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Sample records for implementing team software

  1. Implementing Extreme Programming in Distributed Software Project Teams: Strategies and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruping, Likoebe M.

    Agile software development methods and distributed forms of organizing teamwork are two team process innovations that are gaining prominence in today's demanding software development environment. Individually, each of these innovations has yielded gains in the practice of software development. Agile methods have enabled software project teams to meet the challenges of an ever turbulent business environment through enhanced flexibility and responsiveness to emergent customer needs. Distributed software project teams have enabled organizations to access highly specialized expertise across geographic locations. Although much progress has been made in understanding how to more effectively manage agile development teams and how to manage distributed software development teams, managers have little guidance on how to leverage these two potent innovations in combination. In this chapter, I outline some of the strategies and challenges associated with implementing agile methods in distributed software project teams. These are discussed in the context of a study of a large-scale software project in the United States that lasted four months.

  2. Team Collaboration Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yeou-Fang; Schrock, Mitchell; Baldwin, John R.; Borden, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    The Ground Resource Allocation and Planning Environment (GRAPE 1.0) is a Web-based, collaborative team environment based on the Microsoft SharePoint platform, which provides Deep Space Network (DSN) resource planners tools and services for sharing information and performing analysis.

  3. Implementation team activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, F.

    2002-12-01

    The implementation Team (IT) is a body reporting to the SCSB,. It has been assigned the task of preparing and harmonising policy, standards and specification proposals for evaluation, qualification and quality control, thus enabling a coherent and cost-effective ESCC Specification System for the procurement of EEE space components. Among the 10 recommendations issued by the SCAHC, 7 have been studied under the auspices of the Implementation Team. Its main activities have been the updating and modernising of the ESA/SCC system in order to meet user needs and to be compatible with market trends. In particular it updated the technical aspects of generic specifications for the different component families and introduced the QML concept into the SCC system. It has also studied and discussed other topics such as procurement standards, a reliability system, mutual recognition, databases and the preferred parts list. A summary of the progress made in all these fields will be presented below.

  4. The Effects of Development Team Skill on Software Product Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaver, Justin M.; Schiavone, Guy A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the effect of the skill/experience of the software development team on the quality of the final software product. A method for the assessment of software development team skill and experience is proposed, and was derived from a workforce management tool currently in use by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Using data from 26 smallscale software development projects, the team skill measures are correlated to 5 software product quality metrics from the ISO/IEC 9126 Software Engineering Product Quality standard. in the analysis of the results, development team skill is found to be a significant factor in the adequacy of the design and implementation. In addition, the results imply that inexperienced software developers are tasked with responsibilities ill-suited to their skill level, and thus have a significant adverse effect on the quality of the software product. Keywords: software quality, development skill, software metrics

  5. Benchmarking Software Assurance Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-18

    product The chicken#. (a.k.a. Process Focused Assessment ) – Management Systems ( ISO 9001 , ISO 27001, ISO 2000) – Capability Maturity Models (CMMI...How – Executive leadership commitment – Translate ROI to project manager vocabulary (cost, schedule, quality ) – Start small and build – Use...collaboration Vocabulary Reserved Words Software Acquisition Information Assurance Project Management System Engineering Software Engineering Software

  6. Software Defined GPS API: Development and Implementation of GPS Correlator Architectures Using MATLAB with Focus on SDR Implementations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-18

    intention of offering improved software libraries for GNSS signal acquisition. It has been the team mission to implement new and improved techniques...with the intention of offering improved software libraries for GNSS signal acquisition. It has been the team mission to implement new and improved...intention of offering improved software libraries for GNSS signal acquisition. It has been the team mission to implement new and improved techniques to

  7. Towards a balanced software team formation based on Belbin team role using fuzzy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Mazni; Hasan, Bikhtiyar; Ahmad, Mazida; Yasin, Azman; Baharom, Fauziah; Mohd, Haslina; Darus, Norida Muhd

    2016-08-01

    In software engineering (SE), team roles play significant impact in determining the project success. To ensure the optimal outcome of the project the team is working on, it is essential to ensure that the team members are assigned to the right role with the right characteristics. One of the prevalent team roles is Belbin team role. A successful team must have a balance of team roles. Thus, this study demonstrates steps taken to determine balance of software team formation based on Belbin team role using fuzzy technique. Fuzzy technique was chosen because it allows analyzing of imprecise data and classifying selected criteria. In this study, two roles in Belbin team role, which are Shaper (Sh) and Plant (Pl) were chosen to assign the specific role in software team. Results show that the technique is able to be used for determining the balance of team roles. Future works will focus on the validation of the proposed method by using empirical data in industrial setting.

  8. ERP Software Implementation Best Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Pollyanne S.; Southerland, Arthur R.; Johnson, James T.

    2002-01-01

    Studied the perceptions of chief financial and information officers of enterprise resource planning (ERP) software implementation best practices. Usable responses from 159 respondents show consensus for the most part between the perceptions of the two groups and describe some best practices that represent common ground. (SLD)

  9. A Team Building Model for Software Engineering Courses Term Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Yasar Guneri

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a new model for team building, which enables teachers to build coherent teams rapidly and fairly for the term projects of software engineering courses. Moreover, the model can also be used to build teams for any type of project, if the team member candidates are students, or if they are inexperienced on a certain subject. The…

  10. Roadmap for Peridynamic Software Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Littlewood, David John

    2015-10-01

    The application of peridynamics for engineering analysis requires an efficient and robust software implementation. Key elements include processing of the discretization, the proximity search for identification of pairwise interactions, evaluation of the con- stitutive model, application of a bond-damage law, and contact modeling. Additional requirements may arise from the choice of time integration scheme, for example esti- mation of the maximum stable time step for explicit schemes, and construction of the tangent stiffness matrix for many implicit approaches. This report summaries progress to date on the software implementation of the peridynamic theory of solid mechanics. Discussion is focused on parallel implementation of the meshfree discretization scheme of Silling and Askari [33] in three dimensions, although much of the discussion applies to computational peridynamics in general.

  11. Performance of student software development teams: the influence of personality and identifying as team members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaghan, Conal; Bizumic, Boris; Reynolds, Katherine; Smithson, Michael; Johns-Boast, Lynette; van Rooy, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    One prominent approach in the exploration of the variations in project team performance has been to study two components of the aggregate personalities of the team members: conscientiousness and agreeableness. A second line of research, known as self-categorisation theory, argues that identifying as team members and the team's performance norms should substantially influence the team's performance. This paper explores the influence of both these perspectives in university software engineering project teams. Eighty students worked to complete a piece of software in small project teams during 2007 or 2008. To reduce limitations in statistical analysis, Monte Carlo simulation techniques were employed to extrapolate from the results of the original sample to a larger simulated sample (2043 cases, within 319 teams). The results emphasise the importance of taking into account personality (particularly conscientiousness), and both team identification and the team's norm of performance, in order to cultivate higher levels of performance in student software engineering project teams.

  12. A Quantitative Study of Global Software Development Teams, Requirements, and Software Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Linda L.

    2016-01-01

    The study explored the relationship between global software development teams, effective software requirements, and stakeholders' perception of successful software development projects within the field of information technology management. It examined the critical relationship between Global Software Development (GSD) teams creating effective…

  13. Implementation of critical care response team.

    PubMed

    Al Shimemeri, Abdullah

    2014-04-01

    Analyses of hospital deaths have indicated that a significant proportion of the reported deaths might have been prevented had the patients received intensive level care early enough. Over the past few decades the critical care response team has become an important means of preventing these deaths. As the proactive arm of intensive care delivery, the critical care response team places emphasis on early identification of signs of clinical deterioration, which then prompts the mobilization of intensive care brought right to the patient's bedside. However, the setting up of a critical care response team is a difficult undertaking involving different levels of cooperation between all service stakeholders, and a bringing together of professional expertise and experience in its operations. The implementation of a critical care response team often involves a high-level restructuring of a hospital's service orientation. In the present work, the various factors and different models to be considered in implementing a critical care response team are addressed.

  14. Leader Delegation and Trust in Global Software Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Suling

    2008-01-01

    Virtual teams are an important work structure in global software development. The distributed team structure enables access to a diverse set of expertise which is often not available in one location, to a cheaper labor force, and to a potentially accelerated development process that uses a twenty-four hour work structure. Many software teams…

  15. Implementing an ICU outreach team model.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Betty

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing need for critical care expertise outside of the intensive care unit (ICU). This is particularly related to high acuity levels and limited nursing resources. Teams of critical care health care providers have been formed to meet this need. Team structure and services provided vary according to the organization's need and the resources available. In this article, the process of establishing an ICU outreach team without additional resources, in a 200-bed tertiary care hospital in central Saskatchewan is presented. The team responds to calls from within the hospital to provide critical care expertise to patients about whom the professional caregiver is concerned, or patients who have early warning signs of physiological distress. Implementation of the team has been successful in improving timely patient care, providing a resource for nurses to access for their patients, and providing an opportunity for education and support for nurses on inpatient units.

  16. Implementing Large Projects in Software Engineering Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coppit, David

    2006-01-01

    In software engineering education, large projects are widely recognized as a useful way of exposing students to the real-world difficulties of team software development. But large projects are difficult to put into practice. First, educators rarely have additional time to manage software projects. Second, classrooms have inherent limitations that…

  17. Management Guidelines for Database Developers' Teams in Software Development Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Lazar; Lin, Yifeng; Hodosi, Georg

    Worldwide job market for database developers (DBDs) is continually increasing in last several years. In some companies, DBDs are organized as a special team (DBDs team) to support other projects and roles. As a new role, the DBDs team is facing a major problem that there are not any management guidelines for them. The team manager does not know which kinds of tasks should be assigned to this team and what practices should be used during DBDs work. Therefore in this paper we have developed a set of management guidelines, which includes 8 fundamental tasks and 17 practices from software development process, by using two methodologies Capability Maturity Model (CMM) and agile software development in particular Scrum in order to improve the DBDs team work. Moreover the management guidelines developed here has been complemented with practices from authors' experience in this area and has been evaluated in the case of a software company. The management guidelines for DBD teams presented in this paper could be very usefully for other companies too that are using a DBDs team and could contribute towards an increase of the efficiency of these teams in their work on software development projects.

  18. Roles in Innovative Software Teams: A Design Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaen, Ivan

    With inspiration from role-play and improvisational theater, we are developing a framework for innovation in software teams called Essence. Based on agile principles, Essence is designed for teams of developers and an onsite customer. This paper reports from teaching experiments inspired by design science, where we tried to assign differentiated roles to team members. The experiments provided valuable insights into the design of roles in Essence. These insights are used for redesigning how roles are described and conveyed in Essence.

  19. Team Software Process (TSP) Coach Mentoring Program Guidebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    DACUM Research Chart for Team Software ProcessSM (TSPSM) Coach DACUM ...Software Engineering Institute SEI Coordinators: Jefferson Welch Mary Ellen Rich Valerie Chilson DACUM Facilitator Robert E...Norton CETE/OSU Sponsored by Produced by June 1-2, 2006 DRAFT DACUM

  20. Creative education for rapid response team implementation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amy L

    2009-01-01

    The Institute for Healthcare Improvement advocates implementation of rapid response teams (RRTs) to bring experts to the bedside to assist with patient assessment and treatment. Due to shrinking budgets and limited resources, initiating new programs and policies can be challenging in the health care environment. This article highlights a creative approach that a community hospital used to provide staff education during the RRT implementation process. This education plan includes a review of learning considerations, creation of a video, and other strategies that could be used by staff development educators for a variety of other topics.

  1. Effective Team Support: From Modeling to Software Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie; Sycara, Katia

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and engineers and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in modeling infrastructure and task infrastructure. Work is continuing under a different contract to complete empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support the teams task.

  2. PPM Receiver Implemented in Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Andrew; Kang, Edward; Lay, Norman; Vilnrotter, Victor; Srinivasan, Meera; Lee, Clement

    2010-01-01

    A computer program has been written as a tool for developing optical pulse-position- modulation (PPM) receivers in which photodetector outputs are fed to analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) and all subsequent signal processing is performed digitally. The program can be used, for example, to simulate an all-digital version of the PPM receiver described in Parallel Processing of Broad-Band PPM Signals (NPO-40711), which appears elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. The program can also be translated into a design for digital PPM receiver hardware. The most notable innovation embodied in the software and the underlying PPM-reception concept is a digital processing subsystem that performs synchronization of PPM time slots, even though the digital processing is, itself, asynchronous in the sense that no attempt is made to synchronize it with the incoming optical signal a priori and there is no feedback to analog signal processing subsystems or ADCs. Functions performed by the software receiver include time-slot synchronization, symbol synchronization, coding preprocessing, and diagnostic functions. The program is written in the MATLAB and Simulink software system. The software receiver is highly parameterized and, hence, programmable: for example, slot- and symbol-synchronization filters have programmable bandwidths.

  3. Using "Facebook" to Improve Communication in Undergraduate Software Development Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlton, Terence; Devlin, Marie; Drummond, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    As part of the CETL ALiC initiative (Centre of Excellence in Teaching and Learning: Active Learning in Computing), undergraduate computing science students at Newcastle and Durham universities participated in a cross-site team software development project. To ensure we offer adequate resources to support this collaboration, we conducted an…

  4. Measuring the effect of conflict on software engineering teams.

    PubMed

    Karn, J S; Cowling, A J

    2008-05-01

    This article describes a project that aimed to uncover the effects of different forms of conflict on team performance during the important feasibility, requirements analysis, and design phases of software engineering (SE) projects. The research subjects were master of science students who were working to produce software commissioned by real-world clients. A template was developed that allowed researchers to record details of any conflicts that occurred. It was found that some forms of conflict were more damaging than others and that the frequency and intensity of specific conflicts are important factors to consider. The experience of the researchers when using the final template suggests that it is a valuable weapon to have in one's arsenal if one is interested in observing and recording the details of conflict in either SE teams or teams in different contexts.

  5. Project SYNERGY: Software Support for Underprepared Students. Software Implementation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anandam, Kamala; And Others

    Miami-Dade Community College's (MDCC's) implementation and assessment of computer software as a part of Project SYNERGY, a multi-institutional project funded by the International Business Machines (IBM) Corporation designed to seek technological solutions for helping students underprepared in reading, writing and mathematics, is described in this…

  6. Team Software Development for Aerothermodynamic and Aerodynamic Analysis and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, N.; Atkins, H. L.; Bibb, K. L.; Biedron, R. T.; Carpenter, M. H.; Gnoffo, P. A.; Hammond, D. P.; Jones, W. T.; Kleb, W. L.; Lee-Rausch, E. M.

    2003-01-01

    A collaborative approach to software development is described. The approach employs the agile development techniques: project retrospectives, Scrum status meetings, and elements of Extreme Programming to efficiently develop a cohesive and extensible software suite. The software product under development is a fluid dynamics simulator for performing aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic analysis and design. The functionality of the software product is achieved both through the merging, with substantial rewrite, of separate legacy codes and the authorship of new routines. Examples of rapid implementation of new functionality demonstrate the benefits obtained with this agile software development process. The appendix contains a discussion of coding issues encountered while porting legacy Fortran 77 code to Fortran 95, software design principles, and a Fortran 95 coding standard.

  7. Self-Managed Work Teams in Nursing Homes: Implementing and Empowering Nurse Aide Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeatts, Dale E.; Cready, Cynthia; Ray, Beth; DeWitt, Amy; Queen, Courtney

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes the progress of our study to examine the advantages and costs of using self-managed nurse aide teams in nursing homes, steps that are being taken to implement such teams, and management strategies being used to manage the teams. Design and Methods: A quasi-experimental design is underway where certified nurse aide…

  8. Tips for Ensuring Successful Software Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weathers, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Implementing an enterprise-level, mission-critical software system is an infrastructure project akin to other sizable projects, such as building a school. It's costly and complex, takes a year or more to complete, requires the collaboration of many different parties, involves uncertainties, results in a long-lived asset requiring ongoing…

  9. Implementing Rakim: Open Source Chat Reference Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caraway, Shawn; Payne, Susan

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the conception, implementation, and current status of Rakim open source software at Midlands Technical college in Columbia, SC. Midlands Technical College (MTC) is a 2-year school in Columbia, S.C. It has two large campuses and three smaller campuses. Although the library functions as a single unit, there are separate…

  10. Program for implementing software quality metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Yule, H.P.; Riemer, C.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes a program by which the Veterans Benefit Administration (VBA) can implement metrics to measure the performance of automated data systems and demonstrate that they are improving over time. It provides a definition of quality, particularly with regard to software. Requirements for management and staff to achieve a successful metrics program are discussed. It lists the attributes of high-quality software, then describes the metrics or calculations that can be used to measure these attributes in a particular system. Case studies of some successful metrics programs used by business are presented. The report ends with suggestions on which metrics the VBA should use and the order in which they should be implemented.

  11. Generalized implementation of software safety policies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.; Wika, Kevin G.

    1994-01-01

    As part of a research program in the engineering of software for safety-critical systems, we are performing two case studies. The first case study, which is well underway, is a safety-critical medical application. The second, which is just starting, is a digital control system for a nuclear research reactor. Our goal is to use these case studies to permit us to obtain a better understanding of the issues facing developers of safety-critical systems, and to provide a vehicle for the assessment of research ideas. The case studies are not based on the analysis of existing software development by others. Instead, we are attempting to create software for new and novel systems in a process that ultimately will involve all phases of the software lifecycle. In this abstract, we summarize our results to date in a small part of this project, namely the determination and classification of policies related to software safety that must be enforced to ensure safe operation. We hypothesize that this classification will permit a general approach to the implementation of a policy enforcement mechanism.

  12. Medical emergency team implementation: experiences of a mentor hospital.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Eleanor; Ferrell, Carmen; Rutledge, Dana N

    2008-10-01

    Rapid response teams (RRTs) provide assessment and early intervention for patients not in critical care. The implementation of RRT using an evidence-based practice framework, which led to decreased resuscitations, critical care transfers, overall mortality, and cost, is described.

  13. A Turbo-Team Approach to Establishing a Software Test Process at Union Switch and Signal.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-04-01

    immediate needs of projects. Objectives Management: Define test management, QA, and Software Test Team roles and activities to promote adherence to the...will conclude the Establish Team phase. Team Operating Procedures Team roles will be as follows: Leader/Facilitator: permanant, DRM Recorder

  14. Production Team Maintenance: Systemic Constraints Impacting Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-05-01

    that may lend insight to factors inhibiting PTM implementation. Chapter four highlights alternatives and options that may improve implementation efforts...17). The two-MRC requirement is considered the "principal urgent diet " of the military. Efforts are focused on organizing, training, and equipping...maintenance AGS under the LG 1997: (Apr) CONUS C-130s realigned under AMC and AMOGs restructured The implementation of PTM followed suit--its structure

  15. Teaching Tip: Managing Software Engineering Student Teams Using Pellerin's 4-D System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doman, Marguerite; Besmer, Andrew; Olsen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the use of Pellerin's Four Dimension Leadership System (4-D) as a way to manage teams in a classroom setting. Over a 5-year period, we used a modified version of the 4-D model to manage teams within a senior level Software Engineering capstone course. We found that this approach for team management in a classroom…

  16. Staff perceptions implementing interprofessional team-based behavioural healthcare.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo; Miller, Christopher J; Elwy, A Rani; Holmes, Sally K; Coldwell, Craig M; Bauer, Mark S

    2017-03-01

    The US Veterans Health Administration (VHA) in 2013 mandated a nationwide implementation of interprofessional team-based care in the general mental health setting and officially endorsed the collaborative care model in 2015 to guide the coordinated and anticipatory care to be delivered by these teams. Front-line clinic staff are major stakeholders whose practices are most directly affected by this implementation and may or may not view teams as useful or feasible for their practice. Our objective was to examine their perspectives on delivering team-to-patient care in order to understand what system-level efforts can best support the transition to such care from the more conventional provider-to-patient care. We conducted 14 semi-structured interviews with staff from general mental health clinics across three different VHA medical facilities. The interview questions focused on asking how care is organised and delivered at their clinic, their experiences in collaborating with other staff, and how the clinic handles changes. Four recurrent themes were identified: navigating workplace supervision, organisation, and role structures; continuing professional growth and relationships; delivering patient-focused care through education and connection to resources; and utilising information technology for communication and panel-based management. Quality improvement efforts were rarely discussed during the interviews. Our results indicate that staff's endorsement of the implementation of interprofessional care teams in general mental health settings may be strengthened through associated efforts targeted at enhancing their experiences aligned to these emergent themes.

  17. Performance of Student Software Development Teams: The Influence of Personality and Identifying as Team Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, Conal; Bizumic, Boris; Reynolds, Katherine; Smithson, Michael; Johns-Boast, Lynette; van Rooy, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    One prominent approach in the exploration of the variations in project team performance has been to study two components of the aggregate personalities of the team members: conscientiousness and agreeableness. A second line of research, known as self-categorisation theory, argues that identifying as team members and the team's performance norms…

  18. Implementing Software Safety in the NASA Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Martha S.; Radley, Charles F.

    1994-01-01

    Until recently, NASA did not consider allowing computers total control of flight systems. Human operators, via hardware, have constituted the ultimate safety control. In an attempt to reduce costs, NASA has come to rely more and more heavily on computers and software to control space missions. (For example. software is now planned to control most of the operational functions of the International Space Station.) Thus the need for systematic software safety programs has become crucial for mission success. Concurrent engineering principles dictate that safety should be designed into software up front, not tested into the software after the fact. 'Cost of Quality' studies have statistics and metrics to prove the value of building quality and safety into the development cycle. Unfortunately, most software engineers are not familiar with designing for safety, and most safety engineers are not software experts. Software written to specifications which have not been safety analyzed is a major source of computer related accidents. Safer software is achieved step by step throughout the system and software life cycle. It is a process that includes requirements definition, hazard analyses, formal software inspections, safety analyses, testing, and maintenance. The greatest emphasis is placed on clearly and completely defining system and software requirements, including safety and reliability requirements. Unfortunately, development and review of requirements are the weakest link in the process. While some of the more academic methods, e.g. mathematical models, may help bring about safer software, this paper proposes the use of currently approved software methodologies, and sound software and assurance practices to show how, to a large degree, safety can be designed into software from the start. NASA's approach today is to first conduct a preliminary system hazard analysis (PHA) during the concept and planning phase of a project. This determines the overall hazard potential of

  19. Combining Architecture-Centric Engineering with the Team Software Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    design strategy for the project. The lead architect is a full -time job, more like a team leader role than a team manager role that requires a couple of...the description text for the objective and team member responsibilities is prefilled from the template and common for all roles. Objective When all...Beyond approach describes how each view is documented, with multiple diagrams to represent structure and behavior and text to describe the element

  20. Fault-tolerant software - Experiment with the sift operating system. [Software Implemented Fault Tolerance computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunelle, J. E.; Eckhardt, D. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Results are presented of an experiment conducted in the NASA Avionics Integrated Research Laboratory (AIRLAB) to investigate the implementation of fault-tolerant software techniques on fault-tolerant computer architectures, in particular the Software Implemented Fault Tolerance (SIFT) computer. The N-version programming and recovery block techniques were implemented on a portion of the SIFT operating system. The results indicate that, to effectively implement fault-tolerant software design techniques, system requirements will be impacted and suggest that retrofitting fault-tolerant software on existing designs will be inefficient and may require system modification.

  1. Practical Team-Based Learning from Planning to Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Edward; Eng, Marty; Fuentes, David G.; Helms, Kristen L.; Maki, Erik D.; Vyas, Deepti

    2015-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) helps instructors develop an active teaching approach for the classroom through group work. The TBL infrastructure engages students in the learning process through the Readiness Assessment Process, problem-solving through team discussions, and peer feedback to ensure accountability. This manuscript describes the benefits and barriers of TBL, and the tools necessary for developing, implementing, and critically evaluating the technique within coursework in a user-friendly method. Specifically, the manuscript describes the processes underpinning effective TBL development, preparation, implementation, assessment, and evaluation, as well as practical techniques and advice from authors’ classroom experiences. The paper also highlights published articles in the area of TBL in education, with a focus on pharmacy education. PMID:26889061

  2. Practical Team-Based Learning from Planning to Implementation.

    PubMed

    Whitley, Heather P; Bell, Edward; Eng, Marty; Fuentes, David G; Helms, Kristen L; Maki, Erik D; Vyas, Deepti

    2015-12-25

    Team-based learning (TBL) helps instructors develop an active teaching approach for the classroom through group work. The TBL infrastructure engages students in the learning process through the Readiness Assessment Process, problem-solving through team discussions, and peer feedback to ensure accountability. This manuscript describes the benefits and barriers of TBL, and the tools necessary for developing, implementing, and critically evaluating the technique within coursework in a user-friendly method. Specifically, the manuscript describes the processes underpinning effective TBL development, preparation, implementation, assessment, and evaluation, as well as practical techniques and advice from authors' classroom experiences. The paper also highlights published articles in the area of TBL in education, with a focus on pharmacy education.

  3. Implementation and outcomes of a rapid response team.

    PubMed

    McFarlan, Susan J; Hensley, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Adverse events in hospitalized patients are preceded by clinical signs of decline. Thus, early recognition and intervention should improve patient outcomes. At the University of Kentucky Hospital, the impetus to start a rapid response team (RRT) was to decrease unplanned admissions to ICU, adverse events, and mortality overall. On the basis of the outcomes at our hospital, we conclude that there is benefit to having an RRT. The following article outlines processes for RRT implementation and our outcomes to date.

  4. Implementing team based learning in large classes: nurse educators' experiences.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Elizabeth Ann; Strumpel, Charlene; Fensom, Irene; Andrews, Wendy

    2011-12-21

    Team-based learning (TBL) is an interactive teaching method promoted as an alternative to traditional lectures. TBL was implemented in four large second year classes in a baccalaureate nursing program but the implementation process was found to require much more effort than indicated in the literature. A predominant theme during the implementation phase was the importance of collegial support. Faculty workload increased significantly and they were challenged by occasional student confrontations and technological difficulties. The benefits for students included reduced attrition, reading workloads, and enhanced preparedness for classes, which allowed for more time to be spent in class discussing complex realistic nursing problems. Although TBL was not enthusiastically embraced by all of the students, the majority indicated that they liked and valued TBL, hence commitment to continuing to teach using the TBL method remains.

  5. Team Software Process (TSP) Coach Mentoring Program Guidebook Version 1.1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    complete C NO YES Document how the provisional coach performed in comparison to the DACUM Mentoring artifacts, to be submitted to the SEI during...016 Appendix B TSP Coach Job Analysis Report B-2 | CMU/SEI-2010-SR-016 B-3 | CMU/SEI-2010-SR-016 DACUM Research Chart for Team Software...ProcessSM (TSPSM) Coach DACUM Panel Dan Burton Software Engineering Institute Robert Cannon Software Engineering Institute Noopur

  6. Assessment Models and Software Support for Assistive Technology Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haines, Len; Sanche, Bob

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews requirements for considering the need for assistive technology (AT) services within the Individualized Education Program process and highlights the importance of collaborative teamwork. Current AT models are described, along with the AT Co-Planner. The use of a software version of the model is discussed. (Contains references.)…

  7. Team Software Process (TSP) Body of Knowledge (BOK)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Software Engineering Body of Knowledge (SWEBOK), 2004 Version • Project Management Institute’s A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge ( PMBOK ...Version and PMBOK Guide were influential in determining the document flow and delineation of components used in the description of the TSP BOK. The

  8. A Botanical Garden Data Base Implemented in SAS Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Edward A.; Lewis, Bruce R.

    1985-01-01

    A database had been developed for the Phoenix Desert Botanical Garden's Living Plant Collection using Statistical Analysis System software. Implementation procedures, data dictionary maintenance, data entry, updating, and reporting are described. (JN)

  9. Lessons Learned Implementing Multi-Mission Sequencing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needles, Laura M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper will describe the software and its uses to provide context for its criticality. The different approaches that have been taken to implement the software in a multi-mission format will be outlined. The advantages and disadvantages as well as the lessons learned during development and maintenance of these different architectures will be discussed, Finally. the use of multi-mission software in operations and the lessons learned from using it will be discussed.This paper will provide valuable information to organizations exploring the use of multi-mission software. regardless of whether the change is to minimize spacecraft ground software development time or cost reduction. Similarly. the paper will provide insight into some of the steps that can be taken during software development and operational use that will minimize difficulty later.

  10. Factors to Consider When Implementing Automated Software Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-10

    members plus a few extras for backup  Training costs: Classes needed for the team, if applicable  Environment – Define needs of development and testing... environment 1. Ideal development setting will simulate a production-like environment . 2. Decide which data sets are needed for automated testing...Testing is a major component of the Software Development Lifecycle (SDLC), constituting a prominent cost driver for both government and industry entities

  11. Improving Video Game Development: Facilitating Heterogeneous Team Collaboration through Flexible Software Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musil, Juergen; Schweda, Angelika; Winkler, Dietmar; Biffl, Stefan

    Based on our observations of Austrian video game software development (VGSD) practices we identified a lack of systematic processes/method support and inefficient collaboration between various involved disciplines, i.e. engineers and artists. VGSD includes heterogeneous disciplines, e.g. creative arts, game/content design, and software. Nevertheless, improving team collaboration and process support is an ongoing challenge to enable a comprehensive view on game development projects. Lessons learned from software engineering practices can help game developers to increase game development processes within a heterogeneous environment. Based on a state of the practice survey in the Austrian games industry, this paper presents (a) first results with focus on process/method support and (b) suggests a candidate flexible process approach based on Scrum to improve VGSD and team collaboration. Results showed (a) a trend to highly flexible software processes involving various disciplines and (b) identified the suggested flexible process approach as feasible and useful for project application.

  12. Streamlining Software Aspects of Certification: Technical Team Report on the First Industry Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Holloway, C. Michael; Knight, John C.; Leveson, Nancy G.; Yang, Jeffrey C.; Dorsey, Cheryl A.; McCormick, G. Frank

    1998-01-01

    To address concerns about time and expense associated with software aspects of certification, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) began the Streamlining Software Aspects of Certification (SSAC) program. As part of this program, a Technical Team was established to determine whether the cost and time associated with certifying aircraft can be reduced while maintaining or improving safety, with the intent of impacting the FAA's Flight 2000 program. The Technical Team conducted a workshop to gain a better understanding of the major concerns in industry about software cost and schedule. Over 120 people attended the workshop, including representatives from the FAA,commercial transport and general aviation aircraft manufacturers and suppliers, and procurers and developers of non-airborne systems; and, more than 200 issues about software aspects of certification were recorded. This paper provides an overview of the SSAC program, motivation for the workshop, details of the workshop activities and outcomes, and recommendations for follow-on work.

  13. Simplifying applications software for vision guided robot implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncheon, Charlie

    1994-01-01

    A simple approach to robot applications software is described. The idea is to use commercially available software and hardware wherever possible to minimize system costs, schedules and risks. The U.S. has been slow in the adaptation of robots and flexible automation compared to the fluorishing growth of robot implementation in Japan. The U.S. can benefit from this approach because of a more flexible array of vision guided robot technologies.

  14. Statistical Software Development as an Example of a Citizen Sky Participant Team

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henden, Arne A.; Benn, D.; Beck, S.; Price, A.; Turner, R.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding of authentic science by most people cannot be realized by simply posing a problem and collecting data. Communities of practice are an important element of modern science where discoveries are rarely the result of a single person experiencing an "Eureka!" moment. A core feature of the Citizen Sky project is the development and support of teams of participants with different, yet complimentary skill sets who work together towards a common goal. It is within these teams where the aspect of scientific inquiry really becomes accessible. By working with and debating with other team members (which remains consistent over time), a real community can form - much like those of a real, modern scientific project. Each team has a team leader and a professional assigned to act as an advisor. We present a short history, some early products and lessons learned from our first pilot team. This team is developing an open-source, high-end statistical analysis software package that will be used by other members of the Citizen Sky project. It will also be available to the general astronomical community interested in time series data analysis. Other team projects will also be described.

  15. Implementation and Testing of VLBI Software Correlation at the USNO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fey, Alan; Ojha, Roopesh; Boboltz, Dave; Geiger, Nicole; Kingham, Kerry; Hall, David; Gaume, Ralph; Johnston, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The Washington Correlator (WACO) at the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) is a dedicated VLBI processor based on dedicated hardware of ASIC design. The WACO is currently over 10 years old and is nearing the end of its expected lifetime. Plans for implementation and testing of software correlation at the USNO are currently being considered. The VLBI correlation process is, by its very nature, well suited to a parallelized computing environment. Commercial off-the-shelf computer hardware has advanced in processing power to the point where software correlation is now both economically and technologically feasible. The advantages of software correlation are manifold but include flexibility, scalability, and easy adaptability to changing environments and requirements. We discuss our experience with and plans for use of software correlation at USNO with emphasis on the use of the DiFX software correlator.

  16. Top Down Implementation Plan for system performance test software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, G. N.; Spinak, A.

    1982-01-01

    The top down implementation plan used for the development of system performance test software during the Mark IV-A era is described. The plan is based upon the identification of the hierarchical relationship of the individual elements of the software design, the development of a sequence of functionally oriented demonstrable steps, the allocation of subroutines to the specific step where they are first required, and objective status reporting. The results are: determination of milestones, improved managerial visibility, better project control, and a successful software development.

  17. Effective organizational solutions for implementation of DBMS software packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D.

    1984-01-01

    The space telescope management information system development effort is a guideline for discussing effective organizational solutions used in implementing DBMS software. Focus is on the importance of strategic planning. The value of constructing an information system architecture to conform to the organization's managerial needs, the need for a senior decision maker, dealing with shifting user requirements, and the establishment of a reliable working relationship with the DBMS vendor are examined. Requirements for a schedule to demonstrate progress against a defined timeline and the importance of continued monitoring for production software control, production data control, and software enhancements are also discussed.

  18. Software Implemented Fault-Tolerant (SIFT) user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, D. F., Jr.; Palumbo, D. L.; Baltrus, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    Program development for a Software Implemented Fault Tolerant (SIFT) computer system is accomplished in the NASA LaRC AIRLAB facility using a DEC VAX-11 to interface with eight Bendix BDX 930 flight control processors. The interface software which provides this SIFT program development capability was developed by AIRLAB personnel. This technical memorandum describes the application and design of this software in detail, and is intended to assist both the user in performance of SIFT research and the systems programmer responsible for maintaining and/or upgrading the SIFT programming environment.

  19. Group Maintenance Behaviors of Core and Peripherial Members of Free/Libre Open Source Software Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scialdone, Michael J.; Li, Na; Heckman, Robert; Crowston, Kevin

    Group Maintenance is pro-social, discretionary, and relation-building behavior that occurs between members of groups in order to maintain reciprocal trust and cooperation. This paper considers how Free/libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) teams demonstrate such behaviors within the context of e-mail, as this is the primary medium through which such teams communicate. We compare group maintenance behaviors between both core and peripheral members of these groups, as well as behaviors between a group that remains producing software today and one which has since dissolved. Our findings indicate that negative politeness tactics (those which show respect for the autonomy of others) may be the most instrumental group maintenance behaviors that contribute to a FLOSS group’s ability to survive and continue software production.

  20. Collaborative Falls Prevention: Interprofessional Team Formation, Implementation, and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lasater, Kathie; Cotrell, Victoria; McKenzie, Glenise; Simonson, William; Morgove, Megan W; Long, Emily E; Eckstrom, Elizabeth

    2016-12-01

    As health care rapidly evolves to promote person-centered care, evidence-based practice, and team-structured environments, nurses must lead interprofessional (IP) teams to collaborate for optimal health of the populations and more cost-effective health care. Four professions-nursing, medicine, social work, and pharmacy-formed a teaching team to address fall prevention among older adults in Oregon using an IP approach. The teaching team developed training sessions that included interactive, evidence-based sessions, followed by individualized team coaching. This article describes how the IP teaching team came together to use a unique cross-training approach to teach each other. They then taught and coached IP teams from a variety of community practice settings to foster their integration of team-based falls-prevention strategies into practice. After coaching 25 teams for a year each, the authors present the lessons learned from the teaching team's formation and experiences, as well as feedback from practice team participants that can provide direction for other IP teams. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(12):545-550.

  1. Problems in Implementation of the Team Approach: A Practitioner's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Donald C.; Fleming, Evelyn R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents four challenges facing multidisciplinary teams (MDT): (1) ensuring efficient use of available time; (2) developing the skills and knowledge base of team members; (3) assigning available personnel resources; and (4) developing strategies for reduction of team member stress guidelines for planning internal MDT evaluation…

  2. A Bibliography of the Personal Software Process (PSP) and the Team Software Process (TSP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    http://www.sei.cmu.edu/library/abstracts/reports/09tr011.cfm Nichols, William; Carleton, Anita ; Humphrey, Watts; & Over, James. ―A Distributed Multi...September 2008). http://www.sei.cmu.edu/tspsymposium/ Carleton, Anita & Chick, Tim. ―How Do You Bring Process Discipline to a Team?‖ Proceedings of the...ing (CSEET 2008), Charleston, SC (April 2008). Humphrey, Watts S. & Carleton, Anita . ―How Mexico is Doing It.‖ Watts New? news @column. Carnegie

  3. The Implementation of Computer Data Processing Software for EAST NBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodan; Hu, Chundong; Sheng, Peng; Zhao, Yuanzhe; Wu, Deyun; Cui, Qinglong

    2014-10-01

    One of the most important project missions of neutral beam injectors is the implementation of 100 s neutral beam injection (NBI) with high power energy to the plasma of the EAST superconducting tokamak. Correspondingly, it's necessary to construct a high-speed and reliable computer data processing system for processing experimental data, such as data acquisition, data compression and storage, data decompression and query, as well as data analysis. The implementation of computer data processing application software (CDPS) for EAST NBI is presented in this paper in terms of its functional structure and system realization. The set of software is programmed in C language and runs on Linux operating system based on TCP network protocol and multi-threading technology. The hardware mainly includes industrial control computer (IPC), data server, PXI DAQ cards and so on. Now this software has been applied to EAST NBI system, and experimental results show that the CDPS can serve EAST NBI very well.

  4. Transitions in Classroom Technology: Instructor Implementation of Classroom Management Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, David; Chung, Christina; Sun, Jerry Chih-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The authors look at how business instructor needs are fulfilled by classroom management software (CMS), such as Moodle, and why instructors are sometimes slow to implement it. Instructors at different universities provided both qualitative and quantitative responses regarding their use of CMS. The results indicate that the top needs fulfilled by…

  5. Implementing Kanban for agile process management within the ALMA Software Operations Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reveco, Johnny; Mora, Matias; Shen, Tzu-Chiang; Soto, Ruben; Sepulveda, Jorge; Ibsen, Jorge

    2014-07-01

    After the inauguration of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the Software Operations Group in Chile has refocused its objectives to: (1) providing software support to tasks related to System Integration, Scientific Commissioning and Verification, as well as Early Science observations; (2) testing the remaining software features, still under development by the Integrated Computing Team across the world; and (3) designing and developing processes to optimize and increase the level of automation of operational tasks. Due to their different stakeholders, each of these tasks presents a wide diversity of importances, lifespans and complexities. Aiming to provide the proper priority and traceability for every task without stressing our engineers, we introduced the Kanban methodology in our processes in order to balance the demand on the team against the throughput of the delivered work. The aim of this paper is to share experiences gained during the implementation of Kanban in our processes, describing the difficulties we have found, solutions and adaptations that led us to our current but still evolving implementation, which has greatly improved our throughput, prioritization and problem traceability.

  6. Implementing the Team Approach in Higher Education: Important Questions and Advice for Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lara, Tracy M.; Hughey, Aaron W.

    2008-01-01

    Many companies have implemented the team approach as a way to empower their employees in an effort to enhance productivity, quality and overall profitability. While application of the concept to higher education administration has been limited, colleges and universities could benefit from the team approach if implemented appropriately and…

  7. Software Test Models and Implementation of Associated Test Drivers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    for testing - - be it manual, semi-automatic or formal definitions and analytic models, to fully define the range and scope of the test project. In...software test systems. It will be shown that practical driver systems for automatic testing can be implemented from formal definitions of testing types. The... definition involves a discussion on how program branching points and loops affect the number of paths. The process culminates in an algorithm for

  8. Design and implementation of the mobility assessment tool: software description

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In previous work, we described the development of an 81-item video-animated tool for assessing mobility. In response to criticism levied during a pilot study of this tool, we sought to develop a new version built upon a flexible framework for designing and administering the instrument. Results Rather than constructing a self-contained software application with a hard-coded instrument, we designed an XML schema capable of describing a variety of psychometric instruments. The new version of our video-animated assessment tool was then defined fully within the context of a compliant XML document. Two software applications—one built in Java, the other in Objective-C for the Apple iPad—were then built that could present the instrument described in the XML document and collect participants’ responses. Separating the instrument’s definition from the software application implementing it allowed for rapid iteration and easy, reliable definition of variations. Conclusions Defining instruments in a software-independent XML document simplifies the process of defining instruments and variations and allows a single instrument to be deployed on as many platforms as there are software applications capable of interpreting the instrument, thereby broadening the potential target audience for the instrument. Continued work will be done to further specify and refine this type of instrument specification with a focus on spurring adoption by researchers in gerontology and geriatric medicine. PMID:23879716

  9. Team Faces Tough Odds to Implement New Phone Network | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    It was a Saturday, in the final stretch of winter in late February, and the temperature peaked to a pleasant 66 degrees. Many people were outside enjoying the spring-like weather; however, the Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) Deployment Team was hard at work at Industry Lane. The team of 10 was installing the new voice-only network, including deploying 145 phones, switching and testing the 911 feature, connecting wall mounts, and verifying each phone... Read more

  10. Best Practices for Implementing Team-Based Learning in Pharmacy Education

    PubMed Central

    Sicat, Brigitte L.; Franks, Andrea S.; Pater, Karen S.; Medina, Melissa S.; Persky, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    Colleges and schools of pharmacy are incorporating more team-based learning (TBL) into their curriculum. Published resources are available to assist instructors with implementing TBL and describing it in the health professions literature. The 7 core elements include: team formation, readiness assurance, immediate feedback, sequencing of in-class problem solving, the 4 “S” structure for developing team application exercises (significant problem, same problem, specific answer choice, simultaneous reporting), incentive structure, and peer evaluation. This paper summarizes best practices related to implementation of TBL in pharmacy education, including courses taught using teaching teams. PMID:24159218

  11. Best practices for implementing team-based learning in pharmacy education.

    PubMed

    Farland, Michelle Z; Sicat, Brigitte L; Franks, Andrea S; Pater, Karen S; Medina, Melissa S; Persky, Adam M

    2013-10-14

    Colleges and schools of pharmacy are incorporating more team-based learning (TBL) into their curriculum. Published resources are available to assist instructors with implementing TBL and describing it in the health professions literature. The 7 core elements include: team formation, readiness assurance, immediate feedback, sequencing of in-class problem solving, the 4 "S" structure for developing team application exercises (significant problem, same problem, specific answer choice, simultaneous reporting), incentive structure, and peer evaluation. This paper summarizes best practices related to implementation of TBL in pharmacy education, including courses taught using teaching teams.

  12. Relating Communications Mode Choice and Teamwork Quality: Conversational versus Textual Communication in IT System and Software Development Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James Robert

    2012-01-01

    This cross-sectional study explored how IT system and software development team members communicated in the workplace and whether teams that used more verbal communication (and less text-based communication) experienced higher levels of collaboration as measured using the Teamwork Quality (TWQ) scale. Although computer-mediated communication tools…

  13. Implementing Self-Directed Work Teams at a College Newspaper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Pillis, Emmeline; Parsons, Blake

    2013-01-01

    The problem: Motivating and retaining staff had become an ongoing problem at the student newspaper. Student staffers would quit abruptly when overwhelmed or dissatisfied, leaving the newspaper with critical positions vacant. This affected the performance of the newspaper. Method: The newspaper was organized into self directed work teams (SDWTs).…

  14. Circles of Care: Implementation and Evaluation of Support Teams for African Americans with Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Laura C.; Green, Melissa A.; Hayes, Michelle; Diehl, Sandra J.; Warnock, Steven; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Lin, Feng-Chang; Earp, Jo Anne

    2014-01-01

    Background: Community-based peer support may help meet the practical, emotional, and spiritual needs of African Americans with advanced cancer. Support teams are a unique model of peer support for persons facing serious illness, but research is rare. This study sought to (a) implement new volunteer support teams for African Americans with advanced…

  15. How team-based reflection affects quality improvement implementation: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Eric K; Howard, Jenna; Etz, Rebecca S; Hudson, Shawna V; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2012-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) interventions in health care organizations have produced mixed results with significant questions remaining about how QI interventions are implemented. Team-based reflection may be an important element for understanding QI implementation. Extensive research has focused on individual benefits of reflection including links between reflection, learning, and change. There are currently no published studies that explore how team-based reflection impact QI interventions. We selected 4 primary care practices participating in a QI trial that used a facilitated, team-based approach to improve colorectal cancer screening rates. Trained facilitators met with a team of practice members for up to eleven 1-hour meetings. Data include audio-recorded team meetings and associated fieldnotes. We used a template approach to code transcribed data and an immersion/crystallization technique to identify patterns and themes. Three types of team-based reflection and how each mattered for QI implementation were identified: organizational reflection promoted buy-in, motivation, and feelings of inspiration; process reflection enhanced team problem solving and change management; and relational reflection enhanced discussions of relational dynamics necessary to implement desired QI changes. If QI interventions seek to make changes where collaboration and coordination of care is required, then deliberately integrating team-based reflection into interventions can provide opportunities to facilitate change processes.

  16. Aerospace Expeditionary Force Implementation and the Effect on Team Cohesion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    individuals in a more efficient manner. The Air Force, within the context of its expeditionary background, reacted to the problems of increased 2...the use of personnel from different locations to deploy together and how that influences team integrity, one of the ancillary benefits of the EAF...perceptions of individuals who have deployed under the AEF deployment process within the last 12 months. Additionally, the survey will be sent to individuals

  17. Towards easing the configuration and new team member accommodation for open source software based portals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, L.; West, P.; Zednik, S.; Fox, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    For simple portals such as vocabulary based services, which contain small amounts of data and require only hyper-textual representation, it is often an overkill to adopt the whole software stack of database, middleware and front end, or to use a general Web development framework as the starting point of development. Directly combining open source software is a much more favorable approach. However, our experience with the Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Vocabulary (CMSPV) service portal shows that there are still issues such as system configuration and accommodating a new team member that need to be handled carefully. In this contribution, we share our experience in the context of the CMSPV portal, and focus on the tools and mechanisms we've developed to ease the configuration job and the incorporation process of new project members. We discuss the configuration issues that arise when we don't have complete control over how the software in use is configured and need to follow existing configuration styles that may not be well documented, especially when multiple pieces of such software need to work together as a combined system. As for the CMSPV portal, it is built on two pieces of open source software that are still under rapid development: a Fuseki data server and Epimorphics Linked Data API (ELDA) front end. Both lack mature documentation and tutorials. We developed comparison and labeling tools to ease the problem of system configuration. Another problem that slowed down the project is that project members came and went during the development process, so new members needed to start with a partially configured system and incomplete documentation left by old members. We developed documentation/tutorial maintenance mechanisms based on our comparison and labeling tools to make it easier for the new members to be incorporated into the project. These tools and mechanisms also provided benefit to other projects that reused the software components from the CMSPV

  18. TEAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document presents materials covering the television campaign against drunk driving called "TEAM" (Techniques for Effective Alcohol Management). It is noted that TEAM's purpose is to promote effective alcohol management in public facilities and other establishments that serve alcoholic beverages. TEAM sponsors are listed, including…

  19. Perspectives on a Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Implementation of Planned Emergent Use Research

    PubMed Central

    Racedo Africano, Carlos J.; De Moraes, Alice Gallo; Smischney, Nathan J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the viewpoints of three members of a research team, on the approach to teamwork in the development of an emergent use clinical trial when dealing with diversity of opinions, in order to facilitate stakeholder buy-in. We also discuss a specific approach to the coordination of the team members, which in our opinion had a positive impact on the implementation of the project. We also comment on the influence of the team organization in the timeline and completion of a clinical trial. We hope to start a conversation on team dynamics in the design of clinical trials, especially in the context of emergent use research. PMID:26386913

  20. Perspectives on a Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Implementation of Planned Emergent Use Research.

