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  1. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain Fixed Bridges Porcelain Veneers Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth- ...

  2. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  3. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  4. Nanotechnology and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lavenus, Sandrine; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The long-term clinical success of dental implants is related to their early osseointegration. This paper reviews the different steps of the interactions between biological fluids, cells, tissues, and surfaces of implants. Immediately following implantation, implants are in contact with proteins and platelets from blood. The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells will then condition the peri-implant tissue healing. Direct bone-to-implant contact is desired for a biomechanical anchoring of implants to bone rather than fibrous tissue encapsulation. Surfaces properties such as chemistry and roughness play a determinant role in these biological interactions. Physicochemical features in the nanometer range may ultimately control the adsorption of proteins as well as the adhesion and differentiation of cells. Nanotechnologies are increasingly used for surface modifications of dental implants. Another approach to enhance osseointegration is the application of thin calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings. Bioactive CaP nanocrystals deposited on titanium implants are resorbable and stimulate bone apposition and healing. Future nanometer-controlled surfaces may ultimately direct the nature of peri-implant tissues and improve their clinical success rate.

  5. Nanotechnology and Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Lavenus, Sandrine; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The long-term clinical success of dental implants is related to their early osseointegration. This paper reviews the different steps of the interactions between biological fluids, cells, tissues, and surfaces of implants. Immediately following implantation, implants are in contact with proteins and platelets from blood. The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells will then condition the peri-implant tissue healing. Direct bone-to-implant contact is desired for a biomechanical anchoring of implants to bone rather than fibrous tissue encapsulation. Surfaces properties such as chemistry and roughness play a determinant role in these biological interactions. Physicochemical features in the nanometer range may ultimately control the adsorption of proteins as well as the adhesion and differentiation of cells. Nanotechnologies are increasingly used for surface modifications of dental implants. Another approach to enhance osseointegration is the application of thin calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings. Bioactive CaP nanocrystals deposited on titanium implants are resorbable and stimulate bone apposition and healing. Future nanometer-controlled surfaces may ultimately direct the nature of peri-implant tissues and improve their clinical success rate. PMID:21253543

  6. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  7. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  8. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  9. Current trends in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja; Ong, Joo L

    2014-04-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants.

  10. [Biomechanics of single dental implants].

    PubMed

    Zagorskiĭ, V A; Zagorskiĭ, V V

    2013-01-01

    Bone tissues of human skull, jawbones and hard dental tissues were formed formed by the influence of chewing loads which are functional irritants used for maintaining their physical qualities. Knowledge of tensions and deformations in bony structures allows to increase their joint work with dental implants installed.

  11. [Dental implants in tooth grinders].

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Brouwers, J E; Cune, M S; Naeije, M

    2004-03-01

    Bruxism (tooth grinding and clenching) is generally considered a contraindication for dental implants, although the evidence is usually based on clinical experience only. So far, studies to the possible cause-and-effect relationship between bruxism and implant failure do not yield consistent and specific outcomes. This is partly due to the large variation in the technical and the biological aspects of the investigations. Although there is still no proof that bruxism causes overload of dental implants and their suprastructures, a careful approach is recommended. Practical advices as to minimize the chance of implant failure are given. Besides the recommendation to reduce or eliminate bruxism itself, these advices concern the number and dimensions of the implants, the design of the occlusion and articulation patterns, and the use of a hard nightguard. PMID:15058243

  12. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Eriberto; Sbricoli, Luca; Guazzo, Riccardo; Tocco, Ilaria; Roman, Marco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Stellini, Edoardo; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Sivolella, Stefano; Zavan, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration) is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years. PMID:23344062

  13. Dental implants in the older adult.

    PubMed

    Jones, John D; Partida, M Norma; Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2012-01-01

    A need for dental implant treatment in the older population is recognized considering the prevalence of partial and complete edentulism and the positive predictability of implant therapy. Even with a number of barriers to overcome for the older adult seeking implant care, dental implants provide stabilizing support for removable dental appliances and have been shown to be successful in that population. In this paper, we describe quality of life, systemic, surgical, and prosthodontic considerations of this prosthetic treatment along with maintenance challenges.

  14. Materials for endosseous dental implants.

    PubMed

    Wataha, J C

    1996-02-01

    The goal of placement of endosseous dental implants is to achieve osseointegration or biointegration of the bone with the implant. A wide variety of materials has been used for these implants, but only a few promote osseointegration and biointegration. Titanium and titanium alloy (Ti6A14V) have been the most widely used of these materials. The surface oxide of titanium appears to be central to the ability of this material to osseointegrate. The oxide limits dissolution of elements and promotes the deposition of biological molecules which allow bone to exist as close as 30 A to the surface of the implant. The details of the ultrastructure of the gap between the implant and bone remain undefined, and the consequences of elements which are released on the interface over time are not known. These areas of investigation are particularly important in defining the differences between commercially pure titanium implants and those made of titanium, aluminium and vanadium. The epithelial interface between the gingiva and titanium appears to contain many of the structural characteristics of the native tooth-gingiva interface, but details are still vague. The connective tissue interface with the titanium appears to be one of tightly fitting tissues rather than adhesion. Ceramic coatings appear to improve the ingrowth of bone and promote chemical integration of the implant with the bone. The characteristics of these coatings are complex and affect the bony response, but the mechanisms remain obscure. The degradation of the coatings is an issue of particular controversy. Progress in dental implantology is likely to continue as the interface between the material and bone is more clearly understood, and biological molecules and artificial tissues are developed.

  15. Immediate loading of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Henry, P J; Liddelow, G J

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore the concept of immediate loading as it pertains to dental implants and the indications for clinical practice. The definition of immediate loading will be considered together with a review of the relevant literature in an attempt to provide evidence-based guidelines for successful implementation into practice. A search of electronic databases including Medline, PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was undertaken using the terms "immediate loading'', "dental implants'', "immediate function'', "early loading'', "oral implants'', "immediate restoration'' and "systematic review''. This was supplemented by handsearching in peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. Emphasis was given to systematic reviews and controlled clinical trials. A definition of immediate loading was suggested pertinent to the realities of logistics in clinical practice with respect to application and time frame. The literature was evaluated and shown to be limited with significant shortcomings. Guidelines and recommendations for clinical protocols were suggested and illustrated by examples of case types with a minimum of 1-3 years follow-up. A list of additional references for further reading was provided. Within the limitations of this review, there is evidence to suggest that immediate loading protocols have demonstrated high implant survival rates and may be cautiously recommended for certain clinical situations. However, more high level evidence studies, preferably randomized controlled trials (RCTs), over a long time frame are required to show a clear benefit over more conventional loading protocols.

  16. Head and neck cancer, dental implants, and dental oncology.

    PubMed

    Garg, Arun; Guez, Ghislaine

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is a real presence in the dental-implant world--patients who undergo surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation often seek the assistance of dental-implant practitioners to restore them to better function; other patients who have had implants in place for years will return with questions regarding how their treatment will be affected by the presence of their dental implant. As oral-cancer treatment modalities are rapidly changing, practitioners struggle to keep up with the literature surrounding this important subset of the dental-implant population. This month, we look at the numbers of patients suffering from oral cancers, consider the different treatment options for patients with oral cancers, and investigate the role that implants play in improving therapeutic outcomes or changing treatment course.

  17. Patients awareness and attitude towards dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Shivani; Bhatia, Shekhar; Kaur, Arvinder; Rathakrishnan, Tiviya

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to assess the awareness of the patients regarding implant-retained prosthesis as an option for tooth replacement and the knowledge about tooth replacement as a whole including source of information and attitude towards it amongst Malaysian population. Materials and Methods: Information on demographic characteristics, knowledge about implant as an option for missing tooth replacement, source of information and knowledge about other options of tooth replacement were obtained from patients visiting various dental outpatient departments of hospital and private dental clinics using nationwide self-explanatory survey. Results: Amongst the 1013 response retrieved, 27% of respondents felt moderately well informed about the dental implant treatment. Only 9% of the respondents had dental implant treatment before and 17% felt well informed about different alternatives of replacing missing teeth. The dentists were the main source of information regarding dental implant treatment modality followed by friends and electronic media. 55.6% respondents felt implant to be as good as own teeth during function whereas high cost was the major limiting factor for implant treatment. Conclusion: 56% of Malaysian population was aware of dental implant as an alternative for replacing missing teeth. Necessary efforts and measures should be made to raise the awareness of dental implant treatment in the country. PMID:26752875

  18. Dental-Implantate und ihre Werkstoffe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newesely, Heinrich

    1983-07-01

    Some new trends in materials for dental implants, which also effect in the operative techniques and implant design, are described. Advantages and shortcomings of the different material types are exemplified and correlated with their bioinert resp. bioactive functions. The practical interest in metallic implants focussed in titanium resp. oxide ceramics in the ceramic field, whereas the special goal of implant research follows from the improvement of the bioactive principle with loaded calcium phosphate implants.

  19. Techniques for dental implant nanosurface modifications

    PubMed Central

    Bathala, Lakshmana Rao; Sangur, Rajashekar

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Dental implant has gained clinical success over last decade with the major drawback related to osseointegration as properties of metal (Titanium) are different from human bone. Currently implant procedures include endosseous type of dental implants with nanoscale surface characteristics. The objective of this review article is to summarize the role of nanotopography on titanium dental implant surfaces in order to improve osseointegration and various techniques that can generate nanoscale topographic features to titanium implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS A systematic electronic search of English language peer reviewed dental literature was performed for articles published between December 1987 to January 2012. Search was conducted in Medline, PubMed and Google scholar supplemented by hand searching of selected journals. 101 articles were assigned to full text analysis. Articles were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criterion. All articles were screened according to inclusion standard. 39 articles were included in the analysis. RESULTS Out of 39 studies, seven studies demonstrated that bone implant contact increases with increase in surface roughness. Five studies showed comparative evaluation of techniques producing microtopography and nanotopography. Eight studies concluded that osteoblasts preferably adhere to nano structure as compared to smooth surface. Six studies illustrated that nanotopography modify implant surface and their properties. Thirteen studies described techniques to produce nano roughness. CONCLUSION Modification of dental osseous implants at nanoscale level produced by various techniques can alter biological responses that may improve osseointegration and dental implant procedures. PMID:25558347

  20. Choice of a dental implant system.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Peter R; Gartner, Judith L; Norkin, Frederic J

    2005-04-01

    Many dentists are bewildered by the intricacies and complexities of dental implants. They are constantly besieged by product advertisements and can find it difficult to choose which systems to work with. Some dentists are so intimidated by the subject that they choose to avoid getting involved with implants and instead stick to traditional tooth replacement systems. By breaking implants down into 4 main components, the body, collar, connection, and restorative post, it is easier to understand the structure and function of dental implants. Each portion should be designed to achieve certain objectives. Once these structural components are understood, it is easier to compare and contrast differing implant systems.

  1. Design optimization of functionally graded dental implant.

    PubMed

    Hedia, H S; Mahmoud, Nemat-Alla

    2004-01-01

    The continuous increase of man's life span, and the growing confidence in using artificial materials inside the human body necessities introducing more effective prosthesis and implant materials. However, no artificial implant has biomechanical properties equivalent to the original tissue. Recently, titanium and bioceramic materials, such as hydroxyapatite are extensively used as fabrication materials for dental implant due to their high compatibility with hard tissue and living bone. Titanium has reasonable stiffness and strength while hydroxyapatite has low stiffness, low strength and high ability to reach full integration with living bone. In order to obtain good dental implantation of the biomaterial; full integration of the implant with living bone should be satisfied. Minimum stresses in the implant and the bone must be achieved to increase the life of the implant and prevent bone resorption. Therefore, the aim of the current investigation is to design an implant made from functionally graded material (FGM) to achieve the above advantages. The finite element method and optimization technique are used to reach the required implant design. The optimal materials of the FGM dental implant are found to be hydroxyapatite/titanium. The investigations have shown that the maximum stress in the bone for the hydroxyapatite/titanium FGM implant has been reduced by about 22% and 28% compared to currently used titanium and stainless steel dental implants, respectively.

  2. Bone manipulation procedures in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Yuvika; Jindal, Govind; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental implants for the rehabilitation of missing teeth has broadened the treatment options for patients and clinicians equally. As a result of advances in research in implant design, materials, and techniques, the use of dental implants has increased dramatically in the past two decades and is expected to expand further in the future. Success of dental implants depends largely on the quality and quantity of the available bone in the recipient site. This however may be compromised or unavailable due to tumor, trauma, periodontal disease, etc., which in turn necessitates the need for additional bone manipulation. This review outlines the various bone manipulation techniques that are used to achieve a predictable long-term success of dental implants. PMID:27433052

  3. Bone manipulation procedures in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Yuvika; Jindal, Govind; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental implants for the rehabilitation of missing teeth has broadened the treatment options for patients and clinicians equally. As a result of advances in research in implant design, materials, and techniques, the use of dental implants has increased dramatically in the past two decades and is expected to expand further in the future. Success of dental implants depends largely on the quality and quantity of the available bone in the recipient site. This however may be compromised or unavailable due to tumor, trauma, periodontal disease, etc., which in turn necessitates the need for additional bone manipulation. This review outlines the various bone manipulation techniques that are used to achieve a predictable long-term success of dental implants. PMID:27433052

  4. Bone manipulation procedures in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Yuvika; Jindal, Govind; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental implants for the rehabilitation of missing teeth has broadened the treatment options for patients and clinicians equally. As a result of advances in research in implant design, materials, and techniques, the use of dental implants has increased dramatically in the past two decades and is expected to expand further in the future. Success of dental implants depends largely on the quality and quantity of the available bone in the recipient site. This however may be compromised or unavailable due to tumor, trauma, periodontal disease, etc., which in turn necessitates the need for additional bone manipulation. This review outlines the various bone manipulation techniques that are used to achieve a predictable long-term success of dental implants.

  5. Basic concepts and techniques of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tagliareni, Jonathan M; Clarkson, Earl

    2015-04-01

    Dental implants provide completely edentulous and partial edentulous patients the function and esthetics they had with natural dentition. It is critical to understand and apply predictable surgical principles when treatment planning and surgically restoring edentulous spaces with implants. This article defines basic implant concepts that should be meticulously followed for predictable results when treating patients and restoring dental implants. Topics include biological and functional considerations, biomechanical considerations, preoperative assessments, medical history and risk assessments, oral examinations, radiographic examinations, contraindications, and general treatment planning options. PMID:25835792

  6. Basic concepts and techniques of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tagliareni, Jonathan M; Clarkson, Earl

    2015-04-01

    Dental implants provide completely edentulous and partial edentulous patients the function and esthetics they had with natural dentition. It is critical to understand and apply predictable surgical principles when treatment planning and surgically restoring edentulous spaces with implants. This article defines basic implant concepts that should be meticulously followed for predictable results when treating patients and restoring dental implants. Topics include biological and functional considerations, biomechanical considerations, preoperative assessments, medical history and risk assessments, oral examinations, radiographic examinations, contraindications, and general treatment planning options.

  7. Diagnostic Imaging for Dental Implant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Aishwarya; Perumalsamy, Rajapriya; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan

    2014-01-01

    Dental implant is a device made of alloplastic (foreign) material implanted into the jaw bone beneath the mucosal layer to support a fixed or removable dental prosthesis. Dental implants are gaining immense popularity and wide acceptance because they not only replace lost teeth but also provide permanent restorations that do not interfere with oral function or speech or compromise the self-esteem of a patient. Appropriate treatment planning for replacement of lost teeth is required and imaging plays a pivotal role to ensure a satisfactory outcome. The development of pre-surgical imaging techniques and surgical templates helps the dentist place the implants with relative ease. This article focuses on various types of imaging modalities that have a pivotal role in implant therapy. PMID:25379354

  8. Bacteremia following dental implant surgery: Preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Tayfun; Öksüz, Lütfiye; Gürler, Nezahat

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to investigate the incidence of bacteremia, bacteriology and antibiotic susceptibility against to causative bacteria associated with dental implant installation. Study Design: 30 generally healthy patients were enrolled in this study. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 30 minutes after dental implant installation and 24 hours after dental implant surgery. Blood samples were cultured in a BACTEC system. The isolated bacteria were identified using conventional methods. Antimicrobial sensitivity tests were performed by disc diffusion. Results: No bacteria were isolated at the baseline and 24 hours after surgery, whereas the prevalence of bacteremia at 30 minutes after dental implant installation was 23%. The isolated bacteria species were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Eubacterium spp., Corynebacterium spp. and Streptococcus viridans. The Staphylococcus epidermidis, which was isolated in three patients, was found to be resistant to penicillin which is first choice of many clinicians. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that installation of dental implants can produce bacteremia. Within the limitations of this study, it can be speculated that the resistance of antibiotics may compromise the routine prophylaxis against infective endocarditis. Therefore use of blood cultures and antibiograms may be suggested in risky patients. The outcome of the present study should be verified using a larger patient group with varying conditions. Key words: Dental implant, bacteremia, infective endocarditis, antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:22157668

  9. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic component directly connected to the endosseous dental implant and is intended for use as an aid in...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic component directly connected to the endosseous dental implant and is intended for use as an aid in...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3980 - Endosseous dental implant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant accessories. 872.3980... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3980 Endosseous dental implant accessories. (a) Identification. Endosseous dental implant accessories are manually powered devices...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic...

  20. Biofilm and dental implant: The microbial link

    PubMed Central

    Dhir, Sangeeta

    2013-01-01

    Mouth provides a congenial environment for the growth of the microorganisms as compared to any other part of the human body by exhibiting an ideal nonshedding surface. Dental plaque happens to be a diverse community of the microorganisms found on the tooth surface. Periodontal disease and the peri-implant disease are specific infections that are originating from these resident microbial species when the balance between the host and the microbial pathogenicity gets disrupted. This review discusses the biofilms in relation to the peri-implant region, factors affecting its presence, and the associated treatment to manage this complex microbial colony. Search Methodology: Electronic search of the medline was done with the search words: Implants and biofilms/dental biofilm formation/microbiology at implant abutment interface/surface free energy/roughness and implant, periimplantitis/local drug delivery and dental implant. Hand search across the journals – clinical oral implant research, implant dentistry, journal of dental research, international journal of oral implantology, journal of prosthetic dentistry, perioodntology 2000, journal of periodontology were performed. The articles included in the review comprised of in vivo studies, in vivo (animal and human) studies, abstracts, review articles. PMID:23633764

  1. Dental implants in patients with bruxing habits.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Brouwers, J E I G; Cune, M S; Naeije, M

    2006-02-01

    Bruxism (teeth grinding and clenching) is generally considered a contraindication for dental implants, although the evidence for this is usually based on clinical experience only. So far, studies to the possible cause-and-effect relationship between bruxism and implant failure do not yield consistent and specific outcomes. This is partly because of the large variation in the literature in terms of both the technical aspects and the biological aspects of the study material. Although there is still no proof for the suggestion that bruxism causes an overload of dental implants and of their suprastructures, a careful approach is recommended. There are a few practical guidelines as to minimize the chance of implant failure. Besides the recommendation to reduce or eliminate bruxism itself, these guidelines concern the number and dimensions of the implants, the design of the occlusion and articulation patterns, and the protection of the final result with a hard occlusal stabilization splint (night guard). PMID:16457676

  2. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Classification. (1) Class II (special controls). The device is classified as class II if it is a root-form endosseous dental implant. The root-form endosseous dental implant is characterized by four geometrically... II Special Controls Guidance Document: Root-Form Endosseous Dental Implants and Endosseous...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Classification. (1) Class II (special controls). The device is classified as class II if it is a root-form endosseous dental implant. The root-form endosseous dental implant is characterized by four geometrically... II Special Controls Guidance Document: Root-Form Endosseous Dental Implants and Endosseous...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Classification. (1) Class II (special controls). The device is classified as class II if it is a root-form endosseous dental implant. The root-form endosseous dental implant is characterized by four geometrically... II Special Controls Guidance Document: Root-Form Endosseous Dental Implants and Endosseous...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Classification. (1) Class II (special controls). The device is classified as class II if it is a root-form endosseous dental implant. The root-form endosseous dental implant is characterized by four geometrically... II Special Controls Guidance Document: Root-Form Endosseous Dental Implants and Endosseous...

  6. Nanotechnology Approaches for Better Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Tomsia, Antoni P.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Lee, Janice S.; Mankani, Mahesh H.; Wegst, Ulrike G.K.; Saiz, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The combined requirements imposed by the enormous scale and overall complexity of designing new implants or complete organ regeneration are well beyond the reach of present technology in many dimensions, including nanoscale, as we do not yet have the basic knowledge required to achieve these goals. The need for a synthetic implant to address multiple physical and biological factors imposes tremendous constraints on the choice of suitable materials. There is a strong belief that nanoscale materials will produce a new generation of implant materials with high efficiency, low cost, and high volume. The nanoscale in materials processing is truly a new frontier. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades but they have serious shortcomings related to their osseointegration and the fact that their mechanical properties do not match those of bone. This paper reviews recent advances in the fabrication of novel coatings and nanopatterning of dental implants. It also provides a general summary of the state of the art in dental implant science and describes possible advantages of nanotechnology for further improvements. The ultimate goal is to produce materials and therapies that will bring state-of-the-art technology to the bedside and improve quality of life and current standards of care. PMID:21464998

  7. Nanotechnology approaches to improve dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tomisa, Antoni P; Launey, Maximilien E; Lee, Janice S; Mankani, Mahesh H; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The requirements imposed by the enormous scale and overall complexity of designing new implants or complete organ regeneration are well beyond the reach of present technology in many dimensions, including nanoscale, as researchers do not yet have the basic knowledge required to achieve these goals. The need for a synthetic implant to address multiple physical and biologic factors imposes tremendous constraints on the choice of suitable materials. There is a strong belief that nanoscale materials will produce a new generation of implant materials with high efficiency, low cost, and high volume. The nanoscale in materials processing is truly a new frontier. Metallic dental implants have been used successfully for decades, but they have serious shortcomings related to their osseointegration and the fact that their mechanical properties do not match those of bone. This paper reviews recent advances in the fabrication of novel coatings and nanopatterning of dental implants. It also provides a general summary of the state of the art in dental implant science and describes possible advantages of nanotechnology for future improvements. The ultimate goal is to produce materials and therapies that will bring state-of-the-art technology to the bedside and improve quality of life and current standards of care.

  8. Tissue response: biomaterials, dental implants, and compromised osseous tissue.

    PubMed

    Babu RS, Arvind; Ogle, Orrett

    2015-04-01

    Tissue response represents an important feature in biocompatibility in implant procedures. This review article highlights the fundamental characteristics of tissue response after the implant procedure. This article also highlights the tissue response in compromised osseous conditions. Understanding the histologic events after dental implants in normal and abnormal bone reinforces the concept of case selection in dental implants.

  9. Exposed Dental Implant? Local Autograft A Saviour!

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Raj; Punde, Prashant A; Suryavanshi, Harshal; Shree, Swetha

    2015-01-01

    Implant exposure due to faulty placement, posses as the most common reason for implant failure. The implant placed too close to buccal or lingual cortex have lead to such failure on numerous occasions. Also, anatomic variations like the thin buccolingual width of alveolar ridge predispose exposure of the implant. 25-year-old female patient had undergone surgical placement of implants in mandibular anterior region 2 months back in the private dental clinic. The clinician noted Grade I mobility in one of the implants placed. The case was referred to the author. Thin overlying gingiva depicted an entire buccal aspect of the implant, which suggested more than 90 % loss of buccal cortex. According to literature and review of similar case reports, the only way suggested was to surgically remove the implant and wait for 12-24 months for the bone to heal for subsequent placement. Rather than the removal of implants as suggested, the author followed a naval approach of reinforcing buccal cortex using an autogenous cortical block from mandibular symphysis. The reinforcement surgery had certainly saved patients time, money and most importantly limits a crucial period of edentulism, which may be enforced on a patient in case the implant was removed. PMID:26668490

  10. Silk electrogel coatings for titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Elia, Roberto; Michelson, Courtney D; Perera, Austin L; Harsono, Masly; Leisk, Gray G; Kugel, Gerard; Kaplan, David L

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop biocompatible, biodegradable dental implant coatings capable of withstanding the mechanical stresses imparted during implant placement. Two techniques were developed to deposit uniform silk fibroin protein coatings onto dental implants. Two novel coating techniques were implemented to coat titanium shims, studs, and implants. One technique involved electrodeposition of the silk directly onto the titanium substrates. The second technique consisted of melting electrogels and dispensing the melted gels onto the titanium to form the coatings. Both techniques were tested for coating reproducibility using a stylus profilometer and a dial thickness gauge. The mechanical strength of adhered titanium studs was assessed using a universal mechanical testing machine. Uniform, controllable coatings were obtained from both the electrodeposition and melted electrogel coating techniques, tunable from 35 to 1654 µm thick under the conditions studied, and able to withstand delamination during implantation into implant socket mimics. Mechanical testing revealed that the adhesive strength of electrogel coatings, 0.369 ± 0.09 MPa, rivaled other biologically derived coating systems such as collagen, hydroxyapatite, and chitosan (0.07-4.83 MPa). These novel silk-based techniques offer a unique approach to the deposition of safe, simple, mechanically robust, biocompatible, and degradable implant coatings.

  11. Dental implants from functionally graded materials.

    PubMed

    Mehrali, Mehdi; Shirazi, Farid Seyed; Mehrali, Mohammad; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib Bin; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2013-10-01

    Functionally graded material (FGM) is a heterogeneous composite material including a number of constituents that exhibit a compositional gradient from one surface of the material to the other subsequently, resulting in a material with continuously varying properties in the thickness direction. FGMs are gaining attention for biomedical applications, especially for implants, owing to their reported superior composition. Dental implants can be functionally graded to create an optimized mechanical behavior and achieve the intended biocompatibility and osseointegration improvement. This review presents a comprehensive summary of biomaterials and manufacturing techniques researchers employ throughout the world. Generally, FGM and FGM porous biomaterials are more difficult to fabricate than uniform or homogenous biomaterials. Therefore, our discussion is intended to give the readers about successful and obstacles fabrication of FGM and porous FGM in dental implants that will bring state-of-the-art technology to the bedside and develop quality of life and present standards of care.

  12. Patient selection for endosseous dental implants: oral and systemic considerations.

    PubMed

    Sugerman, Philip B; Barber, Michael T

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature and discusses patient selection for endosseous dental implants and the effect of systemic and local pathology on the success rate of dental implants. Endosseous dental implants may be preferable to conventional dentures in patients with compromised supporting bone or mucosa, xerostomia, allergy to denture materials, severe gag reflex, susceptibility to candidiasis, diseases affecting orofacial motor function or in patients who demand optimal bite force, esthetics, and phonetics. Conventional dentures or fixed partial prostheses may be preferable to endosseous dental implants in growing and epileptic patients and patients at risk of oral carcinoma, anaphylaxis, severe hemorrhage, steroid crisis, endocarditis, osteoradionecrosis, myocardial infarction, or peri-implantitis. A systematic approach to dental implant patient selection is outlined and centralized reporting of dental implant outcomes is recommended.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of Dental Implants: A Utility Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A measure of dental patients' values and preferences was used to assess attitudes of 92 edentulous patients receiving implant and other dental reconstructive therapies. The implant group tended to be younger and better educated and to rate implant reconstruction as more desirable than the nonimplant denture group. (DB)

  14. Surface analysis of four dental implant systems.

    PubMed

    Olefjord, I; Hansson, S

    1993-01-01

    Dental implants obtained from four suppliers were analyzed by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Three of the implants were delivered in a sterilized condition, while the fourth implant was delivered in a plasma-sprayed condition. The covering oxide layer consisted mainly of TiO2. Divalent and trivalent states of titanium were also detected, showing that TiO and Ti2O3 layers occurred. The thickness of the oxide formed on the plasma-sprayed implant was 3.4 nm. The oxide thicknesses of the sterilized implants were 4.6 +/- 0.4 nm. The surfaces of all samples were covered with organic contaminants. A strong fluorine signal was obtained from one sample, indicating that the supplier etches the implants in hydrofluoric acid. Calcium and zinc were found on the surfaces of all samples from one supplier, while calcium and silicon were found on the surfaces of the implants from another supplier. It is suggested that inorganic contaminants should be avoided because these species can possibly provoke the dissolution of titanium.

  15. Medicolegal implications of dental implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Rees, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    Despite the recent economic downturn, the dental implant market continues to grow year on year. Many more dentists are involved in the placement restoration of dental implants and dental implants are being placed in an extended range of clinical scenarios. Dental implant therapy remains a high risk area for the inexperienced interns of civil negligence claims and General Dental Council hearings. Risk can be mitigated by:• Ensuring appropriate indemnity • Complying with the published requirements for training • Maintaining detailed and extensive clinical records • Completing the initial phases of history, examination and investigations robustly • Recording a diagnosis • Providing a bespoke written treatment plan that includes details of the need for treatment, the treatment options (the risks and benefits), the phases of treatment, the costs of treatment,the expected normal sequelae of surgery, the risks and complications of implant therapy and the requirement for future maintenance. The provision of treatment that is different in nature or extent to that agreed can result in a breach of contract as well as a claim for negligence • Engaging sufficiently with the patient to obtain consent • Providing written postoperative instructions detailing emergency arrangements, patients who are anxious or in pain may not retain oral information • Making a frank disclosure of complication or collateral damage • Considering referral at an early stage particularly if reparative surgery is required. The stress of complications or failure may impair a dentist's normally sound judgement; there may be financial pressure, or concerns regarding reputation. In some cases, dentists avoid making a frank disclosure, feel obliged to undertake complicated reparative surgery, fail to make a timely referral, fail to respond appropriately to patient's concerns and in some cases attempt to alter the clinical records.However, in the best of hands and without negligence

  16. The osseointegration of zirconia dental implants.

    PubMed

    Assal, Patrick A

    2013-01-01

    Zirconia is currently extensively used in medicine, especially in orthopedic surgery for various joint replacement appliances. Its outstanding mechanical and chemical properties have made it the "material of choice" for various types of prostheses. Its color in particular makes it a favored material to manufacture dental implants. A literature search through Medline enables one to see zirconia's potential but also to point out and identify its weaknesses. The search shows that zirconia is a biocompatible, osteoconductive material that has the ability to osseointegrate. Its strength of bonding to bone depends on the surface structure of the implant. Although interesting, the studies do not allow for the recommendation of the use of zirconia implants in daily practice. The lack of studies examining the chemical and structural composition of zirconia implants does not allow for a "gold standard" to be established in the implant manufacturing process. Randomized clinical trials (RCT) are urgently needed on surface treatments of zirconia implants intended to achieve the best possible osseointegration.

  17. PEEK dental implants: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Schwitalla, Andreas; Müller, Wolf-Dieter

    2013-12-01

    The insertion of dental implants containing titanium can be associated with various complications (eg, hypersensitivity to titanium). The aim of this article is to evaluate whether there are existing studies reporting on PEEK (polyetheretherketone) as an alternative material for dental implants. A systematic literature search of PubMed until December 2010 yielded 3 articles reporting on dental implants made from PEEK. One article analyzed stress distribution in carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK (CFR-PEEK) dental implants by the 3-dimensional finite element method, demonstrating higher stress peaks due to a reduced stiffness compared to titanium. Two articles reported on investigations in mongrel dogs. The first article compared CFR-PEEK to titanium-coated CFR-PEEK implants, which were inserted into the femurs and evaluated after 4 and 8 weeks. The titanium-coated implants showed significantly higher bone-implant contact (BIC) rates. In a second study, implants of pure PEEK were inserted into the mandibles beside implants made from titanium and zirconia and evaluated after 4 months, where PEEK presented the lowest BIC. The existing articles reporting on PEEK dental implants indicate that PEEK could represent a viable alternative material for dental implants. However, further experimental studies on the chemical modulation of PEEK seem to be necessary, mainly to increase the BIC ratio and to minimize the stress distribution to the peri-implant bone.

  18. [Dental implantations of ceramics-coated metals].

    PubMed

    Cini, L; Gasparini, F; Michieli, S; Pizzoferrato, A; Sandrolini-Cortesi, S

    1975-01-01

    Recent studies and personal experience of the Authors in the field of dental implants have encountered the same fundamental problem which arises with orthopedic prosthesis procedures. The basic problem is that of adhesion between the bone tissue and the metal implant. Chrome-cobalt alloy, Tantalum and Titanium are the metals of most recent use. The Authors therefore proceeded to investigate the behaviour of alveolar bone tissue in the proximity of artificial teeth made of alloy (platinum-gold) covered with ceramic, as used in prosthetic dentistry. The experiment was carried out in a dog and a man. In the dog, two of its mandibular teeth were substituted with the same ceramic-gold implants: the first, a replica of natural tooth, was placed in the socket and held in place by metal splint and mandibular circumferential wirings. The other implant, without a replicated crown, was left free, within the alveolus, without contacting the near or opposing teeth. A solid smooth surfaced alumina device, shaped like a small cylinder, was implanted in the upper femoral epiphysis of the same animal.

  19. Segmental osteotomy for mobilization of dental implant

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Benjamin; Marín, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this work is to evaluate a surgical technique for mobilization of mal posed dental implant in anterior area. Methods A 38-year-old patient consulted our unit for esthetic dissatisfaction with the implant treatment of a central incisor. An implant was observed in 11 and 21, where 11 was 3 mm above the ideal limit, with excessive vestibular angulation. The choice was made to perform a segmental osteotomy and mobilize the bone block and the implant down and forward; a bone block extracted from the mandibular ramus was installed between the implant block and the bed to stabilize the segment. Results After 4 months, a conventional fixed prosthesis was created and the esthetic result achieved was close to what the patient wanted, with no need for further surgery. The surgical condition was stabilized and maintained for the long-time and no complications how necrosis, infection or bone defects was present. Conclusions It was concluded that the procedure is efficient, and the biological arguments in favor of the procedure are discussed. PMID:24236247

  20. Predoctoral dental implant education at King Abdulaziz University

    PubMed Central

    Aljohani, Hind Ahmed; AlGhamdi, Ali Saad Thafeed

    2009-01-01

    Objective In June 2008, a survey of freshly graduated dental students of King Abdulaziz University Jeddah was conducted to evaluate the extent of their exposure to oral implantology and their knowledge of some basic principles of dental implant treatment. Materials and methods Multiple-choice questionnaires were given to the fresh graduate dental students of King Abdulaziz University Jeddah to answer. Sixty-six students responded out of 86, yielding a response rate of 76.7%. Results Majority of the students (78.8%) thought that they did not have enough lectures about dental implants and all of them thought that they did not have enough training in dental implant. Most of the students were not familiar with different dental implant systems (61.1%), designs (60.6%) or sizes (74.2%). Majority of the students were lacking the knowledge about basic principles of dental implant treatment. At King Abdulaziz University, Faculty of Dentistry, implant dentistry is taught to the students in the form of implant-related lectures incorporated into their periodontic, oral surgery and prosthodontic courses with one or two lectures given on dental implant in each course. Conclusion There is an urgent need to develop a well-structured implant course that includes didactic, laboratory, preclinical and clinical components at the undergraduate curriculum of King Abdulaziz University Faculty of Dentistry. PMID:23960472

  1. Bioceramic in dental implants: A review.

    PubMed

    Jayaswal, Gaurav P; Dange, S P; Khalikar, A N

    2010-03-01

    Biomaterials are non-drug substance suitable for inclusion in system which augment or replace the function of bodily tissue or organ. Orthopedic and dental applications represent approximately 55% of the total biomaterials market. Changes in biologic responses and device design have been the direct result of advances in material science. Bioceramics fulfill a unique function as biomedical materials. Bioceramics are non-toxic and bioinert, bioactive or bioresorbable. Bioceramics continue to be vital for bone repair and uncemented implant fixation with recent advances in its composition and coating technology.

  2. Titanium hypersensitivity. A hidden threat for dental implant patients?

    PubMed

    Bilhan, Hakan; Bural, Canan; Geckili, Onur

    2013-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys have been widely used for dental prosthetic devices because of their superior mechanical properties and biocompatibility. However, the incidence of titanium hypersensitivity or allergy is still unknown and the discussion about its existence is ongoing. Unexplained implant failures have also forced dental clinicians to investigate the possibility of titanium hypersensitivity or allergy. This review focuses on the potential of dental implant-related titanium hypersensitivity or allergic reactions. It includes an examination of the existing scientific literature and current knowledge. Evidence-based data and studies related to titanium hypersensitivity in dental implant patients are also discussed.

  3. Expansion of a Predoctoral Surgical Implant Selective for Dental Students.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Stefanie D; Zimmermann, Richard L; Hendricson, William D

    2016-03-01

    Historically, predoctoral dental education programs have focused on the restoration of implants in the clinical environment; however, given the increase in dental implant therapy being performed by general dentists, the need to incorporate surgical implant training is becoming evident. This article describes a predoctoral surgical implant selective at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and its evolution across five years to include emerging techniques and technology to enhance students' understanding of dental implant therapy, both surgical and restorative. From virtual implant planning and guided surgery to intra-oral scanning of implants for custom abutments and restorations, students obtained first-hand experiences with a wide spectrum of aspects of implant therapy. The results of anonymous surveys completed by 2014-15 students before and after the year-long selective regarding their impression of the program are also discussed. PMID:26933108

  4. [Biological dental implant: myth or reality?].

    PubMed

    Magloire, H; Couble, M-L

    2011-09-01

    The currently available options for tooth-loss are prostheses, implants, or surgery (auto-transplantation). They all have their limitations. The emergence of tissue engineering, 15 years ago, was made possible by a better knowledge of the various stages of dental development, and the mastery of stem cell differentiation. It opened a new alternative approach for tooth regeneration. Even if animal experiments have demonstrated that it was possible to obtain a biological tooth from stem cells, two major issues remain to be discussed. Is it possible to use induced pluripotent stem cells instead of embryonic stem cells, which raise an ethical problem? Is it possible to reproduce a dental crown with an adapted shape and colour? Or should we consider the simpler creation of a biological root secondarily covered by a ceramic prosthesis? Our study mentions the main landmarks and the key cells involved in the embryological development of the tooth, establishes a mapping and a list of the various types of stem cells. It details the various methods used to create a biological implant.

  5. Subgingival microbiome in patients with healthy and ailing dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Xu, Lixin; Wang, Zicheng; Li, Lianshuo; Zhang, Jieni; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Ting; Lin, Jiuxiang; Chen, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants are commonly used to replace missing teeth. However, the dysbiotic polymicrobial communities of peri-implant sites are responsible for peri-implant diseases, such as peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis. In this study, we analyzed the microbial characteristics of oral plaque from peri-implant pockets or sulci of healthy implants (n = 10), peri-implant mucositis (n = 8) and peri-implantitis (n = 6) sites using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. An increase in microbial diversity was observed in subgingival sites of ailing implants, compared with healthy implants. Microbial co-occurrence analysis revealed that periodontal pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia, were clustered into modules in the peri-implant mucositis network. Putative pathogens associated with peri-implantitis were present at a moderate relative abundance in peri-implant mucositis, suggesting that peri-implant mucositis an important early transitional phase during the development of peri-implantitis. Furthermore, the relative abundance of Eubacterium was increased at peri-implantitis locations, and co-occurrence analysis revealed that Eubacterium minutum was correlated with Prevotella intermedia in peri-implantitis sites, which suggests the association of Eubacterium with peri-implantitis. This study indicates that periodontal pathogens may play important roles in the shifting of healthy implant status to peri-implant disease. PMID:26077225

  6. Application of uniform design to improve dental implant system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung-Chang; Lin, Deng-Huei; Jiang, Cho-Pei

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the application of uniform experimental design to improve dental implant systems subjected to dynamic loads. The dynamic micromotion of the Zimmer dental implant system is calculated and illustrated by explicit dynamic finite element analysis. Endogenous and exogenous factors influence the success rate of dental implant systems. Endogenous factors include: bone density, cortical bone thickness and osseointegration. Exogenous factors include: thread pitch, thread depth, diameter of implant neck and body size. A dental implant system with a crest module was selected to simulate micromotion distribution and stress behavior under dynamic loads using conventional and proposed methods. Finally, the design which caused minimum micromotion was chosen as the optimal design model. The micromotion of the improved model is 36.42 μm, with an improvement is 15.34% as compared to the original model. PMID:26406045

  7. Advancing dental implant surface technology--from micron- to nanotopography.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Gustavo; Mendonça, Daniela B S; Aragão, Francisco J L; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2008-10-01

    Current trends in clinical dental implant therapy include use of endosseous dental implant surfaces embellished with nanoscale topographies. The goal of this review is to consider the role of nanoscale topographic modification of titanium substrates for the purpose of improving osseointegration. Nanotechnology offers engineers and biologists new ways of interacting with relevant biological processes. Moreover, nanotechnology has provided means of understanding and achieving cell specific functions. The various techniques that can impart nanoscale topographic features to titanium endosseous implants are described. Existing data supporting the role of nanotopography suggest that critical steps in osseointegration can be modulated by nanoscale modification of the implant surface. Important distinctions between nanoscale and micron-scale modification of the implant surface are presently considered. The advantages and disadvantages of nanoscale modification of the dental implant surface are discussed. Finally, available data concerning the current dental implant surfaces that utilize nanotopography in clinical dentistry are described. Nanoscale modification of titanium endosseous implant surfaces can alter cellular and tissue responses that may benefit osseointegration and dental implant therapy.

  8. Exotic encounters with dental implants: managing complications with unidentified systems.

    PubMed

    Mattheos, N; Janda, M Schittek

    2012-06-01

    As the application of dental implants increases worldwide, so is the number of technical and biological complications that general dental practitioners will be called to manage, while maintaining implant patients. In addition, the greater patient mobility encountered today combined with a growing trend of 'dental implant tourism' will very often result in situations where the dentist is requested to deal with complications in implants placed elsewhere and which sometimes might be of an 'exotic' system one cannot directly recognize. Such a situation can pose significant challenges to even experienced clinicians. The challenges are not only in the scientific field, but often include professional and ethical implications. This case report will discuss strategies for the management of implant complications in cases of unidentified implant systems. Critical factors in such situations would be the clinician's experience and special training, the correct radiographic technique, as well as access to the appropriate tools and devices. PMID:22624768

  9. [Adjusting gingival tissues morphology after dental implantation with fibrin use].

    PubMed

    Maĭborodin, I V; Kolesnikov, I S; Sheplev, B V; Ragimova, T M; Kovyntsev, A N; Kovyntsev, D N; Shevela, A I

    2009-01-01

    In gingival tissues of 62 patients after dental implantation of traditional type and with the use of thrombocyte rich fibrin preparation (TRFP) microcirculation and leucocytal infiltration were studied. It was disclosed that in all terms after titanium screw dental implant setting lymphostasis and leucocytal infiltration were seen as signs of active inflammatory process in gingival tissues. 3 months later after implants setting with the use of TRFP the lymphatic vessels status was normalized, the degree of leucocytal infiltration was reduced; when implantation was made without use of fibrin technologies in gingival tissues more leucocytes were found and lymphatic bed components were remained dilated. Besides fibrin preparation use in the process of dental implantation promoted quicker and stronger implant fixation, but granulomatous inflammatory process could develop and amount of eosinophils in gingival tissues could also increased. PMID:19365340

  10. Management of mandibular nerve injuries from dental implants.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Shahrokh C; Meyer, Roger A

    2011-03-01

    Treatment of the patient who has sustained a nerve injury from dental implant procedures involves prompt recognition of this complication, evaluation of sensory dysfunction, the position of the nerve vis-à-vis the implant, and timely management of the injured nerve. In some patients, removal or repositioning of the implant and surgical exploration and repair of the injured nerve will maximize the implant patient's potential for a successful recovery from nerve injury.

  11. Dental implant survival in diabetic patients; review and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Rajendra Kumar; Gupta, Deepesh Kumar; Singh, Amit Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Rising population of diabetic individuals across the world has become a big concern to the society. The persistent hyperglycemia may affect each and every tissue and consequently results in morbidity and eventually mortality in diabetic patients. A direct negative response of diabetes has been observed on oral tissues with few contradictions however, little are known about effect of diabetes on dental implant treatment and the consequent results. Many studies concerned with osteointegration and prognosis of dental implant in diabetic patients have been conducted and published since 1994. These studies have been critically reviewed to understand the impact of diabetes on the success of dental implant and the factors to improve osseointegration and consequently survival of dental implant in diabetic patients. Theoretical literatures and studies in diabetic animals substantiate high failure rate of implants but most of clinical studies indicated statistically insignificant failure of dental implants even in moderately uncontrolled diabetic patients. Success of dental implant in well and fairly controlled diabetic patients with proper treatment planning, prophylactic remedies and adequate postsurgical maintenance appears as good as normal individuals. PMID:24665167

  12. Niobium based coatings for dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, G.; Rodil, S. E.; Arzate, H.; Muhl, S.; Olaya, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    Niobium based thin films were deposited on stainless steel (SS) substrates to evaluate them as possible biocompatible surfaces that might improve the biocompatibility and extend the life time of stainless steel dental implants. Niobium nitride and niobium oxide thin films were deposited by reactive unbalanced magnetron sputtering under standard deposition conditions without substrate bias or heating. The biocompatibility of the surfaces was evaluated by testing the cellular adhesion and viability/proliferation of human cementoblasts during different culture times, up to 7 days. The response of the films was compared to the bare substrate and pieces of Ti6Al4V; the most commonly used implant material for orthopedics and osteo-synthesis applications. The physicochemical properties of the films were evaluated by different means; X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. The results suggested that the niobium oxide films were amorphous and of stoichiometric Nb2O5 (a-Nb2O5), while the niobium nitride films were crystalline in the FCC phase (c-NbN) and were also stoichiometric with an Nb to N ratio of one. The biological evaluation showed that the biocompatibility of the SS could be improved by any of the two films, but neither was better than the Ti6Al4V alloy. On the other hand, comparing the two films, the c-NbN seemed to be a better surface than the oxide in terms of the adhesion and proliferation of human cemetoblasts.

  13. Impact of osteoporosis in dental implants: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Giro, Gabriela; Chambrone, Leandro; Goldstein, Abrao; Rodrigues, Jose Augusto; Zenóbio, Elton; Feres, Magda; Figueiredo, Luciene Cristina; Cassoni, Alessandra; Shibli, Jamil Awad

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the failure and bone-to-implant contact rate of dental implants placed on osteoporotic subjects. METHODS: Extensive examination strategies were created to classify studies for this systematic review. MEDLINE (via PubMed) and EMBASE database were examined for studies in English up to and including May 2014. The examination presented a combination of the MeSH words described as follow: “osteoporosis” or “osteopenia” or “estrogen deficiency” AND “implant” or “dental implant” or “osseointegration”. Assessment of clinical and/or histological peri-implant conditions in osteoporosis subjects treated with titanium dental implants. The examination included a combination of the MeSH terms described as follow: “osteoporosis” or “osteopenia” or “estrogen deficiency” AND “implant” or “dental implant” or “osseointegration”. RESULTS: Of 943 potentially eligible articles, 12 were included in the study. A total of 133 subjects with osteoporosis, 73 subjects diagnosed with osteopenia and 708 healthy subjects were assessed in this systematic review. In these subjects were installed 367, 205, 2981 dental implants in osteoporotic, osteopenic and healthy subjects, respectively. The failure rate of dental implant was 10.9% in osteoporotic subjects, 8.29% in osteopenic and 11.43% in healthy ones. Bone-to-implant contact obtained from retrieved implants ranged between 49.96% to 47.84%, for osteoporosis and non-osteoporotic subjects. CONCLUSION: Osteoporotic subjects presented higher rates of implant loss, however, there is a lower evidence to strengthen or refute the hypothesis that osteoporosis may have detrimental effects on bone healing. Consequently, final conclusions regarding the effect of osteoporosis in dental implant therapy cannot be made at this time. There are no randomized clinical trial accessible for evaluation and the retrospective nature of the evaluated studies shall be taken in account when interpreting this

  14. Adherent endotoxin on dental implant surfaces: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Morra, Marco; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Cascardo, Giovanna; Bellanda, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Osteoimmunology is the crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems, suggesting a role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the stimulation of osteoclast activity. Endotoxin or bacterial challenges to inflammatory cells are directly relevant to dental implant pathologies involving bone resorption, such as osseointegration failure and peri-implantitis. While the endotoxin amount on implant devices is regulated by standards, it is unknown whether commercially available dental implants elicit different levels of adherent-endotoxin stimulated cytokines. The objective of this work is to develop a model system and evaluate endotoxin-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes relevant to osteoclast activation on commercially available dental implants. Murine J774-A1 macrophages were cultured on Ti disks with different level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination to define the time-course of the inflammatory response to endotoxin, as evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The developed protocol was then used to measure adherent endotoxin on commercially available packaged and sterile dental implants in the "as-implanted" condition. Results show that tested dental implants induce variable expression of endotoxin-stimulated genes, sometimes above the level expected to promote bone resorption in vivo. Results are unaffected by the specific surface treatment; rather, they likely reflect care in cleaning and packaging protocols. In conclusion, expression of genes that enhance osteoclast activity through endotoxin stimulation of inflammatory cells is widely different on commercially available dental implants. A reappraisal of the clinical impact of adherent endotoxins on dental (and bone) implant devices is required in light of increasing knowledge on crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems.

  15. Femtosecond laser microstructuring of zirconia dental implants.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Ruíz, R A; Calvo-Guirado, J L; Moreno, P; Guardia, J; Gomez-Moreno, G; Mate-Sánchez, J E; Ramirez-Fernández, P; Chiva, F

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the suitability of femtosecond laser for microtexturizing cylindrical zirconia dental implants surface. Sixty-six cylindrical zirconia implants were used and divided into three groups: Control group (with no laser modification), Group A (microgropored texture), and Group B (microgrooved texture). Scanning electron microscopy observation of microgeometries revealed minimal collateral damage of the original surface surrounding the treated areas. Optical interferometric profilometry showed that ultrafast laser ablation increased surface roughness (R(a), R(q), R(z), and R(t)) significantly for both textured patterns from 1.2 x to 6 x-fold when compared with the control group (p < 0.005). With regard to chemical composition, microanalysis revealed a significant decrease of the relative content of contaminants like carbon (Control 19.7% ± 0.8% > Group B 8.4% ± 0.42% > Group A 1.6% ± 0.35%) and aluminum (Control 4.3% ± 0.9% > Group B 2.3% ± 0.3% > Group A 1.16% ± 0.2%) in the laser-treated surfaces (p < 0.005). X-ray diffraction and Raman spectra analysis were carried out to investigate any change in the crystalline structure induced by laser processing. The original predominant tetragonal phase of zirconia was preserved, whereas the traces of monoclinic phase present in the treated surfaces were reduced (Control 4.32% > Group A 1.94% > Group B 1.72%) as the surfaces were processed with ultrashort laser pulses. We concluded that femtosecond laser microstructuring offers an interesting alternative to conventional surface treatments of zirconia implants as a result of its precision and minimal damage of the surrounding areas.

  16. Genetic susceptibility to dental implant failure: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Alvim-Pereira, Fabino; Montes, Claudia C; Mira, Marcelo T; Trevilatto, Paula C

    2008-01-01

    The observation that clinical factors alone do not explain why some patients develop implant loss; the understanding of the osseointegrated implant failure as a complex, multifactorial process; and the observed aggregation of repetitive failure in certain individuals raise interesting questions related to host susceptibility to dental implant failure. Genetic analysis applied to dental implants began in the late 1990s, and since then, increased interest in genetic susceptibility to the phenotype has been demonstrated by several studies. These studies, however, have been based on and limited to candidate gene association analysis and were intended to find associations between specific alleles and/or genotypes of genetic markers and susceptibility to implant failure. The aim of this review is to provide a brief description of the current methodology for genetic analysis of complex traits, followed by a comprehensive review of the literature related to genetic susceptibility to dental implant failure and a discussion of different aspects of the applied methodology. Moreover, a novel approach of genome wide, case-control analysis is discussed as an alternative method to access genetic influence to dental implant failure mechanisms. Advances toward the elucidation of the genetic basis of dental implant loss may contribute to the understanding of why some patients do not respond to currently available treatments while others do and provide potential targets for effective screening, prevention, and treatment. For example, clinicians might be able to estimate, before the elective surgical procedure, the risk of a given patient to develop a negative individual host response. PMID:18700362

  17. Posterior partially edentulous jaws, planning a rehabilitation with dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Douglas R; Silva, Emily V F; Pellizzer, Eduardo P; Filho, Osvaldo Magro; Goiato, Marcelo C

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To discuss important characteristics of the use of dental implants in posterior quadrants and the rehabilitation planning. METHODS: An electronic search of English articles was conducted on MEDLINE (PubMed) from 1990 up to the period of March 2014. The key terms were dental implants and posterior jaws, dental implants/treatment planning and posterior maxilla, and dental implants/treatment planning and posterior mandible. No exclusion criteria were used for the initial search. Clinical trials, randomized and non randomized studies, classical and comparative studies, multicenter studies, in vitro and in vivo studies, case reports, longitudinal studies and reviews of the literature were included in this review. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty-two articles met the inclusion criteria of treatment planning of dental implants in posterior jaw and were read in their entirety. The selected articles were categorized with respect to their context on space for restoration, anatomic considerations (bone quantity and density), radiographic techniques, implant selection (number, position, diameter and surface), tilted and pterygoid implants, short implants, occlusal considerations, and success rates of implants placed in the posterior region. The results derived from the review process were described under several different topic headings to give readers a clear overview of the literature. In general, it was observed that the use of dental implants in posterior region requires a careful treatment plan. It is important that the practitioner has knowledge about the theme to evaluate the treatment parameters. CONCLUSION: The use of implants to restore the posterior arch presents many challenges and requires a detailed treatment planning. PMID:25610852

  18. Three-dimensional imaging and guided surgery for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Scott D

    2015-04-01

    Clinicians worldwide are increasingly adopting guided surgical applications for dental implants. Clinicians are becoming more aware of the benefits of proper planning through advanced imaging modalities and interactive treatment planning applications. All aspects of the planning phase are based on sound surgical and restorative fundamentals. As an integral part of the implant team, dental laboratories have now moved from analog to the digital world, providing the necessary support to the new digital workflow.

  19. A macro- and nanostructure evaluation of a novel dental implant.

    PubMed

    Tetè, Stefano; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Traini, Tonino; Vinci, Raffaele; Sammartino, Gilberto; Marenzi, Gaetano; Gherlone, Enrico

    2008-09-01

    Success in implant dentistry also comes from the implant macrodesign and nanostructure of its surface. Titanium implant surface treatments have been shown to enhance osseointegration, maximize bone healing, and bone-to-implant contact for predictable clinical results. The aim of the study, was to evaluate the geometric macrodesign and the surface nanostructure of a novel dental implant full contact covering (FCC) obtained by electrochemical procedures. FCC implants were analyzed by scanning electronic microscope, profilometer, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and compared with commercial sandblasted and sandblasted, large-grit acid-etched dental implants. Sample analysis allowed to distinguish the different implant macrodesigns, the step and the profile of the coils that cover the fixture, and the surface characteristics. FCC implant showed novel macro-characteristic of crestal module, coils, and apical zone compared with sandblasted and sandblasted and acid-etched dental implants. Moreover, the FCC nanostructure surface showed roughness values statistically higher than the 2 other surfaces, with a more homogeneity in a peaks and valleys arrangement. Finally, the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis detected differences between the examined surfaces, with the presence of several contaminants according to the different treatment procedures. Research on new macrostructures and nano morphology should result in a better qualitative and quantitative osseointegration response, with a predictability of the clinical results and long-term success of the implants.

  20. The feasibility of immediately loading dental implants in edentulous jaws

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Immediate loading of dental implants has been proved to be feasible in partially edentulous jaws. The purpose of this retrospective investigation was to assess the feasibility of immediately loading dental implants in fully edentulous jaws. Methods A total of 24 patients aged between 53 and 89 years received a total of 154 implants in their edentulous maxillae or mandibles. Among the implants, 45 were set in fresh extracted sockets and 109 in consolidated alveolar bones. The implants were provisionally managed with chair-side made provisional resin bridges and exposed to immediate loading. Implants were followed up for 1–8 years, including radiographic imaging. Marginal bone levels were evaluated based on radiographic imaging. Results A total of 148 out of the 154 implants survived over the follow-up period of 1 to 8 years, giving a survival rate of 96%. The time or region of the implantation, the pre-implant augmentation, and the length and diameter of the implants had no statistically significant influence on the survival or the success rate. The marginal bone level remained stable with only minimal loss of 0.3 mm after 60 months of loading. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, immediate loading is feasible for dental implants in edentulous jaws. PMID:27588213

  1. Imaging of dental implant osseointegration using optical coherent tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, I.; Reisen, P.

    2009-02-01

    Investigation of initial implant stability with different dental implant designs is an important task to obtain good quality dental implants. Failure of a dental implant is often related to failure to osseointegrate correctly. Optical Coherent Tomography is a competitive non-invasive method of osseointegration investigation. FD-OCT with Swept Source was used to obtain 3-D image of the peri-implant tissue (soft and hard) in the case of mandible fixed screw. 1350 nm centered laser source give better images than 850 nm laser source for hard tissue imaging. Present work suggests that Optical Coherent Tomography is a proper technique to obtain the image of the contact tissue-metal screw. OCT images are useful to evaluate optical properties of bone tissues.

  2. Radiographic dental implants recognition for geographic evaluation in human identification.

    PubMed

    Nuzzolese, E; Lusito, S; Solarino, B; Di Vella, G

    2008-06-01

    Dental implants for prosthetic rehabilitation with fixed crown or mobile partial/total dentures is a very common oral treatment among the population in Italy as elsewhere. There is a great number of implant systems of different designs. However, a catalogue of radiographic images and a description of the dental implants available in Italy would be useful in order to identify the manufacturer and the type of implant encountered in forensic casework. When an unidentified body is found with one or more implants in the jaws, and no dental record is available, clues gleaned from the type of implants used could give direction to the investigation. In this study Italian implant manufactures were contacted and asked to provide specimen implants. Digital radiographs were taken of all the implants donated at 0º, 30º, and 60º horizontal rotation, combined with -20º, -10º, 0º, +10º, and +20º vertical inclination relative to the radiographic beam and the X-ray sensor. A total of 15 images per implant were taken and examined to identify consistent, unique features that would aid in implant recognition. Only those observations made from radiographs between -10º and +10º vertical inclination would ever be used for definite identification of any implant. The information from this study should be considered a survey of the commercial distribution of dental implants in Italy through their digital radiographic images. It is also a starting point for a wider geographical evaluation of different manufacturers in other countries and continents. The radiographic images provided should help both the forensic odontologist and the prosthodontist to identify pre-existing implants which they may discover from their radiographic images. PMID:22689351

  3. Implant Education Programs in North American Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arbree, Nancy S.; Chapman, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 52 dental schools found that dental implant techniques were taught in 34 pre- and 34 postdoctoral curricula, involving mostly prosthodontics and oral surgery departments, with periodontology departments lagging behind. Most predoctoral programs did not have research involvement. Cooperation among specialties is recommended over implant…

  4. A Brief Historical Perspective on Dental Implants, Their Surface Coatings and Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Celeste M

    2014-01-01

    This review highlights a brief, chronological sequence of the history of dental implants. This historical perspective begins with ancient civilizations and spotlights predominant dentists and their contributions to implant development through time. The physical, chemical and biologic properties of various dental implant surfaces and coatings are discussed, and specific surface treatments include an overview of machined implants, etched implants, and sand-blasted implants. Dental implant coatings such as hydroxyapatite, fluoride, and statin usage are further reviewed. PMID:24894638

  5. The case for routine maintenance of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thomas G; Valderrama, Pilar; Rodrigues, Danieli B C

    2014-05-01

    The large majority of dental implants are successful over the long term. Failure is usually associated with infection, trauma, inflammation, or a combination of these factors. Early identification and appropriate treatment can identify and eliminate these problems in the majority of cases. Thus routine implant maintenance structured along the guidelines for patients with periodontal diseases is recommended.

  6. Bone stability around dental implants: Treatment related factors.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Friedhelm; Hasan, Istabrak; Bourauel, Christoph; Biffar, Reiner; Mundt, Torsten

    2015-05-01

    The bone bed around dental implants is influenced by implant and augmentation materials, as well as the insertion technique used. The primary influencing factors include the dental implant design, augmentation technique, treatment protocol, and surgical procedure. In addition to these treatment-related factors, in the literature, local and systemic factors have been found to be related to the bone stability around implants. Bone is a dynamic organ that optimises itself depending on the loading condition above it. Bone achieves this optimisation through the remodelling process. Several studies have confirmed the importance of the implant design and direction of the applied force on the implant system. Equally dispersed strains and stresses in the physiological range should be achieved to ensure the success of an implant treatment. If a patient wishes to accelerate the treatment time, different protocols can be chosen. However, each one must consider the amount and quality of the available local bone. Immediate implantation is only successful if the primary stability of the implant can be provided from residual bone in the socket after tooth extraction. Immediate loading demands high primary stability and, sometimes, the distribution of mastication forces by splinting or even by inserting additional implants to ensure their success. Augmentation materials with various properties have been developed in recent years. In particular, resorption time and stableness affect the usefulness in different situations. Hence, treatment protocols can optimise the time for simultaneous implant placements or optimise the follow-up time for implant placement.

  7. Imunohistological aspects of the tissue around dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimigean, Victor; Nimigean, Vanda R.; Sǎlǎvǎstru, Dan I.; Moraru, Simona; BuÅ£incu, Lavinia; Ivaşcu, Roxana V.; Poll, Alexandru

    2016-03-01

    Objectives: study of soft and hard tissues around implants. Material and methods: For the immunohistochemical and histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface, we examined pieces of peri-implant mucosa harvested from 35 patients. The implant/bone interface was assessed using histologic and histomorphometric examination of hard tissues around unloaded, early loaded or delayed loaded dental implants with pre-established design, with a sandblasted and acid-etched surface, placed both in extraction sockets, or after bone healing following tooth removal. This study was performed on 9 common race dogs. Results: The histological study of the implant/soft tissue interface showed regenerative modifications and moderate chronic subepithelial inflammatory reactions. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the soft tissue biopsies revealed the presence of specific immunocompetent cells and proteins of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. Bone-implants contacts were more obvious in the apical half of the implants and at the edges of the threads, than between them. A mature, lamelliform bone containing lacunae with osteocytes and lack of connective tissue were noticed around implants that were late placed and loaded. The new-formed bone was also abundant in the crestal zone, not only in the apical part of the implants. Conclusions: A thorough understanding of the microstructure of dental implant/soft and hard tissue interface will improve the longevity of osseointegrated implants.

  8. Dental extraction, immediate placement of dental implants, and immediate function.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Ole T

    2015-05-01

    Immediate function requires adequate implant stability. Immediate function requires prosthetic stability, particularly when multiple implants are loaded. Factors to consider for immediate implants into extraction sites are thickness of socket walls, thickness of gingival drape, optimal position of the implant, and patient factors such as hygiene and smoking cessation.

  9. Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Watters, William; Rethman, Michael P; Hanson, Nicholas Buck; Abt, Elliot; Anderson, Paul A; Carroll, Karen C; Futrell, Harry C; Garvin, Kevin; Glenn, Stephen O; Hellstein, John; Hewlett, Angela; Kolessar, David; Moucha, Calin; O'Donnell, Richard J; O'Toole, John E; Osmon, Douglas R; Evans, Richard Parker; Rinella, Anthony; Steinberg, Mark J; Goldberg, Michael; Ristic, Helen; Boyer, Kevin; Sluka, Patrick; Martin, William Robert; Cummins, Deborah S; Song, Sharon; Woznica, Anne; Gross, Leeaht

    2013-03-01

    The Prevention of Orthopaedic Implant Infection in Patients Undergoing Dental Procedures evidence-based clinical practice guideline was codeveloped by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Dental Association. This guideline replaces the previous AAOS Information Statement, "Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Bacteremia in Patients With Joint Replacement," published in 2009. Based on the best current evidence and a systematic review of published studies, three recommendations have been created to guide clinical practice in the prevention of orthopaedic implant infections in patients undergoing dental procedures. The first recommendation is graded as Limited; this recommendation proposes that the practitioner consider changing the long-standing practice of routinely prescribing prophylactic antibiotic for patients with orthopaedic implants who undergo dental procedures. The second, graded as Inconclusive, addresses the use of oral topical antimicrobials in the prevention of periprosthetic joint infections. The third recommendation, a Consensus statement, addresses the maintenance of good oral hygiene.

