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Sample records for implement dynamic wafer

  1. Implementation of three-dimensional SOI-MEMS wafer-level packaging using through-wafer interconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chiung-Wen; Yang, Hsueh-An; Wang, Wei Chung; Fang, Weileun

    2007-06-01

    Packaging is an emerging technology for microsystem integration. The silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer has been extensively employed for micromachined devices for its reliable fabrication steps and robust structures. This research reports a packaging approach for silicon-on- insulator-micro-electro-mechanical system (SOI-MEMS) devices using through-wafer vias and anodic bonding technologies. Through-wafer vias are embedded inside the SOI wafers, and are realized using laser drilling and electroplating. These vias provide electrical signal paths to the MEMS device, while isolating MEMS devices from the outer environment. A high-strength hermetic sealing is then achieved after anodic bonding of the through-wafer-vias-embedded SOI wafer to a Pyrex 7740 glass. Moreover, the packaged SOI-MEMS chip is compatible with surface mount technology, and provides a superior way for 3D heterogeneous integration.

  2. Glass Transition of Polystyrene Thin Films on Silicon Wafer Measured by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis and Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Catheryn; Lan, Tian; Caporale, Stefan; Torkelson, John

    Measuring the glass transition temperature, Tg, of polymer films in the thickness range of 20-500 nm is non-routine but commercially important for polymer films used in applications such as membranes and electronic circuit boards. Various specialized methods have been used or developed to determine Tg in thin films, including thermal ellipsometry and many others. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a more conventional method that has been used to measure Tg, but since the thin films must be scraped from the wafer, consolidation and annealing can occur in the pan and may negate effects due to film thickness. Here we report results for polystyrene (PS) spin coated on silicon wafers in the range of 20-500 nm using a benchtop dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) in the 3-point bending mode. For the DMA, the peak tan δ temperature is related to the polymer Tg and effects due to confinement as a function of film thickness are compared to literature values. We use thermal ellipsometry as a control method to measure film thickness and Tg in parallel. Low level additives present in commercial PS were observed to strongly affect the results for thin films and are described.

  3. An architecture for a wafer-scale-implemented MIMD parallel computer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chiajiu.

    1988-01-01

    In this dissertation, a general-purpose parallel computer architecture is proposed and studied. The proposed architecture, called the modified mesh-connected parallel computer (MMCPC) is obtained by enhancing a mesh-connected parallel computer with row buses and column buses. The MMCPC is a multiple instruction multiple data parallel machine. Because of the regular structure and distributed control mechanisms, the MMCPC is suitable for VLSI or WSI implementation. The bus structure of the MMCPC lends itself to configurability and fault tolerance. The MMCPC can be logically configured as a number of different parallel computer topologies. The MMCPC can tolerate as many faulty PE's, located randomly, as there are available spares, resulting in 100% redundancy utilization. The performance of the MMCPC was analyzed by applying a generalized stochastic Petri net graph to the MMCPC. The GSPN performance modeling results show a need for a new processing element (PE). A new PE architecture, able to handle data processing and message passing concurrently, is proposed and the silicon overhead is estimated in comparison with transputer-like PE's. Based upon the proposed PE, optimum sizes of the MMCPC for different program structures are derived. Two routing algorithms for the MMCPC were proposed and studied. Routing analysis was carried out through simulation. The simulation results show that the dynamic routing algorithm out performs the deterministic routing algorithm.

  4. Wafer screening device and methods for wafer screening

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan; Rupnowski, Przemyslaw

    2014-07-15

    Wafer breakage is a serious problem in the photovoltaic industry because a large fraction of wafers (between 5 and 10%) break during solar cell/module fabrication. The major cause of this excessive wafer breakage is that these wafers have residual microcracks--microcracks that were not completely etched. Additional propensity for breakage is caused by texture etching and incomplete edge grinding. To eliminate the cost of processing the wafers that break, it is best to remove them prior to cell fabrication. Some attempts have been made to develop optical techniques to detect microcracks. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to detect microcracks that are embedded within the roughness/texture of the wafers. Furthermore, even if such detection is successful, it is not straightforward to relate them to wafer breakage. We believe that the best way to isolate the wafers with fatal microcracks is to apply a stress to wafers--a stress that mimics the highest stress during cell/module processing. If a wafer survives this stress, it has a high probability of surviving without breakage during cell/module fabrication. Based on this, we have developed a high throughput, noncontact method for applying a predetermined stress to a wafer. The wafers are carried on a belt through a chamber that illuminates the wafer with an intense light of a predetermined intensity distribution that can be varied by changing the power to the light source. As the wafers move under the light source, each wafer undergoes a dynamic temperature profile that produces a preset elastic stress. If this stress exceeds the wafer strength, the wafer will break. The broken wafers are separated early, eliminating cost of processing into cell/module. We will describe details of the system and show comparison of breakage statistics with the breakage on a production line.

  5. Wafer-scale fabrication and growth dynamics of suspended graphene nanoribbon arrays

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hiroo; Kaneko, Toshiro; Shibuta, Yasushi; Ohno, Munekazu; Maekawa, Yuki; Kato, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Adding a mechanical degree of freedom to the electrical and optical properties of atomically thin materials can provide an excellent platform to investigate various optoelectrical physics and devices with mechanical motion interaction. The large scale fabrication of such atomically thin materials with suspended structures remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate the wafer-scale bottom–up synthesis of suspended graphene nanoribbon arrays (over 1,000,000 graphene nanoribbons in 2 × 2 cm2 substrate) with a very high yield (over 98%). Polarized Raman measurements reveal graphene nanoribbons in the array can have relatively uniform-edge structures with near zigzag orientation dominant. A promising growth model of suspended graphene nanoribbons is also established through a comprehensive study that combined experiments, molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical calculations with a phase-diagram analysis. We believe that our results can contribute to pushing the study of graphene nanoribbons into a new stage related to the optoelectrical physics and industrial applications. PMID:27250877

  6. Dynamic Implementation Seeking Equilibrium Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riboldi, Pablo Jose

    Implementing exportable instructional systems has always been a problem for instructional developers. Even the best instructional systems lose effectiveness when they are poorly implemented. Researchers have focused their efforts on creating mechanisms to help developers and managers improve and control implementation. However, most of these…

  7. Design automation for wafer scale integration

    SciTech Connect

    Donlan, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    Wafer scale integration (WSI) is a technique for implementing large digital systems on a single wafer. This thesis describes a system of design automation tools developed to aid in the implementation of wafer scale integrated systems. An overview of wafer scale integration is given with fabrication details and yield considerations discussed. The Wafer architectural Design Language (WDL) used to describe and specify a system architecture to the development system is introduced along with a compiler that translates the high level WDL description into net lists and other internal data bases. Interactive placement tools used to map the system architecture onto the functional die sites on a wafer are described. A very fast line probe router was developed to perform the custom wafer level routing need to personalize each wafer. Router data structures, algorithms, techniques, and results are discussed in detail. Sample wafer scale architectures and the result of their WSI implementations are shown. Also presented is the Wafer Transmission Module (WTM) a packaging technology related to wafer scale integration.

  8. Implementation of various vacuum conditions in sealed chambers for wafer-level bonding by using embedded cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.-W.; Liang, K.-C.; Chu, C.-H.; Fang, W.

    2017-01-01

    The existing foundry processes enable the fabrication and integration of various sensors on a single chip. However, various vacuum conditions of these sensors remain a critical concern after packaging. For example, accelerometers and gyroscopes are operated under two different vacuum conditions. This study extends the concept of using outgassing to realize sealed chambers under different vacuum conditions in one wafer-level bonding step. In other words, by etching various numbers and sizes of cavities on a substrate, the vacuum condition of a sealed chamber can be modulated. In applications, resonators and Pirani gauges were fabricated and characterized to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed process scheme. The vacuum condition of the sealed chambers was then monitored using the quality factor (detected by resonators) and the pressure (measured by Pirani gauges). The measurements indicate that the sealed chambers with vacuum conditions ranging from approximately 2 to 180 mbar were simultaneously fabricated and integrated on the same wafer. This approach could facilitate the monolithic integration of devices with different vacuum requirements, such as approximately 100 mbar chamber pressure for accelerometers, and single-digit millibars vacuum conditions for gyroscopes.

  9. Performance Evaluations of Ceramic Wafer Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2006-01-01

    Future hypersonic vehicles will require high temperature, dynamic seals in advanced ramjet/scramjet engines and on the vehicle airframe to seal the perimeters of movable panels, flaps, and doors. Seal temperatures in these locations can exceed 2000 F, especially when the seals are in contact with hot ceramic matrix composite sealing surfaces. NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced ceramic wafer seals to meet the needs of these applications. High temperature scrub tests performed between silicon nitride wafers and carbon-silicon carbide rub surfaces revealed high friction forces and evidence of material transfer from the rub surfaces to the wafer seals. Stickage between adjacent wafers was also observed after testing. Several design changes to the wafer seals were evaluated as possible solutions to these concerns. Wafers with recessed sides were evaluated as a potential means of reducing friction between adjacent wafers. Alternative wafer materials are also being considered as a means of reducing friction between the seals and their sealing surfaces and because the baseline silicon nitride wafer material (AS800) is no longer commercially available.

  10. Barrier reduction via implementation of InGaN interlayer in wafer-bonded current aperture vertical electron transistors consisting of InGaAs channel and N-polar GaN drain

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeonghee Laurent, Matthew A.; Li, Haoran; Lal, Shalini; Mishra, Umesh K.

    2015-01-12

    This letter reports the influence of the added InGaN interlayer on reducing the inherent interfacial barrier and hence improving the electrical characteristics of wafer-bonded current aperture vertical electron transistors consisting of an InGaAs channel and N-polar GaN drain. The current-voltage characteristics of the transistors show that the implementation of N-polar InGaN interlayer effectively reduces the barrier to electron transport across the wafer-bonded interface most likely due to its polarization induced downward band bending, which increases the electron tunneling probability. Fully functional wafer-bonded transistors with nearly 600 mA/mm of drain current at V{sub GS} = 0 V and L{sub go} = 2 μm have been achieved, and thus demonstrate the feasibility of using wafer-bonded heterostructures for applications that require active carrier transport through both materials.

  11. Wafer-level reliability characterization for wafer-level packaged microbolometer with ultra-small array size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee Yeoun; Yang, Chungmo; Park, Jae Hong; Jung, Ho; Kim, Taehyun; Kim, Kyung Tae; Lim, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sang Woo; Mitchell, Jay; Hwang, Wook Joong; Lee, Kwyro

    2013-06-01

    For the development of small and low cost microbolometer, wafer level reliability characterization techniques of vacuum packaged wafer are introduced. Amorphous silicon based microbolometer-type vacuum sensors fabricated in 8 inch wafer are bonded with cap wafer by Au-Sn eutectic solder. Membrane deflection and integrated vacuum sensor techniques are independently used to characterize the hermeticity in a wafer-level. For the packaged wafer with membrane thickness below 100um, it is possible to determine the hermeticity as screening test by optical detection technique. Integrated vacuum sensor having the same structure as bolometer pixel shows the vacuum level below 100mTorr. All steps from packaging process to fine hermeticity test are implemented in wafer level to prove the high volume and low cost production.

  12. Wafer characteristics via reflectometry

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2010-10-19

    Various exemplary methods (800, 900, 1000, 1100) are directed to determining wafer thickness and/or wafer surface characteristics. An exemplary method (900) includes measuring reflectance of a wafer and comparing the measured reflectance to a calculated reflectance or a reflectance stored in a database. Another exemplary method (800) includes positioning a wafer on a reflecting support to extend a reflectance range. An exemplary device (200) has an input (210), analysis modules (222-228) and optionally a database (230). Various exemplary reflectometer chambers (1300, 1400) include radiation sources positioned at a first altitudinal angle (1308, 1408) and at a second altitudinal angle (1312, 1412). An exemplary method includes selecting radiation sources positioned at various altitudinal angles. An exemplary element (1650, 1850) includes a first aperture (1654, 1854) and a second aperture (1658, 1858) that can transmit reflected radiation to a fiber and an imager, respectfully.

  13. Scriber for silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K. A.; Fortier, E. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A device for dividing silicon wafers into rectangular chips is characterized by a base including a horizontally oriented bed with a planar support surface, a vacuum chuck adapted to capture a silicon wafer seated on the support for translation in mutually perpendicular directions. A stylus support mounted on the bed includes a shaft disposed above and extended across the bed and a truck mounted on the shaft and supported thereby for linear translation along a path extended across the bed a vertically oriented scribe has a diamond tip supported by the truck also adapted as to engage a silicon wafer captured by the chuck and positioned beneath it in order to form score lines in the surface of the wafer as linear translation is imparted to the truck. A chuck positioning means is mounted on the base and is connected to the chuck for positioning the chuck relative to the stylus.

  14. High Throughput, Noncontact System for Screening Silicon Wafers Predisposed to Breakage During Solar Cell Production

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Basnyat, P.; Mehta, V.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a non-contact, on-line system for screening wafers that are likely to break during solar cell/module fabrication. The wafers are transported on a conveyor belt under a light source, which illuminates the wafers with a specific light distribution. Each wafer undergoes a dynamic thermal stress whose magnitude mimics the highest stress the wafer will experience during cell/module fabrication. As a result of the stress, the weak wafers break, leaving only the wafers that are strong enough to survive the production processes. We will describe the mechanism of wafer breakage, introduce the wafer system, and discuss the results of the time-temperature (t-T) profile of wafers with and without microcracks.

  15. Stable wafer-carrier system

    DOEpatents

    Rozenzon, Yan; Trujillo, Robert T; Beese, Steven C

    2013-10-22

    One embodiment of the present invention provides a wafer-carrier system used in a deposition chamber for carrying wafers. The wafer-carrier system includes a base susceptor and a top susceptor nested inside the base susceptor with its wafer-mounting side facing the base susceptor's wafer-mounting side, thereby forming a substantially enclosed narrow channel. The base susceptor provides an upward support to the top susceptor.

  16. Organizational Readiness for Stage-Based Dynamics of Innovation Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, D. Dwayne

    2009-01-01

    Implementing innovations in social and health-related service programs is a dynamic stage-based process. This article discusses training, adoption, implementation, and practice as sequential elements of a conceptual framework for effective preparation and implementation of evidence-based innovations. However, systems need to be prepared for change…

  17. Within-wafer CD variation induced by wafer shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chi-hao; Yang, Mars; Yang, Elvis; Yang, T. H.; Chen, K. C.

    2016-03-01

    In order to meet the increasing storage capacity demand and reduce bit cost of NAND flash memories, 3D stacked vertical flash cell array has been proposed. In constructing 3D NAND flash memories, the bit number per unit area is increased as increasing the number of stacked layers. However, the increased number of stacked layers has made the film stress control extremely important for maintaining good process quality. The residual film stress alters the wafer shape accordingly several process impacts have been readily observed across wafer, such as film deposition non-uniformity, etch rate non-uniformity, wafer chucking error on scanner, materials coating/baking defects, overlay degradation and critical dimension (CD) non-uniformity. The residual tensile and compressive stresses on wafers will result in concave and convex wafer shapes, respectively. This study investigates within-wafer CD uniformity (CDU) associated with wafer shape change induced by the 3D NAND flash memory processes. Within-wafer CDU was correlated with several critical parameters including different wafer bow heights of concave and convex wafer shapes, photo resists with different post exposure baking (PEB) temperature sensitivities, and DoseMapper compensation. The results indicated the trend of within-wafer CDU maintains flat for convex wafer shapes with bow height up to +230um and concave wafer shapes with bow height ranging from 0 ~ -70um, while the within-wafer CDU trends up from -70um to -246um wafer bow heights. To minimize the within-wafer CD distribution induced by wafer warpage, carefully tailoring the film stack and thermal budget in the process flow for maintaining the wafer shape at CDU friendly range is indispensable and using photo-resist materials with lower PEB temperature sensitivity is also suggested. In addition, DoseMapper compensation is also an alternative to greatly suppress the within-wafer CD non-uniformity but the photo-resist profile variation induced by across-wafer

  18. On-wafer high temperature characterization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, L.; ǎghici, F., Dr; Rusu, I.; Brezeanu, G.

    2016-12-01

    In this work a on-wafer high temperature characterization system for wide bandgap semiconductor devices and circuits has been designed, implemented and tested. The proposed system can perform the wafer temperature adjustment in a large domain, from the room temperature up to 3000C with a resolution better than +/-0.50C. In order to obtain both low-noise measurements and low EMI, the heating element of the wafer chuck is supplied in two ways: one is from a DC linear power supply connected to the mains electricity, another one is from a second DC unit powered by batteries. An original temperature control algorithm, different from classical PID, is used to modify the power applied to the chuck.

  19. Etching Of Semiconductor Wafer Edges

    DOEpatents

    Kardauskas, Michael J.; Piwczyk, Bernhard P.

    2003-12-09

    A novel method of etching a plurality of semiconductor wafers is provided which comprises assembling said plurality of wafers in a stack, and subjecting said stack of wafers to dry etching using a relatively high density plasma which is produced at atmospheric pressure. The plasma is focused magnetically and said stack is rotated so as to expose successive edge portions of said wafers to said plasma.

  20. A User Driven Dynamic Circuit Network Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Guok, Chin; Robertson, David; Chaniotakis, Evangelos; Thompson, Mary; Johnston, William; Tierney, Brian

    2008-10-01

    The requirements for network predictability are becoming increasingly critical to the DoE science community where resources are widely distributed and collaborations are world-wide. To accommodate these emerging requirements, the Energy Sciences Network has established a Science Data Network to provide user driven guaranteed bandwidth allocations. In this paper we outline the design, implementation, and secure coordinated use of such a network, as well as some lessons learned.

  1. Minimum wafer thickness by rotated ingot ID wafering. [Inner Diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The efficient utilization of materials is critical to certain device applications such as silicon for photovoltaics or diodes and gallium-gadolinium-garnet for memories. A variety of slicing techniques has been investigated to minimize wafer thickness and wafer kerf. This paper presents the results of analyses of ID wafering of rotated ingots based on predicted fracture behavior of the wafer as a result of forces during wafering and the properties of the device material. The analytical model indicated that the minimum wafer thickness is controlled by the depth of surface damage and the applied cantilever force. Both of these factors should be minimized. For silicon, a minimum thickness was found to be approximately 200 x 10 - 6th m for conventional sizes of rotated ingot wafering. Fractures through the thickness of the wafer rather than through the center supporting column were found to limit the minimum wafer thickness. The model suggested that the use of a vacuum chuck on the wafer surface to enhance cleavage fracture of the center supporting core and, with silicon, by using 111-line-type ingots could have potential for reducing minimum wafer thickness.

  2. AFOSR Wafer Bonding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-31

    cleanliness (foreign particles) and surface morphology (roughness). Two silicon wafers, when properly cleaned, can easily bond at room temperature because of...4 Figure IV data for nSi-nGaN bond. Structure is similar to that shown in Figure Difficulties and Knowledge Added Surface Morphology and...Particles One of the most important features of materials in determining whether they will bond is the quality of the bonding surfaces , in both

  3. Dynamic oversight: implementation gaps and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, John

    2011-04-01

    Nanotechnology is touted as a transformative technology in that it is predicted to improve many aspects of human life. There are hundreds of products in the market that utilize nanostructures in their design, such as composite materials made out of carbon or metal oxides. Potential risks to consumers, to the environment, and to workers from the most common passive nanomaterial—carbon nanotubes—are emerging through scientific research. Newer more active nanostructures—such as cancer therapies and targeted drug systems—are also increasing in use and are raising similar risk concerns. Governing the risks to workers is the subject of this commentary. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 grants the Occupational Safety and Health Administration the legal authority to set occupational health standards to insure that no worker suffers material impairment of health from work. However, setting a standard to protect workers from nanotechnology risks may occur some time in the future because the risks to workers have not been well characterized scientifically. Alternative risk governances—such as dynamic oversight through stakeholder partnerships, "soft law" approaches, and national adoption of international consensus standards—are evaluated in this article.

  4. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers with through-wafer interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Xuefeng

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) is a promising candidate for making ultrasound transducer arrays for applications such as 3D medical ultrasound, non-destructive evaluation and chemical sensing. Advantages of CMUTs over traditional piezoelectric transducers include low-cost batch fabrication, wide bandwidth, and ability to fabricate arrays with broad operation frequency range and different geometric configurations on a single wafer. When incorporated with through-wafer interconnects, a CMUT array can be directly integrated with a front-end integrated circuit (IC) to achieve compact packaging and to mitigate the effects of the parasitic capacitance from the connection cables. Through-wafer via is the existing interconnect scheme for CMUT arrays, and many other types of micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) devices. However, to date, no successful through-wafer via fabrication technique compatible with the wafer-bonding method of making CMUT arrays has been demonstrated. The through-wafer via fabrication steps degrade the surface conditions of the wafer, reduce the radius of curvature, thus making it difficult to bond. This work focuses on new through-wafer interconnect techniques that are compatible with common MEMS fabrication techniques, including both surface-micromachining and direct wafer-to-wafer fusion bonding. In this dissertation, first, a through-wafer via interconnect technique with improved characteristics is presented. Then, two implementations of through-wafer trench isolation are demonstrated. The through-wafer trench methods differ from the through-wafer vias in that the electrical conduction is through the bulk silicon instead of the conductor in the vias. In the first implementation, a carrier wafer is used to provide mechanical support; in the second, mechanical support is provided by a silicon frame structure embedded inside the isolation trenches. Both implementations reduce fabrication complexity compared to the through-wafer

  5. Gettering Silicon Wafers with Phosphorus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon wafers subjected to gettering in phosphorus atmosphere have longer diffusion lengths and higher solar-cell efficiencies than untreated wafers. Gettering treatment improves properties of solar cells manufactured from impure silicon and is compatible with standard solar-cell processing.

  6. Wafer-level vacuum/hermetic packaging technologies for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Mitchell, Jay; Welch, Warren; Lee, Sangwoo; Najafi, Khalil

    2010-02-01

    An overview of wafer-level packaging technologies developed at the University of Michigan is presented. Two sets of packaging technologies are discussed: (i) a low temperature wafer-level packaging processes for vacuum/hermeticity sealing, and (ii) an environmentally resistant packaging (ERP) technology for thermal and mechanical control as well as vacuum packaging. The low temperature wafer-level encapsulation processes are implemented using solder bond rings which are first patterned on a cap wafer and then mated with a device wafer in order to encircle and encapsulate the device at temperatures ranging from 200 to 390 °C. Vacuum levels below 10 mTorr were achieved with yields in an optimized process of better than 90%. Pressures were monitored for more than 4 years yielding important information on reliability and process control. The ERP adopts an environment isolation platform in the packaging substrate. The isolation platform is designed to provide low power oven-control, vibration isolation and shock protection. It involves batch flip-chip assembly of a MEMS device onto the isolation platform wafer. The MEMS device and isolation structure are encapsulated at the wafer-level by another substrate with vertical feedthroughs for vacuum/hermetic sealing and electrical signal connections. This technology was developed for high performance gyroscopes, but can be applied to any type of MEMS device.

  7. Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging of Smart Sensors.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Allan; Temple, Dorota S

    2016-10-31

    The reach and impact of the Internet of Things will depend on the availability of low-cost, smart sensors-"low cost" for ubiquitous presence, and "smart" for connectivity and autonomy. By using wafer-level processes not only for the smart sensor fabrication and integration, but also for packaging, we can further greatly reduce the cost of sensor components and systems as well as further decrease their size and weight. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology of smart sensors. We describe the processes needed to create the wafer-scale vacuum microchambers, focusing on approaches that involve metal seals and that are compatible with the thermal budget of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits. We review choices of seal materials and structures that are available to a device designer, and present techniques used for the fabrication of metal seals on device and window wafers. We also analyze the deposition and activation of thin film getters needed to maintain vacuum in the ultra-small chambers, and the wafer-to-wafer bonding processes that form the hermetic seal. We discuss inherent trade-offs and challenges of each seal material set and the corresponding bonding processes. Finally, we identify areas for further research that could help broaden implementations of the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology.

  8. Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging of Smart Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Allan; Temple, Dorota S.

    2016-01-01

    The reach and impact of the Internet of Things will depend on the availability of low-cost, smart sensors—“low cost” for ubiquitous presence, and “smart” for connectivity and autonomy. By using wafer-level processes not only for the smart sensor fabrication and integration, but also for packaging, we can further greatly reduce the cost of sensor components and systems as well as further decrease their size and weight. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology of smart sensors. We describe the processes needed to create the wafer-scale vacuum microchambers, focusing on approaches that involve metal seals and that are compatible with the thermal budget of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits. We review choices of seal materials and structures that are available to a device designer, and present techniques used for the fabrication of metal seals on device and window wafers. We also analyze the deposition and activation of thin film getters needed to maintain vacuum in the ultra-small chambers, and the wafer-to-wafer bonding processes that form the hermetic seal. We discuss inherent trade-offs and challenges of each seal material set and the corresponding bonding processes. Finally, we identify areas for further research that could help broaden implementations of the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology. PMID:27809249

  9. Influence of the bonding front propagation on the wafer stack curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, E.; Bréchet, Y.; Barthelemy, A.; Radu, I.; Pardoen, T.; Raskin, J.-P.

    2014-08-11

    The influence of the dynamics of the direct wafer bonding process on the curvature of the final wafer stack is investigated. An analytical model for the final curvature of the bonded wafers is developed, as a function of the different load components acting during the bonding front propagation, using thin plate theory and considering a strain discontinuity locked at the bonding interface. Experimental profiles are measured for different bonding conditions and wafer thicknesses. A very good agreement with the model prediction is obtained and the influence of the thin air layer trapped in-between the two wafers is demonstrated. The proposed model contributes to further improvement of the bonding process, in particular, for the stacking of layers of electronic devices, which requires a high accuracy of wafer-to-wafer alignment and a very low distortion level.

  10. Through-wafer optical probe characterization for microelectromechanical systems positional state monitoring and feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Jeremy M.; Chen, Jingdong; Brown, Kolin S.; Famouri, Parviz F.; Hornak, Lawrence A.

    2000-12-01

    Implementation of closed-loop microelectromechanical system (MEMS) control enables mechanical microsystems to adapt to the demands of the environment that they are actuating, opening a broad range of new opportunities for future MEMS applications. Integrated optical microsystems have the potential to enable continuous in situ optical interrogation of MEMS microstructure position fully decoupled from the means of mechanical actuation that is necessary for realization of feedback control. We present the results of initial research evaluating through-wafer optical microprobes for surface micromachined MEMS integrated optical position monitoring. Results from the through-wafer free-space optical probe of a lateral comb resonator fabricated using the multiuser MEMS process service (MUMPS) indicate significant positional information content with an achievable return probe signal dynamic range of up to 80% arising from film transmission contrast. Static and dynamic deflection analysis and experimental results indicate a through-wafer probe positional signal sensitivity of 40 mV/micrometers for the present setup or 10% signal change per micrometer. A simulation of the application of nonlinear sliding control is presented illustrating position control of the lateral comb resonator structure given the availability of positional state information.

  11. System for slicing wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A newly patented process for slicing silicon wafers that has distinct advantages over methods now widely used is described. The primary advantage of the new system is that it allows the efficient slicing of a number of ingots simultaneously at high speed. The cutting action is performed mechanically, most often with diamond particles that are transported to the cutting zone by a fluid vehicle or have been made an integral part of the blade by plating or impregnation. The new system uses a multiple or ganged band saw, arranged and spaced so that each side, or length, segment of a blade element, or loop, provides a cutting function. Each blade is maintained precisely in position by guides as it enters and leaves each ingot. The cutting action is performed with a conventional abrasive slurry composed of diamond grit suspended in an oil- or water-based vehicle. The distribution system draws the slurry from the supply reservoir and pumps it to the injection tubes to supply it to each side of each ingot. A flush system is provided at the outer end of the work-station zone. In order to reduce potential damage, a pneumatically driven flushing fluid is provided.

  12. Future trends in wafer scale integration

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.O.; Neugebauer, C.A.

    1986-12-01

    The dramatic increase in the functional density of VLSI has been achieved without greatly increasing the chip size. In wafer scale integration, the area of an entire wafer is made available to increase the functional density still further. However, the requirement for fault tolerance, additional levels of metallization, excess power dissipation, process conservatism to achieve finite yield, and nonoptimum nature of the AI/SiO/sub 2/ transmission line for cross-wafer communication have made WSI noncompetitive with state-of-the-art VLSI and dense multichip hybrid packaging approaches, at least so far. On the other hand, the potential benefits of WSI are great. Chief among them is the greatly increased expected reliability, which is partly due to an all-monolithic system and partly because of the hope that fault tolerance, which is an absolute requirement for WSI fabrication, can be extended to failure tolerance, and thus the ability to reconfigure during systems operation, and perhaps even transparent to it. Pipeline- or bus-oriented logic structures were found to be the most promising for WSI implementation.

  13. Laser wafering for silicon solar.

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

    2011-03-01

    Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 {micro}m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

  14. Wafer handling and placement tool

    DOEpatents

    Witherspoon, Linda L.

    1988-01-05

    A spring arm tool is provided for clamp engaging and supporting wafers while the tool is hand held. The tool includes a pair of relatively swingable jaw element supporting support arms and the jaw elements are notched to enjoy multiple point contact with a wafer peripheral portion. Also, one disclosed form of the tool includes remotely operable workpiece ejecting structure carried by the jaw elements thereof.

  15. Note: Near infrared interferometric silicon wafer metrology.

    PubMed

    Choi, M S; Park, H M; Joo, K N

    2016-04-01

    In this investigation, two near infrared (NIR) interferometric techniques for silicon wafer metrology are described and verified with experimental results. Based on the transparent characteristic of NIR light to a silicon wafer, the fiber based spectrally resolved interferometry can measure the optical thickness of the wafer and stitching low coherence scanning interferometry can reconstruct entire surfaces of the wafer.

  16. Strategy optimization for mask rule check in wafer fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chuen Huei; Lin, Shaina; Lin, Roger; Wang, Alice; Lee, Rachel; Deng, Erwin

    2015-07-01

    Photolithography process is getting more and more sophisticated for wafer production following Moore's law. Therefore, for wafer fab, consolidated and close cooperation with mask house is a key to achieve silicon wafer success. However, generally speaking, it is not easy to preserve such partnership because many engineering efforts and frequent communication are indispensable. The inattentive connection is obvious in mask rule check (MRC). Mask houses will do their own MRC at job deck stage, but the checking is only for identification of mask process limitation including writing, etching, inspection, metrology, etc. No further checking in terms of wafer process concerned mask data errors will be implemented after data files of whole mask are composed in mask house. There are still many potential data errors even post-OPC verification has been done for main circuits. What mentioned here are the kinds of errors which will only occur as main circuits combined with frame and dummy patterns to form whole reticle. Therefore, strategy optimization is on-going in UMC to evaluate MRC especially for wafer fab concerned errors. The prerequisite is that no impact on mask delivery cycle time even adding this extra checking. A full-mask checking based on job deck in gds or oasis format is necessary in order to secure acceptable run time. Form of the summarized error report generated by this checking is also crucial because user friendly interface will shorten engineers' judgment time to release mask for writing. This paper will survey the key factors of MRC in wafer fab.

  17. High-speed dynamic domino circuit implemented with gaas mesfets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Long (Inventor); Long, Stephen I. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A dynamic logic circuit (AND or OR) utilizes one depletion-mode metal-semiconductor FET for precharging an internal node A, and a plurality of the same type of FETs in series, or a FET in parallel with one or more of the series connected FETs for implementing the logic function. A pair of FETs are connected to provide an output inverter with two series diodes for level shift. A coupling capacitor may be employed with a further FET to provide level shifting required between the inverter and the logic circuit output terminal. These circuits may be cascaded to form a domino chain.

  18. Dynamic damping control: Implementation issues and simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Computed torque algorithms are used to compensate for the changing dynamics of robot manipulators in order to ensure that a constant level of damping is maintained for all configurations. Unfortunately, there are three significant problems with existing computed torque algorithms. First, they are nonpassive and can lead to unstable behavior; second, they make inefficient use of actuator capability; and third, they cannot be used to maintain a constant end-effector stiffness for force control tasks. Recently, we introduced a new control algorithm for robots which, like computed torque, uses a model of the manipulator's dynamics to maintain a constant level of damping in the system, but does so passively. This new class of passive control algorithms has guaranteed stability properties, utilizes actuators more effectively, and can also be used to maintain constant end-effector stiffness. In this paper, this approach is described in detail, implementation issues are discussed, and simulation results are given. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Design and implementation of dynamic hybrid Honeypot network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Peili; Hu, Shan-Shan; Zhai, Ji-Qiang

    2013-05-01

    The method of constructing a dynamic and self-adaptive virtual network is suggested to puzzle adversaries, delay and divert attacks, exhaust attacker resources and collect attacking information. The concepts of Honeypot and Honeyd, which is the frame of virtual Honeypot are introduced. The techniques of network scanning including active fingerprint recognition are analyzed. Dynamic virtual network system is designed and implemented. A virtual network similar to real network topology is built according to the collected messages from real environments in this system. By doing this, the system can perplex the attackers when Hackers attack and can further analyze and research the attacks. The tests to this system prove that this design can successfully simulate real network environment and can be used in network security analysis.

  20. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2009-03-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity DefectTM data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  1. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2009-04-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity Defect(R) data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  2. Automated reticle inspection data analysis for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Derek; Chen, Gong; Reese, Bryan; Hutchinson, Trent; Liesching, Marcus; Ying, Hai; Dover, Russell

    2008-10-01

    To minimize potential wafer yield loss due to mask defects, most wafer fabs implement some form of reticle inspection system to monitor photomask quality in high-volume wafer manufacturing environments. Traditionally, experienced operators review reticle defects found by an inspection tool and then manually classify each defect as 'pass, warn, or fail' based on its size and location. However, in the event reticle defects are suspected of causing repeating wafer defects on a completed wafer, potential defects on all associated reticles must be manually searched on a layer-by-layer basis in an effort to identify the reticle responsible for the wafer yield loss. This 'problem reticle' search process is a very tedious and time-consuming task and may cause extended manufacturing line-down situations. Often times, Process Engineers and other team members need to manually investigate several reticle inspection reports to determine if yield loss can be tied to a specific layer. Because of the very nature of this detailed work, calculation errors may occur resulting in an incorrect root cause analysis effort. These delays waste valuable resources that could be spent working on other more productive activities. This paper examines an automated software solution for converting KLA-Tencor reticle inspection defect maps into a format compatible with KLA-Tencor's Klarity DefecTM data analysis database. The objective is to use the graphical charting capabilities of Klarity Defect to reveal a clearer understanding of defect trends for individual reticle layers or entire mask sets. Automated analysis features include reticle defect count trend analysis and potentially stacking reticle defect maps for signature analysis against wafer inspection defect data. Other possible benefits include optimizing reticle inspection sample plans in an effort to support "lean manufacturing" initiatives for wafer fabs.

  3. Improving on-wafer CD correlation analysis using advanced diagnostics and across-wafer light-source monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagna, Paolo; Zurita, Omar; Rechtsteiner, Gregory; Lalovic, Ivan; Bekaert, Joost

    2014-04-01

    With the implementation of multi-patterning ArF-immersion for sub 20nm integrated circuits (IC), advances in equipment monitoring and control are needed to support on-wafer yield performance. These in-situ equipment monitoring improvements, along with advanced litho-cell corrections based on on-wafer measurements, enable meeting stringent overlay and CD control requirements for advanced lithography patterning. The importance of light-source performance on lithography pattering (CD and overlay) has been discussed in previous publications.[1-3] Recent developments of Cymer ArF light-source metrology and on-board monitoring enable end-users to detect, for each exposed wafer, changes in the near-field and far-field spatial profiles and polarization performance, [4-6] in addition to the key `optical' scalar parameters, such as bandwidth, wavelength and energy. The major advantage of this capability is that the key performance metrics are sampled at rates matched to wafer performance, e.g. every exposure field across the wafer, which is critical for direct correlation with on-wafer performance for process control and excursion detection.

  4. Automated Product Test Wafer Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrew; Minvielle, Anna; Salugsugan, Anita

    1987-04-01

    An automated test wafer procedure has been developed using the KLA 2020 wafer inspector to measure registration and critical dimensions on production wafers. The procedure reduces operator interactions to loading the wafer and entering information for wafer identification. The analysis of the registration data is performed on a PC using the methods established by Perloff to determine both intrafield and grid errors. These results are then used to correct the stepper. CD data is also analyzed by the program and corrections to the exposure time are calculated. It was found that the KLA 2020 is as much as 10 times faster and 4 times more precise in obtaining registration data then an operator reading optical verniers on a microscope. Due to the high precision of the reading, the analysis does not need a large number of readings to obtain precise and accurate stepper corrections. Further, significant improvements can be obtained by adding registration targets to measure the intrafield errors. Using the KLA 2020 and computer analysis we have demonstrated an ability to reduce the errors for a manually aligned run to a one sigma distribution of 0.09 um for x and y translation, 0.4 PPM for scaling and orthogonality, and 2.3 PPM for rotation from the first test wafer for a GCA 6100. Nearly all of this variation is due to operator misalignment or the inability of the stepper to correct the errors. The corrections with this technique measuring the same wafer are precise to + 0.01 um in translation and + 0.5 PPM for rotation, scaling, and orthogonality. It has also been shown that a simple linear equation can be used to correct exposure time, even when a process is not tightly controlled.

  5. Temperature switching waves in a silicon wafer on lamp-based heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovcharov, Vladimir V.; Kurenya, Alexey L.; Rudakov, Valery I.; Prigara, Valeriya P.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic properties of a silicon wafer thermally heated up under a bistable regime in a lamp-based reactor are simulated with regard to an optical non-gomogeneity as a nucleus of a high-temperature phase. The optical non-gomogeneity is represented by a doped layer region on the surface of the wafer imposed by radiation. It is shown that under these conditions temperature switching waves are formed in the wafer. Experimental verification of propagating the switching waves of temperature is obtained at the silicon wafer transition derived from the lower-temperature state to its upper-temperature state and the velocity of the waves is evaluated.

  6. Heating device for semiconductor wafers

    DOEpatents

    Vosen, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernable pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light.

  7. Heating device for semiconductor wafers

    DOEpatents

    Vosen, S.R.

    1999-07-27

    An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernible pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light. 4 figs.

  8. Automated Dynamic Demand Response Implementation on a Micro-grid

    SciTech Connect

    Kuppannagari, Sanmukh R.; Kannan, Rajgopal; Chelmis, Charalampos; Prasanna, Viktor K.

    2016-11-16

    In this paper, we describe a system for real-time automated Dynamic and Sustainable Demand Response with sparse data consumption prediction implemented on the University of Southern California campus microgrid. Supply side approaches to resolving energy supply-load imbalance do not work at high levels of renewable energy penetration. Dynamic Demand Response (D2R) is a widely used demand-side technique to dynamically adjust electricity consumption during peak load periods. Our D2R system consists of accurate machine learning based energy consumption forecasting models that work with sparse data coupled with fast and sustainable load curtailment optimization algorithms that provide the ability to dynamically adapt to changing supply-load imbalances in near real-time. Our Sustainable DR (SDR) algorithms attempt to distribute customer curtailment evenly across sub-intervals during a DR event and avoid expensive demand peaks during a few sub-intervals. It also ensures that each customer is penalized fairly in order to achieve the targeted curtailment. We develop near linear-time constant-factor approximation algorithms along with Polynomial Time Approximation Schemes (PTAS) for SDR curtailment that minimizes the curtailment error defined as the difference between the target and achieved curtailment values. Our SDR curtailment problem is formulated as an Integer Linear Program that optimally matches customers to curtailment strategies during a DR event while also explicitly accounting for customer strategy switching overhead as a constraint. We demonstrate the results of our D2R system using real data from experiments performed on the USC smartgrid and show that 1) our prediction algorithms can very accurately predict energy consumption even with noisy or missing data and 2) our curtailment algorithms deliver DR with extremely low curtailment errors in the 0.01-0.05 kWh range.

  9. SVX3 Six Inch Wafer Failure Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, R.

    1999-05-01

    In 1997 an order was placed with Honeywell for 265 four inch SVX3 wafers. After the initial delivery, the processing line at Honeywell was switched to 6 inch wafers. It was quickly apparent that there were serious problems on the 6 inch wafers which were not seen on the 4 inch wafers. Wafers from one of the 6 inch lots generally have a high yield and do not exhibit the center of the wafer via problem. It is not know if bad vias will recover or good vias go bad with time, temperature and radiation.

  10. Dynamics of the public concern and risk communication program implementation.

    PubMed

    Zaryabova, Victoria; Israel, Michel

    2015-09-01

    The public concern about electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure varies due to different reasons. A part of them are connected with the better and higher quality of information that people receive from science, media, Internet, social networks, industry, but others are based on good communication programs performed by the responsible institutions, administration and persons. Especially, in Bulgaria, public concern follows interesting changes, some of them in correlation with the European processes of concern, but others following the economic and political processes in the country. Here, we analyze the dynamics of the public concern over the last 10 years. Our explanation of the decrease of the people's complaints against EMF exposure from base stations for mobile communication is as a result of our risk communication program that is in implementation for >10 years.

  11. Dynamic partial reconfiguration of logic controllers implemented in FPGAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazydło, Grzegorz; Wiśniewski, Remigiusz

    2016-09-01

    Technological progress in recent years benefits in digital circuits containing millions of logic gates with the capability for reprogramming and reconfiguring. On the one hand it provides the unprecedented computational power, but on the other hand the modelled systems are becoming increasingly complex, hierarchical and concurrent. Therefore, abstract modelling supported by the Computer Aided Design tools becomes a very important task. Even the higher consumption of the basic electronic components seems to be acceptable because chip manufacturing costs tend to fall over the time. The paper presents a modelling approach for logic controllers with the use of Unified Modelling Language (UML). Thanks to the Model Driven Development approach, starting with a UML state machine model, through the construction of an intermediate Hierarchical Concurrent Finite State Machine model, a collection of Verilog files is created. The system description generated in hardware description language can be synthesized and implemented in reconfigurable devices, such as FPGAs. Modular specification of the prototyped controller permits for further dynamic partial reconfiguration of the prototyped system. The idea bases on the exchanging of the functionality of the already implemented controller without stopping of the FPGA device. It means, that a part (for example a single module) of the logic controller is replaced by other version (called context), while the rest of the system is still running. The method is illustrated by a practical example by an exemplary Home Area Network system.

  12. Granular Flow and Dynamics of Lunar Simulants in Excavating Implements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of the lunar surface will rely on properly designed excavation equipment for surface preparations and for collection of lunar regolith in In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) processes. Performance efficiency, i.e minimizing loading forces while maximizing material collection, and mass and volume reductions are major design goals. The NASA Glenn Research Center has embarked on an experimental program to determine the flow characteristics and dynamic forces produced by excavation operations using various excavator bucket designs. A new large scale soil bin facility, 2.27 m x 5.94 m x 0.76 m (nominally 8 ft. x 20 ft. x 27 in.) in size, capable of accommodating moderately large test implements was used for the simulations of lunar operations. The soil bin is filled with GRC-3simulant (a mixture of industrial sands and silt with a particle size distribution and the bulk mechanical (shear) strength representative of an average of lunar regolith from different regions) and uses motorized horizontal rails and a vertical actuator to drive the implement through the lunar simulant soil. A six-axis load cell and encoders provide well resolved measurements of the three dimensional forces and torques and motion of the bucket. In addition, simultaneous video allows for the analysis of the flow behavior and structure formation of the regolith during excavation. The data may be useful in anchoring soil mechanic models and to provide engineering data for design consideration.

  13. Implementation of Dynamic Smart Decision Model for Vertical Handoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Nidhi

    2010-11-01

    International Mobile Telecommunications-Advanced (IMT Advanced), better known as 4G is the next level of evolution in the field of wireless communications. 4G Wireless networks enable users to access information anywhere, anytime, with a seamless connection to a wide range of information and services, and receiving a large volume of information, data, pictures, video and thus increasing the demand for High Bandwidth and Signal Strength. The mobility among various networks is achieved through Vertical Handoff. Vertical handoffs refer to the automatic failover from one technology to another in order to maintain communication. The heterogeneous co-existence of access technologies with largely different characteristics creates a decision problem of determining the "best" available network at "best" time for handoff. In this paper, we implemented the proposed Dynamic and Smart Decision model to decide the "best" network interface and "best" time moment to handoff. The proposed model implementation not only demonstrates the individual user needs but also improve the whole system performance i.e. Quality of Service by reducing the unnecessary handoffs and maintain mobility.

  14. Highly parallel implementation of non-adiabatic Ehrenfest molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanai, Yosuke; Schleife, Andre; Draeger, Erik; Anisimov, Victor; Correa, Alfredo

    2014-03-01

    While the adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer approximation tremendously lowers computational effort, many questions in modern physics, chemistry, and materials science require an explicit description of coupled non-adiabatic electron-ion dynamics. Electronic stopping, i.e. the energy transfer of a fast projectile atom to the electronic system of the target material, is a notorious example. We recently implemented real-time time-dependent density functional theory based on the plane-wave pseudopotential formalism in the Qbox/qb@ll codes. We demonstrate that explicit integration using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme is very suitable for modern highly parallelized supercomputers. Applying the new implementation to systems with hundreds of atoms and thousands of electrons, we achieved excellent performance and scalability on a large number of nodes both on the BlueGene based ``Sequoia'' system at LLNL as well as the Cray architecture of ``Blue Waters'' at NCSA. As an example, we discuss our work on computing the electronic stopping power of aluminum and gold for hydrogen projectiles, showing an excellent agreement with experiment. These first-principles calculations allow us to gain important insight into the the fundamental physics of electronic stopping.

  15. Overview of recent direct wafer bonding advances and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriceau, H.; Rieutord, F.; Fournel, F.; Le Tiec, Y.; Di Cioccio, L.; Morales, C.; Charvet, A. M.; Deguet, C.

    2010-12-01

    Direct wafer bonding processes are being increasingly used to achieve innovative stacking structures. Many of them have already been implemented in industrial applications. This article looks at direct bonding mechanisms, processes developed recently and trends. Homogeneous and heterogeneous bonded structures have been successfully achieved with various materials. Active, insulating or conductive materials have been widely investigated. This article gives an overview of Si and SiO2 direct wafer bonding processes and mechanisms, silicon-on-insulator type bonding, diverse material stacking and the transfer of devices. Direct bonding clearly enables the emergence and development of new applications, such as for microelectronics, microtechnologies, sensors, MEMs, optical devices, biotechnologies and 3D integration.

  16. Characterizing SOI Wafers By Use Of AOTF-PHI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Li-Jen; Li, Guann-Pyng; Zang, Deyu

    1995-01-01

    Developmental nondestructive method of characterizing layers of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer involves combination of polarimetric hyperspectral imaging by use of acousto-optical tunable filters (AOTF-PHI) and computational resources for extracting pertinent data on SOI wafers from polarimetric hyperspectral images. Offers high spectral resolution and both ease and rapidity of optical-wavelength tuning. Further efforts to implement all of processing of polarimetric spectral image data in special-purpose hardware for sake of procesing speed. Enables characterization of SOI wafers in real time for online monitoring and adjustment of production. Also accelerates application of AOTF-PHI to other applications in which need for high-resolution spectral imaging, both with and without polarimetry.

  17. Smoother Scribing of Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danyluk, S.

    1986-01-01

    Proposed new tool used to scribe silicon wafers into chips more smoothly than before. New scriber produces surface that appears ductile. Scribed groove cuts have relatively smooth walls. Scriber consists of diamond pyramid point on rigid shaft. Ethanol flows through shaft and around point, like ink in ballpoint pen. Ethanol has significantly different effect for scribing silicon than water, used in conventional diamond scribers.

  18. WaferOptics® mass volume production and reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolterink, E.; Demeyer, K.

    2010-05-01

    The Anteryon WaferOptics® Technology platform contains imaging optics designs, materials, metrologies and combined with wafer level based Semicon & MEMS production methods. WaferOptics® first required complete new system engineering. This system closes the loop between application requirement specifications, Anteryon product specification, Monte Carlo Analysis, process windows, process controls and supply reject criteria. Regarding the Anteryon product Integrated Lens Stack (ILS), new design rules, test methods and control systems were assessed, implemented, validated and customer released for mass production. This includes novel reflowable materials, mastering process, replication, bonding, dicing, assembly, metrology, reliability programs and quality assurance systems. Many of Design of Experiments were performed to assess correlations between optical performance parameters and machine settings of all process steps. Lens metrologies such as FFL, BFL, and MTF were adapted for wafer level production and wafer mapping was introduced for yield management. Test methods for screening and validating suitable optical materials were designed. Critical failure modes such as delamination and popcorning were assessed and modeled with FEM. Anteryon successfully managed to integrate the different technologies starting from single prototypes to high yield mass volume production These parallel efforts resulted in a steep yield increase from 30% to over 90% in a 8 months period.

  19. NREL Core Program; Session: Wafer Silicon (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.

    2008-04-01

    This project supports the Solar America Initiative by working on: (1) wafer Si accounts for 92% world-wide solar cell production; (2) research to fill the industry R and D pipeline for the issues in wafer Si; (3) development of industry collaborative research; (4) improvement of NREL tools and capabilities; and (5) strengthen US wafer Si research.

  20. Wafering economies for industrialization from a wafer manufacturer's viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, T. P.; Fuerst, F. P.

    1982-02-01

    The key technical limitations which inhibit the lowering of value-added costs for state-of-the-art wafering techniques are assessed. From the best experimental results to date, a projection was made to identify those parts of each system which need to be developed in order to meet or improve upon the value-added cost reduction necessary for $0.70/Wp photovoltaics modules.

  1. Wafering economies for industrialization from a wafer manufacturer's viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, T. P.; Fuerst, F. P.

    1982-01-01

    The key technical limitations which inhibit the lowering of value-added costs for state-of-the-art wafering techniques are assessed. From the best experimental results to date, a projection was made to identify those parts of each system which need to be developed in order to meet or improve upon the value-added cost reduction necessary for $0.70/Wp photovoltaics modules.

  2. Performance of a 10 Gbps FSO System Implementing Novel Beam Tracking a Dynamic Buffering Modem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiriazes, John; Valencia, J. Emilio; Peach, Robert; Visone, Chris; Burdge, Geoffrey; Vickers, John; Leclerc, Troy; Sauer, Paul; Andrews, Larry; Phillips, Ron

    2012-01-01

    A 10 Gbps Free space optical (FSO) system implements beam tracking, a high dynamic range optical receiver, and a dynamic buffering packet modem. Performance was characterized at the 4.5 km Shuttle Landing Facility at Kennedy Space Center Florida.

  3. FPGA Implementation of Discrete-Time Neuronal Network for Dynamic Image Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Ken'ichi; Musashi, Mio; Yoshinaga, Tetsuya

    We have developed a discrete-time dynamical system for dynamic image segmentation. It consists of a global inhibitor and modified chaotic neurons that can generate oscillatory responses. Dynamic image segmentation is performed using its oscillatory responses. This letter presents an implementation of our system in a field programmable gate array (FPGA) device and a successful result of dynamic image segmentation.

  4. Support apparatus for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Nilson, Robert H.; Torres, Kenneth J.

    2003-06-10

    A support apparatus for minimizing gravitational stress in semiconductor wafers, and particularly silicon wafers, during thermal processing. The support apparatus comprises two concentric circular support structures disposed on a common support fixture. The two concentric circular support structures, located generally at between 10 and 70% and 70 and 100% and preferably at 35 and 82.3% of the semiconductor wafer radius, can be either solid rings or a plurality of spaced support points spaced apart from each other in a substantially uniform manner. Further, the support structures can have segments removed to facilitate wafer loading and unloading. In order to withstand the elevated temperatures encountered during semiconductor wafer processing, the support apparatus, including the concentric circular support structures and support fixture can be fabricated from refractory materials, such as silicon carbide, quartz and graphite. The claimed wafer support apparatus can be readily adapted for use in either batch or single-wafer processors.

  5. Non-Reciprocal on Wafer Microwave Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-27

    materials for on-wafer microwave devices concentrated on barium hexagonal ferrite (BaM) films grown on Si because these material is a good candidate...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We studied the growth, structural and magnetic properties of the hexagonal ferrite (BaAlxFe12-xO19) films on a surface of...Pt template/Si wafer. We determine that our hexagonal ferrite films are highly textured, with the c axis perpendicular to the Si wafer surface and

  6. MEMS packaging with etching and thinning of lid wafer to form lids and expose device wafer bond pads

    DOEpatents

    Chanchani, Rajen; Nordquist, Christopher; Olsson, Roy H; Peterson, Tracy C; Shul, Randy J; Ahlers, Catalina; Plut, Thomas A; Patrizi, Gary A

    2013-12-03

    In wafer-level packaging of microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices a lid wafer is bonded to a MEMS wafer in a predermined aligned relationship. Portions of the lid wafer are removed to separate the lid wafer into lid portions that respectively correspond in alignment with MEMS devices on the MEMS wafer, and to expose areas of the MEMS wafer that respectively contain sets of bond pads respectively coupled to the MEMS devices.

  7. Leading Dynamic Schools: How to Create and Implement Ethical Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rallis, Sharon F.; Rossman, Gretchen B.; Cobb, Casey D.; Reagan, Timothy G.; Kuntz, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    This companion book to "Principals of Dynamic Schools" and "Dynamic Teachers" brings to life the process of making and enacting educational policy and helps decision makers evaluate, interpret, and analyze the policies that govern their schools. In accessible language, this book presents educational leaders with a conceptual framework for…

  8. Stress Voiding During Wafer Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.

    1999-03-01

    Wafer processing involves several heating cycles to temperatures as high as 400 C. These thermal excursions are known to cause growth of voids that limit reliability of parts cut from the wafer. A model for void growth is constructed that can simulate the effect of these thermal cycles on void growth. The model is solved for typical process steps and the kinetics and extent of void growth are determined for each. It is shown that grain size, void spacing, and conductor line width are very important in determining void and stress behavior. For small grain sizes, stress relaxation can be rapid and can lead to void shrinkage during subsequent heating cycles. The effect of rapid quenching from process temperatures is to suppress void growth but induce large remnant stress in the conductor line. This stress can provide the driving force for void growth during storage even at room temperature. For isothermal processes the model can be solved analytically and estimates of terminal void size a nd lifetime are obtained.

  9. An Approach for Dynamic Optimization of Prevention Program Implementation in Stochastic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yuncheol; Prabhu, Vittal

    The science of preventing youth problems has significantly advanced in developing evidence-based prevention program (EBP) by using randomized clinical trials. Effective EBP can reduce delinquency, aggression, violence, bullying and substance abuse among youth. Unfortunately the outcomes of EBP implemented in natural settings usually tend to be lower than in clinical trials, which has motivated the need to study EBP implementations. In this paper we propose to model EBP implementations in natural settings as stochastic dynamic processes. Specifically, we propose Markov Decision Process (MDP) for modeling and dynamic optimization of such EBP implementations. We illustrate these concepts using simple numerical examples and discuss potential challenges in using such approaches in practice.

  10. Preparation and Characterization of PZT Wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal, A.; Rao, B. S. S. Chandra; Kamath, S. V.; Sen, A.; Maiti, H. S.

    2008-07-01

    Piezoelectric materials have recently attracted a lot of attention for ultrasonic structural health monitoring (shm) in aerospace, defence and civilian sectors, where they can act as both actuators and sensors. Incidentally, piezoelectric materials in the form of wafers (pwas-piezoelectric wafer active sensor, approx. 5-10 mm square and 0.2-0.3 mm thickness) are inexpensive, non intrusive and non-resonant wide band devices that can be surface-mounted on existing structures, inserted between the layers of lap joints or embedded inside composite materials. The material of choice for piezoelectric wafers is lead zirconate titanate (PZT) of composition close to morphotropic phase boundary [pb(zr0.52 ti0.48)o3]. However, an excess pbo is normally added to pzt as a densification aid and also to make up for the lead loss during high temperature sintering. Hence, it is of paramount importance to know how the shift of the lead content from the morphotropic composition affects the piezoelectric and mechanical properties of the sintered wafers, keeping in view the importance of mechanical properties of wafers in shm. In the present study, we observed that with the increase in the lead content of the sintered wafers, the dielectric and piezoelectric constants decreased. However, the elastic modulus, hardness and fracture toughness of the wafers increased with increasing lead content in the composition. Hence, the lead content in the sintered wafers should be optimized to get acceptable piezoelectric and mechanical

  11. On the feasibility of through-wafer optical interconnects for hybrid wafer-scale-integrated architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornak, L. A.; Tewksbury, S. K.

    1987-07-01

    A method, compatible with VLSI processing, is described which makes it possible to fabricate vertical through-wafer optical interconnects for hybrid multiwafer wafer-scale-integrated (WSI) architectures. Using optical devices operating at wavelengths beyond the Si absorption cutoff, a low-loss through-the-wafer propagation between WSI circuit planes can be achieved over the distances of about 1 mm with the interstitial Si wafers as part of the interconnect 'free-space' transmission medium. VLSI-process-compatible SiO2 Fresnel phase-reversal zone plate arrays were fabricated. Initial results show that a 400-percent improvement in optical power coupling through the wafer was obtained.

  12. The Empowerment Dynamic: Planning and Implementing a Support Group Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Robin; Haley, Pat

    This handbook describes how to plan and implement a support group for disabled youth in transition from school to work. It was developed from the experiences of a 3-year model program entitled Employability Support Network of Disabled Youth (ESN) which used support groups to accomplish its primary goal of creating "employability readiness" for…

  13. Gallium Arsenide wafer scale integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, J. F.; Taylor, G.; Steinvorth, R.; Donlan, B.; Bergendahl, A. S.

    1985-08-01

    Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) digital MESFET technology has recently begun to appear in the semiconductor marketplace. The initial commercial offerings are at the small to medium scale integration levels. The high speed of these parts would seem to be very attractive for designers of high performance signal processing equipment. Persistent yield problems, however, have prevented the appearance of large scale integrated circuits. As a result, intrapackage and interpackage signal propagation problems such as coupling, parasitics and delay are likely to negate much of the benefits of the fast MESFET logic devices for large systems constructed with such small scale building blocks. An early packaging concept, Wafer Scale Integration (WSI), which could possibly be used to address some of these limitations is reexamined.

  14. Methane production using resin-wafer electrodeionization

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Seth W; Lin, YuPo; Urgun-Demirtas, Meltem

    2014-03-25

    The present invention provides an efficient method for creating natural gas including the anaerobic digestion of biomass to form biogas, and the electrodeionization of biogas to form natural gas and carbon dioxide using a resin-wafer deionization (RW-EDI) system. The method may be further modified to include a wastewater treatment system and can include a chemical conditioning/dewatering system after the anaerobic digestion system. The RW-EDI system, which includes a cathode and an anode, can either comprise at least one pair of wafers, each a basic and acidic wafer, or at least one wafer comprising of a basic portion and an acidic portion. A final embodiment of the RW-EDI system can include only one basic wafer for creating natural gas.

  15. Participatory System Dynamics Modeling: Increasing Stakeholder Engagement and Precision to Improve Implementation Planning in Systems.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Lindsey; Lounsbury, David W; Rosen, Craig S; Kimerling, Rachel; Trafton, Jodie A; Lindley, Steven E

    2016-11-01

    Implementation planning typically incorporates stakeholder input. Quality improvement efforts provide data-based feedback regarding progress. Participatory system dynamics modeling (PSD) triangulates stakeholder expertise, data and simulation of implementation plans prior to attempting change. Frontline staff in one VA outpatient mental health system used PSD to examine policy and procedural "mechanisms" they believe underlie local capacity to implement evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs) for PTSD and depression. We piloted the PSD process, simulating implementation plans to improve EBP reach. Findings indicate PSD is a feasible, useful strategy for building stakeholder consensus, and may save time and effort as compared to trial-and-error EBP implementation planning.

  16. Implementation of the dynamic laser goniometer for noncontact measurement of angular movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohkman, Eugene; Burnashev, Mikhail; Filatov, Yuri; Pavlov, Petr

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic laser goniometer (LG) implementation for noncontact measurements of an object's angular position is presented. One of the possible implementations involves determining the time dependence of the scanning mirror's angular position. Another application is aimed at determining the oscillatory movement parameters on the test table. The results obtained in the course of the research show that the dynamic LG makes it possible to calibrate various kinds of test beds making angular oscillations or angular movement of arbitrary law.

  17. Influence of Internal Electric Field on the Recombination Dynamics of Localized Excitons in an InGaN Double-Quantum-Well Laser Diode Wafer Operated at 450 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuma, Takeyoshi; Chichibu, Shigefusa F.; Aoyama, Toyomi; Nakajima, Kiyomi; Ahmet, Parhat; Azuhata, Takashi; Chikyow, Toyohiro; Sota, Takayuki; Nagahama, Shin-ichi; Mukai, Takashi

    2003-12-01

    Optical and structural properties of an InGaN double-quantum-well (DQW) laser diode (LD) wafer that lased at 450 nm were investigated to discuss an enormous impact of a polarization-induced electric field on the recombination dynamics in InGaN quantum structures. The quantum-well (QW) structure was shown to have the well thickness as thin as approximately 1 nm and InN molar fraction x of approximately 14%. The gross effective electric field in the QW (FQW) was estimated to be 490 kV/cm from the Franz-Keldysh oscillation (FKO) period in the electroreflectance (ER) spectrum, implying that an internal piezoelectric field (Fpiz) of approximately 1.4 MV/cm was cancelled by the pn junction built-in field (Fbi) and Coulomb screening due to carriers in the DQW. The magnitude of FQW can be further weakened by applying reverse bias (VR) on the junction; the decrease in the photoluminescence (PL) lifetime at low temperature measured under VR was explained to be due to a recovery of electron-hole wavefunction overlap for small VR (|VR|<4 V), and due mainly to the tunneling escape of carriers through the barriers for larger VR. By applying an appropriate VR smaller than 4 V, electron-hole wavefunction overlap, which had been separated vertically along the c-axis due to quantum-confined Stark effect, could be partially recovered, and then the time-resolved PL signals exhibited a less-pronounced stretched exponential decay, giving a scaling parameter (β) of 0.85 and effective in-plane localization depth (E0) of 40-50 meV for the spontaneous emission. These values were closer to those of much homogeneous QWs compared to those reported previously for InGaN QWs having similar InN molar fractions. The use of very thin QWs is considered to bring easier Coulomb screening of FQW and population inversion under high excitation conditions.

