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Sample records for implanted detection structures

  1. Detection of degradation in polyester implants by analysing mode shapes of structure vibration.

    PubMed

    Samami, Hassan; Pan, Jingzhe

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on using vibration analysis to detect degradation in degrading polyesters. A numerical model of a degrading plate sample is considered. The plate is assumed to degrade following the typical behaviour of amorphous copolymers of polylactide and polyglycolide. Due to the well-known autocatalytic effect in the degradation of these polyesters, the inner core of the plate degrades faster than outer surface region, forming layers of materials with varying Young׳s modulus. Firstly the change in molecular weight and corresponding change in Young׳s modulus at different times are calculated using the mathematical models developed in our previous work. Secondly the first four mode shapes of transverse vibration of the plate are calculated using the finite element method. Finally the curvature of the mode shapes are calculated and related to the spatial distribution of the polymer degradation. It is shown that the curvature of the mode shapes can be used to detect the onset and distribution of polymer degradation. The level of measurement accuracy required in an experiment is presented to guide practical applications of the method. At the end of this paper a demonstration case of coronary stent is presented showing how the method can be used to detect degradation in an implant of sophisticated structure. PMID:27235780

  2. Detection of Acoustic Temporal Fine Structure by Cochlear Implant Listeners: Behavioral Results and Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Imennov, Nikita S.; Won, Jong Ho; Drennan, Ward R.; Jameyson, Elyse; Rubinstein, Jay T.

    2013-01-01

    A test of within-channel detection of acoustic temporal fine structure (aTFS) cues is presented. Eight cochlear implant listeners (CI) were asked to discriminate between two Schroeder-phase (SP) complexes using a two-alternative, forced-choice task. Because differences between the acoustic stimuli are primarily constrained to their aTFS, successful discrimination reflects a combination of the subjects’ perception of and the strategy’s ability to deliver aTFS cues. Subjects were mapped with single-channel Continuous Interleaved Sampling (CIS) and Simultaneous Analog Stimulation (SAS) strategies. To compare within- and across- channel delivery of aTFS cues, a 16-channel clinical HiRes strategy was also fitted. Throughout testing, SAS consistently outperformed the CIS strategy (p ≤ 0.002). For SP stimuli with F0 =50 Hz, the highest discrimination scores were achieved with the HiRes encoding, followed by scores with the SAS and the CIS strategies, respectively. At 200 Hz, single-channel SAS performed better than HiRes (p = 0.022), demonstrating that under a more challenging testing condition, discrimination performance with a single-channel analog encoding can exceed that of a 16-channel pulsatile strategy. To better understand the intermediate steps of discrimination, a biophysical model was used to examine the neural discharges evoked by the SP stimuli. Discrimination estimates calculated from simulated neural responses successfully tracked the behavioral performance trends of single-channel CI listeners. PMID:23333260

  3. Detection of intrinsic stress in cubic boron nitride films by x-ray absorption near-edge structure: Stress relaxation mechanisms by simultaneous ion implantation during growth

    SciTech Connect

    Gago, R.; Abendroth, B.; Moeller, W.; Cerda, J. I.; Jimenez, I.

    2007-11-01

    The bonding structure of cubic boron nitride (cBN) films with different levels of intrinsic stress (1-10 GPa) has been studied from the K-shell x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The stress level was tuned by the damage induced from simultaneous medium-energy ion implantation (1-10 keV) during growth. The films show a dominant sp{sup 3} arrangement for damage values below a certain threshold, with an appreciable sp{sup 3} to sp{sup 2} transformation taking place above this limit. Interestingly, the degree of stress in sp{sup 3} structures is reflected in the B 1s spectral line shape, which progressively converges to that of stress-free cBN powder for increasing ion damage. These results indicate that stress buildup and release occur at a microscopic level. The changes in the spectral line shape are correlated with modifications in the electronic structure due to the presence of intrinsic stress and bond distortion within the cubic network, as predicted by density functional theory calculations. Our findings reveal the potential of XANES spectroscopy to detect stress in disordered BN systems.

  4. Haemocompatibility optimisation of implants by hybrid structuring.

    PubMed

    Bolz, A; Schaldach, M

    1993-07-01

    State of the art in biomaterial research and implant design is a compromise between functionality and biocompatibility. Consequently, results often have disadvantages with respect to both aspects. With regard to biocompatibility, the activation of the clotting system by alloplastic materials is of great significance, because it necessitates anticoagulant therapy. Further improvements in implant technology require an understanding of the interactions between blood and implants. Therefore a microscopic model of thrombogenesis at alloplastic surfaces is briefly presented, relating thrombogenicity of a material to the electronic structure of its surface. The electronic requirements for high haemocompatibility, which result from this model (especially a low band-gap density of states and a high surface conductivity) are fulfilled by an amorphous alloy of silicon and carbon (a-SiC:H). The advantage of amorphous materials is that they do not obey stoichiometric rules. Thus they allow a continuous adjustment of the electronic parameters without fundamental changes in their mechanical and chemical properties. The theoretical results were checked in vitro by total internal reflection intrinsic fluorescence (TIRIF) spectroscopy as well as thrombelastography experiments (TEG). In comparison with conventional materials such as titanium or LTI carbon, the TEG-clotting time of a-SiC:H-coatings was prolonged by in excess of 200 per cent. As a consequence, a-SiC:H is well suited as a haemocompatible coating material for hybrid structuring of cardiovascular implants.

  5. In Vivo Ultrasonic Detection of Polyurea Crosslinked Silica Aerogel Implants

    PubMed Central

    Sabri, Firouzeh; Sebelik, Merry E.; Meacham, Ryan; Boughter, John D.; Challis, Mitchell J.; Leventis, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Background Polyurea crosslinked silica aerogels are highly porous, lightweight, and mechanically strong materials with great potential for in vivo applications. Recent in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated the biocompatibility of this type of aerogel. The highly porous nature of aerogels allows for exceptional thermal, electric, and acoustic insulating capabilities that can be taken advantage of for non-invasive external imaging techniques. Sound-based detection of implants is a low cost, non-invasive, portable, and rapid technique that is routinely used and readily available in major clinics and hospitals. Methodology In this study the first in vivo ultrasound response of polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel implants was investigated by means of a GE Medical Systems LogiQe diagnostic ultrasound machine with a linear array probe. Aerogel samples were inserted subcutaneously and sub-muscularly in a) fresh animal model and b) cadaveric human model for analysis. For comparison, samples of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) were also imaged under similar conditions as the aerogel samples. Conclusion/significance Polyurea crosslinked silica aerogel (X-Si aerogel) implants were easily identified when inserted in either of the regions in both fresh animal model and cadaveric model. The implant dimensions inferred from the images matched the actual size of the implants and no apparent damage was sustained by the X-Si aerogel implants as a result of the ultrasonic imaging process. The aerogel implants demonstrated hyperechoic behavior and significant posterior shadowing. Results obtained were compared with images acquired from the PDMS implants inserted at the same location. PMID:23799093

  6. Surface topographical and structural analysis of Ag+-implanted polymethylmethacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Shafaq; Rafique, M. Shahid; Saleemi, Farhat; Naab, Fabian; Toader, Ovidiu; Sagheer, Riffat; Bashir, Shazia; Zia, Rehana; Siraj, Khurram; Iqbal, Saman

    2016-08-01

    Specimens of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) were implanted with 400-keV Ag+ ions at different ion fluences ranging from 1 × 1014 to 5 × 1015 ions/cm2 using a 400-kV NEC ion implanter. The surface topographical features of the implanted PMMA were investigated by a confocal microscope. Modifications in the structural properties of the implanted specimens were analyzed in comparison with pristine PMMA by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. UV-Visible spectroscopy was applied to determine the effects of ion implantation on optical transmittance of the implanted PMMA. The confocal microscopic images revealed the formation of hillock-like microstructures along the ion track on the implanted PMMA surface. The increase in ion fluence led to more nucleation of hillocks. The XRD pattern confirmed the amorphous nature of pristine and implanted PMMA, while the Raman studies justified the transformation of Ag+-implanted PMMA into amorphous carbon at the ion fluence of ⩾5 × 1014 ions/cm2. Moreover, the decrease in optical transmittance of PMMA is associated with the formation of hillocks and ion-induced structural modifications after implantation.

  7. Preservation of basal inner ear structures in cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Adunka, Oliver; Gstoettner, Wolfgang; Hambek, Markus; Unkelbach, Marc H; Radeloff, Andreas; Kiefer, Jan

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this report was to examine basal trauma in implanted human temporal bones and discuss modified approaches to the basal cochlear turn to avoid destruction of basal cochlear structures. Thirty-three human temporal bones were implanted with four different cochlear implant electrode arrays manufactured by MED-EL using either a caudal approach cochleostomy or round window membrane insertions. All specimens were processed with a special histological technique that allows sectioning of undecalcified bone with the electrode in situ. All bones were evaluated histologically in terms of basal cochlear trauma. Two pathomechanisms of basal trauma could be distinguished and were evaluated separately, buckling of the basal end of the array and trauma by drilling. Using the caudal approach cochleostomy, the total percentage of destructive basal trauma was 48% compared to less than 15% when performing round window membrane insertions. Although it is still unclear whether basal cochlear trauma influences apical cochlear function or not, adapted surgical procedures and no forceful insertion maneuvers should be used when performing cochlear implantations with hearing preservation.

  8. Sensing and detection in Medtronic implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Brown, Mark L; Swerdlow, Charles D

    2016-09-01

    Ensuring sensing and detection of ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) was a prerequisite for the clinical trials that established the survival benefit of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs). However, for decades, a high incidence of unnecessary shocks limited patients' and physicians' acceptance of ICD therapy. Oversensing, misclassification of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) as VT, and self-terminating VT accounted for the vast majority of unnecessary shocks. Medtronic ICDs utilize sensitive baseline settings with minimal blanking periods to ensure accurate sensing of VF, VT, and SVT electrograms. Programmable algorithms reject oversensing caused by far-field R waves, T waves, and non-physiologic signals caused by lead failure. A robust hierarchy of SVT-VT discriminators minimize misclassification of SVT as VT. These features, combined with evidence-based programming, have reduced the 1‑year inappropriate shock rate to 1.5 % for dual-/triple-chamber ICDs and to 2.5 % for single-chamber ICDs. PMID:27624809

  9. Defect engineering in the MOSLED structure by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prucnal, S.; Wójtowicz, A.; Pyszniak, K.; Drozdziel, A.; Zuk, J.; Turek, M.; Rebohle, L.; Skorupa, W.

    2009-05-01

    When amorphous SiO2 films are bombarded with energetic ions, various types of defects are created as a consequence of ion-solid interaction (peroxy radicals POR, oxygen deficient centres (ODC), non-bridging oxygen hole centres (NBOHC), E‧ centres, etc.). The intensity of the electroluminescence (EL) from oxygen deficiency centres at 2.7 eV, non-bridging oxygen hole centres at 1.9 eV and defect centres with emission at 2.07 eV can be easily modified by the ion implantation of the different elements (H, N, O) into the completely processed MOSLED structure. Nitrogen implanted into the SiO2:Gd layer reduces the concentration of the ODC and NBOHC while the doping of the oxygen increases the EL intensity observed from POR defect and NBOHC. Moreover, after oxygen or hydrogen implantation into the SiO2:Ge structure fourfold or fifth fold increase of the germanium related EL intensity was observed.

  10. [Tachycardia detection in implantable cardioverter-defibrillators by Sorin/LivaNova : Algorithms, pearls and pitfalls].

    PubMed

    Kolb, Christof; Ocklenburg, Rolf

    2016-09-01

    For physicians involved in the treatment of patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) the knowledge of tachycardia detection algorithms is of paramount importance. This knowledge is essential for adequate device selection during de-novo implantation, ICD replacement, and for troubleshooting during follow-up. This review describes tachycardia detection algorithms incorporated in ICDs by Sorin/LivaNova and analyses their strengths and weaknesses.

  11. [Tachycardia detection in implantable cardioverter-defibrillators by Sorin/LivaNova : Algorithms, pearls and pitfalls].

    PubMed

    Kolb, Christof; Ocklenburg, Rolf

    2016-09-01

    For physicians involved in the treatment of patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) the knowledge of tachycardia detection algorithms is of paramount importance. This knowledge is essential for adequate device selection during de-novo implantation, ICD replacement, and for troubleshooting during follow-up. This review describes tachycardia detection algorithms incorporated in ICDs by Sorin/LivaNova and analyses their strengths and weaknesses. PMID:27605232

  12. Structural and electrical properties of In-implanted Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, R. Kremer, F.; Mirzaei, S.; Medling, S. A.; Ridgway, M. C.; Sprouster, D. J.; Decoster, S.; Glover, C. J.; Russo, S. P.

    2015-10-28

    We report on the effects of dopant concentration on the structural and electrical properties of In-implanted Ge. For In concentrations of ≤ 0.2 at. %, extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements demonstrate that all In atoms occupy a substitutional lattice site while metallic In precipitates are apparent in transmission electron micrographs for In concentrations ≥0.6 at. %. Evidence of the formation of In-vacancy complexes deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements is complimented by density functional theory simulations. Hall effect measurements of the conductivity, carrier density, and carrier mobility are then correlated with the substitutional In fraction.

  13. Structural defects and chemical interaction of implanted ions with substrate structure in amorphous SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Hideo; Matsunami, Noriaki

    1993-11-01

    Structural defects in SiO2 glasses implanted with Li+, N+, O+, F+, Si+, and P+ ions were examined by vacuum-ultraviolet-absorption and electron-paramagnetic-resonance spectroscopies as well as thermal-gas-release analysis. The chemical interaction of implanted ions with substrate structure was considered on the basis of the obtained results. It is found that the type of predominant defects is controlled by the electronegative nature of implants. Silicon-silicon homobonds, which are oxygen-vacancy-type defects, are produced by electropositive implants (i.e., Li, P, and Si) at concentrations comparable to those of the implants. On the other hand, in the case of electronegative implants (F and O) O2 molecules and peroxy radicals (POR), both of which may be regarded as oxygen-interstitial-type defects, are the major defects and the total concentrations of these two defects are comparable to implant concentrations. These results indicate that chemical interaction of implanted ions with SiO2 is primarily controlled by the electronegative nature of implants. Electropositive implants (M) react chemically with oxygen atoms in the substrate structure to form M-O bonds, leaving Si-Si bonds. Electronegative implants (A) react chemically with silicon atoms to form Si-A bonds and oxygen atoms recoiled with implants combine with each other to form O2 molecules or react with the silica-network structure to form POR's. Concentrations of these predominant defects relative to implants can be used quantitatively to describe the strength of chemical interactions. When the chemical interaction is strong, both concentrations are comparable. On the other hand, when the chemical interaction is weak, concentrations of these defects are much smaller than those of implants because the major fraction of implants occur in a neutral state without forming chemical bonds with constituents of the substrate. Nitrogen is an example of this category and the major fraction of implanted nitrogen atoms

  14. The effect of zirconium implantation on the structure of sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Sina, Younes; McHargue, Carl J; Duscher, Gerd; Zhang, Yanwen

    2012-01-01

    The effect of zirconium implantation on the structure of sapphire was investigated by 175 keV Zr implantation at room temperature to a fluence of 4 1016 ions/cm2 into sapphire single crystals. Samples were examined by several experimental techniques: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy along a channeling direction (RBS-C), electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and Z-contrast images obtained in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. Range and deposited energy were simulated with SRIM-2008.04. The Z-contrast images from transmission electron microscope indicated: a near surface damaged layer ~30 nm thick, a subsurface region exhibiting "random" de-channeling ~52 nm thick, and a deeper damaged, crystalline zone ~64 nm thick. The RBS-C spectra confirmed the presence of these three regions. The two damaged regions contained high concentrations of as yet unresolved defect clusters. The intermediate region contained Zr-clusters embedded in an "amorphous" matrix that exhibited short-range order corresponding to -Al2O3, i.e., a defective spinel structure. The EELS measurements show that the amorphous region is deficient in oxygen.

  15. Influence of the chemical nature of implanted ions on the structure of a silicon layer damaged by implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbachev, K. D. Voronova, M. I.; Bublik, V. T.; Mordkovich, V. N. Pazhin, D. M.; Zinenko, V. I.; Agafonov, Yu. A.

    2013-12-15

    The influence of the implantation of silicon single crystals by fluorine, nitrogen, oxygen, and neon ions on the distribution of strain and the static Debye-Waller factor in the crystal lattice over the implanted-layer depth has been investigated by high-resolution X-ray diffraction. The density depth distribution in the surface layer of native oxide has been measured by X-ray reflectometry. Room-temperature implantation conditions have ensured the equality of the suggested ranges of ions of different masses and the energies transferred by them to the target. It is convincingly shown that the change in the structural parameters of the radiation-damaged silicon layer and the native oxide layer depend on the chemical activity of the implanted ions.

  16. Structural defects induced by Fe-ion implantation in TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leedahl, B.; Zatsepin, D. A.; Boukhvalov, D. W.; Green, R. J.; McLeod, J. A.; Kim, S. S.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Cholakh, S. O.; Moewes, A.

    2014-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy measurements of pellet and thin film forms of TiO2 with implanted Fe ions are presented and discussed. The findings indicate that Fe-implantation in a TiO2 pellet sample induces heterovalent cation substitution (Fe2+ → Ti4+) beneath the surface region. But in thin film samples, the clustering of Fe atoms is primarily detected. In addition to this, significant amounts of secondary phases of Fe3+ are detected on the surface of all doped samples due to oxygen exposure. These experimental findings are compared with density functional theory calculations of formation energies for different configurations of structural defects in the implanted TiO2:Fe system. According to our calculations, the clustering of Fe-atoms in TiO2:Fe thin films can be attributed to the formation of combined substitutional and interstitial defects. Further, the differences due to Fe doping in pellet and thin film samples can ultimately be attributed to different surface to volume ratios.

  17. Structural defects induced by Fe-ion implantation in TiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Leedahl, B. Green, R. J.; McLeod, J. A.; Moewes, A.; Zatsepin, D. A.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Boukhvalov, D. W.; Kim, S. S.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Cholakh, S. O.

    2014-02-07

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy measurements of pellet and thin film forms of TiO{sub 2} with implanted Fe ions are presented and discussed. The findings indicate that Fe-implantation in a TiO{sub 2} pellet sample induces heterovalent cation substitution (Fe{sup 2+} → Ti{sup 4+}) beneath the surface region. But in thin film samples, the clustering of Fe atoms is primarily detected. In addition to this, significant amounts of secondary phases of Fe{sup 3+} are detected on the surface of all doped samples due to oxygen exposure. These experimental findings are compared with density functional theory calculations of formation energies for different configurations of structural defects in the implanted TiO{sub 2}:Fe system. According to our calculations, the clustering of Fe-atoms in TiO{sub 2}:Fe thin films can be attributed to the formation of combined substitutional and interstitial defects. Further, the differences due to Fe doping in pellet and thin film samples can ultimately be attributed to different surface to volume ratios.

  18. Carbon nanotubes implanted manganese-based MOFs for simultaneous detection of biomolecules in body fluids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min-Qiang; Ye, Cui; Bao, Shu-Juan; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Ya-Nan; Xu, Mao-wen

    2016-02-21

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have recently attracted much interest in electrochemical fields due to their controlled porosity, large internal surface area, and countless structural topologies. However, the direct application of single component MOFs is limited since they also exhibit poor electronic conductivity, low mechanical stability, and inferior electrocatalytic ability. To overcome these problems, we implanted multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) into manganese-based metal-organic frameworks (Mn-BDC) using a one-step solvothermal method and found that the introduction of MWCNTs can initiate the splitting of bulky Mn-BDC into thin layers. This splitting is highly significant in that it enhances the electronic conductivity and electrocatalytic ability of Mn-BDC. The constructed Mn-BDC@MWCNT composites were utilized as an electrode modifying material in the fabrication of an electrochemical sensor and then were used successfully for the determination of biomolecules in human body fluid. The sensor displayed successful detection performance with wide linear detection ranges (0.1-1150, 0.01-500, and 0.02-1100 μM for AA, DA and UA, respectively) and low limits of detection (0.01, 0.002, and 0.005 μM for AA, DA and UA, respectively); thus, this preliminary study presents an electrochemical biosensor constructed with a novel electrode modifying material that exhibits superior potential for the practical detection of AA, DA and UA in urine samples.

  19. The generation, detection and measurement of laser-induced carbon plasma ions and their implantation effects on brass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Shahbaz; Bashir, Shazia; Shahid Rafique, M.; Yousaf, Daniel; Ahmad, Riaz

    2016-05-01

    The generation, detection and measurement of laser-induced carbon plasma ions and their implantation effects on brass substrate have been investigated. Thomson parabola technique was employed to measure the energy and flux of carbon ions. The magnetic field of strength 80 mT was applied on the graphite plasma plume to provide an appropriate trajectory to the generated ions. The energy of carbon ions is 678 KeV for laser fluence of 5.1 J/cm2 which was kept constant for all exposures. The flux of ions varies from 32 × 1011 to 72 × 1014 ions/cm2 for varying numbers of laser pulses from 3000 to 12,000. In order to explore the ion irradiation effects on brass, four brass substrates were irradiated by carbon ions of different flux. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) are used to analyze the surface morphology and crystallographic structure of ion-implanted brass, respectively. SEM analysis reveals the formation and growth of nano-/micro-sized cavities, pores and pits for the various ion flux for varying numbers of laser pulses from 3000 to 12,000. By increasing ion flux by increasing the number of pulses up to 9000 shots, the dendritic structures initiate to grow along with cavities and pores. At the maximum ion flux for 12,000 shots, the unequiaxed dendritic structures become distinct and the distance between the dendrites is decreased, whereas cavities, pores and pits are completely finished. The XRD analysis reveals that a new phase of ZnC (0012) is formed in the brass substrate after ion implantation. Universal tensile testing machine and Vickers microhardness tester are used to explore the yield stress, ultimate tensile strength and microhardness of ion-implanted brass substrate. The mechanical properties monotonically increase by increasing the ion flux. Variations in mechanical properties are correlated with surface and structural modifications of brass.

  20. Investigation of the silicone structure in breast implants using ¹H NMR.

    PubMed

    Formes, Andreas; Diehl, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Against the background of the scandal about low-grade silicone breast implants of the French manufacturer Poly Implant Prothese (PIP), several types of implants were examined using (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The intention was to classify an implant according to its silicone structure. Therefore, the certificated raw material of the American silicone producer Nusil Technology was analyzed and used as a reference. The list of tested implants consists of implants by PFM medical, PIP, Silimed, Rofil, Eurosilicone, Mentor, Perouse Plastie, Polytech, Nagor, CUI, and McGhan. In the (1)H NMR spectrum the signal of the vinyl group, which is used to cross link silicone rubbers, is visible. It is possible to differentiate between silicones which have a vinyl terminated end group and silicones whose vinyl group is located within the chain of the polymer. The two different types of the vinyl group are one mean to classify the implants. Other categories besides the type of vinyl include the relative amount of the remaining vinyl in the implant and the chemical structure of the material used for the production of the envelope. With these characteristics the examined implants could be grouped into four types. PMID:24342752

  1. Structural transformation of implanted diamond layers during high temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubanov, S.; Fairchild, B. A.; Suvorova, A.; Olivero, P.; Prawer, S.

    2015-12-01

    In the recent years graphitization of ion-beam induced amorphous layers became the basic tool for device fabrication in diamond. The etchable graphitic layers can be removed to form free-standing membranes into which the desired structures can be sculpted using FIB milling. The optical properties of the devices fabricated using this method are assumed on the model of sharp diamond-air interface. The real quality of this interface could depend on degree of graphitization of the amorphous damage layers after annealing. In the present work the graphitization process was studied using conventional and analytical TEM. It was found that annealing at 550 °C results in a partial graphitization of the implanted volume with formation of the nano-crystalline graphitic phase sandwiched between layers of tetrahedral amorphous carbon. Annealing at 1400 °C resulted in complete graphitization of the amorphous layers. The average size of graphite nano-crystals did not exceed 5 nm with predominant orientation of c-planes normal to the sample surface.

  2. System development and performance evaluation on detection schemes for UWB-IR implant communications.

    PubMed

    Katsu, Kenta; Anzai, Daisuke; Wang, Jianqing

    2013-01-01

    Ultra wideband-impulse radio (UWB-IR) transmission is one of promising transmission technologies in implant body area networks (BANs). Although some studies have investigated the channel model and communication architecture in implant BANs, no study quantitatively shows the feasibility of UWB-IR communication in the human body with actual developed transceivers at a high data rate. In this paper, we focus on experimental evaluation of the correlation detection (coherent detection) and the energy detection (non-coherent detection) for UWB-IR transmission with multi-pulse position modulation (MPPM). For this purpose, we develop a UWB-IR communication system with MPPM scheme, and experimentally evaluate the transmission performance of the developed systems with the two different detection schemes. In addition to the experimental evaluation, we also theoretically analyze the bit error rate (BER) performance by using Gaussian approximation. From the experimental results, the developed system has achieved a BER of 10(-2) at the propagation loss of 75 dB with a data rate of 2 Mbps in the correlation detection. This result shows the feasibility of reliable UWB-IR communication in actual implant BANs. PMID:24109917

  3. Measurements of deformations in osseous structures and implants by digital speckle interferometry (DSPI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, Rosario; González-Peña, Rolando; Cibrián, Rosa; Buendía, Mateo; Mínguez, Fe; Laguía, Manuel; Molina, Teresa; Marti, Luis; Esteve, José; Caballero, José; Micó, Vicente; Sanjuan, Elena

    2006-09-01

    Knowledge of how osseous structures and implants behave under deforming stress is an interesting point when evaluating the response of an implanted prosthesis. The failure of an implant is not always due to the great stress a structure may be subjected to at a particular moment, but rather to the effects of deterioration associated with lesser stress but which is continuously applied. Therefore it is helpful to know how bones and implants respond to this lesser stress. Digital speckle interferometry (DSPI) is suitable for this type of determination, as it is a highly sensitive, non-invasive optical technique. In this study we present the results we obtained when determining the elasticity of a sample of a macerated human radius, a titanium implant and a titanium screw used to treat the fractures of this bone. The correlation ratios we obtained in determining Young's modulus were in the order of r=0.994. Models were made of these structures using the finite elements method (FEM) with the aid of the ANSYS 10.0 program, applying Young's modulus values determined by DSPI. With a view to monitoring the accuracy of the FEM models of the bone and the implant elements we designed a flexion experiment to obtain the DSPI values in and out of plane. The high degree of concordance between the results of both methods makes it possible to continue studying osseous samples with a fixed implant, and also other implants made of different alloys.

  4. Development of Linear Mode Detection for Top-down Ion Implantation of Low Energy Sb Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Jose; Singh, Meenakshi; Bielejec, Edward; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication of donor spin qubits for quantum computing applications requires deterministic control over the number of implanted donors and the spatial accuracy to within which these can be placed. We present an ion implantation and detection technique that allows us to deterministically implant a single Sb ion (donor) with a resulting volumetric distribution of <10 nm. This donor distribution is accomplished by implanting 30keV Sb into Si which yields a longitudinal straggle of <10 nm and combined with a <50 nm spot size using the Sandia NanoImplanter (nI). The ion beam induced charge signal is collected using a MOS detector that is integrated with a Si quantum dot for transport measurments. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Magnetic and structural properties of Fe-implanted cubic GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righetti, V. A. N.; Gratens, X.; Chitta, V. A.; de Godoy, M. P. F.; Rodrigues, A. D.; Abramof, E.; Dias, J. F.; Schikora, D.; As, D. J.; Lischka, K.

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we report on structural and magnetic properties of cubic GaN epitaxial layers implanted with Fe ions and subsequently subjected to thermal annealing. The epitaxial quality of the layers was studied by X-ray diffraction rocking curves (ω-scans) and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that the implantation damages the crystal structure producing an expansion of the lattice parameter in the implanted region. These damages are partially removed by the thermal treatment. Room temperature ferromagnetism is observed for the sample implanted with a dose of 1.2 × 1016 cm-2, while samples implanted with 2.4 × 1016 cm-2 show a coexistence of ferromagnetism and paramagnetism due to disperse Fe3+. Thermal annealing changes these magnetic properties. For the low dose sample, the ferromagnetism is converted into paramagnetism while for the high dose we observed an enhancement of the ferromagnetic contribution characterized by a superparamagnetism behavior attributed to Fe-based particles.

  6. Shallow nitrogen ion implantation: Evolution of chemical state and defect structure in titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manojkumar, P. A.; Chirayath, V. A.; Balamurugan, A. K.; Krishna, Nanda Gopala; Ilango, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Amarendra, G.; Tyagi, A. K.; Raj, Baldev

    2016-09-01

    Evolution of chemical states and defect structure in titanium during low energy nitrogen ion implantation by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) process is studied. The underlying process of chemical state evolution is investigated using secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The implantation induced defect structure evolution as a function of dose is elucidated using variable energy positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy (PAS) and the results were corroborated with chemical state. Formation of 3 layers of defect state was modeled to fit PAS results.

  7. Structure analysis of bimetallic Co-Au nanoparticles formed by sequential ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-jian; Wang, Yu-hua; Zhang, Xiao-jian; Song, Shu-peng; chen, Hong; Zhang, Ke; Xiong, Zu-zhao; Ji, Ling-ling; Dai, Hou-mei; Wang, Deng-jing; Lu, Jian-duo; Wang, Ru-wu; Zheng, Li-rong

    2016-08-01

    Co-Au alloy Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) are formed by sequential ion implantation of Co and Au into silica glass at room temperature. The ion ranges of Au ions implantation process have been displayed to show the ion distribution. We have used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to investigate the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to study the local structural information of bimetallic nanoparticles. With the increase of Au ion implantation, the local environments of Co ions are changed enormously. Hence, three oscillations, respectively, Co-O, Co-Co and Co-Au coordination are determined.

  8. Towards a bimodal proximity sensor for in situ neurovascular bundle detection during dental implant surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jessie R.; Baribeau, François; Grenier, Paul; Émond, Frédéric; Dubois, Sylvain; Duchesne, François; Girard, Marc; Pope, Timothy; Gallant, Pascal; Mermut, Ozzy; Moghadam, Hassan Ghaderi

    2013-01-01

    Proof of concept results are presented towards an in situ bimodal proximity sensor for neurovascular bundle detection during dental implant surgery using combined near infrared absorption (NIR) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) techniques. These modalities are shown to have different sensitivity to the proximity of optical contrast from neurovascular bundles. NIR AC and DC signals from the pulsing of an artery enable qualitative ranging of the bundle in the millimeter range, with best sensitivity around 0.5-3mm distance in a custom phantom setup. OCT provides structural mapping of the neurovascular bundle at sub-millimeter distances in an ex vivo human jaw bone. Combining the two techniques suggests a novel ranging system for the surgeon that could be implemented in a “smart drill.” The proximity to the neurovascular bundle can be tracked in real time in the range of a few millimeters with NIR signals, after which higher resolution imaging OCT to provide finer ranging in the sub-millimeter distances. PMID:24466473

  9. The local structure and ferromagnetism in Fe-implanted SrTiO₃ single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lobacheva, O. Chavarha, M.; Yiu, Y. M.; Sham, T. K.; Goncharova, L. V.

    2014-07-07

    We report a connection between the local structure of low-level Fe impurities and vacancies as the cause of ferromagnetic behavior observed in strontium titanate single crystals (STO), which were implanted with Fe and Si ions at different doses then annealed in oxygen. The effects of Fe doping and post-implantation annealing of STO were studied by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device magnetometry. XANES spectra for Fe and Ti K- and L-edge reveal the changes in the local environment of Fe and Ti following the implantation and annealing steps. The annealing in oxygen atmosphere partially healed implantation damages and changed the oxidation state of the implanted iron from metallic Fe⁰ to Fe²⁺/Fe³⁺ oxide. The STO single crystals were weak ferromagnets prior to implantation. The maximum saturation moment was obtained after our highest implantation dose of 2×10¹⁶ Fe atom/cm², which could be correlated with the metallic Fe⁰ phases in addition to the presence of O/Ti vacancies. After recrystallization annealing, the ferromagnetic response disappears. Iron oxide phases with Fe²⁺ and Fe³⁺ corresponding to this regime were identified and confirmed by calculations using Real Space Multiple Scattering program (FEFF9).

  10. The local structure and ferromagnetism in Fe-implanted SrTiO3 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobacheva, O.; Chavarha, M.; Yiu, Y. M.; Sham, T. K.; Goncharova, L. V.

    2014-07-01

    We report a connection between the local structure of low-level Fe impurities and vacancies as the cause of ferromagnetic behavior observed in strontium titanate single crystals (STO), which were implanted with Fe and Si ions at different doses then annealed in oxygen. The effects of Fe doping and post-implantation annealing of STO were studied by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy and Superconducting Quantum Interference Device magnetometry. XANES spectra for Fe and Ti K- and L-edge reveal the changes in the local environment of Fe and Ti following the implantation and annealing steps. The annealing in oxygen atmosphere partially healed implantation damages and changed the oxidation state of the implanted iron from metallic Fe0 to Fe2+/Fe3+ oxide. The STO single crystals were weak ferromagnets prior to implantation. The maximum saturation moment was obtained after our highest implantation dose of 2 × 1016 Fe atom/cm2, which could be correlated with the metallic Fe0 phases in addition to the presence of O/Ti vacancies. After recrystallization annealing, the ferromagnetic response disappears. Iron oxide phases with Fe2+ and Fe3+ corresponding to this regime were identified and confirmed by calculations using Real Space Multiple Scattering program (FEFF9).

  11. The relationship between dental implant stability and trabecular bone structure using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between primary implant stability as measured by impact response frequency and the structural parameters of trabecular bone using cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT), excluding the effect of cortical bone thickness. Methods We measured the impact response of a dental implant placed into swine bone specimens composed of only trabecular bone without the cortical bone layer using an inductive sensor. The peak frequency of the impact response spectrum was determined as an implant stability criterion (SPF). The 3D microstructural parameters were calculated from CT images of the bone specimens obtained using both micro-CT and CBCT. Results SPF had significant positive correlations with trabecular bone structural parameters (BV/TV, BV, BS, BSD, Tb.Th, Tb.N, FD, and BS/BV) (P<0.01) while SPF demonstrated significant negative correlations with other microstructural parameters (Tb.Sp, Tb.Pf, and SMI) using micro-CT and CBCT (P<0.01). Conclusions There was an increase in implant stability prediction by combining BV/TV and SMI in the stepwise forward regression analysis. Bone with high volume density and low surface density shows high implant stability. Well-connected thick bone with small marrow spaces also shows high implant stability. The combination of bone density and architectural parameters measured using CBCT can predict the implant stability more accurately than the density alone in clinical diagnoses. PMID:27127692

  12. Structural investigations in helium implanted cubic zirconia using grazing incidence XRD and EXAFS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuri, G.; Degueldre, C.; Bertsch, J.; Döbeli, M.

    2010-06-01

    The crystal structure and local atom arrangements surrounding Zr atoms were determined for a helium implanted cubic stabilized zirconia (CSZ) using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, respectively, measured at glancing angles. The implanted specimen was prepared at a helium fluence of 2 × 10 16 cm -2 using He + beams at two energies (2.54 and 2.74 MeV) passing through a 8.0 μm Al absorber foil. XRD results identified the formation of a new rhombohedral phase in the helium embedded layer, attributed to internal stress as a result of expansion of the CSZ-lattice. Zr K-edge EXAFS data suggested loss of crystallinity in the implanted lattice and disorder of the Zr atoms environment. EXAFS Fourier transforms analysis showed that the average first-shell radius of the Zr sbnd O pair in the implanted sample was slightly larger than that of the CSZ standard. Common general disorder features were explained by rhombohedral type short-range ordered clusters. The average structural parameters estimated from the EXAFS data of unimplanted and implanted CSZ are compared and discussed. Potential of EXAFS as a local probe of atomic-scale structural modifications induced by helium implantation in CSZ is demonstrated.

  13. Formation of SIMOX-SOI structure by high-temperature oxygen implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Yasushi; Kamikawa, Tomohiro; Nakata, Jyoji

    2015-12-01

    We have performed oxygen ion implantation in silicon at very high substrate-temperatures (⩽1000 °C) for the purpose of forming silicon-on-insulator (SOI) structure. We have expected that the high-temperature implantation can effectively avoids ion-beam-induced damages in the SOI layer and simultaneously stabilizes the buried oxide (BOX) and SOI-Si layer. Such a high-temperature implantation makes it possible to reduce the post-implantation annealing temperature. In the present study, oxygen ions with 180 keV are incident on Si(0 0 1) substrates at various temperatures from room temperature (RT) up to 1000 °C. The ion-fluencies are in order of 1017-1018 ions/cm2. Samples have been analyzed by atomic force microscope, Rutherford backscattering, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. It is found in the AFM analysis that the surface roughness of the samples implanted at 500 °C or below are significantly small with mean roughness of less than 1 nm, and gradually increased for the 800 °C-implanted sample. On the other hand, a lot of dents are observed for the 1000 °C-implanted sample. RBS analysis has revealed that stoichiometric SOI-Si and BOX-SiO2 layers are formed by oxygen implantation at the substrate temperatures of RT, 500, and 800 °C. However, SiO2-BOX layer has been desorbed during the implantation. Raman spectra shows that the ion-beam-induced damages are fairly suppressed by such a high-temperatures implantation.

  14. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Er implanted ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmu, P. P.; Kennedy, J.; Ruck, B. J.; Leveneur, J.

    2015-09-01

    We report the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Er implanted and annealed ZnO thin films. The effect of annealing in oxygen-deficient and oxygen-rich conditions was investigated. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry results revealed that the Er atoms are located at the implantation depth of around 13 nm, and annealing conditions had no adverse effect on the Er concentration in the layer. Raman spectroscopy results showed peak related to E2(high) mode of ZnO indicating enhanced crystalline quality of the Er implanted and annealed ZnO films. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy results demonstrated pre-edge features in O K-edge which are attributed to the structural defects in the films. Room temperature magnetic ordering was observed in Er implanted and annealed films, and is mainly assigned to the intrinsic defects in ZnO.

  15. Implantable neural spike detection using lifting-based stationary wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuning; Mason, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Spike detection from high data rate neural recordings is desired to ease the bandwidth bottleneck of bio-telemetry. An appropriate spike detection method should be able to detect spikes under low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) while meeting the power and area constraints of implantation. This paper introduces a spike detection system utilizing lifting-based stationary wavelet transform (SWT) that decomposes neural signals into 2 levels using 'symmlet2' wavelet basis. This approach enables accurate spike detection down to an SNR of only 2. The lifting-based SWT architecture permits a hardware implementation consuming only 6.6 μW power and 0.07 mm(2) area for 32 channels with 3.2 MHz master clock.

  16. The structural and optical properties of metal ion-implanted GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macková, A.; Malinský, P.; Sofer, Z.; Šimek, P.; Sedmidubský, D.; Veselý, M.; Böttger, R.

    2016-03-01

    The practical development of novel optoelectronic materials with appropriate optical properties is strongly connected to the structural properties of the prepared doped structures. We present GaN layers oriented along the (0 0 0 1) crystallographic direction that have been grown by low-pressure metal-organic vapour-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on sapphire substrates implanted with 200 keV Co+, Fe+ and Ni+ ions. The structural properties of the ion-implanted layers have been characterised by RBS-channelling and Raman spectroscopy to obtain a comprehensive insight into the structural modification of implanted GaN layers and to study the subsequent influence of annealing on crystalline-matrix recovery. Photoluminescence was measured to control the desired optical properties. The post-implantation annealing induced the structural recovery of the modified GaN layer depending on the introduced disorder level, e.g. depending on the ion implantation fluence, which was followed by structural characterisation and by the study of the surface morphology by AFM.

  17. Structural Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Induced by Deuterium Implantation: Irradiation at 295 K.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Oleksandr; Zhurba, Volodymir; Neklyudov, Ivan; Mats, Oleksandr; Progolaieva, Viktoria; Boshko, Valerian

    2016-12-01

    Deuterium thermal desorption spectra were investigated on the samples of austenitic steel 18Cr10NiTi pre-implanted at 295 K with deuterium ions in the dose range from 8 × 10(14) to 2.7 × 10(18) D/cm(2). The kinetics of structural transformation development in the steel layer was traced from deuterium thermodesorption spectra as a function of deuterium concentration. Three characteristic regions with different low rates of deuterium amount desorption as the implantation dose increases were revealed: I-the linear region of low implantation doses (up to 1 × 10(17) D/cm(2)); II-the nonlinear region of medium implantation doses (1 × 10(17) to 8 × 10(17) D/cm(2)); III-the linear region of high implantation doses (8 × 10(17) to 2.7 × 10(18) D/cm(2)). During the process of deuterium ion irradiation, the coefficient of deuterium retention in steel varies in discrete steps. Each of the discrete regions of deuterium retention coefficient variation corresponds to different implanted-matter states formed during deuterium ion implantation. The low-dose region is characterized by formation of deuterium-vacancy complexes and solid-solution phase state of deuterium in the steel. The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in this region varies between 2.5 and 3 at.%. The medium-dose region is characterized by the radiation-induced action on the steel in the presence of deuterium with the resulting formation of the energy-stable nanosized crystalline structure of steel, having a developed network of intercrystalline boundaries. The basis for this developed network of intercrystalline boundaries is provided by the amorphous state, which manifests itself in the thermodesorption spectra as a widely temperature-scale extended region of deuterium desorption (structure formation with a varying activation energy). The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in the region of medium implantation doses makes 7 to 8 at.%. The

  18. Structural Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Induced by Deuterium Implantation: Irradiation at 295 K.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Oleksandr; Zhurba, Volodymir; Neklyudov, Ivan; Mats, Oleksandr; Progolaieva, Viktoria; Boshko, Valerian

    2016-12-01

    Deuterium thermal desorption spectra were investigated on the samples of austenitic steel 18Cr10NiTi pre-implanted at 295 K with deuterium ions in the dose range from 8 × 10(14) to 2.7 × 10(18) D/cm(2). The kinetics of structural transformation development in the steel layer was traced from deuterium thermodesorption spectra as a function of deuterium concentration. Three characteristic regions with different low rates of deuterium amount desorption as the implantation dose increases were revealed: I-the linear region of low implantation doses (up to 1 × 10(17) D/cm(2)); II-the nonlinear region of medium implantation doses (1 × 10(17) to 8 × 10(17) D/cm(2)); III-the linear region of high implantation doses (8 × 10(17) to 2.7 × 10(18) D/cm(2)). During the process of deuterium ion irradiation, the coefficient of deuterium retention in steel varies in discrete steps. Each of the discrete regions of deuterium retention coefficient variation corresponds to different implanted-matter states formed during deuterium ion implantation. The low-dose region is characterized by formation of deuterium-vacancy complexes and solid-solution phase state of deuterium in the steel. The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in this region varies between 2.5 and 3 at.%. The medium-dose region is characterized by the radiation-induced action on the steel in the presence of deuterium with the resulting formation of the energy-stable nanosized crystalline structure of steel, having a developed network of intercrystalline boundaries. The basis for this developed network of intercrystalline boundaries is provided by the amorphous state, which manifests itself in the thermodesorption spectra as a widely temperature-scale extended region of deuterium desorption (structure formation with a varying activation energy). The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in the region of medium implantation doses makes 7 to 8 at.%. The

  19. Structural Transformations in Austenitic Stainless Steel Induced by Deuterium Implantation: Irradiation at 295 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleksandr; Zhurba, Volodymir; Neklyudov, Ivan; Mats, Oleksandr; Progolaieva, Viktoria; Boshko, Valerian

    2016-02-01

    Deuterium thermal desorption spectra were investigated on the samples of austenitic steel 18Cr10NiTi pre-implanted at 295 K with deuterium ions in the dose range from 8 × 1014 to 2.7 × 1018 D/cm2. The kinetics of structural transformation development in the steel layer was traced from deuterium thermodesorption spectra as a function of deuterium concentration. Three characteristic regions with different low rates of deuterium amount desorption as the implantation dose increases were revealed: I—the linear region of low implantation doses (up to 1 × 1017 D/cm2); II—the nonlinear region of medium implantation doses (1 × 1017 to 8 × 1017 D/cm2); III—the linear region of high implantation doses (8 × 1017 to 2.7 × 1018 D/cm2). During the process of deuterium ion irradiation, the coefficient of deuterium retention in steel varies in discrete steps. Each of the discrete regions of deuterium retention coefficient variation corresponds to different implanted-matter states formed during deuterium ion implantation. The low-dose region is characterized by formation of deuterium-vacancy complexes and solid-solution phase state of deuterium in the steel. The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in this region varies between 2.5 and 3 at.%. The medium-dose region is characterized by the radiation-induced action on the steel in the presence of deuterium with the resulting formation of the energy-stable nanosized crystalline structure of steel, having a developed network of intercrystalline boundaries. The basis for this developed network of intercrystalline boundaries is provided by the amorphous state, which manifests itself in the thermodesorption spectra as a widely temperature-scale extended region of deuterium desorption (structure formation with a varying activation energy). The total concentration of the accumulated deuterium in the region of medium implantation doses makes 7 to 8 at.%. The resulting structure shows stability against the action of

  20. Multiplexed Cytokine Detection of Interstitial Fluid Collected from Polymeric Hollow Tube Implants – A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangdan; Lennartz, Michelle R.; Loegering, Daniel J.; Stenken, Julie A.

    2008-01-01

    Cytokines are important cellular signaling proteins involved in inflammation, wound healing and are thought to direct the foreign body response to implanted materials. In this work, polyurethane tubes (25 mm length, 1.02 mm i.d., and 1.65 mm o.d.) were implanted into subcutaneous tissue of male Sprague-Dawley rats. The tubes served as the biomaterial and a means to collect the interstitial fluid that would be exchanged within the tube lumen and the surrounding tissue. After three and seven days, the tubes were explanted and cytokines in the fluid were quantified with a multiplexed cytokine immunoassay. Six cytokines, interleukin-1β. (IL-1β), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), were simultaneously quantified. All cytokine concentrations with the exception of IL-4 and TNF-α ranged between low pg/mL to mid ng/mL levels. Neither TNF-α nor IL-4 was detected from any sample. These results illustrate the potential of using the tube materials combined with bead-based immunoassays as a direct method for in vivo collection of multiple cytokines in low microliter sample volumes for fixed day biomaterial implant studies. PMID:18519165

  1. Comparisons between detection threshold and loudness perception for individual cochlear implant channels

    PubMed Central

    Bierer, Julie Arenberg; Nye, Amberly D

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of the present study, performed in cochlear implant listeners, was to examine how the level of current required to detect single-channel electrical pulse trains relates to loudness perception on the same channel. The working hypothesis was that channels with relatively high thresholds, when measured with a focused current pattern, interface poorly to the auditory nerve. For such channels a smaller dynamic range between perceptual threshold and the most comfortable loudness would result, in part, from a greater sensitivity to changes in electrical field spread compared to low-threshold channels. The narrower range of comfortable listening levels may have important implications for speech perception. Design Data were collected from eight, adult cochlear implant listeners implanted with the HiRes90k cochlear implant (Advanced Bionics Corp.). The partial tripolar (pTP) electrode configuration, consisting of one intracochlear active electrode, two flanking electrodes carrying a fraction (σ) of the return current, and an extracochlear ground, was used for stimulation. Single-channel detection thresholds and most comfortable listening levels were acquired using the most focused pTP configuration possible (σ ≥ 0.8) to identify three channels for further testing – those with the highest, median, and lowest thresholds – for each subject. Threshold, equal-loudness contours (at 50% of the monopolar dynamic range), and loudness growth functions were measured for each of these three test channels using various partial tripolar fractions. Results For all test channels, thresholds increased as the electrode configuration became more focused. The rate of increase with the focusing parameter σ was greatest for the high-threshold channel compared to the median- and low-threshold channels. The 50% equal-loudness contours exhibited similar rates of increase in level across test channels and subjects. Additionally, test channels with the highest

  2. Offline Impedance Measurements for Detection and Mitigation of Dangerous Implant Interactions: An RF Safety Prescreen

    PubMed Central

    Ellenor, Christopher W; Stang, Pascal P; Etezadi-Amoli, Maryam; Pauly, John M; Scott, Greig C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The concept of a “radiofrequency safety prescreen” is investigated, wherein dangerous interactions between radiofrequency fields used in MRI, and conductive implants in patients are detected through impedance changes in the radiofrequency coil. Theory The behavior of coupled oscillators is reviewed, and the resulting, observable impedance changes are discussed. Methods A birdcage coil is loaded with a static head phantom and a wire phantom with a wire close to its resonant length, the shape, position, and orientation of which can be changed. Interactions are probed with a current sensor and network analyzer. Results Impedance spectra show dramatic, unmistakable splitting in cases of strong coupling, and strong correlation is observed between induced current and scattering parameters. Conclusions The feasibility of a new, low-power prescreening technique has been demonstrated in a simple phantom experiment, which can unambiguously detect resonant interactions between an implanted wire and an imaging coil. A new technique has also been presented which can detect parallel transmit null modes for the wire. Magn Reson Med 73:1328–1339, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24623586

  3. Detecting the onset of urinary bladder contractions using an implantable pressure sensor.

    PubMed

    Melgaard, J; Rijkhoff, N J M

    2011-12-01

    This study investigates whether signals obtained from an implantable pressure sensor placed in the urinary bladder wall could be used to detect the onset of bladder contractions. The sensor assembly was custom made using a small piezoresistive sensor die. The die was mounted on ceramic substrate (8 mm × 8 mm) and encapsulated in silicone by a two-part moulding process. The final sensor was lens shaped with a diameter of 13.6 mm and height of 2.0 mm. Experiments were performed in six pigs that had one or more sensors placed in the bladder wall. An external reference sensor was used to simultaneously monitor intravesical pressure via a transurethral catheter. Bladder contractions were evoked by unilateral electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerve. Onset latency was computed using both signals. In addition, the correlation between wall pressure and intravesical pressure was calculated. On average, the onset latency was - 307 ms using the wall sensors compared to the intravesical pressure, i.e., the detection occurred earlier using the wall sensors than the intravesical sensor. In 91 of 114 recordings the correlation coefficient was above 0.90. In conclusion, the implantable sensor performs similar to the reference sensor when used to detect the onset of bladder contractions. PMID:21997323

  4. Structural characterization of dual ion implantation in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, B.; Franco, N.; Botelho do Rego, A. M.; Alves, E.; Colaço, R.

    2015-12-01

    <1 0 0> Si wafers were dual implanted at room temperature with Fe + C and Ti + C with fluences of 2 × 1017 cm-2. The samples were annealed in vacuum at 800 °C and 1000 °C respectively, and characterized in scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The scanning electron microscopy characterization showed that both annealings generated precipitates, with sizes within the range of 10-100 nm at 800 °C and 1-10 μm for the 1000 °C annealing. The GIXRD measurements revealed the presence of different silicides phases. For the Fe + C implantation β-FeSi2 was observed at 800 °C while at 1000 °C α-FeSi2 and SiC were found. The Ti + C sample at 800 °C showed simultaneously the presence of four different phases, both metastable C49 and stable C54 silicide TiSi2, poly-Si and SiC. At higher temperatures the metastable C49-TiSi2 silicide phase was no longer observed, all the others remaining. The XPS analysis confirmed the existence of the SiC at 1000 °C temperature, and showed that the initial carbon clusters get richer in Si with the increase of temperature to form SiC. It was also possible to see that among all present species, C was the one that oxidized the most with increasing temperature.

  5. Influence of Si ion implantation on structure and morphology of g-C3N4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varalakshmi, B.; Sreenivasulu, K. V.; Asokan, K.; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.

    2016-07-01

    Effect of Si ion implantation on structural and morphological features of graphite-like carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was investigated. g-C3N4 was prepared by using a simple atmospheric thermal decomposition process. The g-C3N4 pellets were irradiated with a Si ion beam of energy 200 keV with different fluencies. Structural, morphological and elemental, and phase analysis of the implanted samples in comparison with the pristine samples was carried out by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques, respectively. The observations revealed that Si ion implantation results in a negligible change in the crystallite size and alteration of the network-like to the sheet-like morphology of g-C3N4 and Si ions in the g-C3N4 network.

  6. Applications of Fault Detection in Vibrating Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eure, Kenneth W.; Hogge, Edward; Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Russell, Andrew; Hill, Boyd L.

    2012-01-01

    Structural fault detection and identification remains an area of active research. Solutions to fault detection and identification may be based on subtle changes in the time series history of vibration signals originating from various sensor locations throughout the structure. The purpose of this paper is to document the application of vibration based fault detection methods applied to several structures. Overall, this paper demonstrates the utility of vibration based methods for fault detection in a controlled laboratory setting and limitations of applying the same methods to a similar structure during flight on an experimental subscale aircraft.

  7. Bone bonding strength of diamond-structured porous titanium-alloy implants manufactured using the electron beam-melting technique.

    PubMed

    Hara, Daisuke; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sato, Taishi; Hirata, Masanobu; Kanazawa, Masayuki; Kohno, Yusuke; Yoshimoto, Kensei; Yoshihara, Yusuke; Nakamura, Akihiro; Nakao, Yumiko; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-02-01

    The present study examined the bone bonding strength of diamond-structured porous titanium-alloy (Porous-Ti-alloy) manufactured using the electron beam-melting technique in comparison with fiber mesh-coated or rough-surfaced implants. Cylindrical implants with four different pore sizes (500, 640, 800, and 1000μm) of Porous-Ti-alloy, titanium fiber mesh (FM), and surfaces roughened by titanium arc spray (Ti-spray) were implanted into the distal femur of rabbits. Bone bonding strength and histological bone ingrowth were evaluated at 4 and 12weeks after implantation. The bone bonding strength of Porous-Ti-alloy implants (640μm pore size) increased over time from 541.4N at 4weeks to 704.6N at 12weeks and was comparable to that of FM and Ti-spray implants at both weeks. No breakage of the porous structure after mechanical testing was found with Porous-Ti-alloy implants. Histological bone ingrowth that increased with implantation time occurred along the inner structure of Porous-Ti-alloy implants. There was no difference in bone ingrowth in Porous-Ti-alloy implants with pore sizes among 500, 640, and 800μm; however, less bone ingrowth was observed with the 1000μm pore size. These results indicated Porous-Ti-alloy implants with pore size under 800μm provided biologically active and mechanically stable surface for implant fixation to bone, and had potential advantages for weight bearing orthopedic implants such as acetabular cups. PMID:26652463

  8. Bone bonding strength of diamond-structured porous titanium-alloy implants manufactured using the electron beam-melting technique.

    PubMed

    Hara, Daisuke; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Sato, Taishi; Hirata, Masanobu; Kanazawa, Masayuki; Kohno, Yusuke; Yoshimoto, Kensei; Yoshihara, Yusuke; Nakamura, Akihiro; Nakao, Yumiko; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2016-02-01

    The present study examined the bone bonding strength of diamond-structured porous titanium-alloy (Porous-Ti-alloy) manufactured using the electron beam-melting technique in comparison with fiber mesh-coated or rough-surfaced implants. Cylindrical implants with four different pore sizes (500, 640, 800, and 1000μm) of Porous-Ti-alloy, titanium fiber mesh (FM), and surfaces roughened by titanium arc spray (Ti-spray) were implanted into the distal femur of rabbits. Bone bonding strength and histological bone ingrowth were evaluated at 4 and 12weeks after implantation. The bone bonding strength of Porous-Ti-alloy implants (640μm pore size) increased over time from 541.4N at 4weeks to 704.6N at 12weeks and was comparable to that of FM and Ti-spray implants at both weeks. No breakage of the porous structure after mechanical testing was found with Porous-Ti-alloy implants. Histological bone ingrowth that increased with implantation time occurred along the inner structure of Porous-Ti-alloy implants. There was no difference in bone ingrowth in Porous-Ti-alloy implants with pore sizes among 500, 640, and 800μm; however, less bone ingrowth was observed with the 1000μm pore size. These results indicated Porous-Ti-alloy implants with pore size under 800μm provided biologically active and mechanically stable surface for implant fixation to bone, and had potential advantages for weight bearing orthopedic implants such as acetabular cups.

  9. Implantable self-reset CMOS image sensor and its application to hemodynamic response detection in living mouse brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Takehara, Hiroaki; Sunaga, Yoshinori; Haruta, Makito; Motoyama, Mayumi; Ohta, Yasumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2016-04-01

    A self-reset pixel of 15 × 15 µm2 with high signal-to-noise ratio (effective peak SNR ≃64 dB) for an implantable image sensor has been developed for intrinsic signal detection arising from hemodynamic responses in a living mouse brain. For detecting local conversion between oxyhemoglobin (HbO) and deoxyhemoglobin (HbR) in brain tissues, an implantable imaging device was fabricated with our newly designed self-reset image sensor and orange light-emitting diodes (LEDs; λ = 605 nm). We demonstrated imaging of hemodynamic responses in the sensory cortical area accompanied by forelimb stimulation of a living mouse. The implantable imaging device for intrinsic signal detection is expected to be a powerful tool to measure brain activities in living animals used in behavioral analysis.

  10. Tachycardia detection in modern implantable cardioverter-defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Brüggemann, Thomas; Dahlke, Daniel; Chebbo, Amin; Neumann, Ilka

    2016-09-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) have to reliably sense, detect, and treat malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Inappropriate treatment of non life-threatening tachyarrhythmias should be avoided. This article outlines the functionality of ICDs developed and manufactured by BIOTRONIK. Proper sensing is achieved by an automatic sensitivity control which can be individually tailored to solve special under- and oversensing situations. The programming of detection zones for ventricular fibrillation (VF), ventricular tachycardia (VT), and zones to monitor other tachyarrhythmias is outlined. Dedicated single-chamber detection algorithms based on average heart rate, cycle length variability, sudden rate onset, and changes in QRS morphology as used in ICDs by BIOTRONIK are described in detail. Preconditions and confirmation algorithms for therapy deliveries as antitachycardia pacing (ATP) and high energy shocks are explained. Finally, a detailed description of the dual-chamber detection algorithm SMART is given. It comprises additional detection criteria as stability of atrial intervals, 1:1 conduction, atrial-ventricular (AV) multiplicity, AV trend, and AV regularity to differentiate between ventricular and supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. PMID:27576695

  11. Synergistic effects of surface chemistry and topologic structure from modified microarc oxidation coatings on Ti implants for improving osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Wei, Daqing; Cao, Jianyun; Feng, Wei; Cheng, Su; Du, Qing; Li, Baoqiang; Wang, Yaming; Jia, Dechang; Zhou, Yu

    2015-04-29

    Microarc oxidation (MAO) coating containing Ca, P, Si, and Na elements on a titanium (Ti) implant has been steam-hydrothermally treated and further mediated by post-heat treatment to overcome the compromised bone-implant integration. The bone regeneration, bone-implant contact, and biomechanical push-out force of the modified Ti implants are discussed thoroughly in this work. The best in vivo performances for the steam-hydrothermally treated one is attributed to the synergistic effects of surface chemistry and topologic structure. Through post-heat treatment, we can decouple the effects of surface chemistry and the nanoscale topologic structure easily. Attributed to the excellent in vivo performance of the surface-modified Ti implant, the steam-hydrothermal treatment could be a promising strategy to improve the osseointegration of the MAO coating covered Ti implant.

  12. [Structural changes of toothbrush bristles by brushing in patients with dental implants].

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, N G; Sirak, S V; Sirak, A G

    2014-01-01

    Lack of proper oral hygiene practices can lead to treatment failure in patients with implant-retained restorations. Structural changes of toothbrush bristles were studied using scanning electron microscopy and correlated with cleaning efficiency which was assessed at baseline and after 3 months of use of various toothbrushes types in 146 patients with implant-retained restorations. Oral hygiene was valued according to several indices (Approximal Plaque-Index (API), the Turesky index (PI), a modified superstructure plaque index Silness-Loe (PLIsk). Ultrasound toothbrush provided the best and the most efficient cleaning outcome in patients with implant-retained restorations. Scanning electron microscopy proved ultrasonic toothbrush bristles to be more resistant to abrasion during the three-month use.

  13. Compositional and Structural Study of Gd Implanted ZnO Films

    SciTech Connect

    Murmu, Peter P.; Kennedy, John V.; Markwitz, Andreas; Ruck, Ben J.

    2009-07-23

    We report a compositional and structural study of ZnO films implanted with 30 keV Gd ions. The depth profile of the implanted ions, measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, matches predictions of DYNAMIC-TRIM calculations. However, after annealing at temperatures above 550 deg. C the Gd ions are observed to migrate towards the bulk, and at the same time atomic force microscope images of the film surfaces show significant roughening. Raman spectroscopy shows that the annealed films have a reduced number of crystalline defects. The overall results are useful for developing an implantation-annealing regime to produce well characterized samples to investigate magnetism in the ZnO:Gd system.

  14. Detection of Structural Abnormalities Using Neural Nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.; Maccalla, A.; Daggumati, V.; Gulati, S.; Toomarian, N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a feed-forward neural net approach for detection of abnormal system behavior based upon sensor data analyses. A new dynamical invariant representing structural parameters of the system is introduced in such a way that any structural abnormalities in the system behavior are detected from the corresponding changes to the invariant.

  15. Evaluation of Cochlear Implant Candidates using a Non-linguistic Spectrotemporal Modulation Detection Test

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Eun; Hong, Sung Hwa; Won, Jong Ho; Park, Hee-Sung; Cho, Young Sang; Chung, Won-Ho; Cho, Yang-Sun; Moon, Il Joon

    2016-01-01

    Adults who score 50% correct or less in open-set sentence recognition test under the best aided listening condition may be considered as candidates for cochlear implant (CI). However, the requirement for ‘the best aided listening condition’ needs significant time and clinical resources to ensure such condition. As speech signals are composed of dynamic spectral and temporal modulations, psychoacoustic sensitivity to the combinations of spectral and temporal modulation cues may be a strong predictor for aided speech recognition. In this study, we tested 27 adults with moderately severe to profound hearing loss to explore the possibility that a non-linguistic unaided spectrotemporal modulation (STM) detection test might be a viable option as a surrogate measure to evaluate CI candidacy. Our results showed that STM detection thresholds were significantly correlated with aided sentence recognition scores for the 27 hearing impaired listeners. The receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis demonstrated that the CI candidacy evaluation by both unaided STM detection test and the traditional best-aided sentence recognition test was fairly consistent. More specifically, our results demonstrated that the STM detection test using a low spectral and temporal modulation rate might provide an efficient process for CI candidacy evaluation. PMID:27731425

  16. Detection of underground structures and tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.M.; Moses, R.W.; Kelly, R.E.; Flynn, E.R.; Kraus, R.H.; Cogbill, A.H.; Stolarczyk, L.G.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. There is a continuing need in the United States defense and drug interdiction for effective over, convert, and standoff means of detecting underground tunnels, structures, and objects. This project sought to begin an assessment of electromagnetic and gravitational gradient detection approaches to the detection of underground structures and tunnels.

  17. Magnesium from bioresorbable implants: Distribution and impact on the nano- and mineral structure of bone.

    PubMed

    Grünewald, T A; Rennhofer, H; Hesse, B; Burghammer, M; Stanzl-Tschegg, S E; Cotte, M; Löffler, J F; Weinberg, A M; Lichtenegger, H C

    2016-01-01

    Biocompatibility is a key issue in the development of new implant materials. In this context, a novel class of biodegrading Mg implants exhibits promising properties with regard to inflammatory response and mechanical properties. The interaction between Mg degradation products and the nanoscale structure and mineralization of bone, however, is not yet sufficiently understood. Investigations by synchrotron microbeam x-ray fluorescence (μXRF), small angle x-ray scattering (μSAXS) and x-ray diffraction (μXRD) have shown the impact of degradation speed on the sites of Mg accumulation in the bone, which are around blood vessels, lacunae and the bone marrow. Only at the highest degradation rates was Mg found at the implant-bone interface. The Mg inclusion into the bone matrix appeared to be non-permanent as the Mg-level decreased after completed implant degradation. μSAXS and μXRD showed that Mg influences the hydroxyl apatite (HAP) crystallite structure, because markedly shorter and thinner HAP crystallites were found in zones of high Mg concentration. These zones also exhibited a contraction of the HAP lattice and lower crystalline order.