  10. Esthetic soft tissue ridge augmentation around dental implant: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hamdan, Khalid S.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to present a method to correct soft tissue ridge deformity around dental implant using acellular dermal matrix (ADM). A 25-year-old female patient presented with a missing maxillary first left premolar, which had class I soft tissue defect. The missing tooth was replaced with single implant supported prosthesis and the soft tissue defect was corrected using ADM utilizing the envelop technique. A 5-years follow-up is presented showing the long-term stability of this technique and the predictability of using the ADM as an alternative method to connective tissue graft to correct the soft tissue defect around dental implant. PMID:23960518

  11. Impact of Dental Implant Surface Modifications on Osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Ralf; Stadlinger, Bernd; Schwarz, Frank; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Jung, Ole; Precht, Clarissa; Kloss, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Ebker, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to review different surface modifications of dental implants and their effect on osseointegration. Common marketed as well as experimental surface modifications are discussed. Discussion. The major challenge for contemporary dental implantologists is to provide oral rehabilitation to patients with healthy bone conditions asking for rapid loading protocols or to patients with quantitatively or qualitatively compromised bone. These charging conditions require advances in implant surface design. The elucidation of bone healing physiology has driven investigators to engineer implant surfaces that closely mimic natural bone characteristics. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of surface modifications that beneficially alter the topography, hydrophilicity, and outer coating of dental implants in order to enhance osseointegration in healthy as well as in compromised bone. In the first part, this paper discusses dental implants that have been successfully used for a number of years focusing on sandblasting, acid-etching, and hydrophilic surface textures. Hereafter, new techniques like Discrete Crystalline Deposition, laser ablation, and surface coatings with proteins, drugs, or growth factors are presented. Conclusion. Major advancements have been made in developing novel surfaces of dental implants. These innovations set the stage for rehabilitating patients with high success and predictable survival rates even in challenging conditions.

  12. Impact of Dental Implant Surface Modifications on Osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Ralf; Stadlinger, Bernd; Schwarz, Frank; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Jung, Ole; Precht, Clarissa; Kloss, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Ebker, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to review different surface modifications of dental implants and their effect on osseointegration. Common marketed as well as experimental surface modifications are discussed. Discussion. The major challenge for contemporary dental implantologists is to provide oral rehabilitation to patients with healthy bone conditions asking for rapid loading protocols or to patients with quantitatively or qualitatively compromised bone. These charging conditions require advances in implant surface design. The elucidation of bone healing physiology has driven investigators to engineer implant surfaces that closely mimic natural bone characteristics. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of surface modifications that beneficially alter the topography, hydrophilicity, and outer coating of dental implants in order to enhance osseointegration in healthy as well as in compromised bone. In the first part, this paper discusses dental implants that have been successfully used for a number of years focusing on sandblasting, acid-etching, and hydrophilic surface textures. Hereafter, new techniques like Discrete Crystalline Deposition, laser ablation, and surface coatings with proteins, drugs, or growth factors are presented. Conclusion. Major advancements have been made in developing novel surfaces of dental implants. These innovations set the stage for rehabilitating patients with high success and predictable survival rates even in challenging conditions. PMID:27478833

  13. Impact of Dental Implant Surface Modifications on Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, Ralf; Stadlinger, Bernd; Schwarz, Frank; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Jung, Ole; Precht, Clarissa; Kloss, Frank; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to review different surface modifications of dental implants and their effect on osseointegration. Common marketed as well as experimental surface modifications are discussed. Discussion. The major challenge for contemporary dental implantologists is to provide oral rehabilitation to patients with healthy bone conditions asking for rapid loading protocols or to patients with quantitatively or qualitatively compromised bone. These charging conditions require advances in implant surface design. The elucidation of bone healing physiology has driven investigators to engineer implant surfaces that closely mimic natural bone characteristics. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of surface modifications that beneficially alter the topography, hydrophilicity, and outer coating of dental implants in order to enhance osseointegration in healthy as well as in compromised bone. In the first part, this paper discusses dental implants that have been successfully used for a number of years focusing on sandblasting, acid-etching, and hydrophilic surface textures. Hereafter, new techniques like Discrete Crystalline Deposition, laser ablation, and surface coatings with proteins, drugs, or growth factors are presented. Conclusion. Major advancements have been made in developing novel surfaces of dental implants. These innovations set the stage for rehabilitating patients with high success and predictable survival rates even in challenging conditions. PMID:27478833

  14. [Implant fracture: a complication of treatment with dental implants--review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Tagger-Green, N; Horwitz, J; Machtei, E E; Peled, M

    2002-10-01

    Dental implants are a functional and esthetic solution to partial and total edentulism. The initial success rate of this treatment modality is 90-95%. But, that treatment modality is not free of complications. One of the rare complications yet, with severe clinical results is fracture of dental implants. The current literature review presents the various causative factors that may lead to implant fracture. Implant failures may be sorted into groups by the timing of their appearance, or by the origin of failure. Fractures belong to the group of late complications, caused by a biomechanical overload. Overload may be caused by inappropriate seat of the superstructure, in-line arrangement of the implants, leverage, heavy occlusal forces (bruxing, clenching), location of the implant and the size of the implant or metal fatigue. Good clinical examinations and correct treatment plans may reduce the risk of implant fracture. PMID:12510252

  15. Dental implants in patients with osteoporosis: a clinical reality?

    PubMed

    Gaetti-Jardim, Ellen Cristina; Santiago-Junior, Joel Ferreira; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Pellizer, Eduardo Piza; Magro-Filho, Osvaldo; Jardim Junior, Elerson Gaetti

    2011-05-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic disorder characterized by generalized decrease in bone mineral density. Dental implantology is a specialty with high predictability when both quantity and quality of the bone are respected. Therefore, the diagnosis and the implant treatment in patients with osteoporosis are important. In the current study, a literature review about osteoporosis and dental implant therapy was conducted. PubMed, Cochrane, ISI, Dentistry Oral Science, SciELO, and Bireme databases were consulted over the last 20 years. English- and Portuguese-language articles were included in this revision. Some authors stated that the osteoporotic bone is similar to the proposed model of bone type IV. Randomized clinical studies reported implant failure in patients with osteoporosis after menopause. Studies that contraindicate the use of implants in patients with osteoporosis infer that the impaired bone metabolism led to reduction of bone healing around the implants. Nevertheless, other authors believe that the presence of osteoporosis is not a definitive condition to contraindicate the therapy with dental implants. In these cases, the dentist should perform a proper treatment planning, modifying the implant geometry, and use larger implant diameter and with surface treatment. Thus, osteoporosis is not a contraindication for implant surgery because an accurate analysis of bone quality by means tomography is performed.

  16. Dental implants for severely atrophied jaws due to ectodermal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Preetha; Balaji, S M; Ugandhar, Prashanthi

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to present the successful esthetical and functional rehabilitation of partial anodontia in a case of severe ectodermal dysplasia with complete atrophy of the jaws. A 17-year-old male with Class III malocclusion with partial anodontia sought dental implant treatment. His expectation was that of Class I occlusion. The challenge in the case was to match the expectation, reality, and the clinical possibilities. Ridge augmentation was performed with a combination of rib graft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2. Simultaneously, 6 implants (Nobel Biocare™ - Tapered Groovy) were placed in maxillary arch and 10 in the mandible. Simultaneous placement ensured faster and better osseointegration though a mild compromise of the primary stability was observed initially. After adequate healing, Customized Zirconia Procera™ system was used to build the framework. Zirconia crown was cemented to the framework. Radiological and clinical evidence of osseointegration was observed in all 16 dental implants. Successful conversion of Class III to Class I occlusion was achieved with the combination of preprosthetic alveolar ridge augmentation, Procera™ Implant Bridge system. Abnormal angulations and or placement of dental implants would result in failure of the implant. Hence conversion of Class III to Class I occlusion needs complete and complex treatment planning so that the entire masticatory apparatus is sufficiently remodeled. Planning should consider the resultant vectors that would otherwise result in failure of framework or compromise the secondary stability of the dental implant during function. A successful case of rehabilitation of complex partial anodontia is presented. PMID:26096119

  17. Surface Modifications and Their Effects on Titanium Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Jemat, A.; Ghazali, M. J.; Razali, M.; Otsuka, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This review covers several basic methodologies of surface treatment and their effects on titanium (Ti) implants. The importance of each treatment and its effects will be discussed in detail in order to compare their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. Published literature for the last 18 years was selected with the use of keywords like titanium dental implant, surface roughness, coating, and osseointegration. Significant surface roughness played an important role in providing effective surface for bone implant contact, cell proliferation, and removal torque, despite having good mechanical properties. Overall, published studies indicated that an acid etched surface-modified and a coating application on commercial pure titanium implant was most preferable in producing the good surface roughness. Thus, a combination of a good surface roughness and mechanical properties of titanium could lead to successful dental implants. PMID:26436097

  18. Surface Modifications and Their Effects on Titanium Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Jemat, A; Ghazali, M J; Razali, M; Otsuka, Y

    2015-01-01

    This review covers several basic methodologies of surface treatment and their effects on titanium (Ti) implants. The importance of each treatment and its effects will be discussed in detail in order to compare their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. Published literature for the last 18 years was selected with the use of keywords like titanium dental implant, surface roughness, coating, and osseointegration. Significant surface roughness played an important role in providing effective surface for bone implant contact, cell proliferation, and removal torque, despite having good mechanical properties. Overall, published studies indicated that an acid etched surface-modified and a coating application on commercial pure titanium implant was most preferable in producing the good surface roughness. Thus, a combination of a good surface roughness and mechanical properties of titanium could lead to successful dental implants.

  19. Bone remodeling induced by dental implants of functionally graded materials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daniel; Li, Qing; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Functionally graded material (FGM) had been developed as a potential implant material to replace titanium for its improved capability of initial osseointegration. The idea behind FGM dental implant is that its properties can be tailored in accordance with the biomechanical needs at different regions adapting to its hosting bony tissues, therefore creating an improved overall integration and stability in the entire restoration. However, there have been very few reports available so far on predicting bone remodeling induced by FGM dental implants. This article aims to evaluate bone remodeling when replacing the titanium with a hydroxyapatite/collagen (HAP/Col) FGM model. A finite element model was constructed in the buccal-lingual section of a dental implant-bone structure generated from in vivo CT scan images. The remodeling simulation was performed over a 4 year healing period. Comparisons were made between the titanium implant and various FGM implants of this model. The FGM implants showed an improved bone remodeling outcome. The study is expected to provide a basis for future development of FGM implants.

  20. Electrochemical Disinfection of Dental Implants – a Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Mohn, Dirk; Zehnder, Matthias; Stark, Wendelin J.; Imfeld, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background Peri-implantitis has gained significant clinical attention in recent years. This disease is an inflammatory reaction to microorganisms around dental implants. Due to the limited accessibility, non-invasive antimicrobial strategies are of high interest. An unexpected approach to implant disinfection may evolve from electrolysis. Given the electrical conductivity of titanium implants, alkalinity or active oxidants can be generated in body fluids. We investigated the use of dental titanium implants as electrodes for the local generation of disinfectants. Our hypothesis was that electrolysis can reduce viable counts of adhering bacteria, and that this reduction should be greater if active oxidative species are generated. Methodology/Principal Findings As model systems, dental implants, covered with a mono-species biofilm of Escherichia coli C43, were placed in photographic gelatin prepared with physiological saline. Implants were treated by a continuous current of 0 - 10 mA for 15 minutes. The reduction of viable counts was investigated on cathodes and anodes. In separate experiments, the local change in pH was visualized using color indicators embedded in the gelatin. Oxidative species were qualitatively detected by potassium iodide-starch paper. The in situ generated alkaline environment around cathodic implants caused a reduction of up to 2 orders of magnitude in viable E. coli counts. On anodic implants, in contrast to cathodic counterparts, oxidative species were detected. Here, a current of merely 7.5 mA caused complete kill of the bacteria. Conclusions/Significance This laboratory study shows that electrochemical treatment may provide access to a new way to decontaminate dental implants in situ. PMID:21264247

  1. Re-stability of dental implants following treatment of peri-implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Hamza Ather; Romanos, Georgios E.

    2013-01-01

    It is hypothesized that active treatment of peri-implantitis (PI) leads to re-stabilization of dental implants. The aim was to assess whether or not dental implants can re-stabilize following treatment of PI. To address the focused question, MEDLINE/PubMed and Google-Scholar databases were explored from 1977 up to and including August 2013. Any disagreements between the authors were resolved via discussion. Articles published only in English were included. Hand searching was also performed. Thirteen experimental studies were included. The treatment regimes adopted in these studies comprised of antibiotic therapy, guided bone regeneration (GBR), laser therapy, use of bone matrix proteins with membrane, conventional flap surgery and mechanical debridement. In four studies, GBR promoted new bone formation; whereas two studies showed photosensitization therapy (in combination with either mechanical debridement or GBR) to regenerate bone around peri-implant defects. Six studies reported that mechanical debridement in conjunction with antibiotic therapy promoted re-stability of dental implants. In one study, recombinant human bone matrix protein-2 with a collagen membrane helped promote re-stabilization of dental implants. New bone formation may occur to some extent around dental implants following treatment for PI; however, a “complete” re-stability may be difficult to achieve without GBR. PMID:24265901

  2. Heat generated during seating of dental implant fixtures.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dennis

    2014-04-01

    Frictional heat can be generated during seating of dental implants into a drill-prepared osteotomy. This in vitro study tested the heat generated by implant seating in dense bovine mandible ramus. A thermocouple was placed approximately 0.5 mm from the rim of the osteotomy during seating of each dental implant. Four diameters of implants were tested. The average temperature increases were 0.075°C for the 5.7-mm-diameter implant, 0.97°C for the 4.7-mm-diameter implant, 1.4°C for the 3.7-mm-diameter implant, and 8.6°C for the 2.5-mm-diameter implant. The results showed that heat was indeed generated and a small temperature rise occurred, apparently by the friction of the implant surface against the fresh-cut bone surface. Bone is a poor thermal conductor. The titanium of the implant and the steel of the handpiece are much better heat conductors. Titanium may be 70 times more heat conductive than bone. The larger diameter and displacement implant may act as a heat sink to draw away any heat produced from the friction of seating the implant at the bone-implant interface. The peak temperature duration was momentary, and not measured, but this was approximately less than 1 second. Except for the 2.5-mm-diameter implants, the temperature rises and durations were found to be below those previously deemed to be detrimental, so no clinically significant osseous damage would be expected during dental implant fixture seating of standard and large-diameter-sized implants. A 2.5-mm implant may generate detrimental heat during seating in nonvital bone, but this may be clinically insignificant in vital bone. The surface area and thermal conductivity are important factors in removing generated heat transfer at the bone-implant interface. The F value as determined by analysis of variance was 69.22, and the P value was less than .0001, demonstrating significant differences between the groups considered as a whole.

  3. Bisphosphonate treatment and dental implants: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    de-Freitas, Nayara-Ribeiro; de-Moura, Marcos-Boaventura; Veloso-Guedes, Cizelene-do-Carmo-Faleiros; Simamoto-Júnior, Paulo-César; de-Magalhães, Denildo

    2016-01-01

    Background To analyze articles that studied patients submitted to diphosphonates therapy and who received dental implants before, during or after bisphosphonate (BP) treatment, compared to healthy patients, analyzing the increase of failure and loss of implants or bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) incidence. Material and Methods The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) statement was used in this study. The clinical question in “PICO” format was: In patients under bisphosphonate therapy, do dental implants placement, compared to healthy patients, increase the failure and loss of implants or bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaw incidence? PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for articles published up until April 15, 2015 using a combination of MeSH terms and their Entry terms. Results The search resulted in 375 articles. After selection according to the eligibility criteria, 15 studies fulfilled were included (eight retrospective, one prospective and six case series), with a total of 1339 patients analyzed, 3748 implants placed, 152 loss of implants and 78 cases of BRONJ. Conclusions Due to the lack of randomized clinical trials looking at this theme, further studies with longer follow-up are needed to elucidate the remaining questions. Thus, it is wise to be careful when planning dental implant surgery in patients undergoing bisphosphonate therapy because of the risk of developing BRONJ as well as occurring failure of implant. Moreover, complete systemic condition of the patient must be also taking into considering when such procedures are performed. Key words:Bisphosphonates, diphosphonates, dental implants, osteonecrosis. PMID:27475681

  4. Dental implants with versus without peri-implant bone defects treated with guided bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Peñarrocha-Diago, Maria; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background The guided bone regeneration (GBR) technique is highly successful for the treatment of peri-implant bone defects. The aim was to determine whether or not implants associated with GBR due to peri-implant defects show the same survival and success rates as implants placed in native bone without defects. Material and Methods Patients with a minimum of two submerged dental implants: one suffering a dehiscence or fenestration defect during placement and undergoing simultaneous guided bone regeneration (test group), versus the other entirely surrounded by bone (control group) were treated and monitored annually for three years. Complications with the healing procedure, implant survival, implant success and peri-implant marginal bone loss were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with non-parametric tests setting an alpha value of 0.05. Results Seventy-two patients and 326 implants were included (142 test, 184 control). One hundred and twenty-five dehiscences (average height 1.92±1.11) and 18 fenestrations (average height 3.34±2.16) were treated. At 3 years post-loading, implant survival rates were 95.7% (test) and 97.3% (control) and implant success rates were 93.6% and 96.2%, respectively. Mean marginal bone loss was 0.54 (SD 0.26 mm) for the test group and 0.43 (SD 0.22 mm) for the control group. No statistically significant differences between both groups were found. Conclusions Within the limits of this study, implants with peri-implant defects treated with guided bone regeneration exhibited similar survival and success rates and peri-implant marginal bone loss to implants without those defects. Large-scale randomized controlled studies with longer follow-ups involving the assessment of esthetic parameters and hard and soft peri-implant tissue stability are needed. Key words:Guided bone regeneration, peri-implant defects, dental implants, marginal bone level, success rate, survival rate. PMID:26330931

  5. [The results of resonance frequency analysis by dental implantation after bone augmentation for alveolar bone atrophy].

    PubMed

    Kulakov, A A; Braĭlovskaia, T V; Osman, B M; Bedretdinov, R M; Dzhakoniia, V D

    2014-01-01

    The report concerns dental implantation effectiveness in case of jawbone atrophy. Thirty patients were included in the study to reveal resonance frequency analysis rates of intraosseous dental implants by dental implant placement with bone augmentation using the veneer technique of cortico-cancellous blocks and guided bone regeneration (GBR) with biodegradable membranes and pins having poly (dl- lactic acid) base.

  6. Biomaterials, biomechanics, tissue healing, and immediate-function dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lemons, Jack E

    2004-01-01

    Selected factors and opinions are reviewed specific to immediate function of dental implants in terms of biomaterial and biomechanical properties and how they might influence postsurgical tissue healing. Comparisons are made among plate, rod, and screw vs plateau, finn, and porous geometry endosteal dental-implant designs with and without alterations in device body-surface microchemistry and microtopography. Available information introduces more questions than answers, and recommendations are made for ongoing studies of bone responses specific to the implant fit and fill parameters focused on the kinetics of postsurgical osteotomy healing and applied loading. The clinical literature supports opportunities for immediate function; however, proposals about pathways for bone healing need further investigation. The current trends within the discipline of implant dentistry offer opportunities to reevaluate current vs previous immediate-function systems.

  7. Management of fractured dental implants: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Gustavo; Mendonça, Daniela Baccelli Silveira; Fernandes-Neto, Alfredo Júlio; Neves, Flávio Domingues

    2009-02-01

    An implant fracture may be one of the major causes of late implant failures. Complications, such as loosening or fracture of the prosthesis restorative components, or even fracture of the implant, may occur and dental professionals should be aware of the causes of these complications. This study reports a clinical situation involving a patient restored with a mandibular overdenture that presented a fractured implant 2 years after placement. The probable cause of the implant fracture was due to biomechanical overload caused by parafunctional habits. The implant head was flattened to make it smooth, retapping the internal screw, installing a new abutment (longer), and fabricating part of the overdenture bar. This treatment was timesaving for the patient in that the prosthesis was repaired in the shortest time possible. PMID:19212233

  8. Dental Implants Installed in Irradiated Jaws

    PubMed Central

    Chambrone, L.; Mandia, J.; Shibli, J.A.; Romito, G.A.; Abrahao, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the survival rate of titanium implants placed in irradiated jaws. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL were searched for studies assessing implants that had been placed in nongrafted sites of irradiated patients. Random effects meta-analyses assessed implant loss in irradiated versus nonirradiated patients and in irradiated patients treated with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy. Of 1,051 potentially eligible publications, 15 were included. A total of 10,150 implants were assessed in the included studies, and of these, 1,689 (14.3%) had been placed in irradiated jaws. The mean survival rate in the studies ranged from 46.3% to 98.0%. The pooled estimates indicated a significant increase in the risk of implant failure in irradiated patients (risk ratio: 2.74; 95% confidence interval: 1.86, 4.05; p < .00001) and in maxillary sites (risk ratio: 5.96; 95% confidence interval: 2.71, 13.12; p < .00001). Conversely, HBO therapy did not reduce the risk of implant failure (risk ratio: 1.28; 95% confidence interval: 0.19, 8.82; p = .80). Radiotherapy was linked to higher implant failure in the maxilla, and HBO therapy did not improve implant survival. Most included publications reported data on machined implants, and only 3 studies on HBO therapy were included. Overall, implant therapy appears to be a viable treatment option for reestablishing adequate occlusion and masticatory conditions in irradiated patients. PMID:24158336

  9. Dental Implant Fractures – Aetiology, Treatment and Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Haddad, Marcela Filié; Gennari Filho, Humberto; Villa, Luiz Marcelo Ribeiro; Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to investigate the etiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment options of dental implants fractures through a literature review and to relate a clinical report. Methods: A literature review was performed using the Medline database and this paper describes a case demonstrating the management of implant fracture. Twenty two articles were selected in the present literature review. Results: Nowadays the use of dental implants to rehabilitate completely and partially edentulous patients became the best treatment option; however, this treatment is suitable to failure. The fracture of implant body is a possible complication. The fracture of implant body is a late complication and is related to the failure in implant design or material, non-passive fitting of the prosthetic crown and overloading. Clinically, prosthesis instability and spontaneous bleeding are observed. Three options of treatment have been indicated: complete removal of implant fragment, maintenance of implant fragment, and surface preparation of the fragment with insertion of a new abutment. Conclusion: The literature indicates the complete removal of the fragment as the best treatment option. PMID:24783165

  10. Recurrent Pyogenic Granuloma Around Dental Implants: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gefrerer, Lidia; Popowski, Wojciech; Perek, Jan Nikodem; Wojtowicz, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present a rare case of a bilateral recurring pyogenic granuloma around dental implants supported by autogenic bone graft. A 55-year-old woman was treated with vertical bone augmentation and dental implants on both sides in the mandible. The patient was followed up for 2 years. Growing granuloma was observed 3 weeks after implants were loaded with splinted porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns. The granulomatous tissue was removed and samples were evaluated histologically and microbiologically with real-time polymerase chain reaction. The pathologic lesion recurred four times on one side and three times on the other side and was removed after each recurrence. Finally, the patient decided to have the implants removed due to the aggressive, permanent, and relapsing nature of the proliferative lesions associated with exposed implant threads. After implant removal, no hyperplasia was seen. Microbiologic contamination was excluded as a cause of this recurring granuloma, and it was presumed that the lesion could have been associated with an insufficient zone of attached gingiva around the implants and exposure of implant threads. However, the etiology of this pyogenic granuloma remains unknown. Due to the high recurrence rate of reactive hyperplastic lesions, a long-term follow-up is necessary. PMID:27333016

  11. An Overview of the Mechanical Integrity of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Shemtov-Yona, Keren; Rittel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    With the growing use of dental implants, the incidence of implants' failures grows. Late treatment complications, after reaching full osseointegration and functionality, include mechanical failures, such as fracture of the implant and its components. Those complications are deemed severe in dentistry, albeit being usually considered as rare, and therefore seldom addressed in the clinical literature. The introduction of dental implants into clinical practice fostered a wealth of research on their biological aspects. By contrast, mechanical strength and reliability issues were seldom investigated in the open literature, so that most of the information to date remains essentially with the manufacturers. Over the years, implants have gone through major changes regarding the material, the design, and the surface characteristics aimed at improving osseointegration. Did those changes improve the implants' mechanical performance? This review article surveys the state-of-the-art literature about implants' mechanical reliability, identifying the known causes for fracture, while outlining the current knowledge-gaps. Recent results on various aspects of the mechanical integrity and failure of implants are presented and discussed next. The paper ends by a general discussion and suggestions for future research, outlining the importance of mechanical considerations for the improvement of their future performance. PMID:26583117

  12. An Overview of the Mechanical Integrity of Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Shemtov-Yona, Keren; Rittel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    With the growing use of dental implants, the incidence of implants' failures grows. Late treatment complications, after reaching full osseointegration and functionality, include mechanical failures, such as fracture of the implant and its components. Those complications are deemed severe in dentistry, albeit being usually considered as rare, and therefore seldom addressed in the clinical literature. The introduction of dental implants into clinical practice fostered a wealth of research on their biological aspects. By contrast, mechanical strength and reliability issues were seldom investigated in the open literature, so that most of the information to date remains essentially with the manufacturers. Over the years, implants have gone through major changes regarding the material, the design, and the surface characteristics aimed at improving osseointegration. Did those changes improve the implants' mechanical performance? This review article surveys the state-of-the-art literature about implants' mechanical reliability, identifying the known causes for fracture, while outlining the current knowledge-gaps. Recent results on various aspects of the mechanical integrity and failure of implants are presented and discussed next. The paper ends by a general discussion and suggestions for future research, outlining the importance of mechanical considerations for the improvement of their future performance.

  13. Osseointegrated dental implants in growing children: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Mankani, Nivedita; Chowdhary, Ramesh; Patil, Brijesh A; Nagaraj, E; Madalli, Poornima

    2014-10-01

    Edentulism is usually associated with the aging patient. However, total or partial tooth loss also affects young individuals, mainly as a result of trauma, decay, anodontia, or congenital and acquired jaw defects involving the alveolar processes. For elderly patients, the use of oral implants has become an accepted treatment modality for edentulism, and most of today's knowledge regarding implants is based on such practice. There has been hesitation to perform implant therapy for growing children; hence, few children to date have been provided with implant-supported construction. Consequently, little is known about the outcome of the osseointegration procedure in young patients, and until now, only a limited number of case presentations have been reported. This article reviews the current literature to discuss the use of dental implants in growing patients and the influence of maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental growth on the stability of those implants. The literature review was performed through Science Direct, Wileys Blackwell Synergy, PubMed, Google, Embase, Medknow publications, and Springer for references published from 1963 to 2011. It is recommended to wait for the completion of dental and skeletal growth, except for severe cases of ectodermal dysplasia.

  14. Allergy related to dental implant and its clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, TP

    2013-01-01

    The oral cavity provides an ideal and unique environment for study of biological processes involving metallic dental aids. Dental materials within the mouth interact continually with physiological fluids. Oral tissues are exposed to a veritable bombardment of both chemical and physical stimuli as well as the metabolism of many species of bacteria; yet, for the most part, oral tissues remain healthy. The pH of saliva varies from 5.2 to 7.8. Teeth, restorations, or any prosthesis including dental implants in the oral cavity have to function in one of the most inhospitable environments in the human body. They are subject to larger temperature and pH variations than most other parts of the body. Corrosion, the graded degradation of materials by electrochemical attack, is of concern particularly when dental implants are placed in the hostile electrolytic environment provided by the human mouth. Allergic reactions may occur from the presence of ions produced from the corrosion of implants. The present article describes various manifestations of allergic reactions due to implant material in the oral cavity. PMID:23990733

  15. Predicting Peri-implant Stresses Around Titanium and Zirconium Dental Implants-A Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gujjarlapudi, Manmohan Choudary; Nunna, Narayana Venkata; Manne, Sanjay Dutt; Sarikonda, Varalakshmi Reddy; Madineni, Praveen Kumar; Meruva, Reddi Narasimha Rao

    2013-09-01

    Due to anatomical and surgical constrains the implant placement may not be parallel to each other always. Non-parallel implants are subjected to detrimental stresses at implant bone interface. Also depending on type of implant material i.e. titanium or zirconium, stresses tend to vary due to change in physical and mechanical properties. Hence stress analysis at implant bone interface between different parallel and non-parallel implants becomes significant. Evaluation and comparison of stress distribution in the bone around two parallel and non-parallel titanium and zirconium dental implants on axial and non-axial loading supporting three unit fixed prosthesis. Three dimensional finite element models (M1, M2, M3) were made of three differently angulated implants in ANSYS (11.0 Version) software and P4 processor with a speed of 3 GHz and 3 Gb RAM hardware, common for titanium and zirconium implants. Stress around the implants was analyzed on an axial load of 200 N and a non-axial load of 50 N. In both titanium and zirconium implants on axial loading in cortical bone, higher stresses were observed in M3 followed by M2 and M1. On non-axial loading higher stresses were observed in M2, followed by M3 and M1. In both titanium and zirconium implants on axial and non-axial loading in cancellous bone stresses were higher in M3 followed by M2 and M1. Zirconium implants showed lower stresses in cortical bone and higher stresses in cancellous bone compared to titanium implants. Over all Stresses in the bone were more due to titanium implants than zirconium implants. Zirconium implants led to lower peri-implant stresses than titanium implants.

  16. Mechanical assessment of grit blasting surface treatments of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Shemtov-Yona, K; Rittel, D; Dorogoy, A

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the influence of surface preparation treatments of dental implants on their potential (mechanical) fatigue failure, with emphasis on grit-blasting. The investigation includes limited fatigue testing of implants, showing the relationship between fatigue life and surface damage condition. Those observations are corroborated by a detailed failure analysis of retrieved fracture dental implants. In both cases, the negative effect of embedded alumina particles related to the grit-blasting process is identified. The study also comprises a numerical simulation part of the grit blasting process that reveals, for a given implant material and particle size, the existence of a velocity threshold, below which the rough surface is obtained without damage, and beyond which the creation of significant surface damage will severely reduce the fatigue life, thus increasing fracture probability. The main outcome of this work is that the overall performance of dental implants comprises, in addition to the biological considerations, mechanical reliability aspects. Fatigue fracture is a central issue, and this study shows that uncontrolled surface roughening grit-blasting treatments can induce significant surface damage which accelerate fatigue fracture under certain conditions, even if those treatments are beneficial to the osseointegration process. PMID:25173238

  17. Dental implant design--effect on bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Pilliar, R M; Deporter, D A; Watson, P A; Valiquette, N

    1991-04-01

    Bone remodeling around three different endosseous dental implant designs placed in dog mandibles was studied using radiography during lengthy periods of function and by histology after animal sacrifice. The three designs investigated were (a) threaded (c.p. titanium), (b) fully porous-coated (titanium alloy), and (c) partially porous-coated (titanium alloy). The implants were kept in function for either 32 weeks (fully porous-coated) or 73 to 77 weeks (partially porous-coated and threaded). The studies indicated that some crestal bone loss occurred for both the threaded and partially porous-coated implants while no significant bone loss was seen with fully porous-coated implants in the absence of plaque-associated infection. It is suggested that these observed differences are a result of the different stress states that develop in bone surrounding the three designs underlying the importance of implant design on bone remodeling.

  18. Did we push dental ceramics too far? A brief history of ceramic dental implants.

    PubMed

    Haubenreich, James E; Robinson, Fonda G; West, Karen P; Frazer, Robert Q

    2005-01-01

    Humankind has developed and used ceramics throughout history. It currently has widespread industrial applications. Dental ceramics are used for fabricating highly esthetic prosthetic denture teeth, crowns, and inlays. However, ceramic's biocompatibility and compressive strength are offset by its hardness and brittleness. Nonetheless, a single crystal sapphire aluminum oxide endosseous implant was developed in 1972 as an alternative to metal. It was more esthetic than its metallic counterparts and was eventually produced in a variety of shapes and sizes. Clinical studies demonstrated its excellent soft and hard tissue biocompatibility, yet the range of problems included fractures during surgery, fractures after loading, mobility, infection, pain, bone loss, and lack of osseointegration. Ultimately, single crystal sapphire implants fell into irredeemable disfavor because of its poor impact strength, and dentists and surgeons eventually turned to other implant materials. However, bioactive ceramic coatings on metal implants have kept ceramics as a key component in dental implantology.

  19. Design optimization of a radial functionally graded dental implant.

    PubMed

    Ichim, Paul I; Hu, Xiaozhi; Bazen, Jennifer J; Yi, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we use FEA to test the hypothesis that a low-modulus coating of a cylindrical zirconia dental implant would reduce the stresses in the peri-implant bone and we use design optimization and the rule of mixture to estimate the elastic modulus and the porosity of the coating that provides optimal stress shielding. We show that a low-modulus coating of a dental implant significantly reduces the maximum stresses in the peri-implant bone without affecting the average stresses thus creating a potentially favorable biomechanical environment. Our results suggest that a resilient coating is capable of reducing the maximum compressive and tensile stresses in the peri-implant bone by up to 50% and the average stresses in the peri-implant bone by up to 15%. We further show that a transitional gradient between the high-modulus core and the low-modulus coating is not necessary and for a considered zirconia/HA composite the optimal thickness of the coating is 100 µ with its optimal elastic at the lowest value considered of 45 GPa.

  20. Fatigue failure of dental implants in simulated intraoral media.

    PubMed

    Shemtov-Yona, K; Rittel, D

    2016-09-01

    Metallic dental implants are exposed to various intraoral environments and repetitive loads during service. Relatively few studies have systematically addressed the potential influence of the environment on the mechanical integrity of the implants, which is therefore the subject of this study. Four media (groups) were selected for room temperature testing, namely dry air, saliva substitute, same with 250ppm of fluoride, and saline solution (0.9%). Monolithic Ti-6Al-4V implants were loaded until fracture, using random spectrum loading. The study reveals that the only aggressive medium of all is the saline solution, as it shortens significantly the spectrum fatigue life of the implants. The quantitative scanning electron fractographic analysis indicates that all the tested implants grew fatigue cracks of similar lengths prior to catastrophic fracture. However, the average crack growth rate in the saline medium was found to largely exceed that in other media, suggesting a decreased fracture toughness. The notion of a characteristic timescale for environmental degradation was proposed to explain the results of our spectrum tests that blend randomly low and high cycle fatigue. Random spectrum fatigue testing is powerful technique to assess and compare the mechanical performance of dental implants for various designs and/or environments.

  1. Periodontal conditions in patients requesting dental implant treatment.

    PubMed

    Ito, Taichi; Yasuda, Masaaki; Norizuki, Yoshie; Sasaki, Hodaka; Honma, Shinya; Furuya, Yoshitaka; Kato, Tetsuo; Yajima, Yasutomo

    2011-01-01

    Periodontal disease is considered a risk factor in dental implant treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the periodontal conditions in patients requesting dental implant therapy. A total of 169 patients visiting Department of Oral and Maxillo-Facial Implantology at Tokyo Dental College Chiba Hospital were targeted. The following intraoral parameters were measured in each patient: Community Periodontal Index (CPI) score, probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and bleeding on probing (BOP). Prevalence of patients with periodontal pockets was high: 38% and 28% of patients had a CPI score of code 3 and 4, respectively. Prevalence of teeth with one or more sites with PPD≥4mm was 27%. Moreover, clinical signs suggestive of periodontitis (PPD, CAL≥4mm) were found in 10-15% of tooth sites. Prevalence rates at sites with severe periodontal breakdown (PPD, CAL≥7mm) were 2-5%. These results further emphasize the importance of thorough periodontal assessment in patients prior to dental implant treatment.

  2. Development and functionality of isoelastic dental implants of titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Breme, J; Biehl, V; Schulte, W; d'Hoedt, B; Donath, K

    1993-10-01

    Two types of isoelastic endosseous dental implants were produced and their functionality was tested. One type consisted of a porous sintered TiTa30 alloy, the other had a special surface structure consisting of titanium wire loops. Their mechanical properties were optimized by the production parameter (sintering and diffusion bonding, respectively). The functionality was tested after insertion into an artificial jaw which had properties corresponding to the natural mandibular. The elastic properties of both implants were similar to the properties of the bone. In addition the implants have a safe anchorage bone ingrowth. In animal experiments using the implant with surface loops it was observed that the bone entered the loops and even extremely small surface cavities in the wire loops.

  3. Topographic characterisation of dental implants for commercial use

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Arnau, Amparo; Vallecillo-Capilla, Manuel-Francisco; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel-Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Background To characterize the surface topography of several dental implants for commercial use. Material and Methods Dental implants analyzed were Certain (Biomet 3i), Tissue Level (Straumann), Interna (BTI), MG-InHex (MozoGrau), SPI (Alphabio) and Hikelt (Bioner). Surface topography was ascertained using a confocal microscope with white light. Roughness parameters obtained were: Ra, Rq, Rv, Rp, Rt, Rsk and Rku. The results were analysed using single-factor ANOVA and Student-Neuman-Keuls(p<0.05) tests. Results Certain and Hikelt obtained the highest Ra and Rq scores, followed by Tissue Level. Interna and SPI obtained lower scores, and MG-InHex obtained the lowest score. Rv scores followed the same trend. Certain obtained the highest Rp score, followed by SPI and Hikelt, then Interna and Tissue Level. MG-InHex obtained the lowest scores. Certain obtained the highest Rt score, followed by Interna and Hikelt, then SPI and Tissue Level. The lowest scores were for MG-InHex. Rsk was negative (punctured surface) in the MG-InHex, SPI and Tissue Level systems, and positive (pointed surface) in the other systems. Rku was higher than 3 (Leptokurtic) in Tissue Level, Interna, MG-InHex and SPI, and lower than 3 (Platykurtic) in Certain and Hikelt. Conclusions The type of implant determines surface topography, and there are differences in the roughness parameters of the various makes of implants for clinical use. Key words:Implants for clinical use, topography, confocal microscopy. PMID:27475680

  4. Noninvasive method for retrieval of broken dental implant abutment screw

    PubMed Central

    Gooty, Jagadish Reddy; Palakuru, Sunil Kumar; Guntakalla, Vikram Reddy; Nera, Mahipal

    2014-01-01

    Dental implants made of titanium for replacement of missing teeth are widely used because of ease of technical procedure and high success rate, but are not free of complications and may fail. Fracturing of the prosthetic screw continues to be a problem in restorative practice and great challenge to remove the fractured screw conservatively. This case report describes and demonstrates the technique of using an ultrasonic scaler in the removal of the fracture screw fragment as a noninvasive method without damaging the hex of implants. PMID:24963261

  5. Analyzing dental occlusion for implants: Tekscan's TScan III.

    PubMed

    Garg, Arun K

    2007-09-01

    Though no single, specific occlusal pattern has been developed that is ideal for oral implantology, research suggests some general criteria for deciding on a particular occlusal pattern that will help reduce cuspal interferences and lessen horizontal or lateral forces on the fixtures. Anticipated occlusal and chewing forces need to be taken under consideration for any implant-supported prosthesis. In addition, opposing dentition, as well as potential parafunctional mandibular movements, should be noted. Tekscan's T-Scan Occlusal Analysis System can help clinicians meet the needs of their patients for reliable measurements of occlusal biting forces. The T-Scan III System is Tekscan's most recent attempt to help dental clinicians obtain consistent and useful occlusal data for the placement, analysis, and repair of dental implants. PMID:17944069

  6. Oral health: dentures and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Martonffy, Andrea Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    More than 35 million Americans have lost all of their teeth, and 178 million are missing at least one tooth. Left unmanaged, tooth loss, or edentulism, can lead to nutritional deficiencies, oral pain, and poor psychosocial functioning. The family physician may be the first clinician to discuss tooth loss as a health concern with the patient. A patient who is interested in replacing missing teeth may be a candidate for dentures, implants, or a combination of these. The patient's preferences, general health, degree of edentulism, ability to follow up regularly, smoking status, and overall oral health should be considered when the prosthodontist makes recommendations for treatment. Smoking can delay tissue healing; therefore, heavy smoking may be a contraindication to implant placement. If a patient chooses dentures, the family physician should perform regular oral examinations, because up to 70% of denture wearers are affected by denture stomatitis at some point. Poor fit, poor hygiene, nighttime wearing of removable dentures, and bacterial or candidal infections can all be identified and managed by the family physician. The physician also can reinforce proper wear and care instructions for dentures and proper care of implants.

  7. Biomechanical determinants of the stability of dental implants: influence of the bone-implant interface properties.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Vincent; Vayron, Romain; Richard, Gilles; Lambert, Grégory; Naili, Salah; Meningaud, Jean-Paul; Haiat, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Dental implants are now widely used for the replacement of missing teeth in fully or partially edentulous patients and for cranial reconstructions. However, risks of failure, which may have dramatic consequences, are still experienced and remain difficult to anticipate. The stability of biomaterials inserted in bone tissue depends on multiscale phenomena of biomechanical (bone-implant interlocking) and of biological (mechanotransduction) natures. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the biomechanical behavior of the bone-dental implant interface as a function of its environment by considering in silico, ex vivo and in vivo studies including animal models as well as clinical studies. The biomechanical determinants of osseointegration phenomena are related to bone remodeling in the vicinity of the implants (adaptation of the bone structure to accommodate the presence of a biomaterial). Aspects related to the description of the interface and to its space-time multiscale nature will first be reviewed. Then, the various approaches used in the literature to measure implant stability and the bone-implant interface properties in vitro and in vivo will be described. Quantitative ultrasound methods are promising because they are cheap, non invasive and because of their lower spatial resolution around the implant compared to other biomechanical approaches.

  8. Computer methods for automating preoperative dental implant planning: implant positioning and size assignment.

    PubMed

    Galanis, Christos C; Sfantsikopoulos, Michael M; Koidis, Petros T; Kafantaris, Nikolaos M; Mpikos, Pavlos G

    2007-04-01

    The paper presents computer-aided methods that allocate a dental implant and suggest its size, during the pre-operative planning stage, in conformance with introduced optimization criteria and established clinical requirements. Based on computed tomography data of the jaw and prosthesis anatomy, single tooth cases are planned for the best-suited implant insertion at a user-defined region. An optimum implantation axis line is produced and cylindrical implants of various candidate sizes are then automatically positioned, while their occlusal end is leveled to bone ridge, and evaluated. Radial safety margins are used for the assessment of the implant safety distance from neighboring anatomical structures and bone quantity and quality are estimated and taken into consideration. A case study demonstrates the concept and allows for its discussion.

  9. Transmission of acoustic emission in bones, implants and dental materials.

    PubMed

    Ossi, Zannar; Abdou, Wael; Reuben, Robert L; Ibbetson, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    There is considerable interest in using acoustic emission (AE) and ultrasound to assess the quality of implant-bone interfaces and to monitor for micro-damage leading to loosening. However, remarkably little work has been done on the transmission of ultrasonic waves though the physical and biological structures involved. The aim of this in vitro study is to assess any differences in transmission between various dental materials and bovine rib bones with various degrees of hydration. Two types of tests have been carried out using pencil lead breaks as a standard AE source. The first set of tests was configured to assess the surface propagation of AE on various synthetic materials compared with fresh bovine rib bone. The second is a set of transmission tests on fresh, dried and hydrated bones each fitted with dental implants with various degrees of fixity, which includes components due to bone and interface transmission. The results indicate that transmission through glass ionomer cement is closest to the bone. This would suggest that complete osseointegration could potentially be simulated using such cement. The transmission of AE energy through bone was found to be dependent on its degree of hydration. It was also found that perfusing samples of fresh bone with water led to an increase in transmitted energy, but this appeared to affect transmission across the interface more than transmission through the bone. These findings have implications not only for implant interface inspection but also for passive AE monitoring of implants.

  10. Diversity of patients microflora on orthopaedic and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Obst, Ursula; Marten, Silke-Mareike; Niessner, Christoph; Hartwig, Erich; Korsch, Michael; Walther, Winfried

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diversity of microbial colonization on implant material from different individuals. Eubacterial DNA was extracted, separated and sequenced from orthopaedic metallic implant material, tissues or body fluids, and skin of 4 patients as well as from identical dental cement material from 10 individuals after revision and routine removal. Additionally, the composition of the bacterial population of the dental cement and the oral swab sample from one individual after direct extraction of bacterial DNA was compared to extraction after conventional microbiological enrichment. The latter investigation proved that the commonly used cultivation technique gave different results than direct extraction of DNA, especially as regards the detection of anaerobes. Comparing the bacterial colonization of implant materials from different patients showed significant individual diversity. The common focus on a constricted pathogen spectrum may have to be expanded toward a multispecies population. Moreover, the dependence of the bacterial population on the individual host has to be integrated in discussing implant colonization and infection.

  11. Fracture analysis of randomized implant-supported fixed dental prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Upshaw, Josephine F.; Mehler, Alex; Clark, Arthur E.; Neal, Dan; Anusavice, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fractures of posterior fixed dental all-ceramic prostheses can be caused by one or more factors including prosthesis design, flaw distribution, direction and magnitude of occlusal loading, and nature of supporting infrastructure (tooth root/implant), and presence of adjacent teeth. This clinical study of implant-supported, all-ceramic fixed dental prostheses, determined the effects of (1) presence of a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; (2) prosthesis loading either along the non-load bearing or load bearing areas; (3) presence of excursive contacts or maximum intercuspation contacts in the prosthesis; and (4) magnitude of bite force on the occurrence of veneer ceramic fracture. Methods 89 implant-supported FDPs were randomized as either a three-unit posterior metal-ceramic (Au-Pd-Ag alloy and InLine POM, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP or a ceramic-ceramic (ZirCAD and ZirPress, Ivoclar, Vivadent) FDP. Two implants (Osseospeed, Dentsply) and custom abutments (Atlantis, Dentsply) supported these FDPs, which were cemented with resin cement (RelyX Universal Cement). Baseline photographs were made with markings of teeth from maximum intercuspation (MI) and excursive function. Patients were recalled at 6 months and 1 to 3 years. Fractures were observed, their locations recorded, and images compared with baseline photographs of occlusal contacts. Conclusion No significant relationship exists between the occurrence of fracture and: (1) the magnitude of bite force; (2) a tooth distal to the most distal retainer; and (3) contacts in load-bearing or non-load-bearing areas. However, there was a significantly higher likelihood of fracture in areas with MI contacts only. Clinical Significance This clinical study demonstrates that there is a need to evaluate occlusion differently with implant-supported prostheses than with natural tooth supported prostheses because of the absence of a periodontal ligament. Implant supported prostheses should have minimal occlusion and

  12. Knowledge and attitudes of dental interns in Karnataka state, India, regarding implants.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sohini; Gowda, Triveni M; Kumar, Tarun A B; Mehta, Dhoom S

    2013-10-01

    Implant treatment today is highly reliable as a valid restorative option for missing teeth. As more patients worldwide opt for implant treatment, it is now imperative for dental practitioners to have sound information about dental implants so they can help patients make informed decisions. This study sought to define the knowledge and attitudes regarding dental implants of dental interns in the state of Karnataka, India, and to evaluate the dental implant curriculum structure at the undergraduate level. A survey was conducted of dental interns (students in their fifth, clinical year of undergraduate study) in seven of the forty-five academic dental institutions in this state. The questionnaire consisted of fifteen questions that assessed the respondents' level of knowledge and source of information regarding implants. A total of 500 questionnaires were distributed, and 417 interns responded for a response rate of 83.4 percent. In the results, 73.3 percent reported they were not provided sufficient information about implants in their undergraduate curriculum, and 95.7 percent of them wanted more. Also, 63.5 percent of the respondents believed that high costs could limit the use of dental implants as a tooth replacement modality in India. This study concludes that revision in the undergraduate dental curricula at these schools is needed to better prepare students for practicing implant dentistry. PMID:24098041

  13. Knowledge and attitudes of dental interns in Karnataka state, India, regarding implants.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Sohini; Gowda, Triveni M; Kumar, Tarun A B; Mehta, Dhoom S

    2013-10-01

    Implant treatment today is highly reliable as a valid restorative option for missing teeth. As more patients worldwide opt for implant treatment, it is now imperative for dental practitioners to have sound information about dental implants so they can help patients make informed decisions. This study sought to define the knowledge and attitudes regarding dental implants of dental interns in the state of Karnataka, India, and to evaluate the dental implant curriculum structure at the undergraduate level. A survey was conducted of dental interns (students in their fifth, clinical year of undergraduate study) in seven of the forty-five academic dental institutions in this state. The questionnaire consisted of fifteen questions that assessed the respondents' level of knowledge and source of information regarding implants. A total of 500 questionnaires were distributed, and 417 interns responded for a response rate of 83.4 percent. In the results, 73.3 percent reported they were not provided sufficient information about implants in their undergraduate curriculum, and 95.7 percent of them wanted more. Also, 63.5 percent of the respondents believed that high costs could limit the use of dental implants as a tooth replacement modality in India. This study concludes that revision in the undergraduate dental curricula at these schools is needed to better prepare students for practicing implant dentistry.

  14. Surgical guidelines for dental implant placement.

    PubMed

    Handelsman, M

    2006-08-12

    The goal of an implant supported reconstruction is to obtain optimal aesthetics and function. In order to achieve this, visualisation of the final restorative reconstruction is necessary prior to beginning treatment. The term 'restorative-driven' treatment planning has been used to identify this process. It requires a team approach of specialists, who can develop a multi-disciplinary treatment plan. It starts with an accurate diagnosis, which will lead to a prognosis of each individual tooth and the overall dentition. This information will help the clinician develop the treatment options suitable for tooth replacement. Only when the goals have been defined can the sequence of therapy be established. Working backwards from the wax-up of the final diagnostic model of the proposed treatment assists not only with the management of the complex case, but will help avoid mishaps. Effective communication between the team and the patient is extremely important. Understanding the patient's expectations is key to a successful outcome. Deciding that these expectations are realistic requires a correct diagnosis and an inter-disciplinary treatment plan that is logical. This approach takes time and requires a comprehensive treatment discussion between the team members, and then a thorough case presentation to the patient. Only then will the patient begin to understand the extent of their problem and the options available to reconstruct their mouth.

  15. Numerical simulation of electrically stimulated osteogenesis in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Acosta, J C; Garzón-Alvarado, D A; Lancellotti, V

    2014-04-01

    Cell behavior and tissue formation are influenced by a static electric field (EF). Several protocols for EF exposure are aimed at increasing the rate of tissue recovery and reducing the healing times in wounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of the EF action on cells and tissues are still a matter of research. In this work we introduce a mathematical model for electrically stimulated osteogenesis at the bone-dental implant interface. The model describes the influence of the EF in the most critical biological processes leading to bone formation at the bone-dental implant interface. The numerical solution is able to reproduce the distribution of spatial-temporal patterns describing the influence of EF during blood clotting, osteogenic cell migration, granulation tissue formation, displacements of the fibrillar matrix, and formation of new bone. In addition, the model describes the EF-mediated cell behavior and tissue formation which lead to an increased osteogenesis in both smooth and rough implant surfaces. Since numerical results compare favorably with experimental evidence, the model can be used to predict the outcome of using electrostimulation in other types of wounds and tissues.

  16. Microscopic Study of Surface Microtopographic Characteristics of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Sezin, M.; Croharé, L.; Ibañez, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare the micro topographic characteristics of dental implants submitted to different surface treatments, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Implants were divided into 7 groups of 3 specimens each, according to the surface treatment used: group 1: Osseotite, BIOMET 3i; group 2: SLA surface, Institut Straumann AG; group 3: Oxalife surface, Tree-Oss implant; group 4: B&W implant surface; group 5: Q-implant surface; group 6: ML implant surface; group 7: RBM surface, Rosterdent implant. The surfaces were examined under SEM (Carl Zeiss FE-SEM-SIGMA). Image Proplus software was used to determine the number and mean diameter of pores per area unit (mm). The data obtained were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. A confocal laser microscope (LEXT-OLS4100 Olympus) was used to conduct the comparative study of surface roughness (Ra). Data were analyzed using Tukey's HSD test. Results: The largest average pore diameter calculated in microns was found in group 5 (3.45 µm+/-1.91) while the smallest in group 7 (1.47µm+/-1.29). Significant differences were observed among each one of the groups studied (p<0.05). The largest number of pores/mm2 was found in group 2 (229343) and the smallest number in group 4 (10937). Group 2 showed significant differences regarding the other groups (p<0.05). The greatest roughness (Ra) was observed in group 2 (0.975µm+/-0.115) and the smallest in group 4 (0.304µm+/-0.063). Group 2 was significantly different from the other groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: The micro topography observed in the different groups presented dissimilar and specific features, depending on the chemical treatment used for the surfaces.. PMID:27335615

  17. Pain Management for Nerve Injury following Dental Implant Surgery at Tokyo Dental College Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Ken-ichi; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Kaneko, Yuzuru

    2012-01-01

    By allowing reconstruction of compromised occlusion, dental implants contribute to an improvement in quality of life (QOL) and diet. Injury to a nerve during such treatment, however, can result in a sudden decline in QOL. And once a nerve has been injured, the chances of a full recovery are slim unless the damage is only slight. If such damage causes neuropathic pain severe enough to prevent sleep, the patient's QOL will deteriorate dramatically. While damage to skin tissue or bone invariably heals over time, damage to nerves does not, indicating the need to avoid such injury while performing implant insertion, for example. This means not relying solely on X-ray images, which can be rather unclear, but also using computed tomography to allow preoperative planning and intraoperative execution to be performed as accurately as possible. Moreover, if sensory damage does occur it is essential to avoid breaking the bond of trust between dentist and patient by giving false assurances of recovery. In such cases, appropriate measures must be taken promptly. This paper describes pain management for nerve injury following dental implant surgery at the Orofacial Pain Center of Tokyo Dental College Suidoubashi Hospital. PMID:22899928

  18. The effect of radiotherapy on survival of dental implants in head and neck cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shamiri, Hashem-Motahir; Al-Maweri, Sadeq; Tarakji, Bassel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the current literature of the survival of dental implants in irradiated head and neck cancer patients considering the role of implant location, bone augmentation, dose of radiation and timing of implant placement. Study Design Pubmed search was conducted to identify articles published between January 2000 and December 2014 and presenting data of dental implant survival with radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Studies on animal subjects and craniofacial implants were excluded. Results 18 articles out of 27 were eligible for inclusion in this systematic review. 12 out of 18 studies reported favorable outcome of dental implants and radiotherapy with survival rates between 74.4% and 97%. Seven out of ten studies comparing the survival rates according to site of implant placement reported that implants were found to osseointegrate with greater success in the irradiated mandible than irradiated maxilla. 5 studies which compared implant survival in irradiated native bone versus irradiated grafted bone reported that irradiated grafted bone showed a significantly reduced dental implant survival rate in comparison to irradiated native bone. 6 out of 18studies in which radiation doses exceeded 70 Gy reported lower survival rates of dental implants in comparison to the studies in which radiation doses were ≤70Gy. Higher survival rates were reported in 2 studies in which implants placement was before radiotherapy in comparison to the remaining 16 studies in which implants placement was after radiotherapy. Conclusions Dental implants may be affected by radiotherapy especially when they are placed in maxilla, in grafted bone, or after radiation, however, they remain a functional option for rehabilitation of head and cancer patients. More Prospective cohort studies and randomized controlled trails are still needed to draw more evidence based conclusions. Key words:Dental implants, implant survival, radiotherapy, head and neck cancer. PMID

  19. Local complications in dental implant surgery: prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    ANNIBALI, S.; RIPARI, M.; LA MONACA, G.; TONOLI, F.; CRISTALLI, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY There are many detailed articles regarding accidents and local complications in dental implantation. Comparison of the data they report is not always easy because different criteria have been followed in the various classifications and there is confusion between the terms accident and complication. The aim of this paper is to propose a classification that considers the timing of the events and makes a distinction between the two terms. Accidents are events that occur during surgery and complications are all the pathological conditions that appear postoperatively. The proper diagnostic procedures and surgical techniques for complications prevention and treatment are also described. PMID:23285333

  20. The dosimetric impact of dental implants on head-and-neck volumetric modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mu-Han; Li, Jinsheng; Price, Robert A., Jr.; Wang, Lu; Lee, Chung-Chi; Ma, C.-M.

    2013-02-01

    This work aims to investigate the dosimetric impact of dental implants on volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for head-and-neck patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for the correction. An in-house Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized for the dose calculation to account for the scattering and attenuation caused by the high-Z implant material. Three different dental implant materials were studied in this work: titanium, Degubond®4 and gold. The dose perturbations caused by the dental implant materials were first investigated in a water phantom with a 1 cm3 insert. The per cent depth dose distributions of a 3 × 3 cm2 photon field were compared with the insert material as water and the three selected dental implant materials. To evaluate the impact of the dental implant on VMAT patient dose calculation, four head-and-neck cases were selected. For each case, the VMAT plan was designed based on the artifact-corrected patient geometry using a treatment planning system (TPS) that was typically utilized for routine patient treatment. The plans were re-calculated using the MC code for five situations: uncorrected geometry, artifact-corrected geometry and artifact-corrected geometry with one of the three different implant materials. The isodose distributions and the dose-volume histograms were cross-compared with each other. To evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for dental implant correction, the implant region was set as water with the material's electron-density ratio and the calculated dose was compared with the MC simulation with the real material. The main effect of the dental implant was the severe attenuation in the downstream. The 1 cm3 dental implant can lower the downstream dose by 10% (Ti) to 51% (Au) for a 3 × 3 cm2 field. The TPS failed to account for the dose perturbation if the dental implant material was not precisely defined. For the VMAT patient dose calculation

  1. Surgical templates for function and esthetics in dental implants.

    PubMed

    Small, B W

    2001-01-01

    The functional and esthetic importance of surgical templates associated with dental implants has been discussed. The design of the stent and proposed location of the fixtures basically determine the dentist's "wish list." Although ideal placement of an implant fixture often is achieved, it can be aided through use of a surgical template. Particularly useful in larger partially edentulous cases as described above, the ideal template is made of hard acrylic with holes slightly larger than the 3.0 mm drill often used during surgery. Construction of a template requires the dentist and surgeon to think about the case, create a wax-up, and decide on location before constructing the appliance. This process will benefit all, particularly the patient, and provide a foundation for a long-lasting prosthetic result.

  2. [Sinus lift and dental implantation after endosurgical treatment of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Sysoliatin, S P; Sysoliatin, P G; Palkina, M O; Solop, M V

    2013-01-01

    The long-term results of dental implant placement in patients with the history of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis are assessed in retrospective study. Maxillary sinusotomy and endoscopic surgery procedures are compared in regard to complications risks after subsequent sinus lift and dental implantation, the latter proving to be method of choice in such cases.

  3. Longevity of dental implants in type IV bone: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Goiato, M C; dos Santos, D M; Santiago, J F; Moreno, A; Pellizzer, E P

    2014-09-01

    Bone quality and quantity are important factors with regard to the survival rate of dental implants. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of dental implants inserted in low-density bone and to determine the survival rate of dental implants with surface treatments over time. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken by two independent individuals; the Medline/PubMed database was searched for the period July 1975 to March 2013. Relevant reports on bone quality and osseointegration of dental implants were selected. The search retrieved 1018 references, and after inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, 19 studies were selected for review. A total of 3937 patients, who had received a total of 12,465 dental implants, were analyzed. The survival rates of dental implants according to the bone density were: type I, 97.6%; type II, 96.2%; type III, 96.5%; and type IV, 88.8%. The survival rate of treated surface implants inserted in low-density bone was higher (97.1%) than that of machined surface implants (91.6%). Surface-treated dental implants inserted in low-density bone have a high survival rate and may be indicated for oral rehabilitation. However, more randomized studies are required to better evaluate this issue.

  4. Development and Applications of Porous Tantalum Trabecular Metal Enhanced Titanium Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bencharit, Sompop; Byrd, Warren C.; Altarawneh, Sandra; Hosseini, Bashir; Leong, Austin; Reside, Glenn; Morelli, Thiago; Offenbacher, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem Porous tantalum trabecular metal has recently been incorporated in titanium dental implants as a new form of implant surface enhancement. However, there is little information on the applications of this material in implant dentistry. Methods We, therefore review the current literature on the basic science and clinical uses of this material. Results Porous tantalum metal is used to improve the contact between osseous structure and dental implants; and therefore presumably facilitate osseointegration. Success of porous tantalum metal in orthopedic implants led to the incorporation of porous tantalum metal in the design of root-from endosseous titanium implants. The porous tantalum three-dimensional enhancement of titanium dental implant surface allows for combining bone ongrowth together with bone ingrowth, or osseoincorporation. While little is known about the biological aspect of the porous tantalum in the oral cavity, there seems to be several possible advantages of this implant design. This article reviews the biological aspects of porous tantalum enhanced titanium dental implants, in particular the effects of anatomical consideration and oral environment to implant designs. Conclusions We propose here possible clinical situations and applications for this type of dental implant. Advantages and disadvantages of the implants as well as needed future clinical studies are discussed. PMID:23527899

  5. Surgical Templates for Dental Implant Positioning; Current Knowledge and Clinical Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kola, Mohammed Zaheer; Shah, Altaf H; Khalil, Hesham S; Rabah, Ahmed Mahmoud; Harby, Nehad Mohammed H; Sabra, Seham Ali; Raghav, Deepti

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants have been used in a variety of different forms for many years. Since the mid-20th century, there has been an increase in interest in the implant process for the replacement of missing teeth. Branemark was one of the initial pioneers who applied scientifically based research techniques to develop an endosseous implant that forms an immobile connection with bone. The need for a dental implant to completely address multiple physical and biological factors imposes tremendous constraints on the surgical and handling protocol. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have serious shortcomings related to their bony union and the fact that their mechanical properties do not match those of bone. However, anatomic limitation and restorative demands encourage the surgeon to gain precision in planning and surgical positioning of dental implants. Ideal placement of the implant facilitates the establishment of favorable forces on the implants and the prosthetic component as well as ensures an aesthetic outcome. Therefore, it is advisable to establish a logical continuity between the planned restoration and the surgical phases, it is essential to use a transfer device that for sure increases the predictability of success. The surgical guide template is fabricated by a dental technician after the presurgical restorative appointments that primarily include determination of occlusal scheme and implant angulations. Here, authors genuinely attempted to review the evolution and clinical applicability of surgical templates used in the placement of dental implants. PMID:25838757

  6. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser treatment for failing dental implants due to peri-implantitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Dawn; Blodgett, Kris; Braga, Charles; Finkbeiner, Larry; Fourrier, Jeanne; George, John; Gregg, Robert; Honigman, Allen; Houser, Bruce; Lamas, William; Lehrman, Neal; Linden, Eric; McCarthy, Delwin; McCawley, Tom; McCormick, Randy; Marcus, Ed; Noraian, Kirk; Rubelman, Peter; Salama, Maurice; Saunders, Steven; Seamons, Brandon; Thein, David; Toms, Michael; Vassos, George; Harris, David M.

    2014-02-01

    A large percentage of dental implants experience complications, most commonly, infection leading to peri-implantitis and peri-mucositis, inflammatory disease involving pathogen contamination. It presents with radiographic findings of crestal bone loss. At this time there appears to be no compelling evidence for an effective intervention. The LANAP protocol is a FDA cleared surgical protocol that produces new attachment and bone regeneration when applied to periodontally infected natural teeth. The LANAP protocol and laser dosimetry have been modified to treat ailing and failing implants. Twenty-one clinicians who have been trained to perform the LANAP protocol and the LAPIPTM protocol have volunteered 26 LAPIP case reports. The time from implant to intervention ranges from 3 months to 16 years. Post-LAPIP radiographs range from 2-48 months. Ten cases were excluded for technical reasons. All 16 remaining cases provide radiographic evidence of increase in crestal bone mass around the implant and, when reported, probe depth reductions. All treating clinicians report control of the infection, reversal of bone loss and rescue of the incumbent implant. Although the success/failure rate cannot be judged from these data, any successes in this area deserve reporting and further study.

  7. Dental Implants – Perceiving Patients’ Satisfaction in Relation to Clinical and Electromyography Study on Implant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Soumendra

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the satisfaction of patients with posterior implants in relation to the clinical success criteria and surface electromyography (sEMG) findings of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Total 42 subjects were investigated. Twenty one subjects with posterior dental implants were interviewed using a questionnaire and the clinical success criteria were determined based on The International Congress of Oral Implantologists. The myofunction of the masticatory muscles were assessed using sEMG (21 subjects) and compared to the control group of subjects without implants (21 subjects). Out of 21 subjects, all were satisfied with the aesthetics of their implant. Twenty of them (95.2%) were satisfied with its function and stability. As for clinical criteria, 100% (50) of the implants were successful with no pain, mobility or exudates. sEMG findings showed that patients have significantly lower (p<0.01) basal or resting median power frequency but with muscle burst. During chewing, control subjects showed faster chewing action. There was no difference in reaction and recovery time of clenching for both groups. In conclusion, the satisfaction of implant patients was high, and which was in relation to the successful clinical success criteria and sEMG findings. PMID:26465146

  8. Finite element simulation of ultrasonic wave propagation in a dental implant for biomechanical stability assessment.

    PubMed

    Vayron, Romain; Nguyen, Vu-Hieu; Bosc, Romain; Naili, Salah; Haïat, Guillaume

    2015-10-01

    Dental implant stability, which is an important parameter for the surgical outcome, can now be assessed using quantitative ultrasound. However, the acoustical propagation in dental implants remains poorly understood. The objective of this numerical study was to understand the propagation phenomena of ultrasonic waves in cylindrically shaped prototype dental implants and to investigate the sensitivity of the ultrasonic response to the surrounding bone quantity and quality. The 10-MHz ultrasonic response of the implant was calculated using an axisymetric 3D finite element model, which was validated by comparison with results obtained experimentally and using a 2D finite difference numerical model. The results show that the implant ultrasonic response changes significantly when a liquid layer is located at the implant interface compared to the case of an interface fully bounded with bone tissue. A dedicated model based on experimental measurements was developed in order to account for the evolution of the bone biomechanical properties at the implant interface. The effect of a gradient of material properties on the implant ultrasonic response is determined. Based on the reproducibility of the measurement, the results indicate that the device should be sensitive to the effects of a healing duration of less than one week. In all cases, the amplitude of the implant response is shown to decrease when the dental implant primary and secondary stability increase, which is consistent with the experimental results. This study paves the way for the development of a quantitative ultrasound method to evaluate dental implant stability.