  18. An SSM-Based Approach to Implement a Dynamic Performance Management System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Piedade Francisco, Roberto; Azevedo, Américo

    This paper underlines how the use of Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) for an efficient planning, implementation and monitoring of a dynamic performance management system supported by a conceptual scheme that enables a conscious and prepared implementation, can provide instances of performance of a collaborative network, and also promote alignment among the partners. A systematic way to implement it and a review on two practical applications in Brazilian collaborative networks of SMEs are also presented.

  19. Dynamic Visualizations: How Attraction, Motivation and Communication Affect Streaming Video Tutorial Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boger, Claire

    2011-01-01

    The rapid advancement in the capabilities of computer technologies has made it easier to design and deploy dynamic visualizations in web-based learning environments; yet, the implementation of these dynamic visuals has been met with mixed results. While many guidelines exist to assist instructional designers in the design and application of…

  20. Dynamic Training Elements in a Circuit Theory Course to Implement a Self-Directed Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krouk, B. I.; Zhuravleva, O. B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the implementation of a self-directed learning process in a circuit theory course, incorporating dynamic training elements which were designed on the basis of a cybernetic model of cognitive process management. These elements are centrally linked in a dynamic learning frame, created on the monitor screen, which displays the…

  1. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency.

  2. Automated Array Assembly Task In-depth Study of Silicon Wafer Surface Texturizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, G. T.; Rhee, S. S.

    1979-01-01

    Several aspects of silicon wafer surface texturizing were studied. A low cost cleaning method that utilizes recycled Freon in an ultrasonic vapor degreaser to remove organic and inorganic contaminants from the surface of silicon wafers as received from silicon suppliers was investigated. The use of clean dry air and high throughout wafer batch drying techniques was shown to lower the cost of wafer drying. A two stage texturizing process was examined for suitability in large scale production. Also, an in-depth gettering study with the two stage texturizing process was performed for the enhancement of solar cell efficiency, minimization of current versus voltage curve dispersion, and improvement in process reproducibility. The 10% efficiency improvement goal was exceeded for the near term implementation of flat plate photovoltaic cost reduction.

  3. Effects of wafer noise on the detection of 20-nm defects using optical volumetric inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Bryan M.; Goasmat, Francois; Sohn, Martin Y.; Zhou, Hui; Vladár, András E.; Silver, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Patterning imperfections in semiconductor device fabrication may either be noncritical [e.g., line edge roughness (LER)] or critical, such as defects that impact manufacturing yield. As the sizes of the pitches and linewidths decrease in lithography, detection of the optical scattering from killer defects may be obscured by the scattering from other variations, called wafer noise. Understanding and separating these optical signals are critical to reduce false positives and overlooked defects. The effects of wafer noise on defect detection are assessed using volumetric processing on both measurements and simulations with the SEMATECH 9-nm gate intentional defect array. Increases in LER in simulation lead to decreases in signal-to-noise ratios due to wafer noise. Measurement procedures illustrate the potential uses in manufacturing while illustrating challenges to be overcome for full implementation. Highly geometry-dependent, the ratio of wafer noise to defect signal should continue to be evaluated for new process architectures and production nodes.

  4. An optimized ultrasound digital beamformer with dynamic focusing implemented on FPGA.

    PubMed

    Almekkawy, Mohamed; Xu, Jingwei; Chirala, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    We present a resource-optimized dynamic digital beamformer for an ultrasound system based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). A comprehensive 64-channel receive beamformer with full dynamic focusing is embedded in the Altera Arria V FPGA chip. To improve spatial and contrast resolution, full dynamic beamforming is implemented by a novel method with resource optimization. This was conceived using the implementation of the delay summation through a bulk (coarse) delay and fractional (fine) delay. The sampling frequency is 40 MHz and the beamformer includes a 240 MHz polyphase filter that enhances the temporal resolution of the system while relaxing the Analog-to-Digital converter (ADC) bandwidth requirement. The results indicate that our 64-channel dynamic beamformer architecture is amenable for a low power FPGA-based implementation in a portable ultrasound system.

  5. Three wafer stacking for 3D integration.

    SciTech Connect

    Greth, K. Douglas; Ford, Christine L.; Lantz, Jeffrey W.; Shinde, Subhash L.; Timon, Robert P.; Bauer, Todd M.; Hetherington, Dale Laird; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony

    2011-11-01

    Vertical wafer stacking will enable a wide variety of new system architectures by enabling the integration of dissimilar technologies in one small form factor package. With this LDRD, we explored the combination of processes and integration techniques required to achieve stacking of three or more layers. The specific topics that we investigated include design and layout of a reticle set for use as a process development vehicle, through silicon via formation, bonding media, wafer thinning, dielectric deposition for via isolation on the wafer backside, and pad formation.

  6. Development of megasonic cleaning for silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, A.

    1980-01-01

    A cleaning and drying system for processing at least 2500 three in. diameter wafers per hour was developed with a reduction in process cost. The system consists of an ammonia hydrogen peroxide bath in which both surfaces of 3/32 in. spaced, ion implanted wafers are cleaned in quartz carriers moved on a belt past two pairs of megasonic transducers. The wafers are dried in the novel room temperature, high velocity air dryer in the same carriers used for annealing. A new laser scanner was used effectively to monitor the cleaning ability on a sampling basis.

  7. Analysis of organic contaminants from silicon wafer and disk surfaces by thermal desorption-GC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camenzind, Mark J.; Ahmed, Latif; Kumar, Anurag

    1999-03-01

    Organic contaminants can affect semiconductor wafer processing including gate oxide integrity, polysilicon growth, deep ultraviolet photoresist line-width, and cleaning & etching steps. Organophosphates are known to counter dope silicon wafers. Organic contaminants in disk drives can cause failures due to stiction or buildup on the heads. Therefore, it is important to identify organic contaminants adsorbed on wafer or disk surfaces and find their sources so they can be either completely eliminated or at least controlled. Dynamic headspace TD-GC-MS (Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry) methods are very sensitive and can be used to identify organic contaminants on disks and wafers, in air, or outgassing from running drives or their individual components.

  8. Enhanced capture rate for haze defects in production wafer inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, Ditza; Shulman, Adi; Rozentsvige, Moshe

    2010-03-01

    Photomask degradation via haze defect formation is an increasing troublesome yield problem in the semiconductor fab. Wafer inspection is often utilized to detect haze defects due to the fact that it can be a bi-product of process control wafer inspection; furthermore, the detection of the haze on the wafer is effectively enhanced due to the multitude of distinct fields being scanned. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel application for enhancing the wafer inspection tool's sensitivity to haze defects even further. In particular, we present results of bright field wafer inspection using the on several photo layers suffering from haze defects. One way in which the enhanced sensitivity can be achieved in inspection tools is by using a double scan of the wafer: one regular scan with the normal recipe and another high sensitivity scan from which only the repeater defects are extracted (the non-repeater defects consist largely of noise which is difficult to filter). Our solution essentially combines the double scan into a single high sensitivity scan whose processing is carried out along two parallel routes (see Fig. 1). Along one route, potential defects follow the standard recipe thresholds to produce a defect map at the nominal sensitivity. Along the alternate route, potential defects are used to extract only field repeater defects which are identified using an optimal repeater algorithm that eliminates "false repeaters". At the end of the scan, the two defect maps are merged into one with optical scan images available for all the merged defects. It is important to note, that there is no throughput hit; in addition, the repeater sensitivity is increased relative to a double scan, due to a novel runtime algorithm implementation whose memory requirements are minimized, thus enabling to search a much larger number of potential defects for repeaters. We evaluated the new application on photo wafers which consisted of both random and haze defects. The evaluation procedure

  9. Improvement of process control using wafer geometry for enhanced manufacturability of advanced semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Honggoo; Lee, Jongsu; Kim, Sang Min; Lee, Changhwan; Han, Sangjun; Kim, Myoungsoo; Kwon, Wontaik; Park, Sung-Ki; Vukkadala, Pradeep; Awasthi, Amartya; Kim, J. H.; Veeraraghavan, Sathish; Choi, DongSub; Huang, Kevin; Dighe, Prasanna; Lee, Cheouljung; Byeon, Jungho; Dey, Soham; Sinha, Jaydeep

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive advancements in semiconductor technology have resulted in integrated chip (IC) manufacturing capability at sub-20nm half-pitch nodes. With this, lithography overlay error budgets are becoming increasingly stringent. The delay in EUV lithography readiness for high volume manufacturing (HVM) and the need for multiple-patterning lithography with 193i technology has further amplified the overlay issue. Thus there exists a need for technologies that can improve overlay errors in HVM. The traditional method for reducing overlay errors predominantly focused on improving lithography scanner printability performance. However, processes outside of the lithography sector known as processinduced overlay errors can contribute significantly to the total overlay at the current requirements. Monitoring and characterizing process-induced overlay has become critical for advanced node patterning. Recently a relatively new technique for overlay control that uses high-resolution wafer geometry measurements has gained significance. In this work we present the implementation of this technique in an IC fabrication environment to monitor wafer geometry changes induced across several points in the process flow, of multiple product layers with critical overlay performance requirement. Several production wafer lots were measured and analyzed on a patterned wafer geometry tool. Changes induced in wafer geometry as a result of wafer processing were related to down-stream overlay error contribution using the analytical in-plane distortion (IPD) calculation model. Through this segmentation, process steps that are major contributors to down-stream overlay were identified. Subsequent process optimization was then isolated to those process steps where maximum benefit might be realized. Root-cause for the within-wafer, wafer-to-wafer, tool-to-tool, and station-to-station variations observed were further investigated using local shape curvature changes - which is directly related to

  10. Implementing efficient dynamic formal verification methods for MPI programs.

    SciTech Connect

    Vakkalanka, S.; DeLisi, M.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Kirby, R. M.; Thakur, R.; Gropp, W.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Utah; Univ. of Illinois

    2008-01-01

    We examine the problem of formally verifying MPI programs for safety properties through an efficient dynamic (runtime) method in which the processes of a given MPI program are executed under the control of an interleaving scheduler. To ensure full coverage for given input test data, the algorithm must take into consideration MPI's out-of-order completion semantics. The algorithm must also ensure that nondeterministic constructs (e.g., MPI wildcard receive matches) are executed in all possible ways. Our new algorithm rewrites wildcard receives to specific receives, one for each sender that can potentially match with the receive. It then recursively explores each case of the specific receives. The list of potential senders matching a receive is determined through a runtime algorithm that exploits MPI's operation ordering semantics. Our verification tool ISP that incorporates this algorithm efficiently verifies several programs and finds bugs missed by existing informal verification tools.

  11. LQR Control of Thin Shell Dynamics: Formulation and Numerical Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    delRosario, R. C. H.; Smith, R. C.

    1997-01-01

    A PDE-based feedback control method for thin cylindrical shells with surface-mounted piezoceramic actuators is presented. Donnell-Mushtari equations modified to incorporate both passive and active piezoceramic patch contributions are used to model the system dynamics. The well-posedness of this model and the associated LQR problem with an unbounded input operator are established through analytic semigroup theory. The model is discretized using a Galerkin expansion with basis functions constructed from Fourier polynomials tensored with cubic splines, and convergence criteria for the associated approximate LQR problem are established. The effectiveness of the method for attenuating the coupled longitudinal, circumferential and transverse shell displacements is illustrated through a set of numerical examples.

  12. Modelling deformation and fracture in confectionery wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Idris K.; Charalambides, Maria N.; Williams, J. Gordon; Rasburn, John

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to model the deformation and fracture behaviour of brittle wafers often used in chocolate confectionary products. Three point bending and compression experiments were performed on beam and circular disc samples respectively to determine the 'apparent' stress-strain curves in bending and compression. The deformation of the wafer for both these testing types was observed in-situ within an SEM. The wafer is modeled analytically and numerically as a composite material with a core which is more porous than the skins. X-ray tomography was used to generate a three dimensional volume of the wafer microstructure which was then meshed and used for quantitative analysis. A linear elastic material model, with a damage function and element deletion, was used and the XMT generated architecture was loaded in compression. The output from the FE simulations correlates closely to the load-deflection deformation observed experimentally.

  13. Forming electrical interconnections through semiconductor wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, T. R.

    1981-01-01

    An information processing system based on CMOS/SOS technology is being developed by NASA to process digital image data collected by satellites. An array of holes is laser drilled in a semiconductor wafer, and a conductor is formed in the holes to fabricate electrical interconnections through the wafers. Six techniques are used to form conductors in the silicon-on-sapphire (SOS) wafers, including capillary wetting, wedge extrusion, wire intersection, electroless plating, electroforming, double-sided sputtering and through-hole electroplating. The respective strengths and weaknesses of these techniques are discussed and compared, with double-sided sputtering and the through-hole plating method achieving best results. In addition, hollow conductors provided by the technique are available for solder refill, providing a natural way of forming an electrically connected stack of SOS wafers.

  14. Genesis Ultrapure Water Megasonic Wafer Spin Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, Judith H.; Stansbery, Eileen K.; Calaway, Michael J.; Rodriquez, Melissa C.

    2013-01-01

    A device removes, with high precision, the majority of surface particle contamination greater than 1-micron-diameter in size from ultrapure semiconductor wafer materials containing implanted solar wind samples returned by NASA's Genesis mission. This cleaning device uses a 1.5-liter/minute flowing stream of heated ultrapure water (UPW) with 1- MHz oscillating megasonic pulse energy focused at 3 to 5 mm away from the wafer surface spinning at 1,000 to 10,000 RPM, depending on sample size. The surface particle contamination is removed by three processes: flowing UPW, megasonic cavitations, and centripetal force from the spinning wafer. The device can also dry the wafer fragment after UPW/megasonic cleaning by continuing to spin the wafer in the cleaning chamber, which is purged with flowing ultrapure nitrogen gas at 65 psi (.448 kPa). The cleaner also uses three types of vacuum chucks that can accommodate all Genesis-flown array fragments in any dimensional shape between 3 and 100 mm in diameter. A sample vacuum chuck, and the manufactured UPW/megasonic nozzle holder, replace the human deficiencies by maintaining a consistent distance between the nozzle and wafer surface as well as allowing for longer cleaning time. The 3- to 5-mm critical distance is important for the ability to remove particles by megasonic cavitations. The increased UPW sonication time and exposure to heated UPW improve the removal of 1- to 5-micron-sized particles.

  15. Reticle and wafer CD variation for different dummy pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, GuoXiang; Buergel, Christian; Ackmann, Paul; Staples, Marc; Thamm, Thomas; Lim, Chin Teong; Leschok, Andre; Roling, Stefan; Zhou, Anthony; Gn, Fang Hong; Richter, Frank

    2012-11-01

    Dummy pattern fill is added to a layout of a reticle for the purpose of raising the pattern-density of specific regions. The pattern-density has also an influence on different process-steps which were performed when manufacturing a reticle (e.g. proximity effect of electron beam exposure process, developer, and etch-processes). Although the reticle processes are set up to compensate the influence of the pattern density, dummy pattern can have an influence onto the reticle CD. When the isolated features become "nested" by insertion of dummy pattern, the reticle CD variation is even larger because nested features exacerbate the proximity effect of an electron beam. Another reason is that the etch ratio as well as the develop dynamics during the reticle manufacturing process are slightly dependent on the local pattern-density of pattern. With different dummy pattern around the main feature, the final reticle CD will be changed. Wafer CD of main feature is also dependant on the surrounding patterns which will induce different boundary conditions for wafer exposure. We have investigated three manufacturing sites for a 28nm first-metal layer reticle. Two of them were manufactured with a comparable process using the same advanced reticle binary blank material. For the third site a different reticle blank material with a relatively thin absorber layer thickness was used which was made with a comparable reticle process. The optical proximity correction (OPC) test patterns were designed with two different dummy patterns. The CD differences of the three reticles will be demonstrated for different dummy pattern and will be discussed individually. All three reticles have been exposed and the respective wafer critical dimension through pitch (CDTP) and linearity performance is demonstrated. Also the line-end performance for two dimensional (2D) structures is shown for the three sites of the reticle. The wafer CD difference for CDTP, linearity, and 2D structures are also

  16. Parallel implementation of three-dimensional molecular dynamic simulation for laser-cluster interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Holkundkar, Amol R.

    2013-11-15

    The objective of this article is to report the parallel implementation of the 3D molecular dynamic simulation code for laser-cluster interactions. The benchmarking of the code has been done by comparing the simulation results with some of the experiments reported in the literature. Scaling laws for the computational time is established by varying the number of processor cores and number of macroparticles used. The capabilities of the code are highlighted by implementing various diagnostic tools. To study the dynamics of the laser-cluster interactions, the executable version of the code is available from the author.

  17. Molecular Dynamics implementation of BN2D or 'Mercedes Benz' water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scukins, Arturs; Bardik, Vitaliy; Pavlov, Evgen; Nerukh, Dmitry

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional 'Mercedes Benz' (MB) or BN2D water model (Naim, 1971) is implemented in Molecular Dynamics. It is known that the MB model can capture abnormal properties of real water (high heat capacity, minima of pressure and isothermal compressibility, negative thermal expansion coefficient) (Silverstein et al., 1998). In this work formulas for calculating the thermodynamic, structural and dynamic properties in microcanonical (NVE) and isothermal-isobaric (NPT) ensembles for the model from Molecular Dynamics simulation are derived and verified against known Monte Carlo results. The convergence of the thermodynamic properties and the system's numerical stability are investigated. The results qualitatively reproduce the peculiarities of real water making the model a visually convenient tool that also requires less computational resources, thus allowing simulations of large (hydrodynamic scale) molecular systems. We provide the open source code written in C/C++ for the BN2D water model implementation using Molecular Dynamics.

  18. Porous solid ion exchange wafer for immobilizing biomolecules

    DOEpatents

    Arora, Michelle B.; Hestekin, Jamie A.; Lin, YuPo J.; St. Martin, Edward J.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2007-12-11

    A porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer. Also disclosed is a porous solid ion exchange wafer having a combination of a biomolecule capture-resin and an ion-exchange resin forming a charged capture resin within said wafer containing a biomolecule with a tag. A separate bioreactor is also disclosed incorporating the wafer described above.

  19. Improvement of focus accuracy on processed wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashibata, Satomi; Komine, Nobuhiro; Fukuhara, Kazuya; Koike, Takashi; Kato, Yoshimitsu; Hashimoto, Kohji

    2013-04-01

    As feature size shrinkage in semiconductor device progress, process fluctuation, especially focus strongly affects device performance. Because focus control is an ongoing challenge in optical lithography, various studies have sought for improving focus monitoring and control. Focus errors are due to wafers, exposure tools, reticles, QCs, and so on. Few studies are performed to minimize the measurement errors of auto focus (AF) sensors of exposure tool, especially when processed wafers are exposed. With current focus measurement techniques, the phase shift grating (PSG) focus monitor 1) has been already proposed and its basic principle is that the intensity of the diffraction light of the mask pattern is made asymmetric by arranging a π/2 phase shift area on a reticle. The resist pattern exposed at the defocus position is shifted on the wafer and shifted pattern can be easily measured using an overlay inspection tool. However, it is difficult to measure shifted pattern for the pattern on the processed wafer because of interruptions caused by other patterns in the underlayer. In this paper, we therefore propose "SEM-PSG" technique, where the shift of the PSG resist mark is measured by employing critical dimension-scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) to measure the focus error on the processed wafer. First, we evaluate the accuracy of SEM-PSG technique. Second, by applying the SEM-PSG technique and feeding the results back to the exposure, we evaluate the focus accuracy on processed wafers. By applying SEM-PSG feedback, the focus accuracy on the processed wafer was improved from 40 to 29 nm in 3σ.

  20. Cost-Effective Silicon Wafers for Solar Cells: Direct Wafer Enabling Terawatt Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: 1366 is developing a process to reduce the cost of solar electricity by up to 50% by 2020—from $0.15 per kilowatt hour to less than $0.07. 1366’s process avoids the costly step of slicing a large block of silicon crystal into wafers, which turns half the silicon to dust. Instead, the company is producing thin wafers directly from molten silicon at industry-standard sizes, and with efficiencies that compare favorably with today’s state-of-the-art technologies. 1366’s wafers could directly replace wafers currently on the market, so there would be no interruptions to the delivery of these products to market. As a result of 1366’s technology, the cost of silicon wafers could be reduced by 80%.

  1. Silicon Wafer-Scale Substrate for Microshutters and Detector Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, Murzy; Franz, David E.; Ewin, Audrey J.; Jhabvala, Christine; Babu, Sachi; Snodgrass, Stephen; Costen, Nicholas; Zincke, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The silicon substrate carrier was created so that a large-area array (in this case 62,000+ elements of a microshutter array) and a variety of discrete passive and active devices could be mounted on a single board, similar to a printed circuit board. However, the density and number of interconnects far exceeds the capabilities of printed circuit board technology. To overcome this hurdle, a method was developed to fabricate this carrier out of silicon and implement silicon integrated circuit (IC) technology. This method achieves a large number of high-density metal interconnects; a 100-percent yield over a 6-in. (approximately equal to 15-cm) diameter wafer (one unit per wafer); a rigid, thermally compatible structure (all components and operating conditions) to cryogenic temperatures; re-workability and component replaceability, if required; and the ability to precisely cut large-area holes through the substrate. A method that would employ indium bump technology along with wafer-scale integration onto a silicon carrier was also developed. By establishing a silicon-based version of a printed circuit board, the objectives could be met with one solution. The silicon substrate would be 2 mm thick to survive the environmental loads of a launch. More than 2,300 metal traces and over 1,500 individual wire bonds are required. To mate the microshutter array to the silicon substrate, more than 10,000 indium bumps are required. A window was cut in the substrate to allow the light signal to pass through the substrate and reach the microshutter array. The substrate was also the receptacle for multiple unpackaged IC die wire-bonded directly to the substrate (thus conserving space over conventionally packaged die). Unique features of this technology include the implementation of a 2-mmthick silicon wafer to withstand extreme mechanical loads (from a rocket launch); integrated polysilicon resistor heaters directly on the substrate; the precise formation of an open aperture

  2. Wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Edwin Y.; James, Ralph B.

    2002-01-01

    Wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector useful for gamma-ray and x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems. The detector is fabricated using wafer fusion to insert an electrically conductive grid, typically comprising a metal, between two solid semiconductor pieces, one having a cathode (negative electrode) and the other having an anode (positive electrode). The wafer fused semiconductor radiation detector functions like the commonly used Frisch grid radiation detector, in which an electrically conductive grid is inserted in high vacuum between the cathode and the anode. The wafer-fused semiconductor radiation detector can be fabricated using the same or two different semiconductor materials of different sizes and of the same or different thicknesses; and it may utilize a wide range of metals, or other electrically conducting materials, to form the grid, to optimize the detector performance, without being constrained by structural dissimilarity of the individual parts. The wafer-fused detector is basically formed, for example, by etching spaced grooves across one end of one of two pieces of semiconductor materials, partially filling the grooves with a selected electrical conductor which forms a grid electrode, and then fusing the grooved end of the one semiconductor piece to an end of the other semiconductor piece with a cathode and an anode being formed on opposite ends of the semiconductor pieces.

  3. Hybrid silicon wafer-scale packaging technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Wafer-scale integration (WSI) approaches the packaging problem by attempting to fabricate the system monolithically utilizing semiconductor techniques. However, WSI has been plagued by yield problems and the need for redundancy. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a novel hybrid technique that uses pretested integrated circuits mounted into holes etched in a master wafer. The chips are interconnected with planar, thin-film metallization. This approach achieves near WSI density, while allowing the use of separately fabricated and tested devices. Test wafers with three monolithic chips and one chip mounted in a hole were fabricated as proof of concept. The key processes developed include fabrication of metallized and patterned wafers with etched holes, mounting of die in etched holes with planar topside topology, and deposition and patterning of interlevel dielectric and metal links. Selection of suitable materials for die attach and for use as an interlevel dielectric was critical. Wafers were thermally cycled to evaluate the compatibility of the materials and the process. No cracks or chip movement were observed after 50 cycles from -25 to +85/sup 0/C.

  4. Silicon hybrid wafer scale integration interconnect evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyke, James C.

    1989-12-01

    The electrical characteristics of interconnections that have been proposed for use in silicon hybrid wafer scale integration (WSI) approaches were investigated. The study was based on a set of 5 inch test wafers, containing various interconnection structures previously designed at AFIT. Two test wafers used a special polyimide dielectric, while a third was composed of a benzocyclobutene (BCB). The investigated structures represented 10 cm length aluminum, coupled, stripline-like transmission lines. The metrics used included continuity measurements, ac measurement of the characteristic impedance and coupling levels, and pulsed-signal response measurements. Continuity results indicated transmission and leakage failures in all wafers, although the failure mechanisms were sometimes wafer-specific. The characteristic impedance measurement technique was flawed, but revealed interesting information concerning the driving-point impedances of the structures. Most coupled structures manifested coupling responses which were consistent in shape with theoretical estimates, but higher in magnitude by 10 to 20 dB. All structures revealed coupling levels lower than -25 dB. Despite correlation difficulties, the results implied that transmission line behavior is manifested in WSIC interconnections.

  5. Implementation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Describes elements for the set of activities to ensure that control strategies are put into effect and that air quality goals and standards are fulfilled, permitting programs, and additional resources related to implementation under the Clean Air Act.

  6. Evolution of Ada technology in the flight dynamics area: Implementation/testing phase analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quimby, Kelvin L.; Esker, Linda; Miller, John; Smith, Laurie; Stark, Mike; Mcgarry, Frank

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the software engineering issues related to the use of Ada for the implementation and system testing phases of four Ada projects developed in the flight dynamics area. These projects reflect an evolving understanding of more effective use of Ada features. In addition, the testing methodology used on these projects has changed substantially from that used on previous FORTRAN projects.

  7. Implementation of Abstract Data Types in Dynamic Sketches for Learning Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasute, Egle; Dagiene, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    A long-term observation of students' usage of a dynamic geometry in a classroom at all grade levels has challenged to develop an approach for learning and understanding mathematics in an easier way for both students and teachers. The paper deals with the results of a study that investigates the process and outcomes of the implementation of…

  8. Environmentally benign processing of YAG transparent wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan; Wu, Yiquan

    2015-12-01

    Transparent yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) wafers were successfully produced via aqueous tape casting and vacuum sintering techniques using a new environmentally friendly binder, a copolymer of isobutylene and maleic anhydride with the commercial name ISOBAM (noted as ISOBAM). Aqueous YAG slurries were mixed by ball-milling, which was followed by de-gassing and tape casting of wafers. The final YAG green tapes were homogenous and flexible, and could be bent freely without cracking. After the drying and sintering processes, transparent YAG wafers were achieved. The microstructures of both the green tape and vacuum-sintered YAG ceramic were observed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Phase compositions were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical transmittance was measured in UV-VIS regions with the result that the transmittance is 82.6% at a wavelength of 800 nm.

  9. Video-rate fuzzy Golay processor for wafer scale integration

    SciTech Connect

    Steinvorth, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The fuzzy Golay transformation is a novel approach for gray-level image processing. Fuzzy-set theory is used to modify the binary image processing techniques developed by M. J. Golay to permit direct gray-level image processing without thresholding. The comparison between gray-level pixels is accomplished with the Pixel Closeness Value (PCV) while comparison between gray-level neighborhoods uses the Neighborhood Closeness Value (NCV). Feature extraction is done by comparing the gray-level image neighborhood to a subset of the fourteen Golay neighborhoods using the NCV function. The Fuzzy Golay Processor (FGP) is an architecture designed to implement the fuzzy Golay transformation. The design of the FGP has been optimized to permit a successful implementation in Wafer Scale Integration (WSI). A system containing four FGPs is capable of performing thirty fuzzy Golay transformations per second on a 256 by 256 eight-bit pixel image. Such a system could fit on a four-inch wafer with enough redundant dies to allow a 30% die yield. The required dies are four Input-Output Modules (IOM) and 56 Neighborhood Evaluation Modules (NEM).

  10. Wafer-scale graphene integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ming; Valdes-Garcia, Alberto; Han, Shu-Jen; Farmer, Damon B; Meric, Inanc; Sun, Yanning; Wu, Yanqing; Dimitrakopoulos, Christos; Grill, Alfred; Avouris, Phaedon; Jenkins, Keith A

    2011-06-10

    A wafer-scale graphene circuit was demonstrated in which all circuit components, including graphene field-effect transistor and inductors, were monolithically integrated on a single silicon carbide wafer. The integrated circuit operates as a broadband radio-frequency mixer at frequencies up to 10 gigahertz. These graphene circuits exhibit outstanding thermal stability with little reduction in performance (less than 1 decibel) between 300 and 400 kelvin. These results open up possibilities of achieving practical graphene technology with more complex functionality and performance.

  11. Making Porous Luminescent Regions In Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, Robert W.; Jones, Eric W.

    1994-01-01

    Regions damaged by ion implantation stain-etched. Porous regions within single-crystal silicon wafers fabricated by straightforward stain-etching process. Regions exhibit visible photoluminescence at room temperature and might constitute basis of novel class of optoelectronic devices. Stain-etching process has advantages over recently investigated anodic-etching process. Process works on both n-doped and p-doped silicon wafers. Related development reported in article, "Porous Si(x)Ge(1-x) Layers Within Single Crystals of Si," (NPO-18836).

  12. Metallic nanowires by full wafer stencil lithography.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Mena, O; Villanueva, G; Savu, V; Sidler, K; van den Boogaart, M A F; Brugger, J

    2008-11-01

    Aluminum and gold nanowires were fabricated using 100 mm stencil wafers containing nanoslits fabricated with a focused ion beam. The stencils were aligned and the nanowires deposited on a substrate with predefined electrical pads. The morphology and resistivity of the wires were studied. Nanowires down to 70 nm wide and 5 mum long have been achieved showing a resistivity of 10 microOmegacm for Al and 5 microOmegacm for Au and maximum current density of approximately 10(8) A/cm(2). This proves the capability of stencil lithography for the fabrication of metallic nanowires on a full wafer scale.

  13. Design and implementation of the flight dynamics system for COMS satellite mission operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung-Sun; Hwang, Yoola; Kim, Hae-Yeon; Kim, Jaehoon

    2011-04-01

    The first Korean multi-mission geostationary Earth orbit satellite, Communications, Ocean, and Meteorological Satellite (COMS) was launched by an Ariane 5 launch vehicle in June 26, 2010. The COMS satellite has three payloads including Ka-band communications, Geostationary Ocean Color Imager, and Meteorological Imager. Although the COMS spacecraft bus is based on the Astrium Eurostar 3000 series, it has only one solar array to the south panel because all of the imaging sensors are located on the north panel. In order to maintain the spacecraft attitude with 5 wheels and 7 thrusters, COMS should perform twice a day wheel off-loading thruster firing operations, which affect on the satellite orbit. COMS flight dynamics system provides the general on-station functions such as orbit determination, orbit prediction, event prediction, station-keeping maneuver planning, station-relocation maneuver planning, and fuel accounting. All orbit related functions in flight dynamics system consider the orbital perturbations due to wheel off-loading operations. There are some specific flight dynamics functions to operate the spacecraft bus such as wheel off-loading management, oscillator updating management, and on-station attitude reacquisition management. In this paper, the design and implementation of the COMS flight dynamics system is presented. An object oriented analysis and design methodology is applied to the flight dynamics system design. Programming language C# within Microsoft .NET framework is used for the implementation of COMS flight dynamics system on Windows based personal computer.

  14. Response to Intervention and Dynamic Assessment: Implementing Systematic, Dynamic and Individualised Interventions in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Stefan; Svensson, Idor; Fälth, Linda

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, response to intervention (RTI) has been the focus of research, debate and educational implementations, especially regarding early reading instruction. RTI provides an educational framework characterised by different tiers or layers of instruction, providing increasingly more intense and individualised interventions for children in…

  15. Innovation implementation in the public sector: an integration of institutional and collective dynamics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin Nam; Chang, Jae Yoon

    2009-01-01

    The present study integrates institutional factors and employee-based collective processes as predictors of 2 key implementation outcomes: implementation effectiveness and innovation effectiveness (Klein, Conn, & Sorra, 2001). Specifically, the authors proposed that institutional factors shape employees' collective implementation efficacy and innovation acceptance. The authors further hypothesized that these employee-based collective processes mediate the effects of institutional factors on implementation outcomes. This integrative framework was examined in the context of 47 agencies and ministries of the Korean Government that were implementing a process innovation called E-Government. Three-wave longitudinal data were collected from 60 external experts and 1,732 government employees. The results reveal the importance of management support for collective implementation efficacy, which affected employees' collective acceptance of the innovation. As hypothesized, these collective employee dynamics mediated the effects of institutional enablers on successful implementation as well as the amount of long-term benefit that accrued to the agencies and ministries. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Si-gold-glass hybrid wafer bond for 3D-MEMS and wafer level packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Jayaprakash; Pratap, Rudra

    2017-01-01

    We report a relatively low temperature (<400 °C) hybrid wafer bonding process that results in the simultaneous anodic and eutectic bonding in different predetermined regions of the wafer. This hybrid bonding process has potential applications in CMOS-MEMS device integration and wafer level packaging. We demonstrate the process by realizing a simple MEMS cantilever beam and a complex MEMS gyroscope structure. These structures are characterized for ohmic contact and electromechanical response to verify the electrical interconnect and the mechanical strength of the structure at the bond interface.

  17. ThermoData Engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 3. Binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Muzny, Chris D; Frenkel, Michael

    2009-02-01

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported recently in this journal. The present paper describes the first application of this concept to the evaluation of thermophysical properties for binary chemical systems. Five activity-coefficient models have been implemented for representation of phase-equilibrium data (vapor-liquid, liquid-liquid, and solid-liquid equilibrium): NRTL, UNIQUAC, Van Laar, Margules/Redlich-Kister, and Wilson. Implementation of these models in TDE is fully described. Properties modeled individually are densities, surface tensions, critical temperatures, critical pressures, excess enthalpies, and the transport properties-viscosity and thermal conductivity. Extensions to the class structure of the program are described with emphasis on special features allowing close linkage between mixture and pure-component properties required for implementation of the models. Details of gas-phase models used in conjunction with the activity-coefficient models are shown. Initial implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept for reactions is demonstrated with evaluation of enthalpies of formation for compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen. Directions for future enhancements are outlined.

  18. Implementation of Parallel Dynamic Simulation on Shared-Memory vs. Distributed-Memory Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu; Wu, Di; Diao, Ruisheng; Huang, Zhenyu

    2015-12-09

    Power system dynamic simulation computes the system response to a sequence of large disturbance, such as sudden changes in generation or load, or a network short circuit followed by protective branch switching operation. It consists of a large set of differential and algebraic equations, which is computational intensive and challenging to solve using single-processor based dynamic simulation solution. High-performance computing (HPC) based parallel computing is a very promising technology to speed up the computation and facilitate the simulation process. This paper presents two different parallel implementations of power grid dynamic simulation using Open Multi-processing (OpenMP) on shared-memory platform, and Message Passing Interface (MPI) on distributed-memory clusters, respectively. The difference of the parallel simulation algorithms and architectures of the two HPC technologies are illustrated, and their performances for running parallel dynamic simulation are compared and demonstrated.

  19. Analysis of Ecodesign Implementation and Solutions for Packaging Waste System by Using System Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzina, Alise; Dace, Elina; Bazbauers, Gatis

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the findings of a research project which explored the packaging waste management system in Latvia. The paper focuses on identifying how the policy mechanisms can promote ecodesign implementation and material efficiency improvement and therefore reduce the rate of packaging waste accumulation in landfill. The method used for analyzing the packaging waste management policies is system dynamics modeling. The main conclusion is that the existing legislative instruments can be used to create an effective policy for ecodesign implementation but substantially higher tax rates on packaging materials and waste disposal than the existing have to be applied.

  20. Terahertz transmission properties of silicon wafers using continuous-wave terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chihoon; Ahn, Jae Sung; Ji, Taeksoo; Eom, Joo Beom

    2017-04-01

    We present the spectral properties of Si wafers using continuous-wave terahertz (CW-THz) spectroscopy. By using a tunable laser source and a fixed distributed-feedback laser diode (DFB-LD), a stably tunable beat source for CW-THz spectroscopy system can be implemented. THz radiation is generated in the frequency range of 100 GHz–800 GHz by photomixing in a photoconductive antenna. We also measured CW-THz waveforms by changing the beat frequency and confirmed repeatability through repeated measurement. We calculated the peaks of the THz frequency by taking fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) of measured THz waveforms. The feasibility of CW-THz spectroscopy is demonstrated by the THz spectra of Si wafers with different resistivities, mobilities, and carrier concentrations. The results show that Si wafers with a lower resistivity absorb more THz waves. Thus, we expect our CW-THz system to have the advantage of being able to perform fast non-destructive analysis.

  1. Methanol Steam Reformer on a Silicon Wafer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Malen, J; Piggott, T; Morse, J; Sopchak, D; Greif, R; Grigoropoulos, C; Havstad, M; Upadhye, R

    2004-04-15

    A study of the reforming rates, heat transfer and flow through a methanol reforming catalytic microreactor fabricated on a silicon wafer are presented. Comparison of computed and measured conversion efficiencies are shown to be favorable. Concepts for insulating the reactor while maintaining small overall size and starting operation from ambient temperature are analyzed.

  2. Bubble-domain circuit wafer evaluation coil set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, T. T.; Williams, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    Coil structures have been designed to permit nondestructive testing of bubble wafers. Wafers can be electrically or optically inspected and operated from quasi-static frequency to maximum device operating frequency.

  3. Artificial solid electrolyte interphase with in-situ formed porosity for enhancing lithiation of silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jie; Guo, Jianlai; Liu, Chang; Guo, Hang

    2016-12-01

    In order to utilize silicon wafer as electrode and substrate for integrated lithium-ion batteries, a composite film with in-situ formed porosity (lithium phosphorous oxynitride/tin oxide, LiPON/SnO2) is fabricated and directly exploited as the artificial solid electrolyte interphase film. Without the compromise of Coulombic efficiency, the capacity and cycle performance of silicon wafer are both developed, resulting from the reduced resistance and the dynamically stable coating. This work provides guidance to enhance the lithiation of bulk silicon, and the strategy of surface modification can be applied to other advanced materials or fields.

  4. MPI implementation of PHOENICS: A general purpose computational fluid dynamics code

    SciTech Connect

    Simunovic, S.; Zacharia, T.; Baltas, N.; Spalding, D.B.

    1995-04-01

    PHOENICS is a suite of computational analysis programs that are used for simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, and dynamical reaction processes. The parallel version of the solver EARTH for the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) program PHOENICS has been implemented using Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard. Implementation of MPI version of PHOENICS makes this computational tool portable to a wide range of parallel machines and enables the use of high performance computing for large scale computational simulations. MPI libraries are available on several parallel architectures making the program usable across different architectures as well as on heterogeneous computer networks. The Intel Paragon NX and MPI versions of the program have been developed and tested on massively parallel supercomputers Intel Paragon XP/S 5, XP/S 35, and Kendall Square Research, and on the multiprocessor SGI Onyx computer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The preliminary testing results of the developed program have shown scalable performance for reasonably sized computational domains.

  5. MPI implementation of PHOENICS: A general purpose computational fluid dynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunovic, S.; Zacharia, T.; Baltas, N.; Spalding, D. B.

    1995-03-01

    PHOENICS is a suite of computational analysis programs that are used for simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, and dynamical reaction processes. The parallel version of the solver EARTH for the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) program PHOENICS has been implemented using Message Passing Interface (MPI) standard. Implementation of MPI version of PHOENICS makes this computational tool portable to a wide range of parallel machines and enables the use of high performance computing for large scale computational simulations. MPI libraries are available on several parallel architectures making the program usable across different architectures as well as on heterogeneous computer networks. The Intel Paragon NX and MPI versions of the program have been developed and tested on massively parallel supercomputers Intel Paragon XP/S 5, XP/S 35, and Kendall Square Research, and on the multiprocessor SGI Onyx computer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The preliminary testing results of the developed program have shown scalable performance for reasonably sized computational domains.

  6. Noncontact sheet resistance measurement technique for wafer inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, Krzysztof; Rommel, J. Martin; Litovsky, Roman; Becla, Peter; Lojek, Bohumil; Bryson, Frank; Blake, Julian

    1995-12-01

    A new technique, MICROTHERM, has been developed for noncontact sheet resistance measurements of semiconductor wafers. It is based on the application of microwave energy to the wafer, and simultaneous detection of the infrared radiation resulting from ohmic heating. The pattern of the emitted radiation corresponds to the sheet resistance distribution across the wafer. This method is nondestructive, noncontact, and allows for measurements of very small areas (several square microns) of the wafer.

  7. User Manual and Source Code for a LAMMPS Implementation of Constant Energy Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD-E)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Distribution List 20 iv INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK. 1 The constant energy dissipative particle dynamics ( DPD -E) method is implemented into the Large-Scale...User Manual and Source Code for a LAMMPS Implementation of Constant Energy Dissipative Particle Dynamics ( DPD -E) by James P. Larentzos...Energy Dissipative Particle Dynamics ( DPD -E) James P. Larentzos Engility Corporation John K. Brennan, Joshua D. Moore, and William D. Mattson

  8. Design of a Synthetic Integral Feedback Circuit: Dynamic Analysis and DNA Implementation.

    PubMed

    Briat, Corentin; Zechner, Christoph; Khammash, Mustafa

    2016-10-21

    The design and implementation of regulation motifs ensuring robust perfect adaptation are challenging problems in synthetic biology. Indeed, the design of high-yield robust metabolic pathways producing, for instance, drug precursors and biofuels, could be easily imagined to rely on such a control strategy in order to optimize production levels and reduce production costs, despite the presence of environmental disturbance and model uncertainty. We propose here a motif that ensures tracking and robust perfect adaptation for the controlled reaction network through integral feedback. Its metabolic load on the host is fully tunable and can be made arbitrarily close to the constitutive limit, the universal minimal metabolic load of all possible controllers. A DNA implementation of the controller network is finally provided. Computer simulations using realistic parameters demonstrate the good agreement between the DNA implementation and the ideal controller dynamics.

  9. Implementing Molecular Dynamics on Hybrid High Performance Computers - Particle-Particle Particle-Mesh

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W Michael; Kohlmeyer, Axel; Plimpton, Steven J; Tharrington, Arnold N

    2012-01-01

    The use of accelerators such as graphics processing units (GPUs) has become popular in scientific computing applications due to their low cost, impressive floating-point capabilities, high memory bandwidth, and low electrical power requirements. Hybrid high-performance computers, machines with nodes containing more than one type of floating-point processor (e.g. CPU and GPU), are now becoming more prevalent due to these advantages. In this paper, we present a continuation of previous work implementing algorithms for using accelerators into the LAMMPS molecular dynamics software for distributed memory parallel hybrid machines. In our previous work, we focused on acceleration for short-range models with an approach intended to harness the processing power of both the accelerator and (multi-core) CPUs. To augment the existing implementations, we present an efficient implementation of long-range electrostatic force calculation for molecular dynamics. Specifically, we present an implementation of the particle-particle particle-mesh method based on the work by Harvey and De Fabritiis. We present benchmark results on the Keeneland InfiniBand GPU cluster. We provide a performance comparison of the same kernels compiled with both CUDA and OpenCL. We discuss limitations to parallel efficiency and future directions for improving performance on hybrid or heterogeneous computers.

  10. Implementing vertex dynamics models of cell populations in biology within a consistent computational framework.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Alexander G; Osborne, James M; Maini, Philip K; Gavaghan, David J

    2013-11-01

    The dynamic behaviour of epithelial cell sheets plays a central role during development, growth, disease and wound healing. These processes occur as a result of cell adhesion, migration, division, differentiation and death, and involve multiple processes acting at the cellular and molecular level. Computational models offer a useful means by which to investigate and test hypotheses about these processes, and have played a key role in the study of cell-cell interactions. However, the necessarily complex nature of such models means that it is difficult to make accurate comparison between different models, since it is often impossible to distinguish between differences in behaviour that are due to the underlying model assumptions, and those due to differences in the in silico implementation of the model. In this work, an approach is described for the implementation of vertex dynamics models, a discrete approach that represents each cell by a polygon (or polyhedron) whose vertices may move in response to forces. The implementation is undertaken in a consistent manner within a single open source computational framework, Chaste, which comprises fully tested, industrial-grade software that has been developed using an agile approach. This framework allows one to easily change assumptions regarding force generation and cell rearrangement processes within these models. The versatility and generality of this framework is illustrated using a number of biological examples. In each case we provide full details of all technical aspects of our model implementations, and in some cases provide extensions to make the models more generally applicable.

  11. Steel bridge fatigue crack detection with piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Ziehl, Paul; Ozevin, Didem; Pollock, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) are well known for its dual capabilities in structural health monitoring, acting as either actuators or sensors. Due to the variety of deterioration sources and locations of bridge defects, there is currently no single method that can detect and address the potential sources globally. In our research, our use of the PWAS based sensing has the novelty of implementing both passive (as acoustic emission) and active (as ultrasonic transducers) sensing with a single PWAS network. The combined schematic is using acoustic emission to detect the presence of fatigue cracks in steel bridges in their early stage since methods such as ultrasonics are unable to quantify the initial condition of crack growth since most of the fatigue life for these details is consumed while the fatigue crack is too small to be detected. Hence, combing acoustic emission with ultrasonic active sensing will strengthen the damage detection process. The integration of passive acoustic emission detection with active sensing will be a technological leap forward from the current practice of periodic and subjective visual inspection, and bridge management based primarily on history of past performance. In this study, extensive laboratory investigation is performed supported by theoretical modeling analysis. A demonstration system will be presented to show how piezoelectric wafer active sensor is used for acoustic emission. Specimens representing complex structures are tested. The results will also be compared with traditional acoustic emission transducers to identify the application barriers.

  12. Wafer-scale boundary value integrated circuit architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Frias, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Wafer scale integration (WSI) technology offers the potential for improving speed and reliability of a large integrated circuit system. An architecture is presented for a boundary value integrated circuit engine which lends itself to implementation in WSI. The philosophy underpinning this architecture includes local communication, cell regularity, and fault tolerance. The research described here proposes, investigates, and simulates this computer architecture and its flaw avoidance schemes for a WSI implementation. Boundary value differential equation computations are utilized in a number of scientific and engineering applications. A boundary value machine is ideally suited for solutions of finite difference and finite element problems with specified boundary values. The architecture is a 2-D array of computational cells. Each basic cell has four bit serial processing elements (PEs) and a local memory. Most communications is limited to transfer between adjacent PEs to reduce complexity, avoid long delays, and localize the effects of silicon flaws. Memory access time is kept short by restricting memory service to PEs in the same cell. I/O operation is performed by means of a row multiple single line I/O bus, which allows fast, reliable and independent data transference. WSI yield losses are due to gross defects and random defects. Gross defects which affect large portions of the wafer are usually fatal for any WSI implementation. Overcoming random defects which cover either a small area or points is achieved by defect avoidance schemes that are developed for this architecture. Those schemes are provided at array, cell, and communication level. Capabilities and limitations of the proposed WSI architecture can be observed through the simulations. Speed degradation of the array and the PE due to silicon defects is observed by means of simulation. Also, module and bus utilization are computed and presented.

  13. Uniaxially strained silicon by wafer bonding and layer transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himcinschi, C.; Radu, I.; Muster, F.; Singh, R.; Reiche, M.; Petzold, M.; Gösele, U.; Christiansen, S. H.

    2007-02-01

    Uniaxial strain on wafer-level was realised by mechanically bending and direct wafer bonding of Si wafers in the bent state followed by thinning one of the Si wafers by the smart-cut process. This approach is flexible and allows to obtain different strain values at wafer-level in both tension and compression. UV micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to determine the strain in the thin transferred Si layers. Numerical modelling by 3D finite elements of the strain provided a good description of the experimental results.

  14. Metrology delay time reduction in lithography via small-lot wafer transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Vinay K.; Englhardt, Eric A.; Koshti, Sushant; Armer, Helen R.

    2006-03-01

    A small lot Automated Material Handling System (AMHS) is presented as a method to reduce the time between wafer exposure at a photolithography tool and collection of metrology / inspection data. A new AMHS system that is capable of the move rates required by small lot wafer transport is described, its implementation in a photolithography bay is explained, and the resulting reduction in metrology delay time is quantified. In addition, a phased implementation approach is described in which some, but not all, components of the new AMHS would be installed in existing fabs to enhance the move rate capability of traditional overhead transport (OHT) AMHS systems. This partial implementation would enable a partial lot size reduction and corresponding metrology delay time reduction of 60-70%. The full AMHS solution would be installed in new fabs and enable true small lot manufacturing in the litho area and would result in the maximum delay time reduction of 75-85%.

  15. Thermal modeling of wafer-based precision glass molding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yang; Shen, Lianguan; Zhou, Jian; Li, Mujun

    2016-10-01

    Wafer based precision glass optics manufacturing has been an innovative approach for combining high accuracy with mass production. However, due to the small ratio of thickness and diameter of the glass wafer, deformation and residual stress would be induced for the nonuniform temperature distribution in the glass wafer after molding. Therefore, thermal modelling of the heating system in the wafer based precision glass molding (PGM) process is of great importance in optimizing the heating system and the technique of the process. The current paper deals with a transient thermal modelling of a self-developed heating system for wafer based PGM process. First, in order to investigate the effect of radiation from the surface and interior of the glass wafer, the thermal modeling is simulated with a discrete ordinates radiation model in the CFD software FLUENT. Temperature distribution of the glass wafer obtained from the simulations is then used to evaluate the performance of heating system and investigate some importance parameters in the model, such as interior and surface radiation in glass wafer, thermal contact conductance between glass wafer and molds, thickness to diameter ratio of glass wafer. Finally, structure modification in the molding chamber is raised to decrease the temperature gradient in the glass wafer and the effect is significant.

  16. Devices using resin wafers and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Lin, YuPo J.; Henry, Michael P.; Snyder, Seth W.; St. Martin, Edward; Arora, Michelle; de la Garza, Linda

    2009-03-24

    Devices incorporating a thin wafer of electrically and ionically conductive porous material made by the method of introducing a mixture of a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material into a mold. The mixture is subjected to temperatures in the range of from about 60.degree. C. to about 170.degree. C. at pressures in the range of from about 0 to about 500 psig for a time in the range of from about 1 to about 240 minutes to form thin wafers. Devices include electrodeionization and separative bioreactors in the production of organic and amino acids, alcohols or esters for regenerating cofactors in enzymes and microbial cells.

  17. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  18. Carbon dioxide capture using resin-wafer electrodeionization

    DOEpatents

    Lin, YuPo J.; Snyder, Seth W.; Trachtenberg, Michael S.; Cowan, Robert M.; Datta, Saurav

    2015-09-08

    The present invention provides a resin-wafer electrodeionization (RW-EDI) apparatus including cathode and anode electrodes separated by a plurality of porous solid ion exchange resin wafers, which when in use are filled with an aqueous fluid. The apparatus includes one or more wafers comprising a basic ion exchange medium, and preferably includes one or more wafers comprising an acidic ion exchange medium. The wafers are separated from one another by ion exchange membranes. The fluid within the acidic and/or basic ion exchange wafers preferably includes, or is in contact with, a carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme to facilitate conversion of bicarbonate ion to carbon dioxide within the acidic medium. A pH suitable for exchange of CO.sub.2 is electrochemically maintained within the basic and acidic ion exchange wafers by applying an electric potential across the cathode and anode.

  19. Wafer dicing utilizing unique beam shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd; Ohar, Orest

    2007-09-01

    Laser dicing of wafers is of keen interest to the semiconductor and LED industry. Devices such as ASICs, Ultra-thin Wafer Scale Packages and LEDS are unique in that they typically are formed from various materials in a multilayered structure. Many of these layers include active device materials, passivation coatings, conductors and dielectric films all deposited on top of a bulk wafer substrate and all potentially having differing ablation thresholds. These composite multi-layered structures require high finesse laser processes to ensure yields, cut quality and low process cost. Such processes have become very complex over the years as new devices have become miniaturized, requiring smaller kerf sizes. Of critical concern is the need to minimize substrate micro-cracking or lift off of upper layers along the dicing streets which directly corresponds to bulk device strength and device operational integrity over its projected lifetime. Laser processes involving the sequential use of single or multiple diode pumped solid state (DPSS) lasers, such as UV DPSS (355nn, 266nm, 532 nm), VIS DPSS (~532 nm) and IR DPSS (1064nm, 1070nm) as well as (UV, VIS, NIR, FIR and Eye Safe Wavelengths) DPFL (Diode Pumped Fiber Lasers) lasers to penetrate various and differing material layers and substrates including Silicon Carbide (SiC), Silicon, GaAs and Sapphire. Development of beam shaping optics with the purpose of permitting two or more differing energy densities within a single focused or imaged beam spot would provide opportunities for pre-processing or pre-scribing of thinner cover layers, while following through with a higher energy density segment to cut through the bulk base substrates. This paper will describe the development of beam shaping optical elements with unique beam shapes that could benefit dicing and patterning of delicate thin film coatings. Various designs will be described, with processing examples using LED wafer materials.

  20. VLED for Si wafer-level packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chen-Fu; Chen, Chiming; Yen, Jui-Kang; Chen, Yung-Wei; Tsou, Chingfu; Chang, Chunming; Doan, Trung; Tran, Chuong Anh

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we introduced the advantages of Vertical Light emitting diode (VLED) on copper alloy with Si-wafer level packaging technologies. The silicon-based packaging substrate starts with a <100> dou-ble-side polished p-type silicon wafer, then anisotropic wet etching technology is done to construct the re-flector depression and micro through-holes on the silicon substrate. The operating voltage, at a typical cur-rent of 350 milli-ampere (mA), is 3.2V. The operation voltage is less than 3.7V under higher current driving conditions of 1A. The VLED chip on Si package has excellent heat dissipation and can be operated at high currents up to 1A without efficiency degradation. The typical spatial radiation pattern emits a uniform light lambertian distribution from -65° to 65° which can be easily fit for secondary optics. The correlated color temperature (CCT) has only 5% variation for daylight and less than 2% variation for warm white, when the junction temperature is increased from 25°C to 110°C, suggesting a stable CCT during operation for general lighting application. Coupled with aspheric lens and micro lens array in a wafer level process, it has almost the same light distribution intensity for special secondary optics lighting applications. In addition, the ul-tra-violet (UV) VLED, featuring a silicon substrate and hard glass cover, manufactured by wafer level pack-aging emits high power UV wavelengths appropriate for curing, currency, document verification, tanning, medical, and sterilization applications.

  1. Wafer plane inspection with soft resist thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Carl; Shi, Rui-fang; Wihl, Mark; Xiong, Yalin; Pang, Song

    2008-10-01

    Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is an inspection mode on the KLA-Tencor TeraScaTM platform that uses the high signalto- noise ratio images from the high numerical aperture microscope, and then models the entire lithographic process to enable defect detection on the wafer plane[1]. This technology meets the needs of some advanced mask manufacturers to identify the lithographically-significant defects while ignoring the other non-lithographically-significant defects. WPI accomplishes this goal by performing defect detection based on a modeled image of how the mask features would actually print in the photoresist. There are several advantages to this approach: (1) the high fidelity of the images provide a sensitivity advantage over competing approaches; (2) the ability to perform defect detection on the wafer plane allows one to only see those defects that have a printing impact on the wafer; (3) the use of modeling on the lithographic portion of the flow enables unprecedented flexibility to support arbitrary illumination profiles, process-window inspection in unit time, and combination modes to find both printing and non-printing defects. WPI is proving to be a valuable addition to the KLA-Tencor detection algorithm suite. The modeling portion of WPI uses a single resist threshold as the final step in the processing. This has been shown to be adequate on several advanced customer layers, but is not ideal for all layers. Actual resist chemistry has complicated processes including acid and base-diffusion and quench that are not consistently well-modeled with a single resist threshold. We have considered the use of an advanced resist model for WPI, but rejected it because the burdensome requirements for the calibration of the model were not practical for reticle inspection. This paper describes an alternative approach that allows for a "soft" resist threshold to be applied that provides a more robust solution for the most challenging processes. This approach is just

  2. Precipitating Chromium Impurities in Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Two new treatments for silicon wafers improve solar-cell conversion efficiency by precipitating electrically-active chromium impurities. One method is simple heat treatment. Other involves laser-induced damage followed by similar heat treatment. Chromium is one impurity of concern in metallurgical-grade silicon for solar cells. In new treatment, chromium active centers are made electrically inactive by precipitating chromium from solid solution, enabling use of lower grade, lower cost silicon in cell manufacture.

  3. Optical characterization of SiC wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J.C.; Pophristic, M.; Long, F.H.; Ferguson, I.

    1999-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate wafers of both 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC. The two-phonon Raman spectra from both 4H- and 6H-SiC have been measured and found to be polytype dependent, consistent with changes in the vibrational density of states. They have observed electronic Raman scattering from nitrogen defect levels in both 4H- and 6H-SiC at room temperature. They have found that electronic Raman scattering from the nitrogen defect levels is significantly enhanced with excitation by red or near IR laser light. These results demonstrate that the laser wavelength is a key parameter in the characterization of SiC by Raman scattering. These results suggest that Raman spectroscopy can be used as a noninvasive, in situ diagnostic for SiC wafer production and substrate evaluation. They also present results on time-resolved photoluminescence spectra of n-type SiC wafers.

  4. Mask-to-wafer alignment system

    DOEpatents

    Sweatt, William C.; Tichenor, Daniel A.; Haney, Steven J.

    2003-11-04

    A modified beam splitter that has a hole pattern that is symmetric in one axis and anti-symmetric in the other can be employed in a mask-to-wafer alignment device. The device is particularly suited for rough alignment using visible light. The modified beam splitter transmits and reflects light from a source of electromagnetic radiation and it includes a substrate that has a first surface facing the source of electromagnetic radiation and second surface that is reflective of said electromagnetic radiation. The substrate defines a hole pattern about a central line of the substrate. In operation, an input beam from a camera is directed toward the modified beam splitter and the light from the camera that passes through the holes illuminates the reticle on the wafer. The light beam from the camera also projects an image of a corresponding reticle pattern that is formed on the mask surface of the that is positioned downstream from the camera. Alignment can be accomplished by detecting the radiation that is reflected from the second surface of the modified beam splitter since the reflected radiation contains both the image of the pattern from the mask and a corresponding pattern on the wafer.

  5. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelkel, Reinhard

    2012-07-01

    Micro-optics is an indispensable key enabling technology for many products and applications today. Probably the most prestigious examples are the diffractive light shaping elements used in high-end DUV lithography steppers. Highly-efficient refractive and diffractive micro-optical elements are used for precise beam and pupil shaping. Micro-optics had a major impact on the reduction of aberrations and diffraction effects in projection lithography, allowing a resolution enhancement from 250 nm to 45 nm within the past decade. Micro-optics also plays a decisive role in medical devices (endoscopes, ophthalmology), in all laser-based devices and fiber communication networks, bringing high-speed internet to our homes. Even our modern smart phones contain a variety of micro-optical elements. For example, LED flash light shaping elements, the secondary camera, ambient light and proximity sensors. Wherever light is involved, micro-optics offers the chance to further miniaturize a device, to improve its performance, or to reduce manufacturing and packaging costs. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication is based on technology established by the semiconductor industry. Thousands of components are fabricated in parallel on a wafer. This review paper recapitulates major steps and inventions in wafer-scale micro-optics technology. The state-of-the-art of fabrication, testing and packaging technology is summarized.

  6. High-precision drop shape analysis (HPDSA) of quasistatic contact angles on silanized silicon wafers with different surface topographies during inclining-plate measurements: Influence of the surface roughness on the contact line dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heib, F.; Hempelmann, R.; Munief, W. M.; Ingebrandt, S.; Fug, F.; Possart, W.; Groß, K.; Schmitt, M.

    2015-07-01

    Contact angles and wetting of solid surfaces are strongly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of the surfaces. These influence quantities are difficult to distinguish from each other if contact angle measurements are performed by measuring only the advancing θa and the receding θr contact angle. In this regard, time-dependent water contact angles are measured on two hydrophobic modified silicon wafers with different physical surface topographies. The first surface is nearly atomically flat while the second surface is patterned (alternating flat and nanoscale rough patterns) which is synthesized by a photolithography and etching procedure. The different surface topographies are characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FTIRRAS) and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR). The resulting set of contact angle data obtained by the high-precision drop shape analysis approach is further analyzed by a Gompertzian fitting procedure and a statistical counting procedure in dependence on the triple line velocity. The Gompertzian fit is used to analyze overall properties of the surface and dependencies between the motion on the front and the back edge of the droplets. The statistical counting procedure results in the calculation of expectation values E(p) and standard deviations σ(p) for the inclination angle φ, contact angle θ, triple line velocity vel and the covered distance of the triple line dis relative to the first boundary points XB,10. Therefore, sessile drops during the inclination of the sample surface are video recorded and different specific contact angle events in dependence on the acceleration/deceleration of the triple line motion are analyzed. This procedure results in characteristically density distributions in dependence on the surface properties. The used procedures lead to the possibility to investigate influences on contact

  7. Development and implementation of dynamic methodologies for evaluating energy conservation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephanedes, Y. J.; Michalopoulos, P. G.; Gabriel, D. A.; Hanna, H.; Plum, R.