    PubMed

    Racedo Africano, Carlos J; Gallo de Moraes, Alice; Smischney, Nathan J

    2015-09-19

    In this paper we present the viewpoints of three members of a research team, on the approach to teamwork in the development of an emergent use clinical trial when dealing with diversity of opinions, in order to facilitate stakeholder buy-in. We also discuss a specific approach to the coordination of the team members, which in our opinion had a positive impact on the implementation of the project. We also comment on the influence of the team organization in the timeline and completion of a clinical trial. We hope to start a conversation on team dynamics in the design of clinical trials, especially in the context of emergent use research.

  1. Interactive multicentre teleconferences using open source software in a team of thoracic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Junichi; Katoh, Daishiro; Nishimura, Motohiro; Yanada, Masashi; Okada, Satoru; Ishihara, Shunta; Ichise, Kaori

    2012-12-01

    Real-time consultation between a team of thoracic surgeons is important for the management of difficult cases. We established a system for interactive teleconsultation between multiple sites, based on open-source software. The graphical desktop-sharing system VNC (virtual network computing) was used for remotely controlling another computer. An image-processing package (OsiriX) was installed on the server to share the medical images. We set up a voice communication system using Voice Chatter, a free, cross-platform voice communication application. Four hospitals participated in the trials. One was connected by gigabit ethernet, one by WiMAX and one by ADSL. Surgeons at three of the sites found that it was comfortable to view images and consult with each other using the teleconferencing system. However, it was not comfortable using the client that connected via WiMAX, because of dropped frames. Apart from the WiMAX connection, the VNC-based screen-sharing system transferred the clinical images efficiently and in real time. We found the screen-sharing software VNC to be a good application for medical image interpretation, especially for a team of thoracic surgeons using multislice CT scans.

  2. Implementation of an OAIS Repository Using Free, Open Source Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flathers, E.; Gessler, P. E.; Seamon, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Northwest Knowledge Network (NKN) is a regional data repository located at the University of Idaho that focuses on the collection, curation, and distribution of research data. To support our home institution and others in the region, we offer services to researchers at all stages of the data lifecycle—from grant application and data management planning to data distribution and archive. In this role, we recognize the need to work closely with other data management efforts at partner institutions and agencies, as well as with larger aggregation efforts such as our state geospatial data clearinghouses, data.gov, DataONE, and others. In the past, one of our challenges with monolithic, prepackaged data management solutions is that customization can be difficult to implement and maintain, especially as new versions of the software are released that are incompatible with our local codebase. Our solution is to break the monolith up into its constituent parts, which offers us several advantages. First, any customizations that we make are likely to fall into areas that can be accessed through Application Program Interfaces (API) that are likely to remain stable over time, so our code stays compatible. Second, as components become obsolete or insufficient to meet new demands that arise, we can replace the individual components with minimal effect on the rest of the infrastructure, causing less disruption to operations. Other advantages include increased system reliability, staggered rollout of new features, enhanced compatibility with legacy systems, reduced dependence on a single software company as a point of failure, and the separation of development into manageable tasks. In this presentation, we describe our application of the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) design paradigm to assemble a data repository that conforms to the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) Reference Model primarily using a collection of free and open-source software. We detail the design

  3. Impact of School Based Leadership Teams for Implementing a Successful Professional Development Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Stuart; Yager, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the depth of implementation of a professional development initiative. In one group, the school based leadership team was provided specialized coaching to support and monitor the implementation of the initiative. In the other group, no assistance was provided. Results indicate that the coaching of a school-based leadership…

  4. Media Implementation Through Teamed Supervision. Evaluation: Title Three, ESEA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boardman Local School District, Youngstown, OH.

    The procedures and techniques developed to evaluate a project to implement media in elementary schools are discussed. To describe the decision-making setting, two necessary conditions--understanding (high or low) and amount of change (large or small)--were paired against each other resulting in four possible evaluation settings. The situation in…

  5. Ada Implementation Guide. Software Engineering With Ada. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Standards and Technology ............. A-4 DON Software Executive Official ...................... A-4 DON Ada Representative...Cost Analysis ........................ A-6 Software Technology Support Center .................... A-6 Software Engineering Institute...A-7 Software Technology for Adaptable, Reliable Systems (STARS) ....................................... A-7 A.1.2 Training

  6. Effective Team Support: From Task and Cognitive Modeling to Software Agents for Time-Critical Complex Work Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie E.; Sycara, Katia

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in completing a system for empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support a team's tasks, and in running experiments for the collection of baseline data.

  7. Spacelab user implementation assessment study. (Software requirements analysis). Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The engineering analyses and evaluation studies conducted for the Software Requirements Analysis are discussed. Included are the development of the study data base, synthesis of implementation approaches for software required by both mandatory onboard computer services and command/control functions, and identification and implementation of software for ground processing activities.

  8. An implementation study of the crisis resolution team model in Norway: Are the crisis resolution teams fulfilling their role?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The establishment of crisis resolution teams (CRTs) is part of the national mental health policy in several Western countries. The purpose of the present study is to describe characteristics of CRTs and their patients, explore the differences between CRTs, and examine whether the CRTs in Norway are organized according to the international CRT model. Methods The study was a naturalistic study of eight CRTs and 680 patients referred to these teams in Norway. Mental health problems were assessed using the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS), Global Assessment of Functioning Scales (GAF) and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision (ICD-10). Results None of the CRTs operated 24 hours a day, seven days a week (24/7 availability) or had gate-keeping functions for acute wards. The CRTs also treated patients who were not considered for hospital admission. Forty per cent of patients waited more than 24 hours for treatment. Fourteen per cent had psychotic symptoms, and 69% had affective symptoms. There were significant variations between teams in patients' total severity of symptoms and social problems, but no variations between teams with respect to patients' aggressive behaviour, non-accidental self-injury, substance abuse or psychotic symptoms. There was a tendency for teams operating extended hours to treat patients with more severe mental illnesses. Conclusions The CRT model has been implemented in Norway without a rapid response, gate-keeping function and 24/7 availability. These findings indicate that the CRTs do not completely fulfil their intended role in the mental health system. PMID:21569226

  9. Designing and implementing customer-focused functional support teams

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, L.O.; Cejka, C.L.

    1995-02-01

    The contract services department of a U.S. Department of Energy research laboratory is radically revising how it serves its primary customers--the laboratory research and development staff. The department provides services that include contract research initiation (proposal preparation and contract negotiation) and acquisition of goods and services to support specific research projects. It previously provided these services with approximately 170 staff in four centralized functional units. In reorganizing, the department used a structured analysis and design process to categorize internal customers according to their unique attributes and specific support needs. Concurrently, it identified a number of conceptually distinct customer-focused units that could accomplish the contract processes in different ways and then chose a preferred concept for each customer category. The organizational concepts were designed to enhance customer service and improve staff morale and development opportunities. The new organization will have a total of 10 customer support units as well as other centralized services and activities. It will flatten the organizational structures and encourage more cooperation among contracts staff to meet customer needs for improved timeliness, communication, and teaming with researchers.

  10. [Practical aspects of implementation quality management system ISO 9001:2000 by hospital infection control team].

    PubMed

    Kuziemski, Arkadiusz; Czerniak, Beata; Frankowska, Krystyna; Gonia, Ewa; Salińska, Teresa; Motuk, Andrzej; Sobociński, Zbigniew

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 the Board of the Jan Biziel Hospital in Bydgoszcz decided to include procedures of health services in the implementation process within the confines of ISO 9001:2000 certification. The hospital infection control team that has operated in the hospital since 1989 performed the analysis of the forms of activities to date and on that basis the team prepared original plan of quality management. In April 2007, this plan was successfully accepted by the certifying team. The aim of this study is to present the aforementioned plan which is the result of 18 years experience of the team. At the same time, I hope that this study will be very helpful for all professionals interested in hospital epidemiology, especially in the context of implementing quality management systems.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) : appraisal method for the implementation of the ASC software quality engineering practices: Version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Turgeon, Jennifer; Minana, Molly A.

    2008-02-01

    This document provides a guide to the process of conducting software appraisals under the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) ASC Program. The goal of this document is to describe a common methodology for planning, conducting, and reporting results of software appraisals thereby enabling: development of an objective baseline on implementation of the software quality engineering (SQE) practices identified in the ASC Software Quality Plan across the ASC Program; feedback from project teams on SQE opportunities for improvement; identification of strengths and opportunities for improvement for individual project teams; guidance to the ASC Program on the focus of future SQE activities Document contents include process descriptions, templates to promote consistent conduct of appraisals, and an explanation of the relationship of this procedure to the SNL ASC software program.

  12. SIFT - Multiprocessor architecture for Software Implemented Fault Tolerance flight control and avionics computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, P.; Moses, K.

    1979-01-01

    A brief description of a SIFT (Software Implemented Fault Tolerance) Flight Control Computer with emphasis on implementation is presented. A multiprocessor system that relies on software-implemented fault detection and reconfiguration algorithms is described. A high level reliability and fault tolerance is achieved by the replication of computing tasks among processing units.

  13. Supporting implementation: the role of community development teams to build infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Saldana, Lisa; Chamberlain, Patricia

    2012-12-01

    Evidence-based methods for assisting consumers, such as counties, in successfully implementing practices are lacking in the field of implementation science. To fill this gap, the Community Development Teams (CDT) approach was developed to assist counties in developing peer networks focused on problem-solving and resource sharing to enhance their possibility of successful implementation. The CDT is an interactive, solution-focused approach that shares many elements of the Interactive Systems Framework (ISF) for Dissemination and Implementation. An ongoing randomized implementation trial of Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) was designed to test the hypothesis that such interactive implementation methods are more successful at helping counties achieve successful and sustainable MTFC programs than standard individualized implementation methods. Using the Stages of Implementation Completion measure, developed for this study, the potential benefit of these interactive methods is examined at different stages of the implementation process ranging from initial engagement to program competency.

  14. A Supernova Feedback Implementation For The Astrophysical Simulation Software Arepo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubel, André-Patrick

    2015-08-01

    Please see the current version (v2) on arXiv (https://arxiv.org/abs/1604.06071) This version is as submitted to the university for my master's degree. I might have worded my critique of Arepo a bit too harshly, and a significant amount of issues were already addressed since the original submission. I removed section 3.4 and most of the discussion in 4.1, as these sections may need rework and further objective underpinning. Supernova (SN) explosions play an important role in the development of galactic structures. The energy and momentum imparted on the interstellar medium (ISM) in so called ”supernova feedback” drives turbulence, heats the gas, enriches it with heavy elements, can lead to the formation of new stars or even suppress star formation by disrupting stellar nurseries. In the numerical simulation at the sub-galactic level, not including the energy and momentum of supernovas in the physical description of the problem can also lead to several problems that might partially be resolved by including a description of supernovas. In this thesis such an implementation is attempted for the combined numerical hydrodynamics and N-body simulation software Arepo (Springel, 2010). In a stochastic process a large amount of thermal energy is imparted on a number of neighbouring cells, mimicking the effect of a supernova explosions. We test this approach by modelling the explosion of a single supernova in a uniform density medium and comparing the evolution of the resulting supernova remnant to the theoretically-predicted behaviour. We also run a simulation with our feedback code and a fixed supernova rate derived from the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation (Kennicutt, 1998) for a duration of about 20 Myrs. We describe our method in detail in this text and discuss the properties of our implementation.

  15. Standard practices for the implementation of computer software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, A. P. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A standard approach to the development of computer program is provided that covers the file cycle of software development from the planning and requirements phase through the software acceptance testing phase. All documents necessary to provide the required visibility into the software life cycle process are discussed in detail.

  16. National implementation of a mental health service model: A survey of Crisis Resolution Teams in England.

    PubMed

    Lloyd-Evans, Brynmor; Paterson, Bethan; Onyett, Steve; Brown, Ellie; Istead, Hannah; Gray, Richard; Henderson, Claire; Johnson, Sonia

    2017-01-11

    In response to pressures on mental health inpatient beds and a perceived 'crisis in acute care', Crisis Resolution Teams (CRTs), acute home treatment services, were implemented nationally in England following the NHS Plan in the year 2000: an unprecedentedly prescriptive policy mandate for three new types of functional community mental health team. We examined the effects of this mandate on implementation of the CRT service model. Two hundred and eighteen CRTs were mapped in England, including services in all 65 mental health administrative regions. Eighty-eight percent (n = 192) of CRT managers in England participated in an online survey. CRT service organization and delivery was highly variable. Nurses were the only professional group employed in all CRT staff teams. Almost no teams adhered fully to government implementation guidance. CRT managers identified several aspects of CRT service delivery as desirable but not routinely provided. A national policy mandate and government guidance and standards have proved insufficient to ensure CRT implementation as planned. Development and testing of resources to support implementation and monitoring of a complex mental health intervention is required.

  17. OUTCOME OF IMPLEMENTATION OF A MULTIDISCIPLINARY TEAM APPROACH TO THE CARE OF PATIENTS AFTER TRANSSPHENOIDAL SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Carminucci, Arthur S.; Ausiello, John C.; Page-Wilson, Gabrielle; Lee, Michelle; Good, Laura; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Freda, Pamela U.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transsphenoidal surgery (TS) for sellar lesions is an established and safe procedure, but complications can occur, particularly involving the neuroendocrine system. We hypothesized that postoperative care of TS patients would be optimized when performed by a coordinated team including a pituitary neurosurgeon, endocrinologists, and a specialty nurse. Methods We implemented a formalized, multidisciplinary team approach and standardized postoperative protocols for the care of adult patients undergoing TS by a single surgeon (J.N.B.) at our institution beginning in July 2009. We retrospectively compared the outcomes of 214 consecutive TS-treated cases: 113 cases prior to and 101 following the initiation of the team approach and protocol implementation. Outcomes assessed included the incidence of neurosurgical and endocrine complications, length of stay (LOS), and rates of hospital readmission and unscheduled clinical visits. Results The median LOS decreased from 3 days preteam to 2 days postteam (P<.01). Discharge occurred on postoperative day 2 in 46% of the preteam group patients compared to 69% of the postteam group (P<.01). Rates of early postoperative diabetes insipidus (DI) and readmissions within 30 days for syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) or other complications did not differ between groups. Conclusion Implementation of a multidisciplinary team approach was associated with a reduction of LOS. Despite earlier discharge, postoperative outcomes were not compromised. The endocrinologist is central to the success of this team approach, which could be successfully applied to care of patients undergoing TS, as well as other types of endocrine surgery at other centers. PMID:26437216

  18. Implementing and Evaluating a Peer-Led Team Learning Approach in Undergraduate Anatomy and Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Kevin; Campisi, Jay

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how a Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) program was implemented in a first-year, undergraduate Anatomy and Physiology course sequence to examine the student perceptions of the program and determine the effects of PLTL on student performance.

  19. Implementing Team-Based Learning in Middle School Social Studies Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanzek, Jeanne; Kent, Shawn C.; Vaughn, Sharon; Swanson, Elizabeth A.; Roberts, Greg; Haynes, Martha

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the effects of team-based learning (TBL) implemented in Grade 8 social studies classes on student content acquisition. Twenty-four classes were randomly assigned to treatment or comparison blocking on teacher. In the treatment classes teachers integrated TBL practices in the content instruction. The authors examined teacher…

  20. How Do Staff Perceive Schoolwide Positive Behavior Supports? Implications for Teams in Planning and Implementing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feuerborn, Laura L.; Tyre, Ashli D.

    2016-01-01

    Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS) offers an alternative to reactive and exclusionary school discipline practices. However, the shift to SWPBS requires substantial change in the practices of staff, and many leadership teams struggle to rally staff support for implementation. With a more thorough understanding of staff perceptions, level…

  1. Implementation of the AES as a Hash Function for Confirming the Identity of Software on a Computer System

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Randy R.; Bass, Robert B.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Mileson, Nicholas D.

    2003-01-20

    This paper provides a brief overview of the implementation of the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) as a hash function for confirming the identity of software resident on a computer system. The PNNL Software Authentication team chose to use a hash function to confirm software identity on a system for situations where: (1) there is limited time to perform the confirmation and (2) access to the system is restricted to keyboard or thumbwheel input and output can only be displayed on a monitor. PNNL reviewed three popular algorithms: the Secure Hash Algorithm - 1 (SHA-1), the Message Digest - 5 (MD-5), and the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) and selected the AES to incorporate in software confirmation tool we developed. This paper gives a brief overview of the SHA-1, MD-5, and the AES and sites references for further detail. It then explains the overall processing steps of the AES to reduce a large amount of generic data-the plain text, such is present in memory and other data storage media in a computer system, to a small amount of data-the hash digest, which is a mathematically unique representation or signature of the former that could be displayed on a computer's monitor. This paper starts with a simple definition and example to illustrate the use of a hash function. It concludes with a description of how the software confirmation tool uses the hash function to confirm the identity of software on a computer system.

  2. Design study of Software-Implemented Fault-Tolerance (SIFT) computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wensley, J. H.; Goldberg, J.; Green, M. W.; Kutz, W. H.; Levitt, K. N.; Mills, M. E.; Shostak, R. E.; Whiting-Okeefe, P. M.; Zeidler, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    Software-implemented fault tolerant (SIFT) computer design for commercial aviation is reported. A SIFT design concept is addressed. Alternate strategies for physical implementation are considered. Hardware and software design correctness is addressed. System modeling and effectiveness evaluation are considered from a fault-tolerant point of view.

  3. On the Role of Connectors in Modeling and Implementing Software Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-15

    On the Role of Connectors in Modeling and Implementing Software Architectures Peyman Oreizy, David S. Rosenblum, and Richard N. Taylor Department of...Std Z39-18 On the Role of Connectors in Modeling and Implementing Software Architectures Peyman Oreizy David S. Rosenblum Richard N. Taylor

  4. Implementing Self-Managing Work Teams in a High Performance Work Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    TEAMS IN A HIGH PERFORMANCE WORK ENVIRONMENT THESIS Gerald L. Page, Captain, USAF AFIT/GLM/LSR/90S-42 4~ELECTE SDEC121l990 Approved for public r:elease...studies in this field. vii IMPLEMENTING SELF-MANAGING WORK TEAMS IN A HIGH PERFORMANCE WORK ENVIRONMENT I. Introduction Background Many organizations today...continuous improveimenIt be sustained by a positive work environment " (28:40). General Issue An aspect of TQM that shows great promise in achieving reduced

  5. Development and implementation of software systems for imaging spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boardman, J.W.; Clark, R.N.; Mazer, A.S.; Biehl, L.L.; Kruse, F.A.; Torson, J.; Staenz, K.

    2006-01-01

    Specialized software systems have played a crucial role throughout the twenty-five year course of the development of the new technology of imaging spectroscopy, or hyperspectral remote sensing. By their very nature, hyperspectral data place unique and demanding requirements on the computer software used to visualize, analyze, process and interpret them. Often described as a marriage of the two technologies of reflectance spectroscopy and airborne/spaceborne remote sensing, imaging spectroscopy, in fact, produces data sets with unique qualities, unlike previous remote sensing or spectrometer data. Because of these unique spatial and spectral properties hyperspectral data are not readily processed or exploited with legacy software systems inherited from either of the two parent fields of study. This paper provides brief reviews of seven important software systems developed specifically for imaging spectroscopy.

  6. Implementation and Simulation Results using Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddock, Robert W.; DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Bowes, Angela; Prince, Jill L. H.; Powell, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    An Autonomous Aerobraking software system is currently under development with support from the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) that would move typically ground-based operations functions to onboard an aerobraking spacecraft, reducing mission risk and mission cost. The suite of software that will enable autonomous aerobraking is the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software (AADS) and consists of an ephemeris model, onboard atmosphere estimator, temperature and loads prediction, and a maneuver calculation. The software calculates the maneuver time, magnitude and direction commands to maintain the spacecraft periapsis parameters within design structural load and/or thermal constraints. The AADS is currently tested in simulations at Mars, with plans to also evaluate feasibility and performance at Venus and Titan.

  7. Evaluation of Multi-Age Team (MAT) Implementation at Crabapple Middle School: Report for 1994-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Randy; Wisenbaker, Joseph

    In fall 1993, administrators and faculty at the Crabappple Middle School in Roswell, Georgia, implemented the Multi-Age Team (MAT) program, creating multi-age teams of sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade students. The projects' main goal was to enhance self-esteem. Additional goals included implementation of interdisciplinary, thematic instruction;…

  8. Evaluation of Multi-Age Team (MAT): Implementation at Crabapple Middle School: Report for 1995-1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Randy; Wisenbaker, Joseph

    In fall 1993, administrators and faculty at the Crabapple Middle School in Roswell, Georgia, implemented the Multi-Age Team (MAT) program, creating multiage teams of sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade students. The project's main goal was to enhance self-esteem. Additional goals included implementation of interdisciplinary, thematic instruction;…

  9. A learning curve-based method to implement multifunctional work teams in the Brazilian footwear sector.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, L B de M; Anzanello, M J; Renner, J S

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a method for implementing multifunctional work teams in a footwear company that followed the Taylor/Ford system for decades. The suggested framework first applies a Learning Curve (LC) modeling to assess whether rotation between tasks of different complexities affects workers' learning rate and performance. Next, the Macroergonomic Work Analysis (MA) method (Guimarães, 1999, 2009) introduces multifunctional principles in work teams towards workers' training and resources improvement. When applied to a pilot line consisting of 100 workers, the intervention-reduced work related accidents in 80%, absenteeism in 45.65%, and eliminated work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD), medical consultations, and turnover. Further, the output rate of the multifunctional team increased average 3% compared to the production rate of the regular lines following the Taylor/Ford system (with the same shoe model being manufactured), while the rework and spoilage rates were reduced 85% and 69%, respectively.

  10. Just Another Gibbs Sampler (JAGS): Flexible Software for MCMC Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Depaoli, Sarah; Clifton, James P.; Cobb, Patrice R.

    2016-01-01

    A review of the software Just Another Gibbs Sampler (JAGS) is provided. We cover aspects related to history and development and the elements a user needs to know to get started with the program, including (a) definition of the data, (b) definition of the model, (c) compilation of the model, and (d) initialization of the model. An example using a…

  11. System- and Policy-Level Challenges to Full Implementation of the Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Model

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Michael T.; Broussard, Beth; Hankerson-Dyson, Dana; Krishan, Shaily; Stewart, Tarianna; Oliva, Janet R.; Watson, Amy C.

    2010-01-01

    The Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) model of collaboration between law enforcement and mental health is widely recognized as being “more than just training” for police officers; the core elements of CIT include a number of other components. However, several system- and policy-level obstacles can make successful implementation of CIT difficult in many communities. Three such challenges are addressed in this article: insufficient training and policies for dispatchers, poor availability of psychiatric emergency receiving facilities, and complexities related to implementation of CIT in rural settings. Collaboratively addressing these and other challenges will undoubtedly advance the goals of CIT. PMID:21113319

  12. Agile Software Teams: How They Engage with Systems Engineering on DoD Acquisition Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    world found that a primary cause of post- design requirements change was “keeping the software and hardware engineers … out of the decision making...engineers translate systems requirements to software requirements to logical design (architecture) in a significantly different way than other types of...software cause software engineers to approach requirements devel- opment and design differently from other forms of engineering. Rather than tying the

  13. The aerospace energy systems laboratory: Hardware and software implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, Richard D.; Oneil-Rood, Nora

    1989-01-01

    For many years NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility has employed automation in the servicing of flight critical aircraft batteries. Recently a major upgrade to Dryden's computerized Battery Systems Laboratory was initiated to incorporate distributed processing and a centralized database. The new facility, called the Aerospace Energy Systems Laboratory (AESL), is being mechanized with iAPX86 and iAPX286 hardware running iRMX86. The hardware configuration and software structure for the AESL are described.

  14. Design and Implementation of Mapping Software: Developing Technology and Geography Skills in Two Different Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Robert S.; Drakes, Jerri; Deek, Fadi P.

    2002-01-01

    A software development collaboration project designed to maximize the skill sets and interests of school children and teachers, educational software technologists and researchers, and college undergraduates is presented. The work brings elementary school children with college seniors and technology consultants to implement a problem-solving…

  15. Ada Implementation Guide. Software Engineering With Ada. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    teaching, the student is less likely to readily adopt new, more powerful ways of accomplishing old tasks 122 Depatn of the NaY I ! Trablng and Educaion and...Maturity Model3 (CMU/SEI-92-TR-25, ESC-TR-/92-0M5). Pittsburgh, PA : Carnegie-Mellon University, 1992. SBoehm. B.W. Software Engineering Economics...Pittsburgh, PA : Carnegie-Mellon University, 19-21 March 1991. £ Contrast: Ada 9X and C++, Schonberg, E. New York University, 1992 (Distributed by Ada IC on

  16. Outcomes of Patients with Intestinal Failure after the Development and Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Team.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Sabrina; Ahmed, Najma; Forget, Sylviane; Sant'Anna, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Aim. A multidisciplinary team was created in our institution to manage patients with intestinal failure (INFANT: INtestinal Failure Advanced Nutrition Team). We aimed to evaluate the impact of the implementation of the team on the outcomes of this patient population. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients with intestinal failure over a 6-year period was performed. Outcomes of patients followed up by INFANT (2010-2012) were compared to a historical cohort (2007-2009). Results. Twenty-eight patients with intestinal failure were followed up by INFANT while the historical cohort was formed by 27 patients. There was no difference between the groups regarding remaining length of small and large bowel, presence of ICV, or number of infants who reached full enteral feeds. Patients followed up by INFANT took longer to attain full enteral feeds and had longer duration of PN, probably reflecting more complex cases. Overall mortality (14.8%/7.1%) was lower than other centers, probably illustrating our population of "early" intestinal failure patients. Conclusions. Our data demonstrates that the creation and implementation of a multidisciplinary program in a tertiary center without an intestinal and liver transplant program can lead to improvement in many aspects of their care.

  17. Outcomes of Patients with Intestinal Failure after the Development and Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Team

    PubMed Central

    Furtado, Sabrina; Ahmed, Najma; Forget, Sylviane; Sant'Anna, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Aim. A multidisciplinary team was created in our institution to manage patients with intestinal failure (INFANT: INtestinal Failure Advanced Nutrition Team). We aimed to evaluate the impact of the implementation of the team on the outcomes of this patient population. Methods. Retrospective chart review of patients with intestinal failure over a 6-year period was performed. Outcomes of patients followed up by INFANT (2010–2012) were compared to a historical cohort (2007–2009). Results. Twenty-eight patients with intestinal failure were followed up by INFANT while the historical cohort was formed by 27 patients. There was no difference between the groups regarding remaining length of small and large bowel, presence of ICV, or number of infants who reached full enteral feeds. Patients followed up by INFANT took longer to attain full enteral feeds and had longer duration of PN, probably reflecting more complex cases. Overall mortality (14.8%/7.1%) was lower than other centers, probably illustrating our population of “early” intestinal failure patients. Conclusions. Our data demonstrates that the creation and implementation of a multidisciplinary program in a tertiary center without an intestinal and liver transplant program can lead to improvement in many aspects of their care. PMID:27446876

  18. The Software Support Qualitative Assessment Methodology. Volume 3. Implementing the Software Supportability Measure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-22

    Supportability Mitasure 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) WV. Michael McCracken, Elizabeth Mynatt , Christopher Smith (GIT) J.F. Nunamaker, Ai-Mei Chang, Titus Purdin...Contract No. ECD-8904815 W. Michael McCracken, Elizabeth Mynatt , Christopher Smith Software Engineering Research Center Georgia Institute of Technology

  19. Re-constructible CMM software system modeling and its implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Y. W.; Wei, S. Y.; Yang, X. H.; Liu, S. P.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a novel way for the re-constructible CMM software system modeling by taking advantage of a tiered modeling strategy. It consists of four tiers: (1) the bottom layer is the CAD model manager which encapsulates geometric engine and 3D object displaying engine as a COM; (2) the middle is the kernel components which is designed to manage the objects of geometric entity, coordinate system, probe and the system environment parameters etc; (3) the third layer is function modules layer that is used to manage and handle the messages and events of the windows/dialog, menus and toolbars; (4) the top layer is GUI module that is designed to initialize the application with the resource of GUI with the manner of dynamic loading. A set of commercial CMM software, Direct DMIS, has applied the method in a R&D of China National Institute of Measuring and Test Technology (NIMTT). It proves that the developed system can effectively integrate the modules distributed in different layers developed with C++ or C# and the proposed method is feasible.

  20. Total Quality Management: Analysis, Evaluation and Implementation Within ACRV Project Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiman, Laura B.

    1991-01-01

    Total quality management (TQM) is a cooperative form of doing business that relies on the talents of everyone in an organization to continually improve quality and productivity, using teams and an assortment of statistical and measurement tools. The Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) Project Office was identified as an excellent project in which to demonstrate the applications and benefits of TQM processes. As the ACRV Program moves through its various stages of development, it is vital that effectiveness and efficiency be maintained in order to provide the Space Station Freedom (SSF) crew an affordable, on-time assured return to Earth. A critical factor for the success of the ACRV is attaining the maximum benefit from the resources applied to the program. Through a series of four tutorials on various quality improvement techniques, and numerous one-on-one sessions during the SSF's 10-week term in the project office, results were obtained which are aiding the ACRV Office in implementing a disciplined, ongoing process for generating fundamental decisions and actions that shape and guide the organization. Significant advances were made in improving the processes for two particular groups - the correspondence distribution team and the WATER Test team. Numerous people from across JSC were a part of the various team activities including engineering, man systems, and safety. The work also included significant interaction with the support contractor to the ACRV Project. The results of the improvement activities can be used as models for other organizations desiring to operate under a system of continuous improvement. In particular, they have advanced the ACRV Project Teams further down the path of continuous improvement, in support of a working philosophy of TQM.

  1. Emerging standards for still image compression: A software implementation and simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollara, F.; Arnold, S.

    1991-01-01

    The software implementation is described of an emerging standard for the lossy compression of continuous tone still images. This software program can be used to compress planetary images and other 2-D instrument data. It provides a high compression image coding capability that preserves image fidelity at compression rates competitive or superior to most known techniques. This software implementation confirms the usefulness of such data compression and allows its performance to be compared with other schemes used in deep space missions and for data based storage.

  2. Implementation of Oak Ridge National Laboratory Software Quality Assurance Requirements for COMSOL 3.4

    SciTech Connect

    Freels, James D

    2008-01-01

    It is desirable for nuclear safety-related calculations to be performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using COMSOL. The Department of Energy (DOE) has mandated that ORNL will incorporate software quality assurance (SQA) with special attention to nuclear safety-related software applications. The author has developed a procedure for implementing these DOE-mandated SQA requirements on nuclear safety-related software applicable to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This paper will describe how this procedure will be implemented for COMSOL so that nuclear safety-related calculations may be performed.

  3. Software Implements a Space-Mission File-Transfer Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rundstrom, Kathleen; Ho, Son Q.; Levesque, Michael; Sanders, Felicia; Burleigh, Scott; Veregge, John

    2004-01-01

    CFDP is a computer program that implements the CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) File Delivery Protocol, which is an international standard for automatic, reliable transfers of files of data between locations on Earth and in outer space. CFDP administers concurrent file transfers in both directions, delivery of data out of transmission order, reliable and unreliable transmission modes, and automatic retransmission of lost or corrupted data by use of one or more of several lost-segment-detection modes. The program also implements several data-integrity measures, including file checksums and optional cyclic redundancy checks for each protocol data unit. The metadata accompanying each file can include messages to users application programs and commands for operating on remote file systems.

  4. A Brief Survey of the Team Software ProcessSM (TSPSM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-24

    spent more than 20 years in industry as a software engineer, system designer, project leader, and development manager working on control systems...InnerWorkings, Inc. Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey Siemens AG SILAC Ingenieria de Software S.A. de C.V

  5. Implementing a rapid response team to decrease emergencies outside the ICU: one hospital's experience.

    PubMed

    Hatler, Carol; Mast, Deanna; Bedker, Debbie; Johnson, Rachel; Corderella, Jeannie; Torres, Jorge; King, Diane; Plueger, Madona

    2009-01-01

    The literature describes use of a rapid response team (RRT) of critical care nurses and respiratory therapists who arrive at medical-surgical patients' bedsides within minutes of a crisis situation, yet, few articles detail the processes necessary for implementation. The rationale, planning, and evaluation of such an effort at a large, tertiary care hospital in the urban Southwest is described. By describing the development and phased deployment of the RRT, the authors provide key insights into the processes used as well as structures needed and lessons learned.

  6. Development of training-related health care software by a team of clinical educators: their experience, from conception to piloting.

    PubMed

    Ap Dafydd, Derfel; Williamson, Ruth; Blunt, Philip; Blunt, Dominic M

    2016-01-01

    The difficulties of producing useful, bespoke, and affordable information technology systems for large health care organizations are well publicized, following several high-profile endeavors in the UK. This article describes the experience of a small group of clinical radiologists and their collaborators in producing an information technology system - from conception to piloting. This system, called Trainee Tracker, enables automated target date recalculation of trainee milestones, depending on their work patterns and other individual circumstances. It utilizes an automated email alert system to notify the educational supervisors and trainees of approaching and elapsed target dates, in order to identify trainees in difficulty early and address their training needs accordingly. The challenges and advantages, both common to and contrasting with larger-scale projects, are also considered. The benefits of the development team's "agile" approach to software development and the lessons learned will be of interest to medical educators, particularly those with expertise in e-portfolios and other training-related software.

  7. Software Capability Evaluation (SCE), Version 2.0 Team Members Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-01

    development that affect what software processes are needed? Nucleus Software Figure 5-3 is a simple representation of why different levels Development...is a consensus, try to develop finding s•;’hfwients. See "Findings" (Ompage 9-13). The findings are abstractions of the information --"ected...can readily and succinctly answer in few sentences. The questions should be at a level of abstraction that is low enough that the identified work

  8. A Scalable and Portable Structure for Conducting Successful Year-Long Undergraduate Software Team Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keogh, Kathleen; Sterling, Leon; Venables, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Year-long team projects with external clients provide a well recognized opportunity for students to gain industry experience, whilst being supported and guided by staff to minimize risks. Each group should be supervised to ensure that they have enough direction and confidence to approach a new problem of significant size, without being daunted. A…

  9. Implementing a modeling software for animated protein-complex interactions using a physics simulation library.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yutaka; Ito, Shuntaro; Konagaya, Akihiko

    2014-12-01

    To better understand the behaviors and structural dynamics of proteins within a cell, novel software tools are being developed that can create molecular animations based on the findings of structural biology. This study proposes our method developed based on our prototypes to detect collisions and examine the soft-body dynamics of molecular models. The code was implemented with a software development toolkit for rigid-body dynamics simulation and a three-dimensional graphics library. The essential functions of the target software system included the basic molecular modeling environment, collision detection in the molecular models, and physical simulations of the movement of the model. Taking advantage of recent software technologies such as physics simulation modules and interpreted scripting language, the functions required for accurate and meaningful molecular animation were implemented efficiently.

  10. The use of hypermedia to increase the productivity of software development teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, L. Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Rapid progress in low-cost commercial PC-class multimedia workstation technology will potentially have a dramatic impact on the productivity of distributed work groups of 50-100 software developers. Hypermedia/multimedia involves the seamless integration in a graphical user interface (GUI) of a wide variety of data structures, including high-resolution graphics, maps, images, voice, and full-motion video. Hypermedia will normally require the manipulation of large dynamic files for which relational data base technology and SQL servers are essential. Basic machine architecture, special-purpose video boards, video equipment, optical memory, software needed for animation, network technology, and the anticipated increase in productivity that will result for the introduction of hypermedia technology are covered. It is suggested that the cost of the hardware and software to support an individual multimedia workstation will be on the order of $10,000.

  11. Determinants of treatment plan implementation in multidisciplinary team meetings for patients with chronic diseases: a mixed-methods study

    PubMed Central

    Raine, Rosalind; Xanthopoulou, Penny; Wallace, Isla; Nic a’ Bháird, Caoimhe; Lanceley, Anne; Clarke, Alex; Livingston, Gill; Prentice, Archie; Ardron, Dave; Harris, Miriam; King, Michael; Michie, Susan; Blazeby, Jane M; Austin-Parsons, Natalie; Gibbs, Simon; Barber, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Objective Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are assumed to produce better decisions and are extensively used to manage chronic disease in the National Health Service (NHS). However, evidence for their effectiveness is mixed. Our objective was to investigate determinants of MDT effectiveness by examining factors influencing the implementation of MDT treatment plans. This is a proxy measure of effectiveness, because it lies on the pathway to improvements in health, and reflects team decision making which has taken account of clinical and non-clinical information. Additionally, this measure can be compared across MDTs for different conditions. Methods We undertook a prospective mixed-methods study of 12 MDTs in London and North Thames. Data were collected by observation of 370 MDT meetings, interviews with 53 MDT members, and from 2654 patient medical records. We examined the influence of patient-related factors (disease, age, sex, deprivation, whether their preferences and other clinical/health behaviours were mentioned) and MDT features (as measured using the ‘Team Climate Inventory’ and skill mix) on the implementation of MDT treatment plans. Results The adjusted odds (or likelihood) of implementation was reduced by 25% for each additional professional group represented at the MDT meeting. Implementation was more likely in MDTs with clear goals and processes and a good ‘Team Climate’ (adjusted OR 1.96; 95% CI 1.15 to 3.31 for a unit increase in Team Climate Inventory (TCI) score). Implementation varied by disease category, with the lowest adjusted odds of implementation in mental health teams. Implementation was also lower for patients living in more deprived areas (adjusted odds of implementation for patients in the most compared with least deprived areas was 0.60, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.91). Conclusions Greater multidisciplinarity is not necessarily associated with more effective decision making. Explicit goals and procedures are also crucial. Decision

  12. Development and analysis of the Software Implemented Fault-Tolerance (SIFT) computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, J.; Kautz, W. H.; Melliar-Smith, P. M.; Green, M. W.; Levitt, K. N.; Schwartz, R. L.; Weinstock, C. B.

    1984-01-01

    SIFT (Software Implemented Fault Tolerance) is an experimental, fault-tolerant computer system designed to meet the extreme reliability requirements for safety-critical functions in advanced aircraft. Errors are masked by performing a majority voting operation over the results of identical computations, and faulty processors are removed from service by reassigning computations to the nonfaulty processors. This scheme has been implemented in a special architecture using a set of standard Bendix BDX930 processors, augmented by a special asynchronous-broadcast communication interface that provides direct, processor to processor communication among all processors. Fault isolation is accomplished in hardware; all other fault-tolerance functions, together with scheduling and synchronization are implemented exclusively by executive system software. The system reliability is predicted by a Markov model. Mathematical consistency of the system software with respect to the reliability model has been partially verified, using recently developed tools for machine-aided proof of program correctness.

  13. Team Teaching among Mixed Messages: Implementing Two-Way Dual Language Bilingual Education at Third Grade in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Deborah; Henderson, Kathryn; Wall, Dorothy; Zúñiga, Christian E.; Berthelsen, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    This article documents and interrogates top-down district-wide implementation of a two-way dual language bilingual education (DLBE) program in a large urban district. We carried out a language policy ethnography to explore the way two schools' teams of third grade teachers worked together to negotiate the intersection of DLBE implementation and…

  14. Advancing Perspectives of Sustainability and Large-Scale Implementation of Design Teams in Ghana's Polytechnics: Issues and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakah, Marie Afua Baah; Voogt, Joke M.; Pieters, Jules M.

    2012-01-01

    Polytechnic staff perspectives are sought on the sustainability and large-scale implementation of design teams (DT), as a means for collaborative curriculum design and teacher professional development in Ghana's polytechnics, months after implementation. Data indicates that teachers still collaborate in DTs for curriculum design and professional…

  15. Pipe Flow Simulation Software: A Team Approach to Solve an Engineering Education Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Renata S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A computer simulation program for use in the study of fluid mechanics is described. The package is an interactive tool to explore the fluid flow characteristics of a pipe system by manipulating the physical construction of the system. The motivation, software design requirements, and specific details on how its objectives were met are presented.…

  16. Supporting Trust in Globally Distributed Software Teams: The Impact of Visualized Collaborative Traces on Perceived Trustworthiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trainer, Erik Harrison

    2012-01-01

    Trust plays an important role in collaborations because it creates an environment in which people can openly exchange ideas and information with one another and engineer innovative solutions together with less perceived risk. The rise in globally distributed software development has created an environment in which workers are likely to have less…

  17. Implementing critical pathways and a multidisciplinary team approach to cardiovascular disease management.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Eric D; Albert, Nancy M; Amin, Alpesh; Patterson, J Herbert; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2008-09-08

    According to several medical registries, there is a need to improve the care of post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients, especially those with left ventricular dysfunction (LVD) and heart failure. This can potentially be achieved by implementing disease management programs, which include critical pathways, patient education, and multidisciplinary hospital teams. Currently, algorithms for critical pathways, including discharge processes, are lacking for post-MI LVD patients. Such schemes can increase the use of evidence-based medicines proved to reduce mortality. Educational programs are aimed at increasing patients' awareness of their condition, promoting medication compliance, and encouraging the adoption of healthy behaviors; such programs have been shown to be effective in improving outcomes of post-MI LVD patients. Reductions in all-cause hospitalizations and medical costs as well as improved survival rates have been observed when a multidisciplinary team (a nurse, a pharmacist, and a hospitalist) is engaged in patient care. In addition, the use of the "pay for performance" method, which can be advantageous for patients, physicians, and hospitals, may potentially improve the care of post-MI patients with LVD.

  18. The Implementation of Satellite Attitude Control System Software Using Object Oriented Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, W. Mark; Hansell, William; Phillips, Tom; Anderson, Mark O.; Drury, Derek

    1998-01-01

    NASA established the Small Explorer (SNMX) program in 1988 to provide frequent opportunities for highly focused and relatively inexpensive space science missions. The SMEX program has produced five satellites, three of which have been successfully launched. The remaining two spacecraft are scheduled for launch within the coming year. NASA has recently developed a prototype for the next generation Small Explorer spacecraft (SMEX-Lite). This paper describes the object-oriented design (OOD) of the SMEX-Lite Attitude Control System (ACS) software. The SMEX-Lite ACS is three-axis controlled and is capable of performing sub-arc-minute pointing. This paper first describes high level requirements governing the SMEX-Lite ACS software architecture. Next, the context in which the software resides is explained. The paper describes the principles of encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism with respect to the implementation of an ACS software system. This paper will also discuss the design of several ACS software components. Specifically, object-oriented designs are presented for sensor data processing, attitude determination, attitude control, and failure detection. Finally, this paper will address the establishment of the ACS Foundation Class (AFC) Library. The AFC is a large software repository, requiring a minimal amount of code modifications to produce ACS software for future projects.

  19. Software engineering and Ada (Trademark) training: An implementation model for NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legrand, Sue; Freedman, Glenn

    1988-01-01

    The choice of Ada for software engineering for projects such as the Space Station has resulted in government and industrial groups considering training programs that help workers become familiar with both a software culture and the intricacies of a new computer language. The questions of how much time it takes to learn software engineering with Ada, how much an organization should invest in such training, and how the training should be structured are considered. Software engineering is an emerging, dynamic discipline. It is defined by the author as the establishment and application of sound engineering environments, tools, methods, models, principles, and concepts combined with appropriate standards, guidelines, and practices to support computing which is correct, modifiable, reliable and safe, efficient, and understandable throughout the life cycle of the application. Neither the training programs needed, nor the content of such programs, have been well established. This study addresses the requirements for training for NASA personnel and recommends an implementation plan. A curriculum and a means of delivery are recommended. It is further suggested that a knowledgeable programmer may be able to learn Ada in 5 days, but that it takes 6 to 9 months to evolve into a software engineer who uses the language correctly and effectively. The curriculum and implementation plan can be adapted for each NASA Center according to the needs dictated by each project.

  20. An Implementation of Active Learning: Assessing the Effectiveness of the Team Infomercial Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matveev, Alexei V.; Milter, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of the team infomercial assignment as an active learning tool in undergraduate courses. The structure and three phases of the team infomercial assignment, as well as student evaluations and feedback, are presented. We investigated student experiences working on the team infomercial assignment, the common…

  1. Software Quality Assurance Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McRae, Kalindra A.

    2004-01-01

    Software Quality Assurance (SQA) is a planned and systematic set of activities that ensures conformance of software life cycle processes and products conform to requirements, standards and procedures. In software development, software quality means meeting requirements and a degree of excellence and refinement of a project or product. Software Quality is a set of attributes of a software product by which its quality is described and evaluated. The set of attributes includes functionality, reliability, usability, efficiency, maintainability, and portability. Software Metrics help us understand the technical process that is used to develop a product. The process is measured to improve it and the product is measured to increase quality throughout the life cycle of software. Software Metrics are measurements of the quality of software. Software is measured to indicate the quality of the product, to assess the productivity of the people who produce the product, to assess the benefits derived from new software engineering methods and tools, to form a baseline for estimation, and to help justify requests for new tools or additional training. Any part of the software development can be measured. If Software Metrics are implemented in software development, it can save time, money, and allow the organization to identify the caused of defects which have the greatest effect on software development. The summer of 2004, I worked with Cynthia Calhoun and Frank Robinson in the Software Assurance/Risk Management department. My task was to research and collect, compile, and analyze SQA Metrics that have been used in other projects that are not currently being used by the SA team and report them to the Software Assurance team to see if any metrics can be implemented in their software assurance life cycle process.

  2. Developing a multidisciplinary team for disorders of sex development: planning, implementation, and operation tools for care providers.

    PubMed

    Moran, Mary Elizabeth; Karkazis, Katrina

    2012-01-01

    In the treatment of patients with disorders of sex development (DSD), multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) represent a new standard of care. While DSDs are too complex for care to be delivered effectively without specialized team management, these conditions are often considered to be too rare for their medical management to be a hospital priority. Many specialists involved in DSD care want to create a clinic or team, but there is no available guidance that bridges the gap between a group of like-minded DSD providers who want to improve care and the formation of a functional MDT. This is an important dilemma, and one with serious implications for the future of DSD care. If a network of multidisciplinary DSD teams is to be a reality, those directly involved in DSD care must be given the necessary program planning and team implementation tools. This paper offers a protocol and set of tools to meet this need. We present a 6-step process to team formation, and a sample set of tools that can be used to guide, develop, and evaluate a team throughout the course of its operation.