  9. Finite element simulation of ultrasonic wave propagation in a dental implant for biomechanical stability assessment.

    PubMed

    Vayron, Romain; Nguyen, Vu-Hieu; Bosc, Romain; Naili, Salah; Haïat, Guillaume

    2015-10-01

    Dental implant stability, which is an important parameter for the surgical outcome, can now be assessed using quantitative ultrasound. However, the acoustical propagation in dental implants remains poorly understood. The objective of this numerical study was to understand the propagation phenomena of ultrasonic waves in cylindrically shaped prototype dental implants and to investigate the sensitivity of the ultrasonic response to the surrounding bone quantity and quality. The 10-MHz ultrasonic response of the implant was calculated using an axisymetric 3D finite element model, which was validated by comparison with results obtained experimentally and using a 2D finite difference numerical model. The results show that the implant ultrasonic response changes significantly when a liquid layer is located at the implant interface compared to the case of an interface fully bounded with bone tissue. A dedicated model based on experimental measurements was developed in order to account for the evolution of the bone biomechanical properties at the implant interface. The effect of a gradient of material properties on the implant ultrasonic response is determined. Based on the reproducibility of the measurement, the results indicate that the device should be sensitive to the effects of a healing duration of less than one week. In all cases, the amplitude of the implant response is shown to decrease when the dental implant primary and secondary stability increase, which is consistent with the experimental results. This study paves the way for the development of a quantitative ultrasound method to evaluate dental implant stability. PMID:25619479

  10. Development of a Drilling Simulator for Dental Implant Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hideaki; Nagahata, Masahiro; Takano, Naoki; Takemoto, Shinji; Matsunaga, Satoru; Abe, Shinichi; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a dental implant surgery simulator that allows learners to experience the drilling forces necessary to perform an osteotomy in the posterior mandibular bone. The simulator contains a force-sensing device that receives input and counteracts this force, which is felt as resistance by the user. The device consists of an actuator, a load cell, and a control unit. A mandibular bone model was fabricated in which the predicted forces necessary to drill the cortical and trabecular bone were determined via micro CT image-based 3D finite element analysis. The simulator was evaluated by five dentists from the Department of Implantology at Tokyo Dental College. The ability of the evaluators to distinguish the drilling resistance through different regions of the mandibular bone was investigated. Of the five dentists, four sensed the change in resistance when the drill perforated the upper cortical bone. All five dentists were able to detect when the drill made contact with lingual cortical bone and when the lingual bone was perforated. This project successfully developed a dental implant surgery simulator that allows users to experience the forces necessary to drill through types of bone encountered during osteotomy. Furthermore, the researchers were able to build a device by which excessive drilling simulates a situation in which the lingual cortical bone is perforated--a situation that could lead to negative repercussions in a clinical setting. The simulator was found to be useful to train users to recognize the differences in resistance when drilling through the mandibular bone. PMID:26729688

  11. Success of multiple endosseous dental implant designs to second-stage surgery across study sites.

    PubMed

    Morris, H F; Manz, M C; Tarolli, J H

    1997-12-01

    A multicenter clinical study of dental implants is being conducted by the Dental Implant Clinical Research Group to investigate the influence of implant design, application, and site on clinical performance and crestal bone. This article reports on the percentage of success up to implant uncovering for different implant designs and the distribution of failures across study sites. Data from 2,847 implants placed at 32 study sites were analyzed. Percentages of success up to implant uncovering were calculated for study implants overall, by implant design, by implant design within study strata, and according to individual study sites and quartile groupings of sites based on success. Comparisons were made, with chi-square and exact tests employed where appropriate. Differences were found between the different implant designs for the study overall, and between implant designs within the different study strata. Although some implant designs were found to have generally high success across study sites, some study sites designated as having surgeons with less experience tended to have higher failure levels, and one implant design failed at higher rates in a subset of study sites. The percentage and distribution of implant failures varied across study sites and by implant design. These differences appeared to be in part related to the level of experience of the surgeons. Further investigation should focus on identification of factors that contribute to higher success in implant placement with different implant designs.

  12. Bioactive and thermally compatible glass coating on zirconia dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kirsten, A; Hausmann, A; Weber, M; Fischer, J; Fischer, H

    2015-02-01

    The healing time of zirconia implants may be reduced by the use of bioactive glass coatings. Unfortunately, existing glasses are either bioactive like Bioglass 45S5 but thermally incompatible with the zirconia substrate, or they are thermally compatible but exhibit only a very low level of bioactivity. In this study, we hypothesized that a tailored substitution of alkaline earth metals and alkaline metals in 45S5 can lead to a glass composition that is both bioactive and thermally compatible with zirconia implants. A novel glass composition was analyzed using x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, dilatometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and heating microscopy to investigate its chemical, physical, and thermal properties. Bioactivity was tested in vitro using simulated body fluid (SBF). Smooth and microstructured glass coatings were applied using a tailored spray technique with subsequent thermal treatment. Coating adhesion was tested on implants that were inserted in bovine ribs. The cytocompatibility of the coating was analyzed using L929 mouse fibroblasts. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the novel glass was shown to be slightly lower (11.58 · 10(-6) K(-1)) than that of the zirconia (11.67 · 10(-6) K(-1)). After storage in SBF, the glass showed reaction layers almost identical to the bioactive glass gold standard, 45S5. A process window between 800 °C and 910 °C was found to result in densely sintered and amorphous coatings. Microstructured glass coatings on zirconia implants survived a minimum insertion torque of 60 Ncm in the in vitro experiment on bovine ribs. Proliferation and cytotoxicity of the glass coatings was comparable with the controls. The novel glass composition showed a strong adhesion to the zirconia substrate and a significant bioactive behavior in the SBF in vitro experiments. Therefore, it holds great potential to significantly reduce the healing time of zirconia dental implants.

  13. Role of primary stability for successful osseointegration of dental implants: Factors of influence and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Hameeda Bashir; Crespi, Roberto; Romanos, Georgios E.

    2013-01-01

    A secure implant primary (mechanical) stability is positively associated with a successful implant integration and long-term successful clinical outcome. Therefore, it is essential to assess the initial stability at different time-points to ensure a successful osseointegration. The present study critically reviews the factors that may play a role in achieving a successful initial stability in dental implants. Databases were searched from 1983 up to and including October 2013 using different combinations of various keywords. Bone quality and quantity, implant geometry, and surgical technique adopted may significantly influence primary stability and overall success rate of dental implants. PMID:24381734

  14. Characterization of Actinomyces species isolated from failed dental implant fixtures.

    PubMed

    Sarkonen, Nanna; Könönen, Eija; Eerola, Erkki; Könönen, Mauno; Jousimies-Somer, Hannele; Laine, Pekka

    2005-08-01

    In the oral cavity, Actinomyces form a fundamental component of the indigenous microflora, being among initial colonizers in polymicrobial biofilms. However, some differences may exist between different species in terms of their attachment not only to teeth but also to biomaterials. In this study we investigated the distribution of Actinomyces in 33 dental implant fixtures explanted from 17 patients. The identification was based on comprehensive biochemical testing and gas-liquid chromatography and when needed, 16S rRNA sequencing. Actinomyces was the most prevalent bacterial genus in these failed implants, colonizing 31/33 (94%) of the fixtures. Proportions of Actinomyces growth of the total bacterial growth in the Actinomyces-positive fixtures varied from 0.01% up to 75%. A. odontolyticus was the most common Actinomyces finding, present in 26/31 (84%) Actinomyces-positive fixtures. Actinomyces naeslundii and A. viscosus were both detected in 10/31 (32%) and A. israelii in 7/31 (23%) fixtures. Other Actinomyces species, including A. georgiae, A. gerencseriae and A. graevenitzii, were detected less frequently. Our results suggest that Actinomyces species are frequent colonizers on failed implant surfaces, where A. odontolyticus was the far most prominent Actinomyces species.

  15. [Experience with the use of short dental implants in the literature].

    PubMed

    Vajdovich, István; Orosz, Mihály

    2015-06-01

    According to the literature short dental implants have often been used for the replacement of teeth in the daily praxis. The implantation of short dental implants raise a lot of questions. The autors's aim is to collect the most important experiences of current literature on the mentioned theme to oral implantologists. In the article 33 reviews and clinical studies have been overviewed. The analysis of the different studies suggest that the use of short implants--taking into account of indications and contraindications--decreases the incidence of complications and the patient's discomfort as well as the cost of treatment. The use of short dental implants is proposed as an alternative method in the daily dental praxis.

  16. Current status of ceramic coatings for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lacefield, W R

    1998-01-01

    There are various ceramic coatings available for dental implants. From a commercial standpoint, plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) is the most popular. These coatings are typically partially amorphous after processing and contain crystalline phases other than HA. Plasma-sprayed HA and the other bioactive ceramic coating materials have been shown to enhance bone apposition as compared with uncoated metal implants. Some of the other available materials include the bioglasses, other calcium phosphates such as fluorapatite and tricalcium phosphate, and the inert ceramics such as alumina. The plasma-spray process is not optimum for all types of ceramic coatings, because it is not suitable for coating porous surfaces; the exact control of structure and chemistry is difficult with this process, and bond strength is not as high as is desired for some applications. Alternative methods for coating include sol-gel processing, ion beam and radio frequency (RF) sputtering, pulsed laser deposition, hot isostatic pressing, and electrophoretic deposition. The use of osteoinductive agents in conjunction with ceramic-coated implants is of current interest, and the degree and type of bonding of these agents appear to vary with the composition of the ceramic coating. Because there seems to be no satisfactory means of incorporating osteoinductive agents into ceramic coatings during any of the conventional coating procedures, the best approach seems to be to diffuse the agents into the coating after processing. Other possibilities include the tethering of the agents to the surface of the ceramic by suitable organic molecules or the placing of the agent in some carrier material such as a cement, which is placed around the implants. PMID:10196808

  17. Biofilm and saliva affect the biomechanical behavior of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Bordin, Dimorvan; Cavalcanti, Indira M G; Jardim Pimentel, Marcele; Fortulan, Carlos A; Sotto-Maior, Bruno S; Del Bel Cury, Altair A; da Silva, Wander José

    2015-04-13

    Friction coefficient (FC) was quantified between titanium-titanium (Ti-Ti) and titanium-zirconia (Ti-Zr), materials commonly used as abutment and implants, in the presence of a multispecies biofilm (Bf) or salivary pellicle (Pel). Furthermore, FC was used as a parameter to evaluate the biomechanical behavior of a single implant-supported restoration. Interface between Ti-Ti and Ti-Zr without Pel or Bf was used as control (Ctrl). FC was recorded using tribometer and analyzed by two-way Anova and Tukey test (p<0.05). Data were transposed to a finite element model of a dental implant-supported restoration. Models were obtained varying abutment material (Ti and Zr) and FCs recorded (Bf, Pel, and Ctrl). Maximum and shear stress were calculated for bone and equivalent von Misses for prosthetic components. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA (p<0.05) and percentage of contribution for each condition (material and FC) was calculated. FC significant differences were observed between Ti-Ti and Ti-Zr for Ctrl and Bf groups, with lower values for Ti-Zr (p<0.05). Within each material group, Ti-Ti differed between all treatments (p<0.05) and for Ti-Zr, only Pel showed higher values compared with Ctrl and Bf (p<0.05). FC contributed to 89.83% (p<0.05) of the stress in the screw, decreasing the stress when the FC was lower. FC resulted in an increase of 59.78% of maximum stress in cortical bone (p=0.05). It can be concluded that the shift of the FC due to the presence of Pel or Bf is able to jeopardize the biomechanical behavior of a single implant-supported restoration. PMID:25711169

  18. On the use of EMI for the assessment of dental implant stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Malfa Ribolla, Emma; Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Gulizzi, Vincenzo

    2014-03-01

    The achievement and the maintenance of dental implant stability are prerequisites for the long-term success of the osseointegration process. Since implant stability occurs at different stages, it is clinically required to monitor an implant over time, i.e. between the surgery and the placement of the artificial tooth. In this framework, non-invasive tests able to assess the degree of osseointegration are necessary. In this paper, the electromechanical impedance (EMI) method is proposed to monitor the stability of dental implants. A 3D finite element model of a piezoceramic transducer (PZT) bonded to a dental implant placed into the bone was created, considering the presence of a bone-implant interface subjected to Young's modulus change. The numerical model was validated experimentally by testing bovine bone samples. The EMI response of a PZT, bonded to the abutment screwed to implants inserted to the bone, was measured. To simulate the osseointegration process a pulp canal sealer was used to secure the implant to the bone. It was found that the PZT's admittance is sensitive to the stiffness variation of the bone-implant interface. The results show that EMIbased method is able (i) to evaluate the material properties around the implant, and (ii) to promote a novel non-invasive monitoring of dental implant surgical procedure.

  19. Photoelastic Analysis of Fixed Partial Prosthesis Crown Height and Implant Length on Distribution of Stress in Two Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Figueirêdo, Evandro Portela; Sigua-Rodriguez, Eder Alberto; Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; de Albergaria-Barbosa, José Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate by photoelastic analysis stress distribution on short and long implants of two dental implant systems with 2-unit implant-supported fixed partial prostheses of 8 mm and 13 mm heights. Sixteen photoelastic models were divided into 4 groups: I: long implant (5 × 11 mm) (Neodent), II: long implant (5 × 11 mm) (Bicon), III: short implant (5 × 6 mm) (Neodent), and IV: short implants (5 × 6 mm) (Bicon). The models were positioned in a circular polariscope associated with a cell load and static axial (0.5 Kgf) and nonaxial load (15°, 0.5 Kgf) were applied to each group for both prosthetic crown heights. Three-way ANOVA was used to compare the factors implant length, crown height, and implant system (α = 0.05). The results showed that implant length was a statistically significant factor for both axial and nonaxial loading. The 13 mm prosthetic crown did not result in statistically significant differences in stress distribution between the implant systems and implant lengths studied, regardless of load type (P > 0.05). It can be concluded that short implants showed higher stress levels than long implants. Implant system and length was not relevant factors when prosthetic crown height were increased. PMID:25374603

  20. Micromotions and combined damages at the dental implant/bone interface

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Ya-Rong; Zhu, Zhuo-Li; Yu, Hai-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Micromotion and fretting damages at the dental implant/bone interface are neglected for the limitation of check methods, but it is particularly important for the initial success of osseointegration and the life time of dental implant. This review article describes the scientific documentation of micromotion and fretting damages on the dental implant/bone interface. The fretting amplitude is less than 30 µm in vitro and the damage in the interface is acceptable. While in vivo, the micromotion's effect is the combination of damage in tissue level and the real biological reaction. PMID:23258381

  1. Accidental displacement of a dental implant into the sublingual space: A Case report

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Solís, José; Marín-Fernández, Ana-Belén; Valencia-Laseca, Alfredo; Monsalve-Iglesias, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Dental implant surgery is continuously expanding. In fact, every day more and more surgeons are choosing dental implants for allowing great results in the field of oral rehabilitation. However, these procedures are not exempt from complications. This report presents the case of a 66 years old man underwent implant surgery by a specialized dentist. No problems were reported during implant placement. Despite this, three months later, it was displaced into the sublingual space at the time of uncovering. Against this backdrop, the patient was referred to an expert maxillofacial surgeon. Next day, the implant was removed using an intraoral approach to reach the sublingual space. According with our knowledge, there are no cases reported in the literature that describe this complication. Key words:Dental implant, sublingual space, bone atrophy, complications of oral surgery. PMID:27703616

  2. Biomechanics and load resistance of small-diameter and mini dental implants: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Istabrak; Bourauel, Christoph; Mundt, Torsten; Stark, Helmut; Heinemann, Friedhelm

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, the application of small-diameter and mini dental implants to support removable and fixed prosthesis has dramatically increased. However, the success of these implants under functional biting forces and the reaction of the bone around them need to be analyzed. This review was aimed to present studies that deal with the fatigue life of small-diameter and mini dental implants under normal biting force, and their survival rate. The numerical and experimental studies concluded that an increase in the risk of bone damage or implant failure may be assumed in critical clinical situations and implants with <3 mm diameter have a risk of fracture in clinical practice. The survival rate of the small-diameter and mini dental implants over 5 years was 98.3-99.4%.

  3. Pyogenic granuloma in relation to dental implants: Clinical and histopathological findings

    PubMed Central

    Pinas, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background The occurrence of pyogenic granuloma in association to dental implants is rare and only five cases have been reported in the literature. Material and Methods Patients charts were analyzed to select patients who had been diagnosed for pyogenic granuloma and its association with dental implants had been evaluated. The clinical status of the dental implants and the prosthesis had also been assessed. Results Clinical and histopathological diagnosis of pyogenic granuloma had been reached for soft mass growth in association with dental implants in 10 patients. Histological analysis of all samples was performed to obtain a firm diagnosis of finding against pyogenic granuloma lesions. Accumulation of dental plaque due to poor oral hygiene and improper design of the prosthesis had been related to the occurrence of pyogenic granuoloma. This lesion showed no predilection to specific surface type and had no significant association with marginal bone loss. Conclusions Pyogenic granuloma should be included in the differential diagnosis of soft mass growth around dental implants. Key words:Reactive lesion, soft mass, pyogenic granuloma, dental implant, titanium. PMID:26535087

  4. Evidence-based techniques to assess the performance of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Kashi, Ajay; Saha, Subrata

    2013-12-01

    The clinical use of evidence-based medicine has been regarded as one of the most significant medical advancements of the last century. As the costs of medical care escalate, clinical decisions have to be made prudently and with a high degree of efficacy. One of the most expensive treatments in dentistry includes the use of dental implants to rehabilitate partial and fully edentulous patients. Due to the high costs of treatments and the ever increasing varieties of dental implants becoming available, the clinician is often faced with a challenging situation to decide the best prostheses for their patients. Furthermore, navigating through the vast database of literature pertaining to dental implants and their related research can be very time consuming and challenging to a dental surgeon before they can make appropriate clinical decisions. Similar to other orthopedic implants, dental implants need to be evaluated for their long-term efficacy in vivo before they are clinically acceptable. In order to help clinician(s) make patient oriented decisions, evidence-based techniques are becoming increasingly popular. This can be a very useful tool in translating research findings into clinical practice, thus narrowing the gap between research and clinical dentistry. This article discusses ways in which evidence-based techniques can help dental surgeons analyze and make informed clinical decisions about dental implant treatments.

  5. Dental implants in patients at high risk for infective endocarditis: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Findler, M; Chackartchi, T; Regev, E

    2014-10-01

    The safety of dental implant placement in patients at high risk for infective endocarditis (IE) has never been shown. The outcome of osseointegrated implants in patients with artificial heart valves or with a history of an infected valve is not known. In this article we describe our experience of dental implant placement in patients at high risk for IE. A retrospective study was conducted on patients at high risk for IE who underwent dental implant placement. All the patients received prophylactic antibiotic treatment before the surgical procedure, in accordance with the relevant American Heart Association guidelines. A total 13 patients underwent 16 surgical procedures for the placement of 57 dental implants over a period of 17 years. Within the follow-up period, no case of IE was reported. Two implants failed before exposure in one patient, one patient suffered from mitral valve thrombosis 14 days after the dental procedure, and another patient suffered a stroke 6 months following treatment. Despite the limitation of the small group of patients and the known low incidence of IE, dental implants may be regarded as a legitimate procedure for patients at high risk for IE. PMID:24893765

  6. Atypical Case of Three Dental Implants Displaced into the Maxillary Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Bruniera, João Felipe Bonatto; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Corrêa; Faria, Paulo Esteves Pinto

    2015-01-01

    Oral rehabilitation with dental implants has become a routine treatment in contemporary dentistry. The displacement of dental implants into the sinus membrane, a complication related to the maxillary sinus, is one of the most common accidents reported in the literature. The treatment for this complication is the surgical removal of the implant. A 60-year-old woman with three dental implants displaced into the maxillary sinus (one implant displaced into the left maxillary sinus and two implants displaced into the right maxillary sinus) underwent surgery for removal of the implants. The surgery to remove the implants was performed under local anesthesia through the Caldwell-Luc technique. The patient was subsequently administered antibiotic, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic drugs. The patient returned 7 days after the surgery for suture removal and is being regularly monitored to determine whether future rehabilitation of the edentulous area is necessary. In conclusion, surgical removal of the dental implant displaced into the maxillary sinus is the treatment of choice. This technique is appropriate because it allows the use of local anesthesia and provides direct visualization for the removal of the implants. PMID:26635979

  7. Biofilm formation on dental restorative and implant materials.

    PubMed

    Busscher, H J; Rinastiti, M; Siswomihardjo, W; van der Mei, H C

    2010-07-01

    Biomaterials for the restoration of oral function are prone to biofilm formation, affecting oral health. Oral bacteria adhere to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, but due to fluctuating shear, little biofilm accumulates on hydrophobic surfaces in vivo. More biofilm accumulates on rough than on smooth surfaces. Oral biofilms mostly consist of multiple bacterial strains, but Candida species are found on acrylic dentures. Biofilms on gold and amalgam in vivo are thick and fully covering, but barely viable. Biofilms on ceramics are thin and highly viable. Biofilms on composites and glass-ionomer cements cause surface deterioration, which enhances biofilm formation again. Residual monomer release from composites influences biofilm growth in vitro, but effects in vivo are less pronounced, probably due to the large volume of saliva into which compounds are released and its continuous refreshment. Similarly, conflicting results have been reported on effects of fluoride release from glass-ionomer cements. Finally, biomaterial-associated infection of implants and devices elsewhere in the body is compared with oral biofilm formation. Biomaterial modifications to discourage biofilm formation on implants and devices are critically discussed for possible applications in dentistry. It is concluded that, for dental applications, antimicrobial coatings killing bacteria upon contact are more promising than antimicrobial-releasing coatings.

  8. Persistent pain and neurosensory disturbance after dental implant surgery: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Okeson, Jeffrey P; Bertoli, Elizangela; Medynski, Denielle C; Khalaf, Mohd W

    2015-01-01

    Nerve trauma caused by dental implant placement is associated with altered sensation and chronic pain. Complete or partial loss of sensation is often reported by patients who have experienced nerve trauma during implant surgery. Some patients report persistent pain and neurosurgery disturbance long after the normal healing time has passed. In addition, neuropathic pain is reported after implant surgery. Practitioners who place dental implants must be familiar with the differential diagnosis, prevention, and management of neuropathic pain. This article provides insights into the prevention and management of neurosensory deficits and chronic persistent neuropathic pain and considerations for patient referral.

  9. Persistent pain and neurosensory disturbance after dental implant surgery: prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Okeson, Jeffrey P; Bertoli, Elizangela; Medynski, Denielle C; Khalaf, Mohd W

    2015-01-01

    Nerve trauma caused by dental implant placement is associated with altered sensation and chronic pain. Complete or partial loss of sensation is often reported by patients who have experienced nerve trauma during implant surgery. Some patients report persistent pain and neurosurgery disturbance long after the normal healing time has passed. In addition, neuropathic pain is reported after implant surgery. Practitioners who place dental implants must be familiar with the differential diagnosis, prevention, and management of neuropathic pain. This article provides insights into the prevention and management of neurosensory deficits and chronic persistent neuropathic pain and considerations for patient referral. PMID:25434563

  10. Persistent pain and neurosensory disturbance after dental implant surgery: pathophysiology, etiology, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Okeson, Jeffrey P; Khalaf, Mohd W; Bhavsar, Ishita

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have documented the successful outcomes of dental implants, but have also reported the association of sensory disturbances with the surgical implant procedure. Postsurgical pain is a normal response to tissue injury, and usually resolves after the tissue heals. However, some patients who receive dental implants experience persistent pain even after normal healing. This article describes the basic anatomy and pathophysiology associated with nerve injury. The incidence and diagnosis of these problems, in addition to factors that result in the development of chronic persistent neuropathic pain and sensory disturbances associated with surgical implant placement, are discussed. PMID:25434562

  11. Piezosurgery in Bone Augmentation Procedures Previous to Dental Implant Surgery: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Magrin, Gabriel Leonardo; Sigua-Rodriguez, Eder Alberto; Goulart, Douglas Rangel; Asprino, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    The piezosurgery has been used with increasing frequency and applicability by health professionals, especially those who deal with dental implants. The concept of piezoelectricity has emerged in the nineteenth century, but it was applied in oral surgery from 1988 by Tomaso Vercellotti. It consists of an ultrasonic device able to cut mineralized bone tissue, without injuring the adjacent soft tissue. It also has several advantages when compared to conventional techniques with drills and saws, such as the production of a precise, clean and low bleed bone cut that shows positive biological results. In dental implants surgery, it has been used for maxillary sinus lifting, removal of bone blocks, distraction osteogenesis, lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve, split crest of alveolar ridge and even for dental implants placement. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the use of piezosurgery in bone augmentation procedures used previously to dental implants placement. PMID:26966469

  12. New approach towards mini dental implants and small-diameter implants: an option for long-term prostheses.

    PubMed

    Gleiznys, Alvydas; Skirbutis, Gediminas; Harb, Ali; Barzdziukaite, Ingrida; Grinyte, Ieva

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Mini dental implants (MDI) and small diameter implants (SDI) have been extensively used as temporary or orthodontic anchorage; however there have been studies that proved their availability as a mean for long term prosthodontics. Our aim was to review the indications, advantages of MDI and SDI, and their long-term survival. METHODS. Computerized searches were conducted for clinical studies between year 2000 and 2011 that involved either implants with 3.3 mm diameter or less, used in prosthodontics; or provided a follow up of MDI or SDI duration of at least 4 months following implant placement including survival rate data. All studies about implants used in orthodontics were excluded. The range of available MDI and SDI has been found in cataloges of the companies: 3M ESPE IMTEC, Bicon Dental, Zimmer, Implant Direct, Intra lock, Hiossen, Simpler Implant, KAT Implants, OCO Biomedical, American Dental Implant. RESULTS. 41 studies meeting the above criteria were selected, 22 out of them reviewed survival rates of MDI and SDI. The follow up duration varried from 4 months to 8 years with survival rates between 91.17 and 100%. Nevertheless, the companies showed a big variety of MDI and SDI provided in the market for long term prostheses. CONCLUSIONS. Implants with small diameters can be used successfully in a variety of clinical situations. Less surgical time, less postoperative pain, ability of direct loading after surgery with no harm to bone and cost effectiveness are the advantages. The reduced surface implants require correct treatment planning so that the loading force would not cause bone loss or implant failure. MDI and SDI show high survival rates, but special cautions for bone quality and good oral hygiene should be maintained.

  13. Evaluation of bone loss in antibacterial coated dental implants: An experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria; Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina; Sevilla, Pablo; Nart, José; Manzanares, Norberto; Manero, José M; Gil, Francisco Javier; Boyd, Steven K; Rodríguez, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effect of antibacterial modified dental implants in the first stages of peri-implantitis. Thirty dental implants were inserted in the mandibular premolar sites of 5 beagle dogs. Sites were randomly assigned to Ti (untreated implants, 10units), Ti_Ag (silver electrodeposition treatment, 10units), and Ti_TSP (silanization treatment, 10units). Coated implants were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Two months after implant insertion, experimental peri-implantitis was initiated by ligature placement. Ligatures were removed 2months later, and plaque formation was allowed for 2 additional months. Clinical and radiographic analyses were performed during the study. Implant-tissue samples were prepared for micro computed tomography, backscattered scanning electron microscopy, histomorphometric and histological analyses and ion release measurements. X-ray, SEM and histology images showed that vertical bone resorption in treated implants was lower than in the control group (P<0.05). This effect is likely due to the capacity of the treatments to reduce bacteria colonization on the implant surface. Histological analysis suggested an increase of peri-implant bone formation on silanized implants. However, the short post-ligature period was not enough to detect differences in clinical parameters among implant groups. Within the limits of this study, antibacterial surface treatments have a positive effect against bone resorption induced by peri-implantitis. PMID:27612745

  14. Evaluation of bone loss in antibacterial coated dental implants: An experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Godoy-Gallardo, Maria; Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina; Sevilla, Pablo; Nart, José; Manzanares, Norberto; Manero, José M; Gil, Francisco Javier; Boyd, Steven K; Rodríguez, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effect of antibacterial modified dental implants in the first stages of peri-implantitis. Thirty dental implants were inserted in the mandibular premolar sites of 5 beagle dogs. Sites were randomly assigned to Ti (untreated implants, 10units), Ti_Ag (silver electrodeposition treatment, 10units), and Ti_TSP (silanization treatment, 10units). Coated implants were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Two months after implant insertion, experimental peri-implantitis was initiated by ligature placement. Ligatures were removed 2months later, and plaque formation was allowed for 2 additional months. Clinical and radiographic analyses were performed during the study. Implant-tissue samples were prepared for micro computed tomography, backscattered scanning electron microscopy, histomorphometric and histological analyses and ion release measurements. X-ray, SEM and histology images showed that vertical bone resorption in treated implants was lower than in the control group (P<0.05). This effect is likely due to the capacity of the treatments to reduce bacteria colonization on the implant surface. Histological analysis suggested an increase of peri-implant bone formation on silanized implants. However, the short post-ligature period was not enough to detect differences in clinical parameters among implant groups. Within the limits of this study, antibacterial surface treatments have a positive effect against bone resorption induced by peri-implantitis.

  15. An overview of zirconia dental implants: basic properties and clinical application of three cases.

    PubMed

    Bankoğlu Güngör, Merve; Aydın, Cemal; Yılmaz, Handan; Gül, Esma Başak

    2014-08-01

    Due to the possible aesthetic problems of titanium implants, the developments in ceramic implant materials are increasing. Natural tooth colored ceramic implants may be an alternative to overcome aesthetic problems. The purpose of this article is to give information about the basic properties of dental zirconia implants and present 3 cases treated with two-piece zirconia implants. Two-piece zirconia dental implants, 4.0 mm diameter and 11.5 mm in length, were inserted into maxillary incisor region. They were left for 6 months to osseointegrate. Panoramic and periapical radiographs were obtained and examined for bone-implant osseointegration. During the follow-up period the patients were satisfied with their prosthesis and no complication was observed.

  16. Dental Implant Placement using C-arm CT Real Time Imaging System: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, B; Boruah, Lalit C; Thind, Amandeep; Jain, Gaurav; Gupta, Shilpi

    2014-12-01

    C-arm computed tomography (CT) is a new and innovative imaging technique. In combination with two-dimensional fluoroscopic or radiographic imaging, information provided by three-dimensional C-arm real time imaging can be valuable for therapy planning, guidance and outcome assessment in dental implant placement. This paper reports a case of two dental implant placement using Artis zee C-arm CT system first time in field of implantology.

  17. The status of undergraduate implant education in dental schools outside the United States.

    PubMed

    Seckinger, R J; Weintraub, A M; Berthold, P; Weintraub, G S

    1995-01-01

    Over the past 20 years the incorporation of implant dentistry into academia has been documented in some detail for North American dental schools but has not been pursued on an international level. In June of 1993, we surveyed 51 dental schools outside of the United States affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine's Office of International Relations concerning their teaching involvement with implant dentistry. Results from the 44 (86 percent) responding schools suggest that implant dentistry is being incorporated into predoctoral curriculums. Industrialized countries were more inclined to provide implant education. Insufficient time and the thought that the predoctoral level was not the place for implant dentistry were cited as some of the reasons for not incorporating implant dentistry into the curriculum. Oral surgery, prosthodontics, and periodontics departments developed and administered the implant curriculum. Formats varied among schools with respect to allotted time, curricular placement, laboratory experience, and clinical participation. Didactic material most frequently presented included a historical overview, diagnosis and treatment planning, classification of dental implants, and surgical and prosthetic concepts. Clinical involvement varied from actual implant placement to observation of prosthodontic procedures. Results were categorized based on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) classification of countries in six regions.

  18. A pilot study in the recovery and recognition of non-osseointegrated dental implants following cremation.

    PubMed

    Berketa, J; James, H; Marino, V

    2011-12-01

    Minimal dimensional changes in free standing dental implants when incinerated in a kiln to a temperature of 1125°C have been reported previously. However, in the same study colour changes were observed between commercially pure titanium and titanium alloy type of implants, with speculation that this change may be a useful distinguishing tool in cases requiring forensic identification. The present study was instigated to determine what changes occur following cremation to bone-supported dental implants placed within mandibles of sheep. A selection of dental implants was photographed and radiographed. They were then surgically placed in sheep mandibles and the entire sheep heads cremated in a commercial cremator. There was detachment of the dental implants from the mandible, which could have implications for scene recovery. Following retrieval and re-irradiating of the implants, image subtraction evaluation of the radiographs was recorded using Adobe(®) Photoshop.(®) As with the previous study there was slight oxidation of the implant surfaces leading to minor alteration of the images. There was, however, no gold crust colour change in the commercially pure titanium. Photography within the retrieved implants revealed the batch number within the Straumann™ implant was still visible, which could significantly add weight to the identification of deceased persons.

  19. A pilot study in the recovery and recognition of non-osseointegrated dental implants following cremation.

    PubMed

    Berketa, J; James, H; Marino, V

    2011-12-01

    Minimal dimensional changes in free standing dental implants when incinerated in a kiln to a temperature of 1125°C have been reported previously. However, in the same study colour changes were observed between commercially pure titanium and titanium alloy type of implants, with speculation that this change may be a useful distinguishing tool in cases requiring forensic identification. The present study was instigated to determine what changes occur following cremation to bone-supported dental implants placed within mandibles of sheep. A selection of dental implants was photographed and radiographed. They were then surgically placed in sheep mandibles and the entire sheep heads cremated in a commercial cremator. There was detachment of the dental implants from the mandible, which could have implications for scene recovery. Following retrieval and re-irradiating of the implants, image subtraction evaluation of the radiographs was recorded using Adobe(®) Photoshop.(®) As with the previous study there was slight oxidation of the implant surfaces leading to minor alteration of the images. There was, however, no gold crust colour change in the commercially pure titanium. Photography within the retrieved implants revealed the batch number within the Straumann™ implant was still visible, which could significantly add weight to the identification of deceased persons. PMID:22717912

  20. The design and production of Ti-6Al-4V ELI customized dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahine, Gilbert; Koike, Mari; Okabe, Toru; Smith, Pauline; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2008-11-01

    This paper addresses the production of customized Ti-6Al-4V ELI dental implants via electron beam melting (EBM). The melting of Ti-6Al-4V ELI powder produces implants with great biocompatibility, fi ne mechanical performance, and a high bone ingrowth potential. The EBM technology is used to produce one-component dental implants that mimic the exact shape of the patient’s tooth, replacing the traditional, three-component, “screw-like” standardized dental implants currently used. The new generation of implants provides the possibility of simplifying pre-insertion procedures leading to faster healing time, and the potential of better and stronger osseointegration, specifi cally through incorporating lattice structure design.

  1. Optimum gradient material for a functionally graded dental implant using metaheuristic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Sadollah, Ali; Bahreininejad, Ardeshir

    2011-10-01

    Despite dental implantation being a great success, one of the key issues facing it is a mismatch of mechanical properties between engineered and native biomaterials, which makes osseointegration and bone remodeling problematical. Functionally graded material (FGM) has been proposed as a potential upgrade to some conventional implant materials such as titanium for selection in prosthetic dentistry. The idea of an FGM dental implant is that the property would vary in a certain pattern to match the biomechanical characteristics required at different regions in the hosting bone. However, matching the properties does not necessarily guarantee the best osseointegration and bone remodeling. Little existing research has been reported on developing an optimal design of an FGM dental implant for promoting long-term success. Based upon remodeling results, metaheuristic algorithms such as the genetic algorithms (GAs) and simulated annealing (SA) have been adopted to develop a multi-objective optimal design for FGM implantation design. The results are compared with those in literature.

  2. Effects of Surface Charges on Dental Implants: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Cecilia Yan; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Tang, Alexander Tin Hong

    2012-01-01

    Osseointegration is a major factor influencing the success of dental implantation. To achieve rapid and strong, durable osseointegration, biomaterial researchers have investigated various surface treatment methods for dental subgingival titanium (Ti) implants. This paper focuses on surface-charge modification on the surface of titanium dental implants, which is a relatively new and very promising methodology for improving the implants' osseointegration properties. We give an overview on both theoretical explanations on how surface-charge affects the implants' osseointegration, as well as a potential surface charge modification method using sandblasting. Additionally, we discuss insights on the important factors affecting effectiveness of surface-charge modification methods and point out several interesting directions for future investigations on this topic. PMID:23093962

  3. Coating with artificial matrices from collagen and sulfated hyaluronan influences the osseointegration of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Matthias C; Korn, Paula; Stadlinger, Bernd; Range, Ursula; Möller, Stephanie; Becher, Jana; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Mai, Ronald; Scharnweber, Dieter; Eckelt, Uwe; Hintze, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Dental implants are an established therapy for oral rehabilitation. High success rates are achieved in healthy bone, however, these rates decrease in compromised host bone. Coating of dental implants with components of the extracellular matrix is a promising approach to enhance osseointegration in compromised peri-implant bone. Dental titanium implants were coated with an artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) consisting of collagen type I and either one of two regioselectively low sulfated hyaluronan (sHA) derivatives (coll/sHA1Δ6s and coll/sHA1) and compared to commercial pure titanium implants (control). After extraction of the premolar teeth, 36 implants were inserted into the maxilla of 6 miniature pigs (6 implants per maxilla). The healing periods were 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. After animal sacrifice, the samples were evaluated histomorphologically and histomorphometrically. All surface states led to a sufficient implant osseointegration after 4 and 8 weeks. Inflammatory or foreign body reactions could not be observed. After 4 weeks of healing, implants coated with coll/sHA1Δ6s showed the highest bone implant contact (BIC; coll/sHA1Δ6s: 45.4%; coll/sHA1: 42.2%; control: 42.3%). After 8 weeks, a decrease of BIC could be observed for coll/sHA1Δ6s and controls (coll/sHA1Δ6s: 37.3%; control: 31.7 %). For implants coated with coll/sHA1, the bone implant contact increased (coll/sHA1: 50.8%). Statistically significant differences could not be observed. Within the limits of the current study, aECM coatings containing low sHA increase peri-implant bone formation around dental implants in maxillary bone compared to controls in the early healing period.

  4. Coating with artificial matrices from collagen and sulfated hyaluronan influences the osseointegration of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Matthias C; Korn, Paula; Stadlinger, Bernd; Range, Ursula; Möller, Stephanie; Becher, Jana; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Mai, Ronald; Scharnweber, Dieter; Eckelt, Uwe; Hintze, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Dental implants are an established therapy for oral rehabilitation. High success rates are achieved in healthy bone, however, these rates decrease in compromised host bone. Coating of dental implants with components of the extracellular matrix is a promising approach to enhance osseointegration in compromised peri-implant bone. Dental titanium implants were coated with an artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) consisting of collagen type I and either one of two regioselectively low sulfated hyaluronan (sHA) derivatives (coll/sHA1Δ6s and coll/sHA1) and compared to commercial pure titanium implants (control). After extraction of the premolar teeth, 36 implants were inserted into the maxilla of 6 miniature pigs (6 implants per maxilla). The healing periods were 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. After animal sacrifice, the samples were evaluated histomorphologically and histomorphometrically. All surface states led to a sufficient implant osseointegration after 4 and 8 weeks. Inflammatory or foreign body reactions could not be observed. After 4 weeks of healing, implants coated with coll/sHA1Δ6s showed the highest bone implant contact (BIC; coll/sHA1Δ6s: 45.4%; coll/sHA1: 42.2%; control: 42.3%). After 8 weeks, a decrease of BIC could be observed for coll/sHA1Δ6s and controls (coll/sHA1Δ6s: 37.3%; control: 31.7 %). For implants coated with coll/sHA1, the bone implant contact increased (coll/sHA1: 50.8%). Statistically significant differences could not be observed. Within the limits of the current study, aECM coatings containing low sHA increase peri-implant bone formation around dental implants in maxillary bone compared to controls in the early healing period. PMID:24113890

  5. Are Dental Implants the Answer to Tooth Loss in Patients with Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed

    Packer, Mark E

    2015-05-01

    Individuals with Parkinson's disease present a challenge to dental clinicians as this degenerative disease leads to problems accessing care and maintaining an adequate level of oral health. This article provides an overview of the implications of Parkinson's disease on oral health and explores the role of dental implants in the management of such patients.

  6. Predictable dental rehabilitation in maxillomandibular reconstruction with free flaps. The role of implant guided surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cebrian-Carretero, José L.; Sobrino, José A.; Yu, Tomás; Burgueño-García, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of maxillomandibular defects secondary to oral cancer surgery, represent a great challenge for Maxillofacial surgeons. During the last decades the reconstructive surgery has experimented a big advance due to the development of the microsurgical techniques. At present, we are able to reconstruct complex defects using free flaps that provide both soft and bone tissue. Fibula, iliac crest and scapula free flaps have been the three classic options for the maxillomandibular reconstruction owing to the amount of bone that this flaps provide, allowing the posterior dental rehabilitation with implants. Today, our objective it is not only the aesthetic reconstruction, but also the functional reconstruction of the patients enhancing their life quality. Guided implant surgery in free flap reconstructed patients has become an essential tool, helping to define the exact position of the dental implant in the flap. In this way it is possible to look for the areas with better bone conditions, avoiding the osteosynthesis material used to fixate the flap with the native bone and deciding the best biomechanical option, in terms of number and situation of the implants, for the future dental prostheses. In summary, using the guided implant surgery, it is possible to design an exact and predictable dental implant rehabilitation in patients with oral cancer who are reconstructed with free microvascular flap, resulting in an optimal aesthetic and functional result. Key words:Oral cancer, mandibulectomy, maxillectomy, microvascular reconstruction, fibula flap, dental implant, guided surgery. PMID:25129241

  7. Pressure behavior of different PEEK materials for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Schwitalla, Andreas Dominik; Spintig, Tobias; Kallage, Ilona; Müller, Wolf-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    Due to its mechanical properties, the biocompatible high-performance material PEEK (polyetheretherketone) and PEEK-based compounds may represent viable alternatives to titanium in the field of dental implantology. Therefore we performed static pressure tests with 11 PEEK materials (two unfilled grades, two grades filled with titanium-dioxide-powder, two grades filled with barium-sulfate-powder, two grades reinforced with short carbon fibers, one grade reinforced with glass fibers and two grades reinforced with continuous carbon fibers) in the form of cylindrical specimens with a diameter of 4, 5 and 6mm. The specimens had a height to diameter ratio of 2:1 and were therefore 8, 10 and 12mm high. The parameters elastic modulus, elastic limit and pressure strength were evaluated. The elastic moduli ranged between 2.65±0.03GPa for specimens of a titanium-dioxide-filled grade and 106.71±14.83GPa for specimens reinforced with continuous carbon fibers. The elastic limits ranged between 808.1±42.44N for specimens of a barium-sulfate-filled grade and 7256.4±519.86N for specimens reinforced with continuous carbon fibers. The lowest pressure strength of 122.77MPa was observed for specimens of an unfilled grade, whereas the highest pressure strength of 712.67±66.02MPa could be evaluated for specimens containing continuous carbon fibers. Regarding the maximum bite force of a first molar, all tested materials seem to be suitable for the use as dental implants.

  8. Pressure behavior of different PEEK materials for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Schwitalla, Andreas Dominik; Spintig, Tobias; Kallage, Ilona; Müller, Wolf-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    Due to its mechanical properties, the biocompatible high-performance material PEEK (polyetheretherketone) and PEEK-based compounds may represent viable alternatives to titanium in the field of dental implantology. Therefore we performed static pressure tests with 11 PEEK materials (two unfilled grades, two grades filled with titanium-dioxide-powder, two grades filled with barium-sulfate-powder, two grades reinforced with short carbon fibers, one grade reinforced with glass fibers and two grades reinforced with continuous carbon fibers) in the form of cylindrical specimens with a diameter of 4, 5 and 6mm. The specimens had a height to diameter ratio of 2:1 and were therefore 8, 10 and 12mm high. The parameters elastic modulus, elastic limit and pressure strength were evaluated. The elastic moduli ranged between 2.65±0.03GPa for specimens of a titanium-dioxide-filled grade and 106.71±14.83GPa for specimens reinforced with continuous carbon fibers. The elastic limits ranged between 808.1±42.44N for specimens of a barium-sulfate-filled grade and 7256.4±519.86N for specimens reinforced with continuous carbon fibers. The lowest pressure strength of 122.77MPa was observed for specimens of an unfilled grade, whereas the highest pressure strength of 712.67±66.02MPa could be evaluated for specimens containing continuous carbon fibers. Regarding the maximum bite force of a first molar, all tested materials seem to be suitable for the use as dental implants. PMID:26492595

  9. Nano-crystalline diamond-coated titanium dental implants - a histomorphometric study in adult domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Philipp; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Stadlinger, Bernd; Zemann, Wolfgang; Schlegel, Karl Andreas; Rosiwal, Stephan; Rupprecht, Stephan

    2013-09-01

    Promising biomaterial characteristics of diamond-coatings in biomedicine have been described in the literature. However, there is a lack of knowledge about implant osseointegration of this surface modification compared to the currently used sandblasted acid-etched Ti-Al6-V4 implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the osseointegration of microwave plasma-chemical-vapour deposition (MWP-CVD) diamond-coated Ti-Al6-V4 dental implants after healing periods of 2 and 5 months. Twenty-four MWP-CVD diamond-coated and 24 un-coated dental titanium-alloy implants (Ankylos(®)) were placed in the frontal skull of eight adult domestic pigs. To evaluate the effects of the nano-structured surfaces on bone formation, a histomorphometric analysis was performed after 2 and 5 months of implant healing. Histomorphometry analysed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC). No significant difference in BIC for the diamond-coated implants in comparison to reference implants could be observed for both healing periods. Scanning electron microscopy revealed an adequate interface between the bone and the diamond surface. No delamination or particle-dissociation due to shearing forces could be detected. In this study, diamond-coated dental titanium-alloy implants and sandblasted acid-etched implants showed a comparable degree of osseointegration.

  10. Dental implants with the periodontium: a new approach for the restoration of missing teeth.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng; Dong, Qing-Shan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jun-Rui; Wu, Li-An; Liu, Bao-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Tooth loss is a common occurrence in mankind and damages human health. Osseointegrated dental implants have been successfully used as a popular prosthetic restoration for the missing teeth for many years. However, osseointegration, representing a direct connection between the implant and bone tissue without the periodontium, causes some inevitable problems, such as masticatory force concentration and immobility of the dental implant. Thus, an ideal dental implant should have its own peri-implant periodontium, as do the natural teeth. A number of attempts have been made to reconstruct the periodontium around the implants. Unfortunately, it has been established that a predictable periodontal reconstruction, especially the acellular cementum reconstruction on the surface of the implant, is a very difficult task. In this paper, we propose the hypothesis that the cementum may be a special phenotype of the bone tissue, on the basis of its strong similarity in development, structure, and function. In a certain condition, the bone tissue may change to cementum for special functional needs. In accordance with this hypothesis, we consider a novel approach to reconstruct the peri-implant tissues. Unlike previous studies, this approach imitates the tooth re-plantation process. The key point is to convert the implant-surrounding bone tissues to cementum as a result of adaptive changes to the implant-support demands. This hypothesis, if proven to be valid, will not only represent a breakthrough in cementum research, but also will open a new door to the restoration of missing teeth. PMID:18829177

  11. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Advanced Glycation End Products in the Malfunctioning of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Guo, M; Liu, L; Zhang, J; Liu, M

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: In the last decade, dental implants have emerged as a crucial modality and serve as an individual form of therapy for dental failure. However, disparities in host responses have led to peri-implantitis and implant failure. The pathological mechanisms driving peri-implantitis remain largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the role of oxidative stress and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the progression of peri-implantitis and dental implants failure, compared with chronic periodontal disease. Subjects and Methods: Three patient groups (peri-implantitis, chronic periodontal disease and control), each with 10 subjects (7M/3F) and average age ranging from 40–60 years were selected for analysis. Salivary oxidative stress and tissue AGE levels were analysed by probing for reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Maillard reaction-related fluorescence, respectively. Results: We observed significant increase (> 2-fold) in oxidative stress and AGE levels in patients with peri-implantitis and chronic periodontal disease compared to controls, with chronic periodontal disease having the highest levels. In addition, we observed a strong positive correlation (r = 0.94) between oxidative stress and AGE levels in the patients. Conclusion: We propose that increased AGE levels and oxidative stress, although not the only pathway, are significant mediators in the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. Altering them may potentially be used in combination with other modalities to manage peri-implantitis. PMID:26624598

  12. Transition from a fixed implant dental prosthesis to an implant overdenture in an edentulous patient: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ali, Bolouri; Bhavani, Venkatachalam

    2014-09-01

    The lack of planning before implant placement and restoration in edentulous patients can lead to a number of problems. Prosthodontists are often faced with the challenge of re-treating patients who have only recently been treated. Although many reports discuss retreatment by fabricating all new prosthetic components, few discuss salvaging parts of the patient's existing prosthesis. This report details the treatment of an edentulous patient who presented with an implant-retained fixed dental prosthesis in the maxillary arch and no opposing prosthesis. The transition from an implant-retained fixed dental prosthesis to a removable implant- and tissue-supported overdenture that uses the patient's existing computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing milled titanium substructure is described.

  13. [Secondary adentia and dental implantation (epidemiological and sociological study by a telephone interview method)].

    PubMed

    Fediaev, I M; Khamadeeva, A M; Nikol'skiĭ, V Iu; Ganzha, I R

    2004-01-01

    Epidemiological research of partial secondary adentia was done by means of telephone interviewing the population of city of Samara (1104 persons are interrogated). Prevalence and intensity of the disease in various age groups, and also average indices for all adult population are established. The share of the persons requiring for dental prosthetics among patients with defects of dental lines is determined. The same method investigates awareness of the population about dental implantation, and also the estimation is given to public opinion on treatment with the use of implants.

  14. Does HIV infection have an impact upon dental implant osseointegration? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ata-Ali, Fadi; Di-Benedetto, Nicolas; Bagán, Leticia; Bagán, José-Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Background A systematic review is made to determine whether human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has an impact upon dental implant osseointegration. Material and Methods A PubMed (MEDLINE) literature search was made of articles published up until 14 April 2014. The systematic review was conducted based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA). The quality of the studies included in the review was assessed using the Methodological Index for Nonrandomized Studies (MINORS) and levels of evidence (based on the University of Oxford’s Center for Evidence Based Medicine criteria). Results The combinations of search terms resulted in a list of 132 titles. Nine studies finally met the inclusion criteria and were selected for inclusion in the systematic review. A total of 173 dental implants were placed in 80 patients (135 implants in 56 HIV-positive subjects and 38 implants in 24 HIV-negative patients), and a single loss of dental implant osseointegration was recorded in an HIV-positive patient. Conclusions Our results suggest that dental implant placement in HIV-positive patients does not increase the dental implant failure rate. Prophylactic antibiotic treatment, the administration of highly active antiretroviral therapy, and control of the CD4+ T lymphocyte counts appear to be the main influencing factors in this respect. Given the few studies included in our systematic review, further prospective studies involving larger sample sizes and longer durations of follow-up are required in order to confirm the results obtained. Key words: Dental implants, implant failure, HIV positive, systematic review, AIDS, HAART. PMID:25662560

  15. Insights on Metal Based Dental Implants and their Interaction with the Surrounding Tissues.

    PubMed

    Popa, Marcela; Hussien, Mohamed D; Cirstea, Alexandra; Grigore, Raluca; Lazar, Veronica; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Sakizlian, Monica; Stavropoulou, Elisavet; Bertesteanu, Serban

    2015-01-01

    At present, the use of dental implants is a very common practice as tooth loss is a frequent problem and can occur as a result of disease or trauma. An implant is usually made of biocompatible materials that do not cause rejection reactions and allow the implant union with the respective bone. To achieve this goal, the implant surface may have different structures and coatings, generally used to increase the adherence of the implant to the bone and to decrease the risk of the periimplantar inflammatory reactions. This review gives some insights of the metal based materials used for dental implants, their limits, improvement strategies as well as the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of periimplantary diseases.

  16. Dental implants in irradiated versus nonirradiated patients: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in dental implant failure rates, postoperative infection, and marginal bone loss for patients being rehabilitated by dental implants and being previously irradiated in the head and neck region versus nonirradiated patients against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. The study suggests that irradiation negatively affects the survival of implants, as well as the difference in implant location (maxilla vs mandible), but there is no statistically significant difference in survival when implants are inserted before or after 12 months after radiotherapy. The study failed to support the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in irradiated patients. It was observed that there was a tendency of lower survival rates of implants inserted in the patients submitted to higher irradiation doses. The results should be interpreted with caution because of the presence of uncontrolled confounding factors in the included studies.

  17. Indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients: Update

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Mang-de la Rosa, María del Rocío; Romero-Pérez, María J.; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the current scientific literature in order to analyse the indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients. A reference research was carried out on PubMed using the key words “implant” AND (oral OR dental) AND (systemic disease OR medically compromised), in articles published between 1993 and 2013. The inclusion criteria were the following: clinical studies in which, at least, 10 patients were treated, consensus articles, reviewed articles and meta-analysis performed in humans treated with dental implants, and which included the disease diagnosis. A total of 64 articles were found, from which 16 met the inclusion criteria. Cardiac systemic diseases, diabetic endocrine pathologies or controlled metabolic disorders do not seem to be a total or partial contraindication to the placement of dental implants. Tobacco addiction, and head and neck radiotherapy are correlated to a higher loss of dental implants. Patients suffering from osteoporosis undergoing biphosphonates therapy show an increased risk of developing bone necrosis after an oral surgery, especially if the drugs are administered intravenously or they are associated to certain concomitant medication. Key words:Dental implants, medically compromised patient, systemic diseases. PMID:24608222

  18. Ion implantation: surface treatment for improving the bone integration of titanium and Ti6Al4V dental implants.

    PubMed

    De Maeztu, Miguel A; Alava, J Iñaki; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2003-02-01

    Dental implants subjected to surface treatment have shown better bone integration than implants which have only been turned (machined). Three main types of treatment are presently available: the addition of material or coating, the removal of material, and surface modification. Ion implantation corresponds to the third approach. A histomorphometric study is made following the rabbit tibial bone placement of 88 commercial dental implants of pure titanium and Ti6AI4V subjected to surface treatment in the form of different ion implants (C+, CO+, N+, Ne+). Light microscopic, scanning electron microscopic (SEM), electron microsonde (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies were made. The results indicate improved bone integration (expressed as percentage bone-implant contact) in those specimens subjected to ion implantation versus the non-treated controls, the difference being statistically significant for the groups treated with C+ and CO+. In these groups, XPS showed a Ti-O-C junction (bone-implant interface) involving covalent type bonds, these being stronger and more stable than the ion-type bonds usually established between the titanium oxide and bone.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of Anterior Implants versus Fixed Dental Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Zitzmann, N.U.; Krastl, G.; Weiger, R.; Kühl, S.; Sendi, P.

    2013-01-01

    For the restoration of an anterior missing tooth, implant-supported single crowns (ISCs) or fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) are indicated, but it is not clear which type of restoration is more cost-effective. A self-selected trial was performed with 15 patients with ISCs and 11 with FDPs. Patient preferences were recorded with visual analog scales before treatment, 1 month following restoration, and then annually. Quality-adjusted tooth years (QATYs) were estimated by considering the type of reconstruction for replacing the missing tooth and its effect on the adjacent teeth. A stochastic cost-effectiveness model was developed using Monte Carlo simulation. The expected costs and QATYs were summarized in cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. ISC was the dominant strategy, with a QATY increase of 0.01 over 3 years and 0.04 over 10 years with a higher probability of being cost-effective. While both treatment options provided satisfactory long-term results from the patient’s perspective, the lower initial costs, particularly laboratory fees, were responsible for the dominance of ISCs over FDPs. PMID:24158338

  20. Cost-effectiveness of anterior implants versus fixed dental prostheses.

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, N U; Krastl, G; Weiger, R; Kühl, S; Sendi, P

    2013-12-01

    For the restoration of an anterior missing tooth, implant-supported single crowns (ISCs) or fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) are indicated, but it is not clear which type of restoration is more cost-effective. A self-selected trial was performed with 15 patients with ISCs and 11 with FDPs. Patient preferences were recorded with visual analog scales before treatment, 1 month following restoration, and then annually. Quality-adjusted tooth years (QATYs) were estimated by considering the type of reconstruction for replacing the missing tooth and its effect on the adjacent teeth. A stochastic cost-effectiveness model was developed using Monte Carlo simulation. The expected costs and QATYs were summarized in cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. ISC was the dominant strategy, with a QATY increase of 0.01 over 3 years and 0.04 over 10 years with a higher probability of being cost-effective. While both treatment options provided satisfactory long-term results from the patient's perspective, the lower initial costs, particularly laboratory fees, were responsible for the dominance of ISCs over FDPs.

  1. Extraordinary sneeze: Spontaneous transmaxillary-transnasal discharge of a migrated dental implant.

    PubMed

    Procacci, Pasquale; De Santis, Daniele; Bertossi, Dario; Albanese, Massimo; Plotegher, Cristina; Zanette, Giovanni; Pardo, Alessia; Nocini, Pier Francesco

    2016-08-16

    This case report describes an extraordinary case of the spontaneous transmaxillary-transnasal discharge of a dental implant, which occurred during a sneeze. The patient was complained of symptoms of acute sinusitis. She underwent a computed tomography scan that revealed a dental implant dislocated in the maxillary sinus. Medical treatment based on antibiotics and mucolytics was administered to the patient in order to prepare her for endoscopic endonasal surgery. The implant was spontaneously discharged two days after during a sneeze. Mucociliary clearance in combination with a local osteolytic inflammatory process and mucolytics therapy are the likely causes of this unusual discharge. PMID:27574611

  2. Extraordinary sneeze: Spontaneous transmaxillary-transnasal discharge of a migrated dental implant

    PubMed Central

    Procacci, Pasquale; De Santis, Daniele; Bertossi, Dario; Albanese, Massimo; Plotegher, Cristina; Zanette, Giovanni; Pardo, Alessia; Nocini, Pier Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes an extraordinary case of the spontaneous transmaxillary-transnasal discharge of a dental implant, which occurred during a sneeze. The patient was complained of symptoms of acute sinusitis. She underwent a computed tomography scan that revealed a dental implant dislocated in the maxillary sinus. Medical treatment based on antibiotics and mucolytics was administered to the patient in order to prepare her for endoscopic endonasal surgery. The implant was spontaneously discharged two days after during a sneeze. Mucociliary clearance in combination with a local osteolytic inflammatory process and mucolytics therapy are the likely causes of this unusual discharge. PMID:27574611

  3. Infrared Thermographic Assessment of Cooling Effectiveness in Selected Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Kirstein, Karol; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Kosior, Piotr; Chrószcz, Aleksander; Dudek, Krzysztof; Fita, Katarzyna; Parulska, Olga; Rybak, Zbigniew; Skalec, Aleksandra; Szklarz, Magdalena; Janeczek, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    The excessive temperature fluctuations during dental implant site preparation may affect the process of bone-implant osseointegration. In the presented studies, we aimed to assess the quality of cooling during the use of 3 different dental implant systems (BEGO®, NEO BIOTECH®, and BIOMET 3i®). The swine rib was chosen as a study model. The preparation of dental implant site was performed with the use of 3 different speeds of rotation (800, 1,200, and 1,500 rpm) and three types of cooling: with saline solution at room temperature, with saline solution cooled down to 3°C, and without cooling. A statistically significant difference in temperature fluctuations was observed between BEGO and NEO BIOTECH dental systems when cooling with saline solution at 3°C was used (22.3°C versus 21.8°C). In case of all three evaluated dental implant systems, the highest temperature fluctuations occurred when pilot drills were used for implant site preparation. The critical temperature, defined in the available literature, was exceeded only in case of pilot drills (of all 3 systems) used at rotation speed of 1,500 rpm without cooling. PMID:27110558

  4. In vitro evaluation of the antibiofilm properties of chlorhexidine and delmopinol on dental implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ready, Derren; Theodoridis, Georgios; Green, Ingrid; Ciric, Lena; Pratten, Jonathan; Tay, Weiming; McDonald, Ailbhe

    2015-06-01

    Biofilm development on the internal surfaces of dental implants and dental implant components may be associated with peri-implant hard and soft tissue abnormalities. Currently, no protocols have been established for effective disinfection of removable implant components. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibiofilm properties of commonly used dental antimicrobial agents (chlorhexidine and delmopinol) on multispecies biofilms. Biofilms of 48 h and 168 h maturity were exposed to 0.2% chlorhexidine, 2% chlorhexidine and a product containing 0.2% delmopinol for 5, 10 and 20 min. 2% chlorhexidine was the most effective agent, achieving a total viable biofilm reduction ranging from 96.2% to >99.99% depending on the time of exposure and the stage of biofilm development. PMID:25963339

  5. Functional results of dental restoration with osseointegrated implants after mandible reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gürlek, A; Miller, M J; Jacob, R F; Lively, J A; Schusterman, M A

    1998-03-01

    We reviewed the cases of 20 cancer patients (mean age 47.4 years) in whom osseointegrated implants were used for dental restoration after mandibular reconstruction between January of 1988 and December of 1994. Seventy-one implants were placed into bone flaps (n = 60) or native mandible (n = 11), an average of 3.55 per patient (range, 2 to 5). Successful integration occurred in 91.5 percent (65 of 71); there were five early failures and one late failure, with no significant difference between the number lost in microvascular flaps (5 of 60) and native mandible (1 of 11) (as determined by Fisher's exact test). Functional evaluation included assessments of diet, speech, and cosmesis. Based on our review, we concluded that (1) implants enhance dental restoration in selected patients, and (2) microvascular bone flaps, including the fibula and iliac crest, are well suited for dental implant restoration.

  6. Mineralized tissue formation associated with 2 different dental implant designs: histomorphometric analyses performed in dogs.

    PubMed

    Olate, Sergio; Chaves Netto, Henrique Duque de Miranda; Klüppel, Leandro Eduardo; Mazzonetto, Renato; de Albergaria-Barbosa, Jose Ricardo

    2011-06-01

    The clinical success of dental implants might be associated with such factors as installation technique, implant shape, size, material, and screw threads. Therefore, the aim of this study is to analyze mineralized tissue formation on the screw threads of conical and cylindrical dental implants. This study includes 7 beagle dogs that had the lower premolars extracted. Three months after bone and soft tissue repair, 2 different designs of dental implants (1 conical and 1 cylindrical) were installed in each hemimandible using a nonsubmerged technique. Both implants when installed had different shape and thread, as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. Six weeks after implant installation, animals were killed and submitted to histomorphometric analysis. Cervical, middle, and apical areas were analyzed. Statistical analysis was carried out using Student t test at a significance level of P < .05. Statistically significant differences were not found between the conical and cylindrical implants. The conical implants presented fewer threads, a smaller area, and more bone formation when compared with the cylindrical ones, without significant differences (P  =  .1226). The highest values concerning bone formation were observed for the cervical area (P  =  .4005), and the lowest for the apical area (P  =  .1899); however, no statistically significant difference was observed. In conclusion, no statistically significant difference was observed in thread bone formation between the cylindrical and conical implant designs when placed using the nonsubmerged technique.

  7. Effect of Nd: YAG laser on titanium dental implants studied by AFM.

    PubMed

    Vassalli, Massimo; Giannelli, Marco

    2003-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of dental implants is considered the main cause of implant failure. Recently, the laser treatment of the implant surface has been proposed as an useful method for decontamination. In such a view, the present study was conducted to investigate the effects of a Nd:YAG laser on the surface morphology of a titanium dental implant by means of an atomic force microscope. We demonstrated that, when the pulse energy of the laser was kept below 30 mJ, independently from the pulse rate, the laser-treated specimens exhibited a qualitatively similar surface morphology when compared to the untreated titanium implants, suggesting that the implant surface was unaffected by the treatment, in these particular conditions. We also found that, by cooling the implant surface with an air flow? during laser irradiation, the mean temperature of the implant was maintained under 37 degrees C. All these data taken together suggest the possibility to use Nd:YAG laser for the treatment of failing dental implants.