  18. The Structure of Sapphire Implanted with Carbon at Room Temperature and 1000° C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, E.; Marques, C.; Safran, G.; McHargue, Carl J.

    2009-03-01

    Carbon was implanted into sapphire at various temperatures as part of a study of the different defect structures produced by a series of light ions. Implantations were made with 150 keV ions to fluences of 1×1016 and 1×1017ions/cm2 at room temperature (RT) and 1000° C. The defect structures were characterized using Rutherford backscattering-channeling (RBS-C) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The RBS-C spectra indicated low residual disorder for RT implantation at 1×1016 C+/cm2. The de-channeling approached the random value at 1×1017 C+/cm2 and the TEM examination revealed a buried amorphous layer containing embedded sapphire nanocrystals. Damaged layers containing planar defects generally aligned parallel to the surface surrounded this layer. The RBS-C spectra for the sample implanted at 1000° C with 1×1017C+/cm2 suggested a highly damaged but crystalline surface that was confirmed by TEM micrographs.

  19. Probability of detection of internal voids in structural ceramics using microfocus radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, G. Y.; Roth, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The reliability of microfocus x-radiography for detecting subsurface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. The microfocus system was operated in the projection mode using low X-ray photon energies (20 keV) and a 10 micro m focal spot. The statistics were developed for implanted subsurface voids in green and sintered silicon carbide and silicon nitride test specimens. These statistics were compared with previously-obtained statistics for implanted surface voids in similar specimens. Problems associated with void implantation are discussed. Statistical results are given as probability-of-detection curves at a 95 percent confidence level for voids ranging in size from 20 to 528 micro m in diameter.

  20. Probability of detection of internal voids in structural ceramics using microfocus radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, G. Y.; Roth, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The reliability of microfocous X-radiography for detecting subsurface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. The microfocus system was operated in the projection mode using low X-ray photon energies (20 keV) and a 10 micro m focal spot. The statistics were developed for implanted subsurface voids in green and sintered silicon carbide and silicon nitride test specimens. These statistics were compared with previously-obtained statistics for implanted surface voids in similar specimens. Problems associated with void implantation are discussed. Statistical results are given as probability-of-detection curves at a 95 precent confidence level for voids ranging in size from 20 to 528 micro m in diameter.

  1. A broad chemical and structural characterization of the damaged region of carbon implanted alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M.; Román, R.; Maffiotte, C.; González-Casablanca, J.; Perez, R.; Hole, D.

    2009-05-01

    As candidate materials for future thermonuclear fusion reactors, isolating ceramics will be submitted to high energy gamma and neutron radiation fluxes together with an intense particle flux. Amorphization cannot be tolerated in ceramics for fusion applications, due to the associated volume change and the deterioration of mechanical properties. Therefore, a comprehensive study was carried out to examine the effects of carbon beam irradiation on polycrystalline aluminium oxide (Al2O3), a ceramic component of some diagnostic and plasma heating systems. Complementary techniques have allowed a complete chemical and structural surface analysis of the implanted alumina. Implantation with 75 keV, mono-energetic carbon ions at doses of 1 × 1017 and 5 × 1017 ions/cm2 was performed on polished and thermally treated ceramic discs. The alumina targets were kept below 120 °C. The structural modifications induced during ion irradiation were studied by the GXRD and TEM techniques. Under these conditions, alumina is readily amorphized by carbon ions, the thickness of the ion-beam induced disordered area increasing with the ion dose. Matrix elements and ion implanted profiles were followed as a function of depth by using ToF-SIMS, indicating the maximum concentration of implanted ions to be in the deeper half of the amorphous region. Ion distribution and chemical modifications caused in the Al2O3 substrate by carbon irradiation were corroborated with XPS. The amount of oxygen in the vicinity of the implanted alumina surface was reduced, suggesting that this element was selectively sputtered during carbon irradiation. The intensity of those peaks referring to Al-O bonds diminishes, while contributions of reduced aluminium and metal carbides are found at the maximum of the carbon distribution. TEM observations on low temperature thermally annealed specimens indicate partial recovery of the initial crystalline structure.

  2. LADAR for structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moosa, Adil G.; Fu, Gongkang

    1999-12-01

    LADAR here stands for laser radar, using laser reflectivity for measurement. This paper presents a new technique using LADAR for structure evaluation. It is experimentally investigated in the laboratory. With cooperation of the US Federal Highway Administration, a recently developed LADAR system was used to measure structural deformation. The data were then treated for reducing noise and used to derive multiple features for diagnosis. The results indicate a promising direction of nondestructive evaluation using LADAR.

  3. Temporal Fine Structure and Applications to Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Complex broadband sounds are decomposed by the auditory filters into a series of relatively narrowband signals, each of which conveys information about the sound by time-varying features. The slow changes in the overall amplitude constitute envelope, while the more rapid events, such as zero crossings, constitute temporal fine structure (TFS).…

  4. Infrared Structural Biology: Detect Functionally Important Structural Motions of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Aihua

    Proteins are dynamic. Lack of dynamic structures of proteins hampers our understanding of protein functions. Infrared structural biology (IRSB) is an emerging technology. There are several advantages of IRSB for mechanistic studies of proteins: (1) its excellent dynamic range (detecting structural motions from picoseconds to >= seconds); (2) its high structural sensitivity (detect tiny but functionally important structural motions such as proton transfer and changes in hydrogen bonding interaction); (3) its ability to detect different structural motions simultaneously. Successful development of infrared structural biology demands not only new experimental techniques (from infrared technologies to chemical synthesis and cell biology), but also new data processing (how to translate infrared signals into quantitative structural information of proteins). These topics will be discussed as well as examples of how to use IRSB to study structure-function relationship of proteins. This work was supported by NSF DBI1338097 and OCAST HR10-078.

  5. Real-time detection of implant-associated neutrophil responses using a formyl peptide receptor-targeting NIR nanoprobe

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Weng, Hong; Tang, Ewin N; Nair, Ashwin; Davé, Digant P; Tang, Liping

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in implant-mediated inflammation and infection. Unfortunately, current methods which monitor neutrophil activity, including enzyme measurements and histological evaluation, require many animals and cannot be used to accurately depict the dynamic cellular responses. To understand the neutrophil interactions around implant-mediated inflammation and infection it is critical to develop methods which can monitor in vivo cellular activity in real time. In this study, formyl peptide receptor (FPR)-targeting near-infrared nanoprobes were fabricated. This was accomplished by conjugating near-infrared dye with specific peptides having a high affinity to the FPRs present on activated neutrophils. The ability of FPR-targeting nanoprobes to detect and quantify activated neutrophils was assessed both in vitro and in vivo. As expected, FPR-targeting nanoprobes preferentially accumulated on activated neutrophils in vitro. Following transplantation, FPR-targeting nanoprobes preferentially accumulated at the biomaterial implantation site. Equally important, a strong relationship was observed between the extent of fluorescence intensity in vivo and the number of recruited neutrophils at the implantation site. Furthermore, FPR-targeting nanoprobes may be used to detect and quantify the number of neutrophils responding to a catheter-associated infection. The results show that FPR-targeting nanoprobes may serve as a powerful tool to monitor and measure the extent of neutrophil responses to biomaterial implants in vivo. PMID:22619542

  6. Autonomous assembly of epithelial structures by subrenal implantation of dissociated embryonic inner-ear cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Kaiqing; Zhu, Helen He; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-05-27

    Microenvironment and cell-cell interactions play an important role during embryogenesis and are required for the stemness and differentiation of stem cells. The inner-ear sensory epithelium, containing hair cells and supporting cells, is derived from the stem cells within the otic vesicle at early embryonic stages. However, whether or not such microenvironment or cell-cell interactions within the embryonic otic tissue have the capacity to regulate the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells and to autonomously reassemble the cells into epithelial structures is unknown. Here, we report that on enzymatic digestion and dissociation to harvest all the single cells from 13.5-day-old rat embryonic (E13.5) inner-ear tissue as well as on implantation of these cells under renal capsules; the dissociated cells are able to reassemble themselves to form epithelial structures as early as 7 days after implantation. By 25 days after implantation, more mature epithelial structures are formed. Immunostaining with cell-type-specific markers reveals that hair cells and supporting cells are not only formed, but are also well aligned with the hair cells located in the apical layer surrounded by the supporting cells. These findings suggest that microenvironment and cell-cell interactions within the embryonic inner-ear tissue have the autonomous signals to induce the formation of sensory epithelial structures. This method may also provide a useful system to study the potential of stem cells to differentiate into hair cells in vivo.

  7. Remote monitoring of cardiovascular implantable devices in the pediatric population improves detection of adverse events.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Lindsey E; Gingerich, Jean; Olson, Mark D; Atkins, Dianne L

    2014-02-01

    With the exponential growth of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) in pediatric patients, a new method of long-term surveillance, remote monitoring (RM), has become the standard of care. The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of RM as a monitoring tool in the pediatric population. A retrospective review was performed of 198 patients at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital who had CIEDs. Data transmitted by RM were analyzed. The following data were examined: patient demographics; median interval between transmissions; detection of adverse events requiring corrective measures, including detection of lead failure; detection of arrhythmias and device malfunctions independent of symptoms; time gained in the detection of events using RM versus standard practice; the validity of RM; and the impact of RM on data management. Of 198 patients, 162 submitted 615 RM transmissions. The median time between remote transmissions was 91 days. Of 615 total transmissions, 16 % had true adverse events with 11 % prompting clinical intervention. Of those events requiring clinical response, 61 % of patients reported symptoms. The median interval between last follow-up and occurrence of events detected by RM was 46 days, representing a gain of 134 days for patients followed-up at 6-month intervals and 44 days for patients followed-up at 3 month-intervals. The sensitivity and specificity of RM were found to be 99 and 72 %, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were found to be 41 and 99 %, respectively. RM allows for early identification of arrhythmias and device malfunctions, thus prompting earlier corrective measures and improving care and safety in pediatric patients.

  8. EXAFS study of the structural properties of In and In + C implanted Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, R.; Kremer, F.; Sprouster, D. J.; Mirzaei, S.; Decoster, S.; Glover, C. J.; Medling, S. A.; Russo, S. P.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2016-05-01

    The structural configurations of In implanted Ge have been studied via x-ray absorption spectroscopy with and without the codoping of C. In the case of In singly implanted Ge, while the In atoms occupy an substitutional site in Ge (InGe4) at low In concentration (≤ 2 at. %), they precipitate into a metallic phase (In metal) and form complexes composed of one vacancy and three Ge atoms (InVGe3) at concentration ≥ 0.6 at. %. This behaviour can be suppressed by the addition of C leading to In-C pairing to form InCGe3 complexes. This cluster enables In atoms to recover a four-fold coordinated structure and has the potential to improve the electrical activation of In atoms in Ge.

  9. Usefulness of Sonication of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices to Enhance Microbial Detection

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Avish; Patel, Robin; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Baddour, Larry M.; Lynch, David T.; Lahr, Brian D.; Maleszewski, Joseph J.; Friedman, Paul A.; Hayes, David L.; Sohail, M. Rizwan

    2015-01-01

    The cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infection rate is rising disproportionately to the rate of device implantation. Identification of microorganisms that cause CIED infections is not always achieved using present laboratory techniques. We conducted a prospective study to determine whether device vortexing-sonication followed by culture of the resulting sonicate fluid would enhance microbial detection compared with traditional swab or pocket tissue cultures. Forty-two subjects with noninfected and 35 with infected CIEDs were prospectively enrolled over 12 months. One swab each from the device pocket and device surface, pocket tissue, and the CIED were collected from each patient. Swabs and tissues were cultured using routine methods. The CIED was processed in Ringer’s solution using vortexing-sonication and the resultant fluid semiquantitatively cultured. Tissue and swab growth was considered significant when colonies grew on ≥2 quadrants of the culture plate and device was considered significant when ≥20 colonies were isolated from 10 ml of sonicate fluid. In noninfected group, 5% of sonicate fluids yielded significant bacterial growth, compared with 5% of tissue cultures (p = 1.00) and 2% of both pocket and device swab cultures (p = 0.317 each). In infected group, significant bacterial growth was observed in 54% of sonicate fluids, significantly greater than the sensitivities of pocket swab (20%, p = 0.001), device swab (9%, p <0.001), or tissue (9%, p <0.001) culture. In conclusion, vortexing-sonication of CIEDs with semiquantitative culture of the resultant sonicate fluid results in a significant increase in the sensitivity of culture results, compared with swab or tissue cultures. PMID:25779615

  10. Structure, electrical and magnetic properties, and the origin of the room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn-implanted Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. F.; Granovsky, A. B.; Balagurov, L. A.; Kulemanov, I. V.; Parkhomenko, Yu. N.; Perov, N. S.; Gan'shina, E. A.; Bublik, V. T.; Shcherbachev, K. D.; Kartavykh, A. V.; Vdovin, V. I.; Sapelkin, A.; Saraikin, V. V.; Agafonov, Yu. A.; Zinenko, V. I.; Rogalev, A.; Smekhova, A.

    2009-10-01

    The structure and the electrical and magnetic properties of Mn-implanted Si, which exhibits ferromagnetic ordering at room temperature, are studied. Single-crystal n- and p-type Si wafers with high and low electrical resistivities are implanted by manganese ions to a dose of 5 × 1016 cm-2. After implantation and subsequent vacuum annealing at 850°C, the implanted samples are examined by various methods. The Mn impurity that exhibits an electric activity and is incorporated into the Si lattice in interstitial sites is found to account for only a few percent of the total Mn content. The main part of Mn is fixed in Mn15Si26 nanoprecipitates in the Si matrix. The magnetization of implanted Si is found to be independent of the electrical resistivity and the conductivity type of silicon and the type of implanted impurity. The magnetization of implanted Si increases slightly upon short-term postimplantation annealing and disappears completely upon vacuum annealing at 1000°C for 5 h. The Mn impurity in Si is shown to have no significant magnetic moment at room temperature. These results indicate that the room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn-implanted Si is likely to be caused by implantation-induced defects in the silicon lattice rather than by a Mn impurity.

  11. Osteoinduction of porous Ti implants with a channel structure fabricated by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, A; Takemoto, M; Saito, T; Fujibayashi, S; Neo, M; Pattanayak, Deepak K; Matsushita, T; Sasaki, K; Nishida, N; Kokubo, T; Nakamura, T

    2011-05-01

    Many studies have shown that certain biomaterials with specific porous structures can induce bone formation in non-osseous sites without the need for osteoinductive biomolecules, however, the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon (intrinsic osteoinduction of biomaterials) remain unclear. In particular, to our knowledge the type of pore structure suitable for osteoinduction has not been reported in detail. In the present study we investigated the effects of interconnective pore size on osteoinductivity and the bone formation processes during osteoinduction. Selective laser melting was employed to fabricate porous Ti implants (diameter 3.3mm, length 15 mm) with a channel structure comprising four longitudinal square channels, representing pores, of different diagonal widths, 500, 600, 900, and 1200 μm (termed p500, p600, p900, and p1200, respectively). These were then subjected to chemical and heat treatments to induce bioactivity. Significant osteoinduction was observed in p500 and p600, with the highest observed osteoinduction occurring at 5mm from the end of the implants. A distance of 5mm probably provides a favorable balance between blood circulation and fluid movement. Thus, the simple architecture of the implants allowed effective investigation of the influence of the interconnective pore size on osteoinduction, as well as the relationship between bone quantity and its location for different pore sizes.

  12. Osteoinduction of porous Ti implants with a channel structure fabricated by selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, A; Takemoto, M; Saito, T; Fujibayashi, S; Neo, M; Pattanayak, Deepak K; Matsushita, T; Sasaki, K; Nishida, N; Kokubo, T; Nakamura, T

    2011-05-01

    Many studies have shown that certain biomaterials with specific porous structures can induce bone formation in non-osseous sites without the need for osteoinductive biomolecules, however, the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon (intrinsic osteoinduction of biomaterials) remain unclear. In particular, to our knowledge the type of pore structure suitable for osteoinduction has not been reported in detail. In the present study we investigated the effects of interconnective pore size on osteoinductivity and the bone formation processes during osteoinduction. Selective laser melting was employed to fabricate porous Ti implants (diameter 3.3mm, length 15 mm) with a channel structure comprising four longitudinal square channels, representing pores, of different diagonal widths, 500, 600, 900, and 1200 μm (termed p500, p600, p900, and p1200, respectively). These were then subjected to chemical and heat treatments to induce bioactivity. Significant osteoinduction was observed in p500 and p600, with the highest observed osteoinduction occurring at 5mm from the end of the implants. A distance of 5mm probably provides a favorable balance between blood circulation and fluid movement. Thus, the simple architecture of the implants allowed effective investigation of the influence of the interconnective pore size on osteoinduction, as well as the relationship between bone quantity and its location for different pore sizes. PMID:21295166

  13. Fourier transform spectral imaging microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy for the detection of indoor common contaminants on the surface of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lutin, Anna; Bulatov, Valery; Jadwat, Yusuf; Wood, Neil H; Feller, Liviu; Schechter, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Endosteal dental implants are used routinely with high success rates to rehabilitate the integrity of the dentition. However if implant surfaces become contaminated by foreign material, osseointegration may not occur and the dental implant will fail because of the lack of mechanical stability. Detection and characterization of dental implant surface contaminants is a difficult task. In this article we investigate the application of several spectral microscopy methods to detect airborne contaminants on dental implant surfaces. We found that Fourier Transform Spectral Imaging Microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy provided the most useful information. Some implants possess weak and homogeneous auto-fluorescence and are best analyzed using FT-SIM methods, while others are Raman inactive and can be analyzed using scanning Raman microscopy.

  14. Fourier transform spectral imaging microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy for the detection of indoor common contaminants on the surface of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lutin, Anna; Bulatov, Valery; Jadwat, Yusuf; Wood, Neil H; Feller, Liviu; Schechter, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Endosteal dental implants are used routinely with high success rates to rehabilitate the integrity of the dentition. However if implant surfaces become contaminated by foreign material, osseointegration may not occur and the dental implant will fail because of the lack of mechanical stability. Detection and characterization of dental implant surface contaminants is a difficult task. In this article we investigate the application of several spectral microscopy methods to detect airborne contaminants on dental implant surfaces. We found that Fourier Transform Spectral Imaging Microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy provided the most useful information. Some implants possess weak and homogeneous auto-fluorescence and are best analyzed using FT-SIM methods, while others are Raman inactive and can be analyzed using scanning Raman microscopy. PMID:25618702

  15. Predictors of Arrhythmic Events Detected by Implantable Loop Recorders in Renal Transplant Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Rodrigo Tavares; Martinelli Filho, Martino; Peixoto, Giselle de Lima; de Lima, José Jayme Galvão; de Siqueira, Sérgio Freitas; Costa, Roberto; Gowdak, Luís Henrique Wolff; de Paula, Flávio Jota; Kalil Filho, Roberto; Ramires, José Antônio Franchini

    2015-01-01

    Background The recording of arrhythmic events (AE) in renal transplant candidates (RTCs) undergoing dialysis is limited by conventional electrocardiography. However, continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring seems to be more appropriate due to automatic detection of arrhythmia, but this method has not been used. Objective We aimed to investigate the incidence and predictors of AE in RTCs using an implantable loop recorder (ILR). Methods A prospective observational study conducted from June 2009 to January 2011 included 100 consecutive ambulatory RTCs who underwent ILR and were followed-up for at least 1 year. Multivariate logistic regression was applied to define predictors of AE. Results During a mean follow-up of 424 ± 127 days, AE could be detected in 98% of patients, and 92% had more than one type of arrhythmia, with most considered potentially not serious. Sustained atrial tachycardia and atrial fibrillation occurred in 7% and 13% of patients, respectively, and bradyarrhythmia and non-sustained or sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) occurred in 25% and 57%, respectively. There were 18 deaths, of which 7 were sudden cardiac events: 3 bradyarrhythmias, 1 ventricular fibrillation, 1 myocardial infarction, and 2 undetermined. The presence of a long QTc (odds ratio [OR] = 7.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.01–26.35; p = 0.002), and the duration of the PR interval (OR = 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02–1.08; p < 0.001) were independently associated with bradyarrhythmias. Left ventricular dilatation (LVD) was independently associated with non-sustained VT (OR = 2.83; 95% CI, 1.01–7.96; p = 0.041). Conclusions In medium-term follow-up of RTCs, ILR helped detect a high incidence of AE, most of which did not have clinical relevance. The PR interval and presence of long QTc were predictive of bradyarrhythmias, whereas LVD was predictive of non-sustained VT. PMID:26351983

  16. Structural Damage Detection Using Virtual Passive Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lew, Jiann-Shiun; Juang, Jer-Nan

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents novel approaches for structural damage detection which uses the virtual passive controllers attached to structures, where passive controllers are energy dissipative devices and thus guarantee the closed-loop stability. The use of the identified parameters of various closed-loop systems can solve the problem that reliable identified parameters, such as natural frequencies of the open-loop system may not provide enough information for damage detection. Only a small number of sensors are required for the proposed approaches. The identified natural frequencies, which are generally much less sensitive to noise and more reliable than the identified natural frequencies, are used for damage detection. Two damage detection techniques are presented. One technique is based on the structures with direct output feedback controllers while the other technique uses the second-order dynamic feedback controllers. A least-squares technique, which is based on the sensitivity of natural frequencies to damage variables, is used for accurately identifying the damage variables.

  17. High Structural Stability of Textile Implants Prevents Pore Collapse and Preserves Effective Porosity at Strain

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, Uwe; Otto, Jens; Mühl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Reinforcement of tissues by use of textiles is encouraged by the reduced rate of recurrent tissue dehiscence but for the price of an inflammatory and fibrotic tissue reaction to the implant. The latter mainly is affected by the size of the pores, whereas only sufficiently large pores are effective in preventing a complete scar entrapment. Comparing two different sling implants (TVT and SIS), which are used for the treatment of urinary incontinence, we can demonstrate that the measurement of the effective porosity reveals considerable differences in the textile construction. Furthermore the changes of porosity after application of a tensile load can indicate a structural instability, favouring pore collapse at stress and questioning the use for purposes that are not “tension-free.” PMID:25973427

  18. Critical issues in the formation of quantum computer test structures by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, T.; Lo, C. C.; Weis, C. D.; Schuh, A.; Persaud, A.; Bokor, J.

    2009-04-06

    The formation of quantum computer test structures in silicon by ion implantation enables the characterization of spin readout mechanisms with ensembles of dopant atoms and the development of single atom devices. We briefly review recent results in the characterization of spin dependent transport and single ion doping and then discuss the diffusion and segregation behaviour of phosphorus, antimony and bismuth ions from low fluence, low energy implantations as characterized through depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Both phosphorus and bismuth are found to segregate to the SiO2/Si interface during activation anneals, while antimony diffusion is found to be minimal. An effect of the ion charge state on the range of antimony ions, 121Sb25+, in SiO2/Si is also discussed.

  19. Critical issues in the formation of quantum computer test structures by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenkel, T.; Lo, C. C.; Weis, C. D.; Schuh, A.; Persaud, A.; Bokor, J.

    2009-08-01

    The formation of quantum computer test structures in silicon by ion implantation enables the characterization of spin readout mechanisms with ensembles of dopant atoms and the development of single atom devices. We briefly review recent results in the characterization of spin dependent transport and single ion doping and then discuss the diffusion and segregation behaviour of phosphorus, antimony and bismuth ions from low fluence, low energy implantations as characterized through depth profiling by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Both phosphorus and bismuth are found to segregate to the SiO 2/Si interface during activation anneals, while antimony diffusion is found to be minimal. An effect of the ion charge state on the range of antimony ions, 121Sb 25+, in SiO 2/Si is also discussed.

  20. Optical and structural properties of an Eu implanted gallium nitride quantum dots/aluminium nitride superlattice.

    PubMed

    Peres, M; Neves, A J; Monteiro, T; Magalhães, S; Franco, N; Lorenz, K; Alves, E; Damilano, B; Massies, J; Dussaigne, A; Grandjean, N

    2010-04-01

    GaN/AIN structures made of GaN quantum dots (QDs) separated by AIN spacer layers, were doped with Europium by ion implantation. Rutherford Backscattering/Channelling measurements showed that Eu is incorporated mainly on near-substitutional cation sites within the superlattice region. Only slight deterioration of the crystal quality and no intermixing of the different layers are observed after implantation and annealing. After thermal annealing, photoluminescence associated with Eu3+ ions was observed. From its behaviour under different photon energy excitation and sample temperature we concluded that the Eu-related emitting centres are located inside the GaN QDs or dispersed in the GaN and AIN buffer or spacer layers. The 624 nm PL line, associated with Eu-doped GaN QDs, shows very low thermal quenching, suggesting recombination of confined carriers through rare-earth ion excitation.

  1. Extended contrast detection on fluoroscopy and angiography for image-guided trans-catheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yinxiao; Liao, Rui; Lv, Xudong

    2012-02-01

    Navigation and deployment of the prosthetic valve during trans-catheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) can be greatly facilitated with 3-D models showing detailed anatomical structures. Fast and robust automatic contrast detection at the aortic root on X-ray images is indispensable for automatically triggering a 2-D/3-D registration to align the 3-D model. Previously, we have proposed an automatic method for contrast detection at the aortic root on fluoroscopic and angiographic sequences [4]. In this paper, we extend that algorithm in several ways, making it more robust to handle more general and difficult cases. Specifically, the histogram likelihood ratio test is multiplied with the histogram portion computation to handle faint contrast cases. Histogram mapping corrects sudden changes in the global brightness, thus avoiding potential false positives. Respiration and heart beating check further reduces the false positive rate. In addition, a probe mask is introduced to enhance the contrast feature curve when the dark ultrasound probe partially occludes the aortic root. Lastly, a semi-global registration method for aligning the aorta shape model is implemented to improve the robustness of the algorithm with respect to the selection of region of interest (ROI) containing the aorta. The extended algorithm was evaluated on 100 sequences, and improved the detection accuracy from 94% to 100%, compared to the original method. Also, the robustness of the extended algorithm was tested with 20 different shifts of the ROI, and the error rate was as low as 0.2%, in comparison to 6.6% for the original method.

  2. Impact of nucleation of carbonaceous clusters on structural, electrical and optical properties of Cr+-implanted PMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Shafaq; Rafique, M. Shahid; Saleemi, Farhat; Naab, Fabian; Toader, Ovidiu; Mahmood, Arshad; Aziz, Uzma

    2016-09-01

    Specimens of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) have been implanted with 400 keV Cr+ ions at different ion fluences ranging from 5 × 1013 to 5 × 1015 ions/cm2. The possible chemical reactions involved in the nucleation of conjugated carbonaceous clusters in implanted PMMA are discussed. Furthermore, impact of formation of carbonaceous clusters on structural, optical, electrical and morphological properties of implanted PMMA has been examined. The structural modifications in implanted PMMA are observed by Raman spectroscopy. The variation in optical band gap and Urbach energy is measured using UV-visible spectroscopic analysis. The effects of Cr+ ion implantation on electrical and morphological properties are investigated by four-probe apparatus and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The Raman spectroscopic analysis confirmed the formation of carbonaceous clusters with the transformation of implanted layer of PMMA into amorphous carbon. Simultaneously, the optical band gap of implanted PMMA has reduced from 3.13 to 0.85 eV. The increase in Urbach energy favors the decline in band gap together with the structural modification in implanted PMMA. As a result of Cr+ ion implantation, the electrical conductivity of PMMA has improved from 2.14 ± 0.06 × 10-10 S/cm (pristine) to 7.20 ± 0.36 × 10-6 S/cm. The AFM images revealed a decrease in surface roughness with an increment in ion fluence up to 5 × 1014 ions/cm2. The modification in the electrical, optical and structural properties makes the PMMA a promising candidate for its future utilization, as a semiconducting and optically active material, in various fields like plastic electronics and optoelectronic devices.

  3. Three Dimensional Finite Element Analysis to Detect Stress Distribution in Spiral Implants and Surrounding Bone

    PubMed Central

    Danza, Matteo; Palmieri, Annalisa; Farinella, Francesca; Brunelli, Giorgio; Carinci, Francesco; Girardi, Ambra; Spinelli, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Background: The aim of research was to study spiral family implant by finite element analysis (FEA) inserted in different bone qualities connected with abutments of different angulations. Methods: The biomechanical behaviour of 4.2 × 13 mm dental implants, connecting screw, straight and 15° and 25° angulated abutments subjected to static loads, in contact with high and poor bone qualities was evaluated by FEA. Results: The lowest stress value was found in the system composed by implants and straight abut-ments loaded with a vertical force, while the highest stress value was found in implants with 15° angulated abutment loaded with an angulated force. In addition, we found the lower the bone quality, the higher the distribution of the stress within the bone. Conclusion: Spiral family implants can be used successfully in low bone quality but applying a straight force is recommended. PMID:21528032

  4. A Structural Equation Modeling Approach to Examining Factors Influencing Outcomes with Cochlear Implant in Mandarin-Speaking Children

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuan; Wong, Lena L. N.; Zhu, Shufeng; Xi, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the direct and indirect effects of demographical factors on speech perception and vocabulary outcomes of Mandarin-speaking children with cochlear implants (CIs). Methods 115 participants implanted before the age of 5 and who had used CI before 1 to 3 years were evaluated using a battery of speech perception and vocabulary tests. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses proposed. Results Early implantation significantly contributed to speech perception outcomes while having undergone a hearing aid trial (HAT) before implantation, maternal educational level (MEL), and having undergone universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) before implantation had indirect effects on speech perception outcomes via their effects on age at implantation. In addition, both age at implantation and MEL had direct and indirect effects on vocabulary skills, while UNHS and HAT had indirect effects on vocabulary outcomes via their effects on age at implantation. Conclusion A number of factors had indirect and direct effects on speech perception and vocabulary outcomes in Mandarin-speaking children with CIs and these factors were not necessarily identical to those reported among their English-speaking counterparts. PMID:26348360

  5. Rate discrimination, gap detection and ranking of temporal pitch in cochlear implant users.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Stefano; Carlyon, Robert P; Deeks, John M; Parkinson, Wendy; Bierer, Julie A

    2016-08-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users have poor temporal pitch perception, as revealed by two key outcomes of rate discrimination tests: (i) rate discrimination thresholds (RDTs) are typically larger than the corresponding frequency difference limen for pure tones in normal hearing listeners, and (ii) above a few hundred pulses per second (i.e. the "upper limit" of pitch), CI users cannot discriminate further increases in pulse rate. Both RDTs at low rates and the upper limit of pitch vary across listeners and across electrodes in a given listener. Here, we compare across-electrode and across-subject variation in these two measures with the variation in performance on another temporal processing task, gap detection, in order to explore the limitations of temporal processing in CI users. RDTs were obtained for 4-5 electrodes in each of 10 Advanced Bionics CI users using two interleaved adaptive tracks, corresponding to standard rates of 100 and 400 pps. Gap detection was measured using the adaptive procedure and stimuli described by Bierer et al. (JARO 16:273-284, 2015), and for the same electrodes and listeners as for the rate discrimination measures. Pitch ranking was also performed using a mid-point comparison technique. There was a marginal across-electrode correlation between gap detection and rate discrimination at 400 pps, but neither measure correlated with rate discrimination at 100 pps. Similarly, there was a highly significant across-subject correlation between gap detection and rate discrimination at 400, but not 100 pps, and these two correlations differed significantly from each other. Estimates of low-rate sensitivity and of the upper limit of pitch, obtained from the pitch ranking experiment, correlated well with rate discrimination for the 100- and 400-pps standards, respectively. The results are consistent with the upper limit of rate discrimination sharing a common basis with gap detection. There was no evidence that this limitation also applied to rate

  6. Optimization of an acoustic telemetry array for detecting transmitter-implanted fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clements, S.; Jepsen, D.; Karnowski, M.; Schreck, C.B.

    2005-01-01

    The development of miniature acoustic transmitters and economical, robust automated receivers has enabled researchers to study the movement patterns and survival of teleosts in estuarine and ocean environments, including many species and age-classes that were previously considered too small for implantation. During 2001-2003, we optimized a receiver mooring system to minimize gear and data loss in areas where current action or wave action and acoustic noise are high. In addition, we conducted extensive tests to determine (1) the performance of a transmitter and receiver (Vemco, Ltd.) that are widely used, particularly in North America and Europe and (2) the optimal placement of receivers for recording the passage of fish past a point in a linear-flow environment. Our results suggest that in most locations the mooring system performs well with little loss of data; however, boat traffic remains a concern due to entanglement with the mooring system. We also found that the reception efficiency of the receivers depends largely on the method and location of deployment. In many cases, we observed a range of 0-100% reception efficiency (the percentage of known transmissions that are detected while the receiver is within range of the transmitter) when using a conventional method of mooring. The efficiency was improved by removal of the mounting bar and obstructions from the mooring line. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  7. Porous Tantalum Structures for Bone Implants: Fabrication, Mechanical and In vitro Biological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bodhak, Subhadip; Bose, Susmita; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2010-01-01

    Relatively high cost of manufacturing and inability to produce modular all tantalum implants has limited its widespread acceptance, in spite of its excellent in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility. In this article, we report how to process Ta to create net shape porous structures with varying porosity using Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™) for the first time. Porous Ta samples with relative densities between 45 to 73% have been successfully fabricated and characterized for their mechanical properties. In vitro cell materials interactions, using human osteoblast cell line hFOB, have been accessed on these porous Ta structures and compared with porous Ti control samples. The results show that the Young’s modulus of porous Ta can be tailored between 1.5 to 20 GPa by changing the pore volume fraction between 27 and 55%. In vitro biocompatibility in terms of MTT assay and immunochemistry study showed excellent cellular adherence, growth and differentitation with abundant extracellular matrix formation on porous Ta structures compared to porous Ti control. These results indicate that porous Ta structures can promote enhanced/early biological fixation. The enhanced in vitro cell-materials interactions on porous Ta surface are attributed to chemistry and its high wettability and surface energy relative to porous Ti. Our results show that these laser processed porous Ta structures can find numerous applications, particularly among older patients, for metallic implants because of their excellent bioactivity. PMID:20132912

  8. Perception of Interaural Phase Differences With Envelope and Fine Structure Coding Strategies in Bilateral Cochlear Implant Users

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Susan; Aschendorff, Antje; Laszig, Roland; Wesarg, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect a target signal masked by noise is improved in normal-hearing listeners when interaural phase differences (IPDs) between the ear signals exist either in the masker or in the signal. To improve binaural hearing in bilaterally implanted cochlear implant (BiCI) users, a coding strategy providing the best possible access to IPD is highly desirable. In this study, we compared two coding strategies in BiCI users provided with CI systems from MED-EL (Innsbruck, Austria). The CI systems were bilaterally programmed either with the fine structure processing strategy FS4 or with the constant rate strategy high definition continuous interleaved sampling (HDCIS). Familiarization periods between 6 and 12 weeks were considered. The effect of IPD was measured in two types of experiments: (a) IPD detection thresholds with tonal signals addressing mainly one apical interaural electrode pair and (b) with speech in noise in terms of binaural speech intelligibility level differences (BILD) addressing multiple electrodes bilaterally. The results in (a) showed improved IPD detection thresholds with FS4 compared with HDCIS in four out of the seven BiCI users. In contrast, 12 BiCI users in (b) showed similar BILD with FS4 (0.6 ± 1.9 dB) and HDCIS (0.5 ± 2.0 dB). However, no correlation between results in (a) and (b) both obtained with FS4 was found. In conclusion, the degree of IPD sensitivity determined on an apical interaural electrode pair was not an indicator for BILD based on bilateral multielectrode stimulation. PMID:27659487

  9. Silicate antibodies in women with silicone breast implants: development of an assay for detection of humoral immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, G Q; Ojo-Amaize, E A; Agopian, M S; Peter, J B

    1996-01-01

    Silicon, in the form of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3), adsorbed onto bovine serum albumin (BSA)-precoated plates served as the solid-phase antigen in an enzyme immunoassay to detect silicate-reactive antibodies in the plasma of 40 symptomatic women with silicone breast implants, 91 asymptomatic women with silicone breast implants, 50 healthy control women, and 52 women with rheumatic diseases and without silicone breast implants, Silicate-reactive antibodies of immunoglobulin G (IgG) or IgM isotypes were detected in the plasma of 30% (12 of 40) of the symptomatic women with silicone breast implants; 9% (8 of 91) of the asymptomatic women with silicone breast implants; 5% (1 of 20) of the women without implants who had systemic lupus erythematosus; and 0% (0 of 32) of the women without implants who had either Sjögren syndrome, scleroderma, or rheumatoid arthritis. Only 2% (1 of 50) of the sera from the healthy control women contained silicate-reactive antibodies. Preincubation of sera with silicate and eight other metal compounds (including SiO2) demonstrated that the IgG and IgM antibodies bound specifically to silicate, because preincubation with Na2SiO3 inhibited more than 90% of the activity, whereas CrO3, Li2SO4, MgSO4, NiSO4, HgCl2, ZrOCl2, BeSO4, and SiO2 failed to inhibit the IgG or IgM antibody binding to the silicate-BSA plates. Furthermore, the F(ab')2 portion and not the Fc portion of the silicate-reactive IgG was reactive with BSA-bound silicate in the enzyme immunoassay. The assay for silicate-reactive antibodies was quantified by assigning arbitrary units to a standard curve composed of serial twofold dilutions of high-positive (ten times higher than the cutoff) silicate antibody sera. This novel assay is a useful method for detecting and quantifying humoral immune response to silicate. PMID:8991630

  10. [Comparative animal experimental study on the importance of the surface structure for the stability of extension implantations].

    PubMed

    Dördelmann, K; Tetsch, P; Ibing, G

    1977-04-01

    An animal experimental study was undertaken where the embedding of extension implants with a smooth or porous surface was histologically examined. Under extreme functional stress there occurs a mobility of the implants with the formation of a broad connective tissue zone, inflammatory reactions and ingrowth of epithelium, which is independent of the surface structure. Implants under less stress show a narrower connective tissue layer which narrows itself further if the surface is porous. The possible causes of this tissue reaction are discussed. PMID:266991

  11. Automatic aorta segmentation and valve landmark detection in C-arm CT for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yefeng; John, Matthias; Liao, Rui; Nöttling, Alois; Boese, Jan; Kempfert, Jörg; Walther, Thomas; Brockmann, Gernot; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a minimally invasive procedure to treat severe aortic valve stenosis. As an emerging imaging technique, C-arm computed tomography (CT) plays a more and more important role in TAVI on both pre-operative surgical planning (e.g., providing 3-D valve measurements) and intra-operative guidance (e.g., determining a proper C-arm angulation). Automatic aorta segmentation and aortic valve landmark detection in a C-arm CT volume facilitate the seamless integration of C-arm CT into the TAVI workflow and improve the patient care. In this paper, we present a part-based aorta segmentation approach, which can handle structural variation of the aorta in case that the aortic arch and descending aorta are missing in the volume. The whole aorta model is split into four parts: aortic root, ascending aorta, aortic arch, and descending aorta. Discriminative learning is applied to train a detector for each part separately to exploit the rich domain knowledge embedded in an expert-annotated dataset. Eight important aortic valve landmarks (three hinges, three commissures, and two coronary ostia) are also detected automatically with an efficient hierarchical approach. Our approach is robust under all kinds of variations observed in a real clinical setting, including changes in the field-of-view, contrast agent injection, scan timing, and aortic valve regurgitation. Taking about 1.1 s to process a volume, it is also computationally efficient. Under the guidance of the automatically extracted patient-specific aorta model, the physicians can properly determine the C-arm angulation and deploy the prosthetic valve. Promising outcomes have been achieved in real clinical applications. PMID:22955891

  12. The “accumulation effect” of positrons in the stack of foils, detected by measurements of the positron implantation profile

    SciTech Connect

    Dryzek, Jerzy; Siemek, Krzysztof

    2013-12-14

    The profiles of positrons implanted from the radioactive source {sup 22}Na into a stack of foils and plates are the subject of our experimental and theoretical studies. The measurements were performed using the depth scanning of positron implantation profile method, and the theoretical calculations using the phenomenological multi-scattering model (MSM). Several stacks consisting of silver, gold and aluminum foils, and titanium and germanium plates were investigated. We notice that the MSM describes well the experimental profiles; however when the stack consisting of silver and gold foils, the backscattering and linear absorption coefficients differ significantly from those reported in the literature. We suggest the energy dependency of the backscattering coefficient for silver and gold. In the stacks which comprise titanium and germanium plates, there were observed the features, which indicate the presence of the “accumulation effect” in the experimental implantation profile. This effect was previously detected in implantation profiles in Monte Carlo simulations using the GEANT4 tool kit, and it consists in higher localization of positrons close the interface. We suppose that this effect can be essential for positron annihilation in any heterogeneous materials.

  13. Structural investigation of CdSSe-nanocrystals synthesized by ion-beam-implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, P.; Karl, H.; Lindner, J. K. N.; Stritzker, B.

    2006-01-01

    II-VI semiconductor nanoparticle systems can be prepared by keV high-dose ion implantation and subsequent thermal annealing. The ternay Cd-S-Se system offers an additional degree of freedom to adjust materials properties, as Se and S are completely miscible on the Se sublattice. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates, that hexagonal CdSxSe1-x nanocrystals are formed after rapid thermal annealing. Peak positions are evaluated using Vegard's law. Material loss is monitored quantitatively by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). Cross-sectional TEM images are revealing strong influence of the composition on the nanocrystal structural evolution.

  14. Development of oral and extra-oral endosseous craniofacial implants by using a mesh structure for connective tissue attachment.

    PubMed

    Mita, Atsushi; Yagihara, Atsushi; Wang, Wei; Takakuda, Kazuo

    2014-03-19

    Connective tissue attachment to a mesh structure incorporated on the surface of oral implants and extra-oral endosseous craniofacial implants (EOECI) was investigated. Two types of implants were prepared: TI and TI-Mesh. TI was composed of an upper and a lower component, both comprised of a titanium cylinder, which could be connected using a titanium screw. The composition of the TIMesh was similar, but the lower cylinder had a lateral groove that was covered with a titanium mesh. In animal experiments performed using rat calvaria, the lower component was first implanted and was left submerged for 3 weeks, then the upper component was mounted percutaneously. After an additional 2 weeks, each implant and the surrounding tissues were harvested and evaluated. Histological observations revealed collagen fibers originating from surrounding hypodermal tissues anchored to the mesh structures of the TI-Mesh whereas no such collagen fibers were observed around TI. Significantly greater values of the attachment strength, the thickness of the dermal tissue, the thickness of hypodermal tissue, and the attachment lengths were observed in TI-Mesh than those of TI. Thus connective tissue attachment with collagen fibers anchored to the mesh was achieved by incorporating mesh structures into the percutaneously placed implants.

  15. Short Implants: New Horizon in Implant Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Manisha; Garg, Meenu; Pathak, Chetan

    2016-01-01

    The choice of implant length is an essential factor in deciding the survival rates of these implants and the overall success of the prosthesis. Placing an implant in the posterior part of the maxilla and mandible has always been very critical due to poor bone quality and quantity. Long implants can be placed in association with complex surgical procedures such as sinus lift and bone augmentation. These techniques are associated with higher cost, increased treatment time and greater morbidity. Hence, there is need for a less invasive treatment option in areas of poor bone quantity and quality. Data related to survival rates of short implants, their design and prosthetic considerations has been compiled and structured in this manuscript with emphasis on the indications, advantages of short implants and critical biomechanical factors to be taken into consideration when choosing to place them. Studies have shown that comparable success rates can be achieved with short implants as those with long implants by decreasing the lateral forces to the prosthesis, eliminating cantilevers, increasing implant surface area and improving implant to abutment connection. Short implants can be considered as an effective treatment alternative in resorbed ridges. Short implants can be considered as a viable treatment option in atrophic ridge cases in order to avoid complex surgical procedures required to place long implants. With improvement in the implant surface geometry and surface texture, there is an increase in the bone implant contact area which provides a good primary stability during osseo-integration. PMID:27790598

  16. Detecting structure of haplotypes and local ancestry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present a two-layer hidden Markov model to detect the structure of haplotypes for unrelated individuals. This allows us to model two scales of linkage disequilibrium (one within a group of haplotypes and one between groups), thereby taking advantage of rich haplotype information to infer local an...

  17. Structure and tribological performance by nitrogen and oxygen plasma based ion implantation on Ti6Al4V alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xingguo; Sun, Mingren; Ma, Xinxin; Tang, Guangze

    2011-09-01

    Ti6Al4V alloy was implanted with nitrogen-oxygen mixture by using plasma based ion implantation (PBII) at pulsed voltage -10, -30 and -50 kV. The implantation was up to 6 × 1017 ions/cm2 fluence. The changes in chemical composition, structure and hardness of the modified surfaces were studied by XPS and nanoindentation measurements. According to XPS, it was found that the modified layer was predominantly TiO2, but contained small amounts of TiO, Ti2O3, TiN and Al2O3 between the outmost layer and metallic substrate. Surface hardness and wear resistance of the samples increased significantly after PBII treatment, the wear rate of the sample implanted N2-O2 mixture at -50 kV decreased eight times than the untreated one. The sample implanted N2-O2 mixture showed better wear resistance than that of the sample only implanted oxygen at - 50 kV. The wear mechanism of untreated sample was abrasive-dominated and adhesive, and the wear scar of the sample implanted at -50 kV was characterized by abrasive wear-type ploughing.

  18. Etching and structural changes in nitrogen plasma immersion ion implanted polystyrene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, B. K.; Bilek, M. M. M.; Kondyurin, A.; Mizuno, K.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2006-06-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII), with nitrogen ions of energy 20 keV in the fluence range of 5 × 1014-2 × 1016 ions cm-2, is used to modify 100 nm thin films of polystyrene on silicon wafer substrates. Ellipsometry is used to study changes in thickness with etching and changes in optical constants. Two distinctly different etch rates are observed as the polymer structure is modified. FTIR spectroscopy data reveals the structural changes, including changes in aromatic and aliphatic groups and oxidation and carbonisation processes, occurring in the polystyrene film as a function of the ion fluence. The transformation to a dense amorphous carbon-like material was observed to progress through an intermediate structural form containing a high concentration of Cdbnd C and Cdbnd O bonds.

  19. In vitro and in vivo studies of surface-structured implants for bone formation

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Lu; Feng, Bo; Wang, Peizhi; Ding, Siyang; Liu, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Jie; Yu, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Background and methods Micronanoscale topologies play an important role in implant osteointegration and determine the success of an implant. We investigated the effect of three different implant surface topologies on osteoblast response and bone regeneration. In this study, implants with nanotubes and micropores were used, and implants with flat surfaces were used as the control group. Results Our in vitro studies showed that the nanostructured topologies improved the proliferation, differentiation, and development of the osteoblastic phenotype. Histological analysis further revealed that the nanotopology increased cell aggregation at the implant-tissue interfaces and enhanced bone-forming ability. Pushout testing indicated that the nanostructured topology greatly increased the bone-implant interfacial strength within 4 weeks of implantation. Conclusion Nanotopography may improve regeneration of bone tissue and shows promise for dental implant applications. PMID:23028216

  20. Wrong detection of ventricular fibrillation in an implantable cardioverter defibrillator caused by the movement near the MRI scanner bore.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Eugenio; Censi, Federica; Triventi, Michele; Mancini, Matteo; Napolitano, Antonio; Genovese, Elisabetta; Cannata, Vittorio; Falsaperla, Rosaria; Calcagnini, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The static magnetic field generated by MRI systems is highly non-homogenous and rapidly decreases when moving away from the bore of the scanner. Consequently, the movement around the MRI scanner is equivalent to an exposure to a time-varying magnetic field at very low frequency (few Hz). For patients with an implanted cardiac stimulators, such as an implantable cardioverter/defibrillator (ICD), the movements inside the MRI environment may thus induce voltages on the loop formed by the leads of the device, with the potential to affect the behavior of the stimulator. In particular, the ICD's detection algorithms may be affected by the induced voltage and may cause inappropriate sensing, arrhythmia detections, and eventually inappropriate ICD therapy.We performed in-vitro measurements on a saline-filled humanshaped phantom (male, 170 cm height), equipped with an MRconditional ICD able to transmit in real-time the detected cardiac activity (electrograms). A biventricular implant was reproduced and the ICD was programmed in standard operating conditions, but with the shock delivery disabled. The electrograms recorded in the atrial, left and right ventricle channels were monitored during rotational movements along the vertical axis, in close proximity of the bore. The phantom was also equipped with an accelerometer and a magnetic field probe to measure the angular velocity and the magnetic field variation during the experiment. Pacing inhibition, inappropriate detection of tachyarrhythmias and of ventricular fibrillation were observed. Pacing inhibition began at an angular velocity of about 7 rad/s, (dB/dt of about 2 T/s). Inappropriate detection of ventricular fibrillation occurred at about 8 rad/s (dB/dt of about 3 T/s). These findings highlight the need for a specific risk assessment of workers with MR-conditional ICDs, which takes into account also effects that are generally not considered relevant for patients, such as the movement around the scanner bore. PMID

  1. Long-term structural failure of coaxial polyurethane implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Robert G; Cannom, David; Hayes, David L; Parsonnet, Victor; Hayes, John; Ratliff, Norman; Tyers, G Frank O; Epstein, Andrew E; Vlay, Stephen C; Furman, Seymour; Gross, Jay

    2002-06-01

    Transvene models 6936/6966, a coaxial polyurethane ICD lead, may be prone to structural failure. These models comprise 54% of ICD lead failures in the authors' Multicenter Registry database. Because ICD leads perform a vital function, the clinical features, causes, and probability of Transvene 6936/6966 lead failure were determined. The Registry and United States Food and Drug Administration databases were queried for the clinical features and structural causes of the Transvene 6936/6966 lead failure, and a five-center substudy estimated the survival probability for 521 Transvene 6936/6966 implants. The mean time to failure was 4.8 +/- 2.1 years, and the estimated survival at 60 and 84 months after implant were 92% and 84%, respectively. Oversensing was the most common sign of failure (76%), and 24 patients experienced inappropriate shocks. The manufacturer's reports indicated that high voltage coil fracture and 80A polyurethane defects were the predominant causes of lead failure. Transvene models 6936 and 6966 coaxial polyurethane ICD leads are prone to failure over time. Patients who have these leads should be evaluated frequently. Additional studies are needed to identify safe management strategies. PMID:12137338

  2. A novel bionic design of dental implant for promoting its long-term success using nerve growth factor (NGF): Utilizing nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant

    PubMed Central

    He, Hao; Yao, Yang; Wang, Yanying; Wu, Yingying; Yang, Yang; Gong, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Summary The absence of periodontium causes masticatory load in excess of the self-repairing potential of peri-implant bone; peri-implant bone loss caused by occlusal overload is not uncommon in patients and greatly diminishes chances of long-term success. Regenerative treatments may be useful in inducing peri-implant bone regeneration, but are only stopgap solutions to the aftermaths caused by the imperfect biomechanical compatibility of the dental implant. Despite promising success, the tissue-engineered periodontal ligament still needs a period of time to be perfected before being clinically applied. Hence, we propose a novel design of dental implant that utilizes nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant. Many studies have shown that NGF, a neurotrophin, is effective for nerve regeneration in both animal and clinical studies. Moreover, NGF has the potential to accelerate bone healing in patients with fracture and fracture nonunion and improve osseointegration of the implant. The key point of the design is to reduce stress concentrated around peri-implant bone by cushioning masticatory forces and distributing them to all the peri-implant bone through nano-springs, and promote osseoperception and osseointegration by NGF-induced nerve regeneration and new bone formation. This design, which transfers the main biomechanical interface of the implant from outside to inside, if proven to be valid, may to some extent compensate for the functions of lost periodontium in stress cushioning and proprioception. PMID:22847209

  3. A novel bionic design of dental implant for promoting its long-term success using nerve growth factor (NGF): utilizing nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant.

    PubMed

    He, Hao; Yao, Yang; Wang, Yanying; Wu, Yingying; Yang, Yang; Gong, Ping

    2012-08-01

    The absence of periodontium causes masticatory load in excess of the self-repairing potential of peri-implant bone; peri-implant bone loss caused by occlusal overload is not uncommon in patients and greatly diminishes chances of long-term success. Regenerative treatments may be useful in inducing peri-implant bone regeneration, but are only stopgap solutions to the aftermaths caused by the imperfect biomechanical compatibility of the dental implant. Despite promising success, the tissue-engineered periodontal ligament still needs a period of time to be perfected before being clinically applied. Hence, we propose a novel design of dental implant that utilizes nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant. Many studies have shown that NGF, a neurotrophin, is effective for nerve regeneration in both animal and clinical studies. Moreover, NGF has the potential to accelerate bone healing in patients with fracture and fracture nonunion and improve osseointegration of the implant. The key point of the design is to reduce stress concentrated around peri-implant bone by cushioning masticatory forces and distributing them to all the peri-implant bone through nano-springs, and promote osseoperception and osseointegration by NGF-induced nerve regeneration and new bone formation. This design, which transfers the main biomechanical interface of the implant from outside to inside, if proven to be valid, may to some extent compensate for the functions of lost periodontium in stress cushioning and proprioception.

  4. Dynamic based damage detection in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sauvik; Ricci, Fabrizio; Baid, Harsh; Mal, Ajit K.

    2009-03-01

    Advanced composites are being used increasingly in state-of-the-art aircraft and aerospace structures. In spite of their many advantages, composite materials are highly susceptible to hidden flaws that may occur at any time during the life cycle of a structure, and if undetected, may cause sudden and catastrophic failure of the entire structure. This paper is concerned with the detection and characterization of hidden defects in composite structures before they grow to a critical size. A methodology for automatic damage identification and localization is developed using a combination of vibration and wave propagation data. The structure is assumed to be instrumented with an array of actuators and sensors to excite and record its dynamic response, including vibration and wave propagation effects. A damage index, calculated from the measured dynamical response of the structure in a previous (reference) state and the current state, is introduced as a determinant of structural damage. The indices are used to identify low velocity impact damages in increasingly complex composite structural components. The potential application of the approach in developing health monitoring systems in defects-critical structures is indicated.

  5. Automated detection of glaucoma using structural and non structural features.

    PubMed

    Salam, Anum A; Khalil, Tehmina; Akram, M Usman; Jameel, Amina; Basit, Imran

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is a chronic disease often called "silent thief of sight" as it has no symptoms and if not detected at an early stage it may cause permanent blindness. Glaucoma progression precedes some structural changes in the retina which aid ophthalmologists to detect glaucoma at an early stage and stop its progression. Fundoscopy is among one of the biomedical imaging techniques to analyze the internal structure of retina. Our proposed technique provides a novel algorithm to detect glaucoma from digital fundus image using a hybrid feature set. This paper proposes a novel combination of structural (cup to disc ratio) and non-structural (texture and intensity) features to improve the accuracy of automated diagnosis of glaucoma. The proposed method introduces a suspect class in automated diagnosis in case of any conflict in decision from structural and non-structural features. The evaluation of proposed algorithm is performed using a local database containing fundus images from 100 patients. This system is designed to refer glaucoma cases from rural areas to specialists and the motivation behind introducing suspect class is to ensure high sensitivity of proposed system. The average sensitivity and specificity of proposed system are 100 and 87 % respectively. PMID:27652092

  6. Feasibility of Structural and Functional MRI Acquisition with Unpowered Implants in Argus II Retinal Prosthesis Patients: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Samantha I.; Shi, Yonggang; Weiland, James D.; Falabella, Paulo; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C.; Zacks, David N.; Tjan, Bosco S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can measure the effects of vision loss and recovery on brain function and structure. In this case study, we sought to determine the feasibility of acquiring anatomical and functional MRI data in recipients of the Argus II epiretinal prosthesis system. Methods Following successful implantation with the Argus II device, two retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients completed MRI scans with their implant unpowered to measure primary visual cortex (V1) functional responses to a tactile task, whole-brain morphometry, V1 cortical thickness, and diffusion properties of the optic tract and optic radiation. Measurements in the subjects with the Argus II implant were compared to measurements obtained previously from RP patients and sighted individuals. Results The presence of the Argus II implant resulted in artifacts that were localized around the patient's implanted eye and did not extend into cortical regions or white matter tracts associated with the visual system. Structural data on V1 cortical thickness and the retinofugal tract obtained from the two Argus II subjects fell within the ranges of sighted and RP groups. When compared to the RP and sighted subjects, Argus II patients' tactile-evoked cross-modal functional MRI (fMRI) blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in V1 also fell within the range of either sighted or RP groups, apparently depending on time since implantation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that successful acquisition and quantification of structural and functional MR images are feasible in the presence of the inactive implant and provides preliminary information on functional changes in the brain that may follow sight restoration treatments. Transitional Relevance Successful MRI and fMRI acquisition in Argus II recipients demonstrates feasibility of using MRI to study the effect of retinal prosthesis use on brain structure and function. PMID:26693097

  7. Implantable polymer/metal thin film structures for the localized treatment of cancer by Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan-Dapaah, Kwabena; Rahbar, Nima; Theriault, Christian; Soboyejo, Wole

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents an implantable polymer/metal alloy thin film structure for localized post-operative treatment of breast cancer. A combination of experiments and models is used to study the temperature changes due to Joule heating by patterned metallic thin films embedded in poly-dimethylsiloxane. The heat conduction within the device and the surrounding normal/cancerous breast tissue is modeled with three-dimensional finite element method (FEM). The FEM simulations are used to explore the potential effects of device geometry and Joule heating on the temperature distribution and lesion (thermal dose). The FEM model is validated using a gel model that mimics biological media. The predictions are also compared to prior results from in vitro studies and relevant in vivo studies in the literature. The implications of the results are discussed for the potential application of polymer/metal thin film structures in hyperthermic treatment of cancer.

  8. Making it stick: the role of structural design in implantable technologies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wontae; Leask, Richard L; Moraes, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Designing technologies that work within the human body requires innovation at the interface of biology, engineering, and material sciences. The human body presents a surprisingly hostile environment towards technologies designed to improve health, and recent approaches to these problems have leveraged the links between material form and function to improve implantable systems. The use of physical structure has emerged as a key design parameter in developing these systems, and has recently been applied to make significant progress in the field. Here, we highlight recent studies that demonstrate the innovative use of structure in the design of technologies meant to operate within the human body, with a specific focus on improving their biointegration, delivery, and functionality. PMID:26446511

  9. Making it stick: the role of structural design in implantable technologies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wontae; Leask, Richard L; Moraes, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Designing technologies that work within the human body requires innovation at the interface of biology, engineering, and material sciences. The human body presents a surprisingly hostile environment towards technologies designed to improve health, and recent approaches to these problems have leveraged the links between material form and function to improve implantable systems. The use of physical structure has emerged as a key design parameter in developing these systems, and has recently been applied to make significant progress in the field. Here, we highlight recent studies that demonstrate the innovative use of structure in the design of technologies meant to operate within the human body, with a specific focus on improving their biointegration, delivery, and functionality.

  10. Aiming for Efficiency by Detecting Structural Similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Judith; Jeliazkov, Nikolay; Kühne, Gerold

    When applying XML-Retrieval in a distributed setting, efficiency issues have to be considered, e.g. reducing the network traffic involved in an swering a given query. The new Efficiency Track of INEX gave us the opportu nity to explore the possibility of improving both effectiveness and efficiency by exploiting structural similarity. We ran some of the track’s highly structured queries on our top-k search engine to analyze the impact of various structural similarity functions. We applied those functions first to the ranking and based on that to the query routing process. Our results indicate that detection of structural similarity can be used in order to re duce the amount of messages sent between distributed nodes and thus lead to more efficiency of the search.

  11. Nanopore sequencing detects structural variants in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Alexis L.; Workman, Rachael E.; Fan, Yunfan; Eshleman, James R.; Timp, Winston

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite advances in sequencing, structural variants (SVs) remain difficult to reliably detect due to the short read length (<300 bp) of 2nd generation sequencing. Not only do the reads (or paired-end reads) need to straddle a breakpoint, but repetitive elements often lead to ambiguities in the alignment of short reads. We propose to use the long-reads (up to 20 kb) possible with 3rd generation sequencing, specifically nanopore sequencing on the MinION. Nanopore sequencing relies on a similar concept to a Coulter counter, reading the DNA sequence from the change in electrical current resulting from a DNA strand being forced through a nanometer-sized pore embedded in a membrane. Though nanopore sequencing currently has a relatively high mismatch rate that precludes base substitution and small frameshift mutation detection, its accuracy is sufficient for SV detection because of its long reads. In fact, long reads in some cases may improve SV detection efficiency. We have tested nanopore sequencing to detect a series of well-characterized SVs, including large deletions, inversions, and translocations that inactivate the CDKN2A/p16 and SMAD4/DPC4 tumor suppressor genes in pancreatic cancer. Using PCR amplicon mixes, we have demonstrated that nanopore sequencing can detect large deletions, translocations and inversions at dilutions as low as 1:100, with as few as 500 reads per sample. Given the speed, small footprint, and low capital cost, nanopore sequencing could become the ideal tool for the low-level detection of cancer-associated SVs needed for molecular relapse, early detection, or therapeutic monitoring. PMID:26787508

  12. Unsupervised Structure Detection in Biomedical Data.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Julia E

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in computational biology is to find simple representations of high-dimensional data that best reveal the underlying structure. In this work, we present an intuitive and easy-to-implement method based on ranked neighborhood comparisons that detects structure in unsupervised data. The method is based on ordering objects in terms of similarity and on the mutual overlap of nearest neighbors. This basic framework was originally introduced in the field of social network analysis to detect actor communities. We demonstrate that the same ideas can successfully be applied to biomedical data sets in order to reveal complex underlying structure. The algorithm is very efficient and works on distance data directly without requiring a vectorial embedding of data. Comprehensive experiments demonstrate the validity of this approach. Comparisons with state-of-the-art clustering methods show that the presented method outperforms hierarchical methods as well as density based clustering methods and model-based clustering. A further advantage of the method is that it simultaneously provides a visualization of the data. Especially in biomedical applications, the visualization of data can be used as a first pre-processing step when analyzing real world data sets to get an intuition of the underlying data structure. We apply this model to synthetic data as well as to various biomedical data sets which demonstrate the high quality and usefulness of the inferred structure.

  13. Angular velocity-based structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yizheng; Kiremidjian, Anne S.; Rajagopal, Ram; Loh, Chin-Hsiung

    2016-04-01

    Damage detection is an important application of structural health monitoring. With the recent development of sensing technology, additional information about structures, angular velocity, has become available. In this paper, the angular velocity signals obtained from gyroscopes are modeled as an autoregressive (AR) model. The damage sensitive features (DSFs) are defined as a function of the AR coefficients. It is found that the mean values of the DSF for the damaged and undamaged signals are different. Also, we show that the angular velocity- based AR model has a linear relationship with the acceleration-based AR model. To test the proposed damage detection method, the algorithm has been tested with the experimental data from a recent shake table test where the damage is introduced systemically. The results indicate that the change of DSF means is statistically significant, and the angular velocity-based DSFs are sensitive to damage.

  14. Leak detection using structure-borne noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Stephen D. (Inventor); Chimenti, Dale E. (Inventor); Roberts, Ronald A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for detection and location of air leaks in a pressure vessel, such as a spacecraft, includes sensing structure-borne ultrasound waveforms associated with turbulence caused by a leak from a plurality of sensors and cross correlating the waveforms to determine existence and location of the leak. Different configurations of sensors and corresponding methods can be used. An apparatus for performing the methods is also provided.

  15. High Mobility SiGe/Si Transistor Structures on Sapphire Substrates Using Ion Implantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Mueller, C. H.; Croke, E. T.