  3. Developing a Multidisciplinary Team for Disorders of Sex Development: Planning, Implementation, and Operation Tools for Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Mary Elizabeth; Karkazis, Katrina

    2012-01-01

    In the treatment of patients with disorders of sex development (DSD), multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) represent a new standard of care. While DSDs are too complex for care to be delivered effectively without specialized team management, these conditions are often considered to be too rare for their medical management to be a hospital priority. Many specialists involved in DSD care want to create a clinic or team, but there is no available guidance that bridges the gap between a group of like-minded DSD providers who want to improve care and the formation of a functional MDT. This is an important dilemma, and one with serious implications for the future of DSD care. If a network of multidisciplinary DSD teams is to be a reality, those directly involved in DSD care must be given the necessary program planning and team implementation tools. This paper offers a protocol and set of tools to meet this need. We present a 6-step process to team formation, and a sample set of tools that can be used to guide, develop, and evaluate a team throughout the course of its operation. PMID:22792098

  4. Simulation-based team training at the sharp end: A qualitative study of simulation-based team training design, implementation, and evaluation in healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Sallie J; Salas, Eduardo; Lyons, Rebecca; Lazzara, Elizabeth H; Rosen, Michael A; DiazGranados, Deborah; Grim, Julia G; Augenstein, Jeffery S; Birnbach, David J; King, Heidi

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a qualitative review of the published literature dealing with the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulation-based team training (SBTT) in healthcare with the purpose of providing synthesis of the present state of the science to guide practice and future research. A systematic literature review was conducted and produced 27 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. These articles were coded using a low-inference content analysis coding scheme designed to extract important information about the training program. Results are summarized in 10 themes describing important considerations for what occurs before, during, and after a training event. Both across disciplines and within Emergency Medicine (EM), SBTT has been shown to be an effective method for increasing teamwork skills. However, the literature to date has underspecified some of the fundamental features of the training programs, impeding the dissemination of lessons learned. Implications of this study are discussed for team training in EM. PMID:21063560

  5. How to Implement Support Services for NonTraditional Students. Teams for NonTraditional. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Bettie

    Based on the experience of Teams of NonTraditionals Support Network at Jefferson State Vocational Technical School (Kentucky), this manual is designed to help teachers and administrators to implement a support system for nontraditional students (primarily females in traditional male fields) in vocational and technical education programs. The…

  6. Software Engineering: A New Component for Instructional Software Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, J. Wey; Shen, Chung-Wei

    1989-01-01

    Discussion of software engineering for computer-based instruction (CBI) focuses on a model for instructional software development. Highlights include a multidisciplinary team approach; needs analysis; feasibility study; requirement analysis; prototype construction; design phase; implementation and development; testing and evaluation; and project…

  7. Evaluation of mass spectral library search algorithms implemented in commercial software.

    PubMed

    Samokhin, Andrey; Sotnezova, Ksenia; Lashin, Vitaly; Revelsky, Igor

    2015-06-01

    Performance of several library search algorithms (against EI mass spectral databases) implemented in commercial software products ( acd/specdb, chemstation, gc/ms solution and ms search) was estimated. Test set contained 1000 mass spectra, which were randomly selected from NIST'08 (RepLib) mass spectral database. It was shown that composite (also known as identity) algorithm implemented in ms search (NIST) software gives statistically the best results: the correct compound occupied the first position in the list of possible candidates in 81% of cases; the correct compound was within the list of top ten candidates in 98% of cases. It was found that use of presearch option can lead to rejection of the correct answer from the list of possible candidates (therefore presearch option should not be used, if possible). Overall performance of library search algorithms was estimated using receiver operating characteristic curves.

  8. Implementing reusable software components for SNOMED CT diagram and expression concept representations.

    PubMed

    Bánfai, Balázs; Porció, Roland; Kovács, Tibor

    2014-01-01

    SNOMED CT is a vital component in the future of semantic interoperability in healthcare as it provides the meaning to EHRs via its semantically rich, controlled terminology. Communicating the concepts of this terminology to both humans and machines is crucial therefore formal guidelines for diagram and expression representations have been developed by the curators of SNOMED CT. This paper presents a novel, model-based approach to implementing these guidelines that allows simultaneous editing of a concept via both diagram and expression editors. The implemented extensible software component can be embedded both both desktop and web applications.

  9. Spacelab user implementation assessment study (software requirements analysis). Volume 1: Executive study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to develop an integrated approach for the development, implementation, and utilization of all software that is required to efficiently and cost-effectively support advanced technology laboratory flight and ground operations. It was recognized that certain aspects of the operations would be mandatory computerized services; computerization of other aspects would be optional. Thus, the analyses encompassed not only alternate computer utilization and implementations but trade studies of the programmatic effects of non-computerized versus computerized approaches to the operations. A general overview of the study is presented.

  10. Design and implementation of a compliant robot with force feedback and strategy planning software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premack, T.; Strempek, F. M.; Solis, L. A.; Brodd, S. S.; Cutler, E. P.; Purves, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    Force-feedback robotics techniques are being developed for automated precision assembly and servicing of NASA space flight equipment. Design and implementation of a prototype robot which provides compliance and monitors forces is in progress. Computer software to specify assembly steps and makes force feedback adjustments during assembly are coded and tested for three generically different precision mating problems. A model program demonstrates that a suitably autonomous robot can plan its own strategy.

  11. Design, Implementation, and Experiences of Third-Party Software Administration at the ORNL NCCS

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Nicholas A; Fahey, Mark R

    2008-01-01

    At the ORNL NCCS, the structure and policy surrounding how we install third-party applications. This change is most notable for its effect on our quad-core Cray XT4 (Jaguar) computer. Of particular interest is the addition of many scripts to automate installing and testing system software, as well as the addition of automated reporting mechanisms. We will present an overview of the design and implementation, and also present our experiences to date

  12. Affect 4.0: a free software package for implementing psychological and psychophysiological experiments.

    PubMed

    Spruyt, Adriaan; Clarysse, Jeroen; Vansteenwegen, Debora; Baeyens, Frank; Hermans, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    We describe Affect 4.0, a user-friendly software package for implementing psychological and psychophysiological experiments. Affect 4.0 can be used to present visual, acoustic, and/or tactile stimuli in highly complex (i.e., semirandomized and response-contingent) sequences. Affect 4.0 is capable of registering response latencies and analog behavioral input with millisecond accuracy. Affect 4.0 is available free of charge.

  13. Software for implementing trigger algorithms on the upgraded CMS Global Trigger System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Takashi; Arnold, Bernhard

    2015-12-01

    The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS Level-1 Trigger and implements a trigger menu, a set of selection requirements applied to the final list of trigger objects. The conditions for trigger object selection, with possible topological requirements on multiobject triggers, are combined by simple combinatorial logic to form the algorithms. The LHC has resumed its operation in 2015, the collision-energy will be increased to 13 TeV with the luminosity expected to go up to 2x1034 cm-2s-1. The CMS Level-1 trigger system will be upgraded to improve its performance for selecting interesting physics events and to operate within the predefined data-acquisition rate in the challenging environment expected at LHC Run 2. The Global Trigger will be re-implemented on modern FPGAs on an Advanced Mezzanine Card in MicroTCA crate. The upgraded system will benefit from the ability to process complex algorithms with DSP slices and increased processing resources with optical links running at 10 Gbit/s, enabling more algorithms at a time than previously possible and allowing CMS to be more flexible in how it handles the trigger bandwidth. In order to handle the increased complexity of the trigger menu implemented on the upgraded Global Trigger, a set of new software has been developed. The software allows a physicist to define a menu with analysis-like triggers using intuitive user interface. The menu is then realised on FPGAs with further software processing, instantiating predefined firmware blocks. The design and implementation of the software for preparing a menu for the upgraded CMS Global Trigger system are presented.

  14. The Implementation of Satellite Control System Software Using Object Oriented Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark O.; Reid, Mark; Drury, Derek; Hansell, William; Phillips, Tom

    1998-01-01

    NASA established the Small Explorer (SMEX) program in 1988 to provide frequent opportunities for highly focused and relatively inexpensive space science missions that can be launched into low earth orbit by small expendable vehicles. The development schedule for each SMEX spacecraft was three years from start to launch. The SMEX program has produced five satellites; Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), Fast Auroral Snapshot Explorer (FAST), Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS), Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and Wide-Field Infrared Explorer (WIRE). SAMPEX and FAST are on-orbit, TRACE is scheduled to be launched in April of 1998, WIRE is scheduled to be launched in September of 1998, and SWAS is scheduled to be launched in January of 1999. In each of these missions, the Attitude Control System (ACS) software was written using a modular procedural design. Current program goals require complete spacecraft development within 18 months. This requirement has increased pressure to write reusable flight software. Object-Oriented Design (OOD) offers the constructs for developing an application that only needs modification for mission unique requirements. This paper describes the OOD that was used to develop the SMEX-Lite ACS software. The SMEX-Lite ACS is three-axis controlled, momentum stabilized, and is capable of performing sub-arc-minute pointing. The paper first describes the high level requirements which governed the architecture of the SMEX-Lite ACS software. Next, the context in which the software resides is explained. The paper describes the benefits of encapsulation, inheritance and polymorphism with respect to the implementation of an ACS software system. This paper will discuss the design of several software components that comprise the ACS software. Specifically, Object-Oriented designs are presented for sensor data processing, attitude control, attitude determination and failure detection. The paper addresses

  15. Requirements for guidelines systems: implementation challenges and lessons from existing software-engineering efforts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A large body of work in the clinical guidelines field has identified requirements for guideline systems, but there are formidable challenges in translating such requirements into production-quality systems that can be used in routine patient care. Detailed analysis of requirements from an implementation perspective can be useful in helping define sub-requirements to the point where they are implementable. Further, additional requirements emerge as a result of such analysis. During such an analysis, study of examples of existing, software-engineering efforts in non-biomedical fields can provide useful signposts to the implementer of a clinical guideline system. Methods In addition to requirements described by guideline-system authors, comparative reviews of such systems, and publications discussing information needs for guideline systems and clinical decision support systems in general, we have incorporated additional requirements related to production-system robustness and functionality from publications in the business workflow domain, in addition to drawing on our own experience in the development of the Proteus guideline system (http://proteme.org). Results The sub-requirements are discussed by conveniently grouping them into the categories used by the review of Isern and Moreno 2008. We cite previous work under each category and then provide sub-requirements under each category, and provide example of similar work in software-engineering efforts that have addressed a similar problem in a non-biomedical context. Conclusions When analyzing requirements from the implementation viewpoint, knowledge of successes and failures in related software-engineering efforts can guide implementers in the choice of effective design and development strategies. PMID:22405400

  16. Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Presented are reviews of two computer software packages for Apple II computers; "Organic Spectroscopy," and "Videodisc Display Program" for use with "The Periodic Table Videodisc." A sample spectrograph from "Organic Spectroscopy" is included. (CW)

  17. Implementation of Cross-Disciplinary Teams of Business and Engineering Students for Quality Improvement Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCahon, Cynthia S.; Lavelle, Jerome P.

    1998-01-01

    Cross-disciplinary teams formed by 29 engineering and 45 business/statistics/human ecology students conducted quality improvement projects. Different levels of commitment and interest were apparent; most had difficulty scheduling meetings with team members, clients, and instructors. Nearly all spoke highly of the learning experience. (SK)

  18. Maximizing the Effectiveness of Building Teams in Response to Intervention Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nellis, Leah M.

    2012-01-01

    In the school setting, teams are abundant, often serving multiple purposes, having various titles, and consisting of diverse members. Teams are considered an essential component of Response to Intervention (RtI) and are the vehicle through which data-based decision making occurs at the school, grade, small-group, and individual student level.…

  19. Investigating and implementing change within the primary health care nursing team.

    PubMed

    Galvin, K; Andrewes, C; Jackson, D; Cheesman, S; Fudge, T; Ferris, R; Graham, I

    1999-07-01

    Primary care is developing rapidly with significant impacts on the nursing team. Such changes have brought inter-professional team-working into sharper focus, particularly community care and collaborative working. This paper: examines the nursing roles within a general practice; describes the perspectives of service users; identifies areas of change; clarifies core and specialist skills; defines new roles among the primary health care nursing team; proposes a new model of working; and identifies appropriate education. The project was set in a general practice in south-west England and used an action research methodology. The objectives were to create a change in practice and to develop and refine existing theory to underpin nursing roles. Throughout the research regular team meetings allowed reflection and discussion about research findings and progress. Data were collected from multiple sources, including team workshops, patient focus group interviews, and individual interviews with GPs, practice managers and area managers. Reflective diaries and a patient survey were also used. The analysis of the quantitative and qualitative data collected from patients formed a basis for practice development and facilitated the team's reflection on the areas of change. Overall high satisfaction with services and care was expressed in the patient interviews and the questionnaire. The themes from the data highlighted areas important for patients and helped in shaping the new roles and responsibilities for team members. Regarding the team perspective, the data indicated many areas that could be considered for development. The community nursing team decided to concentrate on three key areas: child health, leg ulcer management, and cardiovascular health. The research concludes that action research presents some problems and challenges but is a useful approach to developing team-working in primary health care.

  20. Bringing electronic patient records into health professional education: software architecture and implementation.

    PubMed

    Joe, Ronald S; Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Armstrong, Brian; Otto, Tony; Ho, Kendall

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) which has been redesigned specifically for the purposes of teaching medical and other health professional students. Currently available EMR software is designed specifically for use in actual practice settings and not for the needs of students and educators. The authors identified many unique requirements of an EMR in order to satisfy the educational goals unique to the electronic medium. This paper describes the specific architecture and many of the unique features of the EMR implemented for the University of British Columbia (UBC) Medical School program for teaching medical students. This implementation describes 200 participating students participating in a hands-on use of an EMR with a single standardized patient case. The participating students were distributed across three physical sites in the Province of British Columbia UBC curricula in December, 2007.

  1. Implementation of a multidisciplinary team that includes a registered dietitian in a neonatal intensive care unit improved nutrition outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sneve, Jennifer; Kattelmann, Kendra; Ren, Cuirong; Stevens, Dennis C

    This study determined whether nutrition outcomes of neonates who were receiving neonatal intensive care were improved with the implementation of a fully functioning multidisciplinary team that included a registered dietitian. A medical record review was conducted of neonates with birth weights of 1500 g or less who were cared for in Sanford Children's Hospital neonatal intensive care unit from January 1 to December 31, 2001 (prior to functioning multidisciplinary team establishment) and January 1 to December 31, 2004 (subsequent to establishment of a multidisciplinary team). Data from charts in the 2 time periods were examined for differences in nutrition outcomes. Outcome variables included length of stay, birth weight, discharge weight, weight gained for specified time periods, weight at full feeds, weight gain per day, length, head circumference, and number of days to start enteral feeding. Analysis of covariance, controlling for the effect of birth weight, was used to determine differences and was considered significant at P < .05. The mean length of stay (65 days, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 48-68 vs 72 days, 95% CI: 53-73) was not different for the 2 periods. The mean weight at the beginning of enteral feeding was significantly less in the period prior to the establishment of the multidisciplinary team (1099 g, 95% CI: 955-1165 vs 1164 g, 95% CI: 1067-1211, respectively). Weight at discharge, total weight gained, total daily weight gained, daily weight gain from birth to the initiation of enteral feeds, daily weight gain from birth to full feeds, and head circumference growth were significantly greater for neonates in the postgroup than in the pre-multidisciplinary team group. Implementation of a multidisciplinary team that included a registered dietitian improved the nutrition outcomes of low birth weight infants in a neonatal intensive care unit.

  2. Co-design of software and hardware to implement remote sensing algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Theiler, J. P.; Frigo, J.; Gokhale, M.; Szymanski, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Both for offline searches through large data archives and for onboard computation at the sensor head, there is a growing need for ever-more rapid processing of remote sensing data. For many algorithms of use in remote sensing, the bulk of the processing takes place in an 'inner loop' with a large number of simple operations. For these algorithms, dramatic speedups can often be obtained with specialized hardware. The difficulty and expense of digital design continues to limit applicability of this approach, but the development of new design tools is making this approach more feasible, and some notable successes have been reported. On the other hand, it is often the case that processing can also be accelerated by adopting a more sophisticated algorithm design. Unfortunately, a more sophisticated algorithm is much harder to implement in hardware, so these approaches are often at odds with each other. With careful planning, however, it is sometimes possible to combine software and hardware design in such a way that each complements the other, and the final implementation achieves speedup that would not have been possible with a hardware-only or a software-only solution. We will in particular discuss the co-design of software and hardware to achieve substantial speedup of algorithms for multispectral image segmentation and for endmember identification.

  3. Sustainability of cross-functional teams for marketing strategy development and implementation.

    PubMed

    Kono, Ken; Antonucci, Don

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a case study on a cross-functional team used for marketing strategy development and execution at a health insurance company. The study found a set of success factors that contributed to the initial success of the team, but the factors were not enough to maintain the team's high level of productivity over time. The study later identified a set of 8 factors that helped sustain the team's high-productivity level. The 2 sets (ie, success and its subsequent sustainability factors) are analyzed against a normative model of team effectiveness. All the factors are explained by the normative model except for 1 sustainability factor, "challenge motivator." In fact, the study found the "challenge motivator" to be the most critical factor to keep up the team's productivity over time. Apart from a performance crisis, the authors developed 3 "challenge motivators"--first, more granular market information that could unearth hidden performance issues; second, constant value creation to shareholders as the firm being publicly traded; and third, the firm's strategic mandate to meet and exceed customer expectations that puts ultimate performance pressure on the marketing strategy team.

  4. Thirty Meter Telescope: observatory software requirements, architecture, and preliminary implementation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, David R.; Angeli, George; Boyer, Corinne; Sirota, Mark; Trinh, Thang

    2008-07-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) will be a ground-based, 30-m optical-IR alt-az telescope with a highly segmented primary mirror located in a remote location. Efficient science operations require the asynchronous coordination of many different sub-systems including telescope mount, three independent active optics sub-systems, adaptive optics, laser guide stars, and user-configured science instrument. An important high-level requirement is target acquisition and observatory system configuration must be completed in less than 5 minutes (or 10 minutes if moving to a new instrument). To meet this coordination challenge and target acquisition time requirement, a distributed software architecture is envisioned consisting of software components linked by a service-based software communications backbone. A master sequencer coordinates the activities of mid-layer sequencers for the telescope, adaptive optics, and selected instrument. In turn, these mid-layer sequencers coordinate the activities of groups of sub-systems. In this paper, TMT observatory requirements are presented in more detail, followed by a description of the design reference software architecture and a discussion of preliminary implementation strategies.

  5. Implementing reproducible research using the Madagascar open-source software package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomel, S.

    2015-12-01

    Reproducible research is a concept pioneered by Jon Claerbout. It refers to the discipline of attaching software code and data to scientific publications, which enables the reader to reproduce, verify, and extend published computational experiments. The Madagascar open-source software package provides an example of implementing the reproducible research discipline in geophysical publications. The package contains not only software tools for making geophysical computations but also research papers complete with links to data and reproducible data-analysis workflows. When researchers discover a research paper published on the Madagascar website and install Madagascar, they are able to follow the links and replicate all computations to verify the published computational results. Of course, reproducibility is not the goal in itself. The goal is to be able to extend previously published research by, for example, trying new computations on previously used data or previously used computations on new data. The Madagscar collection currently contains about 150 research papers and book chapters and about 900 reproducible scripts. More than 80 people from different organizations around the world have contributed to the development. This experience shows that, instead of being the responsibility of an individual author, computational reproducibility can become the responsibility of open-source scientific-software communities. Our experience shows how a dedicated community effort can keep a body of computational research alive by actively maintaining its reproducibility.

  6. A SaTScan™ macro accessory for cartography (SMAC) package implemented with SAS® software

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Allyson M; Kleinman, Ken P

    2007-01-01

    Background SaTScan is a software program written to implement the scan statistic; it can be used to find clusters in space and/or time. It must often be run multiple times per day when doing disease surveillance. Running SaTScan frequently via its graphical user interface can be cumbersome, and the output can be difficult to visualize. Results The SaTScan Macro Accessory for Cartography (SMAC) package consists of four SAS macros and was designed as an easier way to run SaTScan multiple times and add graphical output. The package contains individual macros which allow the user to make the necessary input files for SaTScan, run SaTScan, and create graphical output all from within SAS software. The macros can also be combined to do this all in one step. Conclusion The SMAC package can make SaTScan easier to use and can make the output more informative. PMID:17341310

  7. Integrated State Estimation and Contingency Analysis Software Implementation using High Performance Computing Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yousu; Glaesemann, Kurt R.; Rice, Mark J.; Huang, Zhenyu

    2015-12-31

    Power system simulation tools are traditionally developed in sequential mode and codes are optimized for single core computing only. However, the increasing complexity in the power grid models requires more intensive computation. The traditional simulation tools will soon not be able to meet the grid operation requirements. Therefore, power system simulation tools need to evolve accordingly to provide faster and better results for grid operations. This paper presents an integrated state estimation and contingency analysis software implementation using high performance computing techniques. The software is able to solve large size state estimation problems within one second and achieve a near-linear speedup of 9,800 with 10,000 cores for contingency analysis application. The performance evaluation is presented to show its effectiveness.

  8. ThermoData Engine (TDE) software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 7. Ternary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Muzny, Chris D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Magee, Joseph W; Abdulagatov, Ilmutdin; Kang, Jeong Won; Frenkel, Michael

    2012-01-23

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported in this journal. The present paper describes the first application of this concept to the evaluation of thermophysical properties for ternary chemical systems. The method involves construction of Redlich-Kister type equations for individual properties (excess volume, thermal conductivity, viscosity, surface tension, and excess enthalpy) and activity coefficient models for phase equilibrium properties (vapor-liquid and liquid-liquid equilibrium). Constructed ternary models are based on those for the three pure component and three binary subsystems evaluated on demand through the TDE software algorithms. All models are described in detail, and extensions to the class structure of the program are provided. Reliable evaluation of properties for the binary subsystems is essential for successful property evaluations for ternary systems, and algorithms are described to aid appropriate parameter selection and fitting for the implemented activity coefficient models (NRTL, Wilson, Van Laar, Redlich-Kister, and UNIQUAC). Two activity coefficient models based on group contributions (original UNIFAC and NIST-KT-UNIFAC) are also implemented. Novel features of the user interface are shown, and directions for future enhancements are outlined.

  9. Design and Implementation of Self-Directed Work Teams in a Pre-Erection Outfitting Department

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    and S. Srivastva. Management of Work: A Socio-Technical Systems Approach. Hackman , J.R. Groups that Work (and those that don’t): Creating Conditions ... teamwork with the Dope Department. By using the results of the survey, the Dope Department eliminated unnecessary duties and created some roles that were...to be broken down by work team. This will allow the teams to plan as well as evaluate their performance ( Hackman , 1990 ). Other systems that may need

  10. Pre-Hardware Optimization of Spacecraft Image Processing Software Algorithms and Hardware Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizhner, Semion; Flatley, Thomas P.; Hestnes, Phyllis; Jentoft-Nilsen, Marit; Petrick, David J.; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spacecraft telemetry rates have steadily increased over the last decade presenting a problem for real-time processing by ground facilities. This paper proposes a solution to a related problem for the Geostationary Operational Environmental Spacecraft (GOES-8) image processing application. Although large super-computer facilities are the obvious heritage solution, they are very costly, making it imperative to seek a feasible alternative engineering solution at a fraction of the cost. The solution is based on a Personal Computer (PC) platform and synergy of optimized software algorithms and re-configurable computing hardware technologies, such as Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) and Digital Signal Processing (DSP). It has been shown in [1] and [2] that this configuration can provide superior inexpensive performance for a chosen application on the ground station or on-board a spacecraft. However, since this technology is still maturing, intensive pre-hardware steps are necessary to achieve the benefits of hardware implementation. This paper describes these steps for the GOES-8 application, a software project developed using Interactive Data Language (IDL) (Trademark of Research Systems, Inc.) on a Workstation/UNIX platform. The solution involves converting the application to a PC/Windows/RC platform, selected mainly by the availability of low cost, adaptable high-speed RC hardware. In order for the hybrid system to run, the IDL software was modified to account for platform differences. It was interesting to examine the gains and losses in performance on the new platform, as well as unexpected observations before implementing hardware. After substantial pre-hardware optimization steps, the necessity of hardware implementation for bottleneck code in the PC environment became evident and solvable beginning with the methodology described in [1], [2], and implementing a novel methodology for this specific application [6]. The PC-RC interface bandwidth problem for the

  11. A Study of the Air Force’s Implementation of DoD Software Data Rights Policy for Reusable Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    still further revisions based on a study conducted by the Software Engineering Institute (5). It is important, at this point, to point out that there...In a 1986 study regarding software acquisition policy, conducted by the Software Engineering Institute (SEI), it was stated that: The question is...system" (13:85). The court held copyrights are valid for all three. In contrast, some believe copyrights are obsolete in this electonic age: In general

  12. ThermoData Engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 3. Binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Muzny, Chris D; Frenkel, Michael

    2009-02-01

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported recently in this journal. The present paper describes the first application of this concept to the evaluation of thermophysical properties for binary chemical systems. Five activity-coefficient models have been implemented for representation of phase-equilibrium data (vapor-liquid, liquid-liquid, and solid-liquid equilibrium): NRTL, UNIQUAC, Van Laar, Margules/Redlich-Kister, and Wilson. Implementation of these models in TDE is fully described. Properties modeled individually are densities, surface tensions, critical temperatures, critical pressures, excess enthalpies, and the transport properties-viscosity and thermal conductivity. Extensions to the class structure of the program are described with emphasis on special features allowing close linkage between mixture and pure-component properties required for implementation of the models. Details of gas-phase models used in conjunction with the activity-coefficient models are shown. Initial implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept for reactions is demonstrated with evaluation of enthalpies of formation for compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen. Directions for future enhancements are outlined.

  13. The SIFT computer and its development. [Software Implemented Fault Tolerance for aircraft control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, J.

    1981-01-01

    Software Implemented Fault Tolerance (SIFT) is an aircraft control computer designed to allow failure probability of less than 10 to the -10th/hour. The system is based on advanced fault-tolerance computing and validation methodology. Since confirmation of reliability by observation is essentially impossible, system reliability is estimated by a Markov model. A mathematical proof is used to justify the validity of the Markov model. System design is represented by a hierarchy of abstract models, and the design proof comprises mathematical proofs that each model is, in fact, an elaboration of the next more abstract model.

  14. A proof-of-concept implementation of a unit-based advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) role: structural empowerment, role clarity and team effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Feistritzer, Nancye R; Jones, Pam O

    2014-03-01

    The quest for decreased cost of care and improved outcomes has created the need for highly effective clinical roles and teams. This article describes the role of a unit-based advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) within a proof-of-concept implementation of a new care delivery model, the Vanderbilt Anticipatory Care Team. Role clarity is central to both structural empowerment of the APRN and team effectiveness. A modified PeaceHealth Team Development Measure tool measured baseline role clarity as a component of overall team effectiveness. A role description for the unit-based APRN based on a comprehensive assessment of the proof-of-concept unit is provided.

  15. Implementation of Shifted Periodic Boundary Conditions in the Large-Scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    Atomic /Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) Software by N Scott Weingarten and James P Larentzos Approved for...0687 ● AUG 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Implementation of Shifted Periodic Boundary Conditions in the Large-Scale Atomic /Molecular...Shifted Periodic Boundary Conditions in the Large-Scale Atomic /Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) Software 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  16. First experiences with the implementation of the European standard EN 62304 on medical device software for the quality assurance of a radiotherapy unit

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background According to the latest amendment of the Medical Device Directive standalone software qualifies as a medical device when intended by the manufacturer to be used for medical purposes. In this context, the EN 62304 standard is applicable which defines the life-cycle requirements for the development and maintenance of medical device software. A pilot project was launched to acquire skills in implementing this standard in a hospital-based environment (in-house manufacture). Methods The EN 62304 standard outlines minimum requirements for each stage of the software life-cycle, defines the activities and tasks to be performed and scales documentation and testing according to its criticality. The required processes were established for the pre-existent decision-support software FlashDumpComparator (FDC) used during the quality assurance of treatment-relevant beam parameters. As the EN 62304 standard implicates compliance with the EN ISO 14971 standard on the application of risk management to medical devices, a risk analysis was carried out to identify potential hazards and reduce the associated risks to acceptable levels. Results The EN 62304 standard is difficult to implement without proper tools, thus open-source software was selected and integrated into a dedicated development platform. The control measures yielded by the risk analysis were independently implemented and verified, and a script-based test automation was retrofitted to reduce the associated test effort. After all documents facilitating the traceability of the specified requirements to the corresponding tests and of the control measures to the proof of execution were generated, the FDC was released as an accessory to the HIT facility. Conclusions The implementation of the EN 62304 standard was time-consuming, and a learning curve had to be overcome during the first iterations of the associated processes, but many process descriptions and all software tools can be re-utilized in follow-up projects

  17. Implementing an integrative multi-agent clinical decision support system with open source software.

    PubMed

    Sayyad Shirabad, Jelber; Wilk, Szymon; Michalowski, Wojtek; Farion, Ken

    2012-02-01

    Clinical decision making is a complex multi-stage process. Decision support can play an important role at each stage of this process. At present, the majority of clinical decision support systems have been focused on supporting only certain stages. In this paper we present the design and implementation of MET3-a prototype multi-agent system providing an integrative decision support that spans over the entire decision making process. The system helps physicians with data collection, diagnosis formulation, treatment planning and finding supporting evidence. MET3 integrates with external hospital information systems via HL7 messages and runs on various computing platforms available at the point of care (e.g., tablet computers, mobile phones). Building MET3 required sophisticated and reliable software technologies. In the past decade the open source software movement has produced mature, stable, industrial strength software systems with a large user base. Therefore, one of the decisions that should be considered before developing or acquiring a decision support system is whether or not one could use open source technologies instead of proprietary ones. We believe MET3 shows that the answer to this question is positive.

  18. The ASTRI mini-array software system (MASS) implementation: a proposal for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanci, Claudio; Tosti, Gino; Conforti, Vito; Schwarz, Joseph; Antolini, Elisa; Antonelli, L. A.; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bruno, Pietro; Canestrari, Rodolfo; Capalbi, Milvia; Cascone, Enrico; Catalano, Osvaldo; Di Paola, Andrea; Di Pierro, Federico; Fioretti, Valentina; Gallozzi, Stefano; Gardiol, Daniele; Gianotti, Fulvio; Giro, Enrico; Grillo, Alessandro; La Palombara, Nicola; Leto, Giuseppe; Lombardi, Saverio; Maccarone, Maria C.; Pareschi, Giovanni; Russo, Federico; Sangiorgi, Pierluca; Scuderi, Salvo; Stringhetti, Luca; Testa, Vincenzo; Trifoglio, Massimo; Vercellone, Stefano; Zoli, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The ASTRI mini-array, composed of nine small-size dual mirror (SST-2M) telescopes, has been proposed to be installed at the southern site of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), as a set of preproduction units of the CTA observatory. The ASTRI mini-array is a collaborative and international effort carried out by Italy, Brazil and South Africa and led by the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics, INAF. We present the main features of the current implementation of the Mini-Array Software System (MASS) now in use for the activities of the ASTRI SST-2M telescope prototype located at the INAF observing station on Mt. Etna, Italy and the characteristics that make it a prototype for the CTA control software system. CTA Data Management (CTADATA) and CTA Array Control and Data Acquisition (CTA-ACTL) requirements and guidelines as well as the ASTRI use cases were considered in the MASS design, most of its features are derived from the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array Control software. The MASS will provide a set of tools to manage all onsite operations of the ASTRI mini-array in order to perform the observations specified in the short term schedule (including monitoring and controlling all the hardware components of each telescope and calibration device), to analyze the acquired data online and to store/retrieve all the data products to/from the onsite repository.

  19. Bridging the gap between PAT concepts and implementation: An integrated software platform for fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chopda, Viki R; Gomes, James; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-01-01

    Bioreactor control significantly impacts both the amount and quality of the product being manufactured. The complexity of the control strategy that is implemented increases with reactor size, which may vary from thousands to tens of thousands of litres in commercial manufacturing. The Process Analytical Technology (PAT) initiative has highlighted the need for having robust monitoring tools and effective control schemes that are capable of taking real time information about the critical quality attributes (CQA) and the critical process parameters (CPP) and executing immediate response as soon as a deviation occurs. However, the limited flexibility that present commercial software packages offer creates a hurdle. Visual programming environments have gradually emerged as potential alternatives to the available text based languages. This paper showcases development of an integrated programme using a visual programming environment for a Sartorius BIOSTAT® B Plus 5L bioreactor through which various peripheral devices are interfaced. The proposed programme facilitates real-time access to data and allows for execution of control actions to follow the desired trajectory. Major benefits of such integrated software system include: (i) improved real time monitoring and control; (ii) reduced variability; (iii) improved performance; (iv) reduced operator-training time; (v) enhanced knowledge management; and (vi) easier PAT implementation.

  20. Architecture and Implementation of OpenPET Firmware and Embedded Software.

    PubMed

    Abu-Nimeh, Faisal T; Ito, Jennifer; Moses, William W; Peng, Qiyu; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2016-04-01

    OpenPET is an open source, modular, extendible, and high-performance platform suitable for multi-channel data acquisition and analysis. Due to the flexibility of the hardware, firmware, and software architectures, the platform is capable of interfacing with a wide variety of detector modules not only in medical imaging but also in homeland security applications. Analog signals from radiation detectors share similar characteristics - a pulse whose area is proportional to the deposited energy and whose leading edge is used to extract a timing signal. As a result, a generic design method of the platform is adopted for the hardware, firmware, and software architectures and implementations. The analog front-end is hosted on a module called a Detector Board, where each board can filter, combine, timestamp, and process multiple channels independently. The processed data is formatted and sent through a backplane bus to a module called Support Board, where 1 Support Board can host up to eight Detector Board modules. The data in the Support Board, coming from 8 Detector Board modules, can be aggregated or correlated (if needed) depending on the algorithm implemented or runtime mode selected. It is then sent out to a computer workstation for further processing. The number of channels (detector modules), to be processed, mandates the overall OpenPET System Configuration, which is designed to handle up to 1,024 channels using 16-channel Detector Boards in the Standard System Configuration and 16,384 channels using 32-channel Detector Boards in the Large System Configuration.

  1. Preventing secondary complications in trauma patients with implementation of a multidisciplinary mobilization team.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Cynthia Ball

    2015-01-01

    Management of the trauma patient is complex. Immobility or bed rest has detrimental effects on multiple body systems. Early mobilization, especially in the multi-injured patient, can be challenging requiring a multidisciplinary team effort. Health care team members' and patient's understanding and perceptions of bed rest greatly influence successful early mobilization. Integrating a multidisciplinary mobility program in the acute care setting can decrease secondary complications and hospital length of stay ultimately improving patient outcomes. Using the strategy for translating research into evidence based practice by incorporating the 4 "Es" of Engage, Educate, Execute, and Evaluate will assist in creating a culture of mobility.

  2. To adopt is to adapt: the process of implementing the ICF with an acute stroke multidisciplinary team in England

    PubMed Central

    Tempest, Stephanie; Harries, Priscilla; Kilbride, Cherry; De Souza, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The success of the International Classifcation of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) depends on its uptake in clinical practice. This project aimed to explore ways the ICF could be used with an acute stroke multidisciplinary team and identify key learning from the implementation process. Method: Using an action research approach, iterative cycles of observe, plan, act and evaluate were used within three phases: exploratory; innovatory and refective. Thematic analysis was undertaken, using a model of immersion and crystallisation, on data collected via interview and focus groups, e-mail communications, minutes from relevant meetings, feld notes and a refective diary. Results: Two overall themes were determined from the data analysis which enabled implementation. There is a need to: (1) adopt the ICF in ways that meet local service needs; and (2) adapt the ICF language and format. Conclusions: The empirical fndings demonstrate how to make the ICF classifcation a clinical reality. First, we need to adopt the ICF as a vehicle to implement local service priorities e.g. to structure a multidisciplinary team report, thus enabling ownership of the implementation process. Second, we need to adapt the ICF terminology and format to make it acceptable for use by clinicians. PMID:22372376

  3. When Leadership Matters: Perspectives from a Teacher Team Implementing Response to Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Michele M.; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research investigating the effectiveness of response to intervention (RTI) has relied on post hoc data analyses and surveys, although few studies have explored interactions among teacher teams. Understanding the synergistic impact of teacher work within the RTI framework may have implications for how school leaders can support teacher…

  4. Planning and Implementing Shared Teaching: An MBA Team-Teaching Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Marilyn M.; Alvis, John M.; Willis, Marilyn

    2005-01-01

    Team teaching is a popular trend in business education. In an attempt to integrate seemingly disparate functional disciplines, a number of business programs have combined courses. Regardless of the courses combined (marketing and finance, management and accounting, economics and strategy, or production and cost accounting), the teaching pedagogy…

  5. The Effectiveness of Information Systems Teams as Change Agents in the Implementation of Business Process Reengineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Gary L.

    2009-01-01

    Changes to information systems and technology (IS/IT) are happening faster than ever before. A literature review suggested within business process reengineering (BPR) there is limited information on what an IS/IT team could do to reduce resistance to change and increase user acceptance. The purpose of this ethnographic case study was to explore…

  6. Implementing a team-based daily goals sheet in a non-ICU setting.

    PubMed

    Holzmueller, Christine G; Timmel, Joanne; Kent, Paula S; Schulick, Richard D; Pronovost, Peter J

    2009-07-01

    A tool was developed to improve communication in non-intensive care unit inpatient units. This tool clarifies patient-centered goals, provides an accurate information source for each patient, and helps nurses communicate more effectively with one another and the surgical team.

  7. Introductory Molecular Orbital Theory: An Honors General Chemistry Computational Lab as Implemented Using Three-Dimensional Modeling Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruddick, Kristie R.; Parrill, Abby L.; Petersen, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a computational molecular orbital theory experiment was implemented in a first-semester honors general chemistry course. Students used the GAMESS (General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure System) quantum mechanical software (as implemented in ChemBio3D) to optimize the geometry for various small molecules. Extended Huckel…

  8. Long-Term Protective Factor Outcomes of Evidence-Based Interventions Implemented by Community Teams through a Community-University Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Cleve; Spoth, Richard L.; Shin, Chungyeol; Schainker, Lisa M.; Greenberg, Mark T.; Feinberg, Mark

    2009-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly common for community teams or coalitions to implement programming for children and families designed to promote positive youth development and prevent adolescent problem behaviors. However, there has been only limited rigorous study of the effectiveness of community teams' programming efforts to produce positive…

  9. Development and Implementation of Team-Based Panel Management Tools: Filling the Gap between Patient and Population Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Watts, Brook; Lawrence, Renée H; Drawz, Paul; Carter, Cameron; Shumaker, Amy Hirsch; Kern, Elizabeth F

    2016-08-01

    Effective team-based models of care, such as the Patient-Centered Medical Home, require electronic tools to support proactive population management strategies that emphasize care coordination and quality improvement. Despite the spread of electronic health records (EHRs) and vendors marketing population health tools, clinical practices still may lack the ability to have: (1) local control over types of data collected/reports generated, (2) timely data (eg, up-to-date data, not several months old), and accordingly (3) the ability to efficiently monitor and improve patient outcomes. This article describes a quality improvement project at the hospital system level to develop and implement a flexible panel management (PM) tool to improve care of subpopulations of patients (eg, panels of patients with diabetes) by clinical teams. An in-depth case analysis approach is used to explore barriers and facilitators in building a PM registry tool for team-based management needs using standard data elements (eg, laboratory values, pharmacy records) found in EHRs. Also described are factors that may contribute to sustainability; to date the tool has been adapted to 6 disease-focused subpopulations encompassing more than 200,000 patients. Two key lessons emerged from this initiative: (1) though challenging, team-based clinical end users and information technology needed to work together consistently to refine the product, and (2) locally developed population management tools can provide efficient data tracking for frontline clinical teams and leadership. The preliminary work identified critical gaps that were successfully addressed by building local PM registry tools from EHR-derived data and offers lessons learned for others engaged in similar work. (Population Health Management 2016;19:232-239).

  10. ACS: ALMA Common Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiozzi, Gianluca; Šekoranja, Matej

    2013-02-01

    ALMA Common Software (ACS) provides a software infrastructure common to all ALMA partners and consists of a documented collection of common patterns and components which implement those patterns. The heart of ACS is based on a distributed Component-Container model, with ACS Components implemented as CORBA objects in any of the supported programming languages. ACS provides common CORBA-based services such as logging, error and alarm management, configuration database and lifecycle management. Although designed for ALMA, ACS can and is being used in other control systems and distributed software projects, since it implements proven design patterns using state of the art, reliable technology. It also allows, through the use of well-known standard constructs and components, that other team members whom are not authors of ACS easily understand the architecture of software modules, making maintenance affordable even on a very large project.

  11. The design and implementation of a parallel unstructured Euler solver using software primitives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, R.; Mavriplis, D. J.; Saltz, J.; Gupta, S.; Ponnusamy, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the implementation of a three-dimensional unstructured grid Euler-solver on massively parallel distributed-memory computer architectures. The goal is to minimize solution time by achieving high computational rates with a numerically efficient algorithm. An unstructured multigrid algorithm with an edge-based data structure has been adopted, and a number of optimizations have been devised and implemented in order to accelerate the parallel communication rates. The implementation is carried out by creating a set of software tools, which provide an interface between the parallelization issues and the sequential code, while providing a basis for future automatic run-time compilation support. Large practical unstructured grid problems are solved on the Intel iPSC/860 hypercube and Intel Touchstone Delta machine. The quantitative effect of the various optimizations are demonstrated, and we show that the combined effect of these optimizations leads to roughly a factor of three performance improvement. The overall solution efficiency is compared with that obtained on the CRAY-YMP vector supercomputer.

  12. Design and implementation of a parallel unstructured Euler solver using software primitives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, R.; Mavriplis, D. J.; Saltz, J.; Gupta, S.; Ponnusamy, R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the implementation of a three-dimensional unstructured-grid Euler solver on massively parallel distributed-memory computer architectures. The goal is to minimize solution time by achieving high computational rates with a numerically efficient algorithm. An unstructured multigrid algorithm with an edge-based data structure has been adopted, and a number of optimizations have been devised and implemented to accelerate the parallel computational rates. The implementation is carried out by creating a set of software tools, which provide an interface between the parallelization issues and the sequential code, while providing a basis for future automatic run-time compilation support. Large practical unstructured grid problems are solved on the Intel iPSC/860 hypercube and Intel Touchstone Delta machine. The quantitative effects of the various optimizations are demonstrated, and we show that the combined effect of these optimizations leads to roughly a factor of 3 performance improvement. The overall solution efficiency is compared with that obtained on the Cray Y-MP vector supercomputer.

  13. Multidisciplinary care team for cancer patients and its implementation in several Middle Eastern countries

    PubMed Central

    Silbermann, M.; Pitsillides, B.; Al-Alfi, N.; Omran, S.; Al-Jabri, K.; Elshamy, K.; Ghrayeb, I.; Livneh, J.; Daher, M.; Charalambous, H.; Jafferri, A.; Fink, R.; El-Shamy, M.

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces palliative care to cancer patients in Middle Eastern countries. It considers the importance of the multidisciplinary team in providing an adequate service to the patient and his/her family. It provides views of professionals from the various countries with regard to the role of the nurse in such teams; whereby the three elements of palliative care nursing entail: 1. Working directly with patients and families; 2. Working with other health and social care professionals to network and co-ordinate services; and 3. working at an organizational level to plan, develop and manage service provision in local, regional and national settings. This article also details the challenges that nurses face in the Middle East and outlines the preferable ways to overcome such challenges. The latter include more focused educational activities at the undergraduate and graduate levels and continuous clinical training throughout their work as palliative care nurse specialists. PMID:24001762

  14. Multidisciplinary care team for cancer patients and its implementation in several Middle Eastern countries.

    PubMed

    Silbermann, M; Pitsillides, B; Al-Alfi, N; Omran, S; Al-Jabri, K; Elshamy, K; Ghrayeb, I; Livneh, J; Daher, M; Charalambous, H; Jafferri, A; Fink, R; El-Shamy, M

    2013-10-01

    This article introduces palliative care to cancer patients in Middle Eastern countries. It considers the importance of the multidisciplinary team in providing an adequate service to the patient and his/her family. It provides views of professionals from the various countries with regard to the role of the nurse in such teams; whereby the three elements of palliative care nursing entail: 1. Working directly with patients and families; 2. Working with other health and social care professionals to network and co-ordinate services; and 3. working at an organizational level to plan, develop and manage service provision in local, regional and national settings. This article also details the challenges that nurses face in the Middle East and outlines the preferable ways to overcome such challenges. The latter include more focused educational activities at the undergraduate and graduate levels and continuous clinical training throughout their work as palliative care nurse specialists.

  15. Implementation of an Intravenous/Phlebotomy Team at Walter Reed Army Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    skills. It is imperative for WRAMC to require annual recertification in basic IV skills for all nurses and physicians. The nursing education office at...recertification should remain with the nursing education office. Estimates for FTE’s were developed from information provided by WRAMC’s department of nursing in...essential to the successful operation of the IV team. Materials required for recertification are currently available in the department of nursing education and

  16. SU-E-T-103: Development and Implementation of Web Based Quality Control Software

    SciTech Connect

    Studinski, R; Taylor, R; Angers, C; La Russa, D; Clark, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Historically many radiation medicine programs have maintained their Quality Control (QC) test results in paper records or Microsoft Excel worksheets. Both these approaches represent significant logistical challenges, and are not predisposed to data review and approval. It has been our group's aim to develop and implement web based software designed not just to record and store QC data in a centralized database, but to provide scheduling and data review tools to help manage a radiation therapy clinics Equipment Quality control program. Methods: The software was written in the Python programming language using the Django web framework. In order to promote collaboration and validation from other centres the code was made open source and is freely available to the public via an online source code repository. The code was written to provide a common user interface for data entry, formalize the review and approval process, and offer automated data trending and process control analysis of test results. Results: As of February 2014, our installation of QAtrack+ has 180 tests defined in its database and has collected ∼22 000 test results, all of which have been reviewed and approved by a physicist via QATrack+'s review tools. These results include records for quality control of Elekta accelerators, CT simulators, our brachytherapy programme, TomoTherapy and Cyberknife units. Currently at least 5 other centres are known to be running QAtrack+ clinically, forming the start of an international user community. Conclusion: QAtrack+ has proven to be an effective tool for collecting radiation therapy QC data, allowing for rapid review and trending of data for a wide variety of treatment units. As free and open source software, all source code, documentation and a bug tracker are available to the public at https://bitbucket.org/tohccmedphys/qatrackplus/.

  17. ThermoData engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 4. Chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Muzny, Chris D; Frenkel, Michael

    2009-12-01

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported recently in this journal. This paper describes the first application of this concept to the evaluation of thermodynamic properties for chemical reactions. Reaction properties evaluated are the enthalpies, entropies, Gibbs energies, and thermodynamic equilibrium constants. Details of key considerations in the critical evaluation of enthalpies of formation and of standard entropies for organic compounds are discussed in relation to their application in the calculation of reaction properties. Extensions to the class structure of the program are described that allow close linkage between the derived reaction properties and the underlying pure-component properties. Derivation of pure-component enthalpies of formation and of standard entropies through the use of directly measured reaction properties (enthalpies of reaction and equilibrium constants) is described. Directions for future enhancements are outlined.

  18. Advancing the Interdisciplinary Collaborative Health Team Model: Applying Democratic Professionalism, Implementation Science, and Therapeutic Alliance to Enact Social Justice Practice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This essay reframes the interdisciplinary collaborative health team model by proposing the application of 3 foundational pillars-democratic professionalism, implementation science, and therapeutic alliance to advance this practice. The aim was to address challenges to the model, enhance their functional capacity, and explicate and enact social justice practices to affect individual health outcomes while simultaneously addressing health inequities. The pillars are described and examples from the author's dissertation research illustrate how the pillars were used to bring about action. Related theories, models, and frameworks that have negotiation, capacity building, collaboration, and knowledge/task/power sharing as central concepts are presented under each of the pillars.