  8. Patients' knowledge and awareness of dental implants in a Turkish subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Özçakır Tomruk, Ceyda; Şençift, Kemal

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patients' knowledge on dental implants in a Turkish subpopulation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Five hundred twenty seven Turkish adults referred to Yeditepe University Faculty of Dentistry, Istanbul, Turkey, were presented with a questionnaire including 20 questions regarding the level of information and awareness about the dental implants. The data were collected and statistical analyses were performed with Chi square test to compare the descriptive data. RESULTS Among 527 subjects, 54% were female and 46% were male with a mean age of 42.2 years. The rate of patients' implant awareness was 27.7%. When the patients were questioned about the treatment options for rehabilitation of tooth missing, 60.9% of patients were informed about fixed partial denture, followed by conventional complete denture (32.5%) and removable partial denture (24.9%). Six percent reported that they were very well informed about the dental implants whereas 48.2% were poorly informed. The information sources of the implants were from the dentist (44.5%), printed media (31.6%) and friends and acquaintances (17.3%), respectively. Sixteen percent of the population believed that their implants would last forever. CONCLUSION The dentists should give more detailed information to the patients about dental implants and tooth-supported fixed partial dentures in the future. PMID:24843399

  9. [Mandible regional blood circulation peculiarities by dental implants placement].

    PubMed

    Malanchuk, V A; Tsilenko, O L; Grabovetskiĭ, P V

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents data on regional blood circulation in mandible implant placement sites. Rheographic assessment in 50 patients divided in two groups according to implant placement protocol revealed that circulation volume and peripheral vessels tonus restored on the 14th day after implant placement with wound draining while in conventional implant placement protocol these values remained disturbed even 21 days after surgical procedure.

  10. Does the Implant Surgical Technique Affect the Primary and/or Secondary Stability of Dental Implants? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Shadid, Rola Muhammed; Sadaqah, Nasrin Rushdi; Othman, Sahar Abdo

    2014-01-01

    Background. A number of surgical techniques for implant site preparation have been advocated to enhance the implant of primary and secondary stability. However, there is insufficient scientific evidence to support the association between the surgical technique and implant stability. Purpose. This review aimed to investigate the influence of different surgical techniques including the undersized drilling, the osteotome, the piezosurgery, the flapless procedure, and the bone stimulation by low-level laser therapy on the primary and/or secondary stability of dental implants. Materials and methods. A search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, and grey literature was performed. The inclusion criteria comprised observational clinical studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in patients who received dental implants for rehabilitation, studies that evaluated the association between the surgical technique and the implant primary and/or secondary stability. The articles selected were carefully read and classified as low, moderate, and high methodological quality and data of interest were tabulated. Results. Eight clinical studies were included then they were classified as moderate or high methodological quality and control of bias. Conclusions. There is a weak evidence suggesting that any of previously mentioned surgical techniques could influence the primary and/or secondary implant stability. PMID:25126094

  11. Biomechanical 3-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Obturator Protheses Retained with Zygomatic and Dental Implants in Maxillary Defects

    PubMed Central

    Akay, Canan; Yaluğ, Suat

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate the stress distribution in the bone around zygomatic and dental implants for 3 different implant-retained obturator prostheses designs in a Aramany class IV maxillary defect using 3-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). Material\\Methods A 3-dimensional finite element model of an Aramany class IV defect was created. Three different implant-retained obturator prostheses were modeled: model 1 with 1 zygomatic implant and 1 dental implant, model 2 with 1 zygomatic implant and 2 dental implants, and model 3 with 2 zygomatic implants. Locator attachments were used as a superstructure. A 150-N load was applied 3 different ways. Qualitative analysis was based on the scale of maximum principal stress; values obtained through quantitative analysis are expressed in MPa. Results In all loading conditions, model 3 (when compared models 1 and 2) showed the lowest maximum principal stress value. Model 3 is the most appropirate reconstruction in Aramany class IV maxillary defects. Two zygomatic implants can reduce the stresses in model 3. The distribution of stresses on prostheses were more rational with the help of zygoma implants, which can distribute the stresses on each part of the maxilla. Conclusions Aramany class IV obturator prosthesis placement of 2 zygomatic implants in each side of the maxilla is more advantageous than placement of dental implants. In the non-defective side, increasing the number of dental implants is not as suitable as zygomatic implants. PMID:25714086

  12. Optimal restoration of dental esthetics and function with advanced implant-supported prostheses: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Meulen, Peter van der; Linden, Wynand van der; Eeden, Ronnie van

    2012-07-01

    For more than 25 years, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has been used in implant restorative dentistry. Today this technology offers a means of milling titanium frameworks that fit dental implants accurately. This report presents a restoratively driven protocol employing advanced implant restorative and surgical techniques. Treatment of a patient with advanced periodontitis with extensive loss of hard and soft tissues is presented. After extraction of the patient's remaining hopeless teeth, dental implants were placed, along with interim, fixed-margin abutments and abutment protection caps. Two days later, acrylic resin fixed-interim prostheses restored the patient's esthetics and partial masticatory function. After implant osseointegration, maxillary, and mandibular frameworks for definitive prostheses were milled from Ti alloy, using one specific CAD/CAM technology. The benefits of this technology are also discussed.

  13. Finite element analysis of the biomechanical effects of PEEK dental implants on the peri-implant bone.

    PubMed

    Schwitalla, A D; Abou-Emara, M; Spintig, T; Lackmann, J; Müller, W D

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants are mostly fabricated of titanium. Potential problems associated with these implants are discussed in the literature, for example, overloading of the jawbone during mastication due to the significant difference in the elastic moduli of titanium (110 GPa) and bone (≈1-30 GPa). Therefore poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) could represent an alternative biomaterial (elastic modulus 3-4 GPa). Endolign(®) represents an implantable carbon fiber reinforced (CFR)-PEEK including parallel oriented endless carbon fibers. According to the manufacturer it has an elastic modulus of 150 GPa. PEEK compounds filled with powders show an elastic modulus around 4 GPa. The aim of the present finite element analysis was to point out the differences in the biomechanical behavior of a dental implant of Endolign(®) and a commercial powder-filled PEEK. Titanium served as control. These three materials were used for a platform-switched dental implant-abutment assembly, whereas Type 1 completely consisted of titanium, Type 2 of a powder-filled PEEK and Type 3 of Endolign(®). A force of 100 N was applied vertically and of 30° to the implant axis. All types showed a minimum safety factor regarding the yield strength of cortical bone. However, within the limits of this study the Type 2 implant showed higher stresses within the adjacent cortical bone than Type 1 and Type 3. These implant assemblies showed similar stress distributions. Endless carbon fibers give PEEK a high stability. Further investigations are necessary to evaluate whether there is a distinct amount of endless carbon fibers causing an optimal stress distribution behavior of CFR-PEEK. PMID:25435385

  14. Finite element analysis of the biomechanical effects of PEEK dental implants on the peri-implant bone.

    PubMed

    Schwitalla, A D; Abou-Emara, M; Spintig, T; Lackmann, J; Müller, W D

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants are mostly fabricated of titanium. Potential problems associated with these implants are discussed in the literature, for example, overloading of the jawbone during mastication due to the significant difference in the elastic moduli of titanium (110 GPa) and bone (≈1-30 GPa). Therefore poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) could represent an alternative biomaterial (elastic modulus 3-4 GPa). Endolign(®) represents an implantable carbon fiber reinforced (CFR)-PEEK including parallel oriented endless carbon fibers. According to the manufacturer it has an elastic modulus of 150 GPa. PEEK compounds filled with powders show an elastic modulus around 4 GPa. The aim of the present finite element analysis was to point out the differences in the biomechanical behavior of a dental implant of Endolign(®) and a commercial powder-filled PEEK. Titanium served as control. These three materials were used for a platform-switched dental implant-abutment assembly, whereas Type 1 completely consisted of titanium, Type 2 of a powder-filled PEEK and Type 3 of Endolign(®). A force of 100 N was applied vertically and of 30° to the implant axis. All types showed a minimum safety factor regarding the yield strength of cortical bone. However, within the limits of this study the Type 2 implant showed higher stresses within the adjacent cortical bone than Type 1 and Type 3. These implant assemblies showed similar stress distributions. Endless carbon fibers give PEEK a high stability. Further investigations are necessary to evaluate whether there is a distinct amount of endless carbon fibers causing an optimal stress distribution behavior of CFR-PEEK.

  15. Design of functionally graded dental implant in the presence of cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Hedia, H S

    2005-10-01

    In a previous work by the author [Hedia HS, Mahmoud NA. Biomed Mater Eng 2004;14(2):133--143], a functionally graded material (FGM) dental implant was designed without cancellous bone in the model. In this investigation, the effect of the presence of cancellous bone as a thin layer around the dental implant was investigated. It is well known that the main inorganic component of natural bone is hydroxyapatite (HAP) and that the main organic component is collagen (Col). HAP implants are not bioabsorbable, and because induction of bone into and around the artificially made HAP is not always satisfactory, loosening or breakage of HAP implants might occur after implantation in the clinical application. The development of a new material that is bioabsorbable and that has osteo-conductive activity is needed. Therefore, the aim of the current investigation was to design an implant, in the presence of cancellous bone as a thin layer around it, from FGM. In this study, a novel biomaterial, Col/HAP, as a FGM, was developed using the finite element and optimization techniques that are available in the ANSYS package. These materials have a self-organized character similar to that of natural bone. The investigations have shown that the maximum stress in the cortical bone and cancellous bone for the Col/HAP functionally graded implant has been reduced by about 40% and 19%, respectively, compared with currently used titanium dental implants.

  16. Impact of excessive occlusal load on successfully-osseointegrated dental implants: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Chang, Michael; Chronopoulos, Vasileios; Mattheos, Nikos

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to review the available evidence on the response of the peri-implant bone when subjected to excessive occlusal forces. The search strategy included papers published in English in the Medline database and the Wiley Online Library from January 1991 to December 2011. Experimental or review papers reporting the conditions of the peri-implant bone of dental implants submitted to excessive occlusal loading in the presence of a controlled oral hygiene regime were eligible for inclusion. The knowledge regarding the response of the peri-implant bone when the dental implant is excessively loaded is limited, and the level of evidence is poor. With animal experimental studies showing conflicting results, it is unclear whether occlusal overload might cause marginal bone loss or total loss of osseointegration to already osseointegrated dental implants when the applied load exceeds the biologically-acceptable limit. This biological limit is also unknown. Furthermore, higher remodeling activity of the peri-implant bone is found around implants subjected to high loading forces.

  17. Indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients: update.

    PubMed

    Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Mang-de la Rosa, María del Rocío; Romero-Pérez, María-Jesús; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio; López-Valverde-Centeno, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to review the current scientific literature in order to analyse the indications and contraindications of dental implants in medically compromised patients. A reference research was carried out on PubMed using the key words "implant" AND (oral OR dental) AND (systemic disease OR medically compromised), in articles published between 1993 and 2013. The inclusion criteria were the following: clinical studies in which, at least, 10 patients were treated, consensus articles, reviewed articles and meta-analysis performed in humans treated with dental implants, and which included the disease diagnosis. A total of 64 articles were found, from which 16 met the inclusion criteria. Cardiac systemic diseases, diabetic endocrine pathologies or controlled metabolic disorders do not seem to be a total or partial contraindication to the placement of dental implants. Tobacco addiction, and head and neck radiotherapy are correlated to a higher loss of dental implants. Patients suffering from osteoporosis undergoing biphosphonates therapy show an increased risk of developing bone necrosis after an oral surgery, especially if the drugs are administered intravenously or they are associated to certain concomitant medication.

  18. The development of a composite bone model for training on placement of dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Alkhodary, Mohamed Ahmed; Abdelraheim, Abdelraheim Emad Eldin; Elsantawy, Abd Elaleem Hassan; Al Dahman, Yousef Hamad; Al-Mershed, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Objectives It takes a lot of training on patients for both undergraduate to develop clinical sense as regards to the placement of dental implants in the jaw bones, also, the models provided by the dental implant companies for training are usually made of strengthened synthetic foams, which are far from the composition, and tactile sense provided by natural bone during drilling for clinical placement of dental implants. Methodology This is an in-vitro experimental study which utilized bovine femur bone, where the shaft of the femur provided the surface compact layer, and the head provided the cancellous bone layer, to provide a training model similar to jaw bones macroscopic anatomy. Both the compact and cancellous bone samples were characterized using mechanical compressive testing. Results The elastic moduli of the cancellous and cortical femur bone were comparable to those of the human mandible, and the prepared training model provided a more lifelike condition during the drilling and placement of dental implants. Conclusion The composite bone model developed simulated the macroscopic anatomy of the jaw bones having a surface layer of compact bone, and a core of cancellous bone, and provided a better and a more natural hands-on experience for placement of dental implants as compared to plastic models made of polyurethane. PMID:26309434

  19. Retrospective study of sintered porous-surfaced dental implants placed in the augmented sinus.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Dong-Seok; Lee, Jae-Mok; Park, In-Sook; Jung, Heui-Seung; Park, Do-Young; Shin, Im-Hee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze clinical and radiographic outcomes of sintered porous-surfaced dental implants placed in partially edentulous posterior maxillae. The study group consisted of 42 partially edentulous patients who received sinus augmentation using the lateral window technique or crestal approach at Catholic University Hospital of Daegu and one private clinic. The 42 patients received a total of 92 sintered porous-surfaced dental implants in the edentulous posterior maxillae. All implants were restored with fixed prostheses. Of the 92 implants, 17 implants were restored with individual (nonsplinted) crowns, while 75 implants were splinted to other implants. Panoramic views and periapical radiographs using the standardized long-cone paralleling technique were taken at the first visit, postoperatively, at the time of prosthesis seating, and at a follow-up visit. Survival rates of implants in relation to location, length, diameter, crown-to-implant (C/I) ratio, and type of prosthesis were investigated. Statistical data were analyzed using software with the chi-square test. Of the 92 implants, 8 (8.7%) were removed, and the cumulative survival rate was 91.3% after a maximum 9-year functional period (mean: 72.8 months; range: 11 to 107 months). There were no statistical differences in relation to the location of implants, C/I ratio, or type of prosthesis. However, there were statistical differences in relation to the length and diameter of implants. Average crestal bone loss was 0.68 mm at 1-year follow-up and 1.13 mm at final examination. All implants were inserted in the augmented maxillary sites. The cumulative survival rate of sintered porous-surfaced implants in posterior maxillae was 91.3%. Sintered porous-surfaced implants showed satisfactory results in the edentulous posterior maxillae. PMID:25006774

  20. Treatment of midfacial defects using prostheses supported by ITI dental implants.

    PubMed

    Scolozzi, Paolo; Jaques, Bertrand

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the use of ITI dental implants used for anchoring facial prostheses in the restorative treatment of midface defects. The authors analyzed the clinical data of 26 patients with orbital defects (n = 11), orbitonasal defects (n = 4), orbitonasomaxillary defects (n = 3), and nasal defects (n = 8). Data included age, sex, primary disease, implant position, implant length, implant failure, prosthetic attachment, radiation therapy, and peri-implant skin reactions. Follow-up was at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then on a yearly basis. The authors noted the status of healing and complications, if any. In total, 62 implants were placed as follows: 27 (43.5 percent) for orbital prostheses, 12 (19.4 percent) for orbitonasal prostheses, 14 (22.6 percent) for orbitonasomaxillary prostheses, and nine (14.5 percent) for nasal prostheses. Thirty-eight implants (61.3 percent) were placed in previously irradiated areas in 18 patients (69.2 percent). Mild skin reactions together with mild accumulation of sebaceous crusting around implants were recorded in 14.2 percent of the skin observations. No patient experienced severe inflammation requiring administration of systemic antibiotics or surgical revision. Implant success was 100 percent in both irradiated and nonirradiated patients. In conclusion, ITI dental implants result in a high rate of success in retaining midface prostheses and offer good stability and aesthetic satisfaction.

  1. Platform switching minimises crestal bone loss around dental implants: truth or myth?

    PubMed

    Romanos, G E; Javed, F

    2014-09-01

    The aim was to assess the role of platform switching (PS) in minimising crestal bone loss around dental implants through a systematic review of the currently available clinical evidence. To address the focused question 'Does PS minimise crestal bone loss compared with non-platform-switched (NPS) implants?', PubMed/Medline and Google Scholar databases were explored from 1986 up to and including December 2013 using the following key words in different combinations: 'bone loss', 'dental implant', 'diameter', 'mandible', 'maxilla' and 'platform switching'. Letters to the Editor, unpublished data, historical reviews, case reports and articles published in languages other than English were excluded. Fifteen clinical studies were included. In seven studies, PS and NPS implants were placed in both the maxilla and mandible. In 13 studies, implants were placed at crestal bone levels whereas in one study, implants were placed supracrestally. Three studies reported the bucco-lingual (or transversal) width of the alveolar ridge which ranged between 7-8 mm. Seven studies reported that implants placed according to the PS concept did not minimise crestal bone loss as compared with NPS implants. 3D-Implant positioning, width of alveolar ridge and control of micromotion at the implant-abutment interface are the more critical factors that influence crestal bone levels than PS.

  2. Computer-aided recognition of dental implants in X-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, Pedro; Queirós, Sandro; Moreira, António H. J.; Ferreira, Adriano; Ferreira, Ernesto; Duque, Duarte; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Vilaça, João. L.

    2015-03-01

    Dental implant recognition in patients without available records is a time-consuming and not straightforward task. The traditional method is a complete user-dependent process, where the expert compares a 2D X-ray image of the dental implant with a generic database. Due to the high number of implants available and the similarity between them, automatic/semi-automatic frameworks to aide implant model detection are essential. In this study, a novel computer-aided framework for dental implant recognition is suggested. The proposed method relies on image processing concepts, namely: (i) a segmentation strategy for semi-automatic implant delineation; and (ii) a machine learning approach for implant model recognition. Although the segmentation technique is the main focus of the current study, preliminary details of the machine learning approach are also reported. Two different scenarios are used to validate the framework: (1) comparison of the semi-automatic contours against implant's manual contours of 125 X-ray images; and (2) classification of 11 known implants using a large reference database of 601 implants. Regarding experiment 1, 0.97±0.01, 2.24±0.85 pixels and 11.12±6 pixels of dice metric, mean absolute distance and Hausdorff distance were obtained, respectively. In experiment 2, 91% of the implants were successfully recognized while reducing the reference database to 5% of its original size. Overall, the segmentation technique achieved accurate implant contours. Although the preliminary classification results prove the concept of the current work, more features and an extended database should be used in a future work.

  3. Effect of coating thickness and its material on the stress distribution for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Hedia, H S

    2007-01-01

    Dental implants have been increasingly used to recover the masticatory function of lost teeth. It has been well known that the success of a dental implant is heavily dependent on initial stability and long-term osseointegration due to optimal stress distribution in the surrounding bones by the concept implant surface coating. Hydroxyapatite (HAP), as a coating material, has been widely used in dentistry due to its biocompatibility. Some investigations show a benefit of coating dental implants with HAP, and others concluded that HAP coating reduces the long-term implant survival. Therefore, the aim of this investigation is to design a new functionally graded dental implant coating, as well as studying the effect of coating thickness on the maximum von Mises stresses in bone adjacent to the coating layer. The gradation of the elastic modulus is changed along the longitudinal direction. Stress analysis using a finite element method showed that using a coating thickness of 150 microm, functionally graded from titanium at the apex to the collagen at the root, will successfully reduce the maximum von Mises stress in bone by 19% and 17% compared to collagen and HAP coating respectively.

  4. The effect of bruxism on treatment planning for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Misch, Carl E

    2002-09-01

    Bruxism is a potential risk factor for implant failure. Excessive force is the primary cause of late implant complications. An appreciation of the etiology of crestal bone loss, failure of implants, failure to retain implant restorations, and fracture of components will lead the practitioner to develop a treatment plan that reduces force on implants and their restorations. The forces are considered in terms of magnitude, duration, direction, type, and magnification. Once the dentist has identified the source(s) of additional force on the implant system, the treatment plan is altered to contend with and reduce the negative sequelae on the bone, implant, and final restoration. One viable approach is to increase the implant-bone surface area. Additional implants can be placed to decrease stress on any one implant, and implants in molar regions should have an increased width. Use of more and wider implants decreases the strain on the prosthesis and also dissipates stress to the bone, especially at the crest. The additional implants should be positioned with intent to eliminate cantilevers when possible. Greater surface area implant designs made of titanium alloy and with an external hex design can also prove advantageous. Anterior guidance in mandibular excursions further decreases force and eliminates or reduces lateral posterior force. Metal occlusal surfaces decrease the risk of porcelain fracture and do not require as much abutment reduction, which in turn enhances prosthesis retention. The retention of the final prosthesis or super-structure is also improved with additional implant abutments. Night guards designed with specific features also are a benefit to initially diagnose the influence of occlusal factors for the patient, and as importantly, to reduce the influence of extraneous stress on implants and implant-retained restorations. PMID:12271847

  5. Squamous cell carcinoma and dental implants: A systematic review of case reports.

    PubMed

    Jeelani, S; Rajkumar, E; Mary, G Geena; Khan, Parvez Ahmad; Gopal, Harish; Roy, Soumya; Maheswaran, T; Anand, B

    2015-08-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death world-wide. Apart from the most common etiopathological factors related to cancer, at times very rare causes such as irritant or foreign body induced carcinogenesis is not to be overlooked. To systematically review case reports concerned with the association between dental implants and oral squamous cell carcinoma. A Medline (PubMed), Cochrane database, and Google Scholar search was conducted of dental article published in English related to case reports concerned with oral squamous cell carcinoma occurring around dental implants from 2000 to 2014. Twenty articles were retrieved, which included 20 rare case reports which were systematically reviewed and the results were obtained pertaining to age, clinical symptoms, habits, previous history of cancer, potentially malignant disorders, systemic illness, and local factors. It is imperative to identify promptly persisting inflammation associated with implants. Since malignancy may disguise as periimplantitis, especially in patients who are at risk with contributing prominent predisposing factors. PMID:26538881

  6. Squamous cell carcinoma and dental implants: A systematic review of case reports.

    PubMed

    Jeelani, S; Rajkumar, E; Mary, G Geena; Khan, Parvez Ahmad; Gopal, Harish; Roy, Soumya; Maheswaran, T; Anand, B

    2015-08-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death world-wide. Apart from the most common etiopathological factors related to cancer, at times very rare causes such as irritant or foreign body induced carcinogenesis is not to be overlooked. To systematically review case reports concerned with the association between dental implants and oral squamous cell carcinoma. A Medline (PubMed), Cochrane database, and Google Scholar search was conducted of dental article published in English related to case reports concerned with oral squamous cell carcinoma occurring around dental implants from 2000 to 2014. Twenty articles were retrieved, which included 20 rare case reports which were systematically reviewed and the results were obtained pertaining to age, clinical symptoms, habits, previous history of cancer, potentially malignant disorders, systemic illness, and local factors. It is imperative to identify promptly persisting inflammation associated with implants. Since malignancy may disguise as periimplantitis, especially in patients who are at risk with contributing prominent predisposing factors.

  7. Effect of cancellous bone on the functionally graded dental implant concept.

    PubMed

    Hedia, H S

    2005-01-01

    In a previous work by the author [H.S. Hedia and M. Nemat-Alla, Design optimization of functionally graded dental implant, submitted to be published in the J. Bio-Medical Materials and Engineering], a functionally graded material dental implant was designed without cansellous bone in the model. In this investigation the effect of presence cancellous bone as a thin layer around the dental implant was investigated. It is well known that the main inorganic component of natural bone is hydroxyapatite (HAP) and that the main organic component is collagen (Col). Hydroxyapatite HAP implants are not bioabsorbable, and because induction of bone into and around the artificially made HAP is not always satisfactory, loosening or breakage of HAP implants may occur after implantation in the clinical application. The development of a new material which is bioabsorbable and which has osteoconductive activity is needed. Therefore, the aim of the current investigation is to design an implant, in the presence of cancellous bone as a thin layer around it, from functionally graded material. In this study, a novel biomaterial, collagen/hydroxyapatite (Col/HAP) as a functionally graded material (FGM), was developed using the finite element and optimization techniques which are available in the ANSYS package. These materials have a self-organized character similar to that of natural bone. The investigations have shown that the maximum stress in the cortical bone and cancellous bone for the Col/HAP functionally graded implant has been reduced by about 40% and 19% respectively compared to currently used titanium dental implants.

  8. Superior biofunctionality of dental implant fixtures uniformly coated with durable bioglass films by magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Popa, A C; Stan, G E; Enculescu, M; Tanase, C; Tulyaganov, D U; Ferreira, J M F

    2015-11-01

    Bioactive glasses are currently considered the suitable candidates to stir the quest for a new generation of osseous implants with superior biological/functional performance. In congruence with this vision, this contribution aims to introduce a reliable technological recipe for coating fairly complex 3D-shaped implants (e.g. dental screws) with uniform and mechanical resistant bioactive glass films by the radio-frequency magnetron sputtering method. The mechanical reliability of the bioactive glass films applied to real Ti dental implant fixtures has been evaluated by a procedure comprised of "cold" implantation in pig mandibular bone from a dead animal, followed by immediate tension-free extraction tests. The effects of the complex mechanical strains occurring during implantation were analysed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with electron dispersive spectroscopy. Extensive biocompatibility assays (MTS, immunofluorescence, Western blot) revealed that the bioactive glass films stimulated strong cellular adhesion and proliferation of human dental pulp stem cells, without promoting their differentiation. The ability of the implant coatings to conserve a healthy stem cell pool is promising to further endorse the fabrication of new osseointegration implant designs with extended lifetime.

  9. Random spectrum loading of dental implants: An alternative approach to functional performance assessment.

    PubMed

    Shemtov-Yona, K; Rittel, D

    2016-09-01

    The fatigue performance of dental implants is usually assessed on the basis of cyclic S/N curves. This neither provides information on the anticipated service performance of the implant, nor does it allow for detailed comparisons between implants unless a thorough statistical analysis is performed, of the kind not currently required by certification standards. The notion of endurance limit is deemed to be of limited applicability, given unavoidable stress concentrations and random load excursions, that all characterize dental implants and their service conditions. We propose a completely different approach, based on random spectrum loading, as long used in aeronautical design. The implant is randomly loaded by a sequence of loads encompassing all load levels it would endure during its service life. This approach provides a quantitative and comparable estimate of its performance in terms of lifetime, based on the very fact that the implant will fracture sooner or later, instead of defining a fatigue endurance limit of limited practical application. Five commercial monolithic Ti-6Al-4V implants were tested under cyclic, and another 5 under spectrum loading conditions, at room temperature and dry air. The failure modes and fracture planes were identical for all implants. The approach is discussed, including its potential applications, for systematic, straightforward and reliable comparisons of various implant designs and environments, without the need for cumbersome statistical analyses. It is believed that spectrum loading can be considered for the generation of new standardization procedures and design applications. PMID:27161957

  10. Clinical evidence on titanium-zirconium dental implants: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Altuna, P; Lucas-Taulé, E; Gargallo-Albiol, J; Figueras-Álvarez, O; Hernández-Alfaro, F; Nart, J

    2016-07-01

    The use of titanium implants is well documented and they have high survival and success rates. However, when used as reduced-diameter implants, the risk of fracture is increased. Narrow diameter implants (NDIs) of titanium-zirconium (Ti-Zr) alloy have recently been developed (Roxolid; Institut Straumann AG). Ti-Zr alloys (two highly biocompatible materials) demonstrate higher tensile strength than commercially pure titanium. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the existing clinical evidence on dental NDIs made from Ti-Zr. A systematic literature search was performed using the Medline database to find relevant articles on clinical studies published in the English language up to December 2014. Nine clinical studies using Ti-Zr implants were identified. Overall, 607 patients received 922 implants. The mean marginal bone loss was 0.36±0.06mm after 1 year and 0.41±0.09mm after 2 years. The follow-up period ranged from 3 to 36 months. Mean survival and success rates were 98.4% and 97.8% at 1 year after implant placement and 97.7% and 97.3% at 2 years. Narrow diameter Ti-Zr dental implants show survival and success rates comparable to regular diameter titanium implants (>95%) in the short term. Long-term follow-up clinical data are needed to confirm the excellent clinical performance of these implants.

  11. Bone regeneration associated with nontherapeutic and therapeutic surface coatings for dental implants in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Hamdan S; Jansen, John A

    2013-06-01

    Oral implantology is considered as the treatment of choice for replacing missing teeth in elderly people. However, implant complications may occur in patients with osteoporosis. The pathogenesis underlying osteoporosis is due to an alteration in bone cell response to hormonal, nutritional, and aging factors. For such challenging situations, improved bone regeneration has been shown around dental implants for certain surface modifications. These modifications include coatings of titanium implants with calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics. Surface coating developments also allow for the addition of organic biomolecules, like growth factors, into the inorganic coatings that increase the bone formation process at the bone-implant interface. The application of therapeutic-based coatings is becoming a rapidly growing research field of interest. CaP-coated implants have the ability to incorporate anti-osteoporotic drugs, which then can be locally released over time from an implant surface in a controlled manner. Thus, it can be anticipated that nontherapeutic and/or therapeutic coated implants can significantly increase low bone density as well as improve impaired bone regeneration in osteoporosis. This review aims to provide a thorough understanding of the underlying mechanisms for impaired bone regeneration around dental implants in osteoporosis. Secondly, the review will focus on biological interactions and beneficial role of the surface-coated (i.e., nontherapeutics and therapeutics) bone implants in osteoporotic bone tissue.

  12. Material parameters of the reindeer antler for use in dental implant biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Hasan, I; Keilig, L; Reimann, S; Rahimi, A; Wahl, G; Bourauel, C

    2012-11-01

    The survival of dental implants, in particular immediately loaded implants, critically depends on the biomechanical properties of the bone bed surrounding them. In experimental animal investigations of immediately loaded implants the initial stability, implant design as well as stress and strain distributions in the surrounding bone have been extensively studied. It was the aim of this study to investigate the biomechanical properties of the reindeer antler used as a bony tissue surrounding dental implants, in particular the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and further numerical parameters such as mesh density, friction models and the corresponding frictional coefficients and relative velocities for establishing a novel animal model that can be used in the numerical analyses of experimentally investigated antler specimens. The sensitivity of the investigated parameters was analysed based on the close correlation of numerical and experimental results. No obvious influence of the frictional coefficient and/or relative velocity was observed on the implant displacement using a finite element model. Moreover, nearly identical numerical and experimental results were observed for two kinds of implants concerning implant deflection in the x-axis and implant rotation around the y-axis.

  13. Removal of dental implants: review of five different techniques.

    PubMed

    Stajčić, Z; Stojčev Stajčić, L J; Kalanović, M; Đinić, A; Divekar, N; Rodić, M

    2016-05-01

    The aims of this study were to review five different explantation techniques for the removal of failing implants and to propose a practical clinical protocol. During a 10-year period, 95 implants were explanted from 81 patients. Explantation techniques used were the bur-forceps (BF), neo bur-elevator-forceps (ηBEF), trephine drill (TD), high torque wrench (HTW), and scalpel-forceps (SF) techniques. The following parameters were analyzed: indications for explanation, site of implantation, and the type, diameter, and length of the implant removed. The most frequent indications for implant removal were peri-implantitis (n=37) and crestal bone loss (n=48). The posterior maxilla was the most frequent site of implant removal (n=48). The longer implants were more frequently removed (n=78). The majority of implants were removed after 1 year in function (n=69). The BF/ηBEF and SF techniques were found to be the most efficient. Explantation techniques appeared to be successful for the removal of failing implants. The BF/ηBEF and SF techniques demonstrated 100% success. The ηBEF technique enabled safe insertion of a new implant in the same explantation site. The HTW technique appeared to be the most elegant technique with the highest predictability for insertion of another implant. An explantation protocol is proposed. PMID:26688293

  14. Fibronectin-Grafted Titanium Dental Implants: An In Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Ning; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming; Chang, Chia-Hsun; Lin, Che-Tong; Teng, Nai-Chia; Pan, Yu Hwa; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the physiochemical properties of titanium surfaces using glow discharge plasma (GDP) and fibronectin coating has been shown to enhance the surface hydrophilicity, surface roughness, cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. This in vivo study aimed to evaluate the bone integration efficacy of a biologically modified implant surface. Two different surface-modified implants (Ar-GDP and GDP-fib) were placed in the mandibular premolar area of six beagle dogs for 2-8 weeks. Three techniques [histologic evaluation, resonance frequency analysis (RFA), and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) evaluation] were used to detect the implant stability and bone-implant contact. The implant stability quotient values of GDP-fib implants were significantly greater than the Ar-GDP implants at 2 and 4 weeks (P < 0.01). The bone volume/total volume ratio of GDP-fib implants was greater than the Ar-GDP implants in micro-CT evaluation. A high positive correlation was observed between RFA and micro-CT measurements. At 2 weeks, osteoblasts were seen to line the implant surface, and multinuclear osteoclasts could be seen on the surface of old parent bone. After 8 weeks, a majority of the space in the wound chamber appeared to be replaced by bone. Enhancement of the stability of biologically modified implants was proved by the results of RFA, micro-CT, and histological analysis. This enhanced stability may help fasten treatment and be clinically beneficial.

  15. Fibronectin-Grafted Titanium Dental Implants: An In Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Ning; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming; Chang, Chia-Hsun; Lin, Che-Tong; Teng, Nai-Chia; Pan, Yu Hwa; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the physiochemical properties of titanium surfaces using glow discharge plasma (GDP) and fibronectin coating has been shown to enhance the surface hydrophilicity, surface roughness, cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. This in vivo study aimed to evaluate the bone integration efficacy of a biologically modified implant surface. Two different surface-modified implants (Ar-GDP and GDP-fib) were placed in the mandibular premolar area of six beagle dogs for 2-8 weeks. Three techniques [histologic evaluation, resonance frequency analysis (RFA), and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) evaluation] were used to detect the implant stability and bone-implant contact. The implant stability quotient values of GDP-fib implants were significantly greater than the Ar-GDP implants at 2 and 4 weeks (P < 0.01). The bone volume/total volume ratio of GDP-fib implants was greater than the Ar-GDP implants in micro-CT evaluation. A high positive correlation was observed between RFA and micro-CT measurements. At 2 weeks, osteoblasts were seen to line the implant surface, and multinuclear osteoclasts could be seen on the surface of old parent bone. After 8 weeks, a majority of the space in the wound chamber appeared to be replaced by bone. Enhancement of the stability of biologically modified implants was proved by the results of RFA, micro-CT, and histological analysis. This enhanced stability may help fasten treatment and be clinically beneficial. PMID:27366739

  16. Fibronectin-Grafted Titanium Dental Implants: An In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Ning; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming; Chang, Chia-Hsun; Lin, Che-Tong; Teng, Nai-Chia; Pan, Yu Hwa; Chang, Wei-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the physiochemical properties of titanium surfaces using glow discharge plasma (GDP) and fibronectin coating has been shown to enhance the surface hydrophilicity, surface roughness, cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. This in vivo study aimed to evaluate the bone integration efficacy of a biologically modified implant surface. Two different surface-modified implants (Ar-GDP and GDP-fib) were placed in the mandibular premolar area of six beagle dogs for 2–8 weeks. Three techniques [histologic evaluation, resonance frequency analysis (RFA), and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) evaluation] were used to detect the implant stability and bone-implant contact. The implant stability quotient values of GDP-fib implants were significantly greater than the Ar-GDP implants at 2 and 4 weeks (P < 0.01). The bone volume/total volume ratio of GDP-fib implants was greater than the Ar-GDP implants in micro-CT evaluation. A high positive correlation was observed between RFA and micro-CT measurements. At 2 weeks, osteoblasts were seen to line the implant surface, and multinuclear osteoclasts could be seen on the surface of old parent bone. After 8 weeks, a majority of the space in the wound chamber appeared to be replaced by bone. Enhancement of the stability of biologically modified implants was proved by the results of RFA, micro-CT, and histological analysis. This enhanced stability may help fasten treatment and be clinically beneficial. PMID:27366739

  17. A Novel Surgical Template Design in Staged Dental Implant Rehabilitations

    PubMed Central

    Patras, Michael; Martin, William; Sykaras, Nikitas

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The philosophy of a gradual transition to an implant retained prosthesis in cases of full-mouth or extensive rehabilitation usually involves a staged treatment concept. In this therapeutic approach, the placement of implants may sometimes be divided into phases. During a subsequent surgical phase of treatment, the pre-existing implants can serve as anchors for the surgical template. Those modified surgical templates help in the precise transferring of restorative information into the surgical field and guide the optimal three-dimensional implant positioning. Methods This article highlights the rationale of implant-retained surgical templates and illustrates them through the presentation of two clinical cases. The templates are duplicates of the provisional restorations and are secured to the existing implants through the utilization of implant mounts. Results This template design in such staged procedures provided stability in the surgical field and enhanced the accuracy in implant positioning based upon the planned restoration, thus ensuring predictable treatment outcomes. Conclusions Successful rehabilitation lies in the correct sequence of surgical and prosthetic procedures. Whenever a staged approach of implant placement is planned, the clinician can effectively use the initially placed implants as anchors for the surgical template during the second phase of implant surgery. PMID:24422012

  18. A contrast and registration template for magnetic resonance image data guided dental implant placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggers, Georg; Cosgarea, Raluca; Rieker, Marcus; Kress, Bodo; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Mühling, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    An oral imaging template was developed to address the shortcomings of MR image data for image guided dental implant planning and placement. The template was conctructed as a gadolinium filled plastic shell to give contrast to the dentition and also to be accurately re-attachable for use in image guided dental implant placement. The result of segmentation and modelling of the dentition from MR Image data with the template was compared to plaster casts of the dentition. In a phantom study dental implant placement was performed based on MR image data. MR imaging with the contrast template allowed complete representation of the existing dentition. In the phantom study, a commercially available system for image guided dental implant placement was used. Transformation of the imaging contrast template into a surgical drill guide based on the MR image data resulted in pilot burr hole placement with an accuracy of 2 mm. MRI based imaging of the existing dentition for proper image guided planning is possible with the proposed template. Using the image data and the template resulted in less accurate pilot burr hole placement in comparison to CT-based image guided implant placement.

  19. Surface Damage on Dental Implants with Release of Loose Particles after Insertion into Bone

    PubMed Central

    Senna, Plinio; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha; Kates, Stephen; Meirelles, Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Background Modern dental implants present surface features of distinct dimensions that can be damaged during the insertion procedure into bone. Purpose The aims of this study were (1) to quantify by means of roughness parameters the surface damage caused by the insertion procedure of dental implants and (2) to investigate the presence of loose particles at the interface. Materials and Methods Three groups of dental implants representing different surface topographies were inserted in fresh cow rib bone blocks. The surface roughness was characterized by interferometry on the same area before and after the insertion. SEM-BSD analysis was used to identify loose particles at the interface. Results The amplitude and hybrid roughness parameters of all three groups were lower after insertion. The surface presenting predominance of peaks (Ssk>0) associated to higher structures (height parameters) presented higher damage associated to more pronounced reduction of material volume. SEM-BSD images revealed loose titanium and aluminum particles at the interface mainly at the crestal cortical bone level. Conclusions Shearing forces during the insertion procedure alters the surface of dental implants. Loose metal particles can be generated at bone-implant interface especially around surfaces composed mainly by peaks and with increased height parameters. PMID:24283455

  20. Periodontal Disease, Dental Implants, Extractions and Medications Related to Osteonecrosis of the Jaws.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neha P; Katsarelis, Helen; Pazianas, Michael; Dhariwal, Daljit K

    2015-11-01

    Patients taking bisphosphonates and other anti-resorptive drugs are likely to attend general dental practice. The term 'bisphosphonate'is often immediately associated with osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ). Risk assessment and subsequent management of these patients should be carried out taking into account all the risk factors associated with ONJ. The introduction of newer drugs, also shown to be associated with ONJ, demands increased awareness of general dental practitioners about these medications. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This paper provides an update on medication-related ONJ and considers the effects of anti-resorptive drugs on the management of patients needing exodontia, treatment for periodontal disease and dental implant placement.

  1. Nasopalatine duct cyst developed in association with dental implant treatment: A case report and histopathological observation

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Kenji; Funaki, Katsuyuki; Jimbo, Ryo; Takahashi, Tetsu

    2013-01-01

    Placement of an anterior maxillary implant has a risk of interfering with the nasopalatine canal in the maxilla. This case report presents one of our experiences of a nasopalatine duct cyst that developed in association with a dental implant treatment. A 45-year-old man received an implant in the maxillary left central incisor due to root fracture. Preoperative radiograph indicated no anatomical abnormalities. A postextraction immediate implant was placed, and radiographic examination after 28 months revealed an asymptomatic, oval-shaped radiolucency around the apex of the implant, seemingly in contact to the nasopalatine canal. The entire lesion was removed along with a part of the implant. Histopathologically it was diagnosed as nasopalatine duct cyst. Accidental contact with the nasopalatine canal during surgery may have induced development of the nasopalatine duct cyst. Careful planning based on preoperative computed tomography scan may prevent such complications. PMID:24250105

  2. Immediate Dental Implant Placements Using Osteotome Technique: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Al-Almaie, Saad

    2016-01-01

    This clinical case describes the effect of the osteotome technique on the osseointegration of a mandibular dental implant in a 42-year-old female patient with dento-alveolar bony defects and to review the literature regarding immediate implant placement using osteotome technique. The amount of bone expansion at the alveolar ridge and the marginal bone resorption from the time of implant placement to one year after the implant’s functional loading were recorded clinically. The esthetic outcome for the restored implant (the gingival margin) was achieved one years after the implant’s functional loading. The surgical and prosthetic sites for the implant showed no postoperative complications, and no infection or wound dehiscence was recorded during the follow-up period. The osteotome technique is good for the purpose for which it was introduced, and its advantages with immediate implant placement include reduced surgical trauma and a shorter treatment time. PMID:27583046

  3. Dental implants installed in irradiated jaws: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chambrone, L; Mandia, J; Shibli, J A; Romito, G A; Abrahao, M

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the survival rate of titanium implants placed in irradiated jaws. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL were searched for studies assessing implants that had been placed in nongrafted sites of irradiated patients. Random effects meta-analyses assessed implant loss in irradiated versus nonirradiated patients and in irradiated patients treated with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy. Of 1,051 potentially eligible publications, 15 were included. A total of 10,150 implants were assessed in the included studies, and of these, 1,689 (14.3%) had been placed in irradiated jaws. The mean survival rate in the studies ranged from 46.3% to 98.0%. The pooled estimates indicated a significant increase in the risk of implant failure in irradiated patients (risk ratio: 2.74; 95% confidence interval: 1.86, 4.05; p < .00001) and in maxillary sites (risk ratio: 5.96; 95% confidence interval: 2.71, 13.12; p < .00001). Conversely, HBO therapy did not reduce the risk of implant failure (risk ratio: 1.28; 95% confidence interval: 0.19, 8.82; p = .80). Radiotherapy was linked to higher implant failure in the maxilla, and HBO therapy did not improve implant survival. Most included publications reported data on machined implants, and only 3 studies on HBO therapy were included. Overall, implant therapy appears to be a viable treatment option for reestablishing adequate occlusion and masticatory conditions in irradiated patients.

  4. Interruption of Electrical Conductivity of Titanium Dental Implants Suggests a Path Towards Elimination Of Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Pozhitkov, Alex E; Daubert, Diane; Brochwicz Donimirski, Ashley; Goodgion, Douglas; Vagin, Mikhail Y; Leroux, Brian G; Hunter, Colby M; Flemmig, Thomas F; Noble, Peter A; Bryers, James D

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of soft tissue and bone around the implant. Titanium implant corrosion has been attributed to the implant failure and cytotoxic effects to the alveolar bone. We have documented the extent of titanium release into surrounding plaque in patients with and without peri-implantitis. An in vitro model was designed to represent the actual environment of an implant in a patient's mouth. The model uses actual oral microbiota from a volunteer, allows monitoring electrochemical processes generated by biofilms growing on implants and permits control of biocorrosion electrical current. As determined by next generation DNA sequencing, microbial compositions in experiments with the in vitro model were comparable with the compositions found in patients with implants. It was determined that the electrical conductivity of titanium implants was the key factor responsible for the biocorrosion process. The interruption of the biocorrosion current resulted in a 4-5 fold reduction of corrosion. We propose a new design of dental implant that combines titanium in zero oxidation state for osseointegration and strength, interlaid with a nonconductive ceramic. In addition, we propose electrotherapy for manipulation of microbial biofilms and to induce bone healing in peri-implantitis patients.

  5. Assessment of metal artefact reduction around dental titanium implants in cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, N; Hassan, B; Syriopoulos, K; van der Stelt, P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate if the metal artefact reduction (MAR) tool used in the software of the ORTHOPANTOMOGRAPH® OP300 (Instrumentarium Dental, Tuusula, Finland) can improve the gray value levels in post-operative implant scans. Methods: 20 potential implant sites were selected from 5 edentulous human dry mandibles. Each mandible was scanned by a CBCT scanner, and images were produced under three different conditions: implant sites drilled but no implants inserted, implants inserted without application of MAR and implants inserted with application of MAR. Using Geomagic® Studio 2012 (Geomagic, Morrisville, NC) and 3Diagnosys® v. 5.3.1 (3Diemme® SRL, Cantù, Italy) software, three scans of each mandible were superimposed. The mean gray value of identical regions of bone around the implants was derived for each condition. The differences between gray value measurements at implant sites derived from different conditions were assessed. Results: A significant difference was found between mean gray values from the scans with no implants inserted and with implants inserted (with and without MAR) (p = 0.012). No significant difference was revealed for gray values measured from scans with and without MAR (p = 0.975). Conclusions: The MAR tool in the software of the ORTHOPANTOMOGRAPH OP300 CBCT scanner does not significantly correct the voxel gray values affected by the metal artefact in the vicinity of an implant in human dry mandibles. PMID:25135316

  6. Early detachment of titanium particles from various different surfaces of endosseous dental implants.

    PubMed

    Franchi, M; Bacchelli, B; Martini, D; Pasquale, V De; Orsini, E; Ottani, V; Fini, M; Giavaresi, G; Giardino, R; Ruggeri, A

    2004-05-01

    Titanium (Ti) endosseous dental screws with different surfaces (smooth titanium--STi, titanium plasma-sprayed-TPS, alumina oxide sandblasted and acid-etched--Al-SLA, zirconium oxide sandblasted and acid etched--Zr-SLA) were implanted in femura and tibiae of sheep to investigate the biological evolution of the peri-implant tissues and detachment of Ti debris from the implant surfaces in early healing. Implants were not loaded. Sections of the screws and the peri-implant tissues obtained by sawing and grinding were analysed by light microscopy immediately after implantation (time 0) and after 14 days. All samples showed new bone trabeculae and vascularised medullary spaces in those areas where gaps between the implants and host bone were visible. In contrast, no osteogenesis was induced in the areas where the implants were initially positioned in close contact with the host bone. Chips of the pre-existing bone inducing new peri-implant neo-osteogenesis were surrounded by new bone trabeculae. The threads of some screws appeared to be deformed where the host bone showed fractures. Ti granules of 3-60 microm were detectable only in the peri-implant tissues of TPS implants both immediately after surgery and after 14 days, thus suggesting that this phenomenon may be related to the friction of the TPS coating during surgical insertion. PMID:14741589

  7. Interruption of Electrical Conductivity of Titanium Dental Implants Suggests a Path Towards Elimination Of Corrosion

    PubMed Central

    Pozhitkov, Alex E.; Daubert, Diane; Brochwicz Donimirski, Ashley; Goodgion, Douglas; Vagin, Mikhail Y.; Leroux, Brian G.; Hunter, Colby M.; Flemmig, Thomas F.; Noble, Peter A.; Bryers, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of soft tissue and bone around the implant. Titanium implant corrosion has been attributed to the implant failure and cytotoxic effects to the alveolar bone. We have documented the extent of titanium release into surrounding plaque in patients with and without peri-implantitis. An in vitro model was designed to represent the actual environment of an implant in a patient’s mouth. The model uses actual oral microbiota from a volunteer, allows monitoring electrochemical processes generated by biofilms growing on implants and permits control of biocorrosion electrical current. As determined by next generation DNA sequencing, microbial compositions in experiments with the in vitro model were comparable with the compositions found in patients with implants. It was determined that the electrical conductivity of titanium implants was the key factor responsible for the biocorrosion process. The interruption of the biocorrosion current resulted in a 4–5 fold reduction of corrosion. We propose a new design of dental implant that combines titanium in zero oxidation state for osseointegration and strength, interlaid with a nonconductive ceramic. In addition, we propose electrotherapy for manipulation of microbial biofilms and to induce bone healing in peri-implantitis patients. PMID:26461491

  8. Early detachment of titanium particles from various different surfaces of endosseous dental implants.

    PubMed

    Franchi, M; Bacchelli, B; Martini, D; Pasquale, V De; Orsini, E; Ottani, V; Fini, M; Giavaresi, G; Giardino, R; Ruggeri, A

    2004-05-01

    Titanium (Ti) endosseous dental screws with different surfaces (smooth titanium--STi, titanium plasma-sprayed-TPS, alumina oxide sandblasted and acid-etched--Al-SLA, zirconium oxide sandblasted and acid etched--Zr-SLA) were implanted in femura and tibiae of sheep to investigate the biological evolution of the peri-implant tissues and detachment of Ti debris from the implant surfaces in early healing. Implants were not loaded. Sections of the screws and the peri-implant tissues obtained by sawing and grinding were analysed by light microscopy immediately after implantation (time 0) and after 14 days. All samples showed new bone trabeculae and vascularised medullary spaces in those areas where gaps between the implants and host bone were visible. In contrast, no osteogenesis was induced in the areas where the implants were initially positioned in close contact with the host bone. Chips of the pre-existing bone inducing new peri-implant neo-osteogenesis were surrounded by new bone trabeculae. The threads of some screws appeared to be deformed where the host bone showed fractures. Ti granules of 3-60 microm were detectable only in the peri-implant tissues of TPS implants both immediately after surgery and after 14 days, thus suggesting that this phenomenon may be related to the friction of the TPS coating during surgical insertion.

  9. Temperature evaluation of dental implant surface irradiated with high-power diode laser.

    PubMed

    Rios, F G; Viana, E R; Ribeiro, G M; González, J C; Abelenda, A; Peruzzo, D C

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of peri-implantitis and the absence of a standard approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface have led to searches for effective therapies. Since the source of diode lasers is portable, has reduced cost, and does not cause damage to the titanium surface of the implant, high-power diode lasers have been used for this purpose. The effect of laser irradiation on the implants is the elevation of the temperature surface. If this elevation exceeds 47 °C, the bone tissue is irreversibly damaged, so for a safety therapy, the laser parameters should be controlled. In this study, a diode laser of GaAsAl was used to irradiate titanium dental implants, for powers 1.32 to 2.64 W (real) or 2.00 to 4.00 W (nominal), in continuous/pulsed mode DC/AC, with exposure time of 5/10 s, with/without air flow for cooling. The elevation of the temperature was monitored in real time in two positions: cervical and apical. The best results for decontamination using a 968-nm diode laser were obtained for a power of 1.65 and 1.98 W (real) for 10 s, in DC or AC mode, with an air flow of 2.5 l/min. In our perspective in this article, we determine a suggested approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface using a 968-nm diode laser. PMID:27365109

  10. Temperature evaluation of dental implant surface irradiated with high-power diode laser.

    PubMed

    Rios, F G; Viana, E R; Ribeiro, G M; González, J C; Abelenda, A; Peruzzo, D C

    2016-09-01

    The prevalence of peri-implantitis and the absence of a standard approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface have led to searches for effective therapies. Since the source of diode lasers is portable, has reduced cost, and does not cause damage to the titanium surface of the implant, high-power diode lasers have been used for this purpose. The effect of laser irradiation on the implants is the elevation of the temperature surface. If this elevation exceeds 47 °C, the bone tissue is irreversibly damaged, so for a safety therapy, the laser parameters should be controlled. In this study, a diode laser of GaAsAl was used to irradiate titanium dental implants, for powers 1.32 to 2.64 W (real) or 2.00 to 4.00 W (nominal), in continuous/pulsed mode DC/AC, with exposure time of 5/10 s, with/without air flow for cooling. The elevation of the temperature was monitored in real time in two positions: cervical and apical. The best results for decontamination using a 968-nm diode laser were obtained for a power of 1.65 and 1.98 W (real) for 10 s, in DC or AC mode, with an air flow of 2.5 l/min. In our perspective in this article, we determine a suggested approach for decontamination of the dental implant surface using a 968-nm diode laser.

  11. Nanomodified Peek Dental Implants: Bioactive Composites and Surface Modification—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Siddiqui, Fahad; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this review is to summarize and evaluate the relevant literature regarding the different ways how polyetheretherketone (PEEK) can be modified to overcome its limited bioactivity, and thereby making it suitable as a dental implant material. Study Selection. An electronic literature search was conducted via the PubMed and Google Scholar databases using the keywords “PEEK dental implants,” “nano,” “osseointegration,” “surface treatment,” and “modification.” A total of 16 in vivo and in vitro studies were found suitable to be included in this review. Results. There are many viable methods to increase the bioactivity of PEEK. Most methods focus on increasing the surface roughness, increasing the hydrophilicity and coating osseoconductive materials. Conclusion. There are many ways in which PEEK can be modified at a nanometer level to overcome its limited bioactivity. Melt-blending with bioactive nanoparticles can be used to produce bioactive nanocomposites, while spin-coating, gas plasma etching, electron beam, and plasma-ion immersion implantation can be used to modify the surface of PEEK implants in order to make them more bioactive. However, more animal studies are needed before these implants can be deemed suitable to be used as dental implants. PMID:26495000

  12. Nanomodified Peek Dental Implants: Bioactive Composites and Surface Modification-A Review.

    PubMed

    Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Siddiqui, Fahad; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this review is to summarize and evaluate the relevant literature regarding the different ways how polyetheretherketone (PEEK) can be modified to overcome its limited bioactivity, and thereby making it suitable as a dental implant material. Study Selection. An electronic literature search was conducted via the PubMed and Google Scholar databases using the keywords "PEEK dental implants," "nano," "osseointegration," "surface treatment," and "modification." A total of 16 in vivo and in vitro studies were found suitable to be included in this review. Results. There are many viable methods to increase the bioactivity of PEEK. Most methods focus on increasing the surface roughness, increasing the hydrophilicity and coating osseoconductive materials. Conclusion. There are many ways in which PEEK can be modified at a nanometer level to overcome its limited bioactivity. Melt-blending with bioactive nanoparticles can be used to produce bioactive nanocomposites, while spin-coating, gas plasma etching, electron beam, and plasma-ion immersion implantation can be used to modify the surface of PEEK implants in order to make them more bioactive. However, more animal studies are needed before these implants can be deemed suitable to be used as dental implants. PMID:26495000

  13. Multiple teeth replacement with endosseous one-piece yttrium-stabilized zirconia dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Borgonovo, Andrea E.; Fabbri, Alberto; Censi, Rachele; Maiorana, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to clinically and radiographically evaluate survival and success rate of multiple zirconia dental implants positioned in each patient during a follow-up period of at least 12 months up to 48 months. Study Design: Eight patients were treated for multiple edentulism with 29 zirconia dental implants. All implants received immediate temporary restorations and 6 months after surgery were definitively restored. 6 months to 4 years after implant insertion, a clinical-radiographic evaluation was performed in order to estimate peri-implant tissues health and peri-implant marginal bone loss. Results: Survival rate within follow-up period was therefore 100%. The average marginal bone loss (MBL) from baseline to 6 months was +1.375±0.388 mm; from 6 months to 1 year was +0.22±0.598 mm; from 1 year to 2 years was -0.368±0.387 mm; from 2 years to 3 years was -0.0669±0.425 mm; from 3 years to 4 years +0.048±0.262 mm. The mean marginal bone loss at 4 years from the implants insertion was +1.208 mm. Conclusions: According to several studies, when using a radiographic criterion for implant success, marginal bone loss below 0.9-1.6 mm during the first year in function can be considered acceptable. In our work, radiographic measurements of MBL showed values not exceeding 1.6 mm during the first year of loading and also 1 year up to 4 years after surgery further marginal bone loss was minimal and not significant. This peri-implant bone preservation may be associated to the absence of micro-gap between fixture and abutment since zirconia dental implants are one-piece implant. Moreover, zirconia is characterized by high biocompatibility and it accumulates significantly fewer bacteria than titanium. Key words:Zirconia dental implants, multiple implants, radiographic evaluation, marginal bone loss (MBL). PMID:22926479

  14. Association between implant apex and sinus floor in posterior maxilla dental implantation: A three-dimensional finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    YAN, XU; ZHANG, XINWEN; CHI, WEICHAO; AI, HONGJUN; WU, LIN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the association between the implant apex and the sinus floor in posterior maxilla dental implantation by means of three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) analysis. Ten 3D FE models of a posterior maxillary region with a sinus membrane and different heights of alveolar ridge with different thicknesses of sinus floor cortical bone were constructed according to anatomical data of the sinus area. Six models were constructed with the same thickness of crestal cortical bone and a 1-mm thick sinus floor cortical bone, but differing heights of alveolar ridge (between 10 and 14 mm). The four models of the second group were similar (11-mm-high alveolar ridge and 1-mm-thick crestal cortical bone) but with a changing thickness of sinus floor cortical bone (between 0.5 and 2.0 mm). The standard implant model based on the Nobel Biocare® implant system was created by computer-aided design (CAD) software and assembled into the models. The materials were assumed to be isotropic and linearly elastic. An inclined force of 129 N was applied. The maximum von Mises stress, stress distribution, implant displacement and resonance frequencies were calculated using CAD software. The von Mises stress was concentrated on the surface of the crestal cortical bone around the implant neck with the exception of that for the bicortical implantation. For immediate loading, when the implant apex broke into or through the sinus cortical bone, the maximum displacements of the implant, particularly at the implant apex, were smaller than those in the other groups. With increasing depth of the implant apex in the sinus floor cortical bone, the maximum displacements decreased and the implant axial resonance frequencies presented a linear upward tendency, but buccolingual resonance frequencies were hardly affected. This FE study on the association between implant apex and sinus floor showed that having the implant apex in contact with, piercing

  15. Custom abutments alone will not eliminate the clinical effects of poor cementation techniques around dental implants.

    PubMed

    Piñeyro, Alfonso; Ganeles, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    With proper planning, placement, prosthetic treatment, and maintenance, dental implants have been shown to be a predictable and reliable treatment option with a high success rate. Clinicians who place cement-retained implant restorations, however, should be aware of the potential and sometimes irreversible biological complications associated with residual excess cement and should be prepared to consider using different practices that may reduce the problem. The present case reports describe the use of custom abutments to restore deeply placed implants with the intent of minimizing residual excess cement.

  16. Current concepts for the biological basis of dental implants: foreign body equilibrium and osseointegration dynamics.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Ricardo; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2015-05-01

    To understand the biological basis of osseointegration, one has to understand the 2 main sides of the implant-host interaction: tissue and biomaterial characteristics. This article addresses osseous tissue characteristics, and the potential role of soft tissues in the osseointegration of dental implants. Successful integration is driven by an inflammatory process. Protein adsorption is key for tissue integration with biomaterials. Osseointegration dynamics relate to the in vivo lifetime of the implant. Understanding this biology is important; it opens the door to putting aside heuristic methods and replaces them by methods that produce solutions to achieve a specific biological goal.

  17. Potential mechanism for osseointegration of dental implants in Zucker diabetic fatty rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhonghao; Zhou, Wenjuan; Tangl, Stefan; Liu, Shutai; Xu, Xin; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2015-10-01

    Our aim was to investigate the impact of diabetes mellitus and different durations of glycaemic control on early osseointegration of dental implants, and to explore possible mechanisms by measuring the expression of integrin α5β1 and fibronectin in bone around the implant. We divided 33 male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats aged 3 months into 3 groups. The first group comprised diabetic rats with dental implants (controls); the second group was treated with insulin and implants were placed simultaneously (exenatide alone group); and the third group was treated with insulin until the serum glucose was at a constant concentration (< 16 mmol/L), and implants were then inserted (exenatide+normal glucose group). Rats were killed 7, 14, 30, and 60 days after implants had been inserted. The expression of integrin α5β1 and fibronectin in bone around the implants was detected by immunohistochemical analysis in each group. The expression in the exenatide+normal glucose group was stronger than in the other 2 groups. Fourteen days after implantation, expression of integrin α5β1 in the exenatide alone group was significantly stronger than that in the control group (p=0.027), and 60 days after implantation the expression of fibronectin in the exenatide alone group was also significantly stronger than that among the controls (p=0.001). Both fibronectin and integrin α5β1 participate in the adhesion of osteoblasts and act as signals at the bone/implant interface. Diabetes interferes with the osseointegration of implants by deferring expression of fibronectin and integrin α5β1.

  18. Dental implants in patients with oral mucosal diseases - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Reichart, P A; Schmidt-Westhausen, A M; Khongkhunthian, P; Strietzel, F P

    2016-05-01

    To reveal dental implants survival rates in patients with oral mucosal diseases: oral lichen planus (OLP), Sjögren's syndrome (SjS), epidermolysis bullosa (EB) and systemic sclerosis (SSc). A systematic literature search using PubMed/Medline and Embase databases, utilising MeSH and search term combinations identified publications on clinical use implant-prosthetic rehabilitation in patients with OLP, SjS, EB, SSc reporting on study design, number, gender and age of patients, follow-up period exceeding 12 months, implant survival rate, published in English between 1980 and May 2015. After a mean observation period (mOP) of 53·9 months (standard deviation [SD] ±18·3), 191 implants in 57 patients with OLP showed a survival rate (SR) of 95·3% (SD ±21·2). For 17 patients with SjS (121 implants, mOP 48·6 ± 28·7 months), 28 patients with EB (165 implants, mOP 38·3 ± 16·9 months) and five patients with SSc (38 implants, mOP 38·3 ± 16·9 months), the respective SR was 91·7 ± 5·97% (SjS), 98·5 ± 2·7% (EB) and 97·4 ± 4·8% (SSc). Heterogeneity of data structure and quality of reporting outcomes did not allow for further comparative data analysis. For implant-prosthetic rehabilitation of patients suffering from OLP, SjS, EB and SSc, no evidence-based treatment guidelines are presently available. However, no strict contraindication for the placement of implants seems to be justified in patients with OLP, SjS, EB nor SSc. Implant survival rates are comparable to those of patients without oral mucosal diseases. Treatment guidelines as for dental implantation in patients with healthy oral mucosa should be followed.

  19. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cicciù, M.; Cervino, G.; Bramanti, E.; Lauritano, F.; Lo Gudice, G.; Scappaticci, L.; Rapparini, A.; Guglielmino, E.; Risitano, G.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results. PMID:26798405

  20. The effects of hydroxyapatite coatings on stress distribution near the dental implant bone interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, W.; Wang, W. D.; Shi, X. H.; Chen, H. Z.; Zou, W.; Guo, Z.; Luo, J. M.; Gu, Z. W.; Zhang, X. D.

    2008-11-01

    The effects of different thickness of hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on bone stress distribution near the dental implant-bone interface are very important factors for the HA-coated dental implant design and clinical application. By means of finite element analysis (FEA), the bone stress distributions near the dental implant coated with different thicknesses from 0 to 200 μm were calculated and analyzed under the 200 N chewing load. In all cases, the maximal von Mises stresses in the bone are at the positions near the neck of dental implant on the lingual side, and decrease with the increase of the HA coatings thickness. The HA coatings weaken the stress concentration and improve the biomechanical property in the bone, however, in HA coatings thickness range of 60-120 μm, the distinctions of that benefit are not obvious. In addition, considering the technical reason of HA coatings, we conclude that thickness of HA coatings range from 60 to 120 μm would be the better choice for clinical application.

  1. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods.

    PubMed

    Cicciù, M; Cervino, G; Bramanti, E; Lauritano, F; Lo Gudice, G; Scappaticci, L; Rapparini, A; Guglielmino, E; Risitano, G

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results. PMID:26798405

  2. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods.

    PubMed

    Cicciù, M; Cervino, G; Bramanti, E; Lauritano, F; Lo Gudice, G; Scappaticci, L; Rapparini, A; Guglielmino, E; Risitano, G

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results.