    2003-01-01

    High mobility n-type SiGe/Si transistor structures have been fabricated on sapphire substrates by ion implanting phosphorus ions into strained 100 Angstrom thick silicon channels for the first time. The strained Si channels were sandwiched between Si(sub 0.7)Ge(sub 0.3) layers, which, in turn, were deposited on Si(sub 0.7)Ge(sub 0.3) virtual substrates and graded SiGe buffer layers. After the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) film growth process was completed, ion thick silicon channels implantation and post-annealing were used to introduce donors. The phosphorous ions were preferentially located in the Si channel at a peak concentration of approximately 1x10(exp 18)/cu cm. Room temperature electron mobilities exceeding 750 sq cm/V-sec at carrier densities of 1x10(exp 12)/sq cm were measured. Electron concentration appears to be the key factor that determines mobility, with the highest mobility observed for electron densities in the 1 - 2x10(exp 12)/sq cm range.

  16. Doping of Graphene by Low-Energy Ion Beam Implantation: Structural, Electronic, and Transport Properties.

    PubMed

    Willke, Philip; Amani, Julian A; Sinterhauf, Anna; Thakur, Sangeeta; Kotzott, Thomas; Druga, Thomas; Weikert, Steffen; Maiti, Kalobaran; Hofsäss, Hans; Wenderoth, Martin

    2015-08-12

    We investigate the structural, electronic, and transport properties of substitutional defects in SiC-graphene by means of scanning tunneling microscopy and magnetotransport experiments. Using ion incorporation via ultralow energy ion implantation, the influence of different ion species (boron, nitrogen, and carbon) can directly be compared. While boron and nitrogen atoms lead to an effective doping of the graphene sheet and can reduce or raise the position of the Fermi level, respectively, (12)C(+) carbon ions are used to study possible defect creation by the bombardment. For low-temperature transport, the implantation leads to an increase in resistance and a decrease in mobility in contrast to undoped samples. For undoped samples, we observe in high magnetic fields a positive magnetoresistance that changes to negative for the doped samples, especially for (11)B(+)- and (12)C(+)-ions. We conclude that the conductivity of the graphene sheet is lowered by impurity atoms and especially by lattice defects, because they result in weak localization effects at low temperatures. PMID:26120803

  17. Quantum structures for multiband photon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, A. G. U.

    2005-09-01

    The work describes multiband photon detectors based on semiconductor micro- and nano-structures. The devices considered include quantum dot, homojunction, and heterojunction structures. In the quantum dot structures, transitions are from one state to another, while free carrier absorption and internal photoemission play the dominant role in homo or heterojunction detectors. Quantum Dots-in-a-Well (DWELL) detectors can tailor the response wavelength by varying the size of the well. A tunneling Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector (T-QDIP) could operate at room temperature by blocking the dark current except in the case of resonance. Photoexcited carriers are selectively collected from InGaAs quantum dots by resonant tunneling, while the dark current is blocked by AlGaAs/InGaAs tunneling barriers placed in the structure. A two-color infrared detector with photoresponse peaks at ~6 and ~17 μm at room temperature will be discussed. A Homojunction or HEterojunction Interfacial Workfunction Internal Photoemission (HIWIP or HEIWIP) infrared detector, formed by a doped emitter layer, and an intrinsic layer acting as the barrier followed by another highly doped contact layer, can detect near infrared (NIR) photons due to interband transitions and mid/far infrared (MIR/FIR) radiation due to intraband transitions. The threshold wavelength of the interband response depends on the band gap of the barrier material, and the MIR/FIR response due to intraband transitions can be tailored by adjusting the band offset between the emitter and the barrier. GaAs/AlGaAs will provide NIR and MIR/FIR dual band response, and with GaN/AlGaN structures the detection capability can be extended into the ultraviolet region. These detectors are useful in numerous applications such as environmental monitoring, medical diagnosis, battlefield-imaging, space astronomy applications, mine detection, and remote-sensing.

  18. Finite element analysis and cellular studies on advanced, controlled porous structures with subsurface continuity in bio-implantable titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Lambert, P; Ankem, S; Wyatt, Z; Ferlin, K M; Fisher, J

    2014-01-01

    Highly-porous metallic implant onlay materials (specifically those containing surface pores that intersect beneath the onlay surface) have been investigated recently for their potential to reduce bone resorption and to improve the overall stability of the implant. In the current study, sub-surface interconnectivity of high-aspect-ratio pores was created directly in the substrate of an implant material using wire electrical discharge machining (EDM). This technique was used to produce intersecting pores with diameters of 180-250 μm on a clinically relevant implant material—commercially pure (CP) Grade 4 Ti—with a very high degree of control over pore morphology. These pores resulted in no significant microstructural modification to the surrounding Ti, and the inner pore surfaces could be thermally oxidized to produce a microrough, bioactive TiO2 layer. Finite element analysis of Ti models containing these EDM-attainable intersecting pore geometries suggested they produce higher bone/implant interface strengths and lower susceptibility to stress shielding of the surrounding bone as compared with models containing simpler surface geometries. In vitro experiments using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) demonstrated mineralized tissue ingrowth of ∼ 300 μm into EDM-produced pores. This amount of ingrowth is expected to allow for full interlocking of mineralized tissue and implant given the proper pore structure design.

  19. Thermal migration of deuterium implanted in graphite: Influence of free surface proximity and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guillou, M.; Moncoffre, N.; Toulhoat, N.; Pipon, Y.; Ammar, M. R.; Rouzaud, J. N.; Deldicque, D.

    2016-03-01

    This paper is a contribution to the study of the behavior of activation products produced in irradiated nuclear graphite, graphite being the moderator of the first French generation of CO2 cooled nuclear fission reactors. This paper is focused on the thermal release of Tritium, a major contributor to the initial activity, taking into account the role of the free surfaces (open pores and graphite surface). Two kinds of graphite were compared. On one hand, Highly Oriented Pyrolitic Graphite (HOPG), a model well graphitized graphite, and on the other hand, SLA2, a porous less graphitized nuclear graphite. Deuterium ion implantation at three different energies 70, 200 and 390 keV allows simulating the presence of Tritium at three different depths, corresponding respectively to projected ranges Rp of 0.75, 1.7 and 3.2 μm. The D isotopic tracing is performed thanks to the D(3He,p)4He nuclear reaction. The graphite structure is studied by Raman microspectrometry. Thermal annealing is performed in the temperature range 200-1200 °C up to 300 h annealing time. As observed in a previous study, the results show that the D release occurs according to three kinetic regimes: a rapid permeation through open pores, a transient regime corresponding to detrapping and diffusion of D located at low energy sites correlated to the edges of crystallites and finally a saturation regime attributed to detrapping of interstitial D located at high energy sites inside the crystallites. Below 600 °C, D release is negligible whatever the implantation depth and the graphite type. The present paper clearly puts forward that above 600 °C, the D release decreases at deeper implantation depths and strongly depends on the graphite structure. In HOPG where high energy sites are more abundant, the D release is less dependent on the surface proximity compared to SLA2. In SLA2, in which the low energy sites prevail, the D release curves are clearly shifted towards lower temperatures when D is located

  20. Structural defects and electronic structure of N-ion implanted TiO2: Bulk versus thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, D. A.; Boukhvalov, D. W.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Korotin, M. A.; Kim, S. S.

    2015-11-01

    Systematic investigation of atomic structure of N-ion implanted TiO2 (thin films and bulk ceramics) was performed by XPS measurements (core levels and valence bands) and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In bulk samples experiment and theory demonstrate anion N → O substitution. For the thin films case experiments evidence valuable contributions from N2 and NO molecule-like structures and theoretical modeling reveals a possibility of formation of these species as result of the appearance of interstitial nitrogen defects on the various surfaces of TiO2. Energetics of formation of oxygen vacancies and its key role for band gap reduction is also discussed.

  1. Intelligent-based Structural Damage Detection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yu, K.F.

    2010-05-21

    This paper presents the application of a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the diagnosis of structural damage. The ANN model, denoted as the GRNNFA, is a hybrid model combining the General Regression Neural Network Model (GRNN) and the Fuzzy ART (FA) model. It not only retains the important features of the GRNN and FA models (i.e. fast and stable network training and incremental growth of network structure) but also facilitates the removal of the noise embedded in the training samples. Structural damage alters the stiffness distribution of the structure and so as to change the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system. The measured modal parameter changes due to a particular damage are treated as patterns for that damage. The proposed GRNNFA model was trained to learn those patterns in order to detect the possible damage location of the structure. Simulated data is employed to verify and illustrate the procedures of the proposed ANN-based damage diagnosis methodology. The results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of applying the GRNNFA model to structural damage diagnosis even when the training samples were noise contaminated.

  2. Intelligent-based Structural Damage Detection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yu, Kin Fung

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the application of a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the diagnosis of structural damage. The ANN model, denoted as the GRNNFA, is a hybrid model combining the General Regression Neural Network Model (GRNN) and the Fuzzy ART (FA) model. It not only retains the important features of the GRNN and FA models (i.e. fast and stable network training and incremental growth of network structure) but also facilitates the removal of the noise embedded in the training samples. Structural damage alters the stiffness distribution of the structure and so as to change the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system. The measured modal parameter changes due to a particular damage are treated as patterns for that damage. The proposed GRNNFA model was trained to learn those patterns in order to detect the possible damage location of the structure. Simulated data is employed to verify and illustrate the procedures of the proposed ANN-based damage diagnosis methodology. The results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of applying the GRNNFA model to structural damage diagnosis even when the training samples were noise contaminated.

  3. An ontology-based annotation of cardiac implantable electronic devices to detect therapy changes in a national registry.

    PubMed

    Rosier, Arnaud; Mabo, Philippe; Chauvin, Michel; Burgun, Anita

    2015-05-01

    The patient population benefitting from cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) is increasing. This study introduces a device annotation method that supports the consistent description of the functional attributes of cardiac devices and evaluates how this method can detect device changes from a CIED registry. We designed the Cardiac Device Ontology, an ontology of CIEDs and device functions. We annotated 146 cardiac devices with this ontology and used it to detect therapy changes with respect to atrioventricular pacing, cardiac resynchronization therapy, and defibrillation capability in a French national registry of patients with implants (STIDEFIX). We then analyzed a set of 6905 device replacements from the STIDEFIX registry. Ontology-based identification of therapy changes (upgraded, downgraded, or similar) was accurate (6905 cases) and performed better than straightforward analysis of the registry codes (F-measure 1.00 versus 0.75 to 0.97). This study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of ontology-based functional annotation of devices in the cardiac domain. Such annotation allowed a better description and in-depth analysis of STIDEFIX. This method was useful for the automatic detection of therapy changes and may be reused for analyzing data from other device registries.

  4. Feasibility of fully automated detection of fiducial markers implanted into the prostate using electronic portal imaging: A comparison of methods

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Emma J. . E-mail: eharris@icr.ac.uk; McNair, Helen A.; Evans, Phillip M.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of fully automated detection of fiducial markers implanted into the prostate using portal images acquired with an electronic portal imaging device. Methods and Materials: We have made a direct comparison of 4 different methods (2 template matching-based methods, a method incorporating attenuation and constellation analyses and a cross correlation method) that have been published in the literature for the automatic detection of fiducial markers. The cross-correlation technique requires a-priory information from the portal images, therefore the technique is not fully automated for the first treatment fraction. Images of 7 patients implanted with gold fiducial markers (8 mm in length and 1 mm in diameter) were acquired before treatment (set-up images) and during treatment (movie images) using 1MU and 15MU per image respectively. Images included: 75 anterior (AP) and 69 lateral (LAT) set-up images and 51 AP and 83 LAT movie images. Using the different methods described in the literature, marker positions were automatically identified. Results: The method based upon cross correlation techniques gave the highest percentage detection success rate of 99% (AP) and 83% (LAT) set-up (1MU) images. The methods gave detection success rates of less than 91% (AP) and 42% (LAT) set-up images. The amount of a-priory information used and how it affects the way the techniques are implemented, is discussed. Conclusions: Fully automated marker detection in set-up images for the first treatment fraction is unachievable using these methods and that using cross-correlation is the best technique for automatic detection on subsequent radiotherapy treatment fractions.

  5. Accelerating aging of zirconia femoral head implants: change of surface structure and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, S; Vohra, Yogesh K; Lemons, Jack E; Ueno, Masaru; Ikeda, Junji

    2007-05-01

    Recently, alternations of zirconia ceramic femoral heads of total hip prostheses during in vivo conditions have caused concern in the medical disciplines regarding phase transformation of zirconia prosthetic components. In this paper, we have investigated the mechanical and structural properties of different laboratory aged zirconia femoral heads and correlated changes in mechanical properties with the phase compositions of the sample. From laser microscope observation, cross-sectional Scanning electron microscopy imaging, and X-ray diffraction analysis on the surface of the zirconia femoral heads, we found monoclinic to tetragonal phase transformation in zirconia prostheses over time during the aging process in the laboratory. Mechanical properties, mainly hardness (H) and Young's modulus (E) values, were measured by nanoindentation technique on the surface of these implants. The results showed that both H and E values decreased with increased monoclinic phase in zirconia, thus confirming a phase transformation over time during aging.

  6. Automated detection and location of structural degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, B.; Blakeman, E.D.; Phillips, L.D.

    1997-03-01

    The investigation of a diagnostic method for detecting and locating the source of structural degradation in mechanical systems is described in this paper. The diagnostic method uses a mathematical model of the mechanical system to define relationships between system parameters, such as spring rates and damping rates, and measurable spectral features, such as natural frequencies and mode shapes. These model-defined relationships are incorporated into a neural network, which is used to relate measured spectral features to system parameters. The diagnosis of the system`s condition is performed by presenting the neural network with measured spectral features and comparing the system parameters estimated by the neural network to previously estimated values. Changes in the estimated system parameters indicate the location and severity of degradation in the mechanical system. The investigation applied the method by using computer-simulated data and data collected form a bench-top mechanical system. The effects of neural network training set size and composition on the accuracy of the model parameter estimates were investigated by using computer simulated data. The results show that diagnostic method can be applied to successfully locate and estimate the magnitude of structural changes in a mechanical system. The average error in the estimated spring rate values of the bench-top mechanical system was less than 10%. This degree of accuracy is sufficient to permit the use of this method for detecting and locating structural degradation in mechanical systems.

  7. Local Arsenic Structure in Shallow Implants in Si following SPER: an EXAFS and MEIS study

    SciTech Connect

    Pepponi, G.; Giubertoni, D.; Gennaro, S.; Bersani, M.; Anderle, M.; Grisenti, R.; Werner, M.; Berg, J. A. van den

    2006-11-13

    Solid phase epitaxial regrowth (SPER) has been investigated in the last few years as a possible method to form ultra shallow dopant distributions in silicon with a high level of electrical. Despite the interest for this process, few investigations were related to arsenic. Apart from the fact that it is easier to form shallow distribution with arsenic than with boron, it is also well known that at the moderate temperatures implied by SPER (500-700 deg. C) arsenic easily deactivates, probably by forming inactive clusters around point defects in silicon. In order to have a better understanding of the SPER process for arsenic implanted silicon in shallow regime, an EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure) and MEIS (medium energy ion scattering) study is reported in this paper. Silicon samples were implanted at 3 keV with arsenic ions (dose was 2E15 at/cm2 producing a 11 nm amorphous layer) and then annealed in nitrogen at temperatures ranging from 500 to 700 deg. C to have different levels of recrystallisation. From the comparison of the recrystallised fraction as measured by MEIS with the electrical activation measured by Hall effect it results evident that a full regrowth of the lattice is not reflected by a high electrical activation. The activated arsenic corresponds to less than one third of the apparently substitutional dopant for all the samples analyzed. This lack of activation was further investigated by EXAFS: the samples that according to MEIS are fully recrystallised do not reveal a clear local order around As atoms suggesting that either the As atoms are not yet completely relocated within the lattice sites or a deactivation occurred resulting in a more disordered local structure.

  8. Optimization of a low noise detection circuit for probing the structure of damage cascades with IBIC

    SciTech Connect

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Doyle, Barney L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Wampler, William R.

    2015-06-18

    Optimal detector / pre-amplifier combinations have been identified for the use of light ion IBIC (ion beam induced charge) to probe the physical structure of electrically active defects in damage cascades caused by heavy ion implantation. The ideal detector must have a sufficiently thin dead layer that incident ions will produce the majority of damage cascades in the depletion region of the detector rather than the dead layer. Detector and circuit noise must be low enough to detect the implantation of a single heavy ion as well as the decrease in the light ion IBIC signal caused by Shockley-Read-Hall recombination when the beam scans regions of the detector damaged by the heavy ion. The IBIC signals from three detectors irradiated with 750 keV He⁺ ions are measured with commercial and bespoke charge sensitive pre-amplifiers to identify the combination with the lowest noise.

  9. Optimization of a low noise detection circuit for probing the structure of damage cascades with IBIC

    DOE PAGES

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Doyle, Barney L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Wampler, William R.

    2015-06-18

    Optimal detector / pre-amplifier combinations have been identified for the use of light ion IBIC (ion beam induced charge) to probe the physical structure of electrically active defects in damage cascades caused by heavy ion implantation. The ideal detector must have a sufficiently thin dead layer that incident ions will produce the majority of damage cascades in the depletion region of the detector rather than the dead layer. Detector and circuit noise must be low enough to detect the implantation of a single heavy ion as well as the decrease in the light ion IBIC signal caused by Shockley-Read-Hall recombinationmore » when the beam scans regions of the detector damaged by the heavy ion. The IBIC signals from three detectors irradiated with 750 keV He⁺ ions are measured with commercial and bespoke charge sensitive pre-amplifiers to identify the combination with the lowest noise.« less

  10. [Influence of an Er:YAG laser on the surface structure of titanium implants].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Frank; Rothamel, Daniel; Becker, Jürgen

    2003-01-01

    In addition to conventional treatment modalities (mechanical and chemical), the use of lasers has been proposed for cleaning and detoxification of implant surfaces. The aim of the present clinical investigation was (1) to evaluate the effects of an Er:YAG laser on the surface properties of titanium implants in vivo and (2) to determine the effectiveness of this treatment modality for subgingival calculus removal. This investigation was conducted on eight implants of two patients, considered for explantation due to severe peri-implantitis inflammation. Immediately before explanatation, six implants were instrumented subgingivally with an Er:YAG laser (100 mJ/pulse and 10 Hz). Two implants served as a control. All titanium implants were examined using scanning electron microscopy by one calibrated and blinded examiner. In comparison to the untreated control group, non-surgical instrumentation of titanium implants with an Er:YAG laser resulted in an effective removal of subgingival calculus without leading to any thermal damages. However, all samples of the test group revealed amounts of residual debris which should be taken into account under clinical conditions.

  11. Fabrication, pore structure and compressive behavior of anisotropic porous titanium for human trabecular bone implant applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuping; Li, Jinshan; Xu, Guangsheng; Liu, Gejun; Kou, Hongchao; Zhou, Lian

    2015-06-01

    Porous titanium with average pore size of 100-650 μm and porosity of 30-70% was fabricated by diffusion bonding of titanium meshes. Pore structure was characterized by Micro-CT scan and SEM. Compressive behavior of porous titanium in the out-of-plane direction was studied. The effect of porosity and pore size on the compressive properties was also discussed based on the deformation mode. The results reveal that the fabrication process can control the porosity precisely. The average pore size of porous titanium can be tailored by adjusting the pore size of titanium meshes. The fabricated porous titanium possesses an anisotropic structure with square pores in the in-plane direction and elongated pores in the out-of-plane direction. The compressive Young's modulus and yield stress are in the range of 1-7.5 GPa and 10-110 MPa, respectively. The dominant compressive deformation mode is buckling of mesh wires, but some uncoordinated buckling is present in porous titanium with lower porosity. Relationship between compressive properties and porosity conforms well to the Gibson-Ashby model. The effect of pore size on compressive properties is fundamentally ascribed to the aspect ratio of titanium meshes. Porous titanium with 60-70% porosity has potential for trabecular bone implant applications.

  12. Locating Structural Damage by Detecting Boundary Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PAI, P. F.; JIN, S.

    2000-04-01

    This paper presents a method of pinpointing structural damage locations using operational deflection shapes (ODSs) measured by a scanning laser vibrometer. The method assumes the form C1cosβx +C2sin βx+C3coshβx +C4sinh βx for an ODS to match with its experimental data using a sliding-window least-squares method to determine the four coefficients Ci. It is shown thatC1 represents the central solution of displacement, C3the boundary-layer solution of displacement caused by boundary constraints, C2β the central solution of slope, andC4β the boundary-layer solution of slope. Moreover,C1 *C3is proportional to the difference of kinetic and elastic energy densities,C3 -C1is proportional to the curvature, andC4 -C2is proportional to the spatial derivative of the curvature. Because cracks on a structure introduce new boundaries to the structure and these coefficients change significantly at boundaries, crack locations are clearly revealed by the peaks on the C1*C3curve, sign change of C4, peaks on the fitting error curve, and sudden changes of C3-C1andC4 -C2. Moreover, numerical and experimental results show that each of these coefficients requires a different length of data points for curve fitting in order to smooth the curve. Based on this different data length requirement and the peaks and sign change of these coefficients we derive a boundary effect detection (BED) method for finding damage locations. A non-linear sliding-window least-squares fitting technique is also derived for estimating the extent of structural damage. Numerical and experimental studies on beams with different damages have been performed to prove the accuracy and reliability of the BED method.

  13. Lagrangian based methods for coherent structure detection.

    PubMed

    Allshouse, Michael R; Peacock, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    There has been a proliferation in the development of Lagrangian analytical methods for detecting coherent structures in fluid flow transport, yielding a variety of qualitatively different approaches. We present a review of four approaches and demonstrate the utility of these methods via their application to the same sample analytic model, the canonical double-gyre flow, highlighting the pros and cons of each approach. Two of the methods, the geometric and probabilistic approaches, are well established and require velocity field data over the time interval of interest to identify particularly important material lines and surfaces, and influential regions, respectively. The other two approaches, implementing tools from cluster and braid theory, seek coherent structures based on limited trajectory data, attempting to partition the flow transport into distinct regions. All four of these approaches share the common trait that they are objective methods, meaning that their results do not depend on the frame of reference used. For each method, we also present a number of example applications ranging from blood flow and chemical reactions to ocean and atmospheric flows. PMID:26428570

  14. Lagrangian based methods for coherent structure detection

    SciTech Connect

    Allshouse, Michael R.; Peacock, Thomas

    2015-09-15

    There has been a proliferation in the development of Lagrangian analytical methods for detecting coherent structures in fluid flow transport, yielding a variety of qualitatively different approaches. We present a review of four approaches and demonstrate the utility of these methods via their application to the same sample analytic model, the canonical double-gyre flow, highlighting the pros and cons of each approach. Two of the methods, the geometric and probabilistic approaches, are well established and require velocity field data over the time interval of interest to identify particularly important material lines and surfaces, and influential regions, respectively. The other two approaches, implementing tools from cluster and braid theory, seek coherent structures based on limited trajectory data, attempting to partition the flow transport into distinct regions. All four of these approaches share the common trait that they are objective methods, meaning that their results do not depend on the frame of reference used. For each method, we also present a number of example applications ranging from blood flow and chemical reactions to ocean and atmospheric flows.

  15. The Effect of Thermal Annealing on Structural-phase Changes in the Ni-Ti Alloy Implanted with Krypton Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poltavtseva, V. P.; Kislitsin, S. B.; Ghyngazov, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    The influence of thermal annealing within the temperature range 100-300°C on the structural-phase state of a Ni-Ti alloy with shape memory effect (SME) implanted with 84Kr ions at the energies E = 280 keV and 1.75 MeV/nucl and the fluences within 5·1012-1·1020 ion/m2 is investigated. For the samples modified by 84Kr ions at E = 1.75 MeV/nucl up to the fluences 1·1020 and 5·1012 ion/m2, the formation of a martensitic NiTi phase with the B19 ' structure, responsible for the SME, is revealed at the annealing temperatures 100 and 300°C, respectively, in the near-surface region corresponding to the outrange area. This is accompanied by the formation of nanosized NiTi particles in the R-phase. As the implantation fluence increases, the probability of their formation decreases. It is shown that annealing of the implanted structures can increase the strength of the Ni-Ti alloy. The degree of hardening is determined by the value of annealing temperature, and an increase in strength is primarily due to ordering of the radiation-induced defect structures (phases). A correlation between the onset temperature of a forward martensitic transition and the structural-phase state of the thermally annealed Ni-Ti alloy is established.

  16. Surface characterization of commercial oral implants on the nanometer level.

    PubMed

    Svanborg, Lory Melin; Andersson, Martin; Wennerberg, Ann

    2010-02-01

    Lately, there has been a growing interest in how the presence of nanometer structures on a bone integrated implant surface influences the healing process. Recent in vitro studies have revealed an increased osteoblast response to different nanophase surfaces. Some commercial implant brands claim their implants have nanometer structures. However, at present, there are no studies where the nano topography of today's commercially available oral implants has been investigated. The aim of this study was to characterize commercial oral implants on the nanometer level and to investigate whether or not the nanometer surface roughness was correlated to the more well-known micrometer roughness on the implants. Twelve different commercial screw-shaped oral implants with various surface modifications were examined using scanning electron microscopy and a white light interferometer. The interferometer is suitable for detection of nanoscale roughness in the vertical dimension; however, limitation exists on the horizontal due to the wavelength of the light. A 1 x 1 microm Gaussian filter was found to be useful for identifying nm roughness with respect to height deviation. The results demonstrated that an implant that was smooth on the micrometer level was not necessarily smooth on the nanometer level. Different structures in the nanometer scale was found on some of the implants, indicating that to fully understand the relationship between the properties of an implant surface and its osseointegration behavior, a characterization at the nanometer scale might be relevant.

  17. Subclinical tonic-clonic epileptic seizure detected by an implantable loop recorder.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Ritsuko; Abe, Haruhiko; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tamura, Masahito; Takeuchi, Masaaki; Otsuji, Yutaka; Benditt, David G

    2013-01-01

    A 73-year old man received an implantable loop recorder (ILR) for the evaluation of transient loss of consciousness (TLOC) spells. His medical history was without any epileptic convulsions or automatism. ILR recording during a spontaneous episode revealed the presence of a regular, narrow QRS complex tachycardia associated with low-amplitude, high-frequency, continuous or discontinuous artifacts, consistent with myopotentials. During the event, the regular, low-amplitude continuous signals gradually became discontinuous, with a prolongation of the inter-signal cycle length, until their disappearance after manual activation of the ILR. The patient was diagnosed as experiencing subclinical tonic-clonic epileptic seizures. Antiepileptic drug treatment was initiated, and the patient has remained free of TLOC symptoms during 13 months follow-up. PMID:24097218

  18. Simulation of fracture of the bone implant with the porous structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenkov, M. V.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2016-08-01

    Different approaches to bone defects reconstruction with the use of ceramic materials have been developed recently. Ceramics are identical with bone matrix, provide biomedical compatibility with bone tissue and possess high strength. But with an overall high strength ceramic implants destruct in dynamic mode. The paper presents a study of the effect of the porosity gradient on the destruction of the bone implants under dynamic loading. It is shown that the fracture behavior of the bone implants is changed with increasing levels of the gradient of porosity.

  19. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Weilin; Jung, Hee Joon; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zhaoying; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Zhu, Zihua; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-03-01

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor applications, silicon carbide (SiC) undergoes transmutation reactions under high-energy neutron irradiation with magnesium as the major metallic transmutant; the others include aluminum, beryllium and phosphorus in addition to helium and hydrogen gaseous species. The impact of these transmutants on SiC structural stability is currently unknown. This study uses ion implantation to introduce Mg into SiC. Multiaxial ion-channeling analysis of the as-produced damage state indicates a lower dechanneling yield observed along the <1 0 0> axis. The microstructure of the annealed sample was examined using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results show a high concentration of likely non-faulted tetrahedral voids and possible stacking fault tetrahedra near the damage peak. In addition to lattice distortion, dislocations and intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults are also observed. Magnesium in 3C-SiC prefers to substitute for Si and it forms precipitates of cubic Mg2Si and tetragonal MgC2. The diffusion coefficient of Mg in 3C-SiC single crystal at 1573 K has been determined to be 3.8 ± 0.4 × 10-19 m2/s.

  20. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Jung, Hee Joon; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zhaoying; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Zhu, Zihua; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-03-01

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor applications, silicon carbide (SiC) undergoes transmutation reactions under high-energy neutron irradiation with magnesium as the major metallic transmutant; the others include aluminum, beryllium and phosphorus in addition to helium and hydrogen gaseous species. The impact of these transmutants on SiC structural stability is currently unknown. This study uses ion implantation to introduce Mg into SiC. Multiaxial ion-channeling analysis of the as-produced damage state suggests that there are preferred Si <100> interstitial splits. The microstructure of the annealed sample was examined using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy. The results show a high concentration of likely non-faulted tetrahedral voids and possible stacking fault tetrahedra near the damage peak. In addition to lattice distortion, dislocations and intrinsic and extrinsic stacking faults are also observed. Magnesium in 3C-SiC prefers to substitute for Si and it forms precipitates of cubic Mg2Si and tetragonal MgC2. The diffusion coefficient of Mg in 3C-SiC single crystal at 1573 K has been determined to be 3.8±0.4×10e-19 m2/sec.

  1. Dual-carrier processing to convey temporal fine structure cues: Implications for cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Apoux, Frédéric; Youngdahl, Carla L.; Yoho, Sarah E.; Healy, Eric W.

    2015-01-01

    Speech intelligibility in noise can be degraded by using vocoder processing to alter the temporal fine structure (TFS). Here it is argued that this degradation is not attributable to the loss of speech information potentially present in the TFS. Instead it is proposed that the degradation results from the loss of sound-source segregation information when two or more carriers (i.e., TFS) are substituted with only one as a consequence of vocoder processing. To demonstrate this segregation role, vocoder processing involving two carriers, one for the target and one for the background, was implemented. Because this approach does not preserve the speech TFS, it may be assumed that any improvement in intelligibility can only be a consequence of the preserved carrier duality and associated segregation cues. Three experiments were conducted using this “dual-carrier” approach. All experiments showed substantial sentence intelligibility in noise improvements compared to traditional single-carrier conditions. In several conditions, the improvement was so substantial that intelligibility approximated that for unprocessed speech in noise. A foreseeable and potentially promising implication for the dual-carrier approach involves implementation into cochlear implant speech processors, where it may provide the TFS cues necessary to segregate speech from noise. PMID:26428784

  2. Sensitivity of bilateral cochlear implant users to fine-structure and envelope interaural time differencesa

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Victor A.; Eddington, Donald K.

    2013-01-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant users have poor sensitivity to interaural time differences (ITDs) of high-rate pulse trains, which precludes use of these stimuli to convey fine-structure ITD cues. However, previous reports of single-neuron recordings in cats demonstrated good ITD sensitivity to 1000 pulses-per-second (pps) pulses when the pulses were sinusoidally amplitude modulated. The ability of modulation to restore ITD sensitivity to high-rate pulses in humans was tested by measuring ITD thresholds for three conditions: ITD encoded in the modulated carrier pulses alone, in the envelope alone, and in the whole waveform. Five of six subjects were not sensitive to ITD in the 1000-pps carrier, even with modulation. One subject's 1000-pps carrier ITD sensitivity did significantly improve due to modulation. Sensitivity to ITD encoded in the envelope was also measured as a function of modulation frequency, including at frequencies from 4 to 16 Hz where much of the speech envelope's energy and information resides. Sensitivity was best at the modulation frequency of 100 Hz and degraded rapidly outside of a narrow range. These results provide little evidence to support encoding ITD in the carrier of current bilateral processors, and suggest envelope ITD sensitivity is poor for an important segment of the speech modulation spectrum. PMID:23556598

  3. Chemical and structural analysis of the bone-implant interface by TOF-SIMS, SEM, FIB and TEM: Experimental study in animal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmquist, Anders; Emanuelsson, Lena; Sjövall, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Although bone-anchored implants are widely used in reconstructive medicine, the mechanism of osseointegration is still not fully understood. Novel analytical tools are needed to further understand this process, where both the chemical and structural aspects of the bone-implant interface are important. The aim of this study was to evaluate the advantages of combining time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) with optical (LM), scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques for studying the bone-implant interface of bone-anchored implants. Laser-modified titanium implants with surrounded bone retrieved after 8 weeks healing in rabbit were dehydrated and resin embedded. Three types of sample preparation were studied to evaluate the information gained by combining TOF-SIMS, SEM, FIB and TEM. The results show that imaging TOF-SIMS can provide detailed chemical information, which in combination with structural information from microscopy methods provide a more complete characterization of anatomical structures at the bone-implant interface. By investigating various sample preparation techniques, it is shown that grinded cross section samples can be used for chemical imaging using TOF-SIMS, if careful consideration of potential preparation artifacts is taken into account. TOF-SIMS analysis of FIB-prepared bone/implant cross section samples show distinct areas corresponding to bone tissue and implant with a sharp interface, although without chemical information about the organic components.

  4. Arsenic implantation-induced intermixing effects on AlGaAs/GaAs single QW structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Q.; Li, Z. F.; Chen, X. S.; Lu, W.; Shen, S. C.; Tan, H. H.; Yuan, S.; Jagadish, C.

    2000-06-01

    The effects of intermixing Al 0.54Ga 0.46As/GaAs/Al 0.54Ga 0.46As quantum well (QW) enhanced by arsenic ion implantation and subsequent annealing have been investigated by photoluminescence and photo-modulated reflectance measurements. Comparing with as-grown QW, obvious blueshifts of all the transitions were observed. The H 22 transition was found to be much less sensitive to the implantation doses than that of H 11. The experimental results are different from the theoretical results calculated by using the model of error function profile of Al composition. The results are fruitful for understanding the potential profile after intermixing enhanced by arsenic ion implantation, and also for the application of implantation enhanced intermixing effects on devices, such as QW lasers and photodetectors, opto-nonlinear devices, etc..

  5. Animal Models for Evaluation of Bone Implants and Devices: Comparative Bone Structure and Common Model Uses.

    PubMed

    Wancket, L M

    2015-09-01

    Bone implants and devices are a rapidly growing field within biomedical research, and implants have the potential to significantly improve human and animal health. Animal models play a key role in initial product development and are important components of nonclinical data included in applications for regulatory approval. Pathologists are increasingly being asked to evaluate these models at the initial developmental and nonclinical biocompatibility testing stages, and it is important to understand the relative merits and deficiencies of various species when evaluating a new material or device. This article summarizes characteristics of the most commonly used species in studies of bone implant materials, including detailed information about the relevance of a particular model to human bone physiology and pathology. Species reviewed include mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, dogs, sheep, goats, and nonhuman primates. Ultimately, a comprehensive understanding of the benefits and limitations of different model species will aid in rigorously evaluating a novel bone implant material or device.

  6. Stress influenced trapping processes in Si based multi-quantum well structures and heavy ions implanted Si

    SciTech Connect

    Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia Lazanu, Sorina

    2014-10-06

    Multi-quantum well structures and Si wafers implanted with heavy iodine and bismuth ions are studied in order to evaluate the influence of stress on the parameters of trapping centers. The experimental method of thermostimullatedcurrents without applied bias is used, and the trapping centers are filled by illumination. By modeling the discharge curves, we found in multilayered structures the parameters of both 'normal' traps and 'stress-induced' ones, the last having a Gaussian-shaped temperature dependence of the cross section. The stress field due to the presence of stopped heavy ions implanted into Si was modeled by a permanent electric field. The increase of the strain from the neighborhood of I ions to the neighborhood of Bi ions produces the broadening of some energy levels and also a temperature dependence of the cross sections for all levels.

  7. Structural and optical properties of Mn-doped CdS thin films prepared by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Chandramohan, S.; Tripathi, J. K.; Sarangi, S. N.; Som, T.; Kanjilal, A.; Sathyamoorthy, R.

    2009-06-15

    We report on structural and optical properties of Mn-doped CdS thin films prepared by 190 keV Mn-ion implantation at different temperatures. Mn-ion implantation in the fluence range of 1x10{sup 13}-1x10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2} does not lead to the formation of any secondary phase. However, it induces structural disorder, causing a decrease in the optical band gap. This is addressed on the basis of band tailing due to creation of localized energy states and Urbach energy calculations. Mn-doped samples exhibit a new band in their photoluminescence spectra at 2.22 eV, which originates from the d-d({sup 4}T{sub 1}->{sup 6}A{sub 1}) transition of tetrahedrally coordinated Mn{sup 2+} ions.

  8. Investigating the structure and biocompatibility of niobium and titanium oxides as coatings for orthopedic metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, D; Wren, A W; Misture, S T; Mellott, N P

    2016-01-01

    Applying sol gel based coatings to orthopedic metallic implant materials can significantly improve their properties and lifespan in vivo. For this work, niobium (Nb2O5) and titanium (TiO2) oxides were prepared via solution processing in order to determine the effect of atomic arrangement (amorphous/crystalline) on bioactivity. Thermal evaluation on the synthesized materials identified an endotherm for Nb2O5 at 75 °C with 40% weight loss below 400 °C, and minimal weight loss between 400 and 850 °C. Regarding TiO2 an endotherm was present at 92 °C with 25% weight loss below 400 °C, and 4% between 400 and 850 °C. Phase evolution was determined using High Temperature X-ray Diffraction (HT-XRD) where amorphous-Nb2O5 (450 °C), hexagonal-Nb2O5 (525 °C), orthorhombic-Nb2O5 (650 °C), amorphous-TiO2 (275 °C) and tetragonal TiO2 (500 °C) structures were produced. Simulated body fluid (SBF) testing was conducted over 1, 7 and 30 days and resulted in positive chemical and morphological changes for crystalline Nb2O5 (525 °C) and TiO2 (500 °C) after 30 days of incubation. Rod-like CaP deposits were observed on the surfaces using Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Grazing Incidence-X-ray Diffraction (GI-XRD) shows that the deposits were X-ray amorphous. Cell viability was higher with the TiO2 (122%) samples when compared to the growing cell population while Nb2O5 samples exhibited a range of viability (64-105%), partially dependent on materials atomic structure. PMID:26478387

  9. Investigating the structure and biocompatibility of niobium and titanium oxides as coatings for orthopedic metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, D; Wren, A W; Misture, S T; Mellott, N P

    2016-01-01

    Applying sol gel based coatings to orthopedic metallic implant materials can significantly improve their properties and lifespan in vivo. For this work, niobium (Nb2O5) and titanium (TiO2) oxides were prepared via solution processing in order to determine the effect of atomic arrangement (amorphous/crystalline) on bioactivity. Thermal evaluation on the synthesized materials identified an endotherm for Nb2O5 at 75 °C with 40% weight loss below 400 °C, and minimal weight loss between 400 and 850 °C. Regarding TiO2 an endotherm was present at 92 °C with 25% weight loss below 400 °C, and 4% between 400 and 850 °C. Phase evolution was determined using High Temperature X-ray Diffraction (HT-XRD) where amorphous-Nb2O5 (450 °C), hexagonal-Nb2O5 (525 °C), orthorhombic-Nb2O5 (650 °C), amorphous-TiO2 (275 °C) and tetragonal TiO2 (500 °C) structures were produced. Simulated body fluid (SBF) testing was conducted over 1, 7 and 30 days and resulted in positive chemical and morphological changes for crystalline Nb2O5 (525 °C) and TiO2 (500 °C) after 30 days of incubation. Rod-like CaP deposits were observed on the surfaces using Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and Grazing Incidence-X-ray Diffraction (GI-XRD) shows that the deposits were X-ray amorphous. Cell viability was higher with the TiO2 (122%) samples when compared to the growing cell population while Nb2O5 samples exhibited a range of viability (64-105%), partially dependent on materials atomic structure.

  10. The neonate brain detects speech structure.

    PubMed

    Gervain, Judit; Macagno, Francesco; Cogoi, Silvia; Peña, Marcela; Mehler, Jacques

    2008-09-16

    What are the origins of the efficient language learning abilities that allow humans to acquire their mother tongue in just a few years very early in life? Although previous studies have identified different mechanisms underlying the acquisition of auditory and speech patterns in older infants and adults, the earliest sensitivities remain unexplored. To address this issue, we investigated the ability of newborns to learn simple repetition-based structures in two optical brain-imaging experiments. In the first experiment, 22 neonates listened to syllable sequences containing immediate repetitions (ABB; e.g., "mubaba," "penana"), intermixed with random control sequences (ABC; e.g., "mubage," "penaku"). We found increased responses to the repetition sequences in the temporal and left frontal areas, indicating that the newborn brain differentiated the two patterns. The repetition sequences evoked greater activation than the random sequences during the first few trials, suggesting the presence of an automatic perceptual mechanism to detect repetitions. In addition, over the subsequent trials, activation increased further in response to the repetition sequences but not in response to the random sequences, indicating that recognition of the ABB pattern was enhanced by repeated exposure. In the second experiment, in which nonadjacent repetitions (ABA; e.g., "bamuba," "napena") were contrasted with the same random controls, no discrimination was observed. These findings suggest that newborns are sensitive to certain input configurations in the auditory domain, a perceptual ability that might facilitate later language development. PMID:18768785

  11. STN area detection using K-NN classifiers for MER recordings in Parkinson patients during neurostimulator implant surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiaffino, L.; Rosado Muñoz, A.; Guerrero Martínez, J.; Francés Villora, J.; Gutiérrez, A.; Martínez Torres, I.; Kohan, y. D. R.

    2016-04-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) applies electric pulses into the subthalamic nucleus (STN) improving tremor and other symptoms associated to Parkinson’s disease. Accurate STN detection for proper location and implant of the stimulating electrodes is a complex task and surgeons are not always certain about final location. Signals from the STN acquired during DBS surgery are obtained with microelectrodes, having specific characteristics differing from other brain areas. Using supervised learning, a trained model based on previous microelectrode recordings (MER) can be obtained, being able to successfully classify the STN area for new MER signals. The K Nearest Neighbours (K-NN) algorithm has been successfully applied to STN detection. However, the use of the fuzzy form of the K-NN algorithm (KNN-F) has not been reported. This work compares the STN detection algorithm of K-NN and KNN-F. Real MER recordings from eight patients where previously classified by neurophysiologists, defining 15 features. Sensitivity and specificity for the classifiers are obtained, Wilcoxon signed rank non-parametric test is used as statistical hypothesis validation. We conclude that the performance of KNN-F classifier is higher than K-NN with p<0.01 in STN specificity.

  12. A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Study on the Biomechanical Simulation of Various Structured Dental Implants and Their Surrounding Bone Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gong; Yuan, Hai; Chen, Xianshuai; Wang, Weijun; Chen, Jianyu; Liang, Jimin; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background/Purpose. This three-dimensional finite element study observed the stress distribution characteristics of 12 types of dental implants and their surrounding bone tissues with various structured abutments, implant threads, and healing methods under different amounts of concentrated loading. Materials and Methods. A three-dimensional geometrical model of a dental implant and its surrounding bone tissue was created; the model simulated a screw applied with a preload of 200 N or a torque of 0.2 N·m and a prosthetic crown applied with a vertical or an inclined force of 100 N. The Von Mises stress was evaluated on the 12 types of dental implants and their surrounding bone tissues. Results. Under the same loading force, the stress influence on the implant threads was not significant; however, the stress influence on the cancellous bone was obvious. The stress applied to the abutment, cortical bone, and cancellous bone by the inclined force applied to the crown was larger than the stress applied by the vertical force to the crown, and the abutment stress of the nonsubmerged healing implant system was higher than that of the submerged healing implant system. Conclusion. A dental implant system characterised by a straight abutment, rectangle tooth, and nonsubmerged healing may provide minimum value for the implant-bone interface. PMID:26904121

  13. A Brief Survey of β-Detected NMR of Implanted 8Li+ in Organic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, F. H.; McKenzie, I.; Buck, T.; Daley, C. R.; Forrest, J. A.; Harada, M.; Kiefl, R. F.; Levy, C. D. P.; Morris, G. D.; Pearson, M. R.; Sugiyama, J.; Wang, D.; MacFarlane, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Unlike the positive muon, we expect the chemistry of the implanted 8Li+β-NMR probe in organic polymers to be simply that of the monovalent ion, but almost nothing is known about the NMR of isolated Li+ in this context. Here, we present a brief survey of 8Li+β-NMR in a variety of insulating polymers at high magnetic field, including polyimide, PET, polycarbonate, polystyrene and polyethylene oxide. In all cases, we find a large-amplitude, broad Lorentzian resonance near the Larmor frequency, consistent with the expected diamagnetic charge state. We also find remarkably fast spin-lattice relaxation rates 1/T1. There is very little dependence of either linewidth or 1/T1 on the proton density, the main source of nuclear dipolar magnetic fields, leading us to conclude the main contribution to both broadening and spin relaxation at room temperature is quadrupolar in origin. This behaviour is very different from crystalline insulators such as MgO and Al2O3, and suggests that 8Li+β-NMR will be an important probe of polymer dynamics. Additionally, we note dramatically different behaviour of one sample above its glass transition, motivating the construction of a high temperature spectrometer to enable further exploration at elevated temperature.

  14. Percutaneous Implants with Porous Titanium Dermal Barriers: An In Vivo Evaluation of Infection Risk

    PubMed Central

    Isackson, Dorthyann; McGill, Lawrence D.; Bachus, Kent N.

    2010-01-01

    Osseointegrated percutaneous implants are a promising prosthetic alternative for a subset of amputees. However, as with all percutaneous implants, they have an increased risk of infection since they breach the skin barrier. Theoretically, host tissues could attach to the metal implant creating a barrier to infection. When compared with smooth surfaces, it is hypothesized that porous surfaces improve the attachment of the host tissues to the implant, and decrease the infection risk. In this study, 4 titanium implants, manufactured with a percutaneous post and a subcutaneous disk, were placed subcutaneously on the dorsum of eight New Zealand White rabbits. Beginning at four weeks post-op, the implants were inoculated weekly with 108 CFU Staphylococcus aureus until signs of clinical infection presented. While we were unable to detect a difference in the incidence of infection of the porous metal implants, smooth surface (no porous coating) percutaneous and subcutaneous components had a 7-fold increased risk of infection compared to the implants with a porous coating on one or both components. The porous coated implants displayed excellent tissue ingrowth into the porous structures; whereas, the smooth implants were surrounded with a thick, organized fibrotic capsule that was separated from the implant surface. This study suggests that porous coated metal percutaneous implants are at a significantly lower risk of infection when compared to smooth metal implants. The smooth surface percutaneous implants were inadequate in allowing a long-term seal to develop with the soft tissue, thus increasing vulnerability to the migration of infecting microorganisms. PMID:21145778

  15. Porous Hydroxyapatite and Aluminium-Oxide Ceramic Orbital Implant Evaluation Using CBCT Scanning: A Method for In Vivo Porous Structure Evaluation and Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Lukáts, Olga; Bujtár, Péter; Sándor, George K.; Barabás, József

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to define CBCT as a technique for postimplantation in vivo examination of porous hydroxyapatite and aluminium-oxide orbital implant shape, volume and density changes. Methods and Materials. CBCT was used to evaluate 30 enucleated patients treated with spherical polyglactin 910 wrapped hydroxyapatite and aluminum-oxide orbital implants. The mean duration of patient followup was 3.2 years or 1338 days with a range of 0.2 to 7.2 years or 79 to 2636 days in a population with an average age of 40.8 years. Results. The resolution of currently clinically used CBCT equipment allowed detailed structural observation of the orbital hydroxyapatite implants with some modifications. Volume and shape estimations were possible while density evaluation was more complicated compared to medical source computed tomography. The mean densities of the orbital implants were followed and a consistent gradual decrease identified from the beginning of implantation which was better defined after the applied correction procedure. Conclusion. CBCT with lower dosages of radiation exposure can be used to follow changes in implanted high-density porous structures. The density evaluation is possible with calibration modifications. Changes in orbital implant densities identified in this study may correspond to healing and maturation of soft tissues surrounding and penetrating the implants. PMID:22481940

  16. Nanostructured multielement (TiHfZrNbVTa)N coatings before and after implantation of N+ ions (1018 cm-2): Their structure and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnjak, A. D.; Bondar, O. V.; Borba, S. O.; Abadias, G.; Konarski, P.; Plotnikov, S. V.; Beresnev, V. M.; Kassenova, L. G.; Drodziel, P.

    2016-10-01

    Multielement high entropy alloy (HEA) nitride (TiHfZrNbVTa)N coatings were deposited by vacuum arc and their structural and mechanical stability after implantation of high doses of N+ ions, 1018 cm-2, were investigated. The crystal structure and phase composition were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy, while depth-resolved nanoindentation tests were used to determine the evolution of hardness and elastic modulus along the implantation depth. XRD patterns show that coatings exhibit a main phase with fcc structure, which preferred orientation varies from (1 1 1) to (2 0 0), depending on the deposition conditions. First-principles calculations reveal that the presence of Nb atoms could favor the formation of solid solution with fcc structure in multielement HEA nitride. TEM results showed that amorphous and nanostructured phases were formed in the implanted coating sub-surface layer (∼100 nm depth). Concentration of nitrogen reached 90 at% in the near-surface layer after implantation, and decreased at higher depth. Nanohardness of the as-deposited coatings varied from 27 to 38 GPa depending on the deposition conditions. Ion implantation led to a significant decrease of the nanohardness to 12 GPa in the implanted region, while it reaches 24 GPa at larger depths. However, the H/E ratio is ⩾0.1 in the sub-surface layer due to N+ implantation, which is expected to have beneficial effect on the wear properties.

  17. Effect of retention design of artificial teeth and implant-supported titanium CAD-CAM structures on fracture resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ladetzki, Kristin; Mateos-Palacios, Rocío; Pascual-Moscardó, Agustín

    2016-01-01

    Background For implant-supported hybrid prostheses, high mastication forces and reduced acrylic resin thickness over a metal substructure often cause failures arising from tooth or resin fractures. To assay fracture resistance of artificial teeth and resin in implant-supported hybrid prostheses in relation to the titanium structure and retention design supporting teeth. Material and Methods 40 specimens bearing incisors were divided into four groups according to the titanium structure supporting the teeth and the type of load force applied: Group I (Control; n=10): Application of static loading to ten incisors set over a metal structure with internal retention. Group II (Control; n=10): Application of static loading to ten incisors set over a metal structure with external retention. The remaining study specimens (n=20) were subjected to 120,000 masticatory and thermal cycles in a chewing simulator. Afterwards, static loading was applied until the point of fracture using an Instron machine. Group III (Study; n=10): Application of dynamic and static loading to ten incisors set over a metal structure with internal retention. Group IV (Study; n=10): Application of dynamic and static loading to ten incisors set over a metal structure with external retention. Data obtained for the four groups was analyzed and compared, determining the type of fracture (cohesive or adhesive) using a reflected light microscope. Results Statistical analysis confirmed that there were significant differences in fracture resistance between the four groups. External retention was found to have more fracture resistance than the internal retention. Conclusions Hybrid prostheses with titanium substructures and external retention obtained significantly better results than samples with internal retention. Key words:Chewing simulator, thermocycler, fatigue, implant-supported hybrid prosthesis, acrylic teeth, fracture, metal structure design. PMID:27034748

  18. Imaging of common breast implants and implant-related complications: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amisha T; Jankharia, Bijal B

    2016-01-01

    The number of women undergoing breast implant procedures is increasing exponentially. It is, therefore, imperative for a radiologist to be familiar with the normal and abnormal imaging appearances of common breast implants. Diagnostic imaging studies such as mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging are used to evaluate implant integrity, detect abnormalities of the implant and its surrounding capsule, and detect breast conditions unrelated to implants. Magnetic resonance imaging of silicone breast implants, with its high sensitivity and specificity for detecting implant rupture, is the most reliable modality to asses implant integrity. Whichever imaging modality is used, the overall aim of imaging breast implants is to provide the pertinent information about implant integrity, detect implant failures, and to detect breast conditions unrelated to the implants, such as cancer. PMID:27413269

  19. PROGRESS IN CHARACTERIZATION OF PRECIPITATES AND DEFECT STRUCTURES IN Mg+ ION IMPLANTED CUBIC SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Zhang, Jiandong; Zhu, Zihua; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the progress of our current experimental effort on Mg+ ion implanted 3C-SiC. Following our initial study [ ] that suggests possible formation of Mg2Si and MgC2 precipitates as well as tetrahedral voids in 24Mg+ ion implanted 3C-SiC, we have designed specific experiments to confirm the results and examine the inclusions and defects. Relatively low fluence (5.0×1015 24Mg+/cm2) implantation in 3C-SiC was performed to reduce defect concentrations and isolate individual defect features for characterization. In addition, 25Mg+ isotope was implanted in 3C-SiC to the same previously applied ion fluence (9.6×1016 ions/cm2) for atom probe tomography (APT) study of precipitates. Each set of the samples was annealed at 1573 K for 2, 6 and 12 h, respectively. The depth profiles of the implanted Mg were measured using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) before and after the annealing steps. The samples are currently being analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and APT.

  20. Community structure detection based on the neighbor node degree information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Li-Ying; Li, Sheng-Nan; Lin, Jian-Hong; Guo, Qiang; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2016-11-01

    Community structure detection is of great significance for better understanding the network topology property. By taking into account the neighbor degree information of the topological network as the link weight, we present an improved Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF) method for detecting community structure. The results for empirical networks show that the largest improved ratio of the Normalized Mutual Information value could reach 63.21%. Meanwhile, for synthetic networks, the highest Normalized Mutual Information value could closely reach 1, which suggests that the improved method with the optimal λ can detect the community structure more accurately. This work is helpful for understanding the interplay between the link weight and the community structure detection.

  1. Structured back gates for high-mobility two-dimensional electron systems using oxygen ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berl, M.; Tiemann, L.; Dietsche, W.; Karl, H.; Wegscheider, W.

    2016-03-01

    We present a reliable method to obtain patterned back gates compatible with high mobility molecular beam epitaxy via local oxygen ion implantation that suppresses the conductivity of an 80 nm thick silicon doped GaAs epilayer. Our technique was optimized to circumvent several constraints of other gating and implantation methods. The ion-implanted surface remains atomically flat which allows unperturbed epitaxial overgrowth. We demonstrate the practical application of this gating technique by using magneto-transport spectroscopy on a two-dimensional electron system (2DES) with a mobility exceeding 20 × 106 cm2/V s. The back gate was spatially separated from the Ohmic contacts of the 2DES, thus minimizing the probability for electrical shorts or leakage and permitting simple contacting schemes.

  2. Charge accumulation in the buried oxide of SOI structures with the bonded Si/SiO2 interface under γ-irradiation: effect of preliminary ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumova, O. V.; Fomin, B. I.; Ilnitsky, M. A.; Popov, V. P.

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of preliminary boron or phosphorous implantation on charge accumulation in the buried oxide of SOI-MOSFETs irradiated with γ-rays in the total dose range (D) of 105-5 × 107 rad. The buried oxide was obtained by high-temperature thermal oxidation of Si, and it was not subjected to any implantation during the fabrication process of SOI structures. It was found that implantation with boron or phosphorous ions, used in fabrication technologies of SOI-MOSFETs, increases the concentration of precursor traps in the buried oxide of SOI structures. Unlike in the case of boron implantation, phosphorous implantation leads to an increased density of states at the Si/buried SiO2 interface during subsequent γ-irradiation. In the γ-irradiated SOI-MOSFETs, the accumulated charge density and the density of surface states in the Si/buried oxide layer systems both vary in proportion to kiln D. The coefficients ki for as-fabricated and ion-implanted Si/buried SiO2 systems were evaluated. From the data obtained, it was concluded that a low density of precursor hole traps was a factor limiting the positive charge accumulation in the buried oxide of as-fabricated (non-implanted) SOI structures with the bonded Si/buried SiO2 interface.

  3. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  4. In situ plasma fabrication of ceramic-like structure on polymeric implant with enhanced surface hardness, cytocompatibility and antibacterial capability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Haigang; Yang, Kun; Wang, Gexia; Wang, Pingli; Ji, Junhui; Chu, Paul K

    2016-05-01

    Polymeric materials are commonly found in orthopedic implants due to their unique mechanical properties and biocompatibility but the poor surface hardness and bacterial infection hamper many biomedical applications. In this study, a ceramic-like surface structure doped with silver is produced by successive plasma implantation of silicon (Si) and silver (Ag) into the polyamine 66 (PA66) substrate. Not only the surface hardness and elastic modulus are greatly enhanced due to the partial surface carbonization and the ceramic-like structure produced by the reaction between energetic Si and the carbon chain of PA66, but also the antibacterial activity is improved because of the combined effects rendered by Ag and SiC structure. Furthermore, the modified materials which exhibit good cytocompatibility upregulate bone-related genes and proteins expressions of the contacted bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). For the first time, it explores out that BMSCs osteogenesis on the antibacterial ceramic-like structure is mediated via the iNOS and nNOS signal pathways. The results reveal that in situ plasma fabrication of an antibacterial ceramic-like structure can endow PA66 with excellent surface hardness, cytocompatibility, as well as antibacterial capability. PMID:26825052

  5. On the Structure of Phoneme Categories in Listeners with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Harlan; Denny, Margaret; Guenther, Frank H.; Hanson, Helen M.; Marrone, Nicole; Matthies, Melanie L.; Perkell, Joseph S.; Stockmann, Ellen; Tiede, Mark; Vick, Jennell; Zandipour, Majid

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe cochlear implant users' phoneme labeling, discrimination, and prototypes for a vowel and a sibilant contrast, and to assess the effects of 1 year's experience with prosthetic hearing. Method: Based on naturally produced clear examples of "boot," "beet," "said," and "shed" by 1 male and 1 female speaker, continua with 13…

  6. Nanoscale electro-structural characterisation of ohmic contacts formed on p-type implanted 4H-SiC

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This work reports a nanoscale electro-structural characterisation of Ti/Al ohmic contacts formed on p-type Al-implanted silicon carbide (4H-SiC). The morphological and the electrical properties of the Al-implanted layer, annealed at 1700°C with or without a protective capping layer, and of the ohmic contacts were studied using atomic force microscopy [AFM], transmission line model measurements and local current measurements performed with conductive AFM. The characteristics of the contacts were significantly affected by the roughness of the underlying SiC. In particular, the surface roughness of the Al-implanted SiC regions annealed at 1700°C could be strongly reduced using a protective carbon capping layer during annealing. This latter resulted in an improved surface morphology and specific contact resistance of the Ti/Al ohmic contacts formed on these regions. The microstructure of the contacts was monitored by X-ray diffraction analysis and a cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, and correlated with the electrical results. PMID:21711667

  7. Detection of entrapped moisture in honeycomb sandwich structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallmark, W. B.

    1967-01-01

    Thermal neutron moisture detection system detects entrapped moisture in intercellular areas of bonded honeycomb sandwich structures. A radium/beryllium fast neutron source bombards a specimen. The emitted thermal neutrons from the target nucleus are detected and counted by a boron trifluoride thermal neutron detector.

  8. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain Fixed Bridges Porcelain Veneers Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth- ...

  9. Usefulness of implantable loop recorders in office-based practice for evaluation of syncope in patients with and without structural heart disease.

    PubMed

    Mason, Pamela K; Wood, Mark A; Reese, Daniel B; Lobban, John H; Mitchell, Mark A; DiMarco, John P

    2003-11-01

    Early use of an implantable loop recorder for evaluating unexplained syncope in an office-based electrophysiology practice is an effective approach in patients with and without structural heart disease. Documentation of rhythm with an implantable loop recorder at the time of symptoms is possible in approximately 50% and 80% of patients in both groups after 1 and 2 years of follow-up, respectively. PMID:14583373

  10. Injectable chitosan-based hydrogel for implantable drug delivery: body response and induced variations of structure and composition.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiali; Jiang, Guoqiang; Qiu, Tingting; Wang, Yujie; Zhang, Kuo; Ding, Fuxin

    2010-12-15

    Thermosensitive hydrogel composed of chitosan and glycerophosphate (CS/GP) is proposed to be the potential candidate of in situ gel-forming implant for long-term drug delivery. The present study was focused on the body response and induced structural and componential variations of the hydrogel, which were considered to impact on the drug delivery significantly but were scarcely reported. The body response was investigated by histological examination. It showed that the hydrogel caused an inflammatory response immediately after being implanted into Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The inflammatory response was mainly exhibited as inflammatory cell surrounding and infiltrating, tissue encapsulating, and vascularization in tissue. The effects of the inflammatory response on the structure and component of the CS/GP hydrogel were extensively explored through analyzing the hydrogel samples taken by surgery. The tissue encapsulation and osmotic pressure caused the water loss of the hydrogel and the compaction of the hydrogel network, and resulted in the porosity decreasing. The cell surrounding and infiltrating spawned big pores in the network and generated the subdivision of the network. All these structural and componential variations of the hydrogel in vivo were quite different from those in vitro and were supposed to exert significantly effects on drug release kinetics.

  11. Effect of Piezoelectric Implant on the Structural Integrity of Composite Laminates Subjected to Tensile Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masmoudi, Sahir; El Mahi, Abderrahim; Turki, Saïd

    2016-07-01

    The embedment of sensors within composite structures gives the opportunity to develop smart materials for health and usage monitoring systems. This study investigates the use of acoustic emission monitoring with embedded piezoelectric sensor during mechanical tests in order to identify the effects of introducing the sensor into the composite materials. The composite specimen with and without embedded sensor were subject to tensile static and fatigue loading. The analysis and observation of AE signals show that the integration of a sensor presents advantage of the detection of the acoustic events and also show the presence of three or four types of damage during tests. The incorporation of piezoelectric sensor has a negligible influence on the mechanical properties of materials.

  12. Postnatal width changes in the internal structures of the human mandible: a longitudinal three-dimensional cephalometric study using implants.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S; Korn, E L

    1992-12-01

    This paper presents case-specific quantitative evidence of the systematic lateral displacement of metallic implants in the mandibles of treated and untreated human subjects between the ages of 8.5 and 15.5 years. This evidence appears to be consistent with the inference of small, but systematic increases in distance between the internal structures of the two sides of the osseous mandible during growth. Such a conclusion, however, is inconsistent with traditional beliefs that the internal structures of the mandibular symphysis fuse at the midline during the first post-natal year and remain dimensionally constant thereafter. We recently published evidence of statistically significant transverse displacement of metallic implants in the mandibular body region for 12 of 28 subjects for whom longitudinal data were available. Of the twelve subjects for whom statistically significant changes were observed, widening occurred in eleven cases and narrowing in one. Matching data are now available on concurrent ramus changes for 22 of the same 28 subjects, including 11 of the 12 for whom statistically significant width changes had previously been noted in the body region. In eight of these 11 subjects, statistically significant widening in the ramus region was also observed. No subject had statistically significant widening in the ramus region without also having statistically significant widening in the body region. No subject had statistically significant trans-ramus narrowing.