  19. Implementation of a data management software system for SSME test history data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Kenneth

    1986-01-01

    The implementation of a software system for managing Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) test/flight historical data is presented. The software system uses the database management system RIM7 for primary data storage and routine data management, but includes several FORTRAN programs, described here, which provide customized access to the RIM7 database. The consolidation, modification, and transfer of data from the database THIST, to the RIM7 database THISRM is discussed. The RIM7 utility modules for generating some standard reports from THISRM and performing some routine updating and maintenance are briefly described. The FORTRAN accessing programs described include programs for initial loading of large data sets into the database, capturing data from files for database inclusion, and producing specialized statistical reports which cannot be provided by the RIM7 report generator utility. An expert system tutorial, constructed using the expert system shell product INSIGHT2, is described. Finally, a potential expert system, which would analyze data in the database, is outlined. This system could use INSIGHT2 as well and would take advantage of RIM7's compatibility with the microcomputer database system RBase 5000.

  20. Implementation and statistical evaluation of a web-based software for bone age assessment.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Metin; Guvenis, Albert; Guven, Esra; Talat, Didar; Haktan, Mahmut

    2011-12-01

    Bone age assessment is a tedious procedure carried out for assessing growth disorders of children using the left hand radiograph. The purpose of this work was to implement and evaluate a web-based software based on the Tanner and Whitehouse method in a pediatric endocrine department of a social security hospital processing 600-1,000 radiographs per year. The system was evaluated by using a statistical technique for comparing measurement methods in order to test the performance of the procedure and a time study to assess its feasibility under local conditions. It was found that the intra-observer variation for the web-based Tanner and Whitehouse method was smaller (95% confidence limits, -0.77 to 0.97 vs. -0.45 to 0.37) then the conventional Greulich and Pyle manual method and the average net time required for an age assessment was 2.4 min. We therefore concluded that the web-based system should be adopted for its higher precision and relatively low turnaround time for cases requiring serial readings on the same patient. The statistical method demonstrated in this study can also serve as an example for evaluating similar biomedical parameter assessing software.

  1. On the characterization and software implementation of general protein lattice models.

    PubMed

    Bechini, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    models of proteins have been widely used as a practical means to computationally investigate general properties of the system. In lattice models any sterically feasible conformation is represented as a self-avoiding walk on a lattice, and residue types are limited in number. So far, only two- or three-dimensional lattices have been used. The inspection of the neighborhood of alpha carbons in the core of real proteins reveals that also lattices with higher coordination numbers, possibly in higher dimensional spaces, can be adopted. In this paper, a new general parametric lattice model for simplified protein conformations is proposed and investigated. It is shown how the supporting software can be consistently designed to let algorithms that operate on protein structures be implemented in a lattice-agnostic way. The necessary theoretical foundations are developed and organically presented, pinpointing the role of the concept of main directions in lattice-agnostic model handling. Subsequently, the model features across dimensions and lattice types are explored in tests performed on benchmark protein sequences, using a Python implementation. Simulations give insights on the use of square and triangular lattices in a range of dimensions. The trend of potential minimum for sequences of different lengths, varying the lattice dimension, is uncovered. Moreover, an extensive quantitative characterization of the usage of the so-called "move types" is reported for the first time. The proposed general framework for the development of lattice models is simple yet complete, and an object-oriented architecture can be proficiently employed for the supporting software, by designing ad-hoc classes. The proposed framework represents a new general viewpoint that potentially subsumes a number of solutions previously studied. The adoption of the described model pushes to look at protein structure issues from a more general and essential perspective, making computational investigations

  2. On the Characterization and Software Implementation of General Protein Lattice Models

    PubMed Central

    Bechini, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Abstract models of proteins have been widely used as a practical means to computationally investigate general properties of the system. In lattice models any sterically feasible conformation is represented as a self-avoiding walk on a lattice, and residue types are limited in number. So far, only two- or three-dimensional lattices have been used. The inspection of the neighborhood of alpha carbons in the core of real proteins reveals that also lattices with higher coordination numbers, possibly in higher dimensional spaces, can be adopted. In this paper, a new general parametric lattice model for simplified protein conformations is proposed and investigated. It is shown how the supporting software can be consistently designed to let algorithms that operate on protein structures be implemented in a lattice-agnostic way. The necessary theoretical foundations are developed and organically presented, pinpointing the role of the concept of main directions in lattice-agnostic model handling. Subsequently, the model features across dimensions and lattice types are explored in tests performed on benchmark protein sequences, using a Python implementation. Simulations give insights on the use of square and triangular lattices in a range of dimensions. The trend of potential minimum for sequences of different lengths, varying the lattice dimension, is uncovered. Moreover, an extensive quantitative characterization of the usage of the so-called “move types” is reported for the first time. The proposed general framework for the development of lattice models is simple yet complete, and an object-oriented architecture can be proficiently employed for the supporting software, by designing ad-hoc classes. The proposed framework represents a new general viewpoint that potentially subsumes a number of solutions previously studied. The adoption of the described model pushes to look at protein structure issues from a more general and essential perspective, making computational

  3. Architecture and Implementation of OpenPET Firmware and Embedded Software

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Nimeh, Faisal T.; Ito, Jennifer; Moses, William W.; Peng, Qiyu; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2016-01-01

    OpenPET is an open source, modular, extendible, and high-performance platform suitable for multi-channel data acquisition and analysis. Due to the flexibility of the hardware, firmware, and software architectures, the platform is capable of interfacing with a wide variety of detector modules not only in medical imaging but also in homeland security applications. Analog signals from radiation detectors share similar characteristics – a pulse whose area is proportional to the deposited energy and whose leading edge is used to extract a timing signal. As a result, a generic design method of the platform is adopted for the hardware, firmware, and software architectures and implementations. The analog front-end is hosted on a module called a Detector Board, where each board can filter, combine, timestamp, and process multiple channels independently. The processed data is formatted and sent through a backplane bus to a module called Support Board, where 1 Support Board can host up to eight Detector Board modules. The data in the Support Board, coming from 8 Detector Board modules, can be aggregated or correlated (if needed) depending on the algorithm implemented or runtime mode selected. It is then sent out to a computer workstation for further processing. The number of channels (detector modules), to be processed, mandates the overall OpenPET System Configuration, which is designed to handle up to 1,024 channels using 16-channel Detector Boards in the Standard System Configuration and 16,384 channels using 32-channel Detector Boards in the Large System Configuration. PMID:27110034

  4. Research and implementation of mining GIS software for unstratified mineral deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei; Liu, Yajing; Mao, Shanjun

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, a professional mining GIS software called Geological and Surveying Spatial Management Information System (GSSMIS) was designed and implemented. Due to restriction of mine design and computerization level, geostatistics and 3D block model were not fully applied in metal mining. The geologists interpreted drill holes and delimit mineral boundaries on the 2D plane and section. Unlike other 3D mining software, a 2D & 3D integration technological architecture for unstratified mineral deposit was proposed considering the conventional exploration and exploitation approaches. The whole system contains 3 modules: geological and surveying database module, 2D MGIS module and 3D modeling and visualization module. Database module input, manage, store and extract all kinds of geological and surveying data. 2D MGIS module provide lots of toolbox for plotting all sorts of engineering maps and processing advance analysis such as geostatistical and uncertain analysis, reserve computation and mining economic estimation. GSSMIS has a typical COM GIS configuration with 5 different developing levels. The 5 level structure has advantage of less coding, easier maintenance and management, good ability of extension and secondary development, adding or subtracting the modules according to user's need. Also, 5 important system characters were introduced in the article, which were: 1) 2D auto-mapping; 2) interactive interpretation of geological boundaries; 3) mutual modifications of plane and section; 4) 3D solid modeling; 5) section profile cutting. Finally, the article presented the implement of GSSMIS in Laixin Iron, Shandong Province. The system changed traditional handcraft mapping mode thoroughly, relieved the heavy burden of engineers and promoted the process of computerization and informatization in China.

  5. [Perceptions of the multi-professional team on the implementation of palliative care in intensive care units].

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ceci Figueredo; Souza, Dalila Melo; Pedreira, Larissa Chaves; dos Santos, Manuela Ribeiro; Faustino, Tássia Nery

    2013-09-01

    The scope of this paper was to analyze the perceptions of the multi-professional team on the implementation of palliative care in an adult intensive care unit. An exploratory-descriptive study using a qualitative approach was conducted with 14 health professionals from a public teaching hospital. The information was collected between February and April 2012, by means of semi-structured interviews and non-participatory observation interpreted using content analysis. Three thematic categories were identified: Care for terminal patients in an ICU fostering physical comfort; Lack of preparation of the team in dealing with terminal patients; and Challenges of palliative care practices in the intensive care environment. The interviewed parties reported having some knowledge of the proposal for palliative care though divergences were observed in the therapeutic conduct of the team in the care provided, demonstrating a lack of interaction and communication among the professionals. The drafting of a national policy to promote care for terminally ill patients is necessary, as well as ongoing training of professionals and the creation of care protocols for promoting the comfort of the patients and their families during the end of life phase.

  6. Implementation of New Process Models for Tailored Polymer Composite Structures into Processing Software Packages

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Smith, Mark T.

    2010-02-23

    This report describes the work conducted under the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) (Nr. 260) between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Autodesk, Inc. to develop and implement process models for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) in processing software packages. The structure of this report is organized as follows. After the Introduction Section (Section 1), Section 2 summarizes the current fiber orientation models developed for injection-molded short-fiber thermoplastics (SFTs). Section 3 provides an assessment of these models to determine their capabilities and limitations, and the developments needed for injection-molded LFTs. Section 4 then focuses on the development of a new fiber orientation model for LFTs. This model is termed the anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model as it explores the concept of anisotropic rotary diffusion to capture the fiber-fiber interaction in long-fiber suspensions and uses the reduced strain closure method of Wang et al. to slow down the orientation kinetics in concentrated suspensions. In contrast to fiber orientation modeling, before this project, no standard model was developed to predict the fiber length distribution in molded fiber composites. Section 5 is therefore devoted to the development of a fiber length attrition model in the mold. Sections 6 and 7 address the implementations of the models in AMI, and the conclusions drawn from this work is presented in Section 8.

  7. Software Environment for the Implementation of Tomographic Reconstruction Algorithms Applied to Cases of Few Projections

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, A. B.; Valda, A.; Somacal, H.

    2007-10-26

    Usually tomographic procedure requires a set of projections around the object under study and a mathematical processing of such projections through reconstruction algorithms. An accurate reconstruction requires a proper number of projections (angular sampling) and a proper number of elements in each projection (linear sampling). However in several practical cases it is not possible to fulfill these conditions leading to the so-called problem of few projections. In this case, iterative reconstruction algorithms are more suitable than analytic ones. In this work we present a program written in C++ that provides an environment for two iterative algorithm implementations, one algebraic and the other statistical. The software allows the user a full definition of the acquisition and reconstruction geometries used for the reconstruction algorithms but also to perform projection and backprojection operations. A set of analysis tools was implemented for the characterization of the convergence process. We analyze the performance of the algorithms on numerical phantoms and present the reconstruction of experimental data with few projections coming from transmission X-ray and micro PIXE (Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission) images.

  8. A secure and easy-to-implement web-based communication framework for caregiving robot teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuna, G.; Daş, R.; Tuna, A.; Örenbaş, H.; Baykara, M.; Gülez, K.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, robots have started to become more commonplace in our lives, from factory floors to museums, festivals and shows. They have started to change how we work and play. With an increase in the population of the elderly, they have also been started to be used for caregiving services, and hence many countries have been investing in the robot development. The advancements in robotics and wireless communications has led to the emergence of autonomous caregiving robot teams which cooperate to accomplish a set of tasks assigned by human operators. Although wireless communications and devices are flexible and convenient, they are vulnerable to many risks compared to traditional wired networks. Since robots with wireless communication capability transmit all data types, including sensory, coordination, and control, through radio frequencies, they are open to intruders and attackers unless protected and their openness may lead to many security issues such as data theft, passive listening, and service interruption. In this paper, a secure web-based communication framework is proposed to address potential security threats due to wireless communication in robot-robot and human-robot interaction. The proposed framework is simple and practical, and can be used by caregiving robot teams in the exchange of sensory data as well as coordination and control data.

  9. Woods Hole Image Processing System Software implementation; using NetCDF as a software interface for image processing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paskevich, Valerie F.

    1992-01-01

    The Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology has been involved in the collection, processing and digital mosaicking of high, medium and low-resolution side-scan sonar data during the past 6 years. In the past, processing and digital mosaicking has been accomplished with a dedicated, shore-based computer system. With the need to process sidescan data in the field with increased power and reduced cost of major workstations, a need to have an image processing package on a UNIX based computer system which could be utilized in the field as well as be more generally available to Branch personnel was identified. This report describes the initial development of that package referred to as the Woods Hole Image Processing System (WHIPS). The software was developed using the Unidata NetCDF software interface to allow data to be more readily portable between different computer operating systems.

  10. An SAS Macro for Implementing the Modified Bollen-Stine Bootstrap for Missing Data: Implementing the Bootstrap Using Existing Structural Equation Modeling Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enders, Craig K.

    2005-01-01

    The Bollen-Stine bootstrap can be used to correct for standard error and fit statistic bias that occurs in structural equation modeling (SEM) applications due to nonnormal data. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the use of a custom SAS macro program that can be used to implement the Bollen-Stine bootstrap with existing SEM software.…

  11. Implementing evidence-based practice using an interprofessional team approach: part two.

    PubMed

    Bohnenkamp, Susan; Pelton, Nicole; Rishel, Cindy J; Kurtin, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    The complexity inherent in the inpatient oncology population requires effective interprofessional collaboration and integrated evidence-based practice (EBP), drawing from each of the disciplines to achieve desired outcomes. Each member of the team lends a strength and expertise that, when combined, often results in outcomes greater than the sum of its parts (Hall & Weaver, 2001; Petri, 2010; Pullon & Fry, 2005). EBP promotes the use of research to solve issues raised in day-to-day nursing practice. This article provides an overview and summary of an evidence-based project to increase compliance of sequential compression devices (SCDs) in gynecologic oncology and urology patients on a post-surgical inpatient unit using the Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) model for continuous quality improvement (CQI) (Institute for Innovation and Improvement, 2013).

  12. The Implementation Process of Two Multigrade/Multiyear Teams in Two Middle Schools in South Florida: A Cross-Site Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heeney, Margaret R.

    Multigrade grouping is the practice of intentionally grouping two or more grade levels in the same classroom to enhance learning. It is becoming a much discussed and implemented alternative grouping practice in middle level education. This paper describes the implementation process of two multigrade "teams" in two Florida middle schools,…

  13. Development and Implementation of Software for Visualizing and Editing Multidimensional Flight Simulation Input Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whelan, Todd Michael

    1996-01-01

    In a real-time or batch mode simulation that is designed to model aircraft dynamics over a wide range of flight conditions, a table look- up scheme is implemented to determine the forces and moments on the vehicle based upon the values of parameters such as angle of attack, altitude, Mach number, and control surface deflections. Simulation Aerodynamic Variable Interface (SAVI) is a graphical user interface to the flight simulation input data, designed to operate on workstations that support X Windows. The purpose of the application is to provide two and three dimensional visualization of the data, to allow an intuitive sense of the data set. SAVI also allows the user to manipulate the data, either to conduct an interactive study of the influence of changes on the vehicle dynamics, or to make revisions to data set based on new information such as flight test. This paper discusses the reasons for developing the application, provides an overview of its capabilities, and outlines the software architecture and operating environment.

  14. Designing and Implementing a Distributed System Architecture for the Mars Rover Mission Planning Software (Maestro)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldgof, Gregory M.

    2005-01-01

    Distributed systems allow scientists from around the world to plan missions concurrently, while being updated on the revisions of their colleagues in real time. However, permitting multiple clients to simultaneously modify a single data repository can quickly lead to data corruption or inconsistent states between users. Since our message broker, the Java Message Service, does not ensure that messages will be received in the order they were published, we must implement our own numbering scheme to guarantee that changes to mission plans are performed in the correct sequence. Furthermore, distributed architectures must ensure that as new users connect to the system, they synchronize with the database without missing any messages or falling into an inconsistent state. Robust systems must also guarantee that all clients will remain synchronized with the database even in the case of multiple client failure, which can occur at any time due to lost network connections or a user's own system instability. The final design for the distributed system behind the Mars rover mission planning software fulfills all of these requirements and upon completion will be deployed to MER at the end of 2005 as well as Phoenix (2007) and MSL (2009).

  15. Radioactive waste acceptance team and generator interface yields successful implementation of waste acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, J.G.; Griffin, W.A.; Rast, D.M.

    1996-02-01

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project has developed a successful Low Level Waste Shipping Program in compliance with the Nevada Test Site Defense Waste Acceptance Criteria, Certification, and Transfer Requirements, NVO-325, Revision 1. This shipping program is responsible for the successful disposal of more than 4 million cubic feet of Low Level Waste over the past decade. The success of the Fernald Low Level Waste Shipping Program is due to the generator program staff working closely with the DOE-NV Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program Team to achieve win/win situations. The teamwork is the direct result of dedicated, proactive professionals working together toward a common objective: the safe disposition of low level radioactive waste. The growth and development of this program has many lessons learned to share with the low level waste generating community. The recognition of reciprocal interests enables consistently high annual volumes of Fernald waste disposal at the Nevada Test Site without incident. The large volumes successfully disposed serve testimony to the success of the program which is equally important to all Nevada Test Site and Fernald stakeholders. The Fernald approach to success is currently being shared with other low-level waste generators through DOE-NV sponsored outreach programs. This paper introduces examples of Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation contributions to the DOE-NV Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program outreach initiatives. These practices are applicable to other low level waste disposal programs whether federal, commercial, domestic or international.

  16. A feasibility study of expert patient and community mental health team led bipolar psychoeducation groups: implementing an evidence based practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Group psychoeducation is a cost effective intervention which reduces relapse and improves functioning in bipolar disorder but is rarely implemented. The aim of this study was to identify the acceptability and feasibility of a group psychoeducation programme delivered by community mental health teams (CMHTs) and peer specialist (PS) facilitators. Organisational learning was used to identify and address systematically barriers and enablers, at organisational, health professional and patient levels, to its implementation into a routine service. Methods A systematic examination of barriers and enablers to a three day training process informed the delivery of a first treatment group and a similar process informed the delivery of the second treatment group. Triangulation of research methods improved its internal validity: direct observation of training, self-rated surveys of participant experiences, group discussion, and thematically analysed individual participant and facilitator interviews were employed. Results Barriers and enablers were identified at organisational, educational, treatment content, facilitator and patient levels. All barriers under the control of the research team were addressed with subsequent improvements in patient knowledge about the condition and about local service. In addition, self-management, agency and altruism were enhanced. Barriers that could not be addressed required senior clinical and education leadership outside the research team’s control. PS and professional facilitators were successfully trained and worked together to deliver groups which were generally reported as being beneficial. Conclusion Psychoeducation groups involving CMHT and PS facilitators is acceptable and feasible but their sustainment requires senior leadership within and outside the organisation that control finance and education services. PMID:24215655

  17. Design and implementation of real-time software radio for anti-interference GPS/WAAS sensors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Juang, Jyh-Ching; Seo, Jiwon; Lo, Sherman; Akos, Dennis M; De Lorenzo, David S; Enge, Per

    2012-10-01

    Adaptive antenna array processing is widely known to provide significant anti-interference capabilities within a Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receiver. A main challenge in the quest for such receiver architecture has always been the computational/processing requirements. Even more demanding would be to try and incorporate the flexibility of the Software-Defined Radio (SDR) design philosophy in such an implementation. This paper documents a feasible approach to a real-time SDR implementation of a beam-steered GNSS receiver and validates its performance. This research implements a real-time software receiver on a widely-available x86-based multi-core microprocessor to process four-element antenna array data streams sampled with 16-bit resolution. The software receiver is capable of 12 channels all-in-view Controlled Reception Pattern Antenna (CRPA) array processing capable of rejecting multiple interferers. Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) instructions assembly coding and multithreaded programming, the key to such an implementation to reduce computational complexity, are fully documented within the paper. In conventional antenna array systems, receivers use the geometry of antennas and cable lengths known in advance. The documented CRPA implementation is architected to operate without extensive set-up and pre-calibration and leverages Space-Time Adaptive Processing (STAP) to provide adaptation in both the frequency and space domains. The validation component of the paper demonstrates that the developed software receiver operates in real time with live Global Positioning System (GPS) and Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) L1 C/A code signal. Further, interference rejection capabilities of the implementation are also demonstrated using multiple synthetic interferers which are added to the live data stream.

  18. Design and Implementation of Real-Time Software Radio for Anti-Interference GPS/WAAS Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Juang, Jyh-Ching; Seo, Jiwon; Lo, Sherman; Akos, Dennis M.; De Lorenzo, David S.; Enge, Per

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive antenna array processing is widely known to provide significant anti-interference capabilities within a Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receiver. A main challenge in the quest for such receiver architecture has always been the computational/processing requirements. Even more demanding would be to try and incorporate the flexibility of the Software-Defined Radio (SDR) design philosophy in such an implementation. This paper documents a feasible approach to a real-time SDR implementation of a beam-steered GNSS receiver and validates its performance. This research implements a real-time software receiver on a widely-available x86-based multi-core microprocessor to process four-element antenna array data streams sampled with 16-bit resolution. The software receiver is capable of 12 channels all-in-view Controlled Reception Pattern Antenna (CRPA) array processing capable of rejecting multiple interferers. Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) instructions assembly coding and multithreaded programming, the key to such an implementation to reduce computational complexity, are fully documented within the paper. In conventional antenna array systems, receivers use the geometry of antennas and cable lengths known in advance. The documented CRPA implementation is architected to operate without extensive set-up and pre-calibration and leverages Space-Time Adaptive Processing (STAP) to provide adaptation in both the frequency and space domains. The validation component of the paper demonstrates that the developed software receiver operates in real time with live Global Positioning System (GPS) and Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) L1 C/A code signal. Further, interference rejection capabilities of the implementation are also demonstrated using multiple synthetic interferers which are added to the live data stream. PMID:23202002

  19. [The implementation of interdisciplinarity in the work routine of the family health care team].

    PubMed

    Scherer, Magda Duarte dos Anjos; de Pires, Denise Elvira Pires; Jean, Rémy

    2013-11-01

    Interdisciplinarity in the work routine of professionals of a Residency Course on Family Health in Southern Brazil was investigated in a qualitative study involving 11 residents and 5 supervisors of seven professions. Through interviews, observations and focal groups the existence of interdisciplinarity in practice was analyzed, duly identifying favorable and unfavorable aspects for its implementation. Interdisciplinarity was expressed as a complex process and concrete action, which occurs in the dramatic implications of its usage, in a dialectical relationship with the political and institutional context. The study revealed that working in family health care renders the work more complex and that the professionals experience difficulties in sharing knowledge and making the transition between multidisciplinarity and interdisciplinarity. The study concludes that interdisciplinarity requires the integrated use of knowledge in the multi-professional practice, the crossing of disciplinary boundaries, the development of competencies to address the challenges of the work environment and personal attitude as a basic component for professional action.

  20. Implementation of a Software Application for Presurgical Case History Review of Frozen Section Pathology Cases

    PubMed Central

    Norgan, Andrew P.; Okeson, Mathew L.; Juskewitch, Justin E.; Shah, Kabeer K.; Sukov, William R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The frozen section pathology practice at Mayo Clinic in Rochester performs ~20,000 intraoperative consultations a year (~70–80/weekday). To prepare for intraoperative consultations, surgical pathology fellows and residents review the case history, previous pathology, and relevant imaging the day before surgery. Before the work described herein, review of pending surgical pathology cases was a paper-based process requiring handwritten transcription from the electronic health record, a laborious and potentially error prone process. Methods: To facilitate more efficient case review, a modular extension of an existing surgical listing software application (Surgical and Procedure Scheduling [SPS]) was developed. The module (SPS-pathology-specific module [PM]) added pathology-specific functionality including recording case notes, prefetching of radiology, pathology, and operative reports from the medical record, flagging infectious cases, and real-time tracking of cases in the operating room. After implementation, users were surveyed about its impact on the surgical pathology practice. Results: There were 16 survey respondents (five staff pathologists and eleven residents or fellows). All trainees (11/11) responded that the application improved an aspect of surgical list review including abstraction from medical records (10/11), identification of possibly infectious cases (7/11), and speed of list preparation (10/11). The average reported time savings in list preparation was 1.4 h/day. Respondents indicated the application improved the speed (11/16), clarity (13/16), and accuracy (10/16) of morning report. During the workday, respondents reported the application improved real-time case review (14/16) and situational awareness of ongoing cases (13/16). Conclusions: A majority of respondents found the SPS-PM improved all preparatory and logistical aspects of the Mayo Clinic frozen section surgical pathology practice. In addition, use of the SPS-PM saved an

  1. Geoscience data standards, software implementations, and the Internet. Where we came from and where we might be going.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blodgett, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Geographic information science and the coupled database and software systems that have grown from it have been evolving since the early 1990s. The multi-file shapefile package, invented early in this evolution, is an example of a highly generalized file format that can be used as an archival, interchange, and format for program execution. There are other formats, such as GeoTIFF and NetCDF that have similar characteristics. These de-facto standard (in contrast to the formally defined and published standards) formats, while not initially designed for machine-readable web-services, are used in them extensively. Relying on these formats allows legacy software to be adapted to web-services, but may require complicate software development to handle dynamic introspection of these legacy file formats' metadata. A generalized system of web-service types that offer archive, interchange, and run-time capabilities based on commonly implemented file formats and established web-service specifications has emerged from exemplar implementations. For example, an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Feature Service is used to serve sites or model polygons and an OGC Sensor Observation Service provides time series data for the sites. The broad system of data formats, web-service types, and freely available software that implements the system will be described. The presentation will include a perspective on the future of this basic system and how it relates to scientific domain specific information models such as the Open Geospatial Consortium standards for geographic, hydrologic, and hydrogeologic data.

  2. Cost-Minimization Model of a Multidisciplinary Antibiotic Stewardship Team Based on a Successful Implementation on a Urology Ward of an Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dik, Jan-Willem H.; Hendrix, Ron; Friedrich, Alex W.; Luttjeboer, Jos; Nannan Panday, Prashant; Wilting, Kasper R.; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.; Postma, Maarten J.; Sinha, Bhanu

    2015-01-01

    Background In order to stimulate appropriate antimicrobial use and thereby lower the chances of resistance development, an Antibiotic Stewardship Team (A-Team) has been implemented at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Focus of the A-Team was a pro-active day 2 case-audit, which was financially evaluated here to calculate the return on investment from a hospital perspective. Methods Effects were evaluated by comparing audited patients with a historic cohort with the same diagnosis-related groups. Based upon this evaluation a cost-minimization model was created that can be used to predict the financial effects of a day 2 case-audit. Sensitivity analyses were performed to deal with uncertainties. Finally, the model was used to financially evaluate the A-Team. Results One whole year including 114 patients was evaluated. Implementation costs were calculated to be €17,732, which represent total costs spent to implement this A-Team. For this specific patient group admitted to a urology ward and consulted on day 2 by the A-Team, the model estimated total savings of €60,306 after one year for this single department, leading to a return on investment of 5.9. Conclusions The implemented multi-disciplinary A-Team performing a day 2 case-audit in the hospital had a positive return on investment caused by a reduced length of stay due to a more appropriate antibiotic therapy. Based on the extensive data analysis, a model of this intervention could be constructed. This model could be used by other institutions, using their own data to estimate the effects of a day 2 case-audit in their hospital. PMID:25955494

  3. Implementation of Physics Education in Nature; A Pioneer Rescue Team Study: An Explanation by Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürel, Zeynep; Ergen, Hüseyin; Gürel, Atilla

    2007-04-01

    Within this research, it is generally aimed at constituting a sample implementation which shapes the contents of physics course together with its social facet and at forming a platform and starting debates for the contents. Within that purpose, we have conglomerated the students, their professor and the volunteers from the public body responsible for civil services such as the protection and maintenance of factories, power plants, rescue of civilians, and etc. to call on duty in instances of war or extra-ordinary circumstances, named civilian defence. Two camping activities in which various performances were fulfilled were held together with the students. The study focuses on sampling one of the performances which is the crossing a steam and a pond by a rope tied to trees in each ends. The focused study neither orients for nor goals any inspiration for civilian defence purposes. Civilian defence purposes are side-products and they have not been covered in the study. The main aims of this study are monitoring the instances of critical awareness in the students and presenting the samples of the process as a case study.

  4. Teachers' Critical Evaluations of Dynamic Geometry Software Implementation in 1:1 Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Jennifer; Stein, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Although the use of dynamic software in high school mathematics in the United States has emerged as a research topic, little research has been conducted on how teachers integrate new software in relation to at-home technology networks. Interviews with eight mathematics teachers from four North Carolina counties participating in 1:1 laptop…

  5. The implementation of an elementary STEM learning team and the effect on teacher self-efficacy: An action research study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Jennifer F.

    Science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education is part of a national movement to prepare students for the demands of a 21st century workforce. STEM uses an integrated, real-world problem solving approach to increase the levels of collaboration, communication, critical, and creative thinking in students. If expectations for students have increased to stay competitive in a global market, teachers must be equipped to meet the needs of the new 21st century learners in their classrooms. To that end, professional learning for educators is essential to ensure they are equipped with the tools necessary for success. While there are many approaches to teacher development, professional learning teams, based on the work of Garmston and Wellman, focus on teachers' instructional delivery, targeted student learning needs, planning, implementing new strategies, collaboration, and reflective dialogue. The purpose of the study is to improve instructional practice providing quality STEM instruction to students and increase teacher self-efficacy---a teachers' perception of his or her ability to instruct students in the STEM disciplines. Theoretical implications of a study on an elementary STEM learning team could affect the way schools deliver STEM professional learning opportunities to teachers and the way students are delivered a quality STEM education. Research has shown that Model I behavior would limit the change process of professional learning through a surface inspection of the issues; however model II behaviors would benefit the teachers, students and organization because teachers would be collaborating on specific objectives to develop a knowledge base and skill set to meet students' needs. Extending professional development by engaging stakeholders in a collaborative process to build model II behaviors will create an organizational structure that facilitates learning.

  6. Challenges and Benefits in Designing and Implementing a Team-Based Research Mentorship Experience in Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Young, Belinda-Rose; Williamson, Heather J.; Burton, Donna L.; Massey, Oliver Thomas; Levin, Bruce Lubotsky; Baldwin, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Translational research seeks to build bridges between research and practice to address public health issues efficiently and effectively. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate a newly formed Institute that provided graduate students and adolescent behavioral health community professionals with a translational research service-learning opportunity through the creation of a community-university mentoring partnership. Goals of the team-based research mentorship approach included: 1) providing students the skills for implementing translational research; 2) providing research opportunities for community agencies to enhance operations and to encourage ongoing research involvement; and 3) developing relationships between university faculty and community agency professionals for further research collaborations. Methods The Institute used the National Institute on Drug Abuse's Mentoring Mosaic to select a diverse group of Community and Academic Mentors. The research mentorship experience of the initial cohort was evaluated based upon the Research Mentorship Conceptual Framework and Self-Assessment Tool. Results As a direct result of the research mentorship, outcomes for the Academic and Community Mentors and Scholars (i.e., those seeking a graduate certificate) included improved working relationships/networking and research experience. Through experiential learning, Scholars also discovered career trajectory clarity, the need for community collaboration in research, opportunities for continuing professional development, a greater understanding of public health competencies and how they align with community-based research, and skill development in best practices for translational research. Conclusion The team mentoring approach is a form of pedagogy that holds promise to enhance translational research and community-based research efforts while developing public health competencies. PMID:26949735

  7. A Randomized Wait-List Controlled Analysis of the Implementation Integrity of Team-Initiated Problem Solving Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, J. Stephen; Horner, Robert H.; Algozzine, Bob; Todd, Anne W.; Algozzine, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Members of Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) teams from 34 elementary schools participated in a Team-Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Workshop and follow-up technical assistance. Within the context of a randomized wait-list controlled trial, team members who were the first recipients of the TIPS intervention demonstrated greater…

  8. The Role of Teams in Implementing School Improvement Plans. The School Improvement Leader: Four Perspectives on Change in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiseman, Jeffrey W.; And Others

    School improvement teams are assembled to share leadership responsibility with the principal. Differing from advisory councils in that they have more involvement in decision making, and differing from management teams in that they include role groups other than administrators, school improvement teams may be composed of teachers and the principal…

  9. Implementing Role-Changing Versus Time-Changing Innovations in Health Care: Differences in Helpfulness of Staff Improvement Teams, Management, and Network for Learning.

    PubMed

    Nembhard, Ingrid M; Morrow, Christopher T; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2015-12-01

    Health care organizations often fail in their effort to implement care-improving innovations. This article differentiates role-changing innovations, altering what workers do, from time-changing innovations, altering when tasks are performed or for how long. We examine our hypothesis that the degree to which access to groups that can alter organizational learning--staff, management, and external network--facilitates implementation depends on innovation type. Our longitudinal study using ordinal logistic regression and survey data on 517 hospitals' implementation of evidence-based practices for treating heart attack confirmed our thesis for factors granting access to each group: improvement team's representativeness (of affected staff), senior management engagement, and network membership. Although team representativeness and network membership were positively associated with implementing role-changing practices, senior management engagement was not. In contrast, senior management engagement was positively associated with implementing time-changing practices, whereas team representativeness was not, and network membership was not unless there was limited management engagement. These findings advance implementation science by explaining mixed results across past studies: Nature of change for workers alters potential facilitators' effects on implementation.

  10. Speeding Up Team Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmondson, Amy; Bohmer, Richard; Pisano, Gary

    2001-01-01

    A study of 16 cardiac surgery teams looked at how the teams adapted to new ways of working. The challenge of team management is to implement new processes as quickly as possible. Steps for creating a learning team include selecting a mix of skills and expertise, framing the challenge, and creating an environment of psychological safety. (JOW)

  11. Development of training-related health care software by a team of clinical educators: their experience, from conception to piloting

    PubMed Central

    ap Dafydd, Derfel; Williamson, Ruth; Blunt, Philip; Blunt, Dominic M

    2016-01-01

    The difficulties of producing useful, bespoke, and affordable information technology systems for large health care organizations are well publicized, following several high-profile endeavors in the UK. This article describes the experience of a small group of clinical radiologists and their collaborators in producing an information technology system – from conception to piloting. This system, called Trainee Tracker, enables automated target date recalculation of trainee milestones, depending on their work patterns and other individual circumstances. It utilizes an automated email alert system to notify the educational supervisors and trainees of approaching and elapsed target dates, in order to identify trainees in difficulty early and address their training needs accordingly. The challenges and advantages, both common to and contrasting with larger-scale projects, are also considered. The benefits of the development team’s “agile” approach to software development and the lessons learned will be of interest to medical educators, particularly those with expertise in e-portfolios and other training-related software. PMID:27853396

  12. Outcomes of a science teacher development program for middle-level interdisciplinary teams: Relationships among teachers' beliefs, school contexts, and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkin, Arlene H.

    Project Alliance, a teacher development program conducted by George Mason University and the American Association for the Advancement of Science with National Science Foundation funding (ESI-9355753) from 1994 to 1998, provided professional development for interdisciplinary teaching teams to enhance middle-level science instruction. Teachers experienced the same kinds of constructivist, hands-on, inquiry-based learning environments that they were expected to create for their students. The purposes of this study of 48 participants are (a) to assess the effectiveness of Project Alliance, and (b) to investigate relationships among teachers' beliefs about teaching and learning, school contexts, and individual teachers' implementation of the program's goals. Two cohorts of interdisciplinary teams from the mid-Atlantic region volunteered for two years each. During the first of two summer institutes, teachers engaged in graduate studies of environmental science, geology, technology, pedagogical content knowledge, and team teaching methods and designed integrated environmental science curriculum units to implement in their schools during the following academic year. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to investigate individual teachers' implementation of the curriculum units. Data sources included surveys, videotaped presentations, interviews, focus groups, and classroom observations. Quantitative analyses employed exploratory correlation and regression procedures. Qualitative analyses followed a constant comparative process. Predictor variables were (1) teachers' personal epistemologies, measured by the Attitudes about Reality Scale; (2) certainty of practice, assessed with the Expert Science Teaching Evaluation Model, Teaching Practices Assessment Inventory; (3) school organizational structure; and (4) administrator involvement. Results showed that more than half of the teachers successfully implemented their units and all implemented unit-related activities

  13. Validation of mission critical software design and implementation using model checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pingree, P. J.; Mikk, E.; Holzmann, G.; Smith, M.; Dams, D.

    2002-01-01

    Model Checking conducts an exhaustive exploration of all possible behaviors of a software system design and as such can be used to detect defects in designs that are typically difficult to discover with conventional testing approaches.

  14. Neuromorphic implementation of a software-defined camera that can see through fire and smoke in real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jae H.; Abbott, A. Lynn; Szu, Harold H.; Willey, Jefferson; Landa, Joseph; Krapels, Keith A.

    2014-05-01

    Software-defined Cameras (SDC) based on Boltzmann's molecular thermodynamics can "see" through visually-degraded fields such as fire, fog, and dust in some situations. This capability is possible by means of unsupervised learning implemented on a neuromorphic algo-tecture. This paper describes the SDC algorithm design strategy with respect to nontrivial solutions, stability, and accuracy. An example neuromorphic learning algorithm is presented along with unsupervised learning stopping criteria.

  15. Software Program: Software Management Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this NASA Software Management Guidebook is twofold. First, this document defines the core products and activities required of NASA software projects. It defines life-cycle models and activity-related methods but acknowledges that no single life-cycle model is appropriate for all NASA software projects. It also acknowledges that the appropriate method for accomplishing a required activity depends on characteristics of the software project. Second, this guidebook provides specific guidance to software project managers and team leaders in selecting appropriate life cycles and methods to develop a tailored plan for a software engineering project.

  16. The Talent Development Middle School. Creating a Motivational Climate Conducive to Talent Development in Middle Schools: Implementation and Effects of Student Team Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mac Iver, Douglas J.; Plank, Stephen B.

    Central East Middle School in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania), an urban school with about 45% Hispanic enrollment, and the Center for Research on the Education of Children Placed at Risk are working together to implement a Talent Development Middle School model of schooling. Part of this effort includes use of the Student Team Reading (STR) Program,…

  17. The Contribution of the Self-Efficacy of Curriculum Development Team and Curriculum Document Quality to the Implementation of Diversified Curriculum in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susilana, Rudi; Asra; Herlina

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe how the self-efficacy of curriculum development team (CDT) and curriculum document quality contributed to the implementation of diversified curriculum in elementary schools. This research is a survey study using descriptive method. Schools were the unit of analysis while respondents selected from the schools…

  18. The Cooperate Assistive Teamwork Environment for Software Description Languages.

    PubMed

    Groenda, Henning; Seifermann, Stephan; Müller, Karin; Jaworek, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Versatile description languages such as the Unified Modeling Language (UML) are commonly used in software engineering across different application domains in theory and practice. They often use graphical notations and leverage visual memory for expressing complex relations. Those notations are hard to access for people with visual impairment and impede their smooth inclusion in an engineering team. Existing approaches provide textual notations but require manual synchronization between the notations. This paper presents requirements for an accessible and language-aware team work environment as well as our plan for the assistive implementation of Cooperate. An industrial software engineering team consisting of people with and without visual impairment will evaluate the implementation.

  19. ThermoData Engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 5. Experiment planning and product design.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Muzny, Chris D; Magee, Joseph W; Abdulagatov, Ilmutdin; Kang, Jeong Won; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Frenkel, Michael

    2011-01-24

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported recently in this journal. In the present paper, we describe development of an algorithmic approach to assist experiment planning through assessment of the existing body of knowledge, including availability of experimental thermophysical property data, variable ranges studied, associated uncertainties, state of prediction methods, and parameters for deployment of prediction methods and how these parameters can be obtained using targeted measurements, etc., and, indeed, how the intended measurement may address the underlying scientific or engineering problem under consideration. A second new feature described here is the application of the software capabilities for aid in the design of chemical products through identification of chemical systems possessing desired values of thermophysical properties within defined ranges of tolerance. The algorithms and their software implementation to achieve this are described. Finally, implementation of a new data validation and weighting system is described for vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data, and directions for future enhancements are outlined.

  20. Active Learning Outside the Classroom: Implementation and Outcomes of Peer-Led Team-Learning Workshops in Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    Kudish, Philip; Shores, Robin; McClung, Alex; Smulyan, Lisa; Vallen, Elizabeth A.; Siwicki, Kathleen K.

    2016-01-01

    Study group meetings (SGMs) are voluntary-attendance peer-led team-learning workshops that supplement introductory biology lectures at a selective liberal arts college. While supporting all students’ engagement with lecture material, specific aims are to improve the success of underrepresented minority (URM) students and those with weaker backgrounds in biology. Peer leaders with experience in biology courses and training in science pedagogy facilitate work on faculty-generated challenge problems. During the eight semesters assessed in this study, URM students and those with less preparation attended SGMs with equal or greater frequency than their counterparts. Most agreed that SGMs enhanced their comprehension of biology and ability to articulate solutions. The historical grade gap between URM and non-URM students narrowed slightly in Biology 2, but not in other biology and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses. Nonetheless, URM students taking introductory biology after program implementation have graduated with biology majors or minors at the same rates as non-URM students, and have enrolled in postcollege degree programs at equal or greater rates. These results suggest that improved performance as measured by science grade point average may not be necessary to improve the persistence of students from underrepresented groups as life sciences majors. PMID:27496361

  1. Active Learning Outside the Classroom: Implementation and Outcomes of Peer-Led Team-Learning Workshops in Introductory Biology.

    PubMed

    Kudish, Philip; Shores, Robin; McClung, Alex; Smulyan, Lisa; Vallen, Elizabeth A; Siwicki, Kathleen K

    2016-01-01

    Study group meetings (SGMs) are voluntary-attendance peer-led team-learning workshops that supplement introductory biology lectures at a selective liberal arts college. While supporting all students' engagement with lecture material, specific aims are to improve the success of underrepresented minority (URM) students and those with weaker backgrounds in biology. Peer leaders with experience in biology courses and training in science pedagogy facilitate work on faculty-generated challenge problems. During the eight semesters assessed in this study, URM students and those with less preparation attended SGMs with equal or greater frequency than their counterparts. Most agreed that SGMs enhanced their comprehension of biology and ability to articulate solutions. The historical grade gap between URM and non-URM students narrowed slightly in Biology 2, but not in other biology and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses. Nonetheless, URM students taking introductory biology after program implementation have graduated with biology majors or minors at the same rates as non-URM students, and have enrolled in postcollege degree programs at equal or greater rates. These results suggest that improved performance as measured by science grade point average may not be necessary to improve the persistence of students from underrepresented groups as life sciences majors.

  2. Implementation of Motion Simulation Software and Visual-Auditory Electronics for Use in a Low Gravity Robotic Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, William Campbell

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is developing the All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) to assist in manned space missions. One of the proposed targets for this robotic vehicle is a near-Earth asteroid (NEA), which typically exhibit a surface gravity of only a few micro-g. In order to properly test ATHLETE in such an environment, the development team has constructed an inverted Stewart platform testbed that acts as a robotic motion simulator. This project focused on creating physical simulation software that is able to predict how ATHLETE will function on and around a NEA. The corresponding platform configurations are calculated and then passed to the testbed to control ATHLETE's motion. In addition, imitation attitude, imitation attitude control thrusters were designed and fabricated for use on ATHLETE. These utilize a combination of high power LEDs and audio amplifiers to provide visual and auditory cues that correspond to the physics simulation.

  3. Queue software reuse and implementation at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, Igor S.; Summers, Douglas M.; Astier, Joseph; Edwards, Michelle L.; Veillet, Christian; Cardwell, Andrew; Power, Jennifer; Walsh, Shane

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we detail the process the LBTO followed to chose software for reuse and modification to support binocular queue operations. We outline the survey of initial candidate solutions, how and why the final selection was made, and describe our requirements gap analysis for LBTO binocular use. We provide details of our software development approach including a project road map and phased release strategy. We provide details of added LBTO functionality, discuss issues, and suggest some reuse lessons learned. We conclude with discussion of known desired enhancements to be addressed in future release cycles.

  4. A Capstone Course on Agile Software Development Using Scrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahnic, V.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an undergraduate capstone course in software engineering is described that not only exposes students to agile software development, but also makes it possible to observe the behavior of developers using Scrum for the first time. The course requires students to work as Scrum Teams, responsible for the implementation of a set of user…

  5. Portal for Families Overcoming Neurodevelopmental Disorders (PFOND): Implementation of a Software Framework for Facilitated Community Website Creation by Nontechnical Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Tuhina; Lee, Cheryl E; Chen, Shirley Yu; Herman, Adam; Sharma, Balraj; Johal, Gurinder; Gu, Bobby

    2013-01-01

    Background The Portal for Families Overcoming Neurodevelopmental Disorders (PFOND) provides a structured Internet interface for the sharing of information with individuals struggling with the consequences of rare developmental disorders. Large disease-impacted communities can support fundraising organizations that disseminate Web-based information through elegant websites run by professional staff. Such quality resources for families challenged by rare disorders are infrequently produced and, when available, are often dependent upon the continued efforts of a single individual. Objective The project endeavors to create an intuitive Web-based software system that allows a volunteer with limited technical computer skills to produce a useful rare disease website in a short time period. Such a system should provide access to emerging news and research findings, facilitate community participation, present summary information about the disorder, and allow for transient management by volunteers who are likely to change periodically. Methods The prototype portal was implemented using the WordPress software system with both existing and customized supplementary plug-in software modules. Gamification scoring features were implemented in a module, allowing editors to measure progress. The system was installed on a Linux-based computer server, accessible across the Internet through standard Web browsers. Results A prototype PFOND system was implemented and tested. The prototype system features a structured organization with distinct partitions for background information, recent publications, and community discussions. The software design allows volunteer editors to create a themed website, implement a limited set of topic pages, and connect the software to dynamic RSS feeds providing information about recent news or advances. The prototype was assessed by a fraction of the disease sites developed (8 out of 27), including Aarskog-Scott syndrome, Aniridia, Adams-Oliver syndrome

  6. Design and Implementation of a Software Training Program for Students with Learning and Behavioral Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seferian, Robert

    This practicum was designed to increase the skills of 13 middle school students with learning and behavioral disabilities in the use of personal productivity software. In addition, teacher training and motivational activities were included. Consultation with the school technology instructor and creative scheduling provided the students with hours…

  7. SDA 7: A modular and parallel implementation of the simulation of diffusional association software

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Michael; Romanowska, Julia; Kokh, Daria B.; Ozboyaci, Musa; Yu, Xiaofeng; Öztürk, Mehmet Ali; Richter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The simulation of diffusional association (SDA) Brownian dynamics software package has been widely used in the study of biomacromolecular association. Initially developed to calculate bimolecular protein–protein association rate constants, it has since been extended to study electron transfer rates, to predict the structures of biomacromolecular complexes, to investigate the adsorption of proteins to inorganic surfaces, and to simulate the dynamics of large systems containing many biomacromolecular solutes, allowing the study of concentration‐dependent effects. These extensions have led to a number of divergent versions of the software. In this article, we report the development of the latest version of the software (SDA 7). This release was developed to consolidate the existing codes into a single framework, while improving the parallelization of the code to better exploit modern multicore shared memory computer architectures. It is built using a modular object‐oriented programming scheme, to allow for easy maintenance and extension of the software, and includes new features, such as adding flexible solute representations. We discuss a number of application examples, which describe some of the methods available in the release, and provide benchmarking data to demonstrate the parallel performance. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26123630

  8. Improvement of CSCW Software Implementation in NPD: The CAM Mechanism for a Better Adoption by Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Restrepo, Tomas; Arbelaez, Natalia; Millet, Dominique; Gidel, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Cooperation between disseminated actors is a key factor in improving new product development (NPD) performance. In the last years, numerous CSCW software applications have been introduced in the industry to support NPD with a low success rate. This is partly due to the limited insight of the organisational and human factors influencing user…

  9. Implementing Quality Assurance for the Numerical Research Software Dune / PDELab / DuMux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemisch, B.; Bastian, P.; Kempf, D.; Koch, T.; Helmig, R.