  3. New Design for Rapid Prototyping of Digital Master Casts for Multiple Dental Implant Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Luis; Jiménez, Mariano; Espinosa, María del Mar; Domínguez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study proposes the replacement of all the physical devices used in the manufacturing of conventional prostheses through the use of digital tools, such as 3D scanners, CAD design software, 3D implants files, rapid prototyping machines or reverse engineering software, in order to develop laboratory work models from which to finish coatings for dental prostheses. Different types of dental prosthetic structures are used, which were adjusted by a non-rotatory threaded fixing system. Method From a digital process, the relative positions of dental implants, soft tissue and adjacent teeth of edentulous or partially edentulous patients has been captured, and a maser working model which accurately replicates data relating to the patients oral cavity has been through treatment of three-dimensional digital data. Results Compared with the conventional master cast, the results show a significant cost savings in attachments, as well as an increase in the quality of reproduction and accuracy of the master cast, with the consequent reduction in the number of patient consultation visits. The combination of software and hardware three-dimensional tools allows the optimization of the planning of dental implant-supported rehabilitations protocol, improving the predictability of clinical treatments and the production cost savings of master casts for restorations upon implants. PMID:26696528

  4. [Exploration of the dental peri-implantitis therapy

    PubMed

    Zou, D R; Dai, Q C

    1999-12-01

    OBJECTIVE:Our study is try to establish the treatment mehtod for periimplantitis from clinical aspect,so as to treat failing implant effectively.METHODS:Peri-implantitis was treated using four methods:(1)essential treatment,(2)gingivectomy,(3)flap operation,(4)guided bone regeneration(GBR).Clinical peri-implant assessments included probing depth (PD),gingival index(GI),mibility (MOB),data analysis was carried out using singed-rank test.RESULTS:27 cases were successfully treated,and the rate was 71.05%,11 implants were extracted,the parameters before and after treatment have significant difference.CONCLUSION:It is essential to maintain good oral hygiene,determine the standard of diagnosis of peri-implantitis and successful treatment.

  5. Direct metal laser sintering titanium dental implants: a review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Mangano, F; Chambrone, L; van Noort, R; Miller, C; Hatton, P; Mangano, C

    2014-01-01

    Statement of Problem. Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technology that allows fabrication of complex-shaped objects from powder-based materials, according to a three-dimensional (3D) computer model. With DMLS, it is possible to fabricate titanium dental implants with an inherently porous surface, a key property required of implantation devices. Objective. The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for the reliability of DMLS titanium dental implants and their clinical and histologic/histomorphometric outcomes, as well as their mechanical properties. Materials and Methods. Electronic database searches were performed. Inclusion criteria were clinical and radiographic studies, histologic/histomorphometric studies in humans and animals, mechanical evaluations, and in vitro cell culture studies on DMLS titanium implants. Meta-analysis could be performed only for randomized controlled trials (RCTs); to evaluate the methodological quality of observational human studies, the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS) was used. Results. Twenty-seven studies were included in this review. No RCTs were found, and meta-analysis could not be performed. The outcomes of observational human studies were assessed using the NOS: these studies showed medium methodological quality. Conclusions. Several studies have demonstrated the potential for the use of DMLS titanium implants. However, further studies that demonstrate the benefits of DMLS implants over conventional implants are needed. PMID:25525434

  6. Direct Metal Laser Sintering Titanium Dental Implants: A Review of the Current Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, F.; Chambrone, L.; van Noort, R.; Miller, C.; Hatton, P.; Mangano, C.

    2014-01-01

    Statement of Problem. Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technology that allows fabrication of complex-shaped objects from powder-based materials, according to a three-dimensional (3D) computer model. With DMLS, it is possible to fabricate titanium dental implants with an inherently porous surface, a key property required of implantation devices. Objective. The aim of this review was to evaluate the evidence for the reliability of DMLS titanium dental implants and their clinical and histologic/histomorphometric outcomes, as well as their mechanical properties. Materials and Methods. Electronic database searches were performed. Inclusion criteria were clinical and radiographic studies, histologic/histomorphometric studies in humans and animals, mechanical evaluations, and in vitro cell culture studies on DMLS titanium implants. Meta-analysis could be performed only for randomized controlled trials (RCTs); to evaluate the methodological quality of observational human studies, the Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS) was used. Results. Twenty-seven studies were included in this review. No RCTs were found, and meta-analysis could not be performed. The outcomes of observational human studies were assessed using the NOS: these studies showed medium methodological quality. Conclusions. Several studies have demonstrated the potential for the use of DMLS titanium implants. However, further studies that demonstrate the benefits of DMLS implants over conventional implants are needed. PMID:25525434

  7. Engineered protein coatings to improve the osseointegration of dental and orthopaedic implants.

    PubMed

    Raphel, Jordan; Karlsson, Johan; Galli, Silvia; Wennerberg, Ann; Lindsay, Christopher; Haugh, Matthew G; Pajarinen, Jukka; Goodman, Stuart B; Jimbo, Ryo; Andersson, Martin; Heilshorn, Sarah C

    2016-03-01

    Here we present the design of an engineered, elastin-like protein (ELP) that is chemically modified to enable stable coatings on the surfaces of titanium-based dental and orthopaedic implants by novel photocrosslinking and solution processing steps. The ELP includes an extended RGD sequence to confer bio-signaling and an elastin-like sequence for mechanical stability. ELP thin films were fabricated on cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V surfaces using scalable spin and dip coating processes with photoactive covalent crosslinking through a carbene insertion mechanism. The coatings withstood procedures mimicking dental screw and hip replacement stem implantations, a key metric for clinical translation. They promoted rapid adhesion of MG63 osteoblast-like cells, with over 80% adhesion after 24 h, compared to 38% adhesion on uncoated Ti6Al4V. MG63 cells produced significantly more mineralization on ELP coatings compared to uncoated Ti6Al4V. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) had an earlier increase in alkaline phosphatase activity, indicating more rapid osteogenic differentiation and mineral deposition on adhesive ELP coatings. Rat tibia and femur in vivo studies demonstrated that cell-adhesive ELP-coated implants increased bone-implant contact area and interfacial strength after one week. These results suggest that ELP coatings withstand surgical implantation and promote rapid osseointegration, enabling earlier implant loading and potentially preventing micromotion that leads to aseptic loosening and premature implant failure. PMID:26790146

  8. Knowledge and practice of implant-retained restorations among dental students in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Fahim; Shah, Altaf Hussain; Zafar, Mohammad Sohail; Kola, Zaheer

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge and practice of implant retained restorations (IRR) among senior dental students in Saudi Arabia. Methods: Four hundred questionnaires were distributed among senior dental students of five dental schools in Saudi Arabia. Student’s knowledge was assessed regarding which implant restoration [cement retained restoration (CRR) or screw retained restoration (SRR)] better provides the desired clinical properties. Students’ practice of IRR, perception of their knowledge and need for further education related to IRR were also assessed. Descriptive statistics and chi-square test were employed to assess collected data. Results: Three hundred and fifty four senior dental students responded at a response rate of 88.5%. Thirty three percent respondents did not have any practical experience of IRR. Students showed a clear preference for CRR with regards to aesthetics (71.4%), passive fit (55.3%), fabrication ease (57.3%) and fracture resistance (40%). SRR were considered to provide better retention (59.6%), soft tissue health (51.1%) and ease of retrievability (72%). Nearly 40% of students agreed that they did not get sufficient information related to IRR in undergraduate courses. Conclusions: Clinical training of IRR is compromised in the undergraduate curriculum in dental schools of Saudi Arabia. The knowledge of dental students regarding IRR was broadly in line with current evidence. PMID:26430416

  9. Peri-implant crevicular fluid levels of cathepsin-K, RANKL, and OPG around standard, short, and mini dental implants after prosthodontic loading

    PubMed Central

    Marakoğlu, İsmail; Haliloğlu, Seyfullah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite the high success rates of endosseous dental implants, their placement is restricted according to the height and volume of bone available. The use of short or mini dental implants could be one way to overcome this limitation. Thus, this study aimed to compare standard, short, and mini dental implants with regard to associated clinical parameters and peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF) levels of cathepsin -K (CTSK), RANK ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG), after prosthodontic loading. Methods A total of 78 non-submerged implants (Euroteknika, Aesthetica+2, Sallanches, France) were installed in 30 subjects (13 male, 17 female; range, 26-62 years) who visited the clinic of the Periodontology Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Selcuk University. Sampling and measurements were performed on the loading date (baseline) and 2, 14, and 90 days after loading. Assessment of the peri-implant status for the implant sites was performed using the pocket probing depth (PPD), modified plaque index, modified gingival index, modified sulcular bleeding index, and radiographic signs of bone loss. PICF samples collected from each implant were evaluated for CTSK, RANKL, and OPG levels using the ELISA method. Keratinized tissue and marginal bone loss (MBL) were also noted. Results Clinical parameters statistically significantly increased in each group but did not show statistical differences between groups without PPD. Although implant groups showed a higher MBL in the upper jaw, only the standard dental group demonstrated a statistically significant difference. At 90 days, the OPG: sRANKL ratio and total amounts of CTSK for each group did not differ from baseline. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, both short and mini dental implants were achieving the same outcomes as the standard dental implants in the early period after loading. PMID:26550525

  10. Long-Term Fatigue and Its Probability of Failure Applied to Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Prados-Privado, María; Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos; Gehrke, Sérgio Alexandre; Sánchez Siles, Mariano; Calvo Guirado, José Luis; Bea, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that dental implants have a high success rate but even so, there are a lot of factors that can cause dental implants failure. Fatigue is very sensitive to many variables involved in this phenomenon. This paper takes a close look at fatigue analysis and explains a new method to study fatigue from a probabilistic point of view, based on a cumulative damage model and probabilistic finite elements, with the goal of obtaining the expected life and the probability of failure. Two different dental implants were analysed. The model simulated a load of 178 N applied with an angle of 0°, 15°, and 20° and a force of 489 N with the same angles. Von Mises stress distribution was evaluated and once the methodology proposed here was used, the statistic of the fatigue life and the probability cumulative function were obtained. This function allows us to relate each cycle life with its probability of failure. Cylindrical implant has a worst behaviour under the same loading force compared to the conical implant analysed here. Methodology employed in the present study provides very accuracy results because all possible uncertainties have been taken in mind from the beginning. PMID:27517052

  11. Modeling the electromechanical impedance technique for the assessment of dental implant stability.

    PubMed

    LaMalfa Ribolla, Emma; Rizzo, Piervincenzo

    2015-07-16

    We simulated the electromechanical impedance (EMI) technique to assess the stability of dental implants. The technique consists of bonding a piezoelectric transducer to the element to be monitored. When subjected to an electric field, the transducer induces structural excitations which, in turn, affect the transducer's electrical admittance. As the structural vibrations depend on the mechanical impedance of the element, the measurement of the transducer's admittance can be exploited to assess the element's health. In the study presented in this paper, we created a 3D finite element model to mimic a transducer bonded to the abutment of a dental implant placed in a host bone site. We simulated the healing that occurs after surgery by changing Young's modulus of the bone-implant interface. The results show that as Young's modulus of the interface increases, i.e. as the mechanical interlock of the implant within the bone is achieved, the electromechanical characteristic of the transducer changes. The model and the findings of this numerical study may be used in the future to predict and interpret experimental data, and to develop a robust and cost-effective method for the assessment of primary and secondary dental implant stability. PMID:26070645

  12. Long-Term Fatigue and Its Probability of Failure Applied to Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Prados-Frutos, Juan Carlos; Gehrke, Sérgio Alexandre; Calvo Guirado, José Luis; Bea, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that dental implants have a high success rate but even so, there are a lot of factors that can cause dental implants failure. Fatigue is very sensitive to many variables involved in this phenomenon. This paper takes a close look at fatigue analysis and explains a new method to study fatigue from a probabilistic point of view, based on a cumulative damage model and probabilistic finite elements, with the goal of obtaining the expected life and the probability of failure. Two different dental implants were analysed. The model simulated a load of 178 N applied with an angle of 0°, 15°, and 20° and a force of 489 N with the same angles. Von Mises stress distribution was evaluated and once the methodology proposed here was used, the statistic of the fatigue life and the probability cumulative function were obtained. This function allows us to relate each cycle life with its probability of failure. Cylindrical implant has a worst behaviour under the same loading force compared to the conical implant analysed here. Methodology employed in the present study provides very accuracy results because all possible uncertainties have been taken in mind from the beginning. PMID:27517052

  13. Critical soft-tissue dimensions with dental implants and treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Daniel S; Mühlemann, Sven; Jung, Ronald E

    2014-10-01

    Dental implants have proven to be a successful treatment option in fully and partially edentulous patients, rendering long-term functional and esthetic outcomes. Various factors are crucial for predictable long-term peri-implant tissue stability, including the biologic width; the papilla height and the mucosal soft-tissue level; the amounts of soft-tissue volume and keratinized tissue; and the biotype of the mucosa. The biotype of the mucosa is congenitally set, whereas many other parameters can, to some extent, be influenced by the treatment itself. Clinically, the choice of the dental implant and the position in a vertical and horizontal direction can substantially influence the establishment of the biologic width and subsequently the location of the buccal mucosa and the papilla height. Current treatment concepts predominantly focus on providing optimized peri-implant soft-tissue conditions before the start of the prosthetic phase and insertion of the final reconstruction. These include refined surgical techniques and the use of materials from autogenous and xenogenic origins to augment soft-tissue volume and keratinized tissue around dental implants, thereby mimicking the appearance of natural teeth.

  14. Design improvement and dynamic finite element analysis of novel ITI dental implant under dynamic chewing loads.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung-Chang; Lin, Deng-Huei; Jiang, Cho-Pei; Lee, Shyh-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this article was to introduce the application of a uniform design for experimental methods to drop the micromotion of a novel ITI dental implant model under the dynamic loads. Combining the characteristics of the traditional ITI and Nano-Tite implants, a new implant with concave holes has been constructed. Compared to the traditional ITI dental implant model, the micromotion of the new dental implant model was significantly reduced by explicit dynamic finite element analysis. From uniform design of experiments, the dynamic finite element analysis method was applied to caluculated the maximum micromotion of the full model. Finally, the chief design in all the experiment simulations which cause the minimum micromotion is picked as the advanced model of the design. Related to the original design, which was associated with a micromotion of 45.11 μm, the micromotion of the improved version was 31.37 μm, for an improvement rate of 30.5%. PMID:26406049

  15. Decontamination of dental implant surface in peri-implantitis treatment: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago-Vera, Pedro; Solá-Ruiz, María F.; Ferrer-García, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Etiological treatment of peri-implantitis aims to reduce the bacterial load within the peri-implant pocket and decontaminate the implant surface in order to promote osseointegration. The aim of this literature review was to evaluate the efficacy of different methods of implant surface decontamination. A search was conducted using the PubMed (Medline) database, which identified 36 articles including in vivo and in vitro studies, and reviews of different decontamination systems (chemical, mechanical, laser and photodynamic therapies). There is sufficient consensus that, for the treatment of peri-implant infections, the mechanical removal of biofilm from the implant surface should be supplemented by chemical decontamination with surgical access. However, more long-term research is needed to confirm this and to establish treatment protocols responding to different implant characterics. Key words:Peri-implantitis, treatment, decontamination, implant surface, laser. PMID:23986023

  16. Dental occlusion: modern concepts and their application in implant prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Gunnar E

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the literature on various aspects of occlusion related to implant prosthodontics, using PubMed and the Cochrane library. Even if the number of studies on implants and prosthodontics is very large, no randomized controlled trials or Cochrane reviews were found on the possible influence of occlusal design or characteristics of occlusion on treatment outcome. Therefore, studies and articles of a lower evidence level were accepted as the main part of the review. The widely spread opinion that implants are superior to natural teeth was refuted by two recent consensus conferences, which concluded that the long-term outcome of implant restorations is not better than that of natural teeth. No controlled studies on the optimal features of a harmonious natural and/or restored occlusion, including implant prostheses, were found. Nor was there any evidence that more sophisticated methods in jaw registration, e.g., using face-bows and adjustable articulators, compared with simpler methods, will yield better clinical prosthodontic results. This article discusses, among other things, concepts of occlusion of implant-supported restorations, occlusal material, cantilevers, and occlusal risk factors. Within the limitations of the review, it was concluded that many factors can influence implant failure and peri-implant bone loss but that little is known of the relative importance of such factors. Most probably, however, occlusal factors and details of occlusion are in general of minor importance for the outcome of implant restorations. Occlusion can be managed successfully by using simple methods for jaw registration and different occlusal concepts.

  17. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells as a Tool for Dental Implant Osseointegration: an Experimental Study in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Eriberto; Botticelli, Daniele; Sivolella, Stefano; Bengazi, Franco; Guazzo, Riccardo; Sbricoli, Luca; Ricci, Sara; Ferroni, Letizia; Gardin, Chiara; Velez, Joaquin Urbizo; Zavan, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The biological interaction between the jaw bones and dental implant is fundamental for the long-term success of dental implant placement. Nevertheless, the insufficient bone volume remains a major clinical problem, especially in case of immediate dental implant. Using a canine model, the present study proves the regenerative potential of adipose- derived stem cells (ADSCs) to repair peri-implant bone defects occurring in immediate dental implant placement. In six labradors, all mandibular premolars and the first molars were extracted bilaterally and three months later dental implants were installed with a marginal gap. The marginal defects were filled with hydroxyapatite (HA)-based scaffolds previously seeded with ADSCs. After one month of healing, specimens were prepared for histological and histomorphometric evaluations. Histological analyses of ground sections show that ADSCs significantly increase bone regeneration. Several new vessels, osteoblasts and new bone matrix were detected. By contrast, no inflammatory cells have been revealed. ADSCs could be used to accelerate bone healing in peri- implant defects in case of immediate dental implant placement. PMID:27014644

  18. Long-term outcomes of oral rehabilitation with dental implants in HIV-positive patients: A retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Gay-Escoda, Cosme; Pérez-Álvarez, Débora; Camps-Font, Octavi

    2016-01-01

    Background The existing information on oral rehabilitations with dental implants in VIH-positive patients is scarce and of poor quality. Moreover, no long-term follow-up studies are available. Hence, the aims of this study were to describe the long-term survival and success rates of dental implants in a group of HIV-positive patients and to identify the most common postoperative complications, including peri-implant diseases. Material and Methods A retrospective case series of HIV-positive subjects treated with dental implants at the School of Dentistry of the University of Barcelona (Spain) was studied. Several clinical parameters were registered, including CD4 cell count, viral load and surgical complications. Additionally, the patients were assessed for implant survival and success rates and for the prevalence of peri-implant diseases. A descriptive statistical analysis of the data was performed. Results Nine participants (57 implants) were included. The patients’ median age was 42 years (IQR=13.5 years). The implant survival and success rates were 98.3% and 68.4%, respectively, with a mean follow-up of 77.5 months (SD=16.1 months). The patient-based prevalence of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were 22.2% and 44.4% respectively at the last appointment. Patients that attended regular periodontal maintenance visits had significantly less mean bone loss than non-compliant patients (1.3 mm and 3.9 mm respectively). Conclusions Oral rehabilitation with dental implants in HIV-positive patients seems to provide satisfactory results. In order to reduce the considerably high prevalence of peri-implant diseases, strict maintenance programmes must be implemented. Key words:HIV infection, dental implants, oral implantology, complications, peri-implantitis, peri-implant diseases. PMID:26946205

  19. Assessment of the increased calcification of the jaw bone with CT-Scan after dental implant placement

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the changes of jaw bone density around the dental implant after placement using computed tomography scan (CT-Scan). Materials and Methods This retrospective study consisted of 30 patients who had lost 1 posterior tooth in maxilla or mandible and installed dental implant. The patients took CT-Scan before and after implant placement. Hounsfield Unit (HU) was measured around the implants and evaluated the difference of HU before and after implant installation. Results The mean HU of jaw bone was 542.436 HU and 764.9 HU before and after implant placement, respectively (p<0.05). The means HUs for male were 632.3 HU and 932.2 HU and those for female 478.2 HU and 645.5 HU before and after implant placement, respectively (p<0.05). Also, the jaw bone with lower density needed longer period for implant procedure and the increased change of HU of jaw bone was less in the cases which needed longer period for osseointegration. Conclusion CT-Scan could be used to assess the change of bone density around dental implants. Bone density around dental implant was increased after placement. The increased rate of bone density could be determined by the quality of jaw bone before implant placement. PMID:21977476

  20. Clinical and microbiological findings on newly inserted hydroxyapatite-coated and pure titanium human dental implants.

    PubMed

    Rams, T E; Roberts, T W; Feik, D; Molzan, A K; Slots, J

    1991-01-01

    The clinical and microbiologic features of 30 hydroxyapatite-coated root-form endosseous dental implants (Tri-Stage) were compared to 10 similar pure titanium implants without hydroxyapatite coatings. In 7 of 9 partially edentulous patients studied, pure titanium fixtures were placed adjacent to hydroxyapatite-coated implants. Implants in the maxilla were submerged beneath mucosal tissues after implant placement for a minimum of 6 months, and in the mandible for at least 4 months. All patients were prescribed short-term beta-lactam antibiotic therapy after fixture placement, and 8 of 9 used chlorhexidine mouthrinses after fixture exposure. Clinical and microbiological examination was carried out 7-10 months after fixed prosthetic loading of the implants. Clinical measurements included the gingival index, plaque index, bleeding on probing and peri-implant probing depths determined with the Florida Probe system. Subgingival microbial samples were collected with paper points and transported in VMGA III. Specimens were examined by direct phase-contrast microscopy and were plated onto nonselective and selective culture media for anaerobic and aerobic incubation. No significant mean clinical or microbiological differences were found between the implant types, although one hydroxyapatite-coated implant exhibited deep probing depths, bleeding on probing and marked radiographic crestal bone loss. Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mitis were the most predominant organisms recovered from clinically stable implants, whereas high proportions of Fusobacterium species and Peptostreptococcus prevotii were isolated from the ailing hydroxyapatite-coated implant. One or more implants in 8 of the study subjects yielded enteric rods, pseudomonads, enterococci or staphylococci. The prognosis of implants with varying early microbiotas needs to be established in longitudinal studies. PMID:1843465

  1. Pre- and post-operative management of dental implant placement. Part 1: management of post-operative pain.

    PubMed

    Bryce, G; Bomfim, D I; Bassi, G S

    2014-08-01

    Although dental implant placements have high success rates and a low incidence of morbidity, post-operative pain and complications with the healing process have been reported. There is little guidance available regarding optimal pre- and post-operative management of dental implant placement. This first paper discusses the mechanisms of pain associated with dental implant placement and offers guidance to clinicians on optimal pre- and post-operative pain management regimes. The second paper aims to discuss pre- and post-operative means of reducing the risk of early healing complications. PMID:25104691

  2. Morse taper dental implants and platform switching: The new paradigm in oral implantology

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, José Paulo; Pereira, Jorge; Vahey, Brendan R.; Henriques, Bruno; Benfatti, Cesar A. M.; Magini, Ricardo S.; López-López, José; Souza, Júlio C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review on the potential benefits with the use of Morse taper dental implant connections associated with small diameter platform switching abutments. A Medline bibliographical search (from 1961 to 2014) was carried out. The following search items were explored: “Bone loss and platform switching,” “bone loss and implant-abutment joint,” “bone resorption and platform switching,” “bone resorption and implant-abutment joint,” “Morse taper and platform switching.” “Morse taper and implant-abutment joint,” Morse taper and bone resorption,” “crestal bone remodeling and implant-abutment joint,” “crestal bone remodeling and platform switching.” The selection criteria used for the article were: meta-analysis; randomized controlled trials; prospective cohort studies; as well as reviews written in English, Portuguese, or Spanish languages. Within the 287 studies identified, 81 relevant and recent studies were selected. Results indicated a reduced occurrence of peri-implantitis and bone loss at the abutment/implant level associated with Morse taper implants and a reduced-diameter platform switching abutment. Extrapolation of data from previous studies indicates that Morse taper connections associated with platform switching have shown less inflammation and possible bone loss with the peri-implant soft tissues. However, more long-term studies are needed to confirm these trends. PMID:27011755

  3. Morse taper dental implants and platform switching: The new paradigm in oral implantology.

    PubMed

    Macedo, José Paulo; Pereira, Jorge; Vahey, Brendan R; Henriques, Bruno; Benfatti, Cesar A M; Magini, Ricardo S; López-López, José; Souza, Júlio C M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review on the potential benefits with the use of Morse taper dental implant connections associated with small diameter platform switching abutments. A Medline bibliographical search (from 1961 to 2014) was carried out. The following search items were explored: "Bone loss and platform switching," "bone loss and implant-abutment joint," "bone resorption and platform switching," "bone resorption and implant-abutment joint," "Morse taper and platform switching." "Morse taper and implant-abutment joint," Morse taper and bone resorption," "crestal bone remodeling and implant-abutment joint," "crestal bone remodeling and platform switching." The selection criteria used for the article were: meta-analysis; randomized controlled trials; prospective cohort studies; as well as reviews written in English, Portuguese, or Spanish languages. Within the 287 studies identified, 81 relevant and recent studies were selected. Results indicated a reduced occurrence of peri-implantitis and bone loss at the abutment/implant level associated with Morse taper implants and a reduced-diameter platform switching abutment. Extrapolation of data from previous studies indicates that Morse taper connections associated with platform switching have shown less inflammation and possible bone loss with the peri-implant soft tissues. However, more long-term studies are needed to confirm these trends.

  4. Decontamination of dental implant surfaces by means of photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Marotti, Juliana; Tortamano, Pedro; Cai, Silvana; Ribeiro, Martha Simões; Franco, João Eduardo Miranda; de Campos, Tomie Toyota

    2013-01-01

    Several implant surface debridement methods have been reported for the treatment of peri-implantitis, however, some of them can damage the implant surface or promote bacterial resistance. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new treatment option for peri-implantitis. The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze implant surface decontamination by means of PDT. Sixty implants were equally distributed (n = 10) into four groups and two subgroups. In group G1 there was no decontamination, while in G2 decontamination was performed with chlorhexidine. G3 (PDT - laser + dye) and G4 (laser, without dye) were divided into two subgroups each; with PDT performed for 3 min in G3a and G4a, and for 5 min in G3b and G4b. After 5 min in contact with methylene blue dye (G3), the implants were irradiated (G3 and G4) with a low-level laser (GaAlAs, 660 nm, 30 mW) for 3 or 5 min (7.2 and 12 J). After the dilutions, culture media were kept in an anaerobic atmosphere for 1 week, and then colony forming units were counted. There was a significant difference (p < 0.001) between G1 and the other groups, and between G4 in comparison with G2 and G3. Better decontamination was obtained in G2 and G3, with no statistically significant difference between them. The results of this study suggest that photodynamic therapy can be considered an efficient method for reducing bacteria on implant surfaces, whereas laser irradiation without dye was less efficient than PDT.

  5. Bruxism: overview of current knowledge and suggestions for dental implants planning.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Daniele; Bucci, Marco Brady; Sabattini, Vincenzo Bucci; Lobbezoo, Frank

    2011-10-01

    Bruxism is commonly considered a detrimental motor activity, potentially causing overload of the stomatognathic structures and representing a risk factor for dental implant survival. The available literature does not provide evidence-based guidelines for the management of bruxers undergoing implant-retained restorations. The present paper reviewed current concepts on bruxism etiology, diagnosis and management, underlining its effects on dental implants in an attempt to provide clinically useful suggestions based on scientifically sound data. Unfortunately, very little data exists on the subject of a cause-and-effect relationship between bruxism and implant failure, to the point that expert opinions and cautionary approaches are still considered the best available sources for suggesting good practice indicators. By including experimental literature data on the effects of different types of occlusal loading on peri-implant marginal bone loss along with data from studies investigating the intensity of the forces transmitted to the bone itself during tooth-clenching and tooth-grinding activities, the authors were able to compile the suggestions presented here for prosthetic implant rehabilitations in patients with bruxism. PMID:22128671

  6. Immediately loaded non-submerged versus delayed loaded submerged dental implants: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, B R; Albrektsson, T; Wennerberg, A

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rate, postoperative infection, and marginal bone loss for patients being rehabilitated with immediately loaded non-submerged dental implants or delayed loaded submerged implants, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in March 2014. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomized or not. The search strategy resulted in 28 publications. The inverse variance method was used for a random- or fixed-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity. The estimates of an intervention were expressed as the risk ratio (RR) and mean difference (MD) in millimetres. Twenty-three studies were judged to be at high risk of bias, one at moderate risk of bias, and four studies were considered at low risk of bias. The difference between procedures (submerged vs. non-submerged implants) significantly affected the implant failure rate (P = 0.02), with a RR of 1.78 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-2.83). There was no apparent significant effect of non-submerged dental implants on the occurrence of postoperative infection (P = 0.29; RR 2.13, CI 0.52-8.65) or on marginal bone loss (P = 0.77; MD -0.03, 95% CI -0.23 to 0.17).

  7. Osteogenesis and morphology of the peri-implant bone facing dental implants.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Marco; Orsini, Ester; Trire, Alessandra; Quaranta, Marilisa; Martini, Desiree; Piccari, Gabriella G; Ruggeri, Alessandro; Ottani, Vittoria

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of different implant surfaces on peri-implant osteogenesis and implant face morphology of peri-implant tissues during the early (2 weeks) and complete healing period (3 months). Thirty endosseous titanium implants (conic screws) with differently treated surfaces (smooth titanium = SS, titanium plasma sprayed = TPS, sand-blasted zirconium oxide = Zr-SLA) were implanted in femur and tibiae diaphyses of two mongrel sheep. Histological sections of the implants and surrounding tissues obtained by sawing and grinding techniques were observed under light microscopy (LM). The peri-implant tissues of other samples were mechanically detached from the corresponding implants to be processed for SEM observation. Two weeks after implantation, we observed osteogenesis (new bone trabeculae) around all implant surfaces only where a gap was present at the host bone-metal interface. No evident bone deposition was detectable where threads of the screws were in direct contact with the compact host bone. Distance osteogenesis predominated in SS implants, while around rough surfaces (TPS and Zr-SLA), both distance and contact osteogenesis were present. At SEM analysis 2 weeks after implantation, the implant face of SS peri-implant tissue showed few, thin, newly formed, bone trabeculae immersed in large, loose, marrow tissue with blood vessels. Around the TPS screws, the implant face of the peri-implant tissue was rather irregular because of the rougher metal surface. Zr-SLA screws showed more numerous, newly formed bone trabeculae crossing marrow spaces and also needle-like crystals in bone nodules indicating an active mineralising process. After 3 months, all the screws appeared osseointegrated, being almost completely covered by a compact, mature, newly formed bone. However, some marrow spaces rich in blood vessels and undifferentiated cells were in contact with the metal surface. By SEM analysis, the implant face of the peri-implant tissue showed

  8. Turned versus anodised dental implants: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, B R; Albrektsson, T; Wennerberg, A

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rates, marginal bone loss (MBL)and post-operative infection for patients being rehabilitated by turned versus anodised-surface implants, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in November 2015. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomised or not. Thirty-eight publications were included. The results suggest a risk ratio of 2·82 (95% CI 1·95-4·06, P < 0·00001) for failure of turned implants, when compared to anodised-surface implants. Sensitivity analyses showed similar results when only the studies inserting implants in maxillae or mandibles were pooled. There were no statistically significant effects of turned implants on the MBL (mean difference-MD 0·02, 95%CI -0·16-0·20; P = 0·82) in comparison to anodised implants. The results of a meta-regression considering the follow-up period as a covariate suggested an increase of the MD with the increase in the follow-up time (MD increase 0·012 mm year(-1) ), however, without a statistical significance (P = 0·813). Due to lack of satisfactory information, meta-analysis for the outcome 'post-operative infection' was not performed. The results have to be interpreted with caution due to the presence of several confounding factors in the included studies.

  9. Use of the electro-mechanical impedance method for the assessment of dental implant stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Piervincenzo; Boemio, Giovanni; de Nardo, Luigi

    2011-04-01

    The robustness and reliability of the Electro-Mechanical Impedance (EMI) method to assess dental prostheses stability is presented. The study aim at addressing an increasing need in the biomedical area where robust, reliable, and non-invasive methods to assess the bone-interface of dental and orthopedic implants are increasingly demanded for clinical diagnosis and direct prognosis. In this study two different dental screws were entrenched in polyurethane foams and immersed in a solution of nitric acid to allow material degradation, inversely simulating a bone-healing process. This process was monitored by bonding a Piezoceramic Transducer (PZT) to the implant and measuring the admittance of the PZT over time. To simulate healing, a second set of experiments was conducted. It consisted of placing four dental screws inside a joint compound specimen and observing the setting of the fresh compound allocated in the alveolus containing each implant. In all cases it was found that the PZT's conductance and the statistical features associated with the analysis of the admittance signatures were sensitive to the degradation or the setting process.

  10. Interaction of bone-dental implant with new ultra low modulus alloy using a numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, B; Baptista, A A; Patoor, E; Bravetti, P; Eberhardt, A; Laheurte, P

    2014-05-01

    Although mechanical stress is known as being a significant factor in bone remodeling, most implants are still made using materials that have a higher elastic stiffness than that of bones. Load transfer between the implant and the surrounding bones is much detrimental, and osteoporosis is often a consequence of such mechanical mismatch. The concept of mechanical biocompatibility has now been considered for more than a decade. However, it is limited by the choice of materials, mainly Ti-based alloys whose elastic properties are still too far from cortical bone. We have suggested using a bulk material in relation with the development of a new beta titanium-based alloy. Titanium is a much suitable biocompatible metal, and beta-titanium alloys such as metastable TiNb exhibit a very low apparent elastic modulus related to the presence of an orthorhombic martensite. The purpose of the present work has been to investigate the interaction that occurs between the dental implants and the cortical bone. 3D finite element models have been adopted to analyze the behavior of the bone-implant system depending on the elastic properties of the implant, different types of implant geometry, friction force, and loading condition. The geometry of the bone has been adopted from a mandibular incisor and the surrounding bone. Occlusal static forces have been applied to the implants, and their effects on the bone-metal implant interface region have been assessed and compared with a cortical bone/bone implant configuration. This work has shown that the low modulus implant induces a stress distribution closer to the actual physiological phenomenon, together with a better stress jump along the bone implant interface, regardless of the implant design. PMID:24656363

  11. Successful dental implant placement surgeries with buccal bone fenestrations.

    PubMed

    Steier, Liviu; Steier, Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    This is the first comprehensive review of the classification, preventative measures, diagnosis, treatment methods, and determination of success criteria of buccal bone plate fenestrations (BPFs) secondary to posterior implant surgeries. The purpose of this review is to present and discuss the current literature from peer-reviewed journals, recent studies, and international implantology guidelines and to provide practitioners with guiding points to identify and understand whether BPFs are complications or accidents of implant surgeries. In addition, this review sets forth a detailed set of criteria for the evaluation and diagnosis of BPFs and for the subsequent classification of BPFs as either complications or accidents of posterior implant surgeries. From the literature analyzed, it is clear that BPFs are disqualified from the class of implant treatment failures because BPFs neither impair nor significantly delay treatment. A comprehensive outline of preventative measures and surgery aids to avoid fenestrating the buccal bone plate during implant placement, and a variety of repair methods are included in this review. Considerations of treatment outcomes and patient sensitivities are also included in this comprehensive review. PMID:23573944

  12. Assessment of dental implant stability by means of the electromechanical impedance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boemio, Giovanni; Rizzo, Piervincenzo; De Nardo, Luigi

    2011-04-01

    Implant stability is a prerequisite for functional recovery in load-bearing prostheses. Robust, reliable and noninvasive methods to assess the bone interface of dental and orthopedic implants are increasingly demanded for clinical diagnosis and direct prognosis. In this paper, a study of the feasibility of a noninvasive method based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) to assess dental prostheses stability is presented. Two different dental screws were entrenched in polyurethane foams (Sawbones®) and immersed in a solution of nitric acid to allow material degradation, inversely simulating a bone healing process. This process was monitored by bonding a piezoceramic transducer (PZT) to the implant and measuring the admittance of the PZT over time. It was found that the PZT's conductance and the statistical features associated with its analysis were sensitive to the degradation of the foams and can be correlated to the Sawbones mechanical properties. The present study shows promising results and may pave the road towards an innovative approach for the noninvasive monitoring of implanted prostheses.

  13. Mixed zirconia calcium phosphate coatings for dental implants: tailoring coating stability and bioactivity potential.

    PubMed

    Pardun, Karoline; Treccani, Laura; Volkmann, Eike; Streckbein, Philipp; Heiss, Christian; Li Destri, Giovanni; Marletta, Giovanni; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-03-01

    Enhanced coating stability and adhesion are essential for long-term success of orthopedic and dental implants. In this study, the effect of coating composition on mechanical, physico-chemical and biological properties of coated zirconia specimens is investigated. Zirconia discs and dental screw implants are coated using the wet powder spraying (WPS) technique. The coatings are obtained by mixing yttria-stabilized zirconia (TZ) and hydroxyapatite (HA) in various ratios while a pure HA coating served as reference material. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical profilometer analysis confirm a similar coating morphology and roughness for all studied coatings, whereas the coating stability can be tailored with composition and is probed by insertion and dissections experiments in bovine bone with coated zirconia screw implants. An increasing content of calcium phosphate (CP) resulted in a decrease of mechanical and chemical stability, while the bioactivity increased in simulated body fluid (SBF). In vitro experiments with human osteoblast cells (HOB) revealed that the cells grew well on all samples but are affected by dissolution behavior of the studied coatings. This work demonstrates the overall good mechanical strength, the excellent interfacial bonding and the bioactivity potential of coatings with higher TZ contents, which provide a highly interesting coating for dental implants. PMID:25579931

  14. Potential use of a polycarbonate-urethane matrix reinforced with polyethylene fibers for shock-absorbing dental implants.

    PubMed

    Sheikhhassani, Ramtin; Anvari, Pasha; Taei, Simin; Sheikhhassani, Yasmin

    2015-09-01

    The absence of a shock-absorbing mechanism in commercial dental implants is a likely factor in the resulting bone loss and possible implant failure. The aim of the current study is to generate a shock-absorbing dental implant that resembles the periodontal ligament, which naturally absorbs occlusal overloading forces. To achieve this, a polycarbonate-urethane composite reinforced with polyethylene fibers will be constructed. Tests based on finite element analysis and mechanical testing are proposed to further examine this novel implant type.

  15. Decontamination of dental implant surface in peri-implantitis treatment: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Mellado-Valero, Ana; Buitrago-Vera, Pedro; Solá-Ruiz, María-Fernanda; Ferrer-García, Juan-Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Etiological treatment of peri-implantitis aims to reduce the bacterial load within the peri-implant pocket and decontaminate the implant surface in order to promote osseointegration. The aim of this literature review was to evaluate the efficacy of different methods of implant surface decontamination. A search was conducted using the PubMed (Medline) database, which identified 36 articles including in vivo and in vitro studies, and reviews of different decontamination systems (chemical, mechanical, laser and photodynamic therapies). There is sufficient consensus that, for the treatment of peri-implant infections, the mechanical removal of biofilm from the implant surface should be supplemented by chemical decontamination with surgical access. However, more long-term research is needed to confirm this and to establish treatment protocols responding to different implant characterics.

  16. Dental implant treatment with different techniques for sinus floor elevation--a case report.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Hideshi; Taguchi, Tatsuo; Seta, Shuichi; Takano, Masayuki; Takeda, Takayuki; Kakizawa, Takashi

    2007-05-01

    A 60-year-old man with missing maxillary molar teeth received dental implant therapy for reconstruction of occlusion. Sinus floor elevation with autogenous bone graft consisting of iliac bone block and particulate cancellous bone and marrow (PCBM) was performed in the bilateral maxillary sinuses for implant placement. On the right side, bone height in the molar region was less than 2mm. Therefore, a delayed protocol was applied, and 2 implants were placed 4 months after bone grafting. Bone graft resorption occurred during the healing period of 4 months. On the left side, 3 implants were placed simultaneously with sinus floor elevation, as bone height in the molar region was more than 4-5mm. The bone graft was carried out at the same time as implant placement. After implant placement, resorption of the bone graft stopped, and the superstructures were delivered on both sides. The tissues around the implants were clinically healthy at one year after examination. Sinus floor elevation with autogenous bone graft is an acceptable option for implant treatment in the maxillary molar region where there is adequate height of existing bone. In postoperative care, it is important to undertake adequate follow-up to ascertain occurrence of bone graft resorption.

  17. Clinical efficacy of early loading versus conventional loading of dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanfei; Zheng, Xinyi; Zeng, Guanqi; Xu, Yi; Qu, Xinhua; Zhu, Min; Lu, Eryi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical differences between early and conventional loading protocols for dental implants. A comprehensive search of the Medline, Embase, and OVID databases for studies published through January 10, 2015 was conducted. Fourteen studies were included in our analysis. We found that early loading imposed a significantly higher risk of implant failure than did conventional loading (risk ratio = 2.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.18, 3.69], P = 0.01), while no significant differences between the methods were found with regards to the marginal bone loss (weighted mean differences [WMD] = 0.11, 95% CI [−0.07, 0.28], P = 0.23), periotest value (WMD = 0.02, 95% CI [−0.83, 0.87], P = 0.96), or implant stability quotient (WMD = 0.79, 95% CI [−0.03, 1.62], P = 0.06). As for the health status of the peri-implant tissue, conventionally loaded implants demonstrated better performance than did early loaded implants. Subgroup analyses demonstrated that the sample size, time of publication, loading definition, implant position, extent, and restoration type influenced the results. Although early implant loading is convenient and comfortable for patients, this method still cannot achieve the same clinical outcomes as the conventional loading method. PMID:26542097

  18. Placement of dental implants in the maxillary tuberosity: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lopes, L F dT P; da Silva, V F; Santiago, J F; Panzarini, S R; Pellizzer, E P

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to identify clinical studies on implants placed in the tuberosity region to determine the survival rate of these implants when compared to implants placed in other regions of the maxilla. A search for data published up until March 2014 was undertaken using the PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, and ScienceDirect databases. Eligible studies were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. The first database search revealed 310 titles. After inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, five studies remained for the detailed analysis. A total of 113 patients were followed for a period of 6-144 months; 289 implants were placed in the patients evaluated. There were eight failures/losses of dental implants in the tuberosity region; the overall survival rate was 94.63% for these implants. In controlled studies, the cumulative survival rates for implants placed in the maxillary tuberosity and other maxillary regions were 96.1% and 95%, respectively. In conclusion, implants placed into the maxillary tuberosity are a predictable alternative for the treatment of patients with insufficient bone volume in the maxillary region. However, randomized trials are needed to assess the effectiveness of this treatment.

  19. Progressive plateau root form dental implant osseointegration: A human retrieval study.

    PubMed

    Gil, Luiz F; Suzuki, Marcelo; Janal, Malvin N; Tovar, Nick; Marin, Charles; Granato, Rodrigo; Bonfante, Estevam A; Jimbo, Ryo; Gil, Jose N; Coelho, Paulo G

    2015-08-01

    Although preclinical and sparse human histology retrieval studies have shown that the interface between implant and bone is constantly remodeling, no human retrieval database has been developed to determine the effect of functional loading time and other clinical/implant design variables on osseointegration. The present study tested the hypothesis that bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO) increase over functional loading time around dental implants. Due to prosthetic retreatment reasons, 93 human implant retrievals from the same manufacturer (Bicon LLC, Boston, MA, USA) were obtained over a period of approximately 15 years. The retrieved implants were under functional loading from 120 days to ∼18 years and were histomorphologic/metrically evaluated. BIC/BAFO were assessed as a function of multiple independent variables: implant surface type, diameter, length, jaw (maxilla/mandible), region (anterior/posterior), and time of functional loading. The results showed that both BIC and BAFO increased over time independently of implant design/clinical variables, supporting the postulated hypothesis.

  20. Titanium: the mystery metal of implant dentistry. Dental materials aspects.

    PubMed

    Parr, G R; Gardner, L K; Toth, R W

    1985-09-01

    A number of important points concerning titanium and its alloys have been discussed. They are summarized as follows. Ti and its alloys, particularly the alpha-beta alloys, possess mechanical properties that make them ideal implant materials. Ti and its alloys oxidize readily in air. This surface oxide is extremely stable in the physiologic environment of the body. The stability and inertness of this surface oxide layer acts to protect Ti from corrosive breakdown when used in the body. The elimination of surface irregularities and contaminants is important when preparing a metal for implantation. Titanium can be coupled with equally passive metals in the body without causing galvanic corrosion.

  1. Immediate dental implant placement with immediate loading following extraction of natural teeth

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mayank; Kumar, Lakshya; Anwar, Mohd.; Chand, Pooran

    2015-01-01

    The loss of tooth in the esthetic area is often a traumatic experience for the patient. Patients may suffer real or perceived detrimental effects following the loss of one or more teeth. Dental implant offers the most cost-effective and long-term solution for replacement of missing teeth with high average life expectancy, providing the patient with the best sense of security and well-being. Recently, immediate implant placement after extraction of tooth with early loading has become more common. The advantages of this procedure include fewer surgical interventions, reduction in overall treatment time, reduced soft and hard tissue loss, and psychological satisfaction to the patient. This case report describes the procedure for immediate implant placement with immediate loading of implants by provisional restorations. PMID:27390509

  2. Where can I learn how to place dental implants? Perspectives from Scandinavia and Canada.

    PubMed

    Jokstad, Asbjørn

    2008-07-01

    An overview is presented of the educational opportunities that exist for dentists in Canada and in the five Nordic countries who wish to learn how to implement implant dentistry in clinical practice. This theme is discussed in the context of the demographic and educational realities in these countries. Data related to dental demographics, implant dentistry educational aspects, advertisement of postgraduate education courses, and demographic and geographic facts were collected from various databases and compared. The educational philosophies and approach to patient care differ between Canada and the five Nordic countries, which make it questionable whether one teaching model for a global implant training program will fit all. Despite these differences, if one is to proceed, a competency-oriented education model seems to be the way forward. The challenge to construct courses in implant dentistry within this competence-oriented education model remains.

  3. Denture-Related Biomechanical Factors for Fixed Partial Dentures Retained on Short Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Pommer, Bernhard; Hingsammer, Lukas; Haas, Robert; Mailath-Pokorny, Georg; Busenlechner, Dieter; Watzek, Georg; Fürhauser, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Prosthodontically driven biomechanical considerations are essential for longterm successful outcomes in dental implant therapy. Correct protocols seek to preclude potential consequences associated with functional and parafunctional occlusal overload such as screw loosening, component fracture, compromised marginal bone maintenance, and the integrity of the induced osseointegration response. Other concerns also need to be addressed, more especially when other implants are selected, for example: bridge insertion torque (BIT) in cases of immediate loading, cantilever length-anteroposterior spread ratio (CL-AP), overall crown-to-implant ratio (oCIR), total bone-to-implant surface area (tBICA), and the status of the opposing dentition. In spite of promising clinical results, evidence-based clinical protocols demand that such biomechanical limits still need to be determined.

  4. Evaluation of design parameters of dental implant shape, diameter and length on stress distribution: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Mohammed Ibrahim, M; Thulasingam, C; Nasser, K S G A; Balaji, V; Rajakumar, M; Rupkumar, P

    2011-09-01

    The aim was to evaluate the design parameters of dental implants shape, diameter and length on stress distribution by finite element analysis (FEA).The objectives of the study was to compare the influence of stress distribution in the implants of screw-vent tapered and parallel design by varying the implant diameter with a standard implant length. Six dental implant models have been simulated three-dimensionally. The influence of diameter and length on stress distribution was evaluated by Group I: for screw-vent tapered design (Zimmer Dental Implant Carlsbad, CA, USA) (1) Dental implant model with diameter 3.7 mm and length 13 mm. (2) Dental implant model with diameter 4.1 mm and length 13 mm. (3) Dental implant model with diameter 4.7 mm and length 13 mm. Group II: for parallel design (Zimmer Dental Implant Carlsbad, CA, USA) (4) Dental implant model with diameter 3.7 mm and length 13 mm. (5) Dental implant model with diameter 4.1 mm and length 13 mm. (6) Dental implant model with diameter 4.7 mm and length 13 mm. The 3-D model of the implant was created in the pro-e wildfire 4.0 software by giving various commands. This model was imported to the ANSYS software through IGES (initial graphic exchange specification) file for further analysis. All six models were loaded with a force of 17.1, 114.6 and 23.4 N in a lingual, an axial and disto-mesial direction respectively, simulating average masticatory force in a natural oblique direction, to analyze the stress distribution on these implants. The increase in implant diameter in Group I and Group II from 3.7 to 4.1 mm and from 4.1 to 4.7 mm with constant 13 mm length for screw-vent tapered and parallel design implant resulted in a reduction in maximum value of Von Mises stress in the bone surrounding the implant was statistically significant at 5% level done by student "t" test. The overall maximum value of Von Mises stress was decreased in parallel design implant diameter of 4.7 mm with constant

  5. A Technique Elucidating the Retrieval of an Adhered Cover Screw in a Dental Implant – A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bhuvaneswarri, J.; Chandrasekaran, S.C.

    2013-01-01

    Dental implants have become one of the most popular and rapidly growing techniques for replacing missing teeth. While their predictability, functionality, and durability make them an attractive option for patients and clinicians alike, complications can arise at any stage from patient assessment to maintenance of therapy. Failure of dental implants not only occurs due to biological factors, like unsuccessful osseointegration or peri-implantitis but may also occur due to technical complications like, failures of implant-supported restorations relating those from the implant components, and those relating to the prosthesis. Technical problems related to implant components include abutment screw fractures and cover screw fractures. In this case report we have elucidated an adhered cover screw in an implant. PMID:24392429

  6. Laser-induced novel patterns: As smart strain actuators for new-age dental implant surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelen, Serap; Özden, Hüseyin

    2012-12-01

    Surface morphologies of titanium implants are of crucial importance for long-term mechanical adaptation for following implantation. One major problem is the stress shielding effect which originates from the mismatch of the bone and the implant elasticity. It is time for a paradigm shift and for an exploration of novel smart surfaces to prevent this problem. Several surface treatment methods have traditionally been used to modify the surface morphology of titanium dental implants. The laser micro-machining can be considered as a unique and promising, non-contact, no media, contamination free, and flexible treatment method for modifying surface properties of materials in the biomedical industry. The aim of the present study is two folds; to develop novel 3D smart surfaces which can be acted as strain actuators by nanosecond laser pulse energies and irradiation strategies. And analyze these smart surface morphologies using finite element methods in order to estimate their internal stiffness values which play a great role on stress shielding effect. Novel 3D smart strain actuators were prepared using an ytterbium fiber laser (λ = 1060 nm) with 200-250 ns pulse durations on commercial pure titanium dental implant material specimen surfaces and optimum operation parameters were suggested.

  7. Myxofibroma of the maxilla. Reconstruction with iliac crest graft and dental implants after tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Infante-Cossío, Pedro; Martínez-de-Fuentes, Rafael; García-Perla-García, Alberto; Jiménez-Castellanos, Emilio; Gómez-Izquierdo, Lourdes

    2011-07-01

    Odontogenic fibromyxomas are benign odontogenic tumors of mesenchymal origin of rare presentation in the oral cavity, which exhibit locally aggressive behavior and are prone to local recurrence. The controversy has mainly been on therapeutic management with recommendations varying, depending on the clinical cases, from simple curettage of lesion to segmental bone resection. We present a case report describing the reconstruction of an osseous defect in the maxilla and the restoration with dental implants in a 32 year old female patient after radical surgical excision due to an odontogenic fibromyxoma with locally aggressive behavior. The primary reconstruction of maxillary discontinuity defect was carried out by an immediate non-vascularized cortico-cancellous iliac crest graft. Using a computer-guided system for the implant treatment-planning, three dental implants were secondary placed in the bone graft by means of flapless implant surgery. The patient was subsequently restored with an implant-supported fixed prosthesis that has remained in continuous function for a period of three years. The surgical, reconstructive and restorative treatment sequence and techniques are discussed.

  8. An alumina toughened zirconia composite for dental implant application: in vivo animal results.

    PubMed

    Schierano, Gianmario; Mussano, Federico; Faga, Maria Giulia; Menicucci, Giulio; Manzella, Carlo; Sabione, Cristian; Genova, Tullio; von Degerfeld, Mitzy Mauthe; Peirone, Bruno; Cassenti, Adele; Cassoni, Paola; Carossa, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic materials are widely used for biomedical applications because of their remarkable biological and mechanical properties. Composites made of alumina and zirconia are particularly interesting owing to their higher toughness with respect to the monolithic materials. On this basis, the present study is focused on the in vivo behavior of alumina toughened zirconia (ATZ) dental implants treated with a hydrothermal process. A minipig model was implemented to assess the bone healing through histology and mRNA expression at different time points (8, 14, 28, and 56 days). The novel ATZ implant was compared to a titanium clinical standard. The implants were analyzed in terms of microstructure and surface roughness before in vivo tests. The most interesting result deals with a statistically significant higher digital histology index for ATZ implants with respect to titanium standard at 56 days, which is an unprecedented finding, to the authors' knowledge. Even if further investigations are needed before proposing the clinical use in humans, the tested material proved to be a promising candidate among the possible ceramic dental implants. PMID:25945324

  9. An Alumina Toughened Zirconia Composite for Dental Implant Application: In Vivo Animal Results

    PubMed Central

    Schierano, Gianmario; Faga, Maria Giulia; Menicucci, Giulio; Sabione, Cristian; Genova, Tullio; von Degerfeld, Mitzy Mauthe; Peirone, Bruno; Cassenti, Adele; Cassoni, Paola; Carossa, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic materials are widely used for biomedical applications because of their remarkable biological and mechanical properties. Composites made of alumina and zirconia are particularly interesting owing to their higher toughness with respect to the monolithic materials. On this basis, the present study is focused on the in vivo behavior of alumina toughened zirconia (ATZ) dental implants treated with a hydrothermal process. A minipig model was implemented to assess the bone healing through histology and mRNA expression at different time points (8, 14, 28, and 56 days). The novel ATZ implant was compared to a titanium clinical standard. The implants were analyzed in terms of microstructure and surface roughness before in vivo tests. The most interesting result deals with a statistically significant higher digital histology index for ATZ implants with respect to titanium standard at 56 days, which is an unprecedented finding, to the authors' knowledge. Even if further investigations are needed before proposing the clinical use in humans, the tested material proved to be a promising candidate among the possible ceramic dental implants. PMID:25945324

  10. Electrochemical coating of dental implants with anodic porous titania for enhanced osteointegration

    PubMed Central

    Shayganpour, Amirreza; Rebaudi, Alberto; Cortella, Pierpaolo; Diaspro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Summary Clinical long-term osteointegration of titanium-based biomedical devices is the main goal for both dental and orthopedical implants. Both the surface morphology and the possible functionalization of the implant surface are important points. In the last decade, following the success of nanostructured anodic porous alumina, anodic porous titania has also attracted the interest of academic researchers. This material, investigated mainly for its photocatalytic properties and for applications in solar cells, is usually obtained from the anodization of ultrapure titanium. We anodized dental implants made of commercial grade titanium under different experimental conditions and characterized the resulting surface morphology with scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer. The appearance of nanopores on these implants confirm that anodic porous titania can be obtained not only on ultrapure and flat titanium but also as a conformal coating on curved surfaces of real objects made of industrial titanium alloys. Raman spectroscopy showed that the titania phase obtained is anatase. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that by carrying out the anodization in the presence of electrolyte additives such as magnesium, these can be incorporated into the porous coating. The proposed method for the surface nanostructuring of biomedical implants should allow for integration of conventional microscale treatments such as sandblasting with additive nanoscale patterning. Additional advantages are provided by this material when considering the possible loading of bioactive drugs in the porous cavities. PMID:26665091

  11. A Comparison of Epithelial Cells, Fibroblasts, and Osteoblasts in Dental Implant Titanium Topographies

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Fu-Yuan; Ko, Chia-Ling; Kuo, Hsien-Nan; Hu, Jin-Jia; Lin, Jia-Horng; Lou, Ching-Wen; Hung, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Yin-Lai; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Wen-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    The major challenge for dental implants is achieving optimal esthetic appearance and a concept to fulfill this criterion is evaluated. The key to an esthetically pleasing appearance lies in the properly manage the soft tissue profile around dental implants. A novel implant restoration technique on the surface was proposed as a way to augment both soft- and hard-tissue profiles at potential implant sites. Different levels of roughness can be attained by sandblasting and acid etching, and a tetracalcium phosphate was used to supply the ions. In particular, the early stage attaching and repopulating abilities of bone cell osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1), fibroblasts (NIH 3T3), and epithelial cells (XB-2) were evaluated. The results showed that XB-2 cell adhesive qualities of a smooth surface were better than those of the roughened surfaces, the proliferative properties were reversed. The effects of roughness on the characteristics of 3T3 cells were opposite to the result for XB-2 cells. E1 proliferative ability did not differ with any statistical significance. These results suggest that a rougher surface which provided calcium and phosphate ions have the ability to enhance the proliferation of osteoblast and the inhibition of fibroblast growth that enhance implant success ratios. PMID:22287942

  12. Cell Adhesion and in Vivo Osseointegration of Sandblasted/Acid Etched/Anodized Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mu-Hyon; Park, Kyeongsoon; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Soo-Hong; Kim, Se Eun; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a new type of titanium (Ti) implant as a Modi-anodized (ANO) Ti implant, the surface of which was treated by sandblasting, acid etching (SLA), and anodized techniques. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the adhesion of MG-63 cells to Modi-ANO surface treated Ti in vitro and to investigate its osseointegration characteristics in vivo. Four different types of Ti implants were examined, that is, machined Ti (control), SLA, anodized, and Modi-ANO Ti. In the cell adhesion study, Modi-ANO Ti showed higher initial MG-63 cell adhesion and induced greater filopodia growth than other groups. In vivo study in a beagle model revealed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC) of Modi-ANO Ti (74.20% ± 10.89%) was much greater than those of machined (33.58% ± 8.63%), SLA (58.47% ± 12.89), or ANO Ti (59.62% ± 18.30%). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Modi-ANO Ti implants produced by sandblasting, acid etching, and anodizing improve cell adhesion and bone ongrowth as compared with machined, SLA, or ANO Ti implants. These findings suggest that the application of Modi-ANO surface treatment could improve the osseointegration of dental implant. PMID:25955650

  13. Effects of pH and elevated glucose levels on the electrochemical behavior of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tamam, Evsen; Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2014-04-01

    Implant failure is more likely to occur in persons with medically compromising systemic conditions, such as diabetes related to high blood glucose levels and inflammatory diseases related to pH levels lower than those in healthy people. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of lower pH level and simulated- hyperglycemia on implant corrosion as these effects are critical to biocompatibility and osseointegration. The electrochemical corrosion properties of titanium implants were studied in four different solutions: Ringer's physiological solution at pH = 7.0 and pH = 5.5 and Ringer's physiological solution containing 15 mM dextrose at pH = 7 and pH = 5.5. Corrosion behaviors of dental implants were determined by cyclic polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Surface alterations were studied using a scanning electron microscope. All test electrolytes led to apparent differences in corrosion behavior of the implants. The implants under conditions of test exhibited statistically significant increases in I(corr) from 0.2372 to 1.007 μAcm(-2), corrosion rates from 1.904 to 8.085 mpy, and a decrease in polarization resistances from 304 to 74 Ω. Implants in dextrose-containing solutions were more prone to corrosion than those in Ringer's solutions alone. Increasing the acidity also yielded greater corrosion rates for the dextrose-containing solutions and the solutions without dextrose.

  14. Early osseointegration driven by the surface chemistry and wettability of dental implants

    PubMed Central

    SARTORETTO, Suelen Cristina; ALVES, Adriana Terezinha Neves Novellino; RESENDE, Rodrigo Figueiredo Britto; CALASANS-MAIA, José; GRANJEIRO, José Mauro; CALASANS-MAIA, Mônica Diuana

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of two different commercially available dental implants on osseointegration. The surfaces were sandblasting and acid etching (Group 1) and sandblasting and acid etching, then maintained in an isotonic solution of 0.9% sodium chloride (Group 2). Material and Methods X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed for surface chemistry analysis. Surface morphology and topography was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy (CM), respectively. Contact angle analysis (CAA) was employed for wetting evaluation. Bone-implant-contact (BIC) and bone area fraction occupied (BAFO) analysis were performed on thin sections (30 μm) 14 and 28 days after the installation of 10 implants from each group (n=20) in rabbits’ tibias. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA at the 95% level of significance considering implantation time and implant surface as independent variables. Results Group 2 showed 3-fold less carbon on the surface and a markedly enhanced hydrophilicity compared to Group 1 but a similar surface roughness (p>0.05). BIC and BAFO levels in Group 2 at 14 days were similar to those in Group 1 at 28 days. After 28 days of installation, BIC and BAFO measurements of Group 2 were approximately 1.5-fold greater than in Group 1 (p<0.05). Conclusion The surface chemistry and wettability implants of Group 2 accelerate osseointegration and increase the area of the bone-to-implant interface when compared to those of Group 1. PMID:26221922

  15. Photogrammetric determination of discrepancies between actual and planned position of dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forlani, G.; Rivara, F.

    2014-05-01

    The paper describes the design and testing of a photogrammetric measurement protocol set up to determine the discrepancies between the planned and actual position of computer-guided template-based dental implants. Two moulds with the implants positioned in pre- and post- intervention are produced and separately imaged with a highly redundant block of convergent images; the model with the implants is positioned on a steel frame with control points and with suitable targets attached. The theoretical accuracy of the system is better than 20 micrometers and 0.3-0.4° respectively for positions of implants and directions of implant axes. In order to compare positions and angles between the planned and actual position of an implant, coordinates and axes directions are brought to a common reference system with a Helmert transformation. A procedure for comparison of positions and directions to identify out-of-tolerance discrepancies is presented; a numerical simulation study shows the effectiveness of the procedure in identifying the implants with significant discrepancies between pre- and post- intervention.