  13. Structures in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: detection and scaling.

    PubMed

    Uritsky, V M; Pouquet, A; Rosenberg, D; Mininni, P D; Donovan, E F

    2010-11-01

    We present a systematic analysis of statistical properties of turbulent current and vorticity structures at a given time using cluster analysis. The data stem from numerical simulations of decaying three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the absence of an imposed uniform magnetic field; the magnetic Prandtl number is taken equal to unity, and we use a periodic box with grids of up to 1536³ points and with Taylor Reynolds numbers up to 1100. The initial conditions are either an X -point configuration embedded in three dimensions, the so-called Orszag-Tang vortex, or an Arn'old-Beltrami-Childress configuration with a fully helical velocity and magnetic field. In each case two snapshots are analyzed, separated by one turn-over time, starting just after the peak of dissipation. We show that the algorithm is able to select a large number of structures (in excess of 8000) for each snapshot and that the statistical properties of these clusters are remarkably similar for the two snapshots as well as for the two flows under study in terms of scaling laws for the cluster characteristics, with the structures in the vorticity and in the current behaving in the same way. We also study the effect of Reynolds number on cluster statistics, and we finally analyze the properties of these clusters in terms of their velocity-magnetic-field correlation. Self-organized criticality features have been identified in the dissipative range of scales. A different scaling arises in the inertial range, which cannot be identified for the moment with a known self-organized criticality class consistent with magnetohydrodynamics. We suggest that this range can be governed by turbulence dynamics as opposed to criticality and propose an interpretation of intermittency in terms of propagation of local instabilities. PMID:21230595

  14. Structures in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: detection and scaling.

    PubMed

    Uritsky, V M; Pouquet, A; Rosenberg, D; Mininni, P D; Donovan, E F

    2010-11-01

    We present a systematic analysis of statistical properties of turbulent current and vorticity structures at a given time using cluster analysis. The data stem from numerical simulations of decaying three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the absence of an imposed uniform magnetic field; the magnetic Prandtl number is taken equal to unity, and we use a periodic box with grids of up to 1536³ points and with Taylor Reynolds numbers up to 1100. The initial conditions are either an X -point configuration embedded in three dimensions, the so-called Orszag-Tang vortex, or an Arn'old-Beltrami-Childress configuration with a fully helical velocity and magnetic field. In each case two snapshots are analyzed, separated by one turn-over time, starting just after the peak of dissipation. We show that the algorithm is able to select a large number of structures (in excess of 8000) for each snapshot and that the statistical properties of these clusters are remarkably similar for the two snapshots as well as for the two flows under study in terms of scaling laws for the cluster characteristics, with the structures in the vorticity and in the current behaving in the same way. We also study the effect of Reynolds number on cluster statistics, and we finally analyze the properties of these clusters in terms of their velocity-magnetic-field correlation. Self-organized criticality features have been identified in the dissipative range of scales. A different scaling arises in the inertial range, which cannot be identified for the moment with a known self-organized criticality class consistent with magnetohydrodynamics. We suggest that this range can be governed by turbulence dynamics as opposed to criticality and propose an interpretation of intermittency in terms of propagation of local instabilities.

  15. Enhancing community detection by using local structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Ju; Hu, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Bao, Mei-Hua; Tang, Liang; Tang, Yan-Ni; Gao, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Jian-Ming; Chen, Benyan; Hu, Jing-Bo

    2016-03-01

    Many real-world networks, such as gene networks, protein-protein interaction networks and metabolic networks, exhibit community structures, meaning the existence of groups of densely connected vertices in the networks. Many local similarity measures in the networks are closely related to the concept of the community structures, and may have a positive effect on community detection in the networks. Here, various local similarity measures are used to extract local structural information, which is then applied to community detection in the networks by using the edge-reweighting strategy. The effect of the local similarity measures on community detection is carefully investigated and compared in various networks. The experimental results show that the local similarity measures are crucial for the improvement of community detection methods, while the positive effect of the local similarity measures is closely related to the networks under study and applied community detection methods.

  16. Nondestructive damage detection and evaluation technique for seismically damaged structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Yukio; Unjoh, Shigeki; Kondoh, Masuo; Ohsumi, Michio

    1999-02-01

    The development of quantitative damage detection and evaluation technique, and damage detection technique for invisible damages of structures are required according to the lessons from the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu earthquake. In this study, two quantitative damage sensing techniques for highway bridge structures are proposed. One method is to measure the change of vibration characteristics of the bridge structure. According to the damage detection test for damaged bridge column by shaking table test, this method can successfully detect the vibration characteristic change caused by damage progress due to increment excitations. The other method is to use self-diagnosis intelligent materials. According to the reinforced concrete beam specimen test, the second method can detect the damage by rupture of intelligent sensors, such as optical fiber or carbon fiber reinforced plastic rod.

  17. Multi-Dimensional Damage Detection for Surfaces and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Lewis, Mark; Roberson, Luke; Medelius, Pedro; Gibson, Tracy; Parks, Steen; Snyder, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Current designs for inflatable or semi-rigidized structures for habitats and space applications use a multiple-layer construction, alternating thin layers with thicker, stronger layers, which produces a layered composite structure that is much better at resisting damage. Even though such composite structures or layered systems are robust, they can still be susceptible to penetration damage. The ability to detect damage to surfaces of inflatable or semi-rigid habitat structures is of great interest to NASA. Damage caused by impacts of foreign objects such as micrometeorites can rupture the shell of these structures, causing loss of critical hardware and/or the life of the crew. While not all impacts will have a catastrophic result, it will be very important to identify and locate areas of the exterior shell that have been damaged by impacts so that repairs (or other provisions) can be made to reduce the probability of shell wall rupture. This disclosure describes a system that will provide real-time data regarding the health of the inflatable shell or rigidized structures, and information related to the location and depth of impact damage. The innovation described here is a method of determining the size, location, and direction of damage in a multilayered structure. In the multi-dimensional damage detection system, layers of two-dimensional thin film detection layers are used to form a layered composite, with non-detection layers separating the detection layers. The non-detection layers may be either thicker or thinner than the detection layers. The thin-film damage detection layers are thin films of materials with a conductive grid or striped pattern. The conductive pattern may be applied by several methods, including printing, plating, sputtering, photolithography, and etching, and can include as many detection layers that are necessary for the structure construction or to afford the detection detail level required. The damage is detected using a detector or

  18. Detection of cystic structures using pulsed ultrasonically induced resonant cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Kovach, John S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus and method for early detection of cystic structures indicative of ovarian and breast cancers uses ultrasonic wave energy at a unique resonance frequency for inducing cavitation in cystic fluid characteristic of cystic structures in the ovaries associated with ovarian cancer, and in cystic structures in the breast associated with breast cancer. Induced cavitation bubbles in the cystic fluid implode, creating implosion waves which are detected by ultrasonic receiving transducers attached to the abdomen of the patient. Triangulation of the ultrasonic receiving transducers enables the received signals to be processed and analyzed to identify the location and structure of the cyst.

  19. The Effect of Automatic Gain Control Structure and Release Time on Cochlear Implant Speech Intelligibility

    PubMed Central

    Khing, Phyu P.; Swanson, Brett A.; Ambikairajah, Eliathamby

    2013-01-01

    Nucleus cochlear implant systems incorporate a fast-acting front-end automatic gain control (AGC), sometimes called a compression limiter. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of replacing the front-end compression limiter with a newly proposed envelope profile limiter. A secondary objective was to investigate the effect of AGC speed on cochlear implant speech intelligibility. The envelope profile limiter was located after the filter bank and reduced the gain when the largest of the filter bank envelopes exceeded the compression threshold. The compression threshold was set equal to the saturation level of the loudness growth function (i.e. the envelope level that mapped to the maximum comfortable current level), ensuring that no envelope clipping occurred. To preserve the spectral profile, the same gain was applied to all channels. Experiment 1 compared sentence recognition with the front-end limiter and with the envelope profile limiter, each with two release times (75 and 625 ms). Six implant recipients were tested in quiet and in four-talker babble noise, at a high presentation level of 89 dB SPL. Overall, release time had a larger effect than the AGC type. With both AGC types, speech intelligibility was lower for the 75 ms release time than for the 625 ms release time. With the shorter release time, the envelope profile limiter provided higher group mean scores than the front-end limiter in quiet, but there was no significant difference in noise. Experiment 2 measured sentence recognition in noise as a function of presentation level, from 55 to 89 dB SPL. The envelope profile limiter with 625 ms release time yielded better scores than the front-end limiter with 75 ms release time. A take-home study showed no clear pattern of preferences. It is concluded that the envelope profile limiter is a feasible alternative to a front-end compression limiter. PMID:24312408

  20. Using the whole read: structural variant detection using NGS data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several classes of Structural Variants (SV) remain difficult to detect within sequenced genomes. Deletions and tandem duplications may affect a large proportion of variable genomic sequence space, yet their detection is still difficult to discern from false positive signals. Here, we present a metho...

  1. Aircraft detection based on probability model of structural elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Long; Jiang, Zhiguo

    2014-11-01

    Detecting aircrafts is important in the field of remote sensing. In past decades, researchers used various approaches to detect aircrafts based on classifiers for overall aircrafts. However, with the development of high-resolution images, the internal structures of aircrafts should also be taken into consideration now. To address this issue, a novel aircrafts detection method for satellite images based on probabilistic topic model is presented. We model aircrafts as the connected structural elements rather than features. The proposed method contains two major steps: 1) Use Cascade-Adaboost classier to identify the structural elements of aircraft firstly. 2) Connect these structural elements to aircrafts, where the relationships between elements are estimated by hierarchical topic model. The model places strict spatial constraints on structural elements which can identify differences between similar features. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  2. Detection of five potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease: A comparison of PCR and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, Gerhard; Tsigaras, Sandra; Rinke, Sven; Kottmann, Tanja; Haak, Rainer; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microbial analysis methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) in terms of detection of five selected potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease. Therefore 45 samples of healthy, mucositis and peri-implantitis (n = 15 each) were assessed according to presence of the following bacteria using PCR (DNA-strip technology) and RT-PCR (fluorescent dye SYBR green-system): Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Treponema denticola (Td), Tanerella forsythia (Tf), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). There were no significant correlations between the bacterial and disease patterns, so the benefit of using microbiological tests for the diagnosis of peri-implant diseases is questionable. Correlations between the methods were highest for Tf (Kendall's Tau: 0.65, Spearman: 0.78), Fn (0.49, 0.61) and Td (0.49, 0.59). For Aa (0.38, 0.42) and Pg (0.04, 0.04), lower correlation values were detected. Accordingly, conventional semi-quantitative PCR seems to be sufficient for analyzing potentially periodontal pathogenic bacterial species.

  3. Automatic detection of contrast injection on fluoroscopy and angiography for image guided trans-catheter aortic valve implantations (TAVI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Rui; You, Wei; Yan, Michelle; John, Matthias

    2011-03-01

    Presentation of detailed anatomical structures via 3-D models helps navigation and deployment of the prosthetic valve in TAVI procedures. Fast and automatic contrast detection in the aortic root on X-ray images facilitates a seamless workflow to utilize the 3-D models by triggering 2-D/3-D registration automatically when motion compensation is needed. In this paper, we propose a novel method for automatic detection of contrast injection in the aortic root on fluoroscopic and angiographic sequences. The proposed method is based on histogram analysis and likelihood ratio test, and is robust to variations in the background, the density and volume of the injected contrast, and the size of the aorta. The performance of the proposed algorithm was evaluated on 26 sequences from 5 patients and 3 clinical sites, with 16 out of 17 contrast injections correctly detected and zero false detections. The proposed method is of general form and can be extended for detection of contrast injection in other organs and/or applications.

  4. Direct synthesis of ultrathin SOI structure by extremely low-energy oxygen implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Yasushi; Yachida, Gosuke; Inoue, Kodai; Toyohara, Taiga; Nakata, Jyoji

    2016-06-01

    We performed extremely low-energy 16O+ implantation at 10 keV (Rp ˜ 25 nm) followed by annealing aiming at directly synthesizing an ultrathin Si layer separated by a buried SiO2 layer in Si(001) substrates, and then investigated feasible condition of recrystallization and stabilization of the superficial Si and the buried oxide layer by significantly low temperature annealing. The elemental compositions were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The crystallinity of the superficial Si layer was quantitatively confirmed by ananlyzing RBS-channeling spectra. Cross-sectional morphologies and atomic configurations were observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM). As a result, we succeeded in directly synthesizing an ultrathin single-crystalline silicon layer with ≤20 nm thick separated by a thin buried stoichiometric SiO2 layer with ≤20 nm thick formed by extremely low-energy 16O+ implantation followed by surprisingly low temperature annealing at 1050∘ C.

  5. A structural and electrical comparison of BCl and BF/sub 2/ ion-implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Delfino, M.; Lunnon, M.E.

    1985-02-01

    The molecular ions BCl/sup +/ and BF/sub 2//sup +/ are implanted into <100> silicon at an energy of 16 keV per boron atom in the dose range of 6 X 10/sup 14/-1.2 X 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ to form shallow p/sup +//n junctions. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy shows that chlorine is at least four times as effective as fluorine in amorphizing silicon. The increase in thickness of the amorphous layer, however, has a small effect in the reduction of axial channeling of boron as measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry. After annealing for 30 min at 900/sup 0/C, diffusion of interstitial boron is enhanced by chlorine relative to fluorine, whereas the electrical activity of boron is inhibited. Diodes made with both BCl/sup +/ and BF/sub 2//sup +/ implantations have comparable I-V characteristics with low reverse-bias junction leakage currents that are not affected by a band of dislocation loops which remain near the original amorphous-crystalline interface.

  6. Finite element analysis of provisional structures of implant-supported complete prostheses.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Bruno Albuquerque; de Brito, Rui Barbosa; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2014-04-01

    The use of provisional resin implant-supported complete dentures is a fast and safe procedure to restore mastication and esthetics of patients soon after surgery and during the adaptation phase to the new denture. This study assessed stress distribution of provisional implant-supported fixed dentures and the all-on-4 concept using self-curing acrylic resin (Tempron) and bis-acrylic resin (Luxatemp) to simulate functional loads through the three-dimensional finite element method. Solidworks software was used to build three-dimensional models using acrylic resin (Tempron, model A) and bis-acrylic resin (Luxatemp, model B) for denture captions. Two loading patterns were applied on each model: (1) right unilateral axial loading of 150 N on the occlusal surfaces of posterior teeth and (2) oblique loading vector of 150 N at 45°. The results showed that higher stress was found on the bone crest below oblique load application with a maximum value of 187.57 MPa on model A and 167.45 MPa on model B. It was concluded that model B improved stress distribution on the denture compared with model A. PMID:24779949

  7. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF PROVISIONAL STRUCTURES OF IMPLANT-SUPPORTED COMPLETE PROSTHESES.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Bruno Albuquerque; Brito Jr, Rui Barbosa; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2012-03-01

    Abstract The use of provisional resin implant-supported complete dentures is a fast and safe procedure to restore mastication and aesthetics of patients soon after surgery and during the adaptation phase to the new denture. This study assessed stress distribution of provisional implant-supported fixed dentures and the all-on-four concept using self-curing acrylic resin (Tempron) and bis-acrylic resin (Luxatemp) to simulate functional loads through the 3D finite element method. The Solidworks software was used to build 3D models, using acrylic resin (Tempron - A) and bis-acrylic resin (Luxatemp - B) for denture captions. Two loading patterns were applied on each model: 1) right unilateral axial loading of 150 N on the occlusal surfaces of posterior teeth; 2) oblique loading vector of 150 N at 45 degrees. The results showed that higher stress was found on the bone crest below oblique load application with maximum value of 187.57 MPa on model A and 167.45 MPa on model B. It was concluded that model B improved stress distribution on the denture compared to model A.

  8. Finite element analysis of provisional structures of implant-supported complete prostheses.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Bruno Albuquerque; de Brito, Rui Barbosa; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2014-04-01

    The use of provisional resin implant-supported complete dentures is a fast and safe procedure to restore mastication and esthetics of patients soon after surgery and during the adaptation phase to the new denture. This study assessed stress distribution of provisional implant-supported fixed dentures and the all-on-4 concept using self-curing acrylic resin (Tempron) and bis-acrylic resin (Luxatemp) to simulate functional loads through the three-dimensional finite element method. Solidworks software was used to build three-dimensional models using acrylic resin (Tempron, model A) and bis-acrylic resin (Luxatemp, model B) for denture captions. Two loading patterns were applied on each model: (1) right unilateral axial loading of 150 N on the occlusal surfaces of posterior teeth and (2) oblique loading vector of 150 N at 45°. The results showed that higher stress was found on the bone crest below oblique load application with a maximum value of 187.57 MPa on model A and 167.45 MPa on model B. It was concluded that model B improved stress distribution on the denture compared with model A.

  9. Bipart: Learning Block Structure for Activity Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yang; Lo, Henry Z.; Ding, Wei; Amaral, Kevin; Crouter, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity consists complex behavior, typically structured in bouts which can consist of one continuous movement (e.g. exercise) or many sporadic movements (e.g. household chores). Each bout can be represented as a block of feature vectors corresponding to the same activity type. This paper introduces a general distance metric technique to use this block representation to first predict activity type, and then uses the predicted activity to estimate energy expenditure within a novel framework. This distance metric, dubbed Bipart, learns block-level information from both training and test sets, combining both to form a projection space which materializes block-level constraints. Thus, Bipart provides a space which can improve the bout classification performance of all classifiers. We also propose an energy expenditure estimation framework which leverages activity classification in order to improve estimates. Comprehensive experiments on waist-mounted accelerometer data, comparing Bipart against many similar methods as well as other classifiers, demonstrate the superior activity recognition of Bipart, especially in low-information experimental settings. PMID:25328361

  10. Capacitance-based damage detection sensing for aerospace structural composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, P.; Yamamoto, N.; Chen, Y.; Manohara, H.

    2014-04-01

    Damage detection technology needs improvement for aerospace engineering application because detection within complex composite structures is difficult yet critical to avoid catastrophic failure. Damage detection is challenging in aerospace structures because not all the damage detection technology can cover the various defect types (delamination, fiber fracture, matrix crack etc.), or conditions (visibility, crack length size, etc.). These defect states are expected to become even more complex with future introduction of novel composites including nano-/microparticle reinforcement. Currently, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methods with X-ray, ultrasound, or eddy current have good resolutions (< 0.1 mm), but their detection capabilities is limited by defect locations and orientations and require massive inspection devices. System health monitoring (SHM) methods are often paired with NDE technologies to signal out sensed damage, but their data collection and analysis currently requires excessive wiring and complex signal analysis. Here, we present a capacitance sensor-based, structural defect detection technology with improved sensing capability. Thin dielectric polymer layer is integrated as part of the structure; the defect in the structure directly alters the sensing layer's capacitance, allowing full-coverage sensing capability independent of defect size, orientation or location. In this work, capacitance-based sensing capability was experimentally demonstrated with a 2D sensing layer consisting of a dielectric layer sandwiched by electrodes. These sensing layers were applied on substrate surfaces. Surface indentation damage (~1mm diameter) and its location were detected through measured capacitance changes: 1 to 250 % depending on the substrates. The damage detection sensors are light weight, and they can be conformably coated and can be part of the composite structure. Therefore it is suitable for aerospace structures such as cryogenic tanks and rocket

  11. Structural and electrical properties of Ge nanocrystals embedded in SiO{sub 2} by ion implantation and annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Duguay, S.; Grob, J.J.; Slaoui, A.; Le Gall, Y.; Amann-Liess, M.

    2005-05-15

    Silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) on Si layers with embedded germanium nanocrystals (Ge-ncs) were fabricated using Ge{sup +} implantation and subsequent annealing. Transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry have been used to study the Ge redistribution in the SiO{sub 2} films as a function of annealing temperature. A monolayer of Ge-ncs near the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface was formed under specific annealing conditions. This layer, with a nc density and mean size measured to be, respectively, 1.1x10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2} and 5 nm, is located at approximately 4 nm from the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. Capacitance-voltage measurements were performed on metal-oxide-semiconductor structures containing such implanted SiO{sub 2} layers in order to study their electrical properties. The results indicate a strong memory effect at relatively low programming voltages (<5 V) due to the presence of Ge-ncs near the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  12. The effects of ion implantation on the interdiffusion coefficients in InxGa1 - xAs/GaAs quantum well structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, I. V.; Gillin, W. P.; Homewood, K. P.; Webb, R. P.

    1993-02-01

    Photoluminescence coupled with repetitive thermal annealing has been used to determine the diffusion coefficients for intermixing in InxGa1-xAs/GaAs quantum wells and to study the subsequent effects of ion implantation on the intermixing. It is shown that following ion implantation there is a very fast interdiffusion process, which is independent of the implanted ion and that is thought to be due to the rapid diffusion of interstitials created during the implantation. Following this rapid process, it was found that neither gallium nor krypton ions had any effect on the subsequent interdiffusion coefficient. Following arsenic implantation in addition to the initial damage related process, an enhanced region of interdiffusion was observed with a diffusion coefficient that was an order of magnitude greater than that of an unimplanted control wafer. This enhanced process is thought to be due to the creation of group III vacancies by the arsenic atoms moving onto group V lattice sites. This fast process was present until the structure had broadened by about 75 Å when the diffusion coefficient returned to the unimplanted control value. The activation energy for the interdiffusion was measured over the temperature range 1050-750°C and a value of 3.7±0.1 eV was measured. This was found to be independent of the implanted ion.

  13. Detection of karst structures using airborne EM and VLF

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, L.P. Nyquist, J.E.; Carpenter, P.J.

    1994-12-31

    Through the combined use of multi-frequency helicopter electromagnetic and VLF data, it is possible to detect and delineate a wide variety of karst structures and possibly to assess their interconnectedness. Multi-frequency EM Can detect karst features if some element of the structure is conductive. This conductive aspect may derive from thick, moist soils in the depression commonly associated with a doline, from conductive fluids in the cavity, or from conductive sediments in the cavity if these occupy a significant portion of it. Multiple loop configurations may also increase the likelihood of detecting karst features. Preliminary evidence indicates total field VLF measurements may be able to detect interconnected karst pathways, so long as the pathways are water or sediment filled. Neither technique can effectively detect dry, resistive air-filled cavities.

  14. Vibration-based damage detection algorithm for WTT structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tuan-Cuong; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Choi, Sang-Hoon; Ryu, Joo-Young; Kim, Jeong-Tae

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the integrity of a wind turbine tower (WTT) structure is nondestructively estimated using its vibration responses. Firstly, a damage detection algorithm using changes in modal characteristics to predict damage locations and severities in structures is outlined. Secondly, a finite element (FE) model based on a real WTT structure is established by using a commercial software, Midas FEA. Thirdly, forced vibration tests are performed on the FE model of the WTT structure under various damage scenarios. The changes in modal parameters such as natural frequencies and mode shapes are examined for damage monitoring in the structure. Finally, the feasibility of the vibration-based damage detection method is numerically verified by predicting locations and severities of the damage in the FE model of the WTT structure.

  15. Electrical properties and electronic structure of Si-implanted hexagonal boron nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    He, B.; Yuen, M. F.; Zhang, W. J.; Qiu, M.

    2014-07-07

    Si ion implantation with a set of ion energies and ion doses was carried out to dope hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) thin films synthesized by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. Hall effect measurements revealed n-type conduction with a low resistivity of 0.5 Ω cm at room temperature, corresponding to an electron concentration of 2.0 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} and a mobility of 0.6 cm{sup 2}/V s. Temperature-dependent resistivity measurements in a wide temperature range from 50 to 800 K demonstrated two shallow donor levels in the hBN band gap induced by Si doping, which was in consistence with the theoretical calculation by density function theory.

  16. KrF resists for implant layers patterning extreme high-aspect ratio structures with a double focal plane exposure technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafaelli, Giorgio; Ferri, Fabio; Volpi, Stefano; Hong, Chisun

    2012-03-01

    The design rules for advanced image sensor applications are requiring continuous CD shrinkage, and increasing aspect ratios which resulting in major challenges associated with using KrF technology. For the implant photo layers in particular, the need to block high-energy boron implants (well above 2 MeV) with extremely localized implant profiles requires an aspect ratio of deep well structures greater than 10:1. Other desirable attributes of a good photoresist for such demanding applications are high transparency, a steep wall profile consistent throughout the entire film, good adhesion with no structure collapse, and a wide process window. In this paper, we will discuss the role of a chemically amplified, ESCAP-type of resist in meeting these design criteria using a double focal plane exposure technique.

  17. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  18. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  19. Implant-supported overdenture manufactured using CAD/CAM techniques to achieve horizontal path insertion between the primary and secondary structure: A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Gomar-Vercher, Sonia; Ferreiroa, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the case of an edentulous patient with an atrophic maxilla and severe class III malocclusion. Prosthetic rehabilitation was performed using CAD/CAM techniques for manufacturing an implant-supported overdenture with horizontal insertion. A vestibulo-lingual insertion overdenture is a precision prosthesis with a fixation system affording a good fit between the primary and secondary structure. Both structures exhibit passive horizontal adjustment. This treatment option requires the same number of implants as implant-supported fixed dentures. The horizontal assembly system prevents the prosthesis from loosening or moving in response to axial and non-axial forces. The technique was used to rehabilitate a patient presenting an atrophic upper maxilla, with the insertion of 8 implants. No complications were reported at follow-up 3, 6 and 12 months after fitting of the prosthesis. This system offers solutions to the clinical and laboratory complications associated with hybrid prostheses, concealing emergence of the chimneys and improving implant-prosthesis hygiene. PMID:26140179

  20. Protein knot server: detection of knots in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Kolesov, Grigory; Virnau, Peter; Kardar, Mehran; Mirny, Leonid A

    2007-07-01

    KNOTS (http://knots.mit.edu) is a web server that detects knots in protein structures. Several protein structures have been reported to contain intricate knots. The physiological role of knots and their effect on folding and evolution is an area of active research. The user submits a PDB id or uploads a 3D protein structure in PDB or mmCIF format. The current implementation of the server uses the Alexander polynomial to detect knots. The results of the analysis that are presented to the user are the location of the knot in the structure, the type of the knot and an interactive visualization of the knot. The results can also be downloaded and viewed offline. The server also maintains a regularly updated list of known knots in protein structures.

  1. Detection of Component Failures for Smart Structure Control Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Hiroshi

    Uncertainties in the dynamics model of a smart structure are often of significance due to model errors caused by parameter identification errors and reduced-order modeling of the system. Design of a model-based Failure Detection and Isolation (FDI) system for smart structures, therefore, needs careful consideration regarding robustness with respect to such model uncertainties. In this paper, we proposes a new method of robust fault detection that is insensitive to the disturbances caused by unknown modeling errors while it is highly sensitive to the component failures. The capability of the robust detection algorithm is examined for the sensor failure of a flexible smart beam control system. It is shown by numerical simulations that the proposed method suppresses the disturbances due to model errors and markedly improves the detection performance.

  2. Gain analysis of higher-order-mode amplification in a dielectric-implanted multi-beam traveling wave structure

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Anthony; Shin, Young-Min

    2013-01-01

    A multi-beam traveling wave amplifier designed with an overmoded staggered double grating array was examined by small signal analysis combined with simulation. Eigenmode and S-parameter analyses show that the 2cm long slow wave structure (SWS) has 1-5dB insertion loss over the passband (TM31 mode) with ~28% cold bandwidth. Analytic gain calculation indicates that in the SWS, TM31-mode is amplified with 15–20 dB/beam at 64–84GHz with three elliptical beams of 10kV and 150mA/beam, which was compared with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. PIC analysis on the analysis of instability with zero-input driving excitations demonstrated that background noises and non-operating lower order modes are noticeably suppressed by implanting equidistant dielectric absorbers; the overmoded structure only allowed the desired 3rd order mode to propagate in the structure. The designed circuit structure can be widely applied to multi-beam devices for high power RF generation.

  3. [Hearing implants].

    PubMed

    Stokroos, Robert J; George, Erwin L J

    2013-01-01

    In the Netherlands, more than 1.5 million people suffer from sensorineural hearing loss or deafness. However, fitting conventional hearing aids does not provide a solution for everyone. In recent decades, developments in medical technology have produced implantable and other devices that restore both sensorineural and conductive hearing losses. These hearing devices can be categorized into bone conductive devices, implantable middle ear prostheses, cochlear implants and auditory brainstem implants. Furthermore, new implants aimed at treating tinnitus and loss of vestibular function have recently been developed.

  4. Structural and Thermal Characterization of Ti+O Ion Implanted UltraHigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Oztarhan, A.; Urkac, E. Sokullu; Kaya, N.; Tihminlioglu, F.; Ila, D.; Chhay, B.; Muntele, C.; Budak, S.; Oks, E.; Nikolaev, A.

    2009-03-10

    In this work, Metal-Gas Hybrid Ion Implantation technique was used as a tool for the surface modification of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE). Samples were Ti+O ion implanted by using Metal-Vapour Vacuum Arc (MEVVA) ion implanter to a fluence of 5x10{sup 16} ion/cm{sup 2} for each species and extraction voltage of 30 kV. Untreated and surface treated samples were investigated by Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) Spectrometry, Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) Spectroscopy, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Results indicate that Ti+O ion implantation can be applied on UHMWPE surfaces successfully. ATR-FTIR spectra indicate that the C-H concentration on the surface decreased after Ti+O implantation. Thermal characterization with TGA and DSC shows that polymeric decomposition temperature is shifted after ion implantation.

  5. Ti-6Al-4V triply periodic minimal surface structures for bone implants fabricated via selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chunze; Hao, Liang; Hussein, Ahmed; Young, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Triply periodic minimal surface (TPMS) structures have already been shown to be a versatile source of biomorphic scaffold designs. Therefore, in this work, Ti-6Al-4V Gyroid and Diamond TPMS lattices having an interconnected high porosity of 80-95% and pore sizes in the range of 560-1600 μm and 480-1450 μm respectively were manufactured by selective laser melting (SLM) for bone implants. The manufacturability, microstructure and mechanical properties of the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices were evaluated. Comparison between 3D micro-CT reconstructed models and original CAD models of the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices shows excellent reproduction of the designs. The as-built Ti-6Al-4V struts exhibit the microstructure of columnar grains filled with very fine and orthogonally oriented α' martensitic laths with the width of 100-300 nm and have the microhardness of 4.01 ± 0.34 GPa. After heat treatment at 680°C for 4h, the α' martensite was converted to a mixture of α and β, in which the α phase being the dominant fraction is present as fine laths with the width of 500-800 nm and separated by a small amount of narrow, interphase regions of dark β phase. Also, the microhardness is decreased to 3.71 ± 0.35 GPa due to the coarsening of the microstructure. The 80-95% porosity TPMS lattices exhibit a comparable porosity with trabecular bone, and the modulus is in the range of 0.12-1.25 GPa and thus can be adjusted to the modulus of trabecular bone. At the same range of porosity of 5-10%, the moduli of cortical bone and of the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices are in a similar range. Therefore, the modulus and porosity of Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices can be tailored to the levels of human bones and thus reduce or avoid "stress shielding" and increase longevity of implants. Due to the biomorphic designs, and high interconnected porosity and stiffness comparable to human bones, SLM-made Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices can be a promising material for load bearing bone implants.

  6. Ti-6Al-4V triply periodic minimal surface structures for bone implants fabricated via selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chunze; Hao, Liang; Hussein, Ahmed; Young, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Triply periodic minimal surface (TPMS) structures have already been shown to be a versatile source of biomorphic scaffold designs. Therefore, in this work, Ti-6Al-4V Gyroid and Diamond TPMS lattices having an interconnected high porosity of 80-95% and pore sizes in the range of 560-1600 μm and 480-1450 μm respectively were manufactured by selective laser melting (SLM) for bone implants. The manufacturability, microstructure and mechanical properties of the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices were evaluated. Comparison between 3D micro-CT reconstructed models and original CAD models of the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices shows excellent reproduction of the designs. The as-built Ti-6Al-4V struts exhibit the microstructure of columnar grains filled with very fine and orthogonally oriented α' martensitic laths with the width of 100-300 nm and have the microhardness of 4.01 ± 0.34 GPa. After heat treatment at 680°C for 4h, the α' martensite was converted to a mixture of α and β, in which the α phase being the dominant fraction is present as fine laths with the width of 500-800 nm and separated by a small amount of narrow, interphase regions of dark β phase. Also, the microhardness is decreased to 3.71 ± 0.35 GPa due to the coarsening of the microstructure. The 80-95% porosity TPMS lattices exhibit a comparable porosity with trabecular bone, and the modulus is in the range of 0.12-1.25 GPa and thus can be adjusted to the modulus of trabecular bone. At the same range of porosity of 5-10%, the moduli of cortical bone and of the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices are in a similar range. Therefore, the modulus and porosity of Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices can be tailored to the levels of human bones and thus reduce or avoid "stress shielding" and increase longevity of implants. Due to the biomorphic designs, and high interconnected porosity and stiffness comparable to human bones, SLM-made Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices can be a promising material for load bearing bone implants. PMID:26210549

  7. Algorithm of detecting structural variations in DNA sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nałecz-Charkiewicz, Katarzyna; Nowak, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Whole genome sequencing enables to use the longest common subsequence algorithm to detect genetic structure variations. We propose to search position of short unique fragments, genetic markers, to achieve acceptable time and space complexity. The markers are generated by algorithms searching the genetic sequence or its Fourier transformation. The presented methods are checked on structural variations generated in silico on bacterial genomes giving the comparable or better results than other solutions.

  8. Fabrication of micro/nano-structures using focused ion beam implantation and XeF2 gas-assisted etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z. W.; Fang, F. Z.; Fu, Y. Q.; Zhang, S. J.; Han, T.; Li, J. M.

    2009-05-01

    A micro/nano-structure fabrication method is developed using focused ion beam implantation (FIBI) and FIB XeF2 gas-assisted etching (FIB-GAE). Firstly, the FIB parameters' influence on the FIBI depth is studied by SEM observation of the FIBI cross-section cutting by FIB. Nanoparticles with 10-15 nm diameter are found to be evenly distributed in the FIBI layer, which can serve as a XeF2-assisted etching mask when the ion dose is larger than 1.4 × 1017 ions cm-2. The FIBI layers being used as the etching mask for the subsequent FIB-GAE process are explored to create different micro/nano-structures such as nano-gratings, nano-electrode and sinusoidal microstructures. It is found that the method of combining FIBI with subsequent FIB-GAE is efficient and flexible in micro/nano-structuring, and it can effectively remove the redeposition effect compared with the FIB milling method.

  9. High holding voltage segmentation stacking silicon-controlled-rectifier structure with field implant as body ties blocking layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Shiang-Shiou; Cheng, Chun-Hu; Lan, Yu-Pin; Chiu, Yu-Chien; Fan, Chia-Chi; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsuan; Chang, Shao-Chin; Jiang, Zhe-Wei; Hung, Li-Yue; Tsai, Chi-Chung; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-04-01

    High electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection robustness and good transient-induced latchup immunity are two important issues for high voltage integrate circuit application. In this study, we report a high-voltage-n-type-field (HVNF) implantation to act as the body ties blocking layer in segmented topology silicon-controlled-rectifier (SCR) structure in 0.11 µm 32 V high voltage process. This body ties blocking layer eliminate the elevated triggered voltage in segmented technique. Using a large resistance as shunt resistor in resistor assisted triggered SCRs stacking structure, the double snapback phenomenon is eliminate. The series SCR could be decoupled a sufficient voltage drop to turned-on when a very low current flow through the shunt resistor. The holding voltage and the failure current of 22 V and 3.4 A are achieved in the best condition of segmented topology SCR stacking structure, respectively. It improves the latchup immunity at high voltage ICs application. On the other hand, the triggered voltage almost keep the same value which is identical to SCR single cell without using segmented topology.

  10. Compressive behaviour of gyroid lattice structures for human cancellous bone implant applications.

    PubMed

    Yánez, A; Herrera, A; Martel, O; Monopoli, D; Afonso, H

    2016-11-01

    Electron beam melting (EBM) was used to fabricate porous titanium alloy structures. The elastic modulus of these porous structures was similar to the elastic modulus of the cancellous human bone. Two types of cellular lattice structures were manufactured and tested: gyroids and diamonds. The design of the gyroid structures was determined by the main angle of the struts with respect to the axial direction. Thus, structures with angles of between 19 and 68.5° were manufactured. The aim of the design was to reduce the amount of material needed to fabricate a structure with the desired angles to increase the range of stiffness of the scaffolds. Compression tests were conducted to obtain the elastic modulus and the strength. Both parameters increased as the angle decreased. Finally, the specific strength of the gyroid structures was compared with that of the diamond structures and other types of structures. It is shown that, for angles lower than 35°, the gyroid structures had a high strength to weight ratios. PMID:27524040

  11. Compressive behaviour of gyroid lattice structures for human cancellous bone implant applications.

    PubMed

    Yánez, A; Herrera, A; Martel, O; Monopoli, D; Afonso, H

    2016-11-01

    Electron beam melting (EBM) was used to fabricate porous titanium alloy structures. The elastic modulus of these porous structures was similar to the elastic modulus of the cancellous human bone. Two types of cellular lattice structures were manufactured and tested: gyroids and diamonds. The design of the gyroid structures was determined by the main angle of the struts with respect to the axial direction. Thus, structures with angles of between 19 and 68.5° were manufactured. The aim of the design was to reduce the amount of material needed to fabricate a structure with the desired angles to increase the range of stiffness of the scaffolds. Compression tests were conducted to obtain the elastic modulus and the strength. Both parameters increased as the angle decreased. Finally, the specific strength of the gyroid structures was compared with that of the diamond structures and other types of structures. It is shown that, for angles lower than 35°, the gyroid structures had a high strength to weight ratios.

  12. Structural impact detection with vibro-haptic interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hwee-Kwon; Park, Gyuhae; Todd, Michael D.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new sensing paradigm for structural impact detection using vibro-haptic interfaces. The goal of this study is to allow humans to ‘feel’ structural responses (impact, shape changes, and damage) and eventually determine health conditions of a structure. The target applications for this study are aerospace structures, in particular, airplane wings. Both hardware and software components are developed to realize the vibro-haptic-based impact detection system. First, L-shape piezoelectric sensor arrays are deployed to measure the acoustic emission data generated by impacts on a wing. Unique haptic signals are then generated by processing the measured acoustic emission data. These haptic signals are wirelessly transmitted to human arms, and with vibro-haptic interface, human pilots could identify impact location, intensity and possibility of subsequent damage initiation. With the haptic interface, the experimental results demonstrate that human could correctly identify such events, while reducing false indications on structural conditions by capitalizing on human’s classification capability. Several important aspects of this study, including development of haptic interfaces, design of optimal human training strategies, and extension of the haptic capability into structural impact detection are summarized in this paper.

  13. Language Structures Used by Kindergartners with Cochlear Implants: Relationship to Phonological Awareness, Lexical Knowledge and Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Nittrouer, Susan; Sansom, Emily; Low, Keri; Rice, Caitlin; Caldwell-Tarr, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Objective Listeners use their knowledge of how language is structured to aid speech recognition in everyday communication. When it comes to children with congenital hearing loss severe enough to warrant cochlear implants (CIs), the question arises of whether these children can acquire the language knowledge needed to aid speech recognition, in spite of only having spectrally degraded signals available to them. That question was addressed in the current study. Specifically there were three goals: (1) to compare the language structures used by children with CIs to those of children with normal hearing (NH); (2) to assess the amount of variance in the language measures explained by phonological awareness and lexical knowledge; and (3) to assess the amount of variance in the language measures explained by factors related to the hearing loss itself and subsequent treatment. Design Language samples were obtained and transcribed for 40 children who had just completed kindergarten: 19 with NH and 21 with CIs. Five measures were derived from Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts (SALT): (1) mean length of utterance in morphemes, (2) number of conjunctions, excluding and, (3) number of personal pronouns, (4) number of bound morphemes, and (5) number of different words. Measures were also collected on phonological awareness and lexical knowledge. Statistics examined group differences, as well as the amount of variance in the language measures explained by phonological awareness, lexical knowledge, and factors related to hearing loss and its treatment for children with CIs. Results Mean scores of children with CIs were roughly one standard deviation below those of children with NH on all language measures, including lexical knowledge, matching outcomes of other studies. Mean scores of children with CIs were closer to two standard deviations below those of children with NH on two out of three measures of phonological awareness (specifically those related to phonemic

  14. Nonlinear structural damage detection using support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Li; Qu, Wenzhong

    2012-04-01

    An actual structure including connections and interfaces may exist nonlinear. Because of many complicated problems about nonlinear structural health monitoring (SHM), relatively little progress have been made in this aspect. Statistical pattern recognition techniques have been demonstrated to be competitive with other methods when applied to real engineering datasets. When a structure existing 'breathing' cracks that open and close under operational loading may cause a linear structural system to respond to its operational and environmental loads in a nonlinear manner nonlinear. In this paper, a vibration-based structural health monitoring when the structure exists cracks is investigated with autoregressive support vector machine (AR-SVM). Vibration experiments are carried out with a model frame. Time-series data in different cases such as: initial linear structure; linear structure with mass changed; nonlinear structure; nonlinear structure with mass changed are acquired.AR model of acceleration time-series is established, and different kernel function types and corresponding parameters are chosen and compared, which can more accurate, more effectively locate the damage. Different cases damaged states and different damage positions have been recognized successfully. AR-SVM method for the insufficient training samples is proved to be practical and efficient on structure nonlinear damage detection.

  15. Detection and location of metallic objects imbedded in nonmetallic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. L.; Neuschaefer, R. W.

    1968-01-01

    Small battery operated eddy current proximity measuring device detects and locates metal objects the size of a dime at distances up to one foot within nonmetallic structures. This device weighs approximately two pounds, occupies approximately 60 cubic inches, and is battery powered.

  16. Detection of structural deterioration and associated airline maintenance problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henniker, H. D.; Mitchell, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Airline operations involving the detection of structural deterioration and associated maintenance problems are discussed. The standard approach to the maintenance and inspection of aircraft components and systems is described. The frequency of inspections and the application of preventive maintenance practices are examined. The types of failure which airline transport aircraft encounter and the steps taken to prevent catastrophic failure are reported.

  17. Detecting damage in vibrating structures with a scanning LDV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, A. Z.; Stanbridge, A. B.; Ewins, D. J.

    1999-12-01

    It has been demonstrated, through experiments on laboratory-scale structures, that structural defects such as cracks can be detected and located using a continuously scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) if vibration sufficient to flex the defect can be induced and if the defects are such as to produce localised mode shape discontinuities. This paper describes such a method of defect detection using a short linear scan at the crack location. Through-cracks are easily detected in thin metal plates whereas narrow slots in a solid cantilever beam have no easily identifiable effect unless they extend more than half-way through the thickness. Cracks in a reinforced-concrete beam introduced marked and identifiable discontinuities in mode shapes. Speckle noise affects the measurements, sometimes seriously. A simple low-pass filter may improve the signal quality.

  18. Expert system structures for fault detection in spaceborne power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Karan; Russell, B. Don; Hackler, Irene

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture for an expert system structure suitable for use with power system fault detection algorithms. The system described is not for the purpose of reacting to faults which have occurred, but rather for the purpose of performing on-line diagnostics and parameter evaluation to determine potential or incipient fault conditions. The system is also designed to detect high impedance or arcing faults which cannot be detected by conventional protection devices. This system is part of an overall monitoring computer hierarchy which would provide a full evaluation of the status of the power system and react to both incipient and catastrophic faults. An approximate hardware structure is suggested and software requirements are discussed. Modifications to CLIPS software, to capitalize on features offered by expert systems, are presented. It is suggested that such a system would have significant advantages over existing protection philosophy.

  19. Structure damage detection based on random forest recursive feature elimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qifeng; Zhou, Hao; Zhou, Qingqing; Yang, Fan; Luo, Linkai

    2014-05-01

    Feature extraction is a key former step in structural damage detection. In this paper, a structural damage detection method based on wavelet packet decomposition (WPD) and random forest recursive feature elimination (RF-RFE) is proposed. In order to gain the most effective feature subset and to improve the identification accuracy a two-stage feature selection method is adopted after WPD. First, the damage features are sorted according to original random forest variable importance analysis. Second, using RF-RFE to eliminate the least important feature and reorder the feature list each time, then get the new feature importance sequence. Finally, k-nearest neighbor (KNN) algorithm, as a benchmark classifier, is used to evaluate the extracted feature subset. A four-storey steel shear building model is chosen as an example in method verification. The experimental results show that using the fewer features got from proposed method can achieve higher identification accuracy and reduce the detection time cost.

  20. Damage detection and health monitoring of operational structures

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.; Mayes, R.; Carne, T.; Reese, G.

    1994-09-01

    Initial damage detection/health monitoring experiments have been performed on three different operational structures: a fracture critical bridge, a composite wind turbine blade, and an aging aircraft. An induced damage test was performed on the Rio Grande/I40 bridge before its demolition. The composite wind turbine test was fatgued to failure with periodic modal testing performed throughout the testing. The front fuselage of a DC-9 aircraft was used as the testbed for an induced damage test. These tests have yielded important insights into techniques for experimental damage detection on real structures. Additionally, the data are currently being used with current damage detection algorithms to further develop the numerical technology. State of the art testing technologies such as, high density modal testing, scanning laser vibrometry and natural excitation testing have also been utilized for these tests.

  1. Method for Real-Time Model Based Structural Anomaly Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy A. (Inventor); Urnes, James M., Sr. (Inventor); Reichenbach, Eric Y. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system and methods for real-time model based vehicle structural anomaly detection are disclosed. A real-time measurement corresponding to a location on a vehicle structure during an operation of the vehicle is received, and the real-time measurement is compared to expected operation data for the location to provide a modeling error signal. A statistical significance of the modeling error signal to provide an error significance is calculated, and a persistence of the error significance is determined. A structural anomaly is indicated, if the persistence exceeds a persistence threshold value.

  2. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  3. Detecting Community Structure by Using a Constrained Label Propagation Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Ratnavelu, Kuru

    2016-01-01

    Community structure is considered one of the most interesting features in complex networks. Many real-world complex systems exhibit community structure, where individuals with similar properties form a community. The identification of communities in a network is important for understanding the structure of said network, in a specific perspective. Thus, community detection in complex networks gained immense interest over the last decade. A lot of community detection methods were proposed, and one of them is the label propagation algorithm (LPA). The simplicity and time efficiency of the LPA make it a popular community detection method. However, the LPA suffers from instability detection due to randomness that is induced in the algorithm. The focus of this paper is to improve the stability and accuracy of the LPA, while retaining its simplicity. Our proposed algorithm will first detect the main communities in a network by using the number of mutual neighbouring nodes. Subsequently, nodes are added into communities by using a constrained LPA. Those constraints are then gradually relaxed until all nodes are assigned into groups. In order to refine the quality of the detected communities, nodes in communities can be switched to another community or removed from their current communities at various stages of the algorithm. We evaluated our algorithm on three types of benchmark networks, namely the Lancichinetti-Fortunato-Radicchi (LFR), Relaxed Caveman (RC) and Girvan-Newman (GN) benchmarks. We also apply the present algorithm to some real-world networks of various sizes. The current results show some promising potential, of the proposed algorithm, in terms of detecting communities accurately. Furthermore, our constrained LPA has a robustness and stability that are significantly better than the simple LPA as it is able to yield deterministic results. PMID:27176470

  4. Advantages of a dual-color fluorescence-tracing glioma orthotopic implantation model: Detecting tumor location, angiogenesis, cellular fusion and the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, YUNTIAN; ZHANG, QUANBIN; ZHANG, JINSHI; LU, ZHAOHUI; WANG, AIDONG; FEI, XIFENG; DAI, XINGLIANG; WU, JINDING; WANG, ZHIMIN; ZHAO, YAODONG; TIAN, YE; DONG, JUN; LAN, QING; HUANG, QIANG

    2015-01-01

    Various organs of the body have distinct microenvironments with diverse biological characteristics that can influence the growth of tumors within them. However, the mechanisms underlying the interactions between tumor and host cells are currently not well understood. In the present study, a dual-color fluorescence-tracing glioma orthotopic implantation model was developed, in which C6 rat glioma cells labeled with the red fluorescent dye CM-Dil, and SU3 human glioma cells stably expressing red fluorescence protein, were inoculated into the right caudate nucleus of transgenic female C57BL/6 nude mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein. The dual-color tracing with whole-body in vivo fluorescence imaging of xenografts was performed using a live imaging system. Frozen sections of the transplanted tumor were prepared for histological analyses, in order to detect the presence of invading tumor cells, blood vessels and cellular fusion. Dual-color images were able to distinguish between red tumor cells and green host cells. The results of the present study suggested that a dual-color fluorescence-tracing glioma orthotopic implantation model may be convenient for detecting tumor location, angiogenesis, cellular fusion, and the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26668594

  5. SEM and EDS investigation of a pyrolytic carbon covered C/C composite maxillofacial implant retrieved from the human body after 8 years.

    PubMed

    Sebők, Béla; Kiss, Gábor; Szabó, Péter J; Rigler, Dániel; Molnár, Milán L; Dobos, Gábor; Réti, Ferenc; Szőcs, Hajnal; Joób, Arpád F; Bogdán, Sándor; Szabó, György

    2013-03-01

    The long term effect of the human body on a pyrolytic carbon covered C/C composite maxillofacial implant (CarBulat(Tm)) was investigated by comparing the structure, the surface morphology and composition of an implant retrieved after 8 years to a sterilized, but not implanted one. Although the thickness of the carbon fibres constituting the implants did not change during the 8 year period, the surface of the implant retrieved was covered with a thin surface layer not present on the unimplanted implant. The composition of this layer is identical to the composition of the underlying carbon fibres. Calcium can only be detected on the surface as a trace element implying that the new layer is not formed by bone tissue. Residual soft tissue penetrating the bulk material between the carbon fibre bunches was found on the retrieved implant indicating the importance of the surface morphology in tissue growth and adhering to implants.

  6. TEM investigation of the surface layer structure [111]{sub B2} of the single NiTi crystal modified by the Si-ion beam implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Girsova, S. L. Poletika, T. M.; Meisner, S. N. Meisner, L. L.

    2015-10-27

    The study was carried on for the single NiTi crystals subjected to the Si-ion beam implantation. Using the transmission electron microscopy technique (TEM), the surface layer structure [111]{sub B2} was examined for the treated material. The modified near-surface sublayers were found to have different composition. Thus the uppermost sublayer contained mostly oxides; the lower-lying modified sublayer material was in an amorphous state and the thin underlying sublayer had a defect structure.

  7. Effect of alpha lipoic acid co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical changes in subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult male albino rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation

    PubMed Central

    Mazroa, Shireen A; Asker, Samar A; Asker, Waleed; Abd Ellatif, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Polypropylene mesh is commonly used in the treatment of abdominal hernia. Different approaches were addressed to improve their tissue integration and consequently reduce long-term complications. This study aimed to investigate the effect of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical (IHC) changes in the subcutaneous tissues of the anterior abdominal wall of the adult rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation. Forty adult male albino rats were divided into: group I (control), group II (receiving ALA), group III (polypropylene mesh implantation) and group IV (mesh implantation + ALA co-administration). After 4 weeks, subcutaneous tissue samples were prepared for light microscopy and IHC study of CD34 as a marker for angiogenesis. In groups I and II rats, positive CD34 expression was demonstrated by IHC reaction, localized to endothelial cells lining small blood vessels. Group III showed an excess inflammatory reaction, deposition of both regular and irregularly arranged collagen fibres around mesh pores and few elastic fibres. CD34-positive was detected not only in cells lining small blood vessels but also in other cells scattered in the connective tissue indicating angiogenesis. In group IV, ALA co-administration resulted in less inflammatory reaction, regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and a significant increase in CD34-positive cells and small blood vessels reflecting improved angiogenesis. ALA co-administration with polypropylene mesh implantation controlled the inflammatory reaction, helped regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and improved angiogenesis in the subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult albino rats, suggesting a possible role of ALA in optimizing mesh integration in subcutaneous tissue. PMID:25891652

  8. Effect of alpha lipoic acid co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical changes in subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult male albino rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation.

    PubMed

    Mazroa, Shireen A; Asker, Samar A; Asker, Waleed; Abd Ellatif, Mohamed

    2015-06-01

    Polypropylene mesh is commonly used in the treatment of abdominal hernia. Different approaches were addressed to improve their tissue integration and consequently reduce long-term complications. This study aimed to investigate the effect of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) co-administration on structural and immunohistochemical (IHC) changes in the subcutaneous tissues of the anterior abdominal wall of the adult rat in response to polypropylene mesh implantation. Forty adult male albino rats were divided into: group I (control), group II (receiving ALA), group III (polypropylene mesh implantation) and group IV (mesh implantation + ALA co-administration). After 4 weeks, subcutaneous tissue samples were prepared for light microscopy and IHC study of CD34 as a marker for angiogenesis. In groups I and II rats, positive CD34 expression was demonstrated by IHC reaction, localized to endothelial cells lining small blood vessels. Group III showed an excess inflammatory reaction, deposition of both regular and irregularly arranged collagen fibres around mesh pores and few elastic fibres. CD34-positive was detected not only in cells lining small blood vessels but also in other cells scattered in the connective tissue indicating angiogenesis. In group IV, ALA co-administration resulted in less inflammatory reaction, regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and a significant increase in CD34-positive cells and small blood vessels reflecting improved angiogenesis. ALA co-administration with polypropylene mesh implantation controlled the inflammatory reaction, helped regular collagen deposition, enhanced elastic fibres synthesis and improved angiogenesis in the subcutaneous tissue of anterior abdominal wall of adult albino rats, suggesting a possible role of ALA in optimizing mesh integration in subcutaneous tissue.

  9. Nonlinear damage detection in composite structures using bispectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciampa, Francesco; Pickering, Simon; Scarselli, Gennaro; Meo, Michele

    2014-03-01

    Literature offers a quantitative number of diagnostic methods that can continuously provide detailed information of the material defects and damages in aerospace and civil engineering applications. Indeed, low velocity impact damages can considerably degrade the integrity of structural components and, if not detected, they can result in catastrophic failure conditions. This paper presents a nonlinear Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) method, based on ultrasonic guided waves (GW), for the detection of the nonlinear signature in a damaged composite structure. The proposed technique, based on a bispectral analysis of ultrasonic input waveforms, allows for the evaluation of the nonlinear response due to the presence of cracks and delaminations. Indeed, such a methodology was used to characterize the nonlinear behaviour of the structure, by exploiting the frequency mixing of the original waveform acquired from a sparse array of sensors. The robustness of bispectral analysis was experimentally demonstrated on a damaged carbon fibre reinforce plastic (CFRP) composite panel, and the nonlinear source was retrieved with a high level of accuracy. Unlike other linear and nonlinear ultrasonic methods for damage detection, this methodology does not require any baseline with the undamaged structure for the evaluation of the nonlinear source, nor a priori knowledge of the mechanical properties of the specimen. Moreover, bispectral analysis can be considered as a nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy (NEWS) technique for materials showing either classical or non-classical nonlinear behaviour.

  10. Neural networks for local structure detection in polymorphic systems.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Philipp; Dellago, Christoph

    2013-10-28

    The accurate identification and classification of local ordered and disordered structures is an important task in atomistic computer simulations. Here, we demonstrate that properly trained artificial neural networks can be used for this purpose. Based on a neural network approach recently developed for the calculation of energies and forces, the proposed method recognizes local atomic arrangements from a set of symmetry functions that characterize the environment around a given atom. The algorithm is simple and flexible and it does not rely on the definition of a reference frame. Using the Lennard-Jones system as well as liquid water and ice as illustrative examples, we show that the neural networks developed here detect amorphous and crystalline structures with high accuracy even in the case of complex atomic arrangements, for which conventional structure detection approaches are unreliable.

  11. Extended Kalman filter based structural damage detection for MR damper controlled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chenhao; Jang, Shinae; Sun, Xiaorong; Jiang, Zhaoshuo; Christenson, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The Magneto-rheological (MR) dampers have been widely used in many building and bridge structures against earthquake and wind loadings due to its advantages including mechanical simplicity, high dynamic range, low power requirements, large force capacity, and robustness. However, research about structural damage detection methods for MR damper controlled structures is limited. This paper aims to develop a real-time structural damage detection method for MR damper controlled structures. A novel state space model of MR damper controlled structure is first built by combining the structure's equation of motion and MR damper's hyperbolic tangent model. In this way, the state parameters of both the structure and MR damper are added in the state vector of the state space model. Extended Kalman filter is then used to provide prediction for state variables from measurement data. The two techniques are synergistically combined to identify parameters and track the changes of both structure and MR damper in real time. The proposed method is tested using response data of a three-floor MR damper controlled linear building structure under earthquake excitation. The testing results show that the adaptive extended Kalman filter based approach is capable to estimate not only structural parameters such as stiffness and damping of each floor, but also the parameters of MR damper, so that more insights and understanding of the damage can be obtained. The developed method also demonstrates high damage detection accuracy and light computation, as well as the potential to implement in a structural health monitoring system.

  12. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  13. Optical properties and oxidation of carbonized and cross-linked structures formed in polycarbonate by plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosobrodova, E.; Kondyurin, A.; Chrzanowski, W.; McCulloch, D. G.; McKenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2014-06-01

    At ion fluences higher than 5 · 1015 ions/cm2, plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) of polycarbonate (PC) results in a formation of a carbonized surface layer. The thickness of this layer is close to the depth of ion penetration. A comparison of PIII treated, spin-coated PC films with pre-treatment thicknesses designed to match and exceed the carbonized layer thickness is employed to study the properties of the carbonised layer independently from the less modified underlying structure. At ion fluencies higher than 1016 ions/cm2, the thinner PC film is completely transformed into an amorphous carbon-like material with no traces of the initial PC structure. The thicker films, however, incorporated two layers: a top carbonised layer and a cross-linked layer below. Compared to the two-layered PC film, the completely carbonized layer was found to have a much higher concentration of Cdbnd O bonds and much lower concentration of O-H bonds after exposure to atmospheric oxygen. The refractive index of the thicker PC films PIII treated with high ion fluencies is close to the refractive index of diamond-like carbon. Anomalous dispersion of the refractive index of the thicker PC films is observed after formation of the carbonised layer. The refractive index of the thinner PC film has normal dispersion at all ion fluences. At ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2, both PC films were found to have the same etching rate as polystyrene. Washing in dichloromethane had no effect on the carbonised layer but affected the underlying material in the case of the thicker PC films leading to a wrinkled structure up to ion fluences of 2 · 1016 ions/cm2. At this and higher fluence, areas of an ordered island-like structure were observed.

  14. Ultrasonic Techniques for Baseline-Free Damage Detection in Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Debaditya

    This research presents ultrasonic techniques for baseline-free damage detection in structures in the context of structural health monitoring (SHM). Conventional SHM methods compare signals obtained from the pristine condition of a structure (baseline signals) with those from the current state, and relate certain changes in the signal characteristics to damage. While this approach has been successful in the laboratory, there are certain drawbacks of depending on baseline signals in real field applications. Data from the pristine condition are not available for most existing structures. Even if they are available, operational and environmental variations tend to mask the effect of damage on the signal characteristics. Most important, baseline measurements may become meaningless while assessing the condition of a structure after an extreme event such as an earthquake or a hurricane. Such events may destroy the sensors themselves and require installation of new sensors at different locations on the structure. Baseline-free structural damage detection can broaden the scope of SHM in the scenarios described above. A detailed discussion on the philosophy of baseline-free damage detection is provided in Chapter 1. Following this discussion, the research questions are formulated. The organization of this document and the major contributions of this research are also listed in this chapter. Chapter 2 describes a fully automated baseline-free technique for notch and crack detection in plates using a collocated pair of piezoelectric wafer transducers for measuring ultrasonic signals. Signal component corresponding to the damage induced mode-converted Lamb waves is extracted by processing the originally measured ultrasonic signals. The damage index is computed as a function of this mode-converted Lamb wave signal component. An over-determined system of Lamb wave measurements is used to find a least-square estimate of the measurement errors. This error estimate serves as the

  15. Detecting small scale CO2 emission structures using OCO-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Eldering, Annmarie; Verhulst, Kristal R.; Miller, Charles E.; Nguyen, Hai M.; Oda, Tomohiro; O'Dell, Christopher; Rao, Preeti; Kahn, Brian; Crisp, David; Gunson, Michael R.; Sanchez, Robert M.; Ashok, Manasa; Pieri, David; Linick, Justin P.; Yuen, Karen

    2016-04-01

    Localized carbon dioxide (CO2) emission structures cover spatial domains of less than 50 km diameter and include cities and transportation networks, as well as fossil fuel production, upgrading and distribution infra-structure. Anthropogenic sources increasingly upset the natural balance between natural carbon sources and sinks. Mitigation of resulting climate change impacts requires management of emissions, and emissions management requires monitoring, reporting and verification. Space-borne measurements provide a unique opportunity to detect, quantify, and analyze small scale and point source emissions on a global scale. NASA's first satellite dedicated to atmospheric CO2 observation, the July 2014 launched Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2), now leads the afternoon constellation of satellites (A-Train). Its continuous swath of 2 to 10 km in width and eight footprints across can slice through coincident emission plumes and may provide momentary cross sections. First OCO-2 results demonstrate that we can detect localized source signals in the form of urban total column averaged CO2 enhancements of ~2 ppm against suburban and rural backgrounds. OCO-2's multi-sounding swath observing geometry reveals intra-urban spatial structures reflected in XCO2 data, previously unobserved from space. The transition from single-shot GOSAT soundings detecting urban/rural differences (Kort et al., 2012) to hundreds of soundings per OCO-2 swath opens up the path to future capabilities enabling urban tomography of greenhouse gases. For singular point sources like coal fired power plants, we have developed proxy detections of plumes using bands of imaging spectrometers with sensitivity to SO2 in the thermal infrared (ASTER). This approach provides a means to automate plume detection with subsequent matching and mining of OCO-2 data for enhanced detection efficiency and validation. © California Institute of Technology

  16. The effect of local IL-4 delivery or CCL2 blockade on implant fixation and bone structural properties in a mouse model of wear particle induced osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Taishi; Pajarinen, Jukka; Behn, Anthony; Jiang, Xinyi; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Loi, Florence; Yao, Zhenyu; Egashira, Kensuke; Yang, Fan; Goodman, Stuart B

    2016-09-01

    Modulation of macrophage polarization and prevention of CCL2-induced macrophage chemotaxis are emerging strategies to reduce wear particle induced osteolysis and aseptic total joint replacement loosening. In this study, the effect of continuous IL-4 delivery or bioactive implant coating that constitutively releases a protein inhibitor of CCL2 signaling (7ND) on particle induced osteolysis were studied in the murine continuous femoral intramedullary particle infusion model. Polyethylene particles with or without IL-4 were infused into mouse distal femurs implanted with hollow titanium rods using subcutaneous infusion pumps. In another experimental group, particles were infused into the femur through a 7ND coated rod. After 4 weeks, fixation of the implant was assessed using a pullout test. The volume of trabecular bone and the geometry of the local cortical bone were assessed by µCT and the corresponding structural properties of the cortical bone determined by torsional testing. Continuous IL-4 delivery led to increased trabecular bone volume as well as enhanced local bone geometry and structural properties, while 7ND implant coating did not have effect on these parameters. The results suggest that local IL-4 treatment is a promising strategy to mitigate wear particle induced osteolysis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2255-2262, 2016.

  17. Precursor transformation method for damage detection in structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi, Armin B.; Tabatabai, Habib; Lotfi, Hamid R.

    1998-06-01

    In this paper, a new concept for damage detection and long- term health monitoring of structures is presented. The Precursor Transformation Method (PTM) is based on determining the causes (precursors) of change in the measured state of the structure under non-variable loading conditions (e.g. dead loads in bridges). The PTM concept addresses the inability of the current structural monitoring methods to discriminate, in structural behavior terms, the meaning of voluminous measured sensor data on a timely and cost effective basis. This method offers advantages in sensitivity and cost efficiency when compared to conventional vibration-based or parameter estimation methods. PTM was developed as part of a research project sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration on bridge stay cable condition assessment. Measured changes in the state of a structure (displacements, strains, internal forces) can be related to precursors through a transformation matrix. This matrix is formed by determining the patterns of change in the state of structure associated with externally imposed strains (temperatures) or displacements representing possible damage scenarios. A finite element model of the undamaged structure is used to calculate these patterns. The use of an undamaged model of the structure in determining damage patterns simplifies the calculation process significantly, while introducing some approximation in results. Theoretical derivations and special case studies indicate that these approximations are limited to second order effects, and in many cases well within measurement and calculation accuracies. Examples using simulated damages on two truss structures and a cable-stayed bridge are also presented.