    1982-04-01

    The modified TRANSIT1 simulation model is developed and implemented to test a wide range of transportation-related energy conservation policies and evaluate their impacts across time. The dynamic structure is based on a set of nonlinear differential equations describing the demand-supply-resource-energy interactions in a transportation system. Time delays associated with fluctuations in travel demand and management responsiveness to those fluctuations are explicitly included. Congestion effects on highway travel times are incorporated by connecting TRANSIT1 to the freeway FREQ6 programs.

  8. Reconfigurable Flight Control Using Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion with a Special Accelerometer Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, Barton J.; Ostroff, Aaron J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to on-line control design for aircraft that have suffered either actuator failure, missing effector surfaces, surface damage, or any combination. The approach is based on a modified version of nonlinear dynamic inversion. The approach does not require a model of the baseline vehicle (effectors at zero deflection), but does require feedback of accelerations and effector positions. Implementation issues are addressed and the method is demonstrated on an advanced tailless aircraft. An experimental simulation analysis tool is used to directly evaluate the nonlinear system's stability robustness.

  9. Impact dynamics in biped locomotion analysis: two modelling and implementation approaches.

    PubMed

    Addi, Khalid; Rodić, Aleksandar D

    2010-07-01

    Stability during the biped locomotion and especially humanoid robots walking is a big challenge in robotics modelling. This paper compares the classical and novel methodologies of modelling and algorithmic implementation of the impact/contact dynamics that occurs during a biped motion. Thus, after establishing the free biped locomotion system model, a formulation using variational inequalities theory via a Linear Complementarity Problem then an impedance model are explicitly developed. Results of the numerical simulations are compared to the experimental measurements then the both approaches are discussed.

  10. Studying chemical reactions in biological systems with MBN Explorer: implementation of molecular mechanics with dynamical topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushko, Gennady B.; Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Verkhovtsev, Alexey V.; Volkov, Sergey N.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of molecular mechanics force field has been widely accepted nowadays for studying various processes in biomolecular systems. In this paper, we suggest a modification for the standard CHARMM force field that permits simulations of systems with dynamically changing molecular topologies. The implementation of the modified force field was carried out in the popular program MBN Explorer, and, to support the development, we provide several illustrative case studies where dynamical topology is necessary. In particular, it is shown that the modified molecular mechanics force field can be applied for studying processes where rupture of chemical bonds plays an essential role, e.g., in irradiation- or collision-induced damage, and also in transformation and fragmentation processes involving biomolecular systems. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey V. Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo Garcia and Eugene Surdutovich.

  11. Thinning of PLZT ceramic wafers for sensor integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Na; Liu, Weiguo

    2010-08-01

    Characteristics of transparent PLZT ceramics can be tailored by controlling the component of them, and therefore showed excellent dielectric, piezoelectric, pyroelectric and ferroelectric properties. To integrate the ceramics with microelectronic circuit to realize integrated applications, the ceramic wafers have to be thinned down to micrometer scale in thickness. A7/65/35 PLZT ceramic wafer was selected in this study for the thinning process. Size of the wafer was 10×10mm with an initial thickness of 300μm. A novel membrane transfer process (MTP) was developed for the thinning and integration of the ceramic wafers. In the MTP process, the ceramic wafer was bonded to silicon wafer using a polymer bonding method. Mechanical grinding method was applied to reduce the thickness of the ceramic. To minimize the surface damage in the ceramic wafer caused by the mechanical grinding, magnetorheological finishing (MRF) method was utilized to polish the wafer. White light interference (WLI) apparatus was used to monitor the surface qualities of the grinded and ploished ceramic wafers. For the PLZT membrane obtained from the MTP process, the final thickness of the thinned and polished wafer was 10μm, the surface roughness was below 1nm in rms, and the flatness was better than λ/5.

  12. Implementation of a fast 16-Bit dynamic clamp using LabVIEW-RT.

    PubMed

    Kullmann, Paul H M; Wheeler, Diek W; Beacom, Joshua; Horn, John P

    2004-01-01

    The dynamic-clamp method provides a powerful electrophysiological tool for creating virtual ionic conductances in living cells and studying their influence on membrane potential. Here we describe G-clamp, a new way to implement a dynamic clamp using the real-time version of the Lab-VIEW programming environment together with a Windows host, an embedded microprocessor that runs a real-time operating system and a multifunction data-acquisition board. The software includes descriptions of a fast voltage-dependent sodium conductance, delayed rectifier, M-type and A-type potassium conductances, and a leak conductance. The system can also read synaptic conductance waveforms from preassembled data files. These virtual conductances can be reliably implemented at speeds < or =43 kHz while simultaneously saving two channels of data with 16-bit precision. G-clamp also includes utilities for measuring current-voltage relations, synaptic strength, and synaptic gain. Taking an approach built on a commercially available software/hardware platform has resulted in a system that is easy to assemble and upgrade. In addition, the graphical programming structure of LabVIEW should make it relatively easy for others to adapt G-clamp for new experimental applications.

  13. ThermoData Engine (TDE) software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 7. Ternary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Muzny, Chris D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Magee, Joseph W; Abdulagatov, Ilmutdin; Kang, Jeong Won; Frenkel, Michael

    2012-01-23

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported in this journal. The present paper describes the first application of this concept to the evaluation of thermophysical properties for ternary chemical systems. The method involves construction of Redlich-Kister type equations for individual properties (excess volume, thermal conductivity, viscosity, surface tension, and excess enthalpy) and activity coefficient models for phase equilibrium properties (vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid equilibrium). Constructed ternary models are based on those for the three pure component and three binary subsystems evaluated on demand through the TDE software algorithms. All models are described in detail, and extensions to the class structure of the program are provided. Reliable evaluation of properties for the binary subsystems is essential for successful property evaluations for ternary systems, and algorithms are described to aid appropriate parameter selection and fitting for the implemented activity coefficient models (NRTL, Wilson, Van Laar, Redlich-Kister, and UNIQUAC). Two activity coefficient models based on group contributions (original UNIFAC and NIST-KT-UNIFAC) are also implemented. Novel features of the user interface are shown, and directions for future enhancements are outlined.

  14. Non-linear dynamics in recurrently connected neural circuits implement Bayesian inference by sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticchi, Alessandro; Faisal, Aldo A.; Brain; Behaviour Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    Experimental evidence at the behavioural-level shows that the brains are able to make Bayes-optimal inference and decisions (Kording and Wolpert 2004, Nature; Ernst and Banks, 2002, Nature), yet at the circuit level little is known about how neural circuits may implement Bayesian learning and inference (but see (Ma et al. 2006, Nat Neurosci)). Molecular sources of noise are clearly established to be powerful enough to pose limits to neural function and structure in the brain (Faisal et al. 2008, Nat Rev Neurosci; Faisal et al. 2005, Curr Biol). We propose a spking neuron model where we exploit molecular noise as a useful resource to implement close-to-optimal inference by sampling. Specifically, we derive a synaptic plasticity rule which, coupled with integrate-and-fire neural dynamics and recurrent inhibitory connections, enables a neural population to learn the statistical properties of the received sensory input (prior). Moreover, the proposed model allows to combine prior knowledge with additional sources of information (likelihood) from another neural population, and to implement in spiking neurons a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm which generates samples from the inferred posterior distribution.

  15. On the implementation of error handling in dynamic interfaces to scientific codes

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, Cynthia Jean

    1993-11-01

    With the advent of powerful workstations with windowing systems, the scientific community has become interested in user friendly interfaces as a means of promoting the distribution of scientific codes to colleagues. Distributing scientific codes to a wider audience can, however, be problematic because scientists, who are familiar with the problem being addressed but not aware of necessary operational details, are encouraged to use the codes. A more friendly environment that not only guides user inputs, but also helps catch errors is needed. This thesis presents a dynamic graphical user interface (GUI) creation system with user controlled support for error detection and handling. The system checks a series of constraints defining a valid input set whenever the state of the system changes and notifies the user when an error has occurred. A naive checking scheme was implemented that checks every constraint every time the system changes. However, this method examines many constraints whose values have not changed. Therefore, a minimum evaluation scheme that only checks those constraints that may have been violated was implemented. This system was implemented in a prototype and user testing was used to determine if it was a success. Users examined both the GUI creation system and the end-user environment. The users found both to be easy to use and efficient enough for practical use. Moreover, they concluded that the system would promote distribution.

  16. Implementation of an ANCF beam finite element for dynamic response optimization of elastic manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohar, B.; Kegl, M.; Ren, Z.

    2008-12-01

    Theoretical and practical aspects of an absolute nodal coordinate formulation (ANCF) beam finite element implementation are considered in the context of dynamic transient response optimization of elastic manipulators. The proposed implementation is based on the introduction of new nodal degrees of freedom, which is achieved by an adequate nonlinear mapping between the original and new degrees of freedom. This approach preserves the mechanical properties of the ANCF beam, but converts it into a conventional finite element so that its nodal degrees of freedom are initially always equal to zero and never depend explicitly on the design variables. Consequently, the sensitivity analysis formulas can be derived in the usual manner, except that the introduced nonlinear mapping has to be taken into account. Moreover, the adjusted element can also be incorporated into general finite element analysis and optimization software in the conventional way. The introduced design variables are related to the cross-section of the beam, to the shape of the (possibly) skeletal structure of the manipulator and to the drive functions. The layered cross-section approach and the design element technique are utilized to parameterize the shape of individual elements and the whole structure. A family of implicit time integration methods is adopted for the response and sensitivity analysis. Based on this assumption, the corresponding sensitivity formulas are derived. Two numerical examples illustrate the performance of the proposed element implementation.

  17. Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulations at Extreme Scale: GPU Algorithms, Implementation and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yu-Hang; Karniadakis, George; Crunch Team

    2014-03-01

    We present a scalable dissipative particle dynamics simulation code, fully implemented on the Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) using a hybrid CUDA/MPI programming model, which achieves 10-30 times speedup on a single GPU over 16 CPU cores and almost linear weak scaling across a thousand nodes. A unified framework is developed within which the efficient generation of the neighbor list and maintaining particle data locality are addressed. Our algorithm generates strictly ordered neighbor lists in parallel, while the construction is deterministic and makes no use of atomic operations or sorting. Such neighbor list leads to optimal data loading efficiency when combined with a two-level particle reordering scheme. A faster in situ generation scheme for Gaussian random numbers is proposed using precomputed binary signatures. We designed custom transcendental functions that are fast and accurate for evaluating the pairwise interaction. Computer benchmarks demonstrate the speedup of our implementation over the CPU implementation as well as strong and weak scalability. A large-scale simulation of spontaneous vesicle formation consisting of 128 million particles was conducted to illustrate the practicality of our code in real-world applications. This work was supported by the new Department of Energy Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials (CM4). Simulations were carried out at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility through the INCITE program under project BIP017.

  18. Building the future of WaferSat spacecraft for relativistic spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brashears, Travis; Lubin, Philip; Rupert, Nic; Stanton, Eric; Mehta, Amal; Knowles, Patrick; Hughes, Gary B.

    2016-09-01

    Recently, there has been a dramatic change in the way space missions are viewed. Large spacecraft with massive propellant-filled launch stages have dominated the space industry since the 1960's, but low-mass CubeSats and low-cost rockets have enabled a new approach to space exploration. In recent work, we have built upon the idea of extremely low mass (sub 1 kg), propellant-less spacecraft that are accelerated by photon propulsion from dedicated directed-energy facilities. Advanced photonics on a chip with hybridized electronics can be used to implement a laser-based communication system on board a sub 1U spacecraft that we call a WaferSat. WaferSat spacecraft are equipped with reflective sails suitable for propulsion by directed-energy beams. This low-mass spacecraft design does not require onboard propellant, creating significant new opportunities for deep space exploration at a very low cost. In this paper, we describe the design of a prototype WaferSat spacecraft, constructed on a printed circuit board. The prototype is envisioned as a step toward a design that could be launched on an early mission into Low Earth Orbit (LEO), as a key milestone in the roadmap to interstellar flight. In addition to laser communication, the WaferSat prototype includes subsystems for power source, attitude control, digital image acquisition, and inter-system communications.

  19. Method of bond strength evaluation for silicon direct wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, Alexander; Avagyan, Avag; Davies, Brady R.

    2001-09-01

    A crack-opening method used for characterization of silicon direct wafer bonding (DWB) techniques was analyzed. Mathematical model describing the influence of the pattern shape on the wafer pair resistance curve, so-called the R-curve, was developed. Two-dimensional patterns were created on a mirror-polished silicon wafer surface by a combination of photolithography, deposition and etching steps. Experimental observations did show that structured wafers can be used for large bond energy measurements. We propose utilization of structured wafers for bond energy measurements. It allows R-curve shape manipulation, increases the method sensitivity, and reduces probability of wafer failure. The resulting theory can also be used for developing new experimental methods for large bond energy measurements.

  20. Brewster's angle silicon wafer terahertz linear polarizer.

    PubMed

    Wojdyla, Antoine; Gallot, Guilhem

    2011-07-18

    We present a new cost-effective terahertz linear polarizer made from a stack of silicon wafers at Brewster's angle, andevaluate its performances. We show that this polarizer is wide-band, has a high extinction ratio (> 6 × 10(3)) and very small insertion losses (< 1%). We provide measurements of the temporal waveforms after linearly polarizing the THz beam and show that there is no distortion of the pulse. We compare its performances with a commercial wire-grid polarizer, and show that the Brewster's angle polarizer can conveniently be used to control the power of a terahertz beam.

  1. Efficient implementation of constant pH molecular dynamics on modern graphics processors.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Evan J; Brooks, Charles L

    2016-09-15

    The treatment of pH sensitive ionization states for titratable residues in proteins is often omitted from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. While static charge models can answer many questions regarding protein conformational equilibrium and protein-ligand interactions, pH-sensitive phenomena such as acid-activated chaperones and amyloidogenic protein aggregation are inaccessible to such models. Constant pH molecular dynamics (CPHMD) coupled with the Generalized Born with a Simple sWitching function (GBSW) implicit solvent model provide an accurate framework for simulating pH sensitive processes in biological systems. Although this combination has demonstrated success in predicting pKa values of protein structures, and in exploring dynamics of ionizable side-chains, its speed has been an impediment to routine application. The recent availability of low-cost graphics processing unit (GPU) chipsets with thousands of processing cores, together with the implementation of the accurate GBSW implicit solvent model on those chipsets (Arthur and Brooks, J. Comput. Chem. 2016, 37, 927), provide an opportunity to improve the speed of CPHMD and ionization modeling greatly. Here, we present a first implementation of GPU-enabled CPHMD within the CHARMM-OpenMM simulation package interface. Depending on the system size and nonbonded force cutoff parameters, we find speed increases of between one and three orders of magnitude. Additionally, the algorithm scales better with system size than the CPU-based algorithm, thus allowing for larger systems to be modeled in a cost effective manner. We anticipate that the improved performance of this methodology will open the door for broad-spread application of CPHMD in its modeling pH-mediated biological processes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Wafer-Level Membrane-Transfer Process for Fabricating MEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok; Wiberg, Dean

    2003-01-01

    A process for transferring an entire wafer-level micromachined silicon structure for mating with and bonding to another such structure has been devised. This process is intended especially for use in wafer-level integration of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) that have been fabricated on dissimilar substrates. Unlike in some older membrane-transfer processes, there is no use of wax or epoxy during transfer. In this process, the substrate of a wafer-level structure to be transferred serves as a carrier, and is etched away once the transfer has been completed. Another important feature of this process is that two electrodes constitutes an electrostatic actuator array. An SOI wafer and a silicon wafer (see Figure 1) are used as the carrier and electrode wafers, respectively. After oxidation, both wafers are patterned and etched to define a corrugation profile and electrode array, respectively. The polysilicon layer is deposited on the SOI wafer. The carrier wafer is bonded to the electrode wafer by using evaporated indium bumps. The piston pressure of 4 kPa is applied at 156 C in a vacuum chamber to provide hermetic sealing. The substrate of the SOI wafer is etched in a 25 weight percent TMAH bath at 80 C. The exposed buried oxide is then removed by using 49 percent HF droplets after an oxygen plasma ashing. The SOI top silicon layer is etched away by using an SF6 plasma to define the corrugation profile, followed by the HF droplet etching of the remaining oxide. The SF6 plasma with a shadow mask selectively etches the polysilicon membrane, if the transferred membrane structure needs to be patterned. Electrostatic actuators with various electrode gaps have been fabricated by this transfer technique. The gap between the transferred membrane and electrode substrate is very uniform ( 0.1 m across a wafer diameter of 100 mm, provided by optimizing the bonding control). Figure 2 depicts the finished product.

  3. Massive black hole and gas dynamics in galaxy nuclei mergers - I. Numerical implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupi, Alessandro; Haardt, Francesco; Dotti, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Numerical effects are known to plague adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) codes when treating massive particles, e.g. representing massive black holes (MBHs). In an evolving background, they can experience strong, spurious perturbations and then follow unphysical orbits. We study by means of numerical simulations the dynamical evolution of a pair MBHs in the rapidly and violently evolving gaseous and stellar background that follows a galaxy major merger. We confirm that spurious numerical effects alter the MBH orbits in AMR simulations, and show that numerical issues are ultimately due to a drop in the spatial resolution during the simulation, drastically reducing the accuracy in the gravitational force computation. We therefore propose a new refinement criterion suited for massive particles, able to solve in a fast and precise way for their orbits in highly dynamical backgrounds. The new refinement criterion we designed enforces the region around each massive particle to remain at the maximum resolution allowed, independently upon the local gas density. Such maximally resolved regions then follow the MBHs along their orbits, and effectively avoids all spurious effects caused by resolution changes. Our suite of high-resolution, AMR hydrodynamic simulations, including different prescriptions for the sub-grid gas physics, shows that the new refinement implementation has the advantage of not altering the physical evolution of the MBHs, accounting for all the non-trivial physical processes taking place in violent dynamical scenarios, such as the final stages of a galaxy major merger.

  4. Real-time computational attention model for dynamic scenes analysis: from implementation to evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courboulay, Vincent; Perreira Da Silva, Matthieu

    2012-06-01

    Providing real time analysis of the huge amount of data generated by computer vision algorithms in interactive applications is still an open problem. It promises great advances across a wide variety of fields. When using dynamics scene analysis algorithms for computer vision, a trade-off must be found between the quality of the results expected, and the amount of computer resources allocated for each task. It is usually a design time decision, implemented through the choice of pre-defined algorithms and parameters. However, this way of doing limits the generality of the system. Using an adaptive vision system provides a more flexible solution as its analysis strategy can be changed according to the new information available. As a consequence, such a system requires some kind of guiding mechanism to explore the scene faster and more efficiently. We propose a visual attention system that it adapts its processing according to the interest (or salience) of each element of the dynamic scene. Somewhere in between hierarchical salience based and competitive distributed, we propose a hierarchical yet competitive and non salience based model. Our original approach allows the generation of attentional focus points without the need of neither saliency map nor explicit inhibition of return mechanism. This new realtime computational model is based on a preys / predators system. The use of this kind of dynamical system is justified by an adjustable trade-off between nondeterministic attentional behavior and properties of stability, reproducibility and reactiveness.

  5. Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, G.S.

    1998-12-15

    Particulate contamination removal from wafers is disclosed using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer`s position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates. 4 figs.

  6. Beginning-to-end wafer bonding for advanced optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrens, Shari N.; Lindner, Paul; Dwyer, Steven; Wimplinger, Markus

    2003-11-01

    The old adage "Work Smarter, Not Harder" is certainly applicable in today's competitive marketplace for Optical MEMS. In order to survive the current economic conditions, high volume manufacturers must get optimum performance and yield from each design and manufactured component. Wafer bonding, and its numerous variants, is entering mainstream production environments by providing solutions throughout the production flow. For example, SOI (silicon on insulator) and other laminated materials such as GaAs/Si are used as cost effective alternatives to molecular epitaxy methods for Bragg mirrors, rf resonators, and hybrid device fabrication. Temporary wafer bonding is used extensively to allow fragile compound semiconductors to be attached to rigid support wafers. This allows for front side and backside processing with a reduction in wafer breakage and increases in thickness uniformity results after backgrind operations. Permanent wafer bonding is used to attach compound semiconductors to each other or silicon to completely integrate optical components and logic or MEMS components. Permanent hermetic sealing is used for waveguide formation and, when combined with vacuum sealing, higher performance is achieved for RF resonators. Finally, many of the low temperature solders and eutectic alloys are finding application in low temperature wafer-to-wafer level packaging of optical devices to ceramic packages. Through clever application of these bonding methods, throughput increases and reduction in fabrication complexity givs a clear edge in the market place. This presentation will provide guidelines and process overviews needed to adopt wafer-to-wafer bonding technologies into the high volume-manufacturing environment.

  7. Dominant factors of the laser gettering of silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, Yu. I. E-mail: yuibokhan@gmail.com; Kamenkov, V. S.; Tolochko, N. K.

    2015-02-15

    The laser gettering of silicon wafers is experimentally investigated. The typical gettering parameters are considered. The surfaces of laser-treated silicon wafers are investigated by microscopy. When studying the effect of laser radiation on silicon wafers during gettering, a group of factors determining the conditions of interaction between the laser beam and silicon-wafer surface and affecting the final result of treatment are selected. The main factors determining the gettering efficiency are revealed. Limitations on the desired value of the getter-layer capacity on surfaces with insufficiently high cleanness (for example, ground or matte) are established.

  8. Micro-miniature gas chromatograph column disposed in silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2000-01-01

    A micro-miniature gas chromatograph column is fabricated by forming matching halves of a circular cross-section spiral microcapillary in two silicon wafers and then bonding the two wafers together using visual or physical alignment methods. Heating wires are deposited on the outside surfaces of each wafer in a spiral or serpentine pattern large enough in area to cover the whole microcapillary area inside the joined wafers. The visual alignment method includes etching through an alignment window in one wafer and a precision-matching alignment target in the other wafer. The two wafers are then bonded together using the window and target. The physical alignment methods include etching through vertical alignment holes in both wafers and then using pins or posts through corresponding vertical alignment holes to force precision alignment during bonding. The pins or posts may be withdrawn after curing of the bond. Once the wafers are bonded together, a solid phase of very pure silicone is injected in a solution of very pure chloroform into one end of the microcapillary. The chloroform lowers the viscosity of the silicone enough that a high pressure hypodermic needle with a thumbscrew plunger can force the solution into the whole length of the spiral microcapillary. The chloroform is then evaporated out slowly to leave the silicone behind in a deposit.

  9. Application of chaotic dynamics in a recurrent neural network to control: hardware implementation into a novel autonomous roving robot.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; Kurata, Shuhei; Morita, Shogo; Shimizu, So; Munetaka, Daigo; Nara, Shigetoshi

    2008-09-01

    Originating from a viewpoint that complex/chaotic dynamics would play an important role in biological system including brains, chaotic dynamics introduced in a recurrent neural network was applied to control. The results of computer experiment was successfully implemented into a novel autonomous roving robot, which can only catch rough target information with uncertainty by a few sensors. It was employed to solve practical two-dimensional mazes using adaptive neural dynamics generated by the recurrent neural network in which four prototype simple motions are embedded. Adaptive switching of a system parameter in the neural network results in stationary motion or chaotic motion depending on dynamical situations. The results of hardware implementation and practical experiment using it show that, in given two-dimensional mazes, the robot can successfully avoid obstacles and reach the target. Therefore, we believe that chaotic dynamics has novel potential capability in controlling, and could be utilized to practical engineering application.

  10. ThermoData engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 4. Chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Muzny, Chris D; Frenkel, Michael

    2009-12-01

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported recently in this journal. This paper describes the first application of this concept to the evaluation of thermodynamic properties for chemical reactions. Reaction properties evaluated are the enthalpies, entropies, Gibbs energies, and thermodynamic equilibrium constants. Details of key considerations in the critical evaluation of enthalpies of formation and of standard entropies for organic compounds are discussed in relation to their application in the calculation of reaction properties. Extensions to the class structure of the program are described that allow close linkage between the derived reaction properties and the underlying pure-component properties. Derivation of pure-component enthalpies of formation and of standard entropies through the use of directly measured reaction properties (enthalpies of reaction and equilibrium constants) is described. Directions for future enhancements are outlined.

  11. Implementation of variable time step stochastic dynamics for electronically inelastic gas-surface collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Bruce C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Murthy, C. S.; Redmon, Michael J.

    1987-01-01

    A variable time step algorithm has been implemented for solving the stochastic equations of motion for gas-surface collisions. It has been tested for a simple model of electronically inelastic collisions with an insulator surface in which the phonon manifold acts as a heat bath and electronic states are localized. In addition to reproducing the accurate nuclear dynamics of the surface atoms, numerical calculations have shown the algorithm to yield accurate ensemble averages of physical observables such as electronic transition probabilities and total energy loss of the gas atom to the surface. This new algorithm offers a gain in efficieny of up to an order of magnitude compared to fixed time step integration.

  12. Photolithography diagnostic expert systems: a systematic approach to problem solving in a wafer fabrication facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherwax Scott, Caroline; Tsareff, Christopher R.

    1990-06-01

    One of the main goals of process engineering in the semiconductor industry is to improve wafer fabrication productivity and throughput. Engineers must work continuously toward this goal in addition to performing sustaining and development tasks. To accomplish these objectives, managers must make efficient use of engineering resources. One of the tools being used to improve efficiency is the diagnostic expert system. Expert systems are knowledge based computer programs designed to lead the user through the analysis and solution of a problem. Several photolithography diagnostic expert systems have been implemented at the Hughes Technology Center to provide a systematic approach to process problem solving. This systematic approach was achieved by documenting cause and effect analyses for a wide variety of processing problems. This knowledge was organized in the form of IF-THEN rules, a common structure for knowledge representation in expert system technology. These rules form the knowledge base of the expert system which is stored in the computer. The systems also include the problem solving methodology used by the expert when addressing a problem in his area of expertise. Operators now use the expert systems to solve many process problems without engineering assistance. The systems also facilitate the collection of appropriate data to assist engineering in solving unanticipated problems. Currently, several expert systems have been implemented to cover all aspects of the photolithography process. The systems, which have been in use for over a year, include wafer surface preparation (HMDS), photoresist coat and softbake, align and expose on a wafer stepper, and develop inspection. These systems are part of a plan to implement an expert system diagnostic environment throughout the wafer fabrication facility. In this paper, the systems' construction is described, including knowledge acquisition, rule construction, knowledge refinement, testing, and evaluation. The roles

  13. 1366 Direct Wafer: Demolishing the Cost Barrier for Silicon Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Adam

    2013-08-30

    The goal of 1366 Direct Wafer™ is to drastically reduce the cost of silicon-based PV by eliminating the cost barrier imposed by sawn wafers. The key characteristics of Direct Wafer are 1) kerf-free, 156-mm standard silicon wafers 2) high throughput for very low CAPEX and rapid scale up. Together, these characteristics will allow Direct Wafer™ to become the new standard for silicon PV wafers and will enable terawatt-scale PV – a prospect that may not be possible with sawn wafers. Our single, high-throughput step will replace the expensive and rate-limiting process steps of ingot casting and sawing, thereby enabling drastically lower wafer cost. This High-Impact PV Supply Chain project addressed the challenges of scaling Direct Wafer technology for cost-effective, high-throughput production of commercially viable 156 mm wafers. The Direct Wafer process is inherently simple and offers the potential for very low production cost, but to realize this, it is necessary to demonstrate production of wafers at high-throughput that meet customer specifications. At the start of the program, 1366 had demonstrated (with ARPA-E funding) increases in solar cell efficiency from 10% to 15.9% on small area (20cm2), scaling wafer size up to the industry standard 156mm, and demonstrated initial cell efficiency on larger wafers of 13.5%. During this program, the throughput of the Direct Wafer furnace was increased by more than 10X, simultaneous with quality improvements to meet early customer specifications. Dedicated equipment for laser trimming of wafers and measurement methods were developed to feedback key quality metrics to improve the process and equipment. Subsequent operations served both to determine key operating metrics affecting cost, as well as generating sample product that was used for developing downstream processing including texture and interaction with standard cell processing. Dramatic price drops for silicon wafers raised the bar significantly, but the

  14. Structure refinement using precession electron diffraction tomography and dynamical diffraction: theory and implementation.

    PubMed

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Petříček, Václav; Corrêa, Cinthia Antunes

    2015-03-01

    Accurate structure refinement from electron-diffraction data is not possible without taking the dynamical-diffraction effects into account. A complete three-dimensional model of the structure can be obtained only from a sufficiently complete three-dimensional data set. In this work a method is presented for crystal structure refinement from the data obtained by electron diffraction tomography, possibly combined with precession electron diffraction. The principle of the method is identical to that used in X-ray crystallography: data are collected in a series of small tilt steps around a rotation axis, then intensities are integrated and the structure is optimized by least-squares refinement against the integrated intensities. In the dynamical theory of diffraction, the reflection intensities exhibit a complicated relationship to the orientation and thickness of the crystal as well as to structure factors of other reflections. This complication requires the introduction of several special parameters in the procedure. The method was implemented in the freely available crystallographic computing system Jana2006.

  15. Implementation of Dynamic Extensible Adaptive Locally Exchangeable Measures (IDEALEM) v 0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Sim, Alex; Lee, Dongeun; Wu, K. John

    2016-03-04

    Handling large streaming data is essential for various applications such as network traffic analysis, social networks, energy cost trends, and environment modeling. However, it is in general intractable to store, compute, search, and retrieve large streaming data. This software addresses a fundamental issue, which is to reduce the size of large streaming data and still obtain accurate statistical analysis. As an example, when a high-speed network such as 100 Gbps network is monitored, the collected measurement data rapidly grows so that polynomial time algorithms (e.g., Gaussian processes) become intractable. One possible solution to reduce the storage of vast amounts of measured data is to store a random sample, such as one out of 1000 network packets. However, such static sampling methods (linear sampling) have drawbacks: (1) it is not scalable for high-rate streaming data, and (2) there is no guarantee of reflecting the underlying distribution. In this software, we implemented a dynamic sampling algorithm, based on the recent technology from the relational dynamic bayesian online locally exchangeable measures, that reduces the storage of data records in a large scale, and still provides accurate analysis of large streaming data. The software can be used for both online and offline data records.

  16. Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation

    DOEpatents

    Selwyn, Gary S.

    1998-01-01

    Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer's position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates.

  17. Analysis of wafer heating in 14nm DUV layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramany, Lokesh; Chung, Woong Jae; Samudrala, Pavan; Gao, Haiyong; Aung, Nyan; Gomez, Juan Manuel; Minghetti, Blandine; Lee, Shawn

    2016-03-01

    To further shrink the contact and trench dimensions, Negative Tone Development (NTD) has become the de facto process at these layers. The NTD process uses a positive tone resist and an organic solvent-based negative tone developer which leads to improved image contrast, larger process window and smaller Mask Error Enhancement Factor (MEEF)[1]. The NTD masks have high transmission values leading to lens heating and as observed here wafer heating as well. Both lens and wafer heating will contribute to overlay error, however the effects of lens heating can be mitigated by applying lens heating corrections while no such corrections exist for wafer heating yet. Although the magnitude of overlay error due to wafer heating is low relative to lens heating; ever tightening overlay requirements imply that the distortions due to wafer heating will quickly become a significant part of the overlay budget. In this work the effects, analysis and observations of wafer heating on contact and metal layers of the 14nm node are presented. On product wafers it manifests as a difference in the scan up and scan down signatures between layers. An experiment to further understand wafer heating is performed with a test reticle that is used to monitor scanner performance.

  18. Wafer hot spot identification through advanced photomask characterization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yohan; Green, Michael; McMurran, Jeff; Ham, Young; Lin, Howard; Lan, Andy; Yang, Richer; Lung, Mike

    2016-10-01

    As device manufacturers progress through advanced technology nodes, limitations in standard 1-dimensional (1D) mask Critical Dimension (CD) metrics are becoming apparent. Historically, 1D metrics such as Mean to Target (MTT) and CD Uniformity (CDU) have been adequate for end users to evaluate and predict the mask impact on the wafer process. However, the wafer lithographer's process margin is shrinking at advanced nodes to a point that the classical mask CD metrics are no longer adequate to gauge the mask contribution to wafer process error. For example, wafer CDU error at advanced nodes is impacted by mask factors such as 3-dimensional (3D) effects and mask pattern fidelity on subresolution assist features (SRAFs) used in Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) models of ever-increasing complexity. These items are not quantifiable with the 1D metrology techniques of today. Likewise, the mask maker needs advanced characterization methods in order to optimize the mask process to meet the wafer lithographer's needs. These advanced characterization metrics are what is needed to harmonize mask and wafer processes for enhanced wafer hot spot analysis. In this paper, we study advanced mask pattern characterization techniques and their correlation with modeled wafer performance.

  19. Strength of Si Wafers with Microcracks: A Theoretical Model; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Rupnowski, P.; Sopori, B.

    2008-05-01

    This paper concentrates on the modeling of the strength of photovoltaic (PV) wafers. First a multimodal Weibull distribution is presented for the strength of a silicon specimen with bulk, surface, and edge imperfections. Next, a specific case is analyzed of a PV wafer with surface damage that takes the form of subsurface microcracks.

  20. MAPPER alignment sensor evaluation on process wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergeer, N.; Lattard, L.; de Boer, G.; Couweleers, F.; Dave, D.; Pradelles, J.; Bustos, J.

    2013-03-01

    MAPPER Lithography is developing a maskless lithography technology based on massively-parallel electron-beam writing. In order to reduce costs and to minimize the footprint of this tool a new alignment sensor has been developed; based on technologies used for DVD optical heads. A wafer with an alignment mark is scanned with the sensor, resulting in an intensity pattern versus position. From this pattern the mark position can be calculated. Evaluations have been made over the performance of this type of sensor using different mark designs at several lithography process steps for FEOL and BEOL manufacturing. It has been shown that sub-nanometer reproducibility (3σ std) of alignment mark readings can be achieved while being robust against various process steps.

  1. Infrared spectroscopy of wafer-scale graphene.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hugen; Xia, Fengnian; Zhu, Wenjuan; Freitag, Marcus; Dimitrakopoulos, Christos; Bol, Ageeth A; Tulevski, George; Avouris, Phaedon

    2011-12-27

    We report spectroscopy results from the mid- to far-infrared on wafer-scale graphene, grown either epitaxially on silicon carbide or by chemical vapor deposition. The free carrier absorption (Drude peak) is simultaneously obtained with the universal optical conductivity (due to interband transitions) and the wavelength at which Pauli blocking occurs due to band filling. From these, the graphene layer number, doping level, sheet resistivity, carrier mobility, and scattering rate can be inferred. The mid-IR absorption of epitaxial two-layer graphene shows a less pronounced peak at 0.37 ± 0.02 eV compared to that in exfoliated bilayer graphene. In heavily chemically doped single-layer graphene, a record high transmission reduction due to free carriers approaching 40% at 250 μm (40 cm(-1)) is measured in this atomically thin material, supporting the great potential of graphene in far-infrared and terahertz optoelectronics.

  2. Reduction of Thermal Conductivity in Wafer-Bonded Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    ZL Liau; LR Danielson; PM Fourspring; L Hu; G Chen; GW Turner

    2006-11-27

    Blocks of silicon up to 3-mm thick have been formed by directly bonding stacks of thin wafer chips. These stacks showed significant reductions in the thermal conductivity in the bonding direction. In each sample, the wafer chips were obtained by polishing a commercial wafer to as thin as 36 {micro}m, followed by dicing. Stacks whose starting wafers were patterned with shallow dots showed greater reductions in thermal conductivity. Diluted-HF treatment of wafer chips prior to bonding led to the largest reduction of the effective thermal conductivity, by approximately a factor of 50. Theoretical modeling based on restricted conduction through the contacting dots and some conduction across the planar nanometer air gaps yielded fair agreement for samples fabricated without the HF treatment.

  3. Backside EBR process performance with various wafer properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Tomohiro; Shigemori, Kazuhito; Vangheluwe, Rik; Erich, Daub; Sanada, Masakazu

    2009-03-01

    In immersion lithography process, film stacking architecture will be necessary to avoid top coat film peeling. To achieve suitable stacking architecture for immersion lithography process, an EBR process that delivers tightly controlled film edge position and good uniformity around the wafer circumference is needed. We demonstrated a new bevel rinse system on a SOKUDO RF3 coat-and-develop track for immersion lithography. The performance of the new bevel rinse system for various wafer properties was evaluated. It was found that the bevel rinse system has a good controllability of film edge position and good uniformity around the wafer circumference. The results indicate that the bevel rinse system has a large margin for wafer centering accuracy, back side particles, wafer shape and substrates with good film edge position controllability, uniformity and clean apex. The system has been demonstrated to provide a suitable film stacking architecture for immersion lithography mass production process.

  4. Overlay Tolerances For VLSI Using Wafer Steppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Harry J.; Rice, Rory

    1988-01-01

    In order for VLSI circuits to function properly, the masking layers used in the fabrication of those devices must overlay each other to within the manufacturing tolerance incorporated in the circuit design. The capabilities of the alignment tools used in the masking process determine the overlay tolerances to which circuits can be designed. It is therefore of considerable importance that these capabilities be well characterized. Underestimation of the overlay accuracy results in unnecessarily large devices, resulting in poor utilization of wafer area and possible degradation of device performance. Overestimation will result in significant yield loss because of the failure to conform to the tolerances of the design rules. The proper methodology for determining the overlay capabilities of wafer steppers, the most commonly used alignment tool for the production of VLSI circuits, is the subject of this paper. Because cost-effective manufacturing process technology has been the driving force of VLSI, the impact on productivity is a primary consideration in all discussions. Manufacturers of alignment tools advertise the capabilities of their equipment. It is notable that no manufacturer currently characterizes his aligners in a manner consistent with the requirements of producing very large integrated circuits, as will be discussed. This has resulted in the situation in which the evaluation and comparison of the capabilities of alignment tools require the attention of a lithography specialist. Unfortunately, lithographic capabilities must be known by many other people, particularly the circuit designers and the managers responsible for the financial consequences of the high prices of modern alignment tools. All too frequently, the designer or manager is confronted with contradictory data, one set coming from his lithography specialist, and the other coming from a sales representative of an equipment manufacturer. Since the latter generally attempts to make his

  5. Graphitized silicon carbide microbeams: wafer-level, self-aligned graphene on silicon wafers.

    PubMed

    Cunning, Benjamin V; Ahmed, Mohsin; Mishra, Neeraj; Kermany, Atieh Ranjbar; Wood, Barry; Iacopi, Francesca

    2014-08-15

    Currently proven methods that are used to obtain devices with high-quality graphene on silicon wafers involve the transfer of graphene flakes from a growth substrate, resulting in fundamental limitations for large-scale device fabrication. Moreover, the complex three-dimensional structures of interest for microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems are hardly compatible with such transfer processes. Here, we introduce a methodology for obtaining thousands of microbeams, made of graphitized silicon carbide on silicon, through a site-selective and wafer-scale approach. A Ni-Cu alloy catalyst mediates a self-aligned graphitization on prepatterned SiC microstructures at a temperature that is compatible with silicon technologies. The graphene nanocoating leads to a dramatically enhanced electrical conductivity, which elevates this approach to an ideal method for the replacement of conductive metal films in silicon carbide-based MEMS and NEMS devices.

  6. Compensating measured intra-wafer ring oscillator stage delay with intra-wafer exposure dose corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, Staf; Nackaerts, Axel; Dusa, Mircea; Carpaij, Rene; Vandenberghe, Geert; Finders, Jo

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to use measurements on real working devices to derive more information than typically measured by the classic line-width measurement techniques. The first part of the paper will discuss the principle of the measurements with a ring oscillator, a circuit used to measure the speed of elementary logic gates. These measurements contribute to the understanding of the exact timing dependencies in circuits, which is of utmost importance for the design and simulation of these circuits. When connecting an odd number of digital inverting stages in a ring, the circuit has no stable digital state but acts as an analog oscillator with the oscillation frequency dependent on the analog propagation delay of the signals through the stages. By varying some conditions during a litho step, the delay change caused by the process condition change can be measured very accurately. The response of the ring oscillator delay to exposure dose is measured and presented in this paper together with a comparison of measured line-width values of the poly gate lines. The second part of the paper will focus on improving the intra-wafer variation of the stage delay. A number of ring oscillators are put in a design at different slit and scan locations. 200mm wafers are processed with 48 full dies present. From the intra-wafer delay fingerprint and the dose sensitivity of the delay an intra-wafer dose correction, also called a dose recipe, is calculated. This dose recipe is used on the scanner to compensate for effects that are the root cause for the delay profile; including reticle and processing such as track, etch and annealing.

  7. Rapid defect detections of bonded wafer using near infrared polariscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chi Seng; Asundi, Anand K.

    2011-10-01

    In modern field of microelectronics and MEMS, wafer bonding has emerged as an important processing step in wide range of manufacturing applications. During the manufacturing process, even in the modern clean room, small defects result from trapped particles and gas bubbles exist at bonded interface. Defects and trapped particles may exist on the top and bottom of the wafers, or at the interface of bonded wafer pair. These inclusions will generate high stress around debond region at the wafers bonded interface. In this paper, inspection at the bonded interface will be the interest of investigation. Since silicon wafer is opaque to visible light, defect detection at the bonded interface of silicon wafer is not possible. Due to the fact that silicon wafer is transparent to wavelength greater than 1150nm, an Near Infrared Polariscope which has showed some promises on residual stress measurement on silicon devices has been adapted and developed. This method is based on the well known photoelastic principles, where the stress variations are measured based on the changes of light propagation velocity in birefringence material. The results are compared and contrast with conventional Infrared Transmission Imaging tool (IRT) which is widely used to inspect the bonded silicon wafer. In this research, the trapped particles that are not visible via conventional infrared transmission method are identified via the generated residual stress pattern. The magnitude of the residual stress fields associated with each defect is examined qualitatively and quantitatively. The stress field generated at the wafers bonded interface will looks like a 'butterfly' pattern. Wafer pairs Pyrex-Si and Si-Si bonded interface will be examined.

  8. The parylene-aluminum multilayer interconnection system for wafer scale integration and wafer scale hybrid packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, N.; Dabral, S.; McDonald, J. F.

    1989-03-01

    Polyimides have been considered as interlayer dielectrics for wafer scale integration (WSI) and wafer scale hybrid packaging (WSHP). However, high temperature curing steps for polyimide lead to large stresses in polyimide films. This is due to differing thermal expansion coefficients of the metal conductor, insulator and substrate materials causing yield and reliability problems. Polyimides also require the use of solvents, and tend to outgas during subsequent processing. They tend to absorb moisture with resulting degradation of dielectric constants. Also, the spin on method used to apply and planarize polyimide layers exhibits nonuniformity of thickness on large wafers. In this paper we examine parylene (Poly-p-xylylene) and some of its derivatives as possible interlayer dielectrics due to some of their attractive features. Parylene has a low dielectric constant. It can be vapor deposited at low temperatures and in vacuum. It is also highly resistant to corrosion and is a clear, transparent material with possible use for optical interconnections. This paper studies the reactive ion etching properties for polyimides and parylenes in an oxygen containing plasma under identical conditions. The etching rates of the parylenes and polyimides have been compared. The surface properties of these polymers are examined. Further, the film growth properties of aluminum deposited on the etched surfaces using the ionized cluster beam are investigated.

  9. Neuromorphic Implementation of Attractor Dynamics in a Two-Variable Winner-Take-All Circuit with NMDARs: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    You, Hongzhi; Wang, Da-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Neural networks configured with winner-take-all (WTA) competition and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated synaptic dynamics are endowed with various dynamic characteristics of attractors underlying many cognitive functions. This paper presents a novel method for neuromorphic implementation of a two-variable WTA circuit with NMDARs aimed at implementing decision-making, working memory and hysteresis in visual perceptions. The method proposed is a dynamical system approach of circuit synthesis based on a biophysically plausible WTA model. Notably, slow and non-linear temporal dynamics of NMDAR-mediated synapses was generated. Circuit simulations in Cadence reproduced ramping neural activities observed in electrophysiological recordings in experiments of decision-making, the sustained activities observed in the prefrontal cortex during working memory, and classical hysteresis behavior during visual discrimination tasks. Furthermore, theoretical analysis of the dynamical system approach illuminated the underlying mechanisms of decision-making, memory capacity and hysteresis loops. The consistence between the circuit simulations and theoretical analysis demonstrated that the WTA circuit with NMDARs was able to capture the attractor dynamics underlying these cognitive functions. Their physical implementations as elementary modules are promising for assembly into integrated neuromorphic cognitive systems. PMID:28223913

  10. 2D ion velocity distribution function measurements by laser-induced fluorescence above a radio-frequency biased silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Nathaniel; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Zhang, Yiting; Kushner, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Ion dynamics have been measured in the sheath above a 30 cm diameter, 2.2 MHz-biased silicon wafer in a plasma processing etch tool using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The velocity distribution function of argon ions was measured at thousands of positions above and radially along the edge of the wafer by sending a planar laser sheet from a pulsed, tunable dye laser into the tool. The RF sheath is clearly resolved. The laser sheet entered the machine both parallel and perpendicular to the wafer in order to measure the distribution function for both parallel and perpendicular velocities/energies (0.4 eV < Emax<600 eV). The resulting fluorescence was recorded using a fast CCD camera, which provided spatial (0.4 mm) and temporal (30 ns) resolution. Data was taken at eight different phases of the 2.2 MHz cycle. The distribution functions were found to be spatially non-uniform near the edge of the wafer and the distribution of energies extremely phase-dependent. Several cm above the wafer the distribution is Maxwellian and independent of phase. Results are compared with simulations; for example, the experimental time-averaged ion energy distribution function compares favorably with a computer model carefully constructed to emulate the device.

  11. 2D ion velocity distribution function measurements by laser-induced fluorescence above a radio-frequency biased silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Nathaniel; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Zhang, Yiting; Kushner, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Ion dynamics have been measured in the sheath above a 30 cm diameter, 2.2 MHz-biased silicon wafer in a plasma processing etch tool using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The velocity distribution function of argon ions was measured at thousands of positions above and radially along the edge of the wafer by sending a planar laser sheet from a pulsed, tunable dye laser into the tool. The RF sheath is clearly resolved. The laser sheet entered the machine both parallel and perpendicular to the wafer in order to measure the distribution function for both parallel and perpendicular velocities/energies (0.4 eV < Emax< 600 eV). The resulting fluorescence was recorded using a fast CCD camera, which provided spatial (0.4 mm) and temporal (30 ns) resolution. Data was taken at eight different phases of the 2.2 MHz cycle. The distribution functions were found to be spatially non-uniform near the edge of the wafer and the distribution of energies extremely phase-dependent. Several cm above the wafer the distribution is Maxwellian and independent of phase. Results are compared with simulations; for example, the experimental time-averaged ion energy distribution function compares favorably with a computer model carefully constructed to emulate the device.

  12. A new dynamic tactile display for reconfigurable braille: implementation and tests

    PubMed Central

    Motto Ros, Paolo; Dante, Vittorio; Mesin, Luca; Petetti, Erminio; Del Giudice, Paolo; Pasero, Eros

    2014-01-01

    Different tactile interfaces have been proposed to represent either text (braille) or, in a few cases, tactile large-area screens as replacements for visual displays. None of the implementations so far can be customized to match users' preferences, perceptual differences and skills. Optimal choices in these respects are still debated; we approach a solution by designing a flexible device allowing the user to choose key parameters of tactile transduction. We present here a new dynamic tactile display, a 8 × 8 matrix of plastic pins based on well-established and reliable piezoelectric technology to offer high resolution (pin gap 0.7mm) as well as tunable strength of the pins displacement, and refresh rate up to 50s−1. It can reproduce arbitrary patterns, allowing it to serve the dual purpose of providing, depending on contingent user needs, tactile rendering of non-character information, and reconfigurable braille rendering. Given the relevance of the latter functionality for the expected average user, we considered testing braille encoding by volunteers a benchmark of primary importance. Tests were performed to assess the acceptance and usability with minimal training, and to check whether the offered flexibility was indeed perceived by the subject as an added value compared to conventional braille devices. Different mappings between braille dots and actual tactile pins were implemented to match user needs. Performances of eight experienced braille readers were defined as the fraction of correct identifications of rendered content. Different information contents were tested (median performance on random strings, words, sentences identification was about 75%, 85%, 98%, respectively, with a significant increase, p < 0.01), obtaining statistically significant improvements in performance during the tests (p < 0.05). Experimental results, together with qualitative ratings provided by the subjects, show a good acceptance and the effectiveness of the proposed solution

  13. A new dynamic tactile display for reconfigurable braille: implementation and tests.

    PubMed

    Motto Ros, Paolo; Dante, Vittorio; Mesin, Luca; Petetti, Erminio; Del Giudice, Paolo; Pasero, Eros

    2014-01-01

    Different tactile interfaces have been proposed to represent either text (braille) or, in a few cases, tactile large-area screens as replacements for visual displays. None of the implementations so far can be customized to match users' preferences, perceptual differences and skills. Optimal choices in these respects are still debated; we approach a solution by designing a flexible device allowing the user to choose key parameters of tactile transduction. We present here a new dynamic tactile display, a 8 × 8 matrix of plastic pins based on well-established and reliable piezoelectric technology to offer high resolution (pin gap 0.7mm) as well as tunable strength of the pins displacement, and refresh rate up to 50s(-1). It can reproduce arbitrary patterns, allowing it to serve the dual purpose of providing, depending on contingent user needs, tactile rendering of non-character information, and reconfigurable braille rendering. Given the relevance of the latter functionality for the expected average user, we considered testing braille encoding by volunteers a benchmark of primary importance. Tests were performed to assess the acceptance and usability with minimal training, and to check whether the offered flexibility was indeed perceived by the subject as an added value compared to conventional braille devices. Different mappings between braille dots and actual tactile pins were implemented to match user needs. Performances of eight experienced braille readers were defined as the fraction of correct identifications of rendered content. Different information contents were tested (median performance on random strings, words, sentences identification was about 75%, 85%, 98%, respectively, with a significant increase, p < 0.01), obtaining statistically significant improvements in performance during the tests (p < 0.05). Experimental results, together with qualitative ratings provided by the subjects, show a good acceptance and the effectiveness of the proposed solution.

  14. Parallel implementation of the particle simulation method with dynamic load balancing: Toward realistic geodynamical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuichi, M.; Nishiura, D.

    2015-12-01

    Fully Lagrangian methods such as Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) and Discrete Element Method (DEM) have been widely used to solve the continuum and particles motions in the computational geodynamics field. These mesh-free methods are suitable for the problems with the complex geometry and boundary. In addition, their Lagrangian nature allows non-diffusive advection useful for tracking history dependent properties (e.g. rheology) of the material. These potential advantages over the mesh-based methods offer effective numerical applications to the geophysical flow and tectonic processes, which are for example, tsunami with free surface and floating body, magma intrusion with fracture of rock, and shear zone pattern generation of granular deformation. In order to investigate such geodynamical problems with the particle based methods, over millions to billion particles are required for the realistic simulation. Parallel computing is therefore important for handling such huge computational cost. An efficient parallel implementation of SPH and DEM methods is however known to be difficult especially for the distributed-memory architecture. Lagrangian methods inherently show workload imbalance problem for parallelization with the fixed domain in space, because particles move around and workloads change during the simulation. Therefore dynamic load balance is key technique to perform the large scale SPH and DEM simulation. In this work, we present the parallel implementation technique of SPH and DEM method utilizing dynamic load balancing algorithms toward the high resolution simulation over large domain using the massively parallel super computer system. Our method utilizes the imbalances of the executed time of each MPI process as the nonlinear term of parallel domain decomposition and minimizes them with the Newton like iteration method. In order to perform flexible domain decomposition in space, the slice-grid algorithm is used. Numerical tests show that our

  15. Verification Benchmarks to Assess the Implementation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Based Hemolysis Prediction Models.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, Prasanna; D'Souza, Gavin; Horner, Marc; Malinauskas, Richard A; Myers, Matthew R

    2015-09-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop verification and validation (V&V) standards for using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the evaluation of medical devices, we have developed idealized flow-based verification benchmarks to assess the implementation of commonly cited power-law based hemolysis models in CFD. Verification process ensures that all governing equations are solved correctly and the model is free of user and numerical errors. To perform verification for power-law based hemolysis modeling, analytical solutions for the Eulerian power-law blood damage model (which estimates hemolysis index (HI) as a function of shear stress and exposure time) were obtained for Couette and inclined Couette flow models, and for Newtonian and non-Newtonian pipe flow models. Subsequently, CFD simulations of fluid flow and HI were performed using Eulerian and three different Lagrangian-based hemolysis models and compared with the analytical solutions. For all the geometries, the blood damage results from the Eulerian-based CFD simulations matched the Eulerian analytical solutions within ∼1%, which indicates successful implementation of the Eulerian hemolysis model. Agreement between the Lagrangian and Eulerian models depended upon the choice of the hemolysis power-law constants. For the commonly used values of power-law constants (α  = 1.9-2.42 and β  = 0.65-0.80), in the absence of flow acceleration, most of the Lagrangian models matched the Eulerian results within 5%. In the presence of flow acceleration (inclined Couette flow), moderate differences (∼10%) were observed between the Lagrangian and Eulerian models. This difference increased to greater than 100% as the beta exponent decreased. These simplified flow problems can be used as standard benchmarks for verifying the implementation of blood damage predictive models in commercial and open-source CFD codes. The current study only used power-law model as an illustrative example to emphasize the need

  16. Development of optical automatic positioning and wafer defect detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Chuen-Lin; Lai, Qun-Huang; Lin, Chern-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The data of a wafer with defects can provide engineers with very important information and clues to improve the yield rate and quality in manufacturing. This paper presents a microscope automatic positioning and wafer detection system with human-machine interface based on image processing and fuzzy inference algorithms. In the proposed system, a XY table is used to move the position of each die on 6 inch or 8 inch wafers. Then, a high-resolution CCD and one set of two-axis optical linear encoder are used to accurately measure the position on the wafer. Finally, the developed human-machine interface is used to display the current position of an actual wafer in order to complete automatic positioning, and a wafer map database can be created. In the process of defect detection, CCD is used for image processing, and during preprocessing, it is required to filter noise, acquire the defect characteristics, define the defective template, and then take the characteristic points of the defective template as the reference input for fuzzy inference. A high-accuracy optical automatic positioning and wafer defect detection system is thus constructed. This study focused on automatic detection of spots, scratches, and bruises, and attempted to reduce the time to detect defective die and improve the accuracy of determining the defects of semiconductor devices.

  17. Techniques for the evaluation of outgassing from polymeric wafer pods

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, D.C.; Liang, A.; Thornberg, S.M.; Bender, S.F.; Lujan, R.D.; Blewer, R.S.; Bowers, W.D.

    1994-03-01

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in using wafer-level isolation environments or pods (microenvironments) to provide a more controllable, cleaner wafer environment during wafer processing. It has been shown that pods can be effective in reducing the amount of particulate contamination on wafers during manufacturing. However, there have also been studies that indicate that pods and wafer boxes can be the source of condensible, molecular organic contamination. This paper summarizes the work that has been performed during the past year at Sandia National Laboratories` Contamination Free Manufacturing Research Center (CFMRC) on (1) devising standard, low-temperature, high sensitivity techniques to detect outgassing of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from polymers used to construct wafer pods and (2) development of a technique that can be used to continuously measure the condensible contamination within pods so that the pod environment can be monitored during manufacturing. Although these techniques have been developed specifically for assessing contamination threats from wafer pods, they can be used to evaluate other potential contamination sources. The high sensitivity outgassing techniques can be used to evaluate outgassing of volatiles from other clean-room materials and the real-time outgassing sensor can be used to monitor contamination condensation in non-pod environments such as ballroom-type cleanrooms and minienvironments.

  18. Using Sociocultural Perspectives: The Dynamic Process of Designing and Implementing Class Activities in an Online Japanese Language Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibakawa, Mayumi

    2012-01-01

    The study documented the dynamic process of designing and implementing instructional interventions in an online course of Japanese language and culture at a two-year college. The results have impact in three distinct areas: pedagogical, theoretical, and methodological. First, the interventions that encouraged student agency with rich…

  19. Implementation of a Research-Based Lab Module in a High School Chemistry Curriculum: A Study of Classroom Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilarz, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    For this study, a research-based lab module was implemented in two high school chemistry classes for the purpose of examining classroom dynamics throughout the process of students completing the module. A research-based lab module developed for use in undergraduate laboratories by the Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education (CASPiE) was…

  20. Implementing Dynamic Assessment of Vocabulary Development as a Trialogical Learning Process: A Practice of Teacher Support in Primary Education Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Veen, Chiel; Dobber, Marjolein; van Oers, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic Assessment (DA) has received a considerable amount of attention in the educational sciences and beyond. DA combines instruction or feedback with assessment or testing within a single activity. DA has great potential for classroom practices, but has not been implemented in many classrooms yet. In this article, we argue that teacher…

  1. Capabilities and performance of the Automated Planet Finder telescope with the implementation of a dynamic scheduler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, Jennifer; Holden, Bradford; Hanson, Russell; Laughlin, Greg; Vogt, Steve; Butler, Paul; Keiser, Sandy; Deich, William

    2015-10-01

    We report initial performance results emerging from 600 h of observations with the Automated Planet Finder (APF) telescope and Levy spectrometer located at UCO/Lick Observatory. We have obtained multiple spectra of 80 G, K, and M-type stars, which comprise 4954 individual Doppler radial velocity (RV) measurements with a median internal uncertainty of 1.35 ms-1. We find a strong, expected correlation between the number of photons accumulated in the 5000 to 6200 Å iodine region of the spectrum and the resulting internal uncertainty estimates. Additionally, we find an offset between the population of G and K stars and the M stars within the dataset when comparing these parameters. As a consequence of their increased spectral line densities, M-type stars permit the same level of internal uncertainty with 2× fewer photons than G-type and K-type stars. When observing M stars, we show that the APF/Levy has essentially the same speed-on-sky as Keck/high resolution echelle spectrometer (HIRES) for precision RVs. In the interest of using the APF for long-duration RV surveys, we have designed and implemented a dynamic scheduling algorithm. We discuss the operation of the scheduler, which monitors ambient conditions and combines on-sky information with a database of survey targets to make intelligent, real-time targeting decisions.

  2. Combined aerodynamic and structural dynamic problem emulating routines (CASPER): Theory and implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William H.

    1985-01-01

    The Combined Aerodynamic and Structural Dynamic Problem Emulating Routines (CASPER) is a collection of data-base modification computer routines that can be used to simulate Navier-Stokes flow through realistic, time-varying internal flow fields. The Navier-Stokes equation used involves calculations in all three dimensions and retains all viscous terms. The only term neglected in the current implementation is gravitation. The solution approach is of an interative, time-marching nature. Calculations are based on Lagrangian aerodynamic elements (aeroelements). It is assumed that the relationships between a particular aeroelement and its five nearest neighbor aeroelements are sufficient to make a valid simulation of Navier-Stokes flow on a small scale and that the collection of all small-scale simulations makes a valid simulation of a large-scale flow. In keeping with these assumptions, it must be noted that CASPER produces an imitation or simulation of Navier-Stokes flow rather than a strict numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation. CASPER is written to operate under the Parallel, Asynchronous Executive (PAX), which is described in a separate report.

  3. Using System Dynamics to Define, Study, and Implement Smart Control Strategies on the Electric Power Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Lyle G. Roybal; Robert F Jeffers

    2013-07-01

    The United States electric power grid is the most complex and expansive control system in the world. Local generation control occurs at individual units based on response time and unit economics, larger regional control coordinates unit response to error conditions, and high level large-area regional control is ultimately administered by a network of humans guided by economic and resiliency related factors. Under normal operating conditions, the grid is a relatively slow moving entity that exhibits high inertia to outside stimuli, and behaves along repeatable diurnal and seasonal patterns. However, that paradigm is quickly changing because of the increasing implementation of renewable generation sources. Renewable generators by nature cannot be tightly controlled or scheduled. They appear like a negative load to the system with all of the variability associated with load on a larger scale. Also, grid-reactive loads (i.e. smart devices) can alter their consumption based on price or demand rules adding more variability to system behavior. This paper demonstrates how a systems dynamic modeling approach capable of operating over multiple time scales, can provide valuable insight into developing new “smart-grid” control strategies and devices needed to accommodate renewable generation and regulate the frequency of the grid.

  4. Ulnar Impaction Syndrome: Ulnar Shortening vs. Arthroscopic Wafer Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Smet, Luc De; Vandenberghe, Lore; Degreef, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of ulnar shortenings was compared with that of arthroscopic wafer resections for ulnar impaction (or abutment) syndrome in patients with a positive ulnar variance. The outcome was measured by DASH score, visual analog scale for pain, and working incapacity. The mean DASH score in the ulnar shortening group was 26; in the wafer group it was 36. The VAS scores were respectively 4.4 and 4.6. The working incapacity was 7?months in the ulnar shortening group and 6.1 months in the wafer group. The differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. PMID:25032075

  5. Surface quality of silicon wafer improved by hydrodynamic effect polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wenqiang; Guan, Chaoliang; Li, Shengyi

    2014-08-01

    Differing from the traditional pad polishing, hydrodynamic effect polishing (HEP) is non-contact polishing with the wheel floated on the workpiece. A hydrodynamic lubricated film is established between the wheel and the workpiece when the wheel rotates at a certain speed in HEP. Nanoparticles mixed with deionized water are employed as the polishing slurry, and with action of the dynamic pressure, nanoparticles with high chemisorption due to the high specific surface area can easily reacted with the surface atoms forming a linkage with workpiece surface. The surface atoms are dragged away when nanoparticles are transported to separate by the flow shear stress. The development of grand scale integration put extremely high requirements on the surface quality on the silicon wafer with surface roughness at subnanometer and extremely low surface damage. In our experiment a silicon sample was processed by HEP, and the surface topography before and after polishing was observed by the atomic force microscopy. Experiment results show that plastic pits and bumpy structures on the initial surface have been removed away clearly with the removal depth of 140nm by HEP process. The processed surface roughness has been improved from 0.737nm RMS to 0.175nm RMS(10μm×10μm) and the section profile shows peaks of the process surface are almost at the same height. However, the machining ripples on the wheel surface will duplicate on the silicon surface under the action of the hydrodynamic effect. Fluid dynamic simulation demonstrated that the coarse surface on the wheel has greatly influence on the distribution of shear stress and dynamic pressure on the workpiece surface.