    2015-12-01

    Quality assurance and, in particular, automated testing, should be one of the key elements of modern software development. However, applying common techniques from software engineering to numerical frameworks, such as Dune, may be challenging since the requirements for a test might be very different to standard software. This talk gives an overview of our work in describing system tests for numerical software and developing test tools to ensure that qualitative and quantitative properties of PDE discretizations are preserved. The developed tools are employed in the Dune discretization module Dune-PDELab and the porous-media simulator DuMux.The newly developed module dune-testtools provides the following components: A domain specific language for feature modelling, which is naturally integrated into the workflow of numerical simulation. Tools to test whether a given PDE discretization does still yield the correct result without performance (or scalability) regressions. Integration of the above tools into a CMake based build system. Extensions to the Dune core modules to support the development of system tests.

  10. What Facilitates and Impedes Collaborative Work during Higher Education Software Implementation Projects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Sharon F.; Tetewsky, Sheldon J.; Marczynski, Kelly S.

    2010-01-01

    Implementations of new or major upgrades of existing student information systems require incorporation of new paradigms and the exchange of familiar routines for new methods. As a result, implementations are almost always time consuming and expensive. Many people in the field of information technology have identified some of the challenges faced…

  11. Optimal parameters for clinical implementation of breast cancer patient setup using Varian DTS software.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sook Kien; Zygmanski, Piotr; Jeung, Andrew; Mostafavi, Hassan; Hesser, Juergen; Bellon, Jennifer R; Wong, Julia S; Lyatskaya, Yulia

    2012-05-10

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) was evaluated as an alternative to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for patient setup. DTS is preferable when there are constraints with setup time, gantry-couch clearance, and imaging dose using CBCT. This study characterizes DTS data acquisition and registration parameters for the setup of breast cancer patients using nonclinical Varian DTS software. DTS images were reconstructed from CBCT projections acquired on phantoms and patients with surgical clips in the target volume. A shift-and-add algorithm was used for DTS volume reconstructions, while automated cross-correlation matches were performed within Varian DTS software. Triangulation on two short DTS arcs separated by various angular spread was done to improve 3D registration accuracy. Software performance was evaluated on two phantoms and ten breast cancer patients using the registration result as an accuracy measure; investigated parameters included arc lengths, arc orientations, angular separation between two arcs, reconstruction slice spacing, and number of arcs. The shifts determined from DTS-to-CT registration were compared to the shifts based on CBCT-to-CT registration. The difference between these shifts was used to evaluate the software accuracy. After findings were quantified, optimal parameters for the clinical use of DTS technique were determined. It was determined that at least two arcs were necessary for accurate 3D registration for patient setup. Registration accuracy of 2 mm was achieved when the reconstruction arc length was > 5° for clips with HU ≥ 1000; larger arc length (≥ 8°) was required for very low HU clips. An optimal arc separation was found to be ≥ 20° and optimal arc length was 10°. Registration accuracy did not depend on DTS slice spacing. DTS image reconstruction took 10-30 seconds and registration took less than 20 seconds. The performance of Varian DTS software was found suitable for the accurate setup of breast cancer patients

  12. A Genuine TEAM Player

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Qualtech Systems, Inc. developed a complete software system with capabilities of multisignal modeling, diagnostic analysis, run-time diagnostic operations, and intelligent interactive reasoners. Commercially available as the TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System) tool set, the software can be used to reveal unanticipated system failures. The TEAMS software package is broken down into four companion tools: TEAMS-RT, TEAMATE, TEAMS-KB, and TEAMS-RDS. TEAMS-RT identifies good, bad, and suspect components in the system in real-time. It reports system health results from onboard tests, and detects and isolates failures within the system, allowing for rapid fault isolation. TEAMATE takes over from where TEAMS-RT left off by intelligently guiding the maintenance technician through the troubleshooting procedure, repair actions, and operational checkout. TEAMS-KB serves as a model management and collection tool. TEAMS-RDS (TEAMS-Remote Diagnostic Server) has the ability to continuously assess a system and isolate any failure in that system or its components, in real time. RDS incorporates TEAMS-RT, TEAMATE, and TEAMS-KB in a large-scale server architecture capable of providing advanced diagnostic and maintenance functions over a network, such as the Internet, with a web browser user interface.

  13. An implementation of Software Defined Radios for federated aerospace networks: Informing satellite implementations using an inter-balloon communications experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtyamov, Rustam; Cruz, Ignasi Lluch i.; Matevosyan, Hripsime; Knoll, Dominik; Pica, Udrivolf; Lisi, Marco; Golkar, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Novel space mission concepts such as Federated Satellite Systems promise to enhance sustainability, robustness, and reliability of current missions by means of in-orbit sharing of space assets. This new paradigm requires the utilization of several technologies in order to confer flexibility and re-configurability to communications systems among heterogeneous spacecrafts. This paper illustrates the results of the experimental demonstration of the value proposition of federated satellites through two stratospheric balloons interoperating with a tracking ground station through Commercial Off-The-Shelf Software Defined Radios (SDRs). The paper reports telemetry analysis and characterizes the communications network that was realized in-flight. Furthermore, it provides details on an in-flight anomaly experienced by one of the balloons, which was recovered through the use of the federated technology that has been developed. The anomaly experienced led to the early loss of the directional link from the ground station to the affected stratospheric balloon node after 15 min in flight. Nevertheless, thanks to the federated approach among the systems, the ground station was still able to retrieve the balloon's data in real time through the network system, for which the other balloon operated as a federated relay for 45 min in flight, uninterrupted. In other words, the federated approach to the system allowed triplicating the useful lifetime of the defective system, which would have not been possible to realize otherwise. Such anomaly coincidentally demonstrated the value of the federated approach to space systems design. The paper paves the way for future tests on space assets.

  14. SIFT - Design and analysis of a fault-tolerant computer for aircraft control. [Software Implemented Fault Tolerant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wensley, J. H.; Lamport, L.; Goldberg, J.; Green, M. W.; Levitt, K. N.; Melliar-Smith, P. M.; Shostak, R. E.; Weinstock, C. B.

    1978-01-01

    SIFT (Software Implemented Fault Tolerance) is an ultrareliable computer for critical aircraft control applications that achieves fault tolerance by the replication of tasks among processing units. The main processing units are off-the-shelf minicomputers, with standard microcomputers serving as the interface to the I/O system. Fault isolation is achieved by using a specially designed redundant bus system to interconnect the processing units. Error detection and analysis and system reconfiguration are performed by software. Iterative tasks are redundantly executed, and the results of each iteration are voted upon before being used. Thus, any single failure in a processing unit or bus can be tolerated with triplication of tasks, and subsequent failures can be tolerated after reconfiguration. Independent execution by separate processors means that the processors need only be loosely synchronized, and a novel fault-tolerant synchronization method is described.

  15. A Prolog Implementation of Pattern Search to Optimize Software Quality Assurance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    interact with the outside environment. - Inference Engine --uses deductive reasoning to drive the system towards a conclusion. - Knowledge Base...reverse engineering , and case tools have all lead to improvements in the production of software. Yet, the research community credited with these...34detected" errors are then passed to the rework sector for correction. Any "undetected" errors, that escape QA and rework, filter through to the testing

  16. genepop'007: a complete re-implementation of the genepop software for Windows and Linux.

    PubMed

    Rousset, François

    2008-01-01

    This note summarizes developments of the genepop software since its first description in 1995, and in particular those new to version 4.0: an extended input format, several estimators of neighbourhood size under isolation by distance, new estimators and confidence intervals for null allele frequency, and less important extensions to previous options. genepop now runs under Linux as well as under Windows, and can be entirely controlled by batch calls.

  17. Proposed powered explicit guidance thrust integrals derivation/implementation. Mission planning, mission analysis and software formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggers, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    A new exoatmospheric, powered explicit guidance (PEG) thrust integral formulation and a simple method of implementation are presented. The new thrust integral formulation is significantly simpler than that currently used in PEG. Preliminary estimates indicate a computer storage savings of 220 words, which is approximately 10 percent of the current PEG ascent program. Alternate methods of implementation that could produce even more savings are noted.

  18. Development and Implementation of a Collaborative Team Care Model for Effective Insulin Use in an Academic Medical Center Primary Care Network.

    PubMed

    Eisenstat, Stephanie A; Chang, Yuchiao; Porneala, Bianca C; Geagan, Elizabeth; Wilkins, Gianna; Chase, Barbara; O'Keefe, Sandra M; Delahanty, Linda M; Atlas, Steven J; Zai, Adrian H; Finn, David; Weil, Eric; Wexler, Deborah J

    2016-05-27

    Improving glycemic control across a primary care diabetes population is challenging. This article describes the development, implementation, and outcomes of the Diabetes Care Collaborative Model (DCCM), a collaborative team care process focused on promoting effective insulin use targeting patients with hyperglycemia in a patient-centered medical home model. After a pilot, the DCCM was implemented in 18 primary care practices affiliated with an academic medical center. Its implementation was associated with improvements in glycemic control and increase in insulin prescription longitudinally and across the entire population, with a >1% reduction in the proportion of glycated hemoglobin >9% at 2 years after the implementation compared with the 2 years prior (P < .001). Facilitating factors included diverse stakeholder engagement, institutional alignment of priorities, awarding various types of credits for participation and implementation to providers, and a strong theoretical foundation using the principles of the collaborative care model.

  19. Implementation of electronic medical records requires more than new software: Lessons on integrating and managing health technologies from Mbarara, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Madore, Amy; Rosenberg, Julie; Muyindike, Winnie R; Bangsberg, David R; Bwana, Mwebesa B; Martin, Jeffrey N; Kanyesigye, Michael; Weintraub, Rebecca

    2015-12-01

    Implementation lessons: • Technology alone does not necessarily lead to improvement in health service delivery, in contrast to the common assumption that advanced technology goes hand in hand with progress. • Implementation of electronic medical record (EMR) systems is a complex, resource-intensive process that, in addition to software, hardware, and human resource investments, requires careful planning, change management skills, adaptability, and continuous engagement of stakeholders. • Research requirements and goals must be balanced with service delivery needs when determining how much information is essential to collect and who should be interfacing with the EMR system. • EMR systems require ongoing monitoring and regular updates to ensure they are responsive to evolving clinical use cases and research questions. • High-quality data and analyses are essential for EMRs to deliver value to providers, researchers, and patients.

  20. Open source software implementation of an integrated testing strategy for skin sensitization potency based on a Bayesian network.

    PubMed

    Pirone, Jason R; Smith, Marjolein; Kleinstreuer, Nicole C; Burns, Thomas A; Strickland, Judy; Dancik, Yuri; Morris, Richard; Rinckel, Lori A; Casey, Warren; Jaworska, Joanna S

    2014-01-01

    An open-source implementation of a previously published integrated testing strategy (ITS) for skin sensitization using a Bayesian network has been developed using R, a free and open-source statistical computing language. The ITS model provides probabilistic predictions of skin sensitization potency based on in silico and in vitro information as well as skin penetration characteristics from a published bioavailability model (Kasting et al., 2008). The structure of the Bayesian network was designed to be consistent with the adverse outcome pathway published by the OECD (Jaworska et al., 2011, 2013). In this paper, the previously published data set (Jaworska et al., 2013) is improved by two data corrections and a modified application of the Kasting model. The new data set implemented in the original commercial software package and the new R version produced consistent results. The data and a fully documented version of the code are publicly available (http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/go/its).

  1. Repository-based software engineering program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James

    1992-01-01

    The activities performed during September 1992 in support of Tasks 01 and 02 of the Repository-Based Software Engineering Program are outlined. The recommendations and implementation strategy defined at the September 9-10 meeting of the Reuse Acquisition Action Team (RAAT) are attached along with the viewgraphs and reference information presented at the Institute for Defense Analyses brief on legal and patent issues related to software reuse.

  2. [Team and team work].

    PubMed

    Richer, E

    1990-01-01

    The coordinator draws conclusions on the symposium day devoted to the teams. After defining "team" he gives several thoughts on the team's work its advantages and its difficulties. During this day the teams talked about their questions and their certainties in the various fields of their work. They also discussed their hard ships and their need of psychological support which the hospital departments do not have the means to satisfy.

  3. Software Design Challenges in Time Series Prediction Systems Using Parallel Implementation of Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Manikandan, Narayanan; Subha, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Software development life cycle has been characterized by destructive disconnects between activities like planning, analysis, design, and programming. Particularly software developed with prediction based results is always a big challenge for designers. Time series data forecasting like currency exchange, stock prices, and weather report are some of the areas where an extensive research is going on for the last three decades. In the initial days, the problems with financial analysis and prediction were solved by statistical models and methods. For the last two decades, a large number of Artificial Neural Networks based learning models have been proposed to solve the problems of financial data and get accurate results in prediction of the future trends and prices. This paper addressed some architectural design related issues for performance improvement through vectorising the strengths of multivariate econometric time series models and Artificial Neural Networks. It provides an adaptive approach for predicting exchange rates and it can be called hybrid methodology for predicting exchange rates. This framework is tested for finding the accuracy and performance of parallel algorithms used. PMID:26881271

  4. Software Design Challenges in Time Series Prediction Systems Using Parallel Implementation of Artificial Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, Narayanan; Subha, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Software development life cycle has been characterized by destructive disconnects between activities like planning, analysis, design, and programming. Particularly software developed with prediction based results is always a big challenge for designers. Time series data forecasting like currency exchange, stock prices, and weather report are some of the areas where an extensive research is going on for the last three decades. In the initial days, the problems with financial analysis and prediction were solved by statistical models and methods. For the last two decades, a large number of Artificial Neural Networks based learning models have been proposed to solve the problems of financial data and get accurate results in prediction of the future trends and prices. This paper addressed some architectural design related issues for performance improvement through vectorising the strengths of multivariate econometric time series models and Artificial Neural Networks. It provides an adaptive approach for predicting exchange rates and it can be called hybrid methodology for predicting exchange rates. This framework is tested for finding the accuracy and performance of parallel algorithms used.

  5. MEDBASE: Strategic Planning and Implementation of an Army Medical Department Software Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    developing the plan: stakeholder analysis , SWOT analysis , a list of competitors ’ strengths and weaknesses, the development of a big, hairy, audacious goal...was created along with the following products: SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis , vision statement, strategy map, and...Implementation, AMEDD Architecture, Strategy Map, Balanced Scorecard, Life Cycle Model, SWOT Analysis , Interim Systems, Injury Tracking, Medical Readiness

  6. Who Owns Your Team?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisen, Kathy; Love, Phyllis

    1988-01-01

    Feelings of team ownership promote team cohesiveness which yields better performance. Coaches should implement strategies that encourage team members to share with the coach responsibility for morale, skill-building, play improvement, and decision making. Maturity level of athletes influences the degree of ownership allowed. Strategies for…

  7. Independent Software Quality Assessment (ISQA) Services: Makes Dollars and Sense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-04

    1 Independent Software Quality Assessment ( ISQA ) Services: Makes Dollars and Sense Presented to the Systems & Software Technology Conference Salt... ISQA ? – What is NOT ISQA • Why? – Software Costs – Benefits of ISQA – ISQA Services • When? – Throughout Life Cycle – Proven Examples • How...advanced technology to meet current needs. • Implement SQA through our ISQA Team – Dedicated Cadre of computer scientists/engineers with access to

  8. [Team work and interdiciplinarity: challenges facing the implementation of comprehensive outpatient care for people with HIV/Aids in Pernambuco].

    PubMed

    Borges, Maria Jucineide Lopes; Sampaio, Aletheia Soares; Gurgel, Idê Gomes Dantas

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of providing healthcare to people with HIV/Aids requires investment in comprehensive action and care, constituting a challenge for the multidisciplinary work teams to build an interdisciplinary practice. This study sought to analyze comprehensive healthcare in the Specialized Assistance Services for HIV/Aids (SAE-HIV/Aids) in Recife, in the State of Pernambuco, starting with the process and organization of team work. This is a case study developed in three SAE-HIV/Aids units, based on a qualitative approach using different research techniques. The results show that SAE-HIV/Aids have complied with most of the Brazilian Health Ministry recommendations in terms of basic infrastructure, though none of them had a team of appropriate size. These services have shown signs of fragmentation and difficulty in establishing a systematic intersectorial and interdisciplinary practice, with failings in ensuring the reference and counter-reference flow. It was seen that there was little appreciation of the role of the manager as team leader. The need to perceive the user as a whole was identified, as well as for the team to work in a coordinated manner in order to ensure communicative and relational activities.

  9. Considering Subcontractors in Distributed Scrum Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzki, Jakub; Hammouda, Imed; Mikkola, Tuomas; Mustonen, Karri; Systä, Tarja

    In this chapter we present our experiences with working with subcontractors in distributed Scrum teams. The context of our experiences is a medium size software service provider company. We present the way the subcontractors are selected and how Scrum practices can be used in real-life projects. We discuss team arrangements and tools used in distributed development teams highlighting aspects that are important when working with subcontractors. We also present an illustrative example where different phases of a project working with subcontractors are described. The example also provides practical tips on work in such projects. Finally, we present a summary of our data that was collected from Scrum and non-Scrum projects implemented over a few years. This chapter should provide a practical point of view on working with subcontractors in Scrum teams for those who are considering such cooperation.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan part 2 mappings for the ASC software quality engineering practices, version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Heaphy, Robert; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR001.3.2 and CPR001.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ''ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines''. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1: ASC software quality engineering practices, Version 2.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. The plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to Sandia Corporate Requirements CPR 1.3.2 and 1.3.6 and to a Department of Energy document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines. This document also identifies ASC management and software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals.

  12. Implementation and application of an interactive user-friendly validation software for RADIANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaram, Anand; Boonn, William W.; Kim, Woojin; Cook, Tessa S.

    2012-02-01

    RADIANCE extracts CT dose parameters from dose sheets using optical character recognition and stores the data in a relational database. To facilitate validation of RADIANCE's performance, a simple user interface was initially implemented and about 300 records were evaluated. Here, we extend this interface to achieve a wider variety of functions and perform a larger-scale validation. The validator uses some data from the RADIANCE database to prepopulate quality-testing fields, such as correspondence between calculated and reported total dose-length product. The interface also displays relevant parameters from the DICOM headers. A total of 5,098 dose sheets were used to test the performance accuracy of RADIANCE in dose data extraction. Several search criteria were implemented. All records were searchable by accession number, study date, or dose parameters beyond chosen thresholds. Validated records were searchable according to additional criteria from validation inputs. An error rate of 0.303% was demonstrated in the validation. Dose monitoring is increasingly important and RADIANCE provides an open-source solution with a high level of accuracy. The RADIANCE validator has been updated to enable users to test the integrity of their installation and verify that their dose monitoring is accurate and effective.

  13. Architecture, implementation and parallelization of the software to search for periodic gravitational wave signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poghosyan, G.; Matta, S.; Streit, A.; Bejger, M.; Królak, A.

    2015-03-01

    The parallelization, design and scalability of the PolGrawAllSky code to search for periodic gravitational waves from rotating neutron stars is discussed. The code is based on an efficient implementation of the F-statistic using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. To perform an analysis of data from the advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors' network, which will start operating in 2015, hundreds of millions of CPU hours will be required-the code utilizing the potential of massively parallel supercomputers is therefore mandatory. We have parallelized the code using the Message Passing Interface standard, implemented a mechanism for combining the searches at different sky-positions and frequency bands into one extremely scalable program. The parallel I/O interface is used to escape bottlenecks, when writing the generated data into file system. This allowed to develop a highly scalable computation code, which would enable the data analysis at large scales on acceptable time scales. Benchmarking of the code on a Cray XE6 system was performed to show efficiency of our parallelization concept and to demonstrate scaling up to 50 thousand cores in parallel.

  14. Active Learning outside the Classroom: Implementation and Outcomes of Peer-Led Team-Learning Workshops in Introductory Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudish, Philip; Shores, Robin; McClung, Alex; Smulyan, Lisa; Vallen, Elizabeth A.; Siwicki, Kathleen K.

    2016-01-01

    Study group meetings (SGMs) are voluntary-attendance peer-led team-learning workshops that supplement introductory biology lectures at a selective liberal arts college. While supporting all students' engagement with lecture material, specific aims are to improve the success of underrepresented minority (URM) students and those with weaker…

  15. Color voltage contrast: A new method of implementing fault contrast with color imaging software

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J.

    1995-12-31

    Although voltage contrast and fault contrast methods are well established, the current methods of implementation are frequently tedious. A new method of mapping voltage contrast (VC) images in a qualitative (stroboscopic) color mode allows multiple logic states to be simultaneously viewed and updated in color. A shortcoming of image subtraction is that only one direction of logic change is represented unless the frames are exclusive OR`ed together. Although this gives fault information it does not include the VC of neighboring unchanged nodes. When tracking failures such as a saturated transistor resulting from a logic short somewhere else, all logic states; both static and transitional need to be understood and viewed simultaneously if an expedient analysis is desired.

  16. Prospective implementation of a software application for pre-disposal L/ILW waste management activities in Romania

    SciTech Connect

    Fako, Raluca; Sociu, Florin; Stan, Camelia; Georgescu, Roxana; Barariu, Gheorghe

    2013-07-01

    Romania is actively engaged to update the Medium and Long Term National Strategy for Safe Management of Radioactive Waste and to approve the Road Map for Geological Repository Development. Considering relevant documents to be further updated, about 122,000 m{sup 3} SL-LILW are to be disposed in a near surface facility that will have room, also, for quantities of VLLW. Planned date for commissioning is under revision. Taking into account that in this moment there are initiated several actions for the improvement of the technical capability for LILW treatment and conditioning, several steps for the possible use of SAFRAN software were considered. In view of specific data for Romanian radioactive waste inventory, authors are trying to highlight the expected limitations and unknown data related with the implementation of SAFRAN software for the foreseen pre-disposal waste management activities. There are challenges that have to be faced in the near future related with clear definition of the properties of each room, area and waste management activity. This work has the aim to address several LILW management issues in accordance with national and international regulatory framework for the assurance of nuclear safety. Also, authors intend to develop their institutional capability for the safety demonstration of the existent and future radioactive waste management facilities and activities. (authors)

  17. Implementing shared decision-making in interprofessional home care teams (the IPSDM-SW study): protocol for a stepped wedge cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Légaré, France; Brière, Nathalie; Stacey, Dawn; Lacroix, Guy; Desroches, Sophie; Dumont, Serge; Fraser, Kimberly D; Rivest, Louis-Paul; Durand, Pierre J; Turcotte, Stéphane; Taljaard, Monica; Bourassa, Henriette; Roy, Lise; Painchaud Guérard, Geneviève

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The frail elderly in Canada face a tough decision when they start to lose autonomy: whether to stay at home or move to another location. This study seeks to scale up and evaluate the implementation of shared decision-making (SDM) in interprofessional (IP) home care teams caring for elderly clients or their caregivers facing a decision about staying at home or moving elsewhere. Methods A stepped wedge cluster randomised trial involving 8 Health and Social Service Centers (HSSCs) will be conducted with IP home care teams. HSSCs are the unit of randomisation. A decision guide will be passively distributed to all of the participating HSSCs at the beginning of the project. The participating HSSCs will then be randomised to 1 of 4 intervention start times, separated by 7-month intervals. The primary outcome is whether or not clients and caregivers assumed an active role in decision-making, assessed with a modified version of the Control Preferences Scale. The intervention, targeted at IP home care teams, consists of a 1.5 hour online tutorial and a 3.5 hour skills building workshop in IP SDM. Clients will be eligible for outcome assessment if they (1) are aged ≥65; (2) are receiving care from the IP home care team of the enrolled HSSCs; (3) have made a decision about whether to stay at home or move to another location during the recruitment periods; (4) are able to read, understand and write French or English; (5) can give informed consent. If clients are not able to provide informed consent, their primary caregiver will become the eligible participant. Ethics and dissemination Ethics committee review approval has been obtained from the Multicenter Ethics Committee of CISSS-Laval. Results will be disseminated at conferences, on websites of team members and in peer-reviewed and professional journals intended for policymakers and managers. Trial registration number NCT02592525, Pre-results. PMID:27884857

  18. Long-term protective factor outcomes of evidence-based interventions implemented by community teams through a community-university partnership.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Cleve; Spoth, Richard L; Shin, Chungyeol; Schainker, Lisa M; Greenberg, Mark T; Feinberg, Mark

    2009-09-01

    It is becoming increasingly common for community teams or coalitions to implement programming for children and families designed to promote positive youth development and prevent adolescent problem behaviors. However, there has been only limited rigorous study of the effectiveness of community teams' programming efforts to produce positive outcomes. This study employed a community-level randomized control design to examine protective parent and youth skills outcomes of evidence-based preventive interventions selected from a menu and delivered by community teams supported by a community-university partnership model called PROSPER. Twenty-eight rural communities in two states were randomized across intervention and control conditions. Data were collected through written questionnaires that were completed by approximately 12,000 middle school students in the fall of the 6th grade, prior to intervention delivery, and again in the spring of the 7th, 8th, and 9th grades. Positive intervention effects were found for youth, parent, and family outcomes (e.g., association with antisocial peers, child management, parent-child affective quality) at each post-intervention assessment point. Improvements in these family and youth skill outcomes are expected to support long-term reductions of adolescent problem behaviors, such as substance abuse. EDITORS' STRATEGIC IMPLICATIONS: In this important and well controlled trial, the authors demonstrate that university partnership-supported community teams, especially when supported with ongoing technical assistance, can continue to produce positive outcomes even after much of the control over delivery of programs is turned over to representatives of the communities in which they are implemented.

  19. An agile implementation of SCRUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, Michele

    Is Agile a way to cut corners? To some, the use of an Agile Software Development Methodology has a negative connotation - “ Oh, you're just not producing any documentation” . So can a team with no experience in Agile successfully implement and use SCRUM?

  20. Is implementation fidelity associated with improved access to care in a school-based Child and Family Team model?

    PubMed

    Gifford, Elizabeth J; Wells, Rebecca S; Bai, Yu; Malone, Patrick S

    2015-04-01

    Effective child and family centered service planning is crucial to addressing vulnerable children's needs. However, there is limited evidence about what facets of these processes improve service use and outcomes. The current study used a Poisson random effects hazard model to test correlations between fidelity to NC's Child and Family Support Team model and time to service receipt, using case management data for 3396 children served by that program during the 2008-2009 school year. Students were more likely to receive recommended services more quickly when caregivers and the students attended planning meetings, when their plans included services for caregivers, and when child and family team leaders followed up after meetings to verify service receipt. Contrary to the Child and Family Support Team theory of change, match between student needs and the lead agency of the meeting was not associated with the odds of quicker service receipt, nor was attendance by natural supports. Findings from this study demonstrate the potential effectiveness of using case management systems to measure service planning process fidelity, as well as how results thereof can both inform process improvement and potential refinements to models' theories of change.

  1. A software module for implementing auditory and visual feedback on a video-based eye tracking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosanlall, Bharat; Gertner, Izidor; Geri, George A.; Arrington, Karl F.

    2016-05-01

    We describe here the design and implementation of a software module that provides both auditory and visual feedback of the eye position measured by a commercially available eye tracking system. The present audio-visual feedback module (AVFM) serves as an extension to the Arrington Research ViewPoint EyeTracker, but it can be easily modified for use with other similar systems. Two modes of audio feedback and one mode of visual feedback are provided in reference to a circular area-of-interest (AOI). Auditory feedback can be either a click tone emitted when the user's gaze point enters or leaves the AOI, or a sinusoidal waveform with frequency inversely proportional to the distance from the gaze point to the center of the AOI. Visual feedback is in the form of a small circular light patch that is presented whenever the gaze-point is within the AOI. The AVFM processes data that are sent to a dynamic-link library by the EyeTracker. The AVFM's multithreaded implementation also allows real-time data collection (1 kHz sampling rate) and graphics processing that allow display of the current/past gaze-points as well as the AOI. The feedback provided by the AVFM described here has applications in military target acquisition and personnel training, as well as in visual experimentation, clinical research, marketing research, and sports training.

  2. Combined Uncertainty and A-Posteriori Error Bound Estimates for General CFD Calculations: Theory and Software Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    This workshop presentation discusses the design and implementation of numerical methods for the quantification of statistical uncertainty, including a-posteriori error bounds, for output quantities computed using CFD methods. Hydrodynamic realizations often contain numerical error arising from finite-dimensional approximation (e.g. numerical methods using grids, basis functions, particles) and statistical uncertainty arising from incomplete information and/or statistical characterization of model parameters and random fields. The first task at hand is to derive formal error bounds for statistics given realizations containing finite-dimensional numerical error [1]. The error in computed output statistics contains contributions from both realization error and the error resulting from the calculation of statistics integrals using a numerical method. A second task is to devise computable a-posteriori error bounds by numerically approximating all terms arising in the error bound estimates. For the same reason that CFD calculations including error bounds but omitting uncertainty modeling are only of limited value, CFD calculations including uncertainty modeling but omitting error bounds are only of limited value. To gain maximum value from CFD calculations, a general software package for uncertainty quantification with quantified error bounds has been developed at NASA. The package provides implementations for a suite of numerical methods used in uncertainty quantification: Dense tensorization basis methods [3] and a subscale recovery variant [1] for non-smooth data, Sparse tensorization methods[2] utilizing node-nested hierarchies, Sampling methods[4] for high-dimensional random variable spaces.

  3. Adaptive heterogeneous multi-robot teams

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1998-11-01

    This research addresses the problem of achieving fault tolerant cooperation within small- to medium-sized teams of heterogeneous mobile robots. The author describes a novel behavior-based, fully distributed architecture, called ALLIANCE, that utilizes adaptive action selection to achieve fault tolerant cooperative control in robot missions involving loosely coupled, largely independent tasks. The robots in this architecture possess a variety of high-level functions that they can perform during a mission, and must at all times select an appropriate action based on the requirements of the mission, the activities of other robots, the current environmental conditions, and their own internal states. Since such cooperative teams often work in dynamic and unpredictable environments, the software architecture allows the team members to respond robustly and reliably to unexpected environmental changes and modifications in the robot team that may occur due to mechanical failure, the learning of new skills, or the addition or removal of robots from the team by human intervention. After presenting ALLIANCE, the author describes in detail the experimental results of an implementation of this architecture on a team of physical mobile robots performing a cooperative box pushing demonstration. These experiments illustrate the ability of ALLIANCE to achieve adaptive, fault-tolerant cooperative control amidst dynamic changes in the capabilities of the robot team.

  4. TMT approach to observatory software development process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buur, Hanne; Subramaniam, Annapurni; Gillies, Kim; Dumas, Christophe; Bhatia, Ravinder

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the Observatory Software System (OSW) is to integrate all software and hardware components of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) to enable observations and data capture; thus it is a complex software system that is defined by four principal software subsystems: Common Software (CSW), Executive Software (ESW), Data Management System (DMS) and Science Operations Support System (SOSS), all of which have interdependencies with the observatory control systems and data acquisition systems. Therefore, the software development process and plan must consider dependencies to other subsystems, manage architecture, interfaces and design, manage software scope and complexity, and standardize and optimize use of resources and tools. Additionally, the TMT Observatory Software will largely be developed in India through TMT's workshare relationship with the India TMT Coordination Centre (ITCC) and use of Indian software industry vendors, which adds complexity and challenges to the software development process, communication and coordination of activities and priorities as well as measuring performance and managing quality and risk. The software project management challenge for the TMT OSW is thus a multi-faceted technical, managerial, communications and interpersonal relations challenge. The approach TMT is using to manage this multifaceted challenge is a combination of establishing an effective geographically distributed software team (Integrated Product Team) with strong project management and technical leadership provided by the TMT Project Office (PO) and the ITCC partner to manage plans, process, performance, risk and quality, and to facilitate effective communications; establishing an effective cross-functional software management team composed of stakeholders, OSW leadership and ITCC leadership to manage dependencies and software release plans, technical complexities and change to approved interfaces, architecture, design and tool set, and to facilitate

  5. Antiterrorist Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David A.

    1998-01-01

    In light of the escalation of terrorism, the Department of Defense spearheaded the development of new antiterrorist software for all Government agencies by issuing a Broad Agency Announcement to solicit proposals. This Government-wide competition resulted in a team that includes NASA Lewis Research Center's Computer Services Division, who will develop the graphical user interface (GUI) and test it in their usability lab. The team launched a program entitled Joint Sphere of Security (JSOS), crafted a design architecture (see the following figure), and is testing the interface. This software system has a state-ofthe- art, object-oriented architecture, with a main kernel composed of the Dynamic Information Architecture System (DIAS) developed by Argonne National Laboratory. DIAS will be used as the software "breadboard" for assembling the components of explosions, such as blast and collapse simulations.

  6. Mars Science Laboratory Flight Software Internal Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Justin D.; Lam, Danny

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) team is sending the rover, Curiosity, to Mars, and therefore is physically and technically complex. During my stay, I have assisted the MSL Flight Software (FSW) team in implementing functional test scripts to ensure that the FSW performs to the best of its abilities. There are a large number of FSW requirements that have been written up for implementation; however I have only been assigned a few sections of these requirements. There are many stages within testing; one of the early stages is FSW Internal Testing (FIT). The FIT team can accomplish this with simulation software and the MSL Test Automation Kit (MTAK). MTAK has the ability to integrate with the Software Simulation Equipment (SSE) and the Mission Processing and Control System (MPCS) software which makes it a powerful tool within the MSL FSW development process. The MSL team must ensure that the rover accomplishes all stages of the mission successfully. Due to the natural complexity of this project there is a strong emphasis on testing, as failure is not an option. The entire mission could be jeopardized if something is overlooked.

  7. Putting the "Team" in the Fine Arts Team: An Application of Business Management Team Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses current challenges to the idea of teamwork in fine arts teams, redefines the terms team and collaboration using a business management perspective, discusses the success of effective teams in the business world and the characteristics of those teams, and proposes the implementation of the business model of…

  8. NASA's Software Safety Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsay, Christopher M.

    2007-01-01

    NASA relies more and more on software to control, monitor, and verify its safety critical systems, facilities and operations. Since the 1960's there has hardly been a spacecraft launched that does not have a computer on board that will provide command and control services. There have been recent incidents where software has played a role in high-profile mission failures and hazardous incidents. For example, the Mars Orbiter, Mars Polar Lander, the DART (Demonstration of Autonomous Rendezvous Technology), and MER (Mars Exploration Rover) Spirit anomalies were all caused or contributed to by software. The Mission Control Centers for the Shuttle, ISS, and unmanned programs are highly dependant on software for data displays, analysis, and mission planning. Despite this growing dependence on software control and monitoring, there has been little to no consistent application of software safety practices and methodology to NASA's projects with safety critical software. Meanwhile, academia and private industry have been stepping forward with procedures and standards for safety critical systems and software, for example Dr. Nancy Leveson's book Safeware: System Safety and Computers. The NASA Software Safety Standard, originally published in 1997, was widely ignored due to its complexity and poor organization. It also focused on concepts rather than definite procedural requirements organized around a software project lifecycle. Led by NASA Headquarters Office of Safety and Mission Assurance, the NASA Software Safety Standard has recently undergone a significant update. This new standard provides the procedures and guidelines for evaluating a project for safety criticality and then lays out the minimum project lifecycle requirements to assure the software is created, operated, and maintained in the safest possible manner. This update of the standard clearly delineates the minimum set of software safety requirements for a project without detailing the implementation for those

  9. Maneuver Automation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uffelman, Hal; Goodson, Troy; Pellegrin, Michael; Stavert, Lynn; Burk, Thomas; Beach, David; Signorelli, Joel; Jones, Jeremy; Hahn, Yungsun; Attiyah, Ahlam; Illsley, Jeannette

    2009-01-01

    The Maneuver Automation Software (MAS) automates the process of generating commands for maneuvers to keep the spacecraft of the Cassini-Huygens mission on a predetermined prime mission trajectory. Before MAS became available, a team of approximately 10 members had to work about two weeks to design, test, and implement each maneuver in a process that involved running many maneuver-related application programs and then serially handing off data products to other parts of the team. MAS enables a three-member team to design, test, and implement a maneuver in about one-half hour after Navigation has process-tracking data. MAS accepts more than 60 parameters and 22 files as input directly from users. MAS consists of Practical Extraction and Reporting Language (PERL) scripts that link, sequence, and execute the maneuver- related application programs: "Pushing a single button" on a graphical user interface causes MAS to run navigation programs that design a maneuver; programs that create sequences of commands to execute the maneuver on the spacecraft; and a program that generates predictions about maneuver performance and generates reports and other files that enable users to quickly review and verify the maneuver design. MAS can also generate presentation materials, initiate electronic command request forms, and archive all data products for future reference.

  10. Geriatric assessment teams.

    PubMed

    Campbell, L J; Cole, K D

    1987-02-01

    In geriatric care, a form of teamwork is the recommended modality because of the complex biopsychosocial needs of the patient. The goal of geriatric assessment programs is to establish an intensive assessment of older adults which requires the competencies of several coordinated disciplines. Not only do teams have the capacity to assess patients in much greater depth but also patients share different information with different providers. The composition of the team is dictated by the needs of the patient population in accordance with resources available. Next, one must identify a method of team practice in order for interactions to take place. The method of functioning determines what kind of team it is, ranging from independent functioning with minimal formal interfacing to interdependent activity interspersed with formal and informal interactions. In initiating a geriatric assessment program, one needs to determine which tasks demand interdisciplinary collaboration, which require interdisciplinary consultation, and which can be performed using a matrix or extended team model. In this model, the core team is supplemented by other disciplines as determined by the team, predicated on patient problems. Teams can profit from training, which can help with choosing an appropriate model, establishing a manual of procedure, and managing interactive issues and problems. This can occur early in the team's formation, or when a team takes on new members. The minimal level of team development would include establishing program goals, delineating professional responsibilities and roles, and implementing a system for exchanging and documenting information about patient plans. Saving input to share only in team meeting is inefficient, so health care teams need to recognize the importance of informal interchanges. It is still a matter of conjecture about what team works best with which patients under what circumstances or conditions. Multiple randomized clinical trials with teams

  11. Free/Libre Open Source Software Implementation in Schools: Evidence from the Field and Implications for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yu-Wei; Zini, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    This empirical paper shows how free/libre open source software (FLOSS) contributes to mutual and collaborative learning in an educational environment. Unlike proprietary software, FLOSS allows extensive customisation of software to support the needs of local users better. This also allows users to participate more proactively in the development…

  12. Logistics Software Implementation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-28

    to obtain benchmark performance results. The list presented in Appendix A is not final and should be considered only as the initial worksheet . d...has been used in more applications and its imple-... mentation is better understood. All of the preliminary tests have indi- cated excellent ...environment. The fifth-generation languages, such as PROLOG, also provide excellent dynamic data base support. The proposed approach for the Logistics

  13. Innovating team-based outpatient mental health care in the Veterans Health Administration: Staff-perceived benefits and challenges to pilot implementation of the Behavioral Health Interdisciplinary Program (BHIP).

    PubMed

    Barry, Catherine N; Abraham, Kristen M; Weaver, Kendra R; Bowersox, Nicholas W

    2016-05-01

    In the past decade, the demand for Veterans Health Administration (VHA) mental health care has increased rapidly. In response to the increased demand, the VHA developed the Behavioral Health Interdisciplinary Program (BHIP) team model as an innovative approach to transform VHA general outpatient mental health delivery. The present formative evaluation gathered information about pilot implementation of BHIP to understand the struggles and successes that staff experienced during facility transitions to the BHIP model. Using a purposive, nonrandom sampling approach, we conducted 1-on-1, semistructured interviews with 37 licensed and nonlicensed clinical providers and 13 clerical support staff assigned to BHIP teams in 21 facilities across the VHA. Interviews revealed that having actively involved facility mental health leaders, obtaining adequate staffing for teams to meet the requirements of the BHIP model, creating clear descriptions and expectations for team member roles within the BHIP framework, and allocating designated time for BHIP team meetings challenged many VHA sites but are crucial for successful BHIP implementation. Despite the challenges, staff reported that the transition to BHIP improved team work and improved patient care. Staff specifically highlighted the potential for the BHIP model to improve staff working relationships and enhance communication, collaboration, morale, and veteran treatment consistency. Future evaluations of the BHIP implementation process and BHIP team functioning focusing on patient outcomes, organizational outcomes, and staff functioning are recommended for fully understanding effects of transitioning to the BHIP model within VHA general mental health clinics and to identify best practices and areas for improvement. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Software Defined Networking challenges and future direction: A case study of implementing SDN features on OpenStack private cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamugam, Veeramani; Murray, I.; Leong, J. A.; Sidhu, Amandeep S.

    2016-03-01

    Cloud computing provides services on demand instantly, such as access to network infrastructure consisting of computing hardware, operating systems, network storage, database and applications. Network usage and demands are growing at a very fast rate and to meet the current requirements, there is a need for automatic infrastructure scaling. Traditional networks are difficult to automate because of the distributed nature of their decision making process for switching or routing which are collocated on the same device. Managing complex environments using traditional networks is time-consuming and expensive, especially in the case of generating virtual machines, migration and network configuration. To mitigate the challenges, network operations require efficient, flexible, agile and scalable software defined networks (SDN). This paper discuss various issues in SDN and suggests how to mitigate the network management related issues. A private cloud prototype test bed was setup to implement the SDN on the OpenStack platform to test and evaluate the various network performances provided by the various configurations.

  15. Computer-implemented land use classification with pattern recognition software and ERTS digital data. [Mississippi coastal plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, A. T.

    1974-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the classification of surface conditions (land uses) with computer-implemented techniques based on the use of ERTS digital data and pattern recognition software. The supervised technique presently used at the NASA Earth Resources Laboratory is based on maximum likelihood ratioing with a digital table look-up approach to classification. After classification, colors are assigned to the various surface conditions (land uses) classified, and the color-coded classification is film recorded on either positive or negative 9 1/2 in. film at the scale desired. Prints of the film strips are then mosaicked and photographed to produce a land use map in the format desired. Computer extraction of statistical information is performed to show the extent of each surface condition (land use) within any given land unit that can be identified in the image. Evaluations of the product indicate that classification accuracy is well within the limits for use by land resource managers and administrators. Classifications performed with digital data acquired during different seasons indicate that the combination of two or more classifications offer even better accuracy.

  16. Identification of the most sensitive parameters in the activated sludge model implemented in BioWin software.

    PubMed

    Liwarska-Bizukojc, Ewa; Biernacki, Rafal

    2010-10-01

    In order to simulate biological wastewater treatment processes, data concerning wastewater and sludge composition, process kinetics and stoichiometry are required. Selection of the most sensitive parameters is an important step of model calibration. The aim of this work is to verify the predictability of the activated sludge model, which is implemented in BioWin software, and select its most influential kinetic and stoichiometric parameters with the help of sensitivity analysis approach. Two different measures of sensitivity are applied: the normalised sensitivity coefficient (S(i,j)) and the mean square sensitivity measure (delta(j)(msqr)). It occurs that 17 kinetic and stoichiometric parameters of the BioWin activated sludge (AS) model can be regarded as influential on the basis of S(i,j) calculations. Half of the influential parameters are associated with growth and decay of phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs). The identification of the set of the most sensitive parameters should support the users of this model and initiate the elaboration of determination procedures for the parameters, for which it has not been done yet.

  17. Implementing a High Performance Work Place in the Distribution and Logistics Industry: Recommendations for Leadership & Team Member Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCann, Laura Harding

    2012-01-01

    Leadership development and employee engagement are two elements critical to the success of organizations. In response to growth opportunities, our Distribution and Logistics company set on a course to implement High Performance Work Place to meet the leadership and employee engagement needs, and to find methods for improving work processes. This…

  18. The Software Maturity Matrix: A Software Performance Metric

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-28

    S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e Overview n Introduction n Software Metrics n Software Maturity Matrix ( SwMM ) n SwMM Relationship to CMM...Development Team As of: 12I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e Software Maturity Matrix ( SwMM ) n Purpose n Description n Evolution n...Implementation As of: 13I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e SwMM Purpose n Forces Developer Requirements Capture (User

  19. Team-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelsen, Larry K.; Sweet, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL), when properly implemented, includes many, if not all, of the common elements of evidence-based best practices. To explain this, a brief overview of TBL is presented. The authors examine the relationship between the best practices of evidence-based teaching and the principles that constitute team-based learning. (Contains…

  20. Continuous Energy Photon Transport Implementation in MCATK

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Terry R.; Trahan, Travis John; Sweezy, Jeremy Ed; Nolen, Steven Douglas; Hughes, Henry Grady; Pritchett-Sheats, Lori A.; Werner, Christopher John

    2016-10-31

    The Monte Carlo Application ToolKit (MCATK) code development team has implemented Monte Carlo photon transport into the MCATK software suite. The current particle transport capabilities in MCATK, which process the tracking and collision physics, have been extended to enable tracking of photons using the same continuous energy approximation. We describe the four photoatomic processes implemented, which are coherent scattering, incoherent scattering, pair-production, and photoelectric absorption. The accompanying background, implementation, and verification of these processes will be presented.

  1. Tactical Fuel and Energy Implementation Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-24

    Software Modeling and Validation of a Microgrid ,” delivered to the Alternative Energy NOW Conference, Orlando, FL, 9 February 2010. 34Ibid. 35...This plan is focused on the tactical environment, defined as maneuver brigade combat team (BCT) and below. The study team developed the objectives...what is expected of them, and must know how to implement the new behaviors, once they have been defined . Education is essential in establishing

  2. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan : ASC software quality engineering practices Version 3.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Turgeon, Jennifer L.; Minana, Molly A.; Hackney, Patricia; Pilch, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in the US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) Quality Criteria, Revision 10 (QC-1) as 'conformance to customer requirements and expectations'. This quality plan defines the SNL ASC Program software quality engineering (SQE) practices and provides a mapping of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirement (CPR) 001.3.6; 'Corporate Software Engineering Excellence'. This plan also identifies ASC management's and the software project teams responsibilities in implementing the software quality practices and in assessing progress towards achieving their software quality goals. This SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitments to improving software products by applying cost-effective SQE practices. This plan enumerates the SQE practices that comprise the development of SNL ASC's software products and explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices.

  3. Level 2 software reuse study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Scott E.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) Level 2 Software Reuse Study group was formed by Bob Nelson (NASA SSFP) from members of the Information Systems Program Support Contract (PSC) team. The objectives of the study were to identify existing software reuse libraries, to identify existing reusability processes and experiences, to identify reusability analysis tools and users, and to provide recommendations for a software reusability process for the SSFP. To date the following have been delivered: (1) definitions of commonality and reuse, (2) a report on existing software reuse libraries and library management systems, (3) a report on reuse process and methodology gleaned from software reuse experts, and (4) a report on software attributes for measuring commonality and reusability. Three implementation alternatives for a repository of reusable components were identified: centralized at the SSE Development Facility (SSEDF), a distributed approach across the network of Software Production Facilities, and a directory approach. A number of findings from the reuse study and several reuse strategy considerations were presented.

  4. Implementation of Similarity Based Kriging in Open Source Software and Application to Uncertainty Quantification and Reduction in Hydrogeological Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komara, R.; Ginsbourger, D.