  18. Fast Detection of Material Deformation through Structural Dissimilarity

    SciTech Connect

    Ushizima, Daniela; Perciano, Talita; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2015-10-29

    Designing materials that are resistant to extreme temperatures and brittleness relies on assessing structural dynamics of samples. Algorithms are critically important to characterize material deformation under stress conditions. Here, we report on our design of coarse-grain parallel algorithms for image quality assessment based on structural information and on crack detection of gigabyte-scale experimental datasets. We show how key steps can be decomposed into distinct processing flows, one based on structural similarity (SSIM) quality measure, and another on spectral content. These algorithms act upon image blocks that fit into memory, and can execute independently. We discuss the scientific relevance of the problem, key developments, and decomposition of complementary tasks into separate executions. We show how to apply SSIM to detect material degradation, and illustrate how this metric can be allied to spectral analysis for structure probing, while using tiled multi-resolution pyramids stored in HDF5 chunked multi-dimensional arrays. Results show that the proposed experimental data representation supports an average compression rate of 10X, and data compression scales linearly with the data size. We also illustrate how to correlate SSIM to crack formation, and how to use our numerical schemes to enable fast detection of deformation from 3D datasets evolving in time.

  19. Nano-crystalline diamond-coated titanium dental implants - a histomorphometric study in adult domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Philipp; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Stadlinger, Bernd; Zemann, Wolfgang; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Rosiwal, Stephan; Rupprecht, Stephan

    2013-09-01

    Promising biomaterial characteristics of diamond-coatings in biomedicine have been described in the literature. However, there is a lack of knowledge about implant osseointegration of this surface modification compared to the currently used sandblasted acid-etched Ti-Al6-V4 implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the osseointegration of microwave plasma-chemical-vapour deposition (MWP-CVD) diamond-coated Ti-Al6-V4 dental implants after healing periods of 2 and 5 months. Twenty-four MWP-CVD diamond-coated and 24 un-coated dental titanium-alloy implants (Ankylos(®)) were placed in the frontal skull of eight adult domestic pigs. To evaluate the effects of the nano-structured surfaces on bone formation, a histomorphometric analysis was performed after 2 and 5 months of implant healing. Histomorphometry analysed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC). No significant difference in BIC for the diamond-coated implants in comparison to reference implants could be observed for both healing periods. Scanning electron microscopy revealed an adequate interface between the bone and the diamond surface. No delamination or particle-dissociation due to shearing forces could be detected. In this study, diamond-coated dental titanium-alloy implants and sandblasted acid-etched implants showed a comparable degree of osseointegration.

  20. Damage detection in structures from vibration and wave propagation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal, Ajit K.; Ricci, Fabrizio; Gibson, Steve; Banerjee, Sauvik

    2003-07-01

    Development of efficient tools to successfully localize and characterize hidden damage in critical structural components is an important task in the design and construction of structural health monitoring systems in aging as well as new structures. In this paper two methodologies for damage identification and localization will be presented. The first is an automatic numerical scheme using a state space system identification approach and the second is based on certain damage correlation indices associated with changes in the frequency response of the structure in presence of flaws. In each case, the structure is to be instrumented with an array of sensors to record its dynamic response including vibration and wave propagation effects. To determine the type and location of an unknown defect, the sensor data detected is used to identify a new system, which then is compared to a database of state-space models to find the nearest match. The second method deals with the definition of a set of damage correlation indices obtained from the frequency response analysis of the structure. Two types of indices have been considered. The first uses the correlation between the responses of the defect free and damaged structure at the same point, and the second uses correlation at two different points. The potential application of the general approach in developing health monitoring systems in defects-critical structures is discussed.

  1. Nondestructive construction error detection in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, Norris; Broome, Taft H.; Osegueda, Roberto

    1988-01-01

    Continuum modeling of large space structures is extended to the problem of detecting construction errors in large space structures such as the proposed space station. First-order dynamic sensitivity equations for structures involving eigenfrequencies, modal masses, modal stiffnesses, and modal damping are presented. Matrix equations relating changes in element parameters to dynamic sensitivities are summarized. The sensitivity equations for the entire dynamical system are rearranged as a system of algebraic equations with unknowns of stiffness losses at selected locations. The feasibility of the formulation is numerically demonstrated on a simply-supported Euler-Bernouilli beam with simulated construction defects. The method is next extended to large space structures modelled as equivalent continua with simulated construction defects.

  2. Using chaotic forcing to detect damage in a structure.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moniz, L.; Nichols, J.; Trickey, S.; Seaver, M.; Pecora, D.; Pecora, L.

    2005-01-01

    In this work we develop a numerical test for Holder continuity and apply it and another test for continuity to the difficult problem of detecting damage in structures. We subject a thin metal plate with incremental damage to the plate changes, its filtering properties, and therefore the phase space trajectories of the response chaotic excitation of various bandwidths. Damage to the plate changes its filtering properties and therefore the phase space of the response. Because the data are multivariate (the plate is instrumented with multiple sensors) we use a singular value decomposition of the set of the output time series to reduce the embedding dimension of the response time series. We use two geometric tests to compare an attractor reconstructed from data from an undamaged structure to that reconstructed from data from a damaged structure. These two tests translate to testing for both generalized and differentiable synchronization between responses. We show loss of synchronization of responses with damage to the structure.

  3. Community detection in networks: Structural communities versus ground truth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hric, Darko; Darst, Richard K.; Fortunato, Santo

    2014-12-01

    Algorithms to find communities in networks rely just on structural information and search for cohesive subsets of nodes. On the other hand, most scholars implicitly or explicitly assume that structural communities represent groups of nodes with similar (nontopological) properties or functions. This hypothesis could not be verified, so far, because of the lack of network datasets with information on the classification of the nodes. We show that traditional community detection methods fail to find the metadata groups in many large networks. Our results show that there is a marked separation between structural communities and metadata groups, in line with recent findings. That means that either our current modeling of community structure has to be substantially modified, or that metadata groups may not be recoverable from topology alone.

  4. Apparatus and method for detecting tampering in flexible structures

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, Lonnie C.; Haynes, Howard D.

    2011-02-01

    A system for monitoring or detecting tampering in a flexible structure includes taking electrical measurements on a sensing cable coupled to the structure, performing spectral analysis on the measured data, and comparing the spectral characteristics of the event to those of known benign and/or known suspicious events. A threshold or trigger value may used to identify an event of interest and initiate data collection. Alternatively, the system may be triggered at preset intervals, triggered manually, or triggered by a signal from another sensing device such as a motion detector. The system may be used to monitor electrical cables and conduits, hoses and flexible ducts, fences and other perimeter control devices, structural cables, flexible fabrics, and other flexible structures.

  5. Structural Damage Detection with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2011-07-01

    Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) are lightweight and inexpensive enablers for a large class of damage detection and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. This paper starts with a brief review of PWAS physical principles and basic modelling and continues by considering the various ways in which PWAS can be used for damage detection: (a) embedded guided-wave ultrasonics, i.e., pitch-catch, pulse-echo, phased arrays, thickness mode; (b) high-frequency modal sensing, i.e., the electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance method; (c) passive detection, i.e., acoustic emission and impact detection. An example of crack-like damage detection and localization with PWAS phased arrays on a small metallic plate is given. The modelling of PWAS detection of disbond damage in adhesive joints is achieved with the analytical transfer matrix method (TMM). The analytical methods offer the advantage of fast computation which enables parameter studies and carpet plots. A parametric study of the effect of crack size and PWAS location on disbond detection is presented. The power and energy transduction between PWAS and structure is studied analytically with a wave propagation method. Special attention is given to the mechatronics modeling of the complete transduction cycle from electrical excitation into ultrasonic acoustic waves by the piezoelectric effect, the transfer through the structure, and finally reverse piezoelectric transduction to generate the received electric signal. It is found that the combination of PWAS size and wave frequency/wavelength play an important role in identifying transduction maxima and minima that could be exploited to achieve an optimum power-efficient design. The multi-physics finite element method (MP-FEM), which permits fine discretization of damaged regions and complicated structural geometries, is used to study the generation of guided waves in a plate from an electrically excited transmitter PWAS and the capture of these waves as electric

  6. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  7. Statistical method for detecting structural change in the growth process.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Yoshiyuki; Yoshimoto, Atsushi

    2008-03-01

    Due to competition among individual trees and other exogenous factors that change the growth environment, each tree grows following its own growth trend with some structural changes in growth over time. In the present article, a new method is proposed to detect a structural change in the growth process. We formulate the method as a simple statistical test for signal detection without constructing any specific model for the structural change. To evaluate the p-value of the test, the tube method is developed because the regular distribution theory is insufficient. Using two sets of tree diameter growth data sampled from planted forest stands of Cryptomeria japonica in Japan, we conduct an analysis of identifying the effect of thinning on the growth process as a structural change. Our results demonstrate that the proposed method is useful to identify the structural change caused by thinning. We also provide the properties of the method in terms of the size and power of the test. PMID:17608782

  8. Thermally detected optical absorption in sophisticated nitride structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasson, A.; Shubina, T. V.; Leymarie, J.

    2005-02-01

    The thermally detected optical absorption (TDOA) is applied to elucidate peculiarities of absorption in nitride structures of unusual morphology like GaN nanocolumns or InN layers with various imperfections. A study of GaN structures permits us to establish position of an absorption edge in TDOA spectra. We demonstrate that the absorption edge is different in GaN regions of opposite polarities. In InN with metallic In inclusions, this technique enable separation of InN interband absorption and extinction related to the Mie resonances, if the latter are below the principal absorption edge.

  9. Detection of electromagnetic radiation using micromechanical multiple quantum wells structures

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G [Knoxville, TN; Rajic, Slobodan [Knoxville, TN; Datskou, Irene [Knoxville, TN

    2007-07-17

    An apparatus and method for detecting electromagnetic radiation employs a deflectable micromechanical apparatus incorporating multiple quantum wells structures. When photons strike the quantum-well structure, physical stresses are created within the sensor, similar to a "bimetallic effect." The stresses cause the sensor to bend. The extent of deflection of the sensor can be measured through any of a variety of conventional means to provide a measurement of the photons striking the sensor. A large number of such sensors can be arranged in a two-dimensional array to provide imaging capability.

  10. Detection of the quadrupole hyperfine structure in HCNH(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Apponi, A. J.; Yoder, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the electric quadrupole hyperfine structure of HCNH(+). The J = 1-0 transition of this interstellar molecular ion was observed toward the cold, dark cloud TMC-1, using the NRAO 12 m telescope at 74 GHz. The three hyperfine components of this transition were clearly detected and resolved, enabling the first experimental determination of the quadrupole coupling constant eqQ of HCNH(+). The value of this constant is calculated to be eqQ = -0.49 +/- 0.07 MHz. The column density of HCNH(+) toward TMC-1 was found to be N(tot) about 2.8 x 10 exp 13/sq cm, corresponding to a fractional abundance relative to H2 of f about 3 x 10 exp -9. This abundance is at least one order of magnitude higher than the predictions of ion-molecule chemistry. Detection of the hyperfine structure clearly establishes the presence of HCNH(+) in interstellar space.

  11. Detecting tubular structures via direct vector field singularity characterization.

    PubMed

    Cabuk, Aytekin D; Alpay, Erdenay; Acar, Burak

    2010-01-01

    The initial step of vessel segmentation in 3D is the detection of vessel centerlines. The proposed methods in literature are either dependent on vessel radius and/or have low response at vessel bifurcations. In this paper we propose a 3D tubular structure detection method that removes these two drawbacks. The proposed method exploits the observations on the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix as is done in literature, yet it employs a direct 3D vector field singularity characterization. The Gradient Vector Flow vector field is used and the eigenvalues of its Jacobian are exploited in computing a parameter free vesselness map. Results on phantom and real patient data exhibit robustness to scale, high response at vessel bifurcations, and good noise/non-vessel structure suppression.

  12. Sensor failure detection using generalized parity relations for flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercadal, Mathieu

    1989-01-01

    Analytical redundancy may be preferable to hardware redundancy in failure detection/isolation tasks for such large-scale systems as space structures. Generalized single-sensor parity relations are presently applied to this problem; they are noted to yield a very simple isolation logic, and their generation is found to be extremely rapid, even in the case of extremely complex systems, provided only that the eigenstructure of the system be known. Their implementation is, however, extremely sensitive to modeling errors and noise.

  13. A method for detecting structural deterioration in bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, H. A., Jr.; Reed, R. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of detecting deterioration in bridge structures is studied with the use of Randomdec analysis. Randomdec signatures, derived from the ambient bridge vibrations in the acoustic range, were obtained for a girder bridge over a period of a year to show the insensitivity of the signatures to environmental changes. A laboratory study was also conducted to show the sensitivity of signatures to fatigue cracks on the order of a centimeter in length in steel beams.

  14. Convolution neural-network-based detection of lung structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1994-05-01

    Chest radiography is one of the most primary and widely used techniques in diagnostic imaging. Nowadays with the advent of digital radiology, the digital medical image processing techniques for digital chest radiographs have attracted considerable attention, and several studies on the computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) as well as on the conventional image processing techniques for chest radiographs have been reported. In the automatic diagnostic process for chest radiographs, it is important to outline the areas of the lungs, the heart, and the diaphragm. This is because the original chest radiograph is composed of important anatomic structures and, without knowing exact positions of the organs, the automatic diagnosis may result in unexpected detections. The automatic extraction of an anatomical structure from digital chest radiographs can be a useful tool for (1) the evaluation of heart size, (2) automatic detection of interstitial lung diseases, (3) automatic detection of lung nodules, and (4) data compression, etc. Based on the clearly defined boundaries of heart area, rib spaces, rib positions, and rib cage extracted, one should be able to use this information to facilitate the tasks of the CADx on chest radiographs. In this paper, we present an automatic scheme for the detection of lung field from chest radiographs by using a shift-invariant convolution neural network. A novel algorithm for smoothing boundaries of lungs is also presented.

  15. Multicycle rapid thermal annealing optimization of Mg-implanted GaN: Evolution of surface, optical, and structural properties

    SciTech Connect

    Greenlee, Jordan D.; Feigelson, Boris N.; Anderson, Travis J.; Hite, Jennifer K.; Mastro, Michael A.; Eddy, Charles R.; Hobart, Karl D.; Kub, Francis J.; Tadjer, Marko J.

    2014-08-14

    The first step of a multi-cycle rapid thermal annealing process was systematically studied. The surface, structure, and optical properties of Mg implanted GaN thin films annealed at temperatures ranging from 900 to 1200 °C were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, UV-visible spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Nomarski microscopy. The GaN thin films are capped with two layers of in-situ metal organic chemical vapor deposition -grown AlN and annealed in 24 bar of N{sub 2} overpressure to avoid GaN decomposition. The crystal quality of the GaN improves with increasing annealing temperature as confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy and the full widths at half maximums of the E{sub 2} and A{sub 1} (LO) Raman modes. The crystal quality of films annealed above 1100 °C exceeds the quality of the as-grown films. At 1200 °C, Mg is optically activated, which is determined by photoluminescence measurements. However, at 1200 °C, the GaN begins to decompose as evidenced by pit formation on the surface of the samples. Therefore, it was determined that the optimal temperature for the first step in a multi-cycle rapid thermal anneal process should be conducted at 1150 °C due to crystal quality and surface morphology considerations.

  16. Airframe structural damage detection: a non-linear structural surface intensity based technique.

    PubMed

    Semperlotti, Fabio; Conlon, Stephen C; Barnard, Andrew R

    2011-04-01

    The non-linear structural surface intensity (NSSI) based damage detection technique is extended to airframe applications. The selected test structure is an upper cabin airframe section from a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter (Sikorsky Aircraft, Stratford, CT). Structural damage is simulated through an impact resonator device, designed to simulate the induced vibration effects typical of non-linear behaving damage. An experimental study is conducted to prove the applicability of NSSI on complex mechanical systems as well as to evaluate the minimum sensor and actuator requirements. The NSSI technique is shown to have high damage detection sensitivity, covering an extended substructure with a single sensing location.

  17. Airframe structural damage detection: a non-linear structural surface intensity based technique.

    PubMed

    Semperlotti, Fabio; Conlon, Stephen C; Barnard, Andrew R

    2011-04-01

    The non-linear structural surface intensity (NSSI) based damage detection technique is extended to airframe applications. The selected test structure is an upper cabin airframe section from a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter (Sikorsky Aircraft, Stratford, CT). Structural damage is simulated through an impact resonator device, designed to simulate the induced vibration effects typical of non-linear behaving damage. An experimental study is conducted to prove the applicability of NSSI on complex mechanical systems as well as to evaluate the minimum sensor and actuator requirements. The NSSI technique is shown to have high damage detection sensitivity, covering an extended substructure with a single sensing location. PMID:21476618

  18. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... response to histrelin implant. Your blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) should be checked regularly.Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about histrelin implant.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and ...

  19. Dexamethasone: intravitreal implant.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Macular oedema is one of the complications of retinal vein occlusion. About half of the patients recover spontaneously within 3 to 6 months. There is currently no drug that improves outcome. An intravitreal implant delivering 0.7 mg of dexamethasone has been authorised for the treatment of macular oedema in this setting. Clinical assessment is based on two double-blind randomised trials including a total of 1267 patients, comparing treatment with intravitreal implants delivering about 0.7 mg or 0.35 mg of dexamethasone, versus a sham procedure. Despite a more rapid initial improvement with dexamethasone, the number of patients whose reading ability improved at 6 months did not significantly differ between the groups. A retrospective subgroup analysis raised the possibility that dexamethasone implants may be beneficial in patients with central retinal vein occlusion. The adverse effects of dexamethasone intravitreal implants are the same as those of intraocular steroid injections, including elevated intraocular pressure (25% of patients), cataracts (27%), conjunctival haemorrhage (20%), and ocular pain. In practice, dexamethasone intravitreal implants do not have a positive harm-benefit balance in most patients with macular oedema following retinal vein occlusion. More rapid recovery after central vein occlusion remains to be confirmed. Pending such studies, it is better to avoid using dexamethasone implants. Patients should instead receive ophthalmologic monitoring to detect and manage possible complications, and any risk factors should be treated.

  20. Defects in ion-implanted hcp-titanium: A first-principles study of electronic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raji, Abdulrafiu T.; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Scandolo, Sandro; Nsengiyumva, Schadrack; Härting, Margit; Britton, David T.

    2011-12-01

    The electronic structures of hexagonal closed-packed (h.c.p) titanium containing a vacancy and krypton impurity atoms at various insertion sites are calculated by first-principles methods in the framework of the density-functional theory (DFT). The density of states (DOS) for titanium containing a vacancy defect shows resonance-like features. Also, the bulk electron density decreases from ˜0.15/Å 3 to ˜0.05/Å 3 at the vacancy centre. Electronic structure calculations have been performed to investigate what underlies the krypton site preference in titanium. The DOS of the nearest-neighbour (NN) titanium atoms to the octahedral krypton appears to be less distorted (relative to pure titanium) when compared to the NN titanium atoms to the tetrahedral krypton. The electronic density deformation maps show that polarization of the titanium atoms is stronger when the krypton atom is located at the tetrahedral site. Since krypton is a closed-shell atom, thus precluding any bonding with the titanium atoms, we may conclude that the polarization of the electrons in the vicinity of the inserted krypton atoms and the distortion of the DOS of the NN titanium atoms to the krypton serve to indicate which defect site is preferred when a krypton atom is inserted into titanium. Based on these considerations, we conclude that the substitutional site is the most favourable one, and the octahedral is the preferred interstitial site, in agreement with recent DFT calculations of the energetics of krypton impurity sites.

  1. A Stochastic Model for Detecting Overlapping and Hierarchical Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiao; Jin, Di; Guo, Xiaojie; Tang, Xianchao

    2015-01-01

    Community detection is a fundamental problem in the analysis of complex networks. Recently, many researchers have concentrated on the detection of overlapping communities, where a vertex may belong to more than one community. However, most current methods require the number (or the size) of the communities as a priori information, which is usually unavailable in real-world networks. Thus, a practical algorithm should not only find the overlapping community structure, but also automatically determine the number of communities. Furthermore, it is preferable if this method is able to reveal the hierarchical structure of networks as well. In this work, we firstly propose a generative model that employs a nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) formulization with a l2,1 norm regularization term, balanced by a resolution parameter. The NMF has the nature that provides overlapping community structure by assigning soft membership variables to each vertex; the l2,1 regularization term is a technique of group sparsity which can automatically determine the number of communities by penalizing too many nonempty communities; and hence the resolution parameter enables us to explore the hierarchical structure of networks. Thereafter, we derive the multiplicative update rule to learn the model parameters, and offer the proof of its correctness. Finally, we test our approach on a variety of synthetic and real-world networks, and compare it with some state-of-the-art algorithms. The results validate the superior performance of our new method. PMID:25822148

  2. Photogrammetric detection technique for rotor blades structural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enei, C.; Bernardini, G.; Serafini, J.; Mattioni, L.; Ficuciello, C.; Vezzari, V.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes an innovative use of photogrammetric detection techniques to experimentally estimate structural/inertial properties of helicopter rotor blades. The identification algorithms for the evaluation of mass and flexural stiffness distributions are an extension of the ones proposed by Larsen, whereas the procedure for torsional properties determination (stiffness and shear center position) is based on the Euler-Prandtl beam theory. These algorithms rely on measurements performed through photogrammetric detection, which requires the collection of digital photos allowing the identification of 3D coordinates of labeled points (markers) on the structure through the correlation of 2D pictures. The displacements are evaluated by comparing the positions of markers in loaded and reference configuration. Being the applied loads known, the structural characteristics can be directly obtained from the measured displacements. The accuracy of the proposed identification algorithms has been firstly verified by comparison with numerical and experimental data, and then applied to the structural characterization of two main rotor blades, designed for ultra-light helicopter applications.

  3. Detection of Alzheimer disease in MR images using structure tensor.

    PubMed

    Archana, M; Ramakrishnan, S

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Therefore, early detection and evaluation of prognosis of AD is an important issue in contemporary brain research. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides valuable diagnostic information about AD. In this work, brain tissue is extracted using phase-based level set method. Structure tensor analysis is used to visualize and quantify structural features of the brain from MRI. Further, quantitative measures are derived to classify different stages of AD. Normal and AD subjects were classified up to an accuracy of 88% using these features. It is observed that structural changes in brain can be characterized using this technique and therefore can be helpful in tracking the progression of AD and aid in classification between normal and AD subjects.

  4. Structure-assisted functional anchor implantation in robust metal-organic frameworks with ultralarge pores.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihye; Feng, Dawei; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-02-01

    A facile functionalization assisted by the structural attributes of PCN-333 has been studied while maintaining the integrity of the parent MOF including ultralarge pores, chemical robustness, and crystallinity. Herein we thoroughly analyzed ligand exchange phenomena in PCN-333 and demonstrate that the extent of exchange can be tailored by varying the exchange conditions as potential applications may require. Through this method a variety of functional groups are incorporated into PCN-333. To further show the capabilities of this system introduction of a BODIPY fluorophore as a secondary functionality was performed to the functionalized framework via a click reaction. We anticipate the PCN-333 with functional anchor can serve as a stable platform for further chemistry to be explored in future applications.

  5. The role of well-defined nanotopography of titanium implants on osseointegration: cellular and molecular events in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Karazisis, Dimitrios; Ballo, Ahmed M; Petronis, Sarunas; Agheli, Hossein; Emanuelsson, Lena; Thomsen, Peter; Omar, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mechanisms governing the cellular interactions with well-defined nanotopography are not well described in vivo. This is partly due to the difficulty in isolating a particular effect of nanotopography from other surface properties. This study employed colloidal lithography for nanofabrication on titanium implants in combination with an in vivo sampling procedure and different analytical techniques. The aim was to elucidate the effect of well-defined nanotopography on the molecular, cellular, and structural events of osseointegration. Materials and methods Titanium implants were nanopatterned (Nano) with semispherical protrusions using colloidal lithography. Implants, with and without nanotopography, were implanted in rat tibia and retrieved after 3, 6, and 28 days. Retrieved implants were evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, histology, immunohistochemistry, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Results Surface characterization showed that the nanotopography was well defined in terms of shape (semispherical), size (79±6 nm), and distribution (31±2 particles/µm2). EDS showed similar levels of titanium, oxygen, and carbon for test and control implants, confirming similar chemistry. The molecular analysis of the retrieved implants revealed that the expression levels of the inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α, and the osteoclastic marker, CatK, were reduced in cells adherent to the Nano implants. This was consistent with the observation of less CD163-positive macrophages in the tissue surrounding the Nano implant. Furthermore, periostin immunostaining was frequently detected around the Nano implant, indicating higher osteogenic activity. This was supported by the EDS analysis of the retrieved implants showing higher content of calcium and phosphate on the Nano implants. Conclusion The results show that Nano implants elicit less periimplant macrophage infiltration and downregulate the early expression of inflammatory (TNF-α) and

  6. The challenges and importance of structural variation detection in livestock

    PubMed Central

    Bickhart, Derek M.; Liu, George E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in humans and other model organisms have demonstrated that structural variants (SVs) comprise a substantial proportion of variation among individuals of each species. Many of these variants have been linked to debilitating diseases in humans, thereby cementing the importance of refining methods for their detection. Despite progress in the field, reliable detection of SVs still remains a problem even for human subjects. Many of the underlying problems that make SVs difficult to detect in humans are amplified in livestock species, whose lower quality genome assemblies and incomplete gene annotation can often give rise to false positive SV discoveries. Regardless of the challenges, SV detection is just as important for livestock researchers as it is for human researchers, given that several productive traits and diseases have been linked to copy number variations (CNVs) in cattle, sheep, and pig. Already, there is evidence that many beneficial SVs have been artificially selected in livestock such as a duplication of the agouti signaling protein gene that causes white coat color in sheep. In this review, we will list current SV and CNV discoveries in livestock and discuss the problems that hinder routine discovery and tracking of these polymorphisms. We will also discuss the impacts of selective breeding on CNV and SV frequencies and mention how SV genotyping could be used in the future to improve genetic selection. PMID:24600474

  7. A structural framework for anomalous change detection and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Lakshman; Theiler, James P

    2009-01-01

    We present a spatially adaptive scheme for automatically searching a pair of images of a scene for unusual and interesting changes. Our motivation is to bring into play structural aspects of image features alongside the spectral attributes used for anomalous change detection (ACD). We leverage a small but informative subset of pixels, namely edge pixels of the images, as anchor points of a Delaunay triangulation to jointly decompose the images into a set of triangular regions, called trixels, which are spectrally uniform. Such decomposition helps in image regularization by simple-function approximation on a feature-adaptive grid. Applying ACD to this trixel grid instead of pixels offers several advantages. It allows: (1) edge-preserving smoothing of images, (2) speed-up of spatial computations by significantly reducing the representation of the images, and (3) the easy recovery of structure of the detected anomalous changes by associating anomalous trixels with polygonal image features. The latter facility further enables the application of shape-theoretic criteria and algorithms to characterize the changes and recognize them as interesting or not. This incorporation of spatial information has the potential to filter out some spurious changes, such as due to parallax, shadows, and misregistration, by identifying and filtering out those that are structurally similar and spatially pervasive. Our framework supports the joint spatial and spectral analysis of images, potentially enabling the design of more robust ACD algorithms.

  8. Damage Detection in Composite Structures with Wavenumber Array Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) have the potential to be an efficient and cost-effective method for rapid damage detection and quantification of large structures. Attractive features include sensitivity to a variety of damage types and the capability of traveling relatively long distances. They have proven to be an efficient approach for crack detection and localization in isotropic materials. However, techniques must be pushed beyond isotropic materials in order to be valid for composite aircraft components. This paper presents our study on GUW propagation and interaction with delamination damage in composite structures using wavenumber array data processing, together with advanced wave propagation simulations. Parallel elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used for the example simulations. Multi-dimensional Fourier transform is used to convert time-space wavefield data into frequency-wavenumber domain. Wave propagation in the wavenumber-frequency domain shows clear distinction among the guided wave modes that are present. This allows for extracting a guided wave mode through filtering and reconstruction techniques. Presence of delamination causes spectral change accordingly. Results from 3D CFRP guided wave simulations with delamination damage in flat-plate specimens are used for wave interaction with structural defect study.

  9. Detecting and representing predictable structure during auditory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Sohoglu, Ediz; Chait, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We use psychophysics and MEG to test how sensitivity to input statistics facilitates auditory-scene-analysis (ASA). Human subjects listened to 'scenes' comprised of concurrent tone-pip streams (sources). On occasional trials a new source appeared partway. Listeners were more accurate and quicker to detect source appearance in scenes comprised of temporally-regular (REG), rather than random (RAND), sources. MEG in passive listeners and those actively detecting appearance events revealed increased sustained activity in auditory and parietal cortex in REG relative to RAND scenes, emerging ~400 ms of scene-onset. Over and above this, appearance in REG scenes was associated with increased responses relative to RAND scenes. The effect of temporal structure on appearance-evoked responses was delayed when listeners were focused on the scenes relative to when listening passively, consistent with the notion that attention reduces 'surprise'. Overall, the results implicate a mechanism that tracks predictability of multiple concurrent sources to facilitate active and passive ASA.

  10. Efficient measurement-device-independent detection of multipartite entanglement structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi; Yuan, Xiao; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2016-07-01

    Witnessing entanglement is crucial in quantum information processing. With properly preparing ancillary states, it has been shown previously that genuine entanglement can be witnessed without trusting measurement devices. In this work we generalize the scenario and show that generic multipartite entanglement structures, including entanglement of subsystems and entanglement depth, can be witnessed via measurement-device-independent means. As the original measurement-device-independent entanglement witness scheme exploits only one out of four Bell measurement outcomes for each party, a direct generalization to multipartite quantum states will inevitably cause inefficiency in entanglement detection after taking account of statistical fluctuations. To resolve this problem, we also present a way to utilize all the measurement outcomes. The scheme is efficient for multipartite entanglement detection and can be realized with state-of-the-art technologies.

  11. Dendritic spine detection using curvilinear structure detector and LDA classifier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Xiaobo; Witt, Rochelle M; Sabatini, Bernardo L; Adjeroh, Donald; Wong, Stephen T C

    2007-06-01

    Dendritic spines are small, bulbous cellular compartments that carry synapses. Biologists have been studying the biochemical pathways by examining the morphological and statistical changes of the dendritic spines at the intracellular level. In this paper a novel approach is presented for automated detection of dendritic spines in neuron images. The dendritic spines are recognized as small objects of variable shape attached or detached to multiple dendritic backbones in the 2D projection of the image stack along the optical direction. We extend the curvilinear structure detector to extract the boundaries as well as the centerlines for the dendritic backbones and spines. We further build a classifier using Linear Discriminate Analysis (LDA) to classify the attached spines into valid and invalid types to improve the accuracy of the spine detection. We evaluate the proposed approach by comparing with the manual results in terms of backbone length, spine number, spine length, and spine density.

  12. FRF-based structural damage detection of controlled buildings with podium structures: Experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. L.; Huang, Q.; Zhan, S.; Su, Z. Q.; Liu, H. J.

    2014-06-01

    How to use control devices to enhance system identification and damage detection in relation to a structure that requires both vibration control and structural health monitoring is an interesting yet practical topic. In this study, the possibility of using the added stiffness provided by control devices and frequency response functions (FRFs) to detect damage in a building complex was explored experimentally. Scale models of a 12-storey main building and a 3-storey podium structure were built to represent a building complex. Given that the connection between the main building and the podium structure is most susceptible to damage, damage to the building complex was experimentally simulated by changing the connection stiffness. To simulate the added stiffness provided by a semi-active friction damper, a steel circular ring was designed and used to add the related stiffness to the building complex. By varying the connection stiffness using an eccentric wheel excitation system and by adding or not adding the circular ring, eight cases were investigated and eight sets of FRFs were measured. The experimental results were used to detect damage (changes in connection stiffness) using a recently proposed FRF-based damage detection method. The experimental results showed that the FRF-based damage detection method could satisfactorily locate and quantify damage.

  13. Detection of community structure in networks based on community coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hu; Wei, Hui

    2012-12-01

    Determining community structure in networks is fundamental to the analysis of the structural and functional properties of those networks, including social networks, computer networks, and biological networks. Modularity function Q, which was proposed by Newman and Girvan, was once the most widely used criterion for evaluating the partition of a network into communities. However, modularity Q is subject to a serious resolution limit. In this paper, we propose a new function for evaluating the partition of a network into communities. This is called community coefficient C. Using community coefficient C, we can automatically identify the ideal number of communities in the network, without any prior knowledge. We demonstrate that community coefficient C is superior to the modularity Q and does not have a resolution limit. We also compared the two widely used community structure partitioning methods, the hierarchical partitioning algorithm and the normalized cuts (Ncut) spectral partitioning algorithm. We tested these methods on computer-generated networks and real-world networks whose community structures were already known. The Ncut algorithm and community coefficient C were found to produce better results than hierarchical algorithms. Unlike several other community detection methods, the proposed method effectively partitioned the networks into different community structures and indicated the correct number of communities.

  14. Detection of damage in welded structure using experimental modal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Husain, N.; Ouyang, H.

    2011-07-01

    A typical automotive structure could contain thousands of spot weld joints that contribute significantly to the vehicle's structural stiffness and dynamic characteristics. However, some of these joints may be imperfect or even absent during the manufacturing process and they are also highly susceptible to damage due to operational and environmental conditions during the vehicle lifetime. Therefore, early detection and estimation of damage are important so necessary actions can be taken to avoid further problems. Changes in physical parameters due to existence of damage in a structure often leads to alteration of vibration modes; thus demonstrating the dependency between the vibration characteristics and the physical properties of structures. A sensitivity-based model updating method, performed using a combination of MATLAB and NASTRAN, has been selected for the purpose of this work. The updating procedure is regarded as parameter identification which aims to bring the numerical prediction to be as closely as possible to the measured natural frequencies and mode shapes data of the damaged structure in order to identify the damage parameters (characterised by the reductions in the Young's modulus of the weld patches to indicate the loss of material/stiffness at the damage region).

  15. Do Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents detect coherent structures?

    PubMed

    Karrasch, Daniel; Haller, George

    2013-12-01

    Ridges of the Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponent (FSLE) field have been used as indicators of hyperbolic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs). A rigorous mathematical link between the FSLE and LCSs, however, has been missing. Here, we prove that an FSLE ridge satisfying certain conditions does signal a nearby ridge of some Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) field, which in turn indicates a hyperbolic LCS under further conditions. Other FSLE ridges violating our conditions, however, are seen to be false positives for LCSs. We also find further limitations of the FSLE in Lagrangian coherence detection, including ill-posedness, artificial jump-discontinuities, and sensitivity with respect to the computational time step.

  16. Do Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents detect coherent structures?

    SciTech Connect

    Karrasch, Daniel; Haller, George

    2013-12-15

    Ridges of the Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponent (FSLE) field have been used as indicators of hyperbolic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs). A rigorous mathematical link between the FSLE and LCSs, however, has been missing. Here, we prove that an FSLE ridge satisfying certain conditions does signal a nearby ridge of some Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) field, which in turn indicates a hyperbolic LCS under further conditions. Other FSLE ridges violating our conditions, however, are seen to be false positives for LCSs. We also find further limitations of the FSLE in Lagrangian coherence detection, including ill-posedness, artificial jump-discontinuities, and sensitivity with respect to the computational time step.

  17. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  18. Surface Structures on Cleaved Silicon by Cleavage Luminescence Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongguang

    This paper reports on further research into the structure and properties of the cleaved surfaces of silicon, using vacuum cleavage luminescence detection methods. Results show resistance partially recovers during the cleavage process through "crack healing". When the elasticity of the parts transmitting the applied stress temporarily absorbs the initial rupture stress, the crack stops and partially re-closes until the applied force "catches up" and reapplies stress. The high resistance created by the two Schottky barriers prevents resistance recovery from mere surfaces re-contact. Instead, resistance recovery from the atom-to-atom re-closure surface healing is more likely, as expected from a Three Bond Scission Model (TBS) silicon surface structure.

  19. A Coupled Approach for Structural Damage Detection with Incomplete Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, George; Cao, Timothy; Kaouk, Mo; Zimmerman, David

    2013-01-01

    This historical work couples model order reduction, damage detection, dynamic residual/mode shape expansion, and damage extent estimation to overcome the incomplete measurements problem by using an appropriate undamaged structural model. A contribution of this work is the development of a process to estimate the full dynamic residuals using the columns of a spring connectivity matrix obtained by disassembling the structural stiffness matrix. Another contribution is the extension of an eigenvector filtering procedure to produce full-order mode shapes that more closely match the measured active partition of the mode shapes using a set of modified Ritz vectors. The full dynamic residuals and full mode shapes are used as inputs to the minimum rank perturbation theory to provide an estimate of damage location and extent. The issues associated with this process are also discussed as drivers of near-term development activities to understand and improve this approach.

  20. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... implant. These specialists may include: Audiologists Speech therapists Ear, nose, and throat doctors (otolaryngologists) This is a very important part of the process. You will need to work closely with your team of specialists to get ...

  1. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... additional visits are needed for activating, adjusting, and programming the various electrodes that have been implanted. Also, ... to the center for checkups once the final programming is made to the speech processor. Both children ...

  2. Multienergy gold ion implantation for enhancing the field electron emission characteristics of heterogranular structured diamond films grown on Au-coated Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, K. J.; Manoharan, D.; Sundaravel, B.; Lin, I. N.

    2016-09-01

    Multienergy Au-ion implantation enhanced the electrical conductivity of heterogranular structured diamond films grown on Au-coated Si substrates to a high level of 5076.0 (Ω cm)-1 and improved the field electron emission (FEE) characteristics of the films to low turn-on field of 1.6 V/μm, high current density of 5.4 mA/cm2 (@ 2.65 V/μm), and high lifetime stability of 1825 min. The catalytic induction of nanographitic phases in the films due to Au-ion implantation and the formation of diamond-to-Si eutectic interface layer due to Au-coating on Si together encouraged the efficient conducting channels for electron transport, thereby improved the FEE characteristics of the films.

  3. Using chaotic forcing to detect damage in a structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moniz, L.; Nichols, J.; Trickey, S.; Seaver, M.; Pecora, D.; Pecora, L.

    2005-01-01

    In this work we develop a numerical test for Holder continuity and apply it and another test for continuity to the difficult problem of detecting damage in structures. We subject a thin metal plate with incremental damage to the plate changes, its filtering properties, and therefore the phase space trajectories of the response chaotic excitation of various bandwidths. Damage to the plate changes its filtering properties and therefore the phase space of the response. Because the data are multivariate (the plate is instrumented with multiple sensors) we use a singular value decomposition of the set of the output time series to reduce the embedding dimension of the response time series. We use two geometric tests to compare an attractor reconstructed from data from an undamaged structure to that reconstructed from data from a damaged structure. These two tests translate to testing for both generalized and differentiable synchronization between responses. We show loss of synchronization of responses with damage to the structure. ?? 2005 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Contraceptive implants.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Burke, Anne E

    2010-03-01

    Implantable contraception has been extensively used worldwide. Implants are one of the most effective and reversible methods of contraception available. These devices may be particularly appropriate for certain populations of women, including women who cannot use estrogen-containing contraception. Implants are safe for use by women with many chronic medical problems. The newest implant, Implanon (Organon International, Oss, The Netherlands), is the only device currently available in the United States and was approved in 2006. It is registered for 3 years of pregnancy prevention. Contraceptive implants have failure rates similar to tubal ligation, and yet they are readily reversible with a return to fertility within days of removal. Moreover, these contraceptive devices can be safely placed in the immediate postpartum period, ensuring good contraceptive coverage for women who may be at risk for an unintended pregnancy. Irregular bleeding is a common side effect for all progestin-only contraceptive implants. Preinsertion counseling should address possible side effects, and treatment may be offered to women who experience prolonged or frequent bleeding.

  5. Structural Damage Detection Using Slopes of Longitudinal Vibration Shapes

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, W.; Zhu, W. D.; Smith, S. A.; Cao, M. S.

    2016-03-18

    While structural damage detection based on flexural vibration shapes, such as mode shapes and steady-state response shapes under harmonic excitation, has been well developed, little attention is paid to that based on longitudinal vibration shapes that also contain damage information. This study originally formulates a slope vibration shape for damage detection in bars using longitudinal vibration shapes. To enhance noise robustness of the method, a slope vibration shape is transformed to a multiscale slope vibration shape in a multiscale domain using wavelet transform, which has explicit physical implication, high damage sensitivity, and noise robustness. These advantages are demonstrated in numericalmore » cases of damaged bars, and results show that multiscale slope vibration shapes can be used for identifying and locating damage in a noisy environment. A three-dimensional (3D) scanning laser vibrometer is used to measure the longitudinal steady-state response shape of an aluminum bar with damage due to reduced cross-sectional dimensions under harmonic excitation, and results show that the method can successfully identify and locate the damage. Slopes of longitudinal vibration shapes are shown to be suitable for damage detection in bars and have potential for applications in noisy environments.« less

  6. Experimental detection of transverse particle movement with structured light.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Belmonte, Aniceto; Torres, Juan P

    2013-10-02

    One procedure widely used to detect the velocity of a moving object is by using the Doppler effect. This is the perceived change in frequency of a wave caused by the relative motion between the emitter and the detector, or between the detector and a reflecting target. The relative movement, in turn, generates a time-varying phase which translates into the detected frequency shift. The classical longitudinal Doppler effect is sensitive only to the velocity of the target along the line-of-sight between the emitter and the detector (longitudinal velocity), since any transverse velocity generates no frequency shift. This makes the transverse velocity undetectable in the classical scheme. Although there exists a relativistic transverse Doppler effect, it gives values that are too small for the typical velocities involved in most laser remote sensing applications. Here we experimentally demonstrate a novel way to detect transverse velocities. The key concept is the use of structured light beams. These beams are unique in the sense that their phases can be engineered such that each point in its transverse plane has an associated phase value. When a particle moves across the beam, the reflected light will carry information about the particle's movement through the variation of the phase of the light that reaches the detector, producing a frequency shift associated with the movement of the particle in the transverse plane.

  7. Experimental detection of transverse particle movement with structured light.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Belmonte, Aniceto; Torres, Juan P

    2013-01-01

    One procedure widely used to detect the velocity of a moving object is by using the Doppler effect. This is the perceived change in frequency of a wave caused by the relative motion between the emitter and the detector, or between the detector and a reflecting target. The relative movement, in turn, generates a time-varying phase which translates into the detected frequency shift. The classical longitudinal Doppler effect is sensitive only to the velocity of the target along the line-of-sight between the emitter and the detector (longitudinal velocity), since any transverse velocity generates no frequency shift. This makes the transverse velocity undetectable in the classical scheme. Although there exists a relativistic transverse Doppler effect, it gives values that are too small for the typical velocities involved in most laser remote sensing applications. Here we experimentally demonstrate a novel way to detect transverse velocities. The key concept is the use of structured light beams. These beams are unique in the sense that their phases can be engineered such that each point in its transverse plane has an associated phase value. When a particle moves across the beam, the reflected light will carry information about the particle's movement through the variation of the phase of the light that reaches the detector, producing a frequency shift associated with the movement of the particle in the transverse plane. PMID:24085150

  8. Surface plasmon resonance for detecting clenbuterol: Influence of monolayer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suherman; Morita, Kinichi; Kawaguchi, Toshikazu

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmon resonance sensor equipped with a fabricated immunosensor chip is used for detecting clenbuterol in this study. Since clenbuterol is a small analyte, indirect competitive inhibition immunoassay is employed. For fabricating the immunosurface, the Au-chip was functionalized by succinimidyl-terminated alkanethiol, and the terminal N-hydroxysuccinimide group of the self-assembled monolayer was either replaced with clenbuterol or blocked with ethanolamine. Scanning tunneling microscope experiments and electrochemical measurements depicted the domain structures of the succinimide group of succinimidyl-terminated propanethiol monolayer. The surface concentration and the orientation of succinimide group was significantly dependent on the concentration of dithiobis(succinimidyl) propionate (DSP) used in fabricating the monolayer. Furthermore, the structure of monolayer significantly influenced both the surface concentration and the orientation of clenbuterol on the sensor surface. Consequently, high coverage and standing-up configuration of clenbuterol showed high affinity for clenbuterol antibody. However, high affinity constant exhibited by the sensor surface was coupled with a low sensitivity. By contrast, lowest concentration of DSP solution (0.1 mM) used in fabricating the immunosurface showed a detection sensitivity of 3 ppt - the highest reported sensitivity for clenbuterol. For regeneration the immunosurface, 0.1 M NaOH was used and the same sensor surface could be reused for performing >100 rapid immunoreaction.

  9. Using Aerospace Technology To Design Orthopedic Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Mraz, P. J.; Davy, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Technology originally developed to optimize designs of composite-material aerospace structural components used to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants. Development effort focused on designing knee implants, long-term goal to develop method for optimizing designs of orthopedic implants in general.

  10. Corrosion detection in multi-layered rotocraft structures

    SciTech Connect

    ROACH,DENNIS P.; WALKINGTON,PHILLIP D.; HOHMAN,ED; MARSHALL,GREG

    2000-04-25

    Rotorcraft structures do not readily lend themselves to quantifiable inspection methods due to airframe construction techniques. Periodic visual inspections are a common practice for detecting corrosion. Unfortunately, when the telltale signs of corrosion appear visually, extensive repair or refurbishment is required. There is a need to nondestructively evaluate airframe structures in order to recognize and quantify corrosion before visual indications are present. Nondestructive evaluations of rotorcraft airframes face inherent problems different from those of the fixed wing industry. Most rotorcraft lap joints are very narrow, contain raised fastener heads, may possess distortion, and consist of thinner gage materials ({approximately}0.012--0.125 inches). In addition the structures involve stack-ups of two and three layers of thin gage skins that are separated by sealant of varying thickness. Industry lacks the necessary data techniques, and experience to adequately perform routine corrosion inspection of rotorcraft. In order to address these problems, a program is currently underway to validate the use of eddy current inspection on specific rotorcraft lap joints. Probability of detection (POD) specimens have been produced that simulate two lap joint configurations on a model TH-57/206 helicopter. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance Center (AANC) at Sandia Labs and Bell Helicopter have applied single and dual frequency eddy current (EC) techniques to these test specimens. The test results showed enough promise to justify beta site testing of the eddy current methods evolved in this study. The technique allows users to distinguish between corrosion signals and those caused by varying gaps between the assembly of skins. Specific structural joints were defined as prime corrosion areas and a series of corrosion specimens were produced with 5--20% corrosion distributed among the layers of each joint. Complete helicopter test beds were used to validate the laboratory

  11. Submicron Defect Detection in Periodic Structures Using Photorefractive Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrich, Craig Edward

    Detection of defects in periodic objects is an important step in the manufacture of integrated circuits, particularly memory chips which are highly repetitive. As feature sizes shrink below 1 mum, automated detection of sub-micron defects becomes necessary. We present a real-time holographic system which allows the detection of sub-micron defects in periodic structures. The inspection technique is a marriage of Fourier spatial filtering and real-time phase conjugate holography. The system output is a near diffraction limited image of any defects in the pattern (defined to be any deviations from periodicity). Real-time holographic recording allows the system to adapt to the orientation and period of the object. The early chapters introduce the photorefractive effect and the generation of the phase conjugate of an optical wavefront using Bi_{12} SiO_{20}. Relevant properties of the optical Fourier transform are also discussed. The following sections present the system design rules and experimental techniques which allow the system to reliably detect sub-micron defects. The most important improvements over previous demonstrations are (1) a novel write/read holographic process which increases phase conjugate reflectivity by orders of magnitude, (2) control of the light polarization to allow efficient object illumination and collection of the diffracted signal, (3) avoidance of noise by moving the crystal away from the origin of the Fourier plane, and (4) compensation for the crystal aberrations with a holographic optical element. The final chapter presents results which clearly show enhancement of sub-micron defects and near perfect suppression of the surrounding periodic patterns. An area larger than 1 mm^2 is inspected in 20-60 seconds. Over 90% of the 0.5 mu m diameter defects on glass masks (viewed in reflection) are detected, and approximately 80% of defects in the 0.2 -0.3 μm range are found. On silicon wafers, the results are even better with over a 95% success

  12. Detection and Monitoring of Microparticles Under Skin by Optical Coherence Tomography as an Approach to Continuous Glucose Sensing Using Implanted Retroreflectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shang; Sherlock, Tim; Salazar, Betsy; Sudheendran, Narendran; Manapuram, Ravi Kiran; Kourentzi, Katerina; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Willson, Richard C.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to image and detect 2.8 μm diameter microparticles (stationary and moving) on a highly-reflective gold surface both in clear media and under skin in vitro. The OCT intensity signal can clearly report the microparticle count, and the OCT response to the number of microparticles shows a good linearity. The detect ability of the intensity change (2.9% ± 0.5%) caused by an individual microparticle shows the high sensitivity of monitoring multiple particles using OCT. An optical sensing method based on this feasibility study is described for continuously measuring blood sugar levels in the subcutaneous tissue, and a molecular recognition unit is designed using competitive binding to modulate the number of bound microparticles as a function of glucose concentration. With further development, an ultra-small, implantable sensor might provide high specificity and sensitivity for long-term continuous monitoring of blood glucose concentration. PMID:26413034

  13. Damage detection in bridges through fiber optic structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornink, J. D.; Phares, B. M.; Wipf, T. J.; Wood, D. L.

    2006-10-01

    A fiber optic structural health monitoring (SHM) system was developed and deployed by the Iowa State University (ISU) Bridge Engineering Center (BEC) to detect gradual or sudden damage in fracture-critical bridges (FCBs). The SHM system is trained with measured performance data, which are collected by fiber optic strain sensors to identify typical bridge behavior when subjected to ambient traffic loads. Structural responses deviating from the trained behavior are considered to be signs of structural damage or degradation and are identified through analytical procedures similar to control chart analyses used in statistical process control (SPC). The demonstration FCB SHM system was installed on the US Highway 30 bridge near Ames, IA, and utilizes 40 fiber bragg grating (FBG) sensors to continuously monitor the bridge response when subjected to ambient traffic loads. After the data is collected and processed, weekly evaluation reports are developed that summarize the continuous monitoring results. Through use of the evaluation reports, the bridge owner is able to identify and estimate the location and severity of the damage. The information presented herein includes an overview of the SHM components, results from laboratory and field validation testing on the system components, and samples of the reduced and analyzed data.

  14. Preimplantation Exposure to Bisphenol A and Triclosan May Lead to Implantation Failure in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Mu; Bai, Ming-Zhu; Huang, Xu-Feng; Zhang, Yue; Liu, Jing; Hu, Min-Hao; Zheng, Wei-Qian; Jin, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are chemicals that have the capacity to interfere with normal endocrine systems. Two EDCs, bisphenol A (BPA) and triclosan (TCS), are mass-produced and widespread. They both have estrogenic properties and similar chemical structures and pharmacokinetic features and have been detected in human fluids and tissues. Clinical evidence has suggested a positive association between BPA exposure and implantation failure in IVF patients. Studies in mouse models have suggested that preimplantation exposure to BPA and TCS can lead to implantation failure. This paper reviews the relationship between preimplantation exposure to BPA and TCS and implantation failure and discusses the remaining problems and possible solutions. PMID:26357649

  15. The structure of crystallographic damage in GaN formed during rare earth ion implantation with and without an ultrathin AlN capping layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloux, F.; Ruterana, P.; Wojtowicz, T.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.

    2006-10-01

    The crystallographic nature of the damage created in GaN implanted by rare earth ions at 300 keV and room temperature has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy versus the fluence, from 7×10 13 to 2×10 16 at/cm 2, using Er, Eu or Tm ions. The density of point defect clusters was seen to increase with the fluence. From about 3×10 15 at/cm 2, a highly disordered 'nanocrystalline layer' (NL) appears on the GaN surface. Its structure exhibits a mixture of voids and misoriented nanocrystallites. Basal stacking faults (BSFs) of I 1, E and I 2 types have been noticed from the lowest fluence, they are I 1 in the majority. Their density increases and saturates when the NL is observed. Many prismatic stacking faults (PSFs) with Drum atomic configuration have been identified. The I 1 BSFs are shown to propagate easily through GaN by folding from basal to prismatic planes thanks to the PSFs. When implanting through a 10 nm AlN cap, the NL threshold goes up to about 3×10 16 at/cm 2. The AlN cap plays a protective role against the dissociation of the GaN up to the highest fluences. The flat surface after implantation and the absence of SFs in the AlN cap indicate its high resistance to the damage formation.

  16. Pleomorphic structural imperfections caused by pulsed Bi-implantation in the bulk and thin-film morphologies of TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, D. A.; Boukhvalov, D. W.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Kim, S. S.; Zhidkov, I. S.

    2016-08-01

    The results of combined experimental and theoretical study of pleomorphic substitutional and clustering effects in Bi-doped TiO2 hosts (bulk and thin-film morphologies) are presented. Bi-doping of the bulk and thin-film titanium dioxide was made with help of pulsed ion-implantation (EBi+ = 30 keV, D = 1 × 1017 cm-2) without posterior tempering. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) qualification (core-levels and valence bands) and Density-Functional Theory (DFT) calculations were employed in order to study the electronic structure of Bi-ion implanted TiO2 samples. According to XPS data obtained and DFT calculations, the Bi → Ti cation substitution occurs in Bi-implanted bulk TiO2, whereas in the thin-film morphology of TiO2:Bi the Bi-atoms have metal-like clusters segregation tendency. Based on the combined XPS and DFT considerations the possible reasons and mechanism for the observed effects are discussed. It is believed that established peculiarities of bismuth embedding into employed TiO2 hosts are mostly the sequence of pleomorphic origin for the formed "bismuth-oxygen" chemical bonding.

  17. Choice of a dental implant system.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Peter R; Gartner, Judith L; Norkin, Frederic J

    2005-04-01

    Many dentists are bewildered by the intricacies and complexities of dental implants. They are constantly besieged by product advertisements and can find it difficult to choose which systems to work with. Some dentists are so intimidated by the subject that they choose to avoid getting involved with implants and instead stick to traditional tooth replacement systems. By breaking implants down into 4 main components, the body, collar, connection, and restorative post, it is easier to understand the structure and function of dental implants. Each portion should be designed to achieve certain objectives. Once these structural components are understood, it is easier to compare and contrast differing implant systems.

  18. Laser-structured bacterial nanocellulose hydrogels support ingrowth and differentiation of chondrocytes and show potential as cartilage implants.

    PubMed

    Ahrem, Hannes; Pretzel, David; Endres, Michaela; Conrad, Daniel; Courseau, Julien; Müller, Hartmut; Jaeger, Raimund; Kaps, Christian; Klemm, Dieter O; Kinne, Raimund W

    2014-03-01

    The small size and heterogeneity of the pores in bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) hydrogels limit the ingrowth of cells and their use as tissue-engineered implant materials. The use of placeholders during BNC biosynthesis or post-processing steps such as (touch-free) laser perforation can overcome this limitation. Since three-dimensionally arranged channels may be required for homogeneous and functional seeding, three-dimensional (3-D) laser perforation of never-dried BNC hydrogels was performed. Never-dried BNC hydrogels were produced in different shapes by: (i) the cultivation of Gluconacetobacter xylinus (DSM 14666; synonym Komagataeibacter xylinus) in nutrient medium; (ii) the removal of bacterial residues/media components (0.1M NaOH; 30 min; 100 °C) and repeated washing (deionized water; pH 5.8); (iii) the unidirectional or 3-D laser perforation and cutting (pulsed CO2 Rofin SC × 10 laser; 220 μm channel diameter); and (iv) the final autoclaving (2M NaOH; 121 °C; 20 min) and washing (pyrogen-free water). In comparison to unmodified BNC, unidirectionally perforated--and particularly 3-D-perforated - BNC allowed ingrowth into and movement of vital bovine/human chondrocytes throughout the BNC nanofiber network. Laser perforation caused limited structural modifications (i.e. fiber or globular aggregates), but no chemical modifications, as indicated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron scattering and viability tests. Pre-cultured human chondrocytes seeding the surface/channels of laser-perforated BNC expressed cartilage-specific matrix products, indicating chondrocyte differentiation. 3-D-perforated BNC showed compressive strength comparable to that of unmodified samples. Unidirectionally or 3-D-perforated BNC shows high biocompatibility and provides short diffusion distances for nutrients and extracellular matrix components. Also, the resulting channels support migration into the BNC, matrix production and phenotypic stabilization of

  19. Detection of Coherent Structures in Extreme-Scale Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C; Iverson, J; Kirk, R; Karypis, G

    2012-03-24

    The analysis of coherent structures is a common problem in many scientific domains ranging from astrophysics to combustion, fusion, and materials science. The data from three-dimensional simulations are analyzed to detect the structures, extract statistics on them, and track them over time to gain insights into the phenomenon being modeled. This analysis is typically done off-line, using data that have been written out by the simulations. However, the move towards extreme scale architectures, with multi-core processors and graphical processing units, will affect how such analysis is done as it is unlikely that the systems will support the I/O bandwidth required for off-line analysis. Moving the analysis in-situ is a solution only if we know a priori what analysis will be done, as well as the algorithms used and their parameter settings. Even then, we need to ensure that this will not substantially increase the memory requirements or the data movement as the former will be limited and the latter will be expensive. In the Exa-DM project, a collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and University of Minnesota, we are exploring ways in which we can address the conflicting demands of coherent structure analysis of simulation data and the architecture of modern parallel systems, while enabling scientific discovery at the exascale. In this paper, we describe our work in two areas: the in situ implementation of an existing algorithm for coherent structure analysis and the use of graph-based techniques to efficiently compress the data.

  20. Molecular Structure and Chirality Detection by Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lobsiger, Simon; Perez, Cristobal; Evangelisti, Luca; Lehmann, Kevin K; Pate, Brooks H

    2015-01-01

    We describe a three-wave mixing experiment using time-separated microwave pulses to detect the enantiomer-specific emission signal of the chiral molecule using Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy. A chirped-pulse FTMW spectrometer operating in the 2-8 GHz frequency range is used to determine the heavy-atom substitution structure of solketal (2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxolan-4-yl-methanol) through analysis of the singly substituted (13)C and (18)O isotopologue rotational spectra in natural abundance. A second set of microwave horn antennas is added to the instrument design to permit three-wave mixing experiments where an enantiomer-specific phase of the signal is observed. Using samples of R-, S-, and racemic solketal, the properties of the three-wave mixing experiment are presented, including the measurement of the corresponding nutation curves to demonstrate the optimal pulse sequence.

  1. Direct Sequence Detection of Structured H5 Influenza Viral RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kerby, Matthew B.; Freeman, Sarah; Prachanronarong, Kristina; Artenstein, Andrew W.; Opal, Steven M.; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2008-01-01

    We describe the development of sequence-specific molecular beacons (dual-labeled DNA probes) for identification of the H5 influenza subtype, cleavage motif, and receptor specificity when hybridized directly with in vitro transcribed viral RNA (vRNA). The cloned hemagglutinin segment from a highly pathogenic H5N1 strain, A/Hanoi/30408/2005(H5N1), isolated from humans was used as template for in vitro transcription of sense-strand vRNA. The hybridization behavior of vRNA and a conserved subtype probe was characterized experimentally by varying conditions of time, temperature, and Mg2+ to optimize detection. Comparison of the hybridization rates of probe to DNA and RNA targets indicates that conformational switching of influenza RNA structure is a rate-limiting step and that the secondary structure of vRNA dominates the binding kinetics. The sensitivity and specificity of probe recognition of other H5 strains was calculated from sequence matches to the National Center for Biotechnology Information influenza database. The hybridization specificity of the subtype probes was experimentally verified with point mutations within the probe loop at five locations corresponding to the other human H5 strains. The abundance frequencies of the hemagglutinin cleavage motif and sialic acid recognition sequences were experimentally tested for H5 in all host viral species. Although the detection assay must be coupled with isothermal amplification on the chip, the new probes form the basis of a portable point-of-care diagnostic device for influenza subtyping. PMID:18403607

  2. DNA Barcode Detects High Genetic Structure within Neotropical Bird Species

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Erika Sendra; Gonçalves, Priscila; Miyaki, Cristina Yumi; Baker, Allan J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Towards lower latitudes the number of recognized species is not only higher, but also phylogeographic subdivision within species is more pronounced. Moreover, new genetically isolated populations are often described in recent phylogenies of Neotropical birds suggesting that the number of species in the region is underestimated. Previous COI barcoding of Argentinean bird species showed more complex patterns of regional divergence in the Neotropical than in the North American avifauna. Methods and Findings Here we analyzed 1,431 samples from 561 different species to extend the Neotropical bird barcode survey to lower latitudes, and detected even higher geographic structure within species than reported previously. About 93% (520) of the species were identified correctly from their DNA barcodes. The remaining 41 species were not monophyletic in their COI sequences because they shared barcode sequences with closely related species (N = 21) or contained very divergent clusters suggestive of putative new species embedded within the gene tree (N = 20). Deep intraspecific divergences overlapping with among-species differences were detected in 48 species, often with samples from large geographic areas and several including multiple subspecies. This strong population genetic structure often coincided with breaks between different ecoregions or areas of endemism. Conclusions The taxonomic uncertainty associated with the high incidence of non-monophyletic species and discovery of putative species obscures studies of historical patterns of species diversification in the Neotropical region. We showed that COI barcodes are a valuable tool to indicate which taxa would benefit from more extensive taxonomic revisions with multilocus approaches. Moreover, our results support hypotheses that the megadiversity of birds in the region is associated with multiple geographic processes starting well before the Quaternary and extending to more recent geological periods

  3. Predictive modeling of neuroanatomic structures for brain atrophy detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xintao; Guo, Lei; Nie, Jingxin; Li, Kaiming; Liu, Tianming

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we present an approach of predictive modeling of neuroanatomic structures for the detection of brain atrophy based on cross-sectional MRI image. The underlying premise of applying predictive modeling for atrophy detection is that brain atrophy is defined as significant deviation of part of the anatomy from what the remaining normal anatomy predicts for that part. The steps of predictive modeling are as follows. The central cortical surface under consideration is reconstructed from brain tissue map and Regions of Interests (ROI) on it are predicted from other reliable anatomies. The vertex pair-wise distance between the predicted vertex and the true one within the abnormal region is expected to be larger than that of the vertex in normal brain region. Change of white matter/gray matter ratio within a spherical region is used to identify the direction of vertex displacement. In this way, the severity of brain atrophy can be defined quantitatively by the displacements of those vertices. The proposed predictive modeling method has been evaluated by using both simulated atrophies and MRI images of Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Detecting and representing predictable structure during auditory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Sohoglu, Ediz; Chait, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We use psychophysics and MEG to test how sensitivity to input statistics facilitates auditory-scene-analysis (ASA). Human subjects listened to 'scenes' comprised of concurrent tone-pip streams (sources). On occasional trials a new source appeared partway. Listeners were more accurate and quicker to detect source appearance in scenes comprised of temporally-regular (REG), rather than random (RAND), sources. MEG in passive listeners and those actively detecting appearance events revealed increased sustained activity in auditory and parietal cortex in REG relative to RAND scenes, emerging ~400 ms of scene-onset. Over and above this, appearance in REG scenes was associated with increased responses relative to RAND scenes. The effect of temporal structure on appearance-evoked responses was delayed when listeners were focused on the scenes relative to when listening passively, consistent with the notion that attention reduces 'surprise'. Overall, the results implicate a mechanism that tracks predictability of multiple concurrent sources to facilitate active and passive ASA. PMID:27602577

  5. Detecting and representing predictable structure during auditory scene analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sohoglu, Ediz; Chait, Maria

    2016-01-01

    We use psychophysics and MEG to test how sensitivity to input statistics facilitates auditory-scene-analysis (ASA). Human subjects listened to ‘scenes’ comprised of concurrent tone-pip streams (sources). On occasional trials a new source appeared partway. Listeners were more accurate and quicker to detect source appearance in scenes comprised of temporally-regular (REG), rather than random (RAND), sources. MEG in passive listeners and those actively detecting appearance events revealed increased sustained activity in auditory and parietal cortex in REG relative to RAND scenes, emerging ~400 ms of scene-onset. Over and above this, appearance in REG scenes was associated with increased responses relative to RAND scenes. The effect of temporal structure on appearance-evoked responses was delayed when listeners were focused on the scenes relative to when listening passively, consistent with the notion that attention reduces ‘surprise’. Overall, the results implicate a mechanism that tracks predictability of multiple concurrent sources to facilitate active and passive ASA. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19113.001 PMID:27602577

  6. Structural Plasticity Controlled by Calcium Based Correlation Detection

    PubMed Central

    Helias, Moritz; Rotter, Stefan; Gewaltig, Marc-Oliver; Diesmann, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Hebbian learning in cortical networks during development and adulthood relies on the presence of a mechanism to detect correlation between the presynaptic and the postsynaptic spiking activity. Recently, the calcium concentration in spines was experimentally shown to be a correlation sensitive signal with the necessary properties: it is confined to the spine volume, it depends on the relative timing of pre- and postsynaptic action potentials, and it is independent of the spine's location along the dendrite. NMDA receptors are a candidate mediator for the correlation dependent calcium signal. Here, we present a quantitative model of correlation detection in synapses based on the calcium influx through NMDA receptors under realistic conditions of irregular pre- and postsynaptic spiking activity with pairwise correlation. Our analytical framework captures the interaction of the learning rule and the correlation dynamics of the neurons. We find that a simple thresholding mechanism can act as a sensitive and reliable correlation detector at physiological firing rates. Furthermore, the mechanism is sensitive to correlation among afferent synapses by cooperation and competition. In our model this mechanism controls synapse formation and elimination. We explain how synapse elimination leads to firing rate homeostasis and show that the connectivity structure is shaped by the correlations between neighboring inputs. PMID:19129936

  7. Acoustic Emission Detection of Impact Damage on Space Shuttle Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.; Gorman, Michael R.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2004-01-01

    The loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia as a result of impact damage from foam debris during ascent has led NASA to investigate the feasibility of on-board impact detection technologies. AE sensing has been utilized to monitor a wide variety of impact conditions on Space Shuttle components ranging from insulating foam and ablator materials, and ice at ascent velocities to simulated hypervelocity micrometeoroid and orbital debris impacts. Impact testing has been performed on both reinforced carbon composite leading edge materials as well as Shuttle tile materials on representative aluminum wing structures. Results of these impact tests will be presented with a focus on the acoustic emission sensor responses to these impact conditions. These tests have demonstrated the potential of employing an on-board Shuttle impact detection system. We will describe the present plans for implementation of an initial, very low frequency acoustic impact sensing system using pre-existing flight qualified hardware. The details of an accompanying flight measurement system to assess the Shuttle s acoustic background noise environment as a function of frequency will be described. The background noise assessment is being performed to optimize the frequency range of sensing for a planned future upgrade to the initial impact sensing system.