  6. Implementation of window shading models into dynamic whole-building simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomanowski, Bartosz Aleksander

    resistances of sealed cavities between glazing/shading layers are calculated at each time-step for various fill gases and mixtures. In addition to modeling glazing/shading layer combinations, the CFC type also provides an alternate method of modeling unshaded windows without relying on third party software to supply the solar optics and cavity resistances. To build confidence in the CFC code implementation, two comparison studies were carried out to compare the CFC type against other models. The first study compared the CFC models for unshaded windows with the standard ESP-r transparent multi-layer construction (TMC) models. The second study compared the CFC slat-type blind models with EnergyPlus 2.0. Good agreement was seen in the simulation results in both studies. The successful implementation of the Complex Fenestration Construction within ESP-r has been demonstrated in the current research. In order for ESP-r users to fully exploit the capabilities of the CFC framework, it is recommended that the current models be extended to include a facility for dynamic shading control as well as the treatment of other types of shading layers. The coupling of daylighting models with the CFC type would provide a useful tool for modeling luminance control in combination with shading control strategies. With these enhancements, it is anticipated that the CFC implementation will be of significant value to practitioners.

  7. Wafer Stepper Characterization And Process Control Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, S. C.; Friedberg, C. B.

    1982-09-01

    A process control vehicle is described which allows the characterization and comparison of wafer steppers with respect to distortion, resolution, uniformity, and misregistration. A block of test structures consisting of optical resolution patterns, verniers, and electrical line width and misalignment resistors is arrayed on an 11 x 11 grid which fills the entire available field of a 10X reticle. Fach block also contains a pair of targets for the THE laser-interferometric auto-alignment system. The ability of the auto-aligner to acquire such targets to within 500 is exploited as a metrology tool whereby the measured coordinates at each site are compared to the ideal (theoretical) coordinates to generate a vector distortion map across the field. Subsequent reduction of misregistration data is accomplished via application of the six parameter model developed by Perloff and co-workers. It is shown that these diagnostic tools permit the rapid characterization of distortion anisotropy for a given stepper and can be used to optimize and monitor level-to-level regis-tration. Further applications are suggested.

  8. Wafer-bonded 2-D CMUT arrays incorporating through-wafer trench-isolated interconnects with a supporting frame.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xuefeng; Wygant, Ira O; Lin, Der-Song; Kupnik, Mario; Oralkan, Omer; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on wafer-bonded, fully populated 2-D capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays. To date, no successful through-wafer via fabrication technique has been demonstrated that is compatible with the wafer-bonding method of making CMUT arrays. As an alternative to through-wafer vias, trench isolation with a supporting frame is incorporated into the 2-D arrays to provide through-wafer electrical connections. The CMUT arrays are built on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer, and all electrical connections to the array elements are brought to the back side of the wafer through the highly conductive silicon substrate. Neighboring array elements are separated by trenches on both the device layer and the bulk silicon. A mesh frame structure, providing mechanical support, is embedded between silicon pillars, which electrically connect to individual elements. We successfully fabricated a 16 x 16-element 2-D CMUT array using wafer bonding with a yield of 100%. Across the array, the pulse-echo amplitude distribution is uniform (rho = 6.6% of the mean amplitude). In one design, we measured a center frequency of 7.6 MHz, a peak-to-peak output pressure of 2.9 MPa at the transducer surface, and a 3-dB fractional bandwidth of 95%. Volumetric ultrasound imaging was demonstrated by chip-to-chip bonding one of the fabricated 2-D arrays to a custom-designed integrated circuit (IC). This study shows that through-wafer trench-isolation with a supporting frame is a viable solution for providing electrical interconnects to CMUT elements and that 2-D arrays fabricated using waferbonding deliver good performance.

  9. Positioning control system of three-dimensional wafer stage of lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Peng; Yan, Wei; Yang, Fan; Li, Fanxing; Hu, Song

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional wafer stage is an important component of lithography. It is required to high positioning precision and efficiency. The closed-loop positioning control system, that consists of five-phase step motor and grating scale, implements rapid and precision positioning control of the three-dimensional wafer stage. The MCU STC15W4K32S4, which is possession of six independent PWM output channels and the pulse width, period is adjustable, is used to control the three axes. The stepper motor driver and grating scale are subdivided according to the precision of lithography, and grating scale data is transmitted to the computer for display in real time via USB communication. According to the lithography material, mask parameter, incident light intensity, it's able to calculate the speed of Z axis, and then get the value of PWM period based on the mathematical formula of speed and pulse period, finally realize high precision control. Experiments show that the positioning control system of three-dimensional wafer stage can meet the requirement of lithography, the closed-loop system is high stability and precision, strong practicability.

  10. Proceedings of the Low-Cost Solar Array Wafering Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, A. D.

    1982-01-01

    The technology and economics of silicon ingot wafering for low cost solar arrays were discussed. Fixed and free abrasive sawing wire, ID, and multiblade sawing, materials, mechanisms, characterization, and innovative concepts were considered.

  11. Stress-warping relation in thin film coated wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schicker, J.; Khan, W. A.; Arnold, T.; Hirschl, C.

    2017-02-01

    A misfit strain or stress in a thin layer on the surface of a wafer lets the composite disk warp. When the wafer is thin and large, the Stoney estimation of the film stress as function of the curvature yields large errors. We present a nonlinear analytical model that describes the relationship between warpage and film stress on an anisotropic wafer, and give evidence for its suitability for large thin wafers by a comparison to finite element results. Finally, we show the confidence limit of the Stoney estimation and the benefit by the nonlinear model. For thin coatings, it can be succesfully used even without knowledge of the film properties, which was the main advantage of the Stoney estimation.

  12. Multiagent Systems Based Modeling and Implementation of Dynamic Energy Management of Smart Microgrid Using MACSimJX

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Leo; Milton, R. S.; Mahadevan, Senthilkumaran

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is implementation of multiagent system (MAS) for the advanced distributed energy management and demand side management of a solar microgrid. Initially, Java agent development environment (JADE) frame work is used to implement MAS based dynamic energy management of solar microgrid. Due to unstable nature of MATLAB, when dealing with multithreading environment, MAS operating in JADE is linked with the MATLAB using a middle ware called Multiagent Control Using Simulink with Jade Extension (MACSimJX). MACSimJX allows the solar microgrid components designed with MATLAB to be controlled by the corresponding agents of MAS. The microgrid environment variables are captured through sensors and given to agents through MATLAB/Simulink and after the agent operations in JADE, the results are given to the actuators through MATLAB for the implementation of dynamic operation in solar microgrid. MAS operating in JADE maximizes operational efficiency of solar microgrid by decentralized approach and increase in runtime efficiency due to JADE. Autonomous demand side management is implemented for optimizing the power exchange between main grid and microgrid with intermittent nature of solar power, randomness of load, and variation of noncritical load and grid price. These dynamics are considered for every time step and complex environment simulation is designed to emulate the distributed microgrid operations and evaluate the impact of agent operations. PMID:27127802

  13. Multiagent Systems Based Modeling and Implementation of Dynamic Energy Management of Smart Microgrid Using MACSimJX.

    PubMed

    Raju, Leo; Milton, R S; Mahadevan, Senthilkumaran

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is implementation of multiagent system (MAS) for the advanced distributed energy management and demand side management of a solar microgrid. Initially, Java agent development environment (JADE) frame work is used to implement MAS based dynamic energy management of solar microgrid. Due to unstable nature of MATLAB, when dealing with multithreading environment, MAS operating in JADE is linked with the MATLAB using a middle ware called Multiagent Control Using Simulink with Jade Extension (MACSimJX). MACSimJX allows the solar microgrid components designed with MATLAB to be controlled by the corresponding agents of MAS. The microgrid environment variables are captured through sensors and given to agents through MATLAB/Simulink and after the agent operations in JADE, the results are given to the actuators through MATLAB for the implementation of dynamic operation in solar microgrid. MAS operating in JADE maximizes operational efficiency of solar microgrid by decentralized approach and increase in runtime efficiency due to JADE. Autonomous demand side management is implemented for optimizing the power exchange between main grid and microgrid with intermittent nature of solar power, randomness of load, and variation of noncritical load and grid price. These dynamics are considered for every time step and complex environment simulation is designed to emulate the distributed microgrid operations and evaluate the impact of agent operations.

  14. Development of Megasonic cleaning for silicon wafers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, A.

    1980-09-01

    The major goals to develop a cleaning and drying system for processing at least 2500 three-in.-diameter wafers per hour and to reduce the process cost were achieved. The new system consists of an ammonia-hydrogen peroxide bath in which both surfaces of 3/32-in.-spaced, ion-implanted wafers are cleaned in quartz carriers moved on a belt past two pairs of Megasonic transducers. The wafers are dried in the novel room-temperature, high-velocity air dryer in the same carriers used for annealing. A new laser scanner was used effectively to monitor the cleaning ability on a sampling basis. The following factors contribute to the improved effectiveness of the process: (1) recirculation and filtration of the cleaning solution permit it to be used for at least 100,000 wafers with only a relatively small amount of chemical make-up before discarding; (2) uniform cleanliness is achieved because both sides of the wafer are Megasonically scrubbed to remove particulate impurities; (3) the novel dryer permits wafers to be dried in a high-velocity room-temperature air stream on a moving belt in their quartz carriers; and (4) the personnel safety of such a system is excellent and waste disposal has no adverse ecological impact. With the addition of mechanical transfer arms, two systems like the one developed will produce enough cleaned wafers for a 30-MW/year production facility. A projected scale-up well within the existing technology would permit a system to be assembled that produces about 12,745 wafers per hour; about 11 such systems, each occupying about 110 square feet, would be needed for each cleaning stage of a 500-MW/year production facility.

  15. Stress rate and proof-testing of silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    Fracture mechanics test methods were applied to evaluate the proof-test characteristics of single-crystal silicon wafers. The results indicate that the strength distribution of silicon wafers is truncated by proof-testing. No subcritical crack growth occurred during proof-loading, as inferred from the lack of a stress-rate effect on strength. Mechanical proof-testing appears to be an effective method for eliminating weak samples before cell processing.

  16. Implementation of Speed Variation in the Structural Dynamic Assessment of Turbomachinery Flow-Path Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Davis, R. Benjamin; DeHaye, Michael

    2013-01-01

    During the design of turbomachinery flow path components, the assessment of possible structural resonant conditions is critical. Higher frequency modes of these structures are frequently found to be subject to resonance, and in these cases, design criteria require a forced response analysis of the structure with the assumption that the excitation speed exactly equals the resonant frequency. The design becomes problematic if the response analysis shows a violation of the HCF criteria. One possible solution is to perform "finite-life" analysis, where Miner's rule is used to calculate the actual life in seconds in comparison to the required life. In this situation, it is beneficial to incorporate the fact that, for a variety of turbomachinery control reasons, the speed of the rotor does not actually dwell at a single value but instead dithers about a nominal mean speed and during the time that the excitation frequency is not equal to the resonant frequency, the damage accumulated by the structure is diminished significantly. Building on previous investigations into this process, we show that a steady-state assumption of the response is extremely accurate for this typical case, resulting in the ability to quickly account for speed variation in the finite-life analysis of a component which has previously had its peak dynamic stress at resonance calculated. A technique using Monte Carlo simulation is also presented which can be used when specific speed time histories are not available. The implementation of these techniques can prove critical for successful turbopump design, as the improvement in life when speed variation is considered is shown to be greater than a factor of two

  17. Implementation of Speed Variation in the Structural Dynamic Assessment of Turbomachinery Flow-Path Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Davis, R. Benjamin; DeHaye, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    During the design of turbomachinery flow path components, the assessment of possible structural resonant conditions is critical. Higher frequency modes of these structures are frequently found to be subject to resonance, and in these cases, design criteria require a forced response analysis of the structure with the assumption that the excitation speed exactly equals the resonant frequency. The design becomes problematic if the response analysis shows a violation of the HCF criteria. One possible solution is to perform "finite-life" analysis, where Miner's rule is used to calculate the actual life in seconds in comparison to the required life. In this situation, it is beneficial to incorporate the fact that, for a variety of turbomachinery control reasons, the speed of the rotor does not actually dwell at a single value but instead dithers about a nominal mean speed and during the time that the excitation frequency is not equal to the resonant frequency, the damage accumulated by the structure is diminished significantly. Building on previous investigations into this process, we show that a steady-state assumption of the response is extremely accurate for this typical case, resulting in the ability to quickly account for speed variation in the finite-life analysis of a component which has previously had its peak dynamic stress at resonance calculated. A technique using Monte Carlo simulation is also presented which can be used when specific speed time histories are not available. The implementation of these techniques can prove critical for successful turbopump design, as the improvement in life when speed variation is considered is shown to be greater than a factor of two.

  18. Wave-front propagation of rinsing flows on rotating semiconductor wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frostad, John M.; Ylitalo, Andy; Walls, Daniel J.; Mui, David S. L.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2016-11-01

    The semiconductor manufacturing industry is migrating to a cleaning technology that involves dispersing cleaning solutions onto a rotating wafer, similar to spin-coating. Advantages include a more continuous overall fabrication process, lower particle level, no cross contamination from the back side of a wafer, and less usage of harsh chemicals for a lower environmental impact. Rapid rotation of the wafer during rinsing can be more effective, but centrifugal forces can pull spiral-like ribbons of liquid radially outward from the advancing wave-front where particles can build up, causing higher instances of device failure at these locations. A better understanding of the rinsing flow is essential for reducing yield losses while taking advantage of the benefits of rotation. In the present work, high-speed video and image processing are used to study the dynamics of the advancing wave-front from an impinging jet on a rotating substrate. The flow-rate and rotation-speed are varied for substrates coated with a thin layer of a second liquid that has a different surface tension than the jet liquid. The difference in surface tension of the two fluids gives rise to Marangoni stresses at the interface that have a significant impact on the rinsing process, despite the extremely short time-scales involved.

  19. Electrochemical method for defect delineation in silicon-on-insulator wafers

    DOEpatents

    Guilinger, Terry R.; Jones, Howland D. T.; Kelly, Michael J.; Medernach, John W.; Stevenson, Joel O.; Tsao, Sylvia S.

    1991-01-01

    An electrochemical method for defect delineation in thin-film SOI or SOS wafers in which a surface of a silicon wafer is electrically connected so as to control the voltage of the surface within a specified range, the silicon wafer is then contacted with an electrolyte, and, after removing the electrolyte, defects and metal contamination in the silicon wafer are identified.

  20. Further investigation of EUV process sensitivities for wafer track processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradon, Neil; Nafus, K.; Shite, H.; Kitano, J.; Kosugi, H.; Goethals, M.; Cheng, S.; Hermans, J.; Hendrickx, E.; Baudemprez, B.; Van Den Heuvel, D.

    2010-04-01

    As Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography technology shows promising results below 40nm feature sizes, TOKYO ELECTRON LTD.(TEL) is committed to understanding the fundamentals needed to improve our technology, thereby enabling customers to meet roadmap expectations. TEL continues collaboration with imec for evaluation of Coater/Developer processing sensitivities using the ASML Alpha Demo Tool for EUV exposures. The results from the collaboration help develop the necessary hardware for EUV Coater/Developer processing. In previous work, processing sensitivities of the resist materials were investigated to determine the impact on critical dimension (CD) uniformity and defectivity. In this work, new promising resist materials have been studied and more information pertaining to EUV exposures was obtained. Specifically, post exposure bake (PEB) impact to CD is studied in addition to dissolution characteristics and resist material hydrophobicity. Additionally, initial results show the current status of CDU and defectivity with the ADT/CLEAN TRACK ACTTM 12 lithocluster. Analysis of a five wafer batch of CDU wafers shows within wafer and wafer to wafer contribution from track processing. A pareto of a patterned wafer defectivity test gives initial insight into the process defects with the current processing conditions. From analysis of these data, it's shown that while improvements in processing are certainly possible, the initial results indicate a manufacturable process for EUV.

  1. Real-time direct and diffraction X-ray imaging of irregular silicon wafer breakage

    PubMed Central

    Rack, Alexander; Scheel, Mario; Danilewsky, Andreas N.

    2016-01-01

    Fracture and breakage of single crystals, particularly of silicon wafers, are multi-scale problems: the crack tip starts propagating on an atomic scale with the breaking of chemical bonds, forms crack fronts through the crystal on the micrometre scale and ends macroscopically in catastrophic wafer shattering. Total wafer breakage is a severe problem for the semiconductor industry, not only during handling but also during temperature treatments, leading to million-dollar costs per annum in a device production line. Knowledge of the relevant dynamics governing perfect cleavage along the {111} or {110} faces, and of the deflection into higher indexed {hkl} faces of higher energy, is scarce due to the high velocity of the process. Imaging techniques are commonly limited to depicting only the state of a wafer before the crack and in the final state. This paper presents, for the first time, in situ high-speed crack propagation under thermal stress, imaged simultaneously in direct transmission and diffraction X-ray imaging. It shows how the propagating crack tip and the related strain field can be tracked in the phase-contrast and diffracted images, respectively. Movies with a time resolution of microseconds per frame reveal that the strain and crack tip do not propagate continuously or at a constant speed. Jumps in the crack tip position indicate pinning of the crack tip for about 1–2 ms followed by jumps faster than 2–6 m s−1, leading to a macroscopically observed average velocity of 0.028–0.055 m s−1. The presented results also give a proof of concept that the described X-ray technique is compatible with studying ultra-fast cracks up to the speed of sound. PMID:27006774

  2. Stability of laser-propelled wafer satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Prashant; Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip; Zhang, Qicheng; Madajian, Jonathan; Brashears, Travis; Kulkarni, Neeraj; Cohen, Alexander; Griswold, Janelle

    2016-09-01

    For interstellar missions, directed energy is envisioned to drive wafer-scale spacecraft to relativistic speeds. Spacecraft propulsion is provided by a large array of phase-locked lasers, either in Earth orbit or stationed on the ground. The directed-energy beam is focused on the spacecraft, which includes a reflective sail that propels the craft by reflecting the beam. Fluctuations and asymmetry in the beam will create rotational forces on the sail, so the sail geometry must possess an inherent, passive stabilizing effect. A hyperboloid shape is proposed, since changes in the incident beam angle due to yaw will passively counteract rotational forces. This paper explores passive stability properties of a hyperboloid reflector being bombarded by directed-energy beam. A 2D cross-section is analyzed for stability under simulated asymmetric loads. Passive stabilization is confirmed over a range of asymmetries. Realistic values of radiation pressure magnitude are drawn from the physics of light-mirror interaction. Estimates of beam asymmetry are drawn from optical modeling of a laser array far-field intensity using fixed and stochastic phase perturbations. A 3D multi-physics model is presented, using boundary conditions and forcing terms derived from beam simulations and lightmirror interaction models. The question of optimal sail geometry can be pursued, using concepts developed for the baseline hyperboloid. For example, higher curvature of the hyperboloid increases stability, but reduces effective thrust. A hyperboloid sail could be optimized by seeking the minimum curvature that is stable over the expected range of beam asymmetries.

  3. Development of a Wafer Positioning System for the Sandia Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wronosky, John B.; Smith, Tony G.; Darnold, Joel R.

    1996-01-01

    A wafer positioning system was recently developed by Sandia National Laboratories for an Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUVL) tool. The system, which utilizes a magnetically levitated fine stage to provide ultra-precise positioning in all six degrees of freedom, incorporates technological improvements resulting from four years of prototype development. This paper describes the design, implementation, and functional capability of the system. Specifics regarding control system electronics, including software and control algorithm structure, as well as performance design goals and test results are presented. Potential system enhancements, some of which are in process, are also discussed.

  4. Investigation of the Relationship between Whole-Wafer Strength and Control of Its Edge Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Ying; Tsai, Ming-Hsing; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Jing, Ming-Haw; Chang, Yukon

    2009-12-01

    Silicon wafer breakage has become a major concern for all semiconductor fabrication lines because it is brittle, and thus high stresses are easily induced in its manufacture. The production cost of devices significantly increases even for a breakage loss of a few percent if wafers are broken near completion. Even wafer breakage near the beginning of the process is significant. In this investigation, we develop a brand new approach to reducing breakage by using a charge-coupled device (CCD) to capture the cross-section image of the wafer at its edge; the data measured at the edge can be used to determine overall wafer strength. Analysis of the image of the wafer edge is used to characterize silicon strength, and a simple drop test is conducted to elucidate wafer failure, improving our understanding of the accumulation of stress in the wafer bulk before failure. We also describe many of the improvements that have resulted in the virtual elimination of wafer breakage due to unidentified causes. Our analysis gives the optimal front size (B1), edge widths (A1,A2), and bevel angle (θ) for the edge profiles of wafers to prevent wafer breakage. Briefly, when a suitable material and suitable process control approaches are utilized, silicon wafer breakage can be prevented. This is the first investigation providing evidence that whole-wafer strength is an important issue. We present a physical model to explain why wafer fracture has become an increasingly serious problem as the diameter of wafers has increased. The control of wafer edge geometry has been demonstrated to be an effective means of protecting wafers with large diameters against breakage. This model reveals that the breakage rate of wafers can be reduced by controlling the uniformity of the differences between the front size and the rear edge widths during the wafer manufacturing process.

  5. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of DNA: implementation and validation of the AMBER98 force field in LAMMPS.

    PubMed

    Grindon, Christina; Harris, Sarah; Evans, Tom; Novik, Keir; Coveney, Peter; Laughton, Charles

    2004-07-15

    Molecular modelling played a central role in the discovery of the structure of DNA by Watson and Crick. Today, such modelling is done on computers: the more powerful these computers are, the more detailed and extensive can be the study of the dynamics of such biological macromolecules. To fully harness the power of modern massively parallel computers, however, we need to develop and deploy algorithms which can exploit the structure of such hardware. The Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) is a scalable molecular dynamics code including long-range Coulomb interactions, which has been specifically designed to function efficiently on parallel platforms. Here we describe the implementation of the AMBER98 force field in LAMMPS and its validation for molecular dynamics investigations of DNA structure and flexibility against the benchmark of results obtained with the long-established code AMBER6 (Assisted Model Building with Energy Refinement, version 6). Extended molecular dynamics simulations on the hydrated DNA dodecamer d(CTTTTGCAAAAG)(2), which has previously been the subject of extensive dynamical analysis using AMBER6, show that it is possible to obtain excellent agreement in terms of static, dynamic and thermodynamic parameters between AMBER6 and LAMMPS. In comparison with AMBER6, LAMMPS shows greatly improved scalability in massively parallel environments, opening up the possibility of efficient simulations of order-of-magnitude larger systems and/or for order-of-magnitude greater simulation times.

  6. Quantitative phase measurement for wafer-level optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Weijuan; Wen, Yongfu; Wang, Zhaomin; Yang, Fang; Huang, Lei; Zuo, Chao

    2015-07-01

    Wafer-level-optics now is widely used in smart phone camera, mobile video conferencing or in medical equipment that require tiny cameras. Extracting quantitative phase information has received increased interest in order to quantify the quality of manufactured wafer-level-optics, detect defective devices before packaging, and provide feedback for manufacturing process control, all at the wafer-level for high-throughput microfabrication. We demonstrate two phase imaging methods, digital holographic microscopy (DHM) and Transport-of-Intensity Equation (TIE) to measure the phase of the wafer-level lenses. DHM is a laser-based interferometric method based on interference of two wavefronts. It can perform a phase measurement in a single shot. While a minimum of two measurements of the spatial intensity of the optical wave in closely spaced planes perpendicular to the direction of propagation are needed to do the direct phase retrieval by solving a second-order differential equation, i.e., with a non-iterative deterministic algorithm from intensity measurements using the Transport-of-Intensity Equation (TIE). But TIE is a non-interferometric method, thus can be applied to partial-coherence light. We demonstrated the capability and disability for the two phase measurement methods for wafer-level optics inspection.

  7. Measuring Radiation Patterns of Reconfigurable Patch Antennas on Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus and technique have been devised for measuring the radiation pattern of a microwave patch antenna that is one of a number of identical units that have been fabricated in a planar array on a high-resistivity silicon wafer. The apparatus and technique are intended, more specifically, for application to such an antenna that includes a DC-controlled microelectromechanical system (MEMS) actuator for switching the antenna between two polarization states or between two resonance frequencies. Prior to the development of the present apparatus and technique, patch antennas on wafers were tested by techniques and equipment that are more suited to testing of conventional printed-circuit antennas. The techniques included sawing of the wafers to isolate individual antennas for testing. The equipment included custom-built test fixtures that included special signal launchers and transmission-line transitions. The present apparatus and technique eliminate the need for sawing wafers and for custom-built test fixtures, thereby making it possible to test antennas in less time and at less cost. Moreover, in a production setting, elimination of the premature sawing of wafers for testing reduces loss from breakage, thereby enhancing yield.

  8. Silicon wafer-based tandem cells: The ultimate photovoltaic solution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Martin A.

    2014-03-01

    Recent large price reductions with wafer-based cells have increased the difficulty of dislodging silicon solar cell technology from its dominant market position. With market leaders expected to be manufacturing modules above 16% efficiency at 0.36/Watt by 2017, even the cost per unit area (60-70/m2) will be difficult for any thin-film photovoltaic technology to significantly undercut. This may make dislodgement likely only by appreciably higher energy conversion efficiency approaches. A silicon wafer-based cell able to capitalize on on-going cost reductions within the mainstream industry, but with an appreciably higher than present efficiency, might therefore provide the ultimate PV solution. With average selling prices of 156 mm quasi-square monocrystalline Si photovoltaic wafers recently approaching 1 (per wafer), wafers now provide clean, low cost templates for overgrowth of thin, wider bandgap high performance cells, nearly doubling silicon's ultimate efficiency potential. The range of possible Si-based tandem approaches is reviewed together with recent results and ultimate prospects.

  9. A benchmark investigation on cleaning photomasks using wafer cleaning technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindt, Louis; Burnham, Jay; Marmillion, Pat

    2004-12-01

    As new technologies are developed for smaller linewidths, the specifications for mask cleanliness become much stricter. Not only must the particle removal efficiency increase, but the largest allowable particle size decreases. Specifications for film thickness and surface roughness are becoming tighter and consequently the integrity of these films must be maintained in order to preserve the functionality of the masks. Residual contamination remaining on the surface of the mask after cleaning processes can lead to subpellicle defect growth once the mask is exposed in a stepper environment. Only during the last several years, has an increased focus been put on improving mask cleaning. Over the years, considerably more effort has been put into developing advanced wafer cleaning technologies. However, because of the small market involved with mask cleaning, wafer cleaning equipment vendors have been reluctant to invest time and effort into developing cleaning processes and adapting their toolset to accommodate masks. With the advent of 300 mm processing, wafer cleaning tools are now more easily adapted to processing masks. These wafer cleaning technologies may offer a solution to the difficulties of mask cleaning and need to be investigated to determine whether or not they warrant continued investigation. This paper focuses on benchmarking advanced wafer cleaning technologies applied to mask cleaning. Ozonated water, hydrogenated water, super critical fluids, and cryogenic cleaning have been investigated with regards to stripping resist and cleaning particles from masks. Results that include film thickness changes, surface contamination, and particle removal efficiency will be discussed.

  10. Use of dMLC for implementation of dynamic respiratory-gated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pepin, Eric W.; Wu, Huanmei; Shirato, Hiroki

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To simulate and evaluate the use of dynamic multileaf collimators (dMLC) in respiratory gating to compensate for baseline drift.Methods: Tumor motion tracking data from 30 lung tumors over 322 treatment fractions was analyzed with the finite state model. A dynamic respiratory gating window was established in real-time by determining the average positions during the previous two end-of-expiration breathing phases and centering the dMLC aperture on a weighted average of these positions. A simulated dMLC with physical motion constraints was used in dynamic gating treatment simulations. Fluence maps were created to provide a statistical description of radiation delivery for each fraction. Duty cycle was also calculated for each fraction.Results: The average duty cycle was 2.3% greater under dynamic gating conditions. Dynamic gating also showed higher fluences and less tumor obstruction. Additionally, dynamic gating required fewer beam toggles and each delivery period was longer on average than with static gating.Conclusions: The use of dynamic gating showed better performance than static gating and the physical constraints of a dMLC were shown to not be an impediment to dynamic gating.

  11. Optical wafer metrology sensors for process-robust CD and overlay control in semiconductor device manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Boef, Arie J.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents three optical wafer metrology sensors that are used in lithography for robustly measuring the shape and position of wafers and device patterns on these wafers. The first two sensors are a level sensor and an alignment sensor that measure, respectively, a wafer height map and a wafer position before a new pattern is printed on the wafer. The third sensor is an optical scatterometer that measures critical dimension-variations and overlay after the resist has been exposed and developed. These sensors have different optical concepts but they share the same challenge that sub-nm precision is required at high throughput on a large variety of processed wafers and in the presence of unknown wafer processing variations. It is the purpose of this paper to explain these challenges in more detail and give an overview of the various solutions that have been introduced over the years to come to process-robust optical wafer metrology.

  12. On-wafer magnetic resonance of magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Charles A. E.; Russek, Stephen E.; Booth, James C.; Kabos, Pavel; Usselman, Robert J.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance measurements of ferumoxytol and TEMPO were made using an on-wafer transmission line technique with a vector network analyzer, allowing for broadband measurements of small sample volumes (4 nL) and small numbers of spins (1 nmol). On-wafer resonance measurements were compared with standard single-frequency cavity-based electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements using a new power conservation approach and the results show similar line shape. On-wafer magnetic resonance measurements using integrated microfluidics and microwave technology can significantly reduce the cost and sample volumes required for EPR spectral analysis and allow for integration of EPR with existing lab-on-a-chip processing and characterization techniques for point-of-care medical diagnostic applications.

  13. Growth of silver nanowires on GaAs wafers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yugang

    2011-05-01

    Silver (Ag) nanowires with chemically clean surfaces have been directly grown on semi-insulating gallium arsenide (GaAs) wafers through a simple solution/solid interfacial reaction (SSIR) between the GaAs wafers themselves and aqueous solutions of silver nitrate (AgNO(3)) at room temperature. The success in synthesis of Ag nanowires mainly benefits from the low concentration of surface electrons in the semi-insulating GaAs wafers that can lead to the formation of a low-density of nuclei that facilitate their anisotropic growth into nanowires. The resulting Ag nanowires exhibit rough surfaces and reasonably good electric conductivity. These characteristics are beneficial to sensing applications based on single-nanowire surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and possible surface-adsorption-induced conductivity variation.

  14. Wafer-scale synthesis and transfer of graphene films.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngbin; Bae, Sukang; Jang, Houk; Jang, Sukjae; Zhu, Shou-En; Sim, Sung Hyun; Song, Young Il; Hong, Byung Hee; Ahn, Jong-Hyun

    2010-02-10

    We developed means to produce wafer scale, high-quality graphene films as large as 3 in. wafer size on Ni and Cu films under ambient pressure and transfer them onto arbitrary substrates through instantaneous etching of metal layers. We also demonstrated the applications of the large-area graphene films for the batch fabrication of field-effect transistor (FET) arrays and stretchable strain gauges showing extraordinary performances. Transistors showed the hole and electron mobilities of the device of 1100 +/- 70 and 550 +/- 50 cm(2)/(V s) at drain bias of -0.75 V, respectively. The piezo-resistance gauge factor of strain sensor was approximately 6.1. These methods represent a significant step toward the realization of graphene devices in wafer scale as well as application in optoelectronics, flexible and stretchable electronics.

  15. Monitoring of acoustic emission activity using thin wafer piezoelectric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Blaine; Zagrai, Andrei; Meisner, Daniel; Momeni, Sepand

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a well-known technique for monitoring onset and propagation of material damage. The technique has demonstrated utility in assessment of metallic and composite materials in applications ranging from civil structures to aerospace vehicles. While over the course of few decades AE hardware has changed dramatically with the sensors experiencing little changes. A traditional acoustic emission sensor solution utilizes a thickness resonance of the internal piezoelectric element which, coupled with internal amplification circuit, results in relatively large sensor footprint. Thin wafer piezoelectric sensors are small and unobtrusive, but they have seen limited AE applications due to low signal-to-noise ratio and other operation difficulties. In this contribution, issues and possible solutions pertaining to the utility of thin wafer piezoelectrics as AE sensors are discussed. Results of AE monitoring of fatigue damage using thin wafer piezoelectric and conventional AE sensors are presented.

  16. Low cost wafer metrology using a NIR low coherence interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Gwang; Seo, Yong Bum; Joo, Ki-Nam

    2013-06-03

    In this investigation, a low cost Si wafer metrology system based on low coherence interferometry using NIR light is proposed and verified. The whole system consists of two low coherence interferometric principles: low coherence scanning interferometry (LCSI) for measuring surface profiles and spectrally-resolved interferometry (SRI) to obtain the nominal optical thickness of the double-sided polished Si wafer. The combination of two techniques can reduce the measurement time and give adequate dimensional information of the Si wafer. The wavelength of the optical source is around 1 μm, for which transmission is non-zero for undoped silicon and can be also detected by a typical CCD camera. Because of the typical CCD camera, the whole system can be constructed inexpensively.

  17. Minority lifetime degradation of silicon wafers after electric zone melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M. C.; Yang, C. F.; Lan, C. W.

    2015-06-01

    The degradation of minority lifetime of mono- and multi-crystalline silicon wafers after electric zone melting, a simple and contamination-free process, was investigated. The thermal-stress induced dislocations were responsible to the degradation; however, the grain size also played a crucial role. It was believed that the grain boundaries helped the relaxation of thermal stress, so that the degradation was reduced as the grain size decreased. In addition to lifetime mapping and etch pit density, photoluminescence mapping was also used to examine the electrically active defects after zone melting. Factors affecting lifetime degradation of silicon wafers after electric zone melting were examined. Small-grain multi-crystalline wafers showed better lifetime after zone melting. Twining area showed better lifetime. The formation of new grains relaxed the thermal stress mitigating lifetime degradation.

  18. IGBT scaling principle toward CMOS compatible wafer processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Omura, Ichiro

    2013-02-01

    A scaling principle for trench gate IGBT is proposed. CMOS technology on large diameter wafer enables to produce various digital circuits with higher performance and lower cost. The transistor cell structure becomes laterally smaller and smaller and vertically shallower and shallower. In contrast, latest IGBTs have rather deeper trench structure to obtain lower on-state voltage drop and turn-off loss. In the aspect of the process uniformity and wafer warpage, manufacturing such structure in the CMOS factory is difficult. In this paper, we show the scaling principle toward shallower structure and better performance. The principle is theoretically explained by our previously proposed "Structure Oriented" analytical model. The principle represents a possibility of technology direction and roadmap for future IGBT for improving the device performance consistent with lower cost and high volume productivity with CMOS compatible large diameter wafer technologies.

  19. Microwave Induced Direct Bonding of Single Crystal Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budraa, N. K.; Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.

    1999-01-01

    We have heated polished doped single-crystal silicon wafers in a single mode microwave cavity to temperatures where surface to surface bonding occurred. The absorption of microwaves and heating of the wafers is attributed to the inclusion of n-type or p-type impurities into these substrates. A cylindrical cavity TM (sub 010) standing wave mode was used to irradiate samples of various geometry's at positions of high magnetic field. This process was conducted in vacuum to exclude plasma effects. This initial study suggests that the inclusion of impurities in single crystal silicon significantly improved its microwave absorption (loss factor) to a point where heating silicon wafers directly can be accomplished in minimal time. Bonding of these substrates, however, occurs only at points of intimate surface to surface contact. The inclusion of a thin metallic layer on the surfaces enhances the bonding process.

  20. Dynamic partial reconfiguration implementation of the SVM/KNN multi-classifier on FPGA for bioinformatics application.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Hanaa M; Benkrid, Khaled; Seker, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Bioinformatics data tend to be highly dimensional in nature thus impose significant computational demands. To resolve limitations of conventional computing methods, several alternative high performance computing solutions have been proposed by scientists such as Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) and Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). The latter have shown to be efficient and high in performance. In recent years, FPGAs have been benefiting from dynamic partial reconfiguration (DPR) feature for adding flexibility to alter specific regions within the chip. This work proposes combing the use of FPGAs and DPR to build a dynamic multi-classifier architecture that can be used in processing bioinformatics data. In bioinformatics, applying different classification algorithms to the same dataset is desirable in order to obtain comparable, more reliable and consensus decision, but it can consume long time when performed on conventional PC. The DPR implementation of two common classifiers, namely support vector machines (SVMs) and K-nearest neighbor (KNN) are combined together to form a multi-classifier FPGA architecture which can utilize specific region of the FPGA to work as either SVM or KNN classifier. This multi-classifier DPR implementation achieved at least ~8x reduction in reconfiguration time over the single non-DPR classifier implementation, and occupied less space and hardware resources than having both classifiers. The proposed architecture can be extended to work as an ensemble classifier.

  1. 450mm wafer patterning with jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Ecron; Hellebrekers, Paul; Hofemann, Paul; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    The next step in the evolution of wafer size is 450mm. Any transition in sizing is an enormous task that must account for fabrication space, environmental health and safety concerns, wafer standards, metrology capability, individual process module development and device integration. For 450mm, an aggressive goal of 2018 has been set, with pilot line operation as early as 2016. To address these goals, consortiums have been formed to establish the infrastructure necessary to the transition, with a focus on the development of both process and metrology tools. Central to any process module development, which includes deposition, etch and chemical mechanical polishing is the lithography tool. In order to address the need for early learning and advance process module development, Molecular Imprints Inc. has provided the industry with the first advanced lithography platform, the Imprio® 450, capable of patterning a full 450mm wafer. The Imprio 450 was accepted by Intel at the end of 2012 and is now being used to support the 450mm wafer process development demands as part of a multi-year wafer services contract to facilitate the semiconductor industry's transition to lower cost 450mm wafer production. The Imprio 450 uses a Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process that employs drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for markets including NAND Flash memory, patterned media for hard disk drives and displays. This paper reviews the recent performance of the J-FIL technology (including overlay, throughput and defectivity), mask development improvements provided by Dai Nippon Printing, and the application of the technology to a 450mm lithography platform.

  2. Recovery Act: Novel Kerf-Free PV Wafering that provides a low-cost approach to generate wafers from 150um to 50um in thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, Theodore E.

    2013-05-06

    The technical paper summarizes the project work conducted in the development of Kerf-Free silicon wafering equipment for silicon solar wafering. This new PolyMax technology uses a two step process of implantation and cleaving to exfoliate 50um to 120um wafers with thicknesses ranging from 50um to 120um from a 125mm or 156mm pseudo-squared silicon ingot. No kerf is generated using this method of wafering. This method of wafering contrasts with the current method of making silicon solar wafers using the industry standard wire saw equipment. The report summarizes the activity conducted by Silicon Genesis Corporation in working to develop this technology further and to define the roadmap specifications for the first commercial proto-type equipment for high volume solar wafer manufacturing using the PolyMax technology.

  3. Apparatus and method for measuring the thickness of a semiconductor wafer

    DOEpatents

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1995-03-07

    Apparatus for measuring thicknesses of semiconductor wafers is discussed, comprising: housing means for supporting a wafer in a light-tight environment; a light source mounted to the housing at one side of the wafer to emit light of a predetermined wavelength to normally impinge the wafer; a light detector supported at a predetermined distance from a side of the wafer opposite the side on which a light source impinges and adapted to receive light transmitted through the wafer; and means for measuring the transmitted light. 4 figs.

  4. An application of selective electrochemical wafer thinning for silicon characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Medernach, J.W.; Stein, H.J.; Stevenson, J.O.

    1990-01-01

    A new technique is reported for the rapid determination of interstitial oxygen (O{sub i}) in heavily doped n{sup +} and p{sup +} silicon. This technique includes application of a selective electrochemical thinning (SET) process and FTIR transmittance measurement on a limited area of a silicon wafer. The O{sub i} is calculated using ASTM F1188--88 with the IOC 88 calibration factor. An advantage of SET over mechanical thinning is that the original wafer thickness and diameter are maintained for additional processing. 1 tab.

  5. Hypervelocity impact on silicon wafers with metallic and polymeric coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, E. A.; Scott, H. J.; Abraham, M.; Kearsley, A. T.

    2001-10-01

    Current and near future developments in microsystem technologies (MST, also known as MEMS) are defining a new trend towards lower mass, smaller volume spacecraft, without loss of functionality. The MST spacecraft components are etched onto silicon wafers coated with different metallic or polymeric material layers (typically 1-2 microns in thickness). These silicon wafers are then integrated to provide the spacecraft structure subsystem. For the majority of spacecraft, small debris and meteoroid impacts are not often able to cause large satellite platform failures, due to the shielding provided by existing structural and thermal materials and the high percentage of 'empty volume' contained within a typical spacecraft structure. Smaller satellites incorporating MST and based on silicon wafers, whilst presenting a smaller surface area, are expected to be vulnerable to impacts as the lower subsystem mass defines a less substantial structure, providing significantly less protection against impact. This paper presents results of a BNSC-funded study aimed at identifying the vulnerability of MST technologies based on silicon wafers to space debris and meteoroid impact. Hypervelocity impact tests were carried out on silicon wafers coated with five different types of deposited material. Multiple glass spheres were fired simultaneously at velocities in the range of 6 km/s. The impact results identify the hypervelocity impact response of the silicon wafers. The impacted targets showed a brittle material damage morphology (defined by fracture) and linked to the crystalline structure of the silicon wafer. As predicted from the mechanical properties, it was found that the silicon tended to fracture along the 111 planes. Cross-sectioned craters also showed the crystalline structure of the silicon, with the onset of fracture-driven spall on the rear surface. The metal and polymeric coatings produced diverse damage morphologies, with delamination zones being up to twice the diameter

  6. ThermoData Engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 6. Dynamic web-based data dissemination through the NIST Web Thermo Tables.

    PubMed

    Kroenlein, Kenneth; Muzny, Chris D; Diky, Vladimir; Kazakov, Andrei F; Chirico, Robert D; Magee, Joseph W; Abdulagatov, Ilmutdin; Frenkel, Michael

    2011-06-27

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported recently in this journal. In the present paper, we describe the development of a World Wide Web-based interface to TDE evaluations of pure compound properties, including critical properties, phase boundary equilibria (vapor pressures, sublimation pressures, and crystal-liquid boundary pressures), densities, energetic properties, and transport properties. This includes development of a system for caching evaluation results to maintain high availability and an advanced window-in-window interface that leverages modern Web-browser technologies. Challenges associated with bringing the principal advantages of the TDE technology to the Web are described, as are compromises to maintain general access and speed of interaction while remaining true to the tenets of dynamic data evaluation. Future extensions of the interface and associated Web-services are outlined.

  7. Implementation of malaria dynamic models in municipality level early warning systems in Colombia. Part I: description of study sites.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Daniel; Cerón, Viviana; Molina, Adriana M; Quiñónes, Martha L; Jiménez, Mónica M; Ahumada, Martha; Gutiérrez, Patricia; Osorio, Salua; Mantilla, Gilma; Connor, Stephen J; Thomson, Madeleine C

    2014-07-01

    As part of the Integrated National Adaptation Pilot project and the Integrated Surveillance and Control System, the Colombian National Institute of Health is working on the design and implementation of a Malaria Early Warning System framework, supported by seasonal climate forecasting capabilities, weather and environmental monitoring, and malaria statistical and dynamic models. In this report, we provide an overview of the local ecoepidemiologic settings where four malaria process-based mathematical models are currently being implemented at a municipal level. The description includes general characteristics, malaria situation (predominant type of infection, malaria-positive cases data, malaria incidence, and seasonality), entomologic conditions (primary and secondary vectors, mosquito densities, and feeding frequencies), climatic conditions (climatology and long-term trends), key drivers of epidemic outbreaks, and non-climatic factors (populations at risk, control campaigns, and socioeconomic conditions). Selected pilot sites exhibit different ecoepidemiologic settings that must be taken into account in the development of the integrated surveillance and control system.

  8. Implementation of Malaria Dynamic Models in Municipality Level Early Warning Systems in Colombia. Part I: Description of Study Sites

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Daniel; Cerón, Viviana; Molina, Adriana M.; Quiñónes, Martha L.; Jiménez, Mónica M.; Ahumada, Martha; Gutiérrez, Patricia; Osorio, Salua; Mantilla, Gilma; Connor, Stephen J.; Thomson, Madeleine C.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Integrated National Adaptation Pilot project and the Integrated Surveillance and Control System, the Colombian National Institute of Health is working on the design and implementation of a Malaria Early Warning System framework, supported by seasonal climate forecasting capabilities, weather and environmental monitoring, and malaria statistical and dynamic models. In this report, we provide an overview of the local ecoepidemiologic settings where four malaria process-based mathematical models are currently being implemented at a municipal level. The description includes general characteristics, malaria situation (predominant type of infection, malaria-positive cases data, malaria incidence, and seasonality), entomologic conditions (primary and secondary vectors, mosquito densities, and feeding frequencies), climatic conditions (climatology and long-term trends), key drivers of epidemic outbreaks, and non-climatic factors (populations at risk, control campaigns, and socioeconomic conditions). Selected pilot sites exhibit different ecoepidemiologic settings that must be taken into account in the development of the integrated surveillance and control system. PMID:24891460

  9. Process variation monitoring (PVM) by wafer inspection tool as a complementary method to CD-SEM for mapping field CDU on advanced production devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Jong; Yoo, Hyung Won; Kim, Chul Hong; Lee, Hak Kwon; Kim, Sung Su; Bae, Koon Ho; Spielberg, Hedvi; Lee, Yun Ho; Levi, Shimon; Bustan, Yariv; Rozentsvige, Moshe

    2010-03-01

    As design rules shrink, Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) and Line Edge Roughness (LER) have a dramatic effect on printed final lines and hence the need to control these parameters increases. Sources of CDU and LER variations include scanner auto-focus accuracy and stability, layer stack thickness, composition variations, and exposure variations. Process variations, in advanced VLSI production designs, specifically in memory devices, attributed to CDU and LER affect cell-to-cell parametric variations. These variations significantly impact device performance and die yield. Traditionally, measurements of LER are performed by CD-SEM or OCD metrology tools. Typically, these measurements require a relatively long time to set and cover only selected points of wafer area. In this paper we present the results of a collaborative work of the Process Diagnostic & Control Business Unit of Applied Materials and Hynix Semiconductor Inc. on the implementation of a complementary method to the CDSEM and OCD tools, to monitor defect density and post litho develop CDU and LER on production wafers. The method, referred to as Process Variation Monitoring (PVM) is based on measuring variations in the scattered light from periodic structures. The application is demonstrated using Applied Materials DUV bright field (BF) wafer inspection tool under optimized illumination and collection conditions. The UVisionTM has already passed a successful feasibility study on DRAM products with 66nm and 54nm design rules. The tool has shown high sensitivity to variations across an FEM wafer in both exposure and focus axes. In this article we show how PVM can help detection of Field to Field variations on DRAM wafers with 44nm design rule during normal production run. The complex die layout and the shrink in cell dimensions require high sensitivity to local variations within Dies or Fields. During normal scan of production wafers local Process variations are translated into GL (Grey Level) values

  10. Organizational Strategies for Promoting Instructional Change: Implementation Dynamics in Schools Working with Comprehensive School Reform Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowan, Brian; Miller, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    This article develops a conceptual framework for studying how three comprehensive school reform (CSR) programs organized schools for instructional change and how the distinctive strategies they pursued affected implementation outcomes. The conceptual model views the Accelerated Schools Project as using a system of cultural control to produce…

  11. Using Dynamic Value Stream Mapping and Lean Accounting Box Scores to Support Lean Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woehrle, Stephen L.; Abou-Shady, Louay

    2010-01-01

    Lean has proven to be an effective management philosophy for improving businesses in a competitive market by eliminating waste and improving operations. An impact of implementing lean projects is the rapid reduction in inventory levels, which gives management the false impression that profits are decreasing while workers on the shop floor observe…

  12. Dynamic Sustainability: Practitioners' Perspectives on Housing First Implementation Challenges and Model Fidelity Over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Zerger, Suzanne; Jeyaratnam, Jeyagobi; Connelly, Jolynn; Kruk, Katherine; O'Campo, Patricia; Hwang, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Although Housing First (HF) is a popular evidence-based intervention for persons experiencing homelessness and mental illness, research exploring its sustainability over time is scant. This mixed methods study captures practitioners' perspectives on key shifts in implementation of Housing First in a large urban center, and factors…

  13. The influence of wafer elasticity on acoustic waves during LIGA development.

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, Aili

    2003-12-01

    During acoustically stimulated LIGA development, a wafer receives sound waves from both sides at a wide variety of incidence angles that vary in time depending on the orientation of the wafer relative to the multiple transducers that are typically actuated in a periodic sequence. It is important to understand the influence of these variables on the transmission of energy through the wafer as well as the induced motion of the wafer itself because these processes impact the induced acoustic streaming of the fluid within features, the mechanism presently thought responsible for enhanced development of LIGA features. In the present work, the impact of wafer elasticity on LIGA development is investigated. Transmission waves, wafer bending waves, and the related concepts such as critical bending frequency, mechanical impedance, coincidence, and resonance, are discussed. Supercritical-frequency incident waves induce supersonic bending waves in the wafer. Incident wave energy is channeled into three components, transmitted, reflected and energy deposited to the wafer, depending on the wafer material, thickness and wave incidence angle. Results show at normal incidence for a 1-mm PMMA wafer, about 47% of the wave energy is deposited in the wafer. The wafer gains almost half of the incident energy, a result that agrees well with the Bankert et a1 measurements. In LIGA development, transmitted waves may sometimes produce strong acoustic motion of the developer on the wafer backside, especially for the so-called coincidence case in which almost all incident wave energy transfers to the backside. Wafer bending waves cause wafer oscillation at high frequency, promoting the development process, but features shaking may weaken their attachments to the substrate. Resonance is not likely for the entire wafer, but may occur in short and wide wafer feature columns, which are least likely to break away from the substrate, perhaps resulting in good agitation of the fluid in adjacent

  14. One-step implementation of the 1->3 orbital state quantum cloning machine via quantum Zeno dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Xiaoqiang; Wang Hongfu; Zhang Shou; Chen Li; Zhao Yongfang; Yeon, Kyu-Hwang

    2009-12-15

    We present an approach for implementation of a 1->3 orbital state quantum cloning machine based on the quantum Zeno dynamics via manipulating three rf superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) qubits to resonantly interact with a superconducting cavity assisted by classical fields. Through appropriate modulation of the coupling constants between rf SQUIDs and classical fields, the quantum cloning machine can be realized within one step. We also discuss the effects of decoherence such as spontaneous emission and the loss of cavity in virtue of master equation. The numerical simulation result reveals that the quantum cloning machine is especially robust against the cavity decay, since all qubits evolve in the decoherence-free subspace with respect to cavity decay due to the quantum Zeno dynamics.

  15. Feasibility Study for Implementing Magnetic Suspension in the Glenn Research Center 225 cm2 Supersonic Wind Tunnel for Testing the Dynamic Stability of Blunt Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevier, Abigail; Davis, David O.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Barnhart, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of a magnetic suspension system in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) 225 cm2 Supersonic Wind Tunnel would be a powerful test technique that could accurately determine the dynamic stability of blunt body entry vehicles with no sting interference. This paper explores initial design challenges to be evaluated before implementation, including defining the lowest possible operating dynamic pressure and corresponding model size, developing a compatible video analysis technique, and incorporating a retractable initial support sting.

  16. Silicon Alignment Pins: An Easy Way to Realize a Wafer-to-Wafer Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung-Kubiak, Cecile; Reck, Theodore J.; Lin, Robert H.; Peralta, Alejandro; Gill, John J.; Lee, Choonsup; Siles, Jose; Toda, Risaku; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Cooper, Ken B.; Mehdi, Imran; Thomas, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Submillimeter heterodyne instruments play a critical role in addressing fundamental questions regarding the evolution of galaxies as well as being a crucial tool in planetary science. To make these instruments compatible with small platforms, especially for the study of the outer planets, or to enable the development of multi-pixel arrays, it is essential to reduce the mass, power, and volume of the existing single-pixel heterodyne receivers. Silicon micromachining technology is naturally suited for making these submillimeter and terahertz components, where precision and accuracy are essential. Waveguide and channel cavities are etched in a silicon bulk material using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) techniques. Power amplifiers, multiplier and mixer chips are then integrated and the silicon pieces are stacked together to form a supercompact receiver front end. By using silicon micromachined packages for these components, instrument mass can be reduced and higher levels of integration can be achieved. A method is needed to assemble accurately these silicon pieces together, and a technique was developed here using etched pockets and silicon pins to align two wafers together.

  17. Guidelines for Implementing a Dynamic Warm-Up for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery; McFarland, James E., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Since recent studies have not found substantial evidence to support the use of static stretching during the warm-up period, there has been a growing interest in dynamic warm-up procedures that can enhance physical fitness, improve performance, and better prepare students for the main part of physical education. In this article, the potential…

  18. Teachers' Critical Evaluations of Dynamic Geometry Software Implementation in 1:1 Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Jennifer; Stein, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Although the use of dynamic software in high school mathematics in the United States has emerged as a research topic, little research has been conducted on how teachers integrate new software in relation to at-home technology networks. Interviews with eight mathematics teachers from four North Carolina counties participating in 1:1 laptop…

  19. Design implementation and control of MRAS error dynamics. [Model-Reference Adaptive System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, B. K.; Boland, J. S., III

    1974-01-01

    Use is made of linearized error characteristic equation for model-reference adaptive systems to determine a parameter adjustment rule for obtaining time-invariant error dynamics. Theoretical justification of error stability is given and an illustrative example included to demonstrate the utility of the proposed technique.

  20. Heuristic Implementation of Dynamic Programming for Matrix Permutation Problems in Combinatorial Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusco, Michael J.; Kohn, Hans-Friedrich; Stahl, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic programming methods for matrix permutation problems in combinatorial data analysis can produce globally-optimal solutions for matrices up to size 30x30, but are computationally infeasible for larger matrices because of enormous computer memory requirements. Branch-and-bound methods also guarantee globally-optimal solutions, but computation…

  1. Ultra-Gradient Test Cavity for Testing SRF Wafer Samples

    SciTech Connect

    N.J. Pogue, P.M. McIntyre, A.I. Sattarov, C. Reece

    2010-11-01

    A 1.3 GHz test cavity has been designed to test wafer samples of superconducting materials. This mushroom shaped cavity, operating in TE01 mode, creates a unique distribution of surface fields. The surface magnetic field on the sample wafer is 3.75 times greater than elsewhere on the Niobium cavity surface. This field design is made possible through dielectrically loading the cavity by locating a hemisphere of ultra-pure sapphire just above the sample wafer. The sapphire pulls the fields away from the walls so the maximum field the Nb surface sees is 25% of the surface field on the sample. In this manner, it should be possible to drive the sample wafer well beyond the BCS limit for Niobium while still maintaining a respectable Q. The sapphire's purity must be tested for its loss tangent and dielectric constant to finalize the design of the mushroom test cavity. A sapphire loaded CEBAF cavity has been constructed and tested. The results on the dielectric constant and loss tangent will be presented

  2. National solar technology roadmap: Wafer-silicon PV

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, Bhushan

    2007-06-01

    This report applies to all bulk-silicon-based PV technologies, including those based on Czochralski, multicrystalline, float-zone wafers, and melt-grown crystals that are 100 μm or thicker, such as ribbons, sheet, or spheral silicon.

  3. An Advanced Wafer Stepper For Sub-Micron Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Herbert E.; Loebach, Ernst W.

    1987-09-01

    An advanced wafer stepper is presented addressing the specific problems involved by sub-micron lithography such as alignment and focusing to multilayer resist films. New sub-systems were developed while maintaining principles well proven in a previous design. The system is described emphasizing the new sub-systems, and performance data are presented.

  4. Scatterometry on pelliclized masks: an option for wafer fabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Emily; Benson, Craig; Higuchi, Masaru; Okumoto, Yasuhiro; Kwon, Michael; Yedur, Sanjay; Li, Shifang; Lee, Sangbong; Tabet, Milad

    2007-03-01

    Optical scatterometry-based metrology is now widely used in wafer fabs for lithography, etch, and CMP applications. This acceptance of a new metrology method occurred despite the abundance of wellestablished CD-SEM and AFM methods. It was driven by the desire to make measurements faster and with a lower cost of ownership. Over the last year, scatterometry has also been introduced in advanced mask shops for mask measurements. Binary and phase shift masks have been successfully measured at all desired points during photomask production before the pellicle is mounted. There is a significant benefit to measuring masks with the pellicle in place. From the wafer fab's perspective, through-pellicle metrology would verify mask effects on the same features that are characterized on wafer. On-site mask verification would enable quality control and trouble-shooting without returning the mask to a mask house. Another potential application is monitoring changes to mask films once the mask has been delivered to the fab (haze, oxide growth, etc.). Similar opportunities apply to the mask metrologist receiving line returns from a wafer fab. The ability to make line-return measurements without risking defect introduction is clearly attractive. This paper will evaluate the feasibility of collecting scatterometry data on pelliclized masks. We explore the effects of several different pellicle types on scatterometry measurements made with broadband light in the range of 320-780 nm. The complexity introduced by the pellicles' optical behavior will be studied.

  5. A simplified implementation of van der Waals density functionals for first-principles molecular dynamics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Gygi, François

    2012-06-01

    We present a simplified implementation of the non-local van der Waals correlation functional introduced by Dion et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004)] and reformulated by Román-Pérez et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 096102 (2009)]. The proposed numerical approach removes the logarithmic singularity of the kernel function. Complete expressions of the self-consistent correlation potential and of the stress tensor are given. Combined with various choices of exchange functionals, five versions of van der Waals density functionals are implemented. Applications to the computation of the interaction energy of the benzene-water complex and to the computation of the equilibrium cell parameters of the benzene crystal are presented. As an example of crystal structure calculation involving a mixture of hydrogen bonding and dispersion interactions, we compute the equilibrium structure of two polymorphs of aspirin (2-acetoxybenzoic acid, C9H8O4) in the P21/c monoclinic structure.

  6. Implementation of a Mechanochemical Model for Dynamic Brittle Fracture in SIERRA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    enabling step in the formulation of the finite deformation analog to the linear elastic mechanochemical model. This formulation is similar to the linear...element size, which dictates the time step used during the calculations. This places some additional requirements on the calculation of the kinetic...reaction law since it too needs to be updated at each time step . If the kinetic reaction law is also implemented in an explicit manner, there would be

  7. The Effect of the Dynamic Skills Protocol RTI Model on Reading Achievement in an Elementary School and the Predictive Validity of Phonics Screening Measures Implemented in the Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laben, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    With the implementation of RTI, educators are attempting to find models that are the best fit for their schools. The problem solving and standard protocol models are the two most common. This study of 65 students examines a new model, the dynamic skills protocol implemented in an elementary school starting in their fourth quarter of kindergarten…

  8. Method for reuse of wafers for growth of vertically-aligned wire arrays

    DOEpatents

    Spurgeon, Joshua M; Plass, Katherine E; Lewis, Nathan S; Atwater, Harry A

    2013-06-04

    Reusing a Si wafer for the formation of wire arrays by transferring the wire arrays to a polymer matrix, reusing a patterned oxide for several array growths, and finally polishing and reoxidizing the wafer surface and reapplying the patterned oxide.

  9. Bonding silicon-on-insulator to glass wafers for integrated bio-electronic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun S.; Blick, Robert H.; Kim, D. M.; Eom, C. B.

    2004-09-01

    We report a method for bonding silicon-on-insulator wafers onto glass wafers. After pre-cleaning the wafers by an ozone and ultraviolet exposure, followed by mega-sonic water rinse, the SOI wafers are bonded to glass wafers in a vacuum chamber. This is performed at a temperature of 400 °C under an applied voltage of 700 V. The interface between the glass and SOI wafer is tested mechanically and inspected by electron beam microscopy. Furthermore, we demonstrate removal of the silicon bulk layer after wafer bonding. The quality of the single crystalline Si thin film on the glass wafers has been verified by four-circle x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. This process will allow us the integration of thin-film electronics in biological sensor applications.

  10. Advanced FTIR technology for the chemical characterization of product wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, P. A.; Bosch-Charpenay, S.; Xu, J.; Yakovlev, V.; Solomon, P. R.

    2001-01-01

    Advances in chemically sensitive diagnostic techniques are needed for the characterization of compositionally variable materials such as chemically amplified resists, low-k dielectrics and BPSG films on product wafers. In this context, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy is emerging as a preferred technique to characterize film chemistry and composition, due to its non-destructive nature and excellent sensitivity to molecular bonds and free carriers. While FTIR has been widely used in R&D environments, its application to mainstream production metrology and process monitoring on product wafers has historically been limited. These limitations have been eliminated in a series of recent FTIR technology advances, which include the use of 1) new sampling optics, which suppress artifact backside reflections and 2) comprehensive model-based analysis. With these recent improvements, it is now possible to characterize films on standard single-side polished product wafers with much simpler training wafer sets and machine-independent calibrations. In this new approach, the chemistry of the films is tracked via the measured infrared optical constants as opposed to conventional absorbance measurements. The extracted spectral optical constants can then be reduced to a limited set of parameters for process control. This paper describes the application of this new FTIR methodology to the characterization of 1) DUV photoresists after various processing steps, 2) low-k materials of different types and after various curing conditions, and 3) doped glass BPSG films of various concentration and, for the first time, widely different thicknesses. Such measurements can be used for improved process control on actual product wafers.