    2014-12-01

    We present the implementation of Similarity Based Kriging (SBK). This approach extends Gaussian process regression (GPR) methods, typically restricted to Euclidean spaces, to spaces that are non-Euclidean or perhaps even non-metric. SBK was inspired by problems in aquifer modeling, where inputs of numerical simulations are typically curves and parameter fields, and predicting scalar or vector outputs by Kriging with such very high-dimensional inputs may seem not feasible at first. SBK combines ideas from the distance-based set-up of Scheidt and Caers (2009) with GPR and allows calculating Kriging predictions based only on similarities between inputs rather than on their high-dimensional representation. Written in open source code, this proposed approach includes automated construction of SBK models and provides diagnostics to assess model quality both in terms of covariance fitting and internal/external prediction validation. Covariance hyperparameters can be estimated both by maximum likelihood and leave-one-out cross validation relying in both cases on efficient formulas and a hybrid genetic optimization algorithm using derivatives. The determination of the best dimension for Classical multidimensional scaling (MDS) and non-metric MDS of the data will be investigated. Application of this software to real life data examples in Euclidean and non-Euclidean (dis)similarity settings will be covered and touch on aquifer modeling, hydrogeological forecasting, and sequential inverse problem solving. In the last case, a novel approach where a variant of the expected improvement criterion is used for choosing several points at a time will be presented. This part of the method and the previous covariance hyperparameter estimation parallelize naturally and we demonstrate how to save computation time by optimally distributing function evaluations over multiple cores or processors.

  5. SU-C-BRD-02: A Team Focused Clinical Implementation and Failure Mode and Effects Analysis of HDR Skin Brachytherapy Using Valencia and Leipzig Surface Applicators

    SciTech Connect

    Sayler, E; Harrison, A; Eldredge-Hindy, H; Dinome, J; Munro, S; Anne, R; Comber, E; Lockamy, V

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: and Leipzig applicators (VLAs) are single-channel brachytherapy surface applicators used to treat skin lesions up to 2cm diameter. Source dwell times can be calculated and entered manually after clinical set-up or ultrasound. This procedure differs dramatically from CT-based planning; the novelty and unfamiliarity could lead to severe errors. To build layers of safety and ensure quality, a multidisciplinary team created a protocol and applied Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) to the clinical procedure for HDR VLA skin treatments. Methods: team including physicists, physicians, nurses, therapists, residents, and administration developed a clinical procedure for VLA treatment. The procedure was evaluated using FMEA. Failure modes were identified and scored by severity, occurrence, and detection. The clinical procedure was revised to address high-scoring process nodes. Results: Several key components were added to the clinical procedure to minimize risk probability numbers (RPN): -Treatments are reviewed at weekly QA rounds, where physicians discuss diagnosis, prescription, applicator selection, and set-up. Peer review reduces the likelihood of an inappropriate treatment regime. -A template for HDR skin treatments was established in the clinical EMR system to standardize treatment instructions. This reduces the chances of miscommunication between the physician and planning physicist, and increases the detectability of an error during the physics second check. -A screen check was implemented during the second check to increase detectability of an error. -To reduce error probability, the treatment plan worksheet was designed to display plan parameters in a format visually similar to the treatment console display. This facilitates data entry and verification. -VLAs are color-coded and labeled to match the EMR prescriptions, which simplifies in-room selection and verification. Conclusion: Multidisciplinary planning and FMEA increased delectability and

  6. TEAMS Model Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tijidjian, Raffi P.

    2010-01-01

    The TEAMS model analyzer is a supporting tool developed to work with models created with TEAMS (Testability, Engineering, and Maintenance System), which was developed by QSI. In an effort to reduce the time spent in the manual process that each TEAMS modeler must perform in the preparation of reporting for model reviews, a new tool has been developed as an aid to models developed in TEAMS. The software allows for the viewing, reporting, and checking of TEAMS models that are checked into the TEAMS model database. The software allows the user to selectively model in a hierarchical tree outline view that displays the components, failure modes, and ports. The reporting features allow the user to quickly gather statistics about the model, and generate an input/output report pertaining to all of the components. Rules can be automatically validated against the model, with a report generated containing resulting inconsistencies. In addition to reducing manual effort, this software also provides an automated process framework for the Verification and Validation (V&V) effort that will follow development of these models. The aid of such an automated tool would have a significant impact on the V&V process.

  7. Science Application Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the science application team activities. Science Application team are: (1) Represent the diversity of NASA onboard computing of the future. (2) Drive architecture and system software requirements. (3) Demonstrate the benefit of highly capable computing onboard. (4) Study the birth of the first galaxies. (5) Study formation of stars. (6) Discusses the next generation space telescope hardware/software requirement: image processing and on-board optical calibration. Also discusses gamma ray large area space telescope; orbital thermal imaging spectrometer; solar terrestrial probe program; autonomous Mars rover;fault tolerance and errors.

  8. Implementation of Software Programmable Radios to Form Ad-Hoc Meshed Networks to Enhance Maritime Interception Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Networks, Software Programmable Radios, MIMO , Ultra-wideband, MIO, VBSS 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18...locations where it was never possible before: in crowded urban environments, massive buildings, subway tunnels, - virtually anywhere.  Networks can be...Multiple Input / Multiple Output ( MIMO )  Network-Controlled Robotics (Unmanned Vehicles) 2. Possible Combination of TW220 and Small Satellites Software

  9. Verifying Architectural Design Rules of the Flight Software Product Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganesan, Dharmalingam; Lindvall, Mikael; Ackermann, Chris; McComas, David; Bartholomew, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents experiences of verifying architectural design rules of the NASA Core Flight Software (CFS) product line implementation. The goal of the verification is to check whether the implementation is consistent with the CFS architectural rules derived from the developer's guide. The results indicate that consistency checking helps a) identifying architecturally significant deviations that were eluded during code reviews, b) clarifying the design rules to the team, and c) assessing the overall implementation quality. Furthermore, it helps connecting business goals to architectural principles, and to the implementation. This paper is the first step in the definition of a method for analyzing and evaluating product line implementations from an architecture-centric perspective.

  10. Modification, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Remote Terminal Emulator as a Software Validation and Stress Testing Tool.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    Dawn, who understood why her dad cuuld not attend all of her athletic events. Craig J. Riesberg ’-% r % ii e% Table of Contents Page Preface... management . The two tools are also compared during the emulation phase of software validation. The RTE package was also examined as a stress testing tool...terminal emulator is the continuation of an effort in software and hardware configuration management which began at the Military Airlift Command in

  11. DOE GIS core team - a best practice

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, J.; Bhaduri, Budhendra; Bleakly, D. R.; Brady-Sabeff, Liz; Guber, Al; Guziel, K. A.; Hargrove, Susan; Lee, J.; Lee, R.; Mickus, Kurt; Morehouse, David; Moore, K.; Ramsdell, Amy; Rich, P. M.

    2004-01-01

    Large government organizations such as the Department of Energy (DOE) are challenged with identifying and implementing best geospatial information management practices to ensure that operational needs are met and government objectives are achieved. Geographic Information System (GIS) professionals, complex wide within the Department, conduct spatial information management practices on a daily basis to complete a wide variety of science and engineering tasks. The DOE Office of the CIO recognized the wealth of geospatial information management knowledge within the DOE complex and formed the DOE GIS Core Team in 2001 as a result. The team is comprised of GIS experts-representing all major DOE labs, site facilities, and programs-who volunteer their time to address issues impacting the entire complex. These include the President's management agenda (with emphasis on the Geospatial One-Stop), homeland security, emergency response, site management, software and geospatial data licensing, and federal, national, and international standards governing the creation and dissemination of geospatial data. The strength of the DOE GIS Core Team is the wide diversity of GIS and scientific expertise represented on the team, which allows it to provide the DOE CIO's office with sound guidance on complex wide issues from a GIS practitioner's perspective. The Core Team's mission is 'to foster technical excellence and communication, to identify and advocate best business practices, and to provide sound recommendations on policy and standards.' As a first step toward identifying best practices the feam conducted a survey of all known GIS assets across the DOE complex. The survey identified each site's GIS expertise, operating systems architecture and software applications, major project areas supported, and a number of other metrics important to the operation of a GIS organization. Results of the survey will be discussed, along with the mission of the Core Team. A broad overview of best

  12. Cammp Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evertt, Shonn F.; Collins, Michael; Hahn, William

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Configuration Analysis Modeling and Mass Properties (CAMMP) Team is presenting a demo of certain CAMMP capabilities at a Booz Allen Hamilton conference in San Antonio. The team will be showing pictures of low fidelity, simplified ISS models, but no dimensions or technical data. The presentation will include a brief description of the contract and task, description and picture of the Topology, description of Generic Ground Rules and Constraints (GGR&C), description of Stage Analysis with constraints applied, and wrap up with description of other tasks such as Special Studies, Cable Routing, etc. The models include conceptual Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Lunar Lander images and animations created for promotional purposes, which are based entirely on public domain conceptual images from public NASA web sites and publicly available magazine articles and are not based on any actual designs, measurements, or 3D models. Conceptual Mars rover and lander are completely conceptual and are not based on any NASA designs or data. The demonstration includes High Fidelity Computer Aided Design (CAD) models of ISS provided by the ISS 3D CAD Team which will be used in a visual display to demonstrate the capabilities of the Teamcenter Visualization software. The demonstration will include 3D views of the CAD models including random measurements that will be taken to demonstrate the measurement tool. A 3D PDF file will be demonstrated of the Blue Book fidelity assembly complete model with no vehicles attached. The 3D zoom and rotation will be displayed as well as random measurements from the measurement tool. The External Configuration Analysis and Tracking Tool (ExCATT) Microsoft Access Database will be demonstrated to show its capabilities to organize and track hardware on ISS. The data included will be part numbers, serial numbers, historical, current, and future locations, of external hardware components on station. It includes dates of

  13. Design and Implementation of a Software for Teaching Health Related Topics to Deaf Students: the First Experience in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Abbasi, Masoomeh; Bahaadinbeigy, Kambiz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Deaf are not able to communicate with other community members due to hearing impaired. Providing health care for deaf is more complex because of their communication problems. Multimedia tools can provide multiple tangible concepts (movie, subtitles, and sign language) for the deaf and hard of hearing. In this study, identify the priority health needs of deaf students in primary schools and health education software has been created. Method: Priority health needs and software requirements were identified through interviews with teachers in primary schools in Tehran. After training videos recorded, videos edited and the required software has been created in stages. Results: As a result, health care needs, including: health, dental, ear, nails, and hair care aids, washing hands and face, the corners of the bathroom. Expected Features of the software was including the use of sign language, lip reading, pictures, animations and simple and short subtitles. Discussion: Based on the results of interviews and interest of educators and students to using of educational software for deaf health problems, we can use this software to help Teachers and student’s families to education and promotion the health of deaf students for learn effectively. PMID:26005271

  14. The BRIGHTEN Program: Implementation and Evaluation of a Program to Bridge Resources of an Interdisciplinary Geriatric Health Team via Electronic Networking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Erin E.; Lapidos, Stan; Eisenstein, Amy R.; Ivan, Iulia I.; Golden, Robyn L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of the BRIGHTEN Program (Bridging Resources of an Interdisciplinary Geriatric Health Team via Electronic Networking), an interdisciplinary team intervention for assessing and treating older adults for depression in outpatient primary and specialty medical clinics. The BRIGHTEN team collaborates "virtually"…

  15. The ALMA software architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Joseph; Farris, Allen; Sommer, Heiko

    2004-09-01

    The software for the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is being developed by many institutes on two continents. The software itself will function in a distributed environment, from the 0.5-14 kmbaselines that separate antennas to the larger distances that separate the array site at the Llano de Chajnantor in Chile from the operations and user support facilities in Chile, North America and Europe. Distributed development demands 1) interfaces that allow separated groups to work with minimal dependence on their counterparts at other locations; and 2) a common architecture to minimize duplication and ensure that developers can always perform similar tasks in a similar way. The Container/Component model provides a blueprint for the separation of functional from technical concerns: application developers concentrate on implementing functionality in Components, which depend on Containers to provide them with services such as access to remote resources, transparent serialization of entity objects to XML, logging, error handling and security. Early system integrations have verified that this architecture is sound and that developers can successfully exploit its features. The Containers and their services are provided by a system-orienteddevelopment team as part of the ALMA Common Software (ACS), middleware that is based on CORBA.

  16. Avoidable Software Procurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Integrated Product Team IT Information Technology ITAM Information Technology Asset Management JAP Joint Applied Project JIE Joint Information Environment...DoD CIO sponsors an Integrated Product Team (IPT) for Information Technology Asset Management ( ITAM ) to include members from all components of DoD...practices for Software Asset Management (SAM) and Information Technology Asset Management ( ITAM ). E. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY Throughout this study we

  17. Software and Information Life Cycle (SILC) for the Integrated Information Services Organization. Analysis and implementation phase adaptations of the Sandia software guidelines: Issue A, April 18, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, D.; Cassidy, A.; Cuyler, D.

    1995-07-01

    This document describes the processes to be used for creating corporate information systems within the scope of the Integrated information Services (IIS) Center. This issue A describes the Analysis and Implementation phases within the context of the entire life cycle. Appendix A includes a full set of examples of the analysis set deliverables. Subsequent issues will describe the other life cycle processes as we move toward enterprise-level management of information assets, including information meta-models and an integrated corporate information model. The analysis phase as described here, when combined with a specifications repository, will provide the basis for future reusable components and improve traceability of information system specifications to enterprise business rules.

  18. SU-E-T-465: Implementation of An Automated Collision Detection Program Using Open Source Software for the Pinnacle Treatment Planning System

    SciTech Connect

    Tanny, S; Bogue, J; Parsai, E; Sperling, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Potential collisions between the gantry head and the patient or table assembly are difficult to detect in most treatment planning systems. We have developed and implemented a novel software package for the representation of potential gantry collisions with the couch assembly at the time of treatment planning. Methods: Physical dimensions of the Varian Edge linear accelerator treatment head were measured and reproduced using the Visual Python display package. A script was developed for the Pinnacle treatment planning system to generate a file with the relevant couch, gantry, and isocenter positions for each beam in a planning trial. A python program was developed to parse the information from the TPS and produce a representative model of the couch/gantry system. Using the model and the Visual Python libraries, a rendering window is generated for each beam that allows the planner to evaluate the possibility of a collision. Results: Comparison against heuristic methods and direct verification on the machine validated the collision model generated by the software. Encounters of <1 cm between the gantry treatment head and table were visualized as collisions in our virtual model. Visual windows were created depicting the angle of collision for each beam, including the anticipated table coordinates. Visual rendering of a 6 arc trial with multiple couch positions was completed in under 1 minute, with network bandwidth being the primary bottleneck. Conclusion: The developed software allows for quick examination of possible collisions during the treatment planning process and helps to prevent major collisions prior to plan approval. The software can easily be implemented on future planning systems due to the versatility and platform independence of the Python programming language. Further integration of the software with the treatment planning system will allow the possibility of patient-gantry collision detection for a range of treatment machines.

  19. Nutrient and Sediment Reductions from Algal Flow-Way Technologies: Recommendations to the Chesapeake Bay Program's Water Quality Goal Implementation Team from the Algal Flow-Way Technologies BMP Expert Panel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Chesapeake Stormwater Network hosted a workshop on July, 2012 to discuss the potential nutrient reductions from emerging stormwater technologies including algal flow-way technologies (AFTs). Workshop participants recommended the Chesapeake Bay Program’s Water Quality Goal Implementation Team(WQ...

  20. Team Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, David

    1999-01-01

    Explains how a team cleaning approach can be cost-effective and efficient means of school maintenance. Assigning staffing responsibilities and work schedules are addressed and the advantages of using a team system are explained. (GR)

  1. Effects of Team-Initiated Problem Solving on Decision Making by Schoolwide Behavior Support Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Anne W.; Horner, Robert H.; Newton, J. Stephen; Algozzine, Robert F.; Algozzine, Kate M.; Frank, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined the problem-solving practices of school teams engaged in implementing and improving schoolwide behavior support implementation. A multiple baseline design across 4 elementary school teams was used to assess the effects of the Team-Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) training program (1 day of team training plus 2 coached…

  2. Implementation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Describes elements for the set of activities to ensure that control strategies are put into effect and that air quality goals and standards are fulfilled, permitting programs, and additional resources related to implementation under the Clean Air Act.

  3. Team Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John

    Chapter 5 of a volume on school leadership, this chapter reviews the literature to define and explain management teams and to describe several successful management team arrangements. The author begins by noting that team management has recently enjoyed a resurgence as a response to collective negotiations, but beyond this function can have value…

  4. Design and implementation of photoelectric rotary table data acquisition and analysis system host computer software based on VC++ and MFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dawei; Yang, Xiufang; Han, Junfeng; Yan, Xiaoxu

    2015-02-01

    Photoelectric rotary table is mainly used in the defense industry and military fields, especially in the shooting range, target tracking, target acquisition, aerospace aspects play an important one. For range photoelectric measuring equipment field test application requirements, combined with a portable photoelectric rotary table data acquisition hardware system, software programming platform is presented based on the VC++, using MFC prepared PC interface, the realization of photoelectric turntable data acquisition, analysis and processing and debugging control. The host computer software design of serial communication and protocol, real-time data acquisition and display, real-time data curve drawing, analog acquisition, debugging guide, error analysis program, and gives the specific design method. Finally, through the photoelectric rotary table data acquisition hardware system alignment, the experimental results show that host computer software can better accomplish with lower machine data transmission, data acquisition, control and analysis, and to achieve the desired effect, the entire software system running performance is stable, flexible, strong practicality and reliability, the advantages of good scalability.

  5. An Analysis of How and Why High School Geometry Teachers Implement Dynamic Geometry Software Tasks for Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nirode, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    This study examined teachers' use of student tasks involving dynamic geometry software, in which a figure is constructed then altered while maintaining its constructed properties. Although researchers, professional organizations, and policy makers generally have been proponents of dynamic geometry for instruction, there is little research about…

  6. ThermoData Engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 9. Extensible thermodynamic constraints for pure compounds and new model developments.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Muzny, Chris D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Magee, Joseph W; Abdulagatov, Ilmutdin; Frenkel, Michael

    2013-12-23

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported in this journal. The present article describes the background and implementation for new additions in latest release of TDE. Advances are in the areas of program architecture and quality improvement for automatic property evaluations, particularly for pure compounds. It is shown that selection of appropriate program architecture supports improvement of the quality of the on-demand property evaluations through application of a readily extensible collection of constraints. The basis and implementation for other enhancements to TDE are described briefly. Other enhancements include the following: (1) implementation of model-validity enforcement for specific equations that can provide unphysical results if unconstrained, (2) newly refined group-contribution parameters for estimation of enthalpies of formation for pure compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, (3) implementation of an enhanced group-contribution method (NIST-Modified UNIFAC) in TDE for improved estimation of phase-equilibrium properties for binary mixtures, (4) tools for mutual validation of ideal-gas properties derived through statistical calculations and those derived independently through combination of experimental thermodynamic results, (5) improvements in program reliability and function that stem directly from the recent redesign of the TRC-SOURCE Data Archival System for experimental property values, and (6) implementation of the Peng-Robinson equation of state for binary mixtures, which allows for critical evaluation of mixtures involving supercritical components. Planned future developments are summarized.

  7. Tactical Fuel and Energy Implementation Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-24

    Technologies Corporation, in a briefing titled “ Software Modeling and Validation of a Microgrid ,” delivered to the Alternative Energy NOW Conference, Orlando...and Energy Implementation Plan 2 This plan is focused on the tactical environment, defined as maneuver brigade combat team (BCT) and below. The...Soldiers must clearly understand what is expected of them, and must know how to implement the new behaviors, once they have been defined

  8. Software Users Manual (SUM): Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Fulton, Christopher E.

    2011-01-01

    This software user manual describes the implementation and use the Extended Testability Analysis (ETA) Tool. The ETA Tool is a software program that augments the analysis and reporting capabilities of a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) testability analysis software package called the Testability Engineering And Maintenance System (TEAMS) Designer. An initial diagnostic assessment is performed by the TEAMS Designer software using a qualitative, directed-graph model of the system being analyzed. The ETA Tool utilizes system design information captured within the diagnostic model and testability analysis output from the TEAMS Designer software to create a series of six reports for various system engineering needs. The ETA Tool allows the user to perform additional studies on the testability analysis results by determining the detection sensitivity to the loss of certain sensors or tests. The ETA Tool was developed to support design and development of the NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle. The diagnostic analysis provided by the ETA Tool was proven to be valuable system engineering output that provided consistency in the verification of system engineering requirements. This software user manual provides a description of each output report generated by the ETA Tool. The manual also describes the example diagnostic model and supporting documentation - also provided with the ETA Tool software release package - that were used to generate the reports presented in the manual

  9. The development model of software product line based AOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, JingHai

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we proposed a development model of MIS (management information system) software based aspect-oriented programming. MIS software will be the full separation of concerns, and establish corresponding platform-independent model, the dynamic weaving of aspects does not require all the static or fixed in weaver weaving in specific areas and at the same time Optimization, reducing system complexity and improve software development efficiency and speed. While the description and implementation of all aspects of the software industry chain assigned to the various levels of development team to complete, MIS can help resolve the current heavy workload of the software development process, low developing level, low software reuse rate, more duplication work of effort Problems.

  10. Idea Paper: The Lifecycle of Software for Scientific Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, Anshu; McInnes, Lois C.

    2016-01-01

    The software lifecycle is a well researched topic that has produced many models to meet the needs of different types of software projects. However, one class of projects, software development for scientific computing, has received relatively little attention from lifecycle researchers. In particular, software for end-to-end computations for obtaining scientific results has received few lifecycle proposals and no formalization of a development model. An examination of development approaches employed by the teams implementing large multicomponent codes reveals a great deal of similarity in their strategies. This idea paper formalizes these related approaches into a lifecycle model for end-to-end scientific application software, featuring loose coupling between submodels for development of infrastructure and scientific capability. We also invite input from stakeholders to converge on a model that captures the complexity of this development processes and provides needed lifecycle guidance to the scientific software community.

  11. NASA Software Engineering Benchmarking Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rarick, Heather L.; Godfrey, Sara H.; Kelly, John C.; Crumbley, Robert T.; Wifl, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    To identify best practices for the improvement of software engineering on projects, NASA's Offices of Chief Engineer (OCE) and Safety and Mission Assurance (OSMA) formed a team led by Heather Rarick and Sally Godfrey to conduct this benchmarking study. The primary goals of the study are to identify best practices that: Improve the management and technical development of software intensive systems; Have a track record of successful deployment by aerospace industries, universities [including research and development (R&D) laboratories], and defense services, as well as NASA's own component Centers; and Identify candidate solutions for NASA's software issues. Beginning in the late fall of 2010, focus topics were chosen and interview questions were developed, based on the NASA top software challenges. Between February 2011 and November 2011, the Benchmark Team interviewed a total of 18 organizations, consisting of five NASA Centers, five industry organizations, four defense services organizations, and four university or university R and D laboratory organizations. A software assurance representative also participated in each of the interviews to focus on assurance and software safety best practices. Interviewees provided a wealth of information on each topic area that included: software policy, software acquisition, software assurance, testing, training, maintaining rigor in small projects, metrics, and use of the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) framework, as well as a number of special topics that came up in the discussions. NASA's software engineering practices compared favorably with the external organizations in most benchmark areas, but in every topic, there were ways in which NASA could improve its practices. Compared to defense services organizations and some of the industry organizations, one of NASA's notable weaknesses involved communication with contractors regarding its policies and requirements for acquired software. One of NASA's strengths

  12. Team Development of Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sooyoung

    2004-01-01

    Advanced technologies, globalization, the competitiveness of business, flexible working practices, and other rapid changes in the nature of work have all led to the booming of "virtual teams." This paper will provide an overview of virtual teams, including a description of their emergence, a definition and typology of the term "virtual team," an…

  13. Design software for reuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tracz, Will

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on the designing of software for reuse. Topics include terminology, software reuse maxims, the science of programming, an interface design example, a modularization example, and reuse and implementation guidelines.

  14. Payload Operations Support Team Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askew, Bill; Barry, Matthew; Burrows, Gary; Casey, Mike; Charles, Joe; Downing, Nicholas; Jain, Monika; Leopold, Rebecca; Luty, Roger; McDill, David; Mermelstein, Scott; Morsics, Jon; Osborne, Richard; Owens, Cindy; Price, Thomas; Quaddumi, Ayman; Thompson, Jim; Walter, Patrick; Vail, Melanie; Campbell, Richard; Kelly, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Payload Operations Support Team Tools is a software system that assists in (1) development and testing of software for payloads to be flown aboard the space shuttles and (2) training of payload customers, flight controllers, and flight crews in payload operations

  15. Electronic Help for the Harried Team Chair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polis, A. Richard

    This paper describes one accreditation team leader's experience with coordinating the entire team accreditation review process on personal computer and offers 14 suggestions for future implementation. The leaders of the accreditation team describes pre-accreditation visit arrangements to facilitate the use of computers. He polled team members on…

  16. Investigating Team Cohesion in COCOMO II.2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowdeal-Carden, Betty A.

    2013-01-01

    Software engineering is team oriented and intensely complex, relying on human collaboration and creativity more than any other engineering discipline. Poor software estimation is a problem that within the United States costs over a billion dollars per year. Effective measurement of team cohesion is foundationally important to gain accurate…

  17. Understanding medical practice team roles.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Do you believe that the roles your employees play on your medical practice team are identical to their job titles or job descriptions? Do you believe that team roles are determined by personality type? This article suggests that a more effective way to build and manage your medical practice team is to define team roles through employee behaviors. It provides 10 rules of behavioral team roles that can help practice managers to select and build high-performing teams, build more productive team relationships, improve the employee recruitment process, build greater team trust and understanding; and increase their own effectiveness. This article describes in detail Belbin's highly regarded and widely used team role theory and summarizes four additional behavioral team role theories and systems. It offers lessons learned when applying team role theory to practice. Finally, this article offers an easy-to-implement method for assessing current team roles. It provides a simple four-question checklist that will help practice managers balance an imbalanced medical practice team.

  18. Technical specification for the Sandia Management Restructure Study Team (MRST) Prototype Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, T.R.; Hall, R.C.; Davis, L.T.; Klamerus, E.J.; Thurston, I.

    1992-01-01

    This document contains implementation details for the Sandia Management Restructure Study Team (MRST) Prototype Information System, which resides on a Sun SPARC II workstation employing the INGRES RDBMS. The INGRES/Windows 4GL application editor was used to define the components of the two user applications which comprise the system. These specifications together with the MRST information model and corresponding database definition constitute the MRST Prototype Information System technical specification and implementation description presented herein. The MRST Prototype Information System represents a completed software product which has been presented to the Management Restructure Study Team to support the management restructing processes at Sandia National Laboratories.

  19. Evidential evaluation of DNA profiles using a discrete statistical model implemented in the DNA LiRa software.

    PubMed

    Puch-Solis, Roberto; Clayton, Tim

    2014-07-01

    The high sensitivity of the technology for producing profiles means that it has become routine to produce profiles from relatively small quantities of DNA. The profiles obtained from low template DNA (LTDNA) are affected by several phenomena which must be taken into consideration when interpreting and evaluating this evidence. Furthermore, many of the same phenomena affect profiles from higher amounts of DNA (e.g. where complex mixtures has been revealed). In this article we present a statistical model, which forms the basis of software DNA LiRa, and that is able to calculate likelihood ratios where one to four donors are postulated and for any number of replicates. The model can take into account dropin and allelic dropout for different contributors, template degradation and uncertain allele designations. In this statistical model unknown parameters are treated following the Empirical Bayesian paradigm. The performance of LiRa is tested using examples and the outputs are compared with those generated using two other statistical software packages likeLTD and LRmix. The concept of ban efficiency is introduced as a measure for assessing model sensitivity.

  20. Software Model Of Software-Development Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chi Y.; Synott, Debra J.; Levary, Reuven R.

    1990-01-01

    Collection of computer programs constitutes software tool for simulation of medium- to large-scale software-development projects. Necessary to include easily identifiable and more-readily quantifiable characteristics like costs, times, and numbers of errors. Mathematical model incorporating these and other factors of dynamics of software-development process implemented in the Software Life Cycle Simulator (SLICS) computer program. Simulates dynamics of software-development process. In combination with input and output expert software systems and knowledge-based management software system, develops information for use in managing large software-development project. Intended to aid managers in planning, managing, and controlling software-development processes by reducing uncertainties in budgets, required personnel, and schedules.

  1. Reconfigurable Software for Controlling Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Joseph B.

    2006-01-01

    Software for a system to control the trajectories of multiple spacecraft flying in formation is being developed to reflect underlying concepts of (1) a decentralized approach to guidance and control and (2) reconfigurability of the control system, including reconfigurability of the software and of control laws. The software is organized as a modular network of software tasks. The computational load for both determining relative trajectories and planning maneuvers is shared equally among all spacecraft in a cluster. The flexibility and robustness of the software are apparent in the fact that tasks can be added, removed, or replaced during flight. In a computational simulation of a representative formation-flying scenario, it was demonstrated that the following are among the services performed by the software: Uploading of commands from a ground station and distribution of the commands among the spacecraft, Autonomous initiation and reconfiguration of formations, Autonomous formation of teams through negotiations among the spacecraft, Working out details of high-level commands (e.g., shapes and sizes of geometrically complex formations), Implementation of a distributed guidance law providing autonomous optimization and assignment of target states, and Implementation of a decentralized, fuel-optimal, impulsive control law for planning maneuvers.

  2. Programming implementation of performance testing of low light level ICCD camera based on LabVIEW software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Li; Ye, Qiong; Qian, Yunsheng

    2016-10-01

    Low light level (LLL) imaging technology major roles in the night and in other low light illumination stage, through a variety of low light level image intensifier and charge-coupled device (CCD), gains image information on the target acquisition, photoelectric conversion and high-performance enhancement, storing and displaying. In order to comprehensively test the parameters such as intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) signal noise ratio (SNR) and dynamic range, this paper uses Laboratory Virtual Instrument Engineering Platform (LabVIEW) software for programming. Data acquisition is the core of the entire software programming, according to the function; it is divided into three parts: a) initializing acquisition cards; b) data collection and storage of useful data; c) closing the acquisition card. NI PXIe-5122 analog acquisition card and PXIe-1435 digital acquisition card were used to collect pal cameras and camera link cameras' shooting pictures, developing with analog interface and the digital interface of ICCD test work. After obtaining data, we can then analyze the performance of the camera by calculating the data according to the principle programmed parameters. Experimental testing process, the use of half-moon test target signal to noise ratio, dynamic range parameters and uniformity test target will be normal. Meanwhile, in order to increase the practicality of the program, we also add the database module into the program. LabSQL is a free, multi-database, cross-platform database access LabVIEW Toolkit. Using LabSQL can access almost any type of database, perform a variety of inquiries and record various operations. With just a simple programming, database access can be achieved in LabVIEW.

  3. Team Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Recounts one Montessori teacher's experience team teaching in a secondary Montessori classroom. Illustrates how a conflict over decision making with a co-teacher helped to create better relationships with students in the classroom and better communication on the teaching team. Contends that resolving issues of conflict between teachers is vital…

  4. Yea, Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinn, Fauneil J.; Weir, Sybil B.

    1984-01-01

    Four problems in higher education are identified: hardening curriculum, graying faculty, shrinking budget, and disappearing students. Team teaching is suggested as one solution. A conceptual framework for types of team teaching is presented and practical suggestions to those who want to work within that framework are provided. (Author/MLW)

  5. Team Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    Experience shows that teamwork produces powerful results. Working in a team environment, however, presents its own set of challenges. This handbook provides U.S. Department of Education managers and employees with guidance to develop high-performing teams. Based on input from agency employees throughout the country, the handbook was designed to…

  6. Leading a successful iGEM team.

    PubMed

    Materi, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    The International Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) competition allows undergraduate teams to develop projects in synthetic biology within the context of a large, international Jamboree. Organizing and managing a successful iGEM team is an exercise in advanced agile project development. While many of the principles applicable to such teams are derived from management of agile software teams, iGEM presents several unique challenges.

  7. Decentralized Formation Flying Control in a Multiple-Team Hierarchy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Joseph .; Thomas, Stephanie J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the prototype of a system that addresses these objectives-a decentralized guidance and control system that is distributed across spacecraft using a multiple-team framework. The objective is to divide large clusters into teams of manageable size, so that the communication and computational demands driven by N decentralized units are related to the number of satellites in a team rather than the entire cluster. The system is designed to provide a high-level of autonomy, to support clusters with large numbers of satellites, to enable the number of spacecraft in the cluster to change post-launch, and to provide for on-orbit software modification. The distributed guidance and control system will be implemented in an object-oriented style using MANTA (Messaging Architecture for Networking and Threaded Applications). In this architecture, tasks may be remotely added, removed or replaced post-launch to increase mission flexibility and robustness. This built-in adaptability will allow software modifications to be made on-orbit in a robust manner. The prototype system, which is implemented in MATLAB, emulates the object-oriented and message-passing features of the MANTA software. In this paper, the multiple-team organization of the cluster is described, and the modular software architecture is presented. The relative dynamics in eccentric reference orbits is reviewed, and families of periodic, relative trajectories are identified, expressed as sets of static geometric parameters. The guidance law design is presented, and an example reconfiguration scenario is used to illustrate the distributed process of assigning geometric goals to the cluster. Next, a decentralized maneuver planning approach is presented that utilizes linear-programming methods to enact reconfiguration and coarse formation keeping maneuvers. Finally, a method for performing online collision avoidance is discussed, and an example is provided to gauge its performance.

  8. Aircrew team management program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margerison, Charles; Mccann, Dick; Davies, Rod

    1987-01-01

    The key features of the Aircrew Team Management Workshop which was designed for and in consultation with Trans Australia Airlines are outlined. Five major sections are presented dealing with: (1) A profile of the airline and the designers; (2) Aircrew consultation and involvement; (3) Educational design and development; (4) Implementation and instruction; and (5) Evaluation and assessment. These areas are detailed.

  9. Roles of the Team Physician.

    PubMed

    Kinderknecht, James

    2016-07-01

    The roles of the team physician are much more than providing medical coverage at a sport's event. The team physician has numerous administrative and medical responsibilities. The development of an emergency action plan is an essential administrative task as an example. The implementation of the components of this plan requires the team physician to have the necessary medical knowledge and skill. An expertise in returning an athlete to play after an injury or other medical condition is a unique attribute of the trained team physician. The athlete's return to participation needs to start with the athlete's safety and best medical interests but not inappropriately restrict the individual from play. The ability to communicate on numerous levels needs to be a characteristic of the team physician. There are several potential ethical conflicts the team physician needs to control. These conflicts can create unique medicolegal issues. The true emphasis of the team physician is to focus on what is best for the athlete.

  10. Project Management Software for Distributed Industrial Companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrojević, M.; Medjo, B.; Rakin, M.; Sedmak, A.

    This paper gives an overview of the development of a new software solution for project management, intended mainly to use in industrial environment. The main concern of the proposed solution is application in everyday engineering practice in various, mainly distributed industrial companies. Having this in mind, special care has been devoted to development of appropriate tools for tracking, storing and analysis of the information about the project, and in-time delivering to the right team members or other responsible persons. The proposed solution is Internet-based and uses LAMP/WAMP (Linux or Windows - Apache - MySQL - PHP) platform, because of its stability, versatility, open source technology and simple maintenance. Modular structure of the software makes it easy for customization according to client specific needs, with a very short implementation period. Its main advantages are simple usage, quick implementation, easy system maintenance, short training and only basic computer skills needed for operators.

  11. Implementation of k0-INAA standardisation at ITU TRIGA Mark II research reactor, Turkey based on k0-IAEA software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esen, Ayse Nur; Haciyakupoglu, Sevilay

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to test the applicability of k0-INAA method at the Istanbul Technical University TRIGA Mark II research reactor. The neutron spectrum parameters such as epithermal neutron flux distribution parameter (α), thermal to epithermal neutron flux ratio (f) and thermal neutron flux (φth) were determined at the central irradiation channel of the ITU TRIGA Mark II research reactor using bare triple-monitor method. HPGe detector calibrations and calculations were carried out by k0-IAEA software. The α, f and φth values were calculated to be -0.009, 15.4 and 7.92·1012 cm-2 s-1, respectively. NIST SRM 1633b coal fly ash and intercomparison samples consisting of clay and sandy soil samples were used to evaluate the validity of the method. For selected elements, the statistical evaluation of the analysis results was carried out by z-score test. A good agreement between certified/reported and experimental values was obtained.

  12. Virtuoso teams.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Bill; Boynton, Andy

    2005-01-01

    Managing a traditional team seems pretty straightforward: Gather up whoever's available, give them time and space to do their jobs, and make sure they all play nicely together. But these teams produce results that are often as unremarkable as the teams themselves. When big change and high performance are required, a virtuoso team is far more likely to deliver outstanding and innovative results. Virtuoso teams are fundamentally different from the garden-variety work groups that most organizations form to pursue more modest goals. They comprise the top experts in their particular fields, are specially convened for ambitious projects, work with frenetic rhythm, and emanate a discernible energy. Not surprisingly, however, the superstars who make up these teams are renowned for being elitist, temperamental, egocentric, and difficult to work with. As a result, many managers fear that if they force such people to interact on a high-stakes project, the group just might implode. In this article, Bill Fischer and Andy Boynton put the inner workings of highly successful virtuoso teams on full display through three examples: the creative group behind West Side Story, the team of writers for Sid Caesar's 1950s-era television hit Your Show of Shows, and the high-powered technologists who averted an investor-relations crisis for Norsk Hydro, the Norwegian energy giant. Each of these teams accomplished enormous goals and changed their businesses, their customers, even their industries. And they did so by breaking all the conventional rules of collaboration--from the way they recruited the best members to the way they enforced their unusual processes, and from the high expectations they held to the exceptional results they produced.

  13. Innovation in healthcare team feedback.

    PubMed

    Plaza, Christine; Beard, Leslie; Fonzo, Anthony Di; Tommaso, Michael Di; Mujawaz, Yaman; Serra-Julia, Marcel; Morra, Dante

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare delivery is evolving from individual, autonomous practice to collaborative team practice. However, barriers such as professional autonomy, time constraints and the perception of error as failure preclude learning behaviours that can facilitate organizational learning and improvement. Although experimentation, engaging in questions and feedback, discussing errors and reflecting on results can facilitate learning and promote effective performance, the cultural barriers within healthcare can prevent or inhibit this type of behaviour among teams. At the University Health Network's Centre for Innovation in Complex Care, we realize the need for a tool that facilitates learning behaviour and is sensitive to the risk-averse nature of the clinical environment. The vehicle for the Team Feedback Tool is a web-based application called Rypple (www.rypple.com), which allows team members to provide anonymous, rapid-fire feedback on team processes and performance. Rypple facilitates communication, elicits feedback and provokes discussion. The process enables follow-up face-to-face team discussions and encourages teams to create actionable solutions for incremental changes to enhance team health and performance. The Team Feedback Tool was implemented and piloted in general internal medicine at the University Health Network's Toronto General Hospital from early May 2009 to July 2009 to address the issues of teamwork and learning behaviour in the clinical environment. This article explores the opportunities and barriers associated with the implementation of the Team Feedback Tool.

  14. DigiFract: A software and data model implementation for flexible acquisition and processing of fracture data from outcrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardebol, N. J.; Bertotti, G.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the development and use of our new DigiFract software designed for acquiring fracture data from outcrops more efficiently and more completely than done with other methods. Fracture surveys often aim at measuring spatial information (such as spacing) directly in the field. Instead, DigiFract focuses on collecting geometries and attributes and derives spatial information through subsequent analyses. Our primary development goal was to support field acquisition in a systematic digital format and optimized for a varied range of (spatial) analyses. DigiFract is developed using the programming interface of the Quantum Geographic Information System (GIS) with versatile functionality for spatial raster and vector data handling. Among other features, this includes spatial referencing of outcrop photos, and tools for digitizing geometries and assigning attribute information through a graphical user interface. While a GIS typically operates in map-view, DigiFract collects features on a surface of arbitrary orientation in 3D space. This surface is overlain with an outcrop photo and serves as reference frame for digitizing geologic features. Data is managed through a data model and stored in shapefiles or in a spatial database system. Fracture attributes, such as spacing or length, is intrinsic information of the digitized geometry and becomes explicit through follow-up data processing. Orientation statistics, scan-line or scan-window analyses can be performed from the graphical user interface or can be obtained through flexible Python scripts that directly access the fractdatamodel and analysisLib core modules of DigiFract. This workflow has been applied in various studies and enabled a faster collection of larger and more accurate fracture datasets. The studies delivered a better characterization of fractured reservoirs analogues in terms of fracture orientation and intensity distributions. Furthermore, the data organisation and analyses provided more

  15. USPS – Lean Green Teams

    SciTech Connect

    2012-08-01

    Institutional change case study details the U.S. Postal Service's Lean Green Teams, which collaborate across functions to identify and implement low- and no-cost ways to conserve natural resources, purchase fewer consumable products, and reduce waste.

  16. Virtual Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geber, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    Virtual work teams scattered around the globe are becoming a feature of corporate workplaces. Although most people prefer face-to-face meetings and interactions, reality often requires telecommuting. (JOW)

  17. Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) software quality plan. Part 1 : ASC software quality engineering practices version 1.0.

    SciTech Connect

    Minana, Molly A.; Sturtevant, Judith E.; Heaphy, Robert; Hodges, Ann Louise; Boucheron, Edward A.; Drake, Richard Roy; Forsythe, Christi A.; Schofield, Joseph Richard, Jr.; Pavlakos, Constantine James; Williamson, Charles Michael; Edwards, Harold Carter

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan is to clearly identify the practices that are the basis for continually improving the quality of ASC software products. Quality is defined in DOE/AL Quality Criteria (QC-1) as conformance to customer requirements and expectations. This quality plan defines the ASC program software quality practices and provides mappings of these practices to the SNL Corporate Process Requirements (CPR 1.3.2 and CPR 1.3.6) and the Department of Energy (DOE) document, ASCI Software Quality Engineering: Goals, Principles, and Guidelines (GP&G). This quality plan identifies ASC management and software project teams' responsibilities for cost-effective software engineering quality practices. The SNL ASC Software Quality Plan establishes the signatories commitment to improving software products by applying cost-effective software engineering quality practices. This document explains the project teams opportunities for tailoring and implementing the practices; enumerates the practices that compose the development of SNL ASC's software products; and includes a sample assessment checklist that was developed based upon the practices in this document.

  18. Aerobraking Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Group and team photos of Langely's Aerobraking teams. These photo's were taken right after the 75 day aerobraking phase. People in the photographs include: Paul V. Tartabini, Mary Kae Lockwood, Richard W. Powell, Eric M. Queen, Bob Tolson, Alicia Dwyer, Jill Hanna, Michelle Munk, Zack Q. Chavis, dick Wilmoth, Naru Takashima, Ruth Amundsen, John Aguirre, Allison Roberts, Loreyna Young, Charles W. Davis, John Dec, Joe Gasbarre, Scott Striepe, Paul Escalera and G. M. Keating.

  19. ThermoData Engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 6. Dynamic web-based data dissemination through the NIST Web Thermo Tables.

    PubMed

    Kroenlein, Kenneth; Muzny, Chris D; Diky, Vladimir; Kazakov, Andrei F; Chirico, Robert D; Magee, Joseph W; Abdulagatov, Ilmutdin; Frenkel, Michael

    2011-06-27

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported recently in this journal. In the present paper, we describe the development of a World Wide Web-based interface to TDE evaluations of pure compound properties, including critical properties, phase boundary equilibria (vapor pressures, sublimation pressures, and crystal-liquid boundary pressures), densities, energetic properties, and transport properties. This includes development of a system for caching evaluation results to maintain high availability and an advanced window-in-window interface that leverages modern Web-browser technologies. Challenges associated with bringing the principal advantages of the TDE technology to the Web are described, as are compromises to maintain general access and speed of interaction while remaining true to the tenets of dynamic data evaluation. Future extensions of the interface and associated Web-services are outlined.

  20. ThermoData Engine (TDE): software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept. 8. Properties of material streams and solvent design.

    PubMed

    Diky, Vladimir; Chirico, Robert D; Muzny, Chris D; Kazakov, Andrei F; Kroenlein, Kenneth; Magee, Joseph W; Abdulagatov, Ilmutdin; Kang, Jeong Won; Gani, Rafiqul; Frenkel, Michael

    2013-01-28

    ThermoData Engine (TDE) is the first full-scale software implementation of the dynamic data evaluation concept, as reported in this journal. The present paper describes the first application of this concept to the evaluation of thermophysical properties for material streams involving any number of chemical components with assessment of uncertainties. The method involves construction of Redlich-Kister type equations for individual properties (excess volume, thermal conductivity, viscosity, surface tension, and excess enthalpy) and activity-coefficient models for phase equilibrium properties (vapor-liquid equilibrium). Multicomponent models are based on those for the pure-components and all binary subsystems evaluated on demand through the TDE software algorithms. Models are described in detail, and extensions to the class structure of the program are provided. Novel program features, such as ready identification of key measurements for subsystems that can reduce the combined uncertainty for a particular stream property, are described. In addition, new product-design features are described for selection of solvents for optimized crystal dissolution, separation of binary crystal mixtures, and solute extraction from a single-component solvent. Planned future developments are summarized.

  1. NeEstimator v2: re-implementation of software for the estimation of contemporary effective population size (Ne ) from genetic data.

    PubMed

    Do, C; Waples, R S; Peel, D; Macbeth, G M; Tillett, B J; Ovenden, J R

    2014-01-01

    NeEstimator v2 is a completely revised and updated implementation of software that produces estimates of contemporary effective population size, using several different methods and a single input file. NeEstimator v2 includes three single-sample estimators (updated versions of the linkage disequilibrium and heterozygote-excess methods, and a new method based on molecular coancestry), as well as the two-sample (moment-based temporal) method. New features include the following: (i) an improved method for accounting for missing data; (ii) options for screening out rare alleles; (iii) confidence intervals for all methods; (iv) the ability to analyse data sets with large numbers of genetic markers (10 000 or more); (v) options for batch processing large numbers of different data sets, which will facilitate cross-method comparisons using simulated data; and (vi) correction for temporal estimates when individuals sampled are not removed from the population (Plan I sampling). The user is given considerable control over input data and composition, and format of output files. The freely available software has a new JAVA interface and runs under MacOS, Linux and Windows.

  2. Conducting SEI (Software Engineering Institute)-Assisted Software Process Assessments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    Agresti, W.W., "Applying Industrial Engineering to the Software Development Process," Proceedings, IEEE Fall COMPCON, Washington, DC: IEEE Com- puter...information. CMU/SEI-89-TR-7 1.2. Software Process Maturity Framework A software process maturity framework was developed by the SEI for two purposes : to pro...training. The purpose of this briefing is to give SEI team members a good understanding of the organization and the types of software it develops . Typical

  3. How to make more out of community data? A conceptual framework and its implementation as models and software.

    PubMed

    Ovaskainen, Otso; Tikhonov, Gleb; Norberg, Anna; Guillaume Blanchet, F; Duan, Leo; Dunson, David; Roslin, Tomas; Abrego, Nerea

    2017-03-20

    Community ecology aims to understand what factors determine the assembly and dynamics of species assemblages at different spatiotemporal scales. To facilitate the integration between conceptual and statistical approaches in community ecology, we propose Hierarchical Modelling of Species Communities (HMSC) as a general, flexible framework for modern analysis of community data. While non-manipulative data allow for only correlative and not causal inference, this framework facilitates the formulation of data-driven hypotheses regarding the processes that structure communities. We model environmental filtering by variation and covariation in the responses of individual species to the characteristics of their environment, with potential contingencies on species traits and phylogenetic relationships. We capture biotic assembly rules by species-to-species association matrices, which may be estimated at multiple spatial or temporal scales. We operationalise the HMSC framework as a hierarchical Bayesian joint species distribution model, and implement it as R- and Matlab-packages which enable computationally efficient analyses of large data sets. Armed with this tool, community ecologists can make sense of many types of data, including spatially explicit data and time-series data. We illustrate the use of this framework through a series of diverse ecological examples.