  16. The relationship between dental implant stability and trabecular bone structure using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between primary implant stability as measured by impact response frequency and the structural parameters of trabecular bone using cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT), excluding the effect of cortical bone thickness. Methods We measured the impact response of a dental implant placed into swine bone specimens composed of only trabecular bone without the cortical bone layer using an inductive sensor. The peak frequency of the impact response spectrum was determined as an implant stability criterion (SPF). The 3D microstructural parameters were calculated from CT images of the bone specimens obtained using both micro-CT and CBCT. Results SPF had significant positive correlations with trabecular bone structural parameters (BV/TV, BV, BS, BSD, Tb.Th, Tb.N, FD, and BS/BV) (P<0.01) while SPF demonstrated significant negative correlations with other microstructural parameters (Tb.Sp, Tb.Pf, and SMI) using micro-CT and CBCT (P<0.01). Conclusions There was an increase in implant stability prediction by combining BV/TV and SMI in the stepwise forward regression analysis. Bone with high volume density and low surface density shows high implant stability. Well-connected thick bone with small marrow spaces also shows high implant stability. The combination of bone density and architectural parameters measured using CBCT can predict the implant stability more accurately than the density alone in clinical diagnoses. PMID:27127692

  17. Effects of pH and elevated glucose levels on the electrochemical behavior of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tamam, Evsen; Turkyilmaz, Ilser

    2014-04-01

    Implant failure is more likely to occur in persons with medically compromising systemic conditions, such as diabetes related to high blood glucose levels and inflammatory diseases related to pH levels lower than those in healthy people. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of lower pH level and simulated- hyperglycemia on implant corrosion as these effects are critical to biocompatibility and osseointegration. The electrochemical corrosion properties of titanium implants were studied in four different solutions: Ringer's physiological solution at pH = 7.0 and pH = 5.5 and Ringer's physiological solution containing 15 mM dextrose at pH = 7 and pH = 5.5. Corrosion behaviors of dental implants were determined by cyclic polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Surface alterations were studied using a scanning electron microscope. All test electrolytes led to apparent differences in corrosion behavior of the implants. The implants under conditions of test exhibited statistically significant increases in I(corr) from 0.2372 to 1.007 μAcm(-2), corrosion rates from 1.904 to 8.085 mpy, and a decrease in polarization resistances from 304 to 74 Ω. Implants in dextrose-containing solutions were more prone to corrosion than those in Ringer's solutions alone. Increasing the acidity also yielded greater corrosion rates for the dextrose-containing solutions and the solutions without dextrose. PMID:24779948

  18. Convergent methods assessing bone growth in an experimental model at dental implants in the minipig.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, Anton; Friedmann, Asisa; Grize, Leticia; Obrecht, Marcel; Dard, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Implant dentistry demonstrated its reliability in treating successfully an increased amount of patients with dental implants exhibiting hydrophilic (modSLA) or non-hydrophilic (SLA) surfaces. Objectives of this minipig study consisted in assessing bone regeneration at both types of dental implants in a new experimental model (lateral bone defects) by implementing a convergent analysis approach combining histology and contact radiography. In six adult female minipigs standardized acute alveolar defects were created, then receiving two implants in the mandibles bilaterally (modSLA and SLA, one of each combined with Guided Bone Regeneration). Animals were sacrificed after 28 days of healing. Mid-crestal specimen were analyzed assessing missing BIC to implant shoulder (fBIC); vertical bone growth upon implant surface, bone:tissue ratio and grafting material area occupied by material remnants for GBR sites. Values obtained from both analyses were compared and statistical correlations scrutinized. Although dimensions of mean differences and adjusted means given by radiographic method were lower than histological ones, comparison of different implants yielded similar results. Statistical analyses of correlation and concordance coefficients used to evaluate radiological method of measurement showed high level of concordance (concordance coefficient=0.912 and correlation coefficient=0.939) for fBIC. Similar results were observed for vertical new bone and for remnants of graft. Discrepancies for new bone and for mineralized tissue resulted in concordance coefficient of 0.182 and 0.054. The results indicate that contact X-rays can be used for morphometric assessments regarding defect fill; however, histological staining remains beneficial if greater resolution for distinguishing qualitative differences in the tissues is required. PMID:24656913

  19. The analysis of cost-effectiveness of implant and conventional fixed dental prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chun, June Sang; Har, Alix; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study conducted an analysis of cost-effectiveness of the implant and conventional fixed dental prosthesis (CFDP) from a single treatment perspective. MATERIALS AND METHODS The Markov model for cost-effectiveness analysis of the implant and CFDP was carried out over maximum 50 years. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed by the 10,000 Monte-Carlo simulations, and cost-effectiveness acceptability curves (CEAC) were also presented. The results from meta-analysis studies were used to determine the survival rates and complication rates of the implant and CFDP. Data regarding the cost of each treatment method were collected from University Dental Hospital and Statistics Korea for 2013. Using the results of the patient satisfaction survey study, quality-adjusted prosthesis year (QAPY) of the implant and CFDP strategy was evaluated with annual discount rate. RESULTS When only the direct cost was considered, implants were more cost-effective when the willingness to pay (WTP) was more than 10,000 won at 10th year after the treatment, and more cost-effective regardless of the WTP from 20th year after the prosthodontic treatment. When the indirect cost was added to the direct cost, implants were more cost-effective only when the WTP was more than 75,000 won at the 10th year after the prosthodontic treatment, more than 35,000 won at the 20th year after prosthodontic treatment. CONCLUSION The CFDP was more cost-effective unless the WTP was more than 75,000 won at the 10th year after prosthodontic treatment. But the cost-effectivenss tendency changed from CFDP to implant as time passed. PMID:26949488

  20. Do interleukin-1 polymorphisms predict the development of periodontitis or the success of dental implants?

    PubMed

    Rogers, Marina A; Figliomeni, Lisa; Baluchova, Katarina; Tan, Albert E S; Davies, Gareth; Henry, Patrick J; Price, Patricia

    2002-02-01

    Factors which increase the risk of severe adult periodontitis (AP) may also contribute to the success of dental implants. To determine which cytokines may be relevant, levels of interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) mRNA were quantitated in gingival tissue from periodontitis patients and healthy controls. Periodontitis significantly increased levels of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and IFN-gamma mRNA relative to healthy tissues. IL-1 was selected for further study, as it has inflammatory and bone resorbing properties. We examined IL-1A(-889) and IL-1B(+3953) alleles in Caucasian patients with AP and early-onset periodontitis (EOP), patients with dental implants and healthy individuals. The IL-1B(+3953) polymorphism was associated with AP. This was evident from an increased homozygosity for allele 2 in patients with AP and a decreased heterozygosity in advanced AP patients. IL-1A(-889) and a composite genotype [IL-1A(-889)2 plus IL-1B(+3953)2] showed no association with the incidence of periodontitis, disease onset or disease severity. IL-1A(-889), IL-1B(+3953) and the composite genotype also showed no association with failure of dental implants. PMID:11858158

  1. Mechanical behavior of single-layer ceramized zirconia abutments for dental implant prosthetic rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Melendo, Manuel; Llena-Blasco, Oriol; Bruguera, August; Llena-Blasco, Jaime; Yáñez-Vico, Rosa-María; García-Calderón, Manuel; Vaquero-Aguilar, Cristina; Velázquez-Cayón, Rocío; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was undertaken to characterize the mechanical response of bare (as-received) and single-layer ceramized zirconia abutments with both internal and external connections that have been developed to enhanced aesthetic restorations. Material and Methods: Sixteen zirconia implant abutments (ZiReal Post®, Biomet 3i, USA) with internal and external connections have been analyzed. Half of the specimens were coated with a 0.5mm-thick layer of a low-fusing fluroapatite ceramic. Mechanical tests were carried out under static (constant cross-head speed of 1mm/min until fracture) and dynamic (between 100 and 400N at a frequency of 1Hz) loading conditions. The failure location was identified by electron microscopy. The removal torque of the retaining screws after testing was also evaluated. Results: The average fracture strength was above 300N for all the abutments, regardless of connection geometry and coating. In most of the cases (94%), failure occurred by abutment fracture. No significant differences were observed either in fatigue behavior and removal torque between the different abutment groups. Conclusions: Mechanical behavior of Zireal zirconia abutments is independent of the type of internal/external connection and the presence/absence of ceramic coating. This may be clinically valuable in dental rehabilitation to improve the aesthetic outcome of zirconia-based dental implant systems. Key words:Dental implant, zirconia, ceramic structure, mechanical properties. PMID:25674313

  2. Do interleukin-1 polymorphisms predict the development of periodontitis or the success of dental implants?

    PubMed

    Rogers, Marina A; Figliomeni, Lisa; Baluchova, Katarina; Tan, Albert E S; Davies, Gareth; Henry, Patrick J; Price, Patricia

    2002-02-01

    Factors which increase the risk of severe adult periodontitis (AP) may also contribute to the success of dental implants. To determine which cytokines may be relevant, levels of interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) mRNA were quantitated in gingival tissue from periodontitis patients and healthy controls. Periodontitis significantly increased levels of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and IFN-gamma mRNA relative to healthy tissues. IL-1 was selected for further study, as it has inflammatory and bone resorbing properties. We examined IL-1A(-889) and IL-1B(+3953) alleles in Caucasian patients with AP and early-onset periodontitis (EOP), patients with dental implants and healthy individuals. The IL-1B(+3953) polymorphism was associated with AP. This was evident from an increased homozygosity for allele 2 in patients with AP and a decreased heterozygosity in advanced AP patients. IL-1A(-889) and a composite genotype [IL-1A(-889)2 plus IL-1B(+3953)2] showed no association with the incidence of periodontitis, disease onset or disease severity. IL-1A(-889), IL-1B(+3953) and the composite genotype also showed no association with failure of dental implants.

  3. Bioinspired micro/nano fabrication on dental implant-bone interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Shi, Liang; He, Wen-Xi; Han, Dong; Yan, Yan; Niu, Zhong-Ying; Shi, Sheng-Gen

    2013-01-01

    Pioneering research suggests fabricating a biomimetic interface with multiscaled surfacial architecture can greatly improve biomaterials' function and property. According to this inspiration, we chiefly single out and analyze the natural hierarchical micro/nano structure in rat's alveolar bone. Then, a combined hierarchical structure, i.e. micro-pits interlaced self-assemble TiO2 nanotubes of several tens of nanometers on dental implant's surface is developed. The as-prepared surface showed that hundreds of self-assembled TiO2 nanotubes were tightly arrayed with a diameter range of 30-50 nm, similar to collagen fibers within rat's mandible (60-80 nm). Meanwhile, this hierarchical micro/nano surface can provide a larger surface energy and roughness, a preferable hydrophilicity, a more adaptive mechanical property and adhesion work, a better bioactivity and biocompatibity, a superior attachment and growth of osteoblasts as compared to the smooth and purely micro-treated counterparts. The results indicated that this bioinspired micro/nano fabrication on dental implant-bone interface can be potentially applied in the update of dental implant in patients' clinical therapy and provide a new strategy for fabricating other osteocompatible materials.

  4. Highly wear-resistant and biocompatible carbon nanocomposite coatings for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Penkov, Oleksiy V; Pukha, Vladimir E; Starikova, Svetlana L; Khadem, Mahdi; Starikov, Vadym V; Maleev, Maxim V; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon coatings are increasingly used as wear-protective coatings for dental implants, artificial joints, etc. Despite their advantages, they may have several weak points such as high internal stress, poor adhesive properties or high sensitivity to ambient conditions. These weak points could be overcome in the case of a new carbon nanocomposite coating (CNC) deposited by using a C60 ion beam on a Co/Cr alloy. The structure of the coatings was investigated by Raman and XPS spectroscopy. The wear resistance was assessed by using a reciprocating tribotester under the loads up to 0.4 N in both dry and wet sliding conditions. Biocompatibility of the dental implants was tested in vivo on rabbits. Biocompatibility, bioactivity and mechanical durability of the CNC deposited on a Co/Cr alloy were investigated and compared with those of bulk Co/Cr and Ti alloys. The wear resistance of the CNC was found to be 250-650 fold higher compared to the Co/Cr and Ti alloys. Also, the CNC demonstrated much better biological properties with respect to formation of new tissues and absence of negative morphological parameters such as necrosis and demineralization. Development of the CNC is expected to aid in significant improvement of lifetime and quality of implants for dental applications.

  5. Alveolar Bone Grafting in Cleft Patients from Bone Defect to Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Vuletić, Marko; Jokić, Dražen; Rebić, Jerko; Žabarović, Domagoj; Macan, Darko

    2014-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is the most common congenital deformity affecting craniofacial structures. Orofacial clefts have great impact on the quality of life which includes aesthetics, function, psychological impact, dental development and facial growth. Incomplete fusion of facial prominences during the fourth to tenth week of gestation is the main cause. Cleft gaps are closed with alveolar bone grafts in surgical procedure called osteoplasty. Autogenic bone is taken from the iliac crest as the gold standard. The time of grafting can be divided into two stages: primary and secondary. The alveolar defect is usually reconstructured between 7 and 11 years and is often related to the development of the maxillary canine root. After successful osteoplasty, cleft defect is closed but there is still a lack of tooth. The space closure with orthodontic treatment has 50-75% success. If the orthodontic treatment is not possible, in order to replace the missing tooth there are three possibilities: adhesive bridgework, tooth transplantation and implants. Dental implant has the role of holding dental prosthesis, prevents pronounced bone atrophy and loads the augmentation material in the cleft area. Despite the fact that autologous bone from iliac crest is the gold standard, it is not a perfect source for reconstruction of the alveolar cleft. Bone morphogenic protein (BMP) is appropriate as an alternative graft material. The purpose of this review is to explain morphology of cleft defects, historical perspective, surgical techniques and possibilities of implant and prosthodontic rehabilitation.

  6. Highly wear-resistant and biocompatible carbon nanocomposite coatings for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Penkov, Oleksiy V; Pukha, Vladimir E; Starikova, Svetlana L; Khadem, Mahdi; Starikov, Vadym V; Maleev, Maxim V; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon coatings are increasingly used as wear-protective coatings for dental implants, artificial joints, etc. Despite their advantages, they may have several weak points such as high internal stress, poor adhesive properties or high sensitivity to ambient conditions. These weak points could be overcome in the case of a new carbon nanocomposite coating (CNC) deposited by using a C60 ion beam on a Co/Cr alloy. The structure of the coatings was investigated by Raman and XPS spectroscopy. The wear resistance was assessed by using a reciprocating tribotester under the loads up to 0.4 N in both dry and wet sliding conditions. Biocompatibility of the dental implants was tested in vivo on rabbits. Biocompatibility, bioactivity and mechanical durability of the CNC deposited on a Co/Cr alloy were investigated and compared with those of bulk Co/Cr and Ti alloys. The wear resistance of the CNC was found to be 250-650 fold higher compared to the Co/Cr and Ti alloys. Also, the CNC demonstrated much better biological properties with respect to formation of new tissues and absence of negative morphological parameters such as necrosis and demineralization. Development of the CNC is expected to aid in significant improvement of lifetime and quality of implants for dental applications. PMID:27336185

  7. Ag-plasma modification enhances bone apposition around titanium dental implants: an animal study in Labrador dogs.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shichong; Cao, Huiliang; Zhao, Xu; Lo, Hueiwen; Zhuang, Longfei; Gu, Yingxin; Shi, Junyu; Liu, Xuanyong; Lai, Hongchang

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants with proper antibacterial ability as well as ideal osseointegration are being actively pursued. The antimicrobial ability of titanium implants can be significantly enhanced via modification with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). However, the high mobility of Ag NPs results in their potential cytotoxicity. The silver plasma immersion ion-implantation (Ag-PIII) technique may remedy the defect. Accordingly, Ag-PIII technique was employed in this study in an attempt to reduce the mobility of Ag NPs and enhance osseointegration of sandblasted and acid-etched (SLA) dental implants. Briefly, 48 dental implants, divided equally into one control and three test groups (further treated by Ag-PIII technique with three different implantation parameters), were inserted in the mandibles of six Labrador dogs. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry were used to investigate the surface topography, chemical states, and silver release of SLA- and Ag-PIII-treated titanium dental implants. The implant stability quotient examination, Microcomputed tomography evaluation, histological observations, and histomorphometric analysis were performed to assess the osseointegration effect in vivo. The results demonstrated that normal soft tissue healing around dental implants was observed in all the groups, whereas the implant stability quotient values in Ag-PIII groups were higher than that in the SLA group. In addition, all the Ag-PIII groups, compared to the SLA-group, exhibited enhanced new bone formation, bone mineral density, and trabecular pattern. With regard to osteogenic indicators, the implants treated with Ag-PIII for 30 minutes and 60 minutes, with the diameter of the Ag NPs ranging from 5-25 nm, were better than those treated with Ag-PIII for 90 minutes, with the Ag NPs diameter out of that range. These results suggest that Ag-PIII technique can reduce the mobility of Ag NPs and enhance

  8. Bacterial contamination along implant-abutment interface in external and internal-hex dental implants

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Greison Rabelo; Olate, Sergio; Pozzer, Leandro; Cavalieri-Pereira, Lucas; Rodrigues-Chessa, Jaime G; Albergaría-Barbosa, José Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate bacterial contamination along the implant-abutment interface in relation to the size of the interface. 80 brand name implants were used, 40 internal-hex and 40 external-hex. The implants were handled in a sterile atmosphere inside a box, where they were inoculated with 0.3 μl of the Streptococcus sanguis ATCC10556 bacterium in the interior and the abutment was immediately installed with a torque of 30 Ncm for the external-hex and 20 Ncm for the internal-hex; the system was included in an Eppendorf control for 30 seconds and then placed in an Eppendorf control for 30 days. The implants were removed and assessed under a scanning electron microscope while the Eppendorf controls were bred in blood agar to analyze the colonies formed. The data were analyzed using the Chi-squared, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests, considering a value of p<0.05 to obtain statistical significance. Five implants were excluded due to probable external contamination. Microspaces of up to 86.8 μm were observed in the external-hex implants and up to 53.9 μm in the internal-hex implants with no significant differences between the different systems being observed (p>0.05). The contamination observed was produced mainly in the external-hex implants and statistically significant differences were observed between the different hex systems from the same company. No significant differences were observed between interface size and bacterial contamination. Within our limitations, there was no relation between the size of the implant-abutment interface and bacterial contamination with Streptococcus sanguis ATCC10556. PMID:24753751

  9. Simultaneous implant placement and bone regeneration around dental implants using tissue-engineered bone with fibrin glue, mesenchymal stem cells and platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenji; Yamada, Yoichi; Naiki, Takahito; Ueda, Minoru

    2006-10-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the use of tissue-engineered bone as grafting material for alveolar augmentation with simultaneous implant placement. Twelve adult hybrid dogs were used in this study. One month after the extraction of teeth in the mandible region, bone defects on both sides of the mandible were induced using a trephine bar with a diameter of 10 mm. Dog mesenchymal stem cells (dMSCs) were obtained via iliac bone biopsy and cultured for 4 weeks before implantation. After installing the dental implants, the defects were simultaneously implanted with the following graft materials: (i) fibrin, (ii) dMSCs and fibrin (dMSCs/fibrin), (iii) dMSCs, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and fibrin (dMSCs/PRP/fibrin) and (iv) control (defect only). The implants were assessed by histological and histomorphometric analysis, 2, 4 and 8 weeks after implantation. The implants exhibited varying degrees of bone-implant contact (BIC). The BIC was 17%, 19% and 29% (control), 20%, 22% and 25% (fibrin), 22%, 32% and 42% (dMSCs/fibrin) and 25%, 49% and 53% (dMSCs/PRP/fibrin) after 2, 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. This study suggests that tissue-engineered bone may be of sufficient quality for predictable enhancement of bone regeneration around dental implants when used simultaneous by with implant placement.

  10. Indigenous hydroxyapatite coated and bioactive glass coated titanium dental implant system – Fabrication and application in humans

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Surajit; Kundu, Debabrata; Datta, Someswar; Basu, Debabrata; Soundrapandian, Chidambaram

    2011-01-01

    Background: The use of different bioactive materials as coating on dental implant to restore tooth function is a growing trend in modern Dentistry. In the present study, hydroxyapatite and the bioactive glass-coated implants were evaluated for their behavior in osseous tissue following implantation in 14 patients. Materials and Methods: Bioactive glass and hydroxyapatite formulated and prepared for coating on Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Hydroxyapatite coating was applied on the implant surface by air plasma spray technique and bioactive glass coating was applied by vitreous enameling technique. Their outcome was assessed after 6 months in vivo study in human. Results: Hydroxyapatite and bioactive glass coating materials were nontoxic and biocompatible. Uneventful healing was observed with both types of implants. Conclusion: The results showed bioactive glass is a good alternative coating material for dental implant. PMID:22028507

  11. Chlorhexidine hexametaphosphate nanoparticles as a novel antimicrobial coating for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Wood, Natalie J; Jenkinson, Howard F; Davis, Sean A; Mann, Stephen; O'Sullivan, Dominic J; Barbour, Michele E

    2015-06-01

    Dental implants are an increasingly popular solution to missing teeth. Implants are prone to colonisation by pathogenic oral bacteria which can lead to inflammation, destruction of bone and ultimately implant failure. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of chlorhexidine (CHX) hexametaphosphate (HMP) nanoparticles (NPs) with a total CHX concentration equivalent to 5 mM as a coating for dental implants. The CHX HMP NPs had mean diameter 49 nm and composition was confirmed showing presence of both chlorine and phosphorus. The NPs formed micrometer-sized aggregated surface deposits on commercially pure grade II titanium substrates following immersion-coating for 30 s. When CHX HMP NP-coated titanium specimens were immersed in deionised water, sustained release of soluble CHX was observed, both in the absence and presence of a salivary pellicle, for the duration of the study (99 days) without reaching a plateau. Control specimens exposed to a solution of aqueous 25 µM CHX (equivalent to the residual aqueous CHX present with the NPs) did not exhibit CHX release. CHX HMP NP-coated surfaces exhibited antimicrobial efficacy against oral primary colonising bacterium Streptococcus gordonii within 8 h. The antimicrobial efficacy was greater in the presence of an acquired pellicle which is postulated to be due to retention of soluble CHX by the pellicle. PMID:26123234

  12. Immediate loaded dental implants: comparison between fixtures inserted in postextractive and healed bone sites.

    PubMed

    Degidi, Marco; Piattelli, Adriano; Carinci, Francesco

    2007-07-01

    In the last two decades, several investigators have reported immediate placement of dental implants into extraction sockets achieving excellent results with a two-stage surgical procedure. Recently, immediate loading (IL) has become an emerging technique because it has been documented to be a successful and time-saving procedure. Regarding the possibility of immediate/early loading of implants placed in fresh extraction sockets, few reports are available. In addition, they are based on limited series with short follow up. Thus, we decided to perform a retrospective study on a large series of postextractive IL implants. From January 1995 to October 2004, 416 IL fixtures were placed immediately after extraction and 658 IL fixtures in healed sites. The mean follow up is 3 years. Multiple implant systems were used. Because only eight of 1,074 implants were lost (i.e., survival rate, 99.3%) and no statistical differences were detected among the studied variables, no or reduced marginal bone loss was considered as an indicator of success rate to evaluate the effect of several host-, surgery-, and implant-related factors. A general linear model was then performed to detect those variables statistically associated with marginal bone loss. Only eight of 1,074 implants were lost (i.e., survival rate, 99.3%) and no differences were detected among the studied variables. On the contrary, the general linear model showed that younger age (cutoff, 55 years) and harder bone are related to a lower delta insertion abutment junction (or marginal bone loss) and thus a better outcome. We demonstrated that postextractive IL implants have a high survival rate and success rate that are similar to those reported in previous studies of two-stage procedures or in IL implants inserted in healed bone. Poor bone quality and older age correlate with a slight higher bone resorption.

  13. Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Subjects with Successful and Failing Dental Implants. A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Koukos, Georgios; Papadopoulos, Christos; Tsalikis, Lazaros; Sakellari, Dimitra; Arsenakis, Minas; Konstantinidis, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    Objectives : To investigate the prevalence of the bacterial genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, tetracyclines and metronidazole respectively, in subjects with successful and failing dental implants and to assess the presence of Staphylococcus aureus and the mecA gene encoding for Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the same samples. Materials and Methodology: The subject sample included 20 participants with clinically healthy osseointegrated implants and 20 participants with implants exhibiting peri-implantitis. Clinical parameters were assessed with an automated probe, samples were collected from the peri-implant sulcus or pocket and analyzed with Polymerase Chain Reaction for blaTEM, tetM, tetQ and nim genes, S. aureus and MRSA using primers and conditions previously described in the literature. Results: Findings have shown high frequencies of detection for both groups for the tetracycline resistance genes tetM (>30%), tetQ (>65%) with no statistical differences between them (z-test with Bonferroni corrections, p<0.05). The blaTEM gene, which encodes resistance to beta-lactams, was detected in <15% of the samples. The nim gene, which encodes resistance to metronidazole, S.aureus and the mecA gene encoding for MRSA were not detected in any of the analyzed samples. Conclusions: Healthy peri-implant sulci and peri-implantitis cases often harbor bacterial genes encoding for resistance to the tetracyclines and less often for beta-lactams. Thus, the antimicrobial activity of the tetracyclines and to a lower extent to beta-lactams, might be compromised for treatment of peri-implantitis. Since no metronidazole resistance genes were detected in the present study, its clinical use is supported by the current findings. S.aureus may not participate in peri-implant pathology. PMID:25646133

  14. Potential applications of biphosphonates in dental surgical implants.

    PubMed

    Berardi, D; Carlesi, T; Rossi, F; Calderini, M; Volpi, R; Perfetti, G

    2007-01-01

    Biphosphonates are largely used for their unquestionable properties of inhibiting bone resorption by osteoclasts in the treatment of various osteometabolic illnesses such as osteoporosis, multiple myeloma, tumors which metastasize to the bone and malignant hypercalcemia. In this literature review the physico-chemical properties, biologic activities and the mechanisms of action of biphosphonates are described. The use of these drugs is discussed, analyzing the quantity of results which have emerged through in vitro and in vivo experiments on animal models. In this study the efficiency of these drugs is demonstrated in contrasting the osteolitic processes of the alveolar bone, in promoting the neoformation and in bettering the quality of bone implants. However, it is important to draw attention to a worrying correlation which has emerged during the last 3-4 years, between osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) and the systemic administration of aminobiphosphonates. This collateral effect did not emerge following the use of non-aminobiphosphonates. The aim of this review is to identify the guidelines for the use of biphosphonates in oral implant surgery. PMID:17880759

  15. A Review on the Wettability of Dental Implant Surfaces II: Biological and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Gittens, Rolando A.; Scheideler, Lutz; Rupp, Frank; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D.

    2014-01-01

    Dental and orthopaedic implants have been under continuous advancement to improve their interactions with bone and ensure a successful outcome for patients. Surface characteristics such as surface topography and surface chemistry can serve as design tools to enhance the biological response around the implant, with in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies confirming their effects. However, the comprehensive design of implants to promote early and long-term osseointegration requires a better understanding of the role of surface wettability and the mechanisms by which it affects the surrounding biological environment. This review provides a general overview of the available information about the contact angle values of experimental and of marketed implant surfaces, some of the techniques used to modify surface wettability of implants, and results from in vitro and clinical studies. We aim to expand the current understanding on the role of wettability of metallic implants at their interface with blood and the biological milieu, as well as with bacteria, and hard and soft tissues. PMID:24709541

  16. A Review on the Wettability of Dental Implant Surfaces: Theoretical and Experimental Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Frank; Gittens, Rolando A.; Scheideler, Lutz; Marmur, Abraham; Boyan, Barbara D.; Schwartz, Zvi; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The surface wettability of biomaterials determines the biological cascade of events at the biomaterial/host interface. Wettability is modulated by surface characteristics, such as surface chemistry and surface topography. However, the design of current implant surfaces focuses mainly on specific micro- and nanotopographical features and is still far from predicting the concomitant wetting behavior. There is an increasing interest in understanding the wetting mechanisms of implant surfaces and the role of wettability on the biological response at the implant/bone or implant/soft tissue interface. Fundamental knowledge related to the influence of surface roughness (i.e., a quantification of surface topography) on titanium and titanium alloy surface wettability, and the different associated wetting regimes, can improve our understanding of the role of wettability of rough implant surfaces on the biological outcome. Such an approach has been applied to biomaterial surfaces only in a limited way. Focusing on titanium dental and orthopaedic implants, the present study reviews the current knowledge on the wettability of biomaterial surfaces, encompassing basic and applied aspects that include measurement techniques, thermodynamic aspects of wetting, and models predicting topographical and roughness effects on the wetting behavior. PMID:24590162

  17. Dental implants inserted in male versus female patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, B R; Albrektsson, T; Wennerberg, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the failure rates, marginal bone loss (MBL) and post-operative infection for implants inserted in male or female patients, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in December 2014. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomized or not. Ninety-one publications were included, with a total of 27,203 implants inserted in men (1185 failures), and 25,154 implants inserted in women (1039 failures). The results suggest that the insertion of dental implants in male patients statistically affected the implant failure rates (RR 1.21, 95% CI 1.07-1.37, P = 0.002). Due to the limited number of studies reporting results on MBL, it is difficult to estimate the real effect of the insertion of implants in different sexes on the marginal bone level. Due to lack of satisfactory information, meta-analysis for the outcome 'post-operative infection' was not performed. The results have to be interpreted with caution due to the presence of several confounding factors in the included studies.

  18. Titanium dental implant surfaces obtained by anodic spark deposition - From the past to the future.

    PubMed

    Kaluđerović, Milena R; Schreckenbach, Joachim P; Graf, Hans-Ludwig

    2016-12-01

    Commercial titanium-based dental implants are obtained applying various methods such as machining, acid etching, anodization, plasma spraying, grit blasting or combination techniques yielding materials with smooth or micro-roughened surfaces. Those techniques are used to optimize the surface properties and to maximize biocompatibility and bioactivity with bone tissue. Present review is focused on the material surfaces obtained by anodic spark deposition (ASD). From the early 1980s till present, the results of numerous studies have shown that anodically oxidized surfaces with different dopants express a positive effect on osteoblasts behavior in vitro and osseointegration in vivo. Those surfaces demonstrated a high biocompatibility and rapid osseointegration in clinical application. This paper provides an overview of the preparation of implant surfaces by employing ASD process. Moreover, reviewed are clinically used ASD implant surfaces (Ticer, TiUnite, Osstem, etc.). The electrolyte variations in ASD process and their influence on surface properties are given herein. Using different electrolytes, anode voltages and temperatures, the above fabrication process can yield various surface morphologies from smooth to rough, porous surfaces. Furthermore, ASD enables thickening of oxide layers and enrichment with different dopands from used electrolyte, which hinder release of potentially toxic titanium ions in surrounding tissue. Particularly exciting results were achieved by calcium and phosphorus doping of the oxide layer (Ticer, ZL Microdent; TiUnite, Nobel Biocare Holding AB) which significantly increased the osteocompatibility. Ticer, a dental implant with anodically oxidized surface and the first among similar materials employed in clinical practice, was found to promote fast osteoblast cell differentiation and mineralization processes. Moreover, Ticer accelerate the integration with the bone, increase the bone/implant contact and improve primary and secondary

  19. Hierarchical micro/nanostructured titanium with balanced actions to bacterial and mammalian cells for dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yu; Cao, Huiliang; Qiao, Shichong; Wang, Manle; Gu, Yingxin; Luo, Huiwen; Meng, Fanhao; Liu, Xuanyong; Lai, Hongchang

    2015-01-01

    A versatile strategy to endow dental implants with long-term antibacterial ability without compromising the cytocompatibility is highly desirable to combat implant-related infection. Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) have been utilized as a highly effective and broad-spectrum antibacterial agent for surface modification of biomedical devices. However, the high mobility and subsequent hazardous effects of the particles on mammalian cells may limit its practical applications. Thus, Ag NPs were immobilized on the surface of sand-blasted, large grit, and acid-etched (SLA) titanium by manipulating the atomic-scale heating effect of silver plasma immersion ion implantation. The silver plasma immersion ion implantation-treated SLA surface gave rise to both good antibacterial activity and excellent compatibility with mammalian cells. The antibacterial activity rendered by the immobilized Ag NPs was assessed using Fusobacterium nucleatum and Staphylococcus aureus, commonly suspected pathogens for peri-implant disease. The immobilized Ag NPs offered a good defense against multiple cycles of bacteria attack in both F. nucleatum and S. aureus, and the mechanism was independent of silver release. F. nucleatum showed a higher susceptibility to Ag NPs than S. aureus, which might be explained by the presence of different wall structures. Moreover, the immobilized Ag NPs had no apparent toxic influence on the viability, proliferation, and differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. These results demonstrated that good bactericidal activity could be obtained with very small quantities of immobilized Ag NPs, which were not detrimental to the mammalian cells involved in the osseointegration process, and promising for titanium-based dental implants with commercial SLA surfaces. PMID:26604743

  20. Impact of a "TED-Style" presentation on potential patients' willingness to accept dental implant therapy: a one-group, pre-test post-test study

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Henry; Abi-Nader, Samer

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE A survey was conducted to assess the impact of a TED-like educational session on participants' willingness to accept dental implant therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Volunteers interested in having information about dental implant therapies were recruited and asked to complete a two-part survey before and after an educational session. The initial survey elicited demographic information, self-perceived knowledge on dental implants and willingness to this kind of treatment. A "TED-style" presentation that provided information about dental implant treatments was conducted before asking the participants to complete a second set of questions assessing the impact of the session. RESULTS The survey was completed by 104 individuals, 78.8% were women and the mean age was 66.5±10.8. Before the educational session, 76.0% of the participants refused dental implants mainly due to lack of knowledge. After the educational session, the rejection of dental implants decreased by almost four folds to 20.2%. CONCLUSION This study proved that an educational intervention can significantly increase willingness to accept treatment with dental implants in a segment of the population who is interested in having information about dental implant therapy. Furthermore, educational interventions, such as TED-like talks, might be useful to increase popular awareness on dental implant therapy. PMID:26816573

  1. Bimaxillary full arch fixed dental implant supported treatment for a patient with renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism and osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dennis; Mancini, Mark

    2015-04-01

    A long-term dialysis patient with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) also referred to as chronic kidney disease (CKD) due to IgA nephropathy complicated by severe secondary hyperparathyroidism and renal osteodystrophy was successfully treated with dental implant-supported fixed prostheses. Phosphate binders, vitamin D, calcium cinacalcet calcimimetic therapy, and dialysis 3 times weekly had been instituted with standard divalent ion serum assessments. Successful control of the patient's secondary hyperparathyroidism was achieved. Long and wide diameter implants were used with an anterior guidance occlusion scheme to reduce the per-square-millimeter off-axial implant force delivered to the bone. Patients with ESRD and renal osteodystrophy may be successfully surgically and prosthetically treated with long wide dental implants supporting fixed full arch splinted dental prostheses with an appropriate occlusal scheme. PMID:24372491

  2. Osseointegration of dental implants and osteonecrosis of the jaw in patients treated with bisphosphonate therapy: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Gurpreet K; Ahmadieh, Azadeh; Kumar, Satish; Sedghizadeh, Parish P

    2013-08-01

    Bisphosphonate (BP) drugs are a commonly prescribed group of medications used in the treatment of metabolic and oncologic bone disorders. The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review in order to evaluate whether patients on BP therapy are appropriate candidates for dental implants as compared to patients not taking BP drugs with respect to successful implant osseointegration and the risk of developing bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw. Based on the current literature, a history of oral or intravenous BP use is not an absolute contraindication for dental implant placement, and dental implants can osseointegrate successfully in this patient population. Importantly, the studies currently available on this topic are of moderate to weak strength of evidence with inherent bias and limitations, and hence results must be interpreted in this context. Well-controlled studies with higher strength of evidence and larger population sizes are required to address this topic more accurately in the future.

  3. Adult stem cells properties in terms of commitment, aging and biological safety of grit-blasted and Acid-etched ti dental implants surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Bressan, Eriberto; Calvo-Guirado, José L; Degidi, Marco; Piattelli, Adriano; Zavan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is one of the most widely used biomaterials for manufacturing dental implants. The implant surface properties strongly influence osseointegration. The aim of the present study was to in vitro investigate the characteristics of Ti dental implants in terms of mutagenicity, hemocompatibility, biocompatibility, osteoinductivity and biological safety. The Ames test was used to test the mutagenicity of the Ti dental implants, and the hemolysis assay for evaluating their hemocompatibility. Human adipose - derived stem cells (ADSCs) were then seeded onto these implants in order to evaluate their cytotoxicity. Gene expression analyzing with real-time PCR was carried out to investigate the osteoinductivity of the biomaterials. Finally, the genetic stability of the cells cultured onto dental implants was determined by karyotyping. Our results demonstrated that Ti dental implants are not mutagenic, do not cause hemolysis, and are biocompatible. The MTT assay revealed that ADSCs, seeded on Ti dental implants, proliferate up to 30 days in culture. Moreover, ADSCs loaded on Ti dental implants show a substantial expression of some osteoblast specific markers, such as COL1A1, OPN, ALPL, and RUNX2, as well as chromosomal stability after 30 days of culture in a medium without osteogenic factors. In conclusion, the grit-blasted and acid-etched treatment seems to favor the adhesion and proliferation of ADSCs and improve the osteoinductivity of Ti dental implant surfaces.

  4. Adult Stem Cells Properties in Terms of Commitment, Aging and Biological Safety of Grit-Blasted and Acid-Etched Ti Dental Implants Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Bressan, Eriberto; Calvo - Guirado, José L.; Degidi, Marco; Piattelli, Adriano; Zavan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is one of the most widely used biomaterials for manufacturing dental implants. The implant surface properties strongly influence osseointegration. The aim of the present study was to in vitro investigate the characteristics of Ti dental implants in terms of mutagenicity, hemocompatibility, biocompatibility, osteoinductivity and biological safety. The Ames test was used to test the mutagenicity of the Ti dental implants, and the hemolysis assay for evaluating their hemocompatibility. Human adipose - derived stem cells (ADSCs) were then seeded onto these implants in order to evaluate their cytotoxicity. Gene expression analyzing with real-time PCR was carried out to investigate the osteoinductivity of the biomaterials. Finally, the genetic stability of the cells cultured onto dental implants was determined by karyotyping. Our results demonstrated that Ti dental implants are not mutagenic, do not cause hemolysis, and are biocompatible. The MTT assay revealed that ADSCs, seeded on Ti dental implants, proliferate up to 30 days in culture. Moreover, ADSCs loaded on Ti dental implants show a substantial expression of some osteoblast specific markers, such as COL1A1, OPN, ALPL, and RUNX2, as well as chromosomal stability after 30 days of culture in a medium without osteogenic factors. In conclusion, the grit-blasted and acid-etched treatment seems to favor the adhesion and proliferation of ADSCs and improve the osteoinductivity of Ti dental implant surfaces. PMID:25635249

  5. A Comparative and a Qualitative Analysis of Patient’s Motivations, Expectations and Satisfaction with Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Komal; Kulkarni, Prasad; Darak, Praveen; Swamy, Shanmukha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dental Implants are the norm of today’s prosthetic and restorative dentistry but, is it the answer for edentulism that can affect both individual’s appearance and functioning, therefore having an impact on the psychological and the social well being of the person is an ongoing quest. Also, patient’s beliefs and personal expectations for dental implants vary, which may influence the treatment outcome, thus emphasizing the importance of a good clinician–patient communication. Hence in this study a qualitative analysis was carried out with an earnest attempt to gain an insight into patient’s motivations, personal expectations, satisfaction and impact of clinician’s motivation for implant maintenance. Aim To learn about patient’s expectations and their level of satisfaction from dental implants. To know the impact of clinician’s instructions and motivation for implant maintenance, with the patient’s level of understanding and compare the level of motivation for implant maintenance and care provided by a dentist with Bachelor’s degree to a dentist with a Master’s degree. Materials and Methods A 30 systemically healthy patients who had undergone implant treatment (aged 25-65 years) were considered and divided into two groups: Group A: 15 patients in whom implant placement was done by a dentist with Bachelor’s degree (24 years, 18 years in general and implant practice respectively) and Group B: 15 patients in whom implant placement was done by a dentist with a Master’s degree (Periodontics; 20 years,17 years in general and implant practice respectively). A qualitative analysis with the help of appropriate questionnaires comprising of multiple choice questions specifically designed for this purpose and few open ended questions was carried out with an earnest attempt to gain an insight into patient’s motivations, personal expectations, satisfaction and impact of clinician’s motivation for implant maintenance. Results Patients

  6. Identification card and codification of the chemical and morphological characteristics of 14 dental implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dohan Ehrenfest, David M; Vazquez, Lydia; Park, Yeong-Joon; Sammartino, Gilberto; Bernard, Jean-Pierre

    2011-10-01

    Dental implants are commonly used in daily practice; however, most surgeons do not really know the characteristics of these biomedical devices they are placing in their patients. The objective of this work is to describe the chemical and morphological characteristics of 14 implant surfaces available on the market and to establish a simple and clear identification (ID) card for all of them, following the classification procedure developed in the Dohan Ehrenfest et al (2010) Codification (DEC) system. Fourteen implant surfaces were characterized: TiUnite (Nobel Biocare), Ospol (Ospol), Kohno HRPS (Sweden & Martina), Osseospeed (AstraTech), Ankylos (Dentsply Friadent), MTX (Zimmer), Promote (Camlog), BTI Interna (Biotechnology Institute), EVL Plus (SERF), Twinkon Ref (Tekka), Ossean (Intra-Lock), NanoTite (Biomet 3I), SLActive (ITI Straumann), Integra-CP/NanoTite (Bicon). Three samples of each implant were analyzed. Superficial chemical composition was analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy/electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and the 100 nm in-depth profile was established using Auger electron spectroscopy. The microtopography was quantified using light interferometry. The general morphology and nanotopography were evaluated using a field emission-scanning electron microscope. Finally, the characterization code of each surface was established using the DEC system, and the main characteristics of each surface were summarized in a reader-friendly ID card. From a chemical standpoint, of the 14 different surfaces, 10 were based on a commercially pure titanium (grade 2 or 4), 3 on a titanium-aluminum alloy (grade 5 titanium), and one on a calcium phosphate core. Nine surfaces presented different forms of chemical impregnation or discontinuous coating of the titanium core, and 3 surfaces were covered with residual aluminablasting particles. Twelve surfaces presented different degrees of inorganic pollutions, and 2 presented a severe organic pollution

  7. Numerical assessment of bone remodeling around conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy dental implants.

    PubMed

    Akça, Kıvanç; Eser, Atılım; Çavuşoğlu, Yeliz; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Çehreli, Murat Cavit

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate conventionally and early loaded titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy implants by three-dimensional finite element stress analysis. Three-dimensional model of a dental implant was created and a thread area was established as a region of interest in trabecular bone to study a localized part of the global model with a refined mesh. The peri-implant tissues around conventionally loaded (model 1) and early loaded (model 2) implants were implemented and were used to explore principal stresses, displacement values, and equivalent strains in the peri-implant region of titanium and titanium-zirconium implants under static load of 300 N with or without 30° inclination applied on top of the abutment surface. Under axial loading, principal stresses in both models were comparable for both implants and models. Under oblique loading, principal stresses around titanium-zirconium implants were slightly higher in both models. Comparable stress magnitudes were observed in both models. The displacement values and equivalent strain amplitudes around both implants and models were similar. Peri-implant bone around titanium and titanium-zirconium implants experiences similar stress magnitudes coupled with intraosseous implant displacement values under conventional loading and early loading simulations. Titanium-zirconium implants have biomechanical outcome comparable to conventional titanium implants under conventional loading and early loading.

  8. Development of a new quantitative gas permeability method for dental implant-abutment connection tightness assessment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Most dental implant systems are presently made of two pieces: the implant itself and the abutment. The connection tightness between those two pieces is a key point to prevent bacterial proliferation, tissue inflammation and bone loss. The leak has been previously estimated by microbial, color tracer and endotoxin percolation. Methods A new nitrogen flow technique was developed for implant-abutment connection leakage measurement, adapted from a recent, sensitive, reproducible and quantitative method used to assess endodontic sealing. Results The results show very significant differences between various sealing and screwing conditions. The remaining flow was lower after key screwing compared to hand screwing (p = 0.03) and remained different from the negative test (p = 0.0004). The method reproducibility was very good, with a coefficient of variation of 1.29%. Conclusions Therefore, the presented new gas flow method appears to be a simple and robust method to compare different implant systems. It allows successive measures without disconnecting the abutment from the implant and should in particular be used to assess the behavior of the connection before and after mechanical stress. PMID:21492459

  9. Prosthodontic Perspective to All-On-4® Concept for Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Chittaranjan, B; Sudheer, N; Tella, Suchita; Abusaad, Md.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical success and longevity of endosteal dental implants as load bearing abutments are controlled largely by the mechanical setting in which they function. The treatment plan is responsible for the design, number and position of the implants. In biomechanically compromised environment such as poor quality bone, strain to the crestal bone can be reduced by increasing the anterioposterior spread of implants, placement of longer implants and maximizing the number of implants. The All-on-4® concept is one such treatment procedure which enlightens us for its use in the completely edentulous patients and which also leaves behind the routine treatment alternative of conventional dentures with successful outcome in the short term, long term and the retrospective studies that have been done in the past. The area of concern for any treatment alternative lies in the success of the prosthesis and its prosthodontic perspective involving the principles of occlusion. This article reviews the All-on-4® concept and its prosthodontic aspects. PMID:25478475

  10. A novel computational method for real-time preoperative assessment of primary dental implant stability.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Sigbjørn; Ferguson, Stephen J; Sigrist, Christian; Fritz, Wolf-Rüdiger; Nolte, Lutz P; Hallermann, Wock; Caversaccio, Marco

    2005-02-01

    A novel methodology which allows for fast and fully automatic structural analysis during preoperative planning for dental implant surgery is presented. This method integrates a fully automatic fast finite element solver within the framework of new concepts in computer-assisted preoperative planning for implant surgery. The planning system including optimized structural planning was validated by experimental results. Nine implants were placed in pig mandibles and mechanically loaded using a testing rig. The resulting displacements were measured and compared with those predicted by numerical analysis during planning. The results show that there were no statistically significant differences (P = 0.65) between the results of the models and the experiments. The results show that fast structural analysis can be integrated with surgical planning software allowing the initial axial implant stability to be predicted in real time during planning. It is believed that such a system could be used to select patients for immediate implant loading and, when further developed, be useful in other areas of preoperative surgical planning. PMID:15642031

  11. Assessment and Evaluation of Quality of Life (OHRQoL) of Patients with Dental Implants Using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) - A Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peri-implant tissue health is a requisite for success of dental implant therapy. Plaque accumulation leads to initiation of gingivitis around natural teeth and peri-implantitis around dental implants. Peri-implantitis around dental implants may result in implant placement failure. For obtaining long-term success, timely assessment of dental implant site is mandatory. Aim To assess and evaluate Quality of Life (OHRQoL) of individuals with dental implants using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). Materials and Methods Total 92 patients were evaluated for assessment of the health of peri-implant tissues by recording, Plaque Index (PI), Probing Pocket Depth (PD), Bleeding On Probing (BOP) and Probing Attachment Level (PAL) as compared to contra-lateral natural teeth (control). In the same patients Quality of Life Assessment was done by utilizing Oral Health Impact Profile Index (OHIP-14). Results The mean plaque index around natural teeth was more compared to implants and it was statistically significant. Other three dimensions mean bleeding on probing; mean probing attachment level and mean pocket depth around both natural teeth and implant surfaces was found to be not statistically significant. OHIP-14 revealed that patients with dental implants were satisfied with their Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL). Conclusion Similar inflammatory conditions are present around both natural teeth and implant prostheses as suggested by results of mean plaque index, mean bleeding on probing, mean pocket depth and mean probing attachment level, hence reinforcing the periodontal health maintenance both prior to and after incorporation of dental implants. Influence of implant prostheses on patient’s oral health related quality of life (as depicted by OHIP-14) and patients’ perceptions and expectations may guide the clinician in providing the best implant services. PMID:27190953

  12. Osseointegration behavior of novel Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy for dental implants: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaona; Meng, Xing; Chu, Shunli; Xiang, Xingchen; Liu, Zhenzhen; Zhao, Jinghui; Zhou, Yanmin

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants on mineral apposition rate and new BIC contact in rabbits. Twelve Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants were fabricated and placed into the right femur sites in six rabbits, and commercially pure titanium implants were used as controls in the left femur. Tetracycline and alizarin red were administered 3 weeks and 1 week before euthanization, respectively. At 4 weeks and 8 weeks after implantation, animals were euthanized, respectively. Surface characterization and implant-bone contact surface analysis were performed by using a scanning electron microscope and an energy dispersive X-ray detector. Mineral apposition rate was evaluated using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Toluidine blue staining was performed on undecalcified sections for histology and histomorphology evaluation. Scanning electron microscope and histomorphology observation revealed a direct contact between implants and bone of all groups. After a healing period of 4 weeks, Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants showed significantly higher mineral apposition rate compared to commercially pure titanium implants (P < 0.05), whereas there was no significant difference between Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants and commercially pure titanium implants (P > 0.05) at 8 weeks. No significant difference of bone-to-implant contact was observed between Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants and commercially pure titanium implants implants after a healing period of 4 weeks and 8 weeks. This study showed that Ti-Nb-Zr-Ta-Si alloy implants could establish a close direct contact comparedto commercially pure titanium implants implants, improved mineral matrix apposition rate, and may someday be an alternative as a material for dental implants. PMID:27534399

  13. Endosseous dental implant vis-à-vis conservative management: Is it a dilemma?

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Ramesh; Bains, Rhythm; Loomba, Kapil; Pal, U. S.; Ram, Hari; Bains, Vivek K.

    2010-01-01

    To overview the current prospective of endosseous dental implant and conservative management. Although emphasis has been made in reinstating the oral functions, less consideration has been given to formulate the best treatment tactics in a particular situation. Properly restored, root canal treated natural teeth surrounded by healthy periodontium tissues yield a very high longevity, and periodontally compromised teeth that are treated and maintained regularly may have longer survival rate. Current trends in implantology have weakened the conservative paradigm, and practitioner's objectivity has been inclined more toward providing the tooth substitutes often flaunted as equal or even superior to conservation of natural tooth PMID:22442546

  14. Purposeful exposure of a polylactic acid barrier to achieve socket preservation for placement of dental implants: case series report.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Paul S; Rosen, Adam D

    2013-01-01

    This retrospective case series reports on the use of a polylactic acid barrier that was left exposed in the process of socket preparation for the placement of dental implants. A retrospective chart review found 43 patients with 48 extraction sockets that were treated in this manner. Teeth were removed and the sockets were thoroughly debrided, with 40 of them receiving a bone replacement graft covered by the polylactic acid barrier and the additional 8 receiving the membrane alone. Suturing left the barrier exposed, and the sites were re-entered on average at 23 weeks for the placement of a dental implant. All sites were able to receive a dental implant, demonstrating the ability to leave a polylactic acid barrier exposed and achieve successful guided bone regeneration (GBR) results. This ultimately helped avoid some of the negative sequelae of trying to achieve primary closure of the flaps at the time of tooth extraction.

  15. Clinical, microbiological, and salivary biomarker profiles of dental implant patients with type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tatarakis, Nikolaos; Kinney, Janet S.; Inglehart, Marita; Braun, Thomas M.; Shelburne, Charles; Lang, Niklaus P.; Giannobile, William V.; Oh, Tae-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Objective Regulators of peri-implant bone loss in diabetic patients appears to involve multiple risk factors that have not been clearly elucidated. This study was conducted to explore putative local etiologic factors on implant bone loss in relation to type 2 diabetes mellitus, including clinical, microbial, salivary biomarker, and psychosocial factors. Materials and Methods Thirty-two subjects (divided into type 2 diabetes mellitus and non-diabetic controls), having at least one functional implant and 6 teeth, were enrolled in a one-year longitudinal investigation. Analyses of clinical measurements and standardized intra-oral radiographs, saliva and serum biomarkers (via protein arrays for 20 selected markers) and plaque biofilm (via qPCR for 8 periodontal pathogens) were performed at baseline and 1 year. In addition, the subjects were asked to respond to questionnaires to assess behavioral and psychosocial variables. Results There was a significant increase from baseline to 1 year in the probing depth of implants in the diabetes group (1.95mm to 2.35mm, p=0.015). The average radiographic bone loss during the study period marginally increased at dental implants compared to natural teeth over the study period (0.08mm vs. 0.05mm; p=0.043). The control group harbored higher levels of T. denticola at their teeth at baseline (p=0.046) and the levels of the pathogen increased significantly over time around the implants of the same group (p=0.003). Salivary osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels were higher in the diabetes group than the control group at baseline only; in addition, the salivary levels of IL-4, IL-10, and OPG associated with host defense were significantly reduced in the diabetes group (p=0.010, p=0.019, and p=0.024) while controls showed an increase in the salivary OPG levels (p=0.005). For psychosocial factors, there were not many significant changes over the observation period, except for some findings related to coping behaviors at baseline. Conclusions The

  16. Voxel-based registration of simulated and real patient CBCT data for accurate dental implant pose estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, António H. J.; Queirós, Sandro; Morais, Pedro; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Correia, André Ricardo; Fernandes, Valter; Pinho, A. C. M.; Fonseca, Jaime C.; Vilaça, João. L.

    2015-03-01

    The success of dental implant-supported prosthesis is directly linked to the accuracy obtained during implant's pose estimation (position and orientation). Although traditional impression techniques and recent digital acquisition methods are acceptably accurate, a simultaneously fast, accurate and operator-independent methodology is still lacking. Hereto, an image-based framework is proposed to estimate the patient-specific implant's pose using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and prior knowledge of implanted model. The pose estimation is accomplished in a threestep approach: (1) a region-of-interest is extracted from the CBCT data using 2 operator-defined points at the implant's main axis; (2) a simulated CBCT volume of the known implanted model is generated through Feldkamp-Davis-Kress reconstruction and coarsely aligned to the defined axis; and (3) a voxel-based rigid registration is performed to optimally align both patient and simulated CBCT data, extracting the implant's pose from the optimal transformation. Three experiments were performed to evaluate the framework: (1) an in silico study using 48 implants distributed through 12 tridimensional synthetic mandibular models; (2) an in vitro study using an artificial mandible with 2 dental implants acquired with an i-CAT system; and (3) two clinical case studies. The results shown positional errors of 67+/-34μm and 108μm, and angular misfits of 0.15+/-0.08° and 1.4°, for experiment 1 and 2, respectively. Moreover, in experiment 3, visual assessment of clinical data results shown a coherent alignment of the reference implant. Overall, a novel image-based framework for implants' pose estimation from CBCT data was proposed, showing accurate results in agreement with dental prosthesis modelling requirements.

  17. The effect of microstructured surfaces and laminin-derived peptide coatings on soft tissue interactions with titanium dental implants.

    PubMed

    Werner, Sandra; Huck, Olivier; Frisch, Benoît; Vautier, Dominique; Elkaim, René; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Brunel, Gérard; Tenenbaum, Henri

    2009-04-01

    In the present study, we investigated the dental implant protection from peri-implant inflammation by improving the soft tissue adhesion on the titanium surface. Porous titanium was used to create, at the level of the transmucosal part of the implants (the "neck"), a microstructured 3-dimensional surface that would tightly seal the interface between the implant and soft tissue. Cell-specific adhesion properties were induced via an adhesion peptide derived from laminin-5 coupled to native or cross-linked PLL/PGA multilayered polyelectrolyte films (MPFs), which are used for biomedical device coatings. Porous titanium exhibited good cell-adhesion properties, but the colonisation of the material was further improved by a coating with laminin-5 functionalised MPFs and especially with (PLL/PGA)(6,5)-PGA-peptide film. Focal contact formation was observed on cross-linked architectures, reflecting cell anchorage on these surfaces. In contrast, when seeded on laminin-5-functionalised native films, epithelial cells formed only very diffuse focal contacts, but adhered via hemidesmosome formation. In vivo experiments confirmed that the porous titanium was colonised by cells of soft tissue. Altogether, the results indicate that the microstructure of the implant neck combined with a specific bioactive coating could constitute efficient routes to improve the integration of soft tissue on titanium dental implants, which could significantly protect implants from peri-implant inflammation and enhance long-term implant stabilisation.

  18. A clinical study on the effectiveness of implant supported dental restoration in patients with chronic periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, B Q; Lan, J; Huang, H Y; Liang, J; Ma, X N; Huo, L D; Xu, X

    2013-02-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of implant supported dental restorations in patients with chronic periodontal diseases at various stages within 2 years of completing treatment. 30 patients with periodontal diseases and 30 patients without periodontal diseases were studied. Total counts of 276 implant bodies were divided into group A (patients with periodontal diseases; a total of 149 implants) and group B (patients with healthy periodontium; a total of 127 implants). In group A subjects, periodontitis was treated prior to implant placement. The study focused on patients' modified sulcus bleeding index, modified plaque index, implant mobility index, periodontal probing depth and implant success rate 12 and 24 months after the completion of the treatment. The result show: there were no significant differences in implant success rate between groups A and B; modified sulcus bleeding index scores showed differences between the groups 24 months after treatment; there were no significant differences in other clinical indexes during the study between the groups; there were no significant differences in periodontal probing depth between the groups; modified plaque index and modified sulcus bleeding index were positively correlated in implant supported dental restoration patients with chronic periodontal diseases.

  19. Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation of Immediate Loaded Dental Implants With Local Application of Melatonin: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    El-Gammal, Mona Y; Salem, Ahmed S; Anees, Mohamed M; Tawfik, Mohamed A

    2016-04-01

    Immediate loading of dental implants in situations where low bone density exist, such as the posterior maxillary region, became possible recently after the introduction of biomimetic agents. This 1-year preliminary clinical trial was carried out to clinically and radiographically evaluate immediate-loaded 1-piece implants with local application of melatonin in the osteotomy site as a biomimetic material. 14 patients with missing maxillary premolars were randomized to receive 14 implants of 1-piece type that were subjected to immediate loading after 2 weeks of initial placement. Group I included 7 implants with acid-etched surface while group II included 7 implants with acid-etched surface combined with local application of melatonin gel at the osteotomy site. Patients were recalled for follow up at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after loading. All implants were considered successful after 12 months of follow-up. Significant difference (P < 0.05) was found between both groups at 1 month of implant loading when considering the implant stability. At 1 and 3 months there were significant differences in the marginal bone level between the 2 groups. These results suggest that the local application of melatonin at the osteotomy site is associated with good stability and minimal bone resorption. However, more studies for longer follow-up periods are required to confirm the effect of melatonin hormone on osseointegration of dental implants.

  20. Dental implants placed on bone subjected to vertical alveolar distraction show the same performance as those placed on primitive bone

    PubMed Central

    León-Camacho, María A.; Somoza-Martín, José M.; Fernández-González, Beatriz; Blanes-Vázquez-Gundín, Silvia; Gándara-Rey, José M.; García-García, Abel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Vertical osteogenic alveolar distraction (VOAD) allows for the augmentation of the alveolar ridge for the placement of dental implants in atrophic alveolar ridges. The goal of this paper is to assess long-term peri-implant bone resorption in implants placed on bones subjected to VOAD, comparing it with a group of patients who had implants placed directly on the alveolar bone without previous bone regeneration. Material and Methods: We conducted a follow-up study on 32 patients who were divided into two groups: The Distraction Group (14 patients), and the Distraction-Free Group (18 patients), who received a total of 100 implants. Peri-implant bone loss was measured by means of panoramic X-rays, at the time of loading and one year later, and in 35 implants of each group after 3 years of functional loading. Results: The peri-implant bone resorption (PBR) average observed in the Distraction Group at the time of prosthetic placement is higher (0.50±0.09 mm) than in the Distraction-Free Group (0.25±0.06 mm), showing statistically significant results (p=0.047). PBR levels 1 year after loading were the same for both groups (0.66 mm). At 3 years, they were higher in the Distraction Group (1.03 ± 0.22 mm vs. 0.68 ± 0.08 mm). Key words:Bone resorption, alveolar distraction osteogenesis, dental implants. PMID:23524476

  1. Assessment of Osstell™ and Periotest® systems in measuring dental implant stability (in vitro study)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jetaily, Samer; Al-dosari, Abdullah AlFarraj

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this in vitro study were to investigate the sensitivity and reliability of the Osstell™ systems (Resonance Frequency Analysis – RFA) compared to the Periotest® system in implant bone simulated conditions. Three conditions were simulated: (1) the direct fixture-bone contact and fibrous tissue fixture contact, (2) The different levels of horizontal bone loss, and (3) The hardening implant–bone interface. Materials and methods Forty-nine dental implant fixtures were placed in the center of acrylic cubes. In Part I seven fixtures were placed in direct contact with acrylic and another seven were placed in contact with polyvinyl siloxane impression material as soft interface. Part II: four sets of 0, 2, 4 and 6 mm horizontally exposed fixture samples were made (seven fixtures in each set). Part III: seven fixtures were placed in contact with a thin mix of autopolymerizing resin. The stability of these fixtures was measured using Osstell™ and Periotest® systems. Results The mean Periotest® value(PTV) and Osstell™ measurements showed a significant difference between the direct contact and soft interface (P < 0.001). These values also showed statistically significant difference between the different levels of horizontally exposed fixture groups (P < 0.001). The level of horizontal fixture exposure was strongly correlated with the PTVS (r = 0.967) and strongly negatively correlated with Implant Stability Quotient (r = −0.946). A strong correlation was found between the Osstell™ readings and the change in the stiffness of the autopolymerizing resin fixture interface group (r = 0.986). Conclusions Both Osstell™ and Periotest® systems proved to be sensitive in measuring dental implant stability in hard and in soft interfaces. Osstell™ also proved to be sensitive in detecting changes in the fixture interface stiffness. Osstell™ system proved to be more reliable compared to Periotest® system in measuring dental

  2. Surface modification of Ti dental implants by Nd:YVO 4 laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Francisco J. C.; Marques, Rodrigo F. C.; Filho, Edson de A.; Guastaldi, Antonio C.

    2007-09-01

    Surface modifications have been applied in endosteal bone devices in order to improve the osseointegration through direct contact between neoformed bone and the implant without an intervening soft tissue layer. Surface characteristics of titanium implants have been modified by addictive methods, such as metallic titanium, titanium oxide and hydroxyapatite powder plasma spray, as well as by subtractive methods, such as acid etching, acid etching associated with sandblasting by either AlO 2 or TiO 2, and recently by laser ablation. Surface modification for dental and medical implants can be obtained by using laser irradiation technique where its parameters like repetition rate, pulse energy, scanning speed and fluency must be taken into accounting to the appropriate surface topography. Surfaces of commercially pure Ti (cpTi) were modified by laser Nd:YVO 4 in nine different parameters configurations, all under normal atmosphere. The samples were characterized by SEM and XRD refined by Rietveld method. The crystalline phases αTi, βTi, Ti 6O, Ti 3O and TiO were formed by the melting and fast cooling processes during irradiation. The resulting phases on the irradiated surface were correlated with the laser beam parameters. The aim of the present work was to control titanium oxides formations in order to improve implants osseointegration by using a laser irradiation technique which is of great importance to biomaterial devices due to being a clean and reproducible process.

  3. Bruxism: its multiple causes and its effects on dental implants - an updated review.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Van Der Zaag, J; Naeije, M

    2006-04-01

    There is a growing interest in bruxism, as evidenced by the rapidly increasing number of papers about this subject during the past 5 years. The aim of the present review was to provide an update of two previous reviews from our department (one about the aetiology of bruxism and the other about the possible role of this movement disorder in the failure of dental implants) and to describe the details of the literature search strategies used, thus enabling the readers to judge the completeness of the review. Most studies that were published about the etiology during the past 5 years corroborate the previously drawn conclusions. Similarly, the update of the review about the possible causal relationship between bruxism and implant failure reveals no new points of view. Thus, there is no reason to assume otherwise than that bruxism is mainly regulated centrally, not peripherally, and that there is still insufficient evidence to support or refute a causal relationship between bruxism and implant failure. This illustrates that there is a vast need for well-designed studies to study both the aetiology of bruxism and its purported relationship with implant failure. PMID:16629884

  4. Is Low Serum Vitamin D Associated with Early Dental Implant Failure? A Retrospective Evaluation on 1625 Implants Placed in 822 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, Natale

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate whether there is a correlation between early dental implant failure and low serum levels of vitamin D. Methods. All patients treated with dental implants in a single centre, in the period 2003–2015, were considered for enrollment in this study. The main outcome was early implant failure. The influence of patient-related variables on implant survival was calculated using the Chi-square test. Results. 822 patients treated with 1625 implants were selected for this study; 27 early failures (3.2%) were recorded. There was no link between gender, age, smoking, history of periodontitis, and an increased incidence of early failures. Statistical analysis reported 9 early failures (2.2%) in patients with serum levels of vitamin D > 30 ng/mL, 16 early failures (3.9%) in patients with levels between 10 and 30 ng/mL, and 2 early failures (9.0%) in patients with levels <10 ng/mL. Although there was an increasing trend in the incidence of early implant failures with the worsening of vitamin D deficiency, the difference between these 3 groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.15). Conclusions. This study failed in proving an effective link between low serum levels of vitamin D and an increased risk of early implant failure. Further studies are needed to investigate this topic. PMID:27738389

  5. Effect of early exposure on the integration of dental implants in the baboon: Part 1--Clinical findings at uncovering.

    PubMed

    Severson, S; Vernino, A R; Caudill, R; Holt, R; Church, C; Davis, A

    2000-04-01

    There has been increased discussion on the advantages of a one- versus a two-stage surgical approach in the placement of dental endosseous implants. This study evaluated the influence of early implant exposure on crestal bone height adjacent to the implant surface and Periotest values at uncovering in the baboon. Forty-eight implants (24 commercially pure titanium, 24 titanium alloy) were placed in maxillary and mandibular posterior sites in 6 baboons. Implant exposure was evaluated weekly for 3 weeks after implant placement. The level of bone adjacent to the dental implants was measured at placement from the top of the implant collar to the crest of the bone at the mesial, distal, buccal, and lingual surfaces. The maxillary sites were measured again at a 6-month uncovering, while the mandibular sites were measured at a 3-month uncovering. Periotest readings were also recorded at uncovering. Early implant exposure was more common in the mandible, with the majority occurring by the second week postplacement. There were no significant differences in the crestal bone height changes at uncovering between the pure titanium and alloy implants in either arch. In the maxilla, the changes in crestal bone height were not statistically different between exposed and nonexposed implants at any aspect. In the mandible, the difference in 3-month changes between exposed and nonexposed implants was significant for the distal, buccal, and lingual aspects. The overall percentage of implants with a Periotest reading in the "good" category was greater for the nonexposed sites as compared to exposed sites. The results of this study suggest that the two-stage surgical approach results in a better clinical outcome as compared to the one-stage approach in the baboon model.