  11. Model implementation for dynamic computation of system cost for advanced life support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levri, J. A.; Vaccari, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Life support system designs for long-duration space missions have a multitude of requirements drivers, such as mission objectives, political considerations, cost, crew wellness, inherent mission attributes, as well as many other influences. Evaluation of requirements satisfaction can be difficult, particularly at an early stage of mission design. Because launch cost is a critical factor and relatively easy to quantify, it is a point of focus in early mission design. The method used to determine launch cost influences the accuracy of the estimate. This paper discusses the appropriateness of dynamic mission simulation in estimating the launch cost of a life support system. This paper also provides an abbreviated example of a dynamic simulation life support model and possible ways in which such a model might be utilized for design improvement. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Implementation of recurrent artificial neural networks for nonlinear dynamic modeling in biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Stošovic, Miona V Andrejevic; Litovski, Vanco B

    2013-11-01

    Simulation is indispensable during the design of many biomedical prostheses that are based on fundamental electrical and electronic actions. However, simulation necessitates the use of adequate models. The main difficulties related to the modeling of such devices are their nonlinearity and dynamic behavior. Here we report the application of recurrent artificial neural networks for modeling of a nonlinear, two-terminal circuit equivalent to a specific implantable hearing device. The method is general in the sense that any nonlinear dynamic two-terminal device or circuit may be modeled in the same way. The model generated was successfully used for simulation and optimization of a driver (operational amplifier)-transducer ensemble. This confirms our claim that in addition to the proper design and optimization of the hearing actuator, optimization in the electronic domain, at the electronic driver circuit-to-actuator interface, should take place in order to achieve best performance of the complete hearing aid.

  13. The Implementation of Slab Geometry for Membrane-Channel Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Bostick, David; Berkowitz, Max L.

    2003-01-01

    Slab geometric boundary conditions are applied in the molecular dynamics simulation of a simple membrane-channel system. The results of the simulation were compared to those of an analogous system using normal three-dimensional periodic boundary conditions. Analysis of the dynamics and electrostatics of the system show that slab geometric periodicity eliminates the artificial bulk water orientational polarization that is present while using normal three-dimensional periodicity. Furthermore, even though the water occupancy and volume of our simple channel is the same when using either method, the electrostatic properties are considerably different when using slab geometry. In particular, the orientational polarization of water is seen to be different in the interior of the channel. This gives rise to a markedly different electric field within the channel. We discuss the implications of slab geometry for the future simulation of this type of system and for the study of channel transport properties. PMID:12829468

  14. Implementing and Simulating Dynamic Traffic Assignment with Intelligent Transportation Systems in Cube Avenue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foytik, Peter; Robinson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    As urban populations and traffic congestion levels increase, effective use of information and communication tools and intelligent transportation systems as becoming increasingly important in order to maximize the efficiency of transportation networks. The appropriate placement and employment of these tools within a network is critical to their effectiveness. This presentation proposes and demonstrates the use of a commercial transportation simulation tool to simulate dynamic traffic assignment and rerouting to model route modifications as a result of traffic information.

  15. ThermoData Engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 5. Experiment planning and product design.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Muzny, Chris D; Magee, Joseph W; Abdulagatov, Ilmutdin; Kang, Jeong Won; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Frenkel, Michael

    2011-01-24

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported recently in this journal. In the present paper, we describe development of an algorithmic approach to assist experiment planning through assessment of the existing body of knowledge, including availability of experimental thermophysical property data, variable ranges studied, associated uncertainties, state of prediction methods, and parameters for deployment of prediction methods and how these parameters can be obtained using targeted measurements, etc., and, indeed, how the intended measurement may address the underlying scientific or engineering problem under consideration. A second new feature described here is the application of the software capabilities for aid in the design of chemical products through identification of chemical systems possessing desired values of thermophysical properties within defined ranges of tolerance. The algorithms and their software implementation to achieve this are described. Finally, implementation of a new data validation and weighting system is described for vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data, and directions for future enhancements are outlined.

  16. The physician-insurer dynamic must shift to successfully implement value-based payments.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Roy A; Happe, Laura E; Funk, Mike

    2016-12-01

    Decades of practice under a system that set the financial interests of physicians and insurers at odds, has resulted in physician distrust of insurers being cited a key obstacle to value-based arrangements. Insurers must work to shift the insurer-provider relationship from one that's transactional to a partnership built on trust. Even when physicians and insurers agree philosophically on quality over quantity, there are practical challenges. Insurers can provide the data, systems and analytical insights that help inform the physician's care strategy. Implementing value-based payments requires the two groups to build trust and work together to change long-established systems.

  17. Optimal mask characterization by Surrogate Wafer Print (SWaP) method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, Kurt R.; Hoellein, Ingo; Peters, Jan Hendrick; Ackmann, Paul; Connolly, Brid; West, Craig

    2008-10-01

    Traditionally, definition of mask specifications is done completely by the mask user, while characterization of the mask relative to the specifications is done completely by the mask maker. As the challenges of low-k1 imaging continue to grow in scope of designs and in absolute complexity, the inevitable partnership between wafer lithographers and mask makers has strengthened as well. This is reflected in the jointly owned mask facilities and device manufacturers' continued maintenance of fully captive mask shops which foster the closer mask-litho relationships. However, while some device manufacturers have leveraged this to optimize mask specifications before the mask is built and, therefore, improve mask yield and cost, the opportunity for post-fabrication partnering on mask characterization is more apparent and compelling. The Advanced Mask Technology Center (AMTC) has been investigating the concept of assessing how a mask images, rather than the mask's physical attributes, as a technically superior and lower-cost method to characterize a mask. The idea of printing a mask under its intended imaging conditions, then characterizing the imaged wafer as a surrogate for traditional mask inspections and measurements represents the ultimate method to characterize a mask's performance, which is most meaningful to the user. Surrogate wafer print (SWaP) is already done as part of leading-edge wafer fab mask qualification to validate defect and dimensional performance. In the past, the prospect of executing this concept has generally been summarily discarded as technically untenable and logistically intractable. The AMTC published a paper at BACUS 2007 successfully demonstrating the performance of SWaP for the characterization of defects as an alternative to traditional mask inspection [1]. It showed that this concept is not only feasible, but, in some cases, desirable. This paper expands on last year's work at AMTC to assess the full implementation of SWaP as an

  18. Rinsing of wafers after wet processing: Simulation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chieh-Chun

    In semiconductor manufacturing, a large amount (50 billion gallons for US semiconductor fabrication plants in 2006) of ultrapure water (UPW) is used to rinse wafers after wet chemical processing to remove ionic contaminants on surfaces. Of great concern are the contaminants left in narrow (tens of nm), high-aspect-ratio (5:1 to 20:1) features (trenches, vias, and contact holes). The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) stipulates that ionic contaminant levels be reduced to below ˜ 10 10 atoms/cm2. Understanding the bottlenecks in the rinsing process would enable conservation of rinse water usage. A comprehensive process model has been developed on the COMSOL platform to predict the dynamics of rinsing of narrow structures on patterned SiO 2 substrates initially cleaned with NH4OH. The model considers the effect of various mass-transport mechanisms, including convection and diffusion/dispersion, which occur simultaneously with various surface phenomena, such as adsorption and desorption of impurities. The influences of charged species in the bulk and on the surface, and their induced electric field that affect both transport and surface interactions, have been addressed. Modeling results show that the efficacy of rinsing is strongly influenced by the rate of desorption of adsorbed contaminants, mass transfer of contaminants from the mouth of the feature to the bulk liquid, and the trench aspect ratio. Detection of the end point of rinsing is another way to conserve water used for rinsing after wet processing. The applicability of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to monitor rinsing of Si processed in HF with and without copper contaminant was explored. In the first study, the effect of the nature of surface state (flat band, depletion, or accumulation) of silicon on rinsing rate was investigated. The experimental results show that the state of silicon could affect rinsing kinetics through modulation of ion adsorption. In the second

  19. HED-TIE: A Wafer Scale Approach for Fabricating Hybrid Electronic Devices with Trench Isolated Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sreetama; Bülz, Daniel; Solonenko, Dmytro; Reuter, Danny; Deibel, Carsten; Hiller, Karla; Zahn, Dietrich; Salvan, Georgeta

    2017-03-15

    Organic-inorganic hybrid electronic devices (HEDs) offer opportunities for functionalities that are not easily obtainable with either organic or inorganic materials individually. In the strive for down-scaling the channel length in planar geometry HEDs the records were achieved with electron beam lithography or nanoimprint lithography. Their application on the wafer level is, however, cost intensive and time consuming. Here, we propose the trench isolated electrodes (TIE) technology as a fast, cost effective, wafer level approach for fabrication of planar HEDs with electrode gaps in the range of 100 nm. The TIE technology is inspired from the process flow which has been successfully implemented in the fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and is based on standard photolithography and a series of isotropic and anisotropic etching steps and trench refilling with silicon oxide. We demonstrate that the formation of the organic channel can be realized by deposition from solution as well as by thermal evaporation of organic molecules. To underline one key feature of planar HED-TIEs, namely full accessibility of the active area of the devices by external stimuli such as light, TIPS-pentacene/Au HED-TIEs were successfully tested for possible application as hybrid photodetectors in the visible spectral range.

  20. Ultra-high-throughput Production of III-V/Si Wafer for Electronic and Photonic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geum, Dae-Myeong; Park, Min-Su; Lim, Ju Young; Yang, Hyun-Duk; Song, Jin Dong; Kim, Chang Zoo; Yoon, Euijoon; Kim, Sanghyeon; Choi, Won Jun

    2016-02-01

    Si-based integrated circuits have been intensively developed over the past several decades through ultimate device scaling. However, the Si technology has reached the physical limitations of the scaling. These limitations have fuelled the search for alternative active materials (for transistors) and the introduction of optical interconnects (called “Si photonics”). A series of attempts to circumvent the Si technology limits are based on the use of III-V compound semiconductor due to their superior benefits, such as high electron mobility and direct bandgap. To use their physical properties on a Si platform, the formation of high-quality III-V films on the Si (III-V/Si) is the basic technology ; however, implementing this technology using a high-throughput process is not easy. Here, we report new concepts for an ultra-high-throughput heterogeneous integration of high-quality III-V films on the Si using the wafer bonding and epitaxial lift off (ELO) technique. We describe the ultra-fast ELO and also the re-use of the III-V donor wafer after III-V/Si formation. These approaches provide an ultra-high-throughput fabrication of III-V/Si substrates with a high-quality film, which leads to a dramatic cost reduction. As proof-of-concept devices, this paper demonstrates GaAs-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), solar cells, and hetero-junction phototransistors on Si substrates.

  1. Ultra-high-throughput Production of III-V/Si Wafer for Electronic and Photonic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Geum, Dae-Myeong; Park, Min-Su; Lim, Ju Young; Yang, Hyun-Duk; Song, Jin Dong; Kim, Chang Zoo; Yoon, Euijoon; Kim, SangHyeon; Choi, Won Jun

    2016-01-01

    Si-based integrated circuits have been intensively developed over the past several decades through ultimate device scaling. However, the Si technology has reached the physical limitations of the scaling. These limitations have fuelled the search for alternative active materials (for transistors) and the introduction of optical interconnects (called “Si photonics”). A series of attempts to circumvent the Si technology limits are based on the use of III-V compound semiconductor due to their superior benefits, such as high electron mobility and direct bandgap. To use their physical properties on a Si platform, the formation of high-quality III-V films on the Si (III-V/Si) is the basic technology ; however, implementing this technology using a high-throughput process is not easy. Here, we report new concepts for an ultra-high-throughput heterogeneous integration of high-quality III-V films on the Si using the wafer bonding and epitaxial lift off (ELO) technique. We describe the ultra-fast ELO and also the re-use of the III-V donor wafer after III-V/Si formation. These approaches provide an ultra-high-throughput fabrication of III-V/Si substrates with a high-quality film, which leads to a dramatic cost reduction. As proof-of-concept devices, this paper demonstrates GaAs-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), solar cells, and hetero-junction phototransistors on Si substrates. PMID:26864968

  2. Implementing a comprehensive approach to the study of health dynamics using the psychoneuroimmunology paradigm.

    PubMed

    McCain, Nancy L; Gray, Dorothy Patricia; Walter, Jeanne M; Robins, JoLynne

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) as an integrative paradigm for advancing both theoretical and empirical knowledge of physiological patterns that contribute to the dynamics of health. We depict relationships among relevant psychobehavioral and physiological components in a PNI-based framework. We then provide examples of how this framework guided 2 clinical trials designed to assess the effectiveness of selected nursing interventions to reduce stress and enhance coping, one in persons with human immunodeficiency viral disease and the other in persons with cancer. The examples address disease-specific measures for assessing the components of the PNI-based framework.

  3. Wafer bonding process for building MEMS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabo, Eric F.; Meiler, Josef; Matthias, Thorsten

    2014-06-01

    The technology for the measurement of colour rendering and colour quality is not new, but many parameters related to this issue are currently changing. A number of standard methods were developed and are used by different specialty areas of the lighting industry. CIE 13.3 has been the accepted standard implemented by many users and used for many years. Light-emitting Diode (LED) technology moves at a rapid pace and, as this lighting source finds wider acceptance, it appears that traditional colour-rendering measurement methods produce inconsistent results. Practical application of various types of LEDs yielded results that challenged conventional thinking regarding colour measurement of light sources. Recent studies have shown that the anatomy and physiology of the human eye is more complex than formerly accepted. Therefore, the development of updated measurement methodology also forces a fresh look at functioning and colour perception of the human eye, especially with regard to LEDs. This paper includes a short description of the history and need for the measurement of colour rendering. Some of the traditional measurement methods are presented and inadequacies are discussed. The latest discoveries regarding the functioning of the human eye and the perception of colour, especially when LEDs are used as light sources, are discussed. The unique properties of LEDs when used in practical applications such as luminaires are highlighted.

  4. Dissipative particle dynamics for systems with high density of charges: Implementation of electrostatic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, A. A.; Chertovich, A. V.; Kramarenko, E. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we study the question of how to introduce electrostatic interactions in dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method in order to correctly reproduce the properties of systems with high density of charges, including those with inhomogeneous charge distribution. To this end, we formulate general requirements for the electrostatic force in DPD and propose a new functional form of the force which suits better for satisfying these requirements than the previously used ones. In order to verify the proposed model, we study the problem of a single polyelectrolyte chain collapse and compare the results with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in which the exact Coulomb force is used. We show that an excellent quantitative agreement between MD and DPD models is observed if the length parameter D of the proposed electrostatic force is chosen properly; the recommendations concerning the choice of this parameter value are given based on the analysis of a polyelectrolyte chain collapse behavior. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of DPD with the proposed electrostatic force to studying microphase separation phenomenon in polyelectrolyte melts and show that the same values of D as in the case of single chain collapse should be used, thus indicating universality of the model. Due to the charge correlation attraction, a long-range order in such melts can be observed even at zero Flory-Huggins parameter.

  5. Modeling the dynamics of evaluation: a multilevel neural network implementation of the iterative reprocessing model.

    PubMed

    Ehret, Phillip J; Monroe, Brian M; Read, Stephen J

    2015-05-01

    We present a neural network implementation of central components of the iterative reprocessing (IR) model. The IR model argues that the evaluation of social stimuli (attitudes, stereotypes) is the result of the IR of stimuli in a hierarchy of neural systems: The evaluation of social stimuli develops and changes over processing. The network has a multilevel, bidirectional feedback evaluation system that integrates initial perceptual processing and later developing semantic processing. The network processes stimuli (e.g., an individual's appearance) over repeated iterations, with increasingly higher levels of semantic processing over time. As a result, the network's evaluations of stimuli evolve. We discuss the implications of the network for a number of different issues involved in attitudes and social evaluation. The success of the network supports the IR model framework and provides new insights into attitude theory.

  6. Implementation of the Algorithm for Congestion control in the Dynamic Circuit Network (DCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalamwar, H. S.; Ivanov, M. A.; Buddhawar, G. U.

    2017-01-01

    Transport Control Protocol (TCP) incast congestion happens when a number of senders work in parallel with the same server where the high bandwidth and low latency network problem occurs. For many data center network applications such as a search engine, heavy traffic is present on such a server. Incast congestion degrades the entire performance as packets are lost at a server side due to buffer overflow, and as a result, the response time becomes longer. In this work, we focus on TCP throughput, round-trip time (RTT), receive window and retransmission. Our method is based on the proactive adjust of the TCP receive window before the packet loss occurs. We aim to avoid the wastage of the bandwidth by adjusting its size as per the number of packets. To avoid the packet loss, the ICTCP algorithm has been implemented in the data center network (ToR).

  7. Method for implementation of back-illuminated CMOS or CCD imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for implementation of back-illuminated CMOS or CCD imagers. An oxide layer buried between silicon wafer and device silicon is provided. The oxide layer forms a passivation layer in the imaging structure. A device layer and interlayer dielectric are formed, and the silicon wafer is removed to expose the oxide layer.

  8. Wafer-level packaging with compression-controlled seal ring bonding

    DOEpatents

    Farino, Anthony J

    2013-11-05

    A device may be provided in a sealed package by aligning a seal ring provided on a first surface of a first semiconductor wafer in opposing relationship with a seal ring that is provided on a second surface of a second semiconductor wafer and surrounds a portion of the second wafer that contains the device. Forcible movement of the first and second wafer surfaces toward one another compresses the first and second seal rings against one another. A physical barrier against the movement, other than the first and second seal rings, is provided between the first and second wafer surfaces.

  9. Compressive uniaxially strained silicon on insulator by prestrained wafer bonding and layer transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himcinschi, C.; Reiche, M.; Scholz, R.; Christiansen, S. H.; Gösele, U.

    2007-06-01

    Wafer level compressive uniaxially strained silicon on insulator is obtained by direct wafer bonding of silicon wafers in cylindrically curved state, followed by thinning one of the wafers using the smart-cut process. The mapping of the wafer bow demonstrates the uniaxial character of the strain induced by the cylindrical bending. The interfacial properties are investigated by infrared transmission imaging, scanning acoustic microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. UV-Raman spectroscopy is employed to determine the strain in the thin transferred layer as a function of radius of curvature of the initial bending.

  10. Study on a new chaotic bitwise dynamical system and its FPGA implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian-Xue; Yu, Si-Min; Guyeux, C.; Bahi, J.; Fang, Xiao-Le

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the structure of a new chaotic bitwise dynamical system (CBDS) is described. Compared to our previous research work, it uses various random bitwise operations instead of only one. The chaotic behavior of CBDS is mathematically proven according to the Devaney's definition, and its statistical properties are verified both for uniformity and by a comprehensive, reputed and stringent battery of tests called TestU01. Furthermore, a systematic methodology developing the parallel computations is proposed for FPGA platform-based realization of this CBDS. Experiments finally validate the proposed systematic methodology. Project supported by China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M552175), the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, Chinese Education Ministry, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61172023), and the Specialized Research Foundation of Doctoral Subjects of Chinese Education Ministry (Grant No. 20114420110003).

  11. The implementation of a modernized Dynamic Digital Map on Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeck, J.; Condit, C. D.

    2012-12-01

    Currently, geology instructors present information to students via PowerPoint, Word, Excel and other programs that are not designed to parse or present geologic data. More tech-savvy, and perhaps better-funded, instructors use Google Earth or ArcGIS to display geologic maps and other visual information. However, Google Earth lacks the ability to present large portions of text, and ArcGIS restricts such functionality to labels and annotations. The original Dynamic Digital Map, which we have renamed Dynamic Digital Map Classic (DDMC), allows instructors to represent both visual and large portions of textual information to students. This summer we generalized the underlying architecture of DDMC, redesigned the user interface, modernized the analytical functionality, renamed the older version and labeled this new creature Dynamic Digital Map Extended (DDME). With the new DDME instructors can showcase maps, images, articles and movies, and create digital field trips. They can set the scale, coordinate system and caption of maps and images, add symbol links to maps and images that can transport the user to any specified destination—either internally (to data contained within the DDME) or externally (to a website address). Instructors and students can also calculate non-linear distances and irregular areas of maps and images, and create digital field trips with any number of stops—complete with notes and driving directions. DDMEs are perhaps best described as a sort of computerized, self-authored, interactive textbook. To display the vast capabilities of DDME, we created a DDME of Gale Crater (DDME-GC), which is the landing site of the most sophisticated NASA Mars Rover—Curiosity. DDME-GC hosts six thematic maps: a detailed geologic map provided by Brad Thompson of the Boston University Center for Remote Sensing (Thompson, et al., 2010), and five maps maintained in ASU's JMARS system, including global mosaics from Mars Global Surveyor's Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter

  12. Characterization of Boron Diffusion Phenomena According to the Specific Resistivity of N-Type Si Wafer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Jin; Choi, Chel-Jong; Park, Gye-Choon; Yang, O-Bong

    2016-02-01

    This paper is directed to characterize the boron diffusion process according to the specific resistivity of the Si wafer. N-type Si wafers were used with the specific resistivity of 0.5-3.2 omega-cm, 1.0-6.5 omega-cm and 2.0-8.0 omega-cm. The boron tribromide (BBr3) was used as boron source to create the PN junction on N-type Si wafer. The boron diffusion in N-type Si wafer was characterized by sheet resistance of wafer surface, secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements (SIMS) and surface life time analysis. The degree of boron diffusion was depended on the variation in specific resistivity and sheet resistance of the bare N-type Si wafer. The boron diffused N-Si wafer exhibited the average junction depth of 750 nm and boron concentration of 1 x 10(19). N-type Si wafer with the different specific resistance considerably affected the boron diffusion length and life time of Si wafer. It was found that the lifetime of boron diffused wafer was proportional to the sheet resistance and resistivity. However, optimization process may necessary to achieve the high efficiency through the high sheet resistance wafer, because the metallization process control is very sensitive.

  13. Optimization of wafer-back pressure profile in chemical mechanical planarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tian-Shiang; Wang, Yao-Chen; Hu, Ian

    2008-11-01

    In chemical mechanical planarization (CMP), a rotating wafer is pressed facedown against a rotating pad, while a slurry is dragged into the pad--wafer interface to assist in planarizing the wafer surface. Due to stress concentration, the interfacial contact stress near the wafer edge generally is much higher than that near the wafer center, resulting in spatially nonuniform material removal rate and hence imperfect planarity of the wafer surface. Here, integrating theories of fluid film lubrication and two-dimensional contact mechanics, we calculate the interfacial contact stress and slurry pressure distributions. In particular, the possibility of using a multizone wafer-back pressure profile to improve the contact stress uniformity is examined, by studying a practical case. The numerical results indicate that using a two-zone wafer-back pressure profile with optimized zonal sizes and pressures can increase the ``usable'' wafer surface area by as much as 12%. Using an optimized three- zone wafer-back pressure profile, however, does not much further increase the usable wafer surface area.

  14. Metal adsorbent for alkaline etching aqua solutions of Si wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamada, Masao; Ueki, Yuji; Seko, Noriaki; Takeda, Toshihide; Kawano, Shin-ichi

    2012-08-01

    High performance adsorbent is expected to be synthesized for the removal of Ni and Cu ions from strong alkaline solution used in the surface etching process of Si wafer. Fibrous adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induce emulsion graft polymerization onto polyethylene nonwoven fabric and subsequent amination. The reaction condition was optimized using 30 L reaction vessel and nonwoven fabric, 0.3 m width and 18 m long. The resulting fibrous adsorbent was evaluated by 48 wt% NaOH and KOH contaminated with Ni and Cu ions, respectively. The concentration levels of Ni and Cu ions was reduced to less than 1 μg/kg (ppb) at the flow rate of 10 h-1 in space velocity. The life of adsorbent was 30 times higher than that of the commercialized resin. This novel adsorbent was commercialized as METOLATE® since the ability of adsorption is remarkably higher than that of commercial resin used practically in Si wafer processing.

  15. JOINT RIGIDITY ASSESSMENT WITH PIEZOELECTRIC WAFERS AND ACOUSTIC WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Montoya, Angela C.; Maji, Arup K.

    2010-02-22

    There has been an interest in the development of rapid deployment satellites. In a modular satellite design, different panels of specific functions can be pre-manufactured. The satellite can then be assembled and tested just prior to deployment. Traditional vibration testing is time-consuming and expensive. An alternative test method to evaluate the connection between two plates will be proposed. The method investigated and described employs piezoelectric wafers to induce and sense lamb waves in two aluminum plates, which were joined by steel brackets to form an 'L-Style' joint. Lamb wave behavior and piezoelectric material properties will be discussed; the experimental setup and results will be presented. A set of 4 piezoelectric ceramic wafers were used alternately as source and sensor. The energy transmitted was shown to correlate with a mechanical assessment of the joint, demonstrating that this method of testing is a feasible and reliable way to inspect the rigidity of joints.

  16. Switchable static friction of piezoelectric composite—silicon wafer contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Ende, D. A.; Fischer, H. R.; Groen, W. A.; van der Zwaag, S.

    2013-04-01

    The meso-scale surface roughness of piezoelectric fiber composites can be manipulated by applying an electric field to a piezocomposite with a polished surface. In the absence of an applied voltage, the tips of the embedded piezoelectric ceramic fibers are below the surface of the piezocomposite and a silicon wafer counter surface rests solely on the matrix region of the piezocomposite surface. When actuated, the piezoelectric ceramic fibers protrude from the surface and the wafer rests solely on these protrusions. A threefold decrease in engineering static friction coefficient upon actuation of the piezocomposite was observed: from μ* = 1.65 to μ* = 0.50. These experimental results could be linked to the change in contact surface area and roughness using capillary adhesion theory, which relates the adhesive force to the number and size of the contacting asperities for the different surface states.

  17. Development and Implementation of Dynamic Scripts to Execute Cycled WRF/GSI Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Berndt, Emily; Li, Quanli; Watson, Leela

    2014-01-01

    Automating the coupling of data assimilation (DA) and modeling systems is a unique challenge in the numerical weather prediction (NWP) research community. In recent years, the Development Testbed Center (DTC) has released well-documented tools such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) DA system that can be easily downloaded, installed, and run by researchers on their local systems. However, developing a coupled system in which the various preprocessing, DA, model, and postprocessing capabilities are all integrated can be labor-intensive if one has little experience with any of these individual systems. Additionally, operational modeling entities generally have specific coupling methodologies that can take time to understand and develop code to implement properly. To better enable collaborating researchers to perform modeling and DA experiments with GSI, the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has developed a set of Perl scripts that couple GSI and WRF in a cycling methodology consistent with the use of real-time, regional observation data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/Environmental Modeling Center (EMC). Because Perl is open source, the code can be easily downloaded and executed regardless of the user's native shell environment. This paper will provide a description of this open-source code and descriptions of a number of the use cases that have been performed by SPoRT collaborators using the scripts on different computing systems.

  18. Probing and exploiting the chaotic dynamics of a hydrodynamic photochemical oscillator to implement all the basic binary logic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kenta; Gotoda, Hiroshi; Gentili, Pier Luigi

    2016-05-01

    The convective motions within a solution of a photochromic spiro-oxazine being irradiated by UV only on the bottom part of its volume, give rise to aperiodic spectrophotometric dynamics. In this paper, we study three nonlinear properties of the aperiodic time series: permutation entropy, short-term predictability and long-term unpredictability, and degree distribution of the visibility graph networks. After ascertaining the extracted chaotic features, we show how the aperiodic time series can be exploited to implement all the fundamental two-inputs binary logic functions (AND, OR, NAND, NOR, XOR, and XNOR) and some basic arithmetic operations (half-adder, full-adder, half-subtractor). This is possible due to the wide range of states a nonlinear system accesses in the course of its evolution. Therefore, the solution of the convective photochemical oscillator results in hardware for chaos-computing alternative to conventional complementary metal-oxide semiconductor-based integrated circuits.

  19. Real-time dynamic simulation of the Cassini spacecraft using DARTS. Part 2: Parallel/vectorized real-time implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, A.; Roberts, J. A.; Jain, A.; Man, G. K.

    1993-01-01

    Part 1 of this paper presented the requirements for the real-time simulation of Cassini spacecraft along with some discussion of the DARTS algorithm. Here, in Part 2 we discuss the development and implementation of parallel/vectorized DARTS algorithm and architecture for real-time simulation. Development of the fast algorithms and architecture for real-time hardware-in-the-loop simulation of spacecraft dynamics is motivated by the fact that it represents a hard real-time problem, in the sense that the correctness of the simulation depends on both the numerical accuracy and the exact timing of the computation. For a given model fidelity, the computation should be computed within a predefined time period. Further reduction in computation time allows increasing the fidelity of the model (i.e., inclusion of more flexible modes) and the integration routine.

  20. Very large scale heterogeneous integration (VLSHI) and wafer-level vacuum packaging for infrared bolometer focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, Fredrik; Roxhed, Niclas; Fischer, Andreas C.; Samel, Björn; Ericsson, Per; Hoivik, Nils; Lapadatu, Adriana; Bring, Martin; Kittilsland, Gjermund; Stemme, Göran; Niklaus, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Imaging in the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) range from 8 to 14 μm is an extremely useful tool for non-contact measurement and imaging of temperature in many industrial, automotive and security applications. However, the cost of the infrared (IR) imaging components has to be significantly reduced to make IR imaging a viable technology for many cost-sensitive applications. This paper demonstrates new and improved fabrication and packaging technologies for next-generation IR imaging detectors based on uncooled IR bolometer focal plane arrays. The proposed technologies include very large scale heterogeneous integration for combining high-performance, SiGe quantum-well bolometers with electronic integrated read-out circuits and CMOS compatible wafer-level vacuum packing. The fabrication and characterization of bolometers with a pitch of 25 μm × 25 μm that are arranged on read-out-wafers in arrays with 320 × 240 pixels are presented. The bolometers contain a multi-layer quantum well SiGe thermistor with a temperature coefficient of resistance of -3.0%/K. The proposed CMOS compatible wafer-level vacuum packaging technology uses Cu-Sn solid-liquid interdiffusion (SLID) bonding. The presented technologies are suitable for implementation in cost-efficient fabless business models with the potential to bring about the cost reduction needed to enable low-cost IR imaging products for industrial, security and automotive applications.

  1. Wafer-level radiometric performance testing of uncooled microbolometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, Denis G.; Topart, Patrice; Tremblay, Bruno; Julien, Christian; Martin, Louis; Vachon, Carl

    2014-03-01

    A turn-key semi-automated test system was constructed to perform on-wafer testing of microbolometer arrays. The system allows for testing of several performance characteristics of ROIC-fabricated microbolometer arrays including NETD, SiTF, ROIC functionality, noise and matrix operability, both before and after microbolometer fabrication. The system accepts wafers up to 8 inches in diameter and performs automated wafer die mapping using a microscope camera. Once wafer mapping is completed, a custom-designed quick insertion 8-12 μm AR-coated Germanium viewport is placed and the chamber is pumped down to below 10-5 Torr, allowing for the evaluation of package-level focal plane array (FPA) performance. The probe card is electrically connected to an INO IRXCAM camera core, a versatile system that can be adapted to many types of ROICs using custom-built interface printed circuit boards (PCBs). We currently have the capability for testing 384x288, 35 μm pixel size and 160x120, 52 μm pixel size FPAs. For accurate NETD measurements, the system is designed to provide an F/1 view of two rail-mounted blackbodies seen through the Germanium window by the die under test. A master control computer automates the alignment of the probe card to the dies, the positioning of the blackbodies, FPA image frame acquisition using IRXCAM, as well as data analysis and storage. Radiometric measurement precision has been validated by packaging dies measured by the automated probing system and re-measuring the SiTF and Noise using INO's pre-existing benchtop system.

  2. 100-GHz Transistors from Wafer-Scale Epitaxial Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.-M.; Dimitrakopoulos, C.; Jenkins, K. A.; Farmer, D. B.; Chiu, H.-Y.; Grill, A.; Avouris, Ph.

    2010-02-01

    The high carrier mobility of graphene has been exploited in field-effect transistors that operate at high frequencies. Transistors were fabricated on epitaxial graphene synthesized on the silicon face of a silicon carbide wafer, achieving a cutoff frequency of 100 gigahertz for a gate length of 240 nanometers. The high-frequency performance of these epitaxial graphene transistors exceeds that of state-of-the-art silicon transistors of the same gate length.

  3. Overlay distortions in wafer-scale integration lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Warren W.

    1993-08-01

    Wafer scale integration (WSI) lithography is the technique used to fabricate ultra large scale integration (ULSI) integrated circuits significantly greater in size than current products. Applications for WSI lithography include large solid state detector arrays, large area liquid crystal displays, high speed mainframe supercomputers, and large random access memories. The lithography technology required to manufacture these devices is particularly challenging, requiring stringent control of both submicron critical dimensions and accurate alignment of level to level device patterns over large chip areas.

  4. Wafer-scale plasmonic and photonic crystal sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, M. C.; Liu, J.-N.; Farhang, A.; Williamson, B.; Black, M.; Wangensteen, T.; Fraser, J.; Petrova, R.; Cunningham, B. T.

    2015-08-01

    200 mm diameter wafer-scale fabrication, metrology, and optical modeling results are reviewed for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors based on 2-D metallic nano-dome and nano-hole arrays (NHA's) as well as 1-D photonic crystal sensors based on a leaky-waveguide mode resonance effect, with potential applications in label free sensing, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and surface-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SEFS). Potential markets include micro-arrays for medical diagnostics, forensic testing, environmental monitoring, and food safety. 1-D and 2-D nanostructures were fabricated on glass, fused silica, and silicon wafers using optical lithography and semiconductor processing techniques. Wafer-scale optical metrology results are compared to FDTD modeling and presented along with application-based performance results, including label-free plasmonic and photonic crystal sensing of both surface binding kinetics and bulk refractive index changes. In addition, SEFS and SERS results are presented for 1-D photonic crystal and 2-D metallic nano-array structures. Normal incidence transmittance results for a 550 nm pitch NHA showed good bulk refractive index sensitivity, however an intensity-based design with 665 nm pitch was chosen for use as a compact, label-free sensor at both 650 and 632.8 nm wavelengths. The optimized NHA sensor gives an SPR shift of about 480 nm per refractive index unit when detecting a series of 0-40% glucose solutions, but according to modeling shows about 10 times greater surface sensitivity when operating at 532 nm. Narrow-band photonic crystal resonance sensors showed quality factors over 200, with reasonable wafer-uniformity in terms of both resonance position and peak height.

  5. Towards reduced impact of EUV mask defectivity on wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonckheere, R.; Van den Heuvel, D.; Pacco, A.; Pollentier, I.; Baudemprez, B.; Jehoul, C.; Hermans, J.; Hendrickx, E.

    2014-07-01

    The defectivity challenges of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) masks, that need to be addressed before production readiness of EUV lithography is assured from the mask perspective, are twofold. First, the EUV-specific defect type relating to the multi-layer (ML) mirror, the so-called ML-defects, require to become more detectable than they are printable. This not only requires proven capability of blank inspection, but also the existence of satisfactory printability mitigation strategies (comprising avoidance, pattern shift methodology, compensation repair). Both these assets need to become available within the mask supply chain, as there is little that can still be done about such residual defects at the wafer fab. In a production phase, finding unexpected printing ML-defects is unacceptable. It is shown how the specific way-of-working in use at imec, starting from the printed wafer, contributes to related learning and identification of remaining gaps, in getting this issue fully dealt with. The second challenge relates to particle contamination during use of the reticle at the wafer fab. Avoiding overlaycritical particles on the backside of NXE3100 reticles is facilitated by the established way-of-working. Minimizing the occurrence of particles "hopping" between reticles via the electrostatic clamp of the scanner (so-called clamp-traveling particles) is a major driver for appropriate mask cleaning. The latter may not have negative impact by frequent use, in view of the highly vulnerable EUV mask stack, and especially for the present "black-border" solution in which the ML is etched away at the image border on the reticle. A lot of effort is spent into monitoring of NXE3100 reticles for particle adders on the pattern side. This is realized by comparing past and present mask defect maps obtained by inspection of printed wafers with subsequent repeater analysis.

  6. Production of Optical Quality Free Standing Diamond Wafer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-19

    Title : Production of Optical Quality Free Standing Diamond Wafer Prime Contractor : Onyx Optics, Inc. 6551 Sierra Lane Dublin, Ca 94568...www.onyxoptics.com Program Manager : Helmuth Meissner Onyx Optics, Inc. 6551 Sierra Lane Dublin, CA 94568 Email: hmeissner@onyxoptics.com Ph: 925...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Onyx Optics, Inc. 6551 Sierra Lane Dublin, Ca 94568 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING

  7. Method for making circular tubular channels with two silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, C.M.; Hui, W.C.

    1996-11-19

    A two-wafer microcapillary structure is fabricated by depositing boron nitride (BN) or silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) on two separate silicon wafers (e.g., crystal-plane silicon with [100] or [110] crystal orientation). Photolithography is used with a photoresist to create exposed areas in the deposition for plasma etching. A slit entry through to the silicon is created along the path desired for the ultimate microcapillary. Acetone is used to remove the photoresist. An isotropic etch, e.g., such as HF/HNO{sub 3}/CH{sub 3}COOH, then erodes away the silicon through the trench opening in the deposition layer. A channel with a half-circular cross section is then formed in the silicon along the line of the trench in the deposition layer. Wet etching is then used to remove the deposition layer. The two silicon wafers are aligned and then bonded together face-to-face to complete the microcapillary. 11 figs.

  8. Method for making circular tubular channels with two silicon wafers

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.; Hui, Wing C.

    1996-01-01

    A two-wafer microcapillary structure is fabricated by depositing boron nitride (BN) or silicon nitride (Si.sub.3 N.sub.4) on two separate silicon wafers (e.g., crystal-plane silicon with [100] or [110] crystal orientation). Photolithography is used with a photoresist to create exposed areas in the deposition for plasma etching. A slit entry through to the silicon is created along the path desired for the ultimate microcapillary. Acetone is used to remove the photoresist. An isotropic etch, e.g., such as HF/HNO.sub.3 /CH.sub.3 COOH, then erodes away the silicon through the trench opening in the deposition layer. A channel with a half-circular cross section is then formed in the silicon along the line of the trench in the deposition layer. Wet etching is then used to remove the deposition layer. The two silicon wafers are aligned and then bonded together face-to-face to complete the microcapillary.

  9. Novel analytical methods for the characterization of oral wafers.

    PubMed

    Garsuch, Verena; Breitkreutz, Jörg

    2009-09-01

    This study aims at compensating the lack of adequate methods for the characterization of the novel dosage forms buccal wafers by applying recent advanced analytical techniques. Fast-dissolving oral wafers need special methods for assessing their properties in drug development and quality control. For morphologic investigations, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) were used. Differences in the distribution of the active pharmaceutical ingredient within wafers can be depicted by NIR-CI. Film thickness was determined by micrometer screw and coating thickness gauge revealing no significant differences between the obtained values. To distinguish between the mechanical properties of different polymers, tensile test was performed. Suitable methods to predict disintegration behaviour are thermomechanical analysis and contact angle measurement. The determination of drug release was carried out by three different methods. Fibre-optic sensor systems allow an online measurement of the drug release profiles and the thorough analysis even within the first seconds of disintegration and drug dissolution.

  10. Physical mechanisms of copper-copper wafer bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Rebhan, B.; Hingerl, K.

    2015-10-07

    The study of the physical mechanisms driving Cu-Cu wafer bonding allowed for reducing the bonding temperatures below 200 °C. Metal thermo-compression Cu-Cu wafer bonding results obtained at such low temperatures are very encouraging and suggest that the process is possible even at room temperature if some boundary conditions are fulfilled. Sputtered (PVD) and electroplated Cu thin layers were investigated, and the analysis of both metallization techniques demonstrated the importance of decreasing Cu surface roughness. For an equal surface roughness, the bonding temperature of PVD Cu wafers could be even further reduced due to the favorable microstructure. Their smaller grain size enhances the length of the grain boundaries (observed on the surface prior bonding), acting as efficient mass transfer channels across the interface, and hence the grains are able to grow over the initial bonding interface. Due to the higher concentration of random high-angle grain boundaries, this effect is intensified. The model presented is explaining the microstructural changes based on atomic migration, taking into account that the reduction of the grain boundary area is the major driving force to reduce the Gibbs free energy, and predicts the subsequent microstructure evolution (grain growth) during thermal annealing.

  11. ALD Enabled Wafer Level Polymer Packaging for MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yadong

    Wafer level polymer packaging for MEMS is a cost-effective approach that is also compatible with microelectronic packaging technologies. However, polymer packages are not hermetic and cannot be used for MEMS devices, which usually demand vacuum or low moisture environment inside the packages. This problem can be solved by applying atomic layer deposition (ALD) of nano-scaled Al 2O3 or other inorganic materials over the polymer packages. Defects and mechanical cracks in ALD coatings are major concerns for hermetic/vacuum sealing. Several techniques have been developed to inspect such defects and cracks. Assisted by the electroplating copper technique, we have reduced the defect density by 1000 times for an ultra-thin, 2-nm ALD Al2O 3 film. Such an ultra-thin coating is essential to enhance coating's mechanical toughness. The toughness is usually determined by monitoring coating's crack initiation and growth in a bending test. A real-time, non-destructive inspection technique has been developed for in-situ characterization of an ALD film coated on a surface or buried in a multilayer structure. With the knowledge and technology established, we have successfully demonstrated a wafer-level polymer packaging process for MEMS using a Pirani gauge as the vacuum sensor. The leak rate through the polymer package has been reduced by 100 times by the ALD Al2O3 coating. More importantly, we have developed models and identified issues that are critical to ALD-enabled wafer level polymer packaging for MEMS.

  12. Wafer-scale aluminum plasmonics for fluorescence based biodetection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhang, Arash; George, Matthew C.; Williamson, Brent; Black, Mike; Wangensteen, Ted; Fraser, James; Petrova, Rumyana; Prestgard, Kent

    2015-08-01

    Moxtek has leveraged existing capabilities in wafer-scale patterning of sub-wavelength wire grid polarizers into the fabrication of 1D and 2D periodic aluminum plasmonic structures. This work will discuss progress in 200 mm diameter wafer-scale fabrication, with detailed emphasis within the realm of microarray based fluorescence detection. Aluminum nanohole arrays in a hexagonal lattice are first numerically investigated. The nanohole array geometry and periodicity are specifically tuned to coincide both with the excitation of the fluorophore Cy3, and to provide a high field enhancement within the nanoholes where labeled biomolecules are captured. This is accomplished through numerical modelling, nanofabrication, SEM imaging, and optical characterization. A 200mm diameter wafer, patterned with the optically optimized nanohole array, is cut into standard 1x3 inch microscope slide pieces and then subsequently printed with various antigens at 9 different concentrations. A sandwich bioassay is then carried out, using the corresponding conjugate antibodies in order to demonstrate specificity. The nanohole array exhibit a 3-4 times total fluorescence enhancement of Cy3, when compared to a leading commercial microarray glass slide.

  13. Wettability investigating on the wet etching textured multicrystalline silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangju; Niu, Yuchao; Zhai, Tongguang; Ma, Yuying; Zhen, Yongtai; Ma, Xiaoyu; Gao, Ying

    2016-02-01

    In order to investigate the wettability properties of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si), the different surface structures were fabricated on the as-cut p-type multi-wire slurry sawn mc-Si wafers, such as as-cut, polished and etched in various acid solutions. The contact angles and the XRD spectra of these samples were measured. It was noted that both the surface structures and the use of surfactant, such as Tween 80, made a stronger effect on wettability of the Si wafer. Due to the lipophilic groups of Tween 80 combined with the Si atoms while the hydrophilic groups of it were outward, a lipophilic surface of Si changed into a hydrophilic one and the rougher the surface, the stronger the hydrophily. Thus, it is feasible to add an appropriate surfactant into the etching solution during black-Si wafer fabrication for solar cells. In addition, different crystal plains of Si had different dangling bond density, so that their surface energies were different. A surface with higher surface energy could attract more water atoms and its wettability was better. However, the effect of crystal plain on the surface wettability was much weaker than surface morphology.

  14. Bloodstain Pattern Analysis: implementation of a fluid dynamic model for position determination of victims

    PubMed Central

    Laan, Nick; de Bruin, Karla G.; Slenter, Denise; Wilhelm, Julie; Jermy, Mark; Bonn, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Bloodstain Pattern Analysis is a forensic discipline in which, among others, the position of victims can be determined at crime scenes on which blood has been shed. To determine where the blood source was investigators use a straight-line approximation for the trajectory, ignoring effects of gravity and drag and thus overestimating the height of the source. We determined how accurately the location of the origin can be estimated when including gravity and drag into the trajectory reconstruction. We created eight bloodstain patterns at one meter distance from the wall. The origin’s location was determined for each pattern with: the straight-line approximation, our method including gravity, and our method including both gravity and drag. The latter two methods require the volume and impact velocity of each bloodstain, which we are able to determine with a 3D scanner and advanced fluid dynamics, respectively. We conclude that by including gravity and drag in the trajectory calculation, the origin’s location can be determined roughly four times more accurately than with the straight-line approximation. Our study enables investigators to determine if the victim was sitting or standing, or it might be possible to connect wounds on the body to specific patterns, which is important for crime scene reconstruction. PMID:26099070

  15. Dynamics, Analysis and Implementation of a Multiscroll Memristor-Based Chaotic Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alombah, N. Henry; Fotsin, Hilaire; Ngouonkadi, E. B. Megam; Nguazon, Tekou

    This article introduces a novel four-dimensional autonomous multiscroll chaotic circuit which is derived from the actual simplest memristor-based chaotic circuit. A fourth circuit element — another inductor — is introduced to generate the complex behavior observed. A systematic study of the chaotic behavior is performed with the help of some nonlinear tools such as Lyapunov exponents, phase portraits, and bifurcation diagrams. Multiple scroll attractors are observed in Matlab, Pspice environments and also experimentally. We also observe the phenomenon of antimonotonicity, periodic and chaotic bubbles, multiple periodic-doubling bifurcations, Hopf bifurcations, crises and the phenomenon of intermittency. The chaotic dynamics of this circuit is realized by laboratory experiments, Pspice simulations, numerical and analytical investigations. It is observed that the results from the three environments agree to a great extent. This topology is likely convenient to be used to intentionally generate chaos in memristor-based chaotic circuit applications, given the fact that multiscroll chaotic systems have found important applications as broadband signal generators, pseudorandom number generators for communication engineering and also in biometric authentication.

  16. Lattice dynamical wavelet neural networks implemented using particle swarm optimization for spatio-temporal system identification.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hua-Liang; Billings, Stephen A; Zhao, Yifan; Guo, Lingzhong

    2009-01-01

    In this brief, by combining an efficient wavelet representation with a coupled map lattice model, a new family of adaptive wavelet neural networks, called lattice dynamical wavelet neural networks (LDWNNs), is introduced for spatio-temporal system identification. A new orthogonal projection pursuit (OPP) method, coupled with a particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm, is proposed for augmenting the proposed network. A novel two-stage hybrid training scheme is developed for constructing a parsimonious network model. In the first stage, by applying the OPP algorithm, significant wavelet neurons are adaptively and successively recruited into the network, where adjustable parameters of the associated wavelet neurons are optimized using a particle swarm optimizer. The resultant network model, obtained in the first stage, however, may be redundant. In the second stage, an orthogonal least squares algorithm is then applied to refine and improve the initially trained network by removing redundant wavelet neurons from the network. An example for a real spatio-temporal system identification problem is presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed new modeling framework.

  17. Bloodstain Pattern Analysis: implementation of a fluid dynamic model for position determination of victims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laan, Nick; de Bruin, Karla G.; Slenter, Denise; Wilhelm, Julie; Jermy, Mark; Bonn, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Bloodstain Pattern Analysis is a forensic discipline in which, among others, the position of victims can be determined at crime scenes on which blood has been shed. To determine where the blood source was investigators use a straight-line approximation for the trajectory, ignoring effects of gravity and drag and thus overestimating the height of the source. We determined how accurately the location of the origin can be estimated when including gravity and drag into the trajectory reconstruction. We created eight bloodstain patterns at one meter distance from the wall. The origin’s location was determined for each pattern with: the straight-line approximation, our method including gravity, and our method including both gravity and drag. The latter two methods require the volume and impact velocity of each bloodstain, which we are able to determine with a 3D scanner and advanced fluid dynamics, respectively. We conclude that by including gravity and drag in the trajectory calculation, the origin’s location can be determined roughly four times more accurately than with the straight-line approximation. Our study enables investigators to determine if the victim was sitting or standing, or it might be possible to connect wounds on the body to specific patterns, which is important for crime scene reconstruction.

  18. Bloodstain Pattern Analysis: implementation of a fluid dynamic model for position determination of victims.

    PubMed

    Laan, Nick; de Bruin, Karla G; Slenter, Denise; Wilhelm, Julie; Jermy, Mark; Bonn, Daniel

    2015-06-22

    Bloodstain Pattern Analysis is a forensic discipline in which, among others, the position of victims can be determined at crime scenes on which blood has been shed. To determine where the blood source was investigators use a straight-line approximation for the trajectory, ignoring effects of gravity and drag and thus overestimating the height of the source. We determined how accurately the location of the origin can be estimated when including gravity and drag into the trajectory reconstruction. We created eight bloodstain patterns at one meter distance from the wall. The origin's location was determined for each pattern with: the straight-line approximation, our method including gravity, and our method including both gravity and drag. The latter two methods require the volume and impact velocity of each bloodstain, which we are able to determine with a 3D scanner and advanced fluid dynamics, respectively. We conclude that by including gravity and drag in the trajectory calculation, the origin's location can be determined roughly four times more accurately than with the straight-line approximation. Our study enables investigators to determine if the victim was sitting or standing, or it might be possible to connect wounds on the body to specific patterns, which is important for crime scene reconstruction.

  19. The design and implementation of the Dynamic Ionosphere Cubesat Experiment (DICE) science instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burr, Steven Reed

    Dynamic Ionosphere Cubesat Experiment (DICE) is a satellite project funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study the ionosphere, more particularly Storm Enhanced Densities (SED) with a payload consisting of plasma diagnostic instrumentation. Three instruments onboard DICE include an Electric Field Probe (EFP), Ion Langmuir Probe (ILP), and Three Axis Magnetometer (TAM). The EFP measures electric fields from +/-8V and consists of three channels a DC to 40Hz channel, a Floating Potential Probe (FPP), and an spectrographic channel with four bands from 16Hz to 512Hz. The ILP measures plasma densities from 1x104 cm--3 to 2x107 cm--3. The TAM measures magnetic field strength with a range +/-0.5 Gauss with a sensitivity of 2nT. To achieve desired mission requirements careful selection of instrument requirements and planning of the instrumentation design to achieve mission success. The analog design of each instrument is described in addition to the digital framework required to sample the science data at a 70Hz rate and prepare the data for the Command and Data Handing (C&DH) system. Calibration results are also presented and show fulfillment of the mission and instrumentation requirements.

  20. Nonadiabatic dynamics with intersystem crossings: A time-dependent density functional theory implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Franco de Carvalho, F.; Tavernelli, I.

    2015-12-14

    In this work, we derive a method to perform trajectory-based nonadiabatic dynamics that is able to describe both nonadiabatic transitions and intersystem crossing events (transitions between states of different spin-multiplicity) at the same level of theory, namely, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). To this end, we combined our previously developed TDDFT-based trajectory surface hopping scheme with an accurate and efficient algorithm for the calculation of the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) matrix elements. More specifically, we designed two algorithms for the calculation of intersystem crossing transitions, one based on an extended Tully’s surface hopping scheme including SOC and the second based on a Landau-Zener approximation applied to the spin sector of the electronic Hilbert space. This development allows for the design of an efficient on-the-fly nonadiabatic approach that can handle, on an equal footing, nonadiabatic and intersystem crossing transitions. The method is applied to the study of the photophysics of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in gas and liquid phases.

  1. Nonadiabatic dynamics with intersystem crossings: A time-dependent density functional theory implementation.

    PubMed

    Franco de Carvalho, F; Tavernelli, I

    2015-12-14

    In this work, we derive a method to perform trajectory-based nonadiabatic dynamics that is able to describe both nonadiabatic transitions and intersystem crossing events (transitions between states of different spin-multiplicity) at the same level of theory, namely, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). To this end, we combined our previously developed TDDFT-based trajectory surface hopping scheme with an accurate and efficient algorithm for the calculation of the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) matrix elements. More specifically, we designed two algorithms for the calculation of intersystem crossing transitions, one based on an extended Tully's surface hopping scheme including SOC and the second based on a Landau-Zener approximation applied to the spin sector of the electronic Hilbert space. This development allows for the design of an efficient on-the-fly nonadiabatic approach that can handle, on an equal footing, nonadiabatic and intersystem crossing transitions. The method is applied to the study of the photophysics of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in gas and liquid phases.

  2. The use of a wax bite wafer and a double computed tomography scan procedure to obtain a three-dimensional augmented virtual skull model.

    PubMed

    Swennen, Gwen R J; Mommaerts, Maurice Y; Abeloos, Johan; De Clercq, Calix; Lamoral, Philippe; Neyt, Nathalie; Casselman, Jan; Schutyser, Filip

    2007-05-01

    A detailed visualization of the interocclusal relationship is essential in a three-dimensional virtual planning setup for orthognathic and facial orthomorphic surgery. The purpose of this study was to introduce and evaluate the use of a wax bite wafer in combination with a double computed tomography (CT) scan procedure to augment the three-dimensional virtual model of the skull with a detailed dental surface. A total of 10 orthognathic patients were scanned after a standardized multislice CT scanning protocol with dose reduction with their wax bite wafer in place. Afterward, the impressions of the upper and lower arches and the wax bite wafer were scanned for each patient separately using a high-resolution standardized multislice CT scanning protocol. Accurate fitting of the virtual impressions on the wax bite wafer was done with surface matching using iterative closest points. Consecutively, automatic rigid point-based registration of the wax bite wafer on the patient scan was performed to implement the digital virtual dental arches into the patient's skull model (Maxilim, version 2.0; Medicim NV, St-Niklaas, Belgium). Probability error histograms showed errors of < or =0.16 mm (25% percentile), < or =0.31 mm (50% percentile), and < or =0.92 (90% percentile) for iterative closest point surface matching. The mean registration error for automatic point-based registration was 0.17 +/- 0.07 mm (range, 0.12-0.22 mm). The combination of the wax bite wafer with the double CT scan procedure allowed for the setup of an accurate three-dimensional virtual augmented model of the skull with detailed dental surface. However, from a clinical workload, data handling, and computational point of view, this method is too time-consuming to be introduced in the clinical routine.

  3. Characterization and mitigation of overlay error on silicon wafers with nonuniform stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, T.; Menon, V.; Wong, C.; Felix, N.; Pike, M.; Gluschenkov, O.; Belyansky, M.; Vukkadala, P.; Veeraraghavan, S.; Klein, S.; Hoo, C. H.; Sinha, J.

    2014-03-01

    Process-induced overlay errors are a growing problem in meeting the ever-tightening overlay requirements for integrated circuit production. While uniform process-induced stress is easily corrected, non-uniform stress across the wafer is much more problematic, often resulting in non-correctable overlay errors. Measurements of the wafer geometry of free, unchucked wafers give a powerful method for characterization of such non-uniform stress. We will describe a Patterned Wafer Geometry (PWG) tool, which uses optical methods to measure the geometry of in-process wafers. PWG data can be related to In-Plane Distortion (IPD) of the wafer through the PIR (Predicted IPD Residual) metric. This paper will explore the relationship between the PIR data and measured overlay data on Engineered Stress Monitor (ESM) wafers containing various designed stress variations. The process used to fabricate ESM wafers is quite versatile and can mimic many different stress variation signatures. For this study, ESM wafers were built with strong across-wafer stress variation and another ESM wafer set was built with strong intrafield stress variation. IPD was extensively characterized in two different ways: using standard overlay error metrology and using PWG metrology. Strong correlation is observed between these two independent sets of data, indicating that the PIR metric is able to clearly see wafer distortions. We have taken another step forward by using PIR data from the PWG tool to correct process-induced overlay error by feedforward to the exposure tool, a novel method that we call PWG-FF. We conclude that appropriate wafer geometry measurements of in-process wafers have strong potential to characterize and reduce process-induced overlay errors.

  4. Implementation and evaluation of modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique for lung SBRT patients following RTOG protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Chengyu; Tazi, Adam; Fang, Deborah Xiangdong; Iannuzzi, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    To implement modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) technique and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocols in our clinic for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment of patients with Stage I/II non–small cell lung cancer. Five patients with non–small cell lung cancer have been treated with SBRT. All the patients were immobilized using CIVCO Body Pro-Lok system and scanned using GE 4-slice computed tomography. The MDCA technique that was previously published was adopted as our planning technique, and RTOG protocols for the lung SBRT were followed. The patients were treated on Novalis Tx system with cone-beam computed tomography imaging guidance. All the patient plans passed the RTOG criteria. The conformal index ranges from 0.99 to 1.12 for the planning target volume, and the biological equivalent dose for the planning target volume is overall 100 Gy. Critical structures (lung, spinal cord, brachial plexus, skin, and chest wall) also meet RTOG protocols or published data. A 6-month follow-up of one of the patients shows good local disease control. We have successfully implemented the MDCA technique into our clinic for the lung SBRT program. It shows that the MDCA is useful and efficient for the lung SBRT planning, with the plan quality meeting the RTOG protocols.

  5. Output blue light evaluation for phosphor based smart white LED wafer level packages.

    PubMed

    Kolahdouz, Zahra; Rostamian, Ali; Kolahdouz, Mohammadreza; Ma, Teng; van Zeijl, Henk; Zhang, Kouchi

    2016-02-22

    This study presents a blue light detector for evaluating the output light of phosphor based white LED package. It is composed of a silicon stripe-shaped photodiode designed and implemented in a 2 μm BiCMOS process which can be used for wafer level integration of different passive and active devices all in just 5 lithography steps. The final device shows a high selectivity to blue light. The maximum responsivity at 480 nm is matched with the target blue LED illumination. The designed structure have better responsivity compared to simple photodiode structure due to reducing the effect of dead layer formation close to the surface because of implantation. It has also a two-fold increase in the responsivity and quantum efficiency compared to previously similar published sensors.

  6. Failure And Yield Analysis Techniques For Readout Devices Tested In A High Throughput Automated Wafer Probing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Noel D.; Holoien, Lee D.

    1990-01-01

    Failure and yield analysis capabilities were developed for focal plane array (FPA) readout devices probe tested at wafer level instead of merely performing production rate testing and cataloging data. Innovative test strategies have been combined with software techniques to provide tools which accomplish these analyses while maintaining high throughput in test. This approach has been beneficial and valuable in saving test time when searching for hardware faults, investigating design susceptibilities, revealing foundry process variations from wafer to wafer and/or lot to lot, and creating a yield model for the parts tested. Testing of readout devices has historically been viewed as a major obstacle in high volume production of reliable components for focal plane systems. Thorough testing in a high throughput automated wafer probe environment may be achieved, but often at the expense of real-time analysis of failures and yield factors. Production testing has been established with these goals in mind rather than as an afterthought. This enables one to identify failure mechanisms as they occur in order to reduce yield loss and unnecessary test time. In addition to performing requisite data base management, routines have been created to re-sort data and reevaluate yield through varying performance parameter limits, to track and map failure mechanisms as they are encountered, to examine acquired data as a function of limits, and to provide yield information for feedback response to foundry processing. Ideas for aiding operators in recognizing and diagnosing possible test set hardware problems (as opposed to on-chip failures) have also been implemented.

  7. Parallel implementation of 3D FFT with volumetric decomposition schemes for efficient molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jaewoon; Kobayashi, Chigusa; Imamura, Toshiyuki; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (3D FFT) plays an important role in a wide variety of computer simulations and data analyses, including molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this study, we develop hybrid (MPI+OpenMP) parallelization schemes of 3D FFT based on two new volumetric decompositions, mainly for the particle mesh Ewald (PME) calculation in MD simulations. In one scheme, (1d_Alltoall), five all-to-all communications in one dimension are carried out, and in the other, (2d_Alltoall), one two-dimensional all-to-all communication is combined with two all-to-all communications in one dimension. 2d_Alltoall is similar to the conventional volumetric decomposition scheme. We performed benchmark tests of 3D FFT for the systems with different grid sizes using a large number of processors on the K computer in RIKEN AICS. The two schemes show comparable performances, and are better than existing 3D FFTs. The performances of 1d_Alltoall and 2d_Alltoall depend on the supercomputer network system and number of processors in each dimension. There is enough leeway for users to optimize performance for their conditions. In the PME method, short-range real-space interactions as well as long-range reciprocal-space interactions are calculated. Our volumetric decomposition schemes are particularly useful when used in conjunction with the recently developed midpoint cell method for short-range interactions, due to the same decompositions of real and reciprocal spaces. The 1d_Alltoall scheme of 3D FFT takes 4.7 ms to simulate one MD cycle for a virus system containing more than 1 million atoms using 32,768 cores on the K computer.