  4. An Introduction to Team Risk Management. (Version 1.0)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    Team Risk Management defines the organizational structure and operational activities for managing risks throughout all phases of the life- cycle of a...program are participating team members. Through the adoption of team risk management , the government and contractor are provided with processes...introduces the team risk management approach for managing risks within a software-dependent development program.

  5. An approach to ensuring quality in environmental software

    SciTech Connect

    Gelston, G.M.; Lundgren, R.E.; McDonald, J.P.; Hoopes, B.L.

    1998-05-01

    Environmental software is often used to determine impacts to the public, workers, and the environment from environmental contamination. It is vital, therefore, that the modeling results, and the software that provides them, be scientifically defensible and capable of withstanding the most rigorous of technical reviews. The control and assurance of quality is a critical factor for the project team that develops environmental software at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This document describes the philosophy, process, and activities that ensure a quality product throughout the life cycle of requirements analysis, design, programming, modification, testing, and implementation of environmental software. Environmental software developed by the project team is designed using an object-oriented approach. This software offers increased benefits, such as ease of maintenance and retention of the development and testing legacy of individual components, over traditional hard wired software. These benefits allow the design and testing of the models and future additions to be faster and less costly. This software is developed using a modular framework concept that allows a variety of models to work within a single construct. This software has two parts: an overall system framework and a set of modules. Each module has up to three components: a user interface, a scientific model, and pre/post-processors. Each of these pieces has a different set of quality criteria associated with it. However, whatever form this software might take for a particular client, standard processes apply to protect the information from inappropriate use. The information contained within this document can be applied to most environmental software to analyze risk in multiple environmental media.

  6. Staying in the Light: Evaluating Sustainability Models for Brokering Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, L. A.; Benedict, K. K.; Best, M.; Fyfe, S.; Jacobs, C. A.; Michener, W. K.; Pearlman, J.; Turner, A.; Nativi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Business Models Team of the Research Data Alliance Brokering Governance Working Group examined several support models proposed to promote the long-term sustainability of brokering middleware. The business model analysis includes examination of funding source, implementation frameworks and obstacles, and policy and legal considerations. The issue of sustainability is not unique to brokering software and these models may be relevant to many applications. Results of this comprehensive analysis highlight advantages and disadvantages of the various models in respect to the specific requirements for brokering services. We offer recommendations based on the outcomes of this analysis while recognizing that all software is part of an evolutionary process and has a lifespan.

  7. Team Collaboration: Lessons Learned Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arterberrie, Rhonda Y.; Eubanks, Steven W.; Kay, Dennis R.; Prahst, Stephen E.; Wenner, David P.

    2005-01-01

    An Agency team collaboration pilot was conducted from July 2002 until June 2003 and then extended for an additional year. The objective of the pilot was to assess the value of collaboration tools and adoption processes as applied to NASA teams. In an effort to share knowledge and experiences, the lessons that have been learned thus far are documented in this report. Overall, the pilot has been successful. An entire system has been piloted - tools, adoption, and support. The pilot consisted of two collaboration tools, a team space and a virtual team meeting capability. Of the two tools that were evaluated, the team meeting tool has been more widely accepted. Though the team space tool has been met with a lesser degree of acceptance, the need for such a tool in the NASA environment has been evidenced. Both adoption techniques and support were carefully developed and implemented in a way that has been well received by the pilot participant community.

  8. Development of intelligent instruments with embedded HTTP servers for control and data acquisition in a cryogenic setup—The hardware, firmware, and software implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Antony, Joby; Mathuria, D. S.; Datta, T. S.; Maity, Tanmoy

    2015-12-15

    The power of Ethernet for control and automation technology is being largely understood by the automation industry in recent times. Ethernet with HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is one of the most widely accepted communication standards today. Ethernet is best known for being able to control through internet from anywhere in the globe. The Ethernet interface with built-in on-chip embedded servers ensures global connections for crate-less model of control and data acquisition systems which have several advantages over traditional crate-based control architectures for slow applications. This architecture will completely eliminate the use of any extra PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) or similar control hardware in any automation network as the control functions are firmware coded inside intelligent meters itself. Here, we describe the indigenously built project of a cryogenic control system built for linear accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, known as “CADS,” which stands for “Complete Automation of Distribution System.” CADS deals with complete hardware, firmware, and software implementation of the automated linac cryogenic distribution system using many Ethernet based embedded cryogenic instruments developed in-house. Each instrument works as an intelligent meter called device-server which has the control functions and control loops built inside the firmware itself. Dedicated meters with built-in servers were designed out of ARM (Acorn RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) Machine) and ATMEL processors and COTS (Commercially Off-the-Shelf) SMD (Surface Mount Devices) components, with analog sensor front-end and a digital back-end web server implementing remote procedure call over HTTP for digital control and readout functions. At present, 24 instruments which run 58 embedded servers inside, each specific to a particular type of sensor-actuator combination for closed loop operations, are now deployed and distributed across control LAN

  9. Development of intelligent instruments with embedded HTTP servers for control and data acquisition in a cryogenic setup—The hardware, firmware, and software implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, Joby; Mathuria, D. S.; Datta, T. S.; Maity, Tanmoy

    2015-12-01

    The power of Ethernet for control and automation technology is being largely understood by the automation industry in recent times. Ethernet with HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is one of the most widely accepted communication standards today. Ethernet is best known for being able to control through internet from anywhere in the globe. The Ethernet interface with built-in on-chip embedded servers ensures global connections for crate-less model of control and data acquisition systems which have several advantages over traditional crate-based control architectures for slow applications. This architecture will completely eliminate the use of any extra PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) or similar control hardware in any automation network as the control functions are firmware coded inside intelligent meters itself. Here, we describe the indigenously built project of a cryogenic control system built for linear accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, known as "CADS," which stands for "Complete Automation of Distribution System." CADS deals with complete hardware, firmware, and software implementation of the automated linac cryogenic distribution system using many Ethernet based embedded cryogenic instruments developed in-house. Each instrument works as an intelligent meter called device-server which has the control functions and control loops built inside the firmware itself. Dedicated meters with built-in servers were designed out of ARM (Acorn RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) Machine) and ATMEL processors and COTS (Commercially Off-the-Shelf) SMD (Surface Mount Devices) components, with analog sensor front-end and a digital back-end web server implementing remote procedure call over HTTP for digital control and readout functions. At present, 24 instruments which run 58 embedded servers inside, each specific to a particular type of sensor-actuator combination for closed loop operations, are now deployed and distributed across control LAN (Local

  10. Development of intelligent instruments with embedded HTTP servers for control and data acquisition in a cryogenic setup--The hardware, firmware, and software implementation.

    PubMed

    Antony, Joby; Mathuria, D S; Datta, T S; Maity, Tanmoy

    2015-12-01

    The power of Ethernet for control and automation technology is being largely understood by the automation industry in recent times. Ethernet with HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) is one of the most widely accepted communication standards today. Ethernet is best known for being able to control through internet from anywhere in the globe. The Ethernet interface with built-in on-chip embedded servers ensures global connections for crate-less model of control and data acquisition systems which have several advantages over traditional crate-based control architectures for slow applications. This architecture will completely eliminate the use of any extra PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) or similar control hardware in any automation network as the control functions are firmware coded inside intelligent meters itself. Here, we describe the indigenously built project of a cryogenic control system built for linear accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, known as "CADS," which stands for "Complete Automation of Distribution System." CADS deals with complete hardware, firmware, and software implementation of the automated linac cryogenic distribution system using many Ethernet based embedded cryogenic instruments developed in-house. Each instrument works as an intelligent meter called device-server which has the control functions and control loops built inside the firmware itself. Dedicated meters with built-in servers were designed out of ARM (Acorn RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) Machine) and ATMEL processors and COTS (Commercially Off-the-Shelf) SMD (Surface Mount Devices) components, with analog sensor front-end and a digital back-end web server implementing remote procedure call over HTTP for digital control and readout functions. At present, 24 instruments which run 58 embedded servers inside, each specific to a particular type of sensor-actuator combination for closed loop operations, are now deployed and distributed across control LAN (Local

  11. Team Learning and Team Composition in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmermans, Olaf; Van Linge, Roland; Van Petegem, Peter; Elseviers, Monique; Denekens, Joke

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore team learning activities in nursing teams and to test the effect of team composition on team learning to extend conceptually an initial model of team learning and to examine empirically a new model of ambidextrous team learning in nursing. Design/methodology/approach: Quantitative research utilising exploratory…

  12. Requirements Engineering in Building Climate Science Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batcheller, Archer L.

    2011-01-01

    Software has an important role in supporting scientific work. This dissertation studies teams that build scientific software, focusing on the way that they determine what the software should do. These requirements engineering processes are investigated through three case studies of climate science software projects. The Earth System Modeling…

  13. Software Defined Radio with Parallelized Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This software implements software-defined radio procession over multi-core, multi-CPU systems in a way that maximizes the use of CPU resources in the system. The software treats each processing step in either a communications or navigation modulator or demodulator system as an independent, threaded block. Each threaded block is defined with a programmable number of input or output buffers; these buffers are implemented using POSIX pipes. In addition, each threaded block is assigned a unique thread upon block installation. A modulator or demodulator system is built by assembly of the threaded blocks into a flow graph, which assembles the processing blocks to accomplish the desired signal processing. This software architecture allows the software to scale effortlessly between single CPU/single-core computers or multi-CPU/multi-core computers without recompilation. NASA spaceflight and ground communications systems currently rely exclusively on ASICs or FPGAs. This software allows low- and medium-bandwidth (100 bps to .50 Mbps) software defined radios to be designed and implemented solely in C/C++ software, while lowering development costs and facilitating reuse and extensibility.

  14. Software Defined Radio with Parallelized Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, Greg

    2013-01-01

    This software implements software-defined radio procession over multicore, multi-CPU systems in a way that maximizes the use of CPU resources in the system. The software treats each processing step in either a communications or navigation modulator or demodulator system as an independent, threaded block. Each threaded block is defined with a programmable number of input or output buffers; these buffers are implemented using POSIX pipes. In addition, each threaded block is assigned a unique thread upon block installation. A modulator or demodulator system is built by assembly of the threaded blocks into a flow graph, which assembles the processing blocks to accomplish the desired signal processing. This software architecture allows the software to scale effortlessly between single CPU/single-core computers or multi-CPU/multi-core computers without recompilation. NASA spaceflight and ground communications systems currently rely exclusively on ASICs or FPGAs. This software allows low- and medium-bandwidth (100 bps to approx.50 Mbps) software defined radios to be designed and implemented solely in C/C++ software, while lowering development costs and facilitating reuse and extensibility.

  15. Extra-team Connections for Knowledge Transfer between Staff Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Wiecha, Jean L.; Emmons, Karen M.; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2009-01-01

    As organizations implement novel health promotion programs across multiple sites, they face great challenges related to knowledge management. Staff social networks may be a useful medium for transferring program-related knowledge in multi-site implementation efforts. To study this potential, we focused on the role of extra-team connections (ties…

  16. Team building

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, C.

    1993-04-01

    Power plants are particularly complicated projects with abundant opportunities for disputes. Efforts are beginning in the power industry to change the way the industry does business. Key elements of a comprehensive team-building approach include partnering, constructability, use of incentives, and the disputes review board.

  17. Team Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begg, Roddy

    2005-01-01

    A personal reminiscence of the events surrounding the establishment of Tertiary Education and Management (TEAM), the journal of the European Association for Institutional Research EAIR, the European Higher Education Society--and its development over its first decade, by the founding Editor, at the time of his retirement from the post.

  18. The human side of lean teams.

    PubMed

    Wackerbarth, Sarah B; Strawser-Srinath, Jamie R; Conigliaro, Joseph C

    2015-05-01

    Organizations use lean principles to increase quality and decrease costs. Lean projects require an understanding of systems-wide processes and utilize interdisciplinary teams. Most lean tools are straightforward, and the biggest barrier to successful implementation is often development of the team aspect of the lean approach. The purpose of this article is to share challenges experienced by a lean team charged with improving a hospital discharge process. Reflection on the experience provides an opportunity to highlight lessons from The Team Handbook by Peter Scholtes and colleagues. To improve the likelihood that process improvement initiatives, including lean projects, will be successful, organizations should consider providing training in organizational change principles and team building. The authors' lean team learned these lessons the hard way. Despite the challenges, the team successfully implemented changes throughout the organization that have had a positive impact. Training to understand the psychology of change might have decreased the resistance faced in implementing these changes.

  19. Implementation of the Performance Management System (PMS) in Senior Secondary Schools in Botswana: An Investigation of Senior Management Team's Expected Benefits of the PMS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulawa, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Different forms of the performance management system have been implemented in many countries for some years. As in other countries, in 1999 the government of Botswana took a decision to implement a performance management system (PMS) across the entire public service including schools. The government explained the purpose for which this reform was…

  20. Management systems and software.

    PubMed

    Levin, R P

    2001-02-01

    To ensure that your software optimizes your practice management systems, design systems that allow you and your team to achieve your goals and provide high levels of quality dentistry and customer service to your patients. Then use your current software system or purchase a new practice management software program that will allow your practice to operate within the guidelines of the systems which you have established. You can be certain that taking these steps will allow you to practice dentistry with maximum profitability and minimum stress for the remainder of your career.

  1. Virtual Team Governance: Addressing the Governance Mechanisms and Virtual Team Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Yihong; Bai, Yu; Liu, Ziheng

    As technology has improved and collaborative software has been developed, virtual teams with geographically dispersed members spread across diverse physical locations have become increasingly prominent. Virtual team is supported by advancing communication technologies, which makes virtual teams able to largely transcend time and space. Virtual teams have changed the corporate landscape, which are more complex and dynamic than traditional teams since the members of virtual teams are spread on diverse geographical locations and their roles in the virtual team are different. Therefore, how to realize good governance of virtual team and arrive at good virtual team performance is becoming critical and challenging. Good virtual team governance is essential for a high-performance virtual team. This paper explores the performance and the governance mechanism of virtual team. It establishes a model to explain the relationship between the performance and the governance mechanisms in virtual teams. This paper is focusing on managing virtual teams. It aims to find the strategies to help business organizations to improve the performance of their virtual teams and arrive at the objectives of good virtual team management.

  2. Software assurance standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This standard specifies the software assurance program for the provider of software. It also delineates the assurance activities for the provider and the assurance data that are to be furnished by the provider to the acquirer. In any software development effort, the provider is the entity or individual that actually designs, develops, and implements the software product, while the acquirer is the entity or individual who specifies the requirements and accepts the resulting products. This standard specifies at a high level an overall software assurance program for software developed for and by NASA. Assurance includes the disciplines of quality assurance, quality engineering, verification and validation, nonconformance reporting and corrective action, safety assurance, and security assurance. The application of these disciplines during a software development life cycle is called software assurance. Subsequent lower-level standards will specify the specific processes within these disciplines.

  3. A performance improvement plan to increase nurse adherence to use of medication safety software.

    PubMed

    Gavriloff, Carrie

    2012-08-01

    Nurses can protect patients receiving intravenous (IV) medication by using medication safety software to program "smart" pumps to administer IV medications. After a patient safety event identified inconsistent use of medication safety software by nurses, a performance improvement team implemented the Deming Cycle performance improvement methodology. The combined use of improved direct care nurse communication, programming strategies, staff education, medication safety champions, adherence monitoring, and technology acquisition resulted in a statistically significant (p < .001) increase in nurse adherence to using medication safety software from 28% to above 85%, exceeding national benchmark adherence rates (Cohen, Cooke, Husch & Woodley, 2007; Carefusion, 2011).

  4. Software productivity improvement through software engineering technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarry, F. E.

    1985-01-01

    It has been estimated that NASA expends anywhere from 6 to 10 percent of its annual budget on the acquisition, implementation and maintenance of computer software. Although researchers have produced numerous software engineering approaches over the past 5-10 years; each claiming to be more effective than the other, there is very limited quantitative information verifying the measurable impact htat any of these technologies may have in a production environment. At NASA/GSFC, an extended research effort aimed at identifying and measuring software techniques that favorably impact productivity of software development, has been active over the past 8 years. Specific, measurable, software development technologies have been applied and measured in a production environment. Resulting software development approaches have been shown to be effective in both improving quality as well as productivity in this one environment.

  5. [Problems with implementation of Polish standards on admissible electromagnetic field levels by the State Sanitary Inspectorate and of the measuring teams].

    PubMed

    Grobelna, Grazyna

    2003-01-01

    Amendments to Polish standards on electromagnetic fields (EMF) have made it necessary to modify the methods and procedures to be employed by the sanitary services responsible for monitoring occupational risks. To ensure a correct functioning of the State Sanitary Inspectorate and of the teams involved in measurements, it seems essential: to adjust other relevant regulations; to develop a method of classifying devices according to the emitted EMF; to provide uniform procedures to be followed in institutions if the measurements required by the regulations are not feasible; and to assemble a database on the determined levels of EMF emitted by various devices--especially those at frequency bands not yet monitored.

  6. Fluorescence multi-scale endoscopy and its applications in the study and diagnosis of gastro-intestinal diseases: set-up design and software implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-García, Pablo Aurelio; Arranz, Alicia; Fresno, Manuel; Desco, Manuel; Mahmood, Umar; Vaquero, Juan José; Ripoll, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    Endoscopy is frequently used in the diagnosis of several gastro-intestinal pathologies as Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis or colorectal cancer. It has great potential as a non-invasive screening technique capable of detecting suspicious alterations in the intestinal mucosa, such as inflammatory processes. However, these early lesions usually cannot be detected with conventional endoscopes, due to lack of cellular detail and the absence of specific markers. Due to this lack of specificity, the development of new endoscopy technologies, which are able to show microscopic changes in the mucosa structure, are necessary. We here present a confocal endomicroscope, which in combination with a wide field fluorescence endoscope offers fast and specific macroscopic information through the use of activatable probes and a detailed analysis at cellular level of the possible altered tissue areas. This multi-modal and multi-scale imaging module, compatible with commercial endoscopes, combines near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) measurements (enabling specific imaging of markers of disease and prognosis) and confocal endomicroscopy making use of a fiber bundle, providing a cellular level resolution. The system will be used in animal models exhibiting gastro-intestinal diseases in order to analyze the use of potential diagnostic markers in colorectal cancer. In this work, we present in detail the set-up design and the software implementation in order to obtain simultaneous RGB/NIRF measurements and short confocal scanning times.

  7. Description of real-time Ada software implementation of a power system monitor for the Space Station Freedom PMAD DC testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, Kimberly; Mackin, Michael; Wright, Theodore

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the Ada language software developed to perform the electrical power system monitoring functions for the NASA Lewis Research Center's Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) DC testbed. The results of the effort to implement this monitor are presented. The PMAD DC testbed is a reduced-scale prototype of the electric power system to be used in Space Station Freedom. The power is controlled by smart switches known as power control components (or switchgear). The power control components are currently coordinated by five Compaq 386/20e computers connected through an 802.4 local area network. The power system monitor algorithm comprises several functions, including periodic data acquisition, data smoothing, system performance analysis, and status reporting. Data are collected from the switchgear sensors every 100 ms, then passed through a 2-Hz digital filter. System performance analysis includes power interruption and overcurrent detection. The system monitor required a hardware timer interrupt to activate the data acquisition function. The execution time of the code was optimized by using an assembly language routine. The routine allows direct vectoring of the processor to Ada language procedures that perform periodic control activities.

  8. Omics Metadata Management Software v. 1 (OMMS)

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-09

    Our application, the Omics Metadata Management Software (OMMS), answers both needs, empowering experimentalists to generate intuitive, consistent metadata, and to perform bioinformatics analyses and information management tasks via a simple and intuitive web-based interface. Several use cases with short-read sequence datasets are provided to showcase the full functionality of the OMMS, from metadata curation tasks, to bioinformatics analyses and results management and downloading. The OMMS can be implemented as a stand alone-package for individual laboratories, or can be configured for web-based deployment supporting geographically dispersed research teams. Our software was developed with open-source bundles, is flexible, extensible and easily installed and run by operators with general system administration and scripting language literacy.

  9. Team SPICE: A SPICE-Based Teamwork Assessment Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amengual, Esperança; Mas, Antònia; Mesquida, Antoni Lluís

    Software engineering is currently paying special attention to cooperative and human aspects of software development. Within this new socio-technical perspective of software engineering, teamwork appears to be a relevant topic. This paper presents a SPICE-based Teamwork Assessment Model for software teams. This model, named Team SPICE, is composed of a Teamwork Reference Model (TRM) and a Measurement Framework, both introduced in previous works. In this paper, the assessment process to be followed to perform a teamwork assessment and the experience of its application to software teams are described.

  10. Software Engineering Program: Software Process Improvement Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide experience-based guidance in implementing a software process improvement program in any NASA software development or maintenance community. This guidebook details how to define, operate, and implement a working software process improvement program. It describes the concept of the software process improvement program and its basic organizational components. It then describes the structure, organization, and operation of the software process improvement program, illustrating all these concepts with specific NASA examples. The information presented in the document is derived from the experiences of several NASA software organizations, including the SEL, the SEAL, and the SORCE. Their experiences reflect many of the elements of software process improvement within NASA. This guidebook presents lessons learned in a form usable by anyone considering establishing a software process improvement program within his or her own environment. This guidebook attempts to balance general and detailed information. It provides material general enough to be usable by NASA organizations whose characteristics do not directly match those of the sources of the information and models presented herein. It also keeps the ideas sufficiently close to the sources of the practical experiences that have generated the models and information.

  11. Developing a team mentoring model.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Jill; Dodd, Karen; Wilkes, Carol

    This article describes the authors' work in setting up a team mentoring system for nursing students on practice placements. The benefits include the ability to share responsibility for mentoring among clinicians and the exposure of students to a greater diversity of practice and teaching styles. Good communication is identified as crucial to effective implementation, while poor communication can be a potential barrier to the success of team mentoring.

  12. NASA-evolving to Ada: Five-year plan. A plan for implementing recommendations made by the Ada and software management assessment working group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    At their March 1988 meeting, members of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Information Resources Management (IRM) Council expressed concern that NASA may not have the infrastructure necessary to support the use of Ada for major NASA software projects. Members also observed that the agency has no coordinated strategy for applying its experiences with Ada to subsequent projects (Hinners, 27 June 1988). To deal with these problems, the IRM Council chair appointed an intercenter Ada and Software Management Assessment Working Group (ASMAWG). They prepared a report (McGarry et al., March 1989) entitled, 'Ada and Software Management in NASA: Findings and Recommendations'. That report presented a series of recommendations intended to enable NASA to develop better software at lower cost through the use of Ada and other state-of-the-art software engineering technologies. The purpose here is to describe the steps (called objectives) by which this goal may be achieved, to identify the NASA officials or organizations responsible for carrying out the steps, and to define a schedule for doing so. This document sets forth four goals: adopt agency-wide software standards and policies; use Ada as the programming language for all mission software; establish an infrastructure to support software engineering, including the use of Ada, and to leverage the agency's software experience; and build the agency's knowledge base in Ada and software engineering. A schedule for achieving the objectives and goals is given.

  13. Evaluation of interprofessional education: lessons learned through the development and implementation of an interprofessional seminar on team communication for undergraduate health care students in Heidelberg - a project report.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sarah; Mahler, Cornelia; Krug, Katja; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Einleitung: Dieser Projektbericht beschreibt die Entwicklung, Pilotierung und Evaluation eines interprofessionellen Seminars zur Team-Kommunikation, das Studierende der Humanmedizin und Studierende des Studiengangs Interprofessionelle Gesundheitsversorgung B.Sc. an der Medizinische Fakultät der Universität Heidelberg zusammengebracht hat.Projektbeschreibung: Ein fünfköpfiges interprofessionelles Team arbeitete zusammen an diesem Projekt. Kolbs Theorie des erfahrungsorientierten Lernens bildete die theoretische Grundlage für das Seminar, in dem drei interprofessionelle Kompetenzdomänen vermittelt wurden: Teamarbeit, Kommunikation und Werte/Ethik. Die Evaluation zum Zwecke der Qualitätssicherung und der zukünftigen curricularen Entwicklung wurde mit zwei quantitativen Instrumenten durchgeführt:deskriptive Analyse eines standardisierten Kurs-Bewertungsinstruments (EvaSys) Varianzanalyse (ANOVA) der deutschen Version des Fragebogens „University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire“ (UWE-IP-D).Ergebnisse: Das Hauptergebnis der standardisierten Kursevaluation war, dass die interprofessionellen Seminare positiver bewertet wurden [MW=2,11 (Bereich: 1 sehr positiv bis 5 sehr negativ), SD=1, n=27] als die monoprofessionellen Seminare [MW=2,55, SD=0,98, n=90]. Der Vergleich der Vorher-/Nachher-Ergebnisse in der UWE-IP-D Befragung der interprofessionellen (IP) (n=40) und monoprofessionellen (MP) Gruppen (n=34) zeigte signifikante positive Veränderungen der Mittelwerte für beide Gruppen hinsichtlich Kommunikation, Teamarbeit und interprofessionellem Lernen. Schlussfolgerungen: Erkenntnisgewinne aus dem Projekt: a) Nutzen einer pragmatischen Vorgehensweise bei der Einführung interprofessioneller Ausbildungssequenzen, die es ermöglichte, dass verschiedene Barrieren bzgl. Logistik sowie Einstellung/Haltung überwunden werden konnten; b) eine quantitative Evaluation allein konnte die positiven Rückmeldungen des interprofessionellen Settings nicht

  14. Consequences of team charter quality: Teamwork mental model similarity and team viability in engineering design student teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway Hughston, Veronica

    Since 1996 ABET has mandated that undergraduate engineering degree granting institutions focus on learning outcomes such as professional skills (i.e. solving unstructured problems and working in teams). As a result, engineering curricula were restructured to include team based learning---including team charters. Team charters were diffused into engineering education as one of many instructional activities to meet the ABET accreditation mandates. However, the implementation and execution of team charters into engineering team based classes has been inconsistent and accepted without empirical evidence of the consequences. The purpose of the current study was to investigate team effectiveness, operationalized as team viability, as an outcome of team charter implementation in an undergraduate engineering team based design course. Two research questions were the focus of the study: a) What is the relationship between team charter quality and viability in engineering student teams, and b) What is the relationship among team charter quality, teamwork mental model similarity, and viability in engineering student teams? Thirty-eight intact teams, 23 treatment and 15 comparison, participated in the investigation. Treatment teams attended a team charter lecture, and completed a team charter homework assignment. Each team charter was assessed and assigned a quality score. Comparison teams did not join the lecture, and were not asked to create a team charter. All teams completed each data collection phase: a) similarity rating pretest; b) similarity posttest; and c) team viability survey. Findings indicate that team viability was higher in teams that attended the lecture and completed the charter assignment. Teams with higher quality team charter scores reported higher levels of team viability than teams with lower quality charter scores. Lastly, no evidence was found to support teamwork mental model similarity as a partial mediator of the team charter quality on team viability

  15. Asteroid team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to support asteroid research and the operation of an Asteroid Team within the Earth and Space Sciences Division at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The Asteroid Team carries out original research on asteroids in order to discover, better characterize and define asteroid properties. This information is needed for the planning and design of NASA asteroid flyby and rendezvous missions. The asteroid Team also provides scientific and technical advice to NASA and JPL on asteroid related programs. Work on asteroid classification continued and the discovery of two Earth-approaching M asteroids was published. In the asteroid photometry program researchers obtained N or Q photometry for more than 50 asteroids, including the two M-earth-crossers. Compositional analysis of infrared spectra (0.8 to 2.6 micrometer) of asteroids is continuing. Over the next year the work on asteroid classification and composition will continue with the analysis of the 60 reduced infrared spectra which we now have at hand. The radiometry program will continue with the reduction of the N and Q bandpass data for the 57 asteroids in order to obtain albedos and diameters. This year the emphasis will shift to IRAS follow-up observations; which includes objects not observed by IRAS and objects with poor or peculiar IRAS data. As in previous year, we plan to give top priority to any opportunities for observing near-Earth asteroids and the support (through radiometric lightcurve observations from the IRTF) of any stellar occultations by asteroids for which occultation observation expeditions are fielded. Support of preparing of IRAS data for publication and of D. Matson for his participation in the NASA Planetary Astronomy Management and Operations Working Group will continue.

  16. The Generalized Support Software (GSS) Domain Engineering Process: An Object-Oriented Implementation and Reuse Success at Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Steven; Hendrick, Robert; Stark, Michael E.; Steger, Warren

    1997-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) recently embarked on a far-reaching revision of its process for developing and maintaining satellite support software. The new process relies on an object-oriented software development method supported by a domain specific library of generalized components. This Generalized Support Software (GSS) Domain Engineering Process is currently in use at the NASA GSFC Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL). The key facets of the GSS process are (1) an architecture for rapid deployment of FDD applications, (2) a reuse asset library for FDD classes, and (3) a paradigm shift from developing software to configuring software for mission support. This paper describes the GSS architecture and process, results of fielding the first applications, lessons learned, and future directions

  17. Decentralized formation flying control in a multiple-team hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Joseph B; Thomas, Stephanie J

    2005-12-01

    In recent years, formation flying has been recognized as an enabling technology for a variety of mission concepts in both the scientific and defense arenas. Examples of developing missions at NASA include magnetospheric multiscale (MMS), solar imaging radio array (SIRA), and terrestrial planet finder (TPF). For each of these missions, a multiple satellite approach is required in order to accomplish the large-scale geometries imposed by the science objectives. In addition, the paradigm shift of using a multiple satellite cluster rather than a large, monolithic spacecraft has also been motivated by the expected benefits of increased robustness, greater flexibility, and reduced cost. However, the operational costs of monitoring and commanding a fleet of close-orbiting satellites is likely to be unreasonable unless the onboard software is sufficiently autonomous, robust, and scalable to large clusters. This paper presents the prototype of a system that addresses these objectives-a decentralized guidance and control system that is distributed across spacecraft using a multiple team framework. The objective is to divide large clusters into teams of "manageable" size, so that the communication and computation demands driven by N decentralized units are related to the number of satellites in a team rather than the entire cluster. The system is designed to provide a high level of autonomy, to support clusters with large numbers of satellites, to enable the number of spacecraft in the cluster to change post-launch, and to provide for on-orbit software modification. The distributed guidance and control system will be implemented in an object-oriented style using a messaging architecture for networking and threaded applications (MANTA). In this architecture, tasks may be remotely added, removed, or replaced post launch to increase mission flexibility and robustness. This built-in adaptability will allow software modifications to be made on-orbit in a robust manner. The

  18. Team Nutrition School Activity Planner. A How-To Guide for Team Nutrition Schools and Supporters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Consumer Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This "how-to" guide for Team Nutrition fairs and tasting activities helps Team Nutrition supporters and schools understand how to work together to improve the health and education of children. Team Nutrition is the implementation tool for the U.S. Department of Agriculture's School Meals Initiative for Healthy Children. Section 1 of the guide…

  19. Virtual Team Culture and the Amplification of Team Boundary Permeability on Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workman, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The implementation of virtual teams is briskly increasing, particularly among transnational organizations that find global virtual teams a natural way to address their needs for global reach. While proximal and virtual teams share many attributes, including similar performance measures, they differ in characteristics in the nature of the work.…

  20. U.S. Associated Pacific Islands Health Care Teams Chart a Course for Improved Health Systems: Implementation and Evaluation of a Non-communicable Disease Collaborative Model.

    PubMed

    Hosey, Gwendolyn M; Rengiil, Augusta; Maddison, Robert; Agapito, Angelica U; Lippwe, Kipier; Wally, Omengkar Damien; Agapito, Dennis D; Seremai, Johannes; Primo, Selma; Luther, X-Ner; Ikerdeu, Edolem; Satterfield, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    The burden of non-communicable disease (NCD) is increasing in the U.S. Associated Pacific Islands (USAPI). We describe the implementation and evaluation of a NCD Collaborative pilot, using local trainers, as an evidence-based strategy to systematically strengthen NCD health care quality and outcomes, focusing on diabetes preventive care across five health systems in the region.

  1. A Matrix Approach to Software Process Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, David; Bachman, Judith; Landis, Linda; Stark, Mike; Godfrey, Sally; Morisio, Maurizio; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) is currently engaged in a Methodology and Metrics program for the Information Systems Center (ISC) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). This paper addresses the Methodology portion of the program. The purpose of the Methodology effort is to assist a software team lead in selecting and tailoring a software development or maintenance process for a specific GSFC project. It is intended that this process will also be compliant with both ISO 9001 and the Software Engineering Institute's Capability Maturity Model (CMM). Under the Methodology program, we have defined four standard ISO-compliant software processes for the ISC, and three tailoring criteria that team leads can use to categorize their projects. The team lead would select a process and appropriate tailoring factors, from which a software process tailored to the specific project could be generated. Our objective in the Methodology program is to present software process information in a structured fashion, to make it easy for a team lead to characterize the type of software engineering to be performed, and to apply tailoring parameters to search for an appropriate software process description. This will enable the team lead to follow a proven, effective software process and also satisfy NASA's requirement for compliance with ISO 9001 and the anticipated requirement for CMM assessment. This work is also intended to support the deployment of sound software processes across the ISC.

  2. Description of real-time Ada software implementation of a power system monitor for the Space Station Freedom PMAD DC testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, Kimberly; Mackin, Michael; Wright, Theodore

    1991-01-01

    The Ada language software development to perform the electrical system monitoring functions for the NASA Lewis Research Center's Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) DC testbed is described. The results of the effort to implement this monitor are presented. The PMAD DC testbed is a reduced-scale prototype of the electrical power system to be used in the Space Station Freedom. The power is controlled by smart switches known as power control components (or switchgear). The power control components are currently coordinated by five Compaq 382/20e computers connected through an 802.4 local area network. One of these computers is designated as the control node with the other four acting as subsidiary controllers. The subsidiary controllers are connected to the power control components with a Mil-Std-1553 network. An operator interface is supplied by adding a sixth computer. The power system monitor algorithm is comprised of several functions including: periodic data acquisition, data smoothing, system performance analysis, and status reporting. Data is collected from the switchgear sensors every 100 milliseconds, then passed through a 2 Hz digital filter. System performance analysis includes power interruption and overcurrent detection. The reporting mechanism notifies an operator of any abnormalities in the system. Once per second, the system monitor provides data to the control node for further processing, such as state estimation. The system monitor required a hardware time interrupt to activate the data acquisition function. The execution time of the code was optimized using an assembly language routine. The routine allows direct vectoring of the processor to Ada language procedures that perform periodic control activities. A summary of the advantages and side effects of this technique are discussed.

  3. Team Leader System description

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, B.J.; Lundeen, T.F.; Moon, B.D.

    1996-10-01

    Purpose of the project is to design, develop, and demonstrate an advanced, prototype computer system to support on-site inspections. The system is a highly portable field computer with on-line access to facilities information, real-time communications, positioning information, and an electronic notebook for data capture. The Team Leader System provides an inspection team with a suite of advanced communication, data gathering, and data analysis tools and can be implemented on many PC-based hardware platforms. The suitcase unit is a transportable system for on-site support in a vehicle or at a stationary location at an inspection site; the personal unit is a wearable computer for in-facility or on-foot inspections.

  4. Software Engineering for Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    The Spacecraft Software Engineering Branch of NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) provides world-class products, leadership, and technical expertise in software engineering, processes, technology, and systems management for human spaceflight. The branch contributes to major NASA programs (e.g. ISS, MPCV/Orion) with in-house software development and prime contractor oversight, and maintains the JSC Engineering Directorate CMMI rating for flight software development. Software engineering teams work with hardware developers, mission planners, and system operators to integrate flight vehicles, habitats, robotics, and other spacecraft elements. They seek to infuse automation and autonomy into missions, and apply new technologies to flight processor and computational architectures. This presentation will provide an overview of key software-related projects, software methodologies and tools, and technology pursuits of interest to the JSC Spacecraft Software Engineering Branch.

  5. Technology Enhanced Accent Modification (TEAM) for International Teaching Assistants (ITAs).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Arthur H.

    The Technology Enhanced Accent Modification (TEAM) project created multimedia software to improve the oral proficiency of international teaching assistants (ITAs). Objectives were to: (1) develop reliable accent modification software that would operate on computers found at most colleges; (2) determine how TEAM-based accent modification…

  6. Implementation of the peer-led team-learning instructional model as a stopgap measure improves student achievement for students opting out of laboratory.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Julia J; Carter, B Elijah; Wiles, Jason R

    2015-03-02

    In entry-level university courses in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields, students participating in associated laboratory sessions generally do better than those who have no related lab classes. This is a problem when, for various reasons, not enough lab sections can be offered for students and/or when students opt out of optional available lab courses. Faced with such a situation, this study evaluated the efficacy of the peer-led team-learning (PLTL) instructional model as a potential method for narrowing the achievement gap among undergraduate students electing not to enroll in an optional laboratory component of an introductory biology course. In peer-led workshops, small groups of students participated in solving problems and other activities that encouraged active learning. Students led by peer leaders attained significantly higher exam and final course grades in introductory biology than comparable students not participating in PLTL. Among the introductory biology students who opted not to enroll in the optional lab course, those who participated in PLTL averaged more than a letter grade higher than those who did not. This difference was statistically significant, and the PLTL workshops almost entirely closed the achievement gap in lecture exam and final grades for students who did not take the lab.

  7. Team Tune-Up: Examining Team Transcripts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Staff Development, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a worksheet that can be used to examine documentation of team meetings in light of goals the team has established. Materials for this worksheet include copies of team transcripts, yellow and pink highlighters, and pencils. Directions for examining team transcripts are presented.

  8. Reinventing The Design Process: Teams and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, Stephen D.

    1999-01-01

    The future of space mission designing will be dramatically different from the past. Formerly, performance-driven paradigms emphasized data return with cost and schedule being secondary issues. Now and in the future, costs are capped and schedules fixed-these two variables must be treated as independent in the design process. Accordingly, JPL has redesigned its design process. At the conceptual level, design times have been reduced by properly defining the required design depth, improving the linkages between tools, and managing team dynamics. In implementation-phase design, system requirements will be held in crosscutting models, linked to subsystem design tools through a central database that captures the design and supplies needed configuration management and control. Mission goals will then be captured in timelining software that drives the models, testing their capability to execute the goals. Metrics are used to measure and control both processes and to ensure that design parameters converge through the design process within schedule constraints. This methodology manages margins controlled by acceptable risk levels. Thus, teams can evolve risk tolerance (and cost) as they would any engineering parameter. This new approach allows more design freedom for a longer time, which tends to encourage revolutionary and unexpected improvements in design.

  9. Risk Assessment Methodology for Software Supportability (RAMSS): guidelines for Adapting Software Supportability Evaluations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-14

    implemented various software OT&E method - ologies. Two of these methods , Software Product maintainability evaluation and Software Support Resources evaluation... methods have matured and have become the Air Force standard for evaluating, software supportablllty. Each of these developed methods evaluates...assessment method which provides software testers with areas which require testing emphasis, and decision makers with an assessment of the software sup

  10. Augmenting team cognition in human-automation teams performing in complex operational environments.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Haydee M; Fiore, Stephen M; Caldwell, Barrett S; Strater, Laura

    2007-05-01

    There is a growing reliance on automation (e.g., intelligent agents, semi-autonomous robotic systems) to effectively execute increasingly cognitively complex tasks. Successful team performance for such tasks has become even more dependent on team cognition, addressing both human-human and human-automation teams. Team cognition can be viewed as the binding mechanism that produces coordinated behavior within experienced teams, emerging from the interplay between each team member's individual cognition and team process behaviors (e.g., coordination, communication). In order to better understand team cognition in human-automation teams, team performance models need to address issues surrounding the effect of human-agent and human-robot interaction on critical team processes such as coordination and communication. Toward this end, we present a preliminary theoretical framework illustrating how the design and implementation of automation technology may influence team cognition and team coordination in complex operational environments. Integrating constructs from organizational and cognitive science, our proposed framework outlines how information exchange and updating between humans and automation technology may affect lower-level (e.g., working memory) and higher-level (e.g., sense making) cognitive processes as well as teams' higher-order "metacognitive" processes (e.g., performance monitoring). Issues surrounding human-automation interaction are discussed and implications are presented within the context of designing automation technology to improve task performance in human-automation teams.

  11. The Impact of the Data Team Structure on Collaborative Teams and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rone, Brenda Catherine

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if implementing a specific collaborative structure would create effective teacher teams that in turn would lead to improved student achievement. An effective team can be viewed as one that uses collaboration to increase its knowledge and improve its practices. The structure that was implemented during…

  12. Software Project Management and Measurement on the World-Wide-Web (WWW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John; Ramakrishnan, Sudhaka

    1996-01-01

    We briefly describe a system for forms-based, work-flow management that helps members of a software development team overcome geographical barriers to collaboration. Our system, called the Web Integrated Software Environment (WISE), is implemented as a World-Wide-Web service that allows for management and measurement of software development projects based on dynamic analysis of change activity in the workflow. WISE tracks issues in a software development process, provides informal communication between the users with different roles, supports to-do lists, and helps in software process improvement. WISE minimizes the time devoted to metrics collection and analysis by providing implicit delivery of messages between users based on the content of project documents. The use of a database in WISE is hidden from the users who view WISE as maintaining a personal 'to-do list' of tasks related to the many projects on which they may play different roles.

  13. A Core Plug and Play Architecture for Reusable Flight Software Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmot, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    The Flight Software Branch, at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), has been working on a run-time approach to facilitate a formal software reuse process. The reuse process is designed to enable rapid development and integration of high-quality software systems and to more accurately predict development costs and schedule. Previous reuse practices have been somewhat successful when the same teams are moved from project to project. But this typically requires taking the software system in an all-or-nothing approach where useful components cannot be easily extracted from the whole. As a result, the system is less flexible and scalable with limited applicability to new projects. This paper will focus on the rationale behind, and implementation of the run-time executive. This executive is the core for the component-based flight software commonality and reuse process adopted at Goddard.

  14. Advanced Modeling of Teaming Data to Enable Superior Team Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-04

    PATENT , TRADEMARK, OR COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT. This material has been approved...permission should be directed to the Software Engineering Institute at permission@sei.cmu.edu. CMMI® is registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark...Operations Team Culture Cost Quality Schedule Survey Q1 Survey Q2 Survey Q3 Survey Q4 Survey Q5 Survey Q6 Survey Q7 Survey Q8 Survey Q9 Survey Q10 Survey

  15. Absorbing Software Testing into the Scrum Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuomikoski, Janne; Tervonen, Ilkka

    In this paper we study, how to absorb software testing into the Scrum method. We conducted the research as an action research during the years 2007-2008 with three iterations. The result showed that testing can and even should be absorbed to the Scrum method. The testing team was merged into the Scrum teams. The teams can now deliver better working software in a shorter time, because testing keeps track of the progress of the development. Also the team spirit is higher, because the Scrum team members are committed to the same goal. The biggest change from test manager’s point of view was the organized Product Owner Team. Test manager don’t have testing team anymore, and in the future all the testing tasks have to be assigned through the Product Backlog.

  16. Secure software practices among Malaysian software practitioners: An exploratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Shafinah Farvin Packeer; Baharom, Fauziah; Deraman, Aziz; Yahya, Jamaiah; Mohd, Haslina

    2016-08-01

    Secure software practices is increasingly gaining much importance among software practitioners and researchers due to the rise of computer crimes in the software industry. It has become as one of the determinant factors for producing high quality software. Even though its importance has been revealed, its current practice in the software industry is still scarce, particularly in Malaysia. Thus, an exploratory study is conducted among software practitioners in Malaysia to study their experiences and practices in the real-world projects. This paper discusses the findings from the study, which involved 93 software practitioners. Structured questionnaire is utilized for data collection purpose whilst statistical methods such as frequency, mean, and cross tabulation are used for data analysis. Outcomes from this study reveal that software practitioners are becoming increasingly aware on the importance of secure software practices, however, they lack of appropriate implementation, which could affect the quality of produced software.

  17. Achieving Agility and Stability in Large-Scale Software Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-16

    question Which software development process are you currently using? 1. Agile software development (e.g., using Scrum , XP practices, test-driven... Scrum teams, product development teams, component teams, feature teams) spend almost all of their time fixing defects, and new capability...architectural runway provides the degree of architectural stability to support the next n iterations of development. In a Scrum project environment

  18. Achieving Agility and Stability in Large-Scale Software Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-16

    question Which software development process are you currently using? 1. Agile software development (e.g., using Scrum , XP practices, test-driven... Scrum teams, product development teams, component teams, feature teams) spend almost all of their time fixing defects, and new capability...architectural runway provides the degree of architectural stability to support the next n iterations of development. In a Scrum project environment, the

  19. User systems guidelines for software projects

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamson, L.

    1986-04-01

    This manual presents guidelines for software standards which were developed so that software project-development teams and management involved in approving the software could have a generalized view of all phases in the software production procedure and the steps involved in completing each phase. Guidelines are presented for six phases of software development: project definition, building a user interface, designing software, writing code, testing code, and preparing software documentation. The discussions for each phase include examples illustrating the recommended guidelines. 45 refs. (DWL)

  20. Knowledge and attitude toward interdisciplinary team working among obstetricians and gynecologists in teaching hospitals in South East Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Iyoke, Chukwuemeka Anthony; Lawani, Lucky Osaheni; Ugwu, George Onyemaechi; Ajah, Leonard Ogbonna; Ezugwu, Euzebus Chinonye; Onah, Paul; Onwuka, Chidinma Ifechi

    2015-01-01

    Background Interdisciplinary team working could facilitate the efficient provision and coordination of increasingly diverse health services, thereby improving the quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to describe knowledge of interdisciplinary team working among obstetricians and gynecologists in two teaching hospitals in South East Nigeria and to determine their attitude toward an interdisciplinary collaborative approach to patient care in these institutions. Methods This was a questionnaire-based cross-sectional study. Data analysis involved descriptive statistics and was carried out using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software version 17.0 for Windows. Results In total, 116 doctors participated in the study. The mean age of the respondents was 31.9±7.0 (range 22–51) years. Approximately 74% of respondents were aware of the concept of interdisciplinary team working. Approximately 15% of respondents who were aware of the concept of interdisciplinary team working had very good knowledge of it; 52% had good knowledge and 33% had poor knowledge. Twenty-nine percent of knowledgeable respondents reported ever receiving formal teaching/training on interdisciplinary team working in the course of their professional development. About 78% of those aware of team working believed that interdisciplinary teams would be useful in obstetrics and gynecology practice in Nigeria, with 89% stating that it would be very useful. Approximately 77% of those aware of team working would support establishment and implementation of interdisciplinary teams at their centers. Conclusion There was a high degree of knowledge of the concept and a positive attitude toward interdisciplinary team working among obstetricians and gynecologists in the study centers. This suggests that the attitude of physicians may not be an impediment to implementation of a collaborative interdisciplinary approach to clinical care in the study centers. PMID:26064058

  1. NASA PC software evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Kuan, Julie C.

    1986-01-01

    The USL NASA PC software evaluation project is intended to provide a structured framework for facilitating the development of quality NASA PC software products. The project will assist NASA PC development staff to understand the characteristics and functions of NASA PC software products. Based on the results of the project teams' evaluations and recommendations, users can judge the reliability, usability, acceptability, maintainability and customizability of all the PC software products. The objective here is to provide initial, high-level specifications and guidelines for NASA PC software evaluation. The primary tasks to be addressed in this project are as follows: to gain a strong understanding of what software evaluation entails and how to organize a structured software evaluation process; to define a structured methodology for conducting the software evaluation process; to develop a set of PC software evaluation criteria and evaluation rating scales; and to conduct PC software evaluations in accordance with the identified methodology. Communication Packages, Network System Software, Graphics Support Software, Environment Management Software, General Utilities. This report represents one of the 72 attachment reports to the University of Southwestern Louisiana's Final Report on NASA Grant NGT-19-010-900. Accordingly, appropriate care should be taken in using this report out of context of the full Final Report.