  6. The impact of CBCT imaging when placing dental implants in the anterior edentulous mandible: a before–after study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, A; Brunton, P; Goodwin, M; Horner, K

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the impact of CBCT imaging when placing dental implants in the anterior edentulous mandible, using a “before–after” study design. Methods: Eight dental practitioners, who regularly place dental implants in independent dental practice in the North West of England, were presented with realistic simulations of four edentulous cases. The practitioners were asked to assess case difficulty, select implants and then drill osteotomies in preparation for dental implants in the lower canine regions to support a complete overdenture. In the “before” part of the study, a panoramic and a trans-symphyseal view were available. In the “after” part of the study, a CBCT image was added. Perception of case difficulty, implant selection and the incidence of perforations or “near miss perforations” of the lingual cortical plate were recorded. Two cases were regarded as “regular” and two as “challenging”. Results: In challenging cases, the availability of CBCT led practitioners to select narrower implants and to assess cases as more difficult. In the challenging cases only, there were fewer perforations of the lingual cortical plate after the availability of CBCT, but this difference was not statistically significant. There were no perforations in the regular cases either before or after the availability of CBCT. Conclusions: Perception of case difficulty and implant selection are of importance only if they change the outcome for the patient. This study provided weak evidence that CBCT is helpful in avoiding perforations in challenging cases. The availability of CBCT had no impact in regular cases. PMID:25472617

  7. Prosthodontic Rehabilitation of Accidental Maxillofacial Gunshot Injury Using Dental Implants: A Five Year Follow-Up Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Vinod; Daniel, Angleena Y

    2016-01-01

    Gunshot injuries to the face can have serious aesthetic, functional, and psychological consequences. The incapacitating nature of maxillofacial defects makes reconstruction of the maxilla and mandible challenging, owing to multiple surgeries and extensive rehabilitation phase. Outcome of prosthodontic treatment is one of the important parameters by which a patient measures the success of rehabilitation. A 5-year follow-up of comprehensive surgical and prosthodontic reconstruction of a gunshot injury using dental implants is described. This case report illustrates the contribution of immediate dental implants with proper oral hygiene follow-up as an effective treatment modality in restoring a patient to near normal function and aesthetics. PMID:27790591

  8. Genetic polymorphisms of the interleukin-1 gene and early marginal bone loss around endosseous dental implants.

    PubMed

    Shimpuku, Hitomi; Nosaka, Yasuhiro; Kawamura, Tatsuya; Tachi, Yoichi; Shinohara, Mitsuko; Ohura, Kiyoshi

    2003-08-01

    Dental implant surgery commonly proceeds in two stages. It is generally accepted that bone loss around implants does not occur at stage-II surgery because implants do not receive mechanical loading. However, early marginal bone loss around implants occasionally does occur during the healing period. Genetic polymorphisms in the interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene have been reported to be important for bone homeostasis and susceptibility to bone disease. We therefore investigated whether the idiopathic early marginal bone loss around implants is related to polymorphisms in the IL-1 gene. We performed a case-control study. Patients demonstrating marginal bone loss around implants at stage-II surgery were designated as the 'marginal bone loss (+)' group and those without bone loss as the 'marginal bone loss (-)' group. Polymorphisms of the IL-1alpha and IL-1beta genes (IL-1A-889, IL-1B-511 and IL-1B+3954) were detected by restriction fragment length polymorphism using NcoI, AvaI and TaqI after polymerase chain reactions. A total of 251 implants were placed in 39 patients. Marginal bone loss was observed in 36 implants. The patients with IL-1B-511 2/2 genotype exhibited a significantly higher occurrence of marginal bone loss than those with IL-1B-511 1/1 or 1/2 genotypes (OR=5.63; 95% CI=1.20-26.42; P=0.033). Multiple logistic regression analyses showed a markedly increased odds ratio (OR=10.86; 95% CI=1.64-71.90) in IL-1B-511 2/2 genotype carriers, while ORs of the other risk factors for bone loss, such as age, smoking status, post-menopausal women and bone quality, remained between 0.44 and 6.20. There was no significant difference in the distributions of the IL-1B+3954 and IL-1 A-889 genotypes between cases and controls. These data suggest that the IL-1B-511 2/2 genotype has a significant association with the incidence of early marginal bone loss around endosseous implants. PMID:12869004

  9. Use of PID and Iterative Learning Controls on Improving Intra-Oral Hydraulic Loading System of Dental Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Cheng; Chan, Manuel; Hsin, Yi-Ping; Ko, Ching-Chang

    This study presents the control design and tests of an intra-oral hydraulic system for quantitatively loading of a dental implant. The computer-controlled system was developed and employed for better pressure error compensation by PID (proportional-integral-derivative) control and point-to-point iterative learning algorithm. In vitro experiments showed that implant loading is precisely controlled (error 3%) for 0.5Hz loading without air inclusion, and reasonably performed (error<10%) with air inclusion up to 20% of the total hydraulic volume. The PID controller maintains forces at the desired level while the learning controller eliminates overshoot/undershoot at the onset of each loading cycle. The system can be potentially used for in vivo animal studies for better understanding of how bone responds to implant loading. Quantitative information derived from this biomechanical model will add to improved designs of dental implants.

  10. Corrosion of phosphate-enriched titanium oxide surface dental implants (TiUnite) under in vitro inflammatory and hyperglycemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Messer, Regina L W; Seta, Francesca; Mickalonis, John; Brown, Yolanda; Lewis, Jill B; Wataha, John C

    2010-02-01

    Endosseous dental implants use is increasing in patients with systemic conditions that compromise wound healing. Manufacturers recently have redesigned implants to ensure more reliable and faster osseointegration. One design strategy has been to create a porous phosphate-enriched titanium oxide (TiUnite) surface to increase surface area and enhance interactions with bone. In the current study, the corrosion properties of TiUnite implants were studied in cultures of monocytic cells and solutions simulating inflammatory and hyperglycemic conditions. Furthermore, to investigate whether placement into bone causes enough mechanical damage to alter implant corrosion properties, the enhanced surface implants as well as machined titanium implants were placed into human cadaver mandibular bone, the bone removed, and the corrosion properties measured. Implant corrosion behavior was characterized by open circuit potentials, linear polarization resistance, and electrical impedance spectroscopy. In selected samples, THP1 cells were activated with lipopolysaccharide prior to implant exposure to simulate an inflammatory environment. No significant differences in corrosion potentials were measured between the TiUnite implants and the machined titanium implants in previous studies. TiUnite implants exhibited lower corrosion rates in all simulated conditions than observed in PBS, and EIS measurements revealed two time constants which shifted with protein-containing electrolytes. In addition, the TiUnite implants displayed a significantly lower corrosion rate than the machined titanium implants after placement into bone. The current study suggests that the corrosion risk of the enhanced oxide implant is lower than its machined surface titanium implant counterpart under simulated conditions of inflammation, elevated dextrose concentrations, and after implantation into bone.

  11. Histology of tissues surrounding single crystal sapphire endosseous dental implants: an experimental study in the beagle dog.

    PubMed

    Fartash, B; Arvidson, K; Ericsson, I

    1990-12-01

    9 single crystal sapphire dental implants were installed bilaterally into pre-extracted areas in the lower jaw of two beagle dogs and histologically analysed after 180 days in situ. 8 implants were stable and radiographs disclosed complete bone healing. Light-, scanning- and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that the stable implants were surrounded by a mineralizing bone boundary and a mucosa nearly free from inflammatory cell infiltrations. The 9th implant was mobile and surrounded by a non-mineralized connective tissue capsule containing bundles of collagen. The ultrastructure of the mucosa surrounding the implants closely resembled the mucosa surrounding the tooth. Histometric analysis of the alveolar bone surrounding the stable implants revealed that the value of the bone contact surface ranged from 37.1% to 86.9% (mean value 61.8%) at the light microscopic level.

  12. FEM and Von Mises analyses of different dental implant shapes for masticatory loading distribution.

    PubMed

    Cicciù, M; Bramanti, E; Cecchetti, F; Scappaticci, L; Guglielmino, E; Risitano, G

    2014-01-01

    The rehabilitation of edentulous patients is today a challenge for the clinicians. The healthy of the hard and soft issue may be considered a fundamental element for having long-term results. The dental implant progresses about the predictable and safe results made this technique chosen from a large group of practitioners. However some problems related intra-operative and postoperative conditions may create discomfort on the patients and consequently to the clinician. The unfavourable results are often related to the bone tissue quality but sometime the dental implant shape and the prosthesis framework may undergo to technical difficulties. The purpose of this work is, through the use of appropriate FEM models, to analyse the effect of all these parameters in the construction of a prosthesis type "Toronto", evaluating all the surgical and prosthetic components in order to direct the choices made by the surgeon and to optimize the distribution of loads reducing the patient's discomfort and having a long term clinical success. PMID:25694795

  13. Characterization and nanomechanical properties of novel dental implant coatings containing copper decorated-carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sasani, N; Vahdati Khaki, J; Mojtaba Zebarjad, S

    2014-09-01

    Fluorapatite-titania coated Ti-based implants are promising for using in dental surgery for restoring teeth. One of the challenges in implantology is to achieve a bioactive coating with appropriate mechanical properties. In this research, simple sol-gel method was developed for synthesis of fluorapatite-titania-carbon nanotube decorated with antibacterial agent. Triethyl phosphate [PO4(C2H5)3], calcium nitrate [Ca(NO3)2] and ammonium fluoride (NH4F) were used as precursors under an ethanol-water based solution for fluorapatite (FA) production. Titanium isopropoxide and isopropanol were used as starting materials for making TiO2 sol-gels. Also, Copper acetate [Cu(C2H3O2)2·H2O] was used as precursor for decoration of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with wet chemical method. The decorated MWCNTs (CNT(Cu)) were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The phase identification of the FA-TiO2-CNT(Cu) coating was carried out by XRD analysis. Morphology of coated samples was investigated by SEM observations. The surface elastic modulus and hardness of coatings were studied using nanoindentation technique. The results indicate that novel dental implant coating containing FA, TiO2 and copper decorated MWCNTs have proper morphological features. The results of nanoindentation test show that incorporation of CNT(Cu) in FA-TiO2 matrix can improve the nanomechanical properties of composite coating.

  14. Nanosurface design of dental implants for improved cell growth and function.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hsu-An; Hung, Yao-Ching; Chiou, Jin-Chern; Tai, Shih-Ming; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Huang, G Steven

    2012-08-24

    A strategy was proposed for the topological design of dental implants based on an in vitro survey of optimized nanodot structures. An in vitro survey was performed using nanodot arrays with dot diameters ranging from 10 to 200 nm. MG63 osteoblasts were seeded on nanodot arrays and cultured for 3 days. Cell number, percentage undergoing apoptotic-like cell death, cell adhesion and cytoskeletal organization were evaluated. Nanodots with a diameter of approximately 50 nm enhanced cell number by 44%, minimized apoptotic-like cell death to 2.7%, promoted a 30% increase in microfilament bundles and maximized cell adhesion with a 73% increase in focal adhesions. An enhancement of about 50% in mineralization was observed, determined by von Kossa staining and by Alizarin Red S staining. Therefore, we provide a complete range of nanosurfaces for growing osteoblasts to discriminate their nanoscale environment. Nanodot arrays present an opportunity to positively and negatively modulate cell behavior and maturation. Our results suggest a topological approach which is beneficial for the design of dental implants.

  15. Nanosurface design of dental implants for improved cell growth and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hsu-An; Hung, Yao-Ching; Chiou, Jin-Chern; Tai, Shih-Ming; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Huang, G. Steven

    2012-08-01

    A strategy was proposed for the topological design of dental implants based on an in vitro survey of optimized nanodot structures. An in vitro survey was performed using nanodot arrays with dot diameters ranging from 10 to 200 nm. MG63 osteoblasts were seeded on nanodot arrays and cultured for 3 days. Cell number, percentage undergoing apoptotic-like cell death, cell adhesion and cytoskeletal organization were evaluated. Nanodots with a diameter of approximately 50 nm enhanced cell number by 44%, minimized apoptotic-like cell death to 2.7%, promoted a 30% increase in microfilament bundles and maximized cell adhesion with a 73% increase in focal adhesions. An enhancement of about 50% in mineralization was observed, determined by von Kossa staining and by Alizarin Red S staining. Therefore, we provide a complete range of nanosurfaces for growing osteoblasts to discriminate their nanoscale environment. Nanodot arrays present an opportunity to positively and negatively modulate cell behavior and maturation. Our results suggest a topological approach which is beneficial for the design of dental implants.

  16. Antifouling coatings for dental implants: Polyethylene glycol-like coatings on titanium by plasma polymerization.

    PubMed

    Buxadera-Palomero, Judit; Canal, Cristina; Torrent-Camarero, Sergi; Garrido, Beatriz; Javier Gil, Francisco; Rodríguez, Daniel

    2015-06-12

    Titanium dental implants are commonly used for the replacement of lost teeth, but they present a considerable number of failures due to the infection on surrounding tissues. The aim of this paper is the development of a polyethylene glycol-like (PEG-like) coating on the titanium surface by plasma polymerization to obtain a novel improved surface with suitable low bacterial adhesion and adequate cell response. Surface analysis data of these coatings are presented, in particular, water contact angle, surface roughness, and film chemistry, demonstrating the presence of a PEG-like coating. Streptococcus sanguinis and Lactobacillus salivarius bacterial adhesion assays showed a decreased adhesion on the plasma polymerized samples, while cell adhesion of fibroblasts and osteoblasts on the treated surfaces was similar to control surfaces. Thus, the PEG-like antifouling coating obtained by plasma polymerization on Ti confers this biomaterial's highly suitable properties for dental applications, as they reduce the possibility of infection while allowing the tissue integration around the implant.

  17. FEM and Von Mises analyses of different dental implant shapes for masticatory loading distribution

    PubMed Central

    CICCIÙ, M.; BRAMANTI, E.; CECCHETTI, F.; SCAPPATICCI, L.; GUGLIELMINO, E.; RISITANO, G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The rehabilitation of edentulous patients is today a challenge for the clinicians. The healthy of the hard and soft issue may be considered a fundamental element for having long-term results. The dental implant progresses about the predictable and safe results made this technique chosen from a large group of practitioners. However some problems related intra-operative and postoperative conditions may create discomfort on the patients and consequently to the clinician. The unfavourable results are often related to the bone tissue quality but sometime the dental implant shape and the prosthesis framework may undergo to technical difficulties. The purpose of this work is, through the use of appropriate FEM models, to analyse the effect of all these parameters in the construction of a prosthesis type “Toronto”, evaluating all the surgical and prosthetic components in order to direct the choices made by the surgeon and to optimize the distribution of loads reducing the patient’s discomfort and having a long term clinical success. PMID:25694795

  18. Systemic Trans- and Postoperative Evaluations of Patients Undergoing Dental Implant Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Junior, Joel Ferreira Santiago; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza; Moreno, Amália; Villa, Luiz Marcelo Ribeiro; de Carvalho Dekon, Stefan Fiuza; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to examine the trans- and postoperative systemic characteristics of patients undergoing dental implant surgery and to investigate the relationship between pre- and post- surgery anxiety levels. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-nine patients were analyzed in 3 call centers to determine anxiety levels, pain levels, and preoperative and postoperative histories using the State–Trait (STAI) questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 93 dental implants were installed, with a success rate of 100%. The most frequently reported systemic disease was hypertension. There was a significantly higher rate of effective clamping (torque) to the mandibular bone than to the maxillary bone. The association between postoperative surgical complications and longer operative time was not significant, but there was a significant correlation between the alteration of mouth opening and daily routine activities and a significant decrease in anxiety levels between the day of surgery and the postoperative time point (p=0.006). CONCLUSION: A longer surgical time was associated with surgery-related complications and with a higher anxiety index on the preoperative evaluation. PMID:27074177

  19. Fourier transform spectral imaging microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy for the detection of indoor common contaminants on the surface of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lutin, Anna; Bulatov, Valery; Jadwat, Yusuf; Wood, Neil H; Feller, Liviu; Schechter, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Endosteal dental implants are used routinely with high success rates to rehabilitate the integrity of the dentition. However if implant surfaces become contaminated by foreign material, osseointegration may not occur and the dental implant will fail because of the lack of mechanical stability. Detection and characterization of dental implant surface contaminants is a difficult task. In this article we investigate the application of several spectral microscopy methods to detect airborne contaminants on dental implant surfaces. We found that Fourier Transform Spectral Imaging Microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy provided the most useful information. Some implants possess weak and homogeneous auto-fluorescence and are best analyzed using FT-SIM methods, while others are Raman inactive and can be analyzed using scanning Raman microscopy.

  20. Fourier transform spectral imaging microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy for the detection of indoor common contaminants on the surface of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Lutin, Anna; Bulatov, Valery; Jadwat, Yusuf; Wood, Neil H; Feller, Liviu; Schechter, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Endosteal dental implants are used routinely with high success rates to rehabilitate the integrity of the dentition. However if implant surfaces become contaminated by foreign material, osseointegration may not occur and the dental implant will fail because of the lack of mechanical stability. Detection and characterization of dental implant surface contaminants is a difficult task. In this article we investigate the application of several spectral microscopy methods to detect airborne contaminants on dental implant surfaces. We found that Fourier Transform Spectral Imaging Microscopy (FT-SIM) and scanning Raman microscopy provided the most useful information. Some implants possess weak and homogeneous auto-fluorescence and are best analyzed using FT-SIM methods, while others are Raman inactive and can be analyzed using scanning Raman microscopy. PMID:25618702

  1. Immediate Loading of Dental Implants Inserted in Edentulous Maxillas and Mandibles: 5-Year Results of a Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Shigehara, Satoshi; Ohba, Seigo; Nakashima, Ken; Takanashi, Yoshiaki; Asahina, Izumi

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of immediately loaded full-arch, fixed, one-piece prostheses supported by dental implants inserted in completely edentulous maxillae and mandibles. Twenty-eight completely edentulous jaws in 27 patients were treated with screw-fixed provisional prostheses on the same day as implant insertion. A total of 189 implants were inserted into the jaws of the patients. All provisional prostheses were the one-piece bridge type and were made with acrylic resin. Final restoration was performed more than 2 months after surgery. Implant survival rate, prosthesis success rate, and complications during the follow-up period were evaluated. Implant size (diameter and length) and bone quality (Hounsfield units) of the region of the implant were also analyzed. Mean follow-up time was 77.9 months. The cumulative survival rate of the implants was 100%, and the success rate of the prostheses was also 100% during the observation time. Although 3 types of minor complications occurred in 10 jaws (10/28; 35.7%), no major complications were found. Immediate loading of dental implants produces an equivalent outcome as that reported in previous studies using conventional loading. We believe this study not only adds to the immediate loading data but also confirms that the immediate loading technique may be most advantageous strategy for edentulous patients. PMID:24707886

  2. Osseointegration properties of titanium dental implants modified with a nanostructured coating based on ordered porous silica and bioactive glass nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covarrubias, Cristian; Mattmann, Matías; Von Marttens, Alfredo; Caviedes, Pablo; Arriagada, Cristián; Valenzuela, Francisco; Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Corral, Camila

    2016-02-01

    The fabrication of a nanoporous silica coating loaded with bioactive glass nanoparticles (nBG/NSC) on titanium dental implant surface and its in vitro and in vivo evaluation is presented. The coating was produced by a combined sol-gel and evaporation induced self-assembly process. In vitro bioactivity was assessed in simulated body fluid (SBF) and investigating the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). A rat tibial model was employed to analyze the bone response to nBG/NSC-modified titanium implant surface in vivo. The nBG/NSC coating was confirmed at nano level to be constituted by a highly ordered nanoporous silica structure. The coating nanotopography in conjunction with the bioactivity of the BG particles accelerate the in vitro apatite formation and promote the osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs in absence of osteogenic supplements. These properties accelerate the formation of bone tissue in the periphery of the implant after 3 weeks of implantation. Backscattered scanning electron microscopy images revealed the presence of gaps and soft tissue in the unmodified implant after 6 weeks, whereas the nBG/NSC-modified implant showed mature bone in intimate contact with the implant surface. The nBG/NSC coating appears promising for accelerating the osseointegration of dental implants.

  3. Surface Topographical Changes of a Failing Acid-Etched Long-Term in Function Retrieved Dental Implant.

    PubMed

    Monje, Alberto; González-García, Raúl; Fernández-Calderón, María Coronada; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; González-Martín, María Luisa; Del Amo, Fernando Suarez-Lopez; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Wang, Hom-Lay; Monje, Florencio

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to report the main topographical and chemical changes of a failing 18-year in function retrieved acid-etching implant in the micro- and nanoscales. A partially edentulous 45 year old rehabilitated with a dental implant at 18 years of age exhibited mobility. After careful examination, a 3.25 × 13-mm press-fit dental implant was retrieved. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis was carried out to study topographical changes of the retrieved implant compared with an unused implant with similar topographical characteristics. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was used to study the surface composition of the retrieved failing implant. Clear changes related to the dual dioxide layer are present as visible in ≥×500 magnification. In addition, it was found that, for the retrieved implant, the surface composition consisted mainly of Ti2p, O1s, C1s, and Al2p. Also, a meaningful decrease of N and C was noticed, whereas the peaks of Ti2p, Al2p, and O1s increased when analyzing deeper (up to ×2000s) in the sample. It was shown that the superficial surface of a retrieved press-fit dual acid-etched implant 18 years after placement is impaired. However, the causes and consequences for these changes cannot be determined. PMID:25642739

  4. A novel root analogue dental implant using CT scan and CAD/CAM: selective laser melting technology.

    PubMed

    Figliuzzi, M; Mangano, F; Mangano, C

    2012-07-01

    Direct laser metal forming (DLMF) is a new technique which allows solids with complex geometry to be produced by annealing metal powder microparticles in a focused laser beam, according to a computer-generated three-dimensional (3D) model. For dental implants, the fabrication process involves the laser-induced fusion of titanium microparticles, in order to build, layer by layer, the desired object. Modern computed tomography (CT) acquisition and 3D image conversion, combined with the DLMF process, allows the fabrication of custom-made, root-analogue implants (RAI), perfect copies of the radicular units that need replacing. This report demonstrates the successful clinical use of a custom-made, root-analogue DLMF implant. CT images of the residual non-restorable root of a right maxillary premolar were acquired and modified with specific software into a 3D model. From this model, a custom-made, root-analogue, DLMF implant was fabricated. Immediately after tooth extraction, the root-analogue implant was placed in the extraction socket and restored with a single crown. At the 1-year follow-up examination, the custom-made implant showed almost perfect functional and aesthetic integration. The possibility of fabricating custom-made, root-analogue DLMF implants opens new interesting perspectives for immediate placement of dental implants.

  5. Surface Topographical Changes of a Failing Acid-Etched Long-Term in Function Retrieved Dental Implant.

    PubMed

    Monje, Alberto; González-García, Raúl; Fernández-Calderón, María Coronada; Hierro-Oliva, Margarita; González-Martín, María Luisa; Del Amo, Fernando Suarez-Lopez; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Wang, Hom-Lay; Monje, Florencio

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to report the main topographical and chemical changes of a failing 18-year in function retrieved acid-etching implant in the micro- and nanoscales. A partially edentulous 45 year old rehabilitated with a dental implant at 18 years of age exhibited mobility. After careful examination, a 3.25 × 13-mm press-fit dental implant was retrieved. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis was carried out to study topographical changes of the retrieved implant compared with an unused implant with similar topographical characteristics. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was used to study the surface composition of the retrieved failing implant. Clear changes related to the dual dioxide layer are present as visible in ≥×500 magnification. In addition, it was found that, for the retrieved implant, the surface composition consisted mainly of Ti2p, O1s, C1s, and Al2p. Also, a meaningful decrease of N and C was noticed, whereas the peaks of Ti2p, Al2p, and O1s increased when analyzing deeper (up to ×2000s) in the sample. It was shown that the superficial surface of a retrieved press-fit dual acid-etched implant 18 years after placement is impaired. However, the causes and consequences for these changes cannot be determined.

  6. Designing a custom made gauge device for application in the access hole correction in the dental implant surgical guide.

    PubMed

    Moslehifard, Elnaz; Nokar, Saeid

    2012-06-01

    Anatomic limitation and restorative demands encourage the surgeon to gain precision in planning and surgical positioning of dental implants. Ideal placement facilitates the establishment of favorable forces on the implants and the prosthetic component as well as ensures an esthetic outcome. The predictability of success can be increased, if the implants are placed properly. During oral implant placement, the drill must be guided by the surgeon according to the final form of the restoration. A surgical template would be helpful in more accurate placement of the dental implants. Surgical guides fabricated in laboratory are still being used. But these guides often need correction after computed tomography (CT) scan evaluation. For their correction and reducing the possibility of error, a scaled milling machine is usually required. But this scaled milling machine is not available omnipresent. In this article a simple device is described that can be attached to any milling machine and surveyor. The presented device can correct the diagnostic template easily and predicts dental implants placement with more favorable esthetic and occlusal outcome.

  7. Prophylactic antibiotic regimen and dental implant failure: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, B R; Albrektsson, T; Wennerberg, A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate whether there are any positive effects of prophylactic antibiotic regimen on implant failure rates and post-operative infection when performing dental implant treatment in healthy individuals. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in March 2014. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomised or not. The search strategy resulted in 14 publications. The I(2) statistic was used to express the percentage of the total variation across studies due to heterogeneity. The inverse variance method was used with a fixed- or random-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity. The estimates of relative effect were expressed in risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval. Six studies were judged to be at high risk of bias, whereas one study was considered at moderate risk, and six studies were considered at low risk of bias. The test for overall effect showed that the difference between the procedures (use versus non-use of antibiotics) significantly affected the implant failure rates (P = 0.0002), with a RR of 0.55 (95% CI 0.41-0.75). The number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent one patient having an implant failure was 50 (95% CI 33-100). There were no apparent significant effects of prophylactic antibiotics on the occurrence of post-operative infections in healthy patients receiving implants (P = 0.520). A sensitivity analysis did not reveal difference when studies judged as having high risk of bias were not considered. The results have to be interpreted with caution due to the presence of several confounding factors in the included studies.

  8. A systematic review on the long-term success of calcium phosphate plasma-spray-coated dental implants.

    PubMed

    van Oirschot, B A J A; Bronkhorst, E M; van den Beucken, J J J P; Meijer, G J; Jansen, J A; Junker, R

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of the current review were (1) to systematically appraise, and (2) to evaluate long-term success data of calcium phosphate (CaP) plasma-spray-coated dental implants in clinical trials with at least 5 years of follow-up. To describe the long-term efficacy of functional implants, the outcome variables were (a) percentage annual complication rate (ACR) and (b) cumulative success rate (CSR), as presented in the selected articles. The electronic search yielded 645 titles. On the basis of the inclusion criteria, 8 studies were finally included. The percentage of implants in function after the first year was estimated to be 98.4 % in the maxilla and 99.2 % in the mandible. The estimates of the weighted mean ACR-percentage increased over the years up to 2.6 (SE 0.7) during the fifth year of function for the maxilla and to 9.4 (SE 8.4) for the mandible in the tenth year of function. After 10 years, the mean percentage of successful implants was estimated to be 71.1 % in the maxilla and 72.2 % in the mandible. The estimates seem to confirm the proposed, long-term progressive bone loss pattern of CaP-ceramic-coated dental implants. Within the limits of this meta-analytic approach to the literature, we conclude that: (1) published long-term success data for calcium phosphate plasma-spray-coated dental implants are limited, (2) comparison of the data is difficult due to differences in success criteria among the studies, and (3) long-term CSRs demonstrate very weak evidence for progressive complications around calcium phosphate plasma-spray-coated dental implants.

  9. Magnesium-containing mixed coatings on zirconia for dental implants: mechanical characterization and in vitro behavior.

    PubMed

    Pardun, Karoline; Treccani, Laura; Volkmann, Eike; Streckbein, Philipp; Heiss, Christian; Gerlach, Juergen W; Maendl, Stephan; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-07-01

    An important challenge in the field of dental and orthopedic implantology is the preparation of implant coatings with bioactive functions that feature a high mechanical stability and at the same time mimic structural and compositional properties of native bone for a better bone ingrowth. This study investigates the influence of magnesium addition to zirconia-calcium phosphate coatings. The mixed coatings were prepared with varying additions of either magnesium oxide or magnesium fluoride to yttria-stabilized zirconia and hydroxyapatite. The coatings were deposited on zirconia discs and screw implants by wet powder spraying. Microstructure studies confirm a porous coating with similar roughness and firm adhesion not hampered by the coating composition. The coating morphology, mechanical flexural strength and calcium dissolution showed a magnesium content-dependent effect. Moreover, the in vitro results obtained with human osteoblasts reveal an improved biological performance caused by the presence of Mg(2+) ions. The magnesium-containing coatings exhibited better cell proliferation and differentiation in comparison to pure zirconia-calcium phosphate coatings. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that magnesium addition increases the bioactivity potential of zirconia-calcium phosphate coatings and is thus a highly suitable candidate for bone implant coatings. PMID:25698722

  10. Antibiotic-decorated titanium with enhanced antibacterial activity through adhesive polydopamine for dental/bone implant.

    PubMed

    He, Shu; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Linxin; Xiong, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yifei; Deng, Yi; Wei, Shicheng

    2014-06-01

    Implant-associated infections, which are normally induced by microbial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, practical approaches to prevent implant-associated infections are in great demand. Inspired by adhesive proteins in mussels, here we have developed a novel antibiotic-decorated titanium (Ti) material with enhanced antibacterial activity. In this study, Ti substrate was coated by one-step pH-induced polymerization of dopamine followed by immobilization of the antibiotic cefotaxime sodium (CS) onto the polydopamine-coated Ti through catechol chemistry. Contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of CS grafted on the Ti surface. Our results demonstrated that the antibiotic-grafted Ti substrate showed good biocompatibility and well-behaved haemocompatibility. In addition, the antibiotic-grafted Ti could effectively prevent adhesion and proliferation of Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Streptococcus mutans (Gram-positive). Moreover, the inhibition of biofilm formation on the antibiotic-decorated Ti indicated that the grafted CS could maintain its long-term antibacterial activity. This modified Ti substrate with enhanced antibacterial activity holds great potential as implant material for applications in dental and bone graft substitutes.

  11. Antibiotic-decorated titanium with enhanced antibacterial activity through adhesive polydopamine for dental/bone implant

    PubMed Central

    He, Shu; Zhou, Ping; Wang, Linxin; Xiong, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yifei; Deng, Yi; Wei, Shicheng

    2014-01-01

    Implant-associated infections, which are normally induced by microbial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, practical approaches to prevent implant-associated infections are in great demand. Inspired by adhesive proteins in mussels, here we have developed a novel antibiotic-decorated titanium (Ti) material with enhanced antibacterial activity. In this study, Ti substrate was coated by one-step pH-induced polymerization of dopamine followed by immobilization of the antibiotic cefotaxime sodium (CS) onto the polydopamine-coated Ti through catechol chemistry. Contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of CS grafted on the Ti surface. Our results demonstrated that the antibiotic-grafted Ti substrate showed good biocompatibility and well-behaved haemocompatibility. In addition, the antibiotic-grafted Ti could effectively prevent adhesion and proliferation of Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) and Streptococcus mutans (Gram-positive). Moreover, the inhibition of biofilm formation on the antibiotic-decorated Ti indicated that the grafted CS could maintain its long-term antibacterial activity. This modified Ti substrate with enhanced antibacterial activity holds great potential as implant material for applications in dental and bone graft substitutes. PMID:24647910

  12. Magnesium-containing mixed coatings on zirconia for dental implants: mechanical characterization and in vitro behavior.

    PubMed

    Pardun, Karoline; Treccani, Laura; Volkmann, Eike; Streckbein, Philipp; Heiss, Christian; Gerlach, Juergen W; Maendl, Stephan; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-07-01

    An important challenge in the field of dental and orthopedic implantology is the preparation of implant coatings with bioactive functions that feature a high mechanical stability and at the same time mimic structural and compositional properties of native bone for a better bone ingrowth. This study investigates the influence of magnesium addition to zirconia-calcium phosphate coatings. The mixed coatings were prepared with varying additions of either magnesium oxide or magnesium fluoride to yttria-stabilized zirconia and hydroxyapatite. The coatings were deposited on zirconia discs and screw implants by wet powder spraying. Microstructure studies confirm a porous coating with similar roughness and firm adhesion not hampered by the coating composition. The coating morphology, mechanical flexural strength and calcium dissolution showed a magnesium content-dependent effect. Moreover, the in vitro results obtained with human osteoblasts reveal an improved biological performance caused by the presence of Mg(2+) ions. The magnesium-containing coatings exhibited better cell proliferation and differentiation in comparison to pure zirconia-calcium phosphate coatings. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that magnesium addition increases the bioactivity potential of zirconia-calcium phosphate coatings and is thus a highly suitable candidate for bone implant coatings.

  13. Biological characterization of a new silicon based coating developed for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ibáñez, M; Juan-Díaz, M J; Lara-Saez, I; Coso, A; Franco, J; Gurruchaga, M; Suay Antón, J; Goñi, Isabel

    2016-04-01

    Taking into account the influence of Si in osteoblast cell proliferation, a series of sol-gel derived silicon based coating was prepared by controlling the process parameters and varying the different Si-alkoxide precursors molar rate in order to obtain materials able to release Si compounds. For this purpose, methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMOS) and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) were hydrolysed together and the sol obtained was used to dip-coat the different substrates. The silicon release ability of the coatings was tested finding that it was dependent on the TEOS precursor content, reaching a Si amount value around ninefolds higher for coatings with TEOS than for the pure MTMOS material. To test the effect of this released Si, the in vitro performance of developed coatings was tested with human adipose mesenchymal stem cells finding a significantly higher proliferation and mineralization on the coating with the higher TEOS content. For in vivo evaluation of the biocompatibility, coated implants were placed in the tibia of the rabbit and a histological analysis was performed. The evaluation of parameters such as the bone marrow state, the presence of giant cells and the fibrous capsule proved the biocompatibility of the developed coatings. Furthermore, coated implants seemed to produce a qualitatively higher osteoblastic activity and a higher number of bone spicules than the control (uncoated commercial SLA titanium dental implant).

  14. Segmental Alveolar Osteotomy by Palatal Approach to Correct Excessive Angulated Dental Implants in Anterior and Posterior Maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Akkas, Ismail; Akpinar, Yusuf Ziya; Ozan, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Dental implants have been used for a long time to achieve better prosthetic and health conditions in the mouth. With the increase in their usage, more complications have occurred, and methods of solving these problems have been developed. One complication is insertion of the implant in the wrong direction. The aim of this case report is to describe an osteotomy technique to reposition a malpositioned dental implant. A female patient, aged 38 years, and a male patient aged 48 years, were referred complaining of the malpositioned osseointegrated implants, which had been placed in the region of the left maxillary first premolar and molar tooth, and in the region of the left maxillary lateral incisor. Due to severe buccal positioning of the implant fixtures, acceptable prosthetic treatment was not possible. Alveolar osteotomy procedure was used to reposition the implants. Satisfactory results were obtained by osteotomy for 18-month of follow up. We conclude that inadequately axially inclined implants can be successfully treated by alveolar osteotomy. The preservation of marginal gingiva permits obtaining better prosthetic results. To avoid the recession of attached gingiva, palatal approach technique may help the clinicians. PMID:26023650

  15. Five- to six-year results of a prospective clinical trial using the ENDOPORE dental implant and a mandibular overdenture.

    PubMed

    Deporter, D; Watson, P; Pharoah, M; Levy, D; Todescan, R

    1999-04-01

    This report is an update on a group of 46 clinical trial patients who each received 3 free-standing Endopore dental implants placed using a 2-stage surgical approach in the anterior mandible. After an initial healing interval of 10 weeks, the implants were used in each case to retain an over-denture, and at the time of the report, all patients had passed 5 years of continuous function. The 5-year cumulative "survival" rate based on a life table analysis was 93.4% and this remained unchanged after 6 years. The 5-year "success rate" was 83.3% when assessed qualitatively with the published criteria of others using a four-field table analysis categorizing every implant in the study as one of "Grade 1 Success", "survival", "unaccounted for" or "failure". Modified periodontal parameters verified continued peri-implant soft tissue health. No implant still in function had more than 1.8 mm cumulative bone loss during the first 5 years of function. These results provide clear evidence that Endopore implants despite their short lengths function at least as well as other dental implant designs used in much longer lengths.

  16. Numerical study of effect of elastomeric stress absorbers on stress reduction in bone-dental implant interface

    PubMed Central

    MEHDI, Ghalem; BELARBI, Abderrahmane; MANSOURI, Bensmaine; AZARI, Zitouni

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper focused on optimal stress distribution in the mandibular bone surrounding a dental implant and is devoted to the development of a modified Osteoplant® implant type in order to minimize stress concentration in the bone-implant interface. Material and Methods This study investigated 0.4 mm thick layers of two elastomeric stress barriers incorporated into the dental implant using 3-D finite element analysis. Results Overall, this proposed implant provoked lower load transfer in bone-implant interface due to the effect of the elastomers as stress absorbers. The stress level in the bone was reduced between 28% and 42% for three load cases: 75 N, 60 N and 27 N in corono-apical, linguo-buccal and disto-mesial direction, respectively. Conclusion The proposed model provided an acceptable solution for load transfer reduction to the mandible. This investigation also permitted to choose how to incorporate two elastomers into the Osteoplant® implant system. PMID:25760271

  17. Coherent Synchrotron-Based Micro-Imaging Employed for Studies of Micro-Gap Formation in Dental Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, T.; Zabler, S.; Rack, A.; Stiller, M.; Riesemeier, H.; Cecilia, A.; Nelson, K.

    2011-09-01

    Biocompatible materials such as titanium are regularly applied in oral surgery. Titanium-based implants for the replacement of missing teeth demand a high mechanical precision in order to minimize micro-bacterial leakage, especially when two-piece concepts are used. Synchrotron-based hard x-ray radiography, unlike conventional laboratory radiography, allows high spatial resolution in combination with high contrast even when micro-sized features in such highly attenuating objects are visualized. Therefore, micro-gap formation at interfaces in two-piece dental implants with the sample under different mechanical loads can be studied. We show the existence of micro-gaps in implants with conical connections and study the mechanical behavior of the mating zone of conical implants during loading. The micro-gap is a potential source of implant failure, i.e., bacterial leakage, which can be a stimulus for an inflammatory process.

  18. Coherent Synchrotron-Based Micro-Imaging Employed for Studies of Micro-Gap Formation in Dental Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, T.; Stiller, M.; Nelson, K.; Zabler, S.; Rack, A.; Riesemeier, H.; Cecilia, A.

    2011-09-09

    Biocompatible materials such as titanium are regularly applied in oral surgery. Titanium-based implants for the replacement of missing teeth demand a high mechanical precision in order to minimize micro-bacterial leakage, especially when two-piece concepts are used. Synchrotron-based hard x-ray radiography, unlike conventional laboratory radiography, allows high spatial resolution in combination with high contrast even when micro-sized features in such highly attenuating objects are visualized. Therefore, micro-gap formation at interfaces in two-piece dental implants with the sample under different mechanical loads can be studied. We show the existence of micro-gaps in implants with conical connections and study the mechanical behavior of the mating zone of conical implants during loading. The micro-gap is a potential source of implant failure, i.e., bacterial leakage, which can be a stimulus for an inflammatory process.

  19. A noninterventional study documenting use and success of implants with a new chemically modified titanium surface in daily dental practice.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Giuseppe; Oteri, Giacomo

    2010-01-01

    A new chemically modified titanium surface, SLActive, has recently been developed. The results obtained in controlled clinical trials indicate that this implant can be safely used and that it offers predictable results. The goal of this noninterventional study was to verify that the success rates of implants used in daily dental practice are comparable to those reported in controlled clinical trials. This study was a prospective, noninterventional study using implants with a chemically modified surface according to the daily dental practice procedures applied by private practitioners. The choice of the implantation procedure and the loading protocol were the responsibility of the investigator and were chosen according to the patient's needs. Thirty clinical centers actively participated in this study, and 226 patients were treated, of which, 8 patients were lost to follow-up. Because of the noninterventional design of the study, the patients were not selected according to strictly defined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Thus, the study included individuals with risk factors such as smoking (24%), untreated gingivitis or periodontitis (9%), and bruxism (6%). The implants were equally distributed between mandible (46%) and maxilla (54%). A bone augmentation procedure was done in 31% of the cases. Early loading (functional loading between 48 hours and 3 months after implant insertion) was applied most frequently (48%), followed by the conventional loading protocol (3 to 6 months after implant placement, 34%). Immediate restoration and immediate loading were rare (7% and 2%, respectively). Of 276 implants inserted and documented, 5 implants failures were reported, all of which were associated with a sinus floor augmentation procedure. The survival rate was 98.2% at the 1-year follow-up visit. The results showed that implants with a chemically modified surface can be successfully restored with success rates similar to those reported in formal clinical trials under more

  20. Clinical outcomes of immediate/early loading of dental implants. A literature review of recent controlled prospective clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Sennerby, L; Gottlow, J

    2008-06-01

    Two previous reviews have evaluated the clinical outcomes of immediate/early loading of dental implants based on studies published until 2005.(1,2) The aim of the present paper was to review controlled clinical studies on the subject published since 2005 including at least 10 patients in each group followed for at least one year in function. Six comparative studies were found and none of these showed any differences in survival rates or marginal bone loss after one to five years. Most authors used specified inclusion criteria to avoid known risk factors such as soft bone, short implants and bruxism. Data from one randomized study in the edentulous maxilla showed no differences between early and delayed loading in consecutive clinical routine cases including short implants and soft bone. Three additional studies comparing different surfaces or implant designs under immediate loading were reviewed. No differences between implants with a moderately rough or smooth surface topography were observed. The data add to the previous bulk of evidence that various designs of implants can be loaded shortly after their placement in both the mandible and the maxilla. However, one study reported on marginal bone loss around a novel one-piece implant design leading to implant failure which was not seen for control two-piece implants.(3). PMID:18498589

  1. Osseointegrated dental implants as alternative therapy to bridge construction or orthodontics in young patients: seven years of clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Ledermann, P D; Hassell, T M; Hefti, A F

    1993-01-01

    Young patients often require fixed bridgework or orthodontic therapy in cases of traumatic tooth loss or congenitally missing teeth. Dental implants represent an alternative to the more conventional treatment methods. We report positive experience over a seven-year period with 42 titanium Ha-Ti implants in 34 patients aged 9 to 18 years. Fourteen implants were placed into prepared tooth sockets immediately after traumatic luxation of anterior teeth in 12 patients aged 9 to 18 years (median age 16). An additional 22 patients (median age 15.5, range 11 to 18) also received implants (N = 28), but these were placed only after healing of extraction sites, or as substitutes for congenitally missing teeth. Implants remained in situ for an average of 7.7 months before loading. During the healing period, three implants were lost due to additional trauma and one became infected. The 38 remaining implants osseointegrated and since have been loaded for five to 79 months in successful function. There was no difference between immediate and delayed implants in clinical success. These experiences demonstrate that appropriate, versatile, osseointegrated implants can provide a successful treatment method for young patients, without damaging adjacent teeth.

  2. Intraoral corrosion resulting from coupling dental implants and restorative metallic systems.

    PubMed

    Lemons, J E; Lucas, L C; Johansson, B I

    1992-01-01

    Materials used for the construction of dental restorations and implants include a wide range of metals and alloys, ceramics and carbons, and polymers. When metals and alloys are placed in direct contact in the oral cavity, a galvanic cell can be formed that may compromise the longevity of one or more of the materials in the couple. In vitro electrochemical corrosion analyses have proven to be a valuable tool for providing guidance on the selection of metallic materials. These analyses can provide basic data on electrochemical potentials, current rates, and the evaluation of galvanic corrosion conditions. This article seeks to provide the clinician with information that can be valuable in the selection of metallic materials that may be placed in direct contact with one another in the oral cavity.

  3. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-15Zr alloy used as dental implant material.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Alexander E; Molotnikov, Andrey; Lapovok, Rimma; Zeller, Rolf; Berner, Simon; Habersetzer, Philippe; Dalla Torre, Florian

    2016-09-01

    Ti-Zr alloys have recently started to receive a considerable amount of attention as promising materials for dental applications. This work compares mechanical properties of a new Ti-15Zr alloy to those of commercially pure titanium Grade4 in two surface conditions - machined and modified by sand-blasting and etching (SLA). As a result of significantly smaller grain size in the initial condition (1-2µm), the strength of Ti-15Zr alloy was found to be 10-15% higher than that of Grade4 titanium without reduction in the tensile elongation or compromising the fracture toughness. The fatigue endurance limit of the alloy was increased by around 30% (560MPa vs. 435MPa and 500MPa vs. 380MPa for machined and SLA-treated surfaces, respectively). Additional implant fatigue tests showed enhanced fatigue performance of Ti-15Zr over Ti-Grade4.

  4. Collagen-functionalised titanium surfaces for biological sealing of dental implants: effect of immobilisation process on fibroblasts response.

    PubMed

    Marín-Pareja, Nathalia; Salvagni, Emiliano; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Aparicio, Conrado; Ginebra, Maria-Pau

    2014-10-01

    The clinical success of a dental implant requires not only an optimum osseointegration, but also the development of a biological sealing; i.e., a soft tissue seal around the transmucosal part of the implant. A promising approach to improve the biological seal of dental implants is the biomimetic modification of titanium surfaces with proteins or peptides that have specific cell-binding moieties. In this work we investigated the process of immobilising collagen on smooth and rough titanium surfaces and its effect on human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cell response. Titanium samples were activated by either oxygen plasma or acid etching to generate a smooth or nanorough surface, respectively. Subsequently, collagen grafting was achieved by either physisorption or covalent bonding through organosilane chemistry. The biofunctionalised titanium samples were then tested for stability and characterised by fluorescent labelling, wettability, OWLS and XPS studies. Biological characterisation was also performed through HDF adhesion, proliferation and gene expression. Covalent-bonded collagen showed higher stability than physisorbed collagen. A significant overexpression of the genes involved in fibroblast activation and extracellular matrix remodelling was observed in the collagen-coated surfaces. This effect was more pronounced on smooth than on rough surfaces. Immobilised collagen on the smooth plasma-treated surfaces favoured both fibroblast adhesion and activation. This study provides essential information for the design of implants with optimal biological sealing, a key aspect to avoid peri-implantitis and ensure long-lasting implant fixation.

  5. A novel closed-loop electromechanical stimulator to enhance osseointegration with immediate loading of dental implant restorations.

    PubMed

    Meswania, I M; Bousdras, V A; Ahir, S P; Cunningham, J L; Blunn, G W; Goodship, A E

    2010-10-01

    The degree of osseomechanical integration of dental implants is acutely sensitive to their mechanical environment. Bone, both as a tissue and structure, adapts its mass and architecture in response to loading conditions. Therefore, application of predefined controlled loads may be considered as a treatment option to promote early maturation of bone/implant interface prior to or in conjunction with crown/prosthesis attachment. Although many studies have established that the magnitude, rate of the applied strain, and frequency have significant effects on the osteogenic response, the actual specific relationships between strain parameters and frequency have not yet been fully defined. The purpose of this study was to develop a stimulator to apply defined mechanical stimuli to individual dental implants in vivo immediately after implantation, exploring the hypothesis that immediate controlled loading could enhance implant integration. An electromechanical device was developed, based on load values obtained using a two-dimensional finite element analysis of the bone/implant interface generating 1000 to 4000 pe and operated at 30 and 3 Hz respectively. The device was then tested in a cadaveric pig mandible, and periosteal bone surface strains were recorded for potential future comparison with a three-dimensional finite element model to determine loading regimens to optimize interface strains and iterate the device for clinical use.

  6. An Ex Vivo Model in Human Femoral Heads for Histopathological Study and Resonance Frequency Analysis of Dental Implant Primary Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Cortés, Pedro; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Catena, Andrés; Ortega-Oller, Inmaculada; Salas-Pérez, José; Gómez-Sánchez, Rafael; Aguilar, Mariano; Aguilar, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study was designed to explore relationships of resonance frequency analysis (RFA)—assessed implant stability (ISQ values) with bone morphometric parameters and bone quality in an ex vivo model of dental implants placed in human femoral heads and to evaluate the usefulness of this model for dental implant studies. Material and Methods. This ex vivo study included femoral heads from 17 patients undergoing surgery for femoral neck fracture due to osteoporosis (OP) (n = 7) or for total prosthesis joint replacement due to severe hip osteoarthrosis (OA) (n = 10). Sixty 4.5 × 13 mm Dentsply Astra implants were placed, followed by RFA. CD44 immunohistochemical analysis for osteocytes was also carried out. Results. As expected, the analysis yielded significant effects of femoral head type (OA versus OA) (P < 0.001), but not of the implants (P = 0.455) or of the interaction of the two factors (P = 0.848). Bonferroni post hoc comparisons showed a lower mean ISQ for implants in decalcified (50.33 ± 2.92) heads than in fresh (66.93 ± 1.10) or fixated (70.77 ± 1.32) heads (both P < 0.001). The ISQ score (fresh) was significantly higher for those in OA (73.52 ± 1.92) versus OP (67.13 ± 1.09) heads. However, mixed linear analysis showed no significant association between ISQ scores and morphologic or histomorphometric results (P > 0.5 in all cases), and no significant differences in ISQ values were found as a function of the length or area of the cortical layer (both P > 0.08). Conclusion. Although RFA-determined ISQ values are not correlated with morphometric parameters, they can discriminate bone quality (OP versus OA). This ex vivo model is useful for dental implant studies. PMID:24995307

  7. Measurement for natural dental neck data of normal adults and its clinical significance on guiding implant restoration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mingxu; Gu, Fang; Wang, Junjun; Zhou, Chengyuan; Xia, Junnan; Qin, Hongwei; Yang, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Provide reference basis for the clinical implant restoration to select implant diameter through measuring each data of 7 teeth in the dental neck of bilateral upper and lower jaws of the young volunteers with normal dentition. Methods: Select 30 healthy young volunteers with complete dentition but no malocclusion, take cone beam CT (CBCT), measure the mesiodistal and buccolingual distance of the tooth root at 1.5 mm from 14 teeth (bilateral upper and lower jaws) to alveolar crest, trace out the outline of each tooth neck in this layer, calculate the cross sectional area and roundness of each tooth neck according to pixel value calibration, and then carry out statistical processing. Results: Complete the data collection and processing of mesiodistal length, buccolingual width, cross sectional area, and cross sectional roundness of the dental neck at 1.5 mm from these seven teeth of the bilateral upper and lower jaws to the alveolar crest of 30 volunteers, and calculate the mean value, variance, and reference value range of medical science of each index. Conclusion: CBCT can effectively obtain the image information of the dental neck. Through mimics 10.0 and Photoshop CS3, it is possible to accurately calculate the dental neck length and width, and cross sectional area of each tooth according to CBCT image information. This result can provide reference basis for the implant restoration of the clinical teeth. PMID:26628955

  8. Titanium dental implants surface-immobilized with gold nanoparticles as osteoinductive agents for rapid osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong Nyoung; Ko, Wan-Kyu; Lee, Hak Rae; Lee, Sang Jin; Lee, Donghyun; Um, Soong Ho; Lee, Jung Haeng; Woo, Yi-Hyung; Zhang, Lijie Grace; Lee, Deok-Won; Kwon, Il Keun

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are quite attractive materials for use as osteogenic agents due to their potential effects on the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation. In this study, an osseo-integrated titanium (Ti) implant surface coated with GNPs was used for promotion of bone regeneration. We prepared a silanized Ti surface by chemical treatment of (3-Mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and immobilized the GNP layer (Ti-GNP) on their surfaces via Au-S bonding. The GNP layer is uniformly immobilized on the surface and the layer covers the titanium oxide surface well, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Ti-GNP was used to investigate the effectiveness of this system both in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro results showed that the Ti-GNP significantly enhances the osteogenic differentiation with increased mRNA expression of osteogenic differentiation specific genes in human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Furthermore, the in vivo results showed that Ti-GNP had a significant influence on the osseous interface formation. Through these in vitro and vivo tests, we found that Ti-GNP can be useful as osseo-integration inducing dental implants for formation of an osseous interface and maintenance of nascent bone formation. PMID:26874978

  9. Dosimetric distribution of the surroundings of different dental crowns and implants during LINAC photon irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kwo-Ping; Lin, Wei-Ting; Shiau, An-Cheng; Chie, Yu-Huang

    2014-11-01

    In radiotherapy of the head and neck, metal dentures or implants will increase the risk of complications such as mucositis and osteoradionecrosis. The aim of this study is to explore the back scatter effect of commercially available dental metal alloys on the mucosa and bone under 6 MV LINAC irradiation. The Monte Carlo method has been employed to calculate the dose distribution in the heterogeneous media of the designed oral phantom based on the oral cavity geometry. Backscatter dose increases up to a maximum of 53%, and is primarily dependent on the physical density and electron density of the metal crown alloy. Ceramic metal crowns have been quantified to increase backscatter dose up to 10% on mucosa. Ceramic serves as an inherent shield of mucosa. The backscatter dose will be greater for a small field size if the tumor is located at a deeper region. Titanium implants will increase the backscatter dose by 13% to bone but will not affect the mucosa. QC-20 (polystyrene resin) is recommended as a shield material (3 mm) to eliminate the backscatter dose on mucosa due to the high density metals.

  10. Nanoparticulate zinc oxide as a coating material for orthopedic and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Sharili, Amir S; Huang, Jie; Rawlinson, Simon C F; Allaker, Robert P

    2015-03-01

    Orthopedic and dental implants are prone to infection. In this study, we describe a novel system using zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) as a coating material to inhibit bacterial adhesion and promote osteoblast growth. Electrohydrodynamic atomisation (EHDA) was employed to deposit mixtures of nZnO and nanohydroxyapatite (nHA) onto the surface of glass substrates. Nano-coated substrates were exposed to Staphylococcus aureus suspended in buffered saline or bovine serum to determine antimicrobial activity. Our results indicate that 100% nZnO and 75% nZnO/25% nHA composite-coated substrates have significant antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, osteoblast function was explored by exposing cells to nZnO. UMR-106 cells exposed to nZnO supernatants showed minimal toxicity. Similarly, MG-63 cells cultured on nZnO substrates did not show release of TNF-α and IL-6 cytokines. These results were reinforced by both proliferation and differentiation studies which revealed that a substrate coated with exclusively nZnO is more efficient than composite surface coatings. Finally, electron and light microscopy, together with immunofluorescence staining, revealed that all cell types tested, including human mesenchymal cell (hMSC), were able to maintain normal cell morphology when adhered onto the surface of the nano-coated substrates. Collectively, these findings indicate that nZnO can, on its own, provide an optimal coating for future bone implants that are both antimicrobial and biocompatible.

  11. Titanium dental implants surface-immobilized with gold nanoparticles as osteoinductive agents for rapid osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Heo, Dong Nyoung; Ko, Wan-Kyu; Lee, Hak Rae; Lee, Sang Jin; Lee, Donghyun; Um, Soong Ho; Lee, Jung Haeng; Woo, Yi-Hyung; Zhang, Lijie Grace; Lee, Deok-Won; Kwon, Il Keun

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are quite attractive materials for use as osteogenic agents due to their potential effects on the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation. In this study, an osseo-integrated titanium (Ti) implant surface coated with GNPs was used for promotion of bone regeneration. We prepared a silanized Ti surface by chemical treatment of (3-Mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) and immobilized the GNP layer (Ti-GNP) on their surfaces via Au-S bonding. The GNP layer is uniformly immobilized on the surface and the layer covers the titanium oxide surface well, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The Ti-GNP was used to investigate the effectiveness of this system both in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro results showed that the Ti-GNP significantly enhances the osteogenic differentiation with increased mRNA expression of osteogenic differentiation specific genes in human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Furthermore, the in vivo results showed that Ti-GNP had a significant influence on the osseous interface formation. Through these in vitro and vivo tests, we found that Ti-GNP can be useful as osseo-integration inducing dental implants for formation of an osseous interface and maintenance of nascent bone formation.

  12. 3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing Single Titanium Dental Implants: A Prospective Multicenter Study with 3 Years of Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Tunchel, Samy; Blay, Alberto; Kolerman, Roni; Mijiritsky, Eitan; Shibli, Jamil Awad

    2016-01-01

    This prospective 3-year follow-up clinical study evaluated the survival and success rates of 3DP/AM titanium dental implants to support single implant-supported restorations. After 3 years of loading, clinical, radiographic, and prosthetic parameters were assessed; the implant survival and the implant-crown success were evaluated. Eighty-two patients (44 males, 38 females; age range 26-67 years) were enrolled in the present study. A total of 110 3DP/AM titanium dental implants (65 maxilla, 45 mandible) were installed: 75 in healed alveolar ridges and 35 in postextraction sockets. The prosthetic restorations included 110 single crowns (SCs). After 3 years of loading, six implants failed, for an overall implant survival rate of 94.5%; among the 104 surviving implant-supported restorations, 6 showed complications and were therefore considered unsuccessful, for an implant-crown success of 94.3%. The mean distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-implant contact was 0.75 mm (±0.32) and 0.89 (±0.45) after 1 and 3 years of loading, respectively. 3DP/AM titanium dental implants seem to represent a successful clinical option for the rehabilitation of single-tooth gaps in both jaws, at least until 3-year period. Further, long-term clinical studies are needed to confirm the present results.

  13. 3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing Single Titanium Dental Implants: A Prospective Multicenter Study with 3 Years of Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This prospective 3-year follow-up clinical study evaluated the survival and success rates of 3DP/AM titanium dental implants to support single implant-supported restorations. After 3 years of loading, clinical, radiographic, and prosthetic parameters were assessed; the implant survival and the implant-crown success were evaluated. Eighty-two patients (44 males, 38 females; age range 26–67 years) were enrolled in the present study. A total of 110 3DP/AM titanium dental implants (65 maxilla, 45 mandible) were installed: 75 in healed alveolar ridges and 35 in postextraction sockets. The prosthetic restorations included 110 single crowns (SCs). After 3 years of loading, six implants failed, for an overall implant survival rate of 94.5%; among the 104 surviving implant-supported restorations, 6 showed complications and were therefore considered unsuccessful, for an implant-crown success of 94.3%. The mean distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-implant contact was 0.75 mm (±0.32) and 0.89 (±0.45) after 1 and 3 years of loading, respectively. 3DP/AM titanium dental implants seem to represent a successful clinical option for the rehabilitation of single-tooth gaps in both jaws, at least until 3-year period. Further, long-term clinical studies are needed to confirm the present results. PMID:27313616

  14. 3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing Single Titanium Dental Implants: A Prospective Multicenter Study with 3 Years of Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Tunchel, Samy; Blay, Alberto; Kolerman, Roni; Mijiritsky, Eitan; Shibli, Jamil Awad

    2016-01-01

    This prospective 3-year follow-up clinical study evaluated the survival and success rates of 3DP/AM titanium dental implants to support single implant-supported restorations. After 3 years of loading, clinical, radiographic, and prosthetic parameters were assessed; the implant survival and the implant-crown success were evaluated. Eighty-two patients (44 males, 38 females; age range 26-67 years) were enrolled in the present study. A total of 110 3DP/AM titanium dental implants (65 maxilla, 45 mandible) were installed: 75 in healed alveolar ridges and 35 in postextraction sockets. The prosthetic restorations included 110 single crowns (SCs). After 3 years of loading, six implants failed, for an overall implant survival rate of 94.5%; among the 104 surviving implant-supported restorations, 6 showed complications and were therefore considered unsuccessful, for an implant-crown success of 94.3%. The mean distance between the implant shoulder and the first visible bone-implant contact was 0.75 mm (±0.32) and 0.89 (±0.45) after 1 and 3 years of loading, respectively. 3DP/AM titanium dental implants seem to represent a successful clinical option for the rehabilitation of single-tooth gaps in both jaws, at least until 3-year period. Further, long-term clinical studies are needed to confirm the present results. PMID:27313616

  15. The effects of flute shape and thread profile on the insertion torque and primary stability of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Wei; Lee, Chia-Ching; Fu, Ping-Yuen; Lin, Shang-Chih

    2012-09-01

    Easy insertion of the implant and stable bone purchase is essential for an ideal dental implantation. At the implant tip, the cutting flutes and conical profile are respectively designed to reduce insertion resistance and facilitate the initial insertion. However, the tapered tip might reduce the self-tapping and bone-purchasing abilities of the flutes and the tip threads. Using sawbone blocks as standard specimens, this study experimentally measures the insertion torque, holding power, and bending strength of eight varieties of implant (4 shapes×2 profiles). The bony contact, interfacial mechanism, and the altered shape of the flutes, at different section planes, are used to explain the experimental results. The results reveal that the bone-implant gaps at the tip region significantly suppress both the self-tapping and bone-purchasing abilities of the flutes and the tip threads. This makes initial insertion of the conical implant easier. However, the conical implant eventually requires a higher insertion torque and holding power, due to tighter bony contact, at the tail threads. The bowl-fluted design has the least flute space to store the squeezed bone chips, so both insertion torque and bending strength are significantly higher. For the conical group, the holding powers of three flute designs are nearly comparable. Overall, the conical implant with bowl flutes is the optimal design, with a lower resistance to initial insertion and higher stability, for final instrumentation. PMID:22041130

  16. The effects of flute shape and thread profile on the insertion torque and primary stability of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Wei; Lee, Chia-Ching; Fu, Ping-Yuen; Lin, Shang-Chih

    2012-09-01

    Easy insertion of the implant and stable bone purchase is essential for an ideal dental implantation. At the implant tip, the cutting flutes and conical profile are respectively designed to reduce insertion resistance and facilitate the initial insertion. However, the tapered tip might reduce the self-tapping and bone-purchasing abilities of the flutes and the tip threads. Using sawbone blocks as standard specimens, this study experimentally measures the insertion torque, holding power, and bending strength of eight varieties of implant (4 shapes×2 profiles). The bony contact, interfacial mechanism, and the altered shape of the flutes, at different section planes, are used to explain the experimental results. The results reveal that the bone-implant gaps at the tip region significantly suppress both the self-tapping and bone-purchasing abilities of the flutes and the tip threads. This makes initial insertion of the conical implant easier. However, the conical implant eventually requires a higher insertion torque and holding power, due to tighter bony contact, at the tail threads. The bowl-fluted design has the least flute space to store the squeezed bone chips, so both insertion torque and bending strength are significantly higher. For the conical group, the holding powers of three flute designs are nearly comparable. Overall, the conical implant with bowl flutes is the optimal design, with a lower resistance to initial insertion and higher stability, for final instrumentation.

  17. Flapless versus Conventional Flapped Dental Implant Surgery: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rates, postoperative infection, and marginal bone loss for patients being rehabilitated by dental implants being inserted by a flapless surgical procedure versus the open flap technique, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in March 2014. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomized or not. The search strategy resulted in 23 publications. The I2 statistic was used to express the percentage of the total variation across studies due to heterogeneity. The inverse variance method was used for random-effects model or fixed-effects model, when indicated. The estimates of relative effect were expressed in risk ratio (RR) and mean difference (MD) in millimeters. Sixteen studies were judged to be at high risk of bias, whereas two studies were considered of moderate risk of bias, and five studies of low risk of bias. The funnel plots indicated absence of publication bias for the three outcomes analyzed. The test for overall effect showed that the difference between the procedures (flapless vs. open flap surgery) significantly affect the implant failure rates (P = 0.03), with a RR of 1.75 (95% CI 1.07–2.86). However, a sensitivity analysis revealed differences when studies of high and low risk of bias were pooled separately. Thus, the results must be interpreted carefully. No apparent significant effects of flapless technique on the occurrence of postoperative infection (P = 0.96; RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.23–4.03) or on the marginal bone loss (P = 0.16; MD −0.07 mm, 95% CI −0.16–0.03) were observed. PMID:24950053

  18. Flapless versus conventional flapped dental implant surgery: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rates, postoperative infection, and marginal bone loss for patients being rehabilitated by dental implants being inserted by a flapless surgical procedure versus the open flap technique, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in March 2014. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomized or not. The search strategy resulted in 23 publications. The I2 statistic was used to express the percentage of the total variation across studies due to heterogeneity. The inverse variance method was used for random-effects model or fixed-effects model, when indicated. The estimates of relative effect were expressed in risk ratio (RR) and mean difference (MD) in millimeters. Sixteen studies were judged to be at high risk of bias, whereas two studies were considered of moderate risk of bias, and five studies of low risk of bias. The funnel plots indicated absence of publication bias for the three outcomes analyzed. The test for overall effect showed that the difference between the procedures (flapless vs. open flap surgery) significantly affect the implant failure rates (P = 0.03), with a RR of 1.75 (95% CI 1.07-2.86). However, a sensitivity analysis revealed differences when studies of high and low risk of bias were pooled separately. Thus, the results must be interpreted carefully. No apparent significant effects of flapless technique on the occurrence of postoperative infection (P = 0.96; RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.23-4.03) or on the marginal bone loss (P = 0.16; MD -0.07 mm, 95% CI -0.16-0.03) were observed.

