprosthetics: a New Model in Pig

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Agha, Naubahar; Minxha, Juri; Komar, Jacob; Patterson, William; Bull, Christopher; Nurmikko, Arto

    2014-01-01

    A new model has been established in the domestic pig for neural prosthetic device development and testing. To this end, we report on a complete neural prosthetic developmental system using a wireless sensor as the implant, a pig as the animal model, and a novel data acquisition paradigm for actuator control. A new type of stereotactic frame with clinically-inspired fixations pins that place the pig brain in standard surgical plane was developed and tested with success during the implantation of the microsystem. The microsystem implanted was an ultralow power (12.5mW) 16-channel intracortical/epicranial device transmitting broadband (40kS/s) data over a wireless infrared telemetric link. Pigs were implanted and neural data was collected over a period of 5 weeks, clearly showing single unit spiking activity. PMID:22254977

  6. Neurosecurity: security and privacy for neural devices.

    PubMed

    Denning, Tamara; Matsuoka, Yoky; Kohno, Tadayoshi

    2009-07-01

    An increasing number of neural implantable devices will become available in the near future due to advances in neural engineering. This discipline holds the potential to improve many patients' lives dramatically by offering improved-and in some cases entirely new-forms of rehabilitation for conditions ranging from missing limbs to degenerative cognitive diseases. The use of standard engineering practices, medical trials, and neuroethical evaluations during the design process can create systems that are safe and that follow ethical guidelines; unfortunately, none of these disciplines currently ensure that neural devices are robust against adversarial entities trying to exploit these devices to alter, block, or eavesdrop on neural signals. The authors define "neurosecurity"-a version of computer science security principles and methods applied to neural engineering-and discuss why neurosecurity should be a critical consideration in the design of future neural devices.

  7. Implantable optoelectronic probes for in vivo optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iseri, Ege; Kuzum, Duygu

    2017-06-01

    More than a decade has passed since optics and genetics came together and lead to the emerging technologies of optogenetics. The advent of light-sensitive opsins made it possible to optically trigger the neurons into activation or inhibition by using visible light. The importance of spatiotemporally isolating a segment of a neural network and controlling nervous signaling in a precise manner has driven neuroscience researchers and engineers to invest great efforts in designing high precision in vivo implantable devices. These efforts have focused on delivery of sufficient power to deep brain regions, while monitoring neural activity with high resolution and fidelity. In this review, we report the progress made in the field of hybrid optoelectronic neural interfaces that combine optical stimulation with electrophysiological recordings. Different approaches that incorporate optical or electrical components on implantable devices are discussed in detail. Advantages of various different designs as well as practical and fundamental limitations are summarized to illuminate the future of neurotechnology development.

  8. Implantable optoelectronic probes for in vivo optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Iseri, Ege; Kuzum, Duygu

    2017-02-15

    More than a decade has passed since optics and genetics came together and lead to the emerging technologies of optogenetics. The advent of light-sensitive opsins made it possible to optically trigger the neurons into activation or inhibition by using visible light. The importance of spatiotemporally isolating a segment of a neural network and controlling nervous signaling in a precise manner has driven neuroscience researchers and engineers to invest great efforts in designing high precision in vivo implantable devices. These efforts have focused on delivery of sufficient power to deep brain regions, while monitoring neural activity with high resolution and fidelity. In this review, we report the progress made in the field of hybrid optoelectronic neural interfaces that combine optical stimulation with electrophysiological recordings. Different approaches that incorporate optical or electrical components on implantable devices are discussed in detail. Advantages of various different designs as well as practical and fundamental limitations are summarized to illuminate the future of neurotechnology development.

  9. Cochlear implants: our experience and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Mariane Barreto Brandão; de Lima, Francis Vinicius Fontes; Santos, Ronaldo Carvalho; Santos, Arlete Cristina Granizo; Barreto, Valéria Maria Prado; de Jesus, Eduardo Passos Fiel

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Cochlear Implants are important for individuals with severe to profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Objective: Evaluate the experience of cochlear implant center of Otorhinolaryngology through the analysis of records of 9 patients who underwent cochlear implant surgery. Methods: This is a retrospective study performed with the patients records. Number 0191.0.107.000-11 ethics committee approval. We evaluated gender, etiology, age at surgery, duration of deafness, classification of deafness, unilateral or bilateral surgery, intraoperative and postoperative neural response and impedance of the electrodes in intraoperative and preoperative tests and found those that counter-indicated surgery. Results: There were 6 pediatric and 3 adult patients. Four male and 5 female. Etiologies: maternal rubella, cytomegalovirus, ototoxicity, meningitis, and sudden deafness. The age at surgery and duration of deafness ranged from 2–46 years and 2–18 years, respectively. Seven patients were pre-lingual. All had profound bilateral PA. There were 7 bilateral implants. Intraoperative complications: hemorrhage. Complications after surgery: vertigo and internal device failure. In 7 patients the electrodes were implanted through. Telemetry showed satisfactory neural response and impedance. CT and MRI was performed in all patients. We found enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct in a patient and incudomalleolar malformation. Conclusion: The cochlear implant as a form of auditory rehabilitation is well established and spreading to different centers specialized in otoaudiology. Thus, the need for structured services and trained professionals in this type of procedure is clear. PMID:25991976

  10. Animal experiments with the microelectronics neural bridge IC.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyuan; Pei, Fei; Wang, Zhigong; Lü, Xiaoying

    2012-01-01

    The combination of the neural science and the microelectronics science offers a new way to restore the function of central nervous system. A neural regeneration module is used to be implanted into body to bridge the damaged nerve. A microelectronics neural bridge IC designed in CSMC 0.5□m CMOS process which can detect the neural signal and stimulate the nerve is presented. The neural regeneration module is composed of the microelectronics neural bridge IC and some discrete devices. An animal experiment has been done to check whether the neural signal can be transmitted with the chip normally or not. The animal experiment results suggest that the neural regeneration module can make the neural signal transmit normally.

  11. Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    FUNDING NUMBERS PROGRAM PROJECT TASK WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO 11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) NEURAL NETWORKS 12. PERSONAL...SUB-GROUP Neural Networks Optical Architectures Nonlinear Optics Adaptation 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number...341i Y C-odes , lo iii/(iv blank) 1. INTRODUCTION Neural networks are a type of distributed processing system [1

  12. Programming characteristics of cochlear implants in children: effects of aetiology and age at implantation.

    PubMed

    Incerti, Paola V; Ching, Teresa Y C; Hou, Sanna; Van Buynder, Patricia; Flynn, Christopher; Cowan, Robert

    2017-09-08

    We investigated effects of aetiology and age at implantation on changes in threshold (T) levels, comfortable (C) levels and dynamic range (DR) for cochlear implants (CIs) in children over the first five years of life. Information was collected at 6 months post-activation of CIs, and at 3 and 5 years of age. One hundred and sixty-one children participating in the Longitudinal Outcomes of Children with Hearing Impairment (LOCHI) study. Children with neural and structural cochlear lesions had higher T-levels and C-levels as compared to those without these conditions. Parameter settings varied from manufacturer's defaults more often in the former than in the latter group. Investigation of the effect of age at implantation for children without neural and structural cochlear lesions showed that those implanted at ≤12 months of age had higher T-levels and narrower DR at 6 months post-activation, as compared to the later-implanted group. For both early- and later-implanted groups, the C-levels at 6 months post-activation were lower than those at age 3 and 5 years. There were no significant differences in T-levels, C-levels, or DR between age 3 and 5 years. Aetiology and age at implantation had significant effects on T-levels and C-levels.

  13. Mechanical and Biological Interactions of Implants with the Brain and Their Impact on Implant Design.

    PubMed

    Prodanov, Dimiter; Delbeke, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Neural prostheses have already a long history and yet the cochlear implant remains the only success story about a longterm sensory function restoration. On the other hand, neural implants for deep brain stimulation are gaining acceptance for variety of disorders including Parkinsons disease and obsessive-compulsive disorder. It is anticipated that the progress in the field has been hampered by a combination of technological and biological factors, such as the limited understanding of the longterm behavior of implants, unreliability of devices, biocompatibility of the implants among others. While the field's understanding of the cell biology of interactions at the biotic-abiotic interface has improved, relatively little attention has been paid on the mechanical factors (stress, strain), and hence on the geometry that can modulate it. This focused review summarizes the recent progress in the understanding of the mechanisms of mechanical interaction between the implants and the brain. The review gives an overview of the factors by which the implants interact acutely and chronically with the tissue: blood-brain barrier (BBB) breach, vascular damage, micromotions, diffusion etc. We propose some design constraints to be considered in future studies. Aspects of the chronic cell-implant interaction will be discussed in view of the chronic local inflammation and the ways of modulating it.

  14. Mechanical and Biological Interactions of Implants with the Brain and Their Impact on Implant Design

    PubMed Central

    Prodanov, Dimiter; Delbeke, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Neural prostheses have already a long history and yet the cochlear implant remains the only success story about a longterm sensory function restoration. On the other hand, neural implants for deep brain stimulation are gaining acceptance for variety of disorders including Parkinsons disease and obsessive-compulsive disorder. It is anticipated that the progress in the field has been hampered by a combination of technological and biological factors, such as the limited understanding of the longterm behavior of implants, unreliability of devices, biocompatibility of the implants among others. While the field's understanding of the cell biology of interactions at the biotic-abiotic interface has improved, relatively little attention has been paid on the mechanical factors (stress, strain), and hence on the geometry that can modulate it. This focused review summarizes the recent progress in the understanding of the mechanisms of mechanical interaction between the implants and the brain. The review gives an overview of the factors by which the implants interact acutely and chronically with the tissue: blood-brain barrier (BBB) breach, vascular damage, micromotions, diffusion etc. We propose some design constraints to be considered in future studies. Aspects of the chronic cell-implant interaction will be discussed in view of the chronic local inflammation and the ways of modulating it. PMID:26903786

  15. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration. PMID:27790598

  16. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neha; Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-09-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration.

  17. Neural prostheses and brain plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallon, James B.; Irvine, Dexter R. F.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2009-12-01

    The success of modern neural prostheses is dependent on a complex interplay between the devices' hardware and software and the dynamic environment in which the devices operate: the patient's body or 'wetware'. Over 120 000 severe/profoundly deaf individuals presently receive information enabling auditory awareness and speech perception from cochlear implants. The cochlear implant therefore provides a useful case study for a review of the complex interactions between hardware, software and wetware, and of the important role of the dynamic nature of wetware. In the case of neural prostheses, the most critical component of that wetware is the central nervous system. This paper will examine the evidence of changes in the central auditory system that contribute to changes in performance with a cochlear implant, and discuss how these changes relate to electrophysiological and functional imaging studies in humans. The relationship between the human data and evidence from animals of the remarkable capacity for plastic change of the central auditory system, even into adulthood, will then be examined. Finally, we will discuss the role of brain plasticity in neural prostheses in general.

  18. Electrophonic hearing and cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Risberg, A; Agelfors, E; Lindström, B; Bredberg, G

    1990-01-01

    It has been difficult to explain the good speech understanding obtained by some cochlear implant patients fitted with a single-channel electrode and analog transmissions of the speech signal (Vienna/3M implant). It has also been difficult to explain the variation in results reported by different groups using the same implant. One hypothesis asserts that the above differences can be explained by the observation that electric stimulation with an implanted electrode might result in two different auditory sensations, the first resulting from the stimulation of the remaining hair cells (electrophonic component) and the second from the electric stimulation of the auditory nerve (electro-neural component). The two sensations are very different. As a result of different definitions of total deafness (functional or threshold definition), patients with remaining hair cells are operated on by some groups, but not by other groups. Some published results from different studies are discussed with reference to the above hypothesis and the possible consequences for the selection of the patients, the use of extra- or intracochlear electrodes, and the selection of the speech coding strategy are discussed.

  19. Cochlear Implants:System Design, Integration and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rebscher, Stephen; Harrison, William V.; Sun, Xiaoan; Feng, Haihong

    2009-01-01

    As the most successful neural prosthesis, cochlear implants have provided partial hearing to more than 120,000 persons worldwide; half of which being pediatric users who are able to develop nearly normal language. Biomedical engineers have played a central role in the design, integration and evaluation of the cochlear implant system, but the overall success is a result of collaborative work with physiologists, psychologists, physicians, educators, and entrepreneurs. This review presents broad yet in-depth academic and industrial perspectives on the underlying research and ongoing development of cochlear implants. The introduction accounts for major events and advances in cochlear implants, including dynamic interplays among engineers, scientists, physicians, and policy makers. The review takes a system approach to address critical issues from design and specifications to integration and evaluation. First, the cochlear implant system design and specifications are laid out. Second, the design goals, principles, and methods of the subsystem components are identified from the external speech processor and radio frequency transmission link to the internal receiver, stimulator and electrode arrays. Third, system integration and functional evaluation are presented with respect to safety, reliability, and challenges facing the present and future cochlear implant designers and users. Finally, issues beyond cochlear implants are discussed to address treatment options for the entire spectrum of hearing impairment as well as to use the cochlear implant as a model to design and evaluate other similar neural prostheses such as vestibular and retinal implants. PMID:19946565

  20. Dental Implant Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Dental implant surgery Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Dental implant surgery is a procedure that replaces tooth roots ... that look and function much like real ones. Dental implant surgery can offer a welcome alternative to dentures ...

  1. Hip Implant Systems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Devices Products and Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants Hip Implants Share ... femoral head) is removed and replaced with a prosthetic ball made of metal or ceramic, and the ...

  2. Natural grouping of neural responses reveals spatially segregated clusters in prearcuate cortex.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Roozbeh; Cueva, Christopher J; Reppas, John B; Peixoto, Diogo; Ryu, Stephen I; Newsome, William T

    2015-03-18

    A fundamental challenge in studying the frontal lobe is to parcellate this cortex into "natural" functional modules despite the absence of topographic maps, which are so helpful in primary sensory areas. Here we show that unsupervised clustering algorithms, applied to 96-channel array recordings from prearcuate gyrus, reveal spatially segregated subnetworks that remain stable across behavioral contexts. Looking for natural groupings of neurons based on response similarities, we discovered that the recorded area includes at least two spatially segregated subnetworks that differentially represent behavioral choice and reaction time. Importantly, these subnetworks are detectable during different behavioral states and, surprisingly, are defined better by "common noise" than task-evoked responses. Our parcellation process works well on "spontaneous" neural activity, and thus bears strong resemblance to the identification of "resting-state" networks in fMRI data sets. Our results demonstrate a powerful new tool for identifying cortical subnetworks by objective classification of simultaneously recorded electrophysiological activity.

  3. [Cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Lehnhardt, E; Battmer, R D; Nakahodo, K; Laszig, R

    1986-07-01

    Since the middle of 1984, the HNO-Klinik der Medizinischen Hochschule Hannover has provided deaf adults with a 22-channel cochlear implant (CI) device of Clark-NUCLEUS. The digital working system consists of an implantable stimulator/receiver and an externally worn speech processor. Energy and signals are transmitted transcutaneously via a transmitter coil. During the prevailing 26 operations (April 1986) the electrode array could be inserted at least 17 mm into the cochlea. The threshold and comfort levels of all patients were adjusted very quickly; the dynamic range usually grows during the first postoperative weeks. The individual rehabilitation results vary greatly, but all patients show a significant increase of vowel and consonant comprehension while using the speech processor and an improvement of words understood per minute in speech tracking from lip-reading alone to lip-reading with speech processor. Four months after surgery seven of 17 patients (group I) are able to understand on average 42.7 words per minute by speech tracking without lip-reading. Six patients (group II) recognise 69.2% of vowels and 42.5% of consonants by speech processor alone. Four patients (group III) can correctly repeat only vowels (52.3%) without lip-reading, but using the speech processor together with lip reading they have an improvement in consonant understanding of 37.9% and under freefield conditions they are able to understand up to 17.8% numbers of the Freiburg speech test.

  4. Implant marketing: cost effective implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Wohrle, P S; Levin, R P

    1996-01-01

    The application of the KAL-Technique to the field of implant dentistry allows both patients and dental practices to benefit. It is an exciting advance that decreases frustration and stress in providing implant procedures and lowers overall costs. Professionals using the KAL-Technique report significant predictability in achieving passive framework fit. They are also lowering overall cost of implant cases, which increases the number of patients who can accept implant treatment. It has been well established that the more individuals in a practice that receive implants, the more referrals a practice will gain. This is because implant patients find tremendous advances in the quality of life, and do not hesitate to tell others who can take advantage of this opportunity. Implant dentistry is one of the fastest growing fields in dentistry today. While some other areas of dentistry begin to decline in volume and need, implant dentistry provides the opportunity to keep practices strong and to insure long-term success.

  5. Bilayer Implants

    PubMed Central

    Schagemann, Jan C.; Rudert, Nicola; Taylor, Michelle E.; Sim, Sotcheadt; Quenneville, Eric; Garon, Martin; Klinger, Mathias; Buschmann, Michael D.; Mittelstaedt, Hagen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the regenerative capacity of 2 distinct bilayer implants for the restoration of osteochondral defects in a preliminary sheep model. Methods Critical sized osteochondral defects were treated with a novel biomimetic poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) implant (Treatment No. 2; n = 6) or a combination of Chondro-Gide and Orthoss (Treatment No. 1; n = 6). At 19 months postoperation, repair tissue (n = 5 each) was analyzed for histology and biochemistry. Electromechanical mappings (Arthro-BST) were performed ex vivo. Results Histological scores, electromechanical quantitative parameter values, dsDNA and sGAG contents measured at the repair sites were statistically lower than those obtained from the contralateral surfaces. Electromechanical mappings and higher dsDNA and sGAG/weight levels indicated better regeneration for Treatment No. 1. However, these differences were not significant. For both treatments, Arthro-BST revealed early signs of degeneration of the cartilage surrounding the repair site. The International Cartilage Repair Society II histological scores of the repair tissue were significantly higher for Treatment No. 1 (10.3 ± 0.38 SE) compared to Treatment No. 2 (8.7 ± 0.45 SE). The parameters cell morphology and vascularization scored highest whereas tidemark formation scored the lowest. Conclusion There was cell infiltration and regeneration of bone and cartilage. However, repair was incomplete and fibrocartilaginous. There were no significant differences in the quality of regeneration between the treatments except in some histological scoring categories. The results from Arthro-BST measurements were comparable to traditional invasive/destructive methods of measuring quality of cartilage repair. PMID:27688843

  6. Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Patrick I.

    2003-09-23

    Physicists use large detectors to measure particles created in high-energy collisions at particle accelerators. These detectors typically produce signals indicating either where ionization occurs along the path of the particle, or where energy is deposited by the particle. The data produced by these signals is fed into pattern recognition programs to try to identify what particles were produced, and to measure the energy and direction of these particles. Ideally, there are many techniques used in this pattern recognition software. One technique, neural networks, is particularly suitable for identifying what type of particle caused by a set of energy deposits. Neural networks can derive meaning from complicated or imprecise data, extract patterns, and detect trends that are too complex to be noticed by either humans or other computer related processes. To assist in the advancement of this technology, Physicists use a tool kit to experiment with several neural network techniques. The goal of this research is interface a neural network tool kit into Java Analysis Studio (JAS3), an application that allows data to be analyzed from any experiment. As the final result, a physicist will have the ability to train, test, and implement a neural network with the desired output while using JAS3 to analyze the results or output. Before an implementation of a neural network can take place, a firm understanding of what a neural network is and how it works is beneficial. A neural network is an artificial representation of the human brain that tries to simulate the learning process [5]. It is also important to think of the word artificial in that definition as computer programs that use calculations during the learning process. In short, a neural network learns by representative examples. Perhaps the easiest way to describe the way neural networks learn is to explain how the human brain functions. The human brain contains billions of neural cells that are responsible for processing

  7. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  8. Wireless Power Transfer Strategies for Implantable Bioelectronics: Methodological Review.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Kush; Jegadeesan, Rangarajan; Guo, Yong-Xin; Thakor, Nitish V

    2017-03-16

    Neural implants have emerged over the last decade as highly effective solutions for the treatment of dysfunctions and disorders of the nervous system. These implants establish a direct, often bidirectional, interface to the nervous system, both sensing neural signals and providing therapeutic treatments. As a result of the technological progress and successful clinical demonstrations, completely implantable solutions have become a reality and are now commercially available for the treatment of various functional disorders. Central to this development is the wireless power transfer (WPT) that has enabled implantable medical devices (IMDs) to function for extended durations in mobile subjects. In this review, we present the theory, link design, and challenges, along with their probable solutions for the traditional near-field resonant inductively coupled WPT, capacitively coupled short ranged WPT, and more recently developed ultrasonic, mid-field and far-field coupled WPT technologies for implantable applications. A comparison of various power transfer methods, based on their power budgets and WPT range follows. Power requirements of specific implants like cochlear, retinal, cortical and peripheral are also considered and currently available IMD solutions are discussed. Patient's safety concerns with respect to electrical, biological, physical, electromagnetic interference and cyber security from an implanted neurotech device are also explored in this review. Finally, we discuss and anticipate future developments that will enhance the capabilities of current-day wirelessly powered implants and make them more efficient and integrable with other electronic components in IMDs.

  9. Implantable brain computer interface: challenges to neurotechnology translation.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Peter; Shanks, Todd

    2010-06-01

    This article reviews three concepts related to implantable brain computer interface (BCI) devices being designed for human use: neural signal extraction primarily for motor commands, signal insertion to restore sensation, and technological challenges that remain. A significant body of literature has occurred over the past four decades regarding motor cortex signal extraction for upper extremity movement or computer interface. However, little is discussed regarding postural or ambulation command signaling. Auditory prosthesis research continues to represent the majority of literature on BCI signal insertion. Significant hurdles continue in the technological translation of BCI implants. These include developing a stable neural interface, significantly increasing signal processing capabilities, and methods of data transfer throughout the human body. The past few years, however, have provided extraordinary human examples of BCI implant potential. Despite technological hurdles, proof-of-concept animal and human studies provide significant encouragement that BCI implants may well find their way into mainstream medical practice in the foreseeable future.

  10. [Bilateral cochlear implantation].

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Jona; Migirov, Lela; Taitelbaum-Swead, Rikey; Hildesheimer, Minka

    2010-06-01

    Cochlear implant surgery became the standard of care in hearing rehabilitation of patients with severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss. This procedure may alter the lives of children and adults enabling them to integrate with the hearing population. In the past, implantation was performed only in one ear, despite the fact that binaural hearing is superior to unilateral, especially in noisy conditions. Cochlear implantation may be performed sequentially or simultaneously. The "sensitive period" of time between hearing loss and implantation and between the two implantations, when performed sequentially, significantly influences the results. Shorter time spans between implantations improve the hearing results after implantation. Hearing success after implantation is highly dependent on the rehabilitation process which includes mapping, implant adjustments and hearing training. Bilateral cochlear implantation in children is recommended as the proposed procedure in spite of the additional financial burden.

  11. Wireless Microstimulators for Neural Prosthetics

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Mesut; Pikov, Victor

    2016-01-01

    One of the roadblocks in the field of neural prosthetics is the lack of microelectronic devices for neural stimulation that can last a lifetime in the central nervous system. Wireless multi-electrode arrays are being developed to improve the longevity of implants by eliminating the wire interconnects as well as the chronic tissue reactions due to the tethering forces generated by these wires. An area of research that has not been sufficiently investigated is a simple single-channel passive microstimulator that can collect the stimulus energy that is transmitted wirelessly through the tissue and immediately convert it into the stimulus pulse. For example, many neural prosthetic approaches to intraspinal microstimulation require only a few channels of stimulation. Wired spinal cord implants are not practical for human subjects because of the extensive flexions and rotations that the spinal cord experiences. Thus, intraspinal microstimulation may be a pioneering application that can benefit from submillimetersize floating stimulators. Possible means of energizing such a floating microstimulator, such as optical, acoustic, and electromagnetic waves, are discussed. PMID:21488815

  12. Design Challenges of Implantable Pressure Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guangqiang

    2010-01-01

    Pressure in various organs and body parts, such as blood vessels, heart, brain, eyes, bladder and GI tracts, is an important indication of health. Long term, continuous pressure monitoring is critically needed for a number of applications. When combined with existing neuro-prosthetics devices, they may provide better solutions to many neural disorders. First efforts toward a long-term implantable pressure monitoring system were initiated more than 40 years ago. However, a reliable, safe and implantable pressure sensor for long-term applications is not yet commercially available. This paper attempts to reveal the design challenges associated with the development of a long-term implantable pressure sensor. PMID:20582255

  13. EDITORIAL: Focus on the neural interface Focus on the neural interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Dominique M.

    2009-10-01

    The possibility of an effective connection between neural tissue and computers has inspired scientists and engineers to develop new ways of controlling and obtaining information from the nervous system. These applications range from `brain hacking' to neural control of artificial limbs with brain signals. Notwithstanding the significant advances in neural prosthetics in the last few decades and the success of some stimulation devices such as cochlear prosthesis, neurotechnology remains below its potential for restoring neural function in patients with nervous system disorders. One of the reasons for this limited impact can be found at the neural interface and close attention to the integration between electrodes and tissue should improve the possibility of successful outcomes. The neural interfaces research community consists of investigators working in areas such as deep brain stimulation, functional neuromuscular/electrical stimulation, auditory prostheses, cortical prostheses, neuromodulation, microelectrode array technology, brain-computer/machine interfaces. Following the success of previous neuroprostheses and neural interfaces workshops, funding (from NIH) was obtained to establish a biennial conference in the area of neural interfaces. The first Neural Interfaces Conference took place in Cleveland, OH in 2008 and several topics from this conference have been selected for publication in this special section of the Journal of Neural Engineering. Three `perspectives' review the areas of neural regeneration (Corredor and Goldberg), cochlear implants (O'Leary et al) and neural prostheses (Anderson). Seven articles focus on various aspects of neural interfacing. One of the most popular of these areas is the field of brain-computer interfaces. Fraser et al, report on a method to generate robust control with simple signal processing algorithms of signals obtained with electrodes implanted in the brain. One problem with implanted electrode arrays, however, is that

  14. Implantable microcoils for intracortical magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Woo; Fallegger, Florian; Casse, Bernard D. F.; Fried, Shelley I.

    2016-01-01

    Neural prostheses that stimulate the neocortex have the potential to treat a wide range of neurological disorders. However, the efficacy of electrode-based implants remains limited, with persistent challenges that include an inability to create precise patterns of neural activity as well as difficulties in maintaining response consistency over time. These problems arise from fundamental limitations of electrodes as well as their susceptibility to implantation and have proven difficult to overcome. Magnetic stimulation can address many of these limitations, but coils small enough to be implanted into the cortex were not thought strong enough to activate neurons. We describe a new microcoil design and demonstrate its effectiveness for both activating cortical neurons and driving behavioral responses. The stimulation of cortical pyramidal neurons in brain slices in vitro was reliable and could be confined to spatially narrow regions (<60 μm). The spatially asymmetric fields arising from the coil helped to avoid the simultaneous activation of passing axons. In vivo implantation was safe and resulted in consistent and predictable behavioral responses. The high permeability of magnetic fields to biological substances may yield another important advantage because it suggests that encapsulation and other adverse effects of implantation will not diminish coil performance over time, as happens to electrodes. These findings suggest that a coil-based implant might be a useful alternative to existing electrode-based devices. The enhanced selectivity of microcoil-based magnetic stimulation will be especially useful for visual prostheses as well as for many brain-computer interface applications that require precise activation of the cortex. PMID:27957537

  15. Norplant implants.

    PubMed

    Henley, E

    1993-06-01

    This letter to the editor is in response to 3 articles on the use of the Norplant implant contraceptive in The Indian Health Service (IHS) Provider. Norplant and the FDA-approved Depo-Provera now expand contraceptive options for women. All IHS and 638 sites might be able to offer both options. Several of the authors expressed concern regarding decreased Norplant effectiveness in heavier patients. Norplant is still more effective than any other currently available reversible contraceptive in the US at all weights. Many experts feel the current silastic capsule provides adequate hormone levels even in heavier women. The Crow Service Unit has initiated their Norplant program, although the Wyeth consent form seems unnecessarily extensive. The Albuquerque Service Unit consent form simply describes the procedure and confirms that patients have read and understand the fact sheet. The theoretical risk of thromboembolism is vastly outweighed by the potential benefit of reliable contraception in high risk alcoholic women, except perhaps in women with severe liver disease. While Norplant is expensive, programs need to consider the actual cost of a pregnancy, potential complications, and the financial and social costs of unintended pregnancy. For those in difficult straits, the manufacturer has set up a foundation for obtaining Norplant free of charge. Depo-Provera comes in a 150 mg dose vial that is given every 3 months. The mean time to ovulation is 4.5 months from the last dose. The adverse reaction spectrum is similar to Norplant as they are both progesterone-related agents. Providers and clinics should reduce barriers to family planning by giving out more pill packs at a time; letting adolescents who wish to delay their first pelvic exam have 3 months of pills without an exam; making condoms available in exam rooms rather than through pharmacy prescriptions; and increasing patient accessibility to the morning-after pill.