  8. Caustic Structures and Detectability of Circumbinary Planets in Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhn, Jacob K.; Penny, Matthew T.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2016-08-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets in Kepler data show that there is a viable channel of planet formation around binary main-sequence stars. Motivated by these discoveries, we have investigated the caustic structures and detectability of circumbinary planets in microlensing events. We have produced a suite of animations of caustics as a function of the projected separation and angle of the binary host to efficiently explore caustic structures over the entire circumbinary parameter space. Aided by these animations, we have derived a semi-empirical analytic expression for the location of planetary caustics, which are displaced in circumbinary lenses relative to those of planets with a single host. We have used this expression to show that the dominant source of caustic motion will be due to the planet’s orbital motion and not that of the binary star. Finally, we estimate the fraction of circumbinary microlensing events that are recognizable as such to be significant (5%-50%) for binary projected separations in the range 0.1-0.5 in units of Einstein radii.

  9. Singularity detection for structural health monitoring using holder exponents.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A. N.; Farrar, C. R.; Sohn, H.

    2003-01-01

    The majority of structural health monitoring studies reported in the technical literature focus on identifying damage sensitive features that can be extracted from dynamic response data . However, many of these studies assume the structure can be modeled as a linear system before and after damage and use parameters of these models as the damage sensitive features. The study summarized in this paper proposes a damage sensitive feature that takes advantage of the nonlinearities associated with discontinuities introduced into the dynamic response data as a result of certain types of damage. Specifically, the Holder exponent, a measure of the degree to which a signal is differentiable, is the feature that is used to detect the presence of damage and when that damage occurred . A procedure for capturing the time varying nature of the Holder exponent based on wavelet transforms is demonstrated through applications to non-stationary random signals with underlying discontinuities and then to a harmonically excited mechanical system that contains a loose part . Also, a classification procedure is developed to quantify when changes in the Holder exponent are significant . The results presented herein show the Holder exponent to be an effective feature for identifying damage that introduces discontinuities into the measured dynamic response data .

  10. Electrochemical immunosensor based on hyperbranched structure for carcinoembryonic antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jingjing; Wang, Xiaobo; Lu, Liandi; Zhu, Peiyuan; Mao, Chun; Zhao, Haolin; Song, Youchao; Shen, Jian

    2014-08-15

    Sensitive determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is very important in clinical research and diagnosis. Herein we report the design and synthesis of a new kind of immunosensor based on the benefits of hyperbranched structure. The hyperbranched polyester was grafted to the surface of indium tin oxides glass (ITO) electrode, and the grafting processes were characterized by attentuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). After CEA and horse radish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled antibody-conjugated AuNPs (HRP-Ab2-AuNPs) bioconjugates were immobilized on the surface of the hyperbranched structure-modified electrode, the optimized conditions of the above electrode were investigated. Moreover, the analytical performance of the proposed immunosensor showed a high sensitivity, a linear range from 0.01 to 80ng/mL with a low detection limit of 2.36pg/mL, and good selectivity for CEA. The designed immunoassay system holds great potential for ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensing of other analytes. PMID:24607616

  11. Caustic Structures and Detectability of Circumbinary Planets in Microlensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhn, Jacob K.; Penny, Matthew T.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2016-08-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets in Kepler data show that there is a viable channel of planet formation around binary main-sequence stars. Motivated by these discoveries, we have investigated the caustic structures and detectability of circumbinary planets in microlensing events. We have produced a suite of animations of caustics as a function of the projected separation and angle of the binary host to efficiently explore caustic structures over the entire circumbinary parameter space. Aided by these animations, we have derived a semi-empirical analytic expression for the location of planetary caustics, which are displaced in circumbinary lenses relative to those of planets with a single host. We have used this expression to show that the dominant source of caustic motion will be due to the planet’s orbital motion and not that of the binary star. Finally, we estimate the fraction of circumbinary microlensing events that are recognizable as such to be significant (5%–50%) for binary projected separations in the range 0.1–0.5 in units of Einstein radii.

  12. Influence of residual pressure and ion implantation on the structure, elemental composition, and properties of (TiZrAlYNb)N nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnjak, A. D.; Yakushchenko, I. V.; Sobol', O. V.; Beresnev, V. M.; Kupchishin, A. I.; Bondar, O. V.; Lisovenko, M. A.; Amekura, H.; Kono, K.; Oyoshi, K.; Takeda, Y.

    2015-08-01

    The nitrides of high-entropy alloys, (TiZrAlYNb)N, fabricated by cathodic vacuum arc evaporation are studied with electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, laser scanning microscopy; energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray phase analysis, time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry; and hardness measurements. It is found that the deposition parameters influence the structure, surface morphology, element distribution, and mechanical properties. The structural—phase state of the coatings before and after the ion implantation of heavy negative gold ions Au- are compared.

  13. Enhanced detection criteria in implantable cardioverter defibrillators: sensitivity and specificity of the stability algorithm at different heart rates.

    PubMed

    Kettering, K; Dörnberger, V; Lang, R; Vonthein, R; Suchalla, R; Bosch, R F; Mewis, C; Eigenberger, B; Kühlkamp, V

    2001-09-01

    The lack of specificity in the detection of ventricular tachyarrhythmias remains a major clinical problem in the therapy with ICDs. The stability criterion has been shown to be useful in discriminating ventricular tachyarrhythmias characterized by a small variation in cycle lengths from AF with rapid ventricular response presenting a higher degree of variability of RR intervals. But RR variability decreases with increasing heart rate during AF. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine if the sensitivity and specificity of the STABILITY algorithm for spontaneous tachyarrhythmias is related to ventricular rate. Forty-two patients who had received an ICD (CPI Ventak Mini I, II, III or Ventak AV) were enrolled in the study. Two hundred ninety-eight episodes of AF with rapid ventricular response and 817 episodes of ventricular tachyarrhythmias were analyzed. Sensitivity and specificity in the detection of ventricular tachyarrhythmias were calculated at different heart rates. When a stability value of 30 ms was programmed the result was a sensitivity of 82.7% and a specificity of 91.4% in the detection of slow ventricular tachyarrhythmias (heart rate < 150 beats/min). When faster ventricular tachyarrhythmias with rates between 150 and 169 beats/min (170-189 beats/min) were analyzed, a stability value of 30 ms provided a sensitivity of 94.5% (94.7%) and a specificity of 76.5% (54.0%). For arrhythmia episodes > or = 190 beats/min, the same stability value resulted in a sensitivity of 78.2% and a specificity of 41.0%. Even when other stability values were taken into consideration, no acceptable sensitivity/specificity values could be obtained in this subgroup. RR variability decreases with increasing heart rate during AF while RR variability remains almost constant at different cycle lengths during ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Thus, acceptable performance of the STABILITY algorithm appears to be limited to ventricular rate zones < 170 beats/min.

  14. [Imaging in silicone breast implantation].

    PubMed

    Gielens, Maaike P M; Koolen, Pieter G L; Hermens, Roland A E C; Rutten, Matthieu J C M

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there have been concerns regarding the use of breast implants from Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP, Seyne sur Mer, France) for breast augmentation due to their tendency to rupture and the possibility of having toxic contents. MRI using a specific silicone-sensitive sequence has proven to be the most sensitive and specific technique in the detection of intra- and extracapsular implant rupture. However, given its high costs, it is important that this technique is used sparingly. In this clinical lesson, we compare the sensitivity and specificity of mammography, ultrasound, CT and MRI for the detection of breast implant rupture. Based on two cases, a diagnostic approach is given in order to reduce health care costs. PMID:24252405

  15. Effect of nitrogen ion implantation on corrosion inhibition of nickel coated 316 stainless steel and correlation with nano-structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayeli-Korpi, Ali-Reza; Savaloni, Hadi

    2012-10-01

    The influence of implantation of N+ with 20 keV energy and different fluences in the range of 1 × 1017 and 5 × 1018 ions/cm2 in the nickel coated type 316 stainless steel (SS) on the corrosion inhibition of SS in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution is investigated. The highest available N+ fluence showed highest corrosion inhibition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed formation of nickel nitride phases that enhanced by increasing the N+ fluence. Surface morphology was studied by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) before and after corrosion test, respectively. AFM results showed that by increasing N+ fluence surface of the sample becomes smoother that may be the result of heat accumulation during implantation causing higher rate of diffusion in the sample.

  16. Formation of a periodic diffractive structure based on poly(methyl methacrylate) with ion-implanted silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galyautdinov, M. F.; Nuzhdin, V. I.; Fattakhov, Ya. V.; Farrakhov, B. F.; Valeev, V. F.; Osin, Yu. N.; Stepanov, A. L.

    2016-02-01

    We propose to form optical diffractive elements on the surface of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) by implanting the polymer with silver ions ( E = 30 keV; D = 5.0 × 1014 to 1.5 × 1017 ion/cm2; I = 2 μA/cm2) through a nickel grid (mask). Ion implantation leads to the nucleation and growth of silver nanoparticles in unmasked regions of the polymer. The formation of periodic surface microstructures during local sputtering of the polymer by incident ions was monitored using an optical microscope. The diffraction efficiency of obtained gratings is demonstrated under conditions of their probing with semiconductor laser radiation in the visible spectral range.

  17. Electrical properties of metal-oxide-semiconductor structures with low-energy Ge-implanted and annealed thin gate oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapetanakis, E.; Normand, P.; Holliger, P.

    2008-03-01

    The electrical characteristics of low-energy (3keV) Ge-implanted and, subsequently, thermal annealed SiO2 layers are investigated through capacitance-voltage (C-V ) and conductance-voltage (G-V) measurements of metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors. Particular emphasis is placed on the properties of such gate oxides for memory applications. Capacitance measurements at flatband voltage before and after the application of constant voltage stress in the accumulation regime indicate that the charge trapping behavior of the devices undergoes a major change after annealing at temperatures higher than 910°C. The latter change is identified as a relocation of Ge atoms mainly toward the upper portion of the oxide with a significant fraction of them leaving the oxide; a finding in harmony with secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis. The interface trap density (Dit) for the thin (9-12nm) implanted oxides decreases with increasing annealing temperature, approaching at 950°C the Dit levels in the mid-1010eV-1cm-2 range of the nonimplanted samples. At elevated annealing temperatures (>1000°C), the device C-V characteristics are substantially disturbed. In this case, the presence of electrically active Ge atoms at an extended depth in the substrate modifies the intrinsic electrical properties of the n-Si substrate, lending a p-type conductivity character to the device high-frequency C-V curves. Substrate electrical modification is interpreted through a model that takes into account the formation of a SiO2/Ge-rich-Si /n-Si system. The SiO2/Ge-rich-Si interface presents very low Dit levels as revealed by conductance loss characteristics. The present study suggests that a combination of Ge implantation into SiO2 films and thermal annealing may be exploited in damage-free SiGe epitaxial growth technology based on Ge implantation.

  18. Ion implantation in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As : damage structures and amorphization mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, B. W.; Turkot, B. A.; Robertson, I. M.; Coleman, J. J.; Roh, S. D.; Forbes, D. V.; Rehn, L. E.; Baldo, P. M.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Illinois

    1998-07-01

    We review previous research on ion implantation in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As-GaAs heterostructures, and include observations from our current work in order to assess the various mechanisms that have been proposed to account for damage accumulation and amorphization in this system. In considering all of the experimental observations, the most consistent description is one where amorphization occurs by a combination of point-defect buildup and direct impact amorphization mechanisms.

  19. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  20. Facial implants.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, M R; Rubenstein, J T

    1998-01-01

    The application of endosseous dental implants for the retention and stabilization of extraoral prostheses and hearing aids has been shown to be effective functionally and aesthetically. Implants have reduced the need for adhesive use, simplifying cleaning procedures and thus extending the life of the prosthesis. Implant-retained prostheses have provided patients the opportunity to participate in routine activities such as work, shopping, swimming, and jogging with less fear of losing their prosthesis. The implants' impact on patients has resulted in their ability to function in society with confidence that their defects will be less noticeable and their ability to respond to the environment enhanced. The culmination of these effects have without doubt improved the overall quality of life for patients. As with any new technology, its application will encounter unanticipated problems and some limitations in use. As the art and science of this technique evolve, however, it is anticipated that it will result in the ability to provide improved health care for patients.

  1. Cryogenic Silicon Detectors with Implanted Contacts for the Detection of Visible Photons Using the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defay, X.; Mondragon, E.; Willers, M.; Langenkämper, A.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Münster, A.; Zöller, A.; Wawoczny, S.; Steiger, H.; Hitzler, F.; Bruhn, C.; Schönert, S.; Potzel, W.; Chapellier, M.

    2016-07-01

    There is a common need in astroparticle experiments such as direct dark matter detection, double-beta decay without emission of neutrinos [0 ν β β ] and coherent neutrino nucleus scattering experiments for light detectors with a very low energy threshold. By employing the Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect, the thermal signal of particle interactions in a semiconductor absorber operated at cryogenic temperatures can be amplified by drifting the photogenerated electrons and holes in an electric field. This technology is not used in current experiments, in particular because of a reduction of the signal amplitude with time which is due to trapping of the charges within the absorber. We present here the first results of a novel type of Neganov-Trofimov-Luke Effect light detector with an electric field configuration designed to improve the charge collection within the semiconductor.

  2. Implant Maintenance: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Govila, Vivek; Anand, Vishal; Anand, Bhargavi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The differences in the supporting structure of the implant make them more susceptible to inflammation and bone loss when plaque accumulates as compared to the teeth. Therefore, a comprehensive maintenance protocol should be followed to ensure the longevity of the implant. Material and Method. A research to provide scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of various implant care methods was carried out using various online resources to retrieve relevant studies published since 1985. Results. The electronic search yielded 708 titles, out of which a total of 42 articles were considered appropriate and finally included for the preparation of this review article. Discussion. A typical maintenance visit for patients with dental implants should last 1 hour and should be scheduled every 3 months to evaluate any changes in their oral and general history. It is essential to have a proper instrument selection to prevent damage to the implant surface and trauma to the peri-implant tissues. Conclusion. As the number of patients opting for dental implants is increasing, it becomes increasingly essential to know the differences between natural teeth and implant care and accept the challenges of maintaining these restorations. PMID:27437506

  3. Effect of phosphorus-ion implantation on the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of titanium.

    PubMed

    Krupa, D; Baszkiewicz, J; Kozubowski, J A; Barcz, A; Sobczak, J W; Biliński, A; Lewandowska-Szumieł, M; Rajchel, B

    2002-08-01

    This work presents data on the structure and corrosion resistance of titanium after phosphorus-ion implantation with a dose of 10(17)P/cm2. The ion energy was 25keV. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the microstructure of the implanted layer. The chemical composition of the surface layer was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. The corrosion resistance was examined by electrochemical methods in a simulated body fluid at a temperature of 37 C. Biocompatibility tests in vitro were performed in a culture of human derived bone cells in direct contact with the materials tested. Both, the viability of the cells determined by an XTT assay and activity of the cells evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity measurements in contact with implanted and non-implanted titanium samples were detected. The morphology of the cells spread on the surface of the materials examined was also observed. The results confirmed the biocompatibility of both phosphorus-ion-implanted and non-implanted titanium under the conditions of the experiment. As shown by transmission electron microscope results, the surface layer formed during phosphorus-ion implantation was amorphous. The results of electrochemical examinations indicate that phosphorus-ion implantation increases the corrosion resistance after short-term as well as long-term exposures.

  4. Structural damage detection of space truss structures using best achievable eigenvectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Tae W.; Kashangaki, Thomas A. L.

    1994-01-01

    A method is presented by which measured modes and frequencies from a modal test can be used to determine the location and magnitude of damage in a space struss structure. The damage is located by computing the Euclidean distances between the measured mode shapes and the best achievable eigenvectors. The best achievable eigenvectors are the projection of the measured mode shapes onto the subspace defined by the refined analytical model of the structure and the measured frequencies. Loss of both stiffness and mass properties can be located and quantified. To examine the performance of the method when experimentally measured modes are employed, various damage detection studies using a laboratory eight-bay truss structure were conducted. The method performs well even though the measurement errors inevitably make the damage location more difficult.

  5. Structural damage detection of space truss structures using best achievable eigenvectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Tae W.; Kashangaki, Thomas A. L.

    1994-05-01

    A method is presented by which measured modes and frequencies from a modal test can be used to determine the location and magnitude of damage in a space truss structure. The damage is located by computing the Euclidean distances between the measured mode shapes and the best achievable eigenvectors. The best achievable eigenvectors are the projection of the measured mode shapes onto the subspace defined by the refined analytical model of the structure and the measured frequencies. Loss of both stiffness and mass properties can be located and quantified. To examine the performance of the method when experimentally measured modes are employed, various damage detection studies using a laboratory eight-bay truss structure were conducted. The method performs well even though the measurement errors inevitably make the damage location more difficult.

  6. Optical detection of structural changes in human carotid atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korol, R. M.; Canham, P. B.; Finlay, H. M.; Hammond, R. R.; Quantz, M.; Ferguson, G. G.; Liu, L. Y.; Lucas, A. R.

    2005-08-01

    spectroscopy is an effective method for evaluating ECM (collagen and elastin) associated with vascular remodeling despite the considerable variability in the plaque structure. Consistent regional differences were detected in the carotid specimens.

  7. Temporal variation in the deposition of different types of collagen within a porous biomaterial implant.

    PubMed

    White, Jacinta F; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Bisucci, Teresa; Darby, Ian A; Ramshaw, John A M

    2014-10-01

    The deposition of new collagen in association with a medical implant has been studied using expanded polytetrafluoroethylene vascular replacement samples implanted subcutaneously in sheep, for up to 28 days. New type I collagen mRNA synthesis was followed by in situ hybridization, while the accumulation of new collagen types III, V, VI, XII, and XIV was followed by immunohistochemistry. All the collagen detected in the pores of the implant were newly deposited at various times after implantation and were not due to any pre-existing dermal collagen that may have been present around the implant. Collagen deposition was seen initially surrounding the implant and, with time, was seen to infiltrate within its pores. In situ hybridization showed that the majority of infiltrating cells had switched on mRNA that coded for type I collagen production. Histology showed that cellular infiltration increased with time, accompanied by increasing collagen deposition. The deposition of different collagen types happened at different rates. The type V and VI collagens preceded the major interstitial collagens in the newly deposited tissue, although at longer time points, detection of type V collagen appeared to decrease. After disruption of the interstitial collagens with enzyme, the "masked" type V collagen was clearly still visible by immunohistochemistry. Little type XII collagen could be seen within the porous mesh, although it was seen in the surrounding tissues. By contrast, type XIV was seen throughout the porous structure of the implanted mesh, with less being visible outside the material where type XII was more abundant.

  8. Effect of implant design and bioactive glass coating on biomechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composite implants.

    PubMed

    Ballo, Ahmed M; Akca, Eralp; Ozen, Tuncer; Moritz, Niko; Lassila, Lippo; Vallittu, Pekka; Närhi, Timo

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of implant design and bioactive glass (BAG) coating on the response of bone to fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) implants. Three different FRC implant types were manufactured for the study: non-threaded implants with a BAG coating; threaded implants with a BAG coating; and threaded implants with a grit-blasted surface. Thirty-six implants (six implants for each group per time point) were installed in the tibiae of six pigs. After an implantation period of 4 and 12 wk, the implants were retrieved and prepared for micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), push-out testing, and scanning electron microscopy analysis. Micro-CT demonstrated that the screw-threads and implant structure remained undamaged during the installation. The threaded FRC/BAG implants had the highest bone volume after 12 wk of implantation. The push-out strengths of the threaded FRC/BAG implants after 4 and 12 wk (463°N and 676°N, respectively) were significantly higher than those of the threaded FRC implants (416°N and 549°N, respectively) and the nonthreaded FRC/BAG implants (219°N and 430°N, respectively). Statistically significant correlation was found between bone volume and push-out strength values. This study showed that osseointegrated FRC implants can withstand the static loading up to failure without fracture, and that the addition of BAG significantly improves the push-out strength of FRC implants.

  9. Microstrip structures of ZnO nanoparticle aggregates of millimetric length formed by selected-area ion implantation and thermal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekura, H.; Wang, H.-S.; Hishita, S.; Pan, J.; Kishimoto, N.; Buchal, Ch; Mantl, S.

    2009-02-01

    Regularly arrayed microstrip regions of width ~1.4 µm and length extending up to ~5 mm, consisting of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) of diameter ~50 nm, were fabricated on silica substrates by a two-step process: i.e., selected-area ion implantation and thermal oxidation. The implantation of 60 keV Zn ions in periodic microstrip regions via a resist mask generated periodic grooves with large wings on the surface of silica glass, which can be ascribed to the radiation-induced plastic deformation of silica and sputtering loss. This is the lowest record of the electronic energy loss (Se) value to induce the radiation-induced plastic deformation of silica, while no or very low threshold energy has been predicted from a recent study. After thermal oxidation at 700 °C for 1 h, the groove structures with the wings disappeared, and periodic microstrips of ZnO nanoparticle aggregates up to 5 mm long appeared on the surface of the substrate. A clear free-exciton peak due to ZnO NPs is observed from these microstrip structures both in optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra.

  10. Influence of Ni deposition and subsequent N + ion implantation at different substrate temperatures on nano-structure and corrosion behaviour of type 316 and 304 stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savaloni, Hadi; Habibi, Maryam

    2011-10-01

    Ni thin films of 250 nm thicknesses were coated on type 304 and 316 stainless steels and post N + ion implanted at 15 keV energy with a fluence of 5 × 10 17 N + cm -2 at different substrate temperatures. Surface nano-structure of the samples were analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) before corrosion test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after corrosion test. Corrosion behaviour of the samples in 1.0 M H 2SO 4 solution was investigated by means of potentiodynamic technique. Nano-structure and crystallography of the films showed the development of Ni 3N(1 1 1) and Ni 4N(2 0 0) orientations with a minimum surface roughness and grain size at 400 K substrate temperature. The highest corrosion resistance with a corrosion current of 0.01 μA cm -2 (for SS(316)) and 0.56 μA cm -2 (for SS(304)) was achieved in case of samples which were N + ion implanted at 400 K. Results for both types of stainless steels showed good agreement and the better performance of SS(316) was attributed to the 2% molybdenum contents in the alloy composition of this type of stainless steel, which enhances the effectiveness of nitrogen in retarding the corrosion process.

  11. Changes in the surface of bone and acid-etched and sandblasted implants following implantation and removal

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Cennet Neslihan; Ertugrul, Abdullah Seckin; Eskitascioglu, Murat; Eskitascioglu, Gurcan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether there are any changes in the surface of bone or implant structures following the removal of a screwed dental implant. Materials and Methods: For this, six individual samples of acid-etched and sandblasted implants from three different manufacturers’ implant systems were used. They were screwed in a D1 bovine bone, and they were removed after primary stabilization. The bone and implant surfaces are evaluated with scanning electron microscope. Results: Through examination of the surfaces of the bone prior to implantation and of the used and unused implant surfaces, it was found that inhomogeneity in the implant surface can cause microcracking in the bone. Conclusions: This is attributed to the stress induced during the implantation of self-tapping implants and suggests that a tap drill may be required in some instances to protect the implant surface. PMID:27011744

  12. Hardness of ion implanted ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, W.C.; McHargue, C.J.; Farlow, G.C.; White, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that the wear behavior of ceramic materials can be modified through ion implantation. Studies have been done to characterize the effect of implantation on the structure and composition of ceramic surfaces. To understand how these changes affect the wear properties of the ceramic, other mechanical properties must be measured. To accomplish this, a commercially available ultra low load hardness tester has been used to characterize Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with different implanted species and doses. The hardness of the base material is compared with the highly damaged crystalline state as well as the amorphous material.

  13. Effect of the Graded-Gap Layer Composition on the Formation of n + -n - -p Structures in Boron-Implanted Heteroepitaxial Cd x Hg1- x Te Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talipov, N. Kh.; Voitsekhovskii, А. V.; Grigor'ev, D. V.

    2014-07-01

    Processes of formation of n + -n--p-structures in boron-implanted heteroepitaxial (HEL) CdxHg1-xTe (CMT) layers of p-type grown by molecular beam epitaxy (HEL CMT MBE) with different compositions of the upper graded-gap layer are studied. It is shown that the surface composition (xs) of HEL CMT MBE significantly affects both the electrical parameters of the implanted layer and the spatial distribution of radiation defects of donor type. For HEL CMT MBE with the small surface composition xs = 0.22-0.33, it is found that the layer electron concentration (Ns) is decreased after saturation with accumulation of radiation defects, as the dose of B+ ions is increased in the range of D = 1ṡ1011-3ṡ1015 сm-2. An increase of the surface composition up to xs = 0.49-0.56 results in a significant decrease in Ns and a disappearance of the saturation of concentration in the whole dose range. The value of Ns monotonically increases with the energy (E) of boron ions and composition xs. It is found that for B+-ion energies E = 20-100 keV, the depth of the surface n + -layer increases with increasing energy and exceeds the total projected path of boron ions. However, in the energy range E = 100-150 keV, the depth of n+-layer stops increasing with the increase of the surface composition. The depth (dn) of a lightly doped n--layer monotonically decreases with increasing energy of boron ions in the entire range of E = 20-150 keV. With increasing dose (D) of B+ ions in the interval D = 1ṡ1014-1ṡ1015сm-2, deep n--layers with dn = 4-5 μm are formed only in the HEL CMT MBE with xs = 0.22-0.33. For the samples with xs = 0.49-0.56, the depth changes in the interval dn = 1.5-2.5 μm. At D ≤ 3ṡ1013сm-2, n + -n--p-structure is not formed for all surface compositions, if implantation is performed at room temperature. However, implantation at T = 130°C leads to the formation of a deep n--layer. Planar photodiodes with the n-p-junction area of A = 35×35 μm2 made on the basis of

  14. Laser Micro-Structuring of Fused Silica Subsequent to Plasma-Induced Silicon Suboxide Generation and Hydrogen Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmeister, Jennifer; Gerhard, Christoph; Brückner, Stephan; Ihlemann, Jürgen; Wieneke, Stephan; Viöl, Wolfgang

    A low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma jet was used for chemical reduction of fused silica. For this purpose, a hydrogen-containing plasma was applied. A silicon suboxide layer was generated and hydrogen was implanted into the bulk material. Changes in stoichiometry, concentration of hydrogen and optical transmission were determined. An ArF excimer laser was used for the ablation of untreated and plasma-treated fused silica. The ablation threshold was significantly decreased by a factor of 4.6 in case of plasma treated substrates. Furthermore, in multi-pulse experiments, the ablation rate remained constant at least up to a depth of 10.5 μm.

  15. Structural, compositional, mechanical characterization and biological assessment of bovine-derived hydroxyapatite coatings reinforced with MgF2 or MgO for implants functionalization.

    PubMed

    Mihailescu, Natalia; Stan, G E; Duta, L; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Bleotu, Coralia; Sopronyi, M; Luculescu, C; Oktar, F N; Mihailescu, I N

    2016-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a consecrated biomaterial for bone reconstruction. In the form of thin films deposited by pulsed laser technologies, it can be used to cover metallic implants aiming to increase biocompatibility and osseointegration rate. HA of animal origin (bovine, BHA) reinforced with MgF2 (2wt.%) or MgO (5wt.%) were used for deposition of thin coatings with improved adherence, biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity. For pulsed laser deposition experiments, a KrF* (λ=248nm, τFWHM≤25ns) excimer laser source was used. The deposited structures were characterized from a physical-chemical point of view by X-Ray Diffraction, Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy in top- and cross-view modes, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy and Pull-out adherence tests. The microbiological assay using the HEp-2 cell line revealed that all target materials and deposited thin films are non-cytotoxic. We conducted tests on three strains isolated from patients with dental implants failure, i.e. Microccocus sp., Enterobacter sp. and Candida albicans sp. The most significant anti-biofilm effect against Microcococcus sp. strain, at 72h, was obtained in the presence of BHA:MgO thin films. For Enterobacter sp. strain a superior antimicrobial activity at 72h was noticed, in respect with simple BHA or Ti control. The enhanced antimicrobial performances, correlated with good cytocompatibility and mechanical properties recommend these biomaterials as an alternative to synthetic HA for the fabrication of reliable implant coatings for dentistry and other applications. PMID:26652442

  16. Evaluation of fit of cement-retained implant-supported 3-unit structures fabricated with direct metal laser sintering and vacuum casting techniques.

    PubMed

    Oyagüe, Raquel Castillo; Sánchez-Turrión, Andrés; López-Lozano, José Francisco; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Suárez-García, María Jesús

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluated the vertical discrepancy of implant-fixed 3-unit structures. Frameworks were constructed with laser-sintered Co-Cr, and vacuum-cast Co-Cr, Ni-Cr-Ti, and Pd-Au. Samples of each alloy group were randomly luted in standard fashion using resin-modified glass-ionomer, self-adhesive, and acrylic/urethane-based cements (n = 12 each). Discrepancies were SEM analyzed. Three-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were run (P < 0.05). Laser-sintered structures achieved the best fit per cement tested. Within each alloy group, resin-modified glass-ionomer and acrylic/urethane-based cements produced comparably lower discrepancies than the self-adhesive agent. The abutment position did not yield significant differences. All misfit values could be considered clinically acceptable.

  17. Hip Implant Modified To Increase Probability Of Retention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canabal, Francisco, III

    1995-01-01

    Modification in design of hip implant proposed to increase likelihood of retention of implant in femur after hip-repair surgery. Decreases likelihood of patient distress and expense associated with repetition of surgery after failed implant procedure. Intended to provide more favorable flow of cement used to bind implant in proximal extreme end of femur, reducing structural flaws causing early failure of implant/femur joint.

  18. Ion-implantation-induced stress in glasses: Variation of damage mode efficiency with changes in glass structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, G. W.

    1988-05-01

    Ion implantation induces lateral stress in glass due to the volume dilatation in the implanted near-surface region. Cantilever-beam experiments allow these quantities to be measured as a function of fluence. For fused silica the stress data for various incident ions are found to scale with atomic collision energy deposition. In sharp contrast, Pyrex (alkali-borosilicate) glass, (1 - x)(Na, K) 2O· xB 2O 3·3SiO 2 glass, and a sodalime (microscope slide) glass, yield stress values which scale with energy deposition into electronic processes. More significantly, this mode of damage production is dominant for the nuclear waste glasses PNL 76-68 and SRP. The void space in fused silica allows room for displaced Si and/or O. For the complex alkali-containing silicates, the interstitial volume is restricted. In the latter case, the probability increases that permanent defects can be formed by ionization-induced bond-breaking and network relaxation. These data imply that alpha-particle ionization energy deposition may be an important factor in nuclear waste glass radiation damage production, but the magnitude of this contribution has not yet been evaluated.

  19. Anomalous wear-out phenomena of europium-implanted light emitters based on a metal-oxide-semiconductor structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rebohle, L.; Lehmann, J.; Prucnal, S.; Nazarov, A.; Tyagulskii, I.; Tyagulskii, S.; Kanjilal, A.; Voelskow, M.; Grambole, D.; Skorupa, W.; Helm, M.

    2009-12-15

    The anomalous wear-out phenomena of Eu-implanted metal-oxide-semiconductor devices were investigated. It will be shown that in contrast to other rare earth elements the electroluminescence (EL) intensity of Eu-implanted SiO{sub 2} layers can rise under constant current injection before the known EL quenching will start. Under certain circumstances, this rise may amount up to two orders of magnitude. The EL behavior will be correlated with the microstructural and electrical properties of the devices. Transmission electron microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy were applied to trace the development of Eu/Eu oxide clusters and the diffusion of Eu to the interfaces of the gate oxide layer. The hydrogen profile within the SiO{sub 2}-SiON interface region was determined by nuclear reaction analysis. Current-voltage characteristics, EL decay times, and the progression of the voltage and the EL spectrum with increasing charge injection were measured to study charge and trapping phenomena in the oxide layer to reveal details of the EL excitation mechanism. A first qualitative model for the anomalous life time behavior is proposed.

  20. Hydroxyapatite motility implants in ocular prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Cowper, T R

    1995-03-01

    For the past 5 years, an increasing number of ophthalmologists have been using hydroxyapatite (HA) motility implants after uncomplicated enucleation or evisceration of the eye. Unlike previous implant materials, HA promotes fibrovascular ingrowth and seemingly true integration of the motility implant to the residual ocular structures. As a result, a more stable defect and greater movement of the overlying prosthesis is produced. In addition, the problems of long-term orbital implant migration and the vexing postenucleation socket syndrome are thought to be minimized. This article briefly reviews the history and development of orbital implants and HA implant surgical and prosthetic procedures. It is concluded that HA implant rehabilitation is indicated after most uncomplicated enucleations or eviscerations where there is small likelihood of complication.

  1. Investigations of silicone breast implants with the NMR-MOUSE.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Mirko; Schwarz, Annett; Blümich, Bernhard

    2007-02-01

    Silicone breast implants are used for breast augmentation and breast reconstruction. The issues of concern associated with such implants are: (a) the quality control of each implant before implantation, and (b) the detection of implant bleeding after implantation. We have studied the use of the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-MObile Universal Surface Explorer (NMR-MOUSE) for the nondestructive testing of (a) the quality of implant shells, and (b) changes in implant gel due to leakage of body fluid into the implant. Depth profiles measured nondestructively through implant shells at different positions of each implant by the Profile NMR-MOUSE assured good reproducibility of the quality and thickness of different shell layers. The leakage of implants upon rupture was mimicked by observing changes in the transverse NMR relaxation time of the implant gel upon ingress of physiological saline solution and safflower oil through the rupture. Results demonstrate that nondestructive testing with unilateral NMR is a potential method for use in the quality control of implants and for the screening of implants for rupture after implantation. PMID:17275616

  2. Distribution of pseudoexfoliation material on anterior segment structures in human autopsy eyes after cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation.

    PubMed

    Schmack, Ingo; Auffarth, Gerd Uwe

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the distribution and amount of pseudoexfoliation material (PXM) on anterior segment structures in pseudophakic human autopsy eyes with pseudoexfoliation (PEX) syndrome and to study its impact on fixation and decentration of posterior chamber intraocular lenses (IOLs). Sixteen human autopsy eyes (donor age [mean ± SD] 77.5 ± 8.6 years; range, 70-90 years) with history of cataract surgery and PEX syndrome were analyzed for distribution and accumulation of PXM on structures of the anterior segment by light microscopy. Quantitative IOL decentration measurements were performed using the Miyake-Apple posterior view technique. All 16 eyes displayed IOLs which were either fixed symmetrically in the capsular bag (n = 8) or asymmetrically with one haptic in the sulcus and one in the bag (n = 7) or at the pars plicata of the ciliary body (n = 1). In the majority, PXM was found around the pars plicata (average grade: 1.6 ± 0.53 µm) and the lens capsule (average grade: 1.05 ± 0.46 µm). Minor amounts were detected at the pars plana and the trabecular meshwork. IOL decentration measurements ranged from 0.51 ± 0.35 (symmetrical-fixation) to 0.61 ± 0.43 mm (asymmetrical-fixation). There was only a weak statistically not significant correlation in regard to the amount of PXM and IOL decentration and between PXM distribution and the IOL fixation site. PXM contributes to weakening of the suspensory apparatus of the crystalline lens. Although PXM induced tissue alterations predispose for a broad spectrum of intra- and postoperative complications, the amount and distribution of PXM on different anterior segment structures showed only a weak correlation to IOL decentration or fixation location. PMID:26307751

  3. Influence of ion-neutral collision parameters on dynamic structure of magnetized sheath during plasma immersion ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoram, Mansour; Ghomi, Hamid

    2016-03-01

    A cold magnetized plasma sheath is considered to examine the gas pressure effect on the sheath dynamics. A fluid model is used to describe the plasma sheath dynamic. The governing fluid equations in the plasma are solved from plasma center to the target using the finite difference method and some convenient initial and boundary conditions at the plasma center and target. It is found that, the ion-neutral collision has significant effect on the dynamic characteristics of the high-voltage sheath in the plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). It means that, the temporal profile of the ion dose on the target and sheath width are decreased by increasing the gas pressure. Also, the gas pressure substantially diminishes the temporal psychograph of ion incident angle on the target.

  4. Electronic structure of ytterbium-implanted GaN at ambient and high pressure: experimental and crystal field studies.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, A; Ma, C-G; Brik, M G; Kozanecki, A; Boćkowski, M; Alves, E; Suchocki, A

    2012-03-01

    The results of high-pressure low-temperature optical measurements in a diamond-anvil cell of bulk gallium nitride crystals implanted with ytterbium are reported in combination with crystal field calculations of the Yb(3+) energy levels. Crystal field analysis of splitting of the (2)F(7/2) and (2)F(5/2) states has been performed, with the aim of assigning all features of the experimental luminescence spectra. A thorough analysis of the pressure behavior of the Yb(3+) luminescence lines in GaN allowed the determination of the ambient-pressure positions and pressure dependence of the Yb(3+) energy levels in the trigonal crystal field as well as the pressure-induced changes of the spin-orbit coupling coefficient.

  5. Information fusion approach for detection of brain structures in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shademan, Azad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents an information fusion approach for automatic detection of mid-brain nuclei (caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and thalamus) from MRI. The method is based on fusion of anatomical information, obtained from brain atlases and expert physicians, into MRI numerical information within a fuzzy framework, employed to model intrinsic uncertainty of problem. First step of this method is segmentation of brain tissues (gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid). Physical landmarks such as inter-hemispheric plane alongside numerical information from segmentation step are then used to describe the nuclei. Each nucleus is defined according to a unique description according to physical landmarks and anatomical landmarks, most of which are the previously detected nuclei. Also, a detected nucleus in slice n serves as key landmark to detect same nucleus in slice n+1. These steps construct fuzzy decision maps. Overall decision is made after fusing all of decisions according to a fusion operator. This approach has been implemented to detect caudate, putamen, and thalamus from a sequence of axial T1-weighted brain MRI's. Our experience shows that final nuclei detection results are highly dependent upon primary tissue segmentation. The method is validated by comparing resultant nuclei volumes with those obtained using manual segmentation performed by expert physicians.

  6. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Eriberto; Sbricoli, Luca; Guazzo, Riccardo; Tocco, Ilaria; Roman, Marco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Stellini, Edoardo; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Sivolella, Stefano; Zavan, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration) is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years. PMID:23344062

  7. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. PMID:26635486

  8. [Implant-associated infections - Diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Renz, N; Müller, M; Perka, C; Trampuz, A

    2016-10-01

    The diagnosis of implant-associated infections is challenging as chronic low-grade infections often only manifest as subtle clinical symptoms. Clinical evaluation, patient history, imaging, histopathological and microbiological examinations build the cornerstones of the diagnostics for implant-associated infections. New onset of pain at rest, local symptoms at the surgical site and early loosening of the prosthesis or pseudarthrosis should raise suspicion for an infection and prompt further evaluation. Percutaneous sinus tracts, purulent wound secretions and skin erosions with exposure of the implant are certain signs of implant-associated infections. Elevated C‑reactive protein levels in blood support the diagnosis of infection but are neither sufficient sensitive nor specific to confirm or exclude infection. Preoperative antibiotic therapy interferes with the diagnostic evaluation and should be avoided. In periprosthetic joint infections, joint aspiration with determination of the leukocyte count and microbiological examination is a crucial first diagnostic step. Through microbiological and histopathological examinations of intraoperative tissue samples, as well as sonication of explanted implants, the causative pathogen can be identified in most cases. In osteosynthesis-associated infections imaging plays a key role to detect non-union, infection callus, sequester, peri-implant osteolysis and extraosseous and intramedullary pathologies. In prosthetic joint infections imaging provides information about the position and stability of the prosthesis. In case of hematogenic infection seeding from a distant focus, blood cultures should be sampled, followed by a meticulous investigation of potential primary focus of infection, depending on the causative agent.

  9. Abridged Technique for Precise Implant Angulation

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Praveen; Chander, Gopi Naveen; Reddy, Ramesh; Muthukumar, B.

    2015-01-01

    Enormous scientific knowledge with evidence and clinical dexterity impart definitive ground for success in implant dentistry. Nevertheless, the unfeasibility to access the inner bone tissue makes the situation altogether more demanding. Presently the advent of numerous imaging techniques and associated surgical guide templates are documented for evaluation of implant angulation. However, they are not cost effective and consume more time to plan and design the structure. This article describes a simple concise technique for precise implant angulation. PMID:26816997

  10. Damage detection in mechanical structures using extreme value statistic.

    SciTech Connect

    Worden, K.; Allen, D. W.; Sohn, H.; Farrar, C. R.

    2002-01-01

    The first and most important objective of any damage identification algorithms is to ascertain with confidence if damage is present or not. Many methods have been proposed for damage detection based on ideas of novelty detection founded in pattern recognition and multivariate statistics. The philosophy of novelty detection is simple. Features are first extracted from a baseline system to be monitored, and subsequent data are then compared to see if the new features are outliers, which significantly depart from the rest of population. In damage diagnosis problems, the assumption is that outliers are generated from a damaged condition of the monitored system. This damage classification necessitates the establishment of a decision boundary. Choosing this threshold value is often based on the assumption that the parent distribution of data is Gaussian in nature. While the problem of novelty detection focuses attention on the outlier or extreme values of the data i.e. those points in the tails of the distribution, the threshold selection using the normality assumption weighs the central population of data. Therefore, this normality assumption might impose potentially misleading behavior on damage classification, and is likely to lead the damage diagnosis astray. In this paper, extreme value statistics is integrated with the novelty detection to specifically model the tails of the distribution of interest. Finally, the proposed technique is demonstrated on simulated numerical data and time series data measured from an eight degree-of-freedom spring-mass system.

  11. Current status of silicone breast implants.

    PubMed

    Cruz, N I

    1991-08-01

    The current status of the silicone breast implants which have recently come under scrutiny by the FDA and received much unfavorable media coverage is reviewed. The gel-filled breast implants which in 1976 were "grandfathered" by the FDA have now been required to provide scientific evidence of safety and effectiveness by July 9, 1991. The possible risks of silicone breast implants include capsular contracture, interference with early tumor detection by routine mammography, development of sarcomas in laboratory animals (no human cases are reported), silicone gel leakage and connective tissue disease. In the less frequently used polyurethane covered implants, the degradation of the polyurethane to diaminotoluene (TDA) has caused liver cancer in laboratory animals, yet at present, this type of implant has been voluntarily removed from the market by the manufacturer. After reviewing the available evidence, the American Society of Plastic Surgery still considers silicone breast implants reliable and safe. PMID:1816782

  12. Cochlear implants in young children.

    PubMed

    Niparko, John K; Blankenhorn, Rebecca

    2003-01-01

    The cochlear implant is best characterized as a device that provides access to the sound environment. The device enables the hearing pathway to respond to environmental and speech sounds, providing informational cues from the surroundings and from others that may escape visual detection. As the developmental effects of a profound hearing loss are multiple, cochlear implants have been applied to ever younger children in an attempt to promote a more normal level of developmental learning through audition. In deafness, transducer elements of the inner ear fail to trigger auditory nerve afferent nerves in the presence of sound input. However, large reserves of afferent fibers exist even in the auditory nerve of a profoundly deaf patient. Furthermore, these nerve fibers retain the ability to respond to prosthetic activation. Through developmental learning in the early, formative years, auditory centers of the brain appear capable of processing information from the implant to provide speech comprehension and oral language development. Multichannel implants have replaced original single channel designs. multichannel devices enable larger percentages of recipients to recognize the spoken word without visual cues because they provide spectral information in addition to temporal and intensity cues. Testing under conditions of auditory (implant)-only input reveals significant open-set speech understanding capabilities in more than 75% of children after three years of device use. The benefit provided by implants may vary with a number of conditions including: hearing history, age of deafness onset, age at implantation, etiology of deafness, linguistic abilities, and the presence of a motivated system of support of oral language development. Patient variables should be given individual consideration in judging candidacy for a cochlear implant and in planning rehabilitative and education services after surgery and activation of the device.

  13. Osteogenesis and morphology of the peri-implant bone facing dental implants.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Marco; Orsini, Ester; Trire, Alessandra; Quaranta, Marilisa; Martini, Desiree; Piccari, Gabriella G; Ruggeri, Alessandro; Ottani, Vittoria

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of different implant surfaces on peri-implant osteogenesis and implant face morphology of peri-implant tissues during the early (2 weeks) and complete healing period (3 months). Thirty endosseous titanium implants (conic screws) with differently treated surfaces (smooth titanium = SS, titanium plasma sprayed = TPS, sand-blasted zirconium oxide = Zr-SLA) were implanted in femur and tibiae diaphyses of two mongrel sheep. Histological sections of the implants and surrounding tissues obtained by sawing and grinding techniques were observed under light microscopy (LM). The peri-implant tissues of other samples were mechanically detached from the corresponding implants to be processed for SEM observation. Two weeks after implantation, we observed osteogenesis (new bone trabeculae) around all implant surfaces only where a gap was present at the host bone-metal interface. No evident bone deposition was detectable where threads of the screws were in direct contact with the compact host bone. Distance osteogenesis predominated in SS implants, while around rough surfaces (TPS and Zr-SLA), both distance and contact osteogenesis were present. At SEM analysis 2 weeks after implantation, the implant face of SS peri-implant tissue showed few, thin, newly formed, bone trabeculae immersed in large, loose, marrow tissue with blood vessels. Around the TPS screws, the implant face of the peri-implant tissue was rather irregular because of the rougher metal surface. Zr-SLA screws showed more numerous, newly formed bone trabeculae crossing marrow spaces and also needle-like crystals in bone nodules indicating an active mineralising process. After 3 months, all the screws appeared osseointegrated, being almost completely covered by a compact, mature, newly formed bone. However, some marrow spaces rich in blood vessels and undifferentiated cells were in contact with the metal surface. By SEM analysis, the implant face of the peri-implant tissue showed

  14. Dosimetry of a thyroid uptake detected in seed migration survey following a patient's iodine-125 prostate implant and in vitro measurements of intentional seed leakages

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qinsheng; Russell, John L. Jr.; Macklis, Roger R.; Weinhous, Martin S.; Blair, Henry F.

    2006-07-15

    As a quality control procedure, a post-implant seed migration survey has been accomplished on 340 prostate cancer patients since November 2001. Pulmonary seed embolization and intracardiac seed embolization have been detected. A case of thyroid uptake due to leaking iodine-125 (I-125) sources was also seized. In order to determine the dose to the thyroid, a dosimetry method was developed to link in vivo measurements and the cumulated dose to the thyroid. The calculated source leakage half-life in the case was approximately 15 days based on the measurements and the estimated cumulated dose to thyroid was 204 cGy. It is concluded that one seed was leaking. In order to verify the in vivo measurements, intentional in vitro seed leakage tests were performed. A seed was cut open and placed in a sealed glass container filled with a given volume of saline. The I-125 concentration in the saline was subsequently measured over a period of six months. Consistent in vivo and in vitro results were obtained. Recent incidents of seed leaks reported from other centers have drawn practitioners' attention to this problem. In order to make the measurements more useful, the seed leakage tests were expanded to include I-125 seeds from six other vendors. The results show that the leakage half-lives of those seeds varied from nine days to a half-year. Two seed models demonstrated least leakage. Since the measurements lasted for six months, the escape of iodine resulted from oxidation of iodide in the saline was a concern for the measurement accuracy. As a reference, another set of leakage tests were performed by adding sodium thiosulfate salt (Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O) to the saline. Sodium thiosulfate is a reducing agent that prevents the conversion of iodide to iodate so as to minimize I-125 evaporation. As a result, significantly shortened leakage half-lives were observed in this group. Seed agitation was also performed and no significant deviations of the

  15. PROPERTIES OF DEFECTS AND IMPLANTS IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Zhu, Zihua; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2013-09-25

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor designs, silicon carbide (SiC) under high-energy neutron irradiation undergoes atomic displacement damage and transmutation reactions that create magnesium as one of the major metallic products. The presence of Mg and lattice disorder in SiC is expected to affect structural stability and degrade thermo-mechanical properties that could limit SiC lifetime for service. We have initiated a combined experimental and computational study that uses Mg+ ion implantation and multiscale modeling to investigate the structural and chemical effects in Mg implanted SiC and explore possible property degradation mechanisms.

  16. Structural chromosomal anomalies detected by prenatal genetic diagnosis: our experience.

    PubMed

    Farcaş, Simona; Crişan, C D; Andreescu, Nicoleta; Stoian, Monica; Motoc, A G M

    2013-01-01

    The prenatal diagnosis is currently widely spread and facilitates the acquiring of important genetic information about the fetus by a rate extremely accelerate and considered without precedent. In this paper, we like to present our experience concerning the genetic diagnosis and counseling offered for pregnancies in which a structural chromosomal aberration was found. The study group is formed by 528 prenatal samples of amniotic fluid and chorionic villi, received by our laboratory from 2006 through October 2012 for cytogenetic diagnosis. The appropriate genetic investigation was selected based on the indications for prenatal diagnosis. The cases with structural chromosomal anomalies and polymorphic variants were analyzed as regard to the maternal age, gestational age, referral indications and type of chromosomal anomaly found. A total number of 21 structural chromosomal anomalies and polymorphic variants were identified in the study group. Out of 21 structural chromosomal anomalies and polymorphic variants, six deletions and microdeletions, four situations with abnormal long "p" arm of acrocentric chromosomes, two duplications, two reciprocal translocations, two inversions, two additions, one Robertsonian translocation associating trisomy 13, one 9q heteromorphism and one complex chromosome rearrangement were noticed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first Romanian study in which the diagnostic strategies and the management of the prenatal cases with structural rearrangements are presented. The data provided about the diagnosis strategy and the management of the prenatal cases with structural chromosomal anomalies represents a useful tool in genetic counseling of pregnancies diagnosed with rare structural chromosomal anomalies. PMID:23771085

  17. Fine Structural Detection of Calcium Ions by Photoconversion

    PubMed Central

    Poletto, V.; Galimberti, V.; Guerra, G.; Rosti, V.; Moccia, F.; Biggiogera, M.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a tool for a rapid high-resolution detection of calcium ions which can be used in parallel with other techniques. We have applied a new approach by photo-oxidation of diaminobenzidine in presence of the emission of an excited fluorochrome specific for calcium detection. This method combines the selectivity of available fluorophores to the high spatial resolution offered by transmission electron microscopy to detect fluorescing molecules even when present in low amounts in membrane-bounded organelles. We show in this paper that Mag-Fura 2 photoconversion via diaminobenzidine oxidation is an efficient way for localizing Ca2+ ions at electron microscopy level, is easily carried out and reproducible, and can be obtained on a good amount of cells, since the exposure in our conditions is not limited to the direct irradiation of the sample via an objective but obtained with a germicide lamp. The end product is sufficiently electron dense to be detected clearly when present in sufficient amount within a membrane boundary. PMID:27734989

  18. An unusual case of a ruptured Poly Implant Prothèse breast implant associated with xanthoma.

    PubMed

    Dinets, Andrii; Unukovych, Dmytro; Khrapach, Vasyl; Zakhartseva, Olga; Sulik, Volodymyr; Kaminskyi, Edgar; Khrapach, Olexandr; Meloyan, Ani; Zakhartseva, Lubov; Mishalov, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    A suspicious breast mass was intra-operatively found in a female patient previously operated for breast augmentation with the Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) implants. The neoplasm was verified as xanthoma and an asymptomatic microrupture of PIP was also detected. This report discusses possible association of breast xanthoma with PIP implant rupture. PMID:27583262

  19. An unusual case of a ruptured Poly Implant Prothèse breast implant associated with xanthoma

    PubMed Central

    Dinets, Andrii; Unukovych, Dmytro; Khrapach, Vasyl; Zakhartseva, Olga; Sulik, Volodymyr; Kaminskyi, Edgar; Khrapach, Olexandr; Meloyan, Ani; Zakhartseva, Lubov; Mishalov, Volodymyr

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A suspicious breast mass was intra-operatively found in a female patient previously operated for breast augmentation with the Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) implants. The neoplasm was verified as xanthoma and an asymptomatic microrupture of PIP was also detected. This report discusses possible association of breast xanthoma with PIP implant rupture. PMID:27583262

  20. New nondestructive techniques for the detection and quantification of corrosion in aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winfree, W. P.; Cramer, K. E.; Johnston, P. H.; Namkung, M.

    1995-01-01

    An overview is presented of several techniques under development at NASA Langley Research Center for detection and quantification of corrosion in aircraft structures. The techniques have been developed as part of the NASA Airframe Structural Integrity Program. The techniques focus on the detection of subsurface corrosion in thin laminated structures. Results are presented on specimens with both manufactured defects, for calibration of the techniques, and on specimens removed from aircraft.

  1. Effects of implantation of three-dimensional engineered bone tissue with a vascular-like structure on repair of bone defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Masanori; Matsumoto, Rena; Dong, Jian; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2012-12-01

    Previously, to create an implantable bone tissue associated with blood vessels, we co-cultured rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with MSC-derived endothelial cells (ECs) within a porous polylactic acid-based scaffold utilizing a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor. Here, this engineered tissue was orthotopically implanted into defects made in femurs of immunodeficient rats, and histological analysis were carried out to examine the repair of the damage and the formation of bone around the implant. The bone defects were better repaired in the implanted group than control group after 3 weeks. The results indicate that the engineered bone could repair bone defects.

  2. Biomechanics of Corneal Ring Implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biomechanics of corneal ring implants by providing a related mathematical theory and biomechanical model for the treatment of myopia and keratoconus. Methods: The spherical dome model considers the inhomogeneity of the tunica of the eye, dimensions of the cornea, lamellar structure of the corneal stroma, and asphericity of the cornea. It is used in this study for calculating a strengthening factor sf for the characterization of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs. The strengthening factor is a measure of the amount of strengthening of the cornea induced by the implant. Results: For ring segments and incomplete rings, sf = 1.0, which indicates that these implants are not able to strengthen the cornea. The intracorneal continuous complete ring (MyoRing) has a strengthening factor of up to sf = 3.2. The MyoRing is, therefore, able to strengthen the cornea significantly. Conclusions: The result of the presented biomechanical analysis of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs can explain the different postoperative clinical results of different implant types in myopia and keratoconus. PMID:26312619

  3. Detection of Anatomic Structures in Human Retinal Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Chaum, Edward; Muthusamy Govindasamy, Vijaya Priya; Karnowski, Thomas Paul

    2007-01-01

    The widespread availability of electronic imaging devices throughout the medical community is leading to a growing body of research on image processing and analysis to diagnose retinal disease such as diabetic retinopathy (DR). Productive computer-based screening of large, at-risk populations at low cost requires robust, automated image analysis. In this paper we present results for the automatic detection of the optic nerve and localization of the macula using digital red-free fundus photography. Our method relies on the accurate segmentation of the vasculature of the retina followed by the determination of spatial features describing the density,average thickness, and average orientation of the vasculature in relation to the position of the optic nerve. Localization of the macula follows using knowledge of the optic nerve location to detect the horizontal raphe of the retina using a geometric model of the vasculature. We report 90.4% detection performance for the optic nerve and 92.5% localization performance for the macula for red-free fundus images representing a population of 345 images corresponding to 269 patients with 18 different pathologies associated with DR and other common retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration.

  4. The case for a generic implant processor.

    PubMed

    Strydis, Christos; Gaydadjiev, Georgi N

    2008-01-01

    A more structured and streamlined design of implants is nowadays possible. In this paper we focus on implant processors located in the heart of implantable systems. We present a real and representative biomedical-application scenario where such a new processor can be employed. Based on a suitably selected processor simulator, various operational aspects of the application are being monitored. Findings on performance, cache behavior, branch prediction, power consumption, energy expenditure and instruction mixes are presented and analyzed. The suitability of such an implant processor and directions for future work are given.

  5. Bilateral Poly Implant Prothèse Implant Rupture: An Uncommon Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mallon, Peter; Ganachaud, François; Malhaire, Caroline; Brunel, Raphael; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Feron, Jean-Guillaume; Couturaud, Benoit; Fitoussi, Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Summary: A woman in her 50s underwent delayed bilateral Poly Implant Prothèse implant reconstruction following mastectomy for breast cancer. Symptoms of implant rupture developed 43 months after surgery with an erythematous rash on her trunk. The rash then spread to her reconstructed breast mounds. Initial ultrasound scan and magnetic resonance imaging were normal; however, subsequent magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated left implant rupture only. In theater, following removal of both implants, both were found to be ruptured. The rash on her trunk resolved within 3 weeks in the postoperative period. Chemical analyses of silicone in both implants confirmed a nonauthorized silicone source; in addition, the chemical structure was significantly different between the left and right implant, perhaps explaining the variation in presentation. PMID:25289223

  6. Detection of Structural Faults by Modal Data, Lower Bounds and Shadow Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contursi, T.; Mangialardi, L. M.; Messina, A.

    1998-02-01

    Different algorithms have recently been developed for the diagnosis of many types of civil and mechanical structures using modal data, such as natural frequencies and mode shapes. Although many solutions have been proposed, some important questions seem to be absent in the technical literature. If changes in a structure's modal parameters are able to reflect structural faults, it is important to know what is the smallest detectable physical change in that structure.It is suggested that damage detection by means of modal data can be useful for macro-damage rather than for micro-damage. This resulted from numerical and experimental tests using a simple correlation between measurement noise and sensitivity of modal data, with respect to structural changes in different parts of a system. An automatic sensitivity approach is presented to obtain the lower bound of structural faults for the particular structure under study. The same automatic procedure is able to detect possible shadow sites within the frequency range analyzed.

  7. Application of shearography to crack detection in concrete structures subjected to traffic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzet, V.; Blain, P.; Przybyla, D.

    2010-09-01

    Early detection of defects in concrete structures, such as bridges or dams, is essential to optimize the maintenance of civil engineering facilities. Optical methods constitute non-destructive means of control and measurement but they are generally confined in laboratories where both the setup and environnement are controlled. The method of shearography is especially well adapted to detect damages due to both its capacity to distinctly visualize strain concentration zones and its robustness. The experimental set-up is relatively compact, which enables to examine an extensive surface area by simply moving the shearographic head. In this paper, the application of this methodology for the detection of cracks is presented on concrete samples and circulated outside concrete structures. Due to its sensitivity to strain concentration, shearography is able to detect structural cracks, even when they were not through-cracks. Operational implementation is made on two circulated structures with experts in manual cracks detection. No stimulation device is used. In the first structure, cracks are detected on the bridge deck and on the bridge abutment. In the second structure, cracks on the intrados of the bridge deck are detected and also beginning of cracks which have not been detected by the visual inspection. Different areas are scanned and the results are in agreement with the visual inspection. This technique enables detecting cracks on structures subjected to traffic load. The natural loading of an engineering structure, i.e. the rolling traffic it bears, proves well suited for cracks detection by means of shearography, provided traffic patterns are regular enough.

  8. A new approach for structural health monitoring by applying anomaly detection on strain sensor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichias, Konstantinos; Pijpers, Richard; Meeuwissen, Erik

    2014-03-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) systems help to monitor critical infrastructures (bridges, tunnels, etc.) remotely and provide up-to-date information about their physical condition. In addition, it helps to predict the structure's life and required maintenance in a cost-efficient way. Typically, inspection data gives insight in the structural health. The global structural behavior, and predominantly the structural loading, is generally measured with vibration and strain sensors. Acoustic emission sensors are more and more used for measuring global crack activity near critical locations. In this paper, we present a procedure for local structural health monitoring by applying Anomaly Detection (AD) on strain sensor data for sensors that are applied in expected crack path. Sensor data is analyzed by automatic anomaly detection in order to find crack activity at an early stage. This approach targets the monitoring of critical structural locations, such as welds, near which strain sensors can be applied during construction and/or locations with limited inspection possibilities during structural operation. We investigate several anomaly detection techniques to detect changes in statistical properties, indicating structural degradation. The most effective one is a novel polynomial fitting technique, which tracks slow changes in sensor data. Our approach has been tested on a representative test structure (bridge deck) in a lab environment, under constant and variable amplitude fatigue loading. In both cases, the evolving cracks at the monitored locations were successfully detected, autonomously, by our AD monitoring tool.

  9. Testing Structural Equation Models or Detection of Misspecifications?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saris, Willem E.; Satorra, Albert; van der Veld, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Assessing the correctness of a structural equation model is essential to avoid drawing incorrect conclusions from empirical research. In the past, the chi-square test was recommended for assessing the correctness of the model but this test has been criticized because of its sensitivity to sample size. As a reaction, an abundance of fit indexes…

  10. DETECTING UNSPECIFIED STRUCTURE IN LOW-COUNT IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Nathan M.; Dyk, David A. van; Kashyap, Vinay L.; Siemiginowska, Aneta E-mail: dvandyk@imperial.ac.uk E-mail: asiemiginowska@cfa.harvard.edu

    2015-11-01

    Unexpected structure in images of astronomical sources often presents itself upon visual inspection of the image, but such apparent structure may either correspond to true features in the source or be due to noise in the data. This paper presents a method for testing whether inferred structure in an image with Poisson noise represents a significant departure from a baseline (null) model of the image. To infer image structure, we conduct a Bayesian analysis of a full model that uses a multiscale component to allow flexible departures from the posited null model. As a test statistic, we use a tail probability of the posterior distribution under the full model. This choice of test statistic allows us to estimate a computationally efficient upper bound on a p-value that enables us to draw strong conclusions even when there are limited computational resources that can be devoted to simulations under the null model. We demonstrate the statistical performance of our method on simulated images. Applying our method to an X-ray image of the quasar 0730+257, we find significant evidence against the null model of a single point source and uniform background, lending support to the claim of an X-ray jet.