  8. Bulk Laser Material Modification: Towards a Kerfless Laser Wafering Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBeau, James

    Due to the ever increasing relevance of finer machining control as well as necessary reduction in material waste by large area semiconductor device manufacturers, a novel bulk laser machining method was investigated. Because the cost of silicon and sapphire substrates are limiting to the reduction in cost of devices in both the light emitting diode (LED) and solar industries, and the present substrate wafering process results in >50% waste, the need for an improved ingot wafering technique exists. The focus of this work is the design and understanding of a novel semiconductor wafering technique that utilizes the nonlinear absorption properties of band-gapped materials to achieve bulk (subsurface) morphological changes in matter using highly focused laser light. A method and tool was designed and developed to form controlled damage regions in the bulk of a crystalline sapphire wafer leaving the surfaces unaltered. The controllability of the subsurface damage geometry was investigated, and the effect of numerical aperture of the focusing optic, energy per pulse, wavelength, and number of pulses was characterized for a nanosecond pulse length variable wavelength Nd:YAG OPO laser. A novel model was developed to describe the geometry of laser induced morphological changes in the bulk of semiconducting materials for nanosecond pulse lengths. The beam propagation aspect of the model was based on ray-optics, and the full Keldysh multiphoton photoionization theory in conjuncture with Thornber's and Drude's models for impact ionization were used to describe high fluence laser light absorption and carrier generation ultimately resulting in permanent material modification though strong electron-plasma absorption and plasma melting. Although the electron-plasma description of laser damage formation is usually reserved for extremely short laser pulses (<20 ps), this work shows that it can be adapted for longer pulses of up to tens of nanoseconds. In addition to a model

  9. The role of biodiversity for the carbon cycle: Implementation of functional diversity in a dynamic vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakschewski, Boris; Boit, Alice; von Bloh, Werner; Rammig, Anja; Thonicke, Kirsten

    2013-04-01

    Most dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) condense natural plant diversity to plant functional types (PFTs). A single PFT usually represents a whole biome, e.g. the PFT "tropical broadleaved evergreen tree" and its constant set of functional trait parameters covers entire regions in the model. This approach minimizes functional diversity and neglects the effects of functional diversity on the modeled vegetation and carbon dynamics. Our work aims to overcome this limitation and extend functional diversity in the vegetation model LPJmL to explore the role of biodiversity in climate change mitigation. Our approach improves the representation of biodiversity in the model by incorporating the natural ranges and eco-physiological interrelations of relevant plant traits. Empirical data on plant traits is provided by the TRY data base (www.try-db.org) and the ROBIN project (www.robinproject.info). A first sensitivity analysis revealed that simulated carbon stocks are very stable under a large range of trait combinations. However, several model output variables appeared highly sensitive to small changes of plant trait parameters and thus the introduction of trait ranges requires several improvements of the PFT concept of LPJmL. One possible way of improvement is to implement missing plant-trait tradeoffs, which will be used to simulate the growth of individual plants with flexible parameter combinations at the landscape scale. Our improved model will enable for the simulation of local competition and complementarity of individual plants which, according to their trait values and ranges, can then be categorized into a much broader variety of PFTs. This modeling approach will allow for investigating the role of bio- and functional diversity in the global carbon cycle as well as in regional vegetation dynamics.

  10. A domain decomposition approach to implementing fault slip in finite-element models of quasi-static and dynamic crustal deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aagaard, B.T.; Knepley, M.G.; Williams, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    We employ a domain decomposition approach with Lagrange multipliers to implement fault slip in a finite-element code, PyLith, for use in both quasi-static and dynamic crustal deformation applications. This integrated approach to solving both quasi-static and dynamic simulations leverages common finite-element data structures and implementations of various boundary conditions, discretization schemes, and bulk and fault rheologies. We have developed a custom preconditioner for the Lagrange multiplier portion of the system of equations that provides excellent scalability with problem size compared to conventional additive Schwarz methods. We demonstrate application of this approach using benchmarks for both quasi-static viscoelastic deformation and dynamic spontaneous rupture propagation that verify the numerical implementation in PyLith.

  11. Metal-induced rapid transformation of diamond into single and multilayer graphene on wafer scale

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Diana; Deshmukh, Sanket; Narayanan, Badri; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K.R.S.; Yan, Zhong; Balandin, Alexander A.; Zinovev, Alexander; Rosenmann, Daniel; Sumant, Anirudha V.

    2016-07-04

    The degradation of intrinsic properties of graphene during the transfer process constitutes a major challenge in graphene device fabrication, stimulating the need for direct growth of graphene on dielectric substrates. Previous attempts of metal-induced transformation of diamond and silicon carbide into graphene suffers from metal contamination and inability to scale graphene growth over large area. Here in this article, we introduce a direct approach to transform polycrystalline diamond into high-quality graphene layers on wafer scale (4 inch in diameter) using a rapid thermal annealing process facilitated by a nickel, Ni thin film catalyst on top. We show that the process can be tuned to grow single or multilayer graphene with good electronic properties. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanism of graphene growth on polycrystalline diamond. Additionally, we demonstrate the lateral growth of free-standing graphene over micron-sized pre-fabricated holes, opening exciting opportunities for future graphene/diamond-based electronics.

  12. Wafer-scale, three-dimensional helical porous thin films deposited at a glancing angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhifeng; Bai, Fan

    2014-07-01

    Minimization of helices opens a door to impose novel functions derived from the dimensional shrinkage of optical, mechanical and electronic devices. Glancing angle deposition (GLAD) enables one to deposit three-dimensional helical porous thin films (HPTFs) composed of separated spiral micro/nano-columns. GLAD integrates a series of advantageous features, including one-step deposition, wafer-scale production with mono-handedness of spirals, flexible engineering of spiral materials and dimensions, and the adaption to various kinds of substrates. Herein, we briefly review the fabrication of HPTFs by GLAD, specific growth mechanisms, physical properties in structures, mechanics and chiral optics, and the emerging applications in green energy. A prospective outlook is presented to illuminate some promising developments in enantioselection, bio-dynamic analyses, wirelessly-controlled drug delivery and mass production.

  13. Metal-induced rapid transformation of diamond into single and multilayer graphene on wafer scale

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Diana; Deshmukh, Sanket A.; Narayanan, Badri; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.; Yan, Zhong; Balandin, Alexander A.; Zinovev, Alexander; Rosenmann, Daniel; Sumant, Anirudha V.

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of intrinsic properties of graphene during the transfer process constitutes a major challenge in graphene device fabrication, stimulating the need for direct growth of graphene on dielectric substrates. Previous attempts of metal-induced transformation of diamond and silicon carbide into graphene suffers from metal contamination and inability to scale graphene growth over large area. Here, we introduce a direct approach to transform polycrystalline diamond into high-quality graphene layers on wafer scale (4 inch in diameter) using a rapid thermal annealing process facilitated by a nickel, Ni thin film catalyst on top. We show that the process can be tuned to grow single or multilayer graphene with good electronic properties. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanism of graphene growth on polycrystalline diamond. In addition, we demonstrate the lateral growth of free-standing graphene over micron-sized pre-fabricated holes, opening exciting opportunities for future graphene/diamond-based electronics. PMID:27373740

  14. Performances of accumulation-mode n- and p-MOSFETs on Si(110) wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubert, Philippe; Teramoto, Akinobu; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the electrical and noise performances of accumulation-mode n- and p-MOSFETs on Si(110) wafers and compare them with conventional MOSFETs fabricated either on Si(100) or Si(110) wafers. With regard to electrical performances, accumulation-mode p-type MOSFETs are in every aspect superior. However, its n-type counterpart does not provide the best performances even though they are still superior to conventional transistors when fabricated on the same type of wafer. Conventional inversion-mode n-MOSFETs on Si(100) wafers still display the best performances. The simultaneous improvement and reduction in drivability respectively in the p- and n-type transistors make the accumulation-mode MOSFETs fabricated on Si(110) wafers extremely well suited for complementary technologies owing to their great balance in terms of drivability. With regard to noise evaluation, accumulation-mode MOSFETs on Si(110) wafers exhibit the highest noise level even though they compare relatively well with the inversion transistors on Si(110) wafers, especially for p-type ones. The lowest noise level is obtained for conventional inversion-mode MOSFETs on Si(100) wafers, and the type of wafer upon which transistors are fabricated is the reason. Indeed, the fabrication of high-quality Si/SiO2 interfaces is better achieved for silicon wafers with a (100) crystallographic orientation, leading to few interface defects and consequently less noise.

  15. The role of the asymptotic dynamics in the design of FPGA-based hardware implementations of gIF-type neural networks.

    PubMed

    Rostro-Gonzalez, Horacio; Cessac, Bruno; Girau, Bernard; Torres-Huitzil, Cesar

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical analysis of the role of asymptotic dynamics in the design of hardware-based implementations of the generalised integrate-and-fire (gIF) neuron models. These proposed implementations are based on extensions of the discrete-time spiking neuron model, which was introduced by Soula et al., and have been implemented on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices using fixed-point arithmetic. Mathematical studies conducted by Cessac have evidenced the existence of three main regimes (neural death, periodic and chaotic regimes) in the activity of such neuron models. These activity regimes are characterised in hardware by considering a precision analysis in the design of an architecture for an FPGA-based implementation. The proposed approach, although based on gIF neuron models and FPGA hardware, can be extended to more complex neuron models as well as to different in silico implementations.

  16. Implementation of a research-based lab module in a high school chemistry curriculum: A study of classroom dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilarz, Matthew

    For this study, a research-based lab module was implemented in two high school chemistry classes for the purpose of examining classroom dynamics throughout the process of students completing the module. A research-based lab module developed for use in undergraduate laboratories by the Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education (CASPiE) was modified and implemented in two high school settings. This module consisted of four phases: Skill Building, Experimental Design, Independent Research, and Results and Poster Presentation. Classroom dynamics were studied by considering the students' and teachers' perceptions of their experiences during the completion of the module and by examining the interactions between students and teachers that took place throughout the module. The results reveal that there are shifts in classroom dynamics throughout the four phases of the module. In the Skill Building phase there was a great deal of dependence on the teacher for help in completing tasks. However, there is a slight contrast to what the students and teachers reported about their experiences during this phase. The teachers describe the students as being very dependent on them and asking questions constantly during the Skill Building experiments. The students report that they tried to figure out their problems with their lab partners and students in other lab groups before asking the teacher for help. The teachers perceived that students came to them immediately for help and did not realize that students were coming to them as sort of a last resort when they could not solve problems on their own. In the Experimental Design phase the students and teachers both report that the lab groups were working together as groups to design their experiments, and rarely had interactions with anyone outside of their lab group. For the Independent Research phase both students and teachers report that lab groups worked very independently of any outside assistance and that they began to

  17. Laser-assisted removal of particles on silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecke, G.; Röhr, E.; Heyns, M. M.

    1999-04-01

    Laser cleaning is one of the new promising dry cleaning techniques considered by semiconductor companies to replace wet cleans in the near future. A dry laser cleaning tool was tested that uses an inert gas jet to remove particles lifted off by the action of a DUV excimer laser. A model was developed to simulate the cleaning process and analyze the influence of experimental parameters on laser cleaning efficiency. The best cleaning efficiencies obtained with 1.0 μm SiO2, ˜0.3 μm Si3N4, and 0.3 μm SiO2 particles deposited on Si wafers were 84±8%, 33±4%, and 12±7%, respectively. This is in qualitative agreement with theoretical calculations showing the existence of a size threshold for the removal of nonabsorbing particles by dry laser cleaning. Among the process parameters tested to optimize the process efficiency, fluence showed the highest influence on removal efficiency, before the number of laser pulses and the laser repetition rate. The use of high fluences was limited by the damaging of the wafer surface, which was not homogeneous on a macroscopic scale. The optimum number of laser pulses per unit area depended on the type of particle. The laser repetition rate had no significant influence on cleaning efficiency and can be used to reduce process time. The influence of capillary condensation on the process was demonstrated by the higher removal efficiency of 0.3 μm SiO2 and Si3N4 particles, 88±6% and 78%, respectively, upon exposure of wafers to air saturated with moisture prior to laser processing. This was attributed to the explosive evaporation of capillary condensed water, similar to the mechanism proposed for liquid assisted laser cleaning.

  18. Addressable Inverter Matrix Tests Integrated-Circuit Wafer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G.

    1988-01-01

    Addressing elements indirectly through shift register reduces number of test probes. With aid of new technique, complex test structure on silicon wafer tested with relatively small number of test probes. Conserves silicon area by reduction of area devoted to pads. Allows thorough evaluation of test structure characteristics and of manufacturing process parameters. Test structure consists of shift register and matrix of inverter/transmission-gate cells connected to two-by-ten array of probe pads. Entire pattern contained in square area having only 1.6-millimeter sides. Shift register is conventional static CMOS device using inverters and transmission gates in master/slave D flip-flop configuration.

  19. Characterization of wafer charging mechanisms and oxide survival prediction methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Lukaszek, W.; Dixon, W.; Vella, M.; Messick, C.; Reno, S.; Shideler, J.

    1994-04-01

    Unipolar, EEPROM-based peak potential sensors and current sensors have been used to characterize the I-V relationship of charging transients which devices normally experience during the course of ion implantation. The results indicate that the charging sources may appear to behave like current-sources or voltage-sources, depending on the impedance of the load. This behavior may be understood in terms of plasma concepts. The ability to empirically characterize the I-V characteristics of charging sources using the CHARM-2 monitor wafers opens the way for prediction of failure rates of oxides subjected to specific processes, if the oxide Q{sub bd} distributions are known.

  20. Selected applications of photothermal and photoluminescence heterodyne techniques for process control in silicon wafer manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlert, Andreas; Kerstan, Michael; Lundt, Holger; Huber, Anton; Helmreich, Dieter; Geiler, Hans-Dieter; Karge, Harald; Wagner, Matthias

    1997-02-01

    Two noncontact laser-based heterodyne techniques, photothermal heterodyne (PTH) and photoluminescence heterodyne (PLH), are introduced and applied to processing and quality control in silicon wafer manufacturing. The crystallographic characteristics of process-induced defects in silicon wafers are suitable for the application of PTH and PLH techniques, which are demonstrated on selected examples from different steps of silicon wafer production. Both PLH and PTH techniques meet the demand for nondestructive and on-line-suitable measurement in the semiconductor industry.

  1. Optical characterization of double-side-textured silicon wafer based on photonic nanostructures for thin-wafer crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayagaki, Takeshi; Furuta, Daichi; Aonuma, Osamu; Takahashi, Isao; Hoshi, Yusuke; Kurokawa, Yasuyoshi; Usami, Noritaka

    2017-04-01

    Crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers have found extensive use in photovoltaic applications. In this regard, to enable advanced light manipulation in thin-wafer c-Si solar cells, we demonstrate the fabrication of double-side-textured Si wafers composed of a front-surface photonic nanotexture fabricated with quantum dot arrays and a rear-surface microtexture. The addition of the rear-surface microtexture to a Si wafer with the front-surface photonic nanotexture increases the wafer’s optical absorption in the near-infrared region, thus enabling enhanced light trapping. Excitation spectroscopy reveals that the photoluminescence intensity in the Si wafer with the double-sided texture is higher than that in the Si wafer without the rear-surface microtexture, thus indicating an increase in true optical absorption in the Si wafer with the double-sided texture. Our results indicate that the double-sided textures, i.e., the front-surface photonic nanotexture and rear-surface microtexture, can effectively reduce the surface reflection loss and provide enhanced light trapping, respectively.

  2. Implementation of an integrated op-amp based chaotic neuron model and observation of its chaotic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Jinwoo; Lee, Jewon; Song, Hanjung

    2011-03-15

    This paper presents a fully integrated circuit implementation of an operational amplifier (op-amp) based chaotic neuron model with a bipolar output function, experimental measurements, and analyses of its chaotic behavior. The proposed chaotic neuron model integrated circuit consists of several op-amps, sample and hold circuits, a nonlinear function block for chaotic signal generation, a clock generator, a nonlinear output function, etc. Based on the HSPICE (circuit program) simulation results, approximated empirical equations for analyses were formulated. Then, the chaotic dynamical responses such as bifurcation diagrams, time series, and Lyapunov exponent were calculated using these empirical equations. In addition, we performed simulations about two chaotic neuron systems with four synapses to confirm neural network connections and got normal behavior of the chaotic neuron such as internal state bifurcation diagram according to the synaptic weight variation. The proposed circuit was fabricated using a 0.8-{mu}m single poly complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology. Measurements of the fabricated single chaotic neuron with {+-}2.5 V power supplies and a 10 kHz sampling clock frequency were carried out and compared with the simulated results.

  3. Fabrication of micro-nano composite textured surface for slurry sawn mc-Si wafers cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y. C.; liu, Z.; Ren, X. K.; Liu, X. J.; Liu, H. T.; Jiang, Y. S.

    2017-01-01

    In order to enhance the PV efficiency of the cell made from slurry sawn (SS) mc-Si wafers, using a Ag-assisted electroless etching (AgNO3+HF+H2O2) combined with an auxiliary etching (HF+HNO3) the RENA textured SS mc-Si wafers (called as RENA wafers) were further textured (nano pores were formed on the original micro pits) to change into micro-nano composite textured wafers (called as MN-RENA wafers). The solar cells made from the MN-RENA wafers had a better PV efficiency than that of RENA wafers. This is mainly attributed to the higher light-trapping of the micro-nano composite texture. The nano size texture enhanced the light-trap of wafer surface and, at the same time, the micro size texture maintained the light-trap uniformity of different gains of RENA wafer. However, there still exist a potential for optimization, such as, the SiNx passviation coating should be improved to be deposited more uniformly in order to passivate the bottom of pits better and to reduce the reflectance of the obtuse tips of pits.

  4. Improved quality control of silicon wafers using novel off-line air pocket image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, John F.; Sanna, M. Cristina

    2014-08-01

    Air pockets (APK) occur randomly in Czochralski (Cz) grown silicon (Si) crystals and may become included in wafers after slicing and polishing. Previously the only APK of interest were those that intersected the front surface of the wafer and therefore directly impacted device yield. However mobile and other electronics have placed new demands on wafers to be internally APK-free for reasons of thermal management and packaging yield. We present a novel, recently patented, APK image processing technique and demonstrate the use of that technique, off-line, to improve quality control during wafer manufacturing.

  5. Critical dimension control using ultrashort laser for improving wafer critical dimension uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avizemer, Dan; Sharoni, Ofir; Oshemkov, Sergey; Cohen, Avi; Dayan, Asaf; Khurana, Ranjan; Kewley, Dave

    2015-07-01

    Requirements for control of critical dimension (CD) become more demanding as the integrated circuit (IC) feature size specifications become tighter and tighter. Critical dimension control, also known as CDC, is a well-known laser-based process in the IC industry that has proven to be robust, repeatable, and efficient in adjusting wafer CD uniformity (CDU) [Proc. SPIE 6152, 615225 (2006)]. The process involves locally and selectively attenuating the deep ultraviolet light which goes through the photomask to the wafer. The input data for the CDC process in the wafer fab is typically taken from wafer CDU data, which is measured by metrology tools such as wafer-critical dimension-scanning electron microscopy (CD-SEM), wafer optical scatterometry, or wafer level CD (WLCD). The CD correction process uses the CDU data in order to create an attenuation correction contour, which is later applied by the in-situ ultrashort laser system of the CDC to locally change the transmission of the photomask. The ultrashort pulsed laser system creates small, partially scattered, Shade-In-Elements (also known as pixels) by focusing the laser beam inside the quartz bulk of the photomask. This results in the formation of a localized, intravolume, quartz modified area, which has a different refractive index than the quartz bulk itself. The CDC process flow for improving wafer CDU in a wafer fab with detailed explanations of the shading elements formation inside the quartz by the ultrashort pulsed laser is reviewed.

  6. How accurate are rapid prototyped (RP) final orthognathic surgical wafers? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shqaidef, Abedalrahman; Ayoub, Ashraf F; Khambay, Balvinder S

    2014-09-01

    Computer packages have been introduced to simulate the movements of the jaw in three dimensions to facilitate planning of treatment. After final 3-dimensional virtual planning, a rapid prototype wafer can be manufactured and used in theatre. Our aim was to assess the accuracy of rapid prototyping of virtual wafers derived from laser scanned dental models using CAD/CAM software. Upper and lower plaster models from 10 orthognathic patients, the articulated models, and the conventional wafers were scanned. The virtual wafers were made from CAD/CAM software, and printed on a stereolithographic printer. We also scanned the articulated models with rapid prototype wafers in place. The validity of the final rapid prototype wafer was measured by the accuracy with which upper and lower models related to one another. The absolute mean error of the rapid prototype wafer when aligned with the dental models was 0.94 (0.09) mm. The absolute distance of the 2 models articulated by conventional and rapid prototype wafers ranged from 0.04 - 1.73mm. The rapid prototype wafers were able to orientate the upper and lower dental models with an absolute mean error of 0.94 (0.09) mm, but it ranged from 0.04-1.73mm.

  7. Growth of Catalyst-Free Epitaxial InAs Nanowires on Si Wafers Using Metallic Masks.

    PubMed

    Soo, M Teng; Zheng, Kun; Gao, Qiang; Tan, H Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Zou, Jin

    2016-07-13

    Development of heteroepitaxy growth of catalyst-free vertical III-V nanowires on Si wafers is highly desirable for future nanoscale Si-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. In this study, a proof-of-concept approach is developed for catalyst-free heteroepitaxy growth of InAs nanowires on Si wafers. Before the growth of InAs nanowires, a Si-compatible metallic film with a thickness of several tens of nanometers was predeposited on a Si wafer and then annealed to form nanosize openings so as to obtain a metallic mask. These nano-openings exposed the surface of the Si wafer, which allowed subsequent nucleation and growth of epitaxial InAs nanowires directly on the surface of the Si wafer. The small size of the nano-openings limits the lateral growth of the nanostructures but promotes their axial growth. Through this approach, catalyst-free InAs nanowires were grown on both Si (111) and (001) wafers successfully at different growth temperatures. In particular, ultralong defect-free InAs nanowires with the wurtzite structure were grown the Si (111) wafers at 550 °C using the Ni mask. This study offers a simple, cost-effective, and scalable method to grow catalyst-free III-V nanowires on Si wafers. The simplicity of the approach opens a new avenue for the growth and integration of catalyst-free high-quality heteroepitaxial III-V nanowires on Si wafers.

  8. Measuring the thickness profiles of wafers to subnanometer resolution using Fabry-Perot interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Farrant, David I.; Arkwright, John W.; Fairman, Philip S.; Netterfield, Roger P

    2007-05-20

    The resolution of an angle-scanning technique for measuring transparent optical wafers is analyzed, and it is shown both theoretically and experimentally that subnanometer resolution can be readily achieved. Data are acquired simultaneously over the whole area of the wafer, producing two-dimensional thickness variation maps in as little as 10 s.Repeatabilities of 0.07 nm have been demonstrated, and wafers of up to100 mm diameter have been measured, with1 mm or better spatial resolution. A technique for compensating wafer and system aberrations is incorporated and analyzed.

  9. Dual-Side Wafer Processing and Resonant Tunneling Transistor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, J.S.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.; Hietala, V.M.; Reno, J.L.; Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.

    1999-07-20

    We describe dual-side wafer processing and its application to resonant tunneling transistors in a planar configuration. The fabrication technique utilizes a novel flip-chip, wafer thinning process called epoxy-bond and stop-etch (EBASE) process, where the substrate material is removed by selective wet etching and stopped at an etch-stop layer. This EBASE method results in a semiconductor epitaxial layer that is typically less than a micron thick and has a mirror-finish, allowing backside gates to be placed in close proximity to frontside gates. Utilizing this technique, a resonant tunneling transistor--the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT)--can be fabricated in a fully planar configuration, where the tunneling between two selectively-contacted 2DEGs in GaAs or InGaAs quantum wells is modulated by surface Schottky gate. Low temperature electrical characterization yields source-drain I-V curves with a gate-tunable negative differential resistance.

  10. UV/Ozone Cleaning For Organics Removal On Silicon Wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafonte, Leo; Chiu, Rafael

    1984-06-01

    The feasibility for using a combination of ultraviolet light and ozone - UV/Ozone Cleaning - for organics removal and photoresist residue cleaning from silicon semiconductor wafers was investigated. The process generates a highly oxidative atmosphere that is specific for removing trace organic residues. Product of the reactions are carbon dioxide and water. In most cases, stable inorganic materials such as oxide coatings remain unaffected. UV/Ozone exposure of silicon causes formation of a thin layer of silicon oxide that tends to retard further oxidation of the silicon. Based on the expected photochemistry o," this process, specific enhancements to accelerate the cleaning rates were tested. The enhancements involved the use of both gas phase and liquio phase additives, and comparative rates of removal were determined. The technique was tested on several photoresists, potential organic residues, and common solvent systems. The photoresists studies were primarily positive resists and were tested at several levels of ion implantation. The results of the testing suggests that the highest potential applications of UV/Ozone Cleaning in the processing of semiconductor wafers include: a) Removal of solvent residues and process contaminants. b) A pre-process step to insure cleanliness by removal of residual organic or airborne organic contaminants. c) As a post-process step to insure cleanliness or to remove trace organics.

  11. Deposition and removal of sodium contamination on silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constant, I.; Tardif, F.; Derrien, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper investigations are performed in order to understand the source of sodium contamination in clean-room environments and to find different cleaning processes able to limit or suppress sodium deposition. In a clean-room environment, the human being has been identified as one of the major sources of sodium. The airborne sodium contamination is essentially transmitted in particle form. In order to limit sodium deposition from the air, the wafers awaiting subsequent processing need to be stored in a protective box or placed far from the human environment and should not be left for much more than 1 week in a class 1 clean room. Also, wet chemistries could cause sodium contamination on wafers particularly during the deionized water rinse. In order to limit the possible contamination, the sodium deposition mechanisms have been studied: they show the typical characteristics of Langmuir adsorption. Temperature and ionic concentration are both parameters which influence the deposition. In water, sodium deposition can be avoided by introducing acid or alkaline solutions or increasing the temperature: it can be drastically reduced by adding traces of HCl (0.01%). Finally, other cleaning chemistries such as SC1 (NH4 OH-H2 O2 -H2 O) in 0.25:1:5 proportion, SC2 (HCl-H2 O2 -H2 O) in 1:1:5 proportion, 0.1% HF and SPM (H2 SO4 -H2 O2 ) in 3:1 proportion reduce the contamination as well.

  12. Thin-film resistance thermometers on silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, Kenneth G; Ripple, Dean C; Kimes, William A

    2009-04-01

    We have fabricated Pt thin-film resistors directly sputtered on silicon substrates to evaluate their use as resistance thermal detectors (RTDs). This technique was chosen to achieve more accurate temperature measurements of large silicon wafers during semiconductor processing. High-purity (0.999 968 mass fraction) platinum was sputter deposited on silicon test coupons using titanium and zirconium bond coats. These test coupons were annealed, and four-point resistance specimens were prepared for thermal evaluation. Their response was compared with calibrated platinum-palladium thermocouples in a tube furnace. We evaluated the effects of furnace atmosphere, thin-film thickness, bond coats, annealing temperature and peak thermal excursion of the Pt thin films. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was performed to evaluate the effect of impurities on the thermal resistance coefficient, α. We present typical resistance versus temperature curves, hysteresis plots versus temperature and an analysis of the causes of uncertainties in the measurement of seven test coupons. We conclude that sputtered thin-film platinum resistors on silicon wafers can yield temperature measurements with uncertainties of less than 1 °C, k = 1 up to 600 °C. This is comparable to or better than commercially available techniques.

  13. Process Performance of Optima XEx Single Wafer High Energy Implanter

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. H.; Yoon, Jongyoon; Kondratenko, S.; David, J.; Rubin, L. M.; Jang, I. S.; Cha, J. C.; Joo, Y. H.; Lee, A. B.; Jin, S. W.

    2011-01-07

    To meet the process requirements for well formation in future CMOS memory production, high energy implanters require more robust angle, dose, and energy control while maintaining high productivity. The Optima XEx high energy implanter meets these requirements by integrating a traditional LINAC beamline with a robust single wafer handling system. To achieve beam angle control, Optima XEx can control both the horizontal and vertical beam angles to within 0.1 degrees using advanced beam angle measurement and correction. Accurate energy calibration and energy trim functions accelerate process matching by eliminating energy calibration errors. The large volume process chamber and UDC (upstream dose control) using faraday cups outside of the process chamber precisely control implant dose regardless of any chamber pressure increase due to PR (photoresist) outgassing. An optimized RF LINAC accelerator improves reliability and enables singly charged phosphorus and boron energies up to 1200 keV and 1500 keV respectively with higher beam currents. A new single wafer endstation combined with increased beam performance leads to overall increased productivity. We report on the advanced performance of Optima XEx observed during tool installation and volume production at an advanced memory fab.

  14. A thermal microprobe fabricated with wafer-stage processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongxia; Zhang, Yanwei; Blaser, Juliana; Sriram, T. S.; Enver, Ahsan; Marcus, R. B.

    1998-05-01

    A thermal microprobe has been designed and built for high resolution temperature sensing. The thermal sensor is a thin-film thermocouple junction at the tip of an atomic force microprobe (AFM) silicon probe needle. Only wafer-stage processing steps are used for the fabrication. For high resolution temperature sensing it is essential that the junction be confined to a short distance at the AFM tip. This confinement is achieved by a controlled photoresist coating process. Experiment prototypes have been made with an Au/Pd junction confined to within 0.5 μm of the tip, with the two metals separated elsewhere by a thin insulating oxide layer. Processing begins with double-polished, n-type, 4 in. diameter, 300-μm-thick silicon wafers. Atomically sharp probe tips are formed by a combination of dry and wet chemical etching, and oxidation sharpening. The metal layers are sputtering deposited and the cantilevers are released by a combination of KOH and dry etching. A resistively heated calibration device was made for temperature calibration of the thermal microprobe over the temperature range 25-110 °C. Over this range the thermal outputs of two microprobes are 4.5 and 5.6 μV/K and is linear. Thermal and topographical images are also obtained from a heated tungsten thin film fuse.

  15. Residual stress in silicon wafer using IR polariscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhijia; Wang, Pin; Asundi, Anand

    2008-09-01

    The infrared phase shift polariscope (IR-PSP) is a full-field optical technique for stress analysis in Silicon wafers. Phase shift polariscope is preferred to a conventional polariscope, as it can provide quantitative information of the normal stress difference and the shear stress in the specimen. The method is based on the principles of photoelasticity, in which stresses induces temporary birefringence in materials which can be quantitatively analyzed using a phase shift polariscope. Compared to other stress analysis techniques such as x-ray diffraction or laser scanning, infrared photoelastic stress analysis provides full-field information with high resolution and in near real time. As the semiconductor fabrication is advancing, larger wafers, thinner films and more compact packages are being manufactured. This results in a growing demand of process control. Residual stress exist in silicon during semiconductor fabrication and these stresses may make cell processing difficult or even cause the failure of the silicon. Reducing these stresses would improve manufacturability and reliability. Therefore stress analysis is essential to trace the root cause of the stresses. The polariscope images are processed using MATLAB and four-step phase shifting method to provide quantitative as well as qualitative information regarding the residual stress of the sample. The system is calibrated using four-point bend specimen and then the residual stress distribution in a MEMS sample is shown.

  16. Model-Based Infrared Metrology for Advanced Technology Nodes and 300 mm Wafer Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, Peter A.; Duran, Carlos; Tower, Josh; Mazurenko, Alex; Mantz, Ulrich; Weidner, Peter; Kasic, Alexander

    2005-09-01

    The use of infrared spectroscopy for production semiconductor process monitoring has evolved recently from primarily unpatterned, i.e. blanket test wafer measurements in a limited historical application space of blanket epitaxial, BPSG, and FSG layers to new applications involving patterned product wafer measurements, and new measurement capabilities. Over the last several years, the semiconductor industry has adopted a new set of materials associated with copper/low-k interconnects, and new structures incorporating exotic materials including silicon germanium, SOI substrates and high aspect ratio trenches. The new device architectures and more chemically sophisticated materials have raised new process control and metrology challenges that are not addressed by current measurement technology. To address the challenges we have developed a new infrared metrology tool designed for emerging semiconductor production processes, in a package compatible with modern production and R&D environments. The tool incorporates recent advances in reflectance instrumentation including highly accurate signal processing, optimized reflectometry optics, and model-based calibration and analysis algorithms. To meet the production requirements of the modern automated fab, the measurement hardware has been integrated with a fully automated 300 mm platform incorporating front opening unified pod (FOUP) interfaces, automated pattern recognition and high throughput ultra clean robotics. The tool employs a suite of automated dispersion-model analysis algorithms capable of extracting a variety of layer properties from measured spectra. The new tool provides excellent measurement precision, tool matching, and a platform for deploying many new production and development applications. In this paper we will explore the use of model based infrared analysis as a tool for characterizing novel bottle capacitor structures employed in high density dynamic random access memory (DRAM) chips. We will explore

  17. Large current MOSFET on photonic silicon-on-insulator wafers and its monolithic integration with a thermo-optic 2 × 2 Mach-Zehnder switch.

    PubMed

    Cong, G W; Matsukawa, T; Chiba, T; Tadokoro, H; Yanagihara, M; Ohno, M; Kawashima, H; Kuwatsuka, H; Igarashi, Y; Masahara, M; Ishikawa, H

    2013-03-25

    n-channel body-tied partially depleted metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) were fabricated for large current applications on a silicon-on-insulator wafer with photonics-oriented specifications. The MOSFET can drive an electrical current as large as 20 mA. We monolithically integrated this MOSFET with a 2 × 2 Mach-Zehnder interferometer optical switch having thermo-optic phase shifters. The static and dynamic performances of the integrated device are experimentally evaluated.

  18. Grid integration and smart grid implementation of emerging technologies in electric power systems through approximate dynamic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jingjie

    A key hurdle for implementing real-time pricing of electricity is a lack of consumers' responses. Solutions to overcome the hurdle include the energy management system that automatically optimizes household appliance usage such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging (and discharging with vehicle-to-grid) via a two-way communication with the grid. Real-time pricing, combined with household automation devices, has a potential to accommodate an increasing penetration of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. In addition, the intelligent energy controller on the consumer-side can help increase the utilization rate of the intermittent renewable resource, as the demand can be managed to match the output profile of renewables, thus making the intermittent resource such as wind and solar more economically competitive in the long run. One of the main goals of this dissertation is to present how real-time retail pricing, aided by control automation devices, can be integrated into the wholesale electricity market under various uncertainties through approximate dynamic programming. What distinguishes this study from the existing work in the literature is that whole- sale electricity prices are endogenously determined as we solve a system operator's economic dispatch problem on an hourly basis over the entire optimization horizon. This modeling and algorithm framework will allow a feedback loop between electricity prices and electricity consumption to be fully captured. While we are interested in a near-optimal solution using approximate dynamic programming; deterministic linear programming benchmarks are use to demonstrate the quality of our solutions. The other goal of the dissertation is to use this framework to provide numerical evidence to the debate on whether real-time pricing is superior than the current flat rate structure in terms of both economic and environmental impacts. For this purpose, the modeling and algorithm framework is tested on a large-scale test case

  19. On finding and using identifiable parameter combinations in nonlinear dynamic systems biology models and COMBOS: a novel web implementation.

    PubMed

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Kuo, Christine Er-zhen; DiStefano, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Parameter identifiability problems can plague biomodelers when they reach the quantification stage of development, even for relatively simple models. Structural identifiability (SI) is the primary question, usually understood as knowing which of P unknown biomodel parameters p1,…, pi,…, pP are-and which are not-quantifiable in principle from particular input-output (I-O) biodata. It is not widely appreciated that the same database also can provide quantitative information about the structurally unidentifiable (not quantifiable) subset, in the form of explicit algebraic relationships among unidentifiable pi. Importantly, this is a first step toward finding what else is needed to quantify particular unidentifiable parameters of interest from new I-O experiments. We further develop, implement and exemplify novel algorithms that address and solve the SI problem for a practical class of ordinary differential equation (ODE) systems biology models, as a user-friendly and universally-accessible web application (app)-COMBOS. Users provide the structural ODE and output measurement models in one of two standard forms to a remote server via their web browser. COMBOS provides a list of uniquely and non-uniquely SI model parameters, and-importantly-the combinations of parameters not individually SI. If non-uniquely SI, it also provides the maximum number of different solutions, with important practical implications. The behind-the-scenes symbolic differential algebra algorithms are based on computing Gröbner bases of model attributes established after some algebraic transformations, using the computer-algebra system Maxima. COMBOS was developed for facile instructional and research use as well as modeling. We use it in the classroom to illustrate SI analysis; and have simplified complex models of tumor suppressor p53 and hormone regulation, based on explicit computation of parameter combinations. It's illustrated and validated here for models of moderate complexity, with

  20. 75 FR 76952 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Lam Research Corporation (Wafer Fabrication Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... Fabrication Equipment) Fremont, Newark, and Livermore, CA Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade... authority to establish a special-purpose subzone at the wafer fabrication equipment manufacturing and... authority for subzone status for activity related to the manufacturing and distribution of wafer...

  1. Non-Destructive Damping Measurement for Wafer-Level Packaged Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Acceleration Switches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Non-destructive Damping Measurement for Wafer-level Packaged Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Acceleration Switches by Ryan Knight and...Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Acceleration Switches Ryan Knight and Evan Cheng Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL...Damping Measurement for Wafer-level Packaged Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Acceleration Switches 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  2. Silicon hybrid Wafer Scale Integration (WSI) used to fabricate a Hilbert transform integrated circuit module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaughan, Daniel J.

    1990-12-01

    This research was performed in order to develop a superior processing schedule for fabricating wafer-scale integration (WSI) circuit modules. This technology allows the design of circuitry that spans the entire surface of a silicon substrate wafer. The circuit element employed in this research was the Hilbert transform, a digital phase-shifting circuit. The transform was incorporated into a three integrated circuit (IC) die package that consisted of a mechanically supportive silicon wafer, three IC die, and a planarizing silicon wafer. The die were epoxied into this wafer using a Teflon block as a flat, and the combination was epoxied onto the substrate wafer, forming the IC module. The original design goals of this research were to keep the IC die and wafer planar and to electrically characterize of the module's interconnections. The first goal was met; the resultant process uses a low temperature (50 C) cure to achieve die-to-wafer planarity of within 5 microns. The second was not met due to the inability to pattern the chosen photosensitive dielectric material. Recommendations for further research included the need to use a stable non-stick surface as a epoxy cure fixture and the need to investigate the photopatternable dielectric material.

  3. Visible luminescence from silicon wafers subjected to stain etches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; George, T.; Ksendzov, A.; Vasquez, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    Etching of Si in a variety of solutions is known to cause staining. These stain layers consist of porous material similar to that produced by anodic etching of Si in HF solutions. In this work, photoluminescence peaked in the red from stain-etched Si wafers of different dopant types, concentrations, and orientations produced in solutions of HF:HNO3:H2O was observed. Luminescence is also observed in stain films produced in solutions of NaNO2 in HF, but not in stain films produced in solutions of CrO3 in HF. The luminescence spectra are similar to those reported recently for porous Si films produced by anodic etching in HF solutions. However, stain films are much easier to produce, requiring no special equipment.

  4. Nanotribology of nanooxide materials in ionic liquids on silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidunsani, Ahmad Termizi; Radiman, Shahidan; Hassan, Masjuki Haji; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2015-09-01

    Nanotribological properties have a significant impact on daily life. Ionic liquids (ILs) are becoming new favourable lubricants currently in researches. Addition of nanooxide materials in lubricants provide improvements to new technology. In this study, we determine nanotribological properties of BMIM+BF4- IL addition of different amount of ZnO nanomaterial on single crystals silicon wafer (Si110). The viscosity changes of IL samples against temperature increase were determined by rheological method. Nanotribological properties were determined by changes in friction coefficient and wear rate on silicon substrate surfaces using a reciprocating friction and wear monitor in 1 hour duration time. Aluminium cylinders acted as pins used to rub Si (110) substrate sample surfaces. Thus, on range between 0 mg to 3.5 mg of ZnO nanooxide material dispersed in 10ml BMIM+BF4- showed a good friction coefficient, wear and surface roughness reduction.

  5. Precise Fabrication of Silicon Wafers Using Gas Cluster Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Isogai, Hiromichi; Toyoda, Eiji; Izunome, Koji; Kashima, Kazuhiko; Mashita, Takafumi; Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2009-03-10

    Precise surface processing of a silicon wafer was studied by using a gas cluster ion beam (GCIB). The damage caused to the silicon surface was strongly dependent on irradiation parameters. The extent of damage varied with the species of source gas and the acceleration voltage (Va) of cluster ions. It also varied with the cluster size and residual gas pressure. The influence of electron acceleration voltage (Ve) used for ionization of a neutral cluster was also investigated. The irradiation damage, such as an amorphous silicon (a-Si) layer, a mixed layer of a-Si and c-Si (transition layer), and surface roughness, was increased with Ve. It is suggested that the increase in the amount of energy per atom was induced by high Ve, because of variation of the cluster size and/or cluster charge. An undamaged smooth surface can be produced by Ar-GCIB irradiation at low Ve and Va.

  6. Bio/chemical microsystem designed for wafer scale testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Anders M.; Mogensen, Klaus B.; Rong, Weimin; Telleman, Pieter; Kutter, Joerg P.

    2001-04-01

    We have designed a bio/chemical microsystem for online monitoring of glucose concentrations during fermentation. The system contains several passive microfluidic components including an enzyme reactor, a flow lamination part and a detector. Detection is based on the reaction of hydrogen peroxide, that is produced from glucose in an enzyme reactor, with luminol. This chemiluminescent reaction generates light that is detected by an integrated back-side contacted photodiode array. Various tests during fabrication are outlined with the emphasis on microwave detected photo conductance decay. The presented microsystem has both fluidic and electrical connection points accessible from the backside. This allows simultaneous testing of both fluidic and electrical parts before dicing the wafer.

  7. Chemical strategies for die/wafer submicron alignment and bonding.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James Ellis; Baca, Alicia I.; Chu, Dahwey; Rohwer, Lauren Elizabeth Shea

    2010-09-01

    This late-start LDRD explores chemical strategies that will enable sub-micron alignment accuracy of dies and wafers by exploiting the interfacial energies of chemical ligands. We have micropatterned commensurate features, such as 2-d arrays of micron-sized gold lines on the die to be bonded. Each gold line is functionalized with alkanethiol ligands before the die are brought into contact. The ligand interfacial energy is minimized when the lines on the die are brought into registration, due to favorable interactions between the complementary ligand tails. After registration is achieved, standard bonding techniques are used to create precision permanent bonds. We have computed the alignment forces and torque between two surfaces patterned with arrays of lines or square pads to illustrate how best to maximize the tendency to align. We also discuss complex, aperiodic patterns such as rectilinear pad assemblies, concentric circles, and spirals that point the way towards extremely precise alignment.

  8. High performance LWIR microbolometer with Si/SiGe quantum well thermistor and wafer level packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roer, Audun; Lapadatu, Adriana; Bring, Martin; Wolla, Erik; Hohler, Erling; Kittilsland, Gjermund

    2011-11-01

    An uncooled microbolometer with peak responsivity in the long wave infrared region of the electromagnetic radiation is developed at Sensonor Technologies. It is a 384 x 288 focal plane array with a pixel pitch of 25μm, based on monocrystalline Si/SiGe quantum wells as IR sensitive material. The high sensitivity (TCR) and low 1/f noise are the main performance characteristics of the product. The frame rate is maximum 60Hz and the output interface is digital (LVDS). The quantum well thermistor material is transferred to the read-out integrated circuit (ROIC) by direct wafer bonding. The ROIC wafer containing the released pixels is bonded in vacuum with a silicon cap wafer, providing hermetic encapsulation at low cost. The resulting wafer stack is mounted in a standard ceramic package. In this paper the architecture of the pixels and the ROIC, the wafer packaging and the electro-optical measurement results are presented.

  9. Imaging Study of Multi-Crystalline Silicon Wafers Throughout the Manufacturing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, S.; Yan, F.; Zaunbrecher, K.; Al-Jassim, M.; Sidelkheir, O.; Blosse, A.

    2011-01-01

    Imaging techniques are applied to multi-crystalline silicon bricks, wafers at various process steps, and finished solar cells. Photoluminescence (PL) imaging is used to characterize defects and material quality on bricks and wafers. Defect regions within the wafers are influenced by brick position within an ingot and height within the brick. The defect areas in as-cut wafers are compared to imaging results from reverse-bias electroluminescence and dark lock-in thermography and cell parameters of near-neighbor finished cells. Defect areas are also characterized by defect band emissions. The defect areas measured by these techniques on as-cut wafers are shown to correlate to finished cell performance.

  10. Imaging Study of Multi-Crystalline Silicon Wafers Throughout the Manufacturing Process: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, S.; Yan, F.; Zaunbracher, K.; Al-Jassim, M.; Sidelkheir, O.; Blosse, A.

    2011-07-01

    Imaging techniques are applied to multi-crystalline silicon bricks, wafers at various process steps, and finished solar cells. Photoluminescence (PL) imaging is used to characterize defects and material quality on bricks and wafers. Defect regions within the wafers are influenced by brick position within an ingot and height within the brick. The defect areas in as-cut wafers are compared to imaging results from reverse-bias electroluminescence and dark lock-in thermography and cell parameters of near-neighbor finished cells. Defect areas are also characterized by defect band emissions. The defect areas measured by these techniques on as-cut wafers are shown to correlate to finished cell performance.

  11. Crack detection and analyses using resonance ultrasonic vibrations in full-size crystalline silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, A.; Polupan, O.; Dallas, W.; Ostapenko, S.; Hess, D.; Wohlgemuth, J.

    2006-03-13

    An experimental approach for fast crack detection and length determination in full-size solar-grade crystalline silicon wafers using a resonance ultrasonic vibrations (RUV) technique is presented. The RUV method is based on excitation of the longitudinal ultrasonic vibrations in full-size wafers. Using an external piezoelectric transducer combined with a high sensitivity ultrasonic probe and computer controlled data acquisition system, real-time frequency response analysis can be accomplished. On a set of identical crystalline Si wafers with artificially introduced periphery cracks, it was demonstrated that the crack results in a frequency shift in a selected RUV peak to a lower frequency and increases the resonance peak bandwidth. Both characteristics were found to increase with the length of the crack. The frequency shift and bandwidth increase serve as reliable indicators of the crack appearance in silicon wafers and are suitable for mechanical quality control and fast wafer inspection.

  12. Wafer-based aberration metrology for lithographic systems using overlay measurements on targets imaged from phase-shift gratings.

    PubMed

    van Haver, Sven; Coene, Wim M J; D'havé, Koen; Geypen, Niels; van Adrichem, Paul; de Winter, Laurens; Janssen, Augustus J E M; Cheng, Shaunee

    2014-04-20

    In this paper, a new methodology is presented to derive the aberration state of a lithographic projection system from wafer metrology data. For this purpose, new types of phase-shift gratings (PSGs) are introduced, with special features that give rise to a simple linear relation between the PSG image displacement and the phase aberration function of the imaging system. By using the PSGs as the top grating in a diffraction-based overlay stack, their displacement can be measured as an overlay error using a standard wafer metrology tool. In this way, the overlay error can be used as a measurand based on which the phase aberration function in the exit pupil of the lithographic system can be reconstructed. In practice, the overlay error is measured for a set of different PSG targets, after which this information serves as input to a least-squares optimization problem that, upon solving, provides estimates for the Zernike coefficients describing the aberration state of the lithographic system. In addition to a detailed method description, this paper also deals with the additional complications that arise when the method is implemented experimentally and this leads to a number of model refinements and a required calibration step. Finally, the overall performance of the method is assessed through a number of experiments in which the aberration state of the lithographic system is intentionally detuned and subsequently estimated by the new method. These experiments show a remarkably good agreement, with an error smaller than 5  mλ, among the requested aberrations, the aberrations measured by the on-tool aberration sensor, and the results of the new wafer-based method.

  13. Implementation of dynamic crop growth processes into a land surface model: evaluation of energy, water and carbon fluxes under corn and soybean rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y.; Jain, A. K.; McIsaac, G. F.

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide expansion of agriculture is impacting the earth's climate by altering carbon, water, and energy fluxes, but the climate in turn is impacting crop production. To study this two-way interaction and its impact on seasonal dynamics of carbon, water, and energy fluxes, we implemented dynamic crop growth processes into a land surface model, the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM). In particular, we implemented crop-specific phenology schemes and dynamic carbon allocation schemes. These schemes account for light, water, and nutrient stresses while allocating the assimilated carbon to leaf, root, stem, and grain pools. The dynamic vegetation structure simulation better captured the seasonal variability in leaf area index (LAI), canopy height, and root depth. We further implemented dynamic root distribution processes in soil layers, which better simulated the root response of soil water uptake and transpiration. Observational data for LAI, above- and belowground biomass, and carbon, water, and energy fluxes were compiled from two AmeriFlux sites, Mead, NE, and Bondville, IL, USA, to calibrate and evaluate the model performance. For the purposes of calibration and evaluation, we use a corn-soybean (C4-C3) rotation system over the period 2001-2004. The calibrated model was able to capture the diurnal and seasonal patterns of carbon assimilation and water and energy fluxes for the corn-soybean rotation system at these two sites. Specifically, the calculated gross primary production (GPP), net radiation fluxes at the top of the canopy, and latent heat fluxes compared well with observations. The largest bias in model results was in sensible heat flux (SH) for corn and soybean at both sites. The dynamic crop growth simulation better captured the seasonal variability in carbon and energy fluxes relative to the static simulation implemented in the original version of ISAM. Especially, with dynamic carbon allocation and root distribution processes, the model

  14. A universal process development methodology for complete removal of residues from 300mm wafer edge bevel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Mai; Linnane, Michael; Longstaff, Chris; Ueda, Kenichi; Winter, Tom

    2006-03-01

    Many yield limiting, etch blocking defects are attributed to "flake" type contamination from the lithography process. The wafer edge bevel is a prime location for generation of this type of defect. Wafer bevel quality is not readily observed with top down or even most off axis inspection equipment. Not all chemistries are removed with one "universal" cleaning process. IC manufacturers must maximize usable silicon area as well. These requirements have made traditional chemical treatments to clean the wafer edge inadequate for many chemistry types used in 193nm processing. IBM has evaluated a method to create a robust wafer bevel and backside cleaning process. An August Technology AXi TM Series advanced macro inspection tool with E20 TM edge inspection module has been used to check wafer bevel cleanliness. Process impact on the removal of post apply residues has been investigated. The new process used backside solvent rinse nozzles only and cleaned the wafer bevel completely. The use of the topside edge solvent clean nozzles was eliminated. Thickness, wet film defect measurements (wet FM), and pattern wafer defect monitors showed no difference between the new backside rinse edge bead removal process and the process of record. Solvent topside edge bead removal of both bottom anti-reflective coatings and resist materials showed better cut width control and uniformity. We conclude that the topside solvent edge bead removal nozzle can be removed from the process. Backside solvent rinse nozzles can clean the backside of the wafer, the wafer bevel, and can wrap to the front edge of the wafer to provide a uniform edge bead removal cut width that is not sensitive to coater module tolerances. Recommendations are made for changes to the typical preventive maintenance procedures.

  15. ThermoData Engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 9. Extensible thermodynamic constraints for pure compounds and new model developments.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Muzny, Chris D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Magee, Joseph W; Abdulagatov, Ilmutdin; Frenkel, Michael

    2013-12-23

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported in this journal. The present article describes the background and implementation for new additions in latest release of TDE. Advances are in the areas of program architecture and quality improvement for automatic property evaluations, particularly for pure compounds. It is shown that selection of appropriate program architecture supports improvement of the quality of the on-demand property evaluations through application of a readily extensible collection of constraints. The basis and implementation for other enhancements to TDE are described briefly. Other enhancements include the following: (1) implementation of model-validity enforcement for specific equations that can provide unphysical results if unconstrained, (2) newly refined group-contribution parameters for estimation of enthalpies of formation for pure compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, (3) implementation of an enhanced group-contribution method (NIST-Modified UNIFAC) in TDE for improved estimation of phase-equilibrium properties for binary mixtures, (4) tools for mutual validation of ideal-gas properties derived through statistical calculations and those derived independently through combination of experimental thermodynamic results, (5) improvements in program reliability and function that stem directly from the recent redesign of the TRC-SOURCE Data Archival System for experimental property values, and (6) implementation of the Peng-Robinson equation of state for binary mixtures, which allows for critical evaluation of mixtures involving supercritical components. Planned future developments are summarized.

  16. Explicit dynamic analysis of elasto-plastic laminated composite shells: implementation of non-iterative stress update schemes for the HOFFMAN yield criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, C. G.; Owen, D. R. J.; Perić, D.

    1995-08-01

    The dynamic analysis of composite shell structures is carried out by an explicit finite element code employing 4-node one-point quadrature elements. The anisotropic Hoffman yield criterion is adopted to model the laminates. The formulation for stress update using a backward Euler scheme is presented in the plane stress subspace. Several numerical examples are presented. The issue of implementing single-iteration schemes for stress update is also investigated.

  17. Implementation of dynamic crop growth processes into a land surface model: evaluation of energy, water and carbon fluxes under corn and soybean rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y.; Jain, A. K.; McIsaac, G. F.

    2013-06-01

    Worldwide expansion of agriculture is impacting Earth's climate by altering the carbon, water and energy fluxes, but climate in turn is impacting crop production. To study this two-way interaction and its impact on seasonal dynamics of carbon, water and energy fluxes, we implemented dynamic crop growth processes into a land surface model, the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM). In particular, we implement crop specific phenology schemes, which account for light, water, and nutrient stresses while allocating the assimilated carbon to leaf, root, stem and grain pools; dynamic vegetation structure growth, which better simulate the LAI and canopy height; dynamic root distribution processes in the soil layers, which better simulate the root response of soil water uptake and transpiration; and litter fall due to fresh and old dead leaves to better represent the water and energy interception by both stem and brown leaves of the canopy during leaf senescence. Observational data for LAI, above and below ground biomass, and carbon, water and energy fluxes were compiled from two Ameri-Flux sites, Mead, NE and Bondville, IL, to calibrate and evaluate the model performance under corn (C4)-soybean (C3) rotation system over the period 2001-2004. The calibrated model was able to capture the diurnal and seasonal patterns of carbon assimilation, water and energy fluxes under the corn-soybean rotation system at these two sites. Specifically, the calculated GPP, net radiation fluxes at the top of canopy and latent heat fluxes compared well with observations. The largest bias in model results is in sensible heat flux (H) for corn and soybean at both sites. With dynamic carbon allocation and root distribution processes, model simulated GPP and latent heat flux (LH) were in much better agreement with observation data than for the without dynamic case. Modeled latent heat improved by 12-27% during the growing season at both sites, leading to the improvement in modeled GPP by 13

  18. Infrared differential interference contrast microscopy for overlay metrology on 3D-interconnect bonded wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Yi-sha; Shyu, Deh-Ming; Lin, Yeou-Sung; Cho, Chia-Hung

    2013-04-01

    Overlay metrology for stacked layers will be playing a key role in bringing 3D IC devices into manufacturing. However, such bonded wafer pairs present a metrology challenge for optical microscopy tools by the opaque nature of silicon. Using infrared microscopy, silicon wafers become transparent to the near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum, enabling metrology at the interface of bonded wafer pairs. Wafers can be bonded face to face (F2F) or face to back (F2B) which the stacking direction is dictated by how the stacks are carried in the process and functionality required. For example, Memory stacks tend to use F2B stacking enables a better managed design. Current commercial tools use single image technique for F2F bonding overlay measurement because depth of focus is sufficient to include both surfaces; and use multiple image techniques for F2B overlay measurement application for the depth of focus is no longer sufficient to include both stacked wafer surfaces. There is a need to specify the Z coordinate or stacking wafer number through the silicon when visiting measurement wafer sites. Two shown images are of the same (X, Y) but separate Z location acquired at focus position of each wafer surface containing overlay marks. Usually the top surface image is bright and clear; however, the bottom surface image is somewhat darker and noisier as an adhesive layer is used in between to bond the silicon wafers. Thus the top and bottom surface images are further processed to achieve similar brightness and noise level before merged for overlay measurement. This paper presents a special overlay measurement technique, using the infrared differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy technique to measure the F2B wafer bonding overlay by a single shot image. A pair of thinned wafers at 50 and 150 μm thickness is bonded on top of a carrier wafer to evaluate the bonding overlay. It works on the principle of interferometry to gain information about the

  19. FPGA implementation of a modified FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron based causal neural network for compact internal representation of dynamic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas-Paracuellos, L.; Alba, Luis; Villacorta-Atienza, Jose A.; Makarov, Valeri A.

    2011-05-01

    Animals for surviving have developed cognitive abilities allowing them an abstract representation of the environment. This internal representation (IR) may contain a huge amount of information concerning the evolution and interactions of the animal and its surroundings. The temporal information is needed for IRs of dynamic environments and is one of the most subtle points in its implementation as the information needed to generate the IR may eventually increase dramatically. Some recent studies have proposed the compaction of the spatiotemporal information into only space, leading to a stable structure suitable to be the base for complex cognitive processes in what has been called Compact Internal Representation (CIR). The Compact Internal Representation is especially suited to be implemented in autonomous robots as it provides global strategies for the interaction with real environments. This paper describes an FPGA implementation of a Causal Neural Network based on a modified FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron to generate a Compact Internal Representation of dynamic environments for roving robots, developed under the framework of SPARK and SPARK II European project, to avoid dynamic and static obstacles.

  20. Mechanics of the pad-abrasive-wafer contact in chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkaya, Dincer

    2009-12-01

    In chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), a rigid wafer is forced on a rough, elastomeric polishing pad, while a slurry containing abrasive particles flows through the interface. The applied pressure on the wafer is carried partially by the 2-body pad-wafer contact (direct contact) and partially by the 3-body contact of pad, wafer and abrasive particles ( particle contact). The fraction of the applied pressure carried by particle contacts is an important factor affecting the material removal rate (MRR) as the majority of the material is removed by the abrasive particles trapped between the pad asperities and the wafer. In this thesis, the contact of a rough, deformable pad and a smooth, rigid wafer in the presence of rigid abrasive particles at the contact interface is investigated by using contact mechanics and finite element (FE) modeling. The interactions between the pad, the wafer and the abrasive particles are modeled at different scales of contact, starting from particle level interactions, and gradually expanding the contact scale to the multi-asperity contact of pad and wafer. The effect of surface forces consisting of van der Waals and electrical double layer forces acting between the wafer and the abrasive particles are also investigated in this work. The wear rate due to each abrasive particle is calculated based on the wafer-abrasive particle contact force, and by considering adhesive and abrasive wear mechanisms. A passivated layer on the wafer surface with a hardness and thickness determined by the chemical effects is modeled, in order to characterize the effect of chemical reactions between slurry and wafer on the MRR. The model provides accurate predictions for the MRR as a function of pad related parameters; pad elastic modulus, pad porosity and pad topography, particle related parameters; particle size and concentration, and slurry related parameters; slurry pH, thickness and hardness of the passivated surface layer of wafer. A good qualitative

  1. 78 FR 61389 - Sanyo Solar of Oregon, LLC, Wafer Slicing and Quality Control Operations, Including On-Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... Employment and Training Administration Sanyo Solar of Oregon, LLC, Wafer Slicing and Quality Control... to workers of Sanyo Solar of Oregon, LLC, Wafer Slicing and Quality Control Operations, Salem, Oregon... Salem, Oregon location of Sanyo Solar of Oregon, LLC, Wafer Slicing and Quality Control Operations....

  2. Development of a gate metal etch process for gallium arsenide wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bammi, Rahul; Cale, Timothy S.; Grivna, Gordon

    1994-12-01

    The reactive ion etching of TiWN, which is used as a gate metal on gallium-arsenide device wafers, was studied in a parallel-plate, single-wafer plasma reactor operating at a frequency of 13.56 MHz. We discuss our experimental program designed to develop a highly uniform TiWN etch process with low linewidth loss for 100 mm GaAs wafers, using a sulfur hexafluoride, trifluoromethane, helium chemistry. The effects of different gas compositions, plasma power, inter-electrode gap, chamber pressure, and electrode temperature on the TiWN etch rate, linewidth loss, and etch uniformity were determined. The effects of adding oxygen and/or nitrogen to the above mixture were also studied. In preliminary experiments on Si wafers, standard design of experiments methods were used to narrow the ranges of parameters for further experiments to develop an optimum process for Si wafers. The results of these experiments guided us to the optimum process for GaAs wafers. The optimum conditions, for both Si and GaAs wafers, are presented.

  3. Kerfless Silicon Precursor Wafer Formed by Rapid Solidification: October 2009 - March 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, A.

    2011-06-01

    1366 Direct Wafer technology is an ultra-low-cost, kerfless method of producing crystalline silicon wafers compatible with the existing dominant silicon PV supply chain. By doubling utilization of silicon and simplifying the wafering process and equipment, Direct Wafers will support drastic reductions in wafer cost and enable module manufacturing costs < $1/W. This Pre-Incubator subcontract enabled us to accelerate the critical advances necessary to commercialize the technology by 2012. Starting from a promising concept that was initially demonstrated using a model material, we built custom equipment necessary to validate the process in silicon, then developed sufficient understanding of the underlying physics to successfully fabricate wafers meeting target specifications. These wafers, 50 mm x 50 mm x 200 ..mu..m thick, were used to make prototype solar cells via standard industrial processes as the project final deliverable. The demonstrated 10% efficiency is already impressive when compared to most thin films, but still offers considerable room for improvement when compared to typical crystalline silicon solar cells.