  19. Relevant aspects in the surface properties in titanium dental implants for the cellular viability.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Ortega, E; Alfonso-Rodríguez, C A; Monsalve-Guil, L; España-López, A; Jiménez-Guerra, A; Garzón, I; Alaminos, M; Gil, F J

    2016-07-01

    Roughness and topographical features are the most relevant of the surface properties for a dental implant for its osseointegration. For that reason, we studied the four surfaces more used in titanium dental implants: machined, sandblasted, acid etching and sandblasted plus acid etching. The roughness and wettability (contact angle and surface free energy) was studied by means 3D-interferometric microscope and sessile drop method. Normal human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) were obtained from small oral mucosa biopsies and were used for cell cultures. To analyze cell integrity, we first quantified the total amount of DNA and LDH released from dead cells to the culture medium. Then, LIVE/DEAD assay was used as a combined method assessing cell integrity and metabolism. All experiments were carried out on each cell type cultured on each Ti material for 24h, 48h and 72h. To evaluate the in vivo cell adhesion capability of each Ti surface, the four types of discs were grafted subcutaneously in 5 Wistar rats. Sandblasted surfaces were significantly rougher than acid etching and machined. Wettability and surface free energy decrease when the roughness increases in sand blasted samples. This fact favors the protein adsorption. The DNA released by cells cultured on the four Ti surfaces did not differ from that of positive control cells (p>0.05). The number of cells per area was significantly lower (p<0.05) in the sand-blasted surface than in the machined and surface for both cell types (7±2 cells for HGF and 10±5 cells for SAOS-2). The surface of the machined-type discs grafted in vivo had a very small area occupied by cells and/or connective tissue (3.5%), whereas 36.6% of the sandblasted plus acid etching surface, 75.9% of sandblasted discs and 59.6% of acid etching discs was covered with cells and connective tissue. Cells cultured on rougher surfaces tended to exhibit attributes of more differentiated osteoblasts than cells cultured on smoother surfaces. These surface

  20. Relevant aspects in the surface properties in titanium dental implants for the cellular viability.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Ortega, E; Alfonso-Rodríguez, C A; Monsalve-Guil, L; España-López, A; Jiménez-Guerra, A; Garzón, I; Alaminos, M; Gil, F J

    2016-07-01

    Roughness and topographical features are the most relevant of the surface properties for a dental implant for its osseointegration. For that reason, we studied the four surfaces more used in titanium dental implants: machined, sandblasted, acid etching and sandblasted plus acid etching. The roughness and wettability (contact angle and surface free energy) was studied by means 3D-interferometric microscope and sessile drop method. Normal human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) were obtained from small oral mucosa biopsies and were used for cell cultures. To analyze cell integrity, we first quantified the total amount of DNA and LDH released from dead cells to the culture medium. Then, LIVE/DEAD assay was used as a combined method assessing cell integrity and metabolism. All experiments were carried out on each cell type cultured on each Ti material for 24h, 48h and 72h. To evaluate the in vivo cell adhesion capability of each Ti surface, the four types of discs were grafted subcutaneously in 5 Wistar rats. Sandblasted surfaces were significantly rougher than acid etching and machined. Wettability and surface free energy decrease when the roughness increases in sand blasted samples. This fact favors the protein adsorption. The DNA released by cells cultured on the four Ti surfaces did not differ from that of positive control cells (p>0.05). The number of cells per area was significantly lower (p<0.05) in the sand-blasted surface than in the machined and surface for both cell types (7±2 cells for HGF and 10±5 cells for SAOS-2). The surface of the machined-type discs grafted in vivo had a very small area occupied by cells and/or connective tissue (3.5%), whereas 36.6% of the sandblasted plus acid etching surface, 75.9% of sandblasted discs and 59.6% of acid etching discs was covered with cells and connective tissue. Cells cultured on rougher surfaces tended to exhibit attributes of more differentiated osteoblasts than cells cultured on smoother surfaces. These surface

  1. Characterization and biocompatibility of a titanium dental implant with a laser irradiated and dual-acid etched surface.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shan-Hui; Liu, Bai-Shuan; Lin, Wen-Hung; Chiang, Heng-Chieh; Huang, Shih-Ching; Cheng, Shih-Shyong

    2007-01-01

    The biological properties of commercial pure titanium (cp-Ti) dental implants can be improved by surface treatment. In this study, the cp-Ti surfaces were prepared to enable machined surfaces (TM) to be compared to the machined, sandblasted, laser irradiated and dual-acid etched surfaces (TA). The surface elements and roughness were characterized. The biocompatibility was evaluated by cell and organ culture in vitro. The removal torque was measured in rabbit implantation. Surface characterization revealed that TA surface was more oxidized than TM surface. The TA surface had micrometric, beehive-like coarse concaves. The average roughness (2.28 mum) was larger than that typical of acid-etched surfaces. Extracts of both materials were not cytotoxic to bone cells. The morphology of cells attached on the TA surface was superior to that on the TM surface. TA promoted cell migration and repaired damaged bones more effectively in organ culture. The formation of bone-like nodules on TA disk exceeded that on TM disk. Rabbit tibia implantation also proved that TA implant had greater removal torque value. These results suggested that TA had good osteoconductivity and was a potential material for dental implantation. PMID:17264387

  2. A three-dimensional finite element study on the biomechanical behavior of an FGBM dental implant in surrounding bone.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Xiang, Hong-Jun

    2007-01-01

    Dental implants made of functionally graded biomaterials (FGBM) have been receiving increasing attention due to their unique advantage of being able to simultaneously satisfy biocompatibility, strength, corrosion resistance, etc., which a single composition with a uniform structure cannot satisfy. This paper investigates the biomechanical behavior of a threaded FGBM dental implant/surrounding bone system under static and harmonic occlusal forces by using a three-dimensional finite element method. The implant is a mixture of a bioceramic and a biometal with a smooth gradient in both the material composition and properties in the longitudinal direction. The interaction of the implant and the supporting bone tissues is considered. Three contact conditions at the implant-bone interface are used to model different osseointegration stages. A comprehensive parametric study is conducted to highlight the influence of the material properties, the volume fraction index, the occlusal force orientation, and the osseointegration quality on the maximum von-Mises stress, deformation distribution, natural frequencies, and harmonic response.

  3. A Three-Dimensional Finite Element Study on the Biomechanical Simulation of Various Structured Dental Implants and Their Surrounding Bone Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gong; Yuan, Hai; Chen, Xianshuai; Wang, Weijun; Chen, Jianyu; Liang, Jimin; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background/Purpose. This three-dimensional finite element study observed the stress distribution characteristics of 12 types of dental implants and their surrounding bone tissues with various structured abutments, implant threads, and healing methods under different amounts of concentrated loading. Materials and Methods. A three-dimensional geometrical model of a dental implant and its surrounding bone tissue was created; the model simulated a screw applied with a preload of 200 N or a torque of 0.2 N·m and a prosthetic crown applied with a vertical or an inclined force of 100 N. The Von Mises stress was evaluated on the 12 types of dental implants and their surrounding bone tissues. Results. Under the same loading force, the stress influence on the implant threads was not significant; however, the stress influence on the cancellous bone was obvious. The stress applied to the abutment, cortical bone, and cancellous bone by the inclined force applied to the crown was larger than the stress applied by the vertical force to the crown, and the abutment stress of the nonsubmerged healing implant system was higher than that of the submerged healing implant system. Conclusion. A dental implant system characterised by a straight abutment, rectangle tooth, and nonsubmerged healing may provide minimum value for the implant-bone interface. PMID:26904121

  4. Alternative to the inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia when placing mandibular dental implants posterior to the mental foramen.

    PubMed

    Heller, A A; Shankland, W E

    2001-01-01

    Local anesthesia block of the inferior alveolar nerve is routinely taught throughout dental education. This commonly used technique eliminates all somatosensory perception of the mandible, mandibular teeth, floor of the mouth, ipsilateral tongue, and all but the lateral (buccal) gingivae. Generally, the dentist or surgeon desires these structures to be anesthetized. However, in the placement of mandibular implants, it may be useful for the patient to be able to sense when the inferior alveolar nerve is in danger of being damaged, possibly producing permanent paresthesia. In this article, the technique of mandibular infiltration prior to mandibular implant placement in the mandible is discussed. PMID:12500871

  5. Dental restoration with endosseous implants after mandibular reconstruction using a fibula free flap and TMJ prosthesis: a patient report.

    PubMed

    Infante-Cossio, Pedro; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Martinez-de-Fuentes, Rafael; Garcia-Perla-Garcia, Alberto; Gutierrez-Perez, Jose-Luis

    2006-01-01

    This patient report describes the secondary reconstruction of a hemimandibular and condylar defect and the dental restoration of a 56-year-old woman who had been subjected to radical ablative surgery 30 years earlier to remove a tumor. In the first phase, a fibula free flap was used in combination with a total TMJ prosthesis for the reconstruction of the hemimandible and condyle. Secondly, 3 endosseous implants were placed in the residual mandible. These implants were used to support an overdenture prosthesis that has remained in continuous function for a period of 2 years.

  6. Oral Pyogenic Granuloma Associated With a Dental Implant Treated With an Er:YAG Laser: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Alper; Ugurlu, Faysal; Basel, Bilal; Sener, Cem B

    2015-12-01

    A pyogenic granuloma is a tumorlike proliferation that occurs slightly more often in females, frequently involving the gingiva in the maxillary region. Clinically, it presents as a sessile or pedunculated exophytic mass with a smooth or lobulated surface, which tends to bleed easily. Its color can range from pink to dark red. The most common treatment is surgical excision. This case report presents a pyogenic granuloma that formed around an implant 7 years after its insertion. Pyogenic granulomas associated with dental implants are extremely rare; this is the fourth reported case and the first case of pyogenic granuloma to be treated with an Er:YAG laser.

  7. Predictable crestal bone remodelling around two porous-coated titanium alloy dental implant designs. A radiographic study in dogs.

    PubMed

    al-Sayyed, A; Deporter, D A; Pilliar, R M; Watson, P A; Pharoah, M; Berhane, K; Carter, S

    1994-09-01

    We have previously suggested that altering the height of the porous-coat segment of a partially porous-coated TiAl6V4 endosseous dental implant would affect the degree of crestal bone loss occurring during implant function by changing the patterns of stress transfer. This conclusion arose from the analysis of data from several different experiments and lacked a direct intra-animal comparison. In the present study we have compared two implant designs varying only in the extent to which they were porous-coated. With one design (type A) the coronal 1.8 mm of the implant root had a machined surface while the remainder of its length was porous-coated with TiAl6V4 beads. The other design (type B) had all but the coronal-most 0.75 mm porous-coated. Two implants of each type were placed in each of 4 dogs and the sites allowed to heal for 4 weeks before re-entry and prosthesis attachment. Monthly the implant-supported bridges were removed and radiographs exposed of each implant using a special film holder connected separately to each implant. These radiographs were analyzed for crestal bone loss using both direct visual and computer-assisted techniques. The results showed that bone remodelled to the machined surface-to-porous coat junction for type B implants and achieved a steady state by 12 weeks of function, whereas a longer time was required to achieve this state with type A implants. Significantly more bone loss occurred with the type A design, and this difference was detectable as early as after the first month of function.

  8. Reliability and fatigue failure modes of implant-supported aluminum-oxide fixed dental prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Stappert, Christian F. J.; Baldassarri, Marta; Zhang, Yu; Hänssler, Felix; Rekow, Elizabeth D.; Thompson, Van P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate failure modes and reliability of implant-supported aluminum-oxide three-unit fixed-dental-prostheses (FDPs) using two different veneering porcelains. Material and methods Thirty-six aluminum-oxide FDP-frameworks were CAD/CAM fabricated and either hand-veneered(n=18) or over-pressed(n=18). All FDPs were adhesively luted to custom-made zirconium-oxide-abutments attached to dental implant fixtures (RP-4×13mm). Specimens were stored in water prior to mechanical testing. A Step-Stress-Accelerated-Life-Test (SSALT) with three load/cycles varying profiles was developed based on initial single-load-to-failure testing. Failure was defined by veneer chipping or chipping in combination with framework fracture. SSALT was performed on each FDP inclined 30° with respect to the applied load direction. For all specimens, failure modes were analyzed using polarized-reflected-light-microscopy and scanning-electron-microscopy (SEM). Reliability was computed using Weibull analysis software (Reliasoft). Results The dominant failure mode for the over-pressed FDPs was buccal chipping of the porcelain in the loading area of the pontic, while hand-veneered specimens failed mainly by combined failure modes in the veneering porcelain, framework and abutments. Chipping of the porcelain occurred earlier in the over-pressed specimens (350 N/85k, load/cycles) than in the hand-veneered (600 N/110k)(profile I). Given a mission at 300 N load and 100k or 200 K cycles the computed Weibull reliability (2-sided at 90.0 % confidence bounds) was 0.99(1/0.98) and 0.99(1/0.98) for hand-veneered FDPs, and 0.45(0.76/0.10) and 0.05(0.63/0) for over-pressed FDPs, respectively. Conclusions In the range of average clinical loads (300–700 N), hand-veneered aluminum-oxide FDPs showed significantly less failure by chipping of the veneer than the over-pressed. Hand-veneered FDPs under fatigue loading failed at loads ≥ 600N. PMID:22093019

  9. Novel nanocomposite coating for dental implant applications in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mehdikhani-Nahrkhalaji, M; Fathi, M H; Mortazavi, V; Mousavi, S B; Hashemi-Beni, B; Razavi, S M

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed at preparation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of novel bioactive, biodegradable, and antibacterial nanocomposite coating for the improvement of stem cells attachment and antibacterial activity as a candidate for dental implant applications. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide)/bioactive glass/hydroxyapatite (PBGHA) nanocomposite coating was prepared via solvent casting process. The nanoparticle amounts of 10, 15, and 20 weight percent (wt%) were chosen in order to determine the optimum amount of nanoparticles suitable for preparing an uniform coating. Bioactivity and degradation of the coating with an optimum amount of nanoparticles were evaluated by immersing the prepared samples in simulated body fluid and phosphate buffer saline (PBS), respectively. The effect of nanocomposite coating on the attachment and viability of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) was investigated. Kirschner wires (K-wires) of stainless steel were coated with the PBGHA nanocomposite coating, and mechanical stability of the coating was studied during intramedullary implantation into rabbit tibiae. The results showed that using 10 wt% nanoparticles (5 wt% HA and 5 wt% BG) in the nanocomposite could provide the desired uniform coating. The study of in vitro bioactivity showed rapid formation of bone-like apatite on the PBGHA coating. It was degraded considerably after about 60 days of immersion in PBS. The hASCs showed excellent attachment and viability on the coating. PBGHA coating remained stable on the K-wires with a minimum of 96% of the original coating mass. It was concluded that PBGHA nanocomposite coating provides an ideal surface for the stem cells attachment and viability. In addition, it could induce antibacterial activity, simultaneously.

  10. Novel nanocomposite coating for dental implant applications in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mehdikhani-Nahrkhalaji, M; Fathi, M H; Mortazavi, V; Mousavi, S B; Hashemi-Beni, B; Razavi, S M

    2012-02-01

    This study aimed at preparation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of novel bioactive, biodegradable, and antibacterial nanocomposite coating for the improvement of stem cells attachment and antibacterial activity as a candidate for dental implant applications. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide)/bioactive glass/hydroxyapatite (PBGHA) nanocomposite coating was prepared via solvent casting process. The nanoparticle amounts of 10, 15, and 20 weight percent (wt%) were chosen in order to determine the optimum amount of nanoparticles suitable for preparing an uniform coating. Bioactivity and degradation of the coating with an optimum amount of nanoparticles were evaluated by immersing the prepared samples in simulated body fluid and phosphate buffer saline (PBS), respectively. The effect of nanocomposite coating on the attachment and viability of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) was investigated. Kirschner wires (K-wires) of stainless steel were coated with the PBGHA nanocomposite coating, and mechanical stability of the coating was studied during intramedullary implantation into rabbit tibiae. The results showed that using 10 wt% nanoparticles (5 wt% HA and 5 wt% BG) in the nanocomposite could provide the desired uniform coating. The study of in vitro bioactivity showed rapid formation of bone-like apatite on the PBGHA coating. It was degraded considerably after about 60 days of immersion in PBS. The hASCs showed excellent attachment and viability on the coating. PBGHA coating remained stable on the K-wires with a minimum of 96% of the original coating mass. It was concluded that PBGHA nanocomposite coating provides an ideal surface for the stem cells attachment and viability. In addition, it could induce antibacterial activity, simultaneously. PMID:22127403

  11. Digital data acquisition for a CAD/CAM-fabricated titanium framework and zirconium oxide restorations for an implant-supported fixed complete dental prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Metz, Michael J; Pollini, Adrien; Ntounis, Athanasios; Morton, Dean

    2014-12-01

    This dental technique report describes a digital workflow with digital data acquisition at the implant level, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing fabricated, tissue-colored, anodized titanium framework, individually luted zirconium oxide restorations, and autopolymerizing injection-molded acrylic resin to fabricate an implant-supported, metal-ceramic-resin fixed complete dental prosthesis in an edentulous mandible. The 1-step computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing fabrication of titanium framework and zirconium oxide restorations can provide a cost-effective alternative to the conventional metal-resin fixed complete dental prosthesis.

  12. Digital data acquisition for a CAD/CAM-fabricated titanium framework and zirconium oxide restorations for an implant-supported fixed complete dental prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Metz, Michael J; Pollini, Adrien; Ntounis, Athanasios; Morton, Dean

    2014-12-01

    This dental technique report describes a digital workflow with digital data acquisition at the implant level, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing fabricated, tissue-colored, anodized titanium framework, individually luted zirconium oxide restorations, and autopolymerizing injection-molded acrylic resin to fabricate an implant-supported, metal-ceramic-resin fixed complete dental prosthesis in an edentulous mandible. The 1-step computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing fabrication of titanium framework and zirconium oxide restorations can provide a cost-effective alternative to the conventional metal-resin fixed complete dental prosthesis. PMID:25258258

  13. Influence of clinically relevant factors on the immediate biomechanical surrounding for a series of dental implant designs.

    PubMed

    Shunmugasamy, Vasanth Chakravarthy; Gupta, Nikhil; Pessoa, Roberto Sales; Janal, Malvin N; Coelho, Paulo G

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the influence of various clinically relevant scenarios on the strain distribution in the biomechanical surrounding of five different dental implant macrogeometries. The biomechanical environment surrounding an implant, i.e., the cortical and trabecular bone, was modeled along with the implant. These models included two different values of the study parameters including loading conditions, trabecular bone elastic modulus, cortical/trabecular bone thickness ratio, and bone loss for five implant designs. Finite element analysis was conducted on the models and strain in the bones surrounding the implant was calculated. Bone volumes having strains in four different windows of 0-200 με, 200-1000 με, 1000-3000 με, and > 3000 με were measured and the effect of each biomechanical variable and their two-way interactions were statistically analyzed using the analysis of variance method. This study showed that all the parameters included in this study had an effect on the volume of bones in all strain windows, except the implant design, which affected only the 0-200 με and >3000 με windows. The two-way interaction results showed that interactions existed between implant design and bone loss, and loading condition, bone loss in the 200-1000 με window, and between implant design and loading condition in the 0-200 με window. Within the limitations of the present methodology, it can be concluded that although some unfavorable clinical scenarios demonstrated a higher volume of bone in deleterious strain levels, a tendency toward the biomechanical equilibrium was evidenced regardless of the implant design.

  14. Towards a bimodal proximity sensor for in situ neurovascular bundle detection during dental implant surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jessie R.; Baribeau, François; Grenier, Paul; Émond, Frédéric; Dubois, Sylvain; Duchesne, François; Girard, Marc; Pope, Timothy; Gallant, Pascal; Mermut, Ozzy; Moghadam, Hassan Ghaderi

    2013-01-01

    Proof of concept results are presented towards an in situ bimodal proximity sensor for neurovascular bundle detection during dental implant surgery using combined near infrared absorption (NIR) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) techniques. These modalities are shown to have different sensitivity to the proximity of optical contrast from neurovascular bundles. NIR AC and DC signals from the pulsing of an artery enable qualitative ranging of the bundle in the millimeter range, with best sensitivity around 0.5-3mm distance in a custom phantom setup. OCT provides structural mapping of the neurovascular bundle at sub-millimeter distances in an ex vivo human jaw bone. Combining the two techniques suggests a novel ranging system for the surgeon that could be implemented in a “smart drill.” The proximity to the neurovascular bundle can be tracked in real time in the range of a few millimeters with NIR signals, after which higher resolution imaging OCT to provide finer ranging in the sub-millimeter distances. PMID:24466473

  15. Electrodeposition of nanostructured bioactive hydroxyapatite-heparin composite coatings on titanium for dental implant applications.

    PubMed

    Bozzini, Benedetto; Barca, Amilcare; Bogani, Francesco; Boniardi, Marco; Carlino, Paolo; Mele, Claudio; Verri, Tiziano; Romano, Alessandro

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we describe the one-pot fabrication of hydroxyapatite (HA)-heparin composites by electrodeposition onto Ti substrates and their characterisation in terms of structure, morphology, heparin content and bioactivity. HA coatings are well known and widely applied osteointegration enhancers, but post-implant healing rate in dental applications is still suboptimal: e.g. coagulation control plays a key role and the incorporation of an anticoagulant is considered a highly desirable option. In this study, we have developed an improved, simple and robust growth procedure for single-phase, pure HA-heparin films of thickness 1/3 μm. HA-heparin, forming nanowires, has the ideal morphology for bone mineralisation. Staining assays revealed homogeneous incorporation of sizable amounts of heparin in the composite films. The bioactivities of the HA and HA-heparin coatings on Ti were compared by HeLa cell proliferation/viability tests and found to be enhanced by the presence of the anticoagulant.

  16. Macro-retentive replaceable veneers on crowns and fixed dental prostheses: a new approach in implant-prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Josef; Neumeier, Peter; Stimmelmayr, Michael; Beuer, Florian; Edelhoff, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Implant-supported prosthetic restorations with veneered crowns and fixed dental prostheses are a proven, scientifically accepted treatment concept in fixed prosthodontics. However, in this area of indication there is a comparatively high technical complication rate, which occurs mainly in the area of the superstructure in the form of minor or major chipping of the veneering material. Various studies have shown that purely implant-supported restorations are subjected to higher loading than those on natural abutment teeth due to the special biomechanical conditions. A possible approach to prevent technical complications is to create higher stability for the implant superstructure through the use of high-strength materials. This would, however, result in undiminished overloading being transmitted to the implant components and could cause increased technical and biological complications. This article describes a new procedure for the use of replaceable veneers made from high-performance polymer material on modified implant abutments. By storing digital datasets for the veneer section, it can be replaced easily and quickly if it becomes worn or is fractured. A reduction in the stresses for the implant components and biological structures under the polymer is also to be expected due the material properties of polymers.

  17. Osteoblast integration of dental implant materials after challenge by sub-gingival pathogens: a co-culture study in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bingran; van der Mei, Henny C; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Busscher, Henk J; Ren, Yijin

    2015-12-01

    Sub-gingival anaerobic pathogens can colonize an implant surface to compromise osseointegration of dental implants once the soft tissue seal around the neck of an implant is broken. In vitro evaluations of implant materials are usually done in monoculture studies involving either tissue integration or bacterial colonization. Co-culture models, in which tissue cells and bacteria battle simultaneously for estate on an implant surface, have been demonstrated to provide a better in vitro mimic of the clinical situation. Here we aim to compare the surface coverage by U2OS osteoblasts cells prior to and after challenge by two anaerobic sub-gingival pathogens in a co-culture model on differently modified titanium (Ti), titanium-zirconium (TiZr) alloys and zirconia surfaces. Monoculture studies with either U2OS osteoblasts or bacteria were also carried out and indicated significant differences in biofilm formation between the implant materials, but interactions with U2OS osteoblasts were favourable on all materials. Adhering U2OS osteoblasts cells, however, were significantly more displaced from differently modified Ti surfaces by challenging sub-gingival pathogens than from TiZr alloys and zirconia variants. Combined with previous work employing a co-culture model consisting of human gingival fibroblasts and supra-gingival oral bacteria, results point to a different material selection to stimulate the formation of a soft tissue seal as compared to preservation of osseointegration under the unsterile conditions of the oral cavity. PMID:26674427

  18. Osteoblast integration of dental implant materials after challenge by sub-gingival pathogens: a co-culture study in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bingran; van der Mei, Henny C; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Busscher, Henk J; Ren, Yijin

    2015-12-18

    Sub-gingival anaerobic pathogens can colonize an implant surface to compromise osseointegration of dental implants once the soft tissue seal around the neck of an implant is broken. In vitro evaluations of implant materials are usually done in monoculture studies involving either tissue integration or bacterial colonization. Co-culture models, in which tissue cells and bacteria battle simultaneously for estate on an implant surface, have been demonstrated to provide a better in vitro mimic of the clinical situation. Here we aim to compare the surface coverage by U2OS osteoblasts cells prior to and after challenge by two anaerobic sub-gingival pathogens in a co-culture model on differently modified titanium (Ti), titanium-zirconium (TiZr) alloys and zirconia surfaces. Monoculture studies with either U2OS osteoblasts or bacteria were also carried out and indicated significant differences in biofilm formation between the implant materials, but interactions with U2OS osteoblasts were favourable on all materials. Adhering U2OS osteoblasts cells, however, were significantly more displaced from differently modified Ti surfaces by challenging sub-gingival pathogens than from TiZr alloys and zirconia variants. Combined with previous work employing a co-culture model consisting of human gingival fibroblasts and supra-gingival oral bacteria, results point to a different material selection to stimulate the formation of a soft tissue seal as compared to preservation of osseointegration under the unsterile conditions of the oral cavity.

  19. Effects of fluoride-ion-implanted titanium surface on the cytocompatibility in vitro and osseointegatation in vivo for dental implant applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-jin; Liu, Hui-ying; Ren, Xiang; Sun, Hui-yan; Zhu, Li-ying; Ying, Xiao-xia; Hu, Shu-hai; Qiu, Ze-wen; Wang, Lang-ping; Wang, Xiao-feng; Ma, Guo-wu

    2015-12-01

    As an attractive technique for the improvement of biomaterials, Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) has been applied to modifying the titanium material for dental implant application. The present study investigated the cytocompatibility and early osseointegration of fluoride-ion-implanted titanium (F-Ti) surface and implants, both characterizing in their composition of titanium oxide and titanium fluoride. The cytocompatibility of F-Ti was evaluated in vitro by using scanning electron microscope, Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, alkaline phosphatase activity assay, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that the F-Ti weakened the effects that Porphyromonas gingivalis exerted on the MG-63 cells in terms of morphology, proliferation, differentiation, and genetic expression when MG-63 cells and Porphyromonas gingivalis were co-cultured on the surface of F-Ti. Meanwhile, the osteogenic activity of F-Ti implants was assessed in vivo via evaluating the histological morphology and estimating histomorphometric parameters. The analysis of toluidine blue staining indicated that the new bone was more mature in subjects with F-Ti group, which exhibited the Haversian system, and the mean bone-implant contact value of F-Ti group was slightly higher than that of cp-Ti group (p>0.05). Fluorescence bands were wider and brighter in the F-Ti group, and the intensity of fluorochromes deposited at the sites of mineralized bone formation was significantly higher for F-Ti surfaces than for cp-Ti surfaces, within the 2nd, 3rd and 4th weeks (p<0.05). An indication is that the fluoride modified titanium can promote cytocompatibility and early osseointegration, thus providing a promising alternative for clinical use.

  20. Studying the issues in the additive manufacturing of dental implants by Electron Beam MeltingRTM (EBM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidinia, Mahdi

    The ability of additive manufacturing (AM) processes to produce complex geometries is resulting in their rapid acceptance by a number of industries. This unique capability could be used for the optimization of the design of functional components that could find an application in different industries such as aerospace, automotive, energy, medical, and implants. However, there are still some challenges confronting this technology such as surface finish, residual stress, dimensional tolerance, processing speed, and anisotropy in microstructure and mechanical properties. Any of the mentioned issues could be influenced by the thermal history of a 3D printed component during the layer-by-layer manufacturing. Therefore, an understanding of the thermal cycling during the AM process is essential. In recent years, significant advances have been achieved in the design, manufacturing, and materials used for dental implants. However, there are still some differences between the natural tooth and a dental implant that might decrease patient satisfaction. One of the differences between the natural tooth and a dental implant is in its modulus of elasticity, which could result in an issue known as bone atrophy. The second important difference between a dental implant and a natural tooth is the fact that a natural tooth is surrounded by a periodontal ligament that allows the tooth to move in three directions. However, the periodontal ligament is destroyed during the extraction of a natural tooth. In the absence of the periodontal ligament, the biting force is directly transferred to the jawbone, resulting in discomfort for the patient. Also, the implant cannot be incorporated with the surrounding natural tooth and form a bridge. In this study, the application of a lattice structure for the manufacturing of a biocompatible dental implant is investigated. Three different lattice structures with different unit cell sizes were experimentally and numerically analyzed. The mechanical

  1. FEM evaluation of cemented-retained versus screw-retained dental implant single-tooth crown prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cicciu, Marco; Bramanti, Ennio; Matacena, Giada; Guglielmino, Eugenio; Risitano, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of partial or total edentulous patients is today a challenge for clinicians and dental practitioners. The application of dental implants in order to recover areas of missing teeth is going to be a predictable technique, however some important points about the implant angulation, the stress distribution over the bone tissue and prosthetic components should be well investigated for having final long term clinical results. Two different system of the prosthesis fixation are commonly used. The screw retained crown and the cemented retained one. All of the two restoration techniques give to the clinicians several advantages and some disadvantages. Aim of this work is to evaluate all the mechanical features of each system, through engineering systems of investigations like FEM and Von Mises analyses. The FEM is today a useful tool for the prediction of stress effect upon material and biomaterial under load or strengths. Specifically three different area has been evaluated through this study: the dental crown with the bone interface; the passant screw connection area; the occlusal surface of the two different type of crown. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed an adequate response for both type of prostheses, although cemented retained one showed better results over the occlusal area. PMID:24955150

  2. FEM evaluation of cemented-retained versus screw-retained dental implant single-tooth crown prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Cicciu, Marco; Bramanti, Ennio; Matacena, Giada; Guglielmino, Eugenio; Risitano, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of partial or total edentulous patients is today a challenge for clinicians and dental practitioners. The application of dental implants in order to recover areas of missing teeth is going to be a predictable technique, however some important points about the implant angulation, the stress distribution over the bone tissue and prosthetic components should be well investigated for having final long term clinical results. Two different system of the prosthesis fixation are commonly used. The screw retained crown and the cemented retained one. All of the two restoration techniques give to the clinicians several advantages and some disadvantages. Aim of this work is to evaluate all the mechanical features of each system, through engineering systems of investigations like FEM and Von Mises analyses. The FEM is today a useful tool for the prediction of stress effect upon material and biomaterial under load or strengths. Specifically three different area has been evaluated through this study: the dental crown with the bone interface; the passant screw connection area; the occlusal surface of the two different type of crown. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed an adequate response for both type of prostheses, although cemented retained one showed better results over the occlusal area. PMID:24955150

  3. Implant-supported fixed dental prostheses with CAD/CAM-fabricated porcelain crown and zirconia-based framework.

    PubMed

    Takaba, Masayuki; Tanaka, Shinpei; Ishiura, Yuichi; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2013-07-01

    Recently, fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with a hybrid structure of CAD/CAM porcelain crowns adhered to a CAD/CAM zirconia framework (PAZ) have been developed. The aim of this report was to describe the clinical application of a newly developed implant-supported FDP fabrication system, which uses PAZ, and to evaluate the outcome after a maximum application period of 36 months. Implants were placed in three patients with edentulous areas in either the maxilla or mandible. After the implant fixtures had successfully integrated with bone, gold-platinum alloy or zirconia custom abutments were first fabricated. Zirconia framework wax-up was performed on the custom abutments, and the CAD/CAM zirconia framework was prepared using the CAD/CAM system. Next, wax-up was performed on working models for porcelain crown fabrication, and CAD/CAM porcelain crowns were fabricated. The CAD/CAM zirconia frameworks and CAD/CAM porcelain crowns were bonded using adhesive resin cement, and the PAZ was cemented. Cementation of the implant superstructure improved the esthetics and masticatory efficiency in all patients. No undesirable outcomes, such as superstructure chipping, stomatognathic dysfunction, or periimplant bone resorption, were observed in any of the patients. PAZ may be a potential solution for ceramic-related clinical problems such as chipping and fracture and associated complicated repair procedures in implant-supported FDPs.

  4. Clinical practice guidelines for recall and maintenance of patients with tooth-borne and implant-borne dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Bidra, Avinash S; Daubert, Diane M; Garcia, Lily T; Kosinski, Timothy F; Nenn, Conrad A; Olsen, John A; Platt, Jeffrey A; Wingrove, Susan S; Chandler, Nancy Deal; Curtis, Donald A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide guidelines for patient recall regimen, professional maintenance regimen, and at-home maintenance regimen for patients with tooth-borne and implant-borne removable and fixed restorations. The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) convened a scientific panel of experts appointed by the ACP, American Dental Association, Academy of General Dentistry, and American Dental Hygienists Association, who critically evaluated and debated recently published findings from 2 systematic reviews on this topic. The major outcomes and consequences considered during formulation of the clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) were risk for failure of tooth- and implant-borne restorations. The panel conducted a roundtable discussion of the proposed guidelines, which were debated in detail. Feedback was used to supplement and refine the proposed guidelines, and consensus was attained. A set of CPGs was developed for tooth-borne restorations and implant-borne restorations. Each CPG comprised (1) patient recall, (2) professional maintenance, and (3) at-home maintenance. For tooth-borne restorations, the professional maintenance and at-home maintenance CPGs were subdivided for removable and fixed restorations. For implant-borne restorations, the professional maintenance CPGs were subdivided for removable and fixed restorations and further divided into biological maintenance and mechanical maintenance for each type of restoration. The at-home maintenance CPGs were subdivided for removable and fixed restorations. The clinical practice guidelines presented in this document were initially developed using the 2 systematic reviews. Additional guidelines were developed using expert opinion and consensus, which included discussion of the best clinical practices, clinical feasibility, and risk-benefit ratio to the patient. To the authors' knowledge, these are the first CPGs addressing patient recall regimen, professional maintenance regimen, and at

  5. Comparison of Azithromycin and Amoxicillin Prior to Dental Implant Placement: An Exploratory Study of Bioavailability and Resolution of Postoperative Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Escalante, Mariana Gil; Eubank, Tim D.; Leblebicioglu, Binnaz; Walters, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that a single prophylactic dose of amoxicillin reduces early implant complications, but it is unclear whether other antibiotics are also effective. This study compared the local antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects resulting from a single dose of azithromycin or amoxicillin prior to surgical placement of one-stage dental implants. Methods Healthy adult patients requiring one-stage dental implant placement were randomly allocated to receive either 2g amoxicillin (n=7) or 500mg azithromycin (n=6) prior to surgery. Peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF) samples from the new implant and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) from adjacent teeth were sampled on postoperative days 6, 13 and 20. Inflammatory mediators in the samples were analyzed by immunoassay and antibiotic levels were measured by bioassay. Results On day 6, azithromycin concentrations in GCF and PICF were 3.39±0.73μg/ml and 2.77±0.90μg/ml, respectively, while amoxicillin was below the limit of detection. During early healing, patents in the azithromycin group exhibited a significantly greater decrease in GCF volume (p=0.03, ANOVA). At specific times during healing, the azithromycin group exhibited significantly lower levels of IL-6 and IL-8 in GCF than the amoxicillin group and exhibited significantly lower levels of G-CSF, IL-8, MIP-1β and IP-10 in PICF. Conclusions Azithromycin was available at the surgical site for a longer period of time than amoxicillin, and patients taking azithromycin exhibited lower levels of specific pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in GCF and PICF. Thus, preoperative azithromycin may enhance resolution of postoperative inflammation to a greater extent than amoxicillin. PMID:26252749

  6. Modulation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cell and human gingival fibroblast behavior by micropatterned silica coating surfaces for zirconia dental implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laranjeira, Marta S.; Carvalho, Ângela; Pelaez-Vargas, Alejandro; Hansford, Derek; Ferraz, Maria Pia; Coimbra, Susana; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Fernandes, Maria Helena; Monteiro, Fernando Jorge

    2014-04-01

    Dental ceramic implants have shown superior esthetic behavior and the absence of induced allergic disorders when compared to titanium implants. Zirconia may become a potential candidate to be used as an alternative to titanium dental implants if surface modifications are introduced. In this work, bioactive micropatterned silica coatings were produced on zirconia substrates, using a combined methodology of sol-gel processing and soft lithography. The aim of the work was to compare the in vitro behavior of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) on three types of silica-coated zirconia surfaces: flat and micropatterned (with pillars and with parallel grooves). Our results showed that cells had a higher metabolic activity (HGF, HDMEC) and increased gene expression levels of fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1) and collagen type I (COL I) on surfaces with pillars. Nevertheless, parallel grooved surfaces were able to guide cell growth. Even capillary tube-like networks of HDMEC were oriented according to the surface geometry. Zirconia and silica with different topographies have shown to be blood compatible and silica coating reduced bacteria adhesion. All together, the results indicated that microstructured bioactive coating seems to be an efficient strategy to improve soft tissue integration on zirconia implants, protecting implants from peri-implant inflammation and improving long-term implant stabilization. This new approach of micropatterned silica coating on zirconia substrates can generate promising novel dental implants, with surfaces that provide physical cues to guide cells and enhance their behavior.

  7. High-density dental implants and radiotherapy planning: evaluation of effects on dose distribution using pencil beam convolution algorithm and Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Çatli, Serap

    2015-09-08

    High atomic number and density of dental implants leads to major problems at providing an accurate dose distribution in radiotherapy and contouring tumors and organs caused by the artifact in head and neck tumors. The limits and deficiencies of the algorithms using in the treatment planning systems can lead to large errors in dose calculation, and this may adversely affect the patient's treatment. In the present study, four commercial dental implants were used: pure titanium, titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), amalgam, and crown. The effects of dental implants on dose distribution are determined with two methods: pencil beam convolution (PBC) algorithm and Monte Carlo code for 6 MV photon beam. The central axis depth doses were calculated on the phantom for a source-skin distance (SSD) of 100 cm and a 10 × 10 cm2 field using both of algorithms. The results of Monte Carlo method and Eclipse TPS were compared to each other and to those previously reported. In the present study, dose increases in tissue at a distance of 2 mm in front of the dental implants were seen due to the backscatter of electrons for dental implants at 6 MV using the Monte Carlo method. The Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) couldn't precisely account for the backscatter radiation caused by the dental prostheses. TPS underestimated the back scatter dose and overestimated the dose after the dental implants. The large errors found for TPS in this study are due to the limits and deficiencies of the algorithms. The accuracy of the PBC algorithm of Eclipse TPS was evaluated in comparison to Monte Carlo calculations in consideration of the recommendations of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 65. From the comparisons of the TPS and Monte Carlo calculations, it is verified that the Monte Carlo simulation is a good approach to derive the dose distribution in heterogeneous media.

  8. Effects of a Low-Intensity Laser on Dental Implant Osseointegration: Removal Torque and Resonance Frequency Analysis in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Blay, Alberto; Blay, Claudia C; Tunchel, Samy; Gehrke, Sergio Alexandre; Shibli, Jamil Awad; Groth, Eduardo B; Zezell, Denise M

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how a low-intensity laser affects the stability and reverse torque resistance of dental implants installed in the tibia of rabbits. Thirty rabbits received 60 dental implants with the same design and surface treatment, one in each proximal metaphysis of the tibia. Three groups were prepared (n = 10 animals each): conventional osseointegration without treatment (control group), surgical sites irradiated with a laser beam emitted in the visible range of 680 nm (Lg1 group), surgical sites irradiated with a laser beam with a wavelength in the infrared range of 830 nm (Lg2 group). Ten irradiation sessions were performed 48 hours apart; the first session was during the immediate postoperative period. Irradiation energy density was 4 J/cm(2) per point in 2 points on each side of the tibias. The resonance frequency and removal torque values were measured at 2 time points after the implantations (3 and 6 weeks). Both laser groups (Lg1 and Lg2) presented a significant difference between resonance frequency analysis values at the baseline and the values obtained after 3 and 6 weeks (P > .05). Although the removal torque values of all groups increased after 6 weeks (P < .05), both laser groups presented greater mean values than those of the control group (P < .01). Photobiomodulation using laser irradiation with wavelengths of 680 and 830 nm had a better degree of bone integration than the control group after 6 weeks of observation time.

  9. Numerical investigation into blood clotting at the bone-dental implant interface in the presence of an electrical stimulus.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Acosta, J C; Garzón-Alvarado, D A; Lancellotti, V

    2013-12-01

    The insertion of a dental implant activates a sequence of wound healing events ending with bone formation and implant osseointegration. This sequence starts with the blood coagulation process and the formation of a fibrin network that detains spilt blood. Fibrin formation can be simplified as the kinetic reaction between thrombin and fibrinogen preceding the conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin. Based on experimental observations of the electrical properties of these molecules, we present a hypothesis for the mechanism of a static electrical stimulus in controlling the formation of the blood clot. Specifically, the electrical stimulus increases the fibrin network formation in such a way that a preferential region of higher fibrin density is obtained. This hypothesis is validated by means of a numerical model for the blood clot formation at the bone-dental implant interface. Numerical results compare favorably to experimental observations for blood clotting with and without the static electrical stimulus. It is concluded that the density of the fibrin network depends on the strength of the static electrical stimulus, and that the blood clot formation has a preferential direction of formation in the presence of the electrical signal.

  10. Lack of clinical evidence on low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on dental titanium implant: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Prados-Frutos, J C; Rodríguez-Molinero, J; Prados-Privado, M; Torres, J H; Rojo, R

    2016-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has proved to have biostimulating effects on tissues over which they are applied, therefore accelerating the healing process. Most studies in implantology were focused on a reduction of the duration of osseointegration. There exist few articles analyzing the potential effects of these therapies on the osseointegration of titanium dental implants. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LLLT on the interaction between the bone and the titanium dental implant and the methodological quality of the studies. We conducted an electronic search in PubMed, ISI Web, and Cochrane Library. From 37 references obtained, only 14 articles met the inclusion criteria. The analysis of the studies shows that most of the experiments were performed in animals, which have a high risk of bias from the methodological point of view. Only two studies were conducted in human bone under different conditions. Several protocols for the use of low-power laser and different types of laser for all studies analyzed were used. Although animal studies have shown a positive effect on osseointegration of titanium implants, it can be concluded that it is necessary to improve and define a unique protocol to offer a more conclusive result by meta-analysis. PMID:26754180

  11. Lack of clinical evidence on low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on dental titanium implant: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Prados-Frutos, J C; Rodríguez-Molinero, J; Prados-Privado, M; Torres, J H; Rojo, R

    2016-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has proved to have biostimulating effects on tissues over which they are applied, therefore accelerating the healing process. Most studies in implantology were focused on a reduction of the duration of osseointegration. There exist few articles analyzing the potential effects of these therapies on the osseointegration of titanium dental implants. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of LLLT on the interaction between the bone and the titanium dental implant and the methodological quality of the studies. We conducted an electronic search in PubMed, ISI Web, and Cochrane Library. From 37 references obtained, only 14 articles met the inclusion criteria. The analysis of the studies shows that most of the experiments were performed in animals, which have a high risk of bias from the methodological point of view. Only two studies were conducted in human bone under different conditions. Several protocols for the use of low-power laser and different types of laser for all studies analyzed were used. Although animal studies have shown a positive effect on osseointegration of titanium implants, it can be concluded that it is necessary to improve and define a unique protocol to offer a more conclusive result by meta-analysis.

  12. A novel bionic design of dental implant for promoting its long-term success using nerve growth factor (NGF): Utilizing nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant

    PubMed Central

    He, Hao; Yao, Yang; Wang, Yanying; Wu, Yingying; Yang, Yang; Gong, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Summary The absence of periodontium causes masticatory load in excess of the self-repairing potential of peri-implant bone; peri-implant bone loss caused by occlusal overload is not uncommon in patients and greatly diminishes chances of long-term success. Regenerative treatments may be useful in inducing peri-implant bone regeneration, but are only stopgap solutions to the aftermaths caused by the imperfect biomechanical compatibility of the dental implant. Despite promising success, the tissue-engineered periodontal ligament still needs a period of time to be perfected before being clinically applied. Hence, we propose a novel design of dental implant that utilizes nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant. Many studies have shown that NGF, a neurotrophin, is effective for nerve regeneration in both animal and clinical studies. Moreover, NGF has the potential to accelerate bone healing in patients with fracture and fracture nonunion and improve osseointegration of the implant. The key point of the design is to reduce stress concentrated around peri-implant bone by cushioning masticatory forces and distributing them to all the peri-implant bone through nano-springs, and promote osseoperception and osseointegration by NGF-induced nerve regeneration and new bone formation. This design, which transfers the main biomechanical interface of the implant from outside to inside, if proven to be valid, may to some extent compensate for the functions of lost periodontium in stress cushioning and proprioception. PMID:22847209

  13. A novel bionic design of dental implant for promoting its long-term success using nerve growth factor (NGF): utilizing nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant.

    PubMed

    He, Hao; Yao, Yang; Wang, Yanying; Wu, Yingying; Yang, Yang; Gong, Ping

    2012-08-01

    The absence of periodontium causes masticatory load in excess of the self-repairing potential of peri-implant bone; peri-implant bone loss caused by occlusal overload is not uncommon in patients and greatly diminishes chances of long-term success. Regenerative treatments may be useful in inducing peri-implant bone regeneration, but are only stopgap solutions to the aftermaths caused by the imperfect biomechanical compatibility of the dental implant. Despite promising success, the tissue-engineered periodontal ligament still needs a period of time to be perfected before being clinically applied. Hence, we propose a novel design of dental implant that utilizes nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant. Many studies have shown that NGF, a neurotrophin, is effective for nerve regeneration in both animal and clinical studies. Moreover, NGF has the potential to accelerate bone healing in patients with fracture and fracture nonunion and improve osseointegration of the implant. The key point of the design is to reduce stress concentrated around peri-implant bone by cushioning masticatory forces and distributing them to all the peri-implant bone through nano-springs, and promote osseoperception and osseointegration by NGF-induced nerve regeneration and new bone formation. This design, which transfers the main biomechanical interface of the implant from outside to inside, if proven to be valid, may to some extent compensate for the functions of lost periodontium in stress cushioning and proprioception.

  14. Macrophage proinflammatory response to the titanium alloy equipment in dental implantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Li, H S; Yin, Y; Feng, Y; Tan, X W

    2015-08-07

    Titanium alloy and stainless steel (SS) had been widely used as dental implant materials because of their affinity with epithelial tissue and connective tissue, and good physical, chemical, biological, mechanical properties and processability. We compared the effects of titanium alloy and SS on macrophage cytokine expression as well as their biocompatibility. Mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells were cultured on titanium alloy and SS surfaces. Cells were counted by scanning electron microscopy. A nitride oxide kit was used to detect released nitric oxide by macrophages on the different materials. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels. Scanning electron microscopy revealed fewer macrophages on the surface of titanium alloy (48.2 ± 6.4 x 10(3) cells/cm(2)) than on SS (135 ± 7.3 x 10(3) cells/cm(2)). The nitric oxide content stimulated by titanium alloy was 22.5 mM, which was lower than that stimulated by SS (26.8 mM), but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.07). The level of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 released was significantly higher in the SS group (OD value = 0.128) than in the titanium alloy group (OD value = 0.081) (P = 0.024). The transforming growth factor-b1 mRNA expression levels in macrophages after stimulation by titanium alloy for 12 and 36 h were significantly higher than that after stimulation by SS (P = 0.31 and 0.25, respectively). Macrophages participate in the inflammatory response by regulating cytokines such as nitric oxide, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and transforming growth factor-b1. There were fewer macrophages and lower inflammation on the titanium alloy surface than on the SS surface. Titanium alloy materials exhibited better biological compatibility than did SS.

  15. Osseointegration of KrF laser hydroxylapatite films on Ti6A14V alloy by mini-pigs: loaded osseointegration of dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostalova, Tatjana; Jelinek, Miroslav; Himmlova, Lucia; Grivas, Christos

    1999-05-01

    Aim of study was to evaluate osseointegration of the KrF laser hydroxyapatite coated titanium alloy Ti6Al4V dental implants. For deposition KrF excimer laser in stainless- steel deposition chamber was used. Thickness of HA films were round 1 μm . Mini-pigs were used in this investigation. Implants were placed vertically into the lower jaw. After 14 weeks unloaded osseointegration the metal ceramic crowns were inserted. the experimental animals were sacrificed (1 year post insertion). The vertical position of implants was controlled with a radiograph. Microscopical sections were cut and ground. Sections were viewed using microscope with CCD camera. 1 year osseointegration in lower jaw confirmed by all implants presence of newly formed bone around the all implants. Laser-deposited coating the layer of fibrous connective tissue was seen only seldom. In the control group (titamium implant without cover) the fibrous connective tissue was seen between implant and newly formed bone.

  16. American Dental Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Prevention Summit ADA Find-a-Dentist Health Literacy in Dentistry Volunteer Efforts Dental Benefit Plan Information ... on Sleep Bruxism Rethinking Dental Insurance Oral Health Literacy's Role in Missed Appointments Dental Implant Failure Rate ...

  17. Micro-arc oxidation as a tool to develop multifunctional calcium-rich surfaces for dental implant applications.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, A R; Oliveira, F; Boldrini, L C; Leite, P E; Falagan-Lotsch, P; Linhares, A B R; Zambuzzi, W F; Fragneaud, B; Campos, A P C; Gouvêa, C P; Archanjo, B S; Achete, C A; Marcantonio, E; Rocha, L A; Granjeiro, J M

    2015-09-01

    Titanium (Ti) is commonly used in dental implant applications. Surface modification strategies are being followed in last years in order to build Ti oxide-based surfaces that can fulfill, simultaneously, the following requirements: induced cell attachment and adhesion, while providing a superior corrosion and tribocorrosion performance. In this work micro-arc oxidation (MAO) was used as a tool for the growth of a nanostructured bioactive titanium oxide layer aimed to enhance cell attachment and adhesion for dental implant applications. Characterization of the surfaces was performed, in terms of morphology, topography, chemical composition and crystalline structure. Primary human osteoblast adhesion on the developed surfaces was investigated in detail by electronic and atomic force microscopy as well as immunocytochemistry. Also an investigation on the early cytokine production was performed. Results show that a relatively thick hybrid and graded oxide layer was produced on the Ti surface, being constituted by a mixture of anatase, rutile and amorphous phases where calcium (Ca) and phosphorous (P) were incorporated. An outermost nanometric-thick amorphous oxide layer rich in Ca was present in the film. This amorphous layer, rich in Ca, improved fibroblast viability and metabolic activity as well as osteoblast adhesion. High-resolution techniques allowed to understand that osteoblasts adhered less in the crystalline-rich regions while they preferentially adhere and spread over in the Ca-rich amorphous oxide layer. Also, these surfaces induce higher amounts of IFN-γ cytokine secretion, which is known to regulate inflammatory responses, bone microarchitecture as well as cytoskeleton reorganization and cellular spreading. These surfaces are promising in the context of dental implants, since they might lead to faster osseointegration. PMID:26046283

  18. Association between tumor necrosis factor-alpha G-308A polymorphism and dental peri-implant disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yuan-Yuan; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Weng, Hong; Cen, Ying; Zhao, Qian; Wen, Xiujie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a potent immune-inflammatory mediator involved in the regulation of bone resorption. The single nucleotide polymorphism G-308A in the TNF-α gene increases the level of this cytokine. This phenomenon is also related to several diseases. Although the association between TNF-α (G-308A) polymorphism and dental peri-implant disease has been investigated, results have remained controversial. Hence, we performed this meta-analysis to provide a comprehensive and systematic conclusion on this topic. Methods: We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure until July 2015. A fixed-effect model was established to calculate pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The calculated values were then used to assess the strength of the association between the TNF-α (G-308A) polymorphism and the dental peri-implant disease risk. The heterogeneity between included studies was evaluated with Cochran Q and I2 statistics. Interstudy publication bias was investigated with a funnel plot. Results: Six eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled ORs did not reveal a significant relationship between the TNF-α (G-308A) polymorphism and the disease susceptibility. Subgroup analyses in terms of ethnicity and disease type yielded similar results. Conclusion: Our meta-analysis revealed that TNF-α (G-308A) polymorphism was not significantly associated with the risk of dental peri-implant disease. However, further studies with large sample sizes should be performed to verify these results. PMID:27583850

  19. Effect of Osteotomy Preparation on Osseointegration of Immediately Loaded, Tapered Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulos, A; Cochran, D; Obrecht, M; Pippenger, B E; Dard, M

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present preclinical in vivo study was to evaluate whether a modified "drill-only" protocol, involving slight underpreparation of the implant site, may have an effect on aspects of osseointegration of a novel bone-level tapered implant, compared with the "standard drilling" protocol involving taping and profiling of the marginal aspect of the implant socket. In each side of the edentulated and completely healed mandible of 11 minipigs, 2 tapered implants (8 mm long × 4.1 mm Ø, BLT; Institut Straumann AG, Basel, Switzerland) were installed either with the drill-only or the standard drilling protocol. Significantly lower average insertion torque values were recorded for the standard drilling protocol group (52 ± 29 Ncm) compared with the drill-only group (70 ± 27 Ncm) (t test, P ≤ 0.05); no significant difference was observed between the 2 groups regarding implant stability, by means of resonance frequency analysis (75 ± 8 vs. 75 ± 6, respectively). Half of the implants were immediately loaded and the rest were submerged, providing observation times of 8 or 4 wk, respectively. Non-decalcified histological and histomorphometric analysis of the implants with surrounding tissues showed no significant differences between the 2 drilling protocols regarding the distance from the implant platform to the first coronal bone-to-implant contact (f-BIC), the total bone-to-implant contact (BIC) as a percentage of the total implant perimeter, and the bone density in an area extending 1 mm laterally from the implant (BATA) within 2 rectangular regions of interest (ROIs) 4 mm in height, representing the coronal (parallel-walled) and apical (tapered) aspect of the implant (ROI 1 and ROI 2, respectively) in non-submerged implants. In general, marginal peri-implant bone levels were at or slightly apical to the implant platform, and large amounts of bone-to-implant contact were observed. In contrast, immediately loaded implants placed with the drill-only protocol

  20. Advantages and Disadvantages of Double Threaded Dental Implant Screws As Opposed to Single-Threaded: A Study from a Biomechanical Perspective by the Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Arenal, A.; de Cos Juez, F. J.; Lasheras, F. Sánchez; Quevedo, M. Mauvezin

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of the present article is to study the advantages from a biomechanical point of view of the use of a double-threaded dental implant over the more common single-threaded one. For this purpose a 3D model of a portion of the jaw was generated. In this model four different bone areas were distinguished (transition cortical, transition trabecular, bulk cortical and bulk trabecular). Not only was the portion of the jaw created with CAD software but also two different implants geometries, one with only one thread (single-threaded) and the other with two threads (double-threaded). The loading condition was defined as 150 N intrusive forces and 15 N lingual-labial forces acting on the implant. The results of the present study shown that from a macroscopic point of view, the choice of one or other of the dental implants does not make a significant difference in the general behaviour of the jaw. In spite of this and notwithstanding the effects of the transition bone-implant, the stress distribution achieved by the single-threaded dental implant is more uniform. This effect is better for the biomechanics of the jaw. The advantage presented by the double threaded implant is that due to its larger surface the osseointegration is better than in the single-threaded version.

  1. In vitro and in vivo studies of ultrafine-grain Ti as dental implant material processed by ECAP.

    PubMed

    An, Baili; Li, Zhirui; Diao, Xiaoou; Xin, Haitao; Zhang, Qiang; Jia, Xiaorui; Wu, Yulu; Li, Kai; Guo, Yazhou

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the surface characterization of ultrafine-grain pure titanium (UFG-Ti) after sandblasting and acid-etching (SLA) and to evaluate its biocompatibility as dental implant material in vitro and in vivo. UFG-Ti was produced by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) using commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti). Microstructure and yield strength were investigated. The morphology, wettability and roughness of the specimens were analyzed after they were modified by SLA. MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were seeded onto the specimens to evaluate its biocompatibility in vitro. For the in vivo study, UFG-Ti implants after SLA were embedded into the femurs of New Zealand rabbits. Osseointegration was investigated though micro-CT analysis, histological assessment and pull-out test. The control group was CP-Ti. UFG-Ti with enhanced mechanical properties was produced by four passes of ECAP in BC route at room temperature. After SLA modification, the hierarchical porous structure on its surface exhibited excellent wettability. The adhesion, proliferation and viability of cells cultured on the UFG-Ti were superior to that of CP-Ti. In the in vivo study, favorable osseointegration occurred between the implant and bone in CP and UFG-Ti groups. The combination intensity of UF- Ti with bone was higher according to the pull-out test. This study supports the claim that UFG-Ti has grain refinement with outstanding mechanical properties and, with its excellent biocompatibility, has potential for use as dental implant material.

  2. In vitro and in vivo studies of ultrafine-grain Ti as dental implant material processed by ECAP.

    PubMed

    An, Baili; Li, Zhirui; Diao, Xiaoou; Xin, Haitao; Zhang, Qiang; Jia, Xiaorui; Wu, Yulu; Li, Kai; Guo, Yazhou

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the surface characterization of ultrafine-grain pure titanium (UFG-Ti) after sandblasting and acid-etching (SLA) and to evaluate its biocompatibility as dental implant material in vitro and in vivo. UFG-Ti was produced by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) using commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti). Microstructure and yield strength were investigated. The morphology, wettability and roughness of the specimens were analyzed after they were modified by SLA. MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were seeded onto the specimens to evaluate its biocompatibility in vitro. For the in vivo study, UFG-Ti implants after SLA were embedded into the femurs of New Zealand rabbits. Osseointegration was investigated though micro-CT analysis, histological assessment and pull-out test. The control group was CP-Ti. UFG-Ti with enhanced mechanical properties was produced by four passes of ECAP in BC route at room temperature. After SLA modification, the hierarchical porous structure on its surface exhibited excellent wettability. The adhesion, proliferation and viability of cells cultured on the UFG-Ti were superior to that of CP-Ti. In the in vivo study, favorable osseointegration occurred between the implant and bone in CP and UFG-Ti groups. The combination intensity of UF- Ti with bone was higher according to the pull-out test. This study supports the claim that UFG-Ti has grain refinement with outstanding mechanical properties and, with its excellent biocompatibility, has potential for use as dental implant material. PMID:27287096

  3. A comparative investigation in dogs: 2-year morphometric results of the dental implant--bone interface.

    PubMed

    Steflik, D E; Lake, F T; Sisk, A L; Parr, G R; Hanes, P J; Davis, H C; Adams, B O; Yavari, J

    1996-01-01

    One hundred twenty titanium and ceramic root-form and titanium blade implants were placed into 30 dog mandibles. Twenty-four implants in six control dogs (in situ for 5 months) did not receive prostheses. Ninety-six implants in 24 dogs supported prostheses for 6, 12, 18, or 24 months. Computerized morphometry data presented the percent of the implant surface apposed directly by bone. A three-way factorial analysis of variance was used to assess significance. Individual implant means ranged from 0% (mobile implant) to 71% bone adaptation. From these data, two-stage titanium root-form implants were shown to be apposed by more bone than the other five systems, and overall, titanium implant systems were apposed by more bone than ceramic systems. Between 41% and 50% of the surface of integrated ceramic implants were apposed by bone, whereas between 50% and 65% of the surfaces of titanium implants were apposed by bone. Also, two-stage surgery for blade implants appears important for implant success. Furthermore, the use of Nomarski differential illumination appears to be useful for examining the quality of interfacial bone to correlate with the amount of bone quantified by morphometric protocols.

  4. Inferior Alveolar Nerve Lateralization and Transposition for Dental Implant Placement. Part I: a Systematic Review of Surgical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The purpose of this first part of a two-part series was to review the literature concerning the indications, contraindications, advantages, disadvantages and surgical techniques of the lateralization and transposition of the inferior alveolar nerve, followed by the placement of an implant in an edentulous atrophic posterior mandible. Material and Methods A comprehensive review of the current literature was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines by accessing the NCBI PubMed and PMC database, academic sites and books. The articles were searched from January 1997 to July 2014 and comprised English-language articles that included adult patients between 18 and 80 years old with minimal residual bone above the mandibular canal who had undergone inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) repositioning with a minimum 6 months of follow-up. Results A total of 16 studies were included in this review. Nine were related to IAN transposition, 4 to IAN lateralization and 3 to both transposition and lateralization. Implant treatment results and complications were presented. Conclusions Inferior alveolar nerve lateralization and transposition in combination with the installation of dental implants is sometimes the only possible procedure to help patients to obtain a fixed prosthesis, in edentulous atrophic posterior mandibles. With careful pre-operative surgical and prosthetic planning, imaging, and extremely precise surgical technique, this procedure can be successfully used for implant placement in edentulous posterior mandibular segments. PMID:25937873

  5. Experimental and computational investigation of Morse taper conometric system reliability for the definition of fixed connections between dental implants and prostheses.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Eriberto; Lops, Diego; Tomasi, Cristiano; Ricci, Sara; Stocchero, Michele; Carniel, Emanuele Luigi

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays, dental implantology is a reliable technique for treatment of partially and completely edentulous patients. The achievement of stable dentition is ensured by implant-supported fixed dental prostheses. Morse taper conometric system may provide fixed retention between implants and dental prostheses. The aim of this study was to investigate retentive performance and mechanical strength of a Morse taper conometric system used as implant-supported fixed dental prostheses retention. Experimental and finite element investigations were performed. Experimental tests were achieved on a specific abutment-coping system, accounting for both cemented and non-cemented situations. The results from the experimental activities were processed to identify the mechanical behavior of the coping-abutment interface. Finally, the achieved information was applied to develop reliable finite element models of different abutment-coping systems. The analyses were developed accounting for different geometrical conformations of the abutment-coping system, such as different taper angle. The results showed that activation process, occurred through a suitable insertion force, could provide retentive performances equal to a cemented system without compromising the mechanical functionality of the system. These findings suggest that Morse taper conometrical system can provide a fixed connection between implants and dental prostheses if proper insertion force is applied. Activation process does not compromise the mechanical functionality of the system.

  6. Biomechanics and strain mapping in bone as related to immediately-loaded dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jing; Lee, Jihyun; Jang, Andrew; Gu, Allen; Hossaini-Zadeh, Mehran; Prevost, Richard; Curtis, Don; Ho, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    The effects of alveolar bone socket geometry and bone-implant contact on implant biomechanics, and resulting strain distributions in bone were investigated. Following extraction of lateral incisors on a cadaver mandible, immediate implants were placed and bone-implant contact area, stability and bone strain were measured. In situ biomechanical testing coupled with micro X-ray microscope (μ-XRM) illustrated less stiff bone-implant complexes (701-822 N/mm) compared with bone-periodontal ligament (PDL)-tooth complexes (791-913 N/mm). X-ray tomograms illustrated that the cause of reduced stiffness was due to reduced and limited bone-implant contact. Heterogeneous elemental composition of bone was identified by using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The novel aspect of this study was the application of a new experimental mechanics method, that is, digital volume correlation, which allowed mapping of strains in volumes of alveolar bone in contact with a loaded implant. The identified surface and subsurface strain concentrations were a manifestation of load transferred to bone through bone-implant contact based on bone-implant geometry, quality of bone, implant placement, and implant design. 3D strain mapping indicated that strain concentrations are not exclusive to the bone-implant contact regions, but also extend into bone not directly in contact with the implant. The implications of the observed strain concentrations are discussed in the context of mechanobiology. Although a plausible explanation of surgical complications for immediate implant treatment is provided, extrapolation of results is only warranted by future systematic studies on more cadaver specimens and/or in vivo small scale animal models. PMID:26162549

  7. State anxiety and depression as factors modulating and influencing postoperative pain in dental implant surgery. A prospective clinical survey

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-de Diego, Rafael; Cutando-Soriano, Antonio; Montero-Martín, Javier; Prados-Frutos, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Objetives: To determine whether preoperative state anxiety and depression modulate or influence objective and subjective postoperative pain following dental implant insertion. Study Design: Prospective, clinical study with 7-day follow-up of a sample of 105 subjects who preoperatively completed the state anxiety questionnaire (STAI-E) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and postoperatively, at 2 and 7 days, recorded objective pain with the Semmes-Weinstein mechanical esthesiometer (SW test) and subjective pain with the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Results: 85.6% and 81.5% of patients, respectively, recorded no signs of state anxiety or depression. The correlation between anxiety and depression for both maxillary bones was the lower (P=0.02). The correlation between subjective and objective pain at 2 and 7 days, and the anatomic regions intervened, was statistically significant in the mandible at day 7 (P<0.01), and highly significant (P<0.001) for the other variables. The correlation between state anxiety and objective pain at day 7 was nearly statistically significant (P=0.07). Conclusions: The correlation between state anxiety and depression, and objective and subjective pain at day 7 was not statistically significant. A strong correlation was found between objective and subjective pain in the immediate postoperative period. Key words:Anxiety, depression, postoperative pain, dental implants. PMID:24880447

  8. Dental Implants Fatigue as a Possible Failure of Implantologic Treatment: The Importance of Randomness in Fatigue Behaviour