  11. Multi-stage identification scheme for detecting damage in structures under ambient excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Chunxiao; Hao, Hong; Li, Zhong-Xian

    2013-04-01

    Structural damage identification methods are critical to the successful application of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems to civil engineering structures. The dynamic response of civil engineering structures is usually characterized by high nonlinearity and non-stationarity. Accordingly, an improved Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) method which is adaptive, output-only and applicable to system identification of in-service structures under ambient excitations is developed in this study. Based on this method, a multi-stage damage detection scheme including the detection of damage occurrence, damage existence, damage location and the estimation of damage severity is developed. In this scheme, the improved HHT method is used to analyse the structural acceleration response, the obtained instantaneous frequency detects the instant of damage occurrence, the instantaneous phase is sensitive to minor damage and provides reliable damage indication, and the damage indicator developed based on statistical analysis of the Hilbert marginal spectrum detects damage locations. Finally, the response sampled at the detected damage location is continuously analysed to estimate the damage severity. Numerical and experimental studies of frame structures under ambient excitations are performed. The results demonstrate that this scheme accomplishes the above damage detection functions within one flow. It is robust, time efficient, simply implemented and applicable to the real-time SHM of in-service structures.

  12. Detection of small exchange fields in S/F structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenko, A. S.; Kawabata, S.; Ozaeta, A.; Golubov, A. A.; Stolyarov, V. S.; Bergeret, F. S.; Hekking, F. W. J.

    2015-06-01

    Ferromagnetic materials with exchange fields Eex smaller or of the order of the superconducting gap Δ are important for applications of corresponding (s-wave) superconductor/ferromagnet/superconductor (SFS) junctions. Presently such materials are not known but there are several proposals how to create them. Small exchange fields are in principle difficult to detect. Based on our results we propose reliable detection methods of such small Eex. For exchange fields smaller than the superconducting gap the subgap differential conductance of the normal metal-ferromagnet-insulator-superconductor (NFIS) junction shows a peak at the voltage bias equal to the exchange field of the ferromagnetic layer, eV =Eex. Thus measuring the subgap conductance one can reliably determine small Eex < Δ. In the opposite case Eex > Δ one can determine the exchange field in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiment. The density of states of the FS bilayer measured at the outer border of the ferromagnet shows a peak at the energy equal to the exchange field, E =Eex. This peak can be only visible for small enough exchange fields of the order of few Δ.

  13. Network community structure detection for directional neural networks inferred from multichannel multisubject EEG data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Moser, Jason; Aviyente, Selin

    2014-07-01

    In many neuroscience applications, one is interested in identifying the functional brain modules from multichannel, multiple subject neuroimaging data. However, most of the existing network community structure detection algorithms are limited to single undirected networks and cannot reveal the common community structure for a collection of directed networks. In this paper, we propose a community detection algorithm for weighted asymmetric (directed) networks representing the effective connectivity in the brain. Moreover, the issue of finding a common community structure across subjects is addressed by maximizing the total modularity of the group. Finally, the proposed community detection algorithm is applied to multichannel multisubject electroencephalogram data.

  14. Detecting structural information of scatterers using spatial frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Bodenschatz, Nico; Krauter, Philipp; Nothelfer, Steffen; Foschum, Florian; Bergmann, Florian; Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate optical phantom experiments on the phase function parameter γ using spatial frequency domain imaging. The incorporation of two different types of scattering particles allows for control of the optical phantoms’ microscopic scattering properties. By laterally structuring areas with either TiO2 or Al2O3 scattering particles, we were able to obtain almost pure subdiffusive scattering contrast in a single optical phantom. Optical parameter mapping was then achieved using an analytical radiative transfer model revealing the microscopic structural contrast on a macroscopic field of view. As part of our study, we explain several correction and referencing techniques for high spatial frequency analysis and experimentally study the sampling depth of the subdiffusive parameter γ.

  15. Detecting structural information of scatterers using spatial frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Bodenschatz, Nico; Krauter, Philipp; Nothelfer, Steffen; Foschum, Florian; Bergmann, Florian; Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate optical phantom experiments on the phase function parameter γ using spatial frequency domain imaging. The incorporation of two different types of scattering particles allows for control of the optical phantoms’ microscopic scattering properties. By laterally structuring areas with either TiO2 or Al2O3 scattering particles, we were able to obtain almost pure subdiffusive scattering contrast in a single optical phantom. Optical parameter mapping was then achieved using an analytical radiative transfer model revealing the microscopic structural contrast on a macroscopic field of view. As part of our study, we explain several correction and referencing techniques for high spatial frequency analysis and experimentally study the sampling depth of the subdiffusive parameter γ. PMID:26590206

  16. [Structural analyses of unknown red dyes detected in dried strawberry].

    PubMed

    Shindo, Tetsuya; Sadamasu, Yuki; Suzuki, Keiko; Tanaka, Yasukazu; Togawa, Akiko; Nakajima, Junichi; Nakazato, Mitsuo; Uematsu, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    We examined two unknown red dyes (designated as red dyes "A" and "B") from a dried strawberry package with a label that indicated the presence of food red No. 40 (R40). Red dye "A" was identified as trisodium 3-hydroxy-4-[(2'-methoxy-5'-methyl-4'-sulfonatophenyl)azo]-2,7-naphthalenedisulfonate (CSA-R) by HPLC, UV-VIS spectra and MS spectra. This compound is one of the four reported subsidiary colors of R40. Detailed analyses of red dye "B" by MS and NMR demonstrated that its structure was disodium 3-hydroxy-4-[(2'-methoxy-5'-methyl-4'-sulfonatophenyl)azo]-2-naphthalenesulfonate. Red dye "B" is a structural isomer of R40, that has not been reported previously. Our results suggest that the two minor red dyes were subsidiary colors contained in R40, which had been added to the dried strawberries.

  17. [High performance of an implantable Holter monitor in the detection of concealed paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with cryptogenic stroke and a suspected embolic mechanism].

    PubMed

    Rojo-Martinez, Esther; Sandín-Fuentes, María; Calleja-Sanz, Ana I; Cortijo-García, Elisa; García-Bermejo, Pablo; Ruiz-Piñero, Marina; Rubio-Sanz, Jerónimo; Arenillas-Lara, Juan F

    2013-09-16

    Introduccion. El holter implantable permite detectar fibrilacion auricular paroxistica (FAP) oculta en pacientes con ictus criptogenico, pero se desconoce que algoritmo de seleccion tiene un mayor rendimiento y la duracion optima de monitorizacion. Objetivo. Conocer la frecuencia y el tiempo hasta detectar la FAP mediante un holter implantable Reveal XT ® en pacientes con ictus criptogenico seleccionados por sospecha elevada de embolismo cerebral. Pacientes y metodos. Criterios de seleccion: ausencia de etiologia del ictus tras el estudio completo incluyendo un ecocardiograma transesofagico, monitorizacion ECG y holter de 24 horas, asi como confirmacion de oclusion aguda embolica de la arteria intracraneal por duplex transcraneal o bien alta sospecha de embolismo por caracteristicas de neuroimagen. Tras implantar el holter Reveal XT se formo a los pacientes para que emprendieran transmisiones todos los meses o ante sintomas. Se reviso la informacion online mensualmente y se realizaron visitas clinicas en las unidades de Neurologia y Cardiologia. Resultados. Se incluyeron 101 pacientes con ictus criptogenico y al menos un mes de seguimiento: edad media de 67 años, 54 mujeres (53,5%). Tiempo medio de seguimiento: 281 ± 212 dias. Se detecto FAP oculta en 34 pacientes (33,7%) y falsos positivos en 23 (22,8%). Mediana desde el implante hasta la deteccion de la arritmia: 102 dias (rango: 26-240 dias). En un 70% de los pacientes se registraron multiples episodios de FAP. El 75% de los eventos se detectaron durante los primeros seis meses de monitorizacion. Conclusiones. El algoritmo de seleccion de pacientes con ictus criptogenico segun sospecha de embolismo cerebral se asocio a una elevada frecuencia (33,7%) de FAP oculta con holter implantable. Uno de cada cuatro eventos sucedio tras los primeros seis meses de monitorizacion.

  18. Detecting the temporal structure of sound sequences in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Háden, Gábor P; Honing, Henkjan; Török, Miklós; Winkler, István

    2015-04-01

    Most high-level auditory functions require one to detect the onset and offset of sound sequences as well as registering the rate at which sounds are presented within the sound trains. By recording event-related brain potentials to onsets and offsets of tone trains as well as to changes in the presentation rate, we tested whether these fundamental auditory capabilities are functional at birth. Each of these events elicited significant event-related potential components in sleeping healthy neonates. The data thus demonstrate that the newborn brain is sensitive to these acoustic features suggesting that infants are geared towards the temporal aspects of segregating sound sources, speech and music perception already at birth.

  19. Wireless system for explosion detection in underground structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikhradze, M.; Bochorishvili, N.; Akhvlediani, I.; Kukhalashvili, D.; Kalichava, I.; Mataradze, E.

    2009-06-01

    Considering the growing threat of terrorist or accidental explosions in underground stations, underground highway and railway sections improvement of system for protecting people from explosions appears urgent. Current automatic protective devices with blast identification module and blast damping absorbers of various designs as their basic elements cannot be considered effective. Analysis revealed that low reliability of blast detection and delayed generation of start signal for the activation of an absorber are the major disadvantages of protective devices. Besides the transmission of trigger signal to an energy absorber through cable communication reduces the reliability of the operation of protective device due to a possible damage of electric wiring under blast or mechanical attack. This paper presents the outcomes of the studies conducted to select accurate criteria for blast identification and to design wireless system of activation of defensive device. The results of testing of blast detection methods (seismic, EMP, optical, on overpressure) showed that the proposed method, which implies constant monitoring of overpressure in terms of its reliability and response speed, best meets the requirements. Proposed wireless system for explosions identification and activation of protective device consists of transmitter and receiver modules. Transmitter module contains sensor and microprocessor equipped with blast identification software. Receiver module produces activation signal for operation of absorber. Tests were performed in the underground experimental base of Mining Institute. The time between the moment of receiving signal by the sensor and activation of absorber - 640 microsecond; distance between transmitter and receiver in direct tunnel - at least 150m; in tunnel with 900 bending - 50m. This research is sponsored by NATO's Public Diplomacy Division in the framework of "Science for Peace".

  20. Surface characteristics of TiN/ZrN coated nanotubular structure on the Ti-35Ta-xHf alloy for bio-implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Byung-Hak; Choe, Han-Cheol; Brantley, William A.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the surface characteristics of the TiN/ZrN-coated nanotubular structure on Ti-35Ta-xHf ternary alloys for bio-implant applications. These ternary alloys contained from 3 wt.% to 15 wt.% Hf contents and were manufactured in an arc-melting furnace. The Ti-35Ta-xHf alloys were heat treated in Ar atmosphere at 1000 °C for 24 h, followed by water quenching. Formation of the nanotubular structure was achieved by an electrochemical method in 1 M H3PO4 electrolytes containing 0.8 wt.% NaF. The TiN coating and ZrN coating were subsequently prepared by DC-sputtering on the nanotubular surface. Microstructures and nanotubular morphology of the alloys were examined by FE-SEM, EDX and XRD. The microstructure showed a duplex (α‧‧ + β) phase structure. Traces of martensite disappeared with increasing Hf content, and the Ti-35Nb-15Hf alloy had an entirely equiaxed structure of β phase. This research has shown that highly ordered, high aspect ratio, and nanotubular morphology surface oxide layers can be formed on the ternary titanium alloys by anodization. The TiN and ZrN coatings formed on the nanotubular surfaces were uniform and stable. The top of the nanotube layers was uniformly covered with the ZrN film compared to the TiN film when the Ti-35Ta-xHf alloys had high Hf content.

  1. Active Structured Learning for High-Speed Object Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, Christoph H.; Peters, Jan

    High-speed smooth and accurate visual tracking of objects in arbitrary, unstructured environments is essential for robotics and human motion analysis. However, building a system that can adapt to arbitrary objects and a wide range of lighting conditions is a challenging problem, especially if hard real-time constraints apply like in robotics scenarios. In this work, we introduce a method for learning a discriminative object tracking system based on the recent structured regression framework for object localization. Using a kernel function that allows fast evaluation on the GPU, the resulting system can process video streams at speed of 100 frames per second or more.

  2. Probability of Detection Study on Impact Damage to Honeycomb Composite Structure using Thermographic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Andrew J.; Walker, James L., II

    2008-01-01

    A probability of detection study was performed for the detection of impact damage using flash heating infrared thermography on a full scale honeycomb composite structure. The honeycomb structure was an intertank structure from a previous NASA technology demonstration program. The intertank was fabricated from IM7/8552 carbon fiber/epoxy facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core. The intertank was impacted in multiple locations with a range of impact energies utilizing a spherical indenter. In a single blind study, the intertank was inspected with thermography before and after impact damage was incurred. Following thermographic inspection several impact sites were sectioned from the intertank and cross-sectioned for microscopic comparisons of NDE detection and actual damage incurred. The study concluded that thermographic inspection was a good method of detecting delamination damage incurred by impact. The 90/95 confidence level on the probability of detection was close to the impact energy that delaminations were first observed through cross-sectional analysis.

  3. Clinical management of implant prostheses in patients with bruxism.

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Osamu; Lobbezoo, Frank; De Laat, Antoon; Iida, Takashi; Kitagawa, Tsuyoshi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kato, Takao; Kawara, Misao

    2012-01-01

    There is general agreement that excessive stress to the bone-implant interface may result in implant overload and failure. Early failure of the implant due to excessive loading occurs shortly after uncovering the implant. Excess load on a final restoration after successful implant integration can result in physical failure of the implant structure. Many clinicians believe that overload of dental implants is a risk factor for vertical peri-implant bone loss and/or may be detrimental for the suprastructure in implant prostheses. It has been documented that occlusal parafunction, such as, bruxism (tooth grinding and clenching) affects the outcome of implant prostheses, but there is no evidence for a causal relation between the failures and overload of dental implants. In spite of this lack of evidence, often metal restorations are preferred instead of porcelain for patients in whom bruxism is presumed on the basis of tooth wear. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the importance of the occlusal scheme used in implant restorations for implant longevity and to suggest a clinical approach and occlusal materials for implant prostheses in order to prevent complications related to bruxism. PMID:22701484

  4. Detection of internal molecular structural motions using anisotropic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rohit; George, Deepu; Korter, Timothy; Markelz, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    The far infrared spectroscopy of molecular crystals reveals both intra and inter molecular vibrational modes [1,2]. With the significant increase in complexity of structures, one finds increasing overlap in the internal modes. As an overall strategy to measure the correlated structural motions in protein, we use anisotropic and birefringent behavior of molecular crystals to develop a new technique called MOSTS (Modulated Orientation Sensitive THz Spectroscopy). We achieve high sensitivity and mode separation by using single molecular crystal such as sucrose and rapid modulation of the relative alignment of the terahertz polarization and the crystal axes by rotating the sample. By locking into the signal at the rotation frequency we determine the polarization sensitive signal and map out the optically active vibrational resonances. To illustrate the technique we compare our measured spectra with the calculated and find a close agreement. [4pt] [1] D.G. Allis, J.A. Zeitler, P.F.Taday and T.M.Korter, Chem. Phys. Lett., 463, 84 (2008).[0pt] [2] P.U. Jepsen and J.C. Stewart, Chem. Phys. Lett., 442, 275 (2007).

  5. Instability signature for detecting snap-through buckling of dome structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guirong; Duan, Qiuhua; Hua, Xugang

    2016-04-01

    Dome structures have been built as roofs for venues where many people convene. Failure of this type of structure may jeopardize the safety of hundreds or even thousands people. For this type of structure, snap-through buckling may occur in a local area and gradually expand to the entire structure, leading to a failure of the overall structure. Although numerous structural health monitoring techniques and damage detection approaches have been developed, no research on the detection of a snap-through buckling has been reported. The objective of this study is to find a signature that is sensitive to snap-through buckling in dome structures and can be used to detect snap-through buckling. Considering that a snap-through buckling results in a significant deformation in a local area, which can be reflected by the change in tilting angles of members in that local area, the change in tilting angles of members will be proposed to be a signature to detect snap-through buckling. To verify the proposed instability signature, a reticulated dome structure will be investigated. Both an eigenvalue buckling analysis and a nonlinear buckling analysis will be conducted. The significant changes in tilting angles of members in the buckled regions have demonstrated the efficacy of the proposed instability signature. This research will bridge the research gap between structural health monitoring and structural stability research.

  6. Local concurrent error detection and correction in data structures using virtual backpointers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. C.; Chen, P. P.; Fuchs, W. K.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique, based on virtual backpointers, for local concurrent error detection and correction in linked data structures is presented. Two new data structures, the Virtual Double Linked List, and the B-tree with Virtual Backpointers, are described. For these structures, double errors can be detected in 0(1) time and errors detected during forward moves can be corrected in 0(1) time. The application of a concurrent auditor process to data structure error detection and correction is analyzed, and an implementation is described, to determine the effect on mean time to failure of a multi-user shared database system. The implementation utilizes a Sequent shared memory multiprocessor system operating on a shared databased of Virtual Double Linked Lists.

  7. Structuring an event ontology for disease outbreak detection

    PubMed Central

    Kawazoe, Ai; Chanlekha, Hutchatai; Shigematsu, Mika; Collier, Nigel

    2008-01-01

    Background This paper describes the design of an event ontology being developed for application in the machine understanding of infectious disease-related events reported in natural language text. This event ontology is designed to support timely detection of disease outbreaks and rapid judgment of their alerting status by 1) bridging a gap between layman's language used in disease outbreak reports and public health experts' deep knowledge, and 2) making multi-lingual information available. Construction and content This event ontology integrates a model of experts' knowledge for disease surveillance, and at the same time sets of linguistic expressions which denote disease-related events, and formal definitions of events. In this ontology, rather general event classes, which are suitable for application to language-oriented tasks such as recognition of event expressions, are placed on the upper-level, and more specific events of the experts' interest are in the lower level. Each class is related to other classes which represent participants of events, and linked with multi-lingual synonym sets and axioms. Conclusions We consider that the design of the event ontology and the methodology introduced in this paper are applicable to other domains which require integration of natural language information and machine support for experts to assess them. The first version of the ontology, with about 40 concepts, will be available in March 2008. PMID:18426553

  8. Evolution of secondary defects in arsenic implanted Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, He; Wang, Miao; Zhang, Bingpo; Wu, Huizhen; Sun, Yan; Hu, Gujin; Dai, Ning

    2016-04-01

    Behavior of defects in ion-implanted semiconductors is an everlasting topic and becomes even more critical as semiconductor devices continuously shrink and ion implantation technique has been increasingly employed. High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) were employed to investigate the structural evolution of arsenic (As) implanted silicon (Si). Project range (PR) defects and end of range (EOR) dislocations are observed via HRTEM. EDX characterization proves the two types of defects are related to dopant atoms precipitations. The sizes of both PR defects and EOR dislocations enlarge at the expense of small ones with the elevation of annealing temperature. The characterizations of electrochemical capacitance-voltage and EDX conclude that the SiO2/Si interface is playing an indispensable role in the deactivation of dopant atoms during the annealing process. As atoms are detected in the As-implanted Si region near the SiO2/Si interface but not in the silica layer. Nanoparticles composed of Si atoms in the silica layer are observed in the 1150 °C-annealed samples, which proves the migration of oxygen atoms at the SiO2/Si interface.

  9. [Biomechanics of single dental implants].

    PubMed

    Zagorskiĭ, V A; Zagorskiĭ, V V

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissues of human skull, jawbones and hard dental tissues were formed formed by the influence of chewing loads which are functional irritants used for maintaining their physical qualities. Knowledge of tensions and deformations in bony structures allows to increase their joint work with dental implants installed.

  10. Complications of Poly Implant Prothèse breast implants: the current discussion.

    PubMed

    Kolios, Leila; Hirche, Christoph; Spiethoff, Alexander; Daigeler, Adrien; Lehnhardt, Marcus

    2013-03-01

    Against the background of the current discussion about Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP, Seyne-sur-mer, France) breast implants, we want to present a case demonstrating the complications such as implant rupture, silicone dissemination and level III silicone lymphadenopathy. A 29-year-old woman with cosmetic breast augmentation with PIP implants 5 years previously showed a sensitive swelling in her right axilla and neck region. All tests to detect an infectious or lymphomatous lymphadenopathy were negative. After ultrasound and MRI, rupture of the right implant was assumed and multiple pathologically enlarged lymph nodes up to supraclavicular region were shown. An excision biopsy of one axillary lymph node was performed; the histological examination detected a strong silicone lymphadenopathy. Surgical removal of both implants as well as capsulectomy was performed and 14 axillary lymph nodes up to level II were resected. Histologic evaluation confirmed the previous results. Our case underlines the actual discussion concerning increased rupture rate and massive silicone lymphadenopathy by PIP implants. The Agence Francaise de Sécurité Sanitaire des Produits de Santé (AFSSAPS) recommends clinical and ultrasound examination every 6 months for women with PIP implants. Any rupture, suspected rupture or leakage of prosthesis should lead to its explantation as well as that of the contralateral implant. In cases of unusual signs of inflammation, histological and immunohistochemical samples are to be taken. PMID:23480085

  11. Improved isolation protocol to detect high molecular weight polysaccharide structures of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Judit K; Felső, Péter; Emődy, Levente; Schneider, György; Kocsis, Béla

    2014-12-01

    Simple detection of high molecular weight, LPS-like structures of Campylobacter jejuni is still an unsolved problem. A phenol-free extraction method for the detection of HMW polysaccharide was developed without the need for Western blot. This method provides a reliable technique for large-scale screening and comparative characterization study of different isolates.

  12. Techniques for dental implant nanosurface modifications

    PubMed Central

    Bathala, Lakshmana Rao; Sangur, Rajashekar

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Dental implant has gained clinical success over last decade with the major drawback related to osseointegration as properties of metal (Titanium) are different from human bone. Currently implant procedures include endosseous type of dental implants with nanoscale surface characteristics. The objective of this review article is to summarize the role of nanotopography on titanium dental implant surfaces in order to improve osseointegration and various techniques that can generate nanoscale topographic features to titanium implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS A systematic electronic search of English language peer reviewed dental literature was performed for articles published between December 1987 to January 2012. Search was conducted in Medline, PubMed and Google scholar supplemented by hand searching of selected journals. 101 articles were assigned to full text analysis. Articles were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criterion. All articles were screened according to inclusion standard. 39 articles were included in the analysis. RESULTS Out of 39 studies, seven studies demonstrated that bone implant contact increases with increase in surface roughness. Five studies showed comparative evaluation of techniques producing microtopography and nanotopography. Eight studies concluded that osteoblasts preferably adhere to nano structure as compared to smooth surface. Six studies illustrated that nanotopography modify implant surface and their properties. Thirteen studies described techniques to produce nano roughness. CONCLUSION Modification of dental osseous implants at nanoscale level produced by various techniques can alter biological responses that may improve osseointegration and dental implant procedures. PMID:25558347

  13. Digital photoelastic analysis applied to implant dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, K.; Hariprasad, M. P.; Bhuvanewari, S.

    2016-12-01

    Development of improved designs of implant systems in dentistry have necessitated the study of stress fields in the implant regions of the mandible/maxilla for better understanding of the biomechanics involved. Photoelasticity has been used for various studies related to dental implants in view of whole field visualization of maximum shear stress in the form of isochromatic contours. The potential of digital photoelasticity has not been fully exploited in the field of implant dentistry. In this paper, the fringe field in the vicinity of the connected implants (All-On-Four® concept) is analyzed using recent advances in digital photoelasticity. Initially, a novel 3-D photoelastic model making procedure, to closely mimic all the anatomical features of the human mandible is proposed. By choosing appropriate orientation of the model with respect to the light path, the essential region of interest were sought to be analysed while keeping the model under live loading conditions. Need for a sophisticated software module to carefully identify the model domain has been brought out. For data extraction, five-step method is used and isochromatics are evaluated by twelve fringe photoelasticity. In addition to the isochromatic fringe field, whole field isoclinic data is also obtained for the first time in implant dentistry, which could throw important information in improving the structural stability of the implant systems. Analysis is carried out for the implant in the molar as well as the incisor region. In addition, the interaction effects of loaded molar implant on the incisor area are also studied.

  14. Materials for endosseous dental implants.

    PubMed

    Wataha, J C

    1996-02-01

    The goal of placement of endosseous dental implants is to achieve osseointegration or biointegration of the bone with the implant. A wide variety of materials has been used for these implants, but only a few promote osseointegration and biointegration. Titanium and titanium alloy (Ti6A14V) have been the most widely used of these materials. The surface oxide of titanium appears to be central to the ability of this material to osseointegrate. The oxide limits dissolution of elements and promotes the deposition of biological molecules which allow bone to exist as close as 30 A to the surface of the implant. The details of the ultrastructure of the gap between the implant and bone remain undefined, and the consequences of elements which are released on the interface over time are not known. These areas of investigation are particularly important in defining the differences between commercially pure titanium implants and those made of titanium, aluminium and vanadium. The epithelial interface between the gingiva and titanium appears to contain many of the structural characteristics of the native tooth-gingiva interface, but details are still vague. The connective tissue interface with the titanium appears to be one of tightly fitting tissues rather than adhesion. Ceramic coatings appear to improve the ingrowth of bone and promote chemical integration of the implant with the bone. The characteristics of these coatings are complex and affect the bony response, but the mechanisms remain obscure. The degradation of the coatings is an issue of particular controversy. Progress in dental implantology is likely to continue as the interface between the material and bone is more clearly understood, and biological molecules and artificial tissues are developed.

  15. Drug-eluting medical implants.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Meital; Kraitzer, Amir; Grinberg, Orly; Elsner, Jonathan J

    2010-01-01

    Drug-eluting medical implants are actually active implants that induce healing effects, in addition to their regular task of support. This effect is achieved by controlled release of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) into the surrounding tissue. In this chapter we focus on three types of drug-eluting devices: drug-eluting vascular stents, drug-eluting wound dressings and protein-eluting scaffolds for tissue regeneration, thus describing both internal and external implants. Each of these drug-eluting devices also presents an approach for solving the drug release issue. Most drug-eluting vascular stents are loaded with water-insoluble antiproliferative agents, and their diffusion from the device to the surrounding tissue is relatively slow. In contrast, most drug-eluting wound dressings are loaded with highly water-soluble antibacterial agents and the issue of fast release must therefore be addressed. Growth factor release from scaffolds for tissue regeneration offers a new approach of incorporating high-molecular-weight bioactive agents which are very sensitive to process conditions and preserve their activity during the preparation stage. The drug-eluting medical implants are described here in terms of matrix formats and polymers, incorporated drugs and their release profiles from the implants, and implant functioning. Basic elements, such as new composite core/shell fibers and structured films, can be used to build new antibiotic-eluting devices. As presented in this chapter, the effect of the processing parameters on the microstructure and the resulting drug release profiles, mechanical and physical properties, and other relevant properties, must be elucidated in order to achieve the desired properties. Newly developed implants and novel modifications of previously developed approaches have enhanced the tools available for creating clinically important biomedical applications.

  16. A New Program for Detecting the Geometrical Core of a Set of Structures of Macromolecular Complexes.

    PubMed

    Vakulenko, Yu A; Nagaev, B E; Alexeevski, A V; Karyagina, A S; Spirin, S A

    2016-04-01

    Comparison of structures of homological proteins often helps to understand functionally significant features of these structures. This concerns not only structures of separate protein chains, but also structures of macromolecular complexes. In particular, a comparison of complexes of homologous proteins with DNA is significant for analysis of the recognition of DNA by proteins. We present program LCore for detecting geometrical cores of a family of structures; a geometrical core is a set of amino acid residues and nucleotides that disposed similarly in all structures of the family. We describe the algorithm of the program, its web interface, and an example of its application to analysis of complexes of homeodomains with DNA.

  17. Structural damage detection in pipeline using Lamb waves and wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoeibi, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi, Afshin; Ghavifekr, Habib Badri

    2011-10-01

    Over the last few decades, damage identification methods of civil and mechanical structures have been drawing much interest from various fields. This article presented a novel time-frequency based approach for detecting structural damage in pipeline. This is done by applying lamb wave technique and wavelet transforms for detection of change in the structural response data. Lamb waves were propagated through pipes and the received signals were subjected to wavelet transforms. The viability of the proposed approach is demonstrated using simulation examples. The pipes were modeled using finite -element method. This damage detection technique may serve the purpose of structural health monitoring because of long -distance inspection capability in situations where spatially distributed measurement of structural response is difficult.

  18. Genome-Wide Structural Variation Detection by Genome Mapping on Nanochannel Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Angel C. Y.; Lai, Yvonne Y. Y.; Lam, Ernest T.; Kwok, Tsz-Piu; Leung, Alden K. Y.; Poon, Annie; Mostovoy, Yulia; Hastie, Alex R.; Stedman, William; Anantharaman, Thomas; Andrews, Warren; Zhou, Xiang; Pang, Andy W. C.; Dai, Heng; Chu, Catherine; Lin, Chin; Wu, Jacob J. K.; Li, Catherine M. L.; Li, Jing-Woei; Yim, Aldrin K. Y.; Chan, Saki; Sibert, Justin; Džakula, Željko; Cao, Han; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Chan, Ting-Fung; Yip, Kevin Y.; Xiao, Ming; Kwok, Pui-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive whole-genome structural variation detection is challenging with current approaches. With diploid cells as DNA source and the presence of numerous repetitive elements, short-read DNA sequencing cannot be used to detect structural variation efficiently. In this report, we show that genome mapping with long, fluorescently labeled DNA molecules imaged on nanochannel arrays can be used for whole-genome structural variation detection without sequencing. While whole-genome haplotyping is not achieved, local phasing (across >150-kb regions) is routine, as molecules from the parental chromosomes are examined separately. In one experiment, we generated genome maps from a trio from the 1000 Genomes Project, compared the maps against that derived from the reference human genome, and identified structural variations that are >5 kb in size. We find that these individuals have many more structural variants than those published, including some with the potential of disrupting gene function or regulation. PMID:26510793

  19. In situ damage detection in frame structures through coupled response measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Gurgenci, H.; Veidt, M.

    2004-05-01

    Due to the existence of global modes and local modes of the neighbouring members, damage detection on a structure is more challenging than damage on isolated beams. Detection of an artificial circumferential crack on a joint in a frame-like welded structure is studied in this paper using coupled response measurements. Similarity to real engineering structures is maintained in the fabrication of the test frame. Both the chords and the branch members have hollow sections and the branch members have smaller sizes. The crack is created by a hacksaw on a joint where a branch meets the chord. The methodology is first demonstrated on a single hollow section beam. The test results are then presented for the damaged and undamaged frame. The existence of the damage is clearly observable from the experimental results. It is suggested that this approach offers the potential to detect damage in welded structures such as cranes, mining equipment, steel-frame bridges, naval and offshore structures.

  20. Genome-Wide Structural Variation Detection by Genome Mapping on Nanochannel Arrays.

    PubMed

    Mak, Angel C Y; Lai, Yvonne Y Y; Lam, Ernest T; Kwok, Tsz-Piu; Leung, Alden K Y; Poon, Annie; Mostovoy, Yulia; Hastie, Alex R; Stedman, William; Anantharaman, Thomas; Andrews, Warren; Zhou, Xiang; Pang, Andy W C; Dai, Heng; Chu, Catherine; Lin, Chin; Wu, Jacob J K; Li, Catherine M L; Li, Jing-Woei; Yim, Aldrin K Y; Chan, Saki; Sibert, Justin; Džakula, Željko; Cao, Han; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Chan, Ting-Fung; Yip, Kevin Y; Xiao, Ming; Kwok, Pui-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive whole-genome structural variation detection is challenging with current approaches. With diploid cells as DNA source and the presence of numerous repetitive elements, short-read DNA sequencing cannot be used to detect structural variation efficiently. In this report, we show that genome mapping with long, fluorescently labeled DNA molecules imaged on nanochannel arrays can be used for whole-genome structural variation detection without sequencing. While whole-genome haplotyping is not achieved, local phasing (across >150-kb regions) is routine, as molecules from the parental chromosomes are examined separately. In one experiment, we generated genome maps from a trio from the 1000 Genomes Project, compared the maps against that derived from the reference human genome, and identified structural variations that are >5 kb in size. We find that these individuals have many more structural variants than those published, including some with the potential of disrupting gene function or regulation.

  1. Fabricating specialised orthopaedic implants using additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Paul

    2014-03-01

    It has been hypothesised that AM is ideal for patient specific orthopaedic implants such as those used in bone cancer treatment, that can rapidly build structures such as lattices for bone and tissues to in-grow, that would be impossible using current conventional subtractive manufacturing techniques. The aim of this study was to describe the adoption of AM (direct metal laser sintering and electron beam melting) into the design manufacturing and post-manufacturing processes and the early clinical use. Prior to the clinical use of AM implants, extensive metallurgical and mechanical testing of both laser and electron beam fabrications were undertaken. Concurrently, post-manufacturing processes evaluated included hipping, cleaning and coating treatments. The first clinical application of a titanium alloy mega-implant was undertaken in November 2010. A 3D model of the pelvic wing implant was designed from CT scans. Novel key features included extensive lattice structures at the bone interfaces and integral flanges to fix the implant to the bone. The pelvic device was implanted with the aid of navigation and to date the patient remains active. A further 18 patient specific mega-implants have now been implanted. The early use of this advanced manufacturing route for patient specific implants has been very encouraging enabling the engineer to produce more advanced and anatomical conforming implants. However, there are a new set of design, manufacturing and regulatory challenges that require addressing to permit this technique to be used more widely. This technology is changing the design and manufacturing paradigm for the fabrication of specialised orthopaedic implants.

  2. Implant success!!!.....simplified.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Kaushal K

    2009-01-01

    The endeavor towards life-like restoration has helped nurture new vistas in the art and science of implant dentistry. The protocol of "restoration-driven implant placement" ensures that the implant is an apical extension of the ideal future restoration and not the opposite. Meticulous pre-implant evaluation of soft and hard tissues, diagnostic cast and use of aesthetic wax-up and radiographic template combined with surgical template can simplify the intricate roadmap for appropriate implant treatment.By applying the harmony of artistic skill, scientific knowledge and clinical expertise, we can simply master the outstanding implant success in requisites of aesthetics, phonetics and function.

  3. Alternative Conformations of Cytochrome c: Structure, Function, and Detection.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana; Tomasina, Florencia; Capdevila, Daiana A; Demicheli, Verónica; Tórtora, Verónica; Alvarez-Paggi, Damián; Jemmerson, Ronald; Murgida, Daniel H; Radi, Rafael

    2016-01-26

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) is a cationic hemoprotein of ∼100 amino acid residues that exhibits exceptional functional versatility. While its primary function is electron transfer in the respiratory chain, cyt c is also recognized as a key component of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, the mitochondrial oxidative protein folding machinery, and presumably as a redox sensor in the cytosol, along with other reported functions. Transition to alternative conformations and gain-of-peroxidase activity are thought to further enable the multiple functions of cyt c and its translocation across cellular compartments. In vitro, direct interactions of cyt c with cardiolipin, post-translational modifications such as tyrosine nitration, phosphorylation, methionine sulfoxidation, mutations, and even fine changes in electrical fields lead to a variety of conformational states that may be of biological relevance. The identification of these alternative conformations and the elucidation of their functions in vivo continue to be a major challenge. Here, we unify the knowledge of the structural flexibility of cyt c that supports functional moonlighting and review biochemical and immunochemical evidence confirming that cyt c undergoes conformational changes during normal and altered cellular homeostasis.

  4. A Novel Structurally Stable Multiepitope Protein for Detection of HCV

    PubMed Central

    Galdino, Alexsandro S.; Santos, José C.; Souza, Marilen Q.; Nóbrega, Yanna K. M.; Xavier, Mary-Ann E.; Felipe, Maria S. S.; Freitas, Sonia M.; Torres, Fernando A. G.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has emerged as the major pathogen of liver diseases in recent years leading to worldwide blood-transmitted chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Accurate diagnosis for differentiation of hepatitis C from other viruses is thus of pivotal importance for proper treatment. In this work we developed a recombinant multiepitope protein (rMEHCV) for hepatitis C diagnostic purposes based on conserved and immunodominant epitopes from core, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, and NS5 regions of the virus polyprotein of genotypes 1a, 1b, and 3a, the most prevalent genotypes in South America (especially in Brazil). A synthetic gene was designed to encode eight epitopes in tandem separated by a flexible linker and bearing a his-tag at the C-terminal end. The recombinant protein was produced in Escherichia coli and purified in a single affinity chromatographic step with >95% purity. Purified rMEHCV was used to perform an ELISA which showed that the recombinant protein was recognized by IgG and IgM from human serum samples. The structural data obtained by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that rMEHCV is a highly thermal stable protein at neutral and alkaline conditions. Together, these results show that rMEHCV should be considered an alternative antigen for hepatitis C diagnosis. PMID:26942007

  5. Alternative Conformations of Cytochrome c: Structure, Function, and Detection.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana; Tomasina, Florencia; Capdevila, Daiana A; Demicheli, Verónica; Tórtora, Verónica; Alvarez-Paggi, Damián; Jemmerson, Ronald; Murgida, Daniel H; Radi, Rafael

    2016-01-26

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) is a cationic hemoprotein of ∼100 amino acid residues that exhibits exceptional functional versatility. While its primary function is electron transfer in the respiratory chain, cyt c is also recognized as a key component of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, the mitochondrial oxidative protein folding machinery, and presumably as a redox sensor in the cytosol, along with other reported functions. Transition to alternative conformations and gain-of-peroxidase activity are thought to further enable the multiple functions of cyt c and its translocation across cellular compartments. In vitro, direct interactions of cyt c with cardiolipin, post-translational modifications such as tyrosine nitration, phosphorylation, methionine sulfoxidation, mutations, and even fine changes in electrical fields lead to a variety of conformational states that may be of biological relevance. The identification of these alternative conformations and the elucidation of their functions in vivo continue to be a major challenge. Here, we unify the knowledge of the structural flexibility of cyt c that supports functional moonlighting and review biochemical and immunochemical evidence confirming that cyt c undergoes conformational changes during normal and altered cellular homeostasis. PMID:26720007

  6. Feasibility of PZT ceramics for impact damage detection in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, Gerges; Koricho, Ermias; Karpenko, Oleksii; Haq, Mahmood; Udpa, Lalita; Udpa, Satish S.

    2015-03-01

    Fiber reinforced plastic composites are becoming widely used in vehicles and airframe structures due to their high strength to weight ratio. However unlike metals, the multilayered composite structures are more susceptible to damage mechanisms such as disbonds and delaminations due to impacts. It is often difficult to visually detect the damage. Lead-Zirconate-Titanate (PZT) thin films are becoming popular for in-situ structural health monitoring due to their small size, high piezoelectric coupling coefficient, and ease of surface-mounting and/or embedding in composite structures. A network of such transducers could be utilized for damage detection using guided wave techniques, impedance techniques, or passive impact detection techniques. However, the PZT films are subject to the same impact probabilities that the structure encounters. If the transducers fail due to the subjected impacts, they can result in false readings and ultimately failing to correctly detect damage in the structure. This paper presents a feasibility study using the guided wave S0 mode for detecting impact damage. The health of the structure is quantified using guided wave measurements, and the PZT health is monitored using impedance methods.

  7. Study on the neotype zirconia's implant coated nanometer hydroxyapatite ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. W.; Yang, D. W.

    2007-07-01

    In recent years, biologic ceramics is a popular material of implants and bioactive surface modification of dental implant became a research emphasis, which aims to improve bioactivity of implants materials and acquire firmer implants-bone interface. The zirconia ceramic has excellent mechanical properties and nanometer HA ceramics is a bioceramic well known for its bioactivity, therefore, nanometer HA ceramics coating on zirconia, allows combining the excellent mechanical properties of zirconia substrates with its bioactivity. This paper shows a new method for implant shape design and bioactive modification of dental implants surface. Zirconia's implant substrate was prepared by sintered method, central and lateral tunnels were drilled in the zirconia hollow porous cylindrical implants by laser processing. The HA powders and needle-like HA crystals were made by a wet precipitation and calcining method. Its surface was coated with nanometer HA ceramics which was used brush HA slurry and vacuum sintering. Mechanical testing results revealed that the attachment strength of nanometer HA ceramics coated zirconia samples is high. SEM and interface observation after inserted experiment indicated that calcium and phosphor content increased and symmetrically around coated implant-bone tissue interface. A significantly higher affinity index was demonstrated in vivo by histomorphometric evaluation in coated versus uncoated implants. SEM analysis demonstrated better bone adhesion to the material in coated implant at any situation. In addition, the hollow porous cylindrical implant coated with nanometer HA ceramics increase the interaction of bone and implant, the new bone induced into the surface of hollow porous cylindrical implant and through the most tunnels filled into central hole. The branch-like structure makes the implant and bone a body, which increased the contact area and decreased elastic ratio. Therefore, the macroscopical and microcosmic nested structure of

  8. Defect structure transformation after thermal annealing in a surface layer of Zn-implanted Si(001) substrates

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbachev, Kirill; Privezentsev, Vladimir; Kulikauskas, Vaclav; Zatekin, Vladimir; Saraykin, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    A combination of high-resolution X-ray diffractometry, Rutherford back scattering spectroscopy and secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) methods were used to characterize structural transformations of the damaged layer in Si(001) substrates heavily doped by Zn ions after a multistage thermal treatment. The shape of the SIMS profiles for Zn atoms correlates with the crystal structure of the damaged layer and depends on the presence of the following factors influencing the mobility of Zn atoms: (i) an amorphous/crystalline (a/c) interface, (ii) end-of-range defects, which are located slightly deeper than the a/c interface; (iii) a surface area enriched by Si vacancies; and (iv) the chemical interaction of Zn with Si atoms, which leads to the formation of Zn-containing phases in the surface layer. PMID:24046492

  9. A novel texture descriptor for detection of glandular structures in colon histology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirinukunwattana, Korsuk; Snead, David R.; Rajpoot, Nasir M.

    2015-03-01

    The first step prior to most analyses on most histopathology images is the detection of area of interest. In this work, we present a superpixel-based approach for glandular structure detection in colon histology images. An image is first segmented into superpixels with the constraint on the presence of glandular boundaries. Texture and color information is then extracted from each superpixel to calculate the probability of that superpixel belonging to glandular regions, resulting in a glandular probability map. In addition, we present a novel texture descriptor derived from a region covariance matrix of scattering coefficients. Our approach shows encouraging results for the detection of glandular structures in colon tissue samples.

  10. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants.

    PubMed

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging.

  11. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants.

    PubMed

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging. PMID:27660602

  12. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A.; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging. PMID:27660602

  13. Capacitive Feedthroughs for Medical Implants

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Sven; Tass, Peter A.; Hauptmann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Important technological advances in the last decades paved the road to a great success story for electrically stimulating medical implants, including cochlear implants or implants for deep brain stimulation. However, there are still many challenges in reducing side effects and improving functionality and comfort for the patient. Two of the main challenges are the wish for smaller implants on one hand, and the demand for more stimulation channels on the other hand. But these two aims lead to a conflict of interests. This paper presents a novel design for an electrical feedthrough, the so called capacitive feedthrough, which allows both reducing the size, and increasing the number of included channels. Capacitive feedthroughs combine the functionality of a coupling capacitor and an electrical feedthrough within one and the same structure. The paper also discusses the progress and the challenges of the first produced demonstrators. The concept bears a high potential in improving current feedthrough technology, and could be applied on all kinds of electrical medical implants, even if its implementation might be challenging.

  14. [Biomaterials in cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Stöver, T; Lenarz, T

    2009-05-01

    Cochlear implants (CI) represent the "gold standard" for the treatment of congenitally deaf children and postlingually deafened adults. Thus, cochlear implantation is a success story of new bionic prosthesis development. Owing to routine application of cochlear implants in adults but also in very young children (below the age of one), high demands are placed on the implants. This is especially true for biocompatibility aspects of surface materials of implant parts which are in contact with the human body. In addition, there are various mechanical requirements which certain components of the implants must fulfil, such as flexibility of the electrode array and mechanical resistance of the implant housing. Due to the close contact of the implant to the middle ear mucosa and because the electrode array is positioned in the perilymphatic space via cochleostomy, there is a potential risk of bacterial transferral along the electrode array into the cochlea. Various requirements that have to be fulfilled by cochlear implants, such as biocompatibility, electrode micromechanics, and although a very high level of technical standards has been carried out there is still demand for the improvement of implants as well as of the materials used for manufacturing, ultimately leading to increased implant performance. General considerations of material aspects related to cochlear implants as well as potential future perspectives of implant development will be discussed.

  15. Spatial scanning for anomaly detection in acoustic emission testing of an aerospace structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensman, James; Worden, Keith; Eaton, Mark; Pullin, Rhys; Holford, Karen; Evans, Sam

    2011-10-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of engineering structures potentially provides a convenient, cost-effective means of performing structural health monitoring. Networks of AE sensors can be easily and unobtrusively installed upon structures, giving the ability to detect and locate damage-related strain releases ('events') in the structure. Use of the technique is not widespread due to the lack of a simple and effective method for detecting abnormal activity levels: the sensitivity of AE sensor networks is such that events unrelated to damage are prevalent in most applications. In this publication, we propose to monitor AE activity in a structure using a spatial scanning statistic, developed and used effectively in the field of epidemiology. The technique is demonstrated on an aerospace structure - an Airbus A320 main landing gear fitting - undergoing fatigue loading, and the method is compared to existing techniques. Despite its simplicity, the scanning statistic proves to be an extremely effective tool in detecting the onset of damage in the structure: it requires little to no user intervention or expertise, is inexpensive to compute and has an easily interpretable output. Furthermore, the generic nature of the method allows the technique to be used in a variety of monitoring scenarios, to detect damage in a wide range of structures.

  16. Similarity between community structures of different online social networks and its impact on underlying community detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, W.; Yeung, K. H.

    2015-03-01

    As social networking services are popular, many people may register in more than one online social network. In this paper we study a set of users who have accounts of three online social networks: namely Foursquare, Facebook and Twitter. Community structure of this set of users may be reflected in these three online social networks. Therefore, high correlation between these reflections and the underlying community structure may be observed. In this work, community structures are detected in all three online social networks. Also, we investigate the similarity level of community structures across different networks. It is found that they show strong correlation with each other. The similarity between different networks may be helpful to find a community structure close to the underlying one. To verify this, we propose a method to increase the weights of some connections in networks. With this method, new networks are generated to assist community detection. By doing this, value of modularity can be improved and the new community structure match network's natural structure better. In this paper we also show that the detected community structures of online social networks are correlated with users' locations which are identified on Foursquare. This information may also be useful for underlying community detection.

  17. A scanning method for detecting clustering pattern of both attribute and structure in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tai-Chi; Phoa, Frederick Kin Hing

    2016-03-01

    Community/cluster is one of the most important features in social networks. Many cluster detection methods were proposed to identify such an important pattern, but few were able to identify the statistical significance of the clusters by considering the likelihood of network structure and its attributes. Based on the definition of clustering, we propose a scanning method, originated from analyzing spatial data, for identifying clusters in social networks. Since the properties of network data are more complicated than those of spatial data, we verify our method's feasibility via simulation studies. The results show that the detection powers are affected by cluster sizes and connection probabilities. According to our simulation results, the detection accuracy of structure clusters and both structure and attribute clusters detected by our proposed method is better than that of other methods in most of our simulation cases. In addition, we apply our proposed method to some empirical data to identify statistically significant clusters.

  18. Mid-infrared-pumped quantum cascade structure for high-sensitive terahertz detection.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Yang, Ning; Duan, Suqing; Chu, Weidong

    2016-07-11

    Based on multiple quantum wells, we design a pumping-detection quantum cascade structure for the detection of terahertz (THz) radiation. In the structure, carriers are first pumped by a mid-infrared (MIR) laser to an excited state, to get enough energy space for the following fast longitudinal optical (LO) phonon extraction. Within the LO-phonon extraction stair, an absorption well is designed for THz detection. Due to the establishment of LO-phonon stair extractor, carriers transport between quantum wells in picosecond range and a high responsivity for THz absorption can be obtained. We also find that doping in both MIR active well and extractor region is significant for high-speed response of the THz detection. Our design is expected to extend the high-sensitive detection of a quantum cascade photodetector from middle wave of MIR to THz region. PMID:27410796

  19. Statistical damage detection method for frame structures using a confidence interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiming; Zhu, Hongping; Luo, Hanbin; Xia, Yong

    2010-03-01

    A novel damage detection method is applied to a 3-story frame structure, to obtain statistical quantification control criterion of the existence, location and identification of damage. The mean, standard deviation, and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) are applied to detect damage information according to statistical process control (SPC) theory. It is concluded that the detection is insignificant with the mean and EWMA because the structural response is not independent and is not a normal distribution. On the other hand, the damage information is detected well with the standard deviation because the influence of the data distribution is not pronounced with this parameter. A suitable moderate confidence level is explored for more significant damage location and quantification detection, and the impact of noise is investigated to illustrate the robustness of the method.

  20. CHAPTER: In-Situ Characterization of Stimulating Microelectrode Arrays: Study of an Idealized Structure Based on Argus II Retinal implantsBOOK TITLE: Implantable Neural Prostheses 2: Techniques and Engineering Approaches, D.M. Zhou and E. Greenbaum, Eds., Springer, NY 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, Elias; Sanders, Charlene A; Kandagor, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    The development of a retinal prosthesis for artificial sight includes a study of the factors affecting the structural and functional stability of chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. Although neuron depolarization and propagation of electrical signals have been studied for nearly a century, the use of multielectrode stimulation as a proposed therapy to treat blindness is a frontier area of modern ophthalmology research. Mapping and characterizing the topographic information contained in the electric field potentials and understanding how this information is transmitted and interpreted in the visual cortex is still very much a work in progress. In order to characterize the electrical field patterns generated by the device, an in vitro prototype that mimics several of the physical and chemical parameters of the in vivo visual implant device was fabricated. We carried out multiple electrical measurements in a model 'eye,' beginning with a single electrode, followed by a 9-electrode array structure, both idealized components based on the Argus II retinal implants. Correlating the information contained in the topographic features of the electric fields with psychophysical testing in patients may help reduce the time required for patients to convert the electrical patterns into graphic signals.

  1. Application of Ultrasonic Phased Array Technology to the Detection of Defect in Composite Stiffened-structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan-Qi; Zhan, Li-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Composite stiffened-structure consists of the skin and stringer has been widely used in aircraft fuselage and wings. The main purpose of the article is to detect the composite material reinforced structure accurately and explore the relationship between defect formation and structural elements or curing process. Based on ultrasonic phased array inspection technology, the regularity of defects in the manufacture of composite materials are obtained, the correlation model between actual defects and nondestructive testing are established. The article find that the forming quality of deltoid area in T-stiffened structure is obviously improved by pre-curing, the defects of hat-stiffened structure are affected by the mandrel. The results show that the ultrasonic phased array inspection technology can be an effectively way for the detection of composite stiffened-structures, which become an important means to control the defects of composite and improve the quality of the product.

  2. Structure Detection of Nonlinear Aeroelastic Systems with Application to Aeroelastic Flight Test Data. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.; Brenner, Martin J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the applicability of NARMAX structure detection to aeroelastic systems. In conclusion, the simulation results demonstrate bootstrap approach for structure computation of aircraft structural stiffness provided a high rate of true model selection: 1. T-test and stepwise regression methods had difficulty providing accurate results 2. Work contributes to understanding of the use of structure detection for modelling and identification of aerospace systems. 3. Limitation of model complexity that can be studied with these structure computation techniques 4. Result of the large number of candidate terms, for a given model order, and the data length required to guarantee convergence 5. Another approach to structure computation problem uses a least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO)

  3. Evaluation of modal-based damage detection techniques for composite aircraft sandwich structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, J. A.; Kosmatka, J. B.

    2005-05-01

    Composite sandwich structures are important as structural components in modern lightweight aircraft, but are susceptible to catastrophic failure without obvious forewarning. Internal damage, such as disbonding between skin and core, is detrimental to the structures' strength and integrity and thus must be detected before reaching critical levels. However, highly directional low density cores, such as Nomex honeycomb, make the task of damage detection and health monitoring difficult. One possible method for detecting damage in composite sandwich structures, which seems to have received very little research attention, is analysis of global modal parameters. This study will investigate the viability of modal analysis techniques for detecting skin-core disbonds in carbon fiber-Nomex honeycomb sandwich panels through laboratory testing. A series of carbon fiber prepreg and Nomex honeycomb sandwich panels-representative of structural components used in lightweight composite airframes-were fabricated by means of autoclave co-cure. All panels were of equal dimensions and two were made with predetermined sizes of disbonded areas, created by substituting areas of Teflon release film in place of epoxy film adhesive during the cure. A laser vibrometer was used to capture frequency response functions (FRF) of all panels, and then real and imaginary FRFs at different locations on each plate and operating shapes for each plate were compared. Preliminary results suggest that vibration-based techniques hold promise for damage detection of composite sandwich structures.

  4. Simulations to Improve Structural Defect Detection and Classification in Swiss-Cheese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskelinen, J.; Haapalainen, J.; Alavuotunki, A.; Hæggström, E.; Alatossava, T.

    2008-02-01

    Ultrasonic 2D simulations to facilitate defect detection and classification for structural quality control of Swiss-cheese are presented. Three economically relevant structure types were modeled with different geometry parameters and the back-scattered ultrasonic field from the structure boundary was simulated to obtain reference data for waveform analysis. Simulated waveform characteristics were evaluated and compared to the experimental ones. Two parameters were introduced to classify different defects by exploiting the frequency spectrum of the signals. Signal waveform and correlation analysis, based on the simulation results, improved defect detection probability.

  5. Thermography Inspection for Early Detection of Composite Damage in Structures During Fatigue Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Parker, F. Raymond; Seebo, Jeffrey P.; Wright, Christopher W.; Bly, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced composite structures are commonly tested under controlled loading. Understanding the initiation and progression of composite damage under load is critical for validating design concepts and structural analysis tools. Thermal nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is used to detect and characterize damage in composite structures during fatigue loading. A difference image processing algorithm is demonstrated to enhance damage detection and characterization by removing thermal variations not associated with defects. In addition, a one-dimensional multilayered thermal model is used to characterize damage. Lastly, the thermography results are compared to other inspections such as non-immersion ultrasonic inspections and computed tomography X-ray.

  6. Rapid detection of delamination areas in laminated structural elements by means of optically monitored strain solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenova, I. V.; Belashov, A. V.; Dreiden, G. V.; Petrov, N. V.; Samsonov, A. M.

    2015-05-01

    Modern structural elements are often made of laminated polymer materials or composites on the base of polymer matrices. The proper functioning of these elements may be of vital importance especially in automotive and aerospace industries, in gas and oil transportation. The major problem in their performance is a possibility of a sudden and irreversible delamination caused by various factors. We propose and study a NDT approach aimed to detect delamination areas in adhesively bonded layered structural elements made of different materials. The proposed approach is evaluated by use of holographic detection and monitoring of the evolution of bulk strain solitons generated in such structures.

  7. More-reliable SOS ion implantations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Conducting layer prevents static charges from accumulating during implantation of silicon-on-sapphire MOS structures. Either thick conducting film or thinner film transparent to ions is deposited prior to implantation, and gaps are etched in regions to be doped. Grounding path eliminates charge flow that damages film or cracks sapphire wafer. Prevention of charge buildup by simultaneously exposing structure to opposite charges requires equipment modifications less practical and more expensive than deposition of conducting layer.

  8. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... visits, your surgeon injects a small amount of saline (salt water) through the valve into the expander. ... breast implants. Implants may be filled with either saline or a silicone gel. You may have another ...

  9. Nano hydroxyapatite-coated implants improve bone nanomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Jimbo, R; Coelho, P G; Bryington, M; Baldassarri, M; Tovar, N; Currie, F; Hayashi, M; Janal, M N; Andersson, M; Ono, D; Vandeweghe, S; Wennerberg, A

    2012-12-01

    Nanostructure modification of dental implants has long been sought as a means to improve osseointegration through enhanced biomimicry of host structures. Several methods have been proposed and demonstrated for creating nanotopographic features; here we describe a nanoscale hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated implant surface and hypothesize that it will hasten osseointegration and improve its quality relative to that of non-coated implants. Twenty threaded titanium alloy implants, half prepared with a stable HA nanoparticle surface and half grit-blasted, acid-etched, and heat-treated (HT), were inserted into rabbit femurs. Pre-operatively, the implants were morphologically and topographically characterized. After 3 weeks of healing, the samples were retrieved for histomorphometry. The nanomechanical properties of the surrounding bone were evaluated by nanoindentation. While both implants revealed similar bone-to-implant contact, the nanoindentation demonstrated that the tissue quality was significantly enhanced around the HA-coated implants, validating the postulated hypothesis.

  10. Effects of phosphorus doping by plasma immersion ion implantation on the structural and optical characteristics of Zn0.85Mg0.15O thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, S.; Nagar, S.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-08-01

    ZnMgO thin films deposited on <100> Si substrates by RF sputtering were annealed at 800, 900, and 1000 °C after phosphorus plasma immersion ion implantation. X-ray diffraction spectra confirmed the presence of <101¯0> and <101¯3> peaks for all the samples. However, in case of the annealed samples, the <0002> peak was also observed. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed the variation in surface morphology caused by phosphorus implantation. Implanted and non-implanted samples were compared to examine the effects of phosphorus implantation on the optical properties of ZnMgO. Optical characteristics were investigated by low-temperature (15 K) photoluminescence experiments. Inelastic exciton-exciton scattering and localized, and delocalized excitonic peaks appeared at 3.377, 3.42, and 3.45 eV, respectively, revealing the excitonic effect resulting from phosphorus implantation. This result is important because inelastic exciton-exciton scattering leads to nonlinear emission, which can improve the performance of many optoelectronic devices.

  11. [Pathology of implants].

    PubMed

    Mittermayer, C; Eblenkamp, M; Richter, H A; Zwadlo-Klarwasser, G; Bhardwaj, R S; Klosterhalfen, B

    2002-01-01

    Progress in the surgery of implants and biomaterials can be accomplished by: 1. Painstakingly analysing and registering of defaulting implants after explantation within a "National Registry of Implant Pathology". 2. Development of a DNA-microarray named "Implantat/Chronic Wound" in order to discover the differential transcriptional activities of cells brought into contact with different foreign surfaces. 3. Predictive cell-engineering combined with custom-made implant surfaces with the aim of optimal patient care.

  12. Structure of collagen adsorbed on a model implant surface resolved by polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Izabella; Habecker, Florian; Ahlers, Michael; Klüner, Thorsten

    2015-03-01

    The polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectra of collagen adsorbed on a titania surface and quantum chemical calculations are used to describe components of the amide I mode to the protein structure at a sub-molecular level. In this study, imino acid rich and poor fragments, representing the entire collagen molecule, are taken into account. The amide I mode of the collagen triple helix is composed of three absorption bands which involve: (i) (∼1690 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching modes at unhydrated groups, (ii) (1655-1673 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching at carbonyl groups at imino acids and glycine forming intramolecular hydrogen bonds with H atoms at both NH2 and, unusual for proteins, CH2 groups at glycine at a neighbouring chain and (iii) (∼1640 cm-1) the Cdbnd O stretching at carbonyl groups forming hydrogen bonds between two, often charged, amino acids as well as hydrogen bonds to water along the entire helix. The IR spectrum of films prepared from diluted solutions (c < 50 μg ml-1) corresponds to solution spectra indicating that native collagen molecules interact with water adsorbed on the titania surface. In films prepared from solutions (c ⩾ 50 μg ml-1) collagen multilayers are formed. The amide I mode is blue-shifted by 18 cm-1, indicating that intramolecular hydrogen bonds at imino acid rich fragments are weakened. Simultaneous red-shift of the amide A mode implies that the strength of hydrogen bonds at the imino acid poor fragments increases. Theoretically predicted distortion of the collagen structure upon adsorption on the titania surface is experimentally confirmed.

  13. An implantable blood pressure and flow transmitter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, R. D.; Meehan, J. P.; Henriksen, J. K. C.

    1973-01-01

    A miniature totally implantable FM/FM telemetry system has been developed to simultaneously measure blood pressure and blood flow, thus providing an appreciation of the hemodynamics of the circulation to the entire body or to a particular organ. Developed for work with animal subjects, the telemetry system's transmission time is controlled by an RF signal that permits an operating life of several months. Pressure is detected by a miniature intravascular transducer and flow is detected by an extravascular interferometric ultrasonic technique. Both pressure and flow are calibrated prior to implanting. The pressure calibration can be checked after the implanting by cannulation; flow calibration can be verified only at the end of the experiment by determining the voltage output from the implanted sensing system as a function of several measured flow rates. The utility of this device has been established by its use in investigating canine renal circulation during exercise, emotional encounters, administration of drugs, and application of accelerative forces.

  14. Machine oil inhibits the osseointegration of orthopaedic implants by impairing osteoblast attachment and spreading.

    PubMed

    Bonsignore, Lindsay A; Goldberg, Victor M; Greenfield, Edward M

    2015-07-01

    The most important factor contributing to short-term and long-term success of cementless total joint arthroplasties is osseointegration. Osseointegration leads to a direct structural and functional connection between living bone and the surface of an implant. Surface contaminants may remain on orthopaedic implants after sterilization procedures and impair osseointegration. For example, specific lots of hip replacement Sulzer Inter-OP(TM) acetabular shells that were associated with impaired osseointegration and early failure rates were found to be contaminated with both bacterial debris and machine oil residues. However, the effect of machine oil on implant integration is unknown. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine if machine oil inhibits the osseointegration of orthopaedic implants. To test this hypothesis in vivo we used our murine model of osseointegration where titanium alloy implants are implanted into a unicortical pilot hole in the mid-diaphysis of the femur. We found that machine oil inhibited bone-to-implant contact and biomechanical pullout measures. Machine oil on titanium alloy discs inhibited early stages of MC3T3-E1 osteogenesis in vitro such as attachment and spreading. Inhibition of osteoblast attachment and spreading occurred in both areas with and without detectable oil. Osteoblast growth was in turn inhibited on discs with machine oil due to both a decrease in proliferation and an increase in cell death. Later stages of osteogenic differentiation and mineralization on titanium alloy discs were also inhibited. Thus, machine oil can inhibit osseointegration through cell autonomous effects on osteoblast cells. These results support routine testing by manufacturers of machine oil residues on orthopaedic implants.

  15. A comparison of four methods for detecting weak genetic structure from marker data.

    PubMed

    Jones, Owen R; Wang, Jinliang

    2012-05-01

    Genetic structure is ubiquitous in wild populations and is the result of the processes of natural selection, genetic drift, mutation, and gene flow. Genetic drift and divergent selection promotes the generation of genetic structure, while gene flow homogenizes the subpopulations. The ability to detect genetic structure from marker data diminishes rapidly with a decreasing level of differentiation among subpopulations. Weak genetic structure may be unimportant over evolutionary time scales but could have important implications in ecology and conservation biology. In this paper we examine methods for detecting and quantifying weak genetic structures using simulated data. We simulated populations consisting of two putative subpopulations evolving for up to 50 generations with varying degrees of gene flow (migration), and varying amounts of information (allelic diversity). There are a number of techniques available to detect and quantify genetic structure but here we concentrate on four methods: F(ST), population assignment, relatedness, and sibship assignment. Under the simple mating system simulated here, the four methods produce qualitatively similar results. However, the assignment method performed relatively poorly when genetic structure was weak and we therefore caution against using this method when the analytical aim is to detect fine-scale patterns. Further work should examine situations with different mating systems, for example where a few individuals dominate reproductive output of the population. This study will help workers to design their experiments (e.g., sample sizes of markers and individuals), and to decide which methods are likely to be most appropriate for their particular data.