  4. Towards ultra-thin plasmonic silicon wafer solar cells with minimized efficiency loss

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yinan; Stokes, Nicholas; Jia, Baohua; Fan, Shanhui; Gu, Min

    2014-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of market-dominating silicon wafer solar cells plays a key role in determining the competiveness of solar energy with other exhaustible energy sources. Reducing the silicon wafer thickness at a minimized efficiency loss represents a mainstream trend in increasing the cost-effectiveness of wafer-based solar cells. In this paper we demonstrate that, using the advanced light trapping strategy with a properly designed nanoparticle architecture, the wafer thickness can be dramatically reduced to only around 1/10 of the current thickness (180 μm) without any solar cell efficiency loss at 18.2%. Nanoparticle integrated ultra-thin solar cells with only 3% of the current wafer thickness can potentially achieve 15.3% efficiency combining the absorption enhancement with the benefit of thinner wafer induced open circuit voltage increase. This represents a 97% material saving with only 15% relative efficiency loss. These results demonstrate the feasibility and prospect of achieving high-efficiency ultra-thin silicon wafer cells with plasmonic light trapping. PMID:24820403

  5. Method and Apparatus for Obtaining a Precision Thickness in Semiconductor and Other Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for processing a wafer comprising a material selected from an electrical semiconducting material and an electrical insulating material is presented. The wafer has opposed generally planar front and rear sides and a peripheral edge, wherein said wafer is pressed against a pad in the presence of a slurry to reduce its thickness. The thickness of the wafer is controlled by first forming a recess such as a dimple on the rear side of the wafer. A first electrical conducting strip extends from a first electrical connection means to the base surface of the recess to the second electrical connector. The first electrical conducting strip overlies the base surface of the recess. There is also a second electrical conductor with an electrical potential source between the first electrical connector and the second electrical connector to form. In combination with the first electrical conducting strip, the second electrical conductor forms a closed electrical circuit, and an electrical current flows through the closed electrical circuit. From the front side of the wafer the initial thickness of the wafer is reduced by lapping until the base surface of the recess is reached. The conductive strip is at least partially removed from the base surface to automatically stop the lapping procedure and thereby achieve the desired thickness.

  6. Towards ultra-thin plasmonic silicon wafer solar cells with minimized efficiency loss.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinan; Stokes, Nicholas; Jia, Baohua; Fan, Shanhui; Gu, Min

    2014-05-13

    The cost-effectiveness of market-dominating silicon wafer solar cells plays a key role in determining the competiveness of solar energy with other exhaustible energy sources. Reducing the silicon wafer thickness at a minimized efficiency loss represents a mainstream trend in increasing the cost-effectiveness of wafer-based solar cells. In this paper we demonstrate that, using the advanced light trapping strategy with a properly designed nanoparticle architecture, the wafer thickness can be dramatically reduced to only around 1/10 of the current thickness (180 μm) without any solar cell efficiency loss at 18.2%. Nanoparticle integrated ultra-thin solar cells with only 3% of the current wafer thickness can potentially achieve 15.3% efficiency combining the absorption enhancement with the benefit of thinner wafer induced open circuit voltage increase. This represents a 97% material saving with only 15% relative efficiency loss. These results demonstrate the feasibility and prospect of achieving high-efficiency ultra-thin silicon wafer cells with plasmonic light trapping.

  7. Validation of thermodesorption method for analysis of semi-volatile organic compounds adsorbed on wafer surface.

    PubMed

    Hayeck, Nathalie; Gligorovski, Sasho; Poulet, Irène; Wortham, Henri

    2014-05-01

    To prevent the degradation of the device characteristics it is important to detect the organic contaminants adsorbed on the wafers. In this respect, a reliable qualitative and quantitative analytical method for analysis of semi-volatile organic compounds which can adsorb on wafer surfaces is of paramount importance. Here, we present a new analytical method based on Wafer Outgassing System (WOS) coupled to Automated Thermal Desorber-Gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry (ATD-GC-MS) to identify and quantify volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds from 6", 8" and 12" wafers. WOS technique allows the desorption of organic compounds from one side of the wafers. This method was tested on three important airborne contaminants in cleanroom i.e. tris-(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris-(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP) and diethyl phthalate (DEP). In addition, we validated this method for the analysis and quantification of DEP, TCEP and TCPP and we estimated the backside organic contamination which may contribute to the front side of the contaminated wafers. We are demonstrating that WOS/ATD-GC-MS is a suitable and highly efficient technique for desorption and quantitative analysis of organophosphorous compounds and phthalate ester which could be found on the wafer surface.

  8. An On-the-Fly Surface-Hopping Program JADE for Nonadiabatic Molecular Dynamics of Polyatomic Systems: Implementation and Applications.

    PubMed

    Du, Likai; Lan, Zhenggang

    2015-04-14

    Nonadiabatic dynamics simulations have rapidly become an indispensable tool for understanding ultrafast photochemical processes in complex systems. Here, we present our recently developed on-the-fly nonadiabatic dynamics package, JADE, which allows researchers to perform nonadiabatic excited-state dynamics simulations of polyatomic systems at an all-atomic level. The nonadiabatic dynamics is based on Tully's surface-hopping approach. Currently, several electronic structure methods (CIS, TDHF, TDDFT(RPA/TDA), and ADC(2)) are supported, especially TDDFT, aiming at performing nonadiabatic dynamics on medium- to large-sized molecules. The JADE package has been interfaced with several quantum chemistry codes, including Turbomole, Gaussian, and Gamess (US). To consider environmental effects, the Langevin dynamics was introduced as an easy-to-use scheme into the standard surface-hopping dynamics. The JADE package is mainly written in Fortran for greater numerical performance and Python for flexible interface construction, with the intent of providing open-source, easy-to-use, well-modularized, and intuitive software in the field of simulations of photochemical and photophysical processes. To illustrate the possible applications of the JADE package, we present a few applications of excited-state dynamics for various polyatomic systems, such as the methaniminium cation, fullerene (C20), p-dimethylaminobenzonitrile (DMABN) and its primary amino derivative aminobenzonitrile (ABN), and 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinoline (10-HBQ).

  9. An Analysis of How and Why High School Geometry Teachers Implement Dynamic Geometry Software Tasks for Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nirode, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    This study examined teachers' use of student tasks involving dynamic geometry software, in which a figure is constructed then altered while maintaining its constructed properties. Although researchers, professional organizations, and policy makers generally have been proponents of dynamic geometry for instruction, there is little research about…

  10. Very compact FTTH Diplexer design using advanced wafer level fabrication methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Christophe; Grosse, Philippe; Gilet, Philippe; Olivier, Nicolas; Chelnokov, Alexei; Fulbert, Laurent; Bernabé, Stéphane; Rossat, Cyrille; Hamelin, Régis; Hamberg, Ivar; Lundqvist, Lennart; Chitica, Nicolae; Hammar, Matthias; Berggren, Jesper; Junique, Stéphane; Wang, Qin; Almqvist, Susanne; Sillans, Christian

    2008-04-01

    FTTH networks require implementing a diplexer at each user termination. According to most of the standards, this diplexer detects a download signal beam at 1.49μm and emits an upload signal beam at 1.31μm on the same single mode fibre. Both signals exhibit datarate speed below 2.5Gbps. Today, most of the diplexers are obtained by actively aligning a set of individual optoelectronic components and micro-optics. However, new manufacturing solutions satisfying very low cost and mass production capability requirements of this market would help to speed the massive spreading of this technology. In this paper, we present an original packaging design to manufacture Diplexer Optical Sub-Assembly for FTTH application. A dual photodiode is stacked over a VCSEL and detects both the download signal beam at 1.49μm passing through the laser and one part of the upload signal beam at 1.31μm for monitoring. To satisfy this approach, an innovative VCSEL has been designed to have a very high transmission at 1.49μm. All these components are mounted on a very small circuit board on glass including also integrated circuits such as transimpedance amplifier. So, the device combines advanced optoelectronic components and highly integrated Multi-Chip-Module on glass approach using collective wafer-level assembling technologies. For the single mode fibre optical coupling, active and passive alignment solutions are considered.

  11. Wafer-scale metasurface for total power absorption, local field enhancement and single molecule Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Best, Michael D; Camden, Jon P; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2013-10-04

    The ability to detect molecules at low concentrations is highly desired for applications that range from basic science to healthcare. Considerable interest also exists for ultrathin materials with high optical absorption, e.g. for microbolometers and thermal emitters. Metal nanostructures present opportunities to achieve both purposes. Metal nanoparticles can generate gigantic field enhancements, sufficient for the Raman spectroscopy of single molecules. Thin layers containing metal nanostructures ("metasurfaces") can achieve near-total power absorption at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Thus far, however, both aims (i.e. single molecule Raman and total power absorption) have only been achieved using metal nanostructures produced by techniques (high resolution lithography or colloidal synthesis) that are complex and/or difficult to implement over large areas. Here, we demonstrate a metasurface that achieves the near-perfect absorption of visible-wavelength light and enables the Raman spectroscopy of single molecules. Our metasurface is fabricated using thin film depositions, and is of unprecedented (wafer-scale) extent.

  12. Study on planarization machining of sapphire wafer with soft-hard mixed abrasive through mechanical chemical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongchao; Lu, Jing; Xu, Xipeng

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the material removal mechanism of sapphire wafer with soft-hard mixed abrasives through mechanical chemical polishing (MCP). The polishing film, which contains diamond as hard abrasives and high reactivity silica as soft abrasives, is prepared through sol-gel technology. Silica abrasives with regular spherical shape and high reactivity are prepared through hydrolysis-precipitation. Diamond grits with three different particle sizes are used as abrasives. Results show that the rate of material removal of mixed abrasives during MCP is more than 52.6% of that of single hard abrasives and the decrease in surface roughness is more than 21.6% of that of single hard abrasives. These results demonstrate that the ideal planarization of sapphire wafer with high removal rate and good surface quality can be achieved when the effect of mechanical removal of hard abrasives and the chemical corrosion effect of soft abrasives are in dynamic equilibrium. A model that describes the material removal mechanism of sapphire with mixed abrasives during MCP is proposed. The results of thermodynamic calculation and polishing residue analysis are used to demonstrate the rationality of the model.

  13. Wafer chamber having a gas curtain for extreme-UV lithography

    DOEpatents

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K.

    2001-01-01

    An EUVL device includes a wafer chamber that is separated from the upstream optics by a barrier having an aperture that is permeable to the inert gas. Maintaining an inert gas curtain in the proximity of a wafer positioned in a chamber of an extreme ultraviolet lithography device can effectively prevent contaminants from reaching the optics in an extreme ultraviolet photolithography device even though solid window filters are not employed between the source of reflected radiation, e.g., the camera, and the wafer. The inert gas removes the contaminants by entrainment.

  14. Non-Contact Wafer Fabrication Process Using Gas Cluster Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Iaso; Isogai, Hiromichi

    2008-11-03

    Gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) was used for precise wafer fabrication process. GCIB realizes a quite low-energy ion beam and shows very precise and good repeatability. To obtain thickness uniformity of Si over the whole wafer, small beam diameter ({approx}4 mm) of GCIB was used. Thickness variations on the wafer can be reduced by location specific irradiation of collimated GCIB. By controlling the scan speed of GCIB irradiation based on the removal thickness at each irradiation position, thickness and height uniformity of Si can be improved to several tens of nm. In addition, etching enhancement by using Ar/SF{sub 6} mixed cluster was studied.

  15. Low temperature solder process to join a copper tube to a silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteeg, Christo; Scarpim de Souza, Marcio

    2014-06-01

    With the application for wafer level packages, which could be Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) based, and which requires a reduced atmosphere, a copper tube connection to a vacuum pump and the package is proposed. The method evaluated uses laser assisted brazing of a solder, to join the copper tube to a silicon wafer. The method was applied to a silicon wafer coated with a metallic interface to bond to the solder. The hermeticity of the joint was tested with a helium leak rate tester and the bonding energy thermal extent was verified with a thin layer of indium that melted wherever the substrate temperature rose above its melting temperature.

  16. The removal of deformed submicron particles from silicon wafers by spin rinse and megasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Busnaina, Ahmed A.; Fury, Michael A.; Wang, Shi-Qing

    2000-02-01

    In order to successfully clean particulate contamination from wafer surfaces, it is necessary to understand the adhesion and deformation between the particles and the substrate in contact. The adhesion and removal mechanisms of deformed submicron particles have not been addressed in many previous studies. Submicron polystyrene latex particles (0.1-0.5 µm) were deposited on silicon wafers and removed by spin rinse and megasonic cleanings. Particle rolling is identified as the major removal mechanism for the deformed submicron particles from silicon wafers. Megasonics provides larger streaming velocity because of the extremely thin boundary layer resulting in a larger removal force that is capable of achieving complete removal of contamination particles.

  17. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY: Material removal rate in chemical-mechanical polishing of wafers based on particle trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianxiu, Su; Xiqu, Chen; Jiaxi, Du; Renke, Kang

    2010-05-01

    Distribution forms of abrasives in the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process are analyzed based on experimental results. Then the relationships between the wafer, the abrasive and the polishing pad are analyzed based on kinematics and contact mechanics. According to the track length of abrasives on the wafer surface, the relationships between the material removal rate and the polishing velocity are obtained. The analysis results are in accord with the experimental results. The conclusion provides a theoretical guide for further understanding the material removal mechanism of wafers in CMP.

  18. Reflectance reduction of InP wafers after high-temperature annealing.

    PubMed

    Semyonov, Oleg G; Subashiev, Arsen V; Shabalov, Alexander; Lifshitz, Nadia; Chen, Zhichao; Hosoda, Takashi; Luryi, Serge

    2012-08-01

    Broadband reduction of light reflection from the surface of InP wafers after high-temperature annealing in air has been observed. In the transparency region of the material, the reflection drop is accompanied by increasing transmission of light through the wafer. The spectral position of a deep minimum of the reflection coefficient can be tuned, by varying the temperature and the time of annealing, in a wide spectral range from ultraviolet to infrared. The effect is due to formation of thermal oxide layers on the surfaces of the wafer with optical parameters favorable for antireflection.

  19. Development of a fixed abrasive slicing technique (FAST) for reducing the cost of photovoltaic wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, F. )

    1991-12-01

    This report examines a wafer slicing technique developed by Crystal Systems, Inc. that reduces the cost of photovoltaic wafers. This fixed, abrasive slicing technique (FAST) uses a multiwire bladepack and a diamond-plated wirepack; water is the coolant. FAST is in the prototype production stage and reduces expendable material costs while retaining the advantages of a multiwire slurry technique. The cost analysis revealed that costs can be decreased by making more cuts per bladepack and slicing more wafers per linear inch. Researchers studied the degradation of bladepacks and increased wirepack life. 21 refs.

  20. Wafer-Scale Microwire Transistor Array Fabricated via Evaporative Assembly.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hoon; Sun, Qijun; Choi, Yongsuk; Lee, Seungwoo; Lee, Dong Yun; Kim, Yong Hoon; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2016-06-22

    One-dimensional (1D) nano/microwires have attracted significant attention as promising building blocks for various electronic and optical device applications. The integration of these elements into functional device networks with controlled alignment and density presents a significant challenge for practical device applications. Here, we demonstrated the fabrication of wafer-scale microwire field-effect transistor (FET) arrays based on well-aligned inorganic semiconductor microwires (indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO)) and organic polymeric insulator microwires fabricated via a simple and large-area evaporative assembly technique. This microwire fabrication method offers a facile approach to precisely manipulating the channel dimensions of the FETs. The resulting solution-processed monolithic IGZO microwire FETs exhibited a maximum electron mobility of 1.02 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and an on/off current ratio of 1 × 10(6). The appropriate choice of the polymeric microwires used to define the channel lengths enabled fine control over the threshold voltages of the devices, which were employed to fabricate high-performance depletion-load inverters. Low-voltage-operated microwire FETs were successfully fabricated on a plastic substrate using a high-capacitance ion gel gate dielectric. The microwire fabrication technique involving evaporative assembly provided a facile, effective, and reliable method for preparing flexible large-area electronics.

  1. Adhesive disbond detection using piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, William; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2015-04-01

    The aerospace industry continues to increase the use of adhesives for structural bonding due to the increased joint efficiency (reduced weight), even distribution of the load path and decreases in stress concentrations. However, the limited techniques for verifying the strength of adhesive bonds has reduced its use on primary structures and requires an intensive inspection schedule. This paper discusses a potential structural health monitoring (SHM) technique for the detection of disbonds through the in situ inspection of adhesive joints. This is achieved through the use of piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS), thin unobtrusive sensors which are permanently bonded to the aircraft structure. The detection method discussed in this study is electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS), a local vibration method. This method detects disbonds from the change in the mechanical impedance of the structure surrounding the disbond. This paper will discuss how predictive modeling can provide valuable insight into the inspection method, and provide better results than empirical methods alone. The inspection scheme was evaluated using the finite element method, and the results were verified experimentally using a large aluminum test article, and included both pristine and disbond coupons.

  2. Wafer-scale arrays of epitaxial ferroelectric nanodiscs and nanorings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hee; Ji, Ran; Park, Yong Jun; Lee, Sung Kyun; LeRhun, Gwenael; Alexe, Marin; Nielsch, Kornelius; Hesse, Dietrich; Gösele, Ulrich; Baik, Sunggi

    2009-01-01

    Wafer-scale arrays of well-ordered Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 nanodiscs and nanorings were fabricated on the entire area (10 mm × 10 mm) of the SrRuO3 bottom electrode on an SrTiO3 single-crystal substrate using the laser interference lithography (LIL) process combined with pulsed laser deposition. The shape and size of the nanostructures were controlled by the amount of PZT deposited through the patterned holes and the temperature of the post-crystallization steps. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that (001)-oriented PZT nanostructures were grown epitaxially on the SrRuO3(001) bottom electrode layer covering the (001)-oriented single-crystal substrate. The domain structures of PZT nano-islands were characterized by reciprocal space mapping using synchrotron x-ray radiation. Ferroelectric properties of each PZT nanostructure were characterized by scanning force microscopy in the piezoresponse mode.

  3. Designing defect spins for wafer-scale quantum technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Koehl, William F.; Seo, Hosung; Galli, Giulia; Awschalom, David D.

    2015-11-27

    The past decade has seen remarkable progress in the development of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect center in diamond, which is one of the leading candidates for quantum information technologies. The success of the NV center as a solid-state qubit has stimulated an active search for similar defect spins in other technologically important and mature semiconductors, such as silicon carbide. If successfully combined with the advanced microfabrication techniques available to such materials, coherent quantum control of defect spins could potentially lead to semiconductor-based, wafer-scale quantum technologies that make use of exotic quantum mechanical phenomena like entanglement. In this article, we describe the robust spin property of the NV center and the current status of NV center research for quantum information technologies. We then outline first-principles computational modeling techniques based on density functional theory to efficiently search for potential spin defects in nondiamond hosts suitable for quantum information applications. The combination of computational modeling and experimentation has proven invaluable in this area, and we describe the successful interplay between theory and experiment achieved with the divacancy spin qubit in silicon carbide.

  4. Wafer level optoelectronic device packaging using MEMS (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallani, Arunkumar; Chen, Ting; Lee, J.-B.; Hayes, Donald; Wallace, David

    2005-07-01

    The emergence of vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) and photo diode (PD) arrays has given scope for the development of many applications such as high speed data communication. Further increase in performance can be obtained by the inclusion of micro-mirrors and microlens in the optical path between these components. However, the lack of efficient assembly and alignment techniques has become bottlenecks for new products. In this paper, we present development of optical sub-assembly and metallic MEMS structures that enable in the massively parallel assembly and alignment of these components to form a single miniature package. VCSEL wafer was processed to have polymer pedestal and polymeric lens on top of it. Such optical sub assembly greatly increases coupling efficiency between the VCSEL and optical fibers. Multiple numbers of suspended MEMS serpentine springs made out of electroplated nickel have been fabricated on ceramic substrates. These springs serve for clamping and alignment of multiple numbers of optoelectronic components. They are designed to be self-aligning with alignment accuracies of less than 3 micron after final assembly. Electrical connection between the bond pads of VCSEL's and PD's to the electrical leads on the substrate has been demonstrated by molten solder inkjet printing into precisely designed MEMS mold structures. This novel massively parallel assembly process is substrate independent and relatively simple process. This technique will provide reliable assembly of optoelectronic components and miniature optical systems in low cost mass production manner.

  5. Thickness mode EMIS of constrained proof-mass piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamas, Tuncay; Giurgiutiu, Victor; Lin, Bin

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses theoretical and experimental work on thickness-mode electromechanical (E/M) impedance spectroscopy (EMIS) of proof-mass piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PMPWAS). The proof-mass (PM) concept was used to develop a new method for tuning the ultrasonic wave modes and for relatively high frequency local modal sensing by the PM affixed on PWAS. In order to develop the theoretical basis of the PMPWAS tuning concept, analytical analyses were conducted by applying the resonator theory to derive the EMIS of a PWAS constrained on one and both surfaces by isotropic elastic materials. The normalized thickness-mode shapes were obtained for the normal mode expansion (NME) method to eventually predict the thickness-mode EMIS using the correlation between PMPWAS and the structural dynamic properties of the substrate. Proof-masses of different sizes and materials were used to tune the system resonance towards an optimal frequency point. The results were verified by coupled-field finite element analyses (CF-FEA) and experimental results. An application of the tuning effect of PM on the standing wave modes was discussed as the increase in PM thickness shifts the excitation frequency of the wave mode toward the surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode.

  6. Metal-induced rapid transformation of diamond into single and multilayer graphene on wafer scale

    DOE PAGES

    Berman, Diana; Deshmukh, Sanket; Narayanan, Badri; ...

    2016-07-04

    The degradation of intrinsic properties of graphene during the transfer process constitutes a major challenge in graphene device fabrication, stimulating the need for direct growth of graphene on dielectric substrates. Previous attempts of metal-induced transformation of diamond and silicon carbide into graphene suffers from metal contamination and inability to scale graphene growth over large area. Here in this article, we introduce a direct approach to transform polycrystalline diamond into high-quality graphene layers on wafer scale (4 inch in diameter) using a rapid thermal annealing process facilitated by a nickel, Ni thin film catalyst on top. We show that the processmore » can be tuned to grow single or multilayer graphene with good electronic properties. Molecular dynamics simulations elucidate the mechanism of graphene growth on polycrystalline diamond. Additionally, we demonstrate the lateral growth of free-standing graphene over micron-sized pre-fabricated holes, opening exciting opportunities for future graphene/diamond-based electronics.« less

  7. Lattice constants of pure methane and carbon dioxide hydrates at low temperatures. Implementing quantum corrections to classical molecular dynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Costandy, Joseph; Michalis, Vasileios K; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N; Stubos, Athanassios K; Economou, Ioannis G

    2016-03-28

    We introduce a simple correction to the calculation of the lattice constants of fully occupied structure sI methane or carbon dioxide pure hydrates that are obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations using the TIP4PQ/2005 water force field. The obtained corrected lattice constants are subsequently used in order to obtain isobaric thermal expansion coefficients of the pure gas hydrates that exhibit a trend that is significantly closer to the experimental behavior than previously reported classical molecular dynamics studies.

  8. Lattice constants of pure methane and carbon dioxide hydrates at low temperatures. Implementing quantum corrections to classical molecular dynamics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costandy, Joseph; Michalis, Vasileios K.; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N.; Stubos, Athanassios K.; Economou, Ioannis G.

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a simple correction to the calculation of the lattice constants of fully occupied structure sI methane or carbon dioxide pure hydrates that are obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations using the TIP4PQ/2005 water force field. The obtained corrected lattice constants are subsequently used in order to obtain isobaric thermal expansion coefficients of the pure gas hydrates that exhibit a trend that is significantly closer to the experimental behavior than previously reported classical molecular dynamics studies.

  9. Institutional pressures, dynamic capabilities and environmental management systems: investigating the ISO 9000--environmental management system implementation linkage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qinghua; Cordeiro, James; Sarkis, Joseph

    2013-01-15

    We hypothesize a model where domestic and international institutional pressures lead to the successful implementation of ISO 9000 and can in turn lead to the successful implementation of environmental management systems such as ISO 14001 environmental certification systems or total quality environmental management (TQEM) systems. Using appropriate tests for mediation with dichotomous mediators and outcomes, we find that the model holds for a sample of 377 Chinese manufacturers in six major industrial groups in Suzhou, Dalian, and Tianjin. Our findings are consistent with the theory linking internal capabilities to heterogeneous external (in this case, institutional) pressures on organizations for environmentally proactive efforts. Our findings suggest that institutions in developing countries with significant environmental concerns such as China as well as foreign suppliers and partners to firms in these countries should encourage and support ISO 9000 implementations by local firms. These findings may influence other developing nations' adoption of quality and environmental process systems.

  10. Low Loss, Finite Width Ground Plane, Thin Film Microstrip Lines on Si Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Margomenos, Alexandros; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1999-01-01

    Si RFICs on standard, 2 Omega-cm. Si wafers require novel transmission lines to reduce the loss caused by the resistive substrate. One such transmission line is commonly called Thin Film Microstrip (TFMS), which is created by depositing a metallic ground plane, thin insulating layers, and the microstrip lines on the Si wafer. Thus, the electric fields are isolated from the Si wafer. In this paper, it is shown through experimental results that the ground plane of TFMS may be finite width and comparable to the strip width in size while still achieving low loss on 2 Omega-cm Si. Measured effective permittivity shows that the field interaction with the Si wafer is small.

  11. Influence of thermal load on 450 mm Si-wafer IPD during lithographic patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peschel, Thomas; Kalkowski, Gerhard; Eberhardt, Ramona

    2012-03-01

    We report on Finite Element Modeling (FEM) of the influence of heat load due to the lithographic exposure on the inplane distortion (IPD) of 450 mm Si-wafers and hence on the effect of the heat load on the achievable image placement accuracy. Based on a scenario of electron beam writing at an exposure power of 20 mW, the thermo-mechanical behavior of the chuck and the attached Si wafer is modeled and used to derive corresponding IPD values. To account for the pin structured chuck surface, an effective layer model is derived. Different materials for the wafer chuck are compared with respect to their influence on wafer IPD and thermal characteristics of the exposure process. Guidelines for the selection of the chuck material und suggestions for its cooling and corrective strategies on e-beam steering during exposure are derived.

  12. A study of defects on EUV mask using blank inspection, patterned mask inspection, and wafer inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, S.; Ren, L.; Chan, D.; Wurm, S.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Nakajima, T.; Kishimoto, M.; Ahn, B.; Kang, I.; Park, J.-O.; Cho, K.; Han, S.-I.; Laursen, T.

    2010-03-12

    The availability of defect-free masks remains one of the key challenges for inserting extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) into high volume manufacturing. yet link data is available for understanding native defects on real masks. In this paper, a full-field EUV mask is fabricated to investigate the printability of various defects on the mask. The printability of defects and identification of their source from mask fabrication to handling were studied using wafer inspection. The printable blank defect density excluding particles and patterns is 0.63 cm{sup 2}. Mask inspection is shown to have better sensitivity than wafer inspection. The sensitivity of wafer inspection must be improved using through-focus analysis and a different wafer stack.

  13. On-wafer vector network analyzer measurements in the 220-325 Ghz frequency band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, King Man Andy; Dawson, D.; Samoska, L.; Lee, K.; Oleson, C.; Boll, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a full two-port on-wafer vector network analyzer test set for the 220-325 GHz (WR3) frequency band. The test set utilizes Oleson Microwave Labs frequency extenders with the Agilent 8510C network analyzer. Two port on-wafer measurements are made with GGB Industries coplanar waveguide (CPW) probes. With this test set we have measured the WR3 band S-parameters of amplifiers on-wafer, and the characteristics of the CPW wafer probes. Results for a three stage InP HEMT amplifier show 10 dB gain at 235 GHz [1], and that of a single stage amplifier, 2.9 dB gain at 231 GHz. The approximate upper limit of loss per CPW probe range from 3.0 to 4.8 dB across the WR3 frequency band.

  14. Multi-wire slurry wafering demonstrations. [slicing silicon ingots for solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1978-01-01

    Ten slicing demonstrations on a multi-wire slurry saw, made to evaluate the silicon ingot wafering capabilities, reveal that the present sawing capabilities can provide usable wafer area from an ingot 1.05m/kg (e.g. kerf width 0.135 mm and wafer thickness 0.265 mm). Satisfactory surface qualities and excellent yield of silicon wafers were found. One drawback is that the add-on cost of producing water from this saw, as presently used, is considerably higher than other systems being developed for the low-cost silicon solar array project (LSSA), primarily because the saw uses a large quantity of wire. The add-on cost can be significantly reduced by extending the wire life and/or by rescue of properly plated wire to restore the diameter.

  15. High-temperature healing of interfacial voids in GaAs wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, YewChung Sermon; Liu, Po Chun; Feigelson, R. S.; Route, R. K.

    2002-02-01

    Artificial voids were introduced at bonding interfaces to study how processing parameters affected the healing mechanism of interfacial voids in GaAs wafer bonding. These voids were created by placing unpatterned wafers in contact with topographically patterned wafers. During the bonding process, crystallites formed within these voids and corresponded to bonded regions within the voids. Their formation depended strongly on the height of the surface irregularities at the wafer interfaces. When the void depth (h) was ⩾200 nm, most of the crystallites were diamond shaped. The edges of the diamond features were elongated in the <100> direction. On the other hand, when the void depth was small (h⩽70 nm), dendrites grew quickly in the <110> direction.

  16. Universal segregation growth approach to wafer-size graphene from non-noble metals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Fu, Lei; Dai, Boya; Yan, Kai; Liu, Xun; Zhao, Ruiqi; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2011-01-12

    Graphene has been attracting wide interests owing to its excellent electronic, thermal, and mechanical performances. Despite the availability of several production techniques, it is still a great challenge to achieve wafer-size graphene with acceptable uniformity and low cost, which would determine the future of graphene electronics. Here we report a universal segregation growth technique for batch production of high-quality wafer-scale graphene from non-noble metal films. Without any extraneous carbon sources, 4 in. graphene wafers have been obtained from Ni, Co, Cu-Ni alloy, and so forth via thermal annealing with over 82% being 1-3 layers and excellent reproducibility. We demonstrate the first example of monolayer and bilayer graphene wafers using Cu-Ni alloy by combining the distinct segregation behaviors of Cu and Ni. Together with the easy detachment from growth substrates, we believe this facile segregation technique will offer a great driving force for graphene research.

  17. Nanoetching process on silicon solar cell wafers during mass production for surface texture improvement.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chisung; Kulkarni, Atul; Ha, Soohyun; Cho, Yujin; Kim, Jeongin; Park, Heejin; Kim, Taesung

    2014-12-01

    Major challenge in nanotechnology is to improve the solar cells efficiency. This can be achieved by controlling the silicon solar cell wafer surface structure. Herein, we report a KOH wet etching process along with an ultrasonic cleaning process to improve the surface texture of silicon solar cell wafers. We evaluated the KOH temperature, concentration, and ultra-sonication time. It was observed that the surface texture of the silicon solar wafer changed from a pyramid shape to a rectangular shape under edge cutting as the concentration of the KOH solution was increased. We controlled the etching time to avoid pattern damage and any further increase of the reflectance. The present study will be helpful for the mass processing of silicon solar cell wafers with improved reflectance.

  18. Robust wafer identification recognition based on asterisk-shape filter and high-low score comparison method.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Chih; Yu, Tsan-Ying; Chen, Kuan-Liang

    2009-12-10

    Wafer identifications (wafer ID) can be used to identify wafers from each other so that wafer processing can be traced easily. Wafer ID recognition is one of the problems of optical character recognition. The process to recognize wafer IDs is similar to that used in recognizing car license-plate characters. However, due to some unique characteristics, such as the irregular space between two characters and the unsuccessive strokes of wafer ID, it will not get a good result to recognize wafer ID by directly utilizing the approaches used in car license-plate character recognition. Wafer ID scratches are engraved by a laser scribe almost along the following four fixed directions: horizontal, vertical, plus 45 degrees , and minus 45 degrees orientations. The closer to the center line of a wafer ID scratch, the higher the gray level will be. These and other characteristics increase the difficulty to recognize the wafer ID. In this paper a wafer ID recognition scheme based on an asterisk-shape filter and a high-low score comparison method is proposed to cope with the serious influence of uneven luminance and make recognition more efficiently. Our proposed approach consists of some processing stages. Especially in the final recognition stage, a template-matching method combined with stroke analysis is used as a recognizing scheme. This is because wafer IDs are composed of Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International (SEMI) standard Arabic numbers and English alphabets, and thus the template ID images are easy to obtain. Furthermore, compared with the approach that requires prior training, such as a support vector machine, which often needs a large amount of training image samples, no prior training is required for our approach. The testing results show that our proposed scheme can efficiently and correctly segment out and recognize the wafer ID with high performance.

  19. Integrating III-V compound semiconductors with silicon using wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yucai

    2000-12-01

    From Main Street to Wall Street, everyone has felt the effects caused by the Internet revolution. The Internet has created a new economy in the New Information Age and has brought significant changes in both business and personal life. This revolution has placed strong demands for higher bandwidth and higher computing speed due to high data traffic on today's information highway. In order to alleviate this problem, growing interconnection bottlenecks in digital designs have to be solved. The most feasible and practical way is to replace the conventional electrical interconnect with an optical interconnect. Since silicon does not have the optical properties necessary to accommodate these optical interconnect requirements, III-V based devices, most of which are GaAs-based or InP-based, must be intimately interconnected with the Si circuit at chip level. This monolithic integration technology enables the development of both intrachip and interchip optical connectors to take advantage of the enormous bandwidth provided by both high-performance very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits and allied fiber and free-space optical technologies. However, lattice mismatch and thermal expansion mismatches between III-V materials and Si create enormous challenges for developing a feasible technology to tackle this problem. Among all the available approaches today, wafer bonding distinguishes itself as the most promising technology for integration due to its ability to overcome the constraints of both lattice constant mismatch and thermal expansion coefficient differences and even strain due to the crystal orientation. We present our development of wafer bonding technology for integrating III-V with Si in my dissertation. First, the pick-and-place multiple-wafer bonding technology was introduced. Then we systematically studied the wafer bonding of GaAs and InP with Si. Both high temperature wafer fusion and low/room temperature (LT/RT) wafer bonding have been investigated for

  20. Improved algorithm for automated alignment of wafers via optimized features location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshin, Michael; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2009-10-01

    We present a new fuzzy logic-based approach for automatic optimized features location. The technique is used for improved automatic alignment and classification of silicon wafers and chips that are used in the electronics industry. The proposed automatic image processing approach was realized and experimentally demonstrated in real industrial application with typical wafers. The automatic features location and grading supported the industrial requirements and could replace human expert-based inspection that currently is performed manually.

  1. A front-end wafer-level microsystem packaging technique with micro-cap array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Yuh-Min

    2002-09-01

    The back-end packaging process is the remaining challenge for the micromachining industry to commercialize microsystem technology (MST) devices at low cost. This dissertation presents a novel wafer level protection technique as a final step of the front-end fabrication process for MSTs. It facilitates improved manufacturing throughput and automation in package assembly, wafer level testing of devices, and enhanced device performance. The method involves the use of a wafer-sized micro-cap array, which consists of an assortment of small caps micro-molded onto a material with adjustable shapes and sizes to serve as protective structures against the hostile environments during packaging. The micro-cap array is first constructed by a micromachining process with micro-molding technique, then sealed to the device wafer at wafer level. Epoxy-based wafer-level micro cap array has been successfully fabricated and showed good compatibility with conventional back-end packaging processes. An adhesive transfer technique was demonstrated to seal the micro cap array with a MEMS device wafer. No damage or gross leak was observed while wafer dicing or later during a gross leak test. Applications of the micro cap array are demonstrated on MEMS, microactuators fabricated using CRONOS MUMPS process. Depending on the application needs, the micro-molded cap can be designed and modified to facilitate additional component functions, such as optical, electrical, mechanical, and chemical functions, which are not easily achieved in the device by traditional means. Successful fabrication of a micro cap array comprised with microlenses can provide active functions as well as passive protection. An optical tweezer array could be one possibility for applications of a micro cap with microlenses. The micro cap itself could serve as micro well for DNA or bacteria amplification as well.

  2. Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Lin, YuPo J.; Henry, Michael P.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2011-07-12

    An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

  3. Electronically and ionically conductive porous material and method for manufacture of resin wafers therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Lin, YuPo J.; Henry, Michael P.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2008-11-18

    An electrically and ionically conductive porous material including a thermoplastic binder and one or more of anion exchange moieties or cation exchange moieties or mixtures thereof and/or one or more of a protein capture resin and an electrically conductive material. The thermoplastic binder immobilizes the moieties with respect to each other but does not substantially coat the moieties and forms the electrically conductive porous material. A wafer of the material and a method of making the material and wafer are disclosed.

  4. Teachers' Implementation of Pre-Constructed Dynamic Geometry Tasks in Technology-Intensive Algebra 1 Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cayton, Charity Sue-Adams

    2012-01-01

    Technology use and a focus on 21st century skills, coupled with recent adoption of Common Core State Standards for Mathematics, marks a new challenge for mathematics teachers. Communication, discourse, and tools for enhancing discourse (NCTM, 1991, 2000) play an integral role in successful implementation of technology and mathematics standards.…

  5. Implementations of Nosé-Hoover and Nosé-Poincaré thermostats in mesoscopic dynamic simulations with the united-residue model of a polypeptide chain.

    PubMed

    Kleinerman, Dana S; Czaplewski, Cezary; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A

    2008-06-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations generate a canonical ensemble only when integration of the equations of motion is coupled to a thermostat. Three extended phase space thermostats, one version of Nose-Hoover and two versions of Nose-Poincare, are compared with each other and with the Berendsen thermostat and Langevin stochastic dynamics. Implementation of extended phase space thermostats was first tested on a model Lennard-Jones fluid system; subsequently, they were implemented with our physics-based protein united-residue (UNRES) force field MD. The thermostats were also implemented and tested for the multiple-time-step reversible reference system propagator (RESPA). The velocity and temperature distributions were analyzed to confirm that the proper canonical distribution is generated by each simulation. The value of the artificial mass constant, Q, of the thermostat has a large influence on the distribution of the temperatures sampled during UNRES simulations (the velocity distributions were affected only slightly). The numerical stabilities of all three algorithms were compared with each other and with that of microcanonical MD. Both Nose-Poincare thermostats, which are symplectic, were not very stable for both the Lennard-Jones fluid and UNRES MD simulations started from nonequilibrated structures which implies major changes of the potential energy throughout a trajectory. Even though the Nose-Hoover thermostat does not have a canonical symplectic structure, it is the most stable algorithm for UNRES MD simulations. For UNRES with RESPA, the "extended system inside-reference system propagator algorithm" of the RESPA implementation of the Nose-Hoover thermostat was the only stable algorithm, and enabled us to increase the integration time step.

  6. Quantitative analysis of trace bulk oxygen in silicon wafers using an inert gas fusion method.

    PubMed

    Uchihara, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Masahiko; Nakahara, Taketoshi

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes a method for removing oxide film from the surface of silicon wafers using an inert gas fusion impulse furnace and precise determination of bulk oxygen within the wafer. A silicon wafer was cut to about 0.35 g (6 x 13 x 2 mm) and dropped into a graphite crucible. The sample was then heated for 40 s at 1300 degrees C. The wafer's oxide film was reduced by carbon and removed as carbon monoxide. The treated silicon sample was taken out of the graphite crucible and maintained again with the holder of the oxygen analyzer. The graphite crucible was then heated to 2100 degrees C. The treated silicon sample was dropped into the heated graphite crucible and the trace bulk oxygen in the wafer was measured using the inert gas fusion infrared absorption method. The relative standard deviations of the oxygen in silicon wafer samples with the removed surface oxide film were determined to be 0.8% for 9.8 x 10(17) atoms/cm3, and 2.7% for 13.0 x 10(17) atoms/cm3.

  7. A wafer mapping technique for residual stress in surface micromachined films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavone, G.; Murray, J.; Smith, S.; Desmulliez, M. P. Y.; Mount, A. R.; Walton, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    The design of MEMS devices employing movable structures is crucially dependant on the mechanical behaviour of the deposited materials. It is therefore important to be able to fully characterize the micromachined films and predict with confidence the mechanical properties of patterned structures. This paper presents a characterization technique that enables the residual stress in MEMS films to be mapped at the wafer level by using microstructures released by surface micromachining. These dedicated MEMS test structures and the associated measurement techniques are used to extract localized information on the strain and Young’s modulus of the film under investigation. The residual stress is then determined by numerically coupling this data with a finite element analysis of the structure. This paper illustrates the measurement routine and demonstrates it with a case study using electrochemically deposited alloys of nickel and iron, particularly prone to develop high levels of residual stress. The results show that the technique enables wafer mapping of film non-uniformities and identifies wafer-to-wafer differences. A comparison between the results obtained from the mapping technique and conventional wafer bow measurements highlights the benefits of using a procedure tailored to films that are non-uniform, patterned and surface-micromachined, as opposed to simple standard stress extraction methods. The presented technique reveals detailed information that is generally unexplored when using conventional stress extraction methods such as wafer bow measurements.

  8. Reduction of batwing effect in white light interferometry for measurement of patterned sapphire substrates (PSS) wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapilouw, Abraham Mario; Chang, Yi-Wei; Yu, Long-Yo; Wang, Hau-Wei

    2016-08-01

    Patterned sapphire substrates (PSS) wafers are used in LED manufacturing to enhance the luminous conversion of LED chips. The most critical characteristics in PSS wafers are height, width, pitch and shape of the pattern. The common way to measure these characteristics is by using surface electron microscope (SEM). White light interferometry is capable to measure dimension with nanometer accuracy and it is suitable for measuring the characteristics of PSS wafers. One of the difficulties in measuring PSS wafers is the aspect ratio and density of the features. The high aspect ratio combined with dense pattern spacing diffracts incoming lights and reduces the accuracy of the white light interferometry measurement. In this paper, a method to improve the capability of white light interferometry for measuring PSS wafers by choosing the appropriate wavelength and microscope objective with high numerical aperture. The technique is proven to be effective for reducing the batwing effect in edges of the feature and improves measurement accuracy for PSS wafers with circular features of 1.95 um in height and diameters, and 700 nm spacing between the features. Repeatability of the measurement is up to 5 nm for height measurement and 20 nm for pitch measurement.

  9. Detection of Metal Contamination on Silicon Wafer Backside and Edge by New TXRF Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Hiroshi; Yamagami, Motoyuki; Formica, Joseph; Shen, Liyong

    2009-09-01

    In conventional 200 mm wafer processing, backside defects are not considered to be of much concern because they are obscured by wafer backside topography. However, in current 300 mm wafer processing where both sides of a wafer are polished, backside defects require more consideration. In the beginning, backside defect inspection examined particle contamination because particle contamination adversely influences the depth of field in lithography. Recently, metal contamination is of concern because backside metal contamination causes cross-contamination in a process line, and backside metals easily transfer to the front surface. As the industry strives to yield more devices from the area around the wafer edge, edge exclusion requirements have also become more important. The current International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors [1] requires a 2 mm edge exclusion. Therefore, metal contamination must be controlled to less than 2 mm from the edge because metal contamination easily diffuses in silicon wafers. To meet these current semiconductor processing requirements, newly developed zero edge exclusion TXRF (ZEE-TXRF) and backside measurement TXRF (BAC-TXRF) are effective metrology methods.

  10. A coarse-graining approach for molecular simulation that retains the dynamics of the all-atom reference system by implementing hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markutsya, Sergiy; Lamm, Monica H.

    2014-11-01

    We report on a new approach for deriving coarse-grained intermolecular forces that retains the frictional contribution that is often discarded by conventional coarse-graining methods. The approach is tested for water and an aqueous glucose solution, and the results from the new implementation for coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation show remarkable agreement with the dynamics obtained from reference all-atom simulations. The agreement between the structural properties observed in the coarse-grained and all-atom simulations is also preserved. We discuss how this approach may be applied broadly to any existing coarse-graining method where the coarse-grained models are rigorously derived from all-atom reference systems.

  11. A coarse-graining approach for molecular simulation that retains the dynamics of the all-atom reference system by implementing hydrodynamic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Markutsya, Sergiy; Lamm, Monica H.

    2014-11-07

    We report on a new approach for deriving coarse-grained intermolecular forces that retains the frictional contribution that is often discarded by conventional coarse-graining methods. The approach is tested for water and an aqueous glucose solution, and the results from the new implementation for coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation show remarkable agreement with the dynamics obtained from reference all-atom simulations. The agreement between the structural properties observed in the coarse-grained and all-atom simulations is also preserved. We discuss how this approach may be applied broadly to any existing coarse-graining method where the coarse-grained models are rigorously derived from all-atom reference systems.

  12. Wafer-scale Thermodynamically Stable GaN Nanorods via Two-Step Self-Limiting Epitaxy for Optoelectronic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kum, Hyun; Seong, Han-Kyu; Lim, Wantae; Chun, Daemyung; Kim, Young-Il; Park, Youngsoo; Yoo, Geonwook

    2017-01-01

    We present a method of epitaxially growing thermodynamically stable gallium nitride (GaN) nanorods via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) by invoking a two-step self-limited growth (TSSLG) mechanism. This allows for growth of nanorods with excellent geometrical uniformity with no visible extended defects over a 100 mm sapphire (Al2O3) wafer. An ex-situ study of the growth morphology as a function of growth time for the two self-limiting steps elucidate the growth dynamics, which show that formation of an Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier and preferential growth in the c-plane direction governs the growth process. This process allows monolithic formation of dimensionally uniform nanowires on templates with varying filling matrix patterns for a variety of novel electronic and optoelectronic applications. A color tunable phosphor-free white light LED with a coaxial architecture is fabricated as a demonstration of the applicability of these nanorods grown by TSSLG.

  13. An Analog Implementation of Fixed-Wing Lateral/Directional Dynamics and Guidelines on Aircraft Simulations in the Engineering Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karayanakis, Nicholas M.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a scheme for the mechanization of fixed-wing, lateral/directional dynamics as demonstrated on the EAI 580 analog/hybrid system. A review of the complete six degrees of freedom program is included, along with useful guidelines of aircraft simulation in the engineering laboratory. (Author/JN)

  14. Design and Effectiveness of Intelligent Tutors for Operators of Complex Dynamic Systems: A Tutor Implementation for Satellite System Operators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Christine M.; Govindaraj, T.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the use of intelligent tutoring systems as opposed to traditional on-the-job training for training operators of complex dynamic systems and describes the computer architecture for a system for operators of a NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) satellite control system. An experimental evaluation with college students is…

  15. Model development on the dynamic of wave-current interaction and the implementation on the offshore wind power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tso-Ren; Huang, Chin-Cheng; Lin, Chun-Wei; Chuang, Mei-Hui; Cheng, Che-Yu; Tsai, Yu-Lin

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we performed the three-dimensional numerical simulation and analysis for solving the dynamic loads from waves and currents on the offshore wind turbines. Scenarios focused on the extreme weather conditions. During the typhoon event, the wind-driven storm waves and currents have to be considered while solving the dynamic load on the structures. The Splash3D model was adopted to perform the simulation of the interaction between breaking waves and structures. The core of the Splash3D model is the Truchas model which was developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and featured as high accuracy. Splash3D is capable of solving the dynamic process for the interaction between the structure and fluids with complex breaking free-surface. This model is also able to simulate the local scour under the violent flow condition. In order to adequately simulate the waves under monsoon or typhoon, we developed a new wave generation module based on the dispersion relationship. This wave-maker module was used to generate regular waves, irregular waves, and breaking waves under the extreme weather condition. The module was used to simulate the synthetic effect under the effects of waves and currents for obtaining the force distribution on the foundation of the offshore wind turbine. Keyword: Splash3D, wind power, VOF, wave-current interaction, dynamic loads, wind turbines.

  16. MATLAB implementation of a dynamic clamp with bandwidth >125 KHz capable of generating INa at 37°C

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, Chris; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter R.; Cohen, Ira S.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the construction of a dynamic clamp with bandwidth >125 KHz that utilizes a high performance, yet low cost, standard home/office PC interfaced with a high-speed (16 bit) data acquisition module. High bandwidth is achieved by exploiting recently available software advances (code-generation technology, optimized real-time kernel). Dynamic-clamp programs are constructed using Simulink, a visual programming language. Blocks for computation of membrane currents are written in the high-level matlab language; no programming in C is required. The instrument can be used in single- or dual-cell configurations, with the capability to modify programs while experiments are in progress. We describe an algorithm for computing the fast transient Na+ current (INa) in real time, and test its accuracy and stability using rate constants appropriate for 37°C. We then construct a program capable of supplying three currents to a cell preparation: INa, the hyperpolarizing-activated inward pacemaker current (If), and an inward-rectifier K+ current (IK1). The program corrects for the IR drop due to electrode current flow, and also records all voltages and currents. We tested this program on dual patch-clamped HEK293 cells where the dynamic clamp controls a current-clamp amplifier and a voltage-clamp amplifier controls membrane potential, and current-clamped HEK293 cells where the dynamic clamp produces spontaneous pacing behavior exhibiting Na+ spikes in otherwise passive cells. PMID:23224681

  17. P/N InP solar cells on Ge wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven; Vernon, Stanley; Burke, Edward A.

    1994-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) P-on-N one-sun solar cells were epitaxially grown using a metalorganic chemical vapor deposition process on germanium (Ge) wafers. The motivation for this work is to replace expensive InP wafers, which are fragile and must be thick and therefore heavy, with less expensive Ge wafers, which are stronger, allowing use of thinner, lighter weight wafers. An intermediate InxGs1-xP grading layer starting as In(0.49)Ga(0.51) at the GaAs-coated Ge wafer surface and ending as InP at the top of the grading layer (backside of the InP cell) was used to attempt to bend some of the threading dislocations generated by lattice-mismatch between the Ge wafer and InP cell so they would be harmlessly confined in this grading layer. The best InP/Ge cell was independently measured by NASA-Lewis with a one-sun 25 C AMO efficiently measured by NASA-Lewis with a one-circuit photocurrent 22.6 mA/sq cm. We believe this is the first published report of an InP cell grown on a Ge wafer. Why get excited over a 9 percent InP/Ge cell? If we look at the cell weight and efficiency, a 9 percent InP cell on an 8 mil Ge wafer has about the same cell power density, 118 W/kg (BOL), as the best InP cell ever made, a 19 percent InP cell on an 18 mil InP wafer, because of the lighter Ge wafer weight. As cell panel materials become lighter, the cell weight becomes more important, and the advantage of lightweight cells to the panel power density becomes more important. In addition, although InP/Ge cells have a low beginning-of-life (BOL) efficiency due to dislocation defects, the InP/Ge cells are very radiation hard (end-of-life power similar to beginning-of-life). We have irradiated an InP/Ge cell with alpha particles to an equivalent fluence of 1.6 x 10(exp 16) 1 MeV electrons/sq cm and the efficiency is still 83 percent of its BOL value. At this fluence level, the power output of these InP/Ge cells matches the GaAs/Ge cell data tabulated in the JPL handbook. Data are presented

  18. Thin, High Lifetime Silicon Wafers with No Sawing; Re-crystallization in a Thin Film Capsule

    SciTech Connect

    Emanuel Sachs Tonio Buonassisi

    2013-01-16

    The project fits within the area of renewable energy called photovoltaics (PV), or the generation of electricity directly from sunlight using semiconductor devices. PV has the greatest potential of any renewable energy technology. The vast majority of photovoltaic modules are made on crystalline silicon wafers and these wafers accounts for the largest fraction of the cost of a photovoltaic module. Thus, a method of making high quality, low cost wafers would be extremely beneficial to the PV industry The industry standard technology creates wafers by casting an ingot and then sawing wafers from the ingot. Sawing rendered half of the highly refined silicon feedstock as un-reclaimable dust. Being a brittle material, the sawing is actually a type of grinding operation which is costly both in terms of capital equipment and in terms of consumables costs. The consumables costs associated with the wire sawing technology are particularly burdensome and include the cost of the wire itself (continuously fed, one time use), the abrasive particles, and, waste disposal. The goal of this project was to make wafers directly from molten silicon with no sawing required. The fundamental concept was to create a very low cost (but low quality) wafer of the desired shape and size and then to improve the quality of the wafer by a specialized thermal treatment (called re-crystallization). Others have attempted to create silicon sheet by recrystallization with varying degrees of success. Key among the difficulties encountered by others were: a) difficulty in maintaining the physical shape of the sheet during the recrystallization process and b) difficulty in maintaining the cleanliness of the sheet during recrystallization. Our method solved both of these challenges by encapsulating the preform wafer in a protective capsule prior to recrystallization (see below). The recrystallization method developed in this work was extremely effective at maintaining the shape and the cleanliness of the

  19. Mystic: Implementation of the Static Dynamic Optimal Control Algorithm for High-Fidelity, Low-Thrust Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01

    Mystic software is designed to compute, analyze, and visualize optimal high-fidelity, low-thrust trajectories, The software can be used to analyze inter-planetary, planetocentric, and combination trajectories, Mystic also provides utilities to assist in the operation and navigation of low-thrust spacecraft. Mystic will be used to design and navigate the NASA's Dawn Discovery mission to orbit the two largest asteroids, The underlying optimization algorithm used in the Mystic software is called Static/Dynamic Optimal Control (SDC). SDC is a nonlinear optimal control method designed to optimize both 'static variables' (parameters) and dynamic variables (functions of time) simultaneously. SDC is a general nonlinear optimal control algorithm based on Bellman's principal.

  20. Universal set of dynamically protected gates for bipartite qubit networks: Soft pulse implementation of the [[5,1,3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Amrit; Pryadko, Leonid P.

    2016-04-01

    We model repetitive quantum error correction (QEC) with the single-error-correcting five-qubit code on a network of individually controlled qubits with always-on Ising couplings. We use our previously designed universal set of quantum gates based on sequences of shaped decoupling pulses. In addition to being accurate quantum gates, the sequences also provide dynamical decoupling (DD) of low-frequency phase noise. The simulation involves integrating the unitary dynamics of six qubits over the duration of tens of thousands of control pulses, using classical stochastic phase noise as a source of decoherence. The combined DD and QEC protocol dramatically improves the coherence, with the QEC alone being responsible for more than an order of magnitude infidelity reduction.

  1. An implementation of granular dynamics for simulating frictional elastic particles based on the DL_POLY code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Hancock, Bruno; Bentham, Craig; Elliott, James

    2005-02-01

    We have modified Daresbury Laboratory's replicated data strategy (RDS) parallel molecular dynamics (MD) package DL_POLY (version 2.13) to study the granular dynamics of frictional elastic particles. DL_POLY [Smith and Forester, The DL_POLY_2 User Manual v2.13, 2001; Forester and Smith, The DL_POLY_2 Reference Manual v2.13, 2001] is a MD package originally developed to study liquid state and macromolecular systems by accounting for various molecular interaction forces. The particles of interest in this study are macroscopic grains in pharmaceutical powders, with sizes ranging from tens to hundreds of microns. We have therefore substituted the molecular interaction forces with contact forces (including linear-dashpot, HKK interaction forces and Coulombic friction) while taking advantage of the RDS scheme. In effect, we have created a parallel Discrete Element Simulation (DES) code. In this paper, we describe the modifications made to the original DL_POLY code and the results from the validation tests of the granular dynamics simulations for systems of monodisperse spherical particles settling under gravity. The code can also be utilized to study particle packings generated via uniaxial compaction and, in some cases, simultaneous application of shear, at constant strain.

  2. Electron mobility-lifetime and resistivity mapping of GaAs:Cr wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chsherbakov, I.; Kolesnikova, I.; Lozinskaya, A.; Mihaylov, T.; Novikov, V.; Shemeryankina, A.; Tolbanov, O.; Tyazhev, A.; Zarubin, A.

    2017-02-01

    Previous works onchromium compensated gallium arsenide (GaAs:Cr) have shown high efficiency, good spatial and energy resolution, which is obviously connected with the high quality of material itself. The purpose of this research was to aggravate the diffusion process by increasing the annealing temperature and to observe whether there will be any degradation of material characteristics. The investigation of three 3-inch GaAs:Cr wafers with different annealing temperature of chromium was carried out. Resistivity and mobility-lifetime measurements were made using pad sensors made of these wafers. The I-V curves were built to estimate the resistivity across the wafer. Furthermore charge collection efficiency (CCE) measurements were carried out in order to estimate the μeτ e product of GaAs:Cr. The resistivity mapping has showed a variation of resistivity across the wafer in the range from 1.25 × 109 to 5.5 × 108 Ohm cm. Although the third wafer showed quite good uniformity, the resistance didn't reached values higher than 3.5 × 108 Ohm cm. In spite of harsh diffusion conditions all the materials showed quite good CCE (about 90%) and μ eτe more than 5 × 10‑5 cm2/V. Also a strong dependency between the resistivity and mobility-lifetime product was found only for one wafer. So the uniformity of μeτ e product across the wafer can be stated independently of resistivity. More detailed information and discussion of experimental results is presented in the article.

  3. In-line TEM sample preparation and wafer return strategy for rapid yield learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicaïs-Lépinay, N.; André, F.; Brevers, S.; Guyader, P.; Trouiller, C.; Kwakman, L. F. Tz.; Pokrant, S.; Verkleij, D.; Schampers, R.; Ithier, L.; Sicurani, E.; Wyon, C.

    2006-03-01

    Full wafer dual beam FIB-SEM systems have received a lot of industrial interest in the last years and by now are operational in several 200mm and 300mm fabs. These tools offer a 3D-physical characterization capability of defects and device structures and as such allow for more rapid yield learning and increased process control. Moreover, if SEM resolution is insufficient to reveal defect origin or the necessary process details, it is now also possible to prepare TEM samples using a controlled, easy to learn in-situ process and to efficiently continue the characterization with a high resolution TEM inspection. Thanks to latest hardware developments and the high degree of automation of this TEM sample preparation process, wafers no longer need to be broken and remain essentially free from contamination. Hence, the TEM lamella process can be considered as non-destructive and wafers may continue the fabrication process flow. In this paper we examine the SEM and TEM application capabilities offered by in-line dual beam systems. To qualify the wafer return strategy, the particle contamination generated by the system hardware as well as the process-induced contamination have been investigated. The particle levels measured are fully acceptable to adopt the wafer return strategy. Ga-contamination does exist but is sufficiently low and localized so that the wafer return strategy can be applied safely in the back-end of line process. Yield analysis has confirmed that there is no measurable impact on device yield. Although yet to be proven for the frond-end of line processes, the wafer return strategy has been demonstrated as a valuable one already in the backend of line processes. The as developed non-destructive 3-D SEM-TEM characterization capability does offer value added data that allow to determine the root cause of critical process defects in almost real-time and this for both standard (SEM) and more advanced (TEM) technologies.