  16. Implantable radio frequency identification sensors: wireless power and communication.

    PubMed

    Hutchens, Chriswell; Rennaker, Robert L; Venkataraman, Srinivasan; Ahmed, Rehan; Liao, Ran; Ibrahim, Tamer

    2011-01-01

    There are significant technical challenges in the development of a fully implantable wirelessly powered neural interface. Challenges include wireless transmission of sufficient power to the implanted device to ensure reliable operation for decades without replacement, minimizing tissue heating, and adequate reliable communications bandwidth. Overcoming these challenges is essential for the development of implantable closed loop system for the treatment of disorders ranging from epilepsy, incontinence, stroke and spinal cord injury. We discuss the development of the wireless power, communication and control for a Radio-Frequency Identification Sensor (RFIDS) system with targeted power range for a 700 mV, 30 to 40 uA load attained at -2 dBm.

  17. CHAPTER: In-Situ Characterization of Stimulating Microelectrode Arrays: Study of an Idealized Structure Based on Argus II Retinal implantsBOOK TITLE: Implantable Neural Prostheses 2: Techniques and Engineering Approaches, D.M. Zhou and E. Greenbaum, Eds., Springer, NY 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Elias; Sanders, Charlene A; Kandagor, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    The development of a retinal prosthesis for artificial sight includes a study of the factors affecting the structural and functional stability of chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. Although neuron depolarization and propagation of electrical signals have been studied for nearly a century, the use of multielectrode stimulation as a proposed therapy to treat blindness is a frontier area of modern ophthalmology research. Mapping and characterizing the topographic information contained in the electric field potentials and understanding how this information is transmitted and interpreted in the visual cortex is still very much a work in progress. In order to characterize the electrical field patterns generated by the device, an in vitro prototype that mimics several of the physical and chemical parameters of the in vivo visual implant device was fabricated. We carried out multiple electrical measurements in a model 'eye,' beginning with a single electrode, followed by a 9-electrode array structure, both idealized components based on the Argus II retinal implants. Correlating the information contained in the topographic features of the electric fields with psychophysical testing in patients may help reduce the time required for patients to convert the electrical patterns into graphic signals.

  18. Advanced Materials for Neural Surface Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Schendel, Amelia A; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Williams, Justin C

    2014-12-01

    Designing electrodes for neural interfacing applications requires deep consideration of a multitude of materials factors. These factors include, but are not limited to, the stiffness, biocompatibility, biostability, dielectric, and conductivity properties of the materials involved. The combination of materials properties chosen not only determines the ability of the device to perform its intended function, but also the extent to which the body reacts to the presence of the device after implantation. Advances in the field of materials science continue to yield new and improved materials with properties well-suited for neural applications. Although many of these materials have been well-established for non-biological applications, their use in medical devices is still relatively novel. The intention of this review is to outline new material advances for neural electrode arrays, in particular those that interface with the surface of the nervous tissue, as well as to propose future directions for neural surface electrode development.

  19. Advanced Materials for Neural Surface Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Schendel, Amelia A.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Williams, Justin C.

    2015-01-01

    Designing electrodes for neural interfacing applications requires deep consideration of a multitude of materials factors. These factors include, but are not limited to, the stiffness, biocompatibility, biostability, dielectric, and conductivity properties of the materials involved. The combination of materials properties chosen not only determines the ability of the device to perform its intended function, but also the extent to which the body reacts to the presence of the device after implantation. Advances in the field of materials science continue to yield new and improved materials with properties well-suited for neural applications. Although many of these materials have been well-established for non-biological applications, their use in medical devices is still relatively novel. The intention of this review is to outline new material advances for neural electrode arrays, in particular those that interface with the surface of the nervous tissue, as well as to propose future directions for neural surface electrode development. PMID:26392802

  20. Suitability of nitinol electrodes in neural prostheses such as endovascular neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yan T; Opie, Nicholas L; John, Sam E; Gerboni, Giulia; Rind, Gil S; Ronayne, Stephen M; Fox, Kate E; Oxley, Thomas J; Grayden, David B

    2016-08-01

    A major challenge facing neural prostheses is the development of electrodes that are well tolerated by the brain and body. A novel way to circumvent the need to perform an invasive craniotomy and penetration of the blood-brain barrier to implant electrodes, is to guide electrodes up into the cerebral veins and place electrodes on the vessel walls adjacent to neuronal populations. To aid in the development of these stent based devices, microelectrodes manufactured from Nitinol would allow electrodes to be implanted via a catheter and then once deployed, alter their shape to conform to the vessel walls. However, there is a paucity of data on whether Nitinol is a suitable material to record neural signals. Here we show that Nitinol is tolerated by the body and that it can effectively measure neural signals. Specifically, we electrochemically evaluate Nitinol electrodes in blood and record visually evoked potentials from sheep.

  1. Neural stimulation and recording electrodes.

    PubMed

    Cogan, Stuart F

    2008-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of nerve tissue and recording of neural electrical activity are the basis of emerging prostheses and treatments for spinal cord injury, stroke, sensory deficits, and neurological disorders. An understanding of the electrochemical mechanisms underlying the behavior of neural stimulation and recording electrodes is important for the development of chronically implanted devices, particularly those employing large numbers of microelectrodes. For stimulation, materials that support charge injection by capacitive and faradaic mechanisms are available. These include titanium nitride, platinum, and iridium oxide, each with certain advantages and limitations. The use of charge-balanced waveforms and maximum electrochemical potential excursions as criteria for reversible charge injection with these electrode materials are described and critiqued. Techniques for characterizing electrochemical properties relevant to stimulation and recording are described with examples of differences in the in vitro and in vivo response of electrodes.

  2. [Biomaterials in cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Stöver, T; Lenarz, T

    2009-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) represent the "gold standard" for the treatment of congenitally deaf children and postlingually deafened adults. Thus, cochlear implantation is a success story of new bionic prosthesis development. Owing to routine application of cochlear implants in adults but also in very young children (below the age of one), high demands are placed on the implants. This is especially true for biocompatibility aspects of surface materials of implant parts which are in contact with the human body. In addition, there are various mechanical requirements which certain components of the implants must fulfil, such as flexibility of the electrode array and mechanical resistance of the implant housing. Due to the close contact of the implant to the middle ear mucosa and because the electrode array is positioned in the perilymphatic space via cochleostomy, there is a potential risk of bacterial transferral along the electrode array into the cochlea. Various requirements that have to be fulfilled by cochlear implants, such as biocompatibility, electrode micromechanics, and although a very high level of technical standards has been carried out there is still demand for the improvement of implants as well as of the materials used for manufacturing, ultimately leading to increased implant performance. General considerations of material aspects related to cochlear implants as well as potential future perspectives of implant development will be discussed.

  3. A wirelessly powered microspectrometer for neural probe-pin device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Kim, Min H.; Song, Kyo D.; Yoon, Hargsoon; Lee, Uhn

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of neurological anomalies, whether done invasively or not, places stringent demands on device functionality and size. We have developed a micro-spectrometer for use as an implantable neural probe to monitor neuro-chemistry in synapses. The micro-spectrometer, based on a NASA-invented miniature Fresnel grating, is capable of differentiating the emission spectra from various brain tissues. The micro-spectrometer meets the size requirements, and is able to probe the neuro-chemistry and suppression voltage typically associated with a neural anomaly. This neural probe-pin device (PPD) is equipped with wireless power technology (WPT) to enable operation in a continuous manner without requiring an implanted battery. The implanted neural PPD, together with a neural electronics interface and WPT, enable real-time measurement and control/feedback for remediation of neural anomalies. The design and performance of the combined PPD/WPT device for monitoring dopamine in a rat brain will be presented to demonstrate the current level of development. Future work on this device will involve the addition of an embedded expert system capable of performing semi-autonomous management of neural functions through a routine of sensing, processing, and control.

  4. Peri-Implant Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alcohol Consumption and Gum Health Workshop on Regeneration Periodontal Disease More Prevalent among Ethnic Minorities Dental Implants Periodontal ... factors for developing peri-implant disease include previous periodontal disease diagnosis, poor plaque control, smoking , and diabetes . It ...

  5. Implants for lucky few

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, David

    2011-08-01

    In his article "Vision of beauty" (May pp22-27), Richard Taylor points the way to fractal design for retinal implants and makes an enthusiastic case for incorporating such features into the next generation of such implants.

  6. Cochlear Implants for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasenstab, M. Suzanne; Laughton, Joan

    1991-01-01

    The use of cochlear implants in children with profound bilateral hearing loss is discussed, focusing on how a cochlear implant works; steps in a cochlear implant program (evaluation, surgery, programing, and training); and rehabilitation procedures involved in auditory development and speech development. (JDD)

  7. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  8. Neural Network Function Classifier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-07

    neural network sets. Each of the neural networks in a particular set is trained to recognize a particular data set type. The best function representation of the data set is determined from the neural network output. The system comprises sets of trained neural networks having neural networks trained to identify different types of data. The number of neural networks within each neural network set will depend on the number of function types that are represented. The system further comprises

  9. Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindling, Jerome

    2010-04-01

    This course presents an overview of the concepts of the neural networks and their aplication in the framework of High energy physics analyses. After a brief introduction on the concept of neural networks, the concept is explained in the frame of neuro-biology, introducing the concept of multi-layer perceptron, learning and their use as data classifer. The concept is then presented in a second part using in more details the mathematical approach focussing on typical use cases faced in particle physics. Finally, the last part presents the best way to use such statistical tools in view of event classifers, putting the emphasis on the setup of the multi-layer perceptron. The full article (15 p.) corresponding to this lecture is written in french and is provided in the proceedings of the book SOS 2008.

  10. Neural Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin

    About the Series: Bioelectric Engineering presents state-of-the-art discussions on modern biomedical engineering with respect to applications of electrical engineering and information technology in biomedicine. This focus affirms Springer's commitment to publishing important reviews of the broadest interest to biomedical engineers, bioengineers, and their colleagues in affiliated disciplines. Recent volumes have covered modeling and imaging of bioelectric activity, neural engineering, biosignal processing, bionanotechnology, among other topics.

  11. Wireless microsensor network solutions for neurological implantable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Jose K.; Whitchurch, Ashwin; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2005-05-01

    The design and development of wireless mocrosensor network systems for the treatment of many degenerative as well as traumatic neurological disorders is presented in this paper. Due to the advances in micro and nano sensors and wireless systems, the biomedical sensors have the potential to revolutionize many areas in healthcare systems. The integration of nanodevices with neurons that are in communication with smart microsensor systems has great potential in the treatment of many neurodegenerative brain disorders. It is well established that patients suffering from either Parkinson"s disease (PD) or Epilepsy have benefited from the advantages of implantable devices in the neural pathways of the brain to alter the undesired signals thus restoring proper function. In addition, implantable devices have successfully blocked pain signals and controlled various pelvic muscles in patients with urinary and fecal incontinence. Even though the existing technology has made a tremendous impact on controlling the deleterious effects of disease, it is still in its infancy. This paper presents solutions of many problems of today's implantable and neural-electronic interface devices by combining nanowires and microelectronics with BioMEMS and applying them at cellular level for the development of a total wireless feedback control system. The only device that will actually be implanted in this research is the electrodes. All necessary controllers will be housed in accessories that are outside the body that communicate with the implanted electrodes through tiny inductively-coupled antennas. A Parkinson disease patient can just wear a hat-system close to the implantable neural probe so that the patient is free to move around, while the sensors continually monitor, record, transmit all vital information to health care specialist. In the event of a problem, the system provides an early warning to the patient while they are still mobile thus providing them the opportunity to react and

  12. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993

  13. Development of human neural transplantation.

    PubMed

    Madrazo, I; Franco-Bourland, R; Aguilera, M; Ostrosky-Solis, F; Cuevas, C; Castrejón, H; Magallón, E; Madrazo, M

    1991-08-01

    The possibility of altering the course of Parkinson's disease by brain grafting is slowly becoming a reality through the efforts of many research groups worldwide. It has been shown that this procedure, as performed in high-level medical research centers, usually produces no permanent adverse effects and can effectively ameliorate parkinsonian signs in certain patients. This progress has served to reinforce our commitment to develop neural transplantation into an effective therapy to treat such a devastating neurodegenerative disease. We have summarized the most important events that have shaped the initial phase of this research. In the course of the last 4 years, considerable knowledge has been gained in the clinical neurosciences regarding the real potential of various brain grafting procedures in treating Parkinson's disease, their shortcomings, and their usefulness in carefully selected patients. There is still no consensus regarding the various fundamental aspects of human brain grafting in Parkinson's disease. Questions concerning surgical technique, candidate selection, the optimal brain regions for implantation, the optimal tissue for implantation, and the real usefulness of brain grafting must be addressed. The importance of the quality of adrenal medulla fragments for grafting, the requirement for immunosuppressors in fetal brain grafting, and the optimal fetal age and the amount of donor tissue for effective grafting are additional areas of concern. The potential of xenografting, preserved tissues, and genetically engineered cells for human brain grafting remain unanswered. The development of human neural transplantation is the responsibility and privilege of neurosurgery.

  14. Neural Prostheses and Brain Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, James B.; Irvine, Dexter R. F.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2010-01-01

    The success of modern neural prostheses is dependent on a complex interplay between the devices’ hardware and software and the dynamic environment in which the devices operate: the patient’s body or ‘wetware’. Over 110,000 severe/profoundly deaf individuals presently receive information enabling auditory awareness and speech perception from cochlear implants. The cochlear implant therefore provides a useful case study for a review of the complex interactions between hardware, software and wetware, and of the important role of the dynamic nature of wetware. This review will examine the evidence of changes in the wetware contributing to changes in speech perception and discuss how these changes relate to electrophysiological and functional imaging studies in humans. The relationship between the human data and evidence from animals of the remarkable capacity for plastic change of the central auditory system, even into adulthood, will then be examined. Finally, we will discuss the role of brain plasticity in neural prostheses in general. PMID:19850976

  15. Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Electrodes for Neural Interfaces: In vivo Biocompatibility Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, María; Taylor, Andrew; Fjorback, Morten; Zachar, Vladimir; Pennisi, Cristian P.

    2016-01-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BDD) electrodes have recently attracted attention as materials for neural electrodes due to their superior physical and electrochemical properties, however their biocompatibility remains largely unexplored. In this work, we aim to investigate the in vivo biocompatibility of BDD electrodes in relation to conventional titanium nitride (TiN) electrodes using a rat subcutaneous implantation model. High quality BDD films were synthesized on electrodes intended for use as an implantable neurostimulation device. After implantation for 2 and 4 weeks, tissue sections adjacent to the electrodes were obtained for histological analysis. Both types of implants were contained in a thin fibrous encapsulation layer, the thickness of which decreased with time. Although the level of neovascularization around the implants was similar, BDD electrodes elicited significantly thinner fibrous capsules and a milder inflammatory reaction at both time points. These results suggest that BDD films may constitute an appropriate material to support stable performance of implantable neural electrodes over time. PMID:27013949

  16. Boron-Doped Nanocrystalline Diamond Electrodes for Neural Interfaces: In vivo Biocompatibility Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, María; Taylor, Andrew; Fjorback, Morten; Zachar, Vladimir; Pennisi, Cristian P

    2016-01-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BDD) electrodes have recently attracted attention as materials for neural electrodes due to their superior physical and electrochemical properties, however their biocompatibility remains largely unexplored. In this work, we aim to investigate the in vivo biocompatibility of BDD electrodes in relation to conventional titanium nitride (TiN) electrodes using a rat subcutaneous implantation model. High quality BDD films were synthesized on electrodes intended for use as an implantable neurostimulation device. After implantation for 2 and 4 weeks, tissue sections adjacent to the electrodes were obtained for histological analysis. Both types of implants were contained in a thin fibrous encapsulation layer, the thickness of which decreased with time. Although the level of neovascularization around the implants was similar, BDD electrodes elicited significantly thinner fibrous capsules and a milder inflammatory reaction at both time points. These results suggest that BDD films may constitute an appropriate material to support stable performance of implantable neural electrodes over time.

  17. Exploiting the 1/f structure of neural signals for the design of integrated neural amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Subramaniam; Patten, Craig; Carmena, Jose M

    2009-01-01

    Neural amplifiers require a large time-constant high-pass filter at approximately 1Hz to reject large DC offsets while amplifying low frequency neural signals. This high pass filter is typically realized using large area capacitors and teraohm resistances which makes integration difficult. In this paper, we present a novel topology for a neural amplifier which exploits the (1/f)(n) power spectra of local field potentials (LFP). Using a high-pass filter at approximately 100Hz, we pre-filter the LFP before amplification. Post digitization, we can recover the LFP signal by building the inverse of the high pass filter in software. We built an array of neural amplifiers based on this principle and tested it on rats chronically implanted with microelectrode arrays. We found that we could recover the initial LFP signal and the power spectral information over time with correlation coefficient greater than 0.94.

  18. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Birth defects & other health conditions > Neural tube defects Neural tube defects E-mail to a friend Please ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Neural tube defects (NTDs) are birth defects of the ...

  19. A High-Performance Neural Prosthesis Enabled by Control Algorithm Design

    PubMed Central

    Gilja, Vikash; Nuyujukian, Paul; Chestek, Cindy A.; Cunningham, John P.; Yu, Byron M.; Fan, Joline M.; Churchland, Mark M.; Kaufman, Matthew T.; Kao, Jonathan C.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2012-01-01

    Neural prostheses translate neural activity from the brain into control signals for guiding prosthetic devices, such as computer cursors and robotic limbs, and thus offer disabled patients greater interaction with the world. However, relatively low performance remains a critical barrier to successful clinical translation; current neural prostheses are considerably slower with less accurate control than the native arm. Here we present a new control algorithm, the recalibrated feedback intention-trained Kalman filter (ReFIT-KF), that incorporates assumptions about the nature of closed loop neural prosthetic control. When tested with rhesus monkeys implanted with motor cortical electrode arrays, the ReFIT-KF algorithm outperforms existing neural prostheses in all measured domains and halves acquisition time. This control algorithm permits sustained uninterrupted use for hours and generalizes to more challenging tasks without retraining. Using this algorithm, we demonstrate repeatable high performance for years after implantation across two monkeys, thereby increasing the clinical viability of neural prostheses. PMID:23160043

  20. New Criteria of Indication and Selection of Patients to Cochlear Implant

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, André L. L.; Araújo, Mercêdes F. S.; Oliveira, Carlos A. C. P.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous changes continue to occur in cochlear implant candidacy. In general, these have been accompanied by concomitant and satisfactory changes in surgical techniques. Together, this has advanced the utility and safety of cochlear implantation. Most devices are now approved for use in patients with severe to profound unilateral hearing loss rather then the prior requirement of a bilateral profound loss. Furthermore, studies have begun utilizing short electrode arrays for shallow insertion in patients with considerable low-frequency residual hearing. This technique will allow the recipient to continue to use acoustically amplified hearing for the low frequencies simultaneously with a cochlear implant for the high frequencies. The advances in design of, and indications for, cochlear implants have been matched by improvements in surgical techniques and decrease in complications. The resulting improvements in safety and efficacy have further encouraged the use of these devices. This paper will review the new concepts in the candidacy of cochlear implant. Medline data base was used to search articles dealing with the following topics: cochlear implant in younger children, cochlear implant and hearing preservation, cochlear implant for unilateral deafness and tinnitus, genetic hearing loss and cochlear implant, bilateral cochlear implant, neuropathy and cochlear implant and neural plasticity, and the selection of patients for cochlear implant. PMID:22013448

  1. Mechanisms of electrical stimulation with neural prostheses.

    PubMed

    Rattay, F; Resatz, S; Lutter, P; Minassian, K; Jilge, B; Dimitrijevic, M R

    2003-01-01

    Individual electric and geometric characteristics of neural substructures can have surprising effects on artificially controlled neural signaling. A rule of thumb approved for the stimulation of long peripheral axons may not hold when the central nervous system is involved. This is demonstrated here with a comparison of results from the electrically stimulated cochlea, retina, and spinal cord. A generalized form of the activating function together with accurate modeling of the neural membrane dynamics are the tools to analyze the excitation mechanisms initiated by neural prostheses. Analysis is sometimes possible with a linear theory, in other cases, simulation of internal calcium concentration or ion channel current fluctuations is needed to see irregularities in spike trains. Spike initiation site can easily change within a single target neuron under constant stimulation conditions of a cochlear implant. Poor myelinization in the soma region of the human cochlear neurons causes firing characteristics different from any animal data. Retinal ganglion cells also generate propagating spikes within the dendritic tree. Bipolar cells in the retina are expected to respond with neurotransmitter release before a spike is generated in the ganglion cell, even when they are far away from the electrode. Epidural stimulation of the lumbar spinal cord predominantly stimulates large sensory axons in the dorsal roots which induce muscle reflex responses. Analysis with the generalized activating function, computer simulations of the nonlinear neural membrane behavior together with experimental and clinical data analysis enlighten our understanding of artificial firing patterns influenced by neural prostheses.

  2. [Cochlear implant in adults].

    PubMed

    Bouccara, D; Mosnier, I; Bernardeschi, D; Ferrary, E; Sterkers, O

    2012-03-01

    Cochlear implant in adults is a procedure, dedicated to rehabilitate severe to profound hearing loss. Because of technological progresses and their applications for signal strategies, new devices can improve hearing, even in noise conditions. Binaural stimulation, cochlear implant and hearing aid or bilateral cochlear implants are the best opportunities to access to better level of comprehension in all conditions and space localisation. By now minimally invasive surgery is possible to preserve residual hearing and use a double stimulation modality for the same ear: electrical for high frequencies and acoustic for low frequencies. In several conditions, cochlear implant is not possible due to cochlear nerve tumour or major malformations of the inner ear. In these cases, a brainstem implantation can be considered. Clinical data demonstrate that improvement in daily communication, for both cochlear and brainstem implants, is correlated with cerebral activation of auditory cortex.

  3. Automatic localization of cochlear implant electrodes in CT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yiyuan; Dawant, Benoit M; Labadie, Robert F; Noble, Jack H

    2014-01-01

    Cochlear Implants (CI) are surgically implanted neural prosthetic devices used to treat severe-to-profound hearing loss. Recent studies have suggested that hearing outcomes with CIs are correlated with the location where individual electrodes in the implanted electrode array are placed, but techniques proposed for determining electrode location have been too coarse and labor intensive to permit detailed analysis on large numbers of datasets. In this paper, we present a fully automatic snake-based method for accurately localizing CI electrodes in clinical post-implantation CTs. Our results show that average electrode localization errors with the method are 0.21 millimeters. These results indicate that our method could be used in future large scale studies to analyze the relationship between electrode position and hearing outcome, which potentially could lead to technological advances that improve hearing outcomes with CIs.

  4. Implant treatment planning considerations.

    PubMed

    Kao, Richard T

    2008-04-01

    As dental implants become a more accepted treatment modality, there is a need for all parties involved with implant dentistry to be familiar with various treatment planning issues. Though the success can be highly rewarding, failure to forecast treatment planning issues can result in an increase of surgical needs, surgical cost, and even case failure. In this issue, the focus is on implant treatment planning considerations.

  5. Direct inductive stimulation for energy-efficient wireless neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sohmyung; Khraiche, Massoud L; Silva, Gabriel A; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2012-01-01

    Advanced neural stimulator designs consume power and produce unwanted thermal effects that risk damage to surrounding tissue. In this work, we present a simplified architecture for wireless neural stimulators that relies on a few circuit components including an inductor, capacitor and a diode to elicit an action potential in neurons. The feasibility of the design is supported with analytical models of the inductive link, electrode, electrolyte, membrane and channels of neurons. Finally, a flexible implantable prototype of the design is fabricated and tested in vitro on neural tissue.

  6. Osseointegrated implant prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Rogoff, G S

    1992-06-01

    This review covers recent literature on prosthodontic aspects of osseointegrated implants. Long-term prognosis, diagnosis and treatment planning, and clinical impression techniques and fabrication technology are discussed.

  7. [Silastic implant and synovitis].

    PubMed

    Sennwald, G

    1989-07-22

    The silastic implant based on siloxane polymere induces granulomatous synovitis in certain predisposed individuals, a reaction which may continue even after removal of the implant. This is also true of a prosthesis of the trapezium in two of our patients, though to a lesser degree. This is probably the reason why the problem has not yet been widely recognized. The hypothesis is put forward that an enzymatic predisposition may allow chemical degradation of the fragmented silastic implant into a toxic component responsible for the pathologic condition. The slow progression of the lesions is a challenge for the future and puts in question the further use of silastic implants.

  8. Spatial channel interactions in cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qing; Benítez, Raul; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2011-08-01

    The modern multi-channel cochlear implant is widely considered to be the most successful neural prosthesis owing to its ability to restore partial hearing to post-lingually deafened adults and to allow essentially normal language development in pre-lingually deafened children. However, the implant performance varies greatly in individuals and is still limited in background noise, tonal language understanding, and music perception. One main cause for the individual variability and the limited performance in cochlear implants is spatial channel interaction from the stimulating electrodes to the auditory nerve and brain. Here we systematically examined spatial channel interactions at the physical, physiological, and perceptual levels in the same five modern cochlear implant subjects. The physical interaction was examined using an electric field imaging technique, which measured the voltage distribution as a function of the electrode position in the cochlea in response to the stimulation of a single electrode. The physiological interaction was examined by recording electrically evoked compound action potentials as a function of the electrode position in response to the stimulation of the same single electrode position. The perceptual interactions were characterized by changes in detection threshold as well as loudness summation in response to in-phase or out-of-phase dual-electrode stimulation. To minimize potentially confounding effects of temporal factors on spatial channel interactions, stimulus rates were limited to 100 Hz or less in all measurements. Several quantitative channel interaction indexes were developed to define and compare the width, slope and symmetry of the spatial excitation patterns derived from these physical, physiological and perceptual measures. The electric field imaging data revealed a broad but uniformly asymmetrical intracochlear electric field pattern, with the apical side producing a wider half-width and shallower slope than the basal

  9. Spatial channel interactions in cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qing; Benítez, Raul; Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2011-08-01

    The modern multi-channel cochlear implant is widely considered to be the most successful neural prosthesis owing to its ability to restore partial hearing to post-lingually deafened adults and to allow essentially normal language development in pre-lingually deafened children. However, the implant performance varies greatly in individuals and is still limited in background noise, tonal language understanding, and music perception. One main cause for the individual variability and the limited performance in cochlear implants is spatial channel interaction from the stimulating electrodes to the auditory nerve and brain. Here we systematically examined spatial channel interactions at the physical, physiological, and perceptual levels in the same five modern cochlear implant subjects. The physical interaction was examined using an electric field imaging technique, which measured the voltage distribution as a function of the electrode position in the cochlea in response to the stimulation of a single electrode. The physiological interaction was examined by recording electrically evoked compound action potentials as a function of the electrode position in response to the stimulation of the same single electrode position. The perceptual interactions were characterized by changes in detection threshold as well as loudness summation in response to in-phase or out-of-phase dual-electrode stimulation. To minimize potentially confounding effects of temporal factors on spatial channel interactions, stimulus rates were limited to 100 Hz or less in all measurements. Several quantitative channel interaction indexes were developed to define and compare the width, slope and symmetry of the spatial excitation patterns derived from these physical, physiological and perceptual measures. The electric field imaging data revealed a broad but uniformly asymmetrical intracochlear electric field pattern, with the apical side producing a wider half-width and shallower slope than the basal

  10. Auditory midbrain implant: a combined approach for vestibular schwannoma surgery and device implantation.

    PubMed

    Samii, Amir; Lenarz, Minoo; Majdani, Omid; Lim, Hubert H; Samii, Madjid; Lenarz, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The lateral suboccipital approach is a well-established route for safe removal of vestibular schwannomas in neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) patients. The goal of this study was to assess if this approach can be extended to a lateral supracerebellar infratentorial approach to enable insertion of an auditory midbrain implant (AMI) penetrating array along the tonotopic gradient of the inferior colliculus central nucleus (ICC). The AMI is a new auditory prosthesis designed for penetrating stimulation of the ICC in patients with neural deafness. The initial candidates are NF2 patients who, because of the growth and/or surgical removal of bilateral acoustic neuromas, develop neural deafness and are unable to benefit from cochlear implants. The ideal surgical approach in NF2 patients must first enable safe removal of vestibular schwannomas and then provide sufficient exposure of the midbrain for AMI implantation. This study was performed on formalin-fixed and fresh cadaver specimens. Computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging were used to study the heads of the specimens and for surgical navigation. The lateral suboccipital craniotomy enabled sufficient exposure of the cerebellopontine angle and internal auditory canal for tumor removal. It could then be extended to a lateral supracerebellar infratentorial approach that provided good exposure of the dorsolateral aspect of the tentorial hiatus and mesencephalon for implantation of the AMI along the tonotopic gradient of the ICC. This approach did not endanger the trochlear nerve or any major midline venous structures in the quadrigeminal cistern. This modified lateral suboccipital approach ensures safe removal of large vestibular schwannomas and provides sufficient exposure of the inferior colliculus for ideal AMI implantation.