  2. Building a leadership team that works.

    PubMed

    Blomenberg, Emily M

    2005-01-01

    Radiology administrators often are challenged to do more with less. In today's fast-paced work environment, leaders must be creative. They must surround themselves with good people in order to successfully achieve their organizations' goals. Once a radiology administrator is satisfied and comfortable that he or she has, the right staff involved, a leadership team can be formally establislished. Howard Regional Health System established an Imaging Services Leadership Team with a vision to provide leaders for the staff to "follow," just as team members learn from the radiology administrator. In addition, team members are vital in assisting the radiology administrator in managing the department The process of building the team consisted of 3 steps: selecting team members (the most challenging and time-consuming component), formalizing a functional team, and putting the team into action. Finding the right people, holding regular meetings, and making those team meetings meaningful are keys to a successful leadership team. The implementation of the team has had a positive effect on imaging services: the number of procedures has increased, the team is used as a communication tool for front-line staff, front-line staff are becoming more comfortable with making decisions.

  3. Peer-Led Team Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cracolice, Mark S.; Deming, John C.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces the Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) model as an alternative to traditional cooperative learning. Discusses the difficulties of PLTL based curriculum which include finding the peer leaders, selecting the right materials for implementation, and training techniques for peer leaders. (YDS)

  4. Speculations on Design Team Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedberg, John; Sims, Rod

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of the design of effective learning environments focuses on design team interactions. Topics include designer intention and instructor implementation; technology tools and their use; instructional design processes, including computer interfaces and interaction possibilities; learner as actor; multimedia; and interpersonal communication.…

  5. Green Team to the Rescue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neeper, Lance S.; Dymond, Stacy K.

    2012-01-01

    Teachers created an after-school club called The Green Team and implemented an instructional strategy know as service-learning to teach environmental science. This article describes the transformation that occurred over a three-year period and illustrates how service-learning can provide a framework for environmental education. (Contains 1 figure,…

  6. Managing for Results Through Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chand, Sunil; Holm, Maudie L.

    1998-01-01

    Using examples from Cuyahoga Community College, this article examines the nature of teams, how they are suited to community college management, and how they can increase the effectiveness of community colleges. Presents tangible implementation strategies and unique applications for community colleges, including the use of faculty as team…

  7. Scientific Software Component Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Dykman, N.; Kumfert, G.; Smolinski, B.

    2000-02-16

    We are developing new software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address issues of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology enables cross-project code re-use, reduces software development costs, and provides additional simulation capabilities for massively parallel laboratory application codes. The success of our approach will be measured by its impact on DOE mathematical and scientific software efforts. Thus, we are collaborating closely with library developers and application scientists in the Common Component Architecture forum, the Equation Solver Interface forum, and other DOE mathematical software groups to gather requirements, write and adopt a variety of design specifications, and develop demonstration projects to validate our approach. Numerical simulation is essential to the science mission at the laboratory. However, it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage the complexity of modern simulation software. Computational scientists develop complex, three-dimensional, massively parallel, full-physics simulations that require the integration of diverse software packages written by outside development teams. Currently, the integration of a new software package, such as a new linear solver library, can require several months of effort. Current industry component technologies such as CORBA, JavaBeans, and COM have all been used successfully in the business domain to reduce software development costs and increase software quality. However, these existing industry component infrastructures will not scale to support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. In particular, they do not address issues related to high-performance parallel computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections between components, language interoperability for scientific languages such as Fortran, parallel data redistribution between components, and massively

  8. Revamp your software selection process.

    PubMed

    Allen, D J

    1999-11-01

    Very few software implementations fail from lack of functionality. More often, the failure results from other factors. Yet most companies continue to focus primarily on software functionality during the selection and evaluation process. By expanding the scope of your evaluation process to include other important factors, your probability of successful implementation and future happiness with your vendor can be dramatically enhanced.

  9. Interprofessional Learning – Development and Implementation of Joint Medical Emergency Team Trainings for Medical and Nursing Students at Universitätsmedizin Greifswald

    PubMed Central

    Partecke, Maud; Balzer, Claudius; Finkenzeller, Ingmar; Reppenhagen, Christiane; Hess, Ulrike; Hahnenkamp, Klaus; Meissner, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Interprofessional collaboration is of great importance in clinical practice, particularly in the field of emergency medicine. The professions involved in providing emergency care must work hand in hand, and tasks and routines must be coordinated effectively. However, medical and nursing students have only few opportunities to experience interprofessional cooperation during their formal training. Addressing this situation, the Department of Anesthesiology and the Vocational School of Greifswald University Medical School initiated a project to increase patient safety by integrating interprofessional human factor training into the curriculum of both health professions. This manuscript addresses how an interprofessional course module focusing on clinical emergency medicine can be taught with an emphasis on competency and problem-solving. In addition, it was important to identify suitable instruments for systematic quality development and assurance of this teaching and learning format. Project description: The aim of the project, which took place from October 2013 to September 2015, was the development, implementation and evaluation of a simulation-based, interprofessional course module on clinical emergency medicine. Target groups were medical and nursing students. Modern pedagogical models and methods were applied to the design and teaching of the course content. The project was carried out in separate phases: definition, planning, practical implementation, evaluation and documentation. The project was accompanied by systematic quality development. Established guidelines for quality-centered school development were applied to quality development, assurance and evaluation. Results: Over two years, a 16 credit-hour course module was developed and then taught and evaluated during the 2014 and 2015 summer semesters. A total of 120 medical students and 120 nursing students participated in the course module. Eighteen teachers from medicine and nursing were

  10. Implementation Reviews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    The point of the implementation review is to prevent problems from occurring later by trying to get our arms around the planning from the start. fmplementation reviews set the tone for management of the project. They establish a teaming relationship (if they are run properly), and they level the playing field instead of setting up turf wars.

  11. Sounds like Team Spirit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2002-01-01

    trying to improve on what they've done before. Second, success in any endeavor stems from people who know how to interpret a composition to sound beautiful when played in a different style. For Knowledge Sharing to work, it must be adapted, reinterpreted, shaped and played with at the centers. In this regard, we've been blessed with another crazy, passionate, inspired artist named Claire Smith. Claire has turned Ames Research Center in California into APPL-west. She is so good and committed to what she does that I just refer people to her whenever they have questions about implementing project management development at the field level. Finally, any great effort requires talented people working behind the scenes, the people who formulate a business approach and know how to manage the money so that the music gets heard. I have known many brilliant and creative people with a ton of ideas that never take off due to an inability to work the business. Again, the Knowledge Sharing team has been fortunate to have competent and passionate people, specifically Tony Maturo and his procurement team at Goddard Space Flight Center, to make sure the process is in place to support the effort. This kind of support is every bit as crucial as the activity itself, and the efforts and creativity that go into successful procurement and contracting is a vital ingredient of this successful team.

  12. DSN data systems software methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, C. K.

    1982-01-01

    A software methodology for JPL deep space network (DSN) data systems software implementations through transfer and delivery is presented. The DSN Data Systems Software Methodology is compatible with and depends on DSN software methodology and also incorporates the characteristics of real-time program development in a DSN environment. The DSN Data Systems software implementation consists of a series of six distinct phases. An Independent Group is responsible for verification and validation of the DSN Data Systems software during developing phases. The DSN data systems software methodology is applied to all development software provided for or by the DSN data systems section in Mark IV where there is a desire for reliability, maintainability, and usability within budget and schedule constraints.

  13. Employability Development Teams: Team Member Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Mary L.; Lewis, Meharry H.

    1972-01-01

    The authors point out that team roles are designed to be complementary, but much of the frustration that develops among team members is due to lack of role definition and too much overlapping of responsibility. (Author)

  14. Distributed control of multi-robot teams: Cooperative baton passing task

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1998-11-01

    This research addresses the problem of achieving fault tolerant cooperation within small- to medium-sized teams of heterogeneous mobile robots. The author describes a novel behavior-based, fully distributed architecture, called ALLIANCE, that utilizes adaptive action selection to achieve fault tolerant cooperative control. The robots in this architecture possess a variety of high-level functions that they can perform during a mission, and must at all times select an appropriate action based on the requirements of the mission, the activities of other robots, the current environmental conditions, and their own internal states. Since such cooperative teams often work in dynamic and unpredictable environments, the software architecture allows the team members to respond robustly and reliably to unexpected environmental changes and modifications in the robot team that may occur due to mechanical failure, the learning of new skills, or the addition or removal of robots from the team by human intervention. After presenting ALLIANCE, they describe the implementation of this architecture on a team of physical mobile robots performing a cooperative baton passing task. These experiments illustrate the ability of ALLIANCE to achieve adaptive, fault-tolerant cooperative control amidst dynamic changes during the task.

  15. Project CELIT (Career Education Leadership Interaction Teams).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    In an attempt to increase successful career education collaborative programming in elementary and secondary schools, representatives of several university counselor education programs planned and then implemented a training program for small teams. The ten teams chosen, all volunteers and consisting of business and government representatives and…

  16. Are Multidisciplinary Teams Worth the Investment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshida, Roland K.

    1983-01-01

    Current research data provide only weak support for the continued use of multidisciplinary teams (MDTs). It is argued that MDTs have not had a fair chance to be implemented and that the complexity of organizational changes needed for MDTs to function effectively have been overlooked by team members and administrators. (Author/PN)

  17. Software Safety Progress in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radley, Charles F.

    1995-01-01

    NASA has developed guidelines for development and analysis of safety-critical software. These guidelines have been documented in a Guidebook for Safety Critical Software Development and Analysis. The guidelines represent a practical 'how to' approach, to assist software developers and safety analysts in cost effective methods for software safety. They provide guidance in the implementation of the recent NASA Software Safety Standard NSS-1740.13 which was released as 'Interim' version in June 1994, scheduled for formal adoption late 1995. This paper is a survey of the methods in general use, resulting in the NASA guidelines for safety critical software development and analysis.

  18. Software Complexity Threatens Performance Portability

    SciTech Connect

    Gamblin, T.

    2015-09-11

    Modern HPC software packages are rarely self-contained. They depend on a large number of external libraries, and many spend large fractions of their runtime in external subroutines. Performance portability depends not only on the effort of application teams, but also on the availability of well-tuned libraries. At most sites, the burden of maintaining libraries is shared by code teams and facilities. Facilities typically provide well-tuned default versions, but code teams frequently build with bleeding-edge compilers to achieve high performance. For this reason, HPC has no “standard” software stack, unlike other domains where performance is not critical. Incompatibilities among compilers and software versions force application teams and facility staff to re-build custom versions of libraries for each new toolchain. Because the number of potential configurations is combinatorial, and because HPC software is notoriously difficult to port to new machines [3, 7, 8], the tuning effort required to support and maintain performance-portable libraries outstrips the available manpower at most sites. Software complexity is a growing obstacle to performance portability for HPC.

  19. Adopting Team Contracts to Initiate Team Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcellino, Patricia Ann

    2008-01-01

    Creighton, Harris and Coleman (2005) suggest that educational leadership instructors introduce aspiring administrators to a sound knowledge base. Currently, engaging in teams is recommended for high performance and problem-solving. Bolton (1999) recommends that instructors coach teams so teaming skills are improved. But, oftentimes, there are team…

  20. WFF TOPEX Software Documentation Overview, May 1999. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Ronald L.; Lee, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    This document provides an overview'of software development activities and the resulting products and procedures developed by the TOPEX Software Development Team (SWDT) at Wallops Flight Facility, in support of the WFF TOPEX Engineering Assessment and Verification efforts.

  1. Software analysis handbook: Software complexity analysis and software reliability estimation and prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Alice T.; Gunn, Todd; Pham, Tuan; Ricaldi, Ron

    1994-01-01

    This handbook documents the three software analysis processes the Space Station Software Analysis team uses to assess space station software, including their backgrounds, theories, tools, and analysis procedures. Potential applications of these analysis results are also presented. The first section describes how software complexity analysis provides quantitative information on code, such as code structure and risk areas, throughout the software life cycle. Software complexity analysis allows an analyst to understand the software structure, identify critical software components, assess risk areas within a software system, identify testing deficiencies, and recommend program improvements. Performing this type of analysis during the early design phases of software development can positively affect the process, and may prevent later, much larger, difficulties. The second section describes how software reliability estimation and prediction analysis, or software reliability, provides a quantitative means to measure the probability of failure-free operation of a computer program, and describes the two tools used by JSC to determine failure rates and design tradeoffs between reliability, costs, performance, and schedule.

  2. Registration and Scheduling at NIU (Implementing Commercial Software at a Large University.) College and University Machine Records Annual Conference (17th, Columbus, Ohio, May 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karabinus, Robert A.; Boris, Richard

    This document describes the development and implementation of a computer based registration and scheduling information system at Northern Illinois University. Because of personnel shortages, the University sought and received help from commercial computer firms. Implementation of scheduling, registration, and billing systems was accomplished in a…

  3. Proprietary software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marnock, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    The protection of intellectual property by a patent, a copyright, or trade secrets is reviewed. The present and future use of computers and software are discussed, along with the governmental uses of software. The popularity of contractual agreements for sale or lease of computer programs and software services is also summarized.

  4. CNEOST Control Software System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Zhao, H. B.; Xia, Y.; Lu, H.; Li, B.

    2015-03-01

    In 2013, CNEOST (China Near Earth Object Survey Telescope) adapted its hardware system for the new CCD camera. Based on the new system architecture, the control software is re-designed and implemented. The software system adopts the message passing mechanism via WebSocket protocol, and improves its flexibility, expansibility, and scalability. The user interface with responsive web design realizes the remote operating under both desktop and mobile devices. The stable operating of software system has greatly enhanced the operation efficiency while reducing the complexity, and has also made a successful attempt for the future system design of telescope and telescope cloud.

  5. Advanced fingerprint verification software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baradarani, A.; Taylor, J. R. B.; Severin, F.; Maev, R. Gr.

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a fingerprint software package that can be used in a wide range of applications from law enforcement to public and private security systems, and to personal devices such as laptops, vehicles, and door- locks. The software and processing units are a unique implementation of new and sophisticated algorithms that compete with the current best systems in the world. Development of the software package has been in line with the third generation of our ultrasonic fingerprinting machine1. Solid and robust performance is achieved in the presence of misplaced and low quality fingerprints.

  6. Software quality assurance handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    There are two important reasons for Software Quality Assurance (SQA) at Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD): First, the benefits from SQA make good business sense. Second, the Department of Energy has requested SQA. This handbook is one of the first steps in a plant-wide implementation of Software Quality Assurance at KCD. The handbook has two main purposes. The first is to provide information that you will need to perform software quality assurance activities. The second is to provide a common thread to unify the approach to SQA at KCD. 2 figs.

  7. Team Learning in Teacher Teams: Team Entitativity as a Bridge between Teams-in-Theory and Teams-in-Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vangrieken, Katrien; Dochy, Filip; Raes, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate team learning in the context of teacher teams in higher vocational education. As teacher teams often do not meet all criteria included in theoretical team definitions, the construct "team entitativity" was introduced. Defined as the degree to which a group of individuals possesses the quality of being a…

  8. Software Formal Inspections Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Software Formal Inspections Guidebook is designed to support the inspection process of software developed by and for NASA. This document provides information on how to implement a recommended and proven method for conducting formal inspections of NASA software. This Guidebook is a companion document to NASA Standard 2202-93, Software Formal Inspections Standard, approved April 1993, which provides the rules, procedures, and specific requirements for conducting software formal inspections. Application of the Formal Inspections Standard is optional to NASA program or project management. In cases where program or project management decide to use the formal inspections method, this Guidebook provides additional information on how to establish and implement the process. The goal of the formal inspections process as documented in the above-mentioned Standard and this Guidebook is to provide a framework and model for an inspection process that will enable the detection and elimination of defects as early as possible in the software life cycle. An ancillary aspect of the formal inspection process incorporates the collection and analysis of inspection data to effect continual improvement in the inspection process and the quality of the software subjected to the process.

  9. Team coordination dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Jamie C; Amazeen, Polemnia G; Cooke, Nancy J

    2010-07-01

    Team coordination consists of both the dynamics of team member interaction and the environmental dynamics to which a team is subjected. Focusing on dynamics, an approach is developed that contrasts with traditional aggregate-static concepts of team coordination as characterized by the shared mental model approach. A team coordination order parameter was developed to capture momentary fluctuations in coordination. Team coordination was observed in three-person uninhabited air vehicle teams across two experimental sessions. The dynamics of the order parameter were observed under changes of a team familiarity control parameter. Team members returned for the second session to either the same (Intact) or different (Mixed) team. 'Roadblock' perturbations, or novel changes in the task environment, were introduced in order to probe the stability of team coordination. Nonlinear dynamic methods revealed differences that a traditional approach did not: Intact and Mixed team coordination dynamics looked very different; Mixed teams were more stable than Intact teams and explored the space of solutions without the need for correction. Stability was positively correlated with the number of roadblock perturbations that were overcome successfully. The novel and non-intuitive contribution of a dynamical analysis was that Mixed teams, who did not have a long history working together, were more adaptive. Team coordination dynamics carries new implications for traditional problems such as training adaptive teams.

  10. Instructional Design Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bancroft, Judith A.; Collins, Keith

    1974-01-01

    An instructional design team, composed of experts in nursing, education, and media production, is used at the University of Wisconsin School of Nursing, Madison, to produce instructional units for a new curriculum. The authors summarize steps of team/faculty communications, team methodology, and factors influencing the team's effectiveness. (EA)

  11. TeamXchange: A Team Project Experience Involving Virtual Teams and Fluid Team Membership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dineen, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    TeamXchange, an online team-based exercise, is described. TeamXchange is consistent with the collaborative model of learning and provides a means of fostering enhanced student learning and engagement through collaboration in virtual teams experiencing periodic membership changes. It was administered in an undergraduate Organizational Behavior…

  12. Sports Teams Extend Reach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    Unlike traditional high school athletic teams, Unified Sports teams are designed to immerse students with intellectual disabilities in a facet of school culture that has largely eluded them. Nationwide, more than 2,000 schools in 42 states have the teams, where the ideal is for about half the athletes on each team to be students with intellectual…

  13. Student Team Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.

    Three Student Team Learning techniques have been extensively researched and found to significantly increase student learning. In Student Teams Achievement Divisions (STAD), teams are made up of high, average, and low performing students of both genders and different racial and ethnic backgrounds. Team members study worksheets, work problems in…

  14. The Discipline of Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzenbach, Jon R.; Smith, Douglas K.

    1993-01-01

    Teams share commitment, translate purpose into performance goals, and have members be accountable with and to their teammates. Types of teams are those that recommend, make or do things, and run things. The distinction between teams and other working groups is performance: an effective team is worth more than the sum of its parts. (SK)

  15. Assessing Team Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Susan; Rottier, Jerry

    Interdisciplinary middle school level teams capitalize on the idea that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Administrators and team members can maximize the advantages of teamwork using team assessments to increase the benefits for students, teachers, and the school environment. Assessing team performance can lead to high performing…

  16. The Implementation of a Multi-Backend Database System (MDBS). Part II. The First Prototype MDBS and the Software Engineering Experience.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    DATABASE SYSTEM (MDBS): PART II - THE FIRST PROTOTYPE MDBS AND THE SOFTWARE ENGINEERING EXPERIENCE Xlngui He, Masanobu Higashida , David K. Hsiao, Douglas S...111101111WO) Xingui He, Masanobu Higashida , David K. Hsiao, N00014-75-C-0573 Douglas S. Kerr, Ali Orooji, Zong-Zhi Shi, Paula Strawser ______________ 9...Xingui, Masanobu Higashida */ 1* (4) Date : Jan. 28, 1982 1* (5) Modified : Feb. 1, 1982 */ 1* Feb. 18, 1982 */ /* Mar. 11, 1982 /* April 1, 1982 *I

  17. Workflow-Based Software Development Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izygon, Michel E.

    2013-01-01

    The Software Developer's Assistant (SDA) helps software teams more efficiently and accurately conduct or execute software processes associated with NASA mission-critical software. SDA is a process enactment platform that guides software teams through project-specific standards, processes, and procedures. Software projects are decomposed into all of their required process steps or tasks, and each task is assigned to project personnel. SDA orchestrates the performance of work required to complete all process tasks in the correct sequence. The software then notifies team members when they may begin work on their assigned tasks and provides the tools, instructions, reference materials, and supportive artifacts that allow users to compliantly perform the work. A combination of technology components captures and enacts any software process use to support the software lifecycle. It creates an adaptive workflow environment that can be modified as needed. SDA achieves software process automation through a Business Process Management (BPM) approach to managing the software lifecycle for mission-critical projects. It contains five main parts: TieFlow (workflow engine), Business Rules (rules to alter process flow), Common Repository (storage for project artifacts, versions, history, schedules, etc.), SOA (interface to allow internal, GFE, or COTS tools integration), and the Web Portal Interface (collaborative web environment

  18. Design and Implementation of a C++ Software Package to scan for and parse Tsunami Messages issued by the Tsunami Warning Centers for Operational use at the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardina, V.

    2012-12-01

    The US Tsunami Warning Centers (TWCs) have traditionally generated their tsunami message products primarily as blocks of text then tagged with headers that identify them on each particular communications' (comms) circuit. Each warning center has a primary area of responsibility (AOR) within which it has an authoritative role regarding parameters such as earthquake location and magnitude. This means that when a major tsunamigenic event occurs the other warning centers need to quickly access the earthquake parameters issued by the authoritative warning center before issuing their message products intended for customers in their own AOR. Thus, within the operational context of the TWCs the scientists on duty have an operational need to access the information contained in the message products issued by other warning centers as quickly as possible. As a solution to this operational problem we designed and implemented a C++ software package that allows scanning for and parsing the entire suite of tsunami message products issued by the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC), the West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC), and the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). The scanning and parsing classes composing the resulting C++ software package allow parsing both non-official message products(observatory messages) routinely issued by the TWCs, and all official tsunami message products such as tsunami advisories, watches, and warnings. This software package currently allows scientists on duty at the PTWC to automatically retrieve the parameters contained in tsunami messages issued by WCATWC, JMA, or PTWC itself. Extension of the capabilities of the classes composing the software package would make it possible to generate XML and CAP compliant versions of the TWCs' message products until new messaging software natively adds this capabilities. Customers who receive the TWCs' tsunami message products could also use the package to automatically retrieve information from

  19. LSST control software component design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Paul J.; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory P.; Lim, Kian-Tat; Johnson, Tony; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Mills, David; Daly, Philip; Schumacher, Germán.; Delgado, Francisco; Pietrowicz, Steve; Selvy, Brian; Sebag, Jacques; Marshall, Stuart; Sundararaman, Harini; Contaxis, Christopher; Bovill, Robert; Jenness, Tim

    2016-08-01

    Construction of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope system involves several different organizations, a situation that poses many challenges at the time of the software integration of the components. To ensure commonality for the purposes of usability, maintainability, and robustness, the LSST software teams have agreed to the following for system software components: a summary state machine, a manner of managing settings, a flexible solution to specify controller/controllee relationships reliably as needed, and a paradigm for responding to and communicating alarms. This paper describes these agreed solutions and the factors that motivated these.

  20. Developing Your Dream Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatlin, Kenda

    2005-01-01

    Almost anyone has held various roles on a team, be it a family unit, sports team, or a project-oriented team. As an educator, one must make a conscious decision to build and invest in a team. Gathering the best team possible will help one achieve one's goals. This article explores some of the key reasons why it is important to focus on the team…

  1. The discipline of teams.

    PubMed

    Katzenbach, J R; Smith, D K

    1993-01-01

    Groups don't become teams because that is what someone calls them. Nor do teamwork values by themselves ensure team performance. So what is a team? How can managers know when the team option makes sense and what they can do to ensure team success? In this article, drawn from their recent book The Wisdom of Teams, McKinsey partners Jon Katzenbach and Douglas Smith answer these questions and outline the discipline that makes a real team. The essence of a team is shared commitment. Without it, groups perform as individuals; with it, they become a powerful unit of collective performance. The best teams invest a tremendous amount of time shaping a purpose that they can own. The best teams also translate their purpose into specific performance goals. And members of successful teams pitch in and become accountable with and to their teammates. The fundamental distinction between teams and other forms of working groups turns on performance. A working group relies on the individual contributions of its members for group performance. But a team strives for something greater than its members could achieve individually. In short, an effective team is always worth more than the sum of its parts. Katzenbach and Smith identify three basic types of teams: teams that recommend things--task forces or project groups; teams that make or do things--manufacturing, operations, or marketing groups; and teams that run things--groups that oversee some significant functional activity. For managers, the key is knowing where in the organization real teams should be encouraged. Team potential exists anywhere hierarchy or organizational boundaries inhibit good performance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Software packager user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, John R.

    1995-01-01

    Software integration is a growing area of concern for many programmers and software managers because the need to build new programs quickly from existing components is greater than ever. This includes building versions of software products for multiple hardware platforms and operating systems, building programs from components written in different languages, and building systems from components that must execute on different machines in a distributed network. The goal of software integration is to make building new programs from existing components more seamless -- programmers should pay minimal attention to the underlying configuration issues involved. Libraries of reusable components and classes are important tools but only partial solutions to software development problems. Even though software components may have compatible interfaces, there may be other reasons, such as differences between execution environments, why they cannot be integrated. Often, components must be adapted or reimplemented to fit into another application because of implementation differences -- they are implemented in different programming languages, dependent on different operating system resources, or must execute on different physical machines. The software packager is a tool that allows programmers to deal with interfaces between software components and ignore complex integration details. The packager takes modular descriptions of the structure of a software system written in the package specification language and produces an integration program in the form of a makefile. If complex integration tools are needed to integrate a set of components, such as remote procedure call stubs, their use is implied by the packager automatically and stub generation tools are invoked in the corresponding makefile. The programmer deals only with the components themselves and not the details of how to build the system on any given platform.

  3. Light Duty Utility Arm Software Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Kiebel, G.R.

    1995-12-18

    This plan describes how validation testing of the software will be implemented for the integrated control and data acquisition system of the Light Duty Utility Arm System (LDUA). The purpose of LDUA software validation testing is to demonstrate and document that the LDUA software meets its software requirements specification.

  4. Sandia software guidelines, Volume 4: Configuration management

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. This volume is based on the IEEE standard and guide for software configuration management. The basic concepts and detailed guidance on implementation of these concepts are discussed for several software project types. Example planning documents for both projects and organizations are included.

  5. Work in Progress: The Seven Rs of Team Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunelli, Jean; Schneider, Elaine Fogel

    2004-01-01

    This article argues that supportive teams--including professionals, paraprofessionals, and parents--can teach staff members how to identify and implement best practices in early intervention settings. The authors describe "the seven Rs of team building" distilled from their many years of team building and maintenance: 1) Reading cues; 2) Regular…

  6. Trainees as Teachers in Team-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravindranath, Divy; Gay, Tamara L.; Riba, Michelle B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Team-based learning is an active learning modality that is gaining popularity in medical education. The authors studied the effect of using trainees as facilitators of team-based learning sessions. Methods: Team-based learning modules were developed and implemented by faculty members and trainees for the third-year medical student…

  7. Using teams and committees effectively.

    PubMed

    Spilker, B

    1998-09-01

    In a corporate setting, the term "team" usually refers to members of a group with different responsibilities and/or skills working together to achieve a common goal or objective. The major reason why a company desires group as opposed to individual involvement is to derive sounder decisions. Two essential issues to resolve in establishing teams or committees are 1) who should be a member or representative; and 2) what is the charter or mandate for the group. Representatives join a team or group in numerous ways; four common methods are 1) appointment by the group member's supervisor; 2) recruitment by the team leader; 3) appointment by a senior manager; and 4) volunteering. There are various profiles of how groups can approach a decision, including "groupthink," the "ideal group process" and the "debating society" approach. Group meetings must be structured to ensure that decisions are reached and then implemented. Foresight and planning are essential prerequisites to have efficient teams and committees that work effectively and achieve their goals.

  8. NA-42 TI Shared Software Component Library FY2011 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Knudson, Christa K.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Dorow, Kevin E.

    2011-07-21

    The NA-42 TI program initiated an effort in FY2010 to standardize its software development efforts with the long term goal of migrating toward a software management approach that will allow for the sharing and reuse of code developed within the TI program, improve integration, ensure a level of software documentation, and reduce development costs. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked with two activities that support this mission. PNNL has been tasked with the identification, selection, and implementation of a Shared Software Component Library. The intent of the library is to provide a common repository that is accessible by all authorized NA-42 software development teams. The repository facilitates software reuse through a searchable and easy to use web based interface. As software is submitted to the repository, the component registration process captures meta-data and provides version control for compiled libraries, documentation, and source code. This meta-data is then available for retrieval and review as part of library search results. In FY2010, PNNL and staff from the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) teamed up to develop a software application with the goal of replacing the aging Aerial Measuring System (AMS). The application under development includes an Advanced Visualization and Integration of Data (AVID) framework and associated AMS modules. Throughout development, PNNL and RSL have utilized a common AMS code repository for collaborative code development. The AMS repository is hosted by PNNL, is restricted to the project development team, is accessed via two different geographic locations and continues to be used. The knowledge gained from the collaboration and hosting of this repository in conjunction with PNNL software development and systems engineering capabilities were used in the selection of a package to be used in the implementation of the software component library on behalf of NA-42 TI. The second task managed by PNNL

  9. Software safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy

    1987-01-01

    Software safety and its relationship to other qualities are discussed. It is shown that standard reliability and fault tolerance techniques will not solve the safety problem for the present. A new attitude requires: looking at what you do NOT want software to do along with what you want it to do; and assuming things will go wrong. New procedures and changes to entire software development process are necessary: special software safety analysis techniques are needed; and design techniques, especially eliminating complexity, can be very helpful.

  10. Fully Employing Software Inspections Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, Forrest; Feldmann, Raimund L.; Seaman, Carolyn; Regardie, Myrna; Godfrey, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Software inspections provide a proven approach to quality assurance for software products of all kinds, including requirements, design, code, test plans, among others. Common to all inspections is the aim of finding and fixing defects as early as possible, and thereby providing cost savings by minimizing the amount of rework necessary later in the lifecycle. Measurement data, such as the number and type of found defects and the effort spent by the inspection team, provide not only direct feedback about the software product to the project team but are also valuable for process improvement activities. In this paper, we discuss NASA's use of software inspections and the rich set of data that has resulted. In particular, we present results from analysis of inspection data that illustrate the benefits of fully utilizing that data for process improvement at several levels. Examining such data across multiple inspections or projects allows team members to monitor and trigger cross project improvements. Such improvements may focus on the software development processes of the whole organization as well as improvements to the applied inspection process itself.

  11. Social Software in Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Considerable buzz has appeared on the Internet over a group of new tools labeled social software. These tools can expand discussion beyond the classroom and provide new ways for students to collaborate and communicate within their class or around the world. Dickinson College has implemented two of the best-known tools, the wiki and the blog, in…

  12. Does team training work? Principles for health care.

    PubMed

    Salas, Eduardo; DiazGranados, Deborah; Weaver, Sallie J; King, Heidi

    2008-11-01

    Teamwork is integral to a working environment conducive to patient safety and care. Team training is one methodology designed to equip team members with the competencies necessary for optimizing teamwork. There is evidence of team training's effectiveness in highly complex and dynamic work environments, such as aviation and health care. However, most quantitative evaluations of training do not offer any insight into the actual reasons why, how, and when team training is effective. To address this gap in understanding, and to provide guidance for members of the health care community interested in implementing team training programs, this article presents both quantitative results and a specific qualitative review and content analysis of team training implemented in health care. Based on this review, we offer eight evidence-based principles for effective planning, implementation, and evaluation of team training programs specific to health care.

  13. Support of Herschel Key Programme Teams at the NASA Herschel Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupe, David L.; Appleton, P. N.; Ardila, D.; Bhattacharya, B.; Mei, Y.; Morris, P.; Rector, J.; NHSC Team

    2010-01-01

    The first science data from the Herschel Space Observatory were distributed to Key Programme teams in September 2009. This poster describes a number of resources that have been developed by the NASA Herschel Science Center (NHSC) to support the first users of the observatory. The NHSC webpages and Helpdesk serve as the starting point for information and queries from the US community. Details about the use of the Herschel Common Science Software can be looked up in the Helpdesk Knowledgebase. The capability of real-time remote support through desktop sharing has been implemented. The NHSC continues to host workshops on data analysis and observation planning. Key Programme teams have been provided Wiki sites upon request for their team's private use and for sharing information with other teams. A secure data storage area is in place for troubleshooting purposes and for use by visitors. The NHSC draws upon close working relationships with Instrument Control Centers and the Herschel Science Center in Madrid in order to have the necessary expertise on hand to assist Herschel observers, including both Key Programme teams and respondents to upcoming open time proposal calls.

  14. TMT common software update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, Kim; Brighton, Allan; Buur, Hanne

    2016-08-01

    TMT Common Software (CSW). CSW consists of software services and library code that is used by developers to create the subsystems and components that participate in the software system. CSW also defines the types of components that can be constructed and their functional roles in the software system. TMT CSW has recently passed its preliminary design review. The unique features of CSW include its use of multiple, open-source products as the basis for services, and an approach that works to reduce the amount of CSW-provided infrastructure code. Considerable prototyping was completed during this phase to mitigate risk with results that demonstrate the validity of this design approach and the selected service implementation products. This paper describes the latest design of TMT CSW, key features, and results from the prototyping effort.

  15. Single software platform used for high speed data transfer implementation in a 65k pixel camera working in single photon counting mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maj, P.; Kasiński, K.; Gryboś, P.; Szczygieł, R.; Kozioł, A.

    2015-12-01

    Integrated circuits designed for specific applications generally use non-standard communication methods. Hybrid pixel detector readout electronics produces a huge amount of data as a result of number of frames per seconds. The data needs to be transmitted to a higher level system without limiting the ASIC's capabilities. Nowadays, the Camera Link interface is still one of the fastest communication methods, allowing transmission speeds up to 800 MB/s. In order to communicate between a higher level system and the ASIC with a dedicated protocol, an FPGA with dedicated code is required. The configuration data is received from the PC and written to the ASIC. At the same time, the same FPGA should be able to transmit the data from the ASIC to the PC at the very high speed. The camera should be an embedded system enabling autonomous operation and self-monitoring. In the presented solution, at least three different hardware platforms are used—FPGA, microprocessor with real-time operating system and the PC with end-user software. We present the use of a single software platform for high speed data transfer from 65k pixel camera to the personal computer.

  16. E-Aid Office 2000: Financial Aid Software Selection, Implementation, and Operation. Monograph. A NASFAA Series, Number 12. Practical Information for Student Aid Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, Washington, DC.

    This monograph provides guidance to financial aid administrators in navigating the waters of computer systems selection and implementation. It outlines the various areas where aid officers rely on computer assistance and discusses technology-driven personnel issues, institution-wide system integration, and emerging technologies that will affect…

  17. Team Effectiveness and Team Development in CSCL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fransen, Jos; Weinberger, Armin; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a wealth of research on computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) that is neglected in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) research. CSCW research is concerned with contextual factors, however, that may strongly influence collaborative learning processes as well, such as task characteristics, team formation, team members'…

  18. Team training/simulation.

    PubMed

    Clark, Erin A S; Fisher, Janet; Arafeh, Julia; Druzin, Maurice

    2010-03-01

    Obstetrical emergencies require the rapid formation of a team with clear communication, strong leadership, and appropriate decision-making to ensure a positive patient outcome. Obstetric teams can improve their emergency response capability and efficiency through team and simulation training. Postpartum hemorrhage is an ideal model for team and simulation training, as postpartum hemorrhage requires a multidisciplinary team with the capability to produce a protocol-driven, rapid response. This article provides an overview of team and simulation training and focuses on applications within obstetrics, particularly preparation for postpartum hemorrhage.

  19. Software Bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    I-Bridge is a commercial version of software developed by I-Kinetics under a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. The software allows users of Windows applications to gain quick, easy access to databases, programs and files on UNIX services. Information goes directly onto spreadsheets and other applications; users need not manually locate, transfer and convert data.

  20. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulfson, Stephen

    1988-01-01

    Presents reviews of six computer software programs for teaching science. Provides the publisher, grade level, cost, and descriptions of software, including: (1) "Recycling Logic"; (2) "Introduction to Biochemistry"; (3) "Food for Thought"; (4) "Watts in a Home"; (5) "Geology in Action"; and (6)…

  1. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Reviews six software packages for the Apple II family. Programs reviewed include "Science Courseware: Earth Science Series"; "Heat and Light"; "In Search of Space: Introduction to Model Rocketry"; "Drug Education Series: Drugs--Their Effects on You'"; "Uncertainties and Measurement"; and "Software Films: Learning about Science Series," which…

  2. Software Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Anne, Ed.; Radziemski, Cathy, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews two software packages for the Macintosh series. "Course Builder 2.0," a courseware authoring system, allows the user to create programs which stand alone and may be used independently in the classroom. "World Builder," an artificial intelligence software package, allows creative thinking, problem-solving, and…

  3. Enhancing Collaborative Learning through Group Intelligence Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yin Leng; Macaulay, Linda A.

    Employers increasingly demand not only academic excellence from graduates but also excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to work collaboratively in teams. This paper discusses the role of Group Intelligence software in helping to develop these higher order skills in the context of an enquiry based learning (EBL) project. The software supports teams in generating ideas, categorizing, prioritizing, voting and multi-criteria decision making and automatically generates a report of each team session. Students worked in a Group Intelligence lab designed to support both face to face and computer-mediated communication and employers provided feedback at two key points in the year long team project. Evaluation of the effectiveness of Group Intelligence software in collaborative learning was based on five key concepts of creativity, participation, productivity, engagement and understanding.

  4. Relay Sequence Generation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Roy E.; Khanampompan, Teerapat

    2009-01-01

    Due to thermal and electromagnetic interactivity between the UHF (ultrahigh frequency) radio onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), which performs relay sessions with the Martian landers, and the remainder of the MRO payloads, it is required to integrate and de-conflict relay sessions with the MRO science plan. The MRO relay SASF/PTF (spacecraft activity sequence file/ payload target file) generation software facilitates this process by generating a PTF that is needed to integrate the periods of time during which MRO supports relay activities with the rest of the MRO science plans. The software also generates the needed command products that initiate the relay sessions, some features of which are provided by the lander team, some are managed by MRO internally, and some being derived.

  5. Radiation Oncology Treatment Team

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients to be advocates. View more information Treatment Team Quick Links Meet the Treatment Team Radiation Oncologist ... as medical oncologists and surgeons to maximize radiation’s effectiveness. Radiation oncologists are the only physicians with the ...

  6. Tiger Team audits

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, G.T.

    1992-03-01

    This paper will address the purpose, scope, and approach of the Department of Energy Tiger Team Assessments. It will use the Tiger Team Assessment experience of Sandia National Laboratories at Albuquerque, New Mexico, as illustration.

  7. Tiger Team audits

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, G.T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper will address the purpose, scope, and approach of the Department of Energy Tiger Team Assessments. It will use the Tiger Team Assessment experience of Sandia National Laboratories at Albuquerque, New Mexico, as illustration.

  8. Predicting Software Suitability Using a Bayesian Belief Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaver, Justin M.; Schiavone, Guy A.; Berrios, Joseph S.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to reliably predict the end quality of software under development presents a significant advantage for a development team. It provides an opportunity to address high risk components earlier in the development life cycle, when their impact is minimized. This research proposes a model that captures the evolution of the quality of a software product, and provides reliable forecasts of the end quality of the software being developed in terms of product suitability. Development team skill, software process maturity, and software problem complexity are hypothesized as driving factors of software product quality. The cause-effect relationships between these factors and the elements of software suitability are modeled using Bayesian Belief Networks, a machine learning method. This research presents a Bayesian Network for software quality, and the techniques used to quantify the factors that influence and represent software quality. The developed model is found to be effective in predicting the end product quality of small-scale software development efforts.

  9. Team Evolution and Maturation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    Ifor NGFS and ASW teams. These efforts have provided an unparalleled set of observations concerning the nature of training-induced changes in team...Variations in TRAEX/SELEX performance scores across teams or over time provide indications of gross changes in the nature of training or of the...of effective communication behaviors increased significantly more for the "posted" teams curing the Last phase of training. There were insufficient

  10. Evaluation of the DSN software methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, A. P.; Mckenzie, M.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of the DSN software methodology, as implemented under the DSN Programming System, on the DSN Mark 3 Data Subsystems Implementation Project (MDS) are described. The software methodology is found to provide a markedly increased visibility to management, and to produce software of greater reliability at a small decrease in implementation cost. It is also projected that additional savings will result during the maintenance phase. Documentation support is identified as an area that is receiving further attention.

  11. Software Smarts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Under an SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) contract with Johnson Space Center, Knowledge Based Systems Inc. (KBSI) developed an intelligent software environment for modeling and analyzing mission planning activities, simulating behavior, and, using a unique constraint propagation mechanism, updating plans with each change in mission planning activities. KBSI developed this technology into a commercial product, PROJECTLINK, a two-way bridge between PROSIm, KBSI's process modeling and simulation software and leading project management software like Microsoft Project and Primavera's SureTrak Project Manager.

  12. Team Building [in HRD].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    These five papers are from a symposium that was facilitated by Susan Dougherty at the 1995 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (HRD). "The Relationship between Productivity and Work Team Autonomy and Team Process Effectiveness" (Candice L. Phelan) reports that correlation analysis of results of a study of 21 work teams revealed…

  13. The "A" Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Larry D.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The Academic Team (A Team) program at Plano (Texas) Senior High School provides academic enrichment for talented students in grades 9-12. Outstanding A Team students are recognized with trophies and scholarships. The school district and the high school have found the program an excellent means of encouraging academic achievement. (MCG)

  14. Leadership of Creative Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolb, Judith A.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined leadership in 16 research and 16 nonresearch teams in various manufacturing, aerospace, and health services companies. It concluded that research team leaders need to be able to fulfill a public relations or boundary management role. Engineering research teams, however, showed leadership patterns suggesting different needs for…

  15. Tracking dynamic team activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tambe, M.

    1996-12-31

    AI researchers are striving to build complex multi-agent worlds with intended applications ranging from the RoboCup robotic soccer tournaments, to interactive virtual theatre, to large-scale real-world battlefield simulations. Agent tracking - monitoring other agent`s actions and inferring their higher-level goals and intentions - is a central requirement in such worlds. While previous work has mostly focused on tracking individual agents, this paper goes beyond by focusing on agent teams. Team tracking poses the challenge of tracking a team`s joint goals and plans. Dynamic, real-time environments add to the challenge, as ambiguities have to be resolved in real-time. The central hypothesis underlying the present work is that an explicit team-oriented perspective enables effective team tracking. This hypothesis is instantiated using the model tracing technology employed in tracking individual agents. Thus, to track team activities, team models are put to service. Team models are a concrete application of the joint intentions framework and enable an agent to track team activities, regardless of the agent`s being a collaborative participant or a non-participant in the team. To facilitate real-time ambiguity resolution with team models: (i) aspects of tracking are cast as constraint satisfaction problems to exploit constraint propagation techniques; and (ii) a cost minimality criterion is applied to constrain tracking search. Empirical results from two separate tasks in real-world, dynamic environments one collaborative and one competitive - are provided.

  16. Quality Work Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswald, Lori Jo

    1995-01-01

    A growing number of schools and districts are considering using teams to handle all types of decision making and advisory activities. The term "teams" can be applied to a wide spectrum of groups with various purposes or powers. This bulletin was designed to assist those who want to create efficient, successful teams. It provides…

  17. Computing and software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Gary C.; Hines, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    The reality is that the statistical methods used for analysis of data depend upon the availability of software. Analysis of marked animal data is no different than the rest of the statistical field. The methods used for analysis are those that are available in reliable software packages. Thus, the critical importance of having reliable, up–to–date software available to biologists is obvious. Statisticians have continued to develop more robust models, ever expanding the suite of potential analysis methodsavailable. But without software to implement these newer methods, they will languish in the abstract, and not be applied to the problems deserving them.In the Computers and Software Session, two new software packages are described, a comparison of implementation of methods for the estimation of nest survival is provided, and a more speculative paper about how the next generation of software might be structured is presented.Rotella et al. (2004) compare nest survival estimation with different software packages: SAS logistic regression, SAS non–linear mixed models, and Program MARK. Nests are assumed to be visited at various, possibly infrequent, intervals. All of the approaches described compute nest survival with the same likelihood, and require that the age of the nest is known to account for nests that eventually hatch. However, each approach offers advantages and disadvantages, explored by Rotella et al. (2004).Efford et al. (2004) present a new software package called DENSITY. The package computes population abundance and density from trapping arrays and other detection methods with a new and unique approach. DENSITY represents the first major addition to the analysis of trapping arrays in 20 years.Barker & White (2004) discuss how existing software such as Program MARK require that each new model’s likelihood must be programmed specifically for that model. They wishfully think that future software might allow the user to combine pieces of likelihood

  18. Curriculum change: the importance of team role.

    PubMed

    Broomfield, D; Bligh, J

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes a study examining aspects of team role in the management of curriculum change. The Belbin Team Role Self-Perception Inventory was completed by 25 members (83%) of a faculty curriculum development team. Overall the group showed a preference for the implementer and shaper roles, whilst the completer-finisher role was relatively weakly represented, ranking fifth out of eight possible roles. Older and more senior team members favoured the co-ordinator role, whilst younger and more junior members favoured the team-worker and completer-finisher roles. Some implications of these findings are discussed in the light of the current trend for widespread change in undergraduate medical curricula and the challenges faced by medical schools in a resource constrained environment.

  19. NASA's Approach to Software Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Martha

    2015-01-01

    NASA defines software assurance as: the planned and systematic set of activities that ensure conformance of software life cycle processes and products to requirements, standards, and procedures via quality, safety, reliability, and independent verification and validation. NASA's implementation of this approach to the quality, safety, reliability, security and verification and validation of software is brought together in one discipline, software assurance. Organizationally, NASA has software assurance at each NASA center, a Software Assurance Manager at NASA Headquarters, a Software Assurance Technical Fellow (currently the same person as the SA Manager), and an Independent Verification and Validation Organization with its own facility. An umbrella risk mitigation strategy for safety and mission success assurance of NASA's software, software assurance covers a wide area and is better structured to address the dynamic changes in how software is developed, used, and managed, as well as it's increasingly complex functionality. Being flexible, risk based, and prepared for challenges in software at NASA is essential, especially as much of our software is unique for each mission.

  20. Empirical studies of software design: Implications for SSEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasner, Herb

    1988-01-01

    Implications for Software Engineering Environments (SEEs) are presented in viewgraph format for characteristics of projects studied; significant problems and crucial problem areas in software design for large systems; layered behavioral model of software processes; implications of field study results; software project as an ecological system; results of the LIFT study; information model of design exploration; software design strategies; results of the team design study; and a list of publications.