  4. Wafer-level fabrication of arrays of glass lens doublets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passilly, Nicolas; Perrin, Stéphane; Albero, Jorge; Krauter, Johann; Gaiffe, Olivier; Gauthier-Manuel, Ludovic; Froehly, Luc; Lullin, Justine; Bargiel, Sylwester; Osten, Wolfgang; Gorecki, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Systems for imaging require to employ high quality optical components in order to dispose of optical aberrations and thus reach sufficient resolution. However, well-known methods to get rid of optical aberrations, such as aspherical profiles or diffractive corrections are not easy to apply to micro-optics. In particular, some of these methods rely on polymers which cannot be associated when such lenses are to be used in integrated devices requiring high temperature process for their further assembly and separation. Among the different approaches, the most common is the lens splitting that consists in dividing the focusing power between two or more optical components. In here, we propose to take advantage of a wafer-level technique, devoted to the generation of glass lenses, which involves thermal reflow in silicon cavities to generate lens doublets. After the convex lens sides are generated, grinding and polishing of both stack sides allow, on the first hand, to form the planar lens backside and, on the other hand, to open the silicon cavity. Nevertheless, silicon frames are then kept and thinned down to form well-controlled and auto-aligned spacers between the lenses. Subsequent accurate vertical assembly of the glass lens arrays is performed by anodic bonding. The latter ensures a high level of alignment both laterally and axially since no additional material is required. Thanks to polishing, the generated lens doublets are then as thin as several hundreds of microns and compatible with micro-opto-electro-systems (MOEMS) technologies since they are only made of glass and silicon. The generated optical module is then robust and provide improved optical performances. Indeed, theoretically, two stacked lenses with similar features and spherical profiles can be almost diffraction limited whereas a single lens characterized by the same numerical aperture than the doublet presents five times higher wavefront error. To demonstrate such assumption, we fabricated glass

  5. Growth of oriented diamond on nickel wafers and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei

    2000-10-01

    Growth of highly oriented diamond thin films on nickel was achieved by a multi-step process involving seeding, high temperature carbon dissolution, and growth. This process is very sensitive to the substrate temperature and requires accurate timing of both the nucleation and growth steps. It was observed that the surface morphology changed dramatically during the nucleation process and that in-situ monitoring of the surface morphology could provide valuable feedback for process control. An optical monitoring system developed under this study has significantly improved both the reproducibility and overall quality of the oriented diamond films grown on Ni substrates. However, since a significant fraction of carbon diffused into the bulk, as confirmed by Auger carbon depth profiling, the highest nucleation density on the bulk Ni substrate was 107 cm-2. To prevent carbon diffusion away from the surface and to maintain a supersaturated surface region, epitaxial nickel and iridium thin films were deposited by electron-beam evaporation on MgO which acted as a carbon diffusion barrier. A multi-layer structure with 100 A iridium and 1 mum nickel grown epitaxially on an MgO (100) wafer by electron-beam evaporation was used as a substrate. The 100 A thick Ir interlayer was used to overcome the delamination of Ni from the MgO substrate during processing. Oriented diamond was successfully deposited on these substrates and yielded nucleation densities of 3 x 108 cm-2, that resulted in faster coalescence of diamond particles. Coalesced diamond thin films on Ni/Ir/MgO substrates were grown in about six hours of growth, as compared to about 25 hours for the bulk Ni substrates. However, a much narrower process widow on Ni thin films made reproducible growth of oriented diamond more challenging. Cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (XHRTEM) was used to investigate the interfacial microstructure formed during hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD

  6. Behavior of piezoelectric wafer active sensor in various media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamas, Tuncay

    The dissertation addresses structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques using ultrasonic waves generated by piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) with an emphasis on the development of theoretical models of standing harmonic waves and guided waves. The focal objective of the research is to extend the theoretical study of electro-mechanical coupled PWAS as a resonator/transducer that interacts with standing and traveling waves in various media through electro-mechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS) method and guided wave propagation. The analytical models are developed and the coupled field finite element analysis (CF-FEA) models are simulated and verified with experiments. The dissertation is divided into two parts with respect to the developments in EMIS methods and GWP methods. In the first part, analytical and finite element models have been developed for the simulation of PWAS-EMIS in in-plane (longitudinal) and out-of-plane (thickness) mode. Temperature effects on free PWAS-EMIS are also discussed with respect to the in-plane mode. Piezoelectric material degradation on certain electrical and mechanical properties as the temperature increases is simulated by our analytical model for in-plane circular PWAS-EMIS that agrees well with the sets of experiments. Then the thickness mode PWAS-EMIS model was further developed for a PWAS resonator bonded on a plate-like structure. The latter analytical model was to determine the resonance frequencies for the normal mode expansion method through the global matrix method by considering PWAS-substrate and proof mass-PWAS-substrate models. The proof mass concept was adapted to shift the systems resonance frequencies in thickness mode. PWAS in contact with liquid medium on one of its surface has been analytically modeled and simulated the electro-mechanical response of PWAS with various liquids with different material properties such as the density and the viscosity. The second part discusses the guided wave propagation

  7. Radiation, temperature, and vacuum effects on piezoelectric wafer active sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Postolache, Cristian; Tudose, Mihai

    2016-03-01

    The effect of radiation, temperature, and vacuum (RTV) on piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWASs) is discussed. This study is relevant for extending structural health monitoring (SHM) methods to space vehicle applications that are likely to be subjected to harsh environmental conditions such as extreme temperatures (hot and cold), cosmic radiation, and interplanetary vacuums. This study contains both theoretical and experimental investigations with the use of electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS). In the theoretical part, analytical models of circular PWAS resonators were used to derive analytical expressions for the temperature sensitivities of EMIS resonance and antiresonance behavior. Closed-form expressions for frequency and peak values at resonance and antiresonance were derived as functions of the coefficients of thermal expansion, {α }1, {α }2, {α }3; the Poisson ratio, ν and its sensitivity, \\partial ν /\\partial T; the relative compliance gradient (\\partial {s}11E/\\partial T)/{s}11E; and the Bessel function root, z and its sensitivity, \\partial z/\\partial T. In the experimental part, tests were conducted to subject the PWAS transducers to RTV conditions. In one set of experiments, several RTV exposure, cycles were applied with EMIS signatures recorded at the beginning and after each of the repeated cycles. In another set of experiments, PWAS transducers were subjected to various temperatures and the EMIS signatures were recorded at each temperature after stabilization. The processing of measured EMIS data from the first set of experiments revealed that the resonance and antiresonance frequencies changed by less than 1% due to RTV exposure, whereas the resonance and antiresonance amplitudes changed by around 15%. After processing an individual set of EMIS data from the second set of experiments, it was determined that the relative temperature sensitivity of the antiresonance frequency ({f}{{AR}}/{f}{{AR}}) is approximately 63.1× {10

  8. Structural Damage Detection with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2011-07-01

    Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) are lightweight and inexpensive enablers for a large class of damage detection and structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. This paper starts with a brief review of PWAS physical principles and basic modelling and continues by considering the various ways in which PWAS can be used for damage detection: (a) embedded guided-wave ultrasonics, i.e., pitch-catch, pulse-echo, phased arrays, thickness mode; (b) high-frequency modal sensing, i.e., the electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance method; (c) passive detection, i.e., acoustic emission and impact detection. An example of crack-like damage detection and localization with PWAS phased arrays on a small metallic plate is given. The modelling of PWAS detection of disbond damage in adhesive joints is achieved with the analytical transfer matrix method (TMM). The analytical methods offer the advantage of fast computation which enables parameter studies and carpet plots. A parametric study of the effect of crack size and PWAS location on disbond detection is presented. The power and energy transduction between PWAS and structure is studied analytically with a wave propagation method. Special attention is given to the mechatronics modeling of the complete transduction cycle from electrical excitation into ultrasonic acoustic waves by the piezoelectric effect, the transfer through the structure, and finally reverse piezoelectric transduction to generate the received electric signal. It is found that the combination of PWAS size and wave frequency/wavelength play an important role in identifying transduction maxima and minima that could be exploited to achieve an optimum power-efficient design. The multi-physics finite element method (MP-FEM), which permits fine discretization of damaged regions and complicated structural geometries, is used to study the generation of guided waves in a plate from an electrically excited transmitter PWAS and the capture of these waves as electric

  9. Hybrid MPI/OpenMP Implementation of the ORAC Molecular Dynamics Program for Generalized Ensemble and Fast Switching Alchemical Simulations.

    PubMed

    Procacci, Piero

    2016-06-27

    We present a new release (6.0β) of the ORAC program [Marsili et al. J. Comput. Chem. 2010, 31, 1106-1116] with a hybrid OpenMP/MPI (open multiprocessing message passing interface) multilevel parallelism tailored for generalized ensemble (GE) and fast switching double annihilation (FS-DAM) nonequilibrium technology aimed at evaluating the binding free energy in drug-receptor system on high performance computing platforms. The production of the GE or FS-DAM trajectories is handled using a weak scaling parallel approach on the MPI level only, while a strong scaling force decomposition scheme is implemented for intranode computations with shared memory access at the OpenMP level. The efficiency, simplicity, and inherent parallel nature of the ORAC implementation of the FS-DAM algorithm, project the code as a possible effective tool for a second generation high throughput virtual screening in drug discovery and design. The code, along with documentation, testing, and ancillary tools, is distributed under the provisions of the General Public License and can be freely downloaded at www.chim.unifi.it/orac .

  10. Dissolution of Oxygen Precipitate Nuclei in n-Type CZ-Si Wafers to Improve Their Material Quality: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, Bhushan; Basnyat, Prakash; Devayajanam, Srinivas; Tan, Teh; Upadhyaya, Ajay; Tate, Keith; Rohatgi, Ajeet; Xu, Han

    2017-01-01

    We present experimental results which show that oxygen-related precipitate nuclei (OPN) present in p-doped, n-type, Czochralski wafers can be dissolved using a flash-annealing process, yielding very high quality wafers for high-efficiency solar cells. Flash annealing consists of heating a wafer in an optical furnace to temperature between 1150 and 1250 degrees C for a short time. This process produces a large increase in the minority carrier lifetime (MCLT) and homogenizes each wafer. We have tested wafers from different axial locations of two ingots. All wafers reach nearly the same high value of MCLT. The OPN dissolution is confirmed by oxygen analysis using Fourier transform infrared spectra and injection-level dependence of MCLT.

  11. Spatial characterization of a 2 in GaN wafer by Raman spectroscopy and capacitance voltage measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Chen, X. D.; Fung, S.; Beling, C. D.; Ling, C. C.

    2004-10-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy and capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements have been used to investigate 2 in GaN epitaxial wafers grown by hydride vapour phase epitaxy on sapphire substrates. The position and line shape of the A1 longitudinal optical (LO) phonon mode were used to determine the carrier concentration at different locations across the wafer. The line-shape fitting of the Raman A1 (LO) coupled modes taken from horizontal lateral-different positions on the wafer yielded a rudimentary spatial map of the carrier concentration. These data compare well with a carrier density map of the wafer obtained by C-V measurements, confirming the non-uniform distribution of carrier concentration in the GaN epitaxial film and that Raman spectroscopy of the LO phonon-plasmon mode can be used as a reliable and production friendly wafer quality test for GaN wafer manufacturing processes.

  12. Ab initio implementation of quantum trajectory mean-field approach and dynamical simulation of the N{sub 2}CO photodissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Binbin; Liu, Lihong; Cui, Ganglong; Fang, Wei-Hai; Cao, Jun; Feng, Wei; Li, Xin-qi

    2015-11-21

    In this work, the recently introduced quantum trajectory mean-field (QTMF) approach is implemented and employed to explore photodissociation dynamics of diazirinone (N{sub 2}CO), which are based on the high-level ab initio calculation. For comparison, the photodissociation process has been simulated as well with the fewest-switches surface hopping (FSSH) and the ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) methods. Overall, the dynamical behavior predicted by the three methods is consistent. The N{sub 2}CO photodissociation at λ > 335 nm is an ultrafast process and the two C—N bonds are broken in a stepwise way, giving birth to CO and N{sub 2} as the final products in the ground state. Meanwhile, some noticeable differences were found in the QTMF, FSSH, and AIMS simulated time constants for fission of the C—N bonds, excited-state lifetime, and nonadiabatic transition ratios in different intersection regions. These have been discussed in detail. The present study provides a clear evidence that direct ab initio QTMF approach is one of the reliable tools for simulating nonadiabatic dynamics processes.

  13. Engine dynamic analysis with general nonlinear finite element codes. Part 2: Bearing element implementation overall numerical characteristics and benchmaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padovan, J.; Adams, M.; Fertis, J.; Zeid, I.; Lam, P.

    1982-01-01

    Finite element codes are used in modelling rotor-bearing-stator structure common to the turbine industry. Engine dynamic simulation is used by developing strategies which enable the use of available finite element codes. benchmarking the elements developed are benchmarked by incorporation into a general purpose code (ADINA); the numerical characteristics of finite element type rotor-bearing-stator simulations are evaluated through the use of various types of explicit/implicit numerical integration operators. Improving the overall numerical efficiency of the procedure is improved.

  14. Process for the controlled growth of single-crystal films of silicon carbide polytypes on silicon carbide wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, David J. (Inventor); Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method for the controlled growth of single-crystal semiconductor-device-quality films of SiC polytypes on vicinal (0001) SiC wafers with low tilt angles is presented. Both homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial SiC films can be produced on the same wafer. In particular, 3C-SiC and 6H-SiC films can be produced within selected areas of the same 6H-SiC wafer.

  15. Process for the controlled growth of single-crystal films of silicon carbide polytypes on silicon carbide wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    This invention is a method for the controlled growth of single-crystal semiconductor device quality films of SiC polytypes on vicinal (0001) SiC wafers with low tilt angles. Both homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial SiC films can be produced on the same wafer. In particular, 3C-SiC and 6H-SiC films can be produced within selected areas of the same 6H-SiC wafer.

  16. High-density-plasma (HDP)-CVD oxide to thermal oxide wafer bonding for strained silicon layer transfer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Radu, I.; Reiche, M.; Himcinschi, C.; Kuck, B.; Tillack, B.; Gösele, U.; Christiansen, S. H.

    2007-01-01

    Direct wafer bonding between high-density-plasma chemical vapour deposited (HDP-CVD) oxide and thermal oxide (TO) has been investigated. HDP-CVD oxides, about 230 nm in thickness, were deposited on Si(0 0 1) control wafers and the wafers of interest that contain a thin strained silicon (sSi) layer on a so-called virtual substrate that is composed of relaxed SiGe (˜4 μm thick) on Si(0 0 1) wafers. The surfaces of the as-deposited HDP-CVD oxides on the Si control wafers were smooth with a root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of <1 nm, which is sufficiently smooth for direct wafer bonding. The surfaces of the sSi/SiGe/Si(0 0 1) substrates show an RMS roughness of >2 nm. After HDP-CVD oxide deposition on the sSi/SiGe/Si substrates, the RMS roughness of the oxide surfaces was also found to be the same, i.e., >2 nm. To use these wafers for direct bonding the RMS roughness had to be reduced below 1 nm, which was carried out using a chemo-mechanical polishing (CMP) step. After bonding the HDP-CVD oxides to thermally oxidized handle wafers, the bonded interfaces were mostly bubble- and void-free for the silicon control and the sSi/SiGe/Si(0 0 1) wafers. The bonded wafer pairs were then annealed at higher temperatures up to 800 °C and the bonded interfaces were still found to be almost bubble- and void-free. Thus, HDP-CVD oxide is quite suitable for direct wafer bonding and layer transfer of ultrathin sSi layers on oxidized Si wafers for the fabrication of novel sSOI substrates.

  17. Correlation between reticle- and wafer-CD difference of multiple 28nm reticle-sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guoxiang; Richter, Frank; Thamm, Thomas; Ackmann, Paul; Staples, Marc; Weisbuch, Francois; Kurth, Karin; Schenker, Joerg; Leschok, Andre; GN, Fang Hong

    2012-11-01

    Reticle critical dimension uniformity (CDU) is an important criterion for the qualification of mask layer processes. Normally, the smaller the three sigma value of reticle CDU is, the better is the reticle CDU performance. For qualification of mask processes, the mask layers to be qualified should have a comparable reticle CDU compared to the process of record (POR) mask layers. Because the reticle critical dimension (CD) measurement is based on algorithms like "middle side lobe measurement", evaluation of the reticle CD-values can not reflect aspects like the sidewall angle of the reticle and variation in corner rounding which may be critical for 45nm technology nodes (and below). All involved tools and processes contribute to the wafer intra-field CDU (scanner, track, reticle, metrology). Normally, the reticle contribution to the wafer CDU should be as small as possible. In order to reduce the process contributions to the wafer intra-field CDU during the mask qualification process, the same toolset (exposure tool, metrology tool) should be applied as for the POR. Out of the results of these investigations the correlation between wafer measurement to target (MTT) and reticle MTT can be obtained in order to accurately qualify the CDU performance of the mask processes. We will demonstrate the correlation between reticle MTT and wafer MTT by use of multiple mask processes and alternative mask blank materials. We will investigate the results of four process-layers looking at advanced binary maskblank material from two different suppliers (moreover the results of a 2X-via layer as an example for a phase-shift maskblank is discussed). Objective of this article is to demonstrate the distribution between reticle MTT and wafer MTT as a qualification criterion for mask processes. The correlation between wafer CD-difference and reticle CD-difference of these mask processes are demonstrated by having performed investigations of dense features of different 28nmtechnology

  18. Vibrational resonance and implementation of dynamic logic gate in a piecewise-linear Murali-Lakshmanan-Chua circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesh, P. R.; Venkatesan, A.

    2016-10-01

    We report the occurrence of vibrational resonance in piecewise-linear non-autonomous system. Especially, we show that an optimal amplitude of the high frequency second harmonic driving enhances the response of a piece-wise linear non-autonomous Murali-Lakshmanan-Chua (MLC) system to a low frequency first harmonic signal. This phenomenon is illustrated with the analytical solutions of circuit equations characterising the system and finally compared with the numerical method. Further, it has been enunciated explicitly, the implementation of the fundamental NOR/NAND gate via vibrational resonance, both by numerical and analytical solutions. In addition, these logical behaviours (AND/NAND/OR/NOR) can be decided by the amplitude of the input square waves without altering the system parameters.

  19. Wafer bonding technology for new generation vacuum MEMS: challenges and promises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoi, V.; Pabo, E.

    2015-05-01

    Various MEMS devices are incorporated into consumer electronic devices. A particular category of MEMS require vacuum packaging by wafer bonding with the need to encapsulate vacuum levels of 10-2 mbar or higher with long time stability. The vacuum requirement is limiting the choice of the wafer bonding process and raises significant challenges to the existing investigation methods (metrology) used for results qualification. From the broad range of wafer bonding processes only few are compatible with vacuum applications: fusion bonding, anodic bonding, glass frit bonding and metal-based bonding. The outgassing from the enclosed surfaces after bonding will affect the vacuum level in the cavity: in some cases, a getter material is used inside the device cavity to compensate for this outgassing. Additionally the selected bonding process must be compatible with the devices on the wafers being bonded. This work reviews the principles of vacuum encapsulation using wafer bonding. Examples showing the suitability of each process for specific applications types will be presented. A significant challenge in vacuum MEMS fabrication is the lack of analytical methods needed for process characterization or reliability testing. A short overview of the most used methods and their limitations will be presented. Specific needs to be addressed will be introduced with examples.

  20. Front-end wafer-level microsystem packaging technique with microcap array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Yuh-Min; Bachman, Mark; Li, Guann-pyng

    2002-07-01

    Packaging represents a significant and expensive obstacle in commercializing microsystem technology (MST) devices such as micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), micro-optical-electro-mechanical-systems (MOEMS), microsensors, microactuators and other micromachined devices. This paper describes a novel wafer level protection method for MST devices which facilitates improved manufacturing throughput and automation in package assembly, wafer level testing of devices, and enhanced device performance. The method involves the use of a wafer-sized micro-cap array. This array consists of an assortment of small caps molded onto a material with adjustable shapes and sizes to serve as protective structures against the hostile environments associated with packaging. It may also include modifications which enhance its adhesion to the MST wafer or increase the MST device function. Depending on the application, the micro-molded cap can be designed and modified to facilitate additional functions, such as optical, electrical, mechanical, and chemical functions, which are not easily achieved in the device by traditional means. The fabrication method, materials selection, and the compatibility of the micro cap device to conventional packaging process are discussed in this paper. The results of wafer-level micro cap packaging demonstrations are also presented.

  1. Preparation of wafer-level glass cavities by a low-cost chemical foaming process (CFP).

    PubMed

    Shang, Jintang; Chen, Boyin; Lin, Wei; Wong, Ching-Ping; Zhang, Di; Xu, Chao; Liu, Junwen; Huang, Qing-An

    2011-04-21

    A novel foaming process-chemical foaming process (CFP)-using foaming agents to fabricate wafer-level micro glass cavities including channels and bubbles was investigated. The process consists of the following steps sequentially: (1) shallow cavities were fabricated by a wet etching on a silicon wafer; (2) powders of a proper foaming agent were placed in a silicon cavity, named 'mother cavity', on the etched silicon surface; (3) the silicon cavities were sealed with a glass wafer by anodic bonding; (4) the bonded wafers were heated to above the softening point of the glass, and baked for several minutes, when the gas released by the decomposition of the foaming agent in the 'mother cavity' went into the other sealed interconnected silicon cavities to foam the softened glass into cylindrical channels named 'daughter channels', or spherical bubbles named 'son bubbles'. Results showed that wafer-level micro glass cavities with smooth wall surfaces were achieved successfully without contamination by the CFP. A model for the CFP was proposed to predict the final shape of the glass cavity. Experimental results corresponded with model predictions. The CFP provides a low-cost avenue to preparation of micro glass cavities of high quality for applications such as micro-reactors, micro total analysis systems (μTAS), analytical and bio-analytical applications, and MEMS packaging.

  2. Engineering Controlled Spalling in (100)-Oriented GaAs for Wafer Reuse

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, Cassi A.; McNeely, Joshua E.; Gorman, Brian; Young, David L.; Ptak, Aaron J.; Packard, Corinne E.

    2015-06-14

    Controlled spalling offers a way to cleave thin, single-crystal films or devices from wafers, particularly if the fracture planes in the material are oriented parallel to the wafer surface. Unfortunately, misalignment between the favored fracture planes and the wafer surface preferred for photovoltaic growth in (100)-oriented GaAs produces a highly faceted surface when subject to controlled spalling. This highly faceted cleavage surface is problematic in several ways: (1) it can result in large variations of spall depth due to unstable crack propagation; (2) it may introduce defects into the device zone or underlying substrate; and (3) it consumes many microns of material outside of the device zone. We present the ways in which we have engineered controlled spalling for (100)-oriented GaAs to minimize these effects. We expand the operational window for controlled spalling to avoid spontaneous spalling, find no evidence of dislocation activity in the spalled film or the parent wafer, and reduce facet height and facet height irregularity. Resolving these issues provides a viable path forward for reducing III-V device cost through the controlled spalling of (100)-oriented GaAs devices and subsequent wafer reuse when these processes are combined with a high-throughput growth method such as Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy.

  3. Mask and wafer cost of ownership (COO) from 65 to 22 nm half-pitch nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Greg; Litt, Lloyd C.; Wüest, Andrea; Palaiyanur, Shyam

    2008-05-01

    Anticipating the cost of ownership (COO) of different lithography approaches into the future is an act of faith. It requires that one believe that all of the lithographic problems with next generation lithography (NGL) approaches will be sufficiently resolved to support the production of manufacturing wafers. This paper assumes that all of the necessary technologies will be available in the future and that the cost of the components can be extrapolated from historic cost trends. Mask and wafer costs of a single critical lithography layer for the 65, 45, 32 and 22 nm half-pitch (HP) nodes will be compared for immersion, double process (DP), double expose (DE), extreme ultraviolet (EUV), and imprint technologies. The mask COO analysis assumes that the basic yield of an optical mask is constant from node to node and that the infrastructure that allows this performance will be in place when the technologies are needed. The primary differences in mask costs among lithography approaches are driven by the patterning write time and materials. The wafer COO is driven by the mask cost (for the low wafer-per-mask use case), the lithography tool cost, and the effective wafers per hour (wph) for the lithography approach being considered.

  4. Microwave ECR plasma electron flood for low pressure wafer charge neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderberg, Bo; Nakatsugawa, Tomoya; Divergilio, William

    2012-11-06

    Modern ion implanters typically use dc arc discharge Plasma Electron Floods (PEFs) to neutralize wafer charge. The arc discharge requires using at least some refractory metal hardware, e.g. a thermionically emitting filament, which can be undesirable in applications where no metallic contamination is critical. rf discharge PEFs have been proposed to mitigate contamination risks but the gas flows required can result in high process chamber pressures. Axcelis has developed a microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) PEF to provide refractory metals contamination-free wafer neutralization with low gas flow requirement. Our PEF uses a custom, reentrant cusp magnet field providing ECR and superior electron confinement. Stable PEF operation with extraction slits sized for 300 mm wafers can be attained at Xe gas flows lower than 0.2 sccm. Electron extraction currents can be as high as 20 mA at absorbed microwave powers < 70 W. On Axcelis' new medium current implanter, plasma generation has proven robust against pressure transients caused by, for example, photoresist outgassing by high power ion beams. Charge monitor and floating potential measurements along the wafer surface corroborate adequate wafer charge neutralization for low energy, high current ion beams.

  5. Silymarin released from sterile wafers restores glucose impaired endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Gadad, Pramod C; Matthews, Kerr H; Knott, Rachel M

    2013-11-30

    Reduced oxygen tension combined with high glucose concentration leads to chronic wounds in diabetic patients. Delayed wound healing is due in part to impaired angiogenesis as a result of reduced endothelial cell migration. Topical applications, in the form of sterile lyophilised wafers hold promise for the treatment of chronic diabetic wounds. In this study wafers containing silymarin were prepared using xanthan gum and sterilised with 25 and 40 kGy gamma radiation. The rheological properties of xanthan gels, before and after lyophilisation, were measured and it was concluded that an increased dose of gamma rays (40 kGy) increased the viscosity coefficient and yield stress of silymarin wafers. HPLC analysis indicated that 89-90% of silymarin was retained in the wafers after irradiation. Dermal microvascular cell migration studies in the presence of high glucose and reduced oxygen tension levels, using novel radial migration and wound healing assays developed 'in house', were also undertaken. Silymarin, when formulated as a lyophilised wafer, successfully retained its ability to overcome the high glucose induced reduction in endothelial cell migration.

  6. The Imaging Properties of a Silicon Wafer X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, M. K.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Fair, S.; Ramsey, B. D.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon wafers have excellent optical properties --- low microroughness and good medium-scale flatness --- which Make them suitable candidates for inexpensive flat-plate grazing-incidence x-ray mirrors. On short spatial scales (less than 3 mm) the surface quality of silicon wafers rivals that expected of the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) high-resolution optics. On larger spatial scales, however, performance may be degraded by the departure from flatness of the wafer and by distortions induced by the mounting scheme. In order to investigate such effects, we designed and constructed a prototype silicon-wafer x-ray telescope. The device was then tested in both visible light and x rays. The telescope module consists of 94 150-mm-diameter wafers, densely packed into the first stage of a Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration. X-ray tests at three energies (4.5, 6.4, and 8.0 keV) showed an energy-independent line spread function with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 150 arcseconds, dominated by deviations from large-scale flatness.

  7. Surface Formation of Single Silicon Wafer Polished with Nano-sized Al2O3 Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu-li; Zuo, Dun-wen; Zhu, Yong-wei; Wang, Min

    2007-12-01

    Ice polishing single silicon wafers with nano-sized Al2O3 abrasives can be known as ice fixed abrasives chemical mechanical polishing (IFA-CMP). TAn abrasive slurry was made of nano-sized Al2O3 particles dispersed in de-ionized water with a surfactant and the slurry was frozen to form an ice polishing pad. Then polishing tests of blanket silicon wafers with the above ice polishing pad were carried out. The morphologies and surface roughness of the polished silicon wafers were observed and examined on an atomic force microscope. The subsurface damage was assessed by means of cross-section transmission electron microscopy. The surface chemical constituents of the polished silicon wafers were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in order to gain insight into the chemical mechanisms in the process. Scratch resistance of the single silicon wafer was measured by nanoscratching using a nanoindenter to explore the mechanical removal mechanism. The results show that a super smooth surface with an average roughness of 0.367 nm is obtained within 1000 nm × 1000 nm and there is a perfect silicon diamond structure without any microcracks in the subsurface. The removal of material is dominated by the coactions of ductile regime machining and chemical corrosion. In the end, a model of material removal of IFA-CMP is built.

  8. Gaussian diffusion sphere model to predict deposition velocity onto wafers in laminar parallel airflow considering thermophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sang-Hee; Yook, Se-Jin; Han, Seog Young

    2012-11-01

    The Gaussian Diffusion Sphere Model (GDSM) was developed and improved to predict the particle deposition velocity onto a flat plate exposed to parallel airflow by considering thermophoresis in addition to the Brownian diffusion and the gravitational settling of particles. The plate surface temperature was varied and considered to be either hotter or colder than the temperature of the parallel airflow. The GDSM was able to estimate the particle deposition velocity under the influence of thermophoresis not only correctly but also very quickly, compared to the numerical approach to calculate the deposition velocity by simulating thermo-flow and particle transport. As the next step, the particle deposition velocities onto both face-up and face-down surfaces of the 450 mm wafer exposed to the parallel airflow were predicted with the GDSM by varying the wafer temperature. It was anticipated that the schemes of heating the wafer and placing the critical surface inverted during the horizontal transport of the wafer could greatly reduce the particulate contamination of the wafer critical surface.

  9. Influence of electrode geometry on the high-field characteristics of photoconductive silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Madangarli, V.P.; Gradinaru, G.; Korony, G.; Sudarshan, T.S.; Loubriel, G.M.; Zutavern, F.J.; Patterson, P.E.

    1994-07-01

    A series of experiment were conducted to study the influence of electrode geometry on the prebreakdown (and breakdown) characteristics of high resistivity ({rho} > 30 k{Omega}-cm), p-type Si wafers under quasi-uniform and non-uniform electric field configurations. In the quasi-uniform field configuration, the 1mm thick Si wafer was mounted between the slots of two plane parallel stainless steel disc electrodes (parallel), while the non-uniform field was obtained by mounting the wafer between two pillar-type electrodes with a hemispherical tip (pillar). The main objective of the above investigation was to verify if the uniform field configuration under a parallel system has a positive influence by reducing the field enhancement at the contact region, as opposed to the definite field enhancement present in the case of the non-uniform pillar system. Also, it was proposed to study the effect of the contact profile on the field distribution over the wafer surface and hence its influence on the high-field performance of the Si wafers.

  10. Direct wafer bonding technology for large-scale InGaAs-on-insulator transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, SangHyeon E-mail: sh-kim@kist.re.kr; Ikku, Yuki; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Nakane, Ryosho; Li, Jian; Kao, Yung-Chung

    2014-07-28

    Heterogeneous integration of III-V devices on Si wafers have been explored for realizing high device performance as well as merging electrical and photonic applications on the Si platform. Existing methodologies have unavoidable drawbacks such as inferior device quality or high cost in comparison with the current Si-based technology. In this paper, we present InGaAs-on-insulator (-OI) fabrication from an InGaAs layer grown on a Si donor wafer with a III-V buffer layer instead of growth on a InP donor wafer. This technology allows us to yield large wafer size scalability of III-V-OI layers up to the Si wafer size of 300 mm with a high film quality and low cost. The high film quality has been confirmed by Raman and photoluminescence spectra. In addition, the fabricated InGaAs-OI transistors exhibit the high electron mobility of 1700 cm{sup 2}/V s and uniform distribution of the leakage current, indicating high layer quality with low defect density.

  11. Fabrication Characterization of Solar-Cell Silicon Wafers Using a Circular-Rhombus Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pa, Pai-Shan

    2010-01-01

    A new recycling fabrication method using a custom-built designed circular-rhombus tool for a process combining of micro-electroetching and electrochemical machining for removal of the surface layers from silicon wafers of solar cells is demonstrated. The low yields of epoxy film and Si3N4 thin-film depositions are important factors in semiconductor production. The aim of the proposed recycling fabrication method is to replace the current approach, which uses strong acid and grinding and may damage the physical structure of silicon wafers and pollute to the environment. A precisely engineered clean production approach for removal of surface microstructure layers from silicon wafers is to develop a mass production system for recycling defective or discarded silicon wafers of solar cells that can reduce pollution and cost. A large diameter cathode of the circular-rhombus tool (with a small gap between the anode and the cathode) corresponds to a high rate of epoxy film removal. A high feed rate of the silicon wafers combined with a high continuous DC electric voltage results in a high removal rate. The high rotational speed of the circular-rhombus tool increases the discharge mobility and improves the removal effect associated with the high feed rate of the workpiece. A small port radius or large end angle of the rhombus anode provides a large discharge space and good removal effect only a short period of time is required to remove the Si3N4 layer and epoxy film easily and cleanly.

  12. Automated defect review of the wafer bevel with a defect review scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGarvey, Steve; Kanezawa, Masakazu

    2009-03-01

    One of the few remaining bastions of non-regulated Integrated Circuit defectivity is the wafer bevel. Recent internal Integrated Circuit Manufacturing studies have suggested that the edge bevel may be responsible for as much as a two to three percent yield loss during a defect excursion on the manufacturing line and a one to two percent yield loss during ongoing wafer manufacturing. A new generation of defect inspection equipment has been introduced to the Research and Development, Integrated Circuit, MEM's and Si wafer manufacturing markets that has imparted the ability for the end equipment user to detect defects located on the bevel of the wafer. The inherent weakness of the current batch of wafer bevel inspection equipment is the lack of automatic discrete defect classification data into multiple, significant classification bins and the lack of discrete elemental analysis data. Root cause analysis is based on minimal discrete defect analysis as a surrogate for a statistically valid sampling of defects from the bevel. This paper provides a study of the methods employed with a Hitachi RS-5500EQEQ Defect Review Scanning Electron Microscope (DRSEM) to automatically capture high resolution/high magnification images and collect elemental analysis on a statistically valid sample of the discrete defects that were located by a bevel inspection system.

  13. Measurement and mapping of materials parameters for gallium arsenide wafers by infrared transmission topography

    SciTech Connect

    Mier, M.G.; Look, D.C.; Walters, D.C.

    1996-12-01

    Polished wafers of semiinsulating (SI) undoped GaAs or of doped conducting GaAs are important for manufacture of monolithic microwave integrated circuits or of junction light emitters. For SI wafers, the EL2 defect causes the SI state, and variation in EL2 density can cause on-wafer variations in device isolation and other device properties. With conducting materials, crystalline dislocations cause dark-line defects and other recombination centers that limit carrier lifetime in fabricated lasers. High free carrier concentration leads to low series resistance ohmic contacts and is very desirable in semiconductor lasers. In the process of evaluating these materials, we have found that infrared transmission measurements can provide dense data on device-pertinent materials parameters for correlation to device parameters. Our custom color maps of these materials parameters keyed to color histograms of the measurement data can provide informative presentations of very large data sets for comparison to device measurements. For example, we discuss nondestructive neutral and total EL2 density measurements in SI GaAs and nondestructive dislocation density and free carrier concentration measurements in GaAs: Si, both by infrared topography. When test devices can be fabricated at known positions on the materials evaluation wafer (or on a nearby wafer from the same boule), sensitive comparison of materials evaluation data to measured device performance can be achieved. We show that topographic color maps allow meaningful comparisons of the materials measurements to device measurements at different spacings.

  14. Silicon-hybrid wafer-scale integration achieved with multilevel aluminum interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Grant L.; Kolesar, Edward S.

    A silicon-hybrid wafer-scale integration (WSI) technique has been developed to interconnect complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuits. Electrical performance tests and processing diagnostics reveal that the interconnect design is very promising. The wafer-scale integrated circuit was fabricated by mounting two CMOS integrated circuit dies into etched wells and then planarizing the surface of the silicon wafer substrate. Next the wafer's surface was coated with a photosensitive polyimide and patterned with vias to accommodate the interconnecting conductors. The CMOS dies were two-bit shift registers and were electrically interconnected with aluminum conductors using conventional silicon processing techniques. A diagnostic evaluation was accomplished to determine the electrical continuity of the conductors and via contacts. When compared to a complementary wire-bonded interconnect scheme, the silicon WSI technology was found to be the superior performer at 1-MHz operating frequencies. Discontinuous interconnects were evaluated, and the failures were identified to occur at the severe topographical steps encountered on the substrate wafer's surface.

  15. Reliability study of wafer bonding for micro-electro-mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almasri, Mahmoud; Altemus, Bruce; Gracias, Alison; Clow, Larry; Tokranova, Natalya; Castracane, James; Xu, Bai

    2003-12-01

    Wafer bonding has attracted significant attention in applications that require integration of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) with Integrated Circuits (IC). The integration of monolithic MEMS and electronic devices is difficult because of issues such as material compatibility, process compliance and thermal budget. It is important to establish a wafer bonding process which provides long-term protection for the MEMS devices yet does not affect their performance. The attentions for such integration are at the die level and wafer level. Recently, the trend is toward wafer-level integration as a cost effective solution to combine sensing, logic, actuation and communications on a single platform. This paper describes the development of low temperature bonding techniques for post-CMOS MEMS integration in system-on-chip (SOC) applications. The bonding methods discussed in this paper involve Benzocyclobutene polymer (BCB) as glue layer to joint two 200 mm wafers together. The bonding temperature is lower than 400°C. Four-point bending and stud-pull methods were used to investigate the mechanical properties of the bonding interfaces. These methods can provide critical information such as adhesion energy and bonding strength of the bonded interfaces. Initial test results at room temperature showed that the BCB bond stayed intact up to an average stress of 50 MPa. It was observed that the BCB bond strength decreased with increasing temperatures and the energy release rate decreased with decreasing BCB thickness.

  16. Reliability study of wafer bonding for micro-electro-mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almasri, Mahmoud; Altemus, Bruce; Gracias, Alison; Clow, Larry; Tokranova, Natalya; Castracane, James; Xu, Bai

    2004-01-01

    Wafer bonding has attracted significant attention in applications that require integration of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) with Integrated Circuits (IC). The integration of monolithic MEMS and electronic devices is difficult because of issues such as material compatibility, process compliance and thermal budget. It is important to establish a wafer bonding process which provides long-term protection for the MEMS devices yet does not affect their performance. The attentions for such integration are at the die level and wafer level. Recently, the trend is toward wafer-level integration as a cost effective solution to combine sensing, logic, actuation and communications on a single platform. This paper describes the development of low temperature bonding techniques for post-CMOS MEMS integration in system-on-chip (SOC) applications. The bonding methods discussed in this paper involve Benzocyclobutene polymer (BCB) as glue layer to joint two 200 mm wafers together. The bonding temperature is lower than 400°C. Four-point bending and stud-pull methods were used to investigate the mechanical properties of the bonding interfaces. These methods can provide critical information such as adhesion energy and bonding strength of the bonded interfaces. Initial test results at room temperature showed that the BCB bond stayed intact up to an average stress of 50 MPa. It was observed that the BCB bond strength decreased with increasing temperatures and the energy release rate decreased with decreasing BCB thickness.

  17. Gated Silicon Drift Detector Fabricated from a Low-Cost Silicon Wafer

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Hideharu; Sakurai, Shungo; Oda, Yuya; Fukushima, Shinya; Ishikawa, Shohei; Takeshita, Akinobu; Hidaka, Atsuki

    2015-01-01

    Inexpensive high-resolution silicon (Si) X-ray detectors are required for on-site surveys of traces of hazardous elements in food and soil by measuring the energies and counts of X-ray fluorescence photons radially emitted from these elements. Gated silicon drift detectors (GSDDs) are much cheaper to fabricate than commercial silicon drift detectors (SDDs). However, previous GSDDs were fabricated from 10-kΩ·cm Si wafers, which are more expensive than 2-kΩ·cm Si wafers used in commercial SDDs. To fabricate cheaper portable X-ray fluorescence instruments, we investigate GSDDs formed from 2-kΩ·cm Si wafers. The thicknesses of commercial SDDs are up to 0.5 mm, which can detect photons with energies up to 27 keV, whereas we describe GSDDs that can detect photons with energies of up to 35 keV. We simulate the electric potential distributions in GSDDs with Si thicknesses of 0.5 and 1 mm at a single high reverse bias. GSDDs with one gate pattern using any resistivity Si wafer can work well for changing the reverse bias that is inversely proportional to the resistivity of the Si wafer. PMID:26007742

  18. A pad roughness model for the analysis of lubrication in the chemical mechanical polishing of a silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dongming; Liu, Jingyuan; Kang, Renke; Jin, Zhuji

    2007-07-01

    The slurry flow beneath the wafer in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), involving the chemical reaction and the lubrication, is critical to the planarity and surface quality of a large-sized silicon wafer. In order to analyse the effects of pad roughness and some important operating parameters on the slurry flow with the suspended abrasives between the wafer and the pad, a complicated three-dimensional model based on the micropolar fluid theory, Brinkman equations and Darcy's law is developed. The effects of pad roughness and vital parameters on the slurry flow between the pad and the wafer are well discussed.

  19. New methodology for dynamic lot dispatching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Wei-Herng; Wang, Jiann-Kwang; Lin, Kuo-Cheng; Hsu, Yi-Chin

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents a new dynamic dispatching rule to improve delivery. The dynamic dispatching rule named `SLACK and OTD (on time delivery)' is developed for focusing on due date and target cycle time under the environment of IC manufacturing. This idea uses traditional SLACK policy to control long term due date and new OTD policy to reflect the short term stage queue time. Through the fuzzy theory, these two policies are combined as the dispatching controller to define the lot priority in the entire production line. Besides, the system would automatically update the lot priority according to the current line situation. Since the wafer dispatching used to be controlled by critical ratio that indicates the low customer satisfaction. And the overall slack time in the front end of the process is greater compared to that in the rear end of the process which reveals that the machines in the rear end are overloaded by rush orders. When SLACK and OTD are used the due date control has been gradually improved. The wafer with either a long stage queue time or urgent due date will be pushed through the overall production line instead of jammed in the front end. A demand pull system is also developed to satisfy not only due date but also the quantity of monthly demand. The SLACK and OTD rule has been implemented in Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company for eight months with beneficial results. In order to clearly monitor the SLACK and OTD policy, a method called box chart is generated to simulate the entire production system. From the box chart, we can not only monitor the result of decision policy but display the production situation on the density figure. The production cycle time and delivery situation can also be investigated.

  20. A dynamic mean field theory for dissipative interacting many-electron systems: Markovian formalism and its implementation.

    PubMed

    Yokojima, Satoshi; Chen, Guanhua; Xu, Ruixue; Yan, Yijing

    2003-12-01

    To demonstrate its applicability for realistic open systems, we apply the dynamic mean field quantum dissipative theory to simulate the photo-induced excitation and nonradiative decay of an embedded butadiene molecule. The Markovian approximation is adopted to further reduce the computational time, and the resulting Markovian formulation assumes a variation of Lindblad's semigroup form, which is shown to be numerically stable. In the calculation, all 22 valence electrons in the butadiene molecule are taken as the system and treated explicitly while the nuclei of the molecules are taken as the immediate bath of the system. It is observed that (1) various excitations decay differently, which leads to different peak widths in the absorption spectra; and (2) the temperature dependences of nonradiative decay rates are distinct for various excitations, which can be explained by the different electron-phonon couplings.

  1. [The implementation of computer model in research of dynamics of proliferation of cells of thyroid gland follicle].

    PubMed

    Abduvaliev, A A; Gil'dieva, M S; Khidirov, B N; Saĭdalieva, M; Khasanov, A A; Musaeva, Sh N; Saatov, T S

    2012-04-01

    The article deals with the results of computational experiments in research of dynamics of proliferation of cells of thyroid gland follicle in normal condition and in the case of malignant neoplasm. The model studies demonstrated that the chronic increase of parameter of proliferation of cells of thyroid gland follicle results in abnormal behavior of numbers of cell cenosis of thyroid gland follicle. The stationary state interrupts, the auto-oscillations occur with transition to irregular oscillations with unpredictable cell proliferation and further to the "black hole" effect. It is demonstrated that the present medical biologic experimental data and theory propositions concerning the structural functional organization of thyroid gland on cell level permit to develop mathematical models for quantitative analysis of numbers of cell cenosis of thyroid gland follicle in normal conditions. The technique of modeling of regulative mechanisms of living systems and equations of cell cenosis regulations was used

  2. Implementation of hybrid Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics in nickel carbide production: recipe for graphene growth formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syuhada, Ibnu; Rosikhin, Ahmad; Marimpul, Rinaldo; Noor, Fatimah A.; Winata, Toto

    2017-02-01

    This study concerns hybrid Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics (MD/MC) methods involving a recipe for creating nickel carbide that can be applied to the graphene growth process. The time-stamped force-bias Monte Carlo (tfMC) method was used for taking care of the bond switching (BS) rate due to the concentration of carbon atoms in the nickel catalyst. It was found that the hybrid MD/MC method promotes the nickel carbide system to vibrational bond switching. This study also revealed that carbon atoms in metal catalyst are not spread randomly but rather prefer to gather in groups. This phenomenon is not caused by the BS rate only, but also by cohesive–adhesive competition between carbon and nickel atoms.

  3. Implementation of molecular dynamics and its extensions with the coarse-grained UNRES force field on massively parallel systems; towards millisecond-scale simulations of protein structure, dynamics, and thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Liwo, Adam; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Czaplewski, Cezary; Kleinerman, Dana S; Blood, Philip; Scheraga, Harold A

    2010-03-09

    We report the implementation of our united-residue UNRES force field for simulations of protein structure and dynamics with massively parallel architectures. In addition to coarse-grained parallelism already implemented in our previous work, in which each conformation was treated by a different task, we introduce a fine-grained level in which energy and gradient evaluation are split between several tasks. The Message Passing Interface (MPI) libraries have been utilized to construct the parallel code. The parallel performance of the code has been tested on a professional Beowulf cluster (Xeon Quad Core), a Cray XT3 supercomputer, and two IBM BlueGene/P supercomputers with canonical and replica-exchange molecular dynamics. With IBM BlueGene/P, about 50 % efficiency and 120-fold speed-up of the fine-grained part was achieved for a single trajectory of a 767-residue protein with use of 256 processors/trajectory. Because of averaging over the fast degrees of freedom, UNRES provides an effective 1000-fold speed-up compared to the experimental time scale and, therefore, enables us to effectively carry out millisecond-scale simulations of proteins with 500 and more amino-acid residues in days of wall-clock time.

  4. Small footprint wafer-level vacuum packaging using compressible gold sealing rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antelius, Mikael; Stemme, Göran; Niklaus, Frank

    2011-08-01

    A novel low-temperature wafer-level vacuum packaging process is presented. The process uses plastically deformed gold rings as sealing structures in combination with flux-free soldering to provide the bond force for a sealing wafer. This process enables the separation of the sealing and the bonding functions both spatially on the wafer and temporally in different process steps, which results in reduced areas for the sealing rings and prevents outgassing from the solder process in the cavity. This enables space savings and yields improvements. We show the experimental result of the hermetic sealing. The leak rate into the packages is determined, by measuring the package lid deformation over 10 months, to be lower than 3.5 × 10-13 mbar l s-1, which is suitable for most MEMS packages. The pressure inside the produced packages is measured to be lower than 10 mbar.

  5. Initiation time of near-infrared laser-induced slip on the surface of silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sungho; Jhang, Kyung-Young

    2014-06-23

    We have determined the initiation time of laser-induced slip on a silicon wafer surface subjected to a near-infrared continuous-wave laser by numerical simulations and experiments. First, numerical analysis was performed based on the heat transfer and thermoelasticity model to calculate the resolved shear stress and the temperature-dependent yield stress. Slip initiation time was predicted by finding the time at which the resolved shear stress reached the yield stress. Experimentally, the slip initiation time was measured by using a laser scattering technique that collects scattered light from the silicon wafer surface and detects strong scattering when the surface slip is initiated. The surface morphology of the silicon wafer surface after laser irradiation was also observed using an optical microscope to confirm the occurrence of slip. The measured slip initiation times agreed well with the numerical predictions.

  6. First On-Wafer Power Characterization of MMIC Amplifiers at Sub-Millimeter Wave Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, A. K.; Gaier, T.; Samoska, L.; Deal, W. R.; Radisic, V.; Mei, X. B.; Yoshida, W.; Liu, P. S.; Uyeda, J.; Barsky, M.; Lai, R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments in semiconductor technology have enabled advanced submillimeter wave (300 GHz) transistors and circuits. These new high speed components have required new test methods to be developed for characterizing performance, and to provide data for device modeling to improve designs. Current efforts in progressing high frequency testing have resulted in on-wafer-parameter measurements up to approximately 340 GHz and swept frequency vector network analyzer waveguide measurements to 508 GHz. On-wafer noise figure measurements in the 270-340 GHz band have been demonstrated. In this letter we report on on-wafer power measurements at 330 GHz of a three stage amplifier that resulted in a maximum measured output power of 1.78mW and maximum gain of 7.1 dB. The method utilized demonstrates the extension of traditional power measurement techniques to submillimeter wave frequencies, and is suitable for automated testing without packaging for production screening of submillimeter wave circuits.

  7. Effects of cleaning procedures of silica wafers on their friction characteristics.

    PubMed

    Donose, Bogdan C; Taran, Elena; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Shinto, Hiroyuki; Higashitani, Ko

    2006-07-01

    Silicon wafers with thermal silicon oxide layers were cleaned and hydrophilized by three different methods: (1) the remote chemical analysis (RCA) wet cleaning by use of ammonia and hydrogen peroxide mixture solutions, (2) water-vapor plasma cleaning, and (3) UV/ozone combined cleaning. All procedures were found to remove effectively organic contaminations on wafers and gave identical characteristics of the contact angle, the surface roughness and the normal force interactions, measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). However, it is found that wafers cleaned by the RCA method have several times larger friction coefficients than those cleaned by the plasma and UV/ozone methods. The difference was explained by the atomic-scale topological difference induced during the RCA cleaning. This study reveals the lateral force microscopy as a very sensitive method to detect the microstructure of surfaces.

  8. Wafer sub-layer impact in OPC/ORC models for advanced node implant layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le-Denmat, Jean-Christophe; Michel, Jean-Christophe; Sungauer, Elodie; Yesilada, Emek; Robert, Frederic; Lan, Song; Feng, Mu; Wang, Lei; Depre, Laurent; Kapasi, Sanjay

    2014-03-01

    From 28 nm technology node and below optical proximity correction (OPC) needs to take into account light scattering effects from prior layers when bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC) is not used, which is typical for ionic implantation layers. These effects are complex, especially when multiple sub layers have to be considered: for instance active and poly structures need to be accounted for. A new model form has been developed to address this wafer topography during model calibration called the wafer 3D+ or W3D+ model. This model can then be used in verification (using Tachyon LMC) and during model based OPC to increase the accuracy of mask correction and verification. This paper discusses an exploration of this new model results using extended wafer measurements (including SEM). Current results show good accuracy on various representative structures.

  9. Fabrication of high-density cantilever arrays and through-wafer interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    A. Harley, J.; Abdollahi-Alibeik, S.; Chow, E. M.; Kenney, T. W.; McCarthy, A. M.; McVittie, J. P.; Partridge; Quate, C. F.; Soh, H. T.

    1998-11-03

    Processes to fabricate dense, dry released microstructures with electrical connections on the opposite side of the wafer are described. A 10 x 10 array of silicon and polysilicon cantilevers with high packing density (5 tips/mm2) and high uniformity (<10 µm length variation across the wafer) are demonstrated. The cantilever release process uses a deep SF6/C4F8, plasma etch followed by a HBr plasma etch to accurately release cantilevers. A process for fabricating electrical contacts through the backside of the wafer is also described. Electrodeposited resist, conformal CVD metal deposition and deep SF6/C4F8 plasma etching are used to make 30 µm/side square vias each of which has a resistance of 50 m(omega).

  10. Vertically Conductive Single-Crystal SiC-Based Bragg Reflector Grown on Si Wafer

    PubMed Central

    Massoubre, David; Wang, Li; Hold, Leonie; Fernandes, Alanna; Chai, Jessica; Dimitrijev, Sima; Iacopi, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Single-crystal silicon carbide (SiC) thin-films on silicon (Si) were used for the fabrication and characterization of electrically conductive distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) on 100 mm Si wafers. The DBRs, each composed of 3 alternating layers of SiC and Al(Ga)N grown on Si substrates, show high wafer uniformity with a typical maximum reflectance of 54% in the blue spectrum and a stopband (at 80% maximum reflectance) as large as 100 nm. Furthermore, high vertical electrical conduction is also demonstrated resulting to a density of current exceeding 70 A/cm2 above 1.5 V. Such SiC/III-N DBRs with high thermal and electrical conductivities could be used as pseudo-substrate to enhance the efficiency of SiC-based and GaN-based optoelectronic devices on large Si wafers. PMID:26601894

  11. Integratible Process for Fabrication of Fluidic Microduct Networks on a Single Wafer

    SciTech Connect

    Matzke, C.M.; Ashby, C.I.; Bridges, M.M.; Griego, L.; Wong, C.C.

    1999-09-07

    We present a microelectronics fabrication compatible process that comprises photolithography and a key room temperature SiON thin film plasma deposition to define and seal a fluidic microduct network. Our single wafer process is independent of thermo-mechanical material properties, particulate cleaning, global flatness, assembly alignment, and glue medium application, which are crucial for wafer fusion bonding or sealing techniques using a glue medium. From our preliminary experiments, we have identified a processing window to fabricate channels on silicon, glass and quartz substrates. Channels with a radius of curvature between 8 and 50 {micro}m, are uniform along channel lengths of several inches and repeatable across the wafer surfaces. To further develop this technology, we have begun characterizing the SiON film properties such as elastic modulus using nanoindentation, and chemical bonding compatibility with other microelectronic materials.

  12. The effect of residual stress on photoluminescence in multi-crystalline silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Vanessa; Melkote, Shreyes N.; Rounsaville, Brian; Danyluk, Steven

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the results of an experiment designed to understand the effect of manufacturing-induced residual stress on photoluminescence (PL) in multi-crystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers used for photovoltaic applications. The experiment relies on the use of near-infrared birefringence polariscopy and polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy to measure casting-induced residual stress present in mc-Si wafers. High temperature annealing was used to relieve the residual stress in the mc-Si wafers, and photoluminescence was used to evaluate the electrical performance to provide a correlation of residual stress to electrical activity. High temperature annealing produced a drastic improvement in photoluminescence. A decrease in the number of points of highest maximum shear stress correlated with an increase in photoluminescence. Additionally, a direct correlation was found between higher tensile residual stress and increased PL.

  13. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT: Theoretical Models and Current Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Handayani, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Prakken, N. H. J.; Slart, R. H. J. A.; Oudkerk, M.; Van Ooijen, P. M. A.; Vliegenthart, R.; Sijens, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT), including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET). This could facilitate integration of myocardial perfusion biomarkers into the current workup for coronary artery disease (CAD), as MRI and CT systems are more widely available than PET scanners. Cardiac PET scanning remains expensive and is restricted by the requirement of a nearby cyclotron. Clinical evidence is needed to demonstrate that MRI and CT have similar accuracy for myocardial perfusion quantification as PET. However, lack of standardization of acquisition protocols and tracer kinetic model selection complicates comparison between different studies and modalities. The aim of this overview is to provide insight into the different tracer kinetic models for quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis and to address typical implementation issues in MRI and CT. We compare different models based on their theoretical derivations and present the respective consequences for MRI and CT acquisition parameters, highlighting the interplay between tracer kinetic modeling and acquisition settings. PMID:27088083

  14. Implementation of interior micro-CT on a carbon nanotube dynamic micro-CT scanner for lower radiation dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Hao; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Cao, Guohua

    2015-03-01

    Micro-CT is a high-resolution volumetric imaging tool that provides imaging evaluations for many preclinical applications. However, the relatively high cumulative radiation dose from micro-CT scans could lead to detrimental influence on the experimental outcomes or even the damages of specimens. Interior micro-computed tomography (micro- CT) produces exact tomographic images of an interior region-of-interest (ROI) embedded within an object from truncated projection data. It holds promises for many biomedical applications with significantly reduced radiation doses. Here, we present our first implementation of an interior micro-CT system using a carbon nanotube (CNT) field-emission microfocus x-ray source. The system has two modes - interior micro-CT mode and global micro-CT mode, which is realized with a detachable x-ray beam collimator at the source side. The interior mode has an effective field-of-view (FOV) of about 10mm in diameter, while for the global mode the FOV is about 40mm in diameter. We acquired CT data in these two modes from a mouse-sized phantom, and compared the reconstructed image qualities and the associated radiation exposures. Interior ROI reconstruction was achieved by using our in-house developed reconstruction algorithm. Overall, interior micro-CT demonstrated comparable image quality to the conventional global micro-CT. Radiation doses measured by an ion chamber show that interior micro-CT yielded significant dose reduction (up to 83%).

  15. Improving wafer level CD uniformity for logic applications utilizing mask level metrology and process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Avi; Trautzsch, Thomas; Buttgereit, Ute; Graitzer, Erez; Hanuka, Ori

    2013-09-01

    Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) is one of the key parameters necessary to assure good performance and reliable functionality of any integrated circuit (IC). The extension of 193nm based lithography usage combined with design rule shrinkage makes process control, in particular the wafer level CDU control, an extremely important and challenging task in IC manufacturing. In this study the WLCD-CDC closed loop solution offered by Carl Zeiss SMS was examined. This solution aims to improve the wafer level intra-field CDU without the need to run wafer prints and extensive wafer CD metrology. It combines two stand-alone tools: The WLCD tool which measures CD based on aerial imaging technology while applying the exact scanner-used illumination conditions to the photomask and the CDC tool which utilizes an ultra-short femto-second laser to write intra-volume shading elements (Shade-In Elements™) inside the photomask bulk material. The CDC process changes the dose going through the photomask down to the wafer, hence the wafer level intra-field CDU improves. The objective of this study was to evaluate how CDC process is affecting the CD for different type of features and pattern density which are typical for logic and system on chip (SOC) devices. The main findings show that the linearity and proximity behavior is maintained by the CDC process and CDU and CDC Ratio (CDCR) show a linear behavior for the different feature types. Finally, it was demonstrated that the CDU errors of the targeted (critical) feature have been effectively eliminated. In addition, the CDU of all other features have been significantly improved as well.

  16. Improved metrology of implant lines on static images of textured silicon wafers using line integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Kuldeep; Saber, Eli; Verrier, Kevin

    2015-02-01

    In solar wafer manufacturing processes, the measurement of implant mask wearing over time is important to maintain the quality of wafers and the overall yield. Mask wearing can be estimated by measuring the width of lines implanted by it on the substrate. Previous methods, which propose image analysis methods to detect and measure these lines, have been shown to perform well on polished wafers. Although it is easier to capture images of textured wafers, the contrast between the foreground and background is extremely low. In this paper, an improved technique to detect and measure implant line widths on textured solar wafers is proposed. As a pre-processing step, a fast non-local means method is used to denoise the image due to the presence of repeated patterns of textured lines in the image. Following image enhancement, the previously proposed line integral method is used to extract the position of each line in the image. Full- Width One-Third maximum approximation is then used to estimate the line widths in pixel units. The conversion of these widths into real-world metric units is done using a photogrammetric approach involving the Sampling Distance. The proposed technique is evaluated using real images of textured wafers and compared with the state-of-the-art using identical synthetic images, to which varying amounts of noise was added. Precision, recall and F-measure values are calculated to benchmark the proposed technique. The proposed method is found to be more robust to noise, with critical SNR value reduced by 10dB in comparison to the existing method.

  17. Equipment for On-Wafer Testing From 220 to 325 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Peralta, Alejandro; Dawson, Douglas; Lee, Karen; Boll, Greg; Oleson, Chuck

    2006-01-01

    A system of electronic instrumentation, constituting the equivalent of a two-port vector network analyzer, has been developed for use in on-wafer measurement of key electrical characteristics of semiconductor devices at frequencies from 220 to 325 GHz. A prior system designed according to similar principles was reported in Equipment for On-Wafer Testing at Frequencies Up to 220 GHz (NPO-20760), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 11 (November 2001), page 42. As one would expect, a major source of difficulty in progressing to the present higher-frequency-range system was the need for greater mechanical precision as wavelengths shorten into the millimeter range, approaching the scale of mechanical tolerances of prior systems. The system (see figure) includes both commercial off-the-shelf and custom equipment. As in the system of the cited prior article, the equipment includes test sets that are extended versions of commercial network analyzers that function in a lower frequency range. The extension to the higher frequency range is accomplished by use of custom frequency-extension modules that contain frequency multipliers and harmonic mixers. On-wafer measurement is made possible by waveguide wafer probes that were custom designed and built for this wavelength range, plus an on-wafer calibration substrate designed for use with these probes. In this case, the calibration substrate was specially fabricated by laser milling. The system was used to make the first on-wafer measurements of a semiconductor device in the frequency range from 220 to 320 GHz. Some of the measurement results showed that the device had gain.

  18. Implementation of an intensive short-term dynamic treatment program for patients with treatment-resistant disorders in residential care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This protocol presents a systematic residential treatment- and research program aimed at patients who have not responded adequately to previous treatment attempts. Patients included in the program primarily suffer from anxiety and/or depressive disorders and usually from one or more comorbid personality disorders. The treatment program is time-limited (eight weeks) and has its basis in treatment principles specified in intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy (ISTDP). This treatment modality is theoretically well-suited for the handling of various forms of treatment resistance presumably central to these patients’ previous non-response to psychological and psychiatric interventions. Methods/Design The research component of the project entails a naturalistic longitudinal research design which aims at systematic evaluation of the effectiveness of the program. To our knowledge, this is one of the first treatment programs and corresponding research projects that systematically select patients with previous non- or negative response to treatment and subjects them to a broad and comprehensive, but theoretically unified and consistent treatment system. Discussion The present paper introduces the project, describes its theoretical and methodological underpinnings, and discusses possible future implications and contributions of the project. It thereby serves as a comprehensive background reference to future publications from the project. PMID:24438222

  19. Rapid Reconstitution Packages (RRPs) implemented by integration of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and 3D printed microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chi, Albert; Curi, Sebastian; Clayton, Kevin; Luciano, David; Klauber, Kameron; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; D'hers, Sebastian; Elman, Noel M

    2014-08-01

    Rapid Reconstitution Packages (RRPs) are portable platforms that integrate microfluidics for rapid reconstitution of lyophilized drugs. Rapid reconstitution of lyophilized drugs using standard vials and syringes is an error-prone process. RRPs were designed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques to optimize fluidic structures for rapid mixing and integrating physical properties of targeted drugs and diluents. Devices were manufactured using stereo lithography 3D printing for micrometer structural precision and rapid prototyping. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) was selected as the initial model drug to test the RRPs as it is unstable in solution. tPA is a thrombolytic drug, stored in lyophilized form, required in emergency settings for which rapid reconstitution is of critical importance. RRP performance and drug stability were evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to characterize release kinetics. In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were performed to test for drug activity after the RRPs were exposed to various controlled temperature conditions. Experimental results showed that RRPs provided effective reconstitution of tPA that strongly correlated with CFD results. Simulation and experimental results show that release kinetics can be adjusted by tuning the device structural dimensions and diluent drug physical parameters. The design of RRPs can be tailored for a number of applications by taking into account physical parameters of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), excipients, and diluents. RRPs are portable platforms that can be utilized for reconstitution of emergency drugs in time-critical therapies.

  20. Fluid dynamics and convective heat transfer in impinging jets through implementation of a high resolution liquid crystal technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.; Wiedner, B.; Camci, C.

    1993-01-01

    A combined convective heat transfer and fluid dynamics investigation in a turbulent round jet impinging on a flat surface is presented. The experimental study uses a high resolution liquid crystal technique for the determination of the convective heat transfer coefficients on the impingement plate. The heat transfer experiments are performed using a transient heat transfer method. The mean flow and the character of turbulent flow in the free jet is presented through five hole probe and hot wire measurements, respectively. The flow field character of the region near the impingement plate plays an important role in the amount of convective heat transfer. Detailed surveys obtained from five hole probe and hot wire measurements are provided. An extensive validation of the liquid crystal based heat transfer method against a conventional technique is also presented. After a complete documentation of the mean and turbulent flow field, the convective heat transfer coefficient distributions on the impingement plate are presented. The near wall of the impingement plate and the free jet region is treated separately. The current heat transfer distributions are compared to other studies available from the literature. The present paper contains complete sets of information on the three dimensional mean flow, turbulent velocity fluctuations, and convective heat transfer to the plate. The experiments also prove that the present nonintrusive heat transfer method is highly effective in obtaining high resolution heat transfer maps with a heat transfer coefficient uncertainty of 5.7 percent.