  11. Neural Network Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    basic useful theorems and general rules which apply to neural networks (in ’Overview of Neural Network Theory’), studies of training time as the...The Neural Network , Bayes- Gaussian, and k-Nearest Neighbor Classifiers’), an analysis of fuzzy logic and its relationship to neural network (in ’Fuzzy

  12. Implantable ultrasound devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilkomerson, David; Chilipka, Thomas; Bogan, John; Blebea, John; Choudry, Rashad; Wang, John; Salvatore, Michael; Rotella, Vittorio; Soundararajan, Krishnan

    2008-03-01

    Using medical implants to wirelessly report physiological data is a technique that is rapidly growing. Ultrasound is well-suited for implants -- it requires little power and this form of radiated energy has no ill effects on the body. We report here on techniques we have developed in our experience gained in implanting over a dozen Doppler ultrasound flow-measuring implants in dogs. The goal of our implantable device is to measure flow in an arterial graft. To accomplish this, we place a Doppler transducer in the wall of a graft and an implant unit under the skin that energizes the 20 MHz Doppler transducer system, either when started by external command or by internal timetable. The implant records the digitized Doppler real and imaginary channels and transmits the data to a nearby portable computer for storage and evaluation. After outlining the overall operation of the system, we will concentrate on three areas of implant design where special techniques are required: ensuring safety, including biocompatibility to prevent the body from reacting to its invasion; powering the device, including minimizing energy used so that a small battery can provide long-life; and transmitting the data obtained.

  13. Batteryless implanted echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Miniature ultrasonic echosonometer implanted within laboratory animals obtains energy from RF power oscillator that is electronically transduced via induction loop to power receiving loop located just under animal's skin. Method of powering device offers significant advantages over those in which battery is part of implanted package.

  14. Implantable, Ingestible Electronic Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    Small quartz-crystal-controlled oscillator swallowed or surgically implanted provides continuous monitoring of patient's internal temperature. Receiver placed near patient measures oscillator frequency, and temperature inferred from previously determined variation of frequency with temperature. Frequency of crystal-controlled oscillator varies with temperature. Circuit made very small and implanted or ingested to measure internal body temperature.

  15. A no bleed implant.

    PubMed

    Ersek, R A; Navarro, J A; Nemeth, D Z; Sas, G

    1993-01-01

    Breast implants have evolved from the original saline-filled, smooth-surfaced silicone rubber bag to silicone gel-filled smooth-walled sacs to a combination of a silicone gel-filled bag within a saline-filled sac, and, most recently, a reversed, double-lumen implant with a saline bag inside of a gel-filled bag. Texture-surfaced implants were first used in 1970 when the standard silicone gel-filled implant was covered with a polyurethane foam. Because of concerns about the degradation products of this foam, they were removed from the market in 1991. In 1975 double-lumen silicone textured implants were developed, followed by silicone gel-filled textured implants. In 1990 a new radiolucent, biocompatible gel was produced that reduced the problem of radioopacity of silicone implants. Because of the gel's sufficiently low coefficient of friction, leakage caused by fold flaw fracture may also be decreased. We present a case where this new biocompatible gel implant was repositioned after four months. The resulting scar capsule in this soft breast was thin [< 0.002 cm (0.008 in.)] and evenly textured as a mirror image of the textured silicone surface. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray defraction spectrophotometry revealed no silicone bleed.

  16. Smoking and dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kasat, V.; Ladda, R.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a prevalent behaviour in the population. The aim of this review is to bring to light the effects of smoking on dental implants. These facts will assist dental professionals when implants are planned in tobacco users. A search of “PubMed” was made with the key words “dental implant,” “nicotine,” “smoking,” “tobacco,” and “osseointegration.” Also, publications on tobacco control by the Government of India were considered. For review, only those articles published from 1988 onward in English language were selected. Smoking has its influence on general as well as oral health of an individual. Tobacco negatively affects the outcome of almost all therapeutic procedures performed in the oral cavity. The failure rate of implant osseointegration is considerably higher among smokers, and maintenance of oral hygiene around the implants and the risk of peri-implantitis are adversely affected by smoking. To increase implant survival in smokers, various protocols have been recommended. Although osseointegrated dental implants have become the state of the art for tooth replacement, they are not without limitations or complications. In this litigious era, it is extremely important that the practitioner clearly understands and is able and willing to convey the spectrum of possible complications and their frequency to the patients. PMID:24478965

  17. Batteryless implanted echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Miniature ultrasonic echosonometer implanted within laboratory animals obtains energy from RF power oscillator that is electronically transduced via induction loop to power receiving loop located just under animal's skin. Method of powering device offers significant advantages over those in which battery is part of implanted package.

  18. Implantable CMOS Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Jun; Tokuda, Takashi; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Noda, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The results of recent research on our implantable CMOS biomedical devices are reviewed. Topics include retinal prosthesis devices and deep-brain implantation devices for small animals. Fundamental device structures and characteristics as well as in vivo experiments are presented. PMID:22291554

  19. Teeth and implants.

    PubMed

    Palmer, R

    1999-08-28

    An osseointegrated implant restoration may closely resemble a natural tooth. However, the absence of a periodontal ligament and connective tissue attachment via cementum, results in fundamental differences in the adaptation of the implant to occlusal forces, and the structure of the gingival cuff.

  20. Percutaneous and skeletal biocarbon implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, V.

    1977-01-01

    Review of carbon implants developed by NASA discussed four different types of implants and subsequent improvements. Improvements could be of specific interest to rehabilitation centers and similar organizations.

  1. Percutaneous and skeletal biocarbon implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, V.

    1977-01-01

    Review of carbon implants developed by NASA discussed four different types of implants and subsequent improvements. Improvements could be of specific interest to rehabilitation centers and similar organizations.

  2. A physiological and behavioral system for hearing restoration with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    King, Julia; Shehu, Ina; Roland, J. Thomas; Svirsky, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear implants are neuroprosthetic devices that provide hearing to deaf patients, although outcomes are highly variable even with prolonged training and use. The central auditory system must process cochlear implant signals, but it is unclear how neural circuits adapt—or fail to adapt—to such inputs. The knowledge of these mechanisms is required for development of next-generation neuroprosthetics that interface with existing neural circuits and enable synaptic plasticity to improve perceptual outcomes. Here, we describe a new system for cochlear implant insertion, stimulation, and behavioral training in rats. Animals were first ensured to have significant hearing loss via physiological and behavioral criteria. We developed a surgical approach for multichannel (2- or 8-channel) array insertion, comparable with implantation procedures and depth in humans. Peripheral and cortical responses to stimulation were used to program the implant objectively. Animals fitted with implants learned to use them for an auditory-dependent task that assesses frequency detection and recognition in a background of environmentally and self-generated noise and ceased responding appropriately to sounds when the implant was temporarily inactivated. This physiologically calibrated and behaviorally validated system provides a powerful opportunity to study the neural basis of neuroprosthetic device use and plasticity. PMID:27281743

  3. Basic design and construction of the Vienna FES implants: existing solutions and prospects for new generations of implants.

    PubMed

    Mayr, W; Bijak, M; Rafolt, D; Sauermann, S; Unger, E; Lanmüller, H

    2001-01-01

    We can distinguish 3 generations of FES implants for activation of neural structures: 1. RF-powered implants with antenna displacement dependent stimulation amplitude; 2. RF-powered implants with stabilised stimulation amplitude; and 3. battery powered implants. In Vienna an 8-channel version of the second generation type has been applied clinically to mobilisation of paraplegics and phrenic pacing. A 20-channel implant of the second generation type for mobilisation of paraplegics and an 8-channel implant of the third generation type for cardiac assist have been tested in animal studies. A device of completely new design for direct stimulation of denervated muscles is being tested in animal studies. There is a limited choice of technologically suitable biocompatible and bioresistant materials for implants. The physical design has to be anatomically shaped without corners or edges. Electrical conductors carrying direct current (D.C.) have to be placed inside a hermetic metal case. The established sealing materials, silicone rubber and epoxy resin, do not provide hermeticity and should only embed DC-free components. For electrical connections outside the hermetic metal case welding is preferable to soldering; conductive adhesives should be avoided. It is advisable to use a hydrophobic oxide ceramic core for telemetry antenna coils embedded in sealing polymer. Cleaning of all components before sealing in resin is of the utmost importance as well as avoidance of rapid temperature changes during the curing process.

  4. Graphene for Biomedical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas; Podila, Ramakrishna; Alexis, Frank; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Bioengineering Team; Clemson Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we used graphene, a one-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms, to modify the surfaces of existing implant materials to enhance both bio- and hemo-compatibility. This novel effort meets all functional criteria for a biomedical implant coating as it is chemically inert, atomically smooth and highly durable, with the potential for greatly enhancing the effectiveness of such implants. Specifically, graphene coatings on nitinol, a widely used implant and stent material, showed that graphene coated nitinol (Gr-NiTi) supports excellent smooth muscle and endothelial cell growth leading to better cell proliferation. We further determined that the serum albumin adsorption on Gr-NiTi is greater than that of fibrinogen, an important and well understood criterion for promoting a lower thrombosis rate. These hemo-and biocompatible properties and associated charge transfer mechanisms, along with high strength, chemical inertness and durability give graphene an edge over most antithrombogenic coatings for biomedical implants and devices.

  5. CUSTOM-FIT RADIOLUCENT CRANIAL IMPLANTS FOR NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL RECORDING AND STIMULATION

    PubMed Central

    Mulliken, Grant H; Bichot, Narcisse P; Ghadooshahy, Azriel; Sharma, Jitendra; Kornblith, Simon; Philcock, Michael; Desimone, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Recording and manipulating neural activity in awake behaving animal models requires long-term implantation of cranial implants that must address a variety of design considerations, which include preventing infection, minimizing tissue damage, mechanical strength of the implant, and MRI compatibility. New Method Here we address these issues by designing legless, custom-fit cranial implants using structural MRI-based reconstruction of the skull and that are made from carbon-reinforced PEEK. Results We report several novel custom-fit radiolucent implant designs, which include a legless recording chamber, a legless stimulation chamber, a multi-channel microdrive and a head post. The fit to the skull was excellent in all cases, with no visible gaps between the base of the implants and the skull. The wound margin was minimal in size and showed no sign of infection or skin recession. Comparison with Existing Methods Cranial implants used for neurophysiological investigation in awake behaving animals often employ methyl methacrylate (MMA) to serve as a bonding agent to secure the implant to the skull. Other designs rely on radially extending legs to secure the implant. Both of these methods have significant drawbacks. MMA is toxic to bone and frequently leads to infection while radially extending legs cause the skin to recede away from the implant, ultimately exposing bone and proliferating granulation tissue. Conclusions These radiolucent implants constitute a set of technologies suitable for reliable long-term recording, which minimize infection and tissue damage. PMID:25542350

  6. Electronic Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Anil

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on electronic neural networks for space station are presented. Topics covered include: electronic neural networks; electronic implementations; VLSI/thin film hybrid hardware for neurocomputing; computations with analog parallel processing; features of neuroprocessors; applications of neuroprocessors; neural network hardware for terrain trafficability determination; a dedicated processor for path planning; neural network system interface; neural network for robotic control; error backpropagation algorithm for learning; resource allocation matrix; global optimization neuroprocessor; and electrically programmable read only thin-film synaptic array.

  7. [Cochlear implant in children: rational, indications and cost/efficacy].

    PubMed

    Martini, A; Bovo, R; Trevisi, P; Forli, F; Berrettini, S

    2013-06-01

    A cochlear implant (CI) is a partially implanted electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound and support speech to severely to profoundly hearing impaired patients. It is constituted by an external portion, that usually sits behind the ear and an internal portion surgically placed under the skin. The external components include a microphone connected to a speech processor that selects and arranges sounds pucked up by the microphone. This is connected to a transmitter coil, worn on the side of the head, which transmits data to an internal receiver coil placed under the skin. The received data are delivered to an array of electrodes that are surgically implanted within the cochlea. The primary neural targets of the electrodes are the spiral ganglion cells which innervate fibers of the auditory nerve. When the electrodes are activated by the signal, they send a current along the auditory nerve and auditory pathways to the auditory cortex. Children and adults who are profoundly or severely hearing impaired can be fitted with cochlear implants. According to the Food and Drug Administration, approximately 188,000 people worldwide have received implants. In Italy it is extimated that there are about 6-7000 implanted patients, with an average of 700 CI surgeries per year. Cochlear implantation, followed by intensive postimplantation speech therapy, can help young children to acquire speech, language, and social skills. Early implantation provides exposure to sounds that can be helpful during the critical period when children learn speech and language skills. In 2000, the Food and Drug Administration lowered the age of eligibility to 12 months for one type of CI. With regard to the results after cochlear implantation in relation to early implantation, better linguistic results are reported in children implanted before 12 months of life, even if no sufficient data exist regarding the relation between this advantage and the duration of implant use and how long

  8. Efficient Universal Computing Architectures for Decoding Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Benjamin I.; Turicchia, Lorenzo; Wattanapanitch, Woradorn; Davidson, Thomas J.; Sarpeshkar, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    The ability to decode neural activity into meaningful control signals for prosthetic devices is critical to the development of clinically useful brain– machine interfaces (BMIs). Such systems require input from tens to hundreds of brain-implanted recording electrodes in order to deliver robust and accurate performance; in serving that primary function they should also minimize power dissipation in order to avoid damaging neural tissue; and they should transmit data wirelessly in order to minimize the risk of infection associated with chronic, transcutaneous implants. Electronic architectures for brain– machine interfaces must therefore minimize size and power consumption, while maximizing the ability to compress data to be transmitted over limited-bandwidth wireless channels. Here we present a system of extremely low computational complexity, designed for real-time decoding of neural signals, and suited for highly scalable implantable systems. Our programmable architecture is an explicit implementation of a universal computing machine emulating the dynamics of a network of integrate-and-fire neurons; it requires no arithmetic operations except for counting, and decodes neural signals using only computationally inexpensive logic operations. The simplicity of this architecture does not compromise its ability to compress raw neural data by factors greater than . We describe a set of decoding algorithms based on this computational architecture, one designed to operate within an implanted system, minimizing its power consumption and data transmission bandwidth; and a complementary set of algorithms for learning, programming the decoder, and postprocessing the decoded output, designed to operate in an external, nonimplanted unit. The implementation of the implantable portion is estimated to require fewer than 5000 operations per second. A proof-of-concept, 32-channel field-programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation of this portion is consequently energy efficient

  9. Cochlear Implants Meet Regenerative Biology: State of the Science and Future Research Directions.

    PubMed

    Dabdoub, Alain; Nishimura, Koji

    2017-09-01

    : The cochlear implant, the first device to restore a human sense, is an electronic substitute for lost mechanosensory hair cells. It has been successful at providing hearing to people with severe to profound hearing loss and as of 2012, an estimated 324,000 patients worldwide have received cochlear implants. Users of cochlear implants however, suffer from difficulties in processing complex sounds such as music and in discriminating sounds in noisy environments. Recent advances in regenerative biology and medicine are opening new avenues for enhancing the efficacy of cochlear implants by improving the neural interface in the future and offer the possibility of an entirely biological solution for hearing loss in the long term. This report comprises the latest developments presented in the first Symposium on cochlear implants and regenerative biology, held at the 14th International Conference on Cochlear Implants in 2016 in Toronto, Canada.

  10. Learning retina implants with epiretinal contacts.

    PubMed

    Eckmiller, R

    1997-01-01

    Retina implants are currently being developed by several interdisciplinary research consortia worldwide for blind humans with various retinal degenerative diseases. It is the aim of our retina implant project to develop a novel type of visual prosthesis to regain a moderate amount of vision such as perception of location and shape of large objects in the first stage and to approach reading quality in a subsequent stage. In our planned retina implant, a retina encoder (RE) outside the eye has to replace the information processing of the retina. A retina stimulator (RS), implanted adjacently to the retinal ganglion cell layer, has to contact a sufficient number of retinal ganglion cells/fibers for electrical elicitation of spikes. A wireless signal and energy transmission system has to provide the communication between the RE and RS. This paper outlines the retina implant project of our consortium of 14 expert groups and describes first results of the learning RE. The RE approximates the typical receptive field (RF) properties of primate retinal ganglion cells by means of individually tunable spatiotemporal RF filters. The RE as a cluster of RF filters maps visual patterns onto spike trains for a number of contacted ganglion cells. A concept is presented to train the individual RF filters in an unsupervised learning process, which employs neural networks in a dialog with the individual human subject. The desired aim of this dialog is an optimization of the visual perception by matching the various RF filter properties with those 'expected' by the central visual system for each contacted ganglion cell.

  11. Peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis: bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Khammissa, R A G; Feller, L; Meyerov, R; Lemmer, J

    2012-03-01

    Osseointegrated dental implants have a ong-term success rate of over 90%, but may be threatened by peri-implant mucostis and peri-implantitis, bacteria biofilm-induced inflammatory conditions. While peri-implant mucositis is a reversible inflammatory condition confined to the peri-implant soft-tissue unit, peri-implantitis is characterised by progressive inflammatory destruction of the crest of the alveolar bone supporting the implant, by increased peri-implant probing depths, and by bleeding and/or suppuration on probing. Effective treatment of peri-implant mucositis will prevent the development of peri-implantitis. Plaque accumulation on the implant/abutment surface juxtaposed to the junctional epithelium and to the connective tissue zone of the peri-implant soft-tissue unit induces the development of peri-implant mucositis which can subsequently progress to peri-implantitis. The aim of this paper is to review some aspects of bacterial infection of the tissue supporting dental implants, and to explore how to maintain the healthy peri-implant soft-tissue unit.

  12. [Extra-oral implants: principal areas of implantation].

    PubMed

    Badie-Modiri, B; Kaplanski, P

    2001-08-01

    The success of extra-oral implants raises a certain number of technical and medical problems. Among these, the anatomy of the implant zone and bone quality are determining factors for osteointegration of the implants. We describe the principal zones of implantation detailing the risks involved in each area.

  13. Suppression of scarring in peripheral nerve implants by drug elution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FitzGerald, James J.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Medical implants made of non-biological materials provoke a chronic inflammatory response, resulting in the deposition of a collagenous scar tissue (ST) layer on their surface, that gradually thickens over time. This is a critical problem for neural interfaces. Scar build-up on electrodes results in a progressive decline in signal level because the scar tissue gradually separates axons away from the recording contacts. In regenerative sieves and microchannel electrodes, progressive scar deposition will constrict and may eventually choke off the sieve hole or channel lumen. Interface designs need to address this issue if they are to be fit for long term use. This study examines a novel method of inhibiting the formation and thickening of the fibrous scar. Approach. Research to date has mainly focused on methods of preventing stimulation of the foreign body response by implant surface modification. In this paper a pharmacological approach using drug elution to suppress chronic inflammation is introduced. Microchannel implants made of silicone doped with the steroid drug dexamethasone were implanted in the rat sciatic nerve for periods of up to a year. Tissue from within the microchannels was compared to that from control devices that did not release any drug. Main results. In the drug eluting implants the scar layer was significantly thinner at all timepoints, and unlike the controls it did not continue to thicken after 6 months. Control implants supported axon regeneration well initially, but axon counts fell rapidly at later timepoints as scar thickened. Axon counts in drug eluting devices were initially much lower, but increased rather than declined and by one year were significantly higher than in controls. Significance. Drug elution offers a potential long term solution to the problem of performance degradation due to scarring around neural implants.

  14. Area-Power Efficient VLSI Implementation of Multichannel DWT for Data Compression in Implantable Neuroprosthetics.

    PubMed

    Kamboh, A M; Raetz, M; Oweiss, K G; Mason, A

    2007-06-01

    Time-frequency domain signal processing of neural recordings, from high-density microelectrode arrays implanted in the cortex, is highly desired to ease the bandwidth bottleneck associated with data transfer to extra-cranial processing units. Because of its energy compactness features, discrete wavelet transform (DWT) has been shown to provide efficient data compression for neural records without compromising the information content. This paper describes an area-power minimized hardware implementation of the lifting scheme for multilevel, multichannel DWT with quantized filter coefficients and integer computation. Performance tradeoffs and key design decisions for implantable neuroprosthetics are presented. A 32-channel 4-level version of the circuit has been custom designed in 0.18-mum CMOS and occupies only 0.22 mm(2) area and consumes 76 muW of power, making it highly suitable for implantable neural interface applications requiring wireless data transfer.

  15. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  16. Single implant tooth replacement.

    PubMed

    Briley, T F

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that direct bone anchorage of dental implants will provide long-term predictability for single tooth implants and multi-unit implants. The function of implant-supported restoration is now routinely achieved. The real challenge facing the restorative dentist and laboratory technician is to achieve optimal aesthetics. The learning objective of this article is to review the prosthodontic procedures essential to maximizing natural aesthetics in implant supported restorations. It will provide a review of master impression techniques, prepable titanium abutments and designing the cement on restoration. Particular emphasis is directed to the soft tissue model from which a series of sequenced techniques can be followed to achieve optimal aesthetics. Analysis of the implant alignment with regard to the neighboring teeth will result in having to make a choice of which prepable abutment will maximize the aesthetic result. The following case outlines how to replace a single missing tooth using an externally hexed implant system and a prefabricated titanium abutment on a 26-year-old male patient.

  17. Boron implanted strontium titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. J. M.

    Single crystals of strontium titanate implanted with boron were found to have highly conductive surface layers. The effects of varying dose from 10 to the 16th power to 10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm, implantation voltage from 50 to 175 keV and annealing conditions on the room temperature surface resistance and Hall mobility are presented. Variation of the implantation voltage did not have a major effect on the sheet resistances obtained by boron implantation of strontium titanate, while dose and annealing conditions have major effects. Doses of 5 x 10 to the 16th power ions/sq cm required annealing on the order of one hour at 500 K for maximum reduction of the room temperature resistance in the implanted layer. Samples implanted with a dose of 1 x 10 to the 17th power ions/sq cm required slightly higher temperatures (approximately 575 K) to obtain a minimum resistance at room temperature. Long term (several weeks) room temperature annealing was found to occur in high dose samples. After one to two months at room temperature followed by an anneal to 575 K, the surface resistances were found to be lower than those produced by the annealing of a freshly implanted sample to 575 K.

  18. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  19. Novel flexible Parylene neural probe with 3D sheath structure for enhancing tissue integration.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jonathan T W; Kim, Brian J; Hara, Seth A; Lee, Curtis D; Gutierrez, Christian A; Hoang, Tuan Q; Meng, Ellis

    2013-02-21

    A Parylene C neural probe with a three dimensional sheath structure was designed, fabricated, and characterized. Multiple platinum (Pt) electrodes for recording neural signals were fabricated on both inner and outer surfaces of the sheath structure. Thermoforming of Parylene was used to create the three dimensional sheath structures from flat surface micromachined microchannels using solid microwires as molds. Benchtop electrochemical characterization was performed on the thin film Pt electrodes using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and showed that electrodes possessed low impedances suitable for neuronal recordings. A procedure for implantation of the neural probe was developed and successfully demonstrated in vitro into an agarose brain tissue model. The electrode-lined sheath will be decorated with eluting neurotrophic factors to promote in vivo neural tissue ingrowth post-implantation. These features will enhance tissue integration and improve recording quality towards realizing reliable chronic neural interfaces.

  20. Volitional control of neural activity: implications for brain–computer interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Fetz, Eberhard E

    2007-01-01

    Successful operation of brain–computer interfaces (BCI) and brain–machine interfaces (BMI) depends significantly on the degree to which neural activity can be volitionally controlled. This paper reviews evidence for such volitional control in a variety of neural signals, with particular emphasis on the activity of cortical neurons. Some evidence comes from conventional experiments that reveal volitional modulation in neural activity related to behaviours, including real and imagined movements, cognitive imagery and shifts of attention. More direct evidence comes from studies on operant conditioning of neural activity using biofeedback, and from BCI/BMI studies in which neural activity controls cursors or peripheral devices. Limits in the degree of accuracy of control in the latter studies can be attributed to several possible factors. Some of these factors, particularly limited practice time, can be addressed with long-term implanted BCIs. Preliminary observations with implanted circuits implementing recurrent BCIs are summarized. PMID:17234689

  1. Optimization of dental implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dol, Aleksandr V.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.

    2017-02-01

    Modern dentistry can not exist without dental implantation. This work is devoted to study of the "bone-implant" system and to optimization of dental prostheses installation. Modern non-invasive methods such as MRI an 3D-scanning as well as numerical calculations and 3D-prototyping allow to optimize all of stages of dental prosthetics. An integrated approach to the planning of implant surgery can significantly reduce the risk of complications in the first few days after treatment, and throughout the period of operation of the prosthesis.

  2. Oxygen implanter for simox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, M.; Benveniste, V.; Ryding, G.; Douglas-Hamilton, D. H.; Reed, M.; Gagne, G.; Armstrong, A.; Mack, M.

    1985-01-01

    Interest in silicon or) insulator (SOI) technology has led to the development of several alternatives to silicon on sapphire. One of the most promising techniques makes use of an ion implanter to form a buried oxide layer directly in the silicon substrate. To have useful single crystalline silicon on top of the oxide layer, it is necessary to do the implant at high wafer temperatures and rely on solid phase epitaxy to maintain surface structure. A high current, 160 keV, Nova ion implanter has been adapted to provide the ability to perform oxygen implants at elevated temperatures. The operator is free to choose any temperature in the range between 400°C and 600°C. The system then preheats the wafers to the selected temperature before the implant begins. A novel technique for providing both heating and cooling capability to the end station is employed. An infrared signal from the wafers is monitored by a room temperature lead salt detector. This signal is then used by a servo-loop to control the heating of the end station and to maintain the wafer temperature to within ± 20°C during the implant. High doses of the type necessary to form a silicon dioxide buried layer require long lived, high current oxygen sources. An oxygen source has been specially developed, which provides as much as 10 mA of ion current. At a 6 mA output, source lifetimes in excess of 40 hours have been achieved. The implanter uses a specifically designed high temperature disk, which holds ten wafers, each of four inch diameter. A variety of implant angles lying between 0° and 15° is available. The beam is scanned mechanically and an electron flood gun can be used to prevent wafer charging. Special thermal barriers have been employed to protect the apparatus from extreme temperatures and to make the heating sequence more efficient and more rapid. Every effort has been made to avoid contamination of the implant. The implant disk, for example, is overcoated with silicon monoxide. Silicon

  3. Biomedical implantable microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Meindl, J D

    1980-10-17

    Innovative applications of microelectronics in new biomedical implantable instruments offer a singular opportunity for advances in medical research and practice because of two salient factors: (i) beyond all other types of biomedical instruments, implants exploit fully the inherent technical advantages--complex functional capability, high reliability, lower power drain, small size and weight-of microelectronics, and (ii) implants bring microelectronics into intimate association with biological systems. The combination of these two factors enables otherwise impossible new experiments to be conducted and new paostheses developed that will improve the quality of human life.

  4. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Oliemy, Ahmed; Al-Attar, Nawwar

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was developed to offer a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not candidates for conventional aortic valve replacement. The improvement in transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes is still of concern in the areas of stroke, vascular injury, heart block, paravalvular regurgitation and valve durability. Concomitantly, the progress, both technical and in terms of material advances of transcatheter valve systems, as well as in patient selection, renders transcatheter aortic valve implantation an increasingly viable treatment for more and more patients with structural heart disease.

  5. DEALING WITH DENTAL IMPLANT FAILURES

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Liran

    2008-01-01

    An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options. When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them. PMID:19089213

  6. Dealing with dental implant failures.

    PubMed

    Levin, L

    2010-01-01

    An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options. When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them.

  7. Dealing with dental implant failures.

    PubMed

    Levin, Liran

    2008-01-01

    An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options.When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them.

  8. Dealing with dental implant failures.

    PubMed

    Levin, L

    2010-07-01

    An implant-supported restoration offers a predictable treatment for tooth replacement. Reported success rates for dental implants are high. Nevertheless, failures that mandate immediate implant removal do occur. The consequences of implant removal jeopardize the clinician's efforts to accomplish satisfactory function and esthetics. For the patient, this usually involves further cost and additional procedures. The aim of this paper is to describe different methods and treatment modalities to deal with dental implant failure. The main topics for discussion include identifying the failing implant, implants replacing failed implants at the exact site, and the use of other restorative options. When an implant fails, a tailor made treatment plan should be provided to each patient according to all relevant variables. Patients should be informed regarding all possible treatment modalities following implant failure and give their consent to the most appropriate treatment option for them.

  9. Flexible and Highly Biocompatible Nanofiber-Based Electrodes for Neural Surface Interfacing.

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong Nyoung; Kim, Han-Jun; Lee, Yi Jae; Heo, Min; Lee, Sang Jin; Lee, Donghyun; Do, Sun Hee; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kwon, Il Keun

    2017-03-28

    Polyimide (PI)-based electrodes have been widely used as flexible biosensors in implantable device applications for recording biological signals. However, the long-term quality of neural signals obtained from PI-based nerve electrodes tends to decrease due to nerve damage by neural tissue compression, mechanical mismatch, and insufficient fluid exchange between the neural tissue and electrodes. Here, we resolve these problems with a developed PI nanofiber (NF)-based nerve electrode for stable neural signal recording, which can be fabricated via electrospinning and inkjet printing. We demonstrate an NF-based nerve electrode that can be simply fabricated and easily applied due to its high permeability, flexibility, and biocompatibility. Furthermore, the electrode can record stable neural signals for extended periods of time, resulting in decreased mechanical mismatch, neural compression, and contact area. NF-based electrodes with highly flexible and body-fluid-permeable properties could enable future neural interfacing applications.

  10. Breast Reconstruction with Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... removes your breast to treat or prevent breast cancer. One type of breast reconstruction uses breast implants — silicone devices filled with silicone gel or salt water (saline) — to reshape your breasts. Breast reconstruction ...

  11. Biocompatibility of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Method of selecting biocompatible materials for surgical implants uses fracture mechanic relationships and surface energies of candidate materials in presence of blood plasma. Technique has been used to characterize 190 materials by parameters that reflect their biocompatibility.

  12. Biocompatibility of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Method of selecting biocompatible materials for surgical implants uses fracture mechanic relationships and surface energies of candidate materials in presence of blood plasma. Technique has been used to characterize 190 materials by parameters that reflect their biocompatibility.

  13. Implantable Medical Devices

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Heart Attack Treatment of a Heart Attack Life After a Heart Attack Heart Failure About Heart Failure ... Attack Introduction Medications Surgical Procedures Implantable Medical Devices • Life After a Heart Attack • Heart Attack Tools & Resources • Support ...

  14. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Intrinsic sphincter deficiency repair; ISD repair; Injectable bulking agents for stress urinary incontinence ... Urine leakage that gets worse Pain where the injection was done Allergic reaction to the material Implant ...

  15. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  16. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... cosmetic surgery after breast cancer can improve your sense of well-being and your quality of life. Alternative Names Breast implants surgery References Roehl KR, Wilhelmi BJ, Phillips LG. Breast reconstruction. ...

  17. Possible sources of neuroprotection following subretinal silicon chip implantation in RCS rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardue, Machelle T.; Phillips, Michael J.; Yin, Hang; Fernandes, Alcides; Cheng, Yian; Chow, Alan Y.; Ball, Sherry L.

    2005-03-01

    Current retinal prosthetics are designed to stimulate existing neural circuits in diseased retinas to create a visual signal. However, implantation of retinal prosthetics may create a neurotrophic environment that also leads to improvements in visual function. Possible sources of increased neuroprotective effects on the retina may arise from electrical activity generated by the prosthetic, mechanical injury due to surgical implantation, and/or presence of a chronic foreign body. This study evaluates these three neuroprotective sources by implanting Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a model of retinitis pigmentosa, with a subretinal implant at an early stage of photoreceptor degeneration. Treatment groups included rats implanted with active and inactive devices, as well as sham-operated. These groups were compared to unoperated controls. Evaluation of retinal function throughout an 18 week post-implantation period demonstrated transient functional improvements in eyes implanted with an inactive device at 6, 12 and 14 weeks post-implantation. However, the number of photoreceptors located directly over or around the implant or sham incision was significantly increased in eyes implanted with an active or inactive device or sham-operated. These results indicate that in the RCS rat localized neuroprotection of photoreceptors from mechanical injury or a chronic foreign body may provide similar results to subretinal electrical stimulation at the current output evaluated here.

  18. Cochlear implantation in children and adults in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Brand, Yves; Senn, Pascal; Kompis, Martin; Dillier, Norbert; Allum, John H J

    2014-02-04

    The cochlear implant (CI) is one of the most successful neural prostheses developed to date. It offers artificial hearing to individuals with profound sensorineural hearing loss and with insufficient benefit from conventional hearing aids. The first implants available some 30 years ago provided a limited sensation of sound. The benefit for users of these early systems was mostly a facilitation of lip-reading based communication rather than an understanding of speech. Considerable progress has been made since then. Modern, multichannel implant systems feature complex speech processing strategies, high stimulation rates and multiple sites of stimulation in the cochlea. Equipped with such a state-of-the-art system, the majority of recipients today can communicate orally without visual cues and can even use the telephone. The impact of CIs on deaf individuals and on the deaf community has thus been exceptional. To date, more than 300,000 patients worldwide have received CIs. In Switzerland, the first implantation was performed in 1977 and, as of 2012, over 2,000 systems have been implanted with a current rate of around 150 CIs per year. The primary purpose of this article is to provide a contemporary overview of cochlear implantation, emphasising the situation in Switzerland.

  19. Neural crest induction at the neural plate border in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Milet, Cécile; Monsoro-Burq, Anne H

    2012-06-01

    The neural crest is a transient and multipotent cell population arising at the edge of the neural plate in vertebrates. Recent findings highlight that neural crest patterning is initiated during gastrulation, i.e. earlier than classically described, in a progenitor domain named the neural border. This chapter reviews the dynamic and complex molecular interactions underlying neural border formation and neural crest emergence.

  20. Tunable retina encoders for retina implants: why and how

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckmiller, Rolf; Neumann, Dirk; Baruth, Oliver

    2005-03-01

    Current research towards retina implants for partial restoration of vision in blind humans with retinal degenerative dysfunctions focuses on implant and stimulation experiments and technologies. In contrast, our approach takes the availability of an epiretinal multi-electrode neural interface for granted and studies the conditions for successful joint information processing of both retinal prosthesis and brain. Our proposed learning retina encoder (RE) includes information processing modules to simulate the complex mapping operation of parts of the 5-layered neural retina and to provide an iterative, perception-based dialog between RE and human subject. Alternative information processing technologies in the learning RE are being described, which allow an individual optimization of the RE mapping operation by means of iterative tuning with learning algorithms in a dialog between implant wearing subject and RE. The primate visual system is modeled by a retina module (RM) composed of spatio-temporal (ST) filters and a central visual system module (VM). RM performs a mapping 1 of an optical pattern P1 in the physical domain onto a retinal output vector R1(t) in a neural domain, whereas VM performs a mapping 2 of R1(t) in a neural domain onto a visual percept P2 in the perceptual domain. Retinal ganglion cell properties represent non-invertible ST filters in RE, which generate ambiguous output signals. VM generates visual percepts only if the corresponding R1(t) is properly encoded, contains sufficient information, and can be disambiguated. Based on the learning RE and the proposed visual system model, a novel retina encoder (RE*) is proposed, which considers both ambiguity removal and miniature eye movements during fixation. Our simulation results suggest that VM requires miniature eye movements under control of the visual system to retrieve unambiguous patterns P2 corresponding to P1. For retina implant applications, RE* can be tuned to generate optimal ganglion cell

  1. An Implanted, Stimulated Muscle Powered Piezoelectric Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Beth; Gustafson, Kenneth; Kilgore, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    A totally implantable piezoelectric generator system able to harness power from electrically activated muscle could be used to augment the power systems of implanted medical devices, such as neural prostheses, by reducing the number of battery replacement surgeries or by allowing periods of untethered functionality. The features of our generator design are no moving parts and the use of a portion of the generated power for system operation and regulation. A software model of the system has been developed and simulations have been performed to predict the output power as the system parameters were varied within their constraints. Mechanical forces that mimic muscle forces have been experimentally applied to a piezoelectric generator to verify the accuracy of the simulations and to explore losses due to mechanical coupling. Depending on the selection of system parameters, software simulations predict that this generator concept can generate up to approximately 700 W of power, which is greater than the power necessary to drive the generator, conservatively estimated to be 50 W. These results suggest that this concept has the potential to be an implantable, self-replenishing power source and further investigation is underway.

  2. Inductive link design for miniature implants.

    PubMed

    Troyk, Philip R; Rush, Alexander D

    2009-01-01

    Advances in microfabrication have allowed the integration of large numbers of electrodes onto one platform. The small size and high channel density of these microelectrode arrays which promise improved performance of a neural prosthesis also complicate the design of an inductive link to achieve efficient powering and communication with the implant. Stimulating or recording with many channels requires high data rate transmission. At the same time, power must be transmitted to the implanted device without exceeding power dissipation limits within the body. Using conventional design techniques, achieving all of these competing requirements simultaneously can require many time consuming iterations. It is proposed that a transcutaneous power and data link can be optimized to meet system level design parameters (power dissipation, data rate, secondary voltage, etc.) by having an analytic understanding of the interacting link level design parameters (receiver radius, carrier frequency, number of turns, implant location, etc.). We demonstrated this technique with the design of a transcutaneous power and data link for an intracortical visual prosthesis.

  3. [Larynx: implants and stents].

    PubMed

    Sittel, C

    2009-05-01

    There is a wide variety of devices and materials to be implanted into the human larynx. Some are intended to remain only for a period of time, like laryngeal stents. If removal is not intended the device meets the definition for a medical implant. The majority of implants is used for the treatment of unilateral vocal fold immobility. There a 2 types of implants serving this purpose: Implants in a stricter sense are devices of solid material, which are brought into the paraglottic space through a window in the laryngeal framework (medialization thyroplasty). Several different products are presented in this review. In contrast, there are different substances available for endoscopic injection into the paralyzed vocal fold (injection laryngoplasty). Since some of these substances show a corpuscular consistency and a high viscosity they need to be deposited into the lateral paraglottic space. Therefore, the term "injectable implants" has been coined for these materials. The different substances available are discussed in detail in this review. Laryngeal stents are primarily used in the early postoperative phase after open reconstruction of the larynx. The different devices available on the market are described with their specific characteristics and intended use.

  4. Anodized dental implant surface.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Muktadar Anand; Chowdhary, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    Anodized implants with moderately rough surface were introduced around 2000. Whether these implants enhanced biologic effect to improve the environment for better osseointegration was unclear. The purpose of this article was to review the literature available on anodized surface in terms of their clinical success rate and bone response in patients till now. A broad electronic search of MEDLINE and PubMed databases was performed. A focus was made on peer-reviewed dental journals. Only articles related to anodized implants were included. Both animal and human studies were included. The initial search of articles resulted in 581 articles on anodized implants. The initial screening of titles and abstracts resulted in 112 full-text papers; 40 animal studies, 16 studies on cell adhesion and bacterial adhesion onto anodized surfaced implants, and 47 human studies were included. Nine studies, which do not fulfill the inclusion criteria, were excluded. The long-term studies on anodized surface implants do favor the surface, but in most of the studies, anodized surface is compared with that of machined surface, but not with other surfaces commercially available. Anodized surface in terms of clinical success rate in cases of compromised bone and immediately extracted sockets has shown favorable success.

  5. Biocompatible implant surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Bikash; Pawar, Sudhir; Pattanaik, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Surface plays a crucial role in biological interactions. Surface treatments have been applied to metallic biomaterials in order to improve their wear properties, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. A systematic review was performed on studies investigating the effects of implant surface treatments on biocompatibility. We searched the literature using PubMed, electronic databases from 1990 to 2009. Key words such as implant surface topography, surface roughness, surface treatment, surface characteristics, and surface coatings were used. The search was restricted to English language articles published from 1990 to December 2009. Additionally, a manual search in the major dental implant journals was performed. When considering studies, clinical studies were preferred followed by histological human studies, animal studies, and in vitro studies. A total of 115 articles were selected after elimination: clinical studies, 24; human histomorphometric studies, 11; animal histomorphometric studies, 46; in vitro studies, 34. The following observations were made in this review: · The focus has shifted from surface roughness to surface chemistry and a combination of chemical manipulations on the porous structure. More investigations are done regarding surface coatings. · Bone response to almost all the surface treatments was favorable. · Future trend is focused on the development of osteogenic implant surfaces. Limitation of this study is that we tried to give a broader overview related to implant surface treatments. It does not give any conclusion regarding the best biocompatible implant surface treatment investigated till date. Unfortunately, the eventually selected studies were too heterogeneous for inference of data.

  6. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine) fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development. PMID:22073103

  7. Contraceptive implants and lactation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Soledad

    2002-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of four contraceptive implants, plant, Implanon, Nestorone and Elcometrine, have been evaluated during use in the postpartum period by lactating women. These implants provide highly effective contraceptive protection with no negative effect on breastfeeding or infant growth and development. Breastfeeding women initiating Norplant use in the second postpartum month experience significantly longer periods of amenorrhea than do untreated women or intrauterine device users. After weaning, the bleeding pattern is similar to that observed in non-nursing women. Norplant use does not affect bone turnover and density during lactation. Norplant and Implanon release orally active progestins while Nestorone and Elcometrine implants release an orally inactive progestin, which represents an advantage since the infant should be free of steroidal effects. The infant's daily intake of steroids (estimated from concentrations in maternal milk during the first month of use) range from 90 to 100 ng of levonorgestrel (Norplant), 75-120 ng of etonogestrel (Implanon), and 50 ng and 110 ng of Nestorone (Nestorone and Elcometrine implants, respectively). Nursing women needing contraception may use progestin-only implants when nonhormonal methods are not available or acceptable. Implants that deliver orally active steroids should only be used after 6 weeks postpartum to avoid transferring of steroids to the newborn.

  8. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Bartlett, Erica L.; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placement. An implant prosthesis should be used on a case-by-case basis. Augmentation rhinoplasty requires the consideration of specific anatomical preoperative factors, including the external nose, nasal length, nasofrontal angle, humps, and facial proportions. It is equally important to consider several operative guidelines to appropriately shape implants to minimize the occurrence of adverse effects and postoperative complications. The most common postoperative complications include infection, nasal height change, movement of implant prosthesis, and silicone implant protrusion. In addition, the surgeon should consider the current standards of Asian beauty aesthetics to better understand the patient's desired outcome. PMID:26648804

  9. Neural Tube Defects

    MedlinePlus

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the first month ... she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina ...

  10. COMMUNICATION: Minocycline increases quality and longevity of chronic neural recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennaker, R. L.; Miller, J.; Tang, H.; Wilson, D. A.

    2007-06-01

    Brain/machine interfaces could potentially be used in the treatment of a host of neurological disorders ranging from paralysis to sensory deficits. Insertion of chronic micro-electrode arrays into neural tissue initiates a host of immunological responses, which typically leads to the formation of a cellular sheath around the implant, resulting in the loss of useful signals. Minocycline has been shown to have neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects in certain neural injury and neurodegenerative disease models. This study examined the effects of minocycline administration on the quality and longevity of chronic multi-channel microwire neural implants 1 week and 1 month post-implantation in auditory cortex. The mean signal-to-noise ratio for the minocycline group stabilized at the end of week 1 and remained above 4.6 throughout the following 3 weeks. The control group signal-to-noise ratio dropped throughout the duration of the study and at the end of 4 weeks was 2.6. Furthermore, 68% of electrodes from the minocycline group showed significant stimulus-driven activity at week 4 compared to 12.5% of electrodes in the control group. There was a significant reduction in the number of activated astrocytes around the implant in minocycline subjects, as well as a reduction in total area occupied by activated astrocytes at 1 and 4 weeks.

  11. Properties of the stimulus router system, a novel neural prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Gan, Liu Shi; Prochazka, Arthur

    2010-02-01

    Various types of neural prostheses (NPs) have been developed to restore motor function after neural injury. Surface NPs are noninvasive and inexpensive, but are often poorly selective, activating nontargeted muscles and cutaneous sensory nerves that can cause discomfort or pain. Implantable NPs are highly selective, but invasive and costly. The stimulus router system (SRS) is a novel NP consisting of fully implanted leads that "capture" and route some of the current flowing between a pair of surface electrodes to the vicinity of a target nerve. An SRS lead consists of a "pick-up" terminal that is implanted subcutaneously under one of the surface electrodes and a "delivery" terminal that is secured on or near the target nerve. We have published a preliminary report on the basic properties of the SRS [L. S. Gan , "A new means of transcutaneous coupling for neural prostheses," IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., vol. 54, no. 3, pp. 509-517, Mar. 2007]. Here, we further characterize the SRS and identify aspects that maximize its performance as a motor NP. The surface current needed to activate nerves with an SRS, was found to depend on the proximity of the delivery terminal(s) to the nerve, electrode configurations, contact areas of the surface electrodes and implanted terminals, and the distance between the surface anode and the delivery terminal.

  12. Short dental implants: an emerging concept in implant treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Hashedi, Ashwaq Ali; Taiyeb Ali, Tara Bai; Yunus, Norsiah

    2014-06-01

    Short implants have been advocated as a treatment option in many clinical situations where the use of conventional implants is limited. This review outlines the effectiveness and clinical outcomes of using short implants as a valid treatment option in the rehabilitation of edentulous atrophic alveolar ridges. Initially, an electronic search was performed on the following databases: Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and DARE using key words from January 1990 until May 2012. An additional hand search was included for the relevant articles in the following journals: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants, Clinical Oral Implants Research, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, International Journal of Periodontics, Journal of Periodontology, and Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research. Any relevant papers from the journals' references were hand searched. Articles were included if they provided detailed data on implant length, reported survival rates, mentioned measures for implant failure, were in the English language, involved human subjects, and researched implants inserted in healed atrophic ridges with a follow-up period of at least 1 year after implant-prosthesis loading. Short implants demonstrated a high rate of success in the replacement of missing teeth in especially atrophic alveolar ridges. The advanced technology and improvement of the implant surfaces have encouraged the success of short implants to a comparable level to that of standard implants. However, further randomized controlled clinical trials and prospective studies with longer follow-up periods are needed.

  13. Close-field electroporation gene delivery using the cochlear implant electrode array enhances the bionic ear.

    PubMed

    Pinyon, Jeremy L; Tadros, Sherif F; Froud, Kristina E; Y Wong, Ann C; Tompson, Isabella T; Crawford, Edward N; Ko, Myungseo; Morris, Renée; Klugmann, Matthias; Housley, Gary D

    2014-04-23

    The cochlear implant is the most successful bionic prosthesis and has transformed the lives of people with profound hearing loss. However, the performance of the "bionic ear" is still largely constrained by the neural interface itself. Current spread inherent to broad monopolar stimulation of the spiral ganglion neuron somata obviates the intrinsic tonotopic mapping of the cochlear nerve. We show in the guinea pig that neurotrophin gene therapy integrated into the cochlear implant improves its performance by stimulating spiral ganglion neurite regeneration. We used the cochlear implant electrode array for novel "close-field" electroporation to transduce mesenchymal cells lining the cochlear perilymphatic canals with a naked complementary DNA gene construct driving expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. The focusing of electric fields by particular cochlear implant electrode configurations led to surprisingly efficient gene delivery to adjacent mesenchymal cells. The resulting BDNF expression stimulated regeneration of spiral ganglion neurites, which had atrophied 2 weeks after ototoxic treatment, in a bilateral sensorineural deafness model. In this model, delivery of a control GFP-only vector failed to restore neuron structure, with atrophied neurons indistinguishable from unimplanted cochleae. With BDNF therapy, the regenerated spiral ganglion neurites extended close to the cochlear implant electrodes, with localized ectopic branching. This neural remodeling enabled bipolar stimulation via the cochlear implant array, with low stimulus thresholds and expanded dynamic range of the cochlear nerve, determined via electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses. This development may broadly improve neural interfaces and extend molecular medicine applications.

  14. A simple implantation method for flexible, multisite microelectrodes into rat brains

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Anja; Xie, Yijing; Schumacher, Anett; Löffler, Susanne; Kirch, Robert D.; Al-Hasani, Jaafar; Rapoport, Daniel H.; Kruse, Charli; Moser, Andreas; Tronnier, Volker; Danner, Sandra; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2013-01-01

    A long term functional and reliable coupling between neural tissue and implanted microelectrodes is the key issue in acquiring neural electrophysiological signals or therapeutically excite neural tissue. The currently often used rigid micro-electrodes are thought to cause a severe foreign body reaction resulting in a thick glial scar and consequently a poor tissue-electrode coupling in the chronic phase. We hypothesize, that this adverse effect might be remedied by probes compliant to the soft brain tissue, i.e., replacing rigid electrodes by flexible ones. Unfortunately, this flexibility comes at the price of a low stiffness, which makes targeted low trauma implantation very challenging. In this study, we demonstrate an adaptable and simple method to implant extremely flexible microprobes even to deep areas of rat's brain. Implantation of flexible probes is achieved by rod supported stereotactic insertion fostered by a hydrogel (2% agarose in PBS) cushion on the exposed skull. We were thus able to implant very flexible micro-probes in 70 rats as deep as the rodent's subthalamic nucleus. This work describes in detail the procedures and steps needed for minimal invasive, but reliable implantation of flexible probes. PMID:23898266

  15. A simple implantation method for flexible, multisite microelectrodes into rat brains.

    PubMed

    Richter, Anja; Xie, Yijing; Schumacher, Anett; Löffler, Susanne; Kirch, Robert D; Al-Hasani, Jaafar; Rapoport, Daniel H; Kruse, Charli; Moser, Andreas; Tronnier, Volker; Danner, Sandra; Hofmann, Ulrich G

    2013-01-01

    A long term functional and reliable coupling between neural tissue and implanted microelectrodes is the key issue in acquiring neural electrophysiological signals or therapeutically excite neural tissue. The currently often used rigid micro-electrodes are thought to cause a severe foreign body reaction resulting in a thick glial scar and consequently a poor tissue-electrode coupling in the chronic phase. We hypothesize, that this adverse effect might be remedied by probes compliant to the soft brain tissue, i.e., replacing rigid electrodes by flexible ones. Unfortunately, this flexibility comes at the price of a low stiffness, which makes targeted low trauma implantation very challenging. In this study, we demonstrate an adaptable and simple method to implant extremely flexible microprobes even to deep areas of rat's brain. Implantation of flexible probes is achieved by rod supported stereotactic insertion fostered by a hydrogel (2% agarose in PBS) cushion on the exposed skull. We were thus able to implant very flexible micro-probes in 70 rats as deep as the rodent's subthalamic nucleus. This work describes in detail the procedures and steps needed for minimal invasive, but reliable implantation of flexible probes.

  16. Nonlinear Neural Network Oscillator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A nonlinear oscillator (10) includes a neural network (12) having at least one output (12a) for outputting a one dimensional vector. The neural ... neural network and the input of the input layer for modifying a magnitude and/or a polarity of the one dimensional output vector prior to the sample of...first or a second direction. Connection weights of the neural network are trained on a deterministic sequence of data from a chaotic source or may be a

  17. Optical Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Warden, Melissa R.; Cardin, Jessica A.; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Genetically encoded optical actuators and indicators have changed the landscape of neuroscience, enabling targetable control and readout of specific components of intact neural circuits in behaving animals. Here, we review the development of optical neural interfaces, focusing on hardware designed for optical control of neural activity, integrated optical control and electrical readout, and optical readout of population and single-cell neural activity in freely moving mammals. PMID:25014785

  18. Prediction and control of neural responses to pulsatile electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Luke J.; Sly, David James; O'Leary, Stephen John

    2012-04-01

    This paper aims to predict and control the probability of firing of a neuron in response to pulsatile electrical stimulation of the type delivered by neural prostheses such as the cochlear implant, bionic eye or in deep brain stimulation. Using the cochlear implant as a model, we developed an efficient computational model that predicts the responses of auditory nerve fibers to electrical stimulation and evaluated the model's accuracy by comparing the model output with pooled responses from a group of guinea pig auditory nerve fibers. It was found that the model accurately predicted the changes in neural firing probability over time to constant and variable amplitude electrical pulse trains, including speech-derived signals, delivered at rates up to 889 pulses s-1. A simplified version of the model that did not incorporate adaptation was used to adaptively predict, within its limitations, the pulsatile electrical stimulus required to cause a desired response from neurons up to 250 pulses s-1. Future stimulation strategies for cochlear implants and other neural prostheses may be enhanced using similar models that account for the way that neural responses are altered by previous stimulation.

  19. Prediction and control of neural responses to pulsatile electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Luke J; Sly, David James; O'Leary, Stephen John

    2012-04-01

    This paper aims to predict and control the probability of firing of a neuron in response to pulsatile electrical stimulation of the type delivered by neural prostheses such as the cochlear implant, bionic eye or in deep brain stimulation. Using the cochlear implant as a model, we developed an efficient computational model that predicts the responses of auditory nerve fibers to electrical stimulation and evaluated the model's accuracy by comparing the model output with pooled responses from a group of guinea pig auditory nerve fibers. It was found that the model accurately predicted the changes in neural firing probability over time to constant and variable amplitude electrical pulse trains, including speech-derived signals, delivered at rates up to 889 pulses s(-1). A simplified version of the model that did not incorporate adaptation was used to adaptively predict, within its limitations, the pulsatile electrical stimulus required to cause a desired response from neurons up to 250 pulses s(-1). Future stimulation strategies for cochlear implants and other neural prostheses may be enhanced using similar models that account for the way that neural responses are altered by previous stimulation.

  20. Implantable Radio Frequency Identification Sensors: Wireless Power and Communication

    PubMed Central

    Hutchens, Chriswell; Rennaker, Robert L.; Venkataraman, Srinivasan; Ahmed, Rehan; Liao, Ran; Ibrahim, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    There are significant technical challenges in the development of a fully implantable wirelessly powered neural interface. Challenges include wireless transmission of sufficient power to the implanted device to ensure reliable operation for decades without replacement, minimizing tissue heating, and adequate reliable communications bandwidth. Overcoming these challenges is essential for the development of implantable closed loop system for the treatment of disorders ranging from epilepsy, incontinence, stroke and spinal cord injury. We discuss the development of the wireless power, communication and control for a Radio-Frequency Identification Sensor (RFIDS) system with targeted power range for a 700mV, 30 to 40uA load attained at −2dBm. PMID:22254944

  1. The acceleration of implant osseointegration by liposomal Wnt3a.

    PubMed

    Popelut, Antoine; Rooker, Scott M; Leucht, Philipp; Medio, Marie; Brunski, John B; Helms, Jill A

    2010-12-01

    The strength of a Wnt-based strategy for tissue regeneration lies in the central role that Wnts play in healing. Tissue injury triggers local Wnt activation at the site of damage, and this Wnt signal is required for the repair and/or regeneration of almost all tissues including bone, neural tissues, myocardium, and epidermis. We developed a biologically based approach to create a transient elevation in Wnt signaling in peri-implant tissues, and in doing so, accelerated bone formation around the implant. Our subsequent molecular and cellular analyses provide mechanistic insights into the basis for this pro-osteogenic effect. Given the essential role of Wnt signaling in bone formation, this protein-based approach may have widespread application in implant osseointegration. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Patterns in neural processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engineer, Sunu

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we propose a model for neural processing that addresses both the evolutionary and functional aspects of neural systems that are observed in nature, from the simplest neural collections to dense large scale associations such as human brains. We propose both an architecture and a process in which these components interact to create the emergent behavior that we define as the 'mind'.

  3. Generalized classifier neural network.

    PubMed

    Ozyildirim, Buse Melis; Avci, Mutlu

    2013-03-01

    In this work a new radial basis function based classification neural network named as generalized classifier neural network, is proposed. The proposed generalized classifier neural network has five layers, unlike other radial basis function based neural networks such as generalized regression neural network and probabilistic neural network. They are input, pattern, summation, normalization and output layers. In addition to topological difference, the proposed neural network has gradient descent based optimization of smoothing parameter approach and diverge effect term added calculation improvements. Diverge effect term is an improvement on summation layer calculation to supply additional separation ability and flexibility. Performance of generalized classifier neural network is compared with that of the probabilistic neural network, multilayer perceptron algorithm and radial basis function neural network on 9 different data sets and with that of generalized regression neural network on 3 different data sets include only two classes in MATLAB environment. Better classification performance up to %89 is observed. Improved classification performances proved the effectivity of the proposed neural network.

  4. [Dental implant-related infections].

    PubMed

    López-Cerero, Lorena

    2008-11-01

    Dental implant-associated infections are expected to be increasingly more common as the number of patients with implants for more than 10 years rises. There are 2 stages of peri-implant infection: early mucositis, consisting of inflammation of the peri-implant soft tissues without loss of supporting bone, and a more advanced form involving a loss of osseointegration, known as peri-implantitis. The estimated prevalence of this latter infection is 10% of 5-year implants and the main risk factor is previous periodontal disease. The etiopathogenesis of peri-implantitis is related with reservoirs of periodontal pathogens; however factors that lead to colonization of the implant surface or increased susceptibility to infection may also have an influence. Treatment should include removal of the bacterial biofilm, debridement of the exposed surface, and surgical regeneration of the peri-implant pocket.

  5. A 96 channel receiver for the ILCTA LLRF system at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mavric, Uros; Chase, Brian; Branlard, Julien; Cullerton, Ed; Klepec, Dan; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The present configuration of an ILC main LINAC RF station has 26 nine cell cavities driven from one klystron. With the addition of waveguide power coupler monitors, 96 RF signals will be down-converted and processed. A down-converter chassis is being developed that contains 12 eight channel analog modules and a single upconverter module. This chassis will first be deployed for testing a cryomodule composed of eight cavities located at New Muon Laboratory (NML) - Fermilab. Critical parts of the design for LLRF applications are identified and a detailed description of the circuit with various characteristic measurements is presented. The board is composed of an input band-pass filter centered at 1.3GHz, followed by a mixer, which down-converts the cavity probe signal to a proposed 13 MHz intermediate frequency. Cables with 8 channels per connector and good isolation between channels are being used to interconnect each down-converter module with a digital board. As mixers, amplifiers and power splitters are the most sensitive parts for noise, nonlinearities and crosstalk issues, special attention is given to these parts in the design of the LO port multiplication and distribution.

  6. A Rare Complication of Cochlear Implantation After Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Reversion of the Magnet.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Erkan; Doruk, Can; Orhan, Kadir Serkan; Çelik, Mehmet; Polat, Beldan; Güldiken, Yahya

    2017-03-21

    Cochlear implants are mechanical devices used for patients with severe sensory-neural hearing loss, which has an inner magnet. It is proven that 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners are safe to use in patients with cochlear implant. In our patient, the authors aim to introduce a rare complication caused after a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanning and the management of this situation; the reversion of the magnet of the implant without displacement and significance of surgery in management.

  7. Bringing Hearing to the Deaf--Cochlear Implants: a Technical and Personal Account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipsey, Ian

    2006-04-01

    Cochlear implants are the first device to successfully restore neural function. They have instigated a popular but controversial revolution in the treatment of deafness, and they serve as a model for research in neuroscience and biomedical engineering. In this talk the physiology of natural hearing will be reviewed from the perspective of a physicist, and the function of cochlear implants will be described in the context of historical treatments, electrical engineering, psychophysics, clinical evaluation of efficacy and personal experience. The social implications of cochlear implantation and the future outlook for auditory prostheses will also be discussed.

  8. Bringing Hearing to the Deaf - Cochlear Implants: A Technical and Personal Account

    SciTech Connect

    Shipsey, Ian

    2003-12-17

    Cochlear implants are the first device to successfully restore neural function. They have instigated a popular but controversial revolution in the treatment of deafness and they serve as a model for research in neuroscience and biomedical engineering. In this talk the physiology of natural hearing will be reviewed from the perspective of a physicist, and the function of cochlear implants will be described in the context of historical treatments, electrical engineering, psychophysics, clinical evaluation of efficacy and personal experience. The social implications of cochlear implantation and the future outlook for auditory prostheses will also be discussed.

  9. Preliminary study of the thermal impact of a microelectrode array implanted in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sohee; Normann, Richard A; Harrison, Reid; Solzbacher, Florian

    2006-01-01

    One requirement of a chronically implantable, wireless neural interface device is the integration of electronic circuitry with the microelectrode array. Since the electronic IC dissipates a certain amount of power, it will affect the temperature in the tissues surrounding the implant site. In this paper, the thermal influence of an integrated, 3-dimensional Utah electrode array, to be implanted in the brain was investigated with simulations using the finite element method (FEM). A temperature increase in the brain tissue was predicted using preliminary simulations with simplified models. The model and method used in the simulations were verified by simple in vitro experiments.

  10. Coding of vowellike signals in cochlear implant listeners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laback, Bernhard; Deutsch, Werner A.; Baumgartner, Wolf-Dieter

    2004-08-01

    Neural-population interactions resulting from excitation overlap in multi-channel cochlear implants (CI) may cause blurring of the ``internal'' auditory representation of complex sounds such as vowels. In experiment I, confusion matrices for eight German steady-state vowellike signals were obtained from seven CI listeners. Identification performance ranged between 42% and 74% correct. On the basis of an information transmission analysis across all vowels, pairs of most and least frequently confused vowels were selected for each subject. In experiment II, vowel masking patterns (VMPs) were obtained using the previously selected vowels as maskers. The VMPs were found to resemble the ``electrical'' vowel spectra to a large extent, indicating a relatively weak effect of neural-population interactions. Correlation between vowel identification data and VMP spectral similarity, measured by means of several spectral distance metrics, showed that the CI listeners identified the vowels based on differences in the between-peak spectral information as well as the location of spectral peaks. The effect of nonlinear amplitude mapping of acoustic into ``electrical'' vowels, as performed in the implant processors, was evaluated separately and compared to the effect of neural-population interactions. Amplitude mapping was found to cause more blurring than neural-population interactions. Subjects exhibiting strong blurring effects yielded lower overall vowel identification scores.

  11. A Wirelessly Powered Micro-Spectrometer for Neural Probe-Pin Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sang H.; Kim, Min Hyuck; Song, Kyo D.; Yoon, Hargsoon; Lee, Uhn

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of neurological anomalies, places stringent demands on device functionality and size. A micro-spectrometer has been developed for use as an implantable neural probe to monitor neuro-chemistry in synapses. The microspectrometer, based on a NASA-invented miniature Fresnel grating, is capable of differentiating the emission spectra from various brain tissues. The micro-spectrometer meets the size requirements, and is able to probe the neuro-chemistry and suppression voltage typically associated with a neural anomaly. This neural probe-pin device (PPD) is equipped with wireless power technology (WPT) enabling operation in a continuous manner without requiring an implanted battery. The implanted neural PPD, together with a neural electronics interface and WPT, allow real-time measurement and control/feedback for remediation of neural anomalies. The design and performance of the combined PPD/WPT device for monitoring dopamine in a rat brain will be presented to demonstrate the current level of development. Future work on this device will involve the addition of an embedded expert system capable of performing semi-autonomous management of neural functions through a routine of sensing, processing, and control.

  12. Positron implantation in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, V.J.; Lynn, K.G.; Welch, D.O.

    1993-12-31

    The Monte Carlo technique for modeling positron prior to annihilation and electron implantation in semi-infinite metals is described. Particle implantation is modelled as a multistep process, a series of collisions with the atoms of the host material. In elastic collisions with neutral atoms there is no transfer of energy. The particle loses energy by several different channels, excitation of the electron gas, ionization of the ion cores, or, at low energies, by phonon excitation. These competing scattering mechanisms have been incorporated into the Monte Carlo framework and several different models are being used. Brief descriptions of these Monte Carlo schemes, as well as an analytic model for positron implantation are included. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations are presented and compared with expermental data. Problems associated with modeling positron implantation are discuss and the need for more expermental data on energy-loss in different materials is stressed. Positron implantation in multilayers of different metals is briefly described and extensions of this work to include a study of multilayers and heterostructures is suggested.

  13. Neural interface methods and apparatus to provide artificial sensory capabilities to a subject

    DOEpatents

    Buerger, Stephen P.; Olsson, III, Roy H.; Wojciechowski, Kenneth E.; Novick, David K.; Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.

    2017-01-24

    Embodiments of neural interfaces according to the present invention comprise sensor modules for sensing environmental attributes beyond the natural sensory capability of a subject, and communicating the attributes wirelessly to an external (ex-vivo) portable module attached to the subject. The ex-vivo module encodes and communicates the attributes via a transcutaneous inductively coupled link to an internal (in-vivo) module implanted within the subject. The in-vivo module converts the attribute information into electrical neural stimuli that are delivered to a peripheral nerve bundle within the subject, via an implanted electrode. Methods and apparatus according to the invention incorporate implantable batteries to power the in-vivo module allowing for transcutaneous bidirectional communication of low voltage (e.g. on the order of 5 volts) encoded signals as stimuli commands and neural responses, in a robust, low-error rate, communication channel with minimal effects to the subjects' skin.

  14. IBCOM (intra-brain communication) microsystem: wireless transmission of neural signals within the brain.

    PubMed

    Al-Ashmouny, Khaled M; Boldt, Chris; Ferguson, John E; Erdman, Arthur G; Redish, A; Yoon, Euisik

    2009-01-01

    We report our preliminary work to explore a new method of signal transmission for bio-implantable microsystems. Intra-brain communication or IBCOM is a wireless signal transmission method that uses the brain itself as a conductive medium to transmit the data and commands between neural implants and data processing systems outside the brain. Two miniaturized IBCOM (micro-IBCOM) CMOS chips were designed and fabricated for an in vivo test bed to transmit two prerecorded neural signals at different binary frequency shift keying (BFSK) carrier frequencies to validate the feasibility of IBCOM concept. The chips were packaged for full implantation in a rat brain except for external power delivery. The original neural signal waveforms were successfully recovered after being transmitted between two platinum electrodes separated by 15 mm with transmission power less than 650 pJ/bit for the CMOS implementation.

  15. Natural grouping of neural responses reveals spatially segregated clusters in prearcuate cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Roozbeh; Cueva, Christopher J.; Reppas, John B.; Peixoto, Diogo; Ryu, Stephen I.; Newsome, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A fundamental challenge in studying the frontal lobe is to parcellate this cortex into ‘natural’ functional modules despite the absence of topographic maps, which are so helpful in primary sensory areas. Here we show that unsupervised clustering algorithms, applied to 96-channel array recordings from prearcuate gyrus, reveal spatially segregated sub-networks that remain stable across behavioral contexts. Looking for natural groupings of neurons based on response similarities, we discovered that the recorded area includes at least two spatially segregated sub-networks that differentially represent behavioral choice and reaction time. Importantly, these sub-networks are detectable during different behavioral states, and surprisingly, are defined better by ‘common noise’ than task-evoked responses. Our parcellation process works well on ‘spontaneous’ neural activity, and thus bears strong resemblance to the identification of ‘resting state’ networks in fMRI datasets. Our results demonstrate a powerful new tool for identifying cortical sub-networks by objective classification of simultaneously recorded electrophysiological activity. PMID:25728571

  16. Poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) hydrogel coatings for improving electrode-neural tissue interface.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Wang, Dingfang; Li, Tao; Zhao, Xueqing; Cao, Yuliang; Yang, Hanxi; Duan, Yanwen Y

    2009-09-01

    A major problem which hinders the applications of neural prostheses is the inconsistent performance caused by tissue responses during long-term implantation. The study investigated a new approach for improving the electrode-neural tissue interface. Hydrogel poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) interpenetrating polymer networks (PVA/PAA IPNs) were synthesized and tailored as coatings for poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) based neural electrodes with the aid of plasma pretreatment. Changes in the electrochemical impedance and maximum charge injection (Q(inj)) limits of the coated iridium oxide microelectrodes were negligible. Protein adsorption on PDMS was reduced by approximately 85% after coating. In the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF), neurite extension of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells was clearly greater on PVA/PAA IPN films than on PDMS substrates. Furthermore, the tissue responses of PDMS implants coated with PVA/PAA IPN films were studied by 6-week implantation in the cortex of rats, which found that the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity in animals (n=8) receiving coated implants was significantly lower (p<0.05) compared to that of uncoated implants (n=7) along the entire distance of 150 microm from the outer skirt to the implant interface. The coated film remained on the surface of the explanted implants, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All of these suggest the hydrogel coating is feasible and favorable to neural electrode applications.

  17. Modification of anti-bacterial surface properties of textile polymers by vacuum arc ion source implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Oks, E. M.; Oztarhan, A.; Akpek, A.; Hames-Kocabas, E.; Urkac, E. S.; Brown, I. G.

    2014-08-01

    Ion implantation provides an important technology for the modification of material surface properties. The vacuum arc ion source is a unique instrument for the generation of intense beams of metal ions as well as gaseous ions, including mixed metal-gas beams with controllable metal:gas ion ratio. Here we describe our exploratory work on the application of vacuum arc ion source-generated ion beams for ion implantation into polymer textile materials for modification of their biological cell compatibility surface properties. We have investigated two specific aspects of cell compatibility: (i) enhancement of the antibacterial characteristics (we chose to use Staphylococcus aureus bacteria) of ion implanted polymer textile fabric, and (ii) the "inverse" concern of enhancement of neural cell growth rate (we chose Rat B-35 neuroblastoma cells) on ion implanted polymer textile. The results of both investigations were positive, with implantation-generated antibacterial efficiency factor up to about 90%, fully comparable to alternative conventional (non-implantation) approaches and with some potentially important advantages over the conventional approach; and with enhancement of neural cell growth rate of up to a factor of 3.5 when grown on suitably implanted polymer textile material.

  18. Hearing rehabilitation with a binaural cochlear implant in a patient with Erdheim-Chester disease.

    PubMed

    Querat, Charlotte; Thai-Van, Hung; Durand, Denis Vital; Cotton, François; Gallego, Stéphane; Truy, Eric

    2015-09-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans form of histiocytosis. This paper reports an exceptional case of bilateral neural involvement, responsible for profound hearing loss. Bilateral cochlear implantation was performed. We present a 57-year-old man affected by ECD with profound bilateral hearing loss. The patient underwent cochlear implantation with a binaural Digisonic(®) cochlear implant, 7 years after the initial diagnosis. Speech intelligibility rose to a plateau after about 6 months of cochlear implant use. The average outcome of speech intelligibility over time was 55% for dissyllabic words without lip reading, and 70% for sentences. Perception score decreased before the patient died from ECD. A description of the ECD and its otological manifestations is presented. This paper reports the effective hearing rehabilitation of profound bilateral hearing loss by the means of a binaural Digisonic(®) cochlear implant.

  19. Extraoral prostheses using extraoral implants.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, G; Tuna, S H; Oghan, F

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate extraoral prostheses and the use of extraoral implants in patients with facial defects. 10 cases were treated utilizing maxillofacial prostheses employing extraoral implants in five cases. 16 extraoral implants were installed. Seven implants were placed in irradiated sites in the orbital regions. Six implants were placed in mastoid regions and three in a zygoma region that was irradiated. Two implants failed before initial integration was achieved in irradiated areas. Using 14 extraoral implants as anchors, five extraoral prostheses were set. The other five cases were treated with extraoral prostheses without using extraoral implants due to cost and patient-related factors. The data included age, sex, primary disease, implant length, implant failure, prosthetic attachment, radiation therapy, and peri-implant skin reactions. The use of extraoral implants for the retention of extraoral prostheses has simplified the placement, removal, and cleaning of the prosthesis by the patient. The stability of the prostheses was improved by anchors. Clinical and technical problems are presented with the techniques used for their resolution. Using extraoral implants resulted in a high rate of success in retaining facial prostheses and gave good stability and aesthetic satisfaction.

  20. Management of peri-implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Prathapachandran, Jayachandran; Suresh, Neethu

    2012-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is a site-specific infectious disease that causes an inflammatory process in soft tissues, and bone loss around an osseointegrated implant in function. The etiology of the implant infection is conditioned by the status of the tissue surrounding the implant, implant design, degree of roughness, external morphology, and excessive mechanical load. The microorganisms most commonly associated with implant failure are spirochetes and mobile forms of Gram-negative anaerobes, unless the origin is the result of simple mechanical overload. Diagnosis is based on changes of color in the gingiva, bleeding and probing depth of peri-implant pockets, suppuration, X-ray, and gradual loss of bone height around the tooth. Treatment will differ depending upon whether it is a case of peri-implant mucositis or peri-implantitis. The management of implant infection should be focused on the control of infection, the detoxification of the implant surface, and regeneration of the alveolar bone. This review article deals with the various treatment options in the management of peri-implantitis. The article also gives a brief description of the etiopathogenesis, clinical features, and diagnosis of peri-implantitis. PMID:23559913

  1. Behavioral and Electrophysiological Responses Evoked by Chronic Infrared Neural Stimulation of the Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Matic, Agnella Izzo; Robinson, Alan M.; Young, Hunter K.; Badofsky, Ben; Rajguru, Suhrud M.; Stock, Stuart; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) has been proposed as a novel method for neural stimulation. In order for INS to translate to clinical use, which would involve the use of implanted devices over years or decades, the efficacy and safety of chronic INS needs to be determined. We examined a population of cats that were chronically implanted with an optical fiber to stimulate the cochlea with infrared radiation, the first known chronic application of INS. Through behavioral responses, the cats demonstrate that stimulation occurs and a perceptual event results. Long-term stimulation did not result in a change in the electrophysiological responses, either optically-evoked or acoustically-evoked. Spiral ganglion neuron counts and post implantation tissue growth, which was localized at the optical fiber, were similar in chronically stimulated and sham implanted cochleae. Results from chronic INS experiments in the cat cochlea support future work toward INS-based neuroprostheses for humans. PMID:23505466

  2. Dental implants: A review.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, B

    2016-12-01

    A high number of patients have one or more missing tooth and it is estimated that one in four American subjects over the age of 74 have lost all their natural teeth. Many options exist to replace missing teeth but dental implants have become one of the most used biomaterial to replace one (or more) missing tooth over the last decades. Contemporary dental implants made with titanium have been proven safe and effective in large series of patients. This review considers the main historical facts concerned with dental implants and present the different critical factors that will ensure a good osseo-integration that will ensure a stable prosthesis anchorage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Towards biodegradable wireless implants.

    PubMed

    Boutry, Clémentine M; Chandrahalim, Hengky; Streit, Patrick; Schinhammer, Michael; Hänzi, Anja C; Hierold, Christofer

    2012-05-28

    A new generation of partially or even fully biodegradable implants is emerging. The idea of using temporary devices is to avoid a second surgery to remove the implant after its period of use, thereby improving considerably the patient's comfort and safety. This paper provides a state-of-the-art overview and an experimental section that describes the key technological challenges for making biodegradable devices. The general considerations for the design and synthesis of biodegradable components are illustrated with radiofrequency-driven resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) resonators made of biodegradable metals (Mg, Mg alloy, Fe, Fe alloys) and biodegradable conductive polymer composites (polycaprolactone-polypyrrole, polylactide-polypyrrole). Two concepts for partially/fully biodegradable wireless implants are discussed, the ultimate goal being to obtain a fully biodegradable sensor for in vivo sensing.

  4. Complications in implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Hanif, Ayesha; Qureshi, Saima; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Rashid, Haroon

    2017-01-01

    After tooth loss, an individual may seek tooth replacement so that his/her function and esthetics could be restored. Clinical prosthodontics, during the past decade, has significantly improved and developed according to the advancements in the science and patient's demands and needs. Conventional options in prosthodontics for substituting a missing single tooth include the removable partial denture, partial and full coverage bridgework, and resin-bonded bridgework. Dental implants have gained increasing popularity over the years as they are capable of restoring the function to near normal in both partial and completely edentulous arches. With substantial evidence available, fixed implant-supported prosthesis are fully acknowledged as a reliable treatment option for the replacement of single or multiple missing teeth nowadays. While dental implants are increasingly becoming the choice of replacement for missing teeth, the impediments associated with them are progressively emerging too. PMID:28435381

  5. [Working Temperature Predication of Artificial Heart Based on Neural Network].

    PubMed

    Li, Qilei; Yang, Ming; Ou, Wenchu; Meng, Fan; Xu, Zihao; Xu, Liang

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to achieve a measurement of temperature prediction for artificial heart without sensor, for which the research briefly describes the application of back propagation neural network as well as the optimized, by genetic algorithm, BP network. Owing to the limit of environment after the artificial heart implanted, detectable parameters out of body are taken advantage of to predict the working temperature of the pump. Lastly, contrast is made to demonstrate the prediction result between BP neural network and genetically optimized BP network, by which indicates that the probability is 1.84% with the margin of error more than 1%.

  6. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  7. Hydroxylapatite Otologic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Beale, B.; Johnson, R.

    2000-01-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMER) and Smith and Nephew Richards Inc. of Bartlett, TN, was initiated in March 1997. The original completion date for the Agreement was March 25, 1998. The purpose of this work is to develop and commercialize net shape forming methods for directly creating dense hydroxylapatite (HA) ceramic otologic implants. The project includes three tasks: (1) modification of existing gelcasting formulations to accommodate HA slurries; (2) demonstration of gelcasting to fabricate green HA ceramic components of a size and shape appropriate to otologic implants: and (3) sintering and evaluation of the HA components.

  8. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  9. Evolvable Neural Software System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  10. Biofilm related to dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Angie; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2010-10-01

    Oral biofilm-related diseases such as periodontal and peri-implant diseases are unique infections in that they develop from the resident indigenous microflora. As more implants are nowadays being placed, clinicians may encounter more complications. Therefore, understanding the etiology is warranted to establish adequate diagnosis and provide proper treatment. This article focuses on understanding peri-implant microbiology and its roles in peri-implant diseases.

  11. 3D nano/microfabrication techniques and nanobiomaterials for neural tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; O'Brien, Christopher; O'Brien, Joseph R; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2014-05-01

    Injuries of the nervous system occur commonly among people of many different ages and backgrounds. Currently, there are no effective strategies to improve neural regeneration; however, tissue engineering provides a promising avenue for regeneration of many tissue types, including the neural context. Functional nerve conduits derived from tissue engineering techniques present bioengineered 3D artificial substitutes for implantation and rehabilitation of injured nerves. In particular, nanotechnology as a versatile vehicle to create biomimetic nanostructured tissue-engineered neural scaffolds provides great potential for the development of innovative and successful nerve grafts. Nanostructured conduits derived from traditional and novel tissue engineering techniques have been shown to be superior for successful neural function construction due to a high degree of biomimetic character. In this paper, we will focus on current progress in developing 3D nano/microstructured neural scaffolds via electrospinning, emerging 3D printing and self-assembly techniques, nanobiomaterials and bioactive cues for enhanced neural tissue regeneration.

  12. Neural recording stability of chronic electrode arrays in freely behaving primates.

    PubMed

    Linderman, Michael D; Gilja, Vikash; Santhanam, Gopal; Afshar, Afsheen; Ryu, Stephen; Meng, Teresa H; Shenoy, Krishna V

    2006-01-01

    Chronically implanted electrode arrays have enabled a broad range of advances, particularly in the field of neural prosthetics. Those successes motivate development of prototype implantable prosthetic processors for long duration, continuous use in freely behaving subjects. However, traditional experimental protocols have provided limited information regarding the stability of the electrode arrays and their neural recordings. In this paper we present preliminary results derived from long duration neural recordings in a freely behaving primate which show variations in action potential shape and RMS noise across a range of time scales. These preliminary results suggest that spike sorting algorithms can no longer assume stable neural signals and will need to transition to adaptive signal processing methodologies to maximize performance.

  13. Fiber-optic bending sensor for cochlear implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enbang; Yao, Jianquan

    2006-09-01

    Cochlear implantation has been proved as a great success in treating profound sensorineural deafness in both children and adults. Cochlear electrode array implantation is a complex and delicate surgical process. Surgically induced damage to the inner wall of the scala tympani could happen if the insertion angle of the electrode is incorrect and an excessive insertion force is applied to the electrode. This damage could lead to severe degeneration of the remaining neural elements. It is therefore of vital importance to monitor the shape and position of the electrode during the implantation surgery. In this paper, we report a fiber-optic bending sensor which can be integrated with the electrode and used to guide the implantation process. The sensor consists of a piece of optical fiber. The end of the fiber is coated with aluminum layer to form a mirror. Bending the fiber with the electrode introduces loss to the light transmitting in the fiber. By detecting the power of the reflected light, we can detennine the bending happened to the fiber, and consequently measure the curved shape of the electrode. Experimental results show that the proposed fiber sensor is a promising technique to make in-situ monitoring of the shape and position of the electrode during the implantation process.

  14. Biomimetic approach to dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Il; Jang, Jun-Hyeog; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C; Ku, Young

    2008-01-01

    Titanium, as an implant material, is regarded to be durable and biocompatible, which allows functional replacement of missing teeth. Successful dental implantation depends on an osseointegration phenomenon, a direct structural and functional binding reaction between bone and implant. It is well known that physicochemical characteristics of the dental implant surface, such as roughness, topography, chemistry, and electrical charge affect the biological reactions occurring at the interface of tissue and implant. Therefore, considerable efforts have been made to modify the surface of titanium implants which are based on mechanical, physical and chemical treatments. Recently, biological molecules were introduced onto the surface of implants to stimulate osteogenic cells in the early stage of implantation and consequently accelerate bone formation around implant and subsequent rapid implant stabilization. A range of extracellular matrix components, designed peptides, and growth factors have been proposed as the biological moiety. In this review, we address several issues related to the biology of dental implants and discuss biomimetic modification of the implant surface as a novel approach to obtain successful osseointegration.

  15. The silicone breast implant controversy.

    PubMed

    Guerette, P H

    1995-02-01

    Feminists call it objectification. Consumer advocates call it victimization. Medical personnel call it augmentation. Women, implantation. Whatever the term, media hype and the increasing number of lawsuits against U.S. manufacturers of silicone breast implants has caused widespread concern among women and raised serious questions about the long term health risks and safety of breast implant devices.

  16. Sterilisation of bioresorbable polymer implants.

    PubMed

    Bernkopf, M

    2007-01-01

    Bioresorbable polymer implants are rapidly growing alternatives to traditional implants in many applications. Because of their resorption in the body, it is necessary to sterilise the complete product before application. The suitability of different sterilisation methods for bioresorbable polymers is discussed using polylactic acid implants as an example.

  17. Treatment of peri-implantitis and the failing implant.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Kevin; Shahbazian, Timothy; MacLeod, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Appropriate treatment of implants is becoming increasingly important for the general dentist as the number of implants placed per year continues to increase. Early diagnosis of peri-implantitis is imperative; initiating the correct treatment protocol depends on a proper diagnosis. Several risk factors exist for the development of peri-implantitis, which can guide patient selection and treatment planning. Treatment of peri-implantitis should be tailored to the severity of the lesion (as outlined by the cumulative interceptive supportive treatment protocol), ranging from mechanical debridement to explantation. Several surgical and nonsurgical treatment alternatives exist. There is little consensus on superior treatment methods. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Development of bioactive conducting polymers for neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Poole-Warren, Laura; Lovell, Nigel; Baek, Sungchul; Green, Rylie

    2010-01-01

    Bioelectrodes for neural recording and neurostimulation are an integral component of a number of neuroprosthetic devices, including the commercially available cochlear implant, and developmental devices, such as the bionic eye and brain-machine interfaces. Current electrode designs limit the application of such devices owing to suboptimal material properties that lead to minimal interaction with the target neural tissue and the formation of fibrotic capsules. In designing an ideal bioelectrode, a number of design criteria must be considered with respect to physical, mechanical, electrical and biological properties. Conducting polymers have the potential to address the synergistic interaction of these properties and show promise as superior coatings for next-generation electrodes in implant devices.

  19. Neural prostheses and biomedical microsystems in neurological rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Koch, K P

    2007-01-01

    Interfaces between electrodes and the neural system differ with respect to material and shape depending on their intended application and fabrication method. This chapter will review the different electrode designs regarding the technological implementation and fabrication process. Furthermore this book chapter will describe electrodes for interfacing the peripheral nerves like cuff, book or helix as well as electrodes for interfacing the cortex like needle arrays. The implantation method and mechanical interaction between the electrode and the nervous tissue were taken into consideration. To develop appropriate microtechnological assembling strategies that ensure proper interfacing between the tiny electrodes and microelectronics or connectors is one of the major challenges. The integration of electronics into the system helps to improve the reliability of detecting neural signals and reduces the size of the implants. Promising results with these novel electrodes will pave the road for future developments such as visual prosthetics or improved control of artificial limbs in paralyzed patients.

  20. Two-stage implant systems.

    PubMed

    Fritz, M E

    1999-06-01

    Since the advent of osseointegration approximately 20 years ago, there has been a great deal of scientific data developed on two-stage integrated implant systems. Although these implants were originally designed primarily for fixed prostheses in the mandibular arch, they have been used in partially dentate patients, in patients needing overdentures, and in single-tooth restorations. In addition, this implant system has been placed in extraction sites, in bone-grafted areas, and in maxillary sinus elevations. Often, the documentation of these procedures has lagged. In addition, most of the reports use survival criteria to describe results, often providing overly optimistic data. It can be said that the literature describes a true adhesion of the epithelium to the implant similar to adhesion to teeth, that two-stage implants appear to have direct contact somewhere between 50% and 70% of the implant surface, that the microbial flora of the two-stage implant system closely resembles that of the natural tooth, and that the microbiology of periodontitis appears to be closely related to peri-implantitis. In evaluations of the data from implant placement in all of the above-noted situations by means of meta-analysis, it appears that there is a strong case that two-stage dental implants are successful, usually showing a confidence interval of over 90%. It also appears that the mandibular implants are more successful than maxillary implants. Studies also show that overdenture therapy is valid, and that single-tooth implants and implants placed in partially dentate mouths have a success rate that is quite good, although not quite as high as in the fully edentulous dentition. It would also appear that the potential causes of failure in the two-stage dental implant systems are peri-implantitis, placement of implants in poor-quality bone, and improper loading of implants. There are now data addressing modifications of the implant surface to alter the percentage of

  1. Implant contamination during spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Bible, Jesse E; O'Neill, Kevin R; Crosby, Colin G; Schoenecker, Jonathan G; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2013-06-01

    Postoperative spine infections have been reported to occur in 1% to 15% of patients and subsequently lead to significant morbidity and cost, with an elevated risk for instrumented cases. Every effort should be made to minimize the risk of intraoperative wound contamination. Consequently, certain practices are followed in the operating room to prevent contamination, many of which are not evidence based. Conversely, certain objects believed to be sterile are frequently overlooked as potential sources of contamination. To assess to what degree contamination of spinal implants occurs during spine surgery and evaluate whether coverage of implants alters the rate of contamination. Prospective study. This study included 105 consecutive noninfection surgical cases performed by a single spine surgeon that required the use of instrumentation. Spinal implant contamination. Cases were randomized to have all implant trays either remain uncovered (n=54) or covered (n=51) with sterile surgical towels on opening until implants were required for the case. After the last implant was placed, a sterile culture swab was used to obtain a sample from all open implants that had been present at the start of the case. The paper outer wraps of the implant trays were sampled in each case as a positive control, and an additional 105 swabs were capped immediately after they were opened to obtain negative controls. Swab samples were assessed for bacterial growth on 5% sheep blood Columbia agar plates. Of note, only departmental funding was used and no applicable financial relationships exist with any author. No growth was observed on any of the 105 negative controls, whereas 99.1% of positive controls demonstrated obvious contamination. Cultures from implant samples demonstrated a 9.5% overall rate of contamination with 2.0% (n=1) of covered implants versus 16.7% (n=9) of uncovered implants demonstrating contamination. Length of time implant trays were open before sample collection; implant type

  2. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  3. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Kenneth J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S.; Wilgen, John B.; Evans, Boyd Mccutchen

    2016-05-10

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  4. Implantable electrical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fully implantable and self contained device is disclosed composed of a flexible electrode array for surrounding damaged nerves and a signal generator for driving the electrode array with periodic electrical impulses of nanoampere magnitude to induce regeneration of the damaged nerves.

  5. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  6. Implantable continuous glucose sensors.

    PubMed

    Renard, Eric

    2008-08-01

    Because of the limits of wearable needle-type or microdialysis-based enzymatic sensors in clinical use, fully implantable glucose monitoring systems (IGMS) represent a promising alternative. Long-term use reducing impact of invasiveness due to implantation, less frequent calibration needs because of a more stable tissue environment around the sensor and potential easier inclusion in a closed-loop insulin delivery system are the expected benefits of IGMS. First experiences with subcutaneous and intravenous IGMS have been recently collected in pilot studies. While no severe adverse events have been reported, biointerface issues have been responsible for the failures of IGMS. Tissue reactions around implanted subcutaneous devices and damages of intravenous sensors due to shearing forces of blood flow impaired IGMS function and longevity. In functioning systems, accuracy of glucose measurement reached satisfactory levels for average durations of about 120 days with subcutaneous IGMS and 259 days with intravenous sensors. Moreover, sensor information could help to improve time spent in normal glucose range when provided to patients wearing subcutaneous IGMS and allowed safe and effective closed-loop glucose control when intravenous sensors were connected to implanted pumps using intra-peritoneal insulin delivery. These data could open a favourable perspective for IGMS after improvement of biointerface conditions and if compatible with an affordable cost.

  7. Cochlear Implantation in Neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajin, Münir Demir; Savaş, Özden; Aslan, Filiz; Sennaroğlu, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurobrucellosis is a disease consisting of a wide spectrum of complications such as peripheral neuropathy, cranial nerve involvement, ataxia, meningeal irritation, paraplegia, seizures, coma, and even death. The vestibulocochlear nerve seems to be the most commonly affected cranial nerve (10%). We present a patient with neurobrucellosis whose auditory perception and speech intelligibility skill performances improved after cochlear implantation. Case Report: A 35 year-old woman was admitted to another hospital 2 years ago with the symptoms of headache, nausea, and altered consciousness, who was finally diagnosed with neurobrucellosis. She developed bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss during the following 6 months. There was no benefit of using hearing aids. After successful treatment of her illness, she was found to be suitable for cochlear implantation. After the operation, her auditory perception skills improved significantly with a Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) score of 5. According to clinical observations and her family members’ statements, her Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) score was 3. Her speech intelligibility skills are still improving. Conclusion: Our case report represents the second case of hearing rehabilitation with cochlear implantation after neurobrucellosis. Cochlear implantation is a cost-effective and time-proven successful intervention in post-lingual adult patients with sensorineural hearing loss. Early timing of the surgery after appropriate treatment of meningitis helps the patient to achieve better postoperative results. PMID:26966626

  8. Practicing implant dentistry profitably.

    PubMed

    Stump, G; Adams, M; Alwan, M

    1997-03-01

    The success of dental implants has opened up countless treatment possibilities for restorative dentists to offer to their patients. Just as our clinical paradigms have had to change because of this new technology, so too must our paradigms concerning the way we communicate with our patients change if we are to get them to say "yes" to treatment that we know that they need. Success in clinical treatment using implants requires a systematic approach. A systematic approach to communicating with your patients will allow you to have the same high degree of success with treatment acceptance that is possible with dental implants. The key to the systems we have discussed is Relationship Centered Care. A relationship is fostered and enhanced through a Comprehensive Examination Process, a structured Consultation Process utilizing the influencing process and Financial Arrangements that allow the patient to receive what they want while the office maintains the profitability that it needs. A system for calculating rational fees can be utilized that allows the practice to have control over an area that traditionally was controlled by anecdotal factors. The Pride Institute has developed this material and is presenting it to the profession so that restorative dentists can truly practice implant dentistry profitably.

  9. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  10. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  11. Implantable Impedance Plethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Theodor, Michael; Ruh, Dominic; Ocker, Martin; Spether, Dominik; Förster, Katharina; Heilmann, Claudia; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Manoli, Yiannos; Zappe, Hans; Seifert, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate by theory, as well as by ex vivo and in vivo measurements that impedance plethysmography, applied extravascularly directly on large arteries, is a viable method for monitoring various cardiovascular parameters, such as blood pressure, with high accuracy. The sensor is designed as an implant to monitor cardiac events and arteriosclerotic progression over the long term. PMID:25123467

  12. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  13. Physiological basis for cochlear and auditory brainstem implants.

    PubMed

    Møller, Aage R

    2006-01-01

    Cochlear implants bypass functions of the cochlea that have been regarded to be fundamental for discrimination of the frequency (or spectrum). Frequency discrimination is essential for discrimination of sounds, including speech sounds, and the normal auditory system is assumed to make use of both (power) spectral and temporal information for frequency discrimination. Spectral information is represented by the place on the basilar membrane that generates the largest amplitude of vibration on the basilar membrane. Evidence has been presented that the temporal representation of frequency is more robust than the place representation and thus regarded more important for speech discrimination. The fact that some cochlear implants provide good speech discrimination using only information about the energy in a few spectral bands seems to contradict these studies. In that way, frequency discrimination may be similar to trichromatic color vision, which is based on the energy in only three different spectral bands of light, accomplished by different color-sensitive pigments in the cones of the retina. Cochlear nucleus implants (ABIs) also bypass the auditory nerve, which does not perform any processing. Therefore, it may be expected that ABIs are equally efficient as cochlear implants. However, experience from the use of ABIs in patients with bilateral vestibular schwannoma has not been encouraging, but recent studies of the use of ABIs in patients with other causes of injuries to the auditory nerve have shown similar speech discrimination as achieved with modern cochlear implants. Cochlear implants and ABIs are successful in providing speech discrimination because of redundancy in the processing in the ear, redundancy of the speech signal and because the auditory nervous system has a high degree of plasticity. Expression of neural plasticity makes the auditory nervous system adapt to the change in demands of processing of the information provided by cochlear implants.

  14. Fuzzy and neural control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1992-01-01

    Fuzzy logic and neural networks provide new methods for designing control systems. Fuzzy logic controllers do not require a complete analytical model of a dynamic system and can provide knowledge-based heuristic controllers for ill-defined and complex systems. Neural networks can be used for learning control. In this chapter, we discuss hybrid methods using fuzzy logic and neural networks which can start with an approximate control knowledge base and refine it through reinforcement learning.

  15. Neural Network Hurricane Tracker

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-05-27

    data about the hurricane and supplying the data to a trained neural network for yielding a predicted path for the hurricane. The system further includes...a device for displaying the predicted path of the hurricane. A method for using and training the neural network in the system is described. In the...method, the neural network is trained using information about hurricanes in a specific geographical area maintained in a database. The training involves

  16. Neural Mechanisms of Attention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-21

    relative to another. However, many of the mechanistic questions cannot be addressed with behavioral analyses, but must be addressed with neural ones...involved in behavior , so the neural language provides a description in terms of the brain. Cognitive neuroscience seeks to identify the relations between...EXPERIMENTAL STRATEGIES TO INVESTIGATE THE NEURONAL CORRELATES OF SELECTIVE ATTENTION One powerful technique to relate neural and cognitive

  17. Exploring neural network technology

    SciTech Connect

    Naser, J.; Maulbetsch, J.

    1992-12-01

    EPRI is funding several projects to explore neural network technology, a form of artificial intelligence that some believe may mimic the way the human brain processes information. This research seeks to provide a better understanding of fundamental neural network characteristics and to identify promising utility industry applications. Results to date indicate that the unique attributes of neural networks could lead to improved monitoring, diagnostic, and control capabilities for a variety of complex utility operations. 2 figs.

  18. Effect of implant design on initial stability of tapered implants.

    PubMed

    Chong, Linus; Khocht, Ahmed; Suzuki, Jon B; Gaughan, John

    2009-01-01

    Implant design is one of the parameters for achieving successful primary stability. This study aims to examine the effect of a self-tapping blades implant design on initial stability in tapered implants. Polyurethane blocks of different densities were used to simulate different bone densities. The two different implant designs included one with self-tapping blades and one without self-tapping blades. Implants were placed at 3 different depths: apical third, middle third, and fully inserted at 3 different densities of polyurethane blocks. A resonance frequency (RF) analyzer was then used to measure stability of the implants. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to examine the effect of implant design, insertion depth, and block density on RF. Analysis of covariance was used to examine the strength of association between RF and the aforementioned factors. In both medium-density (P = .017) and high-density (P = .002) blocks, fully inserted non-self-tapping implants showed higher initial stability than self-tapping implants. No differences were noted between the 2 implant designs that were not fully inserted. The highest strength of association was with insertion depth (standardized beta [std beta] = -0.60, P = .0001), followed by block density (std beta = -0.15, P = .0002). Implant design showed a weak association (std beta = -0.07, P = .09). In conclusion, fully inserted implants without self-tapping blades have higher initial stability than implants with self-tapping blades. However, the association strength between implant design and initial stability is less relevant than other factors, such as insertion depth and block density. Thus, if bone quality and quantity are optimal, they may compensate for design inadequacy.

  19. Computing with Neural Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Brette, Romain

    2012-01-01

    Neurons communicate primarily with spikes, but most theories of neural computation are based on firing rates. Yet, many experimental observations suggest that the temporal coordination of spikes plays a role in sensory processing. Among potential spike-based codes, synchrony appears as a good candidate because neural firing and plasticity are sensitive to fine input correlations. However, it is unclear what role synchrony may play in neural computation, and what functional advantage it may provide. With a theoretical approach, I show that the computational interest of neural synchrony appears when neurons have heterogeneous properties. In this context, the relationship between stimuli and neural synchrony is captured by the concept of synchrony receptive field, the set of stimuli which induce synchronous responses in a group of neurons. In a heterogeneous neural population, it appears that synchrony patterns represent structure or sensory invariants in stimuli, which can then be detected by postsynaptic neurons. The required neural circuitry can spontaneously emerge with spike-timing-dependent plasticity. Using examples in different sensory modalities, I show that this allows simple neural circuits to extract relevant information from realistic sensory stimuli, for example to identify a fluctuating odor in the presence of distractors. This theory of synchrony-based computation shows that relative spike timing may indeed have computational relevance, and suggests new types of neural network models for sensory processing with appealing computational properties. PMID:22719243

  20. Computing with neural synchrony.

    PubMed

    Brette, Romain

    2012-01-01

    Neurons communicate primarily with spikes, but most theories of neural computation are based on firing rates. Yet, many experimental observations suggest that the temporal coordination of spikes plays a role in sensory processing. Among potential spike-based codes, synchrony appears as a good candidate because neural firing and plasticity are sensitive to fine input correlations. However, it is unclear what role synchrony may play in neural computation, and what functional advantage it may provide. With a theoretical approach, I show that the computational interest of neural synchrony appears when neurons have heterogeneous properties. In this context, the relationship between stimuli and neural synchrony is captured by the concept of synchrony receptive field, the set of stimuli which induce synchronous responses in a group of neurons. In a heterogeneous neural population, it appears that synchrony patterns represent structure or sensory invariants in stimuli, which can then be detected by postsynaptic neurons. The required neural circuitry can spontaneously emerge with spike-timing-dependent plasticity. Using examples in different sensory modalities, I show that this allows simple neural circuits to extract relevant information from realistic sensory stimuli, for example to identify a fluctuating odor in the presence of distractors. This theory of synchrony-based computation shows that relative spike timing may indeed have computational relevance, and suggests new types of neural network models for sensory processing with appealing computational properties.

  1. Prosthodontic management of implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Ghadeer; Bryington, Matthew; De Kok, Ingeborg J; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2014-01-01

    Implant-supported dental restorations can be screw-retained, cement-retained, or a combination of both, whereby a metal superstructure is screwed to the implants and crowns are individually cemented to the metal frame. Each treatment modality has advantages and disadvantages. The use of computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture technologies for the manufacture of implant superstructures has proved to be advantageous in the quality of materials, precision of the milled superstructures, and passive fit. Maintenance and recall evaluations are an essential component of implant therapy. The longevity of implant restorations is limited by their biological and prosthetic maintenance requirements.

  2. [Allergic reactions to implant materials].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P

    2003-01-01

    The extent of the immune response upon implantation of metallic devices depends on the individual reactivity and on material characteristics. If specific T-cellular sensitization occurs or an allergy to metal preexists, hypersensitive reactions to implant components may develop. They include eczema, impaired wound healing, and sterile osteomyelitis. The existence of allergy-induced implant loosening is still an open question. Further improvement of clinical allergological diagnostics, better understanding of peri-implantar immune reactions, and interdisciplinary collection of epidemiological data concerning allergy to implants will contribute to a better knowledge about tolerance of implant material in humans.

  3. Development of a chipscale integrated microelectrode/microelectronic device for brain implantable neuroengineering applications.

    PubMed

    Song, Yoon-Kyu; Patterson, William R; Bull, Christopher W; Beals, Joseph; Hwang, Naejye; Deangelis, Andrew P; Lay, Christopher; McKay, J Lucas; Nurmikko, Arto V; Fellows, Matthew R; Simeral, John D; Donoghue, John P; Connors, Barry W

    2005-06-01

    An ultralow power analog CMOS chip and a silicon based microelectrode array have been fully integrated to a microminiaturized "neuroport" for brain implantable neuroengineering applications. The CMOS integrated circuit (IC) includes preamplifier and multiplexing circuitry, and a hybrid flip-chip bonding technique was developed to fabricate a functional, encapsulated microminiaturized neuroprobe device. Our neuroport has been evaluated using various methods, including pseudospike detection and local excitation measurement, and showed suitable characteristics for recording neural activities. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we have measured local field potentials from thalamocortical brain slices of rats, suggesting that the new neuroport can form a prime platform for the development of a microminiaturized neural interface to the brain in a single implantable unit. An alternative power delivery scheme using photovoltaic power converter, and an encapsulation strategy for chronic implantation are also discussed.

  4. Engineered porous metals for implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamsi Krishna, B.; Xue, Weichang; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2008-05-01

    Interest is significant in patient-specific implants with the possibility of guided tissue regeneration, particularly for load-bearing implants. For such implants to succeed, novel design approaches and fabrication technologies that can achieve balanced mechanical and functional performance in the implants are necessary. This article is focused on porous load-bearing implants with tailored micro-as well as macrostructures using laser-engineered net shaping (LENS™), a solid freeform fabrication or rapid prototyping technique that can be used to manufacture patient-specific implants. This review provides an insight into LENS, some properties of porous metals, and the potential applications of this process to fabricate unitized structures which can eliminate longstanding challenges in load-bearing implants to increase their in-vivo lifetime, such as in a total hip prosthesis.

  5. Impression techniques for implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Chee, W; Jivraj, S

    2006-10-07

    The object of making an impression in implant dentistry is to accurately relate an analogue of the implant or implant abutment to the other structures in the dental arch. This is affected by use of an impression coping which is attached to the implant or implant abutment. This impression coping is incorporated in an impression - much as a metal framework is 'picked up' in a remount impression for fixed prosthodontics. With implant copings the coping is usually attached to the implant or abutment with screws. The impression material used is usually an elastomeric impression material; the two types most widely used and shown to be the most appropriate are polyether and polyvinyl siloxane impression materials.

  6. Wireless gigabit data telemetry for large-scale neural recording.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yen-Cheng; Lo, Yi-Kai; Kim, Yanghyo; Chang, Mau-Chung Frank; Liu, Wentai

    2015-05-01

    Implantable wireless neural recording from a large ensemble of simultaneously acting neurons is a critical component to thoroughly investigate neural interactions and brain dynamics from freely moving animals. Recent researches have shown the feasibility of simultaneously recording from hundreds of neurons and suggested that the ability of recording a larger number of neurons results in better signal quality. This massive recording inevitably demands a large amount of data transfer. For example, recording 2000 neurons while keeping the signal fidelity ( > 12 bit, > 40 KS/s per neuron) needs approximately a 1-Gb/s data link. Designing a wireless data telemetry system to support such (or higher) data rate while aiming to lower the power consumption of an implantable device imposes a grand challenge on neuroscience community. In this paper, we present a wireless gigabit data telemetry for future large-scale neural recording interface. This telemetry comprises of a pair of low-power gigabit transmitter and receiver operating at 60 GHz, and establishes a short-distance wireless link to transfer the massive amount of neural signals outward from the implanted device. The transmission distance of the received neural signal can be further extended by an externally rendezvous wireless transceiver, which is less power/heat-constraint since it is not at the immediate proximity of the cortex and its radiated signal is not seriously attenuated by the lossy tissue. The gigabit data link has been demonstrated to achieve a high data rate of 6 Gb/s with a bit-error-rate of 10(-12) at a transmission distance of 6 mm, an applicable separation between transmitter and receiver. This high data rate is able to support thousands of recording channels while ensuring a low energy cost per bit of 2.08 pJ/b.

  7. PEDOT polymer coatings facilitate smaller neural recording electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Kip A.; Langhals, Nicholas B.; Joseph, Mike D.; Richardson-Burns, Sarah M.; Hendricks, Jeffrey L.; Kipke, Daryl R.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated using poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) to lower the impedance of small, gold recording electrodes with initial impedances outside of the effective recording range. Smaller electrode sites enable more densely packed arrays, increasing the number of input and output channels to and from the brain. Moreover, smaller electrode sizes promote smaller probe designs; decreasing the dimensions of the implanted probe has been demonstrated to decrease the inherent immune response, a known contributor to the failure of long-term implants. As expected, chronically implanted control electrodes were unable to record well-isolated unit activity, primarily as a result of a dramatically increased noise floor. Conversely, electrodes coated with PEDOT consistently recorded high-quality neural activity, and exhibited a much lower noise floor than controls. These results demonstrate that PEDOT coatings enable electrode designs 15 microns in diameter. PMID:21245527

  8. Implantable VLSI systems for compression and communication in wireless biosensor recording arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamboh, Awais Mehmood

    Successful use of microelectrode arrays to record neural activity in the cortex has opened new opportunities for scientists to decode the intricate functionality of the human brain and the behavior of neurons that enable its complex operation. The resulting brain-machine interface devices play a critical role in enabling patients with neural disorders to achieve a better lifestyle. Such interfaces provide a direct interface to the brain and show great promise in many biomedical applications. This thesis explores some of the major obstacles impeding the advance of wireless neural implants and addresses them through development of highly efficient algorithms and implantable hardware. An overwhelming amount of data is generated by the microelectrode arrays, resulting in a data bandwidth bottleneck. To overcome this problem, an implantable system has been devised to enable control over the amount of data that must be transmitted without compromising the information contained in the array of neural signals. Furthermore, the nature of the wireless communication channel across the skin tissue is not well characterized. In this thesis, solutions have been developed to maximize that data throughput and enable unfailing yet low-power communication of bidirectional data between the implanted device and the external world. Finally, a unified energy-efficient, implantable CMOS integrated circuit was developed to address these two critical problems. The resulting integrated solution ensures seamless multi-modal operation, and thus establishes a pathway to the design of next-generation neuroprosthetics devices. Although the motivation for this thesis comes from the field of neuroprosthetics, the solutions devised are pertinent to a wide range of implantable applications.

  9. Enhanced biocompatibility of neural probes by integrating microstructures and delivering anti-inflammatory agents via microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Kim, Eric; Meggo, Anika; Gandhi, Sachin; Luo, Hao; Kallakuri, Srinivas; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Jinsheng

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Biocompatibility is a major issue for chronic neural implants, involving inflammatory and wound healing responses of neurons and glial cells. To enhance biocompatibility, we developed silicon-parylene hybrid neural probes with open architecture electrodes, microfluidic channels and a reservoir for drug delivery to suppress tissue responses. Approach. We chronically implanted our neural probes in the rat auditory cortex and investigated (1) whether open architecture electrode reduces inflammatory reaction by measuring glial responses; and (2) whether delivery of antibiotic minocycline reduces inflammatory and tissue reaction. Four weeks after implantation, immunostaining for glial fibrillary acid protein (astrocyte marker) and ionizing calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (macrophages/microglia cell marker) were conducted to identify immunoreactive astrocyte and microglial cells, and to determine the extent of astrocytes and microglial cell reaction/activation. A comparison was made between using traditional solid-surface electrodes and newly-designed electrodes with open architecture, as well as between deliveries of minocycline and artificial cerebral-spinal fluid diffused through microfluidic channels. Main results. The new probes with integrated micro-structures induced minimal tissue reaction compared to traditional electrodes at 4 weeks after implantation. Microcycline delivered through integrated microfluidic channels reduced tissue response as indicated by decreased microglial reaction around the neural probes implanted. Significance. The new design will help enhance the long-term stability of the implantable devices.

  10. Place-pitch manipulations with cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Macherey, Olivier; Carlyon, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Pitch can be conveyed to cochlear implant (CI) listeners via both place of excitation and temporal cues. The transmission of place cues may be hampered by several factors including limitations on the insertion depth and number of implanted electrodes, and the broad current spread produced by monopolar stimulation. The following series of experiments investigate several methods to partially overcome these limitations. Experiment 1 compares two recently published techniques that aim to activate more apical fibers than produced by monopolar or bipolar stimulation of the most apical contacts. The first technique (phantom stimulation) manipulates the current spread by simultaneously stimulating two electrodes with opposite-polarity pulses of different amplitudes. The second technique manipulates the neural spread of excitation by using asymmetric pulses and exploiting the polarity-sensitive properties of auditory nerve fibers. The two techniques yielded similar results and were shown to produce lower place pitch percepts than stimulation of monopolar and bipolar symmetric pulses. Furthermore, combining these two techniques may be advantageous in a clinical setting. Experiment 2 proposes a novel method to create place pitches intermediate to those produced by physical electrodes by using charge-balanced asymmetric pulses in bipolar mode with different degrees of asymmetry. PMID:22423718

  11. Cochlear implants in children implanted in Jordan: A parental overview.

    PubMed

    Alkhamra, Rana A

    2015-07-01

    Exploring the perspective of parents on the cochlear implant process in Jordan. Sixty parents of deaf children were surveyed on the information gathering process prior to cochlear implant surgery, and their implant outcome expectations post-surgery. Whether child or parent characteristics may impact parents' post-surgical expectations was explored. Although parents used a variety of information sources when considering a cochlear implant, the ear, nose and throat doctor comprised their major source of information (60%). Parents received a range of information prior to cochlear implant but agreed (93.3%) on the need for a multidisciplinary team approach. Post-surgically, parents' expected major developments in the areas of spoken language (97%), and auditory skills (100%). Receiving education in mainstream schools (92%) was expected too. Parents perceived the cochlear implant decision as the best decision they can make for their child (98.3%). A significant correlation was found between parents contentment with the cochlear implant decision and expecting developments in the area of reading and writing (r=0.7). Child's age at implantation and age at hearing loss diagnosis significantly affected parents' post-implant outcome expectations (p<0.05). Despite the general satisfaction from the information quantity and quality prior to cochlear implant, parents agree on the need for a comprehensive multidisciplinary team approach during the different stages of the cochlear implant process. Parents' education about cochlear implants prior to the surgery can affect their post-surgical outcome expectations. The parental perspective presented in this study can help professionals develop better understanding of parents' needs and expectations and henceforth improve their services and support during the different stages of the cochlear implant process. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Management of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Figuero, Elena; Graziani, Filippo; Sanz, Ignacio; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano

    2014-10-01

    Peri-implant diseases are defined as inflammatory lesions of the surrounding peri-implant tissues and include peri-implant mucositis (an inflammatory lesion limited to the surrounding mucosa of an implant) and peri-implantitis (an inflammatory lesion of the mucosa that affects the supporting bone with resulting loss of osseointegration). This review aims to describe the different approaches to manage both entities and to provide a critical evaluation of the evidence available on their efficacy. Therapy of peri-implant mucositis and nonsurgical therapy of peri-implantitis usually involve mechanical debridement of the implant surface using curettes, ultrasonic devices, air-abrasive devices or lasers, with or without the adjunctive use of local antibiotics or antiseptics. The efficacy of these therapies has been demonstrated for mucositis: controlled clinical trials show an improvement in clinical parameters, especially in bleeding on probing. For peri-implantitis, the results are limited, especially in terms of probing pocket-depth reduction. Surgical therapy of peri-implantitis is indicated when nonsurgical therapy fails to control the inflammatory changes. Selection of the surgical technique should be based on the characteristics of the peri-implant lesion. In the presence of deep circumferential and intrabony defects, surgical interventions should aim to provide thorough debridement, implant-surface decontamination and defect reconstruction. In the presence of defects without clear bony walls or with a predominant suprabony component, the aim of the surgical intervention should be the thorough debridement and the repositioning of the marginal mucosa to enable the patient to perform effective oral-hygiene practices, although this aim may compromise the esthetic result of the implant-supported restoration. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Hermetic diamond capsules for biomedical implants enabled by gold active braze alloys.

    PubMed

    Lichter, Samantha G; Escudié, Mathilde C; Stacey, Alastair D; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Fox, Kate; Ahnood, Arman; Apollo, Nicholas V; Kua, Dunstan C; Lee, Aaron Z; McGowan, Ceara; Saunders, Alexia L; Burns, Owen; Nayagam, David A X; Williams, Richard A; Garrett, David J; Meffin, Hamish; Prawer, Steven

    2015-01-01

    As the field of biomedical implants matures the functionality of implants is rapidly increasing. In the field of neural prostheses this is particularly apparent as researchers strive to build devices that interact with highly complex neural systems such as vision, hearing, touch and movement. A retinal implant, for example, is a highly complex device and the surgery, training and rehabilitation requirements involved in deploying such devices are extensive. Ideally, such devices will be implanted only once and will continue to function effectively for the lifetime of the patient. The first and most pivotal factor that determines device longevity is the encapsulation that separates the sensitive electronics of the device from the biological environment. This paper describes the realisation of a free standing device encapsulation made from diamond, the most impervious, long lasting and biochemically inert material known. A process of laser micro-machining and brazing is described detailing the fabrication of hermetic electrical feedthroughs and laser weldable seams using a 96.4% gold active braze alloy, another material renowned for biochemical longevity. Accelerated ageing of the braze alloy, feedthroughs and hermetic capsules yielded no evidence of corrosion and no loss of hermeticity. Samples of the gold braze implanted for 15 weeks, in vivo, caused minimal histopathological reaction and results were comparable to those obtained from medical grade silicone controls. The work described represents a first account of a free standing, fully functional hermetic diamond encapsulation for biomedical implants, enabled by gold active alloy brazing and laser micro-machining.

  14. Auditory Cortical Activity During Cochlear Implant-Mediated Perception of Spoken Language, Melody, and Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Anne T.; Jiradejvong, Patpong; Braun, Allen R.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the significant advances in language perception for cochlear implant (CI) recipients, music perception continues to be a major challenge for implant-mediated listening. Our understanding of the neural mechanisms that underlie successful implant listening remains limited. To our knowledge, this study represents the first neuroimaging investigation of music perception in CI users, with the hypothesis that CI subjects would demonstrate greater auditory cortical activation than normal hearing controls. H215O positron emission tomography (PET) was used here to assess auditory cortical activation patterns in ten postlingually deafened CI patients and ten normal hearing control subjects. Subjects were presented with language, melody, and rhythm tasks during scanning. Our results show significant auditory cortical activation in implant subjects in comparison to control subjects for language, melody, and rhythm. The greatest activity in CI users compared to controls was seen for language tasks, which is thought to reflect both implant and neural specializations for language processing. For musical stimuli, PET scanning revealed significantly greater activation during rhythm perception in CI subjects (compared to control subjects), and the least activation during melody perception, which was the most difficult task for CI users. These results may suggest a possible relationship between auditory performance and degree of auditory cortical activation in implant recipients that deserves further study. PMID:19662456

  15. A fully implantable stimulator for use in small laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Rodney E.; Shepherd, Robert K.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a low cost, fully implantable, single channel stimulator that can be manufactured in a research laboratory. The stimulator generates charge-balanced biphasic current pulses which are delivered to a bipolar electrode array for chronic stimulation of neural tissue in free-running laboratory animals such as rats and mice. The system is magnetically coupled and contains no batteries or external leadwires. The subject is placed in a chamber surrounded by three orthogonal coils of wire which are driven to generate a magnetic field. Currents are induced in wire coils in the implanted stimulator then regulated to produce biphasic current pulses with fixed amplitude of up to 500 μA. Phase duration is adjustable from 25 – 250 μs per phase. Charge balance is maintained by capacitive coupling and shorting of the electrodes between pulses. Stimulus rate can be continuously varied, and the temporal precision of the stimulus means that the stimulator can be used in behavioural experiments or for generating electrically-evoked potentials. We describe the application of this stimulator for chronic electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve (i.e. a cochlear implant); however it will have application in other areas of neuroscience requiring controlled safe electrical stimulation of neural tissue over extended periods. Circuit diagrams and manufacturing details are provided as supplementary data. PMID:17897719

  16. A Wireless 32-Channel Implantable Bidirectional Brain Machine Interface.

    PubMed

    Su, Yi; Routhu, Sudhamayee; Moon, Kee S; Lee, Sung Q; Youm, WooSub; Ozturk, Yusuf

    2016-09-24

    All neural information systems (NIS) rely on sensing neural activity to supply commands and control signals for computers, machines and a variety of prosthetic devices. Invasive systems achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by eliminating the volume conduction problems caused by tissue and bone. An implantable brain machine interface (BMI) using intracortical electrodes provides excellent detection of a broad range of frequency oscillatory activities through the placement of a sensor in direct contact with cortex. This paper introduces a compact-sized implantable wireless 32-channel bidirectional brain machine interface (BBMI) to be used with freely-moving primates. The system is designed to monitor brain sensorimotor rhythms and present current stimuli with a configurable duration, frequency and amplitude in real time to the brain based on the brain activity report. The battery is charged via a novel ultrasonic wireless power delivery module developed for efficient delivery of power into a deeply-implanted system. The system was successfully tested through bench tests and in vivo tests on a behaving primate to record the local field potential (LFP) oscillation and stimulate the target area at the same time.

  17. A Wireless 32-Channel Implantable Bidirectional Brain Machine Interface

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi; Routhu, Sudhamayee; Moon, Kee S.; Lee, Sung Q.; Youm, WooSub; Ozturk, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    All neural information systems (NIS) rely on sensing neural activity to supply commands and control signals for computers, machines and a variety of prosthetic devices. Invasive systems achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by eliminating the volume conduction problems caused by tissue and bone. An implantable brain machine interface (BMI) using intracortical electrodes provides excellent detection of a broad range of frequency oscillatory activities through the placement of a sensor in direct contact with cortex. This paper introduces a compact-sized implantable wireless 32-channel bidirectional brain machine interface (BBMI) to be used with freely-moving primates. The system is designed to monitor brain sensorimotor rhythms and present current stimuli with a configurable duration, frequency and amplitude in real time to the brain based on the brain activity report. The battery is charged via a novel ultrasonic wireless power delivery module developed for efficient delivery of power into a deeply-implanted system. The system was successfully tested through bench tests and in vivo tests on a behaving primate to record the local field potential (LFP) oscillation and stimulate the target area at the same time. PMID:27669264

  18. Rupture of poly implant prothèse silicone breast implants: an implant retrieval study.

    PubMed

    Swarts, Eric; Kop, Alan M; Nilasaroya, Anastasia; Keogh, Catherine V; Cooper, Timothy

    2013-04-01

    Poly Implant Prothèse implants were recalled in Australia in April of 2010 following concerns of higher than expected rupture rates and the use of unauthorized industrial grade silicone as a filler material. Although subsequent investigations found that the gel filler material does not pose a threat to human health, the important question of what caused a relatively modern breast implant to have such a poor outcome compared with contemporary silicone breast implants is yet to be addressed. From a cohort of 27 patients, 19 ruptured Poly Implant Prothèse breast implants were subjected to a range of mechanical tests and microscopic/macroscopic investigations to evaluate possible changes in properties as a result of implantation. New Poly Implant Prothèse implants were used as controls. All samples, explanted and controls, complied with the requirements for shell integrity as specified in the International Organization for Standardization 14607. Compression testing revealed rupture rates similar to those reported in the literature. Shell thickness was highly variable, with most shells having regions below the minimum thickness of 0.57 mm that was specified by the manufacturer. Potential regions of stress concentration were observed on the smooth inner surfaces and outer textured surfaces. The high incidence of Poly Implant Prothèse shell rupture is most likely a result of inadequate quality control, with contributory factors being shell thickness variation and manufacturing defects on both inner and outer surfaces of the shell. No evidence of shell degradation with implantation time was determined.

  19. Critical Branching Neural Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kello, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    It is now well-established that intrinsic variations in human neural and behavioral activity tend to exhibit scaling laws in their fluctuations and distributions. The meaning of these scaling laws is an ongoing matter of debate between isolable causes versus pervasive causes. A spiking neural network model is presented that self-tunes to critical…

  20. Critical Branching Neural Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kello, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    It is now well-established that intrinsic variations in human neural and behavioral activity tend to exhibit scaling laws in their fluctuations and distributions. The meaning of these scaling laws is an ongoing matter of debate between isolable causes versus pervasive causes. A spiking neural network model is presented that self-tunes to critical…

  1. A miniaturized neuroprosthesis suitable for implantation into the brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad; Binkley, David; Blalock, Benjamin; Andersen, Richard; Ulshoefer, Norbert; Johnson, Travis; Del Castillo, Linda

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents current research on a miniaturized neuroprosthesis suitable for implantation into the brain. The prosthesis is a heterogeneous integration of a 100-element microelectromechanical system (MEMS) electrode array, front-end complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit for neural signal preamplification, filtering, multiplexing and analog-to-digital conversion, and a second CMOS integrated circuit for wireless transmission of neural data and conditioning of wireless power. The prosthesis is intended for applications where neural signals are processed and decoded to permit the control of artificial or paralyzed limbs. This research, if successful, will allow implantation of the electronics into the brain, or subcutaneously on the skull, and eliminate all external signal and power wiring. The neuroprosthetic system design has strict size and power constraints with each of the front-end preamplifier channels fitting within the 400 x 400-microm pitch of the 100-element MEMS electrode array and power dissipation resulting in less than a 1 degree C temperature rise for the surrounding brain tissue. We describe the measured performance of initial micropower low-noise CMOS preamplifiers for the neuroprosthetic.

  2. A miniaturized neuroprosthesis suitable for implantation into the brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, Mohammad; Binkley, David; Blalock, Benjamin; Andersen, Richard; Ulshoefer, Norbert; Johnson, Travis; Del Castillo, Linda

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents current research on a miniaturized neuroprosthesis suitable for implantation into the brain. The prosthesis is a heterogeneous integration of a 100-element microelectromechanical system (MEMS) electrode array, front-end complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuit for neural signal preamplification, filtering, multiplexing and analog-to-digital conversion, and a second CMOS integrated circuit for wireless transmission of neural data and conditioning of wireless power. The prosthesis is intended for applications where neural signals are processed and decoded to permit the control of artificial or paralyzed limbs. This research, if successful, will allow implantation of the electronics into the brain, or subcutaneously on the skull, and eliminate all external signal and power wiring. The neuroprosthetic system design has strict size and power constraints with each of the front-end preamplifier channels fitting within the 400 x 400-microm pitch of the 100-element MEMS electrode array and power dissipation resulting in less than a 1 degree C temperature rise for the surrounding brain tissue. We describe the measured performance of initial micropower low-noise CMOS preamplifiers for the neuroprosthetic.

  3. High-performance neural networks. [Neural computers

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1987-06-01

    The new Forth hardware architectures offer an intermediate solution to high-performance neural networks while the theory and programming details of neural networks for synthetic intelligence are developed. This approach has been used successfully to determine the parameters and run the resulting network for a synthetic insect consisting of a 200-node ''brain'' with 1760 interconnections. Both the insect's environment and its sensor input have thus far been simulated. However, the frequency-coded nature of the Browning network allows easy replacement of the simulated sensors by real-world counterparts.

  4. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. PMID:26635486

  5. [Fully implantable hearing systems].

    PubMed

    Maurer, J

    2009-03-01

    As yet comparatively little experience has been gained with fully implantable hearing systems, as the two systems available at present have only recently received CE permission for Europe and the FDA permissions are still pending in the USA. Additionally the technology is expensive and usually not covered by insurance companies. However, it could be shown that by careful patient selection and very careful surgical techniques, good results can be achieved with this highly sensitive technology, often with better patient satisfaction and hearing quality than with conventional hearing aids. To spread the technology further, the systems must also show reliable results on a broad application. Further surgery to change the batteries should not be necessary more frequently than with cardiac pacemakers. Not all technical problems are finally solved. However, it is to be foreseen that fully implantable hearing systems will be a good long-term alternative to conventional hearing aids for some patients.

  6. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies.

  7. Is neural Darwinism Darwinism?

    PubMed

    van Belle, T

    1997-01-01

    Neural Darwinism is a theory of cognition developed by Gerald Edelman along with George Reeke and Olaf Sporns at Rockefeller University. As its name suggests, neural Darwinism is modeled after biological Darwinism, and its authors assert that the two processes are strongly analogous. both operate on variation in a population, amplifying the more adaptive individuals. However, from a computational perspective, neural Darwinism is quite different from other models of natural selection, such as genetic algorithms. The individuals of neural Darwinism do not replicate, thus robbing the process of the capacity to explore new solutions over time and ultimately reducing it to a random search. Because neural Darwinism does not have the computational power of a truly Darwinian process, it is misleading to label it as such. to illustrate this disparity in adaptive power, one of Edelman's early computer experiments, Darwin I, is revisited, and it is shown that adding replication greatly improves the adaptive power of the system.

  8. An electroacoustic recording device for wireless sensing of neural signals.

    PubMed

    Hua Meng; Sahin, Mesut

    2013-01-01

    Elimination of wires connecting neural recording electrodes to external electronics is highly desired, particularly in survival animal studies, due to neural damage and the device failures caused by these wires. In this study, an electroacoustic device for sensing and wireless transmission of neural signals to an external unit is proposed and results from a prototype are presented. In this method, the neural signals modulate the acoustic pulse amplitudes generated by a small piezoelectric element that is implanted at the recording site. The acoustics waves are detected wirelessly outside the nervous system by another piezoelectric transducer and the neural signals are extracted by amplitude demodulation. To test the prototype, a sinusoidal signal with 100µVpp amplitude was applied in phosphate buffered saline to simulated neural signals and the external transducer was placed 10mm away from the recording element. The results show that a sinusoidal signal of the given amplitude could be wirelessly sensed and reconstructed with a signal-to-noise ratio of 14dB.

  9. Fully integrated circuit chip of microelectronic neural bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoyan, Shen; Zhigong, Wang

    2014-09-01

    Nerve tracts interruption is one of the major reasons for dysfunction after spiral cord injury. The microelectronic neural bridge is a method to restore function of interrupted neural pathways, by making use of microelectronic chips to bypass the injured nerve tracts. A low-power fully integrated microelectronic neural bridge chip is designed, using CSMC 0.5-μm CMOS technology. The structure and the key points in the circuit design will be introduced in detail. In order to meet the requirement for implantation, the circuit was modified to avoid the use of off-chip components, and fully monolithic integration is achieved. The operating voltage of the circuit is ±2.5 V, and the chip area is 1.21 × 1.18 mm2. According to the characteristic of neural signal, the time-domain method is used in testing. The pass bandwidth of the microelectronic neural bridge system covers the whole frequency range of the neural signal, power consumption is 4.33 mW, and the gain is adjustable. The design goals are achieved.

  10. Requirement for Foxd3 in Maintenance of Neural Crest Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Lu; Mundell, Nathan A.; Frist, Audrey Y.; Wang, Qiaohong; Labosky, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Understanding the molecular mechanisms of stem cell maintenance is critical for the ultimate goal of manipulating stem cells for treatment of disease. Foxd3 is required early in mouse embryogenesis; Foxd3−/− embryos fail around the time of implantation, cells of the inner cell mass cannot be maintained in vitro, and blastocyst-derived stem cell lines cannot be established. Here, we report that Foxd3 is required for maintenance of the multipotent mammalian neural crest. Using tissue specific deletion of Foxd3 in the neural crest, we show that Foxd3flox/−; Wnt1-Cre mice die perinatally with a catastrophic loss of neural crest-derived structures. Cranial neural crest tissues are either missing or severely reduced in size, the peripheral nervous system consists of reduced dorsal root ganglia and cranial nerves, and the entire gastrointestinal tract is devoid of neural crest derivatives. These results demonstrate a global role for this transcriptional repressor in all aspects of neural crest maintenance along the anterior-posterior axis, and establish an unprecedented molecular link between multiple divergent progenitor lineages of the mammalian embryo. PMID:18367558

  11. Implantable visual prostheses.

    PubMed

    Thanos, S; Heiduschka, P; Stupp, T

    2007-01-01

    Visual impairment and blindness is primarily caused by optic neuropathies like injuries and glaucomas, as well as retinopathies like agerelated macular degeneration (MD), systemic diseases like diabetes, hypertonia and hereditary retinitis pigmentosa (RP). These pathological conditions may affect retinal photoreceptors, or retinal pigment epithelium, or particular subsets of retinal neurons, and in particular retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The RGCs which connect the retina with the brain are unique cells with extremely long axons bridging the distance from the retina to visual relays within the thalamus and midbrain, being therefore vulnerable to heterogeneous pathological conditions along this pathway. When becoming mature, RGCs loose the ability to divide and to regenerate their accidentally or experimentally injured axons. Consequently, any loss of RGCs is irreversible and results to loss of visual function. The advent of micro- and nanotechnology, and the construction of artificial implants prompted to create visual prostheses which aimed at compensating for the loss of visual function in particular cases. The purpose of the present contribution is to review the considerable engineering expertise that is essential to fabricate current visual prostheses in connection with their functional features and applicability to the animal and human eye. In this chapter, 1) Retinal and cortical implants are introduced, with particular emphasis given to the requirements they have to fulfil in order to replace very complex functions like vision. 2) Advanced work on material research is presented both from the technological and from the biocompatibility aspect as prerequisites of any perspectives for implantation. 3) Ultimately, experimental studies are presented showing the shaping of implants, the procedures of testing their biocompatibility and essential modifications to improve the interfaces between technical devices and the biological environment. The review ends by

  12. Simplified Design Equations for Class-E Neural Prosthesis Transmitters

    PubMed Central

    Troyk, Philip; Hu, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Extreme miniaturization of implantable electronic devices is recognized as essential for the next generation of neural prostheses, owing to the need for minimizing the damage and disruption of the surrounding neural tissue. Transcutaneous power and data transmission via a magnetic link remains the most effective means of powering and controlling implanted neural prostheses. Reduction in the size of the coil, within the neural prosthesis, demands the generation of a high-intensity radio frequency magnetic field from the extracoporeal transmitter. The Class-E power amplifier circuit topology has been recognized as a highly effective means of producing large radio frequency currents within the transmitter coil. Unfortunately, design of a Class-E circuit is most often fraught by the need to solve a complex set of equations so as to implement both the zero-voltage-switching and zero-voltage-derivative-switching conditions that are required for efficient operation. This paper presents simple explicit design equations for designing the Class-E circuit topology. Numerical design examples are presented to illustrate the design procedure. PMID:23292784

  13. Simplified design equations for Class-E neural prosthesis transmitters.

    PubMed

    Troyk, Philip; Hu, Zhe

    2013-05-01

    Extreme miniaturization of implantable electronic devices is recognized as essential for the next generation of neural prostheses, owing to the need for minimizing the damage and disruption of the surrounding neural tissue. Transcutaneous power and data transmission via a magnetic link remains the most effective means of powering and controlling implanted neural prostheses. Reduction in the size of the coil, within the neural prosthesis, demands the generation of a high-intensity radio frequency magnetic field from the extracoporeal transmitter. The Class-E power amplifier circuit topology has been recognized as a highly effective means of producing large radio frequency currents within the transmitter coil. Unfortunately, design of a Class-E circuit is most often fraught by the need to solve a complex set of equations so as to implement both the zero-voltage-switching and zero-voltage-derivative-switching conditions that are required for efficient operation. This paper presents simple explicit design equations for designing the Class-E circuit topology. Numerical design examples are presented to illustrate the design procedure.

  14. Bone Substitutes for Peri-Implant Defects of Postextraction Implants

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Pâmela Letícia; Gulinelli, Jéssica Lemos; Telles, Cristino da Silva; Betoni Júnior, Walter; Chiacchio Buchignani, Vivian; Queiroz, Thallita Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Placement of implants in fresh sockets is an alternative to try to reduce physiological resorption of alveolar ridge after tooth extraction. This surgery can be used to preserve the bone architecture and also accelerate the restorative procedure. However, the diastasis observed between bone and implant may influence osseointegration. So, autogenous bone graft and/or biomaterials have been used to fill this gap. Considering the importance of bone repair for treatment with implants placed immediately after tooth extraction, this study aimed to present a literature review about biomaterials surrounding immediate dental implants. The search included 56 articles published from 1969 to 2012. The results were based on data analysis and discussion. It was observed that implant fixation immediately after extraction is a reliable alternative to reduce the treatment length of prosthetic restoration. In general, the biomaterial should be used to increase bone/implant contact and enhance osseointegration. PMID:24454377

  15. Zirconia in fixed implant prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Guess, Petra Christine; Att, Wael; Strub, Joerg Rudolf

    2012-10-01

    CAD/CAM technology in combination with zirconia ceramic has increasingly gained popularity in implant dentistry. This narrative review presents the current knowledge on zirconia utilized as framework material for implant-borne restorations and implant abutments, laboratory tests and developments, clinical performance, and possible future trends for implant dentistry are addressed. A review of available literature from 1990 through 2010 was conducted with search terms zirconia,"implants,"abutment,"crown," and "fixed dental prosthesis" using electronic databases (PubMed) and manual searching. Latest applications of zirconia in implant dentistry include implant abutments, multiple unit and full-arch frameworks as well as custom-made bars to support fixed and removable prostheses. High biocompatibility, low bacterial surface adhesion as well as favorable chemical properties of zirconia ceramics are reported. Zirconia stabilized with yttrium oxide exhibits high flexural strength and fracture toughness due to a transformation toughening mechanism. Preliminary clinical data confirmed the high stability of zirconia for abutments and as a framework material for implant borne crowns and fixed dental prostheses. Zirconia abutment or framework damage has rarely been encountered. However, veneering porcelain fractures are the most common technical complication in implant-supported zirconia restorations. These porcelain veneer failures have led to concerns regarding differences in coefficient of thermal expansions between core and veneering porcelain and their respective processing techniques. As presently evidence of clinical long-term data is missing, caution with regard to especially extensive implant-borne zirconia frameworks is recommended. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. [Implantable middle ear hearing aids].

    PubMed

    à Wengen, D F

    2004-01-01

    Conventional acoustic hearing aids are limited in their performance. Due to physical laws their amplification of sound is limited to within 5 kHz. However, the frequencies between 5 and 10 kHz are essential for understanding consonants. Words can only be understood correctly if their consonants can be understood. Furthermore noise amplification remains a problem with hearing aids. Other problems consist of recurrent infections of the external auditory canal, intolerance for occlusion of the ear canal, feedback noise, and resonances in speech or singing. Implantable middle ear hearing aids like the Soundbridge of Symphonix-Siemens and the MET of Otologics offer improved amplification and a more natural sound. Since the first implantation of a Soundbridge in Switzerland in 1996 almost one thousand patients have been implanted worldwide. The currents systems are semi-implantable. The external audio processor containing the microphone, computer chip, battery and radio system is worn in the hair bearing area behind the ear. Implantation is only considered after unsuccessful fitting of conventional hearing aids. In Switzerland the cost for these implantable hearing aids is covered by social insurances. Initially the cost for an implant is higher than for hearing aids. However, hearing aids need replacement every 5 or 6 years whereas implants will last 20 to 30 years. Due to the superior sound quality and the improved understanding of speech in noise, the number of patients with implantable hearing aids will certainly increase in the next years. Other middle ear implants are in clinical testing.

  17. Electronic retinal implant surgery.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, R E

    2017-02-01

    Blindness due to outer retinal degeneration still remains largely untreatable. Photoreceptor loss removes light sensitivity, but the remaining inner retinal layers, the optic nerve, and indeed the physical structure of the eye itself may be unaffected by the degenerative processes. This provides the opportunity to restore some degree of vision with an electronic device in the subretinal space. In this lecture I will provide an overview of our experiences with the first-generation retinal implant Alpha IMS, developed by Retina Implant AG and based on the technology developed by Eberhart Zrenner as part of a multicentre clinical trial (NCT01024803). We are currently in the process of running a second NIHR-funded clinical trial to assess the next-generation device. The positive results from both studies to date indicate that the retinal implant should be included as a potential treatment for patients who are completely blind from retinitis pigmentosa. Evolution of the technology in future may provide further opportunities for earlier intervention or for other diseases.

  18. [Neurotology and cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Merchán, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    In this review we analyse cochlear implantation in terms of the fundamental aspects of the functioning of the auditory system. Concepts concerning neuronal plasticity applied to electrical stimulation in perinatal and adult deep hypoacusis are reviewed, and the latest scientific bases that justify early implantation following screening for congenital deafness are discussed. Finally, this review aims to serve as an example of the importance of fostering the sub-specialty of neurotology in our milieu, with the aim of bridging some of the gaps between specialties and thus improving both the knowledge in the field of research on auditory pathologies and in the screening of patients. The objectives of this review, targeted above all towards specialists in the field of otorhinolaryngology, are to analyse some significant neurological foundations in order to reach a better understanding of the clinical events that condition the indications and the rehabilitation of patients with cochlear implants, as well as to use this means to foster the growth of the sub-specialty of neurotology.

  19. The breast implant controversy.

    PubMed

    Cook, R R; Harrison, M C; LeVier, R R

    1994-02-01

    The breast implant issue is a "bad news/good news" story. For many women with implants, the controversy has caused a fair degree of anxiety which may or may not be resolved as further information becomes available. It has also taken its toll on Dow Corning. Whole lines of medical products have been eliminated or are being phase out. The development of new medical applications has been terminated. As a consequence, employees have lost their jobs. What the effect will be on the biomedical industry as a whole remains to be seen (11). While silicones have been an important component in various medical devices, it is likely that other materials can be used as replacements. However, suppliers of non-silicone materials are also reevaluating their role in this market. For example, Du Pont, the nation's largest chemical company, has determined that the unpredictable and excessive costs of doing business with manufacturers of implantable medical devices no longer justifies the unrestricted sale of standard raw materials into this industry. Other companies are quietly following suit. On the up side, it is possible that the research being driven by this controversy will result in a greater understanding of the immunologic implications of xenobiotics, of the importance of nonbiased observations, of the need for ready access to valid data sets, and of the opportunity for valid scientific information to guide legal decisions. Only time will tell.

  20. Tubo-uterine implantation.

    PubMed

    Green-armytage, V G

    1957-02-01

    After characterizing 2 types of patients presenting with tubal infertility (1 that is "as a rule overweight (the uterus is fixed (and there is easily palpable tubo-uterine pathology," and 1 that is "slim, young, intelligent and often beautiful", 12 1-sentence suggestions are made to increase the success of tubo-uterine implantations in the second type of presenting patient (because the first group has, in the author's mind, disappointing prognosis). Figures are the bulk of the document, with 3 figures demonstrating the type of operation, 3 showing the scheme of the operation, 1 figure showing a posterior view of the implanted tube in utero with a polyethylene prosthesis in situ down to the cervix, and 1 figure showing the instruments used in the operation. A few points of experience the author shares are: 1) operate immediately after a menstrual period; 2) give antibiotics prophylactically and after the procedure; 3) use a Bonney Myomectomy Clamp to elevate the uterus; 4) never use a knife or bistoury at the cornua; 5) use polyethylene rods, when available; and 6) caesarean section is the indicated delivery route after tubo-uterine implantation. Out of 38 patients with the requisite history and findings who have been operated on by this author, 14 have gone to full-term, i.e., 36.1%; 2 have aborted, giving a pregnancy rate of 42.2%, and there was 1 ectopic pregnancy.

  1. Neural constraints on learning.

    PubMed

    Sadtler, Patrick T; Quick, Kristin M; Golub, Matthew D; Chase, Steven M; Ryu, Stephen I; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Yu, Byron M; Batista, Aaron P

    2014-08-28

    Learning, whether motor, sensory or cognitive, requires networks of neurons to generate new activity patterns. As some behaviours are easier to learn than others, we asked if some neural activity patterns are easier to generate than others. Here we investigate whether an existing network constrains the patterns that a subset of its neurons is capable of exhibiting, and if so, what principles define this constraint. We employed a closed-loop intracortical brain-computer interface learning paradigm in which Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) controlled a computer cursor by modulating neural activity patterns in the primary motor cortex. Using the brain-computer interface paradigm, we could specify and alter how neural activity mapped to cursor velocity. At the start of each session, we observed the characteristic activity patterns of the recorded neural population. The activity of a neural population can be represented in a high-dimensional space (termed the neural space), wherein each dimension corresponds to the activity of one neuron. These characteristic activity patterns comprise a low-dimensional subspace (termed the intrinsic manifold) within the neural space. The intrinsic manifold presumably reflects constraints imposed by the underlying neural circuitry. Here we show that the animals could readily learn to proficiently control the cursor using neural activity patterns that were within the intrinsic manifold. However, animals were less able to learn to proficiently control the cursor using activity patterns that were outside of the intrinsic manifold. These results suggest that the existing structure of a network can shape learning. On a timescale of hours, it seems to be difficult to learn to generate neural activity patterns that are not consistent with the existing network structure. These findings offer a network-level explanation for the observation that we are more readily able to learn new skills when they are related to the skills that we already

  2. Listening to Brain Microcircuits for Interfacing With External World-Progress in Wireless Implantable Microelectronic Neuroengineering Devices: Experimental systems are described for electrical recording in the brain using multiple microelectrodes and short range implantable or wearable broadcasting units.

    PubMed

    Nurmikko, Arto V; Donoghue, John P; Hochberg, Leigh R; Patterson, William R; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Bull, Christopher W; Borton, David A; Laiwalla, Farah; Park, Sunmee; Ming, Yin; Aceros, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Acquiring neural signals at high spatial and temporal resolution directly from brain microcircuits and decoding their activity to interpret commands and/or prior planning activity, such as motion of an arm or a leg, is a prime goal of modern neurotechnology. Its practical aims include assistive devices for subjects whose normal neural information pathways are not functioning due to physical damage or disease. On the fundamental side, researchers are striving to decipher the code of multiple neural microcircuits which collectively make up nature's amazing computing machine, the brain. By implanting biocompatible neural sensor probes directly into the brain, in the form of microelectrode arrays, it is now possible to extract information from interacting populations of neural cells with spatial and temporal resolution at the single cell level. With parallel advances in application of statistical and mathematical techniques tools for deciphering the neural code, extracted populations or correlated neurons, significant understanding has been achieved of those brain commands that control, e.g., the motion of an arm in a primate (monkey or a human subject). These developments are accelerating the work on neural prosthetics where brain derived signals may be employed to bypass, e.g., an injured spinal cord. One key element in achieving the goals for practical and versatile neural prostheses is the development of fully implantable wireless microelectronic "brain-interfaces" within the body, a point of special emphasis of this paper.

  3. Listening to Brain Microcircuits for Interfacing With External World—Progress in Wireless Implantable Microelectronic Neuroengineering Devices

    PubMed Central

    Nurmikko, Arto V.; Donoghue, John P.; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Patterson, William R.; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Bull, Christopher W.; Borton, David A.; Laiwalla, Farah; Park, Sunmee; Ming, Yin; Aceros, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Acquiring neural signals at high spatial and temporal resolution directly from brain microcircuits and decoding their activity to interpret commands and/or prior planning activity, such as motion of an arm or a leg, is a prime goal of modern neurotechnology. Its practical aims include assistive devices for subjects whose normal neural information pathways are not functioning due to physical damage or disease. On the fundamental side, researchers are striving to decipher the code of multiple neural microcircuits which collectively make up nature’s amazing computing machine, the brain. By implanting biocompatible neural sensor probes directly into the brain, in the form of microelectrode arrays, it is now possible to extract information from interacting populations of neural cells with spatial and temporal resolution at the single cell level. With parallel advances in application of statistical and mathematical techniques tools for deciphering the neural code, extracted populations or correlated neurons, significant understanding has been achieved of those brain commands that control, e.g., the motion of an arm in a primate (monkey or a human subject). These developments are accelerating the work on neural prosthetics where brain derived signals may be employed to bypass, e.g., an injured spinal cord. One key element in achieving the goals for practical and versatile neural prostheses is the development of fully implantable wireless microelectronic “brain-interfaces” within the body, a point of special emphasis of this paper. PMID:21654935

  4. Implantation of the Subcutaneous Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator: An Evaluation of 4 Implantation Techniques.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, Tom F; Miller, Marc A; Quast, Anne-Floor B E; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Dukkipati, Srinivas R; Reddy, Vivek; Wilde, Arthur A; Willner, Jonathan M; Knops, Reinoud E

    2017-01-01

    Alternative techniques to the traditional 3-incision subcutaneous implantation of the subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator may offer procedural and cosmetic advantages. We evaluate 4 different implant techniques of the subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. Patients implanted with subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillators from 2 hospitals between 2009 and 2016 were included. Four implantation techniques were used depending on physician preference and patient characteristics. The 2- and 3-incision techniques both place the pulse generator subcutaneously, but the 2-incision technique omits the superior parasternal incision for lead positioning. Submuscular implantation places the pulse generator underneath the serratus anterior muscle and subfascial implantation underneath the fascial layer on the anterior side of the serratus anterior muscle. Reported outcomes include perioperative parameters, defibrillation testing, and clinical follow-up. A total of 246 patients were included with a median age of 47 years and 37% female. Fifty-four patients were implanted with the 3-incision technique, 118 with the 2-incision technique, 38 with submuscular, and 37 with subfascial. Defibrillation test efficacy and shock lead impedance during testing did not differ among the groups; respectively, P=0.46 and P=0.18. The 2-incision technique resulted in the shortest procedure duration and time-to-hospital discharge compared with the other techniques (P<0.001). A total of 18 complications occurred, but there were no significant differences between the groups (P=0.21). All infections occurred in subcutaneous implants (3-incision, n=3; 2-incision, n=4). In the 2-incision group, there were no lead displacements. The presented implantation techniques are feasible alternatives to the standard 3-incision subcutaneous implantation, and the 2-incision technique resulted in shortest procedure duration. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. 3D-nanostructured boron-doped diamond for microelectrode array neural interfacing.

    PubMed

    Piret, Gaëlle; Hébert, Clément; Mazellier, Jean-Paul; Rousseau, Lionel; Scorsone, Emmanuel; Cottance, Myline; Lissorgues, Gaelle; Heuschkel, Marc O; Picaud, Serge; Bergonzo, Philippe; Yvert, Blaise

    2015-06-01

    The electrode material is a key element in the design of long-term neural implants and neuroprostheses. To date, the ideal electrode material offering high longevity, biocompatibility, low-noise recording and high stimulation capabilities remains to be found. We show that 3D-nanostructured boron doped diamond (BDD), an innovative material consisting in a chemically stable material with a high aspect ratio structure obtained by encapsulation of a carbon nanotube template within two BDD nanolayers, allows neural cell attachment, survival and neurite extension. Further, we developed arrays of 20-μm-diameter 3D-nanostructured BDD microelectrodes for neural interfacing. These microelectrodes exhibited low impedances and low intrinsic recording noise levels. In particular, they allowed the detection of low amplitude (10-20 μV) local-field potentials, single units and multiunit bursts neural activity in both acute whole embryonic hindbrain-spinal cord preparations and long-term hippocampal cell cultures. Also, cyclic voltammetry measurements showed a wide potential window of about 3 V and a charge storage capacity of 10 mC.cm(-2), showing high potentiality of this material for neural stimulation. These results demonstrate the attractiveness of 3D-nanostructured BDD as a novel material for neural interfacing, with potential applications for the design of biocompatible neural implants for the exploration and rehabilitation of the nervous system.

  6. Neural recording front-end IC using action potential detection and analog buffer with digital delay for data compression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Yao, Lei; Zou, Xiaodan; Goh, Wang Ling; Je, Minkyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a neural recording analog front-end IC intended for simultaneous neural recording with action potential (AP) detection for data compression in wireless multichannel neural implants. The proposed neural recording front-end IC detects the neural spikes and sends only the preserved AP information for wireless transmission in order to reduce the overall power consumption of the neural implant. The IC consists of a low-noise neural amplifier, an AP detection circuit and an analog buffer with digital delay. The neural amplifier makes use of a current-reuse technique to maximize the transconductance efficiency for attaining a good noise efficiency factor. The AP detection circuit uses an adaptive threshold voltage to generate an enable signal for the subsequent functional blocks. The analog buffer with digital delay is employed using a finite impulse response (FIR) filter which preserves the AP waveform before the enable signal as well as provides low-pass filtering. The neural recording front-end IC has been designed using standard CMOS 0.18-µm technology occupying a core area of 220 µm by 820 µm.

  7. Dynamics of neural cryptography.

    PubMed

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2007-05-01

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible.

  8. Dynamics of neural cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2007-05-15

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible.

  9. Dynamics of neural cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2007-05-01

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible.

  10. Impedance testing on cochlear implants after electroconvulsive therapy.

    PubMed

    McRackan, Theodore R; Rivas, Alejandro; Hedley-Williams, Andrea; Raj, Vidya; Dietrich, Mary S; Clark, Nathaniel K; Labadie, Robert F

    2014-12-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) are neural prostheses that restore hearing to individuals with profound sensorineural hearing loss. The surgically implanted component consists of an electrode array, which is threaded into the cochlea, and an electronic processor, which is buried under the skin behind the ear. The Food and Drug Administration and CI manufacturers contend that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is contraindicated in CI recipients owing to risk of damage to the implant and/or the patient. We hypothesized that ECT does no electrical damage to CIs. Ten functional CIs were implanted in 5 fresh cadaveric human heads. Each head then received a consecutive series of 12 unilateral ECT sessions applying maximum full pulse-width energy settings. Electroconvulsive therapy was delivered contralaterally to 5 CIs and ipsilaterally to 5 CIs. Electrical integrity testing (impedance testing) of the electrode array was performed before and after CI insertion, and after the first, third, fifth, seventh, ninth, and 12th ECT sessions. Electroconvulsive therapy was performed by a staff psychiatrist experienced with the technique. Explanted CIs were sent back to the manufacturer for further integrity testing. No electrical damage was identified during impedance testing. Overall, there were statistically significant decreases in impedances (consistent with no electrical damage) when comparing pre-ECT impedance values to those after 12 sessions. There was no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05) in impedance values comparing ipsilateral to contralateral ECT. Manufacturer testing revealed no other electrical damage to the CIs. Electroconvulsive therapy does not seem to cause any detectable electrical injury to CIs.

  11. Deafness: Cross-modal plasticity and cochlear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung; Oh, Seung Ha; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kim, Jeung-Whoon; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Chong Sun

    2001-01-01

    Hearing in profoundly deaf people can be helped by inserting an implant into the inner ear to stimulate the cochlear nerve. This also boosts the low metabolic activity of the auditory cortex, the region of the brain normally used for hearing. Other sensory modalities, such as sign language, can also activate the auditory cortex, a phenomenon known as cross-modal plasticity. Here we show that when metabolism in the auditory cortex of prelingually deaf children (whose hearing was lost before they learned to talk) has been restored by cross-modal plasticity, the auditory cortex can no longer respond to signals from a cochlear implant installed afterwards. Neural substrates in the auditory cortex might therefore be routed permanently to other cognitive processes in prelingually deaf patients.

  12. Implantable electrode for recording nerve signals in awake animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ninomiya, I.; Yonezawa, Y.; Wilson, M. F.

    1976-01-01

    An implantable electrode assembly consisting of collagen and metallic electrodes was constructed to measure simultaneously neural signals from the intact nerve and bioelectrical noises in awake animals. Mechanical artifacts, due to bodily movement, were negligibly small. The impedance of the collagen electrodes, measured in awake cats 6-7 days after implantation surgery, ranged from 39.8-11.5 k ohms at a frequency range of 20-5 kHz. Aortic nerve activity and renal nerve activity, measured in awake conditions using the collagen electrode, showed grouped activity synchronous with the cardiac cycle. Results indicate that most of the renal nerve activity was from postganglionic sympathetic fibers and was inhibited by the baroceptor reflex in the same cardiac cycle.

  13. Peri-implant complications for posterior endosteal implants

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine; Mehler, Alex; Clark, Arthur; Neal, Dan; Gonzaga, Luiz; Anusavice, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Objectives (1) To assess whether there is evidence of an association between the number of peri-implant tissue complications and patient characteristics such as gender, diabetes status, smoking status, and bite force; (2) To assess whether there is evidence of an association between the number of peri-implant tissue complications and location of the implant, surgical technique used, bone graft status and sinus lift status. Materials and Methods This randomized controlled clinical trial included a total of 176 implants (Osseospeed, Dentsply) in 67 participants with 88 fixed dental prostheses. Information was obtained from health histories, a baseline exam, surgical notes, and postoperative exams. The data were analyzed using Fisher's exact and Mann-Whitney tests, and generalized estimating equations logistic regression with a significance level set at 0.05. Results All 176 implants survived within a recall period of three years but 11 implants demonstrated peri-implant tissue complications. Ten sites showed dehiscence and one case exhibited vertical bone loss. There was a statistically significant association between surgical technique used (1-stage or 2-stage) and the presence of soft tissue complications (p = 0.005), where 2-stage surgery was associated with a higher frequency of peri-implant soft tissue complications. A correlation, although not statistically significant (p=0.077) was noted, between peri-implant tissue complications and bone grafting, suggesting a possible role for this factor as well. Conclusions Participants who did not require any second stage surgery at the implant sites experienced fewer complications. Therefore, additional surgical procedures should be performed judiciously considering their possible effects on peri-implant tissue health. PMID:25263400

  14. Transfer characteristics of subretinal visual implants: corneally recorded implant responses.

    PubMed

    Stingl, K; Bartz-Schmidt, K U; Braun, A; Gekeler, F; Greppmaier, U; Schatz, A; Stett, A; Strasser, T; Kitiratschky, V; Zrenner, E

    2016-10-01

    The subretinal Alpha IMS visual implant is a CE-approved medical device for restoration of visual functions in blind patients with end-stage outer retina degeneration. We present a method to test the function of the implant objectively in vivo using standard electroretinographic equipment and to assess the devices' parameter range for an optimal perception. Subretinal implant Alpha IMS (Retina Implant AG, Reutlingen, Germany) consists of 1500 photodiode-amplifier-electrode units and is implanted surgically into the subretinal space in blind retinitis pigmentosa patients. The voltages that regulate the amplifiers' sensitivity (V gl) and gain (V bias), related to the perception of contrast and brightness, respectively, are adjusted manually on a handheld power supply device. Corneally recorded implant responses (CRIR) to full-field illumination with long duration flashes in various implant settings for brightness gain (V bias) and amplifiers' sensitivity (V gl) are measured using electroretinographic setup with a Ganzfeld bowl in a protocol of increasing stimulus luminances up to 1000 cd/m(2). CRIRs are a meaningful tool for assessing the transfer characteristic curves of the electronic implant in vivo monitoring the implants' voltage output as a function of log luminance in a sigmoidal shape. Changing the amplifiers' sensitivity (V gl) shifts the curve left or right along the log luminance axis. Adjustment of the gain (V bias) changes the maximal output. Contrast perception is only possible within the luminance range of the increasing slope of the function. The technical function of subretinal visual implants can be measured objectively using a standard electroretinographic setup. CRIRs help the patient to optimise the perception by adjusting the gain and luminance range of the device and are a useful tool for clinicians to objectively assess the function of subretinal visual implants in vivo.

  15. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate. PMID:21124725

  16. Short implants: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, I.; Desai, Shrikar R.; Singh, Rika

    2012-01-01

    Background: Short implants are manufactured for use in atrophic regions of the jaws. Although many studies report on short implants as ≤10 mm length with considerable success, the literature regarding survival rate of ≤7 mm is sparse. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate the publications concerning short dental implants defined as an implant with a length of ≤7 mm placed in the maxilla or in the mandible. Materials and Methods: A Medline and manual search was conducted to identify studies concerning short dental implants of length ≤7 mm published between 1991 and 2011. The articles included in this study report data on implant length ≤7 mm, such as demographic variables, implant type, location in jaws, observation time, prostheses and complications. Results: The 28 included studies represent one randomized controlled trial, 12 prospective studies and 10 retrospective studies. The survival rate of short implant was found to be increased from 80% to 90% gradually, with recent articles showing 100%. Conclusion: When severe atrophy of jaws was encountered, short and wide implants can be placed successfully. PMID:23162320

  17. Implant biomaterials: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Monika; Singh, Yashpal; Arora, Pooja; Arora, Vipin; Jain, Krati

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate selection of the implant biomaterial is a key factor for long term success of implants. The biologic environment does not accept completely any material so to optimize biologic performance, implants should be selected to reduce the negative biologic response while maintaining adequate function. Every clinician should always gain a thorough knowledge about the different biomaterials used for the dental implants. This article makes an effort to summarize various dental bio-materials which were used in the past and as well as the latest material used now. PMID:25610850

  18. Neural control of muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Markelonis, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    Cholinergic innervation regulates the physiological and biochemical properties of skeletal muscle. The mechanisms that appear to be involved in this regulation include soluble, neurally-derived polypeptides, transmitter-evoked muscle activity and the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, itself. Despite extensive research, the interacting neural mechanisms that control such macromolecules as acetylcholinesterase, the acetylcholine receptor and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase remain unclear. It may be that more simplified in vitro model systems coupled with recent dramatic advances in the molecular biology of neurally-regulated proteins will begin to allow researchers to unravel the mechanisms controlling the expression and maintenance of these macromolecules.

  19. Studies in Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    N00014-87-K-0377 TITLE: "Studies in Neural Networks " fl.U Q l~~izie JUL 021991 "" " F.: L9’CO37 "I! c-1(.d Contract No.: N00014-87-K-0377 Final...34) have been very useful, both in understanding the dynamics of neural networks and in engineering networks to perform particular tasks. We have noted...understanding more complex network computation. Interest in applying ideas from biological neural networks to real problems of engineering raises the issues of

  20. Subdermal progestin implant contraception.

    PubMed

    Darney, P D

    1991-08-01

    Sustained-release progestin contraceptives are a new approach to meeting a worldwide need for more effective and acceptable birth control. These contraceptive systems provide low, stable levels of synthetic progestins for periods of months to several years. Unlike earlier injectable and oral contraceptives, they do not cause peaks in progestin levels beyond those required for effective contraception, nor do they employ estrogens. For these reasons, sustained-release progestin systems are without some of the health risks attributed to birth control pills, and they are more effective, as well as easy to use, and completely reversible. They share common side effects, the most frequent of which is irregular menstrual bleeding caused by the erratic shedding of hypotrophic endometrium. Despite this and other minor side effects, most users find the sustained-release systems acceptable alternatives to other methods of contraception. Permanent or biodegradable subdermal implants, injections, intrauterine and intracervical devices, and vaginal rings are all employed as delivery systems for contraceptive progestins. The Norplant (Wyeth Ayerst, Radnor, PA) system, consisting of six silastic tubes filled with levonorgestrel and implanted under the skin, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and is already used by more than a half million women worldwide. The other sustained-release systems are in various stages of development, at least several years away from general use. When these new methods complete clinical trials, women will be able to choose from among implants, injections, or pellets with various durations of action, all providing convenient, highly effective contraception with low risk to health.

  1. Implants and Decoding for Intracortical Brain Computer Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Mark L.; Nurmikko, Arto V.; Donoghue, John P.; Hochberg, Leigh R.

    2014-01-01

    Intracortical brain computer interfaces (iBCIs) are being developed to enable a person to drive an output device, such as a computer cursor, directly from their neural activity. One goal of the technology is to help people with severe paralysis or limb loss. Key elements of an iBCI are the implanted sensor that records the neural signals and the software which decodes the user’s intended movement from those signals. Here, we focus on recent advances in these two areas, with special attention being placed on contributions that are or may soon be adopted by the iBCI research community. We discuss how these innovations increase the technology’s capability, accuracy, and longevity, all important steps that are expanding the range of possible future clinical applications. PMID:23862678

  2. Age at implantation and auditory memory in cochlear implanted children.

    PubMed

    Mikic, B; Miric, D; Nikolic-Mikic, M; Ostojic, S; Asanovic, M

    2014-05-01

    Early cochlear implantation, before the age of 3 years, provides the best outcome regarding listening, speech, cognition an memory due to maximal central nervous system plasticity. Intensive postoperative training improves not only auditory performance and language, but affects auditory memory as well. The aim of this study was to discover if the age at implantation affects auditory memory function in cochlear implanted children. A total of 50 cochlear implanted children aged 4 to 8 years were enrolled in this study: early implanted (1-3y) n = 27 and late implanted (4-6y) n = 23. Two types of memory tests were used: Immediate Verbal Memory Test and Forward and Backward Digit Span Test. Early implanted children performed better on both verbal and numeric tasks of auditory memory. The difference was statistically significant, especially on the complex tasks. Early cochlear implantation, before the age of 3 years, significantly improve auditory memory and contribute to better cognitive and education outcomes.

  3. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  4. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  5. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2001-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  6. Neurotrophic factors and neural prostheses: potential clinical applications based upon findings in the auditory system.

    PubMed

    Pettingill, Lisa N; Richardson, Rachael T; Wise, Andrew K; O'Leary, Stephen J; Shepherd, Robert K

    2007-06-01

    Spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) are the target cells of the cochlear implant, a neural prosthesis designed to provide important auditory cues to severely or profoundly deaf patients. The ongoing degeneration of SGNs that occurs following a sensorineural hearing loss is, therefore, considered a limiting factor in cochlear implant efficacy. We review neurobiological techniques aimed at preventing SGN degeneration using exogenous delivery of neurotrophic factors. Application of these proteins prevents SGN degeneration and can enhance neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, chronic electrical stimulation of SGNs increases neurotrophic factor-induced survival and is correlated with functional benefits. The application of neurotrophic factors has the potential to enhance the benefits that patients can derive from cochlear implants; moreover, these techniques may be relevant for use with neural prostheses in other neurological conditions.

  7. Neurotrophic factors and neural prostheses: potential clinical applications based upon findings in the auditory system

    PubMed Central

    Pettingill, L.N.; Richardson, R.T.; Wise, A.K.; O'Leary, S.; Shepherd, R.K.

    2007-01-01

    Spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) are the target cells of the cochlear implant, a neural prosthesis designed to provide important auditory cues to severely or profoundly deaf patients. The ongoing degeneration of SGNs that occurs following a sensorineural hearing loss is therefore considered a limiting factor in cochlear implant efficacy. We review neurobiological techniques aimed at preventing SGN degeneration using exogenous delivery of neurotrophic factors. Application of these proteins prevents SGN degeneration and can enhance neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, chronic electrical stimulation of SGNs increases neurotrophic factor-induced survival and is correlated with functional benefits. The application of neurotrophic factors has the potential to enhance the benefits that patients can derive from cochlear implants; moreover, these techniques may be relevant for use with neural prostheses in other neurological conditions. PMID:17551571

  8. Weakly connected neural nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1990-01-01

    A new neural network architecture is proposed based upon effects of non-Lipschitzian dynamics. The network is fully connected, but these connections are active only during vanishingly short time periods. The advantages of this architecture are discussed.

  9. Gluteal lift with subfascial implants.

    PubMed

    de la Peña-Salcedo, Jose Abel; Soto-Miranda, Miguel Angel; Vaquera-Guevara, Marcelo Osvaldo; Lopez-Salguero, Jose Fernando; Lavareda-Santana, Marco Antonio; Ledezma-Rodriguez, Jocelyn Celeste

    2013-06-01

    Gluteal enhancement surgery includes buttock implants, gluteal flaps, lipografting, and gluteal lifts. However, no information is available on the outcomes achievable using the gluteal lift combined with subfascial gluteal implants. A retrospective study was performed to analyze the outcomes of gluteal lift combined with subfascial gluteal implants performed during a 7-year period by a single surgeon at a single institution. During the study period, 114 patients (228 implants) ages 27-68 years (mean 47 years) were found. The follow-up period was 1-7 years (mean 4.5 years). The findings showed seroma in 11.4 % of the patients, hematoma in 5.26 %, minor wound dehiscence in 19.29 %, major wound dehiscence in 1.75 %, minor infection in 1.75 %, implant exposure in 0 %, capsular contracture Becker 3 and 4 in 3.5 %, implant rupture in 0 %, implant malposition in 5.25 %, long-term numbness of the buttock in 0 %, palpability of the implant in 0 %, implant rippling in 0 %, implant rupture in 0 %, wide scars in 41.2 %, need for secondary surgery in 26.31 %, and dissatisfaction with the final volume in 10.52 %. A patient satisfaction rate of 9.6 in 10 was found. The study showed that the gluteal lift combined with gluteal implants placed in the subfascial pocket provided good long-lasting results with an acceptable rate of complications, very high patient satisfaction, and easily concealed scars. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  10. Neural networks for aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linse, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    Current research in Artificial Neural Networks indicates that networks offer some potential advantages in adaptation and fault tolerance. This research is directed at determining the possible applicability of neural networks to aircraft control. The first application will be to aircraft trim. Neural network node characteristics, network topology and operation, neural network learning and example histories using neighboring optimal control with a neural net are discussed.

  11. [Implant rehabilitation of distal mandibular atrophy using a blade implant].

    PubMed

    Veron, C; Chanavaz, M

    1997-11-01

    After a brief revision of the anatomy of the posterior mandible and its natural resorption pattern, the ramus plate-form implant would be the implant of choice for the rehabilitation of this region. This "site specific" implant is inserted on the top of the crest and superficially impacted within the residual alveolar bone at the distal segment of the horizontal branch and guided to climb parallel to the anterior aspect of the ascending ramus. Its form and specific dimensions are perfectly compatible with the frequently limited quantity of available bone above the nerve canal in patients with advanced atrophy of the posterior mandible. It provides a predictable abutment for the implant-supported or dento-implant-supported prostheses of the posterior mandible.

  12. Auditory Implant Research at the House Ear Institute 1989–2013

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Robert V.

    2014-01-01

    The House Ear Institute (HEI) had a long and distinguished history of auditory implant innovation and development. Early clinical innovations include being one of the first cochlear implant (CI) centers, being the first center to implant a child with a cochlear implant in the US, developing the auditory brainstem implant, and developing multiple surgical approaches and tools for Otology. This paper reviews the second stage of auditory implant research at House – in-depth basic research on perceptual capabilities and signal processing for both cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants. Psychophysical studies characterized the loudness and temporal perceptual properties of electrical stimulation as a function of electrical parameters. Speech studies with the noise-band vocoder showed that only four bands of tonotopically arrayed information were sufficient for speech recognition, and that most implant users were receiving the equivalent of 8–10 bands of information. The noise-band vocoder allowed us to evaluate the effects of the manipulation of the number of bands, the alignment of the bands with the original tonotopic map, and distortions in the tonotopic mapping, including holes in the neural representation. Stimulation pulse rate was shown to have only a small effect on speech recognition. Electric fields were manipulated in position and sharpness, showing the potential benefit of improved tonotopic selectivity. Auditory training shows great promise for improving speech recognition for all patients. And the Auditory Brainstem Implant was developed and improved and its application expanded to new populations. Overall, the last 25 years of research at HEI helped increase the basic scientific understanding of electrical stimulation of hearing and contributed to the improved outcomes for patients with the CI and ABI devices. PMID:25449009

  13. Auditory implant research at the House Ear Institute 1989-2013.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Robert V

    2015-04-01

    The House Ear Institute (HEI) had a long and distinguished history of auditory implant innovation and development. Early clinical innovations include being one of the first cochlear implant (CI) centers, being the first center to implant a child with a cochlear implant in the US, developing the auditory brainstem implant, and developing multiple surgical approaches and tools for Otology. This paper reviews the second stage of auditory implant research at House - in-depth basic research on perceptual capabilities and signal processing for both cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants. Psychophysical studies characterized the loudness and temporal perceptual properties of electrical stimulation as a function of electrical parameters. Speech studies with the noise-band vocoder showed that only four bands of tonotopically arrayed information were sufficient for speech recognition, and that most implant users were receiving the equivalent of 8-10 bands of information. The noise-band vocoder allowed us to evaluate the effects of the manipulation of the number of bands, the alignment of the bands with the original tonotopic map, and distortions in the tonotopic mapping, including holes in the neural representation. Stimulation pulse rate was shown to have only a small effect on speech recognition. Electric fields were manipulated in position and sharpness, showing the potential benefit of improved tonotopic selectivity. Auditory training shows great promise for improving speech recognition for all patients. And the Auditory Brainstem Implant was developed and improved and its application expanded to new populations. Overall, the last 25 years of research at HEI helped increase the basic scientific understanding of electrical stimulation of hearing and contributed to the improved outcomes for patients with the CI and ABI devices. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled . Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Neural Networks: A Primer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    capture underlying relationships directly from observed behavior is one of the primary capabilities of neural networks. 29 Back P’ropagation Approximailon...model complex behavior patterns. Particularly in areas traditionally addressed by regression and other functional based techniques, neural networks...to.be determined directly from the observed behavior of a system or sample of individuals. This ability should prove important in personnel analysis and

  15. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    PubMed

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  16. Neural cryptography with queries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2005-01-01

    Neural cryptography is based on synchronization of tree parity machines by mutual learning. We extend previous key-exchange protocols by replacing random inputs with queries depending on the current state of the neural networks. The probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters using numerical simulations. The results show that queries restore the security against cooperating attackers. The success probability can be reduced without increasing the average synchronization time.

  17. Neural constraints on learning

    PubMed Central

    Sadtler, Patrick T.; Quick, Kristin M.; Golub, Matthew D.; Chase, Steven M.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C.; Yu, Byron M.; Batista, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    Motor, sensory, and cognitive learning require networks of neurons to generate new activity patterns. Because some behaviors are easier to learn than others1,2, we wondered if some neural activity patterns are easier to generate than others. We asked whether the existing network constrains the patterns that a subset of its neurons is capable of exhibiting, and if so, what principles define the constraint. We employed a closed-loop intracortical brain-computer interface (BCI) learning paradigm in which Rhesus monkeys controlled a computer cursor by modulating neural activity patterns in primary motor cortex. Using the BCI paradigm, we could specify and alter how neural activity mapped to cursor velocity. At the start of each session, we observed the characteristic activity patterns of the recorded neural population. These patterns comprise a low-dimensional space (termed the intrinsic manifold, or IM) within the high-dimensional neural firing rate space. They presumably reflect constraints imposed by the underlying neural circuitry. We found that the animals could readily learn to proficiently control the cursor using neural activity patterns that were within the IM. However, animals were less able to learn to proficiently control the cursor using activity patterns that were outside of the IM. This result suggests that the existing structure of a network can shape learning. On the timescale of hours, it appears to be difficult to learn to generate neural activity patterns that are not consistent with the existing network structure. These findings offer a network-level explanation for the observation that we are more readily able to learn new skills when they are related to the skills that we already possess3,4. PMID:25164754

  18. [Familial neural mitochondrial deafness].

    PubMed

    Marangos, N; Mausolf, A

    1990-09-01

    Mitochondrial abnormalities are known to cause several neurological syndromes that often include hearing loss as one of their features. We present two brothers with mitochondrial cytopathy and hearing loss. The audiological and electrocochleographic findings suggest a neural origin for the hearing impairment. Muscle biopsy is an important tool for the diagnosis of