  16. A comparison of four methods for detecting weak genetic structure from marker data

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Owen R; Wang, Jinliang

    2012-01-01

    Genetic structure is ubiquitous in wild populations and is the result of the processes of natural selection, genetic drift, mutation, and gene flow. Genetic drift and divergent selection promotes the generation of genetic structure, while gene flow homogenizes the subpopulations. The ability to detect genetic structure from marker data diminishes rapidly with a decreasing level of differentiation among subpopulations. Weak genetic structure may be unimportant over evolutionary time scales but could have important implications in ecology and conservation biology. In this paper we examine methods for detecting and quantifying weak genetic structures using simulated data. We simulated populations consisting of two putative subpopulations evolving for up to 50 generations with varying degrees of gene flow (migration), and varying amounts of information (allelic diversity). There are a number of techniques available to detect and quantify genetic structure but here we concentrate on four methods: FST, population assignment, relatedness, and sibship assignment. Under the simple mating system simulated here, the four methods produce qualitatively similar results. However, the assignment method performed relatively poorly when genetic structure was weak and we therefore caution against using this method when the analytical aim is to detect fine-scale patterns. Further work should examine situations with different mating systems, for example where a few individuals dominate reproductive output of the population. This study will help workers to design their experiments (e.g., sample sizes of markers and individuals), and to decide which methods are likely to be most appropriate for their particular data. PMID:22837848

  17. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  18. The effect of bruxism on treatment planning for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Misch, Carl E

    2002-09-01

    Bruxism is a potential risk factor for implant failure. Excessive force is the primary cause of late implant complications. An appreciation of the etiology of crestal bone loss, failure of implants, failure to retain implant restorations, and fracture of components will lead the practitioner to develop a treatment plan that reduces force on implants and their restorations. The forces are considered in terms of magnitude, duration, direction, type, and magnification. Once the dentist has identified the source(s) of additional force on the implant system, the treatment plan is altered to contend with and reduce the negative sequelae on the bone, implant, and final restoration. One viable approach is to increase the implant-bone surface area. Additional implants can be placed to decrease stress on any one implant, and implants in molar regions should have an increased width. Use of more and wider implants decreases the strain on the prosthesis and also dissipates stress to the bone, especially at the crest. The additional implants should be positioned with intent to eliminate cantilevers when possible. Greater surface area implant designs made of titanium alloy and with an external hex design can also prove advantageous. Anterior guidance in mandibular excursions further decreases force and eliminates or reduces lateral posterior force. Metal occlusal surfaces decrease the risk of porcelain fracture and do not require as much abutment reduction, which in turn enhances prosthesis retention. The retention of the final prosthesis or super-structure is also improved with additional implant abutments. Night guards designed with specific features also are a benefit to initially diagnose the influence of occlusal factors for the patient, and as importantly, to reduce the influence of extraneous stress on implants and implant-retained restorations. PMID:12271847

  19. Effect of bearing geometry and structure support on transient elastohydrodynamic lubrication of metal-on-metal hip implants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Jin, Zhongming; Roberts, Paul; Grigoris, Peter

    2007-01-01

    An effective lubrication can significantly reduce wear of metal-on-metal artificial hip joints. The improvement of the lubrication can be achieved through the optimisation of the bearing geometry in terms of a small clearance and/or the structural support such as a polyethylene backing underneath a metallic bearing in a sandwich acetabular cup form. The separate effects of these two factors on fluid film lubrication of 28 mm diameter metal-on-metal total hip joints under walking conditions were numerically investigated in this paper. The results show that a larger lubricant film due to the polyethylene backing can be significantly enhanced by the transient squeeze-film action, particularly during the stance phase, and a similar lubricant film can be developed for both the monolithic cup relying on the smaller clearance and the sandwich cup benefiting from the polyethylene backing. Both cup systems can function in a wide range of lubrication regimes, covering both mixed and fluid film, under the current design and manufacture conditions.

  20. A dynamic social systems model for considering structural factors in HIV prevention and detection

    PubMed Central

    Latkin, Carl; Weeks, Margaret; Glasman, Laura; Galletly, Carol; Albarracin, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    We present a model for HIV-related behaviors that emphasizes the dynamic and social nature of the structural factors that influence HIV prevention and detection. Key structural dimensions of the model include resources, science and technology, formal social control, informal social influences and control, social interconnectedness, and settings. These six dimensions can be conceptualized on macro, meso, and micro levels. Given the inherent complexity of structural factors and their interrelatedness, HIV prevention interventions may focus on different levels and dimensions. We employ a systems perspective to describe the interconnected and dynamic processes of change among social systems and their components. The topics of HIV testing and safer injection facilities are analyzed using this structural framework. Finally, we discuss methodological issues in the development and evaluation of structural interventions for HIV prevention and detection. PMID:20838871

  1. Topographic bone thickness maps for Bonebridge implantations.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Wilhelm; Gerber, Nicolas; Guignard, Jérémie; Dubach, Patrick; Kompis, Martin; Weber, Stefan; Caversaccio, Marco

    2015-07-01

    Bonebridge™ (BB) implantation relies on optimal anchoring of the bone-conduction implant in the temporal bone. Preoperative position planning has to account for the available bone thickness minimizing unwanted interference with underlying anatomical structures. This study describes the first clinical experience with a planning method based on topographic bone thickness maps (TBTM) for presigmoid BB implantations. The temporal bone was segmented enabling three-dimensional surface generation. Distances between the external and internal surface were color encoded and mapped to a TBTM. Suitable implant positions were planned with reference to the TBTM. Surgery was performed according to the standard procedure (n = 7). Computation of the TBTM and consecutive implant position planning took 70 min on average for a trained technician. Surgical time for implantations under passive TBTM image guidance was 60 min, on average. The sigmoid sinus (n = 5) and dura mater (n = 1) were exposed, as predicted with the TBTM. Feasibility of the TBTM method was shown for standard presigmoid BB implantations. The projection of three-dimensional bone thickness information into a single topographic map provides the surgeon with an intuitive display of the anatomical situation prior to implantation. Nevertheless, TBTM generation time has to be significantly reduced to simplify integration in clinical routine.

  2. Efficient detection of secondary structure folded nucleic acids related to Alzheimer's disease based on junction probes.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Qi, Xiu-Juan; Du, Yan-Yan; Fu, Hua-E; Chen, Guo-Nan; Yang, Huang-Hao

    2012-01-01

    Single stranded DNA often forms stable secondary structures under physiological conditions. These DNA secondary structures play important physiological roles. However, the analysis of such secondary structure folded DNA is often complicated because of its high thermodynamic stability and slow hybridization kinetics. In this article, we demonstrate that Y-shaped junction probes could be used for rapid and highly efficient detection of secondary structure folded DNA. Our approach contained a molecular beacon (MB) probe and an assistant probe. In the absence of target, the MB probe failed to hybridize with the assistant probe. Whereas, the MB probe and the assistant probe could cooperatively unwind the secondary structure folded DNA target to form a ternary Y-shaped junction structure. In this condition, the MB probe was also opened, resulting in separating the fluorophores from the quenching moiety and emitting the fluorescence signal. This approach allowed for the highly sensitive detection of secondary structure folded DNA target, such as a tau specific DNA fragment related to Alzheimer's disease in this case. Additionally, this approach showed strong SNPs identifying capability. Furthermore, it was noteworthy that this newly proposed approach was capable of detecting secondary structure folded DNA target in cell lysate samples.

  3. Nano hydroxyapatite structures influence early bone formation.

    PubMed

    Meirelles, Luiz; Arvidsson, Anna; Andersson, Martin; Kjellin, Per; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2008-11-01

    In a study model that aims to evaluate the effect of nanotopography on bone formation, micrometer structures known to alter bone formation, should be removed. Electropolished titanium implants were prepared to obtain a surface topography in the absence of micro structures, thereafter the implants were divided in two groups. The test group was modified with nanosize hydroxyapatite particles; the other group was left uncoated and served as control for the experiment. Topographical evaluation demonstrated increased nanoroughness parameters for the nano-HA implant and higher surface porosity compared to the control implant. The detected features had increased size and diameter equivalent to the nano-HA crystals present in the solution and the relative frequency of the feature size and diameter was very similar. Furthermore, feature density per microm(2) showed a decrease of 13.5% on the nano-HA implant. Chemical characterization revealed calcium and phosphorous ions on the modified implants, whereas the control implants consisted of pure titanium oxide. Histological evaluation demonstrated significantly increased bone formation to the coated (p < 0.05) compared to uncoated implants after 4 weeks of healing. These findings indicate for the first time that early bone formation is dependent on the nanosize hydroxyapatite features, but we are unaware if we see an isolated effect of the chemistry or of the nanotopography or a combination of both.

  4. Acoustic-sensor-based detection of damage in composite aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Peter; Martin, Tony; Read, Ian

    2004-03-01

    Acoustic emission detection is a well-established method of locating and monitoring crack development in metal structures. The technique has been adapted to test facilities for non-destructive testing applications. Deployment as an operational or on-line automated damage detection technology in vehicles is posing greater challenges. A clear requirement of potential end-users of such systems is a level of automation capable of delivering low-level diagnosis information. The output from the system is in the form of "go", "no-go" indications of structural integrity or immediate maintenance actions. This level of automation requires significant data reduction and processing. This paper describes recent trials of acoustic emission detection technology for the diagnosis of damage in composite aerospace structures. The technology comprises low profile detection sensors using piezo electric wafers encapsulated in polymer film ad optical sensors. Sensors are bonded to the structure"s surface and enable acoustic events from the loaded structure to be located by triangulation. Instrumentation has been enveloped to capture and parameterise the sensor data in a form suitable for low-bandwidth storage and transmission.

  5. The Effect of Breast Implants on Mammogram Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kam, Kelli; Lee, Esther; Pairawan, Seyed; Anderson, Kendra; Cora, Cherie; Bae, Won; Senthil, Maheswari; Solomon, Naveenraj; Lum, Sharon

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer detection in women with implants has been questioned. We sought to evaluate the impact of breast implants on mammographic outcomes. A retrospective review of women undergoing mammography between March 1 and October 30, 2013 was performed. Demographic characteristics and mammogram results were compared between women with and without breast implants. Overall, 4.8 per cent of 1863 women identified during the study period had breast implants. Median age was 59 years (26-93). Women with implants were younger (53.9 vs 59.2 years, P < 0.0001), had lower body mass index (25.4 vs 28.9, P < 0.0001), and were more likely to have dense breast tissue (72.1% vs 56.4%, P = 0.004) than those without. There were no statistically significant differences with regards to Breast Imaging Recording and Data System 0 score (13.3% with implants vs 21.4% without), call back exam (18.9% with vs 24.1% without), time to resolution of abnormal imaging (58.6 days with vs 43.3 without), or cancer detection rate (0% with implants vs 1.0% without). Because implants did not significantly affect mammogram results, women with implants should be reassured that mammography remains useful in detecting cancer. However, future research is required to determine whether lower call back rates and longer time to resolution of imaging findings contribute to delays in diagnosis in patients with implants. PMID:26463307

  6. Application of a Subspace-Based Fault Detection Method to Industrial Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mevel, L.; Hermans, L.; van der Auweraer, H.

    1999-11-01

    Early detection and localization of damage allow increased expectations of reliability, safety and reduction of the maintenance cost. This paper deals with the industrial validation of a technique to monitor the health of a structure in operating conditions (e.g. rotating machinery, civil constructions subject to ambient excitations, etc.) and to detect slight deviations in a modal model derived from in-operation measured data. In this paper, a statistical local approach based on covariance-driven stochastic subspace identification is proposed. The capabilities and limitations of the method with respect to health monitoring and damage detection are discussed and it is explained how the method can be practically used in industrial environments. After the successful validation of the proposed method on a few laboratory structures, its application to a sports car is discussed. The example illustrates that the method allows the early detection of a vibration-induced fatigue problem of a sports car.

  7. Hidden corrosion detection in aircraft aluminum structures using laser ultrasonics and wavelet transform signal analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, M Z; Gouyon, R; Lepoutre, F

    2003-06-01

    Preliminary results of hidden corrosion detection in aircraft aluminum structures using a noncontact laser based ultrasonic technique are presented. A short laser pulse focused to a line spot is used as a broadband source of ultrasonic guided waves in an aluminum 2024 sample cut from an aircraft structure and prepared with artificially corroded circular areas on its back surface. The out of plane surface displacements produced by the propagating ultrasonic waves were detected with a heterodyne Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Time-frequency analysis of the signals using a continuous wavelet transform allowed the identification of the generated Lamb modes by comparison with the calculated dispersion curves. The presence of back surface corrosion was detected by noting the loss of the S(1) mode near its cutoff frequency. This method is applicable to fast scanning inspection techniques and it is particularly suited for early corrosion detection.

  8. Implantation in IVF.

    PubMed

    Busso, Cristiano E; Melo, Marco A B; Fernandez, Manuel; Pellicer, Antonio; Simon, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The recent advances in assisted reproduction have made it possible to study and interfere in almost every step of the human reproductive process except for implantation. The most complex and important step remains in great part unknown. Implantation in human has proven to be less efficient compared with other species. However, in in vitro fertilization (IVF) patients, it has been evaluated to be even poorer. This paper highlights the factors related to infertile patients and IVF treatments that can affect implantation and implantation's clinical aspects related to these treatments: implantation failure and early pregnancy loss.

  9. Application of edge detection to potential field data using eigenvalue analysis of structure tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sertcelik, I.; Kafadar, O.

    2012-09-01

    One of the most important aims of potential field geophysicists is delineate the edges of subsurface structures. There are many methods based on horizontal and vertical derivative of potential field data for edge detection and enhancement. The structure tensor technique one of the image processing techniques is used to edge detection studies in many scientific areas. In this paper, the technique was applied to potential field data and detected edges of the subsurface lineaments using its eigenvalue analysis. Based on noise-free and noisy synthetic data sets, the technique was tested and satisfactory results were obtained. The proposed method was applied on two real potential field data which are gravity data of Konya region and magnetic data of Eastern Anatolia Region in Turkey. These examples demonstrate that the technique provides beneficial information to geoscientists for determining the horizontal location of subsurface structures such as contacts, faults or various source bodies.

  10. Structure Detection of Nonlinear Aeroelastic Systems with Application to Aeroelastic Flight Test Data. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.; Brenner, martin J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the 1. Motivation for the study 2. Nonlinear Model Form 3. Structure Detection 4. Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) 5. Objectives 6. Results 7. Assess LASSO as a Structure Detection Tool: Simulated Nonlinear Models 8. Applicability to Complex Systems: F/A-18 Active Aeroelastic Wing Flight Test Data. The authors conclude that 1. this is a novel approach for detecting the structure of highly over-parameterised nonlinear models in situations where other methods may be inadequate 2. that it is a practical significance in the analysis of aircraft dynamics during envelope expansion and could lead to more efficient control strategies and 3. this could allow greater insight into the functionality of various systems dynamics, by providing a quantitative model which is easily interpretable

  11. The structural and bio-corrosion barrier performance of Mg-substituted fluorapatite coating on 316L stainless steel human body implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifnabi, A.; Fathi, M. H.; Eftekhari Yekta, B.; Hossainalipour, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Mg-substituted fluorapatite coatings were deposited on medical grade AISI 316L stainless steel via sol-gel dip coating method. Phase composition, crystallite size and degree of crystallinity of the obtained coatings were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was also used to evaluate functional groups of the obtained coatings. The surface morphology and cross-section of the final coatings were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy was used to determine elemental chemical composition of the obtained coatings. In order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of uncoated and Mg-substituted fluorapatite coated 316L stainless steel, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed in physiological solutions at 37 ± 1 °C. Moreover, the released metallic ions from uncoated and coated substrates were measured by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) within 2 months of immersing in Ringer's solution at 36.5 ± 1 °C as an indication of biocompatibility. The results showed that fluoride and magnesium were successfully incorporated into apatite lattice structure and the prepared coatings were nanostructured with crystallinity of about 70%. Obtained coatings were totally crack-free and uniform and led to decrease in corrosion current densities of 316L stainless steel in physiological solutions. In addition, coated sample released much less ions such as Fe, Cr and Ni in physiological media. Therefore, it was concluded that Mg-substituted fluorapatite coatings could improve the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of 316L stainless steel human body implants.

  12. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993

  13. Breast implants. A review.

    PubMed

    Van Zele, D; Heymans, O

    2004-04-01

    Breast implants have been used for about four decades for both reconstructive and aesthetic purposes. In 1963, the quality of the artificial implants was revolutionized by the introduction of the silicone gel-filled implant. Since, this modern prosthesis has gone through an evolution of change and improvement with several types of devices with many variations and styles within each class. Actually, for the last three decades, approximately one million women have received silicone breast implants in the USA. But, in 1992, the American FDA banned silicone from the market, leaving saline implants as the only product generally available as an alternative until now. Other filler materials were introduced, but have never progressed beyond the experimental stage in the USA (in contrast with Europe). The evolution of the different implants through time, with their advantages and disadvantages will be discussed, but also the controversy on silicone implants in the USA and their suspected association with systemic diseases. PMID:15154572

  14. Detection of sudden structural damage using blind source separation and time-frequency approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morovati, V.; Kazemi, M. T.

    2016-05-01

    Seismic signal processing is one of the most reliable methods of detecting the structural damage during earthquakes. In this paper, the use of the hybrid method of blind source separation (BSS) and time-frequency analysis (TFA) is explored to detect the changes in the structural response data. The combination of the BSS and TFA is applied to the seismic signals due to the non-stationary nature of them. Firstly, the second-order blind identification technique is used to decompose the response signal of structural vibration into modal coordinate signals which will be mono-components for TFA. Then each mono-component signal is analyzed to extract instantaneous frequency of structure. Numerical simulations and a real-world seismic-excited structure with time-varying frequencies show the accuracy and robustness of the developed algorithm. TFA of extracted sources shows that used method can be successfully applied to structural damage detection. The results also demonstrate that the combined method can be used to identify the time instant of structural damage occurrence more sharply and effectively than by the use of TFA alone.

  15. Low-loss waveguiding and detecting structure for surface plasmon polaritons

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuhara, M. Aihara, T.; Ota, M.; Sakai, H.; Ishii, Y.; Fukuda, M.

    2014-02-24

    A simple and low-loss metal/semiconductor surface plasmon polariton (SPP) device consisting of a SPP waveguide and a detector is studied theoretically and experimentally. We demonstrate a simple diffraction structure (a metal grating) where the SPP couples from the waveguide to the detector. The SPP can propagate without large losses at the air/Au interface, and this interface was used for SPP waveguiding. To convert the SPP into an electric signal using internal photoemission, the propagating SPP is coupled into the Au/Si interface by the diffraction structure. The propagation direction of the coupled SPP at the Au/Si interface depends on the slit pitch of the diffraction structure, and the direction can be controlled by adjusting the pitch. The slit pitch is also modeled using a diffraction grating equation, and the results show good agreement with those of simulations using the finite-difference time-domain method. When diffraction structures consisting of a multi-slit structure and a disk array are placed at the end of the waveguide, SPP coupling into the Au/Si interface is also observed. The photocurrents detected at the Au/Si interface are much larger when compared with that detected for the device without the diffraction structure (26 times for the multi-slit structure and 10 times for the disk array). From the polarization angle dependence of the detected photocurrent, we also confirmed that the photocurrent was caused by the SPP propagating at the air/Au interface.

  16. Reliability of void detection in structural ceramics by use of scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Klima, S. J.; Kiser, J. D.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting surface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. Specimens of sintered silicon nitride and sintered silicon carbide, seeded with surface voids, were examined by SLAM at an ultrasonic frequency of 100 MHz in the as fired condition and after surface polishing. It was observed that polishing substantially increased void detectability. Voids as small as 100 micrometers in diameter were detected in polished specimens with 0.90 probability at a 0.95 confidence level. In addition, inspection times were reduced up to a factor of 10 after polishing. The applicability of the SLAM technique for detection of naturally occurring flaws of similar dimensions to the seeded voids is discussed. A FORTRAN program listing is given for calculating and plotting flaw detection statistics.

  17. Reliability of void detection in structural ceramics using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Klima, S. J.; Kiser, J. D.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting surface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. Specimens of sintered silicon nitride and sintered silicon carbide, seeded with surface voids, were examined by SLAM at an ultrasonic frequency of 100 MHz in the as fired condition and after surface polishing. It was observed that polishing substantially increased void detectability. Voids as small as 100 micrometers in diameter were detected in polished specimens with 0.90 probability at a 0.95 confidence level. In addition, inspection times were reduced up to a factor of 10 after polishing. The applicability of the SLAM technique for detection of naturally occurring flaws of similar dimensions to the seeded voids is discussed. A FORTRAN program listing is given for calculating and plotting flaw detection statistics.

  18. Reliability of void detection in structural ceramics by use of scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, D.J.; Klima, S.J.; Kiser, J.D.; Baaklini, G.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The reliability of scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM) for detecting surface voids in structural ceramic test specimens was statistically evaluated. Specimens of sintered silicon nitride and sintered silicon carbide, seeded with surface voids, were examined by SLAM at an ultrasonic frequency of 100 MHz in the as fired condition and after surface polishing. It was observed that polishing substantially increased void detectability. Voids as small as 100 micrometers in diameter were detected in polished specimens with 0.90 probability at a 0.95 confidence level. In addition, inspection times were reduced up to a factor of 10 after polishing. The applicability of the SLAM technique for detection of naturally occurring flaws of similar dimensions to the seeded voids is discussed. A FORTRAN program listing is given for calculating and plotting flaw detection statistics. 20 references.

  19. High-sensitive nonlinear detection of steroids by resonant double grating waveguide structures-based immunosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muriano, Alejandro; Salvador, J.-Pablo; Galve, Roger; Marco, M.-Pilar; Thayil K. N., Anisha; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Soria, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    We report the non linear fluorescence real-time detection of methylboldenone, an androgenic anabolic steroid used illegally as growth promoter based on a resonant sensing chip: a double grating waveguide structure. The limit of detection of this synthetic steroid is two orders of magnitude lower than the Minimum Required Performance Limit required by the World Anti-Doping Agency. The immunoreagents have been have been immobilized onto the surface of the resonant sensor after being activated with phosphonohexanoic acid spacers. The developed immunosensor presents great potential as a robust sensing device for fast and early detection of illegal dopants and food contaminants.

  20. Structure dependence of lasing action in organic polymer films on DFB gratings for dinitrotoluene vapor detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiufeng; Qiu, Keqiang; He, Shengnan; Liu, Honglin; Liu, Zhengkun; Hong, Yilin; Fu, Shaojun

    2016-06-20

    Structure effects of distributed feedback (DFB) gratings on lasing action have been investigated for detecting explosive vapors. For the first time, we have established the optimized profiles of the DFB grating, and given the theoretical path to design its structure for amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) of organic polymer films based on Bragg conditions. A poly(p-phenylene ethynylene) (PPE) film can realize detection of dinitrotoluene (DNT) vapors in 2 min with a reduced excitation threshold of 26 mJ cm(-2) by using a simple and common 405 nm laser. PMID:27277339

  1. Damage of composite structures: Detection technique, dynamic response and residual strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestari, Wahyu

    2001-10-01

    Reliable and accurate health monitoring techniques can prevent catastrophic failures of structures. Conventional damage detection methods are based on visual or localized experimental methods and very often require prior information concerning the vicinity of the damage or defect. The structure must also be readily accessible for inspections. The techniques are also labor intensive. In comparison to these methods, health-monitoring techniques that are based on the structural dynamic response offers unique information on failure of structures. However, systematic relations between the experimental data and the defect are not available and frequently, the number of vibration modes needed for an accurate identification of defects is much higher than the number of modes that can be readily identified in the experiment. These motivated us to develop an experimental data based detection method with systematic relationships between the experimentally identified information and the analytical or mathematical model representing the defective structures. The developed technique use changes in vibrational curvature modes and natural frequencies. To avoid misinterpretation of the identified information, we also need to understand the effects of defects on the structural dynamic response prior to developing health-monitoring techniques. In this thesis work we focus on two type of defects in composite structures, namely delamination and edge notch like defect. Effects of nonlinearity due to the presence of defect and due to the axial stretching are studied for beams with delamination. Once defects are detected in a structure, next concern is determining the effects of the defects on the strength of the structure and its residual stiffness under dynamic loading. In this thesis, energy release rate due to dynamic loading in a delaminated structure is studied, which will be a foundation toward determining the residual strength of the structure.

  2. Detection of image structures using the Fisher information and the Rao metric.

    PubMed

    Maybank, Stephen J

    2004-12-01

    In many detection problems, the structures to be detected are parameterized by the points of a parameter space. If the conditional probability density function for the measurements is known, then detection can be achieved by sampling the parameter space at a finite number of points and checking each point to see if the corresponding structure is supported by the data. The number of samples and the distances between neighboring samples are calculated using the Rao metric on the parameter space. The Rao metric is obtained from the Fisher information which is, in turn, obtained from the conditional probability density function. An upper bound is obtained for the probability of a false detection. The calculations are simplified in the low noise case by making an asymptotic approximation to the Fisher information. An application to line detection is described. Expressions are obtained for the asymptotic approximation to the Fisher information, the volume of the parameter space, and the number of samples. The time complexity for line detection is estimated. An experimental comparison is made with a Hough transform-based method for detecting lines. PMID:15573819

  3. A Unified Framework for Salient Structure Detection by Contour-Guided Visual Search.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai-Fu; Li, Hui; Li, Chao-Yi; Li, Yong-Jie

    2016-08-01

    We define the task of salient structure (SS) detection to unify the saliency-related tasks, such as fixation prediction, salient object detection, and detection of other structures of interest in cluttered environments. To solve such SS detection tasks, a unified framework inspired by the two-pathway-based search strategy of biological vision is proposed in this paper. First, a contour-based spatial prior (CBSP) is extracted based on the layout of edges in the given scene along a fast non-selective pathway, which provides a rough, task-irrelevant, and robust estimation of the locations where the potential SSs are present. Second, another flow of local feature extraction is executed in parallel along the selective pathway. Finally, Bayesian inference is used to auto-weight and integrate the local cues guided by CBSP and to predict the exact locations of SSs. This model is invariant to the size and features of objects. The experimental results on six large datasets (three fixation prediction datasets and three salient object datasets) demonstrate that our system achieves competitive performance for SS detection (i.e., both the tasks of fixation prediction and salient object detection) compared with the state-of-the-art methods. In addition, our system also performs well for salient object construction from saliency maps and can be easily extended for salient edge detection. PMID:27244740

  4. An automated procedure for covariation-based detection of RNA structure

    SciTech Connect

    Winker, S.; Overbeek, R.; Woese, C.R.; Olsen, G.J.; Pfluger, N.

    1989-12-01

    This paper summarizes our investigations into the computational detection of secondary and tertiary structure of ribosomal RNA. We have developed a new automated procedure that not only identifies potential bondings of secondary and tertiary structure, but also provides the covariation evidence that supports the proposed bondings, and any counter-evidence that can be detected in the known sequences. A small number of previously unknown bondings have been detected in individual RNA molecules (16S rRNA and 7S RNA) through the use of our automated procedure. Currently, we are systematically studying mitochondrial rRNA. Our goal is to detect tertiary structure within 16S rRNA and quaternary structure between 16S and 23S rRNA. Our ultimate hope is that automated covariation analysis will contribute significantly to a refined picture of ribosome structure. Our colleagues in biology have begun experiments to test certain hypotheses suggested by an examination of our program's output. These experiments involve sequencing key portions of the 23S ribosomal RNA for species in which the known 16S ribosomal RNA exhibits variation (from the dominant pattern) at the site of a proposed bonding. The hope is that the 23S ribosomal RNA of these species will exhibit corresponding complementary variation or generalized covariation. 24 refs.

  5. The effect of additional high dose carbon implantation on the tribological properties of titanium implanted steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kazunori; Sasaki, Jun; Ichiko, Osami; Hashiguchi, Yoshihiro

    1996-08-01

    The tribological properties and the structural changes of hardened steel implanted with titanium followed by carbon were investigated as a function of additional carbon dose. The dose of Ti was 5×10 17 Ti cm -2 and the additional C doses were 0, 4×10 17, 8×10 17 and 1.2×10 18 C cm -2. After Ti implantation, the steel surface transformed to a FeTiC ternary amorphous phase. Additional implantation of carbon to a dose of 4×10 17 C cm -2 produced fine TiC precipitates dispersed in the ternary amorphous matrix. When the additional C dose exceeded 8×10 17 C cm -2, very fine graphite precipitates appeared in the ternary amorphous phase. The steel surface with very fine graphite precipitates exhibited superior tribological properties. The benefits provided by additional high dose carbon implantation are considered as follows: strengthening of the amorphous phase, thickening of the modified layer, dispersion strengthening of the implanted layer by very fine graphite precipitates and lubrication effect by graphite particles. Comparing the friction properties of Ti+C implanted steel with that of C implanted steel, the role of Ti implantation is to reduce the friction of the surface during sliding and the role of C implantation is to increase the lifetime of the surface against wear.

  6. An improved modal strain energy method for damage detection in offshore platform structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingchao; Wang, Shuqing; Zhang, Min; Zheng, Chunmei

    2016-06-01

    The development of robust damage detection methods for offshore structures is crucial to prevent catastrophes caused by structural failures. In this research, we developed an Improved Modal Strain Energy (IMSE) method for detecting damage in offshore platform structures based on a traditional modal strain energy method (the Stubbs index method). The most significant difference from the Stubbs index method was the application of modal frequencies. The goal was to improve the robustness of the traditional method. To demonstrate the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed IMSE method, both numerical and experimental studies were conducted for different damage scenarios using a jacket platform structure. The results demonstrated the effectiveness of the IMSE method in damage location when only limited, spatially incomplete, and noise-polluted modal data is available. Comparative studies showed that the IMSE index outperformed the Stubbs index and exhibited stronger robustness, confirming the superiority of the proposed approach.

  7. Surface analysis of four dental implant systems.

    PubMed

    Olefjord, I; Hansson, S

    1993-01-01

    Dental implants obtained from four suppliers were analyzed by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Three of the implants were delivered in a sterilized condition, while the fourth implant was delivered in a plasma-sprayed condition. The covering oxide layer consisted mainly of TiO2. Divalent and trivalent states of titanium were also detected, showing that TiO and Ti2O3 layers occurred. The thickness of the oxide formed on the plasma-sprayed implant was 3.4 nm. The oxide thicknesses of the sterilized implants were 4.6 +/- 0.4 nm. The surfaces of all samples were covered with organic contaminants. A strong fluorine signal was obtained from one sample, indicating that the supplier etches the implants in hydrofluoric acid. Calcium and zinc were found on the surfaces of all samples from one supplier, while calcium and silicon were found on the surfaces of the implants from another supplier. It is suggested that inorganic contaminants should be avoided because these species can possibly provoke the dissolution of titanium.

  8. How detectable is predation in stage-structured populations? Insights from a simulation-testing analysis.

    PubMed

    Oken, Kiva L; Essington, Timothy E

    2015-01-01

    The potential of predation to structure marine food webs is widely acknowledged. However, available tools to detect the regulation of prey population dynamics by predation are limited, partly because available population data often aggregate a population's age structure into a single biomass or abundance metric. Additionally, many food webs are relatively complex, with prey species subject to different assemblages of predators throughout their ontogeny. The goal of this study was to evaluate the extent to which stage-structured predation could be reliably detected from time series of total biomass of predators and prey. We simulated age-structured populations of four mid-trophic-level fish species with distinct life-history traits, exposed them to variable predation at different life stages and fit production models to resulting population biomass to determine how reliably the effects of predators could be detected. Predation targeting early life history and juvenile life stages generally led to larger fluctuations in annual production and was therefore more detectable. However, ecologically realistic levels of observation error and environmental stochasticity masked most predator signals. The addition of predation at a second life stage sharply decreased the ability to detect the effect of each predator. We conclude that the absence of detectable species interactions from biomass time series may be partly due to the interactive effects of environmental variability and complex food web linkages and life histories. We also note that predation signals are most robust for predator-prey systems where predators primarily act on mortality of submature life-history stages. Simulation testing can be applied widely to evaluate the statistical power of analyses to detect predation effects.

  9. Depth Profiling of N and C in Ion Implanted ZnO and Si Using Deuterium Induced Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, John; Murmu, Peter; Markwitz, Andreas

    2008-11-03

    Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) with deuteron ion beams has been used to probe for ion implanted nitrogen and carbon with high sensitivity in zinc oxide and silicon single crystals. The ion implanted N was measured using 1.4 MeV deuteron ion beams and was found to be in agreement with calculated values. The limit of detection for N in ZnO is 8x10{sup 14} ions cm{sup -2}. Raman measurements of the ion implanted samples showed three additional modes at 275, 504, and 644 cm{sup -1} compared to the un-implanted ZnO crystals. The NRA and Raman results provided information on the N concentration, depth distribution, and structural changes that occur in dependence on the nitrogen ion fluences. The deuterium induced {sup 12}C(d,p){sup 13}C reaction was used to measure the carbon impurity/dose in ion implanted silicon. It was found that the use of a large cold shield (liquid nitrogen trap) in the ion implanter chamber greatly reduces the amount of carbon impurity on the surface of ion implanted silicon. Various implantations with N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2} and Pb ions were performed with and without cooling of the liquid nitrogen trap. Simultaneous detection of ppm-level concentrations of {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N enables highly sensitive measurement of impurities that may be incorporated during the fabrication process, transport of the samples and/or storage of the samples in air.

  10. Nanostructures from hydrogen implantation of metals.

    SciTech Connect

    McWatters, Bruce Ray; Causey, Rion A.; DePuit, Ryan J.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Ong, Markus D.

    2009-09-01

    This study investigates a pathway to nanoporous structures created by hydrogen implantation in aluminum. Previous experiments for fusion applications have indicated that hydrogen and helium ion implantations are capable of producing bicontinuous nanoporous structures in a variety of metals. This study focuses specifically on hydrogen and helium implantations of aluminum, including complementary experimental results and computational modeling of this system. Experimental results show the evolution of the surface morphology as the hydrogen ion fluence increases from 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} to 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. Implantations of helium at a fluence of 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2} produce porosity on the order of 10 nm. Computational modeling demonstrates the formation of alanes, their desorption, and the resulting etching of aluminum surfaces that likely drives the nanostructures that form in the presence of hydrogen.

  11. Detection of fault structures with airborne LiDAR point-cloud data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Du, Lei

    2015-08-01

    The airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) technology is a new type of aerial earth observation method which can be used to produce high-precision DEM (Digital Elevation Model) quickly and reflect ground surface information directly. Fault structure is one of the key forms of crustal movement, and its quantitative description is the key to the research of crustal movement. The airborne LiDAR point-cloud data is used to detect and extract fault structures automatically based on linear extension, elevation mutation and slope abnormal characteristics. Firstly, the LiDAR point-cloud data is processed to filter out buildings, vegetation and other non-surface information with the TIN (Triangulated Irregular Network) filtering method and Burman model calibration method. TIN and DEM are made from the processed data sequentially. Secondly, linear fault structures are extracted based on dual-threshold method. Finally, high-precision DOM (Digital Orthophoto Map) and other geological knowledge are used to check the accuracy of fault structure extraction. An experiment is carried out in Beiya Village of Yunnan Province, China. With LiDAR technology, results reveal that: the airborne LiDAR point-cloud data can be utilized to extract linear fault structures accurately and automatically, measure information such as height, width and slope of fault structures with high precision, and detect faults in areas with vegetation coverage effectively.

  12. Nanotechnology and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lavenus, Sandrine; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The long-term clinical success of dental implants is related to their early osseointegration. This paper reviews the different steps of the interactions between biological fluids, cells, tissues, and surfaces of implants. Immediately following implantation, implants are in contact with proteins and platelets from blood. The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells will then condition the peri-implant tissue healing. Direct bone-to-implant contact is desired for a biomechanical anchoring of implants to bone rather than fibrous tissue encapsulation. Surfaces properties such as chemistry and roughness play a determinant role in these biological interactions. Physicochemical features in the nanometer range may ultimately control the adsorption of proteins as well as the adhesion and differentiation of cells. Nanotechnologies are increasingly used for surface modifications of dental implants. Another approach to enhance osseointegration is the application of thin calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings. Bioactive CaP nanocrystals deposited on titanium implants are resorbable and stimulate bone apposition and healing. Future nanometer-controlled surfaces may ultimately direct the nature of peri-implant tissues and improve their clinical success rate.

  13. Nanotechnology and Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Lavenus, Sandrine; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The long-term clinical success of dental implants is related to their early osseointegration. This paper reviews the different steps of the interactions between biological fluids, cells, tissues, and surfaces of implants. Immediately following implantation, implants are in contact with proteins and platelets from blood. The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells will then condition the peri-implant tissue healing. Direct bone-to-implant contact is desired for a biomechanical anchoring of implants to bone rather than fibrous tissue encapsulation. Surfaces properties such as chemistry and roughness play a determinant role in these biological interactions. Physicochemical features in the nanometer range may ultimately control the adsorption of proteins as well as the adhesion and differentiation of cells. Nanotechnologies are increasingly used for surface modifications of dental implants. Another approach to enhance osseointegration is the application of thin calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings. Bioactive CaP nanocrystals deposited on titanium implants are resorbable and stimulate bone apposition and healing. Future nanometer-controlled surfaces may ultimately direct the nature of peri-implant tissues and improve their clinical success rate. PMID:21253543

  14. In vivo degradation of orthodontic miniscrew implants: surface analysis of as-received and retrieved specimens.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro; Muguruma, Takeshi; Kawaguchi, Masahiro; Yasuda, Yoshitaka; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated in vivo degradation of Ti-6Al-4V alloy miniscrew implants. Miniscrew implants were placed in patients, and the surfaces were studied upon retrieval by scanning electron microscopy, microscale X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis and nanoindentation testing. Bone-like structures were formed on the retrieved specimens. The hardness and elastic modulus of the surfaces of the retrieved specimens were significantly lower than the as-received specimens, although no statistically significant differences were observed for the hardness and elastic modulus in the bulk region. Thick organic over-layer containing carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen, with the thickness greater than 50 nm, covered the retrieved specimens, and higher concentrations of hydrogen were detected in the retrieved specimens compared with the as-received specimens. Minimal degradation of the bulk mechanical properties of miniscrew implants was observed after clinical use, although precipitation of bone-like structures, formation of a carbonaceous contamination layer, and hydrogen absorption were observed on the surfaces of miniscrew implants. PMID:25631268

  15. Quantitative structure carcinogenicity relationship for detecting structural alerts in nitroso-compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Helguera, Aliuska Morales Cordeiro, M. Natalia D.S.; Perez, Miguel Angel Cabrera; Combes, Robert D.; Gonzalez, Maykel Perez

    2008-09-01

    In this work, Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) modelling was used as a tool for predicting the carcinogenic potency of a set of 39 nitroso-compounds, which have been bioassayed in male rats by using the oral route of administration. The optimum QSAR model provided evidence of good fit and performance of predicitivity from training set. It was able to account for about 84% of the variance in the experimental activity and exhibited high values of the determination coefficients of cross validations, leave one out and bootstrapping (q{sup 2}{sub LOO} = 78.53 and q{sup 2}{sub Boot} = 74.97). Such a model was based on spectral moments weighted with Gasteiger-Marsilli atomic charges, polarizability and hydrophobicity, as well as with Abraham indexes, specifically the summation solute hydrogen bond basicity and the combined dipolarity/polarizability. This is the first study to have explored the possibility of combining Abraham solute descriptors with spectral moments. A reasonable interpretation of these molecular descriptors from a toxicological point of view was achieved by means of taking into account bond contributions. The set of relationships so derived revealed the importance of the length of the alkyl chains for determining carcinogenic potential of the chemicals analysed, and were able to explain the difference between mono-substituted and di-substituted nitrosoureas as well as to discriminate between isomeric structures with hydroxyl-alkyl and alkyl substituents in different positions. Moreover, they allowed the recognition of structural alerts in classical structures of two potent nitrosamines, consistent with their biotransformation. These results indicate that this new approach has the potential for improving carcinogenicity predictions based on the identification of structural alerts.

  16. Flood member detection for real-time structural health monitoring of sub-sea structures of offshore steel oilrigs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mijarez, Rito; Gaydecki, Patrick; Burdekin, Michael

    2007-10-01

    A structural flood detection system for real-time health monitoring in the hollow sub-sea members of new offshore steel oilrigs is presented. Field-proven flood member detection techniques, integrated within the concept of health monitoring, offer an alternative to underwater nondestructive testing methods based on ultrasound and x-rays, which have been used to detect the presence of seawater in these applications, often with diverse or remote operating vehicles. The system employs a single piezoelectric transducer which can be permanently attached to the inner wall of every sub-sea structure and which is powered by a normally inert seawater battery. Upon activation, the sensor transmits ultrasonic chirp or tone encoded pulses, in the range of 21-42 kHz, to a monitoring receiver system at deck level for decoding and identifying flooded members. Experiments have been carried out using a jointed steel pipe structure, 7 m in length, 0.5 m in diameter and 16 mm in thickness. This structure was flooded and completely immersed in seawater. Two approaches to the system were considered during the investigation, depending on the communication channel exploited; the former utilized guided waves, on the basis of exploiting the steel structure as a wave-guide; the latter employed underwater ultrasound, based on using the seawater as a propagation medium. Although severe losses were encountered in both approaches, the system effectively identified the signals above the background noise. This work forms the foundation for the future development of a system that can be used with large, commercial offshore platforms.

  17. Fibronectin-Grafted Titanium Dental Implants: An In Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Ning; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming; Chang, Chia-Hsun; Lin, Che-Tong; Teng, Nai-Chia; Pan, Yu Hwa; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the physiochemical properties of titanium surfaces using glow discharge plasma (GDP) and fibronectin coating has been shown to enhance the surface hydrophilicity, surface roughness, cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. This in vivo study aimed to evaluate the bone integration efficacy of a biologically modified implant surface. Two different surface-modified implants (Ar-GDP and GDP-fib) were placed in the mandibular premolar area of six beagle dogs for 2-8 weeks. Three techniques [histologic evaluation, resonance frequency analysis (RFA), and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) evaluation] were used to detect the implant stability and bone-implant contact. The implant stability quotient values of GDP-fib implants were significantly greater than the Ar-GDP implants at 2 and 4 weeks (P < 0.01). The bone volume/total volume ratio of GDP-fib implants was greater than the Ar-GDP implants in micro-CT evaluation. A high positive correlation was observed between RFA and micro-CT measurements. At 2 weeks, osteoblasts were seen to line the implant surface, and multinuclear osteoclasts could be seen on the surface of old parent bone. After 8 weeks, a majority of the space in the wound chamber appeared to be replaced by bone. Enhancement of the stability of biologically modified implants was proved by the results of RFA, micro-CT, and histological analysis. This enhanced stability may help fasten treatment and be clinically beneficial.

  18. Detachment of titanium and fluorohydroxyapatite particles in unloaded endosseous implants.

    PubMed

    Martini, D; Fini, M; Franchi, M; Pasquale, V De; Bacchelli, B; Gamberini, M; Tinti, A; Taddei, P; Giavaresi, G; Ottani, V; Raspanti, M; Guizzardi, S; Ruggeri, A

    2003-03-01

    The shape, surface composition and morphology of orthopaedic and endosseous dental titanium implants are key factors to achieve post-surgical and long-term mechanical stability and enhance implant osteointegration. In this study a comparison was made between 12 titanium screws, plasma-spray-coated with titanium powders (TPS), and 12 screws with an additional coating of fluorohydroxyapatite (FHA-Ti). Screws were implanted in the femoral and tibial diaphyses of two mongrel sheep and removed with peri-implant tissues 12 weeks after surgery. The vibrational spectroscopic, ultrastructural and morphological analyses showed good osteointegration for both types of implants in host cortical bone. The portion of the FHA-Ti implants in contact with the medullary canal showed a wider area of newly formed peri-implant bone than that of the TPS implants. Morphological and EDAX analyses demonstrated the presence of small titanium debris in the bone medullary spaces near the TPS surface, presumably due to the friction between the host bone and the implant during insertion. Few traces of titanium were detected around FHA-Ti implants, even if smaller FHA debris were present. The present findings suggest that the FHA coating may act as a barrier against the detachment of titanium debris stored in the medullary spaces near the implant surface.

  19. Fibronectin-Grafted Titanium Dental Implants: An In Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Ning; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming; Chang, Chia-Hsun; Lin, Che-Tong; Teng, Nai-Chia; Pan, Yu Hwa; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the physiochemical properties of titanium surfaces using glow discharge plasma (GDP) and fibronectin coating has been shown to enhance the surface hydrophilicity, surface roughness, cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. This in vivo study aimed to evaluate the bone integration efficacy of a biologically modified implant surface. Two different surface-modified implants (Ar-GDP and GDP-fib) were placed in the mandibular premolar area of six beagle dogs for 2-8 weeks. Three techniques [histologic evaluation, resonance frequency analysis (RFA), and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) evaluation] were used to detect the implant stability and bone-implant contact. The implant stability quotient values of GDP-fib implants were significantly greater than the Ar-GDP implants at 2 and 4 weeks (P < 0.01). The bone volume/total volume ratio of GDP-fib implants was greater than the Ar-GDP implants in micro-CT evaluation. A high positive correlation was observed between RFA and micro-CT measurements. At 2 weeks, osteoblasts were seen to line the implant surface, and multinuclear osteoclasts could be seen on the surface of old parent bone. After 8 weeks, a majority of the space in the wound chamber appeared to be replaced by bone. Enhancement of the stability of biologically modified implants was proved by the results of RFA, micro-CT, and histological analysis. This enhanced stability may help fasten treatment and be clinically beneficial. PMID:27366739

  20. Fibronectin-Grafted Titanium Dental Implants: An In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Ning; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming; Chang, Chia-Hsun; Lin, Che-Tong; Teng, Nai-Chia; Pan, Yu Hwa; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the physiochemical properties of titanium surfaces using glow discharge plasma (GDP) and fibronectin coating has been shown to enhance the surface hydrophilicity, surface roughness, cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. This in vivo study aimed to evaluate the bone integration efficacy of a biologically modified implant surface. Two different surface-modified implants (Ar-GDP and GDP-fib) were placed in the mandibular premolar area of six beagle dogs for 2–8 weeks. Three techniques [histologic evaluation, resonance frequency analysis (RFA), and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) evaluation] were used to detect the implant stability and bone-implant contact. The implant stability quotient values of GDP-fib implants were significantly greater than the Ar-GDP implants at 2 and 4 weeks (P < 0.01). The bone volume/total volume ratio of GDP-fib implants was greater than the Ar-GDP implants in micro-CT evaluation. A high positive correlation was observed between RFA and micro-CT measurements. At 2 weeks, osteoblasts were seen to line the implant surface, and multinuclear osteoclasts could be seen on the surface of old parent bone. After 8 weeks, a majority of the space in the wound chamber appeared to be replaced by bone. Enhancement of the stability of biologically modified implants was proved by the results of RFA, micro-CT, and histological analysis. This enhanced stability may help fasten treatment and be clinically beneficial. PMID:27366739

  1. Anodisation Increases Integration of Unloaded Titanium Implants in Sheep Mandible

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Warwick J.; Lee, Min-Ho; Bae, Tae-Sung; Lee, Sook-Jeong; Gay, Jennifer; Loch, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Spark discharge anodic oxidation forms porous TiO2 films on titanium implant surfaces. This increases surface roughness and concentration of calcium and phosphate ions and may enhance early osseointegration. To test this, forty 3.75 mm × 13 mm titanium implants (Megagen, Korea) were placed into healed mandibular postextraction ridges of 10 sheep. There were 10 implants per group: RBM surface (control), RBM + anodised, RBM + anodised + fluoride, and titanium alloy + anodised surface. Resonant frequency analysis (RFA) was measured in implant stability quotient (ISQ) at surgery and at sacrifice after 1-month unloaded healing. Mean bone-implant contact (% BIC) was measured in undemineralised ground sections for the best three consecutive threads. One of 40 implants showed evidence of failure. RFA differed between groups at surgery but not after 1 month. RFA values increased nonsignificantly for all implants after 1 month, except for controls. There was a marked difference in BIC after 1-month healing, with higher values for alloy implants, followed by anodised + fluoride and anodised implants. Anodisation increased early osseointegration of rough-surfaced implants by 50–80%. RFA testing lacked sufficient resolution to detect this improvement. Whether this gain in early bone-implant contact is clinically significant is the subject of future experiments. PMID:26436099

  2. A macro- and nanostructure evaluation of a novel dental implant.

    PubMed

    Tetè, Stefano; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Traini, Tonino; Vinci, Raffaele; Sammartino, Gilberto; Marenzi, Gaetano; Gherlone, Enrico

    2008-09-01

    Success in implant dentistry also comes from the implant macrodesign and nanostructure of its surface. Titanium implant surface treatments have been shown to enhance osseointegration, maximize bone healing, and bone-to-implant contact for predictable clinical results. The aim of the study, was to evaluate the geometric macrodesign and the surface nanostructure of a novel dental implant full contact covering (FCC) obtained by electrochemical procedures. FCC implants were analyzed by scanning electronic microscope, profilometer, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and compared with commercial sandblasted and sandblasted, large-grit acid-etched dental implants. Sample analysis allowed to distinguish the different implant macrodesigns, the step and the profile of the coils that cover the fixture, and the surface characteristics. FCC implant showed novel macro-characteristic of crestal module, coils, and apical zone compared with sandblasted and sandblasted and acid-etched dental implants. Moreover, the FCC nanostructure surface showed roughness values statistically higher than the 2 other surfaces, with a more homogeneity in a peaks and valleys arrangement. Finally, the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis detected differences between the examined surfaces, with the presence of several contaminants according to the different treatment procedures. Research on new macrostructures and nano morphology should result in a better qualitative and quantitative osseointegration response, with a predictability of the clinical results and long-term success of the implants.

  3. A hybrid method for damage detection and quantification in advanced X-COR composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neerukatti, Rajesh Kumar; Rajadas, Abhishek; Borkowski, Luke; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Huff, Daniel W.

    2016-04-01

    Advanced composite structures, such as foam core carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites, are increasingly being used in applications which require high strength, high in-plane and flexural stiffness, and low weight. However, the presence of in situ damage due to manufacturing defects and/or service conditions can complicate the failure mechanisms and compromise their strength and reliability. In this paper, the capability of detecting damages such as delaminations and foam-core separations in X-COR composite structures using non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques is investigated. Two NDE techniques, flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonics, were used to detect and quantify the damage size and locations. Macro fiber composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors to study the interaction of Lamb waves with delaminations and foam-core separations. The results indicate that both flash thermography and low frequency ultrasonics were capable of detecting damage in X-COR sandwich structures, although low frequency ultrasonic methods were capable of detecting through thickness damages more accurately than flash thermography. It was also observed that the presence of foam-core separations significantly changes the wave behavior when compared to delamination, which complicates the use of wave based SHM techniques. Further, a wave propagation model was developed to model the wave interaction with damages at different locations on the X-COR sandwich plate.

  4. Assessing Dimensionality in Complex Data Structures: A Performance Comparison of DETECT and NOHARM Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svetina, Dubravka

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of complex structure on dimensionality assessment in compensatory and noncompensatory multidimensional item response models (MIRT) of assessment data using dimensionality assessment procedures based on conditional covariances (i.e., DETECT) and a factor analytical approach (i.e., NOHARM). …

  5. Structured-illumination reflectance imaging (SIRI) for enhanced detection of fresh bruises in apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A structured-illumination reflectance imaging technique was developed for the detection of fresh bruises in apples. Experiments were first conducted on a strongly scattering nylon sample embedded with foreign objects of different sizes at different depths, and then on apples of two different cultiva...

  6. Structured-illumination reflectance imaging for enhanced detection of subsurface tissue bruising in apples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this research, a novel method of fresh bruise detection was developed using a structured illumination reflectance imaging (SIRI) system. The SIRI system projects sinusoidal patterns of illumination onto samples, and image demodulation is then used to recover depth-specific information through var...

  7. RAPTR-SV: a hybrid method for the detection of structural variants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Motivation: Identification of Structural Variants (SV) in sequence data results in a large number of false positive calls using existing software, which overburdens subsequent validation. Results: Simulations using RAPTR-SV and another software package that uses a similar algorithm for SV detection...

  8. Dimensionality in Compensatory MIRT When Complex Structure Exists: Evaluation of DETECT and NOHARM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svetina, Dubravka; Levy, Roy

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of complex structure on dimensionality assessment in compensatory multidimensional item response models using DETECT- and NOHARM-based methods. The performance was evaluated via the accuracy of identifying the correct number of dimensions and the ability to accurately recover item groupings using a simple…

  9. Detection of Answer Copying Based on the Structure of a High-Stakes Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belov, Dmitry I.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the Variable Match Index (VM-Index), a new statistic for detecting answer copying. The power of the VM-Index relies on two-dimensional conditioning as well as the structure of the test. The asymptotic distribution of the VM-Index is analyzed by reduction to Poisson trials. A computational study comparing the VM-Index with the…

  10. Enhanced Community Structure Detection in Complex Networks with Partial Background Information

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong-Yuan; Sun, Kai-Di; Wang, Si-Qi

    2013-01-01

    Community structure detection in complex networks is important since it can help better understand the network topology and how the network works. However, there is still not a clear and widely-accepted definition of community structure, and in practice, different models may give very different results of communities, making it hard to explain the results. In this paper, different from the traditional methodologies, we design an enhanced semi-supervised learning framework for community detection, which can effectively incorporate the available prior information to guide the detection process and can make the results more explainable. By logical inference, the prior information is more fully utilized. The experiments on both the synthetic and the real-world networks confirm the effectiveness of the framework. PMID:24247657

  11. Discovery of a Missing Link: Detection and Structure of the Elusive Disilicon Carbide Cluster.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Michael C; Baraban, Joshua H; Changala, P Bryan; Stanton, John F; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Thorwirth, Sven; Gottlieb, Carl A; Reilly, Neil J

    2015-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of the elusive but fundamentally important silicon carbide SiCSi has been detected using sensitive microwave techniques aided by high-level ab initio methods. Its equilibrium structure has been determined to very high precision using isotopic substitution and vibrational corrections calculated quantum-chemically: it is an isosceles triangle with a Si-C bond length of 1.693(1) Å, and an apex angle of 114.87(5)°. Now that all four Si(m)C(n) clusters with m + n = 3 have been observed experimentally, their structure and chemical bonding can be rigorously compared. Because Si2C is so closely linked to other Si-bearing molecules that have been detected in the evolved carbon star IRC+10216, it is an extremely promising candidate for detection with radio telescopes. PMID:26266510

  12. Discovery of a Missing Link: Detection and Structure of the Elusive Disilicon Carbide Cluster.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Michael C; Baraban, Joshua H; Changala, P Bryan; Stanton, John F; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Thorwirth, Sven; Gottlieb, Carl A; Reilly, Neil J

    2015-06-01

    The rotational spectrum of the elusive but fundamentally important silicon carbide SiCSi has been detected using sensitive microwave techniques aided by high-level ab initio methods. Its equilibrium structure has been determined to very high precision using isotopic substitution and vibrational corrections calculated quantum-chemically: it is an isosceles triangle with a Si-C bond length of 1.693(1) Å, and an apex angle of 114.87(5)°. Now that all four Si(m)C(n) clusters with m + n = 3 have been observed experimentally, their structure and chemical bonding can be rigorously compared. Because Si2C is so closely linked to other Si-bearing molecules that have been detected in the evolved carbon star IRC+10216, it is an extremely promising candidate for detection with radio telescopes.

  13. He reemission implanted in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, T.

    2014-10-01

    Helium (He) reemission of Al, Ni and Mo under energetic He implantation (10-30 keV) in wide temperature range is studied to understand behavior of implanted He in correlation with structure changes. The reemission behavior is categorized into 4 different temperature ranges with the normalized temperature (Tm) to the melting point of each metal. At elevated temperatures (well above ∼0.6 Tm), interstitial He atoms and/or He-vacancy (ies) clusters can migrate remaining no structure change and showing smooth reemission without any burst. Between ∼0.25 and 0.6 Tm, He reemission always accompanies significant structure modification. For ∼04-0.6 Tm, implanted He coalesce to make bubbles and the bubbles can move to the surface. Bubble migration accompanies materials flow to the surface resulting in fuzz surface or columnar structure, depending on implantation flux. Slower bubble motion at ∼0.25-0.4 prohibits the material migration. Instead the bubbles coalesce to grow large and multi-layered blistering appears as periodic reemission behavior. Below ∼0.25 Tm, He migration is too slow for bubbles to grow large, but bubble density increases up to a certain fluence, where neighboring bubbles start to coalesce. Accordingly, He release is mostly caused by mechanical failure or blister rapture. With increasing fluence, all defects (bubbles and dislocation loops) tangle or inter connected with neighboring defects and accordingly He migration to the surface along the tangled or connected defects is enhanced, resulting 100% reemission easily without making multilayered blistering.

  14. Structural damage detection using higher-order finite elements and a scanning laser vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Si

    In contrast to conventional non-destructive evaluation methods, dynamics-based damage detection methods are capable of rapid integrity evaluation of large structures and have received considerable attention from aerospace, mechanical, and civil engineering communities in recent years. However, the identifiable damage size using dynamics-based methods is determined by the number of sensors used, level of measurement noise, accuracy of structural models, and signal processing techniques. In this thesis we study dynamics of structures with damage and then derive and experimentally verify new model-independent structural damage detection methods that can locate small damage to structures. To find sensitive damage detection parameters we develop a higher-order beam element that enforces the continuity of displacements, slopes, bending moments, and shear forces at all nodes, and a higher-order rectangular plate element that enforces the continuity of displacements, slopes, and bending and twisting moments at all nodes. These two elements are used to study the dynamics of beams and plates. Results show that high-order spatial derivatives of high-frequency modes are important sensitive parameters that can locate small structural damage. Unfortunately the most powerful and popular structural modeling technique, the finite element method, is not accurate in predicting high-frequency responses. Hence, a model-independent method using dynamic responses obtained from high density measurements is concluded to be the best approach. To increase measurement density and reduce noise a Polytec PI PSV-200 scanning laser vibrometer is used to provide non-contact, dense, and accurate measurements of structural vibration velocities. To avoid the use of structural models and to extract sensitive detection parameters from experimental data, a brand-new structural damage detection method named BED (Boundary-Effect Detection) is developed for pinpointing damage locations using Operational

  15. Use of nondegeneracy in norminally axisymmetric structures for fault detection with application to cylindrical geometries.

    SciTech Connect

    Royston, T. J.; Spohnholtz, T.; Ellingson, W. A.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2000-03-01

    A novel technique is proposed for the detection of localized flaws in otherwise axisymmetric structures. The technique is based on the split-mode phenomena that occurs when the degenerate vibratory modes of the axisymmetric structure become non-degenerate due to the flaw with altered mode shapes and shifted natural frequencies. A basic theoretical motivation is offered and computational and experimental studies on cylindrical structures are reported that verify the premises of the proposed methodology and provide an assessment of its specificity and sensitivity under confounding conditions, such as out-of-roundness.

  16. Computer Aided Prosthetic Implant Manufacturing Using CT Image Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Michael L.; Glenn, William V.; Quinn, John F.; Rothman, Stephen L. G...; Pratt, Clyde; Brewster, Robert B.

    1982-11-01

    A system is described that delivers three-dimensional shape to plan corrective surgery and directly manufacture prosthetic implants. Geometry of implants are manufactured to precise dimensions using CT image data and an algorithm to generate instructions for numerically controlled milling machines. This work extends previous work in CT image segmentation algorithms to wed structure contour data to machinery used for making special implants. The types of implants currently available come in only a few sizes. A combination of changes to both the standard implant and, unfortunately to the femur itself are required to have a firm, stable reconstruction. The system out-lined here minimizes the removal of patient skeletal mass by manufacturing implants customized for each patient. The system is interconnected via digital transmission lines and will become entirely automated. Example implants are shown and new application areas are presented.

  17. Mechanical stresses and amorphization of ion-implanted diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelnitsky, R. A.; Dravin, V. A.; Tal, A. A.; Latushko, M. I.; Khomich, A. A.; Khomich, A. V.; Trushin, A. S.; Alekseev, A. A.; Terentiev, S. A.

    2013-06-01

    Scanning white light interferometry and Raman spectroscopy were used to investigate the mechanical stresses and structural changes in ion-implanted natural diamonds with different impurity content. The uniform distribution of radiation defects in implanted area was obtained by the regime of multiple-energy implantation of keV He+ ions. A modification of Bosia's et al. (Nucl. Instrum. Meth. B 268 (2010) 2991) method for determining the internal stresses and the density variation in an ion-implanted diamond layer was proposed that suggests measuring, in addition to the surface swelling of a diamond plate, the radius of curvature of the plate. It is shown that, under multiple-energy implantation of He+, mechanical stresses in the implanted layer may be as high as 12 GPa. It is shown that radiation damage reaches saturation for the implantation fluence characteristic of amorphization of diamond but is appreciably lower than the graphitization threshold.

  18. Zinc ion implantation-deposition technique improves the osteoblast biocompatibility of titanium surfaces

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, YONGQIANG; XU, JUAN; CHEN, JING; QI, MENGCHUN; XIE, XUEHONG; HU, MIN

    2015-01-01

    The plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) technique was used to implant zinc (Zn) ions into smooth surfaces of pure titanium (Ti) disks for investigation of tooth implant surface modification. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the surface structure and chemical composition of a modified Ti surface following Zn ion implantation and deposition and to examine the effect of such modification on osteoblast biocompatibility. Using the PIIID technique, Zn ions were deposited onto the smooth surface of pure Ti disks. The physical structure and chemical composition of the modified surface layers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. In vitro culture assays using the MG-63 bone cell line were performed to determine the effects of Zn-modified Ti surfaces following PIIID on cellular function. Acridine orange staining was used to detect cell attachment to the surfaces and cell cycle analysis was performed using flow cytometry. SEM revealed a rough ‘honeycomb’ structure on the Zn-modified Ti surfaces following PIIID processing and XPS data indicated that Zn and oxygen concentrations in the modified Ti surfaces increased with PIIID processing time. SEM also revealed significantly greater MG-63 cell growth on Zn-modified Ti surfaces than on pure Ti surfaces (P<0.05). Flow cytometric analysis revealed increasing percentages of MG-63 cells in S phase with increasing Zn implantation and deposition, suggesting that MG-63 apoptosis was inhibited and MG-63 proliferation was promoted on Zn-PIIID-Ti surfaces. The present results suggest that modification with Zn-PIIID may be used to improve the osteoblast biocompatibility of Ti implant surfaces. PMID:25673139

  19. Multiple Regression Model Based Sequential Probability Ratio Test for Structural Change Detection of Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Katsunori; Hattori, Tetsuo; Kawano, Hiromichi

    In real time analysis and forecasting of time series data, it is important to detect the structural change as immediately, correctly, and simply as possible. And it is necessary for rebuilding the next prediction model after the change point as soon as possible. For this kind of time series data analysis, in general, multiple linear regression models are used. In this paper, we present two methods, i.e., Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) and Chow Test that is well-known in economics, and describe those experimental evaluations of the effectiveness in the change detection using the multiple regression models. Moreover, we extend the definition of the detected change point in the SPRT method, and show the improvement of the change detection accuracy.

  20. Enhanced Detectability of Community Structure in Multilayer Networks through Layer Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Dane; Shai, Saray; Stanley, Natalie; Mucha, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    Many systems are naturally represented by a multilayer network in which edges exist in multiple layers that encode different, but potentially related, types of interactions, and it is important to understand limitations on the detectability of community structure in these networks. Using random matrix theory, we analyze detectability limitations for multilayer (specifically, multiplex) stochastic block models (SBMs) in which L layers are derived from a common SBM. We study the effect of layer aggregation on detectability for several aggregation methods, including summation of the layers' adjacency matrices for which we show the detectability limit vanishes as O(L^{-1/2}) with increasing number of layers, L. Importantly, we find a similar scaling behavior when the summation is thresholded at an optimal value, providing insight into the common-but not well understood-practice of thresholding pairwise-interaction data to obtain sparse network representations. PMID